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Sample records for antigen dramatically improves

  1. MHC class II-associated invariant chain linkage of antigen dramatically improves cell-mediated immunity induced by adenovirus vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Mandrup Jensen, Camilla Maria; Orskov, Cathrine

    2008-01-01

    The ideal vaccine induces a potent protective immune response, which should be rapidly induced, long-standing, and of broad specificity. Recombinant adenoviral vectors induce potent Ab and CD8+ T cell responses against transgenic Ags within weeks of administration, and they are among the most...... potent and versatile Ag delivery vehicles available. However, the impact of chronic infections like HIV and hepatitis C virus underscore the need for further improvements. In this study, we show that the protective immune response to an adenovirus-encoded vaccine Ag can be accelerated, enhanced......, broadened, and prolonged by tethering of the rAg to the MHC class II-associated invariant chain (Ii). Thus, adenovirus-vectored vaccines expressing lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV)-derived glycoprotein linked to Ii increased the CD4+ and CD8+ T cell stimulatory capacity in vitro and in vivo...

  2. Microalloying Boron Carbide with Silicon to Achieve Dramatically Improved Ductility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A

    2014-12-04

    Boron carbide (B4C) is a hard material whose value for extended engineering applications such as body armor; is limited by its brittleness under impact. To improve the ductility while retaining hardness, we used density functional theory to examine modifying B4C ductility through microalloying. We found that replacing the CBC chain in B4C with Si-Si, denoted as (B11Cp)-Si2, dramatically improves the ductility, allowing a continuous shear to a large strain of 0.802 (about twice of B4C failure strain) without brittle failure. Moreover, (B11C)-Si2 retains low density and high hardness. This ductility improvement arises because the Si-Si linkages enable the icosahedra accommodate additional shear by rotating instead of breaking bonds.

  3. Turn to staff for dramatic improvement in wait times, productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Baylor Medical Center in Garland,TX, has been able to drastically reduce ED wait times, as well as the LWBS rate by streamlining the triage process and implementing a staff-driven improvement effort aimed at identifying inefficiencies and replacing them with solutions that work. The result is 11 beds of added capacity just from changes in patient flow. A cross section of volunteers from the ED staff reviewed metrics and devised solutions that they felt would work best to boost efficiency and eliminate bottlenecks. Solutions included letting low-acuity patients move themselves between care settings, freeing the charge nurse from patient care duties so that he or she could oversee patient flow, and empowering physician-nurse teams to see patients more quickly. ED managers say leadership is important, but letting staff drive the improvement process is key to their success.

  4. Dramatic pretend play games uniquely improve emotional control in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Thalia R; Lerner, Matthew D

    2017-09-15

    Pretense is a naturally occurring, apparently universal activity for typically developing children. Yet its function and effects remain unclear. One theorized possibility is that pretense activities, such as dramatic pretend play games, are a possible causal path to improve children's emotional development. Social and emotional skills, particularly emotional control, are critically important for social development, as well as academic performance and later life success. However, the study of such approaches has been criticized for potential bias and lack of rigor, precluding the ability to make strong causal claims. We conducted a randomized, component control (dismantling) trial of dramatic pretend play games with a low-SES group of 4-year-old children (N = 97) to test whether such practice yields generalized improvements in multiple social and emotional outcomes. We found specific effects of dramatic play games only on emotional self-control. Results suggest that dramatic pretend play games involving physicalizing emotional states and traits, pretending to be animals and human characters, and engaging in pretend scenarios in a small group may improve children's emotional control. These findings have implications for the function of pretense and design of interventions to improve emotional control in typical and atypical populations. Further, they provide support for the unique role of dramatic pretend play games for young children, particularly those from low-income backgrounds. A video abstract of this article can be viewed at: https://youtu.be/2GVNcWKRHPk. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Critical success factors simplified implementing the powerful drivers of dramatic business improvement

    CERN Document Server

    Howell, Marvin T

    2010-01-01

    Critical-to-success factors (CSFs) have become essential elements to strategic planning and no business can achieve consistent success without effectively adopting them. To take full advantage of CSFs, however, an organization must first understand what they are and how they can be used to drive organizational initiatives and processes. Critical Success Factors Simplified: Implementing the Powerful Drivers of Dramatic Business Improvement provides a concise manual on CSFs that will teach you how to identify and select the right CSFs, measure their impact, and adjust them as needed to reach your goals.

  6. SAFETY IMPROVES DRAMATICALLY IN FLUOR HANFORD SOIL AND GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GERBER MS

    2007-12-05

    This paper describes dramatic improvements in the safety record of the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (SGRP) at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington state over the past four years. During a period of enormous growth in project work and scope, contractor Fluor Hanford reduced injuries, accidents, and other safety-related incidents and enhanced a safety culture that earned the SGRP Star Status in the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) in 2007. This paper outlines the complex and multi-faceted work of Fluor Hanford's SGRP and details the steps taken by the project's Field Operations and Safety organizations to improve safety. Holding field safety meetings and walkdowns, broadening safety inspections, organizing employee safety councils, intensively flowing down safety requirements to subcontractors, and adopting other methods to achieve remarkable improvement in safety are discussed. The roles of management, labor and subcontractors are detailed. Finally, SGRP's safety improvements are discussed within the context of overall safety enhancements made by Fluor Hanford in the company's 11 years of managing nuclear waste cleanup at the Hanford Site.

  7. SAFETY IMPROVES DRAMATICALLY IN FLUOR HANFORD SOIL AND GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION PROJECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GERBER MS

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes dramatic improvements in the safety record of the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (SGRP) at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington state over the past four years. During a period of enormous growth in project work and scope, contractor Fluor Hanford reduced injuries, accidents, and other safety-related incidents and enhanced a safety culture that earned the SGRP Star Status in the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) in 2007. This paper outlines the complex and multi-faceted work of Fluor Hanford's SGRP and details the steps taken by the project's Field Operations and Safety organizations to improve safety. Holding field safety meetings and walkdowns, broadening safety inspections, organizing employee safety councils, intensively flowing down safety requirements to subcontractors, and adopting other methods to achieve remarkable improvement in safety are discussed. The roles of management, labor and subcontractors are detailed. Finally, SGRP's safety improvements are discussed within the context of overall safety enhancements made by Fluor Hanford in the company's 11 years of managing nuclear waste cleanup at the Hanford Site

  8. Simple, low-cost ways to dramatically improve the security of tags and seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, R.G.; Garcia, A.R.E.

    1999-01-01

    The Vulnerability Assessment Team at Los Alamos National Laboratory has analyzed over 100 different tags and security seals (tamper-indicating devices). We have demonstrated how all these security products can be defeated quickly, easily, and inexpensively using low-tech methods. In our view, most of these security devices can be significantly improved with minor changes in their design and/or in how they are used. In this paper, we present some generic suggestions for improving the security and reliability of tags and seals. (author)

  9. Transglycosylated stevia and hesperidin as pharmaceutical excipients: dramatic improvement in drug dissolution and bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Hiromasa; Tozuka, Yuichi; Imono, Masaaki; Takeuchi, Hirofumi

    2010-10-01

    The capability of transglycosylated materials, α-glycosyltransferase-treated stevia (Stevia-G) and α-glycosyl hesperidin (Hsp-G), to enhance the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs was investigated. Spray-dried particles (SDPs) of drug/transglycosylated material, such as, flurbiprofen (FP)/Stevia-G, probucol (PRO)/Stevia-G, FP/Hsp-G, and PRO/Hsp-G were prepared. All SDPs showed pronounced improvement in both dissolution rate and apparent drug solubility. The amount of dissolved PRO was significantly improved to that of untreated PRO crystals when prepared as SDPs of PRO/Stevia-G or PRO/Hsp-G. There was no cytotoxicity to Caco-2 cells at levels of 10% Stevia-G or Hsp-G solution. Values for the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) of untreated PRO, SDPs of PRO/Hsp-G and PRO/Stevia-G after oral administration to rats were 4.94±2.06, 26.08±4.52 and 48.79±9.97μgh/mL, respectively. Interestingly, AUC values in cases of the FP system were in the order of untreated FPexcipient. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Nanocellulose-based Translucent Diffuser for Optoelectronic Device Applications with Dramatic Improvement of Light Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Tassi, Nancy G; Zhu, Hongli; Fang, Zhiqiang; Hu, Liangbing

    2015-12-09

    Nanocellulose is a biogenerated and biorenewable organic material. Using a process based on 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)/NaClO/NaBr system, a highly translucent and light-diffusive film consisting of many layers of nanocellulose fibers and wood pulp microfibers was made. The film demonstrates a combination of large optical transmittance of ∼90% and tunable diffuse transmission of up to ∼78% across the visible and near-infrared spectra. The detailed characterizations of the film indicate the combination of high optical transmittance and haze is due to the film's large packing density and microstructured surface. The superior optical properties make the film a translucent light diffuser and applicable for improving the efficiencies of optoelectronic devices such as thin-film silicon solar cells and organic light-emitting devices.

  11. Dramatic improvement of membrane performance for microalgae harvesting with a simple bubble-generator plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Taewoon; Oh, You-Kwan; Kim, Bohwa; Han, Jong-In

    2015-06-01

    To overcome fouling issue in membrane-based algae harvesting and thus make an otherwise promising harvesting option more competitive, a bubble-generator plate was developed. According to computational fluid dynamics analysis, the plate generated substantial hydrodynamic power in terms of high pressure, velocity, and shear stress. When installed in a membrane filtration system with membranes of different surface and structural characteristics (one prepared by the phase inversion method, and a commercial one) the bubble-generator was indeed effective in reducing fouling. Without the plate, the much cheaper homemade membrane had the similar performance as the commercial one. Use of the bubble-generator considerably improved the performance of both membranes, and revealed a valuable synergy with the asymmetrical structure of the homemade membrane. This result clearly showed that the ever-problematic fouling could be mitigated in a rather easy manner, and in so doing, that membrane technology could indeed become a practical option for algae harvesting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Dramatic improvement of crystal quality for low-­temperature-grown rabbit muscle aldolase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, HaJeung; Rangarajan, Erumbi S.; Sygusch, Jurgen; Izard, Tina

    2010-01-01

    Rabbit muscle aldolase (RMA) was crystallized in complex with the low-complexity domain (LC4) of sorting nexin 9. Monoclinic crystals were obtained at room temperature that displayed large mosaicity and poor X-ray diffraction. However, orthorhombic RMA–LC4 crystals grown at 277 K under similar conditions exhibited low mosaicity, allowing data collection to 2.2 Å Bragg spacing and structure determination. It was concluded that the improvement of crystal quality as indicated by the higher resolution of the new RMA–LC4 complex crystals was a consequence of the introduction of new lattice contacts at lower temperature. The lattice contacts corresponded to an increased number of interactions between high-entropy side chains that mitigate the lattice strain incurred upon cryocooling and accompanying mosaic spread increases. The thermodynamically unfavorable immobilization of high-entropy side chains used in lattice formation was compensated by an entropic increase in the bulk-solvent content owing to the greater solvent content of the crystal lattice. PMID:20445268

  13. Dramatic improvement of crystal quality for low-temperature-grown rabbit muscle aldolase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, HaJeung; Rangarajan, Erumbi S.; Sygusch, Jurgen; Izard, Tina

    2010-01-01

    Rabbit muscle aldolase (RMA) was crystallized in complex with the low-complexity domain (LC4) of sorting nexin 9. Monoclinic crystals were obtained at room temperature that displayed large mosaicity and poor X-ray diffraction. However, orthorhombic RMA–LC4 crystals grown at 277 K under similar conditions exhibited low mosaicity, allowing data collection to 2.2 Å Bragg spacing and structure determination. Rabbit muscle aldolase (RMA) was crystallized in complex with the low-complexity domain (LC4) of sorting nexin 9. Monoclinic crystals were obtained at room temperature that displayed large mosaicity and poor X-ray diffraction. However, orthorhombic RMA–LC4 crystals grown at 277 K under similar conditions exhibited low mosaicity, allowing data collection to 2.2 Å Bragg spacing and structure determination. It was concluded that the improvement of crystal quality as indicated by the higher resolution of the new RMA–LC4 complex crystals was a consequence of the introduction of new lattice contacts at lower temperature. The lattice contacts corresponded to an increased number of interactions between high-entropy side chains that mitigate the lattice strain incurred upon cryocooling and accompanying mosaic spread increases. The thermodynamically unfavorable immobilization of high-entropy side chains used in lattice formation was compensated by an entropic increase in the bulk-solvent content owing to the greater solvent content of the crystal lattice

  14. Dramatic Improvement of Crystal Quality for Low-temperature-grown Rabbit Muscle Aldolase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, H.; Rangarajan, E; Sygusch, J; Izard, T

    2010-01-01

    Rabbit muscle aldolase (RMA) was crystallized in complex with the low-complexity domain (LC4) of sorting nexin 9. Monoclinic crystals were obtained at room temperature that displayed large mosaicity and poor X-ray diffraction. However, orthorhombic RMA-LC4 crystals grown at 277 K under similar conditions exhibited low mosaicity, allowing data collection to 2.2 {angstrom} Bragg spacing and structure determination. It was concluded that the improvement of crystal quality as indicated by the higher resolution of the new RMA-LC4 complex crystals was a consequence of the introduction of new lattice contacts at lower temperature. The lattice contacts corresponded to an increased number of interactions between high-entropy side chains that mitigate the lattice strain incurred upon cryocooling and accompanying mosaic spread increases. The thermodynamically unfavorable immobilization of high-entropy side chains used in lattice formation was compensated by an entropic increase in the bulk-solvent content owing to the greater solvent content of the crystal lattice.

  15. Dramatic improvement of crystal quality for low-temperature-grown rabbit muscle aldolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hajeung; Rangarajan, Erumbi S; Sygusch, Jurgen; Izard, Tina

    2010-05-01

    Rabbit muscle aldolase (RMA) was crystallized in complex with the low-complexity domain (LC4) of sorting nexin 9. Monoclinic crystals were obtained at room temperature that displayed large mosaicity and poor X-ray diffraction. However, orthorhombic RMA-LC4 crystals grown at 277 K under similar conditions exhibited low mosaicity, allowing data collection to 2.2 A Bragg spacing and structure determination. It was concluded that the improvement of crystal quality as indicated by the higher resolution of the new RMA-LC4 complex crystals was a consequence of the introduction of new lattice contacts at lower temperature. The lattice contacts corresponded to an increased number of interactions between high-entropy side chains that mitigate the lattice strain incurred upon cryocooling and accompanying mosaic spread increases. The thermodynamically unfavorable immobilization of high-entropy side chains used in lattice formation was compensated by an entropic increase in the bulk-solvent content owing to the greater solvent content of the crystal lattice.

  16. Therapeutic doll play in the treatment of a severely impaired psychiatric inpatient: dramatic clinical improvements with a nontraditional nursing intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Shira; Hanchuk, Hilary; Nelson, Marjorie

    2015-05-01

    Interest has grown in the use of doll therapy, particularly in geropsychiatric and dementia care settings. In a long-term state psychiatric hospital, a dollhouse-play activity was implemented in an effort to engage an acutely disturbed, middle-aged woman undergoing medication trials and whose symptoms had been refractory to conventional treatments. A schedule of nondirective dollhouse-play activities was implemented over an 8-week period. Measures of behavioral change were tracked. Dramatic clinical improvements were seen, including significant reductions in verbal and physical aggression, use of as-needed medications, and need for close one-to-one monitoring. Improvements were seen prior to achievement of therapeutic drug levels. The patient was successfully discharged from the hospital. Doll play has recently been associated with clinical benefits in the care of patients with dementia and has long been deployed in childhood mental health treatment. The current findings suggest doll play may have applications as a time-limited intervention in the treatment of major psychiatric disorders in adults and warrants consideration when achieving therapeutic alliance has proven particularly challenging. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. BAPTA-AM dramatically improves maturation and development of bovine oocytes from grade-3 cumulus-oocyte complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hongmei; Mo, Xianhong; Li, Xue; Fu, Xiangwei; Hou, Yunpeng

    2018-01-01

    Intracellular free calcium ([Ca 2+ ] i ) is essential for oocyte maturation and early embryonic development. Here, we investigated the role of [Ca 2+ ] i in oocytes from cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) with respect to maturation and early embryonic development, using the calcium-buffering agent BAPTA-AM (1,2-bis[2-aminophenoxy]ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetrakis [acetoxymethyl ester]). COCs were graded based on compactness of the cumulus mass and appearance of the cytoplasm, with Grade 1 indicating higher quality and developmental potential than Grade 3. Results showed that: (i) [Ca 2+ ] i in metaphase-II (MII) oocytes from Grade-3 COCs was significantly higher than those from Grade-1 COCs, and was significantly reduced by BAPTA-AM; (ii) nuclear maturation of oocytes from Grade-3 COCs treated with BAPTA-AM was enhanced compared to untreated COCs; (iii) protein abundance of Cyclin B and oocyte-specific Histone 1 (H1FOO) was improved in MII oocytes from Grade-3 COCs treated with BAPTA-AM; (iv) Ca 2+ transients were triggered in each group upon fertilization, and the amplitude of [Ca 2+ ] i oscillations increased in the Grade-3 group upon treatment with BAPTA-AM, with the magnitude approaching that of the Grade-1 group; and (v) cleavage rates and blastocyst-formation rates were improved in the Grade-3 group treated with BAPTA-AM compared to untreated controls following in vitro fertilization and parthenogenetic activation. Therefore, BAPTA-AM dramatically improved oocyte maturation, oocyte quality, and embryonic development of oocytes from Grade-3 COCs. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Bariatric Surgery Prior to Total Joint Arthroplasty May Not Provide Dramatic Improvements In Post Arthroplasty Surgical Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Elizabeth W.; Fisher, David; Li, Robert A.; Barber, Thomas C.; Singh, Jasvinder A.

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the total joint arthroplasty (TJA) surgical outcomes of patients who had bariatric surgery prior to TJA to TJA patients who were candidates but did not have bariatric surgery. Patients were retrospectively grouped into: Group 1 (n=69), those with bariatric surgery >2 years prior to TJA, Group 2 (n=102), those with surgery within 2 years of TJA, and Group 3 (n=11,032), those without bariatric surgery. In Group 1, 2.9% (95%CI 0.0–6.9%) had complications within 1 year compared to 5.9% (95%CI 1.3–10.4%) in Group 2, and 4.1% (95%CI 3.8–4.5%) in Group 3. 90-day readmission (7.2%, 95%CI 1.1–13.4%) and revision density (3.4/100 years of observation) was highest in Group 1. Bariatric surgery prior to TJA may not provide dramatic improvements in post-operative TJA surgical outcomes. PMID:24674730

  19. Combination of cancer antigen 125 and carcinoembryonic antigen can improve ovarian cancer diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Sofie Sølvsten; Mosgaard, Berit Jul

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the ability of the tumour marker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in combination with cancer antigen 125 (CA-125) to differentiate between malignant ovarian and malignant non-ovarian disease.......The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the ability of the tumour marker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in combination with cancer antigen 125 (CA-125) to differentiate between malignant ovarian and malignant non-ovarian disease....

  20. A Bacterial Glycoengineered Antigen for Improved Serodiagnosis of Porcine Brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortina, María E; Balzano, Rodrigo E; Rey Serantes, Diego A; Caillava, Ana J; Elena, Sebastián; Ferreira, A C; Nicola, Ana M; Ugalde, Juan E; Comerci, Diego J; Ciocchini, Andrés E

    2016-06-01

    Brucellosis is a highly zoonotic disease that affects animals and human beings. Brucella suis is the etiological agent of porcine brucellosis and one of the major human brucellosis pathogens. Laboratory diagnosis of porcine brucellosis mainly relies on serological tests, and it has been widely demonstrated that serological assays based on the detection of anti O-polysaccharide antibodies are the most sensitive tests. Here, we validate a recombinant glycoprotein antigen, an N-formylperosamine O-polysaccharide-protein conjugate (OAg-AcrA), for diagnosis of porcine brucellosis. An indirect immunoassay based on the detection of anti-O-polysaccharide IgG antibodies was developed coupling OAg-AcrA to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay plates (glyco-iELISA). To validate the assay, 563 serum samples obtained from experimentally infected and immunized pigs, as well as animals naturally infected with B. suis biovar 1 or 2, were tested. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed, and based on this analysis, the optimum cutoff value was 0.56 (relative reactivity), which resulted in a diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 99.7%, respectively. A cutoff value of 0.78 resulted in a test sensitivity of 98.4% and a test specificity of 100%. Overall, our results demonstrate that the glyco-iELISA is highly accurate for diagnosis of porcine brucellosis, improving the diagnostic performance of current serological tests. The recombinant glycoprotein OAg-AcrA can be produced in large homogeneous batches in a standardized way, making it an ideal candidate for further validation as a universal antigen for diagnosis of "smooth" brucellosis in animals and humans. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Structured Dietary Management Dramatically Improves Marked Transaminitis, Metabolic and Clinical Profiles in Glycogen Storage Disease Type IXa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrajit S. Karande DCH, FRACP

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen storage disease type IXa (GSD IXa presents in childhood with hepatomegaly, poor growth, and ketotic hypoglycemia. Clinical course is usually mild, often not requiring treatment with attenuation of symptoms with increasing age. The phenotypic spectrum has recently expanded to include more severe involvement with hepatic fibrosis or cirrhosis warranting dietary therapy. We report a 2-year-old boy with a severe phenotype of GSD IXa presenting with a massive hepatomegaly, significant transaminitis, recurrent ketotic hypoglycemia, and short stature. Aggressive dietary management with regular feeds, frequent uncooked cornstarch doses, and protein supplementation resulted in clinical improvements including enhanced growth velocity, energy levels, overall well-being, and reduction in hepatomegaly with restitutions in biochemical parameters. We concur with a recent report which proposed that GSD IXa is not always a mild condition but instead part of an expanding phenotypic spectrum warranting intensive dietary management to optimize metabolic control and quality of life.

  2. A dramatic, objective antiandrogen withdrawal response: case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Litwin Alan

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Antiandrogen withdrawal response is an increasingly recognized entity in patients with metastatic prostate cancer. To our knowledge, there have been no reports describing a durable radiologic improvement along with prostate-specific antigen (PSA with discontinuation of the antiandrogen agent bicalutamide. We report a case in which a dramatic decline of serum PSA levels associated with a dramatic improvement in radiologic disease was achieved with bicalutamide discontinuation.

  3. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy leading to dramatic improvement in a patient with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis and severe pericarditis resistant to steroid pulse therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa-Yashiro, Tomomi; Oki, Eishin; Tsuruga, Kazushi; Nakahata, Tohru; Ito, Etsuro; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2012-05-01

    A 7-year-old Japanese boy with a 4-month history of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (s-JIA) experienced disease flare with spiking fever, exanthema and arthralgia. He then developed progressive dyspnea due to severe pericarditis, and proinflammatory hypercytokinemia was suspected. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy was ineffective and echocardiography showed massive pericardial effusion had persisted. Alternatively, subsequent intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy resulted in dramatic resolution of the pericardial effusion, and his general condition significantly improved within a few days. This case report may lend further support the use of IVIG for selected patients with s-JIA and severe pericarditis.

  4. It IS worth the effort: Patient knowledge of reproductive aspects of inflammatory bowel disease improves dramatically after a single group education session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountifield, Réme; Andrews, Jane M; Bampton, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Individuals with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) have poor knowledge regarding the implications of disease for fertility and pregnancy. Previous studies suggest that this poor knowledge adversely influences reproductive decision making. To examine the effect of a single group education session on IBD-specific reproductive knowledge in subjects with IBD. People with IBD attending an educational event were invited to complete the CCPKnow questionnaire, testing reproductive knowledge in IBD, before and after an evidenced based presentation on this topic delivered by a Gastroenterologist. Of 248 attendees, 155 participated; 69% female, mean age 40.3years. CCPKnow scores (maximum 17) were low at baseline and increased significantly post education (mean 5.4 pre vs. 14.5 post education; p<0.0001). A large majority (65.1%) of subjects had "poor" (score <8) knowledge at baseline, compared with only 1.9% after education (p<0.0001). Whilst all subareas of knowledge improved after education, the most important improvement was in attitudes toward medication use in pregnancy: 33.5% of subjects indicated at baseline that women should avoid all drugs in pregnancy compared with only 1.2% post education (p<0.0001). A single group-delivered education event focussed on reproductive issues in IBD can dramatically improve patient knowledge. This has the potential to change reproductive behaviour and may reduce voluntary childlessness resulting from misperceptions amongst individuals with IBD. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. An improved gold nanoparticle probe-based assay for HCV core antigen ultrasensitive detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hui-Qiong; Ji, Chang-Fu; Yang, Xi-Qin; Wang, Rui; Yang, Shu; Zhang, He-Qiu; Zhang, Jin-Gang

    2017-05-01

    A gold nanoparticle probe-based assay (GNPA) was developed for ultrasensitive detection of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core antigen. In the GNPA, after anti-HCV core antigen polyclonal antibodies and single-stranded barcode signal DNA were labeled on gold nanoparticle probe (NP), DNA enzyme was used to degrade the unbound barcode DNAs. The anti-HCV core antigen monoclonal antibodies were coated on magnetic microparticles probe (MMP). Then the NP-HCV core antigen-MMP sandwich immuno-complex was formed when the target antigen protein was added and captured. Magnetically separated, the immuno-complex containing the single-stranded barcode signal DNA was characterized by TaqMan probe based real-time fluorescence PCR. A detection limit of 1 fg/ml was determined for the HCV core antigen which is magnitude greater than that of ELISA (2ng/ml). The coefficients of variation (CV) of intra-assay and inter-assay respectively ranged from 0.22-2.62% and 1.92-3.01%. The improved GNPA decreased the interference of unbound barcode DNAs and may be an new way for HCV core antigen detection. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Lord Byron's dramatic work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrejević Ana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available All of Byron's six finished dramas aspire to display conflict between the individual will and the strength of the universal and omnipresent inevitability. Although he accentuated classical dramatic rules or three dramatic unities as the way to construct a good drama, he couldn't escape from the deep rooted romantic feeling of his genius. His plays are thus pictures of existing existential revolt with the protagonists true to their feelings, always consistent, active and devoted to one general idea. They are estranged from the meaningless world that leads them to rebellion and death, but prometheously constructed are the most successful and memorable element of his plays. Byron as a dramatist always tries to find an everlasting dimension and virtue in the meaningless world through the construction of personal myth and thus the main subject of all his dramas is freedom in all its aspects.

  7. Poly(2,5-dimercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole) as a Cathode for Rechargeable Lithium Batteries with Dramatically Improved Performance

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Jie

    2012-05-29

    Organosulfur compounds with multiple thiol groups are promising for high gravimetric energy density electrochemical energy storage. We have synthesized a poly(2,5-dimercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole) (PDMcT)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) composite cathode for lithium-ion batteries with a new method and investigated its electrochemical behavior by charge/discharge cycles and cyclic voltammetry (CV) in an ether-based electrolyte. Based on a comparison of the electrochemical performance with a carbonate-based electrolyte, we found a much higher discharge capacity, but also a very attractive cycling performance of PDMcT by using a tetra(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether (TEGDME)-based electrolyte. The first discharge capacity of the as-synthesized PDMcT/PEDOT composite approached 210 mAh g -1 in the TEGDME-based electrolyte. CV results clearly show that the redox reactions of PDMcT are highly reversible in this TEGDME-based electrolyte. The reversible capacity remained around 120 mAh g -1 after 20 charge/discharge cycles. With improved cycling performance and very low cost, PDMcT could become a very promising cathode material when combined with a TEGDME-based electrolyte. The poor capacity in the carbonate-based electrolyte is a consequence of the irreversible reaction of the DMcT monomer and dimer with the solvent, emphasizing the importance of electrolyte chemistry when studying molecular-based battery materials. The nature of the electrolyte has a dramatic effect on the performance of poly(2,5-dimercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole) (PDMcT) as a cathode material in lithium-ion batteries. Whereas the use of an ethylene/diethyl carbonate (EC/DEC)-based electrolyte resulted in very poor performance, the use of a tetra(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether (TEGDME)-based electrolyte dramatically improved the performance in terms of both the discharge capacity and capacity retention (see scheme). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Combined Overexpression of JARID2, PRDM14, ESRRB, and SALL4A Dramatically Improves Efficiency and Kinetics of Reprogramming to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseki, Hiroyoshi; Nakachi, Yutaka; Hishida, Tomoaki; Yamashita-Sugahara, Yzumi; Hirasaki, Masataka; Ueda, Atsushi; Tanimoto, Yoko; Iijima, Saori; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Yagami, Ken-ichi; Takahashi, Satoru; Okuda, Akihiko; Okazaki, Yasushi

    2016-02-01

    Identification of a gene set capable of driving rapid and proper reprogramming to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is an important issue. Here we show that the efficiency and kinetics of iPSC reprogramming are dramatically improved by the combined expression of Jarid2 and genes encoding its associated proteins. We demonstrate that forced expression of JARID2 promotes iPSC reprogramming by suppressing the expression of Arf, a known reprogramming barrier, and that the N-terminal half of JARID2 is sufficient for such promotion. Moreover, JARID2 accelerated silencing of the retroviral Klf4 transgene and demethylation of the Nanog promoter, underpinning the potentiating activity of JARID2 in iPSC reprogramming. We further show that JARID2 physically interacts with ESRRB, SALL4A, and PRDM14, and that these JARID2-associated proteins synergistically and robustly facilitate iPSC reprogramming in a JARID2-dependent manner. Our findings provide an insight into the important roles of JARID2 during reprogramming and suggest that the JARID2-associated protein network contributes to overcoming reprogramming barriers. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  9. Improved serodiagnosis of cystic echinococcosis using the new recombinant 2B2t antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Hernández-González

    Full Text Available A standardized test for the serodiagnosis of human cystic echinococcosis (CE is still needed, because of the low specificity and sensitivity of the currently available commercial tools and the lack of proper evaluation of the existing recombinant antigens. In a previous work, we defined the new ELISA-B2t diagnostic tool for the detection of specific IgGs in CE patients, which showed high sensitivity and specificity, and was useful in monitoring the clinical evolution of surgically treated CE patients. Nevertheless, this recombinant antigen gave rise to false-negative results in a percentage of CE patients. Therefore, in an attempt to improve its sensitivity, we constructed B2t-derived recombinant antigens with two, four and eight tandem repeat of B2t units, and tested them by ELISA on serum samples of CE patients and patients with related parasites. The best diagnostic values were obtained with the two tandem repeat 2B2t antigen. The influence of several clinical variables on the performance of the tests was also evaluated. Finally, the diagnostic performance of the 2B2t-ELISA was compared with that of an indirect haemagglutination commercial test. The 2B2t recombinant antigen performed better than the HF and B2t antigens, and the IHA commercial kit. Therefore, this new 2B2t-ELISA is a promising candidate test for the serodiagnosis of CE in clinical settings.

  10. Antigen-capturing nanoparticles improve the abscopal effect and cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Yuanzeng; Roche, Kyle C; Tian, Shaomin; Eblan, Michael J; McKinnon, Karen P; Caster, Joseph M; Chai, Shengjie; Herring, Laura E; Zhang, Longzhen; Zhang, Tian; DeSimone, Joseph M; Tepper, Joel E; Vincent, Benjamin G; Serody, Jonathan S; Wang, Andrew Z

    2017-09-01

    Immunotherapy holds tremendous promise for improving cancer treatment. To administer radiotherapy with immunotherapy has been shown to improve immune responses and can elicit the 'abscopal effect'. Unfortunately, response rates for this strategy remain low. Herein we report an improved cancer immunotherapy approach that utilizes antigen-capturing nanoparticles (AC-NPs). We engineered several AC-NP formulations and demonstrated that the set of protein antigens captured by each AC-NP formulation is dependent on the NP surface properties. We showed that AC-NPs deliver tumour-specific proteins to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and significantly improve the efficacy of αPD-1 (anti-programmed cell death 1) treatment using the B16F10 melanoma model, generating up to a 20% cure rate compared with 0% without AC-NPs. Mechanistic studies revealed that AC-NPs induced an expansion of CD8 + cytotoxic T cells and increased both CD4 + T/T reg and CD8 + T/T reg ratios (T reg , regulatory T cells). Our work presents a novel strategy to improve cancer immunotherapy with nanotechnology.

  11. Antigen-capturing nanoparticles improve the abscopal effect and cancer immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Yuanzeng; Roche, Kyle C.; Tian, Shaomin; Eblan, Michael J.; McKinnon, Karen P.; Caster, Joseph M.; Chai, Shengjie; Herring, Laura E.; Zhang, Longzhen; Zhang, Tian; Desimone, Joseph M.; Tepper, Joel E.; Vincent, Benjamin G.; Serody, Jonathan S.; Wang, Andrew Z.

    2017-09-01

    Immunotherapy holds tremendous promise for improving cancer treatment. To administer radiotherapy with immunotherapy has been shown to improve immune responses and can elicit the 'abscopal effect'. Unfortunately, response rates for this strategy remain low. Herein we report an improved cancer immunotherapy approach that utilizes antigen-capturing nanoparticles (AC-NPs). We engineered several AC-NP formulations and demonstrated that the set of protein antigens captured by each AC-NP formulation is dependent on the NP surface properties. We showed that AC-NPs deliver tumour-specific proteins to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and significantly improve the efficacy of αPD-1 (anti-programmed cell death 1) treatment using the B16F10 melanoma model, generating up to a 20% cure rate compared with 0% without AC-NPs. Mechanistic studies revealed that AC-NPs induced an expansion of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells and increased both CD4+T/Treg and CD8+T/Treg ratios (Treg, regulatory T cells). Our work presents a novel strategy to improve cancer immunotherapy with nanotechnology.

  12. Idiopathic Facial Aseptic Granuloma in a 13-Year-Old Boy Dramatically Improved with Oral Doxycycline and Topical Metronidazole: Evidence for a Link with Childhood Rosacea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Orion

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic facial aseptic granuloma (IFAG is a rare, benign pediatric dermatological lesion that occurs in children between 8 months and 13 years of age. The pathogenesis of IFAG is still unclear but it is likely to be associated with granulomatous rosacea in childhood. Here we describe a case of IFAG in a 13-year-old boy who showed a dramatic response to oral doxycycline and topical metronidazole, which supports the hypothesis that IFAG may belong to the spectrum of rosacea.

  13. Interleukin 18 secretion and its effect in improving Chimeric Antigen Receptors efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Kun

    Clinical trials have shown that chimeric antigen receptor T cells modified to target cancer cells expressing a surface antigen found on immature B-cells. The purpose of this experiment is to take a pro-inflammatory cytokine, and analyze its effect in improving the efficiency of the T cells. IL-18 has been previously shown to recruit T cells to the tumor site and improve their secretion of cytotoxic cytokines. A human model of the proposed armored T cell has been created and has shown success in combating cancer cells in vitro. The next step is to design and produce a murine model to test in vivo in immunocompetent mice. This research project aimed to create two models: one utilizing 2A peptides and another utilizing IRES elements as a multicistronic vector. Both models would require the insertion of the desired genes into SFG backbones. IRES, a DNA element which acts as a binding site for the transcriptional machinery to recognize which part of the DNA to transcribe, commonly found in bicistronic vectors, is large with 500-600 base pairs, and has a lower transgene expression rate. P2A is smaller, only consisting of about 20 amino acids, and typically has a higher transgene expression rate, which may or may not result in higher effectiveness of the model. I would like to thank Dr. Renier Brentjens for being a mentor who cared about giving his interns as much educational value as possible.

  14. Dramatically improve the Safety Performance of Li ion Battery Separators and Reduce the Manufacturing Cost Using Ultraviolet Curing and High Precision Coating Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voelker, Gary [Miltec UV International, LLC, Stevensville, MD (United States); Arnold, John [Miltec UV International, LLC, Stevensville, MD (United States)

    2017-06-30

    The objective of this project was to improve the safety of operation of Lithium ion batteries (LIB)and at the same time significantly reduce the manufacturing cost of LIB separators. The project was very successful in demonstrating the improved performance and reduced cost attributed to using UV curable binder and high speed printing technology to place a very thin and precisely controlled ceramic layer on the surface of base separators made of polyolefins such as Polyethylene, Polypropylene and combinations of the two as well as cellulosic base separators. The underlying need for this new technology is the recently identified potential of fire in large format Lithium ion batteries used in hybrid, plug-in hybrid and electric vehicles. The primary potential cause of battery fire is thermal runaway caused by several different electrical or mechanical mechanisms; such as, overcharge, puncture, overheating, compaction, and internal short circuit. During thermal runaway, the ideal separator prevents ion flow and continues to physically separate the anode from the cathode. If the temperature of the battery gets higher, the separator may melt and partially clog the pores and help prevent ion flows but it also can shrink which can result in physical contact of the electrodes and accelerate thermal run-away even further. Ceramic coated separators eliminate many of the problems related to the usage of traditional separators. The ceramic coating provides an electrically insulating layer that retains its physical integrity at high temperature, allows for more efficient thermal heat transfer, helps reduce thermal shrinkage, and inhibits dendrite growth that could create a potential short circuit. The use of Ultraviolet (UV) chemistry to bind fine ceramic particles on separators is a unique and innovative approach primarily because of the instant curing of the UV curable binder upon exposure to UV light. This significant reduction in drying/curing time significantly reduces the

  15. Health Sensors, Smart Home Devices, and the Internet of Medical Things: An Opportunity for Dramatic Improvement in Care for the Lower Extremity Complications of Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basatneh, Rami; Najafi, Bijan; Armstrong, David G

    2018-05-01

    The prevalent and long-neglected diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) and its related complications rank among the most debilitating and costly sequelae of diabetes. With the rise of the Internet of medical things (IoMT), along with smart devices, the med-tech industry is on the cusp of a home-care revolution, which could also create opportunity for developing effective solutions with significant potential to reduce DFU-associated costs and saving limbs. This article discusses potential applications of IoMT to the DFU patient population and beyond. To better understand potential opportunities and challenges associated with implementing IoMT for management of DFU, the authors reviewed recent relevant literatures and included their own expert opinions from a multidisciplinary point of view including podiatry, engineering, and data security. The IoMT has opened digital transformation of home-based diabetic foot care, as it enables promoting patient engagement, personalized care and smart management of chronic and noncommunicable diseases through individual data-driven treatment regimens, telecommunication, data mining, and comprehensive feedback tailored to individual requirements. In particular, with recent advances in voice-activated commands technology and its integration as a part of IoMT, new opportunities have emerged to improve the patient's central role and responsibility in enabling an optimized health care ecosystem. The IoMT has opened new opportunities in health care from remote monitoring to smart sensors and medical device integration. While it is at its early stage of development, ultimately we envisage a connected home that, using voice-controlled technology and Bluetooth-radio-connected add-ons, may augment much of what home health does today.

  16. Kenneth Burke's Discovery of Dramatism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feehan, Michael

    1979-01-01

    Discusses how "Twelve Propositions by Kenneth Burke on the Relation between Economics and Psychology" generates a new synthesis of Marx and Freud and foreshadows Burke's system of dramatism. His conception of self, the community, and communication come together in a serious argument for drama as a model of human relations. (JMF)

  17. Optical Refrigeration for Dramatically Improved Cryogenic Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-24

    jet ...impingement  technique,  where  a  high  velocity  liquid   jet  from  a  1-­‐ mm  diameter  nozzle  cools  the  diamond...to   a   pressure   of   below   10-­‐5   torr   using   a   turbo -­‐molecular   pump.   The   collimated   beam  

  18. Little Eyolf and dramatic tradition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Lysell

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The article criticises an Ibsen tradition who has seen the last scene of Little Eyolf as a reconciliation. Instead, the article discusses the improbability of a happy marriage characterised by social engagement. The play is open but it is hardly probable that Rita, with her erotic desire, and Allmers, whose desire has turned into metaphysics, can be happy together. The arguments refer to inner criteria and the constantly present dramatic tradition.

  19. Improved Diagnosis of Acute Pulmonary Histoplasmosis by Combining Antigen and Antibody Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richer, Sarah M; Smedema, Melinda L; Durkin, Michelle M; Herman, Katie M; Hage, Chadi A; Fuller, Deanna; Wheat, L Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Acute pulmonary histoplasmosis can be severe, especially following heavy inoculum exposure. Rapid diagnosis is critical and often possible by detection of antigen, but this test may be falsely negative in 17% of such cases. Antibody detection by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) may increase sensitivity and permit the measurement of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) classes of antibodies separately. Microplates coated with Histoplasma antigen were used for testing of serum from patients with acute pulmonary histoplasmosis and controls in the MVista Histoplasma antibody EIA. Results for IgG and IgM were reported independently. IgG antibodies were detected in 87.5%, IgM antibodies in 67.5%, and IgG and/or IgM antibodies in 88.8% of patients with acute pulmonary histoplasmosis in this assay, while immunodiffusion, complement fixation, and antigen testing showed sensitivities of 55.0%, 73.1%, and 67.5%, respectively (n = 80). Combining antigen and antibody detection increased the sensitivity to 96.3%. The MVista Histoplasma antibody EIA offers increased sensitivity over current antibody tests while also allowing separate detection of IgG and IgM antibodies and complementing antigen detection. Combining antigen and EIA antibody testing provides an optimal method for diagnosis of acute pulmonary histoplasmosis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  20. Prostate cancer antigen 3 moderately improves diagnostic accuracy in Chinese patients undergoing first prostate biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Bo Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer antigen 3 (PCA3 is a biomarker for diagnosing prostate cancer (PCa identified in the Caucasian population. We evaluated the effectiveness of urinary PCA3 in predicting the biopsy result in 500 men undergoing initial prostate biopsy. The predictive power of the PCA3 score was evaluated by the area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve (AUC and by decision curve analysis. PCA3 score sufficed to discriminate positive from negative prostate biopsy results but was not correlated with the aggressiveness of PCa. The ROC analysis showed a higher AUC for the PCA3 score than %fPSA (0.750 vs 0.622, P = 0.046 in patients with a PSA of 4.0-10.0 ng ml−1 , but the PCA3-based model is not significantly better than the base model. Decision curve analysis indicates the PCA3-based model was superior to the base model with a higher net benefit for almost all threshold probabilities, especially the threshold probabilities of 25%-40% in patients with a PSA of 4.0-10.0 ng ml−1 . However, the AUC of the PCA3 score (0.712 is not superior to %fPSA (0.698 or PSAD (0.773 in patients with a PSA >10.0 ng ml−1 . Our results confirmed that the RT-PCR-based PCA3 test moderately improved diagnostic accuracy in Chinese patients undergoing first prostate biopsy with a PSA of 4.0-10.0 ng ml−1 .

  1. Improved protection conferred by vaccination with a recombinant vaccinia virus that incorporates a foreign antigen into the extracellular enveloped virion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Heesun; Mustafa, Waleed; Speirs, Kendra; Abdool, Asha J.; Paterson, Yvonne; Isaacs, Stuart N.

    2004-01-01

    Recombinant poxviruses have shown promise as vaccine vectors. We hypothesized that improved cellular immune responses could be developed to a foreign antigen by incorporating it as part of the extracellular enveloped virion (EEV). We therefore constructed a recombinant vaccinia virus that replaced the cytoplasmic domain of the B5R protein with a test antigen, HIV-1 Gag. Mice immunized with the virus expressing Gag fused to B5R had significantly better primary CD4 T-cell responses than recombinant virus expressing HIV-Gag from the TK-locus. The CD8 T-cell responses were less different between the two groups. Importantly, although we saw differences in the immune response to the test antigen, the vaccinia virus-specific immune responses were similar with both constructs. When groups of vaccinated mice were challenged 30 days later with a recombinant Listeria monocytogenes that expresses HIV-Gag, mice inoculated with the virus that expresses the B5R-Gag fusion protein had lower colony counts of Listeria in the liver and spleen than mice vaccinated with the standard recombinant. Thus, vaccinia virus expressing foreign antigen incorporated into EEV may be a better vaccine strategy than standard recombinant vaccinia virus

  2. Combination of Prostate Cancer Antigen 3 and Prostate-Specific Antigen Improves Diagnostic Accuracy in Men at Risk of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Liyun; Lee, Chi Hyun; Ning, Jing; Handy, Beverly C; Wagar, Elizabeth A; Meng, Qing H

    2018-03-16

    - Prostate cancer antigen 3 (PCA3) is a noncoding RNA that is highly overexpressed in prostate cancer (PCa) tissue and excreted in urine in patients with PCa. - To assess the clinical utility of urinary PCA3 in men at risk of PCa. - We retrospectively reviewed a cohort of 271 men (median age, 63 years) with elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and/or strong family history, and/or abnormal digital rectal examination findings. Diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV), positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR+, LR-), and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), and area under the receiver-operating characteristic curves (AUC) were evaluated. - PCA3 score was a significant predictor of prostate biopsy outcome ( P < .001). A PCA3 score of 30 was the optimal cutoff for our study cohort, with a diagnostic sensitivity of 72.7%, specificity of 67.5%, PPV of 47.1%, NPV of 86.2%, LR+ of 2.24, LR- of 0.40, and DOR of 5.55. At this cutoff score, the PCA3 assay could avoid 57.4% of unnecessary invasive biopsies in the overall study cohort and 70.3% in the subgroup with PSA level in the "gray zone" (4-10 ng/mL). A logistic regression algorithm combining PCA3 with PSA increased the AUC from 0.571 for PSA-only to 0.729 ( P < .001). The logistic combined marker gained the ability to discriminate low-grade from high-grade cancers. - Our data suggest that PCA3 improves the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of PSA and that the combination of PCA3 with PSA gives better overall performance in identification of PCa than serum PSA alone in the high-risk population.

  3. Racial differences in hypogonadal improvement and prostate-specific antigen levels in hypogonadal men treated with testosterone replacement therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Coward, Robert M.; Simhan, Jay; Carson III, Culley C.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To observe hypogonadal men undergoing testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) and assess racial differences in hypogonadal improvement and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a retrospective analysis, 75 hypogonadal men were followed for an average 34 months after initiating TRT. Total testosterone and PSA levels were assessed every 6 months, and patients diagnosed with prostatitis or prostate cancer during treatment were excluded. RESULTS: For 16 African...

  4. [Evaluation of the Recombinant Protein Tp0965 of Treponema Pallidum as Perspective Antigen for the Improved Serological Diagnosis of Syphilis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runina, A V; Starovoitova, A S; Deryabin, D G; Kubanov, A A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGRAUND. Treponemal tests based on the detection of antibodies against the Treponema pallidum antigens are the most specific methods for serological diagnosis of syphilis. Due to the inability to cultivate this bacterium in vitro, the most promising sources of antigens for diagnostics are recombinant proteins of T. pallidum. Evaluation of the analytical value of certain T. pallidum proteins is the approach to improve sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of syphilis serological tests, including possibilities of differential diagnosis of various forms of the disease. The aim of the research was to evaluate the analytical values (sensitivity and specificity) of recombinant protein Tp0965 of T. pallidum as a candidate antigen for serological diagnosis of syphilis. tp0965 gene was cloned into the expression vector pET28a and the construct was used for the transformation of E. coli BL-21 (DE3) cells and further expression and purification of the recombinant protein. The collected protein was used as T. pallidum antigen for serum analysis (ELISA) of groups of patients with various forms of syphilis (n=84) and the group of healthy donors (n = 25). High frequency of positive ELISA results was shown with serum of patients with syphilis, compared to the group of healthy donors. The sensitivity of serological reactions using recombinant protein Tp0965 was 98.8%, specificity--87.5%. The highest sensitivity (100%) was detected in the groups of patients with primary, secondary and early latent syphilis while in the group of patients with late latent syphilis it decreased to 95.2%. We concluded that due to its specificity T. pallidum recombinant protein Tp0965 can be used as a novel perspective antigen for development of syphilis serological diagnostic assays (for primary and early latent forms).

  5. Epitope mapping of the carcinoembryonic antigen by monoclonal antibodies and establishment of a new improved radioimmunoassay system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroki, Masahide; Arakawa, Fumiko; Matsunaga, Akira; Okamoto, Naomi; Takakura, Kyoko; Matsuoka, Yuji; Higuchi, Hiroshi.

    1987-01-01

    A comprehensive mapping of epitopes on the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) molecule has been achieved by analyses of the specificities of 146 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) from more than 300 hybridomas established recently. The reactivities of MAbs were analyzed by radio-immunoassays (RIA) with highly purified preparations of CEA and related antigens including normal fecal antigen-1 (NFA-1), NFA-2 in normal adult feces, nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA) in lung and NCA-2 in meconium. The MAbs could be divided into five groups: group I, 23 clones directed to the NCA-common part of the CEA molecule; group II, 31 clones directed to the normal fecal cross-reacting antigen (NFCA)-common part; group III, 46 clones directed to the NFA-1-common part; group IV, 33 clones reactive with the heterogeneous carbohydrate part; and group V, 13 clones directed to the CEA-distinctive part which seemed to be highly specific for CEA. Mutual inhibitions of CEA binding between MAbs of the individual groups revealed that at least 25 different subgroups can be defined i.e., 4, 7, 8, 4, and 2 subgroups in groups I to V, respectively. The epitopes recognized by the group IV MAbs were found to be sensitive to oxidation with periodate, while the epitopes defined by MAbs of the other groups were resistant to this treatment. A solid-phase sandwich-type RIA system for CEA was established by using 2 MAbs from groups II and III as the CEA catcher and an MAb of group V as the tracer. This assay was shown to exhibit improved cancer-specificity and accuracy in the estimation of serum CEA levels. (author)

  6. Development and validation of an immunoperoxidase antigen detection test for improved diagnosis of rabies in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmadane, Ibnu; Certoma, Andrea F; Peck, Grantley R; Fitria, Yul; Payne, Jean; Colling, Axel; Shiell, Brian J; Beddome, Gary; Wilson, Susanne; Yu, Meng; Morrissy, Chris; Michalski, Wojtek P; Bingham, John; Gardner, Ian A; Allen, John D

    2017-11-01

    Rabies continues to pose a significant threat to human and animal health in regions of Indonesia. Indonesia has an extensive network of veterinary diagnostic laboratories and the 8 National laboratories are equipped to undertake diagnostic testing for rabies using the commercially-procured direct fluorescent antibody test (FAT), which is considered the reference (gold standard) test. However, many of the Indonesian Provincial diagnostic laboratories do not have a fluorescence microscope required to undertake the FAT. Instead, certain Provincial laboratories continue to screen samples using a chemical stain-based test (Seller's stain test, SST). This test has low diagnostic sensitivity, with negative SST-tested samples being forwarded to the nearest National laboratory resulting in significant delays for completion of testing and considerable additional costs. This study sought to develop a cost-effective and diagnostically-accurate immunoperoxidase antigen detection (RIAD) test for rabies that can be readily and quickly performed by the resource-constrained Provincial laboratories. This would reduce the burden on the National laboratories and allow more rapid diagnoses and implementation of post-exposure prophylaxis. The RIAD test was evaluated using brain smears fixed with acetone or formalin and its performance was validated by comparison with established rabies diagnostic tests used in Indonesia, including the SST and FAT. A proficiency testing panel was distributed between Provincial laboratories to assess the reproducibility of the test. The performance of the RIAD test was improved by using acetone fixation of brain smears rather than formalin fixation such that it was of equivalent accuracy to that of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE)-recommended FAT, with both tests returning median diagnostic sensitivity and specificity values of 0.989 and 0.993, respectively. The RIAD test and FAT had higher diagnostic sensitivity than the SST (median = 0

  7. Controlled and targeted release of antigens by intelligent shell for improving applicability of oral vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Zeng, Zhanzhuang; Hu, Chaohua; Bellis, Susan L; Yang, Wendi; Su, Yintao; Zhang, Xinyan; Wu, Yunkun

    2016-01-01

    Conventional oral vaccines with simple architecture face barriers with regard to stimulating effective immunity. Here we describe oral vaccines with an intelligent phase-transitional shielding layer, poly[(methyl methacrylate)-co-(methyl acrylate)-co-(methacrylic acid)]-poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PMMMA-PLGA), which can protect antigens in the gastro-intestinal tract and achieve targeted vaccination in the large intestine. With the surface immunogenic protein (SIP) from group B Streptococcus (GBS) entrapped as the antigen, oral administration with PMMMA-PLGA (PTRBL)/Trx-SIP nanoparticles stimulated robust immunity in tilapia, an animal with a relatively simple immune system. The vaccine succeeded in protecting against Streptococcus agalactiae, a pathogen of worldwide importance that threatens human health and is transmitted in water with infected fish. After oral vaccination with PTRBL/Trx-SIP, tilapia produced enhanced levels of SIP specific antibodies and displayed durability of immune protection. 100% of the vaccinated tilapia were protected from GBS infection, whereas the control groups without vaccines or vaccinated with Trx-SIP only exhibited respective infection rates of 100% or >60% within the initial 5 months after primary vaccination. Experiments in vivo demonstrated that the recombinant antigen Trx-SIP labeled with FITC was localized in colon, spleen and kidney, which are critical sites for mounting an immune response. Our results revealed that, rather than the size of the nanoparticles, it is more likely that the negative charge repulsion produced by ionization of the carboxyl groups in PMMMA shielded the nanoparticles from uptake by small intestinal epithelial cells. This system resolves challenges arising from gastrointestinal damage to antigens, and more importantly, offers a new approach applicable for oral vaccination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Conjugating influenza a (H1N1) antigen to n-trimethylaminoethylmethacrylate chitosan nanoparticles improves the immunogenicity of the antigen after nasal administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingfeng; Zheng, Xiaoyao; Zhang, Chi; Shao, Xiayan; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Qizhi; Jiang, Xinguo

    2015-11-01

    As one of the most serious infectious respiratory diseases, influenza A (H1N1) is a great threat to human health, and it has created an urgent demand for effective vaccines. Nasal immunization can induce both systemic and mucosal immune responses against viruses, and it can serve as an ideal route for vaccination. However, the low immunogenicity of antigens on nasal mucosa is a high barrier for the development of nasal vaccines. In this study, we covalently conjugated an influenza A (H1N1) antigen to the surface of N-trimethylaminoethylmethacrylate chitosan (TMC) nanoparticles (H1N1-TMC/NP) through thioester bonds to increase the immunogenicity of the antigen after nasal administration. SDS-PAGE revealed that most of the antigen was conjugated on TMC nanoparticles, and an in vitro biological activity assay confirmed the stability of the antigen after conjugation. After three nasal immunizations, the H1N1-TMC/NP induced significantly higher levels of serum IgG and mucosal sIgA compared with free antigen. A hemagglutination inhibition assay showed that H1N1-TMC/NP induced much more protective antibodies than antigen-encapsulated nanoparticles or alum-precipitated antigen (I.M.). In the mechanistic study, H1N1-TMC/NP was shown to stimulate macrophages to produce IL-1β and IL-6 and to stimulate spleen lymphocytes to produce IL-2 and IFN-γ. These results indicated that H1N1-TMC/NP may be an effective vaccine against influenza A (H1N1) viruses for use in nasal immunization. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. A Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain that improves stimulation of antigen-presenting cells does not enhance vaccine efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Deanna M; O'Dee, Dawn M; Horzempa, Joseph; Carlson, Paul E; Russo, Brian C; Bales, Jacqueline M; Brown, Matthew J; Nau, Gerard J

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination is a proven strategy to mitigate morbidity and mortality of infectious diseases. The methodology of identifying and testing new vaccine candidates could be improved with rational design and in vitro testing prior to animal experimentation. The tularemia vaccine, Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS), does not elicit complete protection against lethal challenge with a virulent type A Francisella strain. One factor that may contribute to this poor performance is limited stimulation of antigen-presenting cells. In this study, we examined whether the interaction of genetically modified LVS strains with human antigen-presenting cells correlated with effectiveness as tularemia vaccine candidates. Human dendritic cells infected with wild-type LVS secrete low levels of proinflammatory cytokines, fail to upregulate costimulatory molecules, and activate human T cells poorly in vitro. One LVS mutant, strain 13B47, stimulated higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines from dendritic cells and macrophages and increased costimulatory molecule expression on dendritic cells compared to wild type. Additionally, 13B47-infected dendritic cells activated T cells more efficiently than LVS-infected cells. A deletion allele of the same gene in LVS displayed similar in vitro characteristics, but vaccination with this strain did not improve survival after challenge with a virulent Francisella strain. In vivo, this mutant was attenuated for growth and did not stimulate T cell responses in the lung comparable to wild type. Therefore, stimulation of antigen-presenting cells in vitro was improved by genetic modification of LVS, but did not correlate with efficacy against challenge in vivo within this model system.

  10. A Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain that improves stimulation of antigen-presenting cells does not enhance vaccine efficacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deanna M Schmitt

    Full Text Available Vaccination is a proven strategy to mitigate morbidity and mortality of infectious diseases. The methodology of identifying and testing new vaccine candidates could be improved with rational design and in vitro testing prior to animal experimentation. The tularemia vaccine, Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS, does not elicit complete protection against lethal challenge with a virulent type A Francisella strain. One factor that may contribute to this poor performance is limited stimulation of antigen-presenting cells. In this study, we examined whether the interaction of genetically modified LVS strains with human antigen-presenting cells correlated with effectiveness as tularemia vaccine candidates. Human dendritic cells infected with wild-type LVS secrete low levels of proinflammatory cytokines, fail to upregulate costimulatory molecules, and activate human T cells poorly in vitro. One LVS mutant, strain 13B47, stimulated higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines from dendritic cells and macrophages and increased costimulatory molecule expression on dendritic cells compared to wild type. Additionally, 13B47-infected dendritic cells activated T cells more efficiently than LVS-infected cells. A deletion allele of the same gene in LVS displayed similar in vitro characteristics, but vaccination with this strain did not improve survival after challenge with a virulent Francisella strain. In vivo, this mutant was attenuated for growth and did not stimulate T cell responses in the lung comparable to wild type. Therefore, stimulation of antigen-presenting cells in vitro was improved by genetic modification of LVS, but did not correlate with efficacy against challenge in vivo within this model system.

  11. Improved Activation toward Primary Colorectal Cancer Cells by Antigen-Specific Targeting Autologous Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Schlimper

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive therapy of malignant diseases with cytokine-induced killer (CIK cells showed promise in a number of trials; the activation of CIK cells from cancer patients towards their autologous cancer cells still needs to be improved. Here, we generated CIK cells ex vivo from blood lymphocytes of colorectal cancer patients and engineered those cells with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR with an antibody-defined specificity for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA. CIK cells thereby gained a new specificity as defined by the CAR and showed increase in activation towards CEA+ colon carcinoma cells, but less in presence of CEA− cells, indicated by increased secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Redirected CIK activation was superior by CAR-mediated CD28-CD3ζ than CD3ζ signaling only. CAR-engineered CIK cells from colon carcinoma patients showed improved activation against their autologous, primary carcinoma cells from biopsies resulting in more efficient tumour cell lysis. We assume that adoptive therapy with CAR-modified CIK cells shows improved selectivity in targeting autologous tumour lesions.

  12. Novel means of viral antigen identification: improved detection of avian influenza viruses by proximity ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlingemann, Joerg; Leijon, Mikael; Yacoub, Alia; Schlingemann, Heidi; Zohari, Siamak; Matyi-Tóth, Anna; Kiss, István; Holmquist, Göran; Nordengrahn, Ann; Landegren, Ulf; Ekström, Björn; Belák, Sándor

    2010-01-01

    Recent outbreaks of avian influenza in different parts of the world have caused major economic losses for the poultry industry, affected wildlife seriously and present a significant threat even to human public health, due to the risk for zoonotic transmission. The ability to recognize avian influenza viruses (AIVs) early is of paramount importance to ensure that appropriate measures can be taken quickly to contain the outbreak. In this study, the performance of a proximity ligation assay (PLA) for the detection of AIV antigens in biological specimens was evaluated. It is shown that PLA: (i) as a novel principle of highly sensitive antigen detection is extending the arsenal of tools for the diagnosis of AIV; (ii) is very specific, nearly as sensitive as a commonly used reference real-time PCR assay, and four orders of magnitude more sensitive than a sandwich ELISA, utilizing the same antibody; (iii) avoids the necessity of nucleic acids extraction, which greatly facilitates high-throughput implementations; (iv) allows the use of inactivated samples, which safely can be transported from the field to diagnostic laboratories for further analysis. In summary, the results demonstrate that PLA is suited for rapid, accurate and early detection of AIV.

  13. Dramatic response to infliximab in refractory neurosarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chintamaneni Sreekanth

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease characterized by noncaseating granulomas in the involved organs. Neurologic manifestations involving the central and/or peripheral nervous system occur in about 5% of patients. Neurosarcoidosis is often refractory to conventional treatment and therefore more effective treatment options are needed. While the etiology of the disease is still unknown, there is now a better understanding of its pathogenesis on a molecular level. It is clear that tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα plays a pivotal role in the development of the granulomas and it is believed to be a key cytokine involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Taking advantage of this better understanding of disease pathogenesis, anti-TNFα agents are being increasingly used to treat refractory sarcoidosis. We report a patient with refractory neurosarcoidosis who showed dramatic improvement in the clinical and radiological manifestations following treatment with infliximab; he suffered a relapse upon discontinuation of the medication.

  14. Long-term Prostate-specific Antigen Velocity in Improved Classification of Prostate Cancer Risk and Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsted, David Dynnes; Bojesen, Stig E; Kamstrup, Pia R

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It remains unclear whether adding long-term prostate-specific antigen velocity (PSAV) to baseline PSA values improves classification of prostate cancer (PCa) risk and mortality in the general population. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether long-term PSAV improves classification of PCa risk...... and mortality in the general population. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: We studied 503 men aged 30-80 yr, with and without PCa, who had repeated PSA measurements over 20 yr and up to 28 yr before PCa diagnosis. These were selected from among 7455 men in the Copenhagen City Heart Study, a prospective...... classification was assessed using the net reclassification index (NRI). RESULTS: Age-adjusted hazard ratios for PCa risk and mortality were 2.7-5.3 and 2.3-3.4, respectively, for long-term PSAV when added to models already including baseline PSA values. For PCa risk and mortality, adding long-term PSAV to models...

  15. Improved transfection of spleen-derived antigen-presenting cells in culture using TATp-liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, Juan Sebastián; Quattrocchi, Valeria; Langellotti, Cecilia; Di Giacomo, Sebastián; Gnazzo, Victoria; Olivera, Valeria; Calamante, Gabriela; Zamorano, Patricia I; Levchenko, Tatyana S; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2009-02-20

    Antigen presenting cells (APC) are among the most important cells of the immune system since they link the innate and the adaptative immune responses, directing the type of immune response to be elicited. To modulate the immune response in immune preventing or treating therapies, gene delivery into immunocompetent cells could be used. However, APC are very resistant to transfection. To increase the efficiency of APC transfection, we have used liposome-based lipoplexes additionally modified with cell-penetrating TAT peptide (TATp) for better intracellular delivery of a model plasmid encoding for the enhanced-green fluorescent protein (pEGFP). pEGFP-bearing lipoplexes made of a mixture of PC:Chol:DOTAP (60:30:10 molar ratio) with the addition of 2% mol of polyethylene glycol-phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG-PE) conjugate (plain-L) or TATp-PEG-PE (TATp-L) were shown to effectively protect the incorporated DNA from degradation. Uptake assays of rhodamine-labeled lipoplexes and transfections with the EGFP reporter gene were performed with APC derived from the mouse spleen. TATp-L-based lipoplexes allowed for significantly enhanced both, the uptake and transfection in APC. Such a tool could be used for the APC transfection as a first step in immune therapy.

  16. Incorporation of a hinge domain improves the expansion of chimeric antigen receptor T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Qin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple iterations of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs have been developed, mainly focusing on intracellular signaling modules. However, the effect of non-signaling extracellular modules on the expansion and therapeutic efficacy of CARs remains largely undefined. Methods We generated two versions of CAR vectors, with or without a hinge domain, targeting CD19, mesothelin, PSCA, MUC1, and HER2, respectively. Then, we systematically compared the effect of the hinge domains on the growth kinetics, cytokine production, and cytotoxicity of CAR T cells in vitro and in vivo. Results During in vitro culture period, the percentages and absolute numbers of T cells expressing the CARs containing a hinge domain continuously increased, mainly through the promotion of CD4+ CAR T cell expansion, regardless of the single-chain variable fragment (scFv. In vitro migration assay showed that the hinges enhanced CAR T cells migratory capacity. The T cells expressing anti-CD19 CARs with or without a hinge had similar antitumor capacities in vivo, whereas the T cells expressing anti-mesothelin CARs containing a hinge domain showed enhanced antitumor activities. Conclusions Hence, our results demonstrate that a hinge contributes to CAR T cell expansion and is capable of increasing the antitumor efficacy of some specific CAR T cells. Our results suggest potential novel strategies in CAR vector design.

  17. Introducing Dramatic Inquiry as Visual Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoades, Mindi; Daiello, Vittoria S.

    2016-01-01

    This article defines dramatic inquiry, exploring its possible contributions to discourses on subjectivity, embodied pedagogy, and relational knowing in art education. As a communal, ensemble endeavor emerging from the discipline of drama education, dramatic inquiry offers strategies for enhancing arts education's critical inquiries by facilitating…

  18. Gamma irradiated antigen extracts improves the immune response and protection in experimental toxoplasmosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Andrea da; Galisteo Junior, Andres Jimenez; Andrade Junior, Heitor Franco de

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to use ionizing radiation on soluble extracts of T. gondii tachyzoites (AgTg) and tested the ability of these extracts to induce immunity in BALB/c mice against a challenge. T. gondii RH strain AgTg was irradiated with Co-60 at 0.25 to 4 kGy and were affected after 1 kGy, as evidenced by a progressive high molecular weight protein aggregates and no loss in antigenicity, as detected by immunoblotting, except after 4kGy. BALB/c mice were immunized with biweekly doses of 03 s.c. native or irradiated AgTg without adjuvants; the anti-T.gondii IgG production was detected by ELISA, and higher levels and avidity were detected in mice immunized with 1.5 kGy AgTg compared to controls (p<0.05). Mice immunized with native AgTg exhibited spleen CD19 + B, CD3 + CD4 + or CD3 + CD8 + T cell proliferation levels of 5%, while 1.5 kGy-immunized mice exhibited spleen cell proliferation levels of 12.2%, primarily for CD19 + or CD3 + CD8 + lymphocytes and less evidently for CD3 + CD4 + (8.8%) helper T lymphocytes. All cells from control mice showed little to no proliferation when stimulated with AgTg. These cells secreted more IFN-γ in the 1.5 kGy AgTg-immunized group (p<0.05). BALB/c mice immunized with 1.5 kGy and challenged with different strains of T. gondii were partially protected, as evidenced by survival after RH virulent strain challenge (p<0.0001) but also after ME-49 strain challenge: the brain cyst numbers (p<0.05) and the levels of T. gondii DNA measured by real-time PCR (p<0.05) decreased compared to non-immunized controls. (author)

  19. Gamma irradiated antigen extracts improves the immune response and protection in experimental toxoplasmosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Andrea da; Galisteo Junior, Andres Jimenez; Andrade Junior, Heitor Franco de, E-mail: andreacosta@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Medicina Tropical; Zorgi, Nahiara Estevez [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas; Nascimento, Nanci do [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    We aimed to use ionizing radiation on soluble extracts of T. gondii tachyzoites (AgTg) and tested the ability of these extracts to induce immunity in BALB/c mice against a challenge. T. gondii RH strain AgTg was irradiated with Co-60 at 0.25 to 4 kGy and were affected after 1 kGy, as evidenced by a progressive high molecular weight protein aggregates and no loss in antigenicity, as detected by immunoblotting, except after 4kGy. BALB/c mice were immunized with biweekly doses of 03 s.c. native or irradiated AgTg without adjuvants; the anti-T.gondii IgG production was detected by ELISA, and higher levels and avidity were detected in mice immunized with 1.5 kGy AgTg compared to controls (p<0.05). Mice immunized with native AgTg exhibited spleen CD19{sup +} B, CD3{sup +}CD4{sup +} or CD3{sup +}CD8{sup +} T cell proliferation levels of 5%, while 1.5 kGy-immunized mice exhibited spleen cell proliferation levels of 12.2%, primarily for CD19{sup +} or CD3{sup +}CD8{sup +} lymphocytes and less evidently for CD3{sup +}CD4{sup +} (8.8%) helper T lymphocytes. All cells from control mice showed little to no proliferation when stimulated with AgTg. These cells secreted more IFN-γ in the 1.5 kGy AgTg-immunized group (p<0.05). BALB/c mice immunized with 1.5 kGy and challenged with different strains of T. gondii were partially protected, as evidenced by survival after RH virulent strain challenge (p<0.0001) but also after ME-49 strain challenge: the brain cyst numbers (p<0.05) and the levels of T. gondii DNA measured by real-time PCR (p<0.05) decreased compared to non-immunized controls. (author)

  20. Novel Non-Histocompatibility Antigen Mismatched Variants Improve the Ability to Predict Antibody-Mediated Rejection Risk in Kidney Transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pineda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Transplant rejection is the critical clinical end-point limiting indefinite survival after histocompatibility antigen (HLA mismatched organ transplantation. The predominant cause of late graft loss is antibody-mediated rejection (AMR, a process whereby injury to the organ is caused by donor-specific antibodies, which bind to HLA and non-HLA (nHLA antigens. AMR is incompletely diagnosed as donor/recipient (D/R matching is only limited to the HLA locus and critical nHLA immunogenic antigens remain to be identified. We have developed an integrative computational approach leveraging D/R exome sequencing and gene expression to predict clinical post-transplant outcome. We performed a rigorous statistical analysis of 28 highly annotated D/R kidney transplant pairs with biopsy-confirmed clinical outcomes of rejection [either AMR or T-cell-mediated rejection (CMR] and no-rejection (NoRej, identifying a significantly higher number of mismatched nHLA variants in AMR (ANOVA—p-value = 0.02. Using Fisher’s exact test, we identified 123 variants associated mainly with risk of AMR (p-value < 0.001. In addition, we applied a machine-learning technique to circumvent the issue of statistical power and we found a subset of 65 variants using random forest, that are predictive of post-tx AMR showing a very low error rate. These variants are functionally relevant to the rejection process in the kidney and AMR as they relate to genes and/or expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs that are enriched in genes expressed in kidney and vascular endothelium and underlie the immunobiology of graft rejection. In addition to current D/R HLA mismatch evaluation, additional mismatch nHLA D/R variants will enhance the stratification of post-tx AMR risk even before engraftment of the organ. This innovative study design is applicable in all solid organ transplants, where the impact of mitigating AMR on graft survival may be greater, with considerable benefits on

  1. Transgenic Expression of IL15 Improves Antiglioma Activity of IL13Rα2-CAR T Cells but Results in Antigen Loss Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenciute, Giedre; Prinzing, Brooke L; Yi, Zhongzhen; Wu, Meng-Fen; Liu, Hao; Dotti, Gianpietro; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2017-07-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive primary brain tumor in adults and is virtually incurable with conventional therapies. Immunotherapy with T cells expressing GBM-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) is an attractive approach to improve outcomes. Although CAR T cells targeting GBM antigens, such as IL13 receptor subunit α2 (IL13Rα2), HER2, and EGFR variant III (EGFRvIII), have had antitumor activity in preclinical models, early-phase clinical testing has demonstrated limited antiglioma activity. Transgenic expression of IL15 is an appealing strategy to enhance CAR T-cell effector function. We tested this approach in our IL13Rα2-positive glioma model in which limited IL13Rα2-CAR T-cell persistence results in recurrence of antigen-positive gliomas. T cells were genetically modified with retroviral vectors encoding IL13Rα2-CARs or IL15 (IL13Rα2-CAR.IL15 T cells). IL13Rα2-CAR.IL15 T cells recognized glioma cells in an antigen-dependent fashion, had greater proliferative capacity, and produced more cytokines after repeated stimulations in comparison with IL13Rα2-CAR T cells. No autonomous IL13Rα2-CAR.IL15 T-cell proliferation was observed; however, IL15 expression increased IL13Rα2-CAR T-cell viability in the absence of exogenous cytokines or antigen. In vivo , IL13Rα2-CAR.IL15 T cells persisted longer and had greater antiglioma activity than IL13Rα2-CAR T cells, resulting in a survival advantage. Gliomas recurring after 40 days after T-cell injection had downregulated IL13Rα2 expression, indicating that antigen loss variants occur in the setting of improved T-cell persistence. Thus, CAR T cells for GBM should not only be genetically modified to improve their proliferation and persistence, but also to target multiple antigens. Summary: Glioblastoma responds imperfectly to immunotherapy. Transgenic expression of IL15 in T cells expressing CARs improved their proliferative capacity, persistence, and cytokine production. The emergence of antigen

  2. An improved haemolytic plaque assay for the detection of cells secreting antibody to bacterial antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barington, T; Heilmann, C

    1992-01-01

    -polysaccharide AbSC of the IgG isotype, the increase was as high as 7.4-11.8 times. Evidence is presented that the pronounced improvement in the detection of the latter is due to the presence of aggregating anti-IgG antibody from the beginning of the assay. It is proposed that in the case of low affinity of anti...

  3. In Vitro Use of Autologous Dendritic Cells Improves Detection of T Cell Responses to Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carotenuto, Patrizia; Artsen, Andre; Niesters, Hubert G.; Osterhaus, Albert D.; Pontesilli, Oscar

    T lymphocyte responses to hepatitis B virus (HBV) core antigen (HBcAg) are vigorous and easily detectable in vitro during recovery from acute hepatitis B but significantly weaker in patients with chronic HBV infection. In contrast, T cell responses to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) are almost

  4. Building Family and Community Demand for Dramatic Change in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinson, Dana; Steiner, Lucy

    2012-01-01

    District-led, dramatic change efforts in failing schools--including turnarounds and school closures--often face strong resistance from families and communities. Resistance may be based on years of tension and distrust between districts and communities, failed past school improvement efforts, or a lack of understanding about the chasm between a…

  5. Narrative and Dramatic Structure in Plato's Dialogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Pourelm

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Plato did not allow many artists and poets into his Utopia Republic because of their bad and misleading influence on the young. But it seems that he learned storytelling and narrating from them and concealed what he learned beneath his philosophy. Thus, Plato's dialogues became more effective and gained aesthetic and artistic qualities. Theaetetus, one of the best known dialogues of Plato, is a conversation and discussion about episteme. Due to using classical dramatic structure, this dialogue is the most important dialogue with regard to dramatization of philosophical thoughts. The goal of this article is to study the dramatic structure of Plato's dialogues and show its potentials for interaction with narrative theories. It could be said that Plato's dialogues have many resemblances to the Greek drama and, today, we can call Plato a playwright. Thus, it is important and necessary to reread and reevaluate Plato's works via narratological view.

  6. HPLC purification of recombinant NcGRA6 antigen improves enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for serodiagnosis of bovine neosporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, M C; Fetterer, R; Schares, G; Björkman, C; Wapenaar, W; McAllister, M; Dubey, J P

    2005-08-10

    The gene for a dense granule protein (NcGRA6) of Neospora caninum was expressed in Escherichia coli as a His-tag fusion protein and purified by NiNTA affinity chromatography. In a preliminary study, high binding of antibodies from N. caninum-negative cows was observed in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using NiNTA-purified NcGRA6. Analysis of NiNTA eluates revealed a significant number of E. coli proteins that co-purified with recombinant NcGRA6. In an attempt to improve the relative sensitivity and specificity of the NcGRA6-based ELISA, the rNcGRA6 eluates were subjected to a secondary purification using reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Analysis of RP-HPLC eluates by SDS-PAGE/silver staining revealed the purification of recombinant NcGRA6 from contaminating E. coli proteins. ELISAs using the RP-HPLC purified NcGRA6 (dELISA) or singly purified NcGRA6 (sELISA) for identifying seropositive and seronegative cows in a beef herd experiencing an epidemic outbreak of neosporosis were compared to standard assays based on native tachyzoite protein-immunofluorescence antibody test, immunoblot assay, and ISCOM-ELISA. The relative sensitivity, specificity, and kappa value of the NcGRA6d-ELISA were greatly improved over the NcGRA6s-ELISA when compared to the three native antigen immunoassays. These results indicate that removal of contaminating E. coli proteins improves the performance of recombinant NcGRA6 ELISA in diagnosing bovine neosporosis, and may have applicability to the use of recombinant proteins in diagnosing other infectious agents.

  7. The porcine circovirus type 1 capsid gene promoter improves antigen expression and immunogenicity in a HIV-1 plasmid vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burger Marieta

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the promising avenues for development of vaccines against Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and other human pathogens is the use of plasmid-based DNA vaccines. However, relatively large doses of plasmid must be injected for a relatively weak response. We investigated whether genome elements from Porcine circovirus type 1 (PCV-1, an apathogenic small ssDNA-containing virus, had useful expression-enhancing properties that could allow dose-sparing in a plasmid vaccine. Results The linearised PCV-1 genome inserted 5' of the CMV promoter in the well-characterised HIV-1 plasmid vaccine pTHgrttnC increased expression of the polyantigen up to 2-fold, and elicited 3-fold higher CTL responses in mice at 10-fold lower doses than unmodified pTHgrttnC. The PCV-1 capsid gene promoter (Pcap alone was equally effective. Enhancing activity was traced to a putative composite host transcription factor binding site and a "Conserved Late Element" transcription-enhancing sequence previously unidentified in circoviruses. Conclusions We identified a novel PCV-1 genome-derived enhancer sequence that significantly increased antigen expression from plasmids in in vitro assays, and improved immunogenicity in mice of the HIV-1 subtype C vaccine plasmid, pTHgrttnC. This should allow significant dose sparing of, or increased responses to, this and other plasmid-based vaccines. We also report investigations of the potential of other circovirus-derived sequences to be similarly used.

  8. Serum fucosylated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) improves the differentiation of aggressive from non-aggressive prostate cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing Kay; Chen, Li; Ao, Ming-Hui; Chiu, Joyce Hanching; Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Hui; Chan, Daniel W

    2015-01-01

    Clinically, it is still challenging to differentiate aggressive from non-aggressive prostate cancers (Pca) by non-invasive approaches. Our recent studies showed that overexpression of alpha (1-6) fucosyltransferase played an important role in Pca cells. In this study, we have investigated levels of glycoproteins and their fucosylated glycoforms in sera of Pca patients, as well as the potential utility of fucosylated glycoproteins in the identification of aggressive Pca. Serum samples from histomorphology-proven Pca cases were included. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA), tissue inhibitor of metallopeptidase 1 (TIMP1) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), and their fucosylated glycoforms were captured by Aleuria Aurantia Lectin (AAL), followed by the multiplex magnetic bead-based immunoassay. The level of fucosylated glycoproteins was correlated with patients' Gleason score of the tumor. Among three fucosylated glycoproteins, the fucosylated PSA was significantly increased and correlated with the tumor Gleason score (pPSA showed a marked increase in aggressive tumors in comparison to non-aggressive tumors. ROC analysis also showed an improved predictive power of fucosylated PSA in the identification of aggressive Pca. Our data demonstrated that fucosylated PSA has a better predictive power to differentiate aggressive tumors from non-aggressive tumors, than that of native PSA and two other glycoproteins. The fucosylated PSA has the potential to be used as a surrogate biomarker.

  9. DRAMATIC LITERATURE FOR DEVELOPMENT: IMPERATIVES OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Precious

    DRAMATIC LITERATURE FOR DEVELOPMENT: IMPERATIVES OF NWAMUO's SAVE OUR LIVES AND ... the Community Theatre Workshop / Theatre for Development approach. Two plays are here examined: ... stage when drama is physicalized, reminiscent of old tunes sang when time was young and beautiful under ...

  10. Optimization of IL13Rα2-Targeted Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells for Improved Anti-tumor Efficacy against Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christine E; Aguilar, Brenda; Starr, Renate; Yang, Xin; Chang, Wen-Chung; Weng, Lihong; Chang, Brenda; Sarkissian, Aniee; Brito, Alfonso; Sanchez, James F; Ostberg, Julie R; D'Apuzzo, Massimo; Badie, Behnam; Barish, Michael E; Forman, Stephen J

    2018-01-03

    T cell immunotherapy is emerging as a powerful strategy to treat cancer and may improve outcomes for patients with glioblastoma (GBM). We have developed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell immunotherapy targeting IL-13 receptor α2 (IL13Rα2) for the treatment of GBM. Here, we describe the optimization of IL13Rα2-targeted CAR T cells, including the design of a 4-1BB (CD137) co-stimulatory CAR (IL13BBζ) and a manufacturing platform using enriched central memory T cells. Utilizing orthotopic human GBM models with patient-derived tumor sphere lines in NSG mice, we found that IL13BBζ-CAR T cells improved anti-tumor activity and T cell persistence as compared to first-generation IL13ζ-CAR CD8 + T cells that had shown evidence for bioactivity in patients. Investigating the impact of corticosteroids, given their frequent use in the clinical management of GBM, we demonstrate that low-dose dexamethasone does not diminish CAR T cell anti-tumor activity in vivo. Furthermore, we found that local intracranial delivery of CAR T cells elicits superior anti-tumor efficacy as compared to intravenous administration, with intraventricular infusions exhibiting possible benefit over intracranial tumor infusions in a multifocal disease model. Overall, these findings help define parameters for the clinical translation of CAR T cell therapy for the treatment of brain tumors. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Differential percentage of serum prostate-specific antigen subforms suggests a new way to improve prostate cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrats, Ariadna; Comet, Josep; Tabarés, Glòria; Ramírez, Manel; Aleixandre, R Núria; de Llorens, Rafael; Peracaula, Rosa

    2010-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is the tumor marker currently used for prostate cancer (PCa) screening and diagnosis. However, its use is controversial as serum PSA levels are also increased in other non-malignant prostatic diseases such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). PSA sialic acid content is altered in tumor situation and modifies PSA's isoelectric point (pI). Our goal has been to evaluate serum PSA subforms from PCa and BPH patients by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and to investigate whether they could be used to improve PCa diagnosis. PSA from 20 PCa and 20 BPH patients' sera was subjected to a four-step method to obtain serum PSA 2-DE subforms from free PSA (fPSA) plus PSA released from the complex with alpha-1-antichymotrypsin. Relative percentages of PSA spots were quantified and subjected to statistical analysis. Five PSA subforms (F1, F2, F3, F4, and F5) of different pI were obtained. Relative percentages of F3 (%F3) and F4 (%F4) were different between PCa and BPH groups. %F3 decreased in cancers and this decrease correlated with the cancer stage, while F4 behaved oppositely. These observations were also found when only focusing on the patients within the low total PSA (tPSA) range 2-20 ng/ml. %F3 showed a tendency of higher sensitivity and specificity than the currently used tPSA and %fPSA tests. Therefore, %F3 measurement should be investigated in a larger cohort of patients to study whether it could be introduced to improve PCa diagnosis. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Care initiation area yields dramatic results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    The ED at Gaston Memorial Hospital in Gastonia, NC, has achieved dramatic results in key department metrics with a Care Initiation Area (CIA) and a physician in triage. Here's how the ED arrived at this winning solution: Leadership was trained in and implemented the Kaizen method, which eliminates redundant or inefficient process steps. Simulation software helped determine additional space needed by analyzing arrival patterns and other key data. After only two days of meetings, new ideas were implemented and tested.

  13. Dramatization and attraction: new identification tools

    OpenAIRE

    V I Panteleeva

    2009-01-01

    The article provides the analysis of identification mechanisms and its presentation patterns in the contemporary megapolis, the reasons for identification challenges emerging in the contemporary multicultural world where the contemporary urban community offers the opportunity for identity transformation, so that the citizens of metropolis are faced with the challenge of finding new identification tools. The notions of «dramatization» and «social attraction» offered in the article for the iden...

  14. Conformal treatment of prostate cancer with improved targeting: superior prostate-specific antigen response compared to standard treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corn, Benjamin W.; Hanks, Gerald E.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Hunt, Margie A.; Lee, W. Robert; Coia, Lawrence R.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Conformal radiation therapy (CRT) decreases the morbidity of prostate cancer treatment, but no published data attest to the improved ability of CRT to control disease. Therefore, we compared Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) response at 1 year among similarly staged patients treated by conformal techniques to those treated with conventional approaches, looking for an early indicator of tumor response. Method and Materials: Patients with locally advanced disease were treated by pelvic fields followed by prostate field conedowns; those with early stage/low grade disease received only prostate field irradiation. Between October, 1987 and November, 1991, conventional treatments used rectangular beams with or without corner blocks. Neither urethrography nor immobilization casts were used for conventionally treated patients. Between April, 1989 and December, 1992, conformal treatments have used rigid immobilization and Computed Tomography-based, beams-eye-view field design. As such, our conformal approach allowed improved targeting. Median prescribed doses (minimal doses to the Planning Target Volume) were 70 Gy (66-73 Gy) and 70.2 Gy (64.8-75 Gy) for conventionally and conformally treated patients, respectively. Median daily fraction size was 1.8 Gy for conventional treatment and 2.0 Gy for conformal therapy. Baseline PSA data were available on 170 consecutive patients treated conformally and 90 consecutive patients treated conventionally. Results: Among those receiving only prostatic field irradiation, 12-month PSA values returned to normal in 96% and 85% of conformally and conventionally treated patients, respectively, when normalization was defined as ≤ 4 ng/ml (p 15), and the use of conformal irradiation were statistically significant prognostic discriminants of PSA normalization at 1 year while total irradiation dose, clinical stage, and the addition of pelvic fields were not significant. Conclusions: As measured by PSA normalization, conformal techniques

  15. Racial differences in hypogonadal improvement and prostate-specific antigen levels in hypogonadal men treated with testosterone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M. Coward

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To observe hypogonadal men undergoing testosterone replacement therapy (TRT and assess racial differences in hypogonadal improvement and prostate-specific antigen (PSA levels. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a retrospective analysis, 75 hypogonadal men were followed for an average 34 months after initiating TRT. Total testosterone and PSA levels were assessed every 6 months, and patients diagnosed with prostatitis or prostate cancer during treatment were excluded. RESULTS: For 16 African American men, the average age at diagnosis of hypogonadism was 53.5 years, compared with 57.8 years in 59 Caucasian men (p = NS. Pre- and post-treatment testosterone was 219 ng/dL and 310 ng/dL in African American men, and 247 ng/dL and 497 ng/dL in Caucasian men (p = NS. Symptomatic response was 81% in African American men and 93% in Caucasian men (p = NS. Baseline PSA level was 1.32 ng/mL in African American men and 1.27 ng/mL in Caucasian men, and there was no significant difference in PSA between racial groups at 6-month intervals, although there was a small decreasing trend in the PSA of African Americans compared with Caucasians. CONCLUSIONS: Hypogonadal African American men have a similar normalization of testosterone and symptomatic response as hypogonadal Caucasian men, and PSA levels remain stable over time in both groups. In this hypogonadal cohort, in contrast to studies of eugonadal men, higher PSA levels in African Americans were not observed.

  16. [Improvement of sensitivity in the second generation HCV core antigen assay by a novel concentration method using polyethylene glycol (PEG)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashimoto, Makiko; Takahashi, Masahiko; Jokyu, Ritsuko; Syundou, Hiromi; Saito, Hidetsugu

    2007-11-01

    A HCV core antigen (Ag) detection assay system, Lumipulse Ortho HCV Ag has been developed and is commercially available in Japan with a lower detection level limit of 50 fmol/l, which is equivalent to 20 KIU/ml in PCR quantitative assay. HCV core Ag assay has an advantage of broader dynamic range compared with PCR assay, however the sensitivity is lower than PCR. We developed a novel HCV core Ag concentration method using polyethylene glycol (PEG), which can improve the sensitivity five times better than the original assay. The reproducibility was examined by consecutive five-time measurement of HCV patients serum, in which the results of HCV core Ag original and concentrated method were 56.8 +/- 8.1 fmol/l (mean +/- SD), CV 14.2% and 322.9 +/- 45.5 fmol/l CV 14.0%, respectively. The assay results of HCV negative samples in original HCV core Ag were all 0.1 fmol/l and the results were same even in the concentration method. The results of concentration method were 5.7 times higher than original assay, which was almost equal to theoretical rate as expected. The assay results of serially diluted samples were also as same as expected data in both original and concentration assay. We confirmed that the sensitivity of HCV core Ag concentration method had almost as same sensitivity as PCR high range assay in the competitive assay study using the serially monitored samples of five HCV patients during interferon therapy. A novel concentration method using PEG in HCV core Ag assay system seems to be useful for assessing and monitoring interferon treatment for HCV.

  17. Improvement in Diagnosis of Histoplasma Meningitis by Combined Testing for Histoplasma Antigen and Immunoglobulin G and Immunoglobulin M Anti-Histoplasma Antibody in Cerebrospinal Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Karen C; Myint, Thein; Raymond-Guillen, Luke; Hage, Chadi A; Davis, Thomas E; Wright, Patty W; Chow, Felicia C; Woc-Colburn, Laila; Khairy, Raed N; Street, Alan C; Yamamoto, Tomotaka; Albers, Amanda; Wheat, L Joseph

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background Central nervous system (CNS) histoplasmosis is a life-threatening condition and represents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Isolation of Histoplasma capsulatum from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or brain tissue is diagnostic; however, culture is insensitive and slow growth may result in significant treatment delay. We performed a retrospective multicenter study to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of a new anti-Histoplasma antibody enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for the detection of IgG and IgM antibody in the CSF for diagnosis of CNS histoplasmosis, the primary objective of the study. The secondary objective was to determine the effect of improvements in the Histoplasma galactomannan antigen detection EIA on the diagnosis of Histoplasma meningitis. Methods Residual CSF specimens from patients with Histoplasma meningitis and controls were tested for Histoplasma antigen and anti-Histoplasma immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibody using assays developed at MiraVista Diagnostics. Results A total of 50 cases and 157 controls were evaluated. Fifty percent of patients with CNS histoplasmosis were immunocompromised, 14% had other medical conditions, and 36% were healthy. Histoplasma antigen was detected in CSF in 78% of cases and the specificity was 97%. Anti-Histoplasma IgG or IgM antibody was detected in 82% of cases and the specificity was 93%. The sensitivity of detection of antibody by currently available serologic testing including immunodiffusion and complement fixation was 51% and the specificity was 96%. Testing for both CSF antigen and antibody by EIA was the most sensitive approach, detecting 98% of cases. Conclusions Testing CSF for anti-Histoplasma IgG and IgM antibody complements antigen detection and improves the sensitivity for diagnosis of Histoplasma meningitis. PMID:29020213

  18. Dramatic reduction of culture time of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodbane, Ramzi; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2014-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture, a critical technique for routine diagnosis of tuberculosis, takes more than two weeks. Here, step-by-step improvements in the protocol including a new medium, microaerophlic atmosphere or ascorbic-acid supplement and autofluorescence detection dramatically shortened this delay. In the best case, primary culture and rifampicin susceptibility testing were achieved in 72 hours when specimens were inoculated directly on the medium supplemented by antibiotic at the beginning of the culture.

  19. Dramatization and attraction: new identification tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V I Panteleeva

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The article provides the analysis of identification mechanisms and its presentation patterns in the contemporary megapolis, the reasons for identification challenges emerging in the contemporary multicultural world where the contemporary urban community offers the opportunity for identity transformation, so that the citizens of metropolis are faced with the challenge of finding new identification tools. The notions of «dramatization» and «social attraction» offered in the article for the identity problem analysis in the context of diverse style and taste options of the contemporary urban community serve to form an estimate of the behaviour of an individual who keeps deciding on his own behavioral pattern.

  20. Proteasomal targeting and minigene repetition improve cell-surface presentation of a transfected, modified melanoma tumour antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, A B; Zocca, M-B; Bonefeld, C M

    2004-01-01

    on the density of specific major histocompatibility complex-peptide complexes on the surface of the antigen-presenting cell. In this study, we explored the cell-surface presentation of a substituted MART-1 peptide encoded by transfected minigenes. We investigated the potential of proteasomal targeting compared...

  1. The aesthetics of Harold Pinter's dramatic art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šoškić Radoje V.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The British playwright Harold Pinter (1930-2008 is undoubtedly one of the greatest and most extraordinary modern playwrights, with the writing career which spanned over fifty years. The world Pinter depicts in his dramas is deeply political, violent, malevolent, and absurd at the same time, and is certainly reflective of dread, the precarious condition inhabited by most of contemporary humanity. A whole gallery of Pinter's characters (in his early plays are not driven by ambition to make progress in such a world, they don't care to dispute the public arena, they are uninterested in changing the world for better or for worse. On the contrary, those characters are sad citizens of intimacy, fear, the horrific nature of which unmasks itself in claustrophobic rooms they are entrapped in, where power games, domination, and the struggle for liberation originate. Pinter's characters are obsessed only with their own survival, governed by the 'territorial imperative'. The paper aims at analyzing thematic preoccupations, dramatic devices and major dramatic and poetic elements of Pinter's plays, with the emphasis on his connection with the 'Theatre of the Absurd'. The focus is also on the concept of the hidden violence of language and linguistic absurdity as used by Pinter.

  2. Improving dengue viral antigens detection in dengue patient serum specimens using a low pH glycine buffer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wen-Fan; Galula, Jedhan Ucat; Chang, Gwong-Jen J; Wu, Han-Chung; King, Chwan-Chuen; Chao, Day-Yu

    2017-04-01

    Early diagnosis of dengue virus (DENV) infection to monitor the potential progression to hemorrhagic fever can influence the timely management of dengue-associated severe illness. Nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) antigen detection in acute serum specimens has been widely accepted as an early diagnostic assay for dengue infection; however, lower sensitivity of the NS1 antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Ag-ELISA) in secondary dengue viral infection has been reported. In this study, we developed two forms of Ag-ELISA capable of detecting E-Ag containing virion and virus-like particles, and secreted NS1 (sNS1) antigens, respectively. The temporal kinetics of viral RNA, sNS1, and E-Ag were evaluated based on the in vitro infection experiment. Meanwhile, a panel of 62 DENV-2 infected patients' sera was tested. The sensitivity was 3.042 ng/mL and 3.840 ng/mL for sNS1 and E, respectively. The temporal kinetics of the appearance of viral RNA, E, NS1, and infectious virus in virus-infected tissue culture media suggested that viral RNAs and NS1 antigens could be detected earlier than E-Ag and infectious virus. Furthermore, a panel of 62 sera from patients infected by DENV Serotype 2 was tested. Treating clinical specimens with the dissociation buffer increased the detectable level of E from 13% to 92% and NS1 antigens from 40% to 85%. Inclusion of a low-pH glycine buffer treatment step in the commercially available Ag-ELISA is crucial for clinical diagnosis and E-containing viral particles could be a valuable target for acute DENV diagnosis, similar to NS1 detection. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Evaluation of Selected Borrelia burgdorferi lp54 Plasmid-Encoded Gene Products Expressed during Mammalian Infection as Antigens To Improve Serodiagnostic Testing for Early Lyme Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Zachary P.; Crew, Rebecca M.; Brandt, Kevin S.; Ullmann, Amy J.; Schriefer, Martin E.; Molins, Claudia R.

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory testing for the diagnosis of Lyme disease is performed primarily by serologic assays and is accurate for detection beyond the acute stage of the infection. Serodiagnostic assays to detect the early stages of infection, however, are limited in their sensitivity, and improvement is warranted. We analyzed a series of Borrelia burgdorferi proteins known to be induced within feeding ticks and/or during mammalian infection for their utility as serodiagnostic markers against a comprehensive panel of Lyme disease patient serum samples. The antigens were assayed for IgM and IgG reactivity in line immunoblots and separately by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), with a focus on reactivity against early Lyme disease with erythema migrans (EM), early disseminated Lyme neuroborreliosis, and early Lyme carditis patient serum samples. By IgM immunoblotting, we found that recombinant proteins BBA65, BBA70, and BBA73 reacted with early Lyme EM samples at levels comparable to those of the OspC antigen used in the current IgM blotting criteria. Additionally, these proteins reacted with serum samples from patients with early neuroborreliosis and early carditis, suggesting value in detecting early stages of this disease progression. We also found serological reactivity against recombinant proteins BBA69 and BBA73 with early-Lyme-disease samples using IgG immunoblotting and ELISA. Significantly, some samples that had been scored negative by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-recommended 2-tiered testing algorithm demonstrated positive reactivity to one or more of the antigens by IgM/IgG immunoblot and ELISA. These results suggest that incorporating additional in vivo-expressed antigens into the current IgM/IgG immunoblotting tier in a recombinant protein platform assay may improve the performance of early-Lyme-disease serologic testing. PMID:26376927

  4. The Transformational Qualities of Dramatic Arts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Gardner Salazar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available During the International Drama and Education Association (IDEA Congress in Kenya in 1998, the life of two educators crossed roads. Although both are from different geographical contexts (Colombia and the United States, they have shared the same passion: to encourage in their societies the implementation of dramatic arts in different educational settings (schools, universities, communities so children and adults could develop to their fullest, thus enabling them to participate actively in building a more democratic society. Fifteen years after this encounter, they met again in the 2013 IDEA Congress in Paris to reflect on their efforts during their life spans. Through examining their drama practices, they discuss how this human expression functions as a critical thinking art form, changing players, audiences, and communities. Lessons derived from their experiences might be useful for a new generation of transformational drama leaders.

  5. The dramatic extraction construction in French

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Abeillé

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Relying on spoken corpora (Corpaix, CRFP and on previous studies (Sabio 1995, 1996, we identify a construction common in spoken French, which we analyze as a particular case of extraction:a. dix sept ans il a. (Seventeen years he has [Corpaix]b. deux cigarettes j'ai fumé. (Two cigarettes I smoked [on the fly]The construction can only be a root clause and a declarative clause. Its interpretation is that of a thetic proposition. On the other hand, it is not associated with a unique information structure, since it is compatible with a focus-ground partition, with the extracted constotunet as a narrow focus, or with an all focus interpretation. We call this construction ‘dramatic extraction’, and the extracted element a ‘center’ (i.e. a focus or a figure. We formalize our analysis in the HPSG grammar.

  6. [Dramatic increase of gender dysphoria in youth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisén, Louise; Söder, Olle; Rydelius, Per-Anders

    2017-02-22

    Dramatic increase of gender dysphoria in youth In the past decade there has been a dramatic increase in the number of young people with gender dysphoria seeking help for gender-confirming medical interventions. From a situation of no more than a few patients annually, there were almost 200 referrals of gender dysphoria to the Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital in 2016. This child and adolescent psychiatric unit has the whole country as a catchment area for patients Gender-confirming medical interventions are regulated by a special law that sets a minimum age for legal and surgical gender reassignment to 18 years. The law, which is under revision, does not prevent medical investigations, hormonal therapy, and some surgical procedures before the age of 18. Gender dysphoria is defined as a persistent desire to live and be accepted as the opposite sex, usually accompanied by a perceived inconsistency with the sex assigned at birth and a desire to change the body in accordance with the perceived sex. The cause is unknown despite attempts of etiological mapping including genetic analyses, hormonal studies and modern brain imaging techniques. Repeated studies have shown that only a minority (about 20 %) of prepubertal children with gender dysphoria will have a persistent desire for later gender-confirming medical interventions, while the majority of those whose gender dysphoria is reinforced during puberty will later meet the diagnostic criteria for gender dysphoria (DSM-5) and transsexualism (ICD-10) (so called persisters). Persisters can be offered treatment with puberty stopping hormones to avoid the development of undesirable secondary sexual characteristics. Gender-confirming medical interventions are the only recommended treatment for gender dysphoria, and early treatment facilitates the ability to successfully pass in the desired sex, which is associated with a significantly better prognosis.

  7. Immunotherapy of acute leukemia by chimeric antigen receptor-modified lymphocytes using an improved Sleeping Beauty transposon platform

    OpenAIRE

    Magnani, Chiara F.; Turazzi, Nice; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Calabria, Andrea; Tenderini, Erika; Tettamanti, Sarah; Attianese, Greta M.P. Giordano; Cooper, Laurence J.N.; Aiuti, Alessandro; Montini, Eugenio; Biondi, Andrea; Biagi, Ettore

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T-cell adoptive immunotherapy is a remarkable therapeutic option proven effective in the treatment of hematological malignancies. In order to optimize cell manufacturing, we sought to develop a novel clinical-grade protocol to obtain CAR-modified cytokine-induced killer cells (CIKs) using the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system. Administration of irradiated PBMCs overcame cell death of stimulating cells induced by non-viral transfection, enabling ro...

  8. Therapeutic application of human leukocyte antigen-G1 improves atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Naoyoshi; Yamada, Chisato; Takahashi, Ami; Kuroki, Kimiko; Maenaka, Katsumi

    2017-09-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G is an immune checkpoint molecule that plays critical roles in immune response and in triggering inhibitory signaling to immune cells such as T cells, natural killer cells, and antigen-presenting cells. Thus, the application of HLA-G can be considered for treating immune response-related inflammatory disorders. We have previously reported that treatment with HLA-G1 and HLA-G2 ameliorates the joint swelling associated with collagen-induced arthritis of DBA/1 mice, an animal model for rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, we further investigated the effects of HLA-G1 on atopic dermatitis (AD), the most common inflammatory skin disorder. AD-like lesions were induced with the extract of the house dust mite Dermatophagoides farinae in NC/Nga mice. Continuous administration of HLA-G1 ameliorated the AD-like skin lesions in the mice. Furthermore, production of immunoglobulin E, interleukin (IL)-13, and IL-17A was significantly reduced in HLA-G1-treated mice, suggesting a Th2/Th17-mediated immune-inhibitory function of HLA-G1 in vivo. Our studies shed light on novel therapeutic strategies with recombinant HLA-G proteins for immune reaction-mediated chronic inflammatory disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Dramatic Advance in Quality in Flexographic Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Richter

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The enormous changes in flexography printing in recent years concerning the printing quality achievable cannot generally be ascribed to a single revolutionary invention, but are the result of continuous developments to the complete system. Thus the direct drive technology in all machine types and its associated advantages in terms of printing length corrections has become established since drupa 2000. The race for ever finer raster rolls has also been completed to the benefit of improvements in bowl geometry and in ceramic surfaces. Clearly improved colour transfer behaviour has become feasible as a result. In a closely intermeshed system such as flexography printing this naturally has to have an effect on the printing colours used. Further improvements in bonding agents and pigment concentrations now allow users to print ever thinner colour layers while maintaining all of the required authenticities.Furthermore, it has become possible to reduce additional disturbing characteristics in the UV colour area, such as the unpleasant odour. While the digital imaging of printing plates has primarily been improved in terms of economic efficiency by the use of up to eight parallel laser beams, extreme improvements in the system are noticeable especially in the area of directly engraved printing moulds. Whereas many still dismissed directly engraved polymer plates at the last drupa as a laboratory system, the first installation was recently placed on the market a mere three years later. A further noteworthy innovation of recent years that has reached market maturity is thin sleeve technology, which combines the advantages of a photopolymer plate with a round imaged printing mould. There are no high sleeve costs for each printing mould, except for one-off cost for an adapter sleeve. To conclude, it can be said that although flexography printing has experienced many new features in the time between drupa 2000 and today, it still has enormous potential for

  10. Affinity improvement of a therapeutic antibody by structure-based computational design: generation of electrostatic interactions in the transition state stabilizes the antibody-antigen complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Kiyoshi

    Full Text Available The optimization of antibodies is a desirable goal towards the development of better therapeutic strategies. The antibody 11K2 was previously developed as a therapeutic tool for inflammatory diseases, and displays very high affinity (4.6 pM for its antigen the chemokine MCP-1 (monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1. We have employed a virtual library of mutations of 11K2 to identify antibody variants of potentially higher affinity, and to establish benchmarks in the engineering of a mature therapeutic antibody. The most promising candidates identified in the virtual screening were examined by surface plasmon resonance to validate the computational predictions, and to characterize their binding affinity and key thermodynamic properties in detail. Only mutations in the light-chain of the antibody are effective at enhancing its affinity for the antigen in vitro, suggesting that the interaction surface of the heavy-chain (dominated by the hot-spot residue Phe101 is not amenable to optimization. The single-mutation with the highest affinity is L-N31R (4.6-fold higher affinity than wild-type antibody. Importantly, all the single-mutations showing increase affinity incorporate a charged residue (Arg, Asp, or Glu. The characterization of the relevant thermodynamic parameters clarifies the energetic mechanism. Essentially, the formation of new electrostatic interactions early in the binding reaction coordinate (transition state or earlier benefits the durability of the antibody-antigen complex. The combination of in silico calculations and thermodynamic analysis is an effective strategy to improve the affinity of a matured therapeutic antibody.

  11. Improving influenza virological surveillance in Europe: strain-based reporting of antigenic and genetic characterisation data, 11 European countries, influenza season 2013/14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broberg, Eeva; Hungnes, Olav; Schweiger, Brunhilde; Prosenc, Katarina; Daniels, Rod; Guiomar, Raquel; Ikonen, Niina; Kossyvakis, Athanasios; Pozo, Francisco; Puzelli, Simona; Thomas, Isabelle; Waters, Allison; Wiman, Åsa; Meijer, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Influenza antigenic and genetic characterisation data are crucial for influenza vaccine composition decision making. Previously, aggregate data were reported to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control by European Union/European Economic Area (EU/EEA) countries. A system for collecting case-specific influenza antigenic and genetic characterisation data was established for the 2013/14 influenza season. In a pilot study, 11 EU/EEA countries reported through the new mechanism. We demonstrated feasibility of reporting strain-based antigenic and genetic data and ca 10% of influenza virus-positive specimens were selected for further characterisation. Proportions of characterised virus (sub)types were similar to influenza virus circulation levels. The main genetic clades were represented by A/StPetersburg/27/2011(H1N1)pdm09 and A/Texas/50/2012(H3N2). A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses were more prevalent in age groups (by years) viruses were most prevalent in those ≥ 65 years (62%*; p = 0.0012). Hospitalised patients in the age groups 6–19 years (67%; p = 0.0494) and ≥ 65 years (52%; p = 0.0005) were more frequently infected by A/Texas/50/2012 A(H3N2)-like viruses compared with hospitalised cases in other age groups. Strain-based reporting enabled deeper understanding of influenza virus circulation among hospitalised patients and substantially improved the reporting of virus characterisation data. Therefore, strain-based reporting of readily available data is recommended to all reporting countries within the EU/EEA. PMID:27762211

  12. Improving Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guèrin as a vaccine delivery vector for viral antigens by incorporation of glycolipid activators of NKT cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjunatha M Venkataswamy

    Full Text Available Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guèrin (rBCG has been explored as a vector for vaccines against HIV because of its ability to induce long lasting humoral and cell mediated immune responses. To maximize the potential for rBCG vaccines to induce effective immunity against HIV, various strategies are being employed to improve its ability to prime CD8+ T cells, which play an important role in the control of HIV infections. In this study we adopted a previously described approach of incorporating glycolipids that activate CD1d-restricted natural killer T (NKT cells to enhance priming of CD8+ T cells by rBCG strains expressing an SIV Gag antigen (rBCG-SIV gag. We found that the incorporation of the synthetic NKT activating glycolipid α-galactosylceramide (α-GC into rBCG-SIV gag significantly enhanced CD8+ T cell responses against an immunodominant Gag epitope, compared to responses primed by unmodified rBCG-SIV gag. The abilities of structural analogues of α-GC to enhance CD8+ T cell responses to rBCG were compared in both wild type and partially humanized mice that express human CD1d molecules in place of mouse CD1d. These studies identified an α-GC analogue known as 7DW8-5, which has previously been used successfully as an adjuvant in non-human primates, as a promising compound for enhancing immunogenicity of antigens delivered by rBCG.vectors. Our findings support the incorporation of synthetic glycolipid activators of NKT cells as a novel approach to enhance the immunogenicity of rBCG-vectored antigens for induction of CD8+ T cell responses. The glycolipid adjuvant 7DW8-5 may be a promising candidate for advancing to non-human primate and human clinical studies for the development of HIV vaccines based on rBCG vectors.

  13. Improving Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guèrin as a vaccine delivery vector for viral antigens by incorporation of glycolipid activators of NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M; Ng, Tony W; Kharkwal, Shalu S; Carreño, Leandro J; Johnson, Alison J; Kunnath-Velayudhan, Shajo; Liu, Zheng; Bittman, Robert; Jervis, Peter J; Cox, Liam R; Besra, Gurdyal S; Wen, Xiangshu; Yuan, Weiming; Tsuji, Moriya; Li, Xiangming; Ho, David D; Chan, John; Lee, Sunhee; Frothingham, Richard; Haynes, Barton F; Panas, Michael W; Gillard, Geoffrey O; Sixsmith, Jaimie D; Korioth-Schmitz, Birgit; Schmitz, Joern E; Larsen, Michelle H; Jacobs, William R; Porcelli, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guèrin (rBCG) has been explored as a vector for vaccines against HIV because of its ability to induce long lasting humoral and cell mediated immune responses. To maximize the potential for rBCG vaccines to induce effective immunity against HIV, various strategies are being employed to improve its ability to prime CD8+ T cells, which play an important role in the control of HIV infections. In this study we adopted a previously described approach of incorporating glycolipids that activate CD1d-restricted natural killer T (NKT) cells to enhance priming of CD8+ T cells by rBCG strains expressing an SIV Gag antigen (rBCG-SIV gag). We found that the incorporation of the synthetic NKT activating glycolipid α-galactosylceramide (α-GC) into rBCG-SIV gag significantly enhanced CD8+ T cell responses against an immunodominant Gag epitope, compared to responses primed by unmodified rBCG-SIV gag. The abilities of structural analogues of α-GC to enhance CD8+ T cell responses to rBCG were compared in both wild type and partially humanized mice that express human CD1d molecules in place of mouse CD1d. These studies identified an α-GC analogue known as 7DW8-5, which has previously been used successfully as an adjuvant in non-human primates, as a promising compound for enhancing immunogenicity of antigens delivered by rBCG.vectors. Our findings support the incorporation of synthetic glycolipid activators of NKT cells as a novel approach to enhance the immunogenicity of rBCG-vectored antigens for induction of CD8+ T cell responses. The glycolipid adjuvant 7DW8-5 may be a promising candidate for advancing to non-human primate and human clinical studies for the development of HIV vaccines based on rBCG vectors.

  14. The Challenges and Prospects of Teaching and Learning Dramatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dramatic education is an all-inclusive academic discipline which uses as tools branches of learning that bear upon the dramatic impulse. It utilizes eclectically each and every single discipline into one unified body of knowledge, so that it can help man to comprehend the nature of experience. Educational drama or Dramatic ...

  15. Human Leukocyte Antigen-G: A Promising Prognostic Marker of Disease Progression to Improve the Control of Human African Trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gineau, Laure; Courtin, David; Camara, Mamadou; Ilboudo, Hamidou; Jamonneau, Vincent; Dias, Fabricio C; Tokplonou, Leonidas; Milet, Jacqueline; Mendonça, Priscila B; Castelli, Erick C; Camara, Oumou; Camara, Mariam; Favier, Benoit; Rouas-Freiss, Nathalie; Moreau, Philippe; Donadi, Eduardo A; Bucheton, Bruno; Sabbagh, Audrey; Garcia, André

    2016-11-01

     Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense can be diagnosed in the early hemolymphatic stage (stage 1 [S1]) or meningoencephalitic stage (stage 2 [S2]). Importantly, individuals harbouring high and specific antibody responses to Tbg antigens but negative parasitology are also diagnosed in the field (seropositive [SERO]). Whereas some develop the disease in the months following their initial diagnosis (SERO/HAT), others remain parasitologically negative for long periods (SERO) and are apparently able to control infection. Human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-G, an immunosuppressive molecule, could play a critical role in this variability of progression between infection and disease.  Soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) was measured in plasma for patients in the SERO (n = 65), SERO/HAT (n = 14), or HAT (n = 268) group and in cerebrospinal fluid for patients in S1 (n = 55), early S2 (n = 93), or late S2 (n = 110). Associations between these different statuses and the soluble level or genetic polymorphisms of HLA-G were explored.  Plasma sHLA-G levels were significantly higher in HAT (P = 6 × 10 -7 ) and SERO/HAT (P = .007) than SERO patients. No difference was observed between the SERO/HAT and HAT groups. Within the HAT group, specific haplotypes (HG010102 and HG0103) displayed increased frequencies in S1 (P = .013) and late S2 (P = .036), respectively.  These results strongly suggest the involvement of HLA-G in HAT disease progression. Importantly, high plasma sHLA-G levels in SERO patients could be predictive of subsequent disease development and could represent a serological marker to help guide therapeutic decision making. Further studies are necessary to assess the predictive nature of HLA-G and to estimate both sensitivity and specificity. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Using dramatic role-play to develop emotional aptitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Dinapoli

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available As university educators, we need to prepare students for the transition from the information age to what Daniel H. Pink (2005 calls the conceptual age, which is governed by artistry, empathy and emotion, by including in the curricula activities that stimulate both hemispheres of the brain. This can be done by promoting activities that energize what Daniel Goleman (1995 refers to as emotional intelligence, and it further maintains that, as Paul Ekman (2003 suggests, the ability to detect feelings improves communication. Recognizing the need to include in the curricula procedures that help develop students’ right brain aptitudes and enhance their communication skills, I have endeavoured to introduce dramatic scene study as a sustained activity in my English for Specific Purposes courses at the Universidad de Valencia. My aim was to energize the students’ creative and emotional aptitudes, as well as to dynamize effective teamwork. This article sustains that dramatic role-play, based on scripted scene study and related improvisational activities, is one way of achieving this.

  17. Immunotherapy of acute leukemia by chimeric antigen receptor-modified lymphocytes using an improved Sleeping Beauty transposon platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnani, Chiara F; Turazzi, Nice; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Calabria, Andrea; Tenderini, Erika; Tettamanti, Sarah; Giordano Attianese, Greta M P; Cooper, Laurence J N; Aiuti, Alessandro; Montini, Eugenio; Biondi, Andrea; Biagi, Ettore

    2016-08-09

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T-cell adoptive immunotherapy is a remarkable therapeutic option proven effective in the treatment of hematological malignancies. In order to optimize cell manufacturing, we sought to develop a novel clinical-grade protocol to obtain CAR-modified cytokine-induced killer cells (CIKs) using the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system. Administration of irradiated PBMCs overcame cell death of stimulating cells induced by non-viral transfection, enabling robust gene transfer together with efficient T-cell expansion. Upon single stimulation, we reached an average of 60% expression of CD123- and CD19- specific 3rd generation CARs (CD28/OX40/TCRzeta). Furthermore, modified cells displayed persistence of cell subsets with memory phenotype, specific and effective lytic activity against leukemic cell lines and primary blasts, cytokine secretion, and proliferation. Adoptive transfer of CD123.CAR or CD19.CAR lymphocytes led to a significant anti-tumor response against acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) disseminated diseases in NSG mice. Notably, we found no evidence of integration enrichment near cancer genes and transposase expression at the end of the differentiation. Taken all together, our findings describe a novel donor-derived non-viral CAR approach that may widen the repertoire of available methods for T cell-based immunotherapy.

  18. Novel ISCOMs from Quillaja brasiliensis saponins induce mucosal and systemic antibody production, T-cell responses and improved antigen uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Mourglia-Ettlin, Gustavo; Teixeira, Thais Fumaco; Quirici, Lenora; Roehe, Paulo Michel; Ferreira, Fernando; Silveira, Fernando

    2016-02-24

    In the last decades, significant efforts have been dedicated to the search for novel vaccine adjuvants. In this regard, saponins and its formulations as "immunostimulating complexes" (ISCOMs) have shown to be capable of stimulating potent humoral and cellular immune responses, enhanced cytokine production and activation of cytotoxic T cells. The immunological activity of ISCOMs formulated with a saponin fraction extracted from Quillaja brasiliensis (QB-90 fraction) as an alternative to classical ISCOMs based on Quil A(®) (IQA) is presented here. The ISCOMs prepared with QB-90, named IQB-90, typically consist of 40-50 nm, spherical, cage-like particles, built up by QB-90, cholesterol, phospholipids and antigen (ovalbumin, OVA). These nanoparticles were efficiently uptaken in vitro by murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Subcutaneously inoculated IQB-90 induced strong serum antibody responses encompassing specific IgG1 and IgG2a, robust DTH reactions, significant T cell proliferation and increases in Th1 (IFN-γ and IL-2) cytokine responses. Intranasally delivered IQB-90 elicited serum IgG and IgG1, and mucosal IgA responses at distal systemic sites (nasal passages, large intestine and vaginal lumen). These results indicate that IQB-90 is a promising alternative to classic ISCOMs as vaccine adjuvants, capable of enhancing humoral and cellular immunity to levels comparable to those induced by ISCOMs manufactured with Quillaja saponaria saponins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Combination of autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 and viral capsid antigen immunoglobulin A for improved detection of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yu-Hui; Xu, Yi-Wei; Qiu, Si-Qi; Hong, Chao-Qun; Zhai, Tian-Tian; Li, En-Min; Xu, Li-Yan

    2014-09-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is one of the most common malignant tumors in Southern China and Southeast Asia, and early detection remains a challenge. Autoantibodies have been found to precede the manifestations of symptomatic cancer by several months to years, making their identification of particular relevance for early detection. In the present study, the diagnostic value of serum autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 in NPC patients was evaluated. The study included 112 patients with NPC and 138 normal controls. Serum levels of autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 and classical Epstein-Barr virus marker, viral capsid antigen immunoglobulin A (VCA-IgA), were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Measurement of autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 and VCA-IgA demonstrated a sensitivity/specificity of 42.9/94.9% [95% confidence interval (CI), 33.7-52.6/89.4-97.8%] and 55.4/95.7% (95% CI, 45.7-64.7/90.4-98.2%), respectively. The area under receiver operating characteristic curve for autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 (0.821; 95% CI, 0.771-0.871) was marginally lower than that for VCA-IgA (0.860; 95% CI, 0.810-0.910) in NPC. The combination of autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 and VCA-IgA yielded an enhanced sensitivity of 80.4% (95% CI, 71.6-87.0%) and a specificity of 90.6% (95% CI, 84.1-94.7%). Moreover, detection of autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 could differentiate early-stage NPC patients from normal controls. Our results suggest that autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 may serve as a potential biomarker, as a supplement to VCA-IgA, for the screening and diagnosis of NPC.

  20. Phase II trial of anticarcinoembryonic antigen pretargeted radioimmunotherapy in progressive metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma: biomarker response and survival improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaun, Pierre-Yves; Campion, Loïc; Bournaud, Claire; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Vuillez, Jean-Philippe; Taieb, David; Ansquer, Catherine; Rousseau, Caroline; Borson-Chazot, Françoise; Bardet, Stéphane; Oudoux, Aurore; Cariou, Bertrand; Mirallié, Eric; Chang, Chien-Hsing; Sharkey, Robert M; Goldenberg, David M; Chatal, Jean-François; Barbet, Jacques; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise

    2012-08-01

    The prognosis of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) varies from long- to short-term survival based on such prognostic factors as serum calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) doubling times (DTs). This prospective phase II multicenter trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of anti-CEA pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (pRAIT) in rapidly progressing metastatic MTC patients and also how serum biomarker DTs correlate with clinical outcome. From June 2004 to January 2008, 42 patients were treated with anti-CEA × anti-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) bispecific antibody (hMN-14 × m734) (40 mg/m(2)), followed by (131)I-di-DTPA-indium bivalent hapten (1.8 GBq/m(2)) 4-6 d later. The disease control rate (durable stabilization plus objective response) was 76.2%. Grade 3-4 hematologic toxicity was observed in 54.7% of patients and myelodysplastic syndrome in 2, including 1 heavily treated previously. After pRAIT, 21 of 37 assessed patients (56.7%) showed a significant impact on DT (≥100% increase of pre-pRAIT calcitonin or CEA DT or prolonged decrease of the biomarker concentration after pRAIT). Pre-pRAIT DT and post-pRAIT DT were significant independent predictors for overall survival (OS) from pRAIT (pre-pRAIT: hazard ratio [HR], 0.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.24-0.86; P = 0.016; and post-pRAIT: HR, 5.32; 95% CI, 1.63-17.36; P = 0.006) and OS from diagnosis (pre-pRAIT: HR, 0.21; 95% CI, 0.08-0.51; P = 0.001; and post-pRAIT: HR, 6.16; 95% CI, 1.81-20.98; P = 0.004). pRAIT showed antitumor activity, with manageable hematologic toxicity in progressive MTC. Increased biomarker DT after treatment correlated with increased OS.

  1. Loss of T Cell Antigen Recognition Arising from Changes in Peptide and Major Histocompatibility Complex Protein Flexibility: Implications for Vaccine Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Insaidoo, Francis K.; Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Hossain, Moushumi; Santhanagopolan, Sujatha M.; Baxter, Tiffany K.; Baker, Brian M. (Notre)

    2012-05-08

    Modification of the primary anchor positions of antigenic peptides to improve binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins is a commonly used strategy for engineering peptide-based vaccine candidates. However, such peptide modifications do not always improve antigenicity, complicating efforts to design effective vaccines for cancer and infectious disease. Here we investigated the MART-1{sub 27-35} tumor antigen, for which anchor modification (replacement of the position two alanine with leucine) dramatically reduces or ablates antigenicity with a wide range of T cell clones despite significantly improving peptide binding to MHC. We found that anchor modification in the MART-1{sub 27-35} antigen enhances the flexibility of both the peptide and the HLA-A*0201 molecule. Although the resulting entropic effects contribute to the improved binding of the peptide to MHC, they also negatively impact T cell receptor binding to the peptide {center_dot} MHC complex. These results help explain how the 'anchor-fixing' strategy fails to improve antigenicity in this case, and more generally, may be relevant for understanding the high specificity characteristic of the T cell repertoire. In addition to impacting vaccine design, modulation of peptide and MHC flexibility through changes to antigenic peptides may present an evolutionary strategy for the escape of pathogens from immune destruction.

  2. Microneedle arrays coated with charge reversal pH-sensitive copolymers improve antigen presenting cells-homing DNA vaccine delivery and immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Huu Thuy Trang; Kim, Nak Won; Thambi, Thavasyappan; Giang Phan, V H; Lee, Min Sang; Yin, Yue; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Lee, Doo Sung

    2018-01-10

    Successful delivery of a DNA vaccine to antigen-presenting cells and their subsequent stimulation of CD4 + and CD8 + T cell immunity remains an inefficient process. In general, the delivery of prophylactic vaccines is mainly mired by low transfection efficacy, poor immunogenicity, and safety issues from the materials employed. Currently, several strategies have been exploited to improve immunogenicity, but an effective strategy for safe and pain-free delivery of DNA vaccines is complicated. Herein, we report the rapid delivery of polyplex-based DNA vaccines using microneedle arrays coated with a polyelectrolyte multilayer assembly of charge reversal pH-responsive copolymer and heparin. The charge reversal pH-responsive copolymer, composed of oligo(sulfamethazine)-b-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(amino urethane) (OSM-b-PEG-b-PAEU), was used as a triggering layer in the polyelectrolyte multilayer assembly on microneedles. Charge reversal characteristics of this copolymer, that is, the OSM-b-PEG-b-PAEU copolymer exhibit, positive charge at low pH (pH4.03) and becoming negative charge when exposed to physiological pH conditions (pH7.4), allowing the facile assembly and disassembly of polyelectrolyte multilayers. The electrostatic repulsion between heparin and OSM-b-PEG-b-PAEU charge reversal copolymer triggered the release of DNA vaccines. DNA vaccines laden on microneedles are effectively transfected into RAW 264.7 macrophage cells in vitro. Vaccination of BALB/c mice by DNA vaccine-loaded microneedle arrays coated with a polyelectrolyte multilayer generated antigen-specific robust immune responses. These findings provide potential strategy of charge reversal pH-responsive copolymers coated microneedles for DNA vaccine delivery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. A vegan diet free of gluten improves the signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis: the effects on arthritis correlate with a reduction in antibodies to food antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafström, I; Ringertz, B; Spångberg, A; von Zweigbergk, L; Brannemark, S; Nylander, I; Rönnelid, J; Laasonen, L; Klareskog, L

    2001-10-01

    Whether food intake can modify the course of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an issue of continued scientific and public interest. However, data from controlled clinical trials are sparse. We thus decided to study the clinical effects of a vegan diet free of gluten in RA and to quantify the levels of antibodies to key food antigens not present in the vegan diet. Sixty-six patients with active RA were randomized to either a vegan diet free of gluten (38 patients) or a well-balanced non-vegan diet (28 patients) for 1 yr. All patients were instructed and followed-up in the same manner. They were analysed at baseline and after 3, 6 and 12 months, according to the response criteria of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR). Furthermore, levels of antibodies against gliadin and beta-lactoglobulin were assessed and radiographs of the hands and feet were performed. Twenty-two patients in the vegan group and 25 patients in the non-vegan diet group completed 9 months or more on the diet regimens. Of these diet completers, 40.5% (nine patients) in the vegan group fulfilled the ACR20 improvement criteria compared with 4% (one patient) in the non-vegan group. Corresponding figures for the intention to treat populations were 34.3 and 3.8%, respectively. The immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody levels against gliadin and beta-lactoglobulin decreased in the responder subgroup in the vegan diet-treated patients, but not in the other analysed groups. No retardation of radiological destruction was apparent in any of the groups. The data provide evidence that dietary modification may be of clinical benefit for certain RA patients, and that this benefit may be related to a reduction in immunoreactivity to food antigens eliminated by the change in diet.

  4. A Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain That Improves Stimulation of Antigen-Presenting Cells Does Not Enhance Vaccine Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt, Deanna M.; O'Dee, Dawn M.; Horzempa, Joseph; Carlson, Paul E.; Russo, Brian C.; Bales, Jacqueline M.; Brown, Matthew J.; Nau, Gerard J.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination is a proven strategy to mitigate morbidity and mortality of infectious diseases. The methodology of identifying and testing new vaccine candidates could be improved with rational design and in vitro testing prior to animal experimentation. The tularemia vaccine, Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS), does not elicit complete protection against lethal challenge with a virulent type A Francisella strain. One factor that may contribute to this poor performance is limited s...

  5. Dramatically Enhanced Spin Dynamo with Plasmonic Diabolo Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Peng; Qian, Jie; Xi, Fuchun; Zou, Yuexin; Cao, Jun; Yu, Haochi; Zhao, Ziyi; Yang, Le; Xu, Jie; Wang, Hengliang; Zhang, Lijian; An, Zhenghua

    2017-07-13

    The applications of spin dynamos, which could potentially power complex nanoscopic devices, have so far been limited owing to their extremely low energy conversion efficiencies. Here, we present a unique plasmonic diabolo cavity (PDC) that dramatically improves the spin rectification signal (enhancement of more than three orders of magnitude) under microwave excitation; further, it enables an energy conversion efficiency of up to ~0.69 mV/mW, compared with ~0.27 μV/mW without a PDC. This remarkable improvement arises from the simultaneous enhancement of the microwave electric field (~13-fold) and the magnetic field (~195-fold), which cooperate in the spin precession process generates photovoltage (PV) efficiently under ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) conditions. The interplay of the microwave electromagnetic resonance and the ferromagnetic resonance originates from a hybridized mode based on the plasmonic resonance of the diabolo structure and Fabry-Perot-like modes in the PDC. Our work sheds light on how more efficient spin dynamo devices for practical applications could be realized and paves the way for future studies utilizing both artificial and natural magnetism for applications in many disciplines, such as for the design of future efficient wireless energy conversion devices, high frequent resonant spintronic devices, and magnonic metamaterials.

  6. dramatization of character in selected nigerian short stories

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Characterization in the short story endears the short story genre more to the conventions of the stage because of its dramatization of character. By paying strict attention to the manipulation of action and dialogue, the short story writer creates dramatic characters who illuminate setting, promote the plot and ultimately realize ...

  7. Topical application of Rosa multiflora root extract improves atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions induced by mite antigen in NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwan Hee; Jeong, Mi Sook; Park, Kwang Jun; Choi, Young Wook; Seo, Seong Jun; Lee, Min Won

    2014-01-01

    The roots of Rosa multiflora THUNB. (RM) has been used in oriental traditional medicines as remedies for scabies, rheumatic arthralgia and stomatitis which were practicably related with today's inflammatory and allergic diseases. In the present study, we evaluated whether RM root extract (RME) and its major constituent, 2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-6-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-8-(2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-2,3-trans-6,7-cis-7,8-trans-3,4,7,8-tetrahydro-2H,6H-pyrano[2,3-f] chromene-3,7,9-triol (RM-3) belongs to condensed tannins, improve atopic dermatitis (AD)-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice induced by mite antigen. Topical application of RME as well as RM-3 improved skin severity and suppressed mRNA levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) on skin tissues, in addition, significantly reduced T helper 2 (Th2) immune responses via interleukin 10 (IL-10) up-regulation. Thus, RME, contains lots of condensed tannins such as RM-3 which possesses potent anti-inflammtory and immune-modulatory effects, may be useful for treatment of skin allergies and can be developed as new alternative herbal therapy against AD.

  8. Redirected Primary Human Chimeric Antigen Receptor Natural Killer Cells As an “Off-the-Shelf Immunotherapy” for Improvement in Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf Oberschmidt

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary human natural killer (NK cells recognize and subsequently eliminate virus infected cells, tumor cells, or other aberrant cells. However, cancer cells are able to develop tumor immune escape mechanisms to undermine this immune control. To overcome this obstacle, NK cells can be genetically modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs in order to improve specific recognition of cancer surface markers (e.g., CD19, CD20, and ErbB2. After target recognition, intracellular CAR domain signaling (CD3ζ, CD28, 4-1BB, and 2B4 leads to activation of PI3K or DNAX proteins (DAP10, DAP12 and finally to enhanced cytotoxicity, proliferation, and/or interferon γ release. This mini-review summarizes both the first preclinical trials with CAR-engineered primary human NK cells and the translational implications for “off-the-shelf immunotherapy” in cancer treatment. Signal transduction in NK cells as well as optimization of CAR signaling will be described, becoming more and more a focal point of interest in addition to redirected T cells. Finally, strategies to overcome off-target effects will be discussed in order to improve future clinical trials and to avoid attacking healthy tissues.

  9. The classical dramatic text and its value in contemporary theatre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Žavbi Milojević

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the classical dramatic text and its staging in contemporary theatre. Specifically, it aims to show that classical texts can address topical issues. This is illustrated by the example of several stagings of Ivan Cankar’s Hlapci, one of the most influential dramatic texts in Slovene literature. The history of this dramatic text is presented from its first publication and reception to the different stagings in various Slovene professional theatres. The focus is on how the situation in Slovene society is reflected in each examined staging. The drama Hlapci was first staged almost one hundred years ago, when the staging followed closely the dramatic text. However, after 1980 stagings became more independent from the text and more artistic freedom was allowed. The paper will prove that classical dramatic texts are very appropriate for staging in contemporary theatre, especially with an innovative director’s approach.

  10. Improved diagnostic performance of a commercial anaplasma antibody competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using recombinant major surface protein 5–glutathione S-transferase fusion protein as antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study tested the hypothesis that removal of maltose binding protein from recombinant antigen used for plate coating would improve the specificity of Anaplasma antibody competitive ELISA. Three hundred and eight sera with significant MBP antibody binding (=30%I) in Anaplasma negative herds was 1...

  11. In vivo targeting of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus antigen through porcine DC-SIGN to dendritic cells elicits antigen-specific CD4T cell immunity in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Sakthivel; Piñeyro, Pablo; Tian, Debin; Overend, Christopher; Yugo, Danielle M; Matzinger, Shannon R; Rogers, Adam J; Haac, Mary Etna R; Cao, Qian; Heffron, C Lynn; Catanzaro, Nicholas; Kenney, Scott P; Huang, Yao-Wei; Opriessnig, Tanja; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2014-11-28

    Immunogenicity of protein subunit vaccines may be dramatically improved by targeting them through antibodies specific to c-type lectin receptors (CLRs) of dendritic cells in mice, cattle, and primates. This novel vaccine development approach has not yet been explored in pigs or other species largely due to the lack of key reagents. In this study, we demonstrate that porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) antigen was targeted efficiently to dendritic cells through antibodies specific to a porcine CLR molecule DC-SIGN (dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin) in pigs. A recombinant PRRSV antigen (shGP45M) was constructed by fusing secretory-competent subunits of GP4, GP5 and M proteins derived from genetically-shuffled strains of PRRSV. In vaccinated pigs, when the PRRSV shGP45M antigen was delivered through a recombinant mouse-porcine chimeric antibody specific to the porcine DC-SIGN (pDC-SIGN) neck domain, porcine dendritic cells rapidly internalized them in vitro and induced higher numbers of antigen-specific interferon-γ producing CD4T cells compared to the pigs receiving non-targeted PRRSV shGP45M antigen. The pDC-SIGN targeting of recombinant antigen subunits may serve as an alternative or complementary strategy to existing vaccines to improve protective immunity against PRRSV by inducing efficient T cell responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Measurement of aberrant glycosylation of prostate specific antigen can improve specificity in early detection of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneyama, Tohru; Ohyama, Chikara; Hatakeyama, Shingo; Narita, Shintaro; Habuchi, Tomonori; Koie, Takuya; Mori, Kazuyuki; Hidari, Kazuya I P J; Yamaguchi, Maho; Suzuki, Takashi; Tobisawa, Yuki

    2014-06-13

    We previously identified prostate cancer (PCa)-associated aberrant glycosylation of PSA, where α2,3-linked sialylation is an additional terminal N-glycan on free PSA (S2,3PSA). We then developed a new assay system measuring S2,3PSA using a magnetic microbead-based immunoassay. We compared the diagnostic accuracy of conventional PSA and percent-free PSA (%fPSA) tests. We used MagPlex beads to measure serum S2,3PSA levels using anti-human fPSA monoclonal antibody (8A6) for capture and anti-α2,3-linked sialic acid monoclonal antibody (HYB4) for detection. We determined the cutoff values in a training test and measured serum S2,3PSA levels in 314 patients who underwent biopsy, including 138 PCa and 176 non-PCa patients with PSA of presented as mean fluorescence intensity (MFI). Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of total PSA, %fPSA, and S2,3PSA. We determined an MFI cutoff value of 1130 with a sensitivity of 95.0% and specificity of 72.0% for the diagnosis of PCa in the training test. In the validation study, the area under the curve for the detection of PCa with S2,3PSA was 0.84, which was significantly higher than that with PSA or %fPSA. Although the present study is small and preliminary, these results suggest that the measurement of serum S2,3PSA using a magnetic microbead-based immunoassay may improve the accuracy of early detection of PCa and reduce unnecessary prostate biopsy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Carcinoma-associated antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartorelli, A.; Accinni, R.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to novel antigens associated with breast carcinoma, anti-sera specific to said antigens, 125 I-labeled forms of said antigens and methods of detecting said antigens in serum or plasma. The invention also relates to a diagnostic kit containing standardised antigens or antisera or marked forms thereof for the detection of said antigens in human blood, serum or plasma. (author)

  14. Dramatically enhanced electrical breakdown strength in cellulose nanopaper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwen Huang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Electrical breakdown behaviors of nanopaper prepared from nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC were investigated. Compared to conventional insulating paper made from micro softwood fibers, nanopaper has a dramatically enhanced breakdown strength. Breakdown field of nanopaper is 67.7 kV/mm, whereas that of conventional paper is only 20 kV/mm. Air voids in the surface of conventional paper are observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM. Further analyses using mercury intrusion show that pore diameter of conventional paper is around 1.7 μm, while that of nanopaper is below 3 nm. Specific pore size of nanopaper is determined to be approximately 2.8 nm by the gas adsorption technique. In addition, theoretical breakdown strengths of nanopaper and conventional paper are also calculated to evaluate the effect of pore size. It turns out that theoretical values agree well with experimental data, indicating that the improved strength in nanopaper is mainly attributed to the decreased pore size. Due to its outstanding breakdown strength, this study indicates the suitability of nanopaper for electrical insulation in ultra-high voltage convert transformers and other electrical devices.

  15. Theodramatic Rehearsal: Fighting Self-Deception through the Dramatic Imagination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Vaden

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to appropriate the insights of dramatic theology for Christian psychology and soul care. According to Kevin Vanhoozer, Scripture is the ‘script’ for human beings’ fitting participation in the acts and deeds of God in the world (i.e., ‘theodrama’. Keeping with this dramatic paradigm, the author will explore what ‘rehearsal’ might entail by drawing from a branch of psychotherapy called ‘psychodrama.’ The main question to be addressed in this appropriation of dramatic theology is, “How might dramatic rehearsal combat self-deception?” The author will only begin to answer this question, but in the attempt it is hoped that further reflection and clarity will be induced.

  16. Grieg: Songs and dramatic works with orchestra. / Alan Blyth

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Blyth, Alan

    1993-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Grieg: Songs and dramatic works with orchestra. Barbara Bonney, Randi Stene, Hakan Hagegard, Ruth Tellefsen, Gothenburg Symphony Chorus and Orchestra, Neeme Järvi." CD 437 519 - 2GH

  17. Video Taping and Abnormal Psychology: Dramatized Clinical Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Michael J.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Students in an abnormal psychology course worked in teams to produce dramatizations of diagnostic interviews and then presented them in class. Positive and negative aspects of the activity are discussed. (RM)

  18. Dramatic Increases in Maternal Opioid Use and Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome Dramatic Increases in Maternal Opioid Use and Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome Email Facebook Twitter Text Description of Infographic Use of opiates during pregnancy can result in a drug withdrawal syndrome in newborns called neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). ...

  19. ANTIGENIC PROMOTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chin-Yu; Cinader, Bernard

    1971-01-01

    Rabbits were immunized with p-azobenzene arsonic acid derivatives of human serum albumin (HA-As) or of dissociated keyhole limpet hemocyanin. The IgM response to the hapten was evaluated in terms of the number of hapten-specific plaque-forming cells in the lymph node draining the injection site. In some experiments, antibody was measured by agglutination of tanned and sensitized erythrocytes. The hapten response of animals immunized with HA-As was increased (promoting effect) when the animals were injected with one of several structurally unrelated macromolecules: keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), horse spleen ferritin (HSF), lysozyme (Lys), alum-precipitated human gamma globulin (alum-precipitated HGG). Different macromolecules differed in the magnitude of the promoting effect they induced, e.g., promotion by the associated form of KLH was greater than that by the dissociated form; alum-precipitated HGG was a better promoter than was soluble HGG. The relative magnitude of promotion by different macromolecules (associated vs. dissociated KLH, alum-precipitated vs. soluble HGG) correlated with the relative magnitude of the carrier effect, as judged by the hapten response induced by p-azobenzene arsonic acid conjugated to various proteins. Promotion was detected by agglutination assay of circulating antibody, by plaque assay of cells from the popliteal lymph node draining the site of preinjection, but not by plaque assay of cells from the contralateral lymph node. Promotion was dependent on the dose of the promoting macromolecule and on the dose of the hapten-protein conjugate. It was not observed in animals tolerant to the promoting macromolecule. Inhibition (i.e. antigenic competition), rather than promotion, was observed upon a secondary response to the preinjected macromolecule or when the hapten-protein conjugate was incorporated in Freund's adjuvant. PMID:15776570

  20. Socio-Dramatic Affective-Relational Intervention for Adolescents with Asperger Syndrome & High Functioning Autism: Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Matthew D.; Mikami, Amori Yee; Levine, Karen

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a novel intervention called "socio-dramatic affective-relational intervention" (SDARI), intended to improve social skills among adolescents with Asperger syndrome and high functioning autism diagnoses. SDARI adapts dramatic training activities to focus on in vivo practice of areas of social skill…

  1. Phage display aided improvement of a unique prostate-specific antigen (PSA) antibody unreactive with Lys(145)-Lys(146) internally cleaved forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liton, Md Ferdhos Khan; Peltola, Mari T; Vehniäinen, Markus; Kuusela, Erica; Pettersson, Tiina; Lamminmäki, Urpo; Pettersson, Kim; Brockmann, Eeva-Christine

    2015-07-01

    Prostate specific antigen (PSA) is a commonly used marker of prostate cancer. A panel of four kallikrein immunoassays has been reported to improve the prediction of prostate biopsy outcome (cancer vs benign) in men with elevated PSA in the circulation. Assay of one of the kallikrein forms, intact free PSA (fPSA-I), is based on a unique monoclonal antibody (4D4), which is specific for PSA without the internal cleavage at Lys(145)-Lys(146). Due to high dissociation rate the 4D4 antibody is less than optimal for achieving a highly sensitive robust assay. In this study, we cloned the 4D4 Mab into a recombinant fragment (Fab) format and constructed three mutant libraries with the aim to increase its binding affinity. The libraries contained targeted mutations either in the CDR-H1, CDR-H2 or CDR-L3 region. PSA-I specific antibodies were enriched from the libraries by phage display technology. We identified fourteen unique clones with 1-5 mutated amino acids showing reduced dissociation of the PSA conjugate compared to the wt-4D4 Fab. Five of these mutant antibodies had 2-6 times higher binding affinity compared to the wt-4D4 Fab yet retaining the original specificity for PSA-I. The analytical sensitivity of fPSA-I assay with mutant L3-2 Fab was 0.12 μg/L compared to 4.46 μg/L with the original wt-4D4 Fab. In the method comparison study, the developed assay showed an excellent correlation to the existing fPSA-I assay. The high affinity and specificity of these mutant antibodies have potential to provide sensitive and robust detection of intact and nicked PSA from patient samples in different test formats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Narrative and Dramatic Structure in Plato\\'s Dialogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Pourelm

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Plato did not allow many artists and poets into his Utopia Republic because of their bad and misleading influence on the young. But it seems that he learned storytelling and narrating from them and concealed what he learned beneath his philosophy. Thus, Plato's dialogues became more effective and gained aesthetic and artistic qualities. Theaetetus, one of the best known dialogues of Plato, is a conversation and discussion about episteme. Due to using classical dramatic structure, this dialogue is the most important dialogue with regard to dramatization of philosophical thoughts. The goal of this article is to study the dramatic structure of Plato's dialogues and show its potentials for interaction with narrative theories. It could be said that Plato's dialogues have many resemblances to the Greek drama and, today, we can call Plato a playwright. Thus, it is important and necessary to reread and reevaluate Plato's works via narratological view.

  3. Content familiarity, attitude and achievement in dramatic literature-in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study adopted a descriptive survey design. Three hundred and four students of Literature-in-English language, purposively and randomly selected, were involved in the study. Four research questions guided this study. The instruments used were Dramatic Literature-in-English Achievement Test (DLEAT), Content ...

  4. To Say and Not to Say: Skills of Dramatic Play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giffin, Holly

    1990-01-01

    Identifies metacommunication strategies with which preschool children negotiate meanings during dramatic play. Finds behaviors ranging from those which overtly expose the play frame to those which operate within the play frame. Proposes a system of implicit rules, indigenous to the child culture, which guide choice of strategy. (SR)

  5. Use of Bilingual/Bicultural Education and Dramatization as Ancillary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We found that Deaf and Hard of hearing learners who were exposed to instructional methods and strategies in the American Sign Language/English bilingual methods and dramatization performed exceptionally better than those taught using the Total Communication approach. Keywords: Special education, demonstration ...

  6. Formaldehyde scavengers function as novel antigen retrieval agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollert, Craig T.; Moree, Wilna J.; Gregory, Steven; Bark, Steven J.; Eriksen, Jason L.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen retrieval agents improve the detection of formaldehyde-fixed proteins, but how they work is not well understood. We demonstrate that formaldehyde scavenging represents a key characteristic associated with effective antigen retrieval; under controlled temperature and pH conditions, scavenging improves the typical antigen retrieval process through reversal of formaldehyde-protein adduct formation. This approach provides a rational framework for the identification and development of more effective antigen retrieval agents. PMID:26612041

  7. Assessment of CD37 B-cell antigen and cell of origin significantly improves risk prediction in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu-Monette, Z.Y.; Li, L; Byrd, J.C.; Jabbar, K.J.; Manyam, G.C.; Winde, C. Maria de; Brand, M. van den; Tzankov, A.; Visco, C.; Wang, J; Dybkaer, K.; Chiu, A.; Orazi, A.; Zu, Y.; Bhagat, G.; Richards, K.L.; Hsi, E.D.; Choi, W.W.; Huh, J.; Ponzoni, M.; Ferreri, A.J.; Moller, M.B.; Parsons, B.M.; Winter, J.N.; Wang, M.; Hagemeister, F.B.; Piris, M.A.; Krieken, J.H. van; Medeiros, L.J.; Li, Y.; Spriel, A.B. van; Young, K.H.

    2016-01-01

    CD37 (tetraspanin TSPAN26) is a B-cell surface antigen widely expressed on mature B cells. CD37 is involved in immune regulation and tumor suppression but its function has not been fully elucidated. We assessed CD37 expression in de novo diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), and investigated its

  8. Improving the malaria transmission-blocking activity of a Plasmodium falciparum 48/45 based vaccine antigen by SpyTag/SpyCatcher mediated virus-like display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Susheel K; Thrane, Susan; Janitzek, Christoph M

    2017-01-01

    Malaria is a devastating disease caused by Plasmodium parasites, resulting in almost 0.5 million deaths per year. The Pfs48/45 protein exposed on the P. falciparum sexual stages is one of the most advanced antigen candidates for a transmission-blocking (TB) vaccine in the clinical pipeline. However...

  9. Improved serodiagnosis of bovine brucellosis by novel synthetic oligosaccharide antigens representing the capping m epitope elements of Brucella O-polysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGiven, John; Howells, Laurence; Duncombe, Lucy; Stack, Judy; Ganesh, N Vijaya; Guiard, Julie; Bundle, David R

    2015-04-01

    Members of the genus Brucella have cell wall characteristics of Gram-negative bacteria, which in the most significant species includes O-polysaccharide (OPS). Serology is the most cost-effective means of detecting brucellosis, as infection with smooth strains of Brucella leads to the induction of high antibody titers against the OPS, an unbranched homopolymer of 4,6-dideoxy-4-formamido-D-mannopyranosyl residues (D-Rha4NFo) that are variably α(1→2)- and α(1→3)-linked. Six d-Rha4NFo homo-oligosaccharides were synthesized, each containing a single α(1→3) link but with a varied number of α(1→2) links. After conjugation to bovine serum albumin (BSA), glycoconjugates 1 to 6 were used to develop individual indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (iELISAs). The diagnostic capabilities of these antigens were applied to panels of cattle serum samples, including those falsely positive in conventional assays, and the results were compared with those of the complement fixation test (CFT), serum agglutination test (SAT), fluorescent polarization assay (FPA), smooth lipopolysaccharide (sLPS) iELISA, and competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) methods. Results from field serum samples demonstrated that all of the synthetic antigens had excellent diagnostic capabilities. Assays developed with the α(1→3)-linked disaccharide conjugate 1 were the best at resolving false-positive serological results. This was supported by the results from serum samples derived from experimentally infected cattle. Data from synthetic trisaccharide antigens 2 and 3 and tetrasaccharide antigen 4 identified an OPS epitope equally common to all Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis strains but unique to Brucella. Synthetic oligosaccharide conjugates function as effective surrogates for naturally derived antigens. The creation of discrete OPS epitope antigens reveals not only the previously untapped diagnostic potential within this key diagnostic structure but also holds

  10. LATERAL FLOW ASSAY FOR CRYPTOCOCCAL ANTIGEN: AN IMPORTANT ADVANCE TO IMPROVE THE CONTINUUM OF HIV CARE AND REDUCE CRYPTOCOCCAL MENINGITIS-RELATED MORTALITY

    OpenAIRE

    VIDAL, Jose E.; BOULWARE, David R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY AIDS-related cryptococcal meningitis continues to cause a substantial burden of death in low and middle income countries. The diagnostic use for detection of cryptococcal capsular polysaccharide antigen (CrAg) in serum and cerebrospinal fluid by latex agglutination test (CrAg-latex) or enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA) has been available for over decades. Better diagnostics in asymptomatic and symptomatic phases of cryptococcosis are key components to reduce mortality. Recently, the cry...

  11. Characterisation of Sarcoptes scabiei antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejduk, Gloria; Hofstätter, Katja; Löwenstein, Michael; Peschke, Roman; Miller, Ingrid; Joachim, Anja

    2011-02-01

    In pig herds, the status of Sarcoptes scabiei infections is routinely monitored by serodiagnosis. Crude antigen for ELISA is usually prepared from S. scabiei var. canis or other variations and may lead to variations in the outcome of different tests, making assay standardisation difficult. This study was performed to investigate the antigen profiles of S. scabiei, including differences between hydrophilic and more hydrophobic protein fractions, by Western blotting with sera from pigs with defined infection status. Potential cross-reactivity among S. scabiei (var. canis, suis and bovis), Dermatophagoides farinae and Tyrophagus putrescentiae was also analysed. Hydrophobic S. scabiei antigens were detectable in the range of 40-50 kDa, whilst the hydrophilic fraction showed no specific antigenicity. In the hydrophobic fractions of D. farinae and T. putrescentiae, two major protein fractions in a similar size range could be identified, but no cross-reactivity with Sarcoptes-positive sera was detectable. However, examination of the hydrophilic fractions revealed cross-reactivity between Sarcoptes-positive sera and both the house dust mite and the storage mite in the range of 115 and 28/38 kDa. Specific bands in the same range (42 and 48 kDa) could be detected in blots from hydrophobic fractions of all three tested variations of S. scabiei (var. canis, bovis and suis). These results show that there are considerable differences in mange antibody reactivity, including reactions with proteins from free-living mites, which may interfere with tests based on hydrophilic antigens. Further refinement of antigen and the use of specific hydrophobic proteins could improve ELISA performance and standardisation.

  12. Dramatic response to levetiracetam in post-ischaemic Holmes’ tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striano, P; Elefante, Andrea; Coppola, Antonietta; Tortora, Fabio; Zara, Federico; Minetti, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    Holmes’ tremor refers to an unusual combination of rest, postural and kinetic tremor of extremities. Common causes of Holmes’ tremor include stroke, trauma, vascular malformations and multiple sclerosis, with lesions involving the thalamus, brain stem or cerebellum. Although some drugs (eg, levodopa and dopaminergic drugs, clonazepam and propranolol) have been occasionally reported to give some benefit, medical treatment of Holmes’ tremor is unsatisfactory, and many patients require thalamic surgery to achieve satisfactory control. We report a patient in whom post-ischaemic Holmes’ tremor dramatically responded to levetiracetam treatment. PMID:21686707

  13. Stuttering therapy in 1837 and a young boy's dramatic experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preus, A

    1994-01-01

    This is a historical account of the first known case of stuttering therapy in Norway. In his autobiography, school administrator and politician Nils Hertzberg relates how he in 1837 as a 10-year-old boy travelled on horseback, skis and by boat across Norway from west to east and back in order to receive therapy from a travelling German speech teacher C.F. Bansmann. The article provides extracts from the exciting and dramatic journey, describes Bansmann's method and offers some comments on stuttering and stuttering therapy.

  14. FORMING FUTURE ENGLISH TEACHERS’ LISTENING SKILLS VIA DRAMATIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olha Datskiv

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the problem of forming future English teachers’ listening competence as an important component of future English teachers’ communicative competence. The requirements for future English teachers’ listening competence at the beginning stage of the university course have been determined. Dramatization has been considered as a means of forming future English teachers’ listening skills and it has been defined as interaction of a lecturer and students in drama games, role plays, improvisations, simulations and theatre projects aimed at forming the students’ communicative competence. The appropriateness of using different forms of dramatization for forming the second year students’ listening skills has been substantiated, the students’ listening skills have been determined. The complex of exercises for forming the students’ listening skills while learning the topic “Work and Employment” has been suggested. The structure of the complex has been outlined, the types and kinds of exercises have been described. The examples of exercises have been given. The exercises of the complex are aimed at simultaneous development of speaking, listening and writing skills of the future English teachers.

  15. Vaccination and antigenic drift in influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boni, Maciej F

    2008-07-18

    The relationship between influenza antigenic drift and vaccination lies at the intersection of evolutionary biology and public health, and it must be viewed and analyzed in both contexts simultaneously. In this paper, 1 review what is known about the effects of antigenic drift on vaccination and the effects of vaccination on antigenic drift, and I suggest some simple ways to detect the presence of antigenic drift in seasonal influenza data. If antigenic drift occurs on the time scale of a single influenza season, it may be associated with the presence of herd immunity at the beginning of the season and may indicate a need to monitor for vaccine updates at the end of the season. The relationship between antigenic drift and vaccination must also be viewed in the context of the global circulation of influenza strains and the seeding of local and regional epidemics. In the data sets I consider--from New Zealand, New York, and France--antigenic drift can be statistically detected during some seasons, and seeding of epidemics appears to be endogenous sometimes and exogenous at other times. Improved detection of short-term antigenic drift and epidemic seeding would significantly benefit influenza monitoring efforts and vaccine selection.

  16. Dienogest improves human leucocyte antigen-DR underexpression and reduces tumour necrosis factor-α production in peritoneal fluid cells from women with endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, N; Izumiya, C; Taniguchi, K; Matsushima, S; Mita, S; Shimizu, Y; Fukaya, T

    2014-06-01

    To determine the immunological effect of dienogest (DNG), an oral anti-endometriosis drug, on peritoneal fluid (PF) macrophages collected from women with endometriosis. Although it has been suggested that DNG has direct effects on endometriotic cells, including decreased cell proliferation and decreased anti-inflammatory cytokine production, the effects of DNG on PF cells are unclear. The effects of DNG on PF cells from 34 women with endometriosis and 22 women without endometriosis (controls) were investigated. Expression of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR in PF macrophages, obtained from the peritoneal cavity during laparoscopic surgery, was determined by flow cytometry. HLA-DR expression was measured again after PF cells had been cultured for 72 h in a humidified atmosphere at 37 °C in 5% CO₂-95% air with or without DNG. After 72 h of incubation, the concentration of pro-inflammatory tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α in the media was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. HLA-DR expression was lower in PF macrophages from women with endometriosis compared with controls. However, after DNG treatment, HLA-DR expression in PF macrophages from women with endometriosis was increased to the same level as in controls. The TNF-α concentration in the media was decreased by DNG. DNG can restore the antigen-presenting ability of PF macrophages by increased HLA-DR expression, and may have an anti-inflammatory effect on PF macrophages in women with endometriosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dramatic Regression of a Fungating Breast Lesion Treated with Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Robert W; Edlund, Shane; Yuan, Jianling

    2017-06-16

    Although advances in screening mammography have dramatically improved the early detection of breast cancer, a subset of breast cancer cases still present as locally advanced disease. Some of these patients develop fungating lesions, which are difficult to manage and can have a severe impact on the quality of life. Palliative treatment options include surgery, intra-arterial chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. Herein, we describe the case of a patient who presented with a fungating breast mass and demonstrated an immediate and durable response to radiation therapy with a significantly improved quality of life.

  18. AntigenMap 3D: an online antigenic cartography resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, J Lamar; Yang, Jialiang; Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2012-05-01

    Antigenic cartography is a useful technique to visualize and minimize errors in immunological data by projecting antigens to 2D or 3D cartography. However, a 2D cartography may not be sufficient to capture the antigenic relationship from high-dimensional immunological data. AntigenMap 3D presents an online, interactive, and robust 3D antigenic cartography construction and visualization resource. AntigenMap 3D can be applied to identify antigenic variants and vaccine strain candidates for pathogens with rapid antigenic variations, such as influenza A virus. http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap3D

  19. Antigens of Streptococcus sanguis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosan, Burton

    1973-01-01

    An antigenic analysis of the alpha-hemolytic streptococci isolated from dental plaque was performed by use of antisera against a strain of Streptococcus sanguis (M-5) which was isolated from dental plaque. Immunoelectrophoretic and Ouchterlony tests of Rantz and Randall extracts of 45 strains gave positive reactions with the M-5 antisera. These strains represented 60% of the strains tested. The number of antigens which could be identified in these extracts varied from one to five and were designated a to e. The a antigen was found in 36 of the strains tested, including reference strains of S. sanguis and the group H streptococci. The strains reacting with the M-5 antisera were divided into two majors types: type I consisted of 23 strains in which the a antigen was found alone or with one or more of the c, d, and e antigens; type II consisted of 13 strains in which both the a and b antigens were found with or without one or more of the c, d, and e antigens. The remaining strains contained, either singly or in combination, the b, c, d, and e antigens but not the a antigen. Biochemical tests of representatives of each serotype and reference strains indicated that strains reacting with M-5 antisera were S. sanguis. These findings suggest that S. sanguis strains share common physiological and serological properties. Images PMID:4633291

  20. Burke’s Dramatism Framework: A Lens to Analyse Bullying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynette Jacobs

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Bullying is rife in schools across the world, which has emotional, educational as well as financial implications. Research suggests that the way in which bystanders, and in particular adults, react to such incidents is pivotal in curbing this problem. While a dearth of research focuses on the victims as well as the perpetrators of bullying, one should not ignore how different interactions between role-players influence the situation. The purpose of the paper is to explore the extent to which Burke’s Dramatism framework can be used as a lens to gain insight into how role-players respond to bullying incidences, and how this contributes to the drama. I use a series of email discussions with the mother of a bullied child as a case study.

  1. PROMOTING INCIDENTAL VOCABULARY LEARNING THROUGH VERBAL DRAMATIZATION OF WORDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Looi-Chin Ch’ng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that explicit teaching of vocabulary is often practised in English as a Second Language (ESL classrooms, it has been proven to be rather ineffective, largely because words are not taught in context. This has prompted the increasing use of incidental vocabulary learning approach, which emphasises on repeated readings as a source for vocabulary learning. By adopting this approach, this study aims to investigate students’ ability in learning vocabulary incidentally via verbal dramatization of written texts. In this case, readers’ theatre (RT is used as a way to allow learners to engage in active reading so as to promote vocabulary learning. A total of 160 diploma students participated in this case study and they were divided equally into two groups, namely classroom reading (CR and RT groups. A proficiency test was first conducted to determine their vocabulary levels. Based on the test results, a story was selected as the reading material in the two groups. The CR group read the story through a normal reading lesson in class while the RT group was required to verbally dramatize the text through readers’ theatre activity. Then, a post-test based on vocabulary levels was carried out and the results were compared. The findings revealed that incidental learning was more apparent in the RT group and their ability to learn words from the higher levels was noticeable through higher accuracy scores. Although not conclusive, this study has demonstrated the potential of using readers’ theatre as a form of incidental vocabulary learning activity in ESL settings.

  2. LATERAL FLOW ASSAY FOR CRYPTOCOCCAL ANTIGEN: AN IMPORTANT ADVANCE TO IMPROVE THE CONTINUUM OF HIV CARE AND REDUCE CRYPTOCOCCAL MENINGITIS-RELATED MORTALITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    VIDAL, Jose E.; BOULWARE, David R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY AIDS-related cryptococcal meningitis continues to cause a substantial burden of death in low and middle income countries. The diagnostic use for detection of cryptococcal capsular polysaccharide antigen (CrAg) in serum and cerebrospinal fluid by latex agglutination test (CrAg-latex) or enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA) has been available for over decades. Better diagnostics in asymptomatic and symptomatic phases of cryptococcosis are key components to reduce mortality. Recently, the cryptococcal antigen lateral flow assay (CrAg LFA) was included in the armamentarium for diagnosis. Unlike the other tests, the CrAg LFA is a dipstick immunochromatographic assay, in a format similar to the home pregnancy test, and requires little or no lab infrastructure. This test meets all of the World Health Organization ASSURED criteria (Affordable, Sensitive, Specific, User friendly, Rapid/robust, Equipment-free, and Delivered). CrAg LFA in serum, plasma, whole blood, or cerebrospinal fluid is useful for the diagnosis of disease caused by Cryptococcus species. The CrAg LFA has better analytical sensitivity for C. gattii than CrAg-latex or EIA. Prevention of cryptococcal disease is new application of CrAg LFA via screening of blood for subclinical infection in asymptomatic HIV-infected persons with CD4 counts < 100 cells/mL who are not receiving effective antiretroviral therapy. CrAg screening of leftover plasma specimens after CD4 testing can identify persons with asymptomatic infection who urgently require pre-emptive fluconazole, who will otherwise progress to symptomatic infection and/or die. PMID:26465368

  3. Improved cytotoxic T-lymphocyte immune responses to a tumor antigen by vaccines co-expressing the SLAM-associated adaptor EAT-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldhamen, Y A; Seregin, S S; Kousa, Y A; Rastall, D P W; Appledorn, D M; Godbehere, S; Schutte, B C; Amalfitano, A

    2013-10-01

    The signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated adaptor Ewing's sarcoma's-activated transcript 2 (EAT-2) is primarily expressed in dendritic cells, macrophages and natural killer cells. Including EAT-2 in a vaccination regimen enhanced innate and adaptive immune responses toward pathogen-derived antigens, even in the face of pre-existing vaccine immunity. Herein, we investigate whether co-vaccinations with two recombinant Ad5 (rAd5) vectors, one expressing the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and one expressing EAT-2, can induce more potent CEA-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and antitumor activity in the therapeutic CEA-expressing MC-38 tumor model. Our results suggest that inclusion of EAT-2 significantly alters the kinetics of Th1-biasing proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine responses, and enhances anti-CEA-specific CTL responses. As a result, rAd5-EAT2-augmented rAd5-CEA vaccinations are more efficient in eliminating CEA-expressing target cells as measured by an in vivo CTL assay. Administration of rAd5-EAT2 vaccines also reduced the rate of growth of MC-38 tumor growth in vivo. Also, an increase in MC-38 tumor cell apoptosis (as measured by hematoxylin and eosin staining, active caspase-3 and granzyme B levels within the tumors) was observed. These data provide evidence that more efficient, CEA-specific effector T cells are generated by rAd5 vaccines expressing CEA, when augmented by rAd5 vaccines expressing EAT-2, and this regimen may be a promising approach for cancer immunotherapy in general.

  4. LATERAL FLOW ASSAY FOR CRYPTOCOCCAL ANTIGEN: AN IMPORTANT ADVANCE TO IMPROVE THE CONTINUUM OF HIV CARE AND REDUCE CRYPTOCOCCAL MENINGITIS-RELATED MORTALITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Jose E; Boulware, David R

    2015-09-01

    AIDS-related cryptococcal meningitis continues to cause a substantial burden of death in low and middle income countries. The diagnostic use for detection of cryptococcal capsular polysaccharide antigen (CrAg) in serum and cerebrospinal fluid by latex agglutination test (CrAg-latex) or enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA) has been available for over decades. Better diagnostics in asymptomatic and symptomatic phases of cryptococcosis are key components to reduce mortality. Recently, the cryptococcal antigen lateral flow assay (CrAg LFA) was included in the armamentarium for diagnosis. Unlike the other tests, the CrAg LFA is a dipstick immunochromatographic assay, in a format similar to the home pregnancy test, and requires little or no lab infrastructure. This test meets all of the World Health Organization ASSURED criteria (Affordable, Sensitive, Specific, User friendly, Rapid/robust, Equipment-free, and Delivered). CrAg LFA in serum, plasma, whole blood, or cerebrospinal fluid is useful for the diagnosis of disease caused by Cryptococcus species. The CrAg LFA has better analytical sensitivity for C. gattii than CrAg-latex or EIA. Prevention of cryptococcal disease is new application of CrAg LFA via screening of blood for subclinical infection in asymptomatic HIV-infected persons with CD4 counts < 100 cells/mL who are not receiving effective antiretroviral therapy. CrAg screening of leftover plasma specimens after CD4 testing can identify persons with asymptomatic infection who urgently require pre-emptive fluconazole, who will otherwise progress to symptomatic infection and/or die.

  5. LATERAL FLOW ASSAY FOR CRYPTOCOCCAL ANTIGEN: AN IMPORTANT ADVANCE TO IMPROVE THE CONTINUUM OF HIV CARE AND REDUCE CRYPTOCOCCAL MENINGITIS-RELATED MORTALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose E. VIDAL

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARYAIDS-related cryptococcal meningitis continues to cause a substantial burden of death in low and middle income countries. The diagnostic use for detection of cryptococcal capsular polysaccharide antigen (CrAg in serum and cerebrospinal fluid by latex agglutination test (CrAg-latex or enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA has been available for over decades. Better diagnostics in asymptomatic and symptomatic phases of cryptococcosis are key components to reduce mortality. Recently, the cryptococcal antigen lateral flow assay (CrAg LFA was included in the armamentarium for diagnosis. Unlike the other tests, the CrAg LFA is a dipstick immunochromatographic assay, in a format similar to the home pregnancy test, and requires little or no lab infrastructure. This test meets all of the World Health Organization ASSURED criteria (Affordable, Sensitive, Specific, User friendly, Rapid/robust, Equipment-free, and Delivered. CrAg LFA in serum, plasma, whole blood, or cerebrospinal fluid is useful for the diagnosis of disease caused by Cryptococcusspecies. The CrAg LFA has better analytical sensitivity for C. gattii than CrAg-latex or EIA. Prevention of cryptococcal disease is new application of CrAg LFA via screening of blood for subclinical infection in asymptomatic HIV-infected persons with CD4 counts < 100 cells/mL who are not receiving effective antiretroviral therapy. CrAg screening of leftover plasma specimens after CD4 testing can identify persons with asymptomatic infection who urgently require pre-emptive fluconazole, who will otherwise progress to symptomatic infection and/or die.

  6. Eosinofil Sel Penyaji Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safari Wahyu Jatmiko

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sel eosinofil merupakan jenis sel lekosit yang terlibat dalam berbagai patogenesis penyakit. Sel eosinofil pada awalnya dikenal sebagai sel efektor  dari sistem imunitas alamiah. Akan tetapi, kemampuan sel eosinofil dalam memfagositosis patogen menimbulkan dugaan bahwa sel eosinofil ikut berperan sebagai sel penyaji antigen. Hal ini dianalogikan dengan sel makrofag dan sel dendritik yang bisa memfagositosis dan menyajikan antigen sebagai hasil dari degradasi patogen yang difagositosis. Untuk menjawab permasalahan ini, penulis melakukan penelusuran artikel tentang eosinofil sebagai sel penyaji antigen melalui US National Library of Medicine National Institute of Healthdengan kata kunci eoshinophil dan antigen presenting cell. Hasil penelusuran adalah ditemukannya 10 artikel yang relevan dengan topik. Hasil dari sintesis kesepuluh jurnal tersebut adalah sel eosinofil mampu berperan sebagai sel penyaji antigen yang profesional (professionalantigenpresentng cell

  7. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ephraim, K.H.; Cox, P.H.; Hamer, C.J.A. v.d.; Berends, W.; Delhez, H.

    1977-01-01

    The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a complex of antigen determinants and also the carrier of these determinants. Chemically it is a glycoprotein. Its occurrence in blood serum or urine is correlated with malignant disease. Several radioimmunoassays (RIA) have been developed, one by Hoffmann-Laroche and one by the Rotterdam Radiotherapeutic Institute. Both methods and the Hoffmann assay kit are tested. Specifications are given for isolation of the antigen, preparation of the antiserum, and the execution of the RIA. Biochemical and clinical aspects are discussed

  8. Historical sampling reveals dramatic demographic changes in western gorilla populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guschanski Katerina

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Today many large mammals live in small, fragmented populations, but it is often unclear whether this subdivision is the result of long-term or recent events. Demographic modeling using genetic data can estimate changes in long-term population sizes while temporal sampling provides a way to compare genetic variation present today with that sampled in the past. In order to better understand the dynamics associated with the divergences of great ape populations, these analytical approaches were applied to western gorillas (Gorilla gorilla and in particular to the isolated and Critically Endangered Cross River gorilla subspecies (G. g. diehli. Results We used microsatellite genotypes from museum specimens and contemporary samples of Cross River gorillas to infer both the long-term and recent population history. We find that Cross River gorillas diverged from the ancestral western gorilla population ~17,800 years ago (95% HDI: 760, 63,245 years. However, gene flow ceased only ~420 years ago (95% HDI: 200, 16,256 years, followed by a bottleneck beginning ~320 years ago (95% HDI: 200, 2,825 years that caused a 60-fold decrease in the effective population size of Cross River gorillas. Direct comparison of heterozygosity estimates from museum and contemporary samples suggests a loss of genetic variation over the last 100 years. Conclusions The composite history of western gorillas could plausibly be explained by climatic oscillations inducing environmental changes in western equatorial Africa that would have allowed gorilla populations to expand over time but ultimately isolate the Cross River gorillas, which thereafter exhibited a dramatic population size reduction. The recent decrease in the Cross River population is accordingly most likely attributable to increasing anthropogenic pressure over the last several hundred years. Isolation of diverging populations with prolonged concomitant gene flow, but not secondary admixture, appears

  9. Survival improvement in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma who undergo pretargeted anti-carcinoembryonic-antigen radioimmunotherapy: a collaborative study with the French Endocrine Tumor Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatal, Jean-François; Campion, Loïc; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Bardet, Stephane; Vuillez, Jean-Philippe; Charbonnel, Bernard; Rohmer, Vincent; Chang, Chien-Hsing; Sharkey, Robert M; Goldenberg, David M; Barbet, Jacques

    2006-04-10

    No effective therapy is currently available for the management of patients with metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). The efficacy of pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (pRAIT) with bispecific monoclonal antibody (BsMAb) and a iodine-131 (131I) -labeled bivalent hapten is evaluated. Twenty-nine patients with advanced, progressive MTC, as documented by short serum calcitonin doubling times (Ct DTs), received an anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)/anti-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) -indium BsMAb, followed 4 days later by a 131I-labeled bivalent hapten. Overall survival (OS) was compared with 39 contemporaneous untreated MTC patients with comparable prognostic indicators. OS was significantly longer in high-risk, treated patients (Ct DT < 2 years) than in high-risk, untreated patients (median OS, 110 v 61 months; P < .030). Forty-seven percent of patients, defined as biologic responders by a more than 100% increase in CtDT, experienced significantly longer survival than nonresponders (median OS, 159 v 109 months; P < .035) and untreated patients (median OS, 159 v 61 months; P < .010). Treated patients with bone/bone-marrow disease had a longer survival than patients without such involvement (10-year OS, 83% v 14%; P < .023). Toxicity was mainly hematologic and related to bone/bone-marrow tumor spread. pRAIT against CEA induced long-term disease stabilization and a significantly longer survival in high-risk patients with Ct DTs less than 2 years, compared with similarly high-risk, untreated patients. Ct DT and bone-marrow involvement appear to be prognostic indicators in MTC patients who undergo pRAIT.

  10. Liven up Your Student Dramatics with Commedia dell' Arte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Jonathan

    1980-01-01

    Suggests using the ancient Commedia dell' Arte technique of establishing characters and a plot and then allowing the actors to create their own play. Indicates that this improves student performances even in more traditional plays. (TJ)

  11. Dramatic Changes in the Infrared Spectrum of V838 Monocerotis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturini, C. C.; Lynch, D. K.; Rudy, R. J.; Russell, R. W.; Mazuk, S.; Dimpfl, W.; Sitko, M.; Puetter, R. C.; Bernstein, L. S.; Perry, R. B.

    2003-05-01

    Multiple spectrum of V838 Mon have been obtained from two different instruments providing data with combined wavelength coverage between 0.8 to 14 microns. The first measurements were taken in January 2002 followed by another set of measurements about a year later. Initially, the 3-14 micron spectrum showed a source with a smooth continuum consistent with a black body at about 2350 K and roughly 50 percent excess above the black body fit between the 8 to 10 micron region. Data between 0.8-2.5 microns exhibited a continuum that peaked near one micron (implying a temperature of roughly 3000 K) with a slightly elevated continuum near 1.6 microns suggestive of the H-opacity minimum. The continuum also showed significant broad structure between 0.8 and 1.2 microns. Emission lines present included HI Paschen and weak Bracket lines, many with strong P-Cygni profiles indicating an expansion velocity of around 500 km/sec. Also present were the Ca II IR triplet with strong absorption and weak emission, and deep CO first overtone band absorption near 2.3 microns. The second set of measurements, taken approximately a year later, revealed a spectrum that had changed dramatically. The hydrogen emission lines had disappeared and the continuum shape indicted that the source had cooled by roughly one-two thousand degrees. Between the two epochs, the K brightness increased by about a factor of three while the N brightness increased by roughly a factor a 20. The source now showed deep molecular absorption bands of H2O, CO, TiO, AlO, VO and probably OH. The AlO bands were particularly prominent: the A-X (4,0) doublet with peak absorptions at 1.225 and 1.244 microns, and the A-X (2,0) doublet at 1.650 and 1.687 microns. CrH and FeH may have been present but methane was not seen. In a years time, V838 Mon went from looking like late type star around 3000 K with weak hydrogen emission from a small expanding shell to an object that was cool enough to show no atomic lines but only a wide

  12. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of PSA and prostate-specific membrane antigen mRNA to detect circulating tumor cells improves recurrence-free survival nomogram prediction after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, David R; Rouprêt, Morgan; Drouin, Sarah J; Comperat, Eva; Ricci, Sylvie; Lacave, Roger; Sèbe, Philippe; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Bitker, Marc-Olivier; Cussenot, Olivier

    2012-09-01

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) analysis is a potential new biomarker in prostate cancer. We hypothesize that quantitative detection of CTCs in patients pre- and post-radical prostatectomy (RP) using quantitative TaqMan® fluorogenic RT-PCR will improve the accuracy of the Kattan nomogram to predict the probability of recurrence-free survival (RFS) post-RP. Ninty-two patients who underwent RP between 2004 and 2009 had venous blood samples taken pre- (Day - 1) and post-operatively (Day + 7). We performed quantitative Taqman® RT-PCR to detect circulating prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) mRNA. We calculated both the logarithmic ratio of Day + 7/Day - 1 for PSA (PSAr) and PSMA (PSMAr) expression (log(Day+7/Day-1) ) and the Kattan nomogram predicted probability of disease recurrence for each patient. We then analyzed how the AUC-ROC analysis for the Kattan nomogram prediction alone (K) compared to the addition of the PSAr and PSMAr in predicting 5-year RFS. The mean age (years), PSA (ng/ml), and follow-up (mo) was 65.1, 9.13, and 72, respectively. The AUCs for K, PSAr + K, and PSMAr + K were 0.752 (95%CI 0.620-0.860), 0.830 (95%CI 0.740-0.911), and 0.837 (95%CI 0.613-0.923), respectively (P = 0.03). The Kattan 5-year PSA RFS was 75%. The actual 5-year PSA RFS survival rate was 77%. Data from modern quantitative RT-PCR to detect circulating prostate-derived PSA and PSM mRNA pre- and post-RP improves the accuracy of the Kattan nomogram to predict biochemical recurrence. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Recombinant protective antigen anthrax vaccine improves survival when administered as a postexposure prophylaxis countermeasure with antibiotic in the New Zealand white rabbit model of inhalation anthrax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffel, Elizabeth K; Bourdage, James S; Williamson, E Diane; Duchars, Matthew; Fuerst, Thomas R; Fusco, Peter C

    2012-08-01

    Inhalation anthrax is a potentially lethal form of disease resulting from exposure to aerosolized Bacillus anthracis spores. Over the last decade, incidents spanning from the deliberate mailing of B. anthracis spores to incidental exposures in users of illegal drugs have highlighted the importance of developing new medical countermeasures to protect people who have been exposed to "anthrax spores" and are at risk of developing disease. The New Zealand White rabbit (NZWR) is a well-characterized model that has a pathogenesis and clinical presentation similar to those seen in humans. This article reports how the NZWR model was adapted to evaluate postexposure prophylaxis using a recombinant protective antigen (rPA) vaccine in combination with an oral antibiotic, levofloxacin. NZWRs were exposed to multiples of the 50% lethal dose (LD(50)) of B. anthracis spores and then vaccinated immediately (day 0) and again on day 7 postexposure. Levofloxacin was administered daily beginning at 6 to 12 h postexposure for 7 treatments. Rabbits were evaluated for clinical signs of disease, fever, bacteremia, immune response, and survival. A robust immune response (IgG anti-rPA and toxin-neutralizing antibodies) was observed in all vaccinated groups on days 10 to 12. Levofloxacin plus either 30 or 100 μg rPA vaccine resulted in a 100% survival rate (18 of 18 per group), and a vaccine dose as low as 10 μg rPA resulted in an 89% survival rate (16 of 18) when used in combination with levofloxacin. In NZWRs that received antibiotic alone, the survival rate was 56% (10 of 18). There was no adverse effect on the development of a specific IgG response to rPA in unchallenged NZWRs that received the combination treatment of vaccine plus antibiotic. This study demonstrated that an accelerated two-dose regimen of rPA vaccine coadministered on days 0 and 7 with 7 days of levofloxacin therapy results in a significantly greater survival rate than with antibiotic treatment alone. Combination of

  14. An investigation into the dramatic increase in deaths from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The first author collected the information on a cause of death form, a data form and an audit tool. As part of the quality-improvement project, 10 items were assessed to determine whether doctors adhered to treatment protocols, and 10 items were assessed to determine whether nurses adhered to nursing orders and basic ...

  15. Allosensibilisation to erythrocyte antigens (literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Mineeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article literature review of the causes of allosensibilisation to erythrocyte antigens are presented. It is shown that the ability to produce antierythrocyte antibodies is affected by many factors, principal of whom it is difficult to identify. For the allosensibilisation development requires genetically determined differences in erythrocyte antigens phenotypes of donor and recipient, mother and fetus, which can lead to immune response and antibodies production. The biochemical nature of erythrocyte antigens, antigen dose (the amount of transfused doses, the number of antigens determinants on donor and fetus erythrocytes, the number of pregnancies are important. Individual patient characteristics: age, gender, diseases, the use of immunosuppressive therapy and the presence of inflammatory processes, are also relevant. Note that antibody to one erythrocyte antigens have clinical value, and to the other – have no. The actual data about frequency of clinically significant antibodies contribute to the development of post-transfusion hemolytic complications prophylaxis as well as the improvement of laboratory diagnosis of hemolytic disease of the newborn in the presence of maternal antierythrocyte antibodies.

  16. Free prostate-specific antigen improves prostate cancer detection in a high-risk population of men with a normal total PSA and digitalrectal examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzzo, Robert G; Pinover, Wayne H; Horwitz, Eric M; Parlanti, Alicia; Mazzoni, Susan; Raysor, Susan; Mirchandani, Ila; Greenberg, Richard E; Pollack, Alan; Hanks, Gerald E; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah

    2003-04-01

    Uncertainty exists regarding optimal prostate cancer screening parameters for high-risk populations. The purpose of this study is to report the use of percent free prostate-specific antigen (PSA) as an indication for biopsy in men at increased risk for developing prostate cancer who have a normal digital rectal examination (DRE) and total PSA level between 2 and 4 ng/mL. African-American men and men with at least one first-degree relative with prostate cancer are eligible for enrollment into the Prostate Cancer Risk Assessment Program (PRAP) at our institution. Between October 1996 and April 2002, 310 asymptomatic high-risk men with no history of prostate cancer, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), or prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) were screened in the PRAP with DRE and total PSA. Percent free PSA was obtained in men with a total PSA between 2 and 10 ng/mL. Men with a normal DRE and total PSA between 2 and 4 ng/mL were advised to undergo transrectal ultrasound-guided (TRUS) biopsies of the prostate if the percent free PSA was less than 27%. Other indications for biopsy included an abnormal DRE or a total PSA greater than 4 ng/mL. The primary endpoint evaluated was prostate cancer detection in high-risk men with a benign prostate examination, a normal total PSA between 2 and 4 ng/mL, and percent free PSA less than 27%. Of the 310 men, 174 (56%) were African American and 202 (65%) had at least one first-degree relative with prostate cancer. Sixty-two of the 310 men were referred for prostate biopsy, and 40 of 62 had biopsy performed. Twenty-one of 40 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer for a cancer detection rate of 53% in all men undergoing biopsy and an overall cancer detection rate of 6.8% in this high-risk population. Thirty-seven high-risk men (median age 54 years) with a total PSA level between 2 and 4 ng/mL (median 2.7 ng/mL) and a normal DRE were found to have a percent free PSA level of less than 27% (median 16%, range 8% to 25%). Twenty

  17. Prostate Health Index (Phi) and Prostate Cancer Antigen 3 (PCA3) significantly improve prostate cancer detection at initial biopsy in a total PSA range of 2-10 ng/ml.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Matteo; Bruzzese, Dario; Perdonà, Sisto; Marino, Ada; Mazzarella, Claudia; Perruolo, Giuseppe; D'Esposito, Vittoria; Cosimato, Vincenzo; Buonerba, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Musi, Gennaro; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Chun, Felix K; Terracciano, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Many efforts to reduce prostate specific antigen (PSA) overdiagnosis and overtreatment have been made. To this aim, Prostate Health Index (Phi) and Prostate Cancer Antigen 3 (PCA3) have been proposed as new more specific biomarkers. We evaluated the ability of phi and PCA3 to identify prostate cancer (PCa) at initial prostate biopsy in men with total PSA range of 2-10 ng/ml. The performance of phi and PCA3 were evaluated in 300 patients undergoing first prostate biopsy. ROC curve analyses tested the accuracy (AUC) of phi and PCA3 in predicting PCa. Decision curve analyses (DCA) were used to compare the clinical benefit of the two biomarkers. We found that the AUC value of phi (0.77) was comparable to those of %p2PSA (0.76) and PCA3 (0.73) with no significant differences in pairwise comparison (%p2PSA vs phi p = 0.673, %p2PSA vs. PCA3 p = 0.417 and phi vs. PCA3 p = 0.247). These three biomarkers significantly outperformed fPSA (AUC = 0.60), % fPSA (AUC = 0.62) and p2PSA (AUC = 0.63). At DCA, phi and PCA3 exhibited a very close net benefit profile until the threshold probability of 25%, then phi index showed higher net benefit than PCA3. Multivariable analysis showed that the addition of phi and PCA3 to the base multivariable model (age, PSA, %fPSA, DRE, prostate volume) increased predictive accuracy, whereas no model improved single biomarker performance. Finally we showed that subjects with active surveillance (AS) compatible cancer had significantly lower phi and PCA3 values (pPSA range 2-10 ng/ml at initial biopsy, outperforming currently used %fPSA.

  18. World-Wide Effort Produces Dramatic "Movie" of Cosmic Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    Astronomers using a world-wide collection of radio telescopes, including the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), have made a dramatic "movie" of a voracious, superdense neutron star repeatedly spitting out subatomic particles at nearly the speed of light into two narrow jets as it pulls material from a companion star. The movie shows these jets ejecting clouds of hot plasma that are then "zapped" by pulses of energy in the jets as they move away from the neutron star. Frame from Radio-Telescope 'Movie' of Scorpius X-1 "We have directly measured the speed of energy flow in a cosmic jet for the first time," said Ed Fomalont, an astronomer at the NRAO in Charlottesville, Virginia. Fomalont worked with Barry Geldzahler and Charles Bradshaw of George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. The astronomers used the VLBA, the NSF's Very Large Array (VLA) and the Green Bank 140-foot telescope, along with radio telescopes from the European VLBI Network, Australia, Japan and South Africa to record the double-star system's eruptions continuously for 56 hours. "This study is going to be extremely valuable in helping us understand a phenomenon that we see throughout the universe," Fomalont said. Cosmic jets of superfast particles are ejected from the cores of numerous galaxies. On a smaller scale, similar jets are ejected from binary-star systems closer to home, in our own Milky Way Galaxy. While the jets from galaxy cores are thought to be powered by supermassive black holes millions of times more massive than the Sun, the closer "microquasars" are powered by much smaller black holes or by neutron stars only a few times more massive than the sun. "Studying one of the closer, smaller examples will help us understand how they all work, including the bigger ones," Geldzahler said. "The jets coming from distant galaxies are harder to study because of their much greater distance and the slowness of their

  19. Conformal technique dose escalation for prostate cancer: biochemical evidence of improved cancer control with higher doses in patients with pretreatment prostate-specific antigen ≥10 NG/ML

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanks, Gerald E.; Lee, W. Robert; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Hunt, Margie; Kaplan, Edward; Epstein, Barry E.; Movsas, Benjamin; Schultheiss, Timothy E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Conformal radiation technology results in fewer late complications and allows testing of the value of higher doses in prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We report the biochemical freedom from disease (bNED) rates (bNED failure is Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) ≥ 1.5 ng/ml and rising) at 2 and 3 years for 375 consecutive patients treated with conformal technique from 66 to 79 Gy. Median follow-up was 21 months. Biochemical freedom from disease was analyzed for patients treated above and below 71 Gy as well as above and below 73 Gy. Each dose group was subdivided by pretreatment PSA level (<10, 10-19.9, and ≥ 20 ng/ml). Dose was stated to be at the center of the prostate gland. Results: There was significant improvement in bNED survival for all patients divided by a dose above or below 71 Gy (p = 0.007) and a marginal improvement above or below 73 Gy (p 0.07). Subdividing by pretreatment PSA level showed no benefit to the PSA <10 ng/ml group at the higher dose but there was a significant improvement at 71 and 73 Gy for pretreatment PSA 10-19.9 ng/ml (p = 0.03 and 0.05, respectively) and for pretreatment PSA ≥ 20 ng/ml (p = 0.003 and 0.02, respectively). Conclusions: Increasing dose above 71 or 73 Gy did not result in improved bNED survival for patients with pretreatment PSA <10 ng/ml at 2 or 3 years. Further dose escalation studies may not be useful in these patients. A significant improvement in bNED survival was noted for patients with pretreatment PSA ≥ 10 ng/ml treated above 71 or 73 Gy; further dose escalation studies are warranted

  20. Identification of protective antigens for vaccination against systemic salmonellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk eBumann

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available There is an urgent medical need for improved vaccines with broad serovar coverage and high efficacy against systemic salmonellosis. Subunit vaccines offer excellent safety profiles but require identification of protective antigens, which remains a challenging task. Here, I review crucial properties of Salmonella antigens that might help to narrow down the number of potential candidates from more than 4000 proteins encoded in Salmonella genomes, to a more manageable number of 50-200 most promising antigens. I also discuss complementary approaches for antigen identification and potential limitations of current pre-clinical vaccine testing.

  1. Improving Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guèrin as a Vaccine Delivery Vector for Viral Antigens by Incorporation of Glycolipid Activators of NKT Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M.; Ng, Tony W.; Kharkwal, Shalu S.; Carreño, Leandro J.; Johnson, Alison J.; Kunnath-Velayudhan, Shajo; Liu, Zheng; Bittman, Robert; Jervis, Peter J.; Cox, Liam R.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Wen, Xiangshu; Yuan, Weiming; Tsuji, Moriya; Li, Xiangming

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guèrin (rBCG) has been explored as a vector for vaccines against HIV because of its ability to induce long lasting humoral and cell mediated immune responses. To maximize the potential for rBCG vaccines to induce effective immunity against HIV, various strategies are being employed to improve its ability to prime CD8+ T cells, which play an important role in the control of HIV infections. In this study we adopted a previously described approac...

  2. Alternative BCG delivery strategies improve protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in non-human primates: Protection associated with mycobacterial antigen-specific CD4 effector memory T-cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, S; White, A; Sarfas, C; Sibley, L; Gleeson, F; McIntyre, A; Basaraba, R; Clark, S; Hall, G; Rayner, E; Williams, A; Marsh, P D; Dennis, M

    2016-12-01

    Intradermal (ID) BCG injection provides incomplete protection against TB in humans and experimental models. Alternative BCG vaccination strategies may improve protection in model species, including rhesus macaques. This study compares the immunogenicity and efficacy of BCG administered by ID and intravenous (IV) injection, or as an intratracheal mucosal boost (ID + IT), against aerosol challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis Erdman strain. Disease pathology was significantly reduced, and survival improved, by each BCG vaccination strategy, relative to unvaccinated animals. However, IV induced protection surpassed that achieved by all other routes, providing an opportunity to explore protective immunological mechanisms using antigen-specific IFN-γ ELISpot and polychromatic flow cytometry assays. IFN-γ spot forming units and multifunctional CD4 T-cell frequencies increased significantly following each vaccination regimen and were greatest following IV immunisation. Vaccine-induced multifunctional CD4 T-cells producing IFN-γ and TNF-α were associated with reduced disease pathology following subsequent M.tb challenge; however, high frequencies of this population following M.tb infection correlated with increased pathology. Cytokine producing T-cells primarily occupied the CD4 transitional effector memory phenotype, implicating this population as central to the mycobacterial response, potentially contributing to the stringent control observed in IV vaccinated animals. This study demonstrates the protective efficacy of IV BCG vaccination in rhesus macaques, offering a valuable tool for the interrogation of immunological mechanisms and potential correlates of protection. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Dramatically improved RNA in situ hybridization signals using LNA-modified probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rune; Nielsen, Peter Stein; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2005-01-01

    In situ detection of RNA by hybridization with complementary probes is a powerful technique. Probe design is a critical parameter in successful target detection. We have evaluated the efficiency of fluorescent DNA oligonucleotides modified to contain locked nucleic acid (LNA) residues. This incre......In situ detection of RNA by hybridization with complementary probes is a powerful technique. Probe design is a critical parameter in successful target detection. We have evaluated the efficiency of fluorescent DNA oligonucleotides modified to contain locked nucleic acid (LNA) residues....... This increases the thermal stability of hybrids formed with RNA. The LNA-based probes detect specific RNAs in fixed yeast cells with an efficiency far better than conventional DNA oligonucleotide probes of the same sequence. Using this probe design, we were also able to detect poly(A)+ RNA accumulation within...

  4. Dramatic improvement of crystal quality for low-­temperature-grown rabbit muscle aldolase

    OpenAIRE

    Park, HaJeung; Rangarajan, Erumbi S.; Sygusch, Jurgen; Izard, Tina

    2010-01-01

    Rabbit muscle aldolase (RMA) was crystallized in complex with the low-complexity domain (LC4) of sorting nexin 9. Monoclinic crystals were obtained at room temperature that displayed large mosaicity and poor X-ray diffraction. However, orthorhombic RMA–LC4 crystals grown at 277 K under similar conditions exhibited low mosaicity, allowing data collection to 2.2 Å Bragg spacing and structure determination.

  5. Dramatic increase in fatigue life in hierarchical graphene composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavari, F; Rafiee, M A; Rafiee, J; Yu, Z-Z; Koratkar, N

    2010-10-01

    We report the synthesis and fatigue characterization of fiberglass/epoxy composites with various weight fractions of graphene platelets infiltrated into the epoxy resin as well as directly spray-coated on to the glass microfibers. Remarkably only ∼0.2% (with respect to the epoxy resin weight and ∼0.02% with respect to the entire laminate weight) of graphene additives enhanced the fatigue life of the composite in the flexural bending mode by up to 1200-fold. By contrast, under uniaxial tensile fatigue conditions, the graphene fillers resulted in ∼3-5-fold increase in fatigue life. The fatigue life increase (in the flexural bending mode) with graphene additives was ∼1-2 orders of magnitude superior to those obtained using carbon nanotubes. In situ ultrasound analysis of the nanocomposite during the cyclic fatigue test suggests that the graphene network toughens the fiberglass/epoxy-matrix interface and prevents the delamination/buckling of the glass microfibers under compressive stress. Such fatigue-resistant hierarchical materials show potential to improve the safety, reliability, and cost effectiveness of fiber-reinforced composites that are increasingly the material of choice in the aerospace, automotive, marine, sports, biomedical, and wind energy industries.

  6. A monkey antigen crossreacting with carcinoembryonic antigen, CEA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engvall, E.; Vuento, M.; Ruoslahti, E.

    1976-01-01

    Normal monkey tissues were found to contain an antigen which crossreacts immunologically with the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) of the human digestive tract. The monkey antigen reacted with complete or partial identity to the normal crossreacting antigen (NCA) in humans when tested in immunodiffusion against anti-CEA or anti-NCA. Extracts of monkey tissues inhibited in radioimmunoassays measuring human NCA. It is possible that monkey foetuses and colonic tumours contain CEA. Images Fig. 1 PMID:823952

  7. The use of high-throughput DNA sequencing in the investigation of antigenic variation: application to Neisseria species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K Davies

    Full Text Available Antigenic variation occurs in a broad range of species. This process resembles gene conversion in that variant DNA is unidirectionally transferred from partial gene copies (or silent loci into an expression locus. Previous studies of antigenic variation have involved the amplification and sequencing of individual genes from hundreds of colonies. Using the pilE gene from Neisseria gonorrhoeae we have demonstrated that it is possible to use PCR amplification, followed by high-throughput DNA sequencing and a novel assembly process, to detect individual antigenic variation events. The ability to detect these events was much greater than has previously been possible. In N. gonorrhoeae most silent loci contain multiple partial gene copies. Here we show that there is a bias towards using the copy at the 3' end of the silent loci (copy 1 as the donor sequence. The pilE gene of N. gonorrhoeae and some strains of Neisseria meningitidis encode class I pilin, but strains of N. meningitidis from clonal complexes 8 and 11 encode a class II pilin. We have confirmed that the class II pili of meningococcal strain FAM18 (clonal complex 11 are non-variable, and this is also true for the class II pili of strain NMB from clonal complex 8. In addition when a gene encoding class I pilin was moved into the meningococcal strain NMB background there was no evidence of antigenic variation. Finally we investigated several members of the opa gene family of N. gonorrhoeae, where it has been suggested that limited variation occurs. Variation was detected in the opaK gene that is located close to pilE, but not at the opaJ gene located elsewhere on the genome. The approach described here promises to dramatically improve studies of the extent and nature of antigenic variation systems in a variety of species.

  8. Antigen smuggling in tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudrisier, Denis; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2014-06-11

    The importance of CD4 T lymphocytes in immunity to M. tuberculosis is well established; however, how dendritic cells activate T cells in vivo remains obscure. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Srivastava and Ernst (2014) report a mechanism of antigen transfer for efficient activation of antimycobacterial T cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 6 (2001), s. 425-430 ISSN 0001-2815. [Conference on Human leucocyte differentiation antigens /7./. Harrogate, 20.06.2000-25.06.2000] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules, HLDA Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 2.864, year: 2001

  10. CD antigens 2002

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 10 (2002), s. 3877-3880 ISSN 0006-4971. [Conference on Human leucocyte differentiation antigens /7./. Harrogate, 20.06.2000-25.06.2000] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules, HLDA Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 9.631, year: 2002

  11. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 168, č. 5 (2002), s. 2083-2086 ISSN 0022-1767. [Conference on Human leucocyte differentiation antigens /7./. Harrogate, 20.06.2000-25.06.2000] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules, HLDA Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 7.014, year: 2002

  12. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 4 (2001), s. 401-406 ISSN 0019-2805 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/99/0349 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : antigen * CD * leukocyte Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.656, year: 2001

  13. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 6 (2001), s. 556-562 ISSN 1066-5099 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7052904 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD * leukocyte antigens Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.689, year: 2001

  14. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 10 (2001), s. 2841-2847 ISSN 0014-2980 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7052904 Keywords : CD * leukocyte antigens Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.990, year: 2001

  15. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 211, č. 2 (2001), s. 81-85 ISSN 0008-8749 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/99/0349 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : antigen * CD * leukocyte Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.604, year: 2001

  16. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2002), s. 71-76 ISSN 0893-3952. [Conference on Human leucocyte differentiation antigens /7./. Harrogate, 20.06.2000-25.06.2000] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules, HLDA Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.821, year: 2002

  17. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 5 (2001), s. 685-690 ISSN 0741-5400 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7052904 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD * leukocyte antigens Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.516, year: 2001

  18. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 9 (2001), s. 1095-1098 ISSN 0953-8178 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/99/0349 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : antigen * CD * leukocyte Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.611, year: 2001

  19. β-endorphin antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to the production of antigens comprising β-endorphin, βsub(h)-endorphin, or βsub(c)-endorphin, in covalent conjugation with human gammaglobulin as immunogenic carrier material, and an antibody having the property of specifically binding β-endorphin or fragments thereof, containing the (6-15) residue sequence. (U.K.)

  20. Acute Otitis Media-Induced Gradenigo Syndrome, a Dramatic Response to Intravenous Antibiotic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayebeh Kazemi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Petrositis is a rare but severe complication of acute otitis media and mastoiditis. Despite efficient antibiotic therapy, there are still reports of both intratemporal and intracranial complications of otitis media with the potential risk of high morbidity and mortality. Petrositis has traditionally been treated with surgery, but recent advances in imaging, with improved antibiotic treatment, allow more conservative management.   Case Report: In this case report we describe the clinical course and treatment of a 33-year-old man with petrous apicitis who presented with severe otalgia, retro-orbital pain, and sixth cranial nerve palsy Gradenigo syndrome. Our patient showed a dramatic response to intravenous antibiotics only, without need for any surgical intervention, even myringotomy.   Conclusion: It seems that early detection and management of this syndrome before development of other intratemporal or intracranial complications may prevent the need for surgical intervention.

  1. Comparison of standard and delayed imaging to improve the detection rate of [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT in patients with biochemical recurrence or prostate-specific antigen persistence after primary therapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmuck, Sebastian; Nordlohne, Stefan; Sohns, Jan M.; Ross, Tobias L.; Bengel, Frank M.; Derlin, Thorsten [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hannover (Germany); Klot, Christoph A. von [Hannover Medical School, Department of Urology and Urologic Oncology, Hannover (Germany); Henkenberens, Christoph; Christiansen, Hans [Hannover Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Hannover (Germany); Wester, Hans-Juergen [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Pharmaceutical Radiochemistry, Garching (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the value of dual-time point imaging in PET/CT for detection of biochemically recurrent or persistent prostate cancer, using the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) ligand [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T. 240 patients who underwent a [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT in the context of biochemical relapse of prostate cancer were included in this retrospective analysis. Imaging consisted of a standard whole-body PET/CT (1 h p.i.), followed by delayed (3 h p.i.) imaging of the abdomen. PSA-stratified proportions of positive PET/CT results, standardized uptake values and target-to-background ratios were analyzed, and compared between standard and delayed imaging. The overall detection rates of [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT were 94.2, 71.8, 58.6, 55.9 and 38.9% for PSA levels of ≥2, 1 to <2, 0.5 to <1, >0.2 to <0.5, and 0.01 to 0.2 ng/mL, respectively. Although the target-to-background ratio improved significantly over time (P < 0.0001), the majority (96.6%) of all lesions suggestive of recurrent disease could already be detected in standard imaging. Delayed imaging at 3 h p.i. exclusively identified pathologic findings in 5.4% (10/184) of abnormal [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT scans, and exclusively detected 3.4% (38/1134) of all lesions suggestive of recurrent disease. [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT shows high detection rates in patients with prostate-specific antigen persistence or biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer. Delayed imaging can detect lesions with improved contrast compared to standard imaging. However, the impact on detection rates was limited in this study. (orig.)

  2. Evaluation of Hepatitis C Virus Core Antigen Assays in Detecting Recombinant Viral Antigens of Various Genotypes ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Mohsan; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Kondo, Madoka; Aizaki, Hideki; Kato, Takanobu; Mizuochi, Toshiaki; Wakita, Takaji; Watanabe, Haruo; Suzuki, Tetsuro

    2009-01-01

    A single substitution within the hepatitis C virus core antigen sequence, A48T, which is observed in ∼30% of individuals infected with genotype 2a virus, reduces the sensitivity of a commonly used chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay. Quantitation of the antigen is improved by using a distinct anticore antibody with a different epitope. PMID:19812276

  3. Harnessing Dendritic Cells for Tumor Antigen Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nierkens, Stefan [Department of Tumor Immunology, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 28, Nijmegen 6525 GA (Netherlands); Janssen, Edith M., E-mail: edith.janssen@cchmc.org [Division of Molecular Immunology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Research Foundation, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States)

    2011-04-26

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells that are crucial for the induction of anti-tumor T cell responses. As a consequence, research has focused on the harnessing of DCs for therapeutic interventions. Although current strategies employing ex vivo-generated and tumor-antigen loaded DCs have been proven feasible, there are still many obstacles to overcome in order to improve clinical trial successes and offset the cost and complexity of customized cell therapy. This review focuses on one of these obstacles and a pivotal step for the priming of tumor-specific CD8{sup +} and CD4{sup +} T cells; the in vitro loading of DCs with tumor antigens.

  4. Socio-dramatic affective-relational intervention for adolescents with asperger syndrome & high functioning autism: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Matthew D; Mikami, Amori Yee; Levine, Karen

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a novel intervention called 'socio-dramatic affective-relational intervention' (SDARI), intended to improve social skills among adolescents with Asperger syndrome and high functioning autism diagnoses. SDARI adapts dramatic training activities to focus on in vivo practice of areas of social skill deficit among this population. SDARI was administered as a six-week summer program in a community human service agency. Nine SDARI participants and eight age- and diagnosis-group matched adolescents not receiving SDARI were compared on child- and parent-report of social functioning at three week intervals beginning six weeks prior to intervention and ending six weeks post-intervention. Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) was used to estimate growth trends between groups to assess treatment outcomes and post-treatment maintenance. Results indicated significant improvement and post-treatment maintenance among SDARI participants on several measures of child social functioning. Implications for practice and research are discussed.

  5. Improved humoral and cellular immune response against the gp120 V3 loop of HIV-1 following genetic immunization with a chimeric DNA vaccine encoding the V3 inserted into the hepatites B surface antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, A.; Nielsen, H.V.; Bryder, K.

    1998-01-01

    -2d-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope. In an attempt to improve the immunogenicity of V3 in DNA vaccines, a plasmid expressing MN V3 as a fusion protein with the highly immunogenic middle (pre-S2+S) surface antigen of hepatitis B virus (HBsAg) was constructed. Epidermal inoculation...... by gene gun was used for genetic immunization in a mouse model. Antibody and CTL responses to MN V3 and HBsAg were measured and compared with the immune responses obtained after vaccination with plasmids encoding the complete HIV-1 MN gp160 and HBsAg (pre-S2+S), respectively. DNA vaccination with the HIV...... MN gp160 envelope plasmid induced a slow and low titred anti-MN V3 antibody response at 12 weeks post-inoculation (p.i.) and a late appearing (7 weeks), weak and variable CTL response. In contrast, DNA vaccination with the HBsAg-encoding plasmid induced a rapid and high titred anti-HBsAg antibody...

  6. Human platelet antigens - 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, B R; McFarland, J G

    2014-02-01

    To date, 33 human platelet alloantigens (HPAs) have been identified on six functionally important platelet glycoprotein (GP) complexes and have been implicated in alloimmune platelet disorders including foetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT), posttransfusion purpura (PTP) and multitransfusion platelet refractoriness (MPR). The greatest number of recognized HPA (20 of 33) resides on the GPIIb/IIIa complex, which serves as the receptor for ligands important in mediating haemostasis and inflammation. These include HPA-1a, the most commonly implicated HPA in FNAIT and PTP in Caucasian populations. Other platelet GP complexes, GPIb/V/IX, GPIa/IIa and CD109, express the remaining 13 HPAs. Of the recognized HPAs, 12 occur as six serologically and genetically defined biallelic 'systems' where the -a form designates the higher frequency allele and the -b form, the lower. Twenty-one other HPAs are low-frequency or rare antigens for which postulated higher frequency -a alleles have not yet been identified as antibody specificities. In addition to the HPA markers, platelets also express ABO and human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antigens; antibodies directed at the former are occasionally important in FNAIT, and to the latter, in MPR. © 2013 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  7. Dramatic Reduction in Hospital-Acquired Pressure Injuries Using a Pink Paper Reminder System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, David C; Berringer, Christine M; Pantoja, Roselyn; Resureccion, Juji; Rainbolt, Joria M; Hokoki, Amena

    2018-03-01

    The goal of this quality improvement project was to reduce the number of hospital-acquired pressure injuries (HAPIs) by flagging extremely high-risk patients with a pink paper reminder system and implementing a pressure injury prevention order set. The pink paper reminder system is an innovative, cost-neutral, simple approach to identify patients at highest risk of pressure injury development who meet specific criteria. There are 2 steps to this intervention. First, study authors developed a new risk assessment tool, the pink paper criteria. When a patient met the specified criteria, a pink piece of paper titled "SKIN AT RISK" in a large font was hung at the head of his/her bed to reinforce preventive strategies. Next, a set of pressure injury preventive measures was ordered. This quality improvement project included all adult hospitalized patients of all specialties based in 2 Kaiser Permanente hospitals. There was a 67% reduction in HAPI incidences following the initiation of the pink paper reminder system, from a mean rate of 1.2 to 0.4 incidence of HAPIs per 1000 patient-days measured over 4 years. Identifying and flagging patients who are at extremely high risk of pressure injuries and implementing an order set of pressure injury preventive measures dramatically reduced the rate of HAPIs per 1000 patient-days.

  8. Cancer testis antigen and immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnadas DK

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Deepa Kolaseri Krishnadas, Fanqi Bai, Kenneth G Lucas Department of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Louisville, KY, USA Abstract: The identification of cancer testis (CT antigens has been an important advance in determining potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. Multiple previous studies have shown that CT antigen vaccines, using both peptides and dendritic cell vaccines, can elicit clinical and immunologic responses in several different tumors. This review details the expression of melanoma antigen family A, 1 (MAGE-A1, melanoma antigen family A, 3 (MAGE-A3, and New York esophageal squamous cell carcinoma-1 (NY-ESO-1 in various malignancies, and presents our current understanding of CT antigen based immunotherapy. Keywords: cancer testis antigens, immunotherapy, vaccine

  9. Serologic responses to somatic O and colonization-factor antigens of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deetz, T R; Evans, D J; Evans, D G; DuPont, H L

    1979-07-01

    To improve the retrospective diagnoses of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) as a cause of travelers' diarrhea, as well as to determine the presence of colonization-factor antigens in these infections, a study of serologic responses to antigens of ETEC was done. Paired sera from 60 United States students in Cholula, Puebla, Mexico, were analyzed for rises in titer of antibody to heat-labile toxin, eight somatic antigen O serogroups associated with ETEC, and two colonization-factor antigens, CFA/I and CFA/II. Only 9% had a response to O antigens, while 20% had responses to the colonization-factor antigens. Response to the colonization-factor antigens correlated significantly with response to the heat-labile toxin and with culture evidence of ETEC infection. Serologic studies confirmed that colonization-factor antigen has a role in naturally acquired cases of travelers' diarrhea and that it can be used as an additional determinant of infection with ETEC.

  10. Antigen antibody interactions

    CERN Document Server

    DeLisi, Charles

    1976-01-01

    1. 1 Organization of the Immune System One of the most important survival mechanisms of vertebrates is their ability to recognize and respond to the onslaught of pathogenic microbes to which they are conti- ously exposed. The collection of host cells and molecules involved in this recognition­ 12 response function constitutes its immune system. In man, it comprises about 10 cells 20 (lymphocytes) and 10 molecules (immunoglobulins). Its ontogenic development is c- strained by the requirement that it be capable of responding to an almost limitless variety of molecular configurations on foreign substances, while simultaneously remaining inert to those on self components. It has thus evolved to discriminate, with exquisite precision, between molecular patterns. The foreign substances which induce a response, called antigens, are typically large molecules such as proteins and polysaccharides. The portions of these with which immunoglobulins interact are called epitopes or determinants. A typical protein epitope m...

  11. Exploring Lyric, Epic, and Dramatic Voices: Stages of Incandescence in the Poetry of the Aged.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, M. Ann

    1992-01-01

    Identifies true relationships between the psyche and the lyric, epic, and dramatic voices of poetry. Shows how the acts of identifying, responding to, and composing in these three voices engage healing, inspiration, and active imagination among the aging. (SR)

  12. Increasing vaccine potency through exosome antigen targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Zachary C; Wei, Junping; Glass, Oliver K; Guo, Hongtao; Lei, Gangjun; Yang, Xiao-Yi; Osada, Takuya; Hobeika, Amy; Delcayre, Alain; Le Pecq, Jean-Bernard; Morse, Michael A; Clay, Timothy M; Lyerly, Herbert K

    2011-11-21

    While many tumor associated antigens (TAAs) have been identified in human cancers, efforts to develop efficient TAA "cancer vaccines" using classical vaccine approaches have been largely ineffective. Recently, a process to specifically target proteins to exosomes has been established which takes advantage of the ability of the factor V like C1C2 domain of lactadherin to specifically address proteins to exosomes. Using this approach, we hypothesized that TAAs could be targeted to exosomes to potentially increase their immunogenicity, as exosomes have been demonstrated to traffic to antigen presenting cells (APC). To investigate this possibility, we created adenoviral vectors expressing the extracellular domain (ECD) of two non-mutated TAAs often found in tumors of cancer patients, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and HER2, and coupled them to the C1C2 domain of lactadherin. We found that these C1C2 fusion proteins had enhanced expression in exosomes in vitro. We saw significant improvement in antigen specific immune responses to each of these antigens in naïve and tolerant transgenic animal models and could further demonstrate significantly enhanced therapeutic anti-tumor effects in a human HER2+ transgenic animal model. These findings demonstrate that the mode of secretion and trafficking can influence the immunogenicity of different human TAAs, and may explain the lack of immunogenicity of non-mutated TAAs found in cancer patients. They suggest that exosomal targeting could enhance future anti-tumor vaccination protocols. This targeting exosome process could also be adapted for the development of more potent vaccines in some viral and parasitic diseases where the classical vaccine approach has demonstrated limitations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cancer antigen 125 and prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgdall, Estrid Vilma Solyom

    2008-01-01

    cancer antigen 125 determination may be implemented into clinical practice, cut-off levels must be evaluated and internationally defined. Studies examining serum cancer antigen 125 levels after surgery but before, during, or after treatment confirmed that changes in serum levels are of prognostic value...

  14. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurath, A.R.; Strick, N.; Baker, L.; Krugman, S.

    1982-01-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid-phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bound adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure

  15. Dramatic Response of Resistant Obsessive Compulsive Disorder to Repeated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Right Supplementary Motor Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Talaei

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The response rate to the treatment of obsessive compulsivedisorder (OCD is 21.6% to 61.3%, which shows a relativeresistance to current treatments and a need for noveltherapeutic approaches. Here we report a case of resistantOCD with fast and dramatic response to a relatively newmethod of repeated transcranial magnetic stimulation. In thismethod a pulse magnetic field emits from a coil over thesurface of the scalp to induce a localized electrical current inthe cortex below. Cortical activity can then be either inhibitedor stimulated. The patient was a 40-year-old woman withsevere OCD who admitted to our psychiatric hospital. She wastreated with 10 sessions of rTMS (110% intensity, 1 Hzfrequency and duration of 30 minutes per day / a total of 1200pulses per day on right supplementary motor area. Herimprovement evaluated serially with Yale Brown Scale. Bythe end of the 2nd day she reported a major improvement ofsymptoms. Dramatic improvement was observed in herobsessive and compulsive behaviors, and avoidance recoveredcompletely. She also reported significant improvement inability to control obsessive thoughts and impulses, and anxietysymptoms. Since repeated transcranial magnetic stimulation isa low risk method with almost no interaction with the commonmedications, as well as the faster response obtained by usingthis method, it can be used as an add-on treatment in resistantcases of OCD and even in the initial stages of this disorder.

  16. Towards patient-specific tumor antigen selection for vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Weinschenk, Toni; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Stevanović, Stefan

    2002-10-01

    In this review, we discuss the possibilities for combining the power of molecular analysis of the antigens expressed in a given individual tumor with the design of a tailored vaccine containing defined antigens. Step 1 is a differential gene expression analysis of tumor and corresponding normal tissue. Step 2 is the analysis of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) ligands on tumor cells. Step 3 is data mining with the aim to select those antigens that might be suitable for tumor attack by the adaptive immune system. Step 4 is the on-the-spot clinical grade production of the constituents of the patient tailored vaccine, e.g. peptides. Step 5 is then vaccination and monitoring. Although it will not be possible to cover all relevant antigens expressed in a tumor, the antigens that can be identified with our present technical possibilities might be enough for improved immunotherapy. The scope of the present review is to explore the possibilities and the formidable technical and logistical challenge for such individual patient-oriented antigen definition to be used for therapeutic immunization.

  17. COLONOSCOPY AND CARCINOEMBRYONIC ANTIGEN VARIATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita G SOUSA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Colonoscopy is essential for synchronous and metachronous cancer detection. Carcinoembryonic antigen is a colorectal cancer tumor marker, important as a follow-up tool in patients with previous colorectal cancer. False-positive carcinoembryonic antigen elevation results in multiples exams and in patient anxiety. In literature, there is reference to transient carcinoembryonic antigen increase with colonoscopy. Objective To evaluate the influence of bowel preparation and colonoscopy in carcinoembryonic antigen blood levels. Methods We prospectively studied subjects that underwent routine colonoscopy in our institution. Blood samples were collected (1 before bowel cleaning, (2 before colonoscopy and (3 immediately after colonoscopy. Blood carcinoembryonic antigen levels were determined by “Sandwich” immunoassay. The statistical methods used were the paired t-test and ANOVA. Results Thirty-seven patients (22M/15F were included; age range 28-84 (mean 56 years. Mean carcinoembryonic antigen values were 1.9, 2 and 1.8 for (1, (2 and (3, respectively. An increase in value (2 compared with (1 was observed in 20/37 patients (P = 0.018, mainly in younger patients and in patients requiring more endoluminal interventions. In 29/37 patients, the CEA value decreased from (2 to (3 (P = 1.3x10-7. Conclusions A trend for carcinoembryonic antigen increase after bowel cleaning was observed, especially in younger patients and in patients with more endoluminal interventions, but without clinical meaning.

  18. Colonoscopy and carcinoembryonic antigen variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Rita G; Nunes, Ana; Meira, Tânia; Carreira, Olga; Pires, Ana M; Freitas, João

    2014-01-01

    Colonoscopy is essential for synchronous and metachronous cancer detection. Carcinoembryonic antigen is a colorectal cancer tumor marker, important as a follow-up tool in patients with previous colorectal cancer. False-positive carcinoembryonic antigen elevation results in multiples exams and in patient anxiety. In literature, there is reference to transient carcinoembryonic antigen increase with colonoscopy. To evaluate the influence of bowel preparation and colonoscopy in carcinoembryonic antigen blood levels. We prospectively studied subjects that underwent routine colonoscopy in our institution. Blood samples were collected (1) before bowel cleaning, (2) before colonoscopy and (3) immediately after colonoscopy. Blood carcinoembryonic antigen levels were determined by "Sandwich" immunoassay. The statistical methods used were the paired t-test and ANOVA. Thirty-seven patients (22M/15F) were included; age range 28-84 (mean 56 years). Mean carcinoembryonic antigen values were 1.9, 2 and 1.8 for (1), (2) and (3), respectively. An increase in value (2) compared with (1) was observed in 20/37 patients (P = 0.018), mainly in younger patients and in patients requiring more endoluminal interventions. In 29/37 patients, the CEA value decreased from (2) to (3) (P = 1.3x10-7). A trend for carcinoembryonic antigen increase after bowel cleaning was observed, especially in younger patients and in patients with more endoluminal interventions, but without clinical meaning.

  19. Permeability enhancers dramatically increase zanamivir absolute bioavailability in rats: implications for an orally bioavailable influenza treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric H Holmes

    Full Text Available We have demonstrated that simple formulations composed of the parent drug in combination with generally regarded as safe (GRAS permeability enhancers are capable of dramatically increasing the absolute bioavailability of zanamivir. This has the advantage of not requiring modification of the drug structure to promote absorption, thus reducing the regulatory challenges involved in conversion of an inhaled to oral route of administration of an approved drug. Absolute bioavailability increases of up to 24-fold were observed when Capmul MCM L8 (composed of mono- and diglycerides of caprylic/capric acids in glycerol was mixed with 1.5 mg of zanamivir and administered intraduodenally to rats. Rapid uptake (t(max of 5 min and a C(max of over 7200 ng/mL was achieved. Variation of the drug load or amount of enhancer demonstrated a generally linear variation in absorption, indicating an ability to optimize a formulation for a desired outcome such as a targeted C(max for enzyme saturation. No absorption enhancement was observed when the enhancer was given 2 hr prior to drug administration, indicating, in combination with the observed tmax, that absorption enhancement is temporary. This property is significant and aligns well with therapeutic applications to limit undesirable drug-drug interactions, potentially due to the presence of other poorly absorbed polar drugs. These results suggest that optimal human oral dosage forms of zanamivir should be enteric-coated gelcaps or softgels for intraduodenal release. There continues to be a strong need and market for multiple neuraminidase inhibitors for influenza treatment. Creation of orally available formulations of inhibitor drugs that are currently administered intravenously or by inhalation would provide a significant improvement in treatment of influenza. The very simple GRAS formulation components and anticipated dosage forms would require low manufacturing costs and yield enhanced convenience. These results

  20. Oral administration of visceral adipose tissue antigens ameliorates metabolic disorders in mice and elevates visceral adipose tissue-resident CD4+CD25+Foxp3+regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiangyu; Zhang, Dali; Chen, Xiaoling; Meng, Gang; Zheng, Qian; Mai, Wenli; Wu, Yuzhang; Ye, Lilin; Wang, Li

    2017-08-16

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are linked with chronic, low-grade inflammation in visceral adipose tissue (VAT). A unique population of VAT-resident CD4 + Foxp3 + Tregs plays a crucial role in regulating VAT inflammation and metabolic homeostasis. VAT-resident Tregs display a highly restricted TCR repertoire, suggesting they recognize certain autoantigen(s) in VAT. A dramatic reduction of VAT-resident Tregs has been shown to closely correlate with obesity-related VAT chronic inflammation and metabolic disorders. Oral tolerance strategy may modulate inflammatory response to autoantigens by several mechanisms including induction of autoantigen-specific Tregs. Here, we explored the effects and cellular mechanism of oral administration of VAT pooled antigens on high-fat diet (HFD)-induced metabolic disorders in mice. Indeed, we found that oral treatment of VAT mixture antigens effectively inhibited gain in body weight and fat mass, ameliorated serum lipid parameters, and improved insulin sensitivity in HFD mice. This strategy was shown to significantly restore HFD-induced decrease of VAT-resident Tregs, accompanied by a hampered M2-type to M1-type macrophages phenotypic switch as well as decreased CD8 + T cells infiltration in VAT. Thus, oral administration of VAT antigens may be a novel and safe strategy against obesity and its related metabolic disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The NS1 glycoprotein can generate dramatic antibody-enhanced dengue viral replication in normal out-bred mice resulting in lethal multi-organ disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew K I Falconar

    Full Text Available Antibody-enhanced replication (AER of dengue type-2 virus (DENV-2 strains and production of antibody-enhanced disease (AED was tested in out-bred mice. Polyclonal antibodies (PAbs generated against the nonstructural-1 (NS1 glycoprotein candidate vaccine of the New Guinea-C (NG-C or NSx strains reacted strongly and weakly with these antigens, respectively. These PAbs contained the IgG2a subclass, which cross-reacted with the virion-associated envelope (E glycoprotein of the DENV-2 NSx strain, suggesting that they could generate its AER via all mouse Fcγ-receptor classes. Indeed, when these mice were challenged with a low dose (<0.5 LD₅₀ of the DENV-2 NSx strain, but not the NG-C strain, they all generated dramatic and lethal DENV-2 AER/AED. These AER/AED mice developed life-threatening acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, displayed by diffuse alveolar damage (DAD resulting from i dramatic interstitial alveolar septa-thickening with mononuclear cells, ii some hyperplasia of alveolar type-II pneumocytes, iii copious intra-alveolar protein secretion, iv some hyaline membrane-covered alveolar walls, and v DENV-2 antigen-positive alveolar macrophages. These mice also developed meningo-encephalitis, with greater than 90,000-fold DENV-2 AER titers in microglial cells located throughout their brain parenchyma, some of which formed nodules around dead neurons. Their spleens contained infiltrated megakaryocytes with DENV-2 antigen-positive red-pulp macrophages, while their livers displayed extensive necrosis, apoptosis and macro- and micro-steatosis, with DENV-2 antigen-positive Kuppfer cells and hepatocytes. Their infections were confirmed by DENV-2 isolations from their lungs, spleens and livers. These findings accord with those reported in fatal human "severe dengue" cases. This DENV-2 AER/AED was blocked by high concentrations of only the NG-C NS1 glycoprotein. These results imply a potential hazard of DENV NS1 glycoprotein-based vaccines

  2. Antigenic relationships among four herpesviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, W T; Plummer, G

    1973-06-01

    Common viral antigens were detected, by fluorescent-antibody studies, in cells infected with herpes simplex virus 1, squirrel monkey herpesvirus 1, bovine rhinotracheitis, and equine abortion viruses. The two primate viruses showed slight cross-neutralization.

  3. HLA-B27 antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human leukocyte antigen B27; Ankylosing spondylitis-HLA; Psoriatic arthritis-HLA; Reactive arthritis-HLA ... Erythrocyte sedimentation rate ( ESR ) Rheumatoid factor X-rays HLA testing is also used to match donated tissue ...

  4. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Christopher J; Ros, Vera I D; Stevenson, Brian; Sniegowski, Paul D; Brisson, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide an experimentally tractable system to test whether natural selection has favored mechanisms that increase evolvability. Many antigenic variation systems consist of paralogous unexpressed 'cassettes' that recombine into an expression site to rapidly alter the expressed protein. Importantly, the magnitude of antigenic change is a function of the genetic diversity among the unexpressed cassettes. Thus, evidence that selection favors among-cassette diversity is direct evidence that natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability. We used the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, as a model to test the prediction that natural selection favors amino acid diversity among unexpressed vls cassettes and thereby promotes evolvability in a primary surface antigen, VlsE. The hypothesis that diversity among vls cassettes is favored by natural selection was supported in each B. burgdorferi strain analyzed using both classical (dN/dS ratios) and Bayesian population genetic analyses of genetic sequence data. This hypothesis was also supported by the conservation of highly mutable tandem-repeat structures across B. burgdorferi strains despite a near complete absence of sequence conservation. Diversification among vls cassettes due to natural selection and mutable repeat structures promotes long-term antigenic evolvability of VlsE. These findings provide a direct demonstration that molecular mechanisms that enhance evolvability of surface antigens are an evolutionary adaptation. The molecular evolutionary processes identified here can serve as a model for the evolution of antigenic evolvability in many pathogens which utilize similar strategies to establish chronic infections.

  5. Epicutaneous sensitization with protein antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Lin Liu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the past few decades there has been a progressive understanding that epicutaneous sensitization with protein antigen is an important sensitization route in patients with atopic dermatitis. A murine protein-patch model has been established, and an abundance of data has been obtained from experiments using this model. This review discusses the characteristics of epicutaneous sensitization with protein antigen, the induced immune responses, the underlying mechanisms, and the therapeutic potential.

  6. Lym-1 Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells Exhibit Potent Anti-Tumor Effects against B-Cell Lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Long Zheng; Peisheng Hu; Brandon Wolfe; Caryn Gonsalves; Luqing Ren; Leslie A. Khawli; Harvey R. Kaslow; Alan L. Epstein

    2017-01-01

    T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) recognizing CD19 epitopes have produced remarkable anti-tumor effects in patients with B-cell malignancies. However, cancer cells lacking recognized epitopes can emerge, leading to relapse and death. Thus, CAR T cells targeting different epitopes on different antigens could improve immunotherapy. The Lym-1 antibody targets a conformational epitope of Human Leukocyte Antigen-antigen D Related (HLA-DR) on the surface of human B-cell lymphomas...

  7. Socio-dramatic transition of language use in the plays of Ola Rotimi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Literary language in African writing makes for interesting study because of the linguistic nuances and flavour of the indigenous African language of its author that finds creative expression in English. How language is used in dramatic communication is a subject of serious intellectual debate. This study, through the textual ...

  8. The Effect of Dramatized Instruction on Speaking Ability of Imam Ali University EFL Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadegh Khosronejad

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Teaching language as a second or foreign language, undoubtedly, is so demanding and seeking to find methods for facilitating this prominent practice whets the appetite of any practitioner who works in this field. Research shows that using drama in the classroom as a means of teaching helps students learn socially, academically, and developmentally. This study was an attempt to determine the effect of dramatized instruction on the speaking ability of EFL learners of Imam Ali University. Sixty EFL male students at the intermediate level participated in the study. Their age range was 19-22. Two instruments were utilized in this study; pretest, and posttest.  The data were analyzed through t-test. The data analysis indicated that the mean scores of the experimental group students (M = 72.80 were significantly different (3.29>2; df = 58 from the control group students (M = 65.39. In other words, the experimental group outperformed the control group in the posttest significantly. Moreover, the findings indicated that dramatized instruction does have a great effect on the speaking skills. This study supported the idea of effectiveness of dramatized instruction on developing speaking skill and the teachers can help the learners at lower levels promote their speaking skill through dramatized instruction in EFL classes.

  9. The Devil and his Dramatic Function in Calderon’s Autos Sacramentales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Iglesias Feijoo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In some Calderón’s autos sacramentales the character of the Devil draws the plot and establishes the dramatic action as a demiurge. He elaborates plans and strategies to confuse the Man, but he always fails. This function approaches the autos to the metatheater. Finally certain parallels with Shakespeare are suggested.

  10. Lord Kelvin and the Age-of-the-Earth Debate: A Dramatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinner, Art; Tecihman, Jurgen

    2003-01-01

    Presents a dramatization of a fictitious debate about the age of the earth that takes place at the Royal Institution, London, England, in the year 1872 among Sir William Thomson, T.H. Huxley, Sir Charles Lyell, and Hermann von Helmholtz. (Contains 17 references.) (Author/YDS)

  11. Art-House Cinema, Avant-Garde Film, and Dramatic Modernism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardullo, Bert

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about art-house cinema, avant-garde film, and dramatic modernism. He believes that the most important modes of film practice are art-house cinema and the avant-garde, both of which contrast with the classical Hollywood mode of film practice. While the latter is characterized by its commercial imperative, corporate…

  12. Athenian and Shakespearean Tragedies in Oceania: Teaching Dramatic Literatures in Fiji

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anae, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a theorised classroom-based narrative discussing the author's interdisciplinary approach to the teaching of English dramatic literatures--in particular, Sophocles' "Oedipus the King" and Shakespeare's "Macbeth"--to i-Taukei, Indo-Fijian and Pacific Islander tertiary students at a South Pacific university.…

  13. Dramatic colour changes in a bird of paradise caused by uniquely structured breast feather barbules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavenga, Doekele G.; Leertouwer, Hein L.; Marshall, N. Justin; Osorio, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The breast-plate plumage of male Lawes' parotia (Parotia lawesii) produces dramatic colour changes when this bird of paradise displays on its forest-floor lek. We show that this effect is achieved not solely by the iridescence-that is an angular-dependent spectral shift of the reflected light-which

  14. Sublingual Administration of an Adenovirus Serotype 5 (Ad5)-Based Vaccine Confirms Toll-Like Receptor Agonist Activity in the Oral Cavity and Elicits Improved Mucosal and Systemic Cell-Mediated Responses against HIV Antigens despite Preexisting Ad5 Immunity ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appledorn, Daniel M.; Aldhamen, Yasser A.; Godbehere, Sarah; Seregin, Sergey S.; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    HIV/AIDS continue to devastate populations worldwide. Recent studies suggest that vaccines that induce beneficial immune responses in the mucosal compartment may improve the efficacy of HIV vaccines. Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)-based vectors remain a promising platform for the development of effective vaccines. In an effort to improve the efficacy of Ad5-based vaccines, even in the presence of preexisting Ad5 immunity, we evaluated the potential for an Ad5-based HIV vaccine to induce antigen-specific immune responses following sublingual (s.l.) administration, a route not previously tested in regard to Ad-based vaccines. s.l. vaccination with an Ad5-based HIV-Gag vaccine resulted in a significant induction of Gag-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses in both the systemic and the mucosal compartment. We also show that s.l. immunization not only avoided preexisting Ad5 immunity but also elicited a broad repertoire of antigen-specific CTL clones. Additionally, we confirm for the first time that oral delivery of a vaccine expressing a potent Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist can stimulate innate immune responses through induction of cytokines and chemokines and activation of NK cells, NKT cells, and macrophages in vivo. These results positively correlated with improved antigen-specific CTL responses. These results could be achieved both in Ad5-naïve mice and in mice with preexisting immunity to Ad5. The simplicity of the s.l. vaccination regimen coupled with augmentation of TLR-dependent pathways active in the oral cavity makes s.l. delivery a promising method for HIV vaccine development specifically, as well as for many other vaccine applications in general. PMID:21084461

  15. Plasma-enhanced antibody immobilization for the development of a capillary-based carcinoembryonic antigen immunosensor using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiaoling; Zhan, Xuefang; Liu, Kunping; Lv, Hao; Duan, Yixiang

    2013-05-07

    In this study, antibody immobilization using a microwave-induced H2O/Ar plasma pretreatment was achieved for the first time. Plasma was used to activate the surface of a capillary-based immunosensor by increasing the density of silicon hydroxyls and dangling bonds to ensure better silanization. The capture antibodies were covalently immobilized after the silanized surface reacted with glutaraldehyde and antibodies. A Cy3-labeled detection antibody was used in combination with the antigen captured by the immunosensor to complete the sandwich-type immunoassay, and the signals were measured using a laser-induced fluorescence system. Microwave-induced H2O/Ar plasma pretreatment of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) immunosensor improved the antibody immobilization, and there was an obvious improvement in the linear detection range, i.e., 1 order of magnitude compared with a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). This novel immobilization method dramatically improved the detection limit (0.5 pmol/L CEA) and sensitivity. Assay validation studies indicated that the correlation coefficient reached 0.9978, and the relative standard deviations were Ar plasma was demonstrated to be a sensitive tool for CEA diagnostics.

  16. Antigen microarrays: descriptive chemistry or functional immunomics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prechl, József; Papp, Krisztián; Erdei, Anna

    2010-04-01

    Advances in protein microarray technology allow the generation of high content, reliable information about complex, multilevel protein interaction networks. Yet antigen arrays are used mostly only as devices for parallel immune assays describing multitudes of individual binding events. We propose here that the huge amount of immunological information hidden in the plasma of an individual could be better revealed by combining the characterization of antibody binding to target epitopes with improved estimation of effector functions triggered by these binding events. Furthermore, we could generate functional immune profiles characterizing general immune responsiveness of the individual by designing arrays incorporating epitope collections from diverse subsets of antibody targets. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Human sensitization to Ganoderma antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarlo, S M; Bell, B; Srinivasan, J; Dolovich, J; Hargreave, F E

    1979-07-01

    Continuous air sampling with a Hirst volumetric spore trap over 3 yr has identified basidiospores of Ganoderma applanatum, a bracket fungus, as the most numerous fungal spores in two southern Ontario locations. The particle size is small and the calculated total spore mass approximates that of the spores of Cladosporium and Alternaria. Extracts of Ganoderma applanatum bracket fungus and spores in w/v, 1:10 concentration were prepared after collection of samples of the fungus from local woods. Skin prick tests with the extracts were performed in 294 consecutive children and adults attending two chest/allergy clinics. Of these patients, 182 (61.9%) reacted to 1 or more of the common inhalant allergen extracts and 24 (8.2%) reacted to Ganoderma antigen. There was no consistent relationship between reactivity to Ganoderma antigen and any of the common inhaled allergens. IgE-dependent sensitization to Ganoderma was confirmed by the radioallergosorbent test (RAST). Rabbit antisera to Ganoderma antigen preparations did not appear to cross-react with preparations of the various clinically important allergens. The findings indicate that Ganoderma antigen is commonly encountered, can induce human sensitization, and has unique antigenicity among common allergens of clinical importance.

  18. Rapid profiling of the antigen regions recognized by serum antibodies using massively parallel sequencing of antigen-specific libraries.

    KAUST Repository

    Domina, Maria

    2014-12-04

    There is a need for techniques capable of identifying the antigenic epitopes targeted by polyclonal antibody responses during deliberate or natural immunization. Although successful, traditional phage library screening is laborious and can map only some of the epitopes. To accelerate and improve epitope identification, we have employed massive sequencing of phage-displayed antigen-specific libraries using the Illumina MiSeq platform. This enabled us to precisely identify the regions of a model antigen, the meningococcal NadA virulence factor, targeted by serum antibodies in vaccinated individuals and to rank hundreds of antigenic fragments according to their immunoreactivity. We found that next generation sequencing can significantly empower the analysis of antigen-specific libraries by allowing simultaneous processing of dozens of library/serum combinations in less than two days, including the time required for antibody-mediated library selection. Moreover, compared with traditional plaque picking, the new technology (named Phage-based Representation OF Immuno-Ligand Epitope Repertoire or PROFILER) provides superior resolution in epitope identification. PROFILER seems ideally suited to streamline and guide rational antigen design, adjuvant selection, and quality control of newly produced vaccines. Furthermore, this method is also susceptible to find important applications in other fields covered by traditional quantitative serology.

  19. An MHC-restricted antibody-based chimeric antigen receptor requires TCR-like affinity to maintain antigen specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela V Maus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are synthetic receptors that usually redirect T cells to surface antigens independent of human leukocyte antigen (HLA. Here, we investigated a T cell receptor-like CAR based on an antibody that recognizes HLA-A*0201 presenting a peptide epitope derived from the cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1. We hypothesized that this CAR would efficiently redirect transduced T cells in an HLA-restricted, antigen-specific manner. However, we found that despite the specificity of the soluble Fab, the same antibody in the form of a CAR caused moderate lysis of HLA-A2 expressing targets independent of antigen owing to T cell avidity. We hypothesized that lowering the affinity of the CAR for HLA-A2 would improve its specificity. We undertook a rational approach of mutating residues that, in the crystal structure, were predicted to stabilize binding to HLA-A2. We found that one mutation (DN lowered the affinity of the Fab to T cell receptor-range and restored the epitope specificity of the CAR. DN CAR T cells lysed native tumor targets in vitro, and, in a xenogeneic mouse model implanted with two human melanoma lines (A2+/NYESO+ and A2+/NYESO−, DN CAR T cells specifically migrated to, and delayed progression of, only the HLA-A2+/NY-ESO-1+ melanoma. Thus, although maintaining MHC-restricted antigen specificity required T cell receptor-like affinity that decreased potency, there is exciting potential for CARs to expand their repertoire to include a broad range of intracellular antigens.

  20. [Farmer's lung antigens in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennekamp, J; Joest, M; Sander, I; Engelhart, S; Raulf-Heimsoth, M

    2012-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that besides the long-known farmer's lung antigen sources Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula (Micropolyspora faeni), Thermoactinomyces vulgaris, and Aspergillus fumigatus, additionally the mold Absidia (Lichtheimia) corymbifera as well as the bacteria Erwinia herbicola (Pantoea agglomerans) and Streptomyces albus may cause farmer's lung in Germany. In this study the sera of 64 farmers with a suspicion of farmer's lung were examined for the following further antigens: Wallemia sebi, Cladosporium herbarum, Aspergillus versicolor, and Eurotium amstelodami. Our results indicate that these molds are not frequent causes of farmer's lung in Germany. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. DRAMATIC STRUCTURES IN RELIGIOUS ORATORY CASE STUDY – ANTIM IVIREANU`S DIDAHII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan CRISTESCU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Antim‘s „Didahii” have always been a great topic of debate but very often the discussion has remained at a general level. Our approach aims to reveal a virtual aspect of the „Didahii”. The originality of Antim‘s homilies, affirmed as well as contested, consists of both imp licit dramatic structures and specific forms of expression. These are themes and reasons of a behaviour dictated by a conjuncture understood as a play convention.

  2. Paradise, pleasure and desire: Edenic delight in some late-medieval dramatic fragments

    OpenAIRE

    James, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the biblical Paradise and its relationship with the concept of delight or pleasure. In the first section it discusses the changing descriptions and interpretations of Paradise, from the biblical text to later medieval works; it goes on to explore the Augustinian and Thomist philosophies of pleasure and delight. Finally it brings together three late-medieval dramatic texts, all of which share an interest in Paradise, and explores the ways in which these texts utilise the co...

  3. Samuel Beckett’s ‘Ill Seen’: Visual Impairment in the Late Dramatic Works

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

      Samuel Beckett’s critics have often written about his “aesthetics of impoverishment,” focusing on the ways in which Beckett impaired verbal language. Following the lead of those critics who have focused on the “ill said” in Beckett’s work, this paper traces Beckett’s use of the “ill seen”―i.e. the ways in which Beckett impaired the visual dimensions of his late dramatic works.

  4. Discrimination, developmental science, and the law: addressing dramatic shifts in civil rights jurisprudence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Roger J R

    2014-01-01

    The civil rights movement fostered dramatic shifts in legal responses to discrimination based on race, gender, and a host of other group characteristics. The legal system now evinces yet another dramatic shift, as it moves from considering difference to focusing on neutrality, from efforts that seek to counter subjugation to those that adopt a "color-blind" approach. The shifting approach already has reached laws regulating responses to the group that spurred massive civil rights reform: minority youth. The shift requires a different body of empirical evidence to address it and a new look at equality jurisprudence. This article notes the need to turn to the current understanding of prejudice and discrimination for guidance, and uses, as illustration, developmental science to shed light on the development, manifestation, and alleviation of invidious discrimination. Using that understanding, the analysis details how the legal system can benefit from that research and better address discrimination in light of dramatic changes in law. The article articulates the need to address discrimination by recognizing and enlisting the law's inculcative powers through multiple sites of inculcation, ranging from families, schools, health and justice systems to religious and community groups. The discussion concludes with brief suggestions for reform benefiting from understandings of prejudice and its expression. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graves, C.J.; Ros, V.I.D.; Stevenson, B.; Sniegowski, P.D.; Brisson, D.

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide

  6. The NS1 Glycoprotein Can Generate Dramatic Antibody-Enhanced Dengue Viral Replication in Normal Out-Bred Mice Resulting in Lethal Multi-Organ Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconar, Andrew K. I.; Martinez, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Antibody-enhanced replication (AER) of dengue type-2 virus (DENV-2) strains and production of antibody-enhanced disease (AED) was tested in out-bred mice. Polyclonal antibodies (PAbs) generated against the nonstructural-1 (NS1) glycoprotein candidate vaccine of the New Guinea-C (NG-C) or NSx strains reacted strongly and weakly with these antigens, respectively. These PAbs contained the IgG2a subclass, which cross-reacted with the virion-associated envelope (E) glycoprotein of the DENV-2 NSx strain, suggesting that they could generate its AER via all mouse Fcγ-receptor classes. Indeed, when these mice were challenged with a low dose (AER/AED. These AER/AED mice developed life-threatening acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), displayed by diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) resulting from i) dramatic interstitial alveolar septa-thickening with mononuclear cells, ii) some hyperplasia of alveolar type-II pneumocytes, iii) copious intra-alveolar protein secretion, iv) some hyaline membrane-covered alveolar walls, and v) DENV-2 antigen-positive alveolar macrophages. These mice also developed meningo-encephalitis, with greater than 90,000-fold DENV-2 AER titers in microglial cells located throughout their brain parenchyma, some of which formed nodules around dead neurons. Their spleens contained infiltrated megakaryocytes with DENV-2 antigen-positive red-pulp macrophages, while their livers displayed extensive necrosis, apoptosis and macro- and micro-steatosis, with DENV-2 antigen-positive Kuppfer cells and hepatocytes. Their infections were confirmed by DENV-2 isolations from their lungs, spleens and livers. These findings accord with those reported in fatal human “severe dengue” cases. This DENV-2 AER/AED was blocked by high concentrations of only the NG-C NS1 glycoprotein. These results imply a potential hazard of DENV NS1 glycoprotein-based vaccines, particularly against DENV strains that contain multiple mutations or genetic recombination within or between their

  7. Rational design of protamine nanocapsules as antigen delivery carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Aramundiz, José Vicente; Presas, Elena; Dalmau-Mena, Inmaculada; Martínez-Pulgarín, Susana; Alonso, Covadonga; Escribano, José M; Alonso, María J; Csaba, Noemi Stefánia

    2017-01-10

    Current challenges in global immunization indicate the demand for new delivery strategies, which could be applied to the development of new vaccines against emerging diseases, as well as to improve safety and efficacy of currently existing vaccine formulations. Here, we report a novel antigen nanocarrier consisting of an oily core and a protamine shell, further stabilized with pegylated surfactants. These nanocarriers, named protamine nanocapsules, were rationally designed to promote the intracellular delivery of antigens to immunocompetent cells and to trigger an efficient and long-lasting immune response. Protamine nanocapsules have nanometric size, positive zeta potential and high association capacity for H1N1 influenza hemagglutinin, a protein that was used here as a model antigen. The new formulation shows an attractive stability profile both, as an aqueous suspension or a freeze-dried powder formulation. In vitro studies showed that protamine nanocapsules were efficiently internalized by macrophages without eliciting significant toxicity. In vivo studies indicate that antigen-loaded nanocapsules trigger immune responses comparable to those achieved with alum, even when using significantly lower antigen doses, thus indicating their adjuvant properties. These promising in vivo data, alongside with their versatility for the loading of different antigens and oily immunomodulators and their excellent stability profile, make these nanocapsules a promising platform for the delivery of antigens. Protamine sulphate (PubChem SID: 7849283), Sodium Cholate (PubChem CID: 23668194), Miglyol (PubChem CID: 53471835), α tocopherol (PubChem CID: 14985), Tween® 20(PubChem CID: 443314), Tween® 80(PubChem CID: 5281955), TPGS (PubChem CID: 71406). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Concepts and applications for influenza antigenic cartography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Influenza antigenic cartography projects influenza antigens into a two or three dimensional map based on immunological datasets, such as hemagglutination inhibition and microneutralization assays. A robust antigenic cartography can facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection since the antigenic map can simplify data interpretation through intuitive antigenic map. However, antigenic cartography construction is not trivial due to the challenging features embedded in the immunological data, such as data incompleteness, high noises, and low reactors. To overcome these challenges, we developed a computational method, temporal Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS), by adapting the low rank MC concept from the movie recommendation system in Netflix and the MDS method from geographic cartography construction. The application on H3N2 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A viruses demonstrates that temporal MC-MDS is effective and efficient in constructing influenza antigenic cartography. The web sever is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap. PMID:21761589

  9. Multi-Wavelength Analysis of the Quasar CTA102 during a Dramatic Outburst in 2016 December

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Marscher, Alan P.; Williamson, Karen E.; Larionov, Valeri M.; Smith, Paul S.; Gurwell, Mark A.; Lahteenmaki, Anne

    2017-08-01

    Abstract: The quasar CTA102 underwent a dramatic outburst from gamma-ray toradio wavelengths in late 2016. The gamma-ray emission at 0.1-200 GeV roseup to (12.1+-0.7)x10^{-6} phot/s/cm^2, with a significant flattening of the spectral index. The blazar reached an optical brightness level never observed previously, funded in part by NASA through Fermi Guest Investigator grant NNX14AQ58G and by the National Science Foundation through grant AST-1615796.

  10. Dramatic Response of a Case ofRecurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma toSystemic Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mohammadianpanah

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common cancer among humans, and the standard treatment is surgery. Other modalities are reserved as a second line of treatment. Topical chemotherapy may be used in primary BCC. Systemic chemotherapy has no role in the primary treatment of BCC, although it may be efficacious in metastatic cases. We report the case of a patient with persistent recurrent BCC following multiple surgeries and radiotherapy, who achieved a dramatic response with a cisplatinand 5-flourouracil chemotherapy regimen.

  11. A proposal for the reorganization of citizenship education via the implementation of the dramatic metod

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökçen Özbek

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to establish the relationship between citizenship education and drama method. In this study, I propose a reorganization of the citizenship and/or democracy education by building in a component of drama method. To this end, citizenship education, as well as its applications in Europe and in Turkey, will be explained in order to provide a framework for the concept. Following this, the dramatic method and the connections between drama and citizenship education will be presented for the purpose of demonstrating the possible impact of drama on civic education.

  12. Lipophilic Muramyl Dipeptide-Antigen Conjugates as Immunostimulating Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Marian M J H P; Zom, Gijs G; Meeuwenoord, Nico; Khan, Selina; Ossendorp, Ferry; Overkleeft, Herman S; van der Marel, Gijsbert A; Filippov, Dmitri V; Codée, Jeroen D C

    2016-01-19

    Muramyl dipeptide (MDP) is the smallest peptidoglycan fragment capable of triggering the innate immune system through interaction with the intracellular NOD2 receptor. To develop synthetic vaccine modalities composed of an antigenic entity (typically a small peptide) and a molecular adjuvant with well-defined activity, we previously assembled covalent MDP-antigen conjugates. Although these were found to be capable of stimulating the NOD2 receptor and were processed by dendritic cells (DCs) leading to effective antigen presentation, DC maturation--required for an apt immune response--could not be achieved with these conjugates. To improve the efficacy of these vaccine modalities, we equipped the MDP moiety with lipophilic tails, well-known modifications to enhance the immune-stimulatory activity of MDPs. Herein we report the design and synthesis of a lipophilic MDP-antigen conjugate and show that it is a promising vaccine modality capable of stimulating the NOD2 receptor, maturing DCs, and delivering antigen cargo into the MHC-I cross-presentation pathway. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Screening Donors for Rare Antigen Constellations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Franz F

    2009-01-01

    SCREENING BLOOD DONORS FOR RARE ANTIGEN CONSTELLATIONS HAS BEEN IMPLEMENTED USING SIMPLE PCR METHODS: PCR with enzyme digestion has been used to type donor cohorts for Dombrock antigens, and PCR with sequence-specific priming to identify donors negative for antigens of high frequency. The advantages and disadvantages of the methods as well as their current state is discussed.

  14. Rv2299c, a novel dendritic cell-activating antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, fused-ESAT-6 subunit vaccine confers improved and durable protection against the hypervirulent strain HN878 in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Han-Gyu; Choi, Seunga; Back, Yong Woo; Paik, Seungwha; Park, Hye-Soo; Kim, Woo Sik; Kim, Hongmin; Cha, Seung Bin; Choi, Chul Hee; Shin, Sung Jae; Kim, Hwa-Jung

    2017-03-21

    Understanding functional interactions between DCs and antigens is necessary for achieving an optimal and desired immune response during vaccine development. Here, we identified and characterized protein Rv2299c (heat-shock protein 90 family), which effectively induced DC maturation. The Rv2299c-maturated DCs showed increased expression of surface molecules and production of proinflammatory cytokines. Rv2299c induced these effects by binding to TLR4 and stimulating the downstream MyD88-, MAPK- and NF-κB-dependent signaling pathways. The Rv2299c-maturated DCs also showed an induced Th1 cell response with bactericidal activity and expansion of effector/memory T cells. The Rv2299c-ESAT-6 fused protein had greater immunoreactivity than ESAT-6. Furthermore, boosting BCG with the fused protein significantly reduced hypervirulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis HN878 burdens post-challenge. The pathological study of the lung from the challenged mice assured the efficacy of the fused protein. The fused protein boosting also induced Rv2299c-ESAT-6-specific multifunctional CD4+ T-cell response in the lungs of the challenged mice. Our findings suggest that Rv2299c is an excellent candidate for the rational design of an effective multiantigenic TB vaccine.

  15. Impact of heat treatment on Dirofilaria immitis antigen detection in shelter dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian A. DiGangi

    2017-11-01

    heartworm diagnoses. Of the 74 dogs found to be infected with heartworms in this study, 39.2% (29 had no detectable antigen prior to heat treatment. Conclusions Heat treatment of serum samples should be considered to improve diagnostic test accuracy, particularly in dogs that reportedly received a heartworm preventive prior to antigen testing regardless of region of origin.

  16. Impact of heat treatment on Dirofilaria immitis antigen detection in shelter dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGangi, Brian A; Dworkin, Carly; Stull, Jason W; O'Quin, Jeanette; Elser, Morgan; Marsh, Antoinette E; Groshong, Lesli; Wolfson, Wendy; Duhon, Brandy; Broaddus, Katie; Gingrich, Elise N; Swiniarski, Emily; Berliner, Elizabeth A

    2017-11-09

    heartworms in this study, 39.2% (29) had no detectable antigen prior to heat treatment. Heat treatment of serum samples should be considered to improve diagnostic test accuracy, particularly in dogs that reportedly received a heartworm preventive prior to antigen testing regardless of region of origin.

  17. Dramatic effect of levetiracetam in early-onset epileptic encephalopathy due to STXBP1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilena, Robertino; Striano, Pasquale; Traverso, Monica; Viri, Maurizio; Cristofori, Gloria; Tadini, Laura; Barbieri, Sergio; Romeo, Antonino; Zara, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Syntaxin Binding Protein 1 (STXBP1) mutations determine a central neurotransmission dysfunction through impairment of the synaptic vesicle release, thus causing a spectrum of phenotypes varying from syndromic and non-syndromic epilepsy to intellectual disability of variable degree. Among the antiepileptic drugs, levetiracetam has a unique mechanism of action binding SV2A, a glycoprotein of the synaptic vesicle release machinery. We report a 1-month-old boy manifesting an epileptic encephalopathy with clonic seizures refractory to phenobarbital, pyridoxine and phenytoin that presented a dramatic response to levetiracetam with full epilepsy control and EEG normalization. Genetic analysis identified a novel de novo heterozygous mutation (c.[922A>T]p.[Lys308(∗)]) in the STXBP1 gene that severely affects the protein. The observation of a dramatic efficacy of levetiracetam in a case of STXBP1 epileptic encephalopathy refractory to other antiepileptic drugs and considerations regarding the specific mechanism of action of levetiracetam modulating the same system affected by STXBP1 mutations support the hypothesis that this drug may be able to reverse specifically the disease epileptogenic abnormalities. Further clinical observations and laboratory studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis and eventually lead to consider levetiracetam as the first choice treatment of patients with suspected or confirmed STXBP1-related epilepsies. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Pre-treatment with heat facilitates detection of antigen of Dirofilaria immitis in canine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Susan E; Munzing, Candace; Heise, Steph R; Allen, Kelly E; Starkey, Lindsay A; Johnson, Eileen M; Meinkoth, James; Reichard, Mason V

    2014-06-16

    Diagnosis of Dirofilaria immitis infection in dogs is largely dependent on detection of antigen in canine serum, plasma, or whole blood, but antigen may be bound in immune complexes and thus not detected. To develop a model for antigen blocking, we mixed serum from a microfilaremic, antigen-positive dog with that of a hypergammaglobulinemic dog not currently infected with D. immitis and converted the positive sample to antigen-negative; detection of antigen was restored when the mixed sample was heat-treated, presumably due to disruption of antigen/antibody complexes. A blood sample was also evaluated from a dog that was microfilaremic and for which microfilariae were identified as D. immitis by morphologic examination. Antigen of D. immitis was not detected in this sample prior to heating but the sample was strongly positive after heat treatment of whole blood. Taken together, our results indicate that blood samples from some dogs may contain factors that inhibit detection of antigen of D. immitis, and that heat treatment of these samples prior to testing could improve the sensitivity of these assays in some patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Gallium arsenide exposure impairs processing of particulate antigen by macrophages: modification of the antigen reverses the functional defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Constance B; McCoy, Kathleen L

    2004-06-11

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), a semiconductor used in the electronics industry, causes systemic immunosuppression in animals. The chemical's impact on macrophages to process the particulate antigen, sheep red blood cells (SRBC), for a T cell response in culture was examined after in vivo exposure of mice. GaAs-exposed splenic macrophages were defective in activating SRBC-primed lymph node T cells that could not be attributed to impaired phagocytosis. Modified forms of SRBC were generated to examine the compromised function of GaAs-exposed macrophages. SRBC were fixed to maintain their particulate nature and subsequently delipidated with detergent. Delipidation of intact SRBC was insufficient to restore normal antigen processing in GaAs-exposed macrophages. However, chemically exposed cells efficiently processed soluble sheep proteins. These findings suggest that the problem may lie in the release of sequestered sheep protein antigens, which then could be effectively cleaved to peptides. Furthermore, opsonization of SRBC with IgG compensated for the macrophage processing defect. The influence of signal transduction and phagocytosis via Fcgamma receptors on improved antigen processing could be dissociated. Immobilized anti-Fcgamma receptor antibody activated macrophages to secrete a chemokine, but did not enhance processing of unmodified SRBC by GaAs-exposed macrophages. Restoration of normal processing of particulate SRBC by chemically exposed macrophages involved phagocytosis through Fcgamma receptors. Hence, initial immune responses may be very sensitive to GaAs exposure, and the chemical's immunosuppression may be averted by opsonized particulate antigens.

  20. A Study of Effect of Dramatic Activities on Improving English Communicative Speaking Skill of Grade 11th Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iamsaard, Prisana; Kerdpol, Sakon

    2015-01-01

    This paper aimed to reexamine the current EFL communicative speaking skill in high school level in Thailand due to the coming of the entry to ASEAN at the end of the year 2015. Thai students need to be well prepared for workforce in the future since English is used as the working language in ASEAN. The purposes of this paper were to study the…

  1. Identification of an Antigen from Normal Human Tissue That Crossreacts with the Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleist, S. Von; Chavanel, G.; Burtin, P.

    1972-01-01

    A glycoprotein present in normal human tissue is characterized that is neither organ- nor tumor-specific (nonspecific crossreacting antigen) and that crossreacts (by the Ouchterlony double-diffusion technique) with the carcinoembryonic antigen. This immunological relationship indicates common determinants on the molecules of both antigens. We demonstrate that the nonspecific crossreacting antigen is not a fragment of the carcinoembryonic antigen molecule. Images PMID:4115954

  2. Observational analyses of dramatic developments of a severe air pollution event in the Beijing area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ju; Sun, Jielun; Zhou, Mingyu; Cheng, Zhigang; Li, Qingchun; Cao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Jingjiang

    2018-03-01

    A rapid development of a severe air pollution event in Beijing, China, at the end of November 2015 was investigated with unprecedented observations collected during the field campaign of the Study of Urban Rainfall and Fog/Haze (SURF-15). Different from previous statistical analyses of air pollution events and their correlations with meteorological environmental conditions in the area, the role of turbulent mixing in the pollutant transfer was investigated in detail. The analyses indicate that the major pollution source associated with high particulate matter of diameter 2.5 µm (PM2.5) was from south of Beijing. Before the day of the dramatic PM2.5 increase, the nighttime downslope flow from the mountains to the west and north of Beijing reduced the surface PM2.5 concentration northwest of Beijing. The nighttime surface stable boundary layer (SBL) not only kept the relatively less-polluted air near the surface, it also shielded the rough surface from the pollutant transfer by southwesterly winds above the SBL, leading to the fast transport of pollutants over the Beijing area at night. As the daytime convective turbulent mixing developed in the morning, turbulent mixing transported the elevated polluted air downward even though the weak surface wind was from northeast, leading to the dramatic increase of the surface PM2.5 concentration in the urban area. As a result of both turbulent mixing and advection processes with possible aerosol growth from secondary aerosol formation under the low-wind and high-humidity conditions, the PM2.5 concentration reached over 700 µg m-3 in the Beijing area by the end of the day. Contributions of the two transporting processes to the PM2.5 oscillations prior to this dramatic event were also analyzed. The study demonstrates the important role of large-eddy convective turbulent mixing in vertical transfer of pollutants and the role of the SBL in not only decoupling vertical transport of trace gases and aerosols but also in

  3. Mosquito Passage Dramatically Changes var Gene Expression in Controlled Human Plasmodium falciparum Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Anna; Petter, Michaela; Krumkamp, Ralf; Esen, Meral; Held, Jana; Scholz, Judith A M; Li, Tao; Sim, B Kim Lee; Hoffman, Stephen L; Kremsner, Peter G; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Duffy, Michael F; Tannich, Egbert

    2016-04-01

    Virulence of the most deadly malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is linked to the variant surface antigen PfEMP1, which is encoded by about 60 var genes per parasite genome. Although the expression of particular variants has been associated with different clinical outcomes, little is known about var gene expression at the onset of infection. By analyzing controlled human malaria infections via quantitative real-time PCR, we show that parasite populations from 18 volunteers expressed virtually identical transcript patterns that were dominated by the subtelomeric var gene group B and, to a lesser extent, group A. Furthermore, major changes in composition and frequency of var gene transcripts were detected between the parental parasite culture that was used to infect mosquitoes and Plasmodia recovered from infected volunteers, suggesting that P. falciparum resets its var gene expression during mosquito passage and starts with the broad expression of a specific subset of var genes when entering the human blood phase.

  4. Spinal cord injury, immunodepression, and antigenic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Katherine S; Lane, Thomas E

    2014-10-01

    The inability to effectively control microbial infection is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in individuals affected by spinal cord injury (SCI). Available evidence from clinical studies as well as animal models of SCI demonstrate that increased susceptibility to infection is derived from disruption of central nervous system (CNS) communication with the host immune system that ultimately leads to immunodepression. Understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms governing muted cellular and humoral responses that occur post-injury resulting in impaired host defense following infection is critical for improving the overall quality of life of individuals with SCI. This review focuses on studies performed using preclinical animal models of SCI to evaluate how injury impacts T and B lymphocyte responses following either viral infection or antigenic challenge. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Dramatic reduction of sulfur dioxide emission in Northeastern China in the last decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, J.

    2017-12-01

    Analysis of spatial and temporal variations of sulfur dioxide concentration in planetary boundary layer were conducted. The data were generated by NASA satellite daily from October of 2004 and were obtained through NASA Giovanni. The global monthly mean spatial distribution of sulfur dioxide showed several hot spots including: several spots on some islands in the Pacific Ocean, several spots in central America, and central Africa. Most of these hot spots of sulfur dioxide are related to known active volcanos. The biggest hot spot of sulfur dioxide were observed in Northeastern China. While high concentration sulfur dioxide was still observed in Northeastern China in 2017. The area averaged concentration of sulfur dioxide declined dramatically since its peak in 2008. This temporal trend indicates that sulfur reduction effort has been effective in the last decade or post 2008 financial crisis recovery lead an industry less sulfur dioxide emission.

  6. DNA fingerprinting on trial: the dramatic early history of a new forensic technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Jay D

    2005-09-01

    The early history of "DNA fingerprinting" in the UK might have been different were it not for the accounts of two dramatic courtroom trials, made by the participants and the media, in the mid-1980s. But these reports, which misrepresented the importance DNA evidence had in the trials, left a strong impression on the British public and on judges on both sides of the Atlantic. These trials, widely considered to be the first "victories" for DNA fingerprinting, have been frequently cited as proof of the utility and reliability of the technique, in both the UK and beyond. But in reality, it was the threat of DNA evidence being used rather than the integrity or validity of it that resolved these cases. At that time, DNA fingerprinting was still in its infancy, an untried and untested technology.

  7. Jamie Beck’s “Cinemagraphs” in the context of dramatic theory of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Woźniak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to present works of a New York photographer Jamie Beck, who developed a new type of moving photography – cinemagraphs, and look at her work from the perspective of the dramatic theory of literature. Jamie Beck in her works redefines many notions related to the visual realm. Movement and time relationship, the model identity and the impact of material on the image perception are the most interesting problems, that are connected with cinemagraphs. All these issues are analyzed in relation to fields dealing with image: André Rouille’s and Roland Barthes’ photographic theories, art history represented by Georges Didi- Huberman and Rudolf Arnheim’s “the psychology of creative eye”.

  8. The philosophical poetics of George Steiner. A rhetoric and dramatic reading of Antigones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Pego Puigbó

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In the work of George Steiner Antigones plays a singular role. It is his book more philological in a classical sense, offering simultaneously a view over the 19th and 20th century philosophical reception of the Sophocles’ tragedy. This paper tries to analyze its general design and the disposition of its parts reflecting the philosophical interpretations which Steiner himself comments according to a rhetorical grammatical methodology. Having been built on a dramatic and musical pattern, its fields of analysis are those of translation, ontology and structural anthropology from Hegel and Hölderlin to Heideggeror Lévi-Strauss. The echoes and the parallelisms between its sections reflect, on the one hand, the dialectical irony of Sören Kierkegaard and, on the other hand, the attention to the details as studied byJacob Burckhardt or Aby Warburg

  9. Remanences of Hellenistic Culture in a Dramatic Text by Arturo Clavijo Tisseur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Antonio Ramírez-Castellanos

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The study of remanences Greco-Roman cultural tradition in works of Santiago de Cuba literature from the colonial era to the present Republican era is a topic of attention from the most contemporary literary research in the region. From this epistemological approach, revisit texts and authors who are part of the patrimonial heritage in Santiago de Cuba, at present, little known or forgotten, can elucidate how the ideo-aesthetic components of the classical tradition has survived in the collective cultural imagination through times. Such is the case of the work of Arturo Clavijo Tisseur, poet, journalist, novelist and playwright, whose imprint has not been studied in detail. This paper therefore offers an analysis of the remanences of Hellenistic culture on the play El Arte entre sudarios (The art between shrouds, the first of the dramatic texts of this author, published in Santiago de Cuba in 1922. 

  10. Dramatic Clinical Response of Relapsed Metastatic Extramammary Paget’s Disease to Trastuzumab Monotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Wakabayashi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the first case of 68-year-old Japanese woman with metastatic HER2-positive extramammary Paget’s disease that showed the validity of trastuzumab monotherapy. We administered trastuzumab at a loading dose of 8 mg/kg i.v., followed by a 6 mg/kg maintenance dose every three weeks according to a protocol for HER2-positive metastatic breast cancers and a near-complete response was achieved after the tenth infusion. The patient experienced a moderate headache and flushing during the first infusion, but had no advanced effects during subsequent infusions with ibuprofen and d-chlorpheniramine maleate. Given the dramatic response, the patient has had 17 infusions of trastuzumab with no disease progression. Thus, trastuzumab has few side effects and is well tolerated for elderly patients. It may become a new choice of the adjubant therapy of this disease.

  11. Antigen delivery to macrophages using liposomal nanoparticles targeting sialoadhesin/CD169.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihsu C Chen

    Full Text Available Sialoadhesin (Sn, Siglec-1, CD169 is a member of the sialic acid binding Ig-like lectin (siglec family expressed on macrophages. Its macrophage specific expression makes it an attractive target for delivering antigens to tissue macrophages via Sn-mediated endocytosis. Here we describe a novel approach for delivering antigens to macrophages using liposomal nanoparticles displaying high affinity glycan ligands of Sn. The Sn-targeted liposomes selectively bind to and are internalized by Sn-expressing cells, and accumulate intracellularly over time. Our results show that ligand decorated liposomes are specific for Sn, since they are taken up by bone marrow derived macrophages that are derived from wild type but not Sn(-/- mice. Importantly, the Sn-targeted liposomes dramatically enhance the delivery of antigens to macrophages for presentation to and proliferation of antigen-specific T cells. Together, these data provide insights into the potential of cell-specific targeting and delivery of antigens to intracellular organelles of macrophages using Sn-ligand decorated liposomal nanoparticles.

  12. NovelTreponema pallidumRecombinant Antigens for Syphilis Diagnostics: Current Status and Future Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubanov, Aleksey; Runina, Anastassia; Deryabin, Dmitry

    2017-01-01

    The recombinant protein technology considerably promoted the development of rapid and accurate treponema-specific laboratory diagnostics of syphilis infection. For the last ten years, the immunodominant recombinant inner membrane lipoproteins are proved to be sensitive and specific antigens for syphilis screening. However, the development of an enlarged T. pallidum antigen panel for diagnostics of early and late syphilis and differentiation of syphilis stages or cured syphilis remains as actual goal of multidisciplinary expertise. Current review revealed novel recombinant antigens: surface-exposed proteins, adhesins, and periplasmic and flagellar proteins, which are promising candidates for the improved syphilis serological diagnostics. The opportunities and limitations of diagnostic usage of these antigens are discussed and the criteria for selection of optimal antigens panel summarized.

  13. Novel Treponema pallidum Recombinant Antigens for Syphilis Diagnostics: Current Status and Future Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubanov, Aleksey; Runina, Anastassia

    2017-01-01

    The recombinant protein technology considerably promoted the development of rapid and accurate treponema-specific laboratory diagnostics of syphilis infection. For the last ten years, the immunodominant recombinant inner membrane lipoproteins are proved to be sensitive and specific antigens for syphilis screening. However, the development of an enlarged T. pallidum antigen panel for diagnostics of early and late syphilis and differentiation of syphilis stages or cured syphilis remains as actual goal of multidisciplinary expertise. Current review revealed novel recombinant antigens: surface-exposed proteins, adhesins, and periplasmic and flagellar proteins, which are promising candidates for the improved syphilis serological diagnostics. The opportunities and limitations of diagnostic usage of these antigens are discussed and the criteria for selection of optimal antigens panel summarized. PMID:28523273

  14. Unpolarized Release of Vaccinia Virus and HIV Antigen by Colchicine Treatment Enhances Intranasal HIV Antigen Expression and Mucosal Humoral Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Yang, Jingyi; Bao, Rong; Chen, Yaoqing; Zhou, Dihan; He, Benxia; Zhong, Maohua; Li, Yaoming; Liu, Fang; Li, Qiaoli; Yang, Yi; Han, Chen; Sun, Ying; Cao, Yuan; Yan, Huimin

    2011-01-01

    The induction of a strong mucosal immune response is essential to building successful HIV vaccines. Highly attenuated recombinant HIV vaccinia virus can be administered mucosally, but even high doses of immunization have been found unable to induce strong mucosal antibody responses. In order to solve this problem, we studied the interactions of recombinant HIV vaccinia virus Tiantan strain (rVTT-gagpol) in mucosal epithelial cells (specifically Caco-2 cell layers) and in BALB/c mice. We evaluated the impact of this virus on HIV antigen delivery and specific immune responses. The results demonstrated that rVTT-gagpol was able to infect Caco-2 cell layers and both the nasal and lung epithelia in BALB/c mice. The progeny viruses and expressed p24 were released mainly from apical surfaces. In BALB/c mice, the infection was limited to the respiratory system and was not observed in the blood. This showed that polarized distribution limited antigen delivery into the whole body and thus limited immune response. To see if this could be improved upon, we stimulated unpolarized budding of the virus and HIV antigens by treating both Caco-2 cells and BALB/c mice with colchicine. We found that, in BALB/c mice, the degree of infection and antigen expression in the epithelia went up. As a result, specific immune responses increased correspondingly. Together, these data suggest that polarized budding limits antigen delivery and immune responses, but unpolarized distribution can increase antigen expression and delivery and thus enhance specific immune responses. This conclusion can be used to optimize mucosal HIV vaccine strategies. PMID:21935396

  15. Unpolarized release of vaccinia virus and HIV antigen by colchicine treatment enhances intranasal HIV antigen expression and mucosal humoral responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    Full Text Available The induction of a strong mucosal immune response is essential to building successful HIV vaccines. Highly attenuated recombinant HIV vaccinia virus can be administered mucosally, but even high doses of immunization have been found unable to induce strong mucosal antibody responses. In order to solve this problem, we studied the interactions of recombinant HIV vaccinia virus Tiantan strain (rVTT-gagpol in mucosal epithelial cells (specifically Caco-2 cell layers and in BALB/c mice. We evaluated the impact of this virus on HIV antigen delivery and specific immune responses. The results demonstrated that rVTT-gagpol was able to infect Caco-2 cell layers and both the nasal and lung epithelia in BALB/c mice. The progeny viruses and expressed p24 were released mainly from apical surfaces. In BALB/c mice, the infection was limited to the respiratory system and was not observed in the blood. This showed that polarized distribution limited antigen delivery into the whole body and thus limited immune response. To see if this could be improved upon, we stimulated unpolarized budding of the virus and HIV antigens by treating both Caco-2 cells and BALB/c mice with colchicine. We found that, in BALB/c mice, the degree of infection and antigen expression in the epithelia went up. As a result, specific immune responses increased correspondingly. Together, these data suggest that polarized budding limits antigen delivery and immune responses, but unpolarized distribution can increase antigen expression and delivery and thus enhance specific immune responses. This conclusion can be used to optimize mucosal HIV vaccine strategies.

  16. Honokiol nanosuspensions: preparation, increased oral bioavailability and dramatically enhanced biodistribution in the cardio-cerebro-vascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Meihua; Yu, Xin; Guo, Yifei; Wang, Yanhong; Kuang, Haixue; Wang, Xiangtao

    2014-04-01

    Honokiol is a phytochemical component with multiple pharmacological activities, but Honokiol's wider use has been restricted by its poor solubility. Using bovine serum albumin and polyvinylpyrrolidone as stabilisers in a solvent precipitation-ultrasonication method, Honokiol nanosuspensions were prepared with a mean particle size of 116.2 nm (±2 nm), a zeta potential of -44.7 mV (±1.7 mV) and a high drug payload of 50.4 ± 0.6% (w/w). X-ray powder diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry indicated that Honokiol was in an amorphous state in the nanosuspensions, in contrast with bulk Honokiol powder. Honokiol was released faster in vitro from nanosuspensions with no burst release, and the highest 98% cumulative release was after 60 h. Honokiol nanosuspensions improved the oral bioavailability of Honokiol in in vivo studies in rats with a 3.94-fold Cmax and a 2.2-fold AUC(0-t). Remarkably, in contrast to oral administration, intraperitoneal administration of Honokiol nanosuspensions could dramatically alter the biodistribution of Honokiol, resulting in a much higher drug level and tissue bioavailability in the blood, heart and brain, benefitting the treatment of cardio-cerebro-vascular diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Antigenicity of Dermatophilus congolensis hemolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalka, B; Pospísil, L

    1993-05-01

    The separated cell-free form of hemolytic exosubstance was obtained from five strains of Dermatophilus congolensis. Three strains produced exosubstance with high activity, two strains produced exosubstance with lower intensity of activity. The separated forms exhibited the same hemolytic interactions as the native forms produced by growing strains, namely the antagonism with staphylococcal beta hemolysin and the synergism with staphylococcal delta hemolysin, streptococcal CAMP factor and rhodococcal equi factor. Rabbit sera obtained after intravenous or intraperitoneal application of the separated forms contained precipitation and neutralization antibodies. Cross tests of precipitation and neutralization proved antigen identity of hemolysins of different D. congolensis, strains which makes the serodiagnostics of this species possible.

  18. Isolation of Fasciola hepatica tegument antigens.

    OpenAIRE

    Hillyer, G V

    1980-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica tegument antigens were isolated from intact worms in the cold by using Nonidet P-40. Proof of the tegumental nature of the antigens was shown by the peroxidase-antiperoxidase immunocytochemical technique at the light microscope level. The potential of F. hepatica tegument antigens for the immunodiagnosis of rabbit and human fascioliasis was shown by Ouchterlony immunodiffusion, although cross-reactivity was evident in one of six serum samples from patients infected with Schi...

  19. SNX5 is essential for efficient macropinocytosis and antigen processing in primary macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jet Phey; Teasdale, Rohan D; Gleeson, Paul A

    2012-09-15

    Macropinocytosis mediates the bulk endocytosis of solute molecules, nutrients and antigens. As this endocytic pathway is considered important in functions associated with immune responses, the molecular mechanisms regulating this pathway in immune cells is of particular significance. However, the regulators of macropinocytosis in primary cells remain poorly defined. Members of the sorting nexin (SNX) family have been implicated in macropinosome biogenesis in cultured cells and here we have analyzed the role of two SNX family members, SNX1 and its binding partner SNX5, in macropinocytosis of mouse primary macrophages. We show that endogenous SNX1 and SNX5 are localised to newly-formed macropinosomes in primary mouse macrophages and, moreover, demonstrate that SNX5 plays an essential role in macropinosome biogenesis. Depletion of SNX5 in bone marrow-derived macrophages dramatically decreased both the number and size of macropinosomes. Depletion of SNX5 also resulted in dramatic reduction in uptake and processing of soluble ovalbumin in macrophages, indicating that the majority of antigen uptake and delivery to late endosomes is via macropinocytosis. By contrast, the absence of SNX1 had no effect on endogenous SNX5 localisation and macropinosome biogenesis using macrophages from SNX1 knockout mice. Therefore, SNX5 can function independently of SNX1 and is a modulator of macropinocytosis that influences the uptake and processing of soluble antigen in primary mouse macrophages.

  20. SNX5 is essential for efficient macropinocytosis and antigen processing in primary macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jet Phey Lim

    2012-07-01

    Macropinocytosis mediates the bulk endocytosis of solute molecules, nutrients and antigens. As this endocytic pathway is considered important in functions associated with immune responses, the molecular mechanisms regulating this pathway in immune cells is of particular significance. However, the regulators of macropinocytosis in primary cells remain poorly defined. Members of the sorting nexin (SNX family have been implicated in macropinosome biogenesis in cultured cells and here we have analyzed the role of two SNX family members, SNX1 and its binding partner SNX5, in macropinocytosis of mouse primary macrophages. We show that endogenous SNX1 and SNX5 are localised to newly-formed macropinosomes in primary mouse macrophages and, moreover, demonstrate that SNX5 plays an essential role in macropinosome biogenesis. Depletion of SNX5 in bone marrow-derived macrophages dramatically decreased both the number and size of macropinosomes. Depletion of SNX5 also resulted in dramatic reduction in uptake and processing of soluble ovalbumin in macrophages, indicating that the majority of antigen uptake and delivery to late endosomes is via macropinocytosis. By contrast, the absence of SNX1 had no effect on endogenous SNX5 localisation and macropinosome biogenesis using macrophages from SNX1 knockout mice. Therefore, SNX5 can function independently of SNX1 and is a modulator of macropinocytosis that influences the uptake and processing of soluble antigen in primary mouse macrophages.

  1. Chemical camouflage of antigenic determinants: stealth erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, M D; Murad, K L; Koumpouras, F; Talbot, M; Eaton, J W

    1997-07-08

    In a number of clinical circumstances it would be desirable to artificially conceal cellular antigenic determinants to permit survival of heterologous donor cells. A case in point is the problem encountered in transfusions of patients with rare blood types or chronically transfused patients who become allosensitized to minor blood group determinants. We have tested the possibility that chemical modification of the red blood cell (RBC) membrane might serve to occlude antigenic determinants, thereby minimizing transfusion reactions. To this end, we have covalently bound methoxy(polyethylene glycol) (mPEG) to the surface of mammalian RBC via cyanuric chloride coupling. Human RBC treated with this technique lose ABO blood group reactivity as assessed by solution-phase antisera agglutination. In accord with this, we also find a profound decrease in anti-blood group antibody binding. Furthermore, whereas human monocytes avidly phagocytose untreated sheep RBC, mPEG-derivatized sheep RBC are ineffectively phagocytosed. Surprisingly, human and mouse RBC appear unaffected by this covalent modification of the cell membrane. Thus, mPEG-treated RBC are morphologically normal, have normal osmotic fragility, and mPEG-derivatized murine RBC have normal in vivo survival, even following repeated infusions. Finally, in preliminary experiments, mPEG-modified sheep RBC intraperitoneally transfused into mice show significantly improved (up to 360-fold) survival when compared with untreated sheep RBC. We speculate that similar chemical camouflage of intact cells may have significant clinical applications in both transfusion (e.g., allosensitization and autoimmune hemolytic disease) and transplantation (e.g., endothelial cells and pancreatic beta cells) medicine.

  2. T-cell target antigens across major gynecologic cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Alba; Minutolo, Nicholas G; Robinson, John M; Powell, Daniel J

    2017-06-01

    Immunotherapies have achieved remarkable success in treating different forms of cancer including melanoma, non-small cell lung carcinoma, bladder cancer, synovial cell sarcoma, and multiple myeloma using immune checkpoint blockade or gene-engineered T-cells. Although gynecologic cancers have not been historically classified as immunogenic tumors, growing evidence has shown that they are in fact able to elicit endogenous antitumor immune responses suggesting that patients with these cancers may benefit from immunotherapy. Modest clinical success has been accomplished in early trials using immunotherapeutic modalities for major gynecologic cancers including ovarian, cervical, and endometrial cancer. Unlike solid cancers with high mutational burdens, or hematologic malignancies where target antigens are expressed homogenously and exclusively by tumor cells, identifying tumor-restricted antigens has been challenging when designing a T-cell targeted therapy for gynecologic tumors. Nevertheless, mounting preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that targeting shared, viral or patient-specific mutated antigens expressed by gynecologic tumors with T-cells may improve patient outcome. Here we review the strengths and weaknesses of targeting these various antigens, as well as provide insight into the future of immunotherapy for gynecologic cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A DRAMATICALLY REDUCED SIZE IN THE GANTRY DESIGN FOR THE PROTON-CARBON THERAPY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TRBOJEVIC, D.; GUPTA, R.; PARKER, B.; KEIL, E.; SESSLER, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Gantries in the proton/carbon cancer therapy machines represent the major cost and are of the largest size. This report explains a new way to the gantry design. The size and cost of the gantries are reduced and their use is simplified by using the fixed magnetic field. The ''new'' gantry is made of a very large momentum acceptance non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) quarter and half arc beam lines. The gantry is made of combined function magnets with a very strong focusing and small dispersion function. Additional magnets with a fast response are required to allow adjustments of the beam position for different energies at the beginning of the gantry. Additional strong focusing magnets following the gantry have also to be adjustable to provide required spot size and radial scanning above the patients. The fixed field combined function magnets could be made of small permanent magnets for the proton machine, or of the high temperature superconductors or superconductors for the carbon machine, reducing dramatically the size

  4. Regulatory Bodies: Dramatic Creativity, Control and the Commodity of Lady Audley's Secret

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Mattacks

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available 'Lady Audley's Secret' resonates with a sense of theatricality grounded in the eponymous heroine's propensity for visual tactics to attract an audience. Repositioning the dramatic exchange between actress and audience within the domestic sphere sensitised the reader to the question of diagnosing morally degenerative artificiality whilst involving the reader in the complicit act of encouraging Lady Audley's performance through consumer demand. This complex relationship between consumerism, theatre and society saw Lady Audley's figure assume an iconic status, but little has been written on the creative interplay between the novel and the theatre itself. Beginning with the way in which aspiring actresses used Lady Audley as a model to display their histrionic variety, I argue that the theatre used her character to engage with the complex connections between drama and commodity culture. Her autophagy in favour of a false identity provided a model for actresses to visualise self-commodification whilst highlighting the tension between the material practices of the theatre and the materiality of commodity culture. The drive for regulation of the theatrical medium finds its locus in the licensing text/published acting edition of William E. Suter's 'Lady Audley's Secret' (1863. Here I move to show how Suter's adaptation functioned as a site where the state regulation of the theatre was explored and contested. These unauthorised images of Lady Audley's containment came to symbolise not only the regulatory processes of licensing and copyright, but also the creative exploitation of a commodity culture critiqued through the dehumanised form of Braddon's original heroine.

  5. Weight gain reveals dramatic increases in skeletal muscle extracellular matrix remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Charmaine S; Covington, Jeffrey D; Bajpeyi, Sudip; Tchoukalova, Yourka; Burk, David; Johannsen, Darcy L; Zingaretti, Cristina M; Cinti, Saverio; Ravussin, Eric

    2014-05-01

    In animal models of obesity, chronic inflammation and dysregulated extracellular matrix remodeling in adipose tissue leads to insulin resistance. Whether similar pathophysiology occurs in humans is not clear. The aim of this study was to test whether 10% weight gain induced by overfeeding triggers inflammation and extracellular matrix remodeling (gene expression, protein, histology) in skeletal muscle and sc adipose tissue in humans. We also investigated whether such remodeling was associated with an impaired metabolic response (hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp). Twenty-nine free-living males were fed 40% over their baseline energy requirements for 8 weeks. Ten percent body weight gain prompted dramatic up-regulation of a repertoire of extracellular matrix remodeling genes in muscle and to a lesser degree in adipose tissue. The amount of extracellular matrix genes in the muscle were directly associated with the amount of lean tissue deposited during overfeeding. Despite weight gain and impaired insulin sensitivity, there was no change in local adipose tissue or systemic inflammation, but there was a slight increase in skeletal muscle inflammation. We propose that skeletal muscle extracellular matrix remodeling is another feature of the pathogenic milieu associated with energy excess and obesity, which, if disrupted, may contribute to the development of metabolic dysfunction.

  6. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Bullous Pemphigoid with Dramatic Response to Dapsone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, Maria Cristina; Corsello, Giovanni; Prinzi, Eugenia; Cimaz, Rolando

    2017-03-29

    BACKGROUND Bullous pemphigoid is an autoimmune blistering disease, with relapses, isolated or associated with other autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Joint manifestations rapidly respond to small or moderate doses of corticosteroids, whereas skin manifestations usually respond to antimalarial drugs. CASE REPORT We describe the clinical case of an 11-year-old girl with SLE. She showed bullous skin lesions with arthralgia, mild proteinuria, resolved after steroid treatment. At the tapering of her prednisone dose, the patient had new skin lesions requiring an increased dose of prednisone. She started dapsone at the dosage of 1 mg/kg/day, maintaining low dose prednisone; this treatment was successfully followed by the dramatic disappearance of skin lesions and limb pain. CONCLUSIONS Bullous skin lesions can represent the first clinical presentation of pediatric SLE and could influence the treatment and the outcome of these patients. This case showed an atypical course as both skin manifestations and arthritis promptly and persistently resolved with dapsone without the use of high-dose glucocorticoids. Only a few cases of patients with SLE associated with bullous pemphigoid have been reported in the literature, and very few in the pediatric population.

  7. Analysing the development of TV news programmes: from information to dramatization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maribel Rodríguez Fidalgo, Ph.D.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The TV news programme is the backbone of all television networks, be they national, regional or local. These types of programmes have been changing over the time. The essence of the information is being modified and has adopted a new format. Based on these principles, this research analyses the evolution of the language used on the Spanish TV news programmes, from their origins until today. This research has been carried out in three different phases: late 1980s, the 1990s and recent years. These stages were thoroughly examined through surveys applied to representative samples of the population. The results showed that TV news programmes have been acquiring a changing narrative style throughout time: they began using an “objective” narrative, followed by a mediated type, and finally dramatized narrative which uses shocking visual content and aims to achieve audience’s sensibilization and identification with news’ protagonists. The spectacularization of information has become the identitary feature of the current TV news programmes as a response to the need of reaching higher audience ratings.

  8. Living on the Edge: Parasite Prevalence Changes Dramatically across a Range Edge in an Invasive Gecko.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Andrew; Barnett, Louise K; Hoskin, Conrad; Phillips, Ben L

    2017-02-01

    Species interactions can determine range limits, and parasitism is the most intimate of such interactions. Intriguingly, the very conditions on range edges likely change host-parasite dynamics in nontrivial ways. Range edges are often associated with clines in host density and with environmental transitions, both of which may affect parasite transmission. On advancing range edges, founder events and fitness/dispersal costs of parasitism may also cause parasites to be lost on range edges. Here we examine the prevalence of three species of parasite across the range edge of an invasive gecko, Hemidactylus frenatus, in northeastern Australia. The gecko's range edge spans the urban-woodland interface at the edge of urban areas. Across this edge, gecko abundance shows a steep decline, being lower in the woodland. Two parasite species (a mite and a pentastome) are coevolved with H. frenatus, and these species become less prevalent as the geckos become less abundant. A third species of parasite (another pentastome) is native to Australia and has no coevolutionary history with H. frenatus. This species became more prevalent as the geckos become less abundant. These dramatic shifts in parasitism (occurring over 3.5 km) confirm that host-parasite dynamics can vary substantially across the range edge of this gecko host.

  9. Dramatic Increases of Soil Microbial Functional Gene Diversity at the Treeline Ecotone of Changbai Mountain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Congcong; Shi, Yu; Ni, Yingying; Deng, Ye; Van Nostrand, Joy D; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Chu, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    The elevational and latitudinal diversity patterns of microbial taxa have attracted great attention in the past decade. Recently, the distribution of functional attributes has been in the spotlight. Here, we report a study profiling soil microbial communities along an elevation gradient (500-2200 m) on Changbai Mountain. Using a comprehensive functional gene microarray (GeoChip 5.0), we found that microbial functional gene richness exhibited a dramatic increase at the treeline ecotone, but the bacterial taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing did not exhibit such a similar trend. However, the β-diversity (compositional dissimilarity among sites) pattern for both bacterial taxa and functional genes was similar, showing significant elevational distance-decay patterns which presented increased dissimilarity with elevation. The bacterial taxonomic diversity/structure was strongly influenced by soil pH, while the functional gene diversity/structure was significantly correlated with soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC). This finding highlights that soil DOC may be a good predictor in determining the elevational distribution of microbial functional genes. The finding of significant shifts in functional gene diversity at the treeline ecotone could also provide valuable information for predicting the responses of microbial functions to climate change.

  10. Samuel Beckett's "Rockaby": dramatizing the plight of the solitary elderly at life's end.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groninger, Hunter; Childress, Marcia Day

    2007-01-01

    Irish playwright Samuel Beckett's spare, compact, and provocative play Rockaby (1981) is a study in old age, isolation, and disengagement from life. In it, an elderly woman rocks in a chair while the audience hears a distant voice remembering her lifelong search for human contact or communion. The play dramatizes the woman's intense physical and psychological isolation and the last sputterings of her impulse to narrate. Such radical isolation may be a necessary precondition for a person relinquishing the narrating that Beckett equates with being, and surrendering unto death. Despite its apparent simplicity, the play powerfully explores the nature of aging in contemporary society, quality-of-life issues for the frail, solitary elderly in our communities and health-care institutions, and how the elderly prepare for life's end in a death-denying culture. Rockaby is thus a text that can help clinicians and other caregivers appreciate the predicament of solitary elderly persons nearing life's end and better understand how we all must manage one day the lonely, self-abnegating yet also paradoxically self-assertive act of dying.

  11. DRAMAtic transforms in magic angle spinning recoupling NMR: The Bessel function pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Russell; Hancock, Jason; Siemens, Mark; Jarrell, Harold; Siminovitch, David

    2005-07-01

    In magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR recoupling experiments, the extraction of multiple couplings or a coupling distribution from the observed dephasing signals remains a challenging problem. At least for REDOR experiments, the REDOR transform solves this problem, enabling the simultaneous measurement of multiple dipolar couplings. Focusing on the quadrupolar dephasing observed in QUADRAMA experiments as a representative example, we demonstrate that the same analytical form used for the mathematical description of REDOR dephasing also describes the dephasing observed in a wide variety of MAS NMR recoupling experiments. This fact immediately extends REDOR transform techniques to a much broader suite of recoupling experiments than had previously been realized, including those of DRAMA, MELODRAMA and QUADRAMA. As an illustration, we use the DRAMAtic transform to provide the first inversion of a QUADRAMA dephasing signal to extract the quadrupole coupling distribution. Using a complete elliptic integral of the first kind, we further develop a novel expression for the Pake-spun powder patterns of the corresponding recoupled lineshapes. Our methods and results reinforce the central role that Bessel functions can play in simplifying the integrals that define both the dephasing signals in the time domain, and their Fourier transforms in the frequency domain.

  12. Who gets custody now? Dramatic changes in children's living arrangements after divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancian, Maria; Meyer, Daniel R; Brown, Patricia R; Cook, Steven T

    2014-08-01

    This article reexamines the living arrangements of children following their parents' divorce, using Wisconsin Court Records, updating an analysis that showed relatively small but significant increases in shared custody in the late 1980s and early 1990s. These changes have accelerated markedly in the intervening years: between 1988 and 2008, the proportion of mothers granted sole physical custody fell substantially, the proportion of parents sharing custody increased dramatically, and father-sole custody remained relatively stable. We explore changes in the correlates of alternative custody outcomes, showing that some results from the earlier analysis still hold (for example, cases with higher total family income are more likely to have shared custody), but other differences have lessened (shared-custody cases have become less distinctive as they have become more common). Despite the considerable changes in marriage and divorce patterns over this period, we do not find strong evidence that the changes in custody are related to changes in the characteristics of families experiencing a divorce; rather, changes in custody may be the result of changes in social norms and the process by which custody is determined.

  13. Membrane Proteins Are Dramatically Less Conserved than Water-Soluble Proteins across the Tree of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojo, Victor; Dessimoz, Christophe; Pomiankowski, Andrew; Lane, Nick

    2016-11-01

    Membrane proteins are crucial in transport, signaling, bioenergetics, catalysis, and as drug targets. Here, we show that membrane proteins have dramatically fewer detectable orthologs than water-soluble proteins, less than half in most species analyzed. This sparse distribution could reflect rapid divergence or gene loss. We find that both mechanisms operate. First, membrane proteins evolve faster than water-soluble proteins, particularly in their exterior-facing portions. Second, we demonstrate that predicted ancestral membrane proteins are preferentially lost compared with water-soluble proteins in closely related species of archaea and bacteria. These patterns are consistent across the whole tree of life, and in each of the three domains of archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotes. Our findings point to a fundamental evolutionary principle: membrane proteins evolve faster due to stronger adaptive selection in changing environments, whereas cytosolic proteins are under more stringent purifying selection in the homeostatic interior of the cell. This effect should be strongest in prokaryotes, weaker in unicellular eukaryotes (with intracellular membranes), and weakest in multicellular eukaryotes (with extracellular homeostasis). We demonstrate that this is indeed the case. Similarly, we show that extracellular water-soluble proteins exhibit an even stronger pattern of low homology than membrane proteins. These striking differences in conservation of membrane proteins versus water-soluble proteins have important implications for evolution and medicine. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  14. Dramatic effect of curvature on DW velocity in chiral domain walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Chirag; Yang, See-Hun; Phung, Timothy; Pushp, Aakash; Parkin, Stuart S. P.; Magnetoelectronics Group, IBM Almaden Team

    The use of current pulses to manipulate domain walls (DWs) in nanowires is one of the most exciting developments in spintronics over the past decade, promising a range of novel devices. However, even after more than 10 years of work on current induced DW motion it has not been realized that the curvature of the nanowire can affect the speed of chiral DWs. Here we show that simply changing the sign of the curvature of a nanowire, dramatically changes the speed of Néel DWs in perpendicularly magnetized nanowires, by up to a factor of 10. We find that, DWs have an increased or decreased velocity in wires of a given curvature, independent of the DW chirality and the sign of the current induced torques. The fundamental origin of this effect is due to a current induced tilting of the DW that breaks the symmetry of the DW's motion with respect to the curvature of the wire. Whilst the strong dependence of the DW velocity on the nanowire's curvature may offer added device functionalities, we find that in synthetic antiferromagnetic nanowires, the influence of the curvature on the DW's velocity can be completely removed.

  15. Blastogenic response of human lymphocytes to early antigen(s) of human cytomegalovirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Waner, J L; Kong, N; Biano, S

    1983-01-01

    The lymphocytes of asymptomatic, seropositive donors demonstrated blastogenic responses to early antigens of human cytomegalovirus whether or not antibodies to early antigens were detectable. The lymphocytes of six of nine patients with active cytomegalovirus infections gave stimulation indexes of greater than or equal to 2.00 with antigens of productively infected cells, whereas only two patients demonstrated comparable stimulation indexes with early antigens. Four patients with stimulation ...

  16. Antigenic cartography of H1N1 influenza viruses using sequence-based antigenic distance calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Christopher S; McCall, Patrick R; Stern, Harry A; Yang, Hongmei; Topham, David J

    2018-02-12

    The ease at which influenza virus sequence data can be used to estimate antigenic relationships between strains and the existence of databases containing sequence data for hundreds of thousands influenza strains make sequence-based antigenic distance estimates an attractive approach to researchers. Antigenic mismatch between circulating strains and vaccine strains results in significantly decreased vaccine effectiveness. Furthermore, antigenic relatedness between the vaccine strain and the strains an individual was originally primed with can affect the cross-reactivity of the antibody response. Thus, understanding the antigenic relationships between influenza viruses that have circulated is important to both vaccinologists and immunologists. Here we develop a method of mapping antigenic relationships between influenza virus stains using a sequence-based antigenic distance approach (SBM). We used a modified version of the p-all-epitope sequence-based antigenic distance calculation, which determines the antigenic relatedness between strains using influenza hemagglutinin (HA) genetic coding sequence data and provide experimental validation of the p-all-epitope calculation. We calculated the antigenic distance between 4838 H1N1 viruses isolated from infected humans between 1918 and 2016. We demonstrate, for the first time, that sequence-based antigenic distances of H1N1 Influenza viruses can be accurately represented in 2-dimenstional antigenic cartography using classic multidimensional scaling. Additionally, the model correctly predicted decreases in cross-reactive antibody levels with 87% accuracy and was highly reproducible with even when small numbers of sequences were used. This work provides a highly accurate and precise bioinformatics tool that can be used to assess immune risk as well as design optimized vaccination strategies. SBM accurately estimated the antigenic relationship between strains using HA sequence data. Antigenic maps of H1N1 virus strains reveal

  17. Purification of nonlipopolysaccharide antigen from Brucella abortus during preparation of antigen used for indirect hemolysis test.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, E M; Houle, J J

    1986-01-01

    The indirect hemolysis test (IHLT) for the diagnosis of brucellosis uses a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antigen obtained by dimethyl sulfoxide extraction of Brucella abortus. We showed that a non-LPS antigen can be obtained as a by-product of the IHLT antigen preparation. The antigen was purified to homogeneity by a combination of gel-filtration chromatography and ion-exchange chromatography. The substance contained 8% protein and about 65% carbohydrate. The molecular weight of the primary unit w...

  18. A computational framework for influenza antigenic cartography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2010-10-07

    Influenza viruses have been responsible for large losses of lives around the world and continue to present a great public health challenge. Antigenic characterization based on hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay is one of the routine procedures for influenza vaccine strain selection. However, HI assay is only a crude experiment reflecting the antigenic correlations among testing antigens (viruses) and reference antisera (antibodies). Moreover, antigenic characterization is usually based on more than one HI dataset. The combination of multiple datasets results in an incomplete HI matrix with many unobserved entries. This paper proposes a new computational framework for constructing an influenza antigenic cartography from this incomplete matrix, which we refer to as Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS). In this approach, we first reconstruct the HI matrices with viruses and antibodies using low-rank matrix completion, and then generate the two-dimensional antigenic cartography using multidimensional scaling. Moreover, for influenza HI tables with herd immunity effect (such as those from Human influenza viruses), we propose a temporal model to reduce the inherent temporal bias of HI tables caused by herd immunity. By applying our method in HI datasets containing H3N2 influenza A viruses isolated from 1968 to 2003, we identified eleven clusters of antigenic variants, representing all major antigenic drift events in these 36 years. Our results showed that both the completed HI matrix and the antigenic cartography obtained via MC-MDS are useful in identifying influenza antigenic variants and thus can be used to facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection. The webserver is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap.

  19. Real-time PCR analysis of genes encoding tumor antigens in esophageal tumors and a cancer vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinert, Brian T; Krishnadath, Kausilia K; Milano, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    Tumor antigens are the primary target of therapeutic cancer vaccines. We set out to define and compare the expression pattern of tumor antigen genes in esophagus carcinoma biopsies and in an allogeneic tumor lysate-based cancer vaccine, MelCancerVac. Cells used for vaccine production were treated...... with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR) to determine whether this treatment could improve the profile of tumor antigen genes expressed in these cells. In addition, the presence of MAGE-A tumor antigen protein was evaluated in the purified tumor cell lysate used...

  20. Clinical simulation with dramatization: gains perceived by students and health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negri, Elaine Cristina; Mazzo, Alessandra; Martins, José Carlos Amado; Pereira, Gerson Alves; Almeida, Rodrigo Guimarães Dos Santos; Pedersoli, César Eduardo

    2017-08-03

    to identify in the literature the gains health students and professionals perceive when using clinical simulation with dramatization resources. integrative literature review, using the method proposed by the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI). A search was undertaken in the following databases: Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature, Web of Science, National Library of Medicine, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, The Cochrane Library, Scopus, Scientific Electronic Library Online. 53 studies were analyzed, which complied with the established inclusion criteria. Among the different gains obtained, satisfaction, self-confidence, knowledge, empathy, realism, reduced level of anxiety, comfort, communication, motivation, capacity for reflection and critical thinking and teamwork stand out. the evidence demonstrates the great possibilities to use dramatization in the context of clinical simulation, with gains in the different health areas, as well as interprofessional gains. identificar na literatura quais os ganhos percebidos pelos estudantes e profissionais da área de saúde, utilizando-se da simulação clínica realizada com recursos da dramatização. revisão integrativa da literatura, com a metodologia proposta pelo Instituto Joanna Briggs (JBI), com busca nas bases de dados: Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde, Web of Science, National Library of Medicine, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, The Cochrane Library, Scopus, Scientific Electronic Library Online. foram analisados 53 estudos, que atenderam os critérios de inclusão estabelecidos. Entre os diversos ganhos obtidos, destaca-se a satisfação, autoconfiança, conhecimento, empatia, realismo, diminuição do nível de ansiedade, conforto, comunicação, motivação, capacidade de reflexão e de pensamento crítico e trabalho em equipe. as evidências demonstram a ampla possibilidade de uso da dramatização no contexto de

  1. A Dramatic Increase in Tongue Tie-Related Articles: A 67 Years Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin-Nun, Alona; Kasirer, Yair M; Mimouni, Francis B

    2017-09-01

    Tongue tie or ankyloglossia articles are recorded in the Medline since 1949. To study trends in yearly number of tongue tie or ankyloglossia publications. Medline search engine was used to determine the yearly number of published consensus statements from 1949 to 2016. Keywords of tongue tie OR ankyloglossia OR frenotomy OR frenulotomy were used for the search. Articles were classified as case reports (or series), reviews, editorials (or opinions), cohort studies, clinical trials (nonrandomized), randomized controlled trials (RCT), and systematic reviews (SR). Linear or polynomial regression was used to determine trends. We also systematically summarized all RCTs published to date. The total number of yearly published articles increased in a cubic fashion (r 2  = 82.6%, p < 0.0001) over time (0-7 per year from 1949 to 1989, and up to 27-44 in the last 5 years). In terms of strength of evidence hierarchy, most articles belonged to low hierarchy categories (case reports 37.9%, reviews 15.4%, and editorials/opinions 13.4%), with only 8 RCTs and 10 SRs (all of them published during the last 10 years of the study period). The yearly number of tongue tie or ankyloglossia-related articles has increased dramatically in past few years. Most articles bring little evidence, but the past few years have witnessed publication of few RCTs and SRs. If this trend continues, much more solid evidence should accumulate about diagnosis and management of tongue tie, as it relates to breastfeeding and other outcomes.

  2. Combining xenoestrogens at levels below individual no-observed-effect concentrations dramatically enhances steroid hormone action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapakse, Nissanka; Silva, Elisabete; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2002-09-01

    The low potency of many man-made estrogenic chemicals, so-called xenoestrogens, has been used to suggest that risks arising from exposure to individual chemicals are negligible. Another argument used to dismiss concerns of health effects is that endogenous steroidal estrogens are too potent for xenoestrogens to contribute significantly to estrogenic effects. Using a yeast reporter gene assay with the human estrogen receptoralpha, we tested these ideas experimentally by assessing the ability of a combination of 11 xenoestrogens to affect the actions of 17ss-estradiol. Significantly, each xenoestrogen was present at a level well below its no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC). To derive accurate descriptions of low effects, we recorded concentration-response relationships for each xenoestrogen and for 17ss-estradiol. We used these data to predict entire concentration-response curves of mixtures of xenoestrogens with 17ss-estradiol, assuming additive combination effects. Over a large range of concentrations, the experimentally observed responses decisively confirmed the model predictions. The combined additive effect of the 11 xenoestrogens led to a dramatic enhancement of the hormone's action, even when each single agent was present below its NOEC. Our results show that not even sub-NOEC levels of xenoestrogens can be considered to be without effect on potent steroidal estrogens when they act in concert with a large number of similarly acting chemicals. It remains to be seen to what degree these effects can be neutralized by environmental chemicals with antiestrogenic activity. Nevertheless, potential human and wildlife responses induced by additive combination effects of xenoestrogens deserve serious consideration.

  3. Urbanization dramatically altered the water balances of a paddy field dominated basin in Southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, L.; Sun, G.; Liu, Y.; Wan, J.; Qin, M.; Qian, H.; Liu, C.; John, R.; Fan, P.; Chen, J.

    2015-02-01

    Rice paddy fields provide important ecosystem services (e.g., food production, water retention, carbon sequestration) to a large population globally. However, these benefits are declining as a result of rapid environmental and socioeconomic transformations characterized by population growth, urbanization, and climate change in many Asian countries. This case study examined the responses of streamflow and watershed water balances to the decline of rice paddy fields due to urbanization in the Qinhuai River Basin in southern China where massive industrialization has occurred in the region during the past three decades. We found that streamflow increased by 58% and evapotranspiration (ET) decreased by 23% during 1986-2013 as a result of an increase in urban areas of three folds and reduction of rice paddy field by 27%. Both highflows and lowflows increased significantly by about 28% from 2002 to 2013. The increases in streamflow were consistent with the decreases in ET and leaf area index monitored by independent remote sensing MODIS data. The reduction in ET and increase in streamflow was attributed to the large cropland conversion that overwhelmed the effects of regional climate warming and climate variability. Converting traditional rice paddy fields to urban use dramatically altered land surface conditions from a water-dominated to a human-dominated landscape, and thus was considered as one of the extreme types of contemporary hydrologic disturbances. The ongoing large-scale urbanization in the rice paddy-dominated regions in the humid southern China, and East Asia, will likely elevate stormflow volume, aggravate flood risks, and intensify urban heat island effects. Understanding the linkage between land use change and changes in hydrological processes is essential for better management of urbanizing watersheds.

  4. Dramatic reduction of dimensionality in large biochemical networks owing to strong pair correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Michael; Mukherjee, Sayak; Jayaprakash, Ciriyam; Das, Jayajit

    2012-01-01

    Large multi-dimensionality of high-throughput datasets pertaining to cell signalling and gene regulation renders it difficult to extract mechanisms underlying the complex kinetics involving various biochemical compounds (e.g. proteins and lipids). Data-driven models often circumvent this difficulty by using pair correlations of the protein expression levels to produce a small number (fewer than 10) of principal components, each a linear combination of the concentrations, to successfully model how cells respond to different stimuli. However, it is not understood if this reduction is specific to a particular biological system or to nature of the stimuli used in these experiments. We study temporal changes in pair correlations, described by the covariance matrix, between concentrations of different molecular species that evolve following deterministic mass-action kinetics in large biologically relevant reaction networks and show that this dramatic reduction of dimensions (from hundreds to less than five) arises from the strong correlations between different species at any time and is insensitive to the form of the nonlinear interactions, network architecture, and to a wide range of values of rate constants and concentrations. We relate temporal changes in the eigenvalue spectrum of the covariance matrix to low-dimensional, local changes in directions of the system trajectory embedded in much larger dimensions using elementary differential geometry. We illustrate how to extract biologically relevant insights such as identifying significant timescales and groups of correlated chemical species from our analysis. Our work provides for the first time, to our knowledge, a theoretical underpinning for the successful experimental analysis and points to a way to extract mechanisms from large-scale high-throughput datasets. PMID:22378749

  5. Dramatic reduction of dimensionality in large biochemical networks owing to strong pair correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Michael; Mukherjee, Sayak; Jayaprakash, Ciriyam; Das, Jayajit

    2012-08-07

    Large multi-dimensionality of high-throughput datasets pertaining to cell signalling and gene regulation renders it difficult to extract mechanisms underlying the complex kinetics involving various biochemical compounds (e.g. proteins and lipids). Data-driven models often circumvent this difficulty by using pair correlations of the protein expression levels to produce a small number (fewer than 10) of principal components, each a linear combination of the concentrations, to successfully model how cells respond to different stimuli. However, it is not understood if this reduction is specific to a particular biological system or to nature of the stimuli used in these experiments. We study temporal changes in pair correlations, described by the covariance matrix, between concentrations of different molecular species that evolve following deterministic mass-action kinetics in large biologically relevant reaction networks and show that this dramatic reduction of dimensions (from hundreds to less than five) arises from the strong correlations between different species at any time and is insensitive to the form of the nonlinear interactions, network architecture, and to a wide range of values of rate constants and concentrations. We relate temporal changes in the eigenvalue spectrum of the covariance matrix to low-dimensional, local changes in directions of the system trajectory embedded in much larger dimensions using elementary differential geometry. We illustrate how to extract biologically relevant insights such as identifying significant timescales and groups of correlated chemical species from our analysis. Our work provides for the first time, to our knowledge, a theoretical underpinning for the successful experimental analysis and points to a way to extract mechanisms from large-scale high-throughput datasets.

  6. Diagnostic Values of Carcinoembryonic Antigen, Cancer Antigen 15-3 and Cancer Antigen 125 Levels in Nipple Discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Song; Gai, Xiaodong; Wang, Yongmei; Liang, Weili; Gao, Haidong; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Huimin; Liu, Yanhong; Wang, Jianli; Ma, Rong

    2015-12-31

    An expedient and cost-effective diagnostic tool is needed to complement galactography and exfoliative cytology for detection of benign or malignant breast diseases with nipple discharge. The aim of this prospective study is to explore the utility of carcinoembryonic antigen, cancer antigen 15-3 and cancer antigen 125 levels in nipple discharge for the diagnosis of various breast diseases. We evaluated the pre-operative tumor marker levels in 153 nipple discharge samples collected from one or both breasts of 142 women undergoing surgery. Patients with nipple discharge underwent auxiliary examination (ultrasonography, exfoliative cytology, ductoscopy and galactography). Statistically higher levels of carcinoembryonic antigen and cancer antigen 15-3 were found in patients in the malignant group as compared to those in the benign group. No statistically significant difference in the level of cancer antigen 125 (P = 0.895). Sensitivities of carcinoembryonic antigen and cancer antigen 15-3 for diagnosing breast cancer were 74.42% and 58.14%, and specificities were 87.27% and 80.00% where as the cutoff values with max-sum of sensitivity and specificity were 224.3 ng/ml and 1368.2 U/ml, respectively. The following sensitivities for telling malignant from benign could be determined: exfoliative cytology 46.67%, ultrasonography 76.74%, galactography 75.00%, and ductoscopy 0%. Exfoliative cytology was found to be a valuable alternative method for differentiating benign from malignancy. Thus, tumor marker analysis of nipple discharge fluid for carcinoembryonic antigen and cancer antigen 15-3 would enhance the accurate assessment and treatment planning for patients with nipple discharge.

  7. Increased detection of Dirofilaria immitis antigen in cats after heat pretreatment of samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruntmeir, Jeff M; Adolph, Chris B; Thomas, Jennifer E; Reichard, Mason V; Blagburn, Byron L; Little, Susan E

    2017-10-01

    Objectives To determine whether pretreating diagnostic samples with heat increases the detection of Dirofilaria immitis antigen in adult cats, we evaluated feline serum and plasma samples collected in heartworm-endemic areas of the southern United States. Methods Commercial microtiter well assays for detection of D immitis antigen were used to evaluate serum or plasma samples from 385 shelter and free-roaming cats from the southcentral and southeastern United States before and after heat treatment; commercial antibody tests were performed on a subset of samples. Results Prior to sample heat treatment, 1/220 (0.5%) shelter cats and 4/165 (2.4%) free-roaming cats had detectable D immitis antigen. After heat pretreatment, the detection rate increased to 13/220 (5.9%) and 13/165 (7.9%), respectively. Antibody reactive to D immitis was significantly more common ( P cats that were antigen positive after heat treatment (10/13; 76.9%) than serum from cats that remained antigen negative after heat treatment (22/163; 13.5%). Conclusions and relevance Heat pretreatment of feline samples increased antigen detection by commercial assays for D immitis and improved overall concordance of antigen and antibody test results in antigen-positive samples in this population. Although further work to investigate the specificity of D immitis antigen assays when using pre-treated samples is warranted, this approach may be useful in the diagnosis of heartworm infection in individual cats and may increase the accuracy of surveys based on antigen detection.

  8. Monoclonal antibodies against rat leukocyte surface antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, T. K.; Puklavec, M. J.; Barclay, A. N.; Dijkstra, C. D.

    2001-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have proven to be powerful tools for studying the properties of leukocyte surface antigens and the cells that express them. In the past decades many monoclonal antibodies (mAb) for identifying the different rat leukocyte surface antigens have been described. A list of mAb is

  9. Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... antigen level New England Journal of Medicine 2004;350(22):2239-2246. [PubMed Abstract] Barry ... antigen testing for early diagnosis of prostate cancer. New England Journal of Medicine 2001;344(18):1373-1377. [PubMed Abstract] Pinsky ...

  10. Evaluation of an Antigen-Antibody

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    1. ABSTRACT. BACKGROUND: Development of “combination” assays detecting in parallel, within a single test,. Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) antigens and antibodies, not ... considered above threshold of detection for antigen proteins suggested a lack of sensitivity by this assay ..... Hepatic veno-occlusive disease (sinusoidal.

  11. Virosomes for antigen and DNA delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daemen, T; de Mare, A; Bungener, L; de Jonge, J; Huckriede, A; Wilschut, J

    2005-01-01

    Specific targeting and delivery as well as the display of antigens on the surface of professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are key issues in the design and development of new-generation vaccines aimed at the induction of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity. Prophylactic vaccination

  12. Protein antigen delivery by gene gun-mediated epidermal antigen incorporation (EAI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiblhofer, Sandra; Ritter, Uwe; Thalhamer, Josef; Weiss, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The gene gun technology can not only be employed for efficient transfer of gene vaccines into upper layers of the skin, but also for application of protein antigens. As a tissue rich in professional antigen presenting cells, the skin represents an attractive target for immunizations. In this chapter we present a method for delivery of the model antigen ovalbumin into the skin of mice termed epidermal antigen incorporation and describe in detail how antigen-specific proliferation in draining lymph nodes can be followed by flow cytometry.

  13. Dramatic Response After Lamotrigine in a Patient With Epileptic Encephalopathy and a De NovoCACNA1A Variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, Heather M; Beatty, Christopher W; Hahn, Si Houn; Gospe, Sidney M

    2016-07-01

    Channelopathies are a group of monogenic disorders that affect a single ion channel and can result in neurological disease. While a rare cause of epilepsy, channelopathies offer unique insight to the molecular basis of epilepsy and treatment opportunities. Calcium homeostasis is tightly regulated by a series of interacting subunits. CACNA1A encodes the principal pore-forming subunit of the voltage-gated P/Q-type calcium channel, alpha1. Patients with epileptic encephalopathy due to pathogenic variants in CACNA1A have been previously described and are challenging to treat. We describe a child with epileptic encephalopathy, ataxia, cognitive impairment, and significant social-behavioral abnormalities due to a de novo pathogenic variant, p.S1373L in the CACNA1A gene. After failing zonisamide and divalproex sodium, she had a dramatic response to lamotrigine with a precipitous decrease in seizure frequency and severity. This improvement has persisted over one year. While classically thought to act at sodium channels, lamotrigine also modulates the activity of the P/Q-type calcium channel, making it a candidate for precision therapy for patients with epileptic encephalopathy due to CACNA1A pathogenic variants. The rarity and clinical heterogeneity of epilepsy due to variants in CACNA1A presents challenges to clinical diagnosis. However, genetic analysis for patients with epilepsy continues to expand; additional patients are likely to be identified molecularly. Lamotrigine should be considered as a first-line treatment in patients with epileptic encephalopathy due to pathogenic variants in CACNA1A. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Molecular pathways undergoing dramatic transcriptomic changes during tumor development in the human colon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maglietta, Rosalia; Buffoli, Federico; Andriulli, Angelo; Marra, Giancarlo; Ancona, Nicola; Liuzzi, Vania Cosma; Cattaneo, Elisa; Laczko, Endre; Piepoli, Ada; Panza, Anna; Carella, Massimo; Palumbo, Orazio; Staiano, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    The malignant transformation of precancerous colorectal lesions involves progressive alterations at both the molecular and morphologic levels, the latter consisting of increases in size and in the degree of cellular atypia. Analyzing preinvasive tumors of different sizes can therefore shed light on the sequence of these alterations. We used a molecular pathway-based approach to analyze transcriptomic profiles of 59 colorectal tumors representing early and late preinvasive stages and the invasive stage of tumorigenesis. Random set analysis was used to identify biological pathways enriched for genes differentially regulated in tumors (compared with 59 samples of normal mucosa). Of the 880 canonical pathways we investigated, 112 displayed significant tumor-related upregulation or downregulation at one or more stages of tumorigenesis. This allowed us to distinguish between pathways whose dysregulation is probably necessary throughout tumorigenesis and those whose involvement specifically drives progression from one stage to the next. We were also able to pinpoint specific changes within each gene set that seem to play key roles at each transition. The early preinvasive stage was characterized by cell-cycle checkpoint activation triggered by DNA replication stress and dramatic downregulation of basic transmembrane signaling processes that maintain epithelial/stromal homeostasis in the normal mucosa. In late preinvasive lesions, there was also downregulation of signal transduction pathways (e.g., those mediated by G proteins and nuclear hormone receptors) involved in cell differentiation and upregulation of pathways governing nuclear envelope dynamics and the G2>M transition in the cell cycle. The main features of the invasive stage were activation of the G1>S transition in the cell cycle, upregulated expression of tumor-promoting microenvironmental factors, and profound dysregulation of metabolic pathways (e.g., increased aerobic glycolysis, downregulation of pathways

  15. Urbanization dramatically altered the water balances of a paddy field-dominated basin in southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, L.; Sun, G.; Liu, Y.; Wan, J.; Qin, M.; Qian, H.; Liu, C.; Zheng, J.; John, R.; Fan, P.; Chen, J.

    2015-07-01

    Rice paddy fields provide important ecosystem services (e.g., food production, water retention, carbon sequestration) to a large population globally. However, these benefits are diminishing as a result of rapid environmental and socioeconomic transformations, characterized by population growth, urbanization, and climate change in many Asian countries. This case study examined the responses of stream flow and watershed water balances to the decline of rice paddy fields due to urbanization in the Qinhuai River basin in southern China, where massive industrialization has occurred during the past 3 decades. We found that stream flow increased by 58 % and evapotranspiration (ET) decreased by 23 % during 1986-2013 as a result of a three-fold increase in urban areas and a reduction of rice paddy fields by 27 %. Both high flows and low flows increased significantly by about 28 % from 2002 to 2013. The increases in stream flow were consistent with the decreases in ET and leaf area index monitored by independent remote sensing MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data. Attribution analysis, based on two empirical models, indicated that land-use/land-cover change contributed about 82-108 % of the observed increase in stream flow from 353 ± 287 mm yr-1 during 1986-2002 to 556 ± 145 during 2003-2013. We concluded that the reduction in ET was largely attributed to the conversion of cropland to urban use. The effects of land-use change overwhelmed the effects of regional climate warming and climate variability. Converting traditional rice paddy fields to urban use dramatically altered land surface conditions from an artificial wetland-dominated landscape to an urban land-use- dominated one, and thus was considered an extreme type of contemporary hydrologic disturbance. The ongoing large-scale urbanization of the rice paddy-dominated regions, in humid southern China and East Asia, will likely elevate storm-flow volume, aggravate flood risks, and intensify urban

  16. Molecular pathways undergoing dramatic transcriptomic changes during tumor development in the human colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maglietta Rosalia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The malignant transformation of precancerous colorectal lesions involves progressive alterations at both the molecular and morphologic levels, the latter consisting of increases in size and in the degree of cellular atypia. Analyzing preinvasive tumors of different sizes can therefore shed light on the sequence of these alterations. Methods We used a molecular pathway-based approach to analyze transcriptomic profiles of 59 colorectal tumors representing early and late preinvasive stages and the invasive stage of tumorigenesis. Random set analysis was used to identify biological pathways enriched for genes differentially regulated in tumors (compared with 59 samples of normal mucosa. Results Of the 880 canonical pathways we investigated, 112 displayed significant tumor-related upregulation or downregulation at one or more stages of tumorigenesis. This allowed us to distinguish between pathways whose dysregulation is probably necessary throughout tumorigenesis and those whose involvement specifically drives progression from one stage to the next. We were also able to pinpoint specific changes within each gene set that seem to play key roles at each transition. The early preinvasive stage was characterized by cell-cycle checkpoint activation triggered by DNA replication stress and dramatic downregulation of basic transmembrane signaling processes that maintain epithelial/stromal homeostasis in the normal mucosa. In late preinvasive lesions, there was also downregulation of signal transduction pathways (e.g., those mediated by G proteins and nuclear hormone receptors involved in cell differentiation and upregulation of pathways governing nuclear envelope dynamics and the G2>M transition in the cell cycle. The main features of the invasive stage were activation of the G1>S transition in the cell cycle, upregulated expression of tumor-promoting microenvironmental factors, and profound dysregulation of metabolic pathways (e

  17. The Dramatic Size and Kinematic Evolution of Massive Early-type Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapi, A.; Pantoni, L.; Zanisi, L.; Shi, J.; Mancuso, C.; Massardi, M.; Shankar, F.; Bressan, A.; Danese, L.

    2018-04-01

    We aim to provide a holistic view on the typical size and kinematic evolution of massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) that encompasses their high-z star-forming progenitors, their high-z quiescent counterparts, and their configurations in the local Universe. Our investigation covers the main processes playing a relevant role in the cosmic evolution of ETGs. Specifically, their early fast evolution comprises biased collapse of the low angular momentum gaseous baryons located in the inner regions of the host dark matter halo; cooling, fragmentation, and infall of the gas down to the radius set by the centrifugal barrier; further rapid compaction via clump/gas migration toward the galaxy center, where strong heavily dust-enshrouded star formation takes place and most of the stellar mass is accumulated; and ejection of substantial gas amount from the inner regions by feedback processes, which causes a dramatic puffing-up of the stellar component. In the late slow evolution, passive aging of stellar populations and mass additions by dry merger events occur. We describe these processes relying on prescriptions inspired by basic physical arguments and by numerical simulations to derive new analytical estimates of the relevant sizes, timescales, and kinematic properties for individual galaxies along their evolution. Then we obtain quantitative results as a function of galaxy mass and redshift, and compare them to recent observational constraints on half-light size R e , on the ratio v/σ between rotation velocity and velocity dispersion (for gas and stars) and on the specific angular momentum j ⋆ of the stellar component; we find good consistency with the available multiband data in average values and dispersion, both for local ETGs and for their z ∼ 1–2 star-forming and quiescent progenitors. The outcomes of our analysis can provide hints to gauge sub-grid recipes implemented in simulations, to tune numerical experiments focused on specific processes, and to plan

  18. Study of the antigenic cross reactivity between carcinoembryonic antigen and "nonspecific cross reacting antigens" (NCA and NCA 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveu, T.; Staebler, D.; Chavanel, G.; Burtin, P.

    1975-01-01

    The immunochemical relationship between CEA, NCA and NCA 2 was studied in guinea-pigs. Strong cross reactions were found between these antigens, either in delayed or anaphylactic reactions. Some specific determinants for each antigen could still be demonstrated. Delayed hypersensitivity is likely to be due to the protein moiety of the molecules while anaphylactic reactivity could probably be related to their glucidic parts. Consequently, CEA and NCA have common antigenic determinants on their glucidic and peptidic moieties, perhaps more on the latter ones. PMID:50854

  19. Antigenic variation: Molecular and genetic mechanisms of relapsing disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruse, J.M.; Lewis, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. They are: Contemporary Concepts of Antigenic Variation; Antigenic Variation in the Influenza Viruses; Mechanisms of Escape of Visna Lentiviruses from Immunological Control; A Review of Antigenic Variation by the Equine Infectious Anemia Virus; Biologic and Molecular Variations in AIDS Retrovirus Isolates; Rabies Virus Infection: Genetic Mutations and the Impact on Viral Pathogenicity and Immunity; Immunobiology of Relapsing Fever; Antigenic Variation in African Trypanosomes; Antigenic Variation and Antigenic Diversity in Malaria; and Mechanisms of Immune Evasion in Schistosomiasis.

  20. Expression and immunogenicity of novel subunit enterovirus 71 VP1 antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Juan; Wang, Shixia; Gan, Weihua; Zhang, Wenhong; Ju, Liwen; Huang, Zuhu; Lu, Shan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► EV71 is a major emerging infectious disease in many Asian countries. ► Inactivated EV71 vaccines are in clinical studies but their safety and efficacy are unknown. ► Developing subunit based EV71 vaccines is significant and novel antigen design is needed. ► DNA immunization is an efficient tool to test the immunogenicity of VP1 based EV71 vaccines. ► Multiple VP1 antigens are developed showing immunogenic potential. -- Abstract: Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is a common viral illness in young children. HFMD is caused by viruses belonging to the enterovirus genus of the picornavirus family. Recently, enterovirus 71 (EV71) has emerged as a virulent agent for HFMD with severe clinical outcomes. In the current report, we conducted a pilot antigen engineering study to optimize the expression and immunogenicity of subunit VP1 antigen for the design of EV71 vaccines. DNA immunization was adopted as a simple technical approach to test different designs of VP1 antigens without the need to express VP1 protein in vitro first. Our studies indicated that the expression and immunogenicity of VP1 protein can be improved with alternated VP1 antigen designs. Data presented in the current report revealed novel pathways to optimize the design of VP1 antigen-based EV71 vaccines.

  1. Expression and immunogenicity of novel subunit enterovirus 71 VP1 antigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Juan [China-US Vaccine Research Center, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University (China); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Nanjing Medical University (China); Wang, Shixia [China-US Vaccine Research Center, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University (China); Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School (United States); Gan, Weihua [Department of Pediatrics, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University (China); Zhang, Wenhong [Department of Infectious Diseases, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University (China); Ju, Liwen [School of Public Health, Fudan University (China); Huang, Zuhu [Department of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University (China); China-US Vaccine Research Center, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University (China); Lu, Shan, E-mail: shan.lu@umassmed.edu [Department of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University (China); China-US Vaccine Research Center, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University (China); Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EV71 is a major emerging infectious disease in many Asian countries. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inactivated EV71 vaccines are in clinical studies but their safety and efficacy are unknown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Developing subunit based EV71 vaccines is significant and novel antigen design is needed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA immunization is an efficient tool to test the immunogenicity of VP1 based EV71 vaccines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiple VP1 antigens are developed showing immunogenic potential. -- Abstract: Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is a common viral illness in young children. HFMD is caused by viruses belonging to the enterovirus genus of the picornavirus family. Recently, enterovirus 71 (EV71) has emerged as a virulent agent for HFMD with severe clinical outcomes. In the current report, we conducted a pilot antigen engineering study to optimize the expression and immunogenicity of subunit VP1 antigen for the design of EV71 vaccines. DNA immunization was adopted as a simple technical approach to test different designs of VP1 antigens without the need to express VP1 protein in vitro first. Our studies indicated that the expression and immunogenicity of VP1 protein can be improved with alternated VP1 antigen designs. Data presented in the current report revealed novel pathways to optimize the design of VP1 antigen-based EV71 vaccines.

  2. Benchtop Antigen Detection Technique using Nanofiltration and Fluorescent Dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Varaljay, Vanessa

    2009-01-01

    The designed benchtop technique is primed to detect bacteria and viruses from antigenic surface marker proteins in solutions, initially water. This inclusive bio-immunoassay uniquely combines nanofiltration and near infrared (NIR) dyes conjugated to antibodies to isolate and distinguish microbial antigens, using laser excitation and spectrometric analysis. The project goals include detecting microorganisms aboard the International Space Station, space shuttle, Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), and human habitats on future Moon and Mars missions, ensuring astronaut safety. The technique is intended to improve and advance water contamination testing both commercially and environmentally as well. Lastly, this streamlined technique poses to greatly simplify and expedite testing of pathogens in complex matrices, such as blood, in hospital and laboratory clinics.

  3. Validation of immune complex dissociation methods for use with heartworm antigen tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa J. Beall

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antigen testing is routinely used to diagnose canine Dirofilaria immitis infections. Immune complex dissociation (ICD methods, which were employed in the original heartworm antigen tests to release antigen that was bound by endogenous canine antibodies, were discontinued with improvements in assay reagents. The purpose of this study was to evaluate different ICD methods for detection of heartworm antigen by microtiter plate ELISA and assess the performance in samples from pet dogs. Methods The original PetChek® Heartworm Test (IDEXX Laboratories, Inc. utilized pepsin at an acidic pH for ICD prior to antigen testing. Performance and characteristics of the pepsin ICD method were compared with those for heat treatment (with and without EDTA and acid treatment. Results All four methods released complexed antigen in serum samples when tested using microtiter plate ELISA. Heat treatment required ≥600 μL of serum or plasma, whereas pepsin and acid methods needed only a 50-μL sample. Samples from 1115 dogs submitted to IDEXX Laboratories between 2014 and 2016 for investigation of discrepant heartworm results were evaluated with and without pepsin ICD using the PetChek Heartworm Test. Samples from 10% (n = 112 of the dogs were antigen positive with the ICD protocol only while 90% of the results remained unchanged. In a prospective study, antigen levels with and without ICD were evaluated for 12 dogs receiving pre-adulticide heartworm treatment with a macrocyclic lactone and doxycycline for 28 days. Serial samples revealed that three dogs had a reduction in detectable heartworm antigen within 4 weeks of initiating treatment. In these cases, heartworm antigen levels could be recovered with ICD. Conclusions Heartworm antigen testing with ICD can be a valuable diagnostic tool for patients with discrepant results that have had intermittent use of a preventive, or have been treated with a macrocyclic lactone and doxycycline

  4. Evaluation by ELISA of Anisakis simplex Larval Antigen Purified by Affinity Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodero M

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the specificity and sensitivity of the techniques for the human anisakidosis diagnosis, a method of affinity chromatography for the purification of species-specific antigens from Anisakis simplex third-stage larvae (L3 has been developed. New Zealand rabbits were immunized with A. simplex or Ascaris suum antigens or inoculated with Toxocara canis embryonated eggs. The IgG specific antibodies were isolated by means of protein A-Sepharose CL-4B beads columns. IgG anti-A. simplex and -A. suum were coupled to CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B. For the purification of the larval A. simplex antigens, these were loaded into the anti-A. simplex column and bound antigens eluted. For the elimination of the epitopes responsible for the cross-reactions, the A. simplex specific proteins were loaded into the anti-A. suum column. To prove the specificity of the isolated proteins, immunochemical analyses by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were carried out. Further, we studied the different responses by ELISA to the different antigenic preparations of A. simplex used, observing their capability of discriminating among the different antisera raised in rabbits (anti-A. simplex, anti-A. suum, anti-T. canis. The discriminatory capability with the anti-T. canis antisera was good using the larval A. simplex crude extract (CE antigen. When larval A. simplex CE antigen was loaded into a CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B coupled to IgG from rabbits immunized with A. simplex CE antigen, its capability for discriminate between A. simplex and A. suum was improved, increasing in the case of T. canis. The best results were obtained using larval A. simplex CE antigen loaded into a CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B coupled to IgG from rabbits immunized with adult A. suum CE antigen. When we compared the different serum dilution and antigenic concentration, we selected the working serum dilution of 1/400 and 1 mg/ml of antigenic concentration.

  5. BRAF-V600E mutant papillary craniopharyngioma dramatically responds to combination BRAF and MEK inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, Ashley; Odia, Yazmin

    2017-04-01

    We present a patient with BRAF-V600E mutant papillary craniopharyngioma successfully treated with combination BRAF (dabrafenib 150 mg twice daily) and MEK (trametinib 2 mg daily) inhibitors after her unresectable tumor proved refractory to radiation. Serial brain MRIs and PET revealed marked tumor reduction with gradual neurological improvement and permanent panhypopituitarism.

  6. Dramatic synergistic effects between hydroquinone and resorcinol derivatives for the organocatalyzed reduction of dioxygen by diethylhydroxylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebeuf, Raphaël; Nardello-Rataj, Véronique; Aubry, Jean-Marie

    2014-01-25

    Diethylhydroxylamine reduces dioxygen in the presence of catalytic amounts of hydroquinone. A great improvement is achieved by adding resorcinol derivatives as co-catalysts. Though the formation of heterodimers does not seem to be the sole cause of the synergy, such products constitute a new class of powerful organocatalysts for dioxygen scavenging.

  7. THE THEORETICAL AND PRACTICAL ASPECTS OF THE RECOMBINANT ANTIGENS FOR THE DIAGNOSIS OF BOVINE LEUKEMIA PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapovalova OV

    2016-12-01

    sequence construction. The efficiency of BLV gp51 and p24 encoding regions fusion-sequence integration was confirmed by the screening with the specially designed oligonucleotides. The recombinant antigen expression was induced by addition of IPTG. To isolate the antigen bacterial mass was destroyed by defrostation and ultrasonic disintegration in the experimentally selected modes. The activity and specificity of the antigen was determined by AGID with the use of the bovine fetal serum, positive and negative reference diagnostic serum by unified method in comparison with the standardized cultural BLV antigen in AGID. The antigen specificity was increased by adsorption with commercial anticolibacillosis serum. The antigen activity was confirmed by AGID. Conclusions. Nowadays the most promising BLV antigens expressing genetic constructions with E. coli and baculovirus. E. coli recombinant strains are the most available and effective using expressing system, which allows to get an active and specific antigenic product if an optimal vector constructions and commercially available systems of metal affinity chromatography purification and control with appropriate Mab are used. As an cultural and recombinant antigens alternative the mimicking critical BLV antigenic epitopes synthetic peptides were tested. In recent times many scientific works formed the basis for the bovine leukemia diagnostic test systems’ creation, which are now widely available on the biotechnological products market. Although the majority of manufacturers prefer the recombinant antigens of the pathogen, pilot studies on more improved and cheaper ways to obtain different diagnostic antigens preparations shall not lose relevance.

  8. Posttransplant chimeric antigen receptor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Melody; Zakrzewski, Johannes; James, Scott; Sadelain, Michel

    2018-03-08

    Therapeutic T-cell engineering is emerging as a powerful approach to treat refractory hematological malignancies. Its most successful embodiment to date is based on the use of second-generation chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting CD19, a cell surface molecule found in most B-cell leukemias and lymphomas. Remarkable complete remissions have been obtained with autologous T cells expressing CD19 CARs in patients with relapsed, chemo-refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Allogeneic CAR T cells may also be harnessed to treat relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, the use of donor T cells poses unique challenges owing to potential alloreactivity. We review different approaches to mitigate the risk of causing or aggravating graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), including CAR therapies based on donor leukocyte infusion, virus-specific T cells, T-cell receptor-deficient T cells, lymphoid progenitor cells, and regulatory T cells. Advances in CAR design, T-cell selection and gene editing are poised to enable the safe use of allogeneic CAR T cells without incurring GVHD. © 2018 by The American Society of Hematology.

  9. Obstetrical APS: is there a place for hydroxychloroquine to improve the pregnancy outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekinian, Arsene; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Masseau, Agathe; Tincani, Angela; De Caroli, Sara; Alijotas-Reig, Jaume; Ruffatti, Amelia; Ambrozic, Ales; Botta, Angela; Le Guern, Véronique; Fritsch-Stork, Ruth; Nicaise-Roland, Pascale; Carbonne, Bruno; Carbillon, Lionel; Fain, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The use of the conventional APS treatment (the combination of low-dose aspirin and LMWH) dramatically improved the obstetrical prognosis in primary obstetrical APS (OAPS). The persistence of adverse pregnancy outcome raises the need to find other drugs to improve obstetrical outcome. Hydroxychloroquine is widely used in patients with various autoimmune diseases, particularly SLE. Antimalarials have many anti-inflammatory, anti-aggregant and immune-regulatory properties: they inhibit phospholipase activity, stabilize lysosomal membranes, block the production of several pro-inflammatory cytokines and, in addition, impair complement-dependent antigen-antibody reactions. There is ample evidence of protective effects of hydroxychloroquine in OAPS similar to the situation in SLE arising from in vitro studies of pathophysiological working mechanism of hydroxychloroquine. However, the clinical data on the use of hydroxychloroquine in primary APS are lacking and prospective studies are necessary. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Demonstration of Antigenic Identity Between Purified Equine Infectious Anemia Virus and an Antigen Extracted from Infected Horse Spleen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hideo; Norcross, Neil L.; Coggins, Leroy

    1972-01-01

    Antigenic relationship between purified equine infectious anemia (EIA) virus and spleen-derived antigen from EIA-infected horses was examined by immunodiffusion. Identical antigenicity of these two antigens has been proven because precipitation lines formed between the two antigens and EIA antiserum connected with each other. The results indicate that the antigenic substance derived from infected spleen is a component of EIA virus. Images PMID:4629262

  11. Indirect haemagglutination reaction with Sarcocystis dispersa antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerva, L; Cerná, Z

    1982-01-01

    A description is given of the preparation of antigen from Sarcocystis dispersa cystozoites and the procedure of the indirect haemagglutination test (IHA). The antibodies against this antigen were detected in experimentally infected mice from day 20 p.i. (1: 640). In the following weeks the antibody titres reached the value of 1: 40,960. The sera of pigs, sheep and horses spontaneously infected with other Sarcocystis species reacted with this antigen in low titres only. The bovine sera gave negative reactions even in cases when Sarcocystis cysts were present in the muscles of the examined animals. A possible application of IHA for the research and diagnostic purposes is discussed.

  12. Digestibility and antigenicity of β-lactoglobulin as affected by heat, pH and applied shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Toheder; Vasiljevic, Todor; Ramchandran, Lata

    2017-02-15

    Processing induced conformational changes can modulate digestibility of food allergens and thereby their antigenicity. Effect of different pH (3, 5, 7), temperature (room temperature, 120°C) and shear (0s(-1), 1000s(-1)) on simulated gastrointestinal digestibility of β-lg and post digestion antigenic characteristics have been studied. At all pH levels unheated β-lg showed resistance to peptic digestion with high antigenic value while it was fairly susceptible to pancreatin with moderate reduction in antigenicity. Heating at 120°C significantly improved both peptic and pancreatic digestion attributed to structural alterations that resulted in much lower antigenicity; the level of reduction being pH dependant. The lowest antigenicity was recorded at pH 5. Shearing (1000s(-1)) had a minor impact reducing digestibility and thereby enhancing antigenicity of unheated β-lg at pH 5 and 7 slightly; however in conjunction with heating (120°C) it reduced antigenicity further irrespective of the pH. Overall, treatment at pH 5, 120°C and 1000s(-1) could potentially reduce post digestion antigenicity of β-lg. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Crude antigens of Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica using ELISA test: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaur S.N.S

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fasciolosis is a worldwide disease with major economic and public health consequences. Early detection of the infection is important for the prevention and control of the disease. ELISA allows for early detection of fasciolosis in man and animals. Fasciolosis is caused by Fasciola hepatica and F. gigantica in man and domestic animals respectively. These two species have many similar morphological characteristics. In this study, the crude antigens of these two species are investigated by ELISA test. Methods: The excretory-secretory and somatic antigens of two species were prepared from adult flukes collected from the bile ducts of sheep and stored at -20oC. For the preparation of the antisera, the antigens were injected to laboratory-bred rabbits. Each rabbit received five injections at intervals of seven days, starting with 0.5 ml and ending with 2.5 ml. Ten days after the last injection, the rabbits were bled, and serum samples separated and stored at -20oC. The reaction between homologous and heterologous antigens and antisera was tested by ELISA and optical densities were recorded.Results: Excretory- secretory and somatic antigens of each species showed a strong positive reaction with the antisera of the other species. In a homologous combination of antigens and antisera, a stronger reaction was observed compared to the heterologous combination, therefore many antigenic materials of both species are the same.Conclusion: The differences of these crude antigenic materials of F. hepatica and F. gigantica are insufficient to prevent cross reaction of two species by ELISA. Further investigations are recommended for the identification, detection and purification of antigenic material of each species to improve the specificity of this assay.

  14. Social insect genomes exhibit dramatic evolution in gene composition and regulation while preserving regulatory features linked to sociality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simola, Daniel F.; Wissler, Lothar; Donahue, Greg

    2013-01-01

    Genomes of eusocial insects code for dramatic examples of phenotypic plasticity and social organization. We compared the genomes of seven ants, the honeybee, and various solitary insects to examine whether eusocial lineages share distinct features of genomic organization. Each ant lineage contain...

  15. Is there a morphological or physiological explanation for the dramatic increase in hybridization between loblolly and shortleaf pine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodney E. Will; Curtis J. Lilly; John F. Stewart; C. Dana Nelson; Charles G. Taue

    2015-01-01

    Hybrids between shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata Mill.) and loblolly pine (P. taeda L.) have dramatically increased since the 1950s (Stewart and others 2012). Fire suppression, planting nonnative seed sources, and other anthropogenic activities have the potential to break down ecological barriers that previously kept these species from interbreeding (Tauer and others...

  16. TAR (Theatre as Representation) as a Provocative Teaching Tool in School Administration: A Dramatized Inclusive Classroom Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Matthew J.; Young, David C.

    2013-01-01

    The following dramatized classroom scenario depicts a teacher struggling with the nature of an inclusive learning environment, with instructional leadership and supervision of instruction as the theoretical and practical backdrop. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate how the use of a TAR (theatre as representation) case study can be used…

  17. The Development of Evaluation Model for Internal Quality Assurance System of Dramatic Arts College of Bunditpattanasilpa Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinthukhot, Kittisak; Srihamongkol, Yannapat; Luanganggoon, Nuchwana; Suwannoi, Paisan

    2013-01-01

    The research purpose was to develop an evaluation model for the internal quality assurance system of the dramatic arts College of Bunditpattanasilpa Institute. The Research and Development method was used as research methodology which was divided into three phases; "developing the model and its guideline", "trying out the actual…

  18. 30 years of data reveal dramatic increase in abundance of brown trout following the removal of a small hydrodam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birnie-Gauvin, Kim; Larsen, Martin Hage; Nielsen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    and spawning of fish. In the present study, we present thirty years of data from electrofishing surveys obtained at two sites, both prior to and following the removal of a small-scale hydropower dam in Central Jutland, Denmark. We demonstrate that the dam removal has led to a dramatic increase in trout density...

  19. Learning Form and Function by Dance-Dramatizing Cultural Legends to Drum Rhythms Wearing Student-Made Animal Masks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Phyllis; Rule, Audrey C.; Kirkland Holmes, Gloria; Logan, Stephanie R.; Alert, Andrea L.; Mason, Cynthia A.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the self-efficacy in science, art, dance, and music; attitudes concerning contributions of people of various ethnic/cultural groups; and science learning of students involved in an after-school arts-integrated science enrichment project. Students dramatized three traditional animal legends from African, Native American, and…

  20. Home in the heat: Dramatic seasonal variation in home range of desert golden eagles informs management for renewable energy development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melissa Braham; Tricia Miller; Adam E. Duerr; Michael Lanzone; Amy Fesnock; Larry LaPre; Daniel Driscoll; Todd. Katzner

    2015-01-01

    Renewable energy is expanding quickly with sometimes dramatic impacts to species and ecosystems. To understand the degree to which sensitive species may be impacted by renewable energy projects, it is informative to know how much space individuals use and how that space may overlap with planned development. We used global positioning system-global system for mobile...

  1. Tissue polypeptide antigen activity in cerebrospinal fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, F; Söletormos, Georg; Dombernowsky, P

    1991-01-01

    Tissue polypeptide antigen (TPpA) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was measured in 59 consecutive breast cancer patients with suspected central nervous system (CNS) metastases. Subsequently, we determined that 13 patients had parenchymal brain metastases, 10 had leptomeningeal carcinomatosis...

  2. HLA antigens in three populations of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papiha, S S; Wentzel, J; Shah, K C; Roberts, D F

    1989-01-01

    In blood samples from a Hindu population of Uttar Pradesh (North India) and from two Muslim groups, one from Andhra Pradesh (South India) and the other from Gujurat (West India), frequencies of 38 HLA-A, -B and -C antigens were investigated. Eight antigens - A23, A25, A29, A32, Bw45, B21, Bw22 and Bw53 - were absent in the Hindu population, four different antigens - A29, Bw52, B14 and Bw42 - were absent in Hyderabad Muslims, two antigens - A31 and Bw45 - were lacking in Surat Muslims. The three populations showed considerable genetic heterogeneity. The genetic difference between the two Muslim groups was small, but the Hindu population showed pronounced differences from each of the Muslim groups.

  3. 9 CFR 113.407 - Pullorum antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... determined by a colorimetric method. (2) The phenol content for Pullorum Tube Antigen shall be 0.55 ±0.05 percent as determined by direct titration with a standardized bromide-bromate solution. (d) Sensitivity...

  4. Comparison of Three Antigenic Extracts of Eurotium amstelodami in Serological Diagnosis of Farmer's Lung Disease▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, Sandrine; Reboux, Gabriel; Rognon, Bénédicte; Monod, Michel; Grenouillet, Frédéric; Quadroni, Manfredo; Fellrath, Jean-Marc; Aubert, John-David; Dalphin, Jean-Charles; Millon, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    In France and Finland, farmer's lung disease (FLD), a hypersensitivity pneumonitis common in agricultural areas, is mainly caused by Eurotium species. The presence of antibodies in patients' serum is an important criterion for diagnosis. Our study aimed to improve the serological diagnosis of FLD by using common fungal particles that pollute the farm environment as antigens. Fungal particles of the Eurotium species were observed in handled hay. A strain of Eurotium amstelodami was grown in vitro using selected culture media; and antigen extracts from sexual (ascospores), asexual (conidia), and vegetative (hyphae) forms were made. Antigens were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), which was used to test for immunoglobulin G antibodies from the sera of 17 FLD patients, 40 healthy exposed farmers, and 20 nonexposed controls. The antigens were compared by receiver operating characteristic analysis, and a threshold was then established. The ascospores contained in asci enclosed within cleistothecia were present in 38% of the hay blades observed; conidial heads of aspergillus were less prevalent. The same protocol was followed to make the three antigen extracts. A comparison of the results for FLD patients and exposed controls showed the area under the curve to be 0.850 for the ascospore antigen, 0.731 for the conidia, and 0.690 for the hyphae. The cutoffs that we determined, with the standard deviation for measures being taken into account, showed 67% for sensitivity and 92% for specificity with the ascospore antigen. In conclusion, the serological diagnosis of FLD by ELISA was improved by the adjunction of ascospore antigen. PMID:19906892

  5. Comparison of three antigenic extracts of Eurotium amstelodami in serological diagnosis of farmer's lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, Sandrine; Reboux, Gabriel; Rognon, Bénédicte; Monod, Michel; Grenouillet, Frédéric; Quadroni, Manfredo; Fellrath, Jean-Marc; Aubert, John-David; Dalphin, Jean-Charles; Millon, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    In France and Finland, farmer's lung disease (FLD), a hypersensitivity pneumonitis common in agricultural areas, is mainly caused by Eurotium species. The presence of antibodies in patients' serum is an important criterion for diagnosis. Our study aimed to improve the serological diagnosis of FLD by using common fungal particles that pollute the farm environment as antigens. Fungal particles of the Eurotium species were observed in handled hay. A strain of Eurotium amstelodami was grown in vitro using selected culture media; and antigen extracts from sexual (ascospores), asexual (conidia), and vegetative (hyphae) forms were made. Antigens were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), which was used to test for immunoglobulin G antibodies from the sera of 17 FLD patients, 40 healthy exposed farmers, and 20 nonexposed controls. The antigens were compared by receiver operating characteristic analysis, and a threshold was then established. The ascospores contained in asci enclosed within cleistothecia were present in 38% of the hay blades observed; conidial heads of aspergillus were less prevalent. The same protocol was followed to make the three antigen extracts. A comparison of the results for FLD patients and exposed controls showed the area under the curve to be 0.850 for the ascospore antigen, 0.731 for the conidia, and 0.690 for the hyphae. The cutoffs that we determined, with the standard deviation for measures being taken into account, showed 67% for sensitivity and 92% for specificity with the ascospore antigen. In conclusion, the serological diagnosis of FLD by ELISA was improved by the adjunction of ascospore antigen.

  6. Carcinoembryonic antigen in thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissel, M.; Hoefer, R.

    1982-01-01

    In order to investigate the usefulness of determining the serum concentrations of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a specific tumor marker in thyroid cancer, CEA serum levels were measured (enzymeimmunoassay, Abbott-Kit) repeatedly at the routine followup checks performed at various intervals after total thyroidectomy, in 65 patients with papillary, 82 with follicular, 25 with mixed type (papillary/follicular), 8 with anaplastic, and in 18 patients with medullary thyroid cancer. The postoperative observation period of these patients ranged from 2 to 36 months. Calcitonin serum levels were additionally determined in patients with medullary carcinoma (radioimmunoassay kit of Immuno-Nuclear Corp.). In the family of one patient with medullary carcinoma we also had an opportunity to investigate, within the framework of family screening (pentagastrin tests, etc.), the value of preoperative CEA determination. In the patients with ''non-medullary'' histological types of thyroid cancer, the maximum CEA serum concentration was 9.8 ng/ml. 6% of the patients with papillary, 9% of the patients with follicular, and 8% of those with mixed type thyroid cancer had serum levels above the upper limit of our normal range (5 ng/ml). All patients with anaplastic carcinoma had values below 3 ng/ml. The values quoted represent maximal values and were confirmed at various follow-up checks. However, 1 year after thyroidectomy, a female patient with follicular thyroid carcinoma developed an adenocarcinoma of the rectum: The CEA levels measured in this patient were: 4.2 ng/ml 3 weeks after thyroidectomy, 8.4 ng/ml 6 months later, and 37 ng/ml 1 week before operation on the rectum. In none of the other patients with elevated CEA levels were metastases of thyroid cancer, or any other malignancy, detected. (orig.) [de

  7. Antigenic variation in vector-borne pathogens.

    OpenAIRE

    Barbour, A. G.; Restrepo, B. I.

    2000-01-01

    Several pathogens of humans and domestic animals depend on hematophagous arthropods to transmit them from one vertebrate reservoir host to another and maintain them in an environment. These pathogens use antigenic variation to prolong their circulation in the blood and thus increase the likelihood of transmission. By convergent evolution, bacterial and protozoal vector-borne pathogens have acquired similar genetic mechanisms for successful antigenic variation. Borrelia spp. and Anaplasma marg...

  8. Dengue NS1 Antigen - for Early Detection of Dengue Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol Hartalkar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy of NS1 antigen assay for early diagnosis of dengue virus infection in a tertiary care hospital. Methods: This cross sectional study was carried out in department of Medicine from August to December 2013. Total 100 patients with dengue fever were included. Complete blood count, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, Dengue NS1 antigen and IgM and IgG antibodies of dengue virus were done in all cases. Results: Of the 100 sera tested, 75% were positive for dengue virus infection based on dengue NS1 antigen, IgM antibody and IgG antibody. Dengue NS1 antigen and IgM, IgG antibody were able to detect dengue virus infection between day 1 to day 8 in 92% of samples, 86.7% of samples and 82.6% of samples respectively. Sixty nine percent (69% were found positive for dengue NS1 antigen, 65% were IgM positive and 62% were IgG positive. Based on the dengue NS1 antigen and IgM antibody combination, 74% were positive for dengue virus infections. Sensitivity of Dengue NS1 antigen was 92.3% and specificity of 74.28% in comparison to IgM antibody. Detection rate increased to 75%, based on the antigen and IgG antibody combination. Sensitivity of dengue NS1 antigen was 90.3% and specificity of 65.8% in comparison to IgG antibody. Conclusion: Dengue NS1 antigen is a useful, sensitive and specific test for early diagnosis of dengue virus infection and it improves diagnostic efficiency in combination with antibody test. Key words: Dengue fever, NS1 antigen. Introduction: Dengue fever (DF is the most common arboviral illness in humans. Each year, an estimated 50-100 million cases of dengue fever and 500,000 cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever occur worldwide, with 30000 deaths (mainly in children. Globally 2.5-3 billion people in approximately 112 tropical and subtropical countries are at risk of dengue.of samples respectively. Sixty nine percent (69% were found positive for dengue NS1 antigen, 65% were Ig

  9. Mucosal delivery of antigens using adsorption to bacterial spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jen-Min; Hong, Huynh A; Van Tong, Hoang; Hoang, Tran H; Brisson, Alain; Cutting, Simon M

    2010-01-22

    The development of new-generation vaccines has followed a number of strategic avenues including the use of live recombinant bacteria. Of these, the use of genetically engineered bacterial spores has been shown to offer promise as both a mucosal as well as a heat-stable vaccine delivery system. Spores of the genus Bacillus are currently in widespread use as probiotics enabling a case to be made for their safety. In this work we have discovered that the negatively charged and hydrophobic surface layer of spores provides a suitable platform for adsorption of protein antigens. Binding can be promoted under conditions of low pH and requires a potent combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between spore and immunogen. Using appropriately adsorbed spores we have shown that mice immunised mucosally can be protected against challenge with tetanus toxin, Clostridium perfringens alpha toxin and could survive challenge with anthrax toxin. In some cases protection is actually greater than using a recombinant vaccine. Remarkably, killed or inactivated spores appear equally effective as live spores. The spore appears to present a bound antigen in its native conformation promoting a cellular (T(h)1-biased) response coupled with a strong antibody response. Spores then, should be considered as mucosal adjuvants, most similar to particulate adjuvants, by enhancing responses against soluble antigens. The broad spectrum of immune responses elicited coupled with the attendant benefits of safety suggest that spore adsorption could be appropriate for improving the immunogenicity of some vaccines as well as the delivery of biotherapeutic molecules.

  10. Targeting lentiviral vectors to antigen-specific immunoglobulins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Leslie; Yang, Lili; Joo, Kye il; Yang, Haiguang; Baltimore, David; Wang, Pin

    2008-09-01

    Gene transfer into B cells by lentivectors can provide an alternative approach to managing B lymphocyte malignancies and autoreactive B cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. These pathogenic B cell populations can be distinguished by their surface expression of monospecific immunoglobulin. Development of a novel vector system to deliver genes to these specific B cells could improve the safety and efficacy of gene therapy. We have developed an efficient method to target lentivectors to monospecific immunoglobulin-expressing cells in vitro and in vivo. We were able to incorporate a model antigen CD20 and a fusogenic protein derived from the Sindbis virus as two distinct molecules into the lentiviral surface. This engineered vector could specifically bind to cells expressing surface immunoglobulin recognizing CD20 (alphaCD20), resulting in efficient transduction of target cells in a cognate antigen-dependent manner in vitro, and in vivo in a xenografted tumor model. Tumor suppression was observed in vivo, using the engineered lentivector to deliver a suicide gene to a xenografted tumor expressing alphaCD20. These results show the feasibility of engineering lentivectors to target immunoglobulin- specific cells to deliver a therapeutic effect. Such targeting lentivectors also could potentially be used to genetically mark antigen-specific B cells in vivo to study their B cell biology.

  11. [Antigenic relations of several strains of Naegleria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubiaur, E; Alonso, P

    1987-02-01

    In previous papers different aspects of one strain of Naegleria lovaniensis (Aq/9/1/45D) and two strains of N. gruberi (1518/le and 1518/lf) have been studied. From the results obtained it can be concluded that each strain behaves differently; no more similarities have been found between both N. gruberi strains, than between each of these and N. lovaniensis. Such an event has prompted us to characterize their antigenic relationships by means of an immunoprecipitation assay (double diffusion in plate). Each antiserum was tested against the different antigenic extracts. For N. lovaniensis, besides the whole extract, two fractions (particulate and soluble) and their respective antisera were assayed separately. No reaction occurred between any of the anti-N. lovaniensis sera and either of the two N. gruberi extracts. The antiserum to N. gruberi 1518/lf reacted only with its homologue and with N. lovaniensis antigens. Both N. lovaniensis fractions share some antigenic components being more complex the antigenic structure of the soluble fraction. Therefore no more similarities occur between both N. gruberi strains than between each one and N. lovaniensis, rather N. gruberi 1518/le exhibits more antigenic relationships with N. lovaniensis than with 1518/lf strains. In view of such results the species N. gruberi should be taxonomically reconsidered, criterium shared by other authors.

  12. Diagnostic value of carcinoembryonic antigen and carcinoma antigen 19-9 for colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi-Yan; Lin, Min; Zhang, Hui-Bing

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic efficiency of colorectal carcinoma (CRC) with the tumor markers Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) and Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9), in addition to investigating whether CA 19-9 can be used to screen the disease process in patients with CRC who had no elevation of CEA levels. Serum levels of CEA and CA 19-9 were measured in: 138 patients with CRC; 111 patients with benign colorectal diseases. The diagnostic value was performed using the logistic regression equation and receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC). The serum levels of CEA and CA 19-9 in the patients with CRC were significantly higher than those in the patients with benign colorectal diseases (P < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) in the patients with CRC versus those with benign colorectal disease yielded the optimal cut-off value of 3.36 ng/ml for CEA and 23.9 U/ml for CA 19-9, respectively. The area under ROC curve (AUC) was 0.789 for CEA, 0.690 for CA 19-9 and 0.900 for the combination of the two tumor markers. The combination resulted in a higher Youden index and a sensitivity of 85.3%. The combined detection of serum CEA and CA 19-9 could play a pivotal role in the diagnosis of CRC, and could drastically improve the sensitivity for the diagnosis of CRC. CA 19-9 might be a tumor biomarker in addition to CEA for CRC.

  13. Continuous quality improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourne, P.B.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the various statistical tools used at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory to achieve continuous quality improvement in the development of Breeder Reactor Technology and in reactor operations. The role of the quality assurance professionals in this process, including quantifiable measurements using actual examples, is provided. The commitment to quality improvement through top management involvement is dramatically illustrated

  14. Antigen-Independent Methods to Improve Radioimmunotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baranowska-Kortylewicz, Janina

    2004-01-01

    .... To date three peptides able to modify vascular permeability (VP) were tested. Cytotoxicity studies indicated dose-dependent changes in cell metabolic activities after treatment with two agonists interacting with CD88 (C5aAP peptides...

  15. Physiological level production of antigen-specific human immunoglobulin in cloned transchromosomic cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Akiko; Matsushita, Hiroaki; Wu, Hua; Jiao, Jin-An; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sullivan, Eddie J; Wang, Zhongde; Kuroiwa, Yoshimi

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs) derived from pooled plasma from human donors are Food and Drug Administration approved biologics used in the treatment of a variety of human diseases. Powered by the natural diversity of immune response, hpAbs are effective in treating diseases caused by complex or quickly-evolving antigens such as viruses. We previously showed that transchromosomic (Tc) cattle carrying a human artificial chromosome (HAC) comprising the entire unrearranged human immunoglobulin heavy-chain (hIGH) and kappa-chain (hIGK) germline loci (named as κHAC) are capable of producing functional hpAbs when both of the bovine immunoglobulin mu heavy-chains, bIGHM and bIGHML1, are homozygously inactivated (double knockouts or DKO). However, B lymphocyte development in these Tc cattle is compromised, and the overall production of hpAbs is low. Here, we report the construction of an improved HAC, designated as cKSL-HACΔ, by incorporating all of the human immunoglobulin germline loci into the HAC. Furthermore, for avoiding the possible human-bovine interspecies incompatibility between the human immunoglobulin mu chain protein (hIgM) and bovine transmembrane α and β immunoglobulins (bIgα and bIgβ) in the pre-B cell receptor (pre-BCR) complex, we partially replaced (bovinized) the hIgM constant domain with the counterpart of bovine IgM (bIgM) that is involved in the interaction between bIgM and bIgα/Igβ; human IgM bovinization would also improve the functionality of hIgM in supporting B cell activation and proliferation. We also report the successful production of DKO Tc cattle carrying the cKSL-HACΔ (cKSL-HACΔ/DKO), the dramatic improvement of B cell development in these cattle and the high level production of hpAbs (as measured for the human IgG isotype) in the plasma. We further demonstrate that, upon immunization by tumor immunogens, high titer tumor immunogen-specific human IgG (hIgG) can be produced from such Tc cattle.

  16. Physiological level production of antigen-specific human immunoglobulin in cloned transchromosomic cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Sano

    Full Text Available Therapeutic human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs derived from pooled plasma from human donors are Food and Drug Administration approved biologics used in the treatment of a variety of human diseases. Powered by the natural diversity of immune response, hpAbs are effective in treating diseases caused by complex or quickly-evolving antigens such as viruses. We previously showed that transchromosomic (Tc cattle carrying a human artificial chromosome (HAC comprising the entire unrearranged human immunoglobulin heavy-chain (hIGH and kappa-chain (hIGK germline loci (named as κHAC are capable of producing functional hpAbs when both of the bovine immunoglobulin mu heavy-chains, bIGHM and bIGHML1, are homozygously inactivated (double knockouts or DKO. However, B lymphocyte development in these Tc cattle is compromised, and the overall production of hpAbs is low. Here, we report the construction of an improved HAC, designated as cKSL-HACΔ, by incorporating all of the human immunoglobulin germline loci into the HAC. Furthermore, for avoiding the possible human-bovine interspecies incompatibility between the human immunoglobulin mu chain protein (hIgM and bovine transmembrane α and β immunoglobulins (bIgα and bIgβ in the pre-B cell receptor (pre-BCR complex, we partially replaced (bovinized the hIgM constant domain with the counterpart of bovine IgM (bIgM that is involved in the interaction between bIgM and bIgα/Igβ; human IgM bovinization would also improve the functionality of hIgM in supporting B cell activation and proliferation. We also report the successful production of DKO Tc cattle carrying the cKSL-HACΔ (cKSL-HACΔ/DKO, the dramatic improvement of B cell development in these cattle and the high level production of hpAbs (as measured for the human IgG isotype in the plasma. We further demonstrate that, upon immunization by tumor immunogens, high titer tumor immunogen-specific human IgG (hIgG can be produced from such Tc cattle.

  17. An intertidal snail shows a dramatic size increase over the past century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jonathan A D; Rhile, Erika C; Liu, Harrison; Petraitis, Peter S

    2009-03-31

    Changes in the shell architecture of marine snails enhance defenses and greatly improve survival against predators. In the northwest Atlantic Ocean, shorter and thicker shells have been reported for several species following the introduction of predatory Carcinus maenas crabs early in the 20th century. But we report that the shell lengths of Nucella lapillus actually increased by an average of 22.6% over the past century, with no evidence of shell thickening after correcting for shell length. The increases in shell length were greatest on sheltered shores, highlighting the interaction between wave exposure and the sampling period. Comparisons were based on archived shells collected in 1915-1922 from sites that were resampled in 2007. N. lapillus is an important member of North Atlantic marine ecosystems, and our results suggest that the impacts of historical changes in species' key morphological traits on marine ecosystems remain underappreciated.

  18. Induced polyploidy dramatically increases the size and alters the shape of fruit in Actinidia chinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin-Hu; Ferguson, A. Ross; Murray, Brian G.; Jia, Yilin; Datson, Paul M.; Zhang, Jingli

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Some otherwise promising selections of Actinidia chinensis (kiwifruit) have fruit that are too small for successful commercialization. We have therefore made the first detailed study in diploid kiwifruit of the effects of chromosome doubling induced by colchicine on fruit size, shape and crop loading. Methods Flow cytometric analysis of young leaves and chromosome analysis of flower buds and root tips was used to confirm the stability of induced autotetraploids. Fruit weight, size and crop load were measured in the third year after planting in the field and for three consecutive years. DNA fingerprinting was used to confirm the origin of the material. Key Results There was a very significant increase in fruit size in induced autotetraploids of different genotypes of A. chinensis. With the commercially important diploid cultivar ‘Hort16A’, most regenerants, Type A plants, had fruit which were much the same shape as fruit of the diploid but, at the same fruit load, were much larger and heavier. Some regenerants, Type B plants, produced fruit similar to ‘fasciated’ fruit. Fruit of the autotetraploids induced from three female red-fleshed A. chinensis selections were also 50–60 % larger than fruit of their diploid progenitors. The main increase in fruit dimensions was in their diameters. These improved fruit characteristics were stable over several seasons. Conclusions Chromosome doubling has been shown to increase significantly fruit size in autotetraploid A. chinensis, highlighting the considerable potential of this technique to produce new cultivars with fruit of adequate size. Other variants with differently shaped fruit were also produced but the genetic basis of this variation remains to be elucidated. Autoploids of other Actinidia species with commercial potential may also show improved fruit characteristics, opening up many new possibilities for commercial development. PMID:21980192

  19. VaxiJen: a server for prediction of protective antigens, tumour antigens and subunit vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flower Darren R

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccine development in the post-genomic era often begins with the in silico screening of genome information, with the most probable protective antigens being predicted rather than requiring causative microorganisms to be grown. Despite the obvious advantages of this approach – such as speed and cost efficiency – its success remains dependent on the accuracy of antigen prediction. Most approaches use sequence alignment to identify antigens. This is problematic for several reasons. Some proteins lack obvious sequence similarity, although they may share similar structures and biological properties. The antigenicity of a sequence may be encoded in a subtle and recondite manner not amendable to direct identification by sequence alignment. The discovery of truly novel antigens will be frustrated by their lack of similarity to antigens of known provenance. To overcome the limitations of alignment-dependent methods, we propose a new alignment-free approach for antigen prediction, which is based on auto cross covariance (ACC transformation of protein sequences into uniform vectors of principal amino acid properties. Results Bacterial, viral and tumour protein datasets were used to derive models for prediction of whole protein antigenicity. Every set consisted of 100 known antigens and 100 non-antigens. The derived models were tested by internal leave-one-out cross-validation and external validation using test sets. An additional five training sets for each class of antigens were used to test the stability of the discrimination between antigens and non-antigens. The models performed well in both validations showing prediction accuracy of 70% to 89%. The models were implemented in a server, which we call VaxiJen. Conclusion VaxiJen is the first server for alignment-independent prediction of protective antigens. It was developed to allow antigen classification solely based on the physicochemical properties of proteins without

  20. Expression and Antigenic Evaluation of VacA Antigenic Fragment of Helicobacter Pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanzadeh, Leila; Ghaznavi-Rad, Ehsanollah; Soufian, Safieh; Farjadi, Vahideh; Abtahi, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s) : Helicobacter pylori, a human specific gastric pathogen is a causative agent of chronic active gastritis. The vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA) is an effective virulence factor involved in gastric injury. The aim of this study was to construct a recombinant protein containing antigenic region of VacA gene and determine its antigenicity. Materials and Methods: The antigenic region of VacA gene was detected by bioinformatics methods. The polymerase chain reaction method was used to amplify a highly antigenic region of VacA gene from chromosomal DNA of H. pylori. The eluted product was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET32a. The target protein was expressed in the Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) pLysS. The bacteria including pET32a-VacA plasmids were induced by IPTG. The antigenicity was finally studied by western blotting using sera of 15 H. pylori infected patients after purification. Results: Enzyme digestion analysis, PCR and DNA sequencing results showed that the target gene was inserted correctly into the recombinant vector. The expressed protein was purified successfully via affinity chromatography. Data indicated that antigenic region of VacA protein from Helicobacter pylori was recognized by all 15 patient’s sera. Conclusion : Our data showed that antigenic region of VacA protein can be expressed by in E. co.li. This protein was recognized by sera patients suffering from H. pylori infection. the recombinant protein has similar epitopes and close antigenic properties to the natural form of this antigen. Recombinant antigenic region of VacA protein also seems to be a promising antigen for protective and serologic diagnosis . PMID:23997913

  1. Expression and Antigenic Evaluation of VacA Antigenic Fragment of Helicobacter Pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Hasanzadeh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Helicobacter pylori, a human specific gastric pathogen is a causative agent of chronic active gastritis. The vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA is an effective virulence factor involved in gastric injury. The aim of this study was to construct a recombinant protein containing antigenic region of VacA gene and determine its antigenicity.   Materials and Methods: The antigenic region of VacA gene was detected by bioinformatics methods. The polymerase chain reaction method was used to amplify a highly antigenic region of VacA gene from chromosomal DNA of H. pylori. The eluted product was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET32a. The target protein was expressed in the Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3 pLysS. The bacteria including pET32a-VacA plasmids were induced by IPTG. The antigenicity was finally studied by western blotting using sera of 15 H. pylori infected patients after purification. Results: Enzyme digestion analysis, PCR and DNA sequencing results showed that the target gene was inserted correctly into the recombinant vector. The expressed protein was purified successfully via affinity chromatography. Data indicated that antigenic region of VacA protein from Helicobacter pylori was recognized by all 15 patient’s sera. Conclusion : Our data showed that antigenic region of VacA protein can be expressed by in E. co.li. This protein was recognized by sera patients suffering from H. pylori infection. the recombinant protein has similar epitopes and close antigenic properties to the natural form of this antigen. Recombinant antigenic region of VacA protein also seems to be a promising antigen for protective and serologic diagnosis .

  2. Phosphorylation of Large T Antigen Regulates Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, Jason; Wang, Xin; Tsang, Sabrina H.; Jiao, Jing; You, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV) was recently discovered as a novel human polyomavirus that is associated with ~80% of Merkel Cell Carcinomas. The Large Tumor antigen (LT) is an early viral protein which has a variety of functions, including manipulation of the cell cycle and initiating viral DNA replication. Phosphorylation plays a critical regulatory role for polyomavirus LT proteins, but no investigation of MCPyV LT phosphorylation has been performed to date. In this report mass spectrometry analysis reveals three unique phosphorylation sites: T271, T297 and T299. In vivo replication assays confirm that phosphorylation of T271 does not play a role in viral replication, while modification at T297 and T299 have dramatic and opposing effects on LT’s ability to initiate replication from the viral origin. We test these mutants for their ability to bind, unwind, and act as a functional helicase at the viral origin. These studies provide a framework for understanding how phosphorylation of LT may dynamically regulate viral replication. Although the natural host cell of MCPyV has not yet been established, this work provides a foundation for understanding how LT activity is regulated and provides tools for better exploring this regulation in both natural host cells and Merkel cells

  3. Phosphorylation of Large T Antigen Regulates Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Diaz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV was recently discovered as a novel human polyomavirus that is associated with ~80% of Merkel Cell Carcinomas. The Large Tumor antigen (LT is an early viral protein which has a variety of functions, including manipulation of the cell cycle and initiating viral DNA replication. Phosphorylation plays a critical regulatory role for polyomavirus LT proteins, but no investigation of MCPyV LT phosphorylation has been performed to date. In this report mass spectrometry analysis reveals three unique phosphorylation sites: T271, T297 and T299. In vivo replication assays confirm that phosphorylation of T271 does not play a role in viral replication, while modification at T297 and T299 have dramatic and opposing effects on LT’s ability to initiate replication from the viral origin. We test these mutants for their ability to bind, unwind, and act as a functional helicase at the viral origin. These studies provide a framework for understanding how phosphorylation of LT may dynamically regulate viral replication. Although the natural host cell of MCPyV has not yet been established, this work provides a foundation for understanding how LT activity is regulated and provides tools for better exploring this regulation in both natural host cells and Merkel cells.

  4. Phosphorylation of Large T Antigen Regulates Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Jason; Wang, Xin; Tsang, Sabrina H. [Department of Microbiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Jiao, Jing [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); You, Jianxin, E-mail: jianyou@mail.med.upenn.edu [Department of Microbiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2014-07-08

    Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV) was recently discovered as a novel human polyomavirus that is associated with ~80% of Merkel Cell Carcinomas. The Large Tumor antigen (LT) is an early viral protein which has a variety of functions, including manipulation of the cell cycle and initiating viral DNA replication. Phosphorylation plays a critical regulatory role for polyomavirus LT proteins, but no investigation of MCPyV LT phosphorylation has been performed to date. In this report mass spectrometry analysis reveals three unique phosphorylation sites: T271, T297 and T299. In vivo replication assays confirm that phosphorylation of T271 does not play a role in viral replication, while modification at T297 and T299 have dramatic and opposing effects on LT’s ability to initiate replication from the viral origin. We test these mutants for their ability to bind, unwind, and act as a functional helicase at the viral origin. These studies provide a framework for understanding how phosphorylation of LT may dynamically regulate viral replication. Although the natural host cell of MCPyV has not yet been established, this work provides a foundation for understanding how LT activity is regulated and provides tools for better exploring this regulation in both natural host cells and Merkel cells.

  5. Heterosubtypic protection against pathogenic human and avian influenza viruses via in vivo electroporation of synthetic consensus DNA antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominick J Laddy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The persistent evolution of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI highlights the need for novel vaccination techniques that can quickly and effectively respond to emerging viral threats. We evaluated the use of optimized consensus influenza antigens to provide broad protection against divergent strains of H5N1 influenza in three animal models of mice, ferrets, and non-human primates. We also evaluated the use of in vivo electroporation to deliver these vaccines to overcome the immunogenicity barrier encountered in larger animal models of vaccination. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Mice, ferrets and non-human primates were immunized with consensus plasmids expressing H5 hemagglutinin (pH5HA, N1 neuraminidase (pN1NA, and nucleoprotein antigen (pNP. Dramatic IFN-gamma-based cellular immune responses to both H5 and NP, largely dependent upon CD8+ T cells were seen in mice. Hemaggutination inhibition titers classically associated with protection (>1:40 were seen in all species. Responses in both ferrets and macaques demonstrate the ability of synthetic consensus antigens to induce antibodies capable of inhibiting divergent strains of the H5N1 subtype, and studies in the mouse and ferret demonstrate the ability of synthetic consensus vaccines to induce protection even in the absence of such neutralizing antibodies. After challenge, protection from morbidity and mortality was seen in mice and ferrets, with significant reductions in viral shedding and disease progression seen in vaccinated animals. CONCLUSIONS: By combining several consensus influenza antigens with in vivo electroporation, we demonstrate that these antigens induce both protective cellular and humoral immune responses in mice, ferrets and non-human primates. We also demonstrate the ability of these antigens to protect from both morbidity and mortality in a ferret model of HPAI, in both the presence and absence of neutralizing antibody, which will be critical in responding to the

  6. Co-expression of tumor antigen and interleukin-2 from an adenoviral vector augments the efficiency of therapeutic tumor vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech; Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Nørgaard Nielsen, Karen

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that for the majority of antigens, adenoviral vaccines expressing the target antigen fused to the MHC associated invariant chain (Ii) induce an accelerated, augmented, and prolonged transgene-specific CD8+ T-cell response. Here we describe a new adenoviral vaccine vector...... prolonged tumor control in vaccinated wild type (WT) mice. The improved tumor control required antigen-specific cells, since no tumor control was observed, unless the melanoma cells expressed the vaccine targeted antigen. We also tested our new vaccine in immunodeficient (CD80/86 deficient) mice. Following...... approach where the target antigen fused to Ii is expressed from the adenoviral E1 region and IL-2 is expressed from the E3 region. Immunization of mice with this new vector construct resulted in an augmented primary effector CD8+ T-cell response. Furthermore, in a melanoma model we observed significantly...

  7. The Abbey Theatre Digital Archive: a digitization project with dramatic impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Cox

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available National University of Ireland Galway digitized the archive of the Abbey Theatre between 2012 and 2015. This was the largest theatre archive digitization project worldwide and it has had a major impact on the University and its Library. The scale of the digitization project presented a series of challenges, including fragile material, limited time, streamlined workflows, complex digital rights management and effective systems. The project was completed on time and on budget in 2015, using a ‘more product, less process’ approach. Access to the Abbey Theatre Digital Archive has delivered strong academic impact for the University, generating new research income and international connections as well as contributing to improved institutional ranking. The Digital Archive enables new types of research, including text and data mining, and has reshaped undergraduate curricula. It has also had a transformative effect on the Library as leader of the project. The role of the archivist has changed and partnerships with the academic community have strengthened. A growing emphasis on digital publication has been a catalyst for a function- rather than subject-based organizational structure which promotes participation in digital scholarship initiatives, with archives and special collections occupying a new position of prominence.

  8. Functional role of BK virus tumor antigens in transformation.

    OpenAIRE

    Nakshatri, H; Pater, M M; Pater, A

    1988-01-01

    We have examined the role of the human papovavirus BK virus (BKV) tumor (T) antigen(s) in the maintenance of transformation and have identified the domain of T antigen essential for transformation. BKV-transformed BHK 21 and NIH 3T3 cells expressing antisense T-antigen RNA lose their ability to grow in soft agar, indicating the need for the continued expression of T antigen for the maintenance of the transformed phenotype. Experiments using translation termination linker insertion and deletio...

  9. Different immunogenicity but similar antitumor efficacy of two DNA vaccines coding for an antigen secreted in different membrane vesicle-associated forms

    OpenAIRE

    Bellier, Bertrand; Sedlik, Christine; Vigneron, James; Torrieri-Dramard, Lea; Pitoiset, Fabien; Denizeau, Jordan; Chesneau, Caroline; de la Rochere, Philippe; Lantz, Olivier; Thery, Clotilde

    2014-01-01

    The induction of an active immune response to control or eliminate tumours is still an unfulfilled challenge. We focused on plasmid DNA vaccines using an innovative approach whereby the antigen is expressed in association with extracellular vesicles (EVs) to facilitate antigen cross-presentation and improve induced immunity. Our two groups had independently shown previously that DNA vaccines encoding EV-associated antigens are more efficient at inducing cytotoxic T-cell responses than vaccine...

  10. Enhanced specificity in immunoscreening of expression cDNA clones using radiolabeled antigen overlay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, S.; Chao, L.; Chao, J.

    1989-01-01

    A highly sensitive and specific method has been developed for immunoscreening clones from an expression cDNA library. The procedures utilize a radiolabeled antigen detection method described originally for the immunoblotting of plasma proteins. Screening of rat alpha 1-antitrypsin clones was used. Comparison between Western blots of alpha 1-antitrypsin using both labeled antigen and protein A detection methods showed that the former yielded lower background and greater sensitivity than the latter. Further, this technique was shown to have a lower detection limit of less than 20 ng through Western blot analysis of varying concentrations of alpha 1-antitrypsin. The procedures are based on the expression of the protein by cDNA clones containing the DNA inserts in the correct reading frame. Following the transfer of phage proteins to nitrocellulose membranes, the bivalent antibodies bind monovalently to both nitrocellulose-bound-antigen in the phage lysates and radiolabeled antigen. The radiolabeled antigen overlay method is superior to the protein A detection method in sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility. This improved method can be applied in general for screening expression cDNA libraries, provided that the specific antiserum and radiolabeled antigen are available

  11. Dramatic course of osteomyelitis in a patient treated with immediately placed dental implants suffering from uncontrolled diabetes: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Christian; Hartwig, Stefan; Nack, Claudia; Nahles, Susanne; Nelson, Katja; Raguse, Jan-Dirk

    2015-01-01

    To report a rare and dramatic complication following immediate dental implant placement in a heavy smoker, who had a delayed diagnosis of uncontrolled diabetes. In this case report we present the dramatic course of a 64-year old female patient treated with five immediate post-extractive dental implants in the mandible, who developed osteomyelitis, which manifested initially as local peri-implant inflammation and progressed into a spontaneous jaw fracture, despite repeated surgical interventions and antibiotic courses over a 3-year period, until diabetes was diagnosed. A symptom-free status could be achieved only after partial mandibulectomy, treatment of diabetes and reconstruction with a microvascular fibula free flap. In the presence of mandibular osteomyelitis refractory to therapy, yet undiagnosed underlying pathologies, such as diabetes, should be investigated and treated urgently.

  12. Surveillance, Auditing, and Feedback Can Reduce Surgical Site Infection Dramatically: Toward Zero Surgical Site Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manivannan, Bhavani; Gowda, Deepak; Bulagonda, Pradeep; Rao, Abhishek; Raman, Sai Suguna; Natarajan, Shanmuga Vadivoo

    2018-04-01

    We evaluated the Surveillance of Surgical Site Infection (SSI), Auditing, and Feedback (SAF) effect on the rate of compliance with an SSI care bundle and measured its effectiveness in reducing the SSI rate. A prospective cohort study from January 2014 to December 2016 was classified into three phases: pre-SAF, early-SAF, and late-SAF. Pre-operative baseline characteristics of 24,677 patients who underwent orthopedic, cardiovascular thoracic surgery (CTVS) or urologic operations were recorded. Univariable analyses of the SSI rates in the pre-SAF and post-SAF phases were performed. Percentage compliance and non-compliance with each care component were calculated. Correlation between reduction in the SSI rate and increase in compliance with the pre-operative, peri-operative, and post-operative care-bundle components was performed using the Spearman test. There was a significant decrease in the SSI rate in orthopedic procedures that involved surgical implantation and in mitral valve/aortic valve (MVR/AVR) cardiac operations, with a relative risk (RR) ratio of 0.19 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.12-0.31) and 0.08 (95% CI 0.03-0.22), respectively. The SSI rate was inversely correlated with the rate of compliance with pre-operative (r = -0.738; p = 0.037), peri-operative (r = - 0.802; p = 0.017), and post-operative (r = -0.762; p = 0.028) care bundles. Implementation of the Surveillance of SSI, Auditing, and Feedback bundle had a profound beneficial effect on the SSI rate, thereby reducing healthcare costs and improving patient quality of life.

  13. HSP: bystander antigen in atopic diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost A Aalberse

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the last years insight in the complex interactions between innate and adaptive immunity in the regulation of an inflammatory response has increased enormously. This has revived the interest in stress proteins; proteins that are expressed during cell stress. As these proteins can attract and trigger an immunological response they can act as important mediators in this interaction. In this respect, of special interest are proteins that may act as modulators of both innate and adaptive immunity. Heat shock proteins (HSPs are stress proteins that have these, and more, characteristics. More than two decades of studies on HSPs has revealed that they are part of intrinsic, natural mechanisms that steer inflammation. This has provoked comprehensive explorations of the role of HSPs in various human inflammatory diseases.Most studies have focused on classical autoimmune diseases. This has led to the development of clinical studies with HSPs that have shown promise in Phase II/III clinical trials. Remarkably, only very little is yet known of the role of HSPs in atopic diseases. In allergic disease a number of studies have investigated the possibility that allergen-specific regulatory T cell (Treg function is defective in individuals with allergic diseases. This raises the question whether methods can be identified to improve the Treg repertoire. Studies from other inflammatory diseases have suggested HSPs may have such a beneficial effect on the T cell repertoire. Based on the immune mechanisms of atopic diseases, in this review we will argue that, as in other human inflammatory conditions, understanding immunity to HSPs is likely also relevant for atopic diseases. Specifically, we will discuss why certain HSPs such as HSP60 connect the immune response to environmental antigens with regulation of the inflammatory response.Thus they provide a molecular link that may eventually even help to better understand the immune pathological basis of the hygiene

  14. Dramatic Rewritings of the Spanish Golden Age Theater of Cervantes´s La fuerza de la sangre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Escudero Baztán

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the Golden age spanish theater recreations of Cervantes’s exemplary novel La fuerza de la sangre. Specifically, the paper reviews three important stages in these recreations: La fuerza de la sangre of Guillen de Castro, El agravio satisfecho de Castillo Solórzano, and No hay cosa como callar de Calderon de la Barca. Different rewrites indicate a close relationship between the three dramatic texts through intertextuality and other influences.

  15. Liposome-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccines: Formulation Strategies for Subunit Antigens and Immunostimulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe Tandrup Schmidt

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of subunit vaccines has become very attractive in recent years due to their superior safety profiles as compared to traditional vaccines based on live attenuated or whole inactivated pathogens, and there is an unmet medical need for improved vaccines and vaccines against pathogens for which no effective vaccines exist. The subunit vaccine technology exploits pathogen subunits as antigens, e.g., recombinant proteins or synthetic peptides, allowing for highly specific immune responses against the pathogens. However, such antigens are usually not sufficiently immunogenic to induce protective immunity, and they are often combined with adjuvants to ensure robust immune responses. Adjuvants are capable of enhancing and/or modulating immune responses by exposing antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APCs concomitantly with conferring immune activation signals. Few adjuvant systems have been licensed for use in human vaccines, and they mainly stimulate humoral immunity. Thus, there is an unmet demand for the development of safe and efficient adjuvant systems that can also stimulate cell-mediated immunity (CMI. Adjuvants constitute a heterogeneous group of compounds, which can broadly be classified into delivery systems or immunostimulators. Liposomes are versatile delivery systems for antigens, and they can carefully be customized towards desired immune profiles by combining them with immunostimulators and optimizing their composition, physicochemical properties and antigen-loading mode. Immunostimulators represent highly diverse classes of molecules, e.g., lipids, nucleic acids, proteins and peptides, and they are ligands for pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs, which are differentially expressed on APC subsets. Different formulation strategies might thus be required for incorporation of immunostimulators and antigens, respectively, into liposomes, and the choice of immunostimulator should ideally be based on knowledge regarding the

  16. Added value of antigen ELISA in the diagnosis of neurocysticercosis in resource poor settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Gabriël

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neurocysticercosis (NCC is the most common cause of acquired epilepsy in Taenia solium endemic areas, primarily situated in low-income countries. Diagnosis is largely based upon the "Del Brutto diagnostic criteria" using the definitive/probable/no NCC diagnosis approach. Neuroimaging and specific T. solium cysticercosis antibody detection results are at the mainstay of this diagnosis, while antigen detection in serum has never been included. This study aimed at evaluating the addition of antigen detection as a major diagnostic criterion, especially in areas where neuroimaging is absent. METHODS: The B158/B60 monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for the detection of circulating cysticercus antigen was carried out retrospectively on serum samples collected during a hospital-based study from 83 people with epilepsy (PWE in an endemic area. RESULTS: The addition of antigen results as a major criterion allowed the correct diagnosis of definitive NCC in 10 out of 17 patients as opposed to 0/17 without antigen results in the absence of neuroimaging. A sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 84% were determined for the diagnosis of active NCC using antigen ELISA. While the use of a higher cutoff improves the specificity of the test to 96%, it decreases its sensitivity to 83%. CONCLUSIONS: In areas where neuroimaging is absent, NCC diagnosis according to the existing criteria is problematic. Taking into account its limitations for diagnosis of inactive NCC, antigen detection can be of added value for diagnosing NCC in PWE by supporting diagnostic and treatment decisions. Therefore, we recommend a revision of the "Del Brutto diagnostic criteria" for use in resource poor areas and suggest the inclusion of serum antigen detection as a major criterion.

  17. Tumor-Associated Antigens for Specific Immunotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Schmitz

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is the most common noncutaneous cancer diagnosis and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in the United States. Effective treatment modalities for advanced metastatic PCa are limited. Immunotherapeutic strategies based on T cells and antibodies represent interesting approaches to prevent progression from localized to advanced PCa and to improve survival outcomes for patients with advanced disease. CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs efficiently recognize and destroy tumor cells. CD4+ T cells augment the antigen-presenting capacity of dendritic cells and promote the expansion of tumor-reactive CTLs. Antibodies mediate their antitumor effects via antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, activation of the complement system, improving the uptake of coated tumor cells by phagocytes, and the functional interference of biological pathways essential for tumor growth. Consequently, several tumor-associated antigens (TAAs have been identified that represent promising targets for T cell- or antibody-based immunotherapy. These TAAs comprise proteins preferentially expressed in normal and malignant prostate tissues and molecules which are not predominantly restricted to the prostate, but are overexpressed in various tumor entities including PCa. Clinical trials provide evidence that specific immunotherapeutic strategies using such TAAs represent safe and feasible concepts for the induction of immunological and clinical responses in PCa patients. However, further improvement of the current approaches is required which may be achieved by combining T cell- and/or antibody-based strategies with radio-, hormone-, chemo- or antiangiogenic therapy.

  18. Tumor-Associated Antigens for Specific Immunotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiessling, Andrea [Biologics Safety and Disposition, Preclinical Safety, Translational Sciences, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Novartis Pharma AG, Werk Klybeck, Klybeckstraße 141, Basel CH-4057 (Switzerland); Wehner, Rebekka [Institute of Immunology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany); Füssel, Susanne [Department of Urology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany); Bachmann, Michael [Institute of Immunology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany); Wirth, Manfred P. [Department of Urology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany); Schmitz, Marc, E-mail: marc.schmitz@tu-dresden.de [Institute of Immunology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany)

    2012-02-22

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common noncutaneous cancer diagnosis and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in the United States. Effective treatment modalities for advanced metastatic PCa are limited. Immunotherapeutic strategies based on T cells and antibodies represent interesting approaches to prevent progression from localized to advanced PCa and to improve survival outcomes for patients with advanced disease. CD8{sup +} cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) efficiently recognize and destroy tumor cells. CD4{sup +} T cells augment the antigen-presenting capacity of dendritic cells and promote the expansion of tumor-reactive CTLs. Antibodies mediate their antitumor effects via antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, activation of the complement system, improving the uptake of coated tumor cells by phagocytes, and the functional interference of biological pathways essential for tumor growth. Consequently, several tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) have been identified that represent promising targets for T cell- or antibody-based immunotherapy. These TAAs comprise proteins preferentially expressed in normal and malignant prostate tissues and molecules which are not predominantly restricted to the prostate, but are overexpressed in various tumor entities including PCa. Clinical trials provide evidence that specific immunotherapeutic strategies using such TAAs represent safe and feasible concepts for the induction of immunological and clinical responses in PCa patients. However, further improvement of the current approaches is required which may be achieved by combining T cell- and/or antibody-based strategies with radio-, hormone-, chemo- or antiangiogenic therapy.

  19. Antigenic determinant of the Lancefield group H antigen of Streptococcus sanguis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosan, B; Argenbright, L

    1982-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that the teichoic acid isolated from strains of Streptococcus sanguis was group specific and defined the Lancefield group H streptococci. To determine the specific antigenic determinants, the antigen was extracted from a group H streptococcus (ATCC 903) by the phenol-water method and purified by column chromatography. The isolated antigen had a glycerol/phosphate/glucose molar ratio of 1:0.9:0.3; the lipid concentration was 7.6% of its dry weight. No nucleic acids were detected, and amino acids constituted approximately 2% of the dry weight. The minimum concentration of antigen required to sensitize erythrocytes for hemagglutination with a 1:1,000 dilution of either group H antiserum or antiteichoic acid serum was 0.02 microgram/ml. Hemagglutination inhibition studies suggested that the major antigenic determinant consisted of an alpha-glucose linked to the glycerol phosphate backbone. Images PMID:6185428

  20. [Enterobacterial antigen in human peripheral blood lymphocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure-Fontenla, M A; García-Tamayo, F

    1989-11-01

    The following study has as prior history the research reports which have shown the existence of an antigenic tissue deposit in gram-negative enterobacteria. The antigens of the enterobacteria have also been found in the lymphocytic membranes and cytoplasm. Since intestinal lymphoid tissue cells can recirculate by means of the thoracic duct to the peripheral venous system, it was proposed that the circulating lymphocytes in healthy people could also contain small amounts of a common enterobacterial antigen. The study was carried out in 15 human venous blood samples, of which the lymphocytic population was separated to later be used in the preparation of 15 alcohol soluble extracts. This material was used for inhibiting the immuno-hemolysis assay in three occasions in order to show the presence of antigens shared by different enterobacterias, using as reference a fraction separated from the LPS of Escherichia coli 08. The results showed that the human lymphocytes also had antigenic determinants common to gram-negative bacteria.

  1. The Molecular Determinants of Antibody Recognition and Antigenic Drift in the H3 Hemagglutinin of Swine Influenza A Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abente, Eugenio J.; Santos, Jefferson; Lewis, Nicola S.; Gauger, Phillip C.; Stratton, Jered; Skepner, Eugene; Rajao, Daniela S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza A virus (IAV) of the H3 subtype is an important respiratory pathogen that affects both humans and swine. Vaccination to induce neutralizing antibodies against the surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) is the primary method used to control disease. However, due to antigenic drift, vaccine strains must be periodically updated. Six of the 7 positions previously identified in human seasonal H3 (positions 145, 155, 156, 158, 159, 189, and 193) were also indicated in swine H3 antigenic evolution. To experimentally test the effect on virus antigenicity of these 7 positions, substitutions were introduced into the HA of an isogenic swine lineage virus. We tested the antigenic effect of these introduced substitutions by using hemagglutination inhibition (HI) data with monovalent swine antisera and antigenic cartography to evaluate the antigenic phenotype of the mutant viruses. Combinations of substitutions within the antigenic motif caused significant changes in antigenicity. One virus mutant that varied at only two positions relative to the wild type had a >4-fold reduction in HI titers compared to homologous antisera. Potential changes in pathogenesis and transmission of the double mutant were evaluated in pigs. Although the double mutant had virus shedding titers and transmissibility comparable to those of the wild type, it caused a significantly lower percentage of lung lesions. Elucidating the antigenic effects of specific amino acid substitutions at these sites in swine H3 IAV has important implications for understanding IAV evolution within pigs as well as for improved vaccine development and control strategies in swine. IMPORTANCE A key component of influenza virus evolution is antigenic drift mediated by the accumulation of amino acid substitutions in the hemagglutinin (HA) protein, resulting in escape from prior immunity generated by natural infection or vaccination. Understanding which amino acid positions of the HA contribute to the ability

  2. 4-1BB Costimulation Ameliorates T Cell Exhaustion Induced by Tonic Signaling of Chimeric Antigen Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Adrienne H.; Haso, Waleed M.; Shern, Jack F.; Wanhainen, Kelsey M.; Murgai, Meera; Ingaramo, Maria; Smith, Jillian P.; Walker, Alec J.; Kohler, M. Eric; Venkateshwara, Vikas R.; Kaplan, Rosandra N.; Patterson, George H.; Fry, Terry J.; Orentas, Rimas J.; Mackall, Crystal L.

    2015-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting CD19 have mediated dramatic anti-tumor responses in hematologic malignancies, but tumor regression has rarely occurred using CARs targeting other antigens. It remains unknown whether the impressive effects of CD19 CARs relate to greater susceptibility of hematologic malignancies to CAR therapies, or superior functionality of the CD19 CAR itself. We discovered that tonic CAR CD3ζ phosphorylation, triggered by antigen-independent clustering of CAR scFvs, can induce early exhaustion of CAR T cells that limits anti-tumor efficacy. Such activation is present to varying degrees in all CARs studied, with the exception of the highly effective CD19 CAR. We further identify that CD28 costimulation augments, while 4-1BB costimulation ameliorates, exhaustion induced by persistent CAR signaling. Our results provide biological explanations for the dramatic anti-tumor effects of CD19 CARs and for the observations that CD19.BBz CAR T cells are more persistent than CD19.28z CAR T cells in clinical trials. PMID:25939063

  3. HLA antigens, epilepsy and cytomegalovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannetti, P; Morellini, M; Raucci, U; Cappellacci, S

    1988-01-01

    Thirty-one epileptic patients, selected from among 900 children with previous febrile convulsions and subsequent epilepsy, were typed for HLA antigens. In 16 of the 31 patients CMV was isolated from the urine shortly after the appearance of spontaneous fits; in the remaining 15 patients the virus was never detected. All the examined children were typed for 14 HLA-A, 23 HLA-B, 7 HLA-C and 9 HLA-DR specificities, and compared with a group of healthy subjects. The HLA-A11 antigen was present in 25% of the children with chronic CMV infection and epilepsy, and absent in patients with epilepsy but without CMV infection (p less than 0.02). The possibility that the A11 antigen is a marker of the predisposing genes for CMV infection in children with epilepsy following FC is proposed.

  4. Antigenic typing Polish isolates of canine parvovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizak, B. [National Veterinary Research Institute, Pulawy (Poland); Plucienniczak, A. [Polish Academy ofd Sciences. Microbiology and Virology Center, Lodz (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    Polish strains of canine parvovirus isolated between 1982 and 1993 were examined to determine the extent to which the virus has evolved antigenically and genetically over eleven years. Two CPV isolates obtained in Warsaw in 1982 and Pulawy in 1993, were examined using monoclonal antibody typing, restriction analysis and sequencing VP-2 protein gene. Five other isolates from Warsaw and Pulawy were tested with the panel of monoclonal antibodies specific to CPV-2, CPV-2a and common for canine parvovirus, feline panleukopenia virus and milk enteritis virus. Results of the studies demonstrated that all isolates tested represented CPV-2a antigenic type. Rapid antigenic strain replacement recorded by Parrish and Senda in the U.S.A and Japan was not confirmed in Poland. (author). 30 refs, 2 tabs.

  5. Idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and HLA antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gerbase-DeLima

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate a possible association between HLA class II antigens and idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS. HLA-A, -B, -DR and -DQ antigens were determined in 19 Brazilian patients (16 white subjects and three subjects of Japanese origin with biopsy-proven FSGS. Comparison of the HLA antigen frequencies between white patients and white local controls showed a significant increase in HLA-DR4 frequency among FSGS patients (37.7 vs 17.2%, P<0.05. In addition, the three patients of Japanese extraction, not included in the statistical analysis, also presented HLA-DR4. In conclusion, our data confirm the association of FSGS with HLA-DR4 previously reported by others, thus providing further evidence for a role of genes of the HLA complex in the susceptibility to this disease

  6. Original antigenic sin: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatti, Anup; Monsalve, Diana M; Pacheco, Yovana; Chang, Christopher; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Gershwin, M Eric

    2017-09-01

    The concept of "original antigenic sin" was first proposed by Thomas Francis, Jr. in 1960. This phenomenon has the potential to rewrite what we understand about how the immune system responds to infections and its mechanistic implications on how vaccines should be designed. Antigenic sin has been demonstrated to occur in several infectious diseases in both animals and humans, including human influenza infection and dengue fever. The basis of "original antigenic sin" requires immunological memory, and our immune system ability to autocorrect. In the context of viral infections, it is expected that if we are exposed to a native strain of a pathogen, we should be able to mount a secondary immune response on subsequent exposure to the same pathogen. "Original antigenic sin" will not contradict this well-established immunological process, as long as the subsequent infectious antigen is identical to the original one. But "original antigenic sin" implies that when the epitope varies slightly, then the immune system relies on memory of the earlier infection, rather than mount another primary or secondary response to the new epitope which would allow faster and stronger responses. The result is that the immunological response may be inadequate against the new strain, because the immune system does not adapt and instead relies on its memory to mount a response. In the case of vaccines, if we only immunize to a single strain or epitope, and if that strain/epitope changes over time, then the immune system is unable to mount an accurate secondary response. In addition, depending of the first viral exposure the secondary immune response can result in an antibody-dependent enhancement of the disease or at the opposite, it could induce anergy. Both of them triggering loss of pathogen control and inducing aberrant clinical consequences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Multivalent Chromosomal Expression of the Clostridium botulinum Serotype A Neurotoxin Heavy-Chain Antigen and the Bacillus anthracis Protective Antigen in Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flaherty, Sarah; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2016-10-15

    Clostridium botulinum and Bacillus anthracis produce potent toxins that cause severe disease in humans. New and improved vaccines are needed for both of these pathogens. For mucosal vaccine delivery using lactic acid bacteria, chromosomal expression of antigens is preferred over plasmid-based expression systems, as chromosomal expression circumvents plasmid instability and the need for antibiotic pressure. In this study, we constructed three strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM expressing from the chromosome (i) the nontoxic host receptor-binding domain of the heavy chain of Clostridium botulinum serotype A neurotoxin (BoNT/A-Hc), (ii) the anthrax protective antigen (PA), and (iii) both the BoNT/A-Hc and the PA. The BoNT/A-Hc vaccine cassette was engineered to contain the signal peptide from the S-layer protein A from L. acidophilus and a dendritic-cell-targeting peptide. A chromosomal region downstream of lba0889 carrying a highly expressed enolase gene was selected for insertion of the vaccine cassettes. Western blot analysis confirmed the heterologous expression of the two antigens from plasmid and chromosome locations. Stability assays demonstrated loss of the vaccine cassettes from expression plasmids without antibiotic maintenance. RNA sequencing showed high expression of each antigen and that insertion of the vaccine cassettes had little to no effect on the transcription of other genes in the chromosome. This study demonstrated that chromosomal integrative recombinant strains are promising vaccine delivery vehicles when targeted into high-expression chromosomal regions. Levels of expression match high-copy-number plasmids and eliminate the requirement for antibiotic selective maintenance of recombinant plasmids. Clostridium botulinum and Bacillus anthracis produce potent neurotoxins that pose a biochemical warfare concern; therefore, effective vaccines against these bacteria are required. Chromosomal expression of antigens is preferred over plasmid

  8. Outer membrane protein antigens of Moraxella bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostle, A G; Rosenbusch, R F

    1986-07-01

    Outer membranes were isolated from bovine isolates and type strains of Moraxella bovis, M phenylpyruvica, M lacunata, and M ovis by sodium N lauroyl sarcosinate extraction and differential centrifugation. Analysis of outer membranes from these organisms by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis revealed that all M bovis isolates shared a common polypeptide pattern that was readily distinguishable from other Moraxella spp. Nine major outer membrane protein bands were identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis analysis of M bovis. Immunoblotting of protein antigens of M bovis revealed several outer membrane proteins that seemed to be common antigens of all M bovis isolates.

  9. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela Ramirez, J.E.; Roychoudhury, R.; Habte, H.H.; Cho, M. W.; Pohl, N. L. B.; Narasimhan, B.

    2015-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells, and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by dendritic cells. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and antigen presenting cells and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  10. Cell-free antigens of Sporothrix brasiliensis: antigenic diversity and application in an immunoblot assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Pizzini, Cláudia Vera; Reis, Rosani Santos; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida; Peralta, José Mauro; Gutierrez-Galhardo, Maria Clara; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2012-11-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycosis diagnosed by isolation of the fungus in culture. Serological tests for help in diagnosis in general do not use purified or recombinant antigens, because there is a paucity of described immunoreactive proteins, especially for the new described Sporothrix species, such as Sporothrix brasiliensis. This study aims to characterise antigens from S. brasiliensis and verify their application in serodiagnosis of sporotrichosis. An immunoblot assay allied with computer-based analysis was used to identify putative antigenic molecules in a cell-free extracts of both morphological phases of this fungus, and to delineate antigenic polymorphism among seven S. brasiliensis isolates and one S. schenckii Brazilian strain. The mycelial and yeast phase of the fungus originated 14 and 23 reactive bands, respectively, which were variable in intensity. An 85 kDa antigen, verified in the yeast phase of the fungus, was observed in all strains used and the immunodominant protein was identified. This protein, however, cross-react with serum samples from patients infected with other pathogens. The results show that the S. brasiliensis cell-free antigen extract is a single and inexpensive source of antigens, and can be applied on the sporotrichosis serodiagnosis. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Antigen processing and remodeling of the endosomal pathway: requirements for antigen cross-presentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewoud Bernardus Compeer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen as peptide/class I MHC complexes plays a central role in the elicitation of CD8+ T cell clones that mediate anti-viral and anti-tumor immune responses. While it has been clear that there are specific subsets of professional antigen presenting cells (APC capable of antigen cross-presentation, description of mechanisms involved is still ongoing. Especially amongst dendritic cells (DC, there are specialized subsets that are highly proficient at antigen cross-presentation. We here present a focused survey on the cell biological processes in the endosomal pathway that support antigen cross-presentation. This review highlight DC-intrinsic mechanisms that facilitate the cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen, including receptor-mediated uptake, recycling and maturation including the sorting of membrane proteins, dynamic remodeling of endosomal structures and cell-surface directed endosomal trafficking. We will conclude with description of pathogen-induced deviation of endosomal processing, and discuss how immune evasion strategies pertaining endosomal trafficking may preclude antigen cross-presentation.

  12. Antigenic structures stably expressed by recombinant TGEV-derived vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becares, Martina; Sanchez, Carlos M; Sola, Isabel; Enjuanes, Luis; Zuñiga, Sonia

    2014-09-01

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) are positive-stranded RNA viruses with potential as immunization vectors, expressing high levels of heterologous genes and eliciting both secretory and systemic immune responses. Nevertheless, its high recombination rate may result in the loss of the full-length foreign gene, limiting their use as vectors. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) was engineered to express porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) small protein domains, as a strategy to improve heterologous gene stability. After serial passage in tissue cultures, stable expression of small PRRSV protein antigenic domains was achieved. Therefore, size reduction of the heterologous genes inserted in CoV-derived vectors led to the stable expression of antigenic domains. Immunization of piglets with these TGEV vectors led to partial protection against a challenge with a virulent PRRSV strain, as immunized animals showed reduced clinical signs and lung damage. Further improvement of TGEV-derived vectors will require the engineering of vectors with decreased recombination rate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification of sVSG117 as an immunodiagnostic antigen and evaluation of a dual-antigen lateral flow test for the diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Lauren; Fleming, Jennifer; Sastry, Lalitha; Mehlert, Angela; Wall, Steven J; Ferguson, Michael A J

    2014-07-01

    The diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense relies mainly on the Card Agglutination Test for Trypanosomiasis (CATT). There is no immunodiagnostic for HAT caused by T. b. rhodesiense. Our principle aim was to develop a prototype lateral flow test that might be an improvement on CATT. Pools of infection and control sera were screened against four different soluble form variant surface glycoproteins (sVSGs) by ELISA and one, sVSG117, showed particularly strong immunoreactivity to pooled infection sera. Using individual sera, sVSG117 was shown to be able to discriminate between T. b. gambiense infection and control sera by both ELISA and lateral flow test. The sVSG117 antigen was subsequently used with a previously described recombinant diagnostic antigen, rISG65, to create a dual-antigen lateral flow test prototype. The latter was used blind in a virtual field trial of 431 randomized infection and control sera from the WHO HAT Specimen Biobank. In the virtual field trial, using two positive antigen bands as the criterion for infection, the sVSG117 and rISG65 dual-antigen lateral flow test prototype showed a sensitivity of 97.3% (95% CI: 93.3 to 99.2) and a specificity of 83.3% (95% CI: 76.4 to 88.9) for the detection of T. b. gambiense infections. The device was not as good for detecting T. b. rhodesiense infections using two positive antigen bands as the criterion for infection, with a sensitivity of 58.9% (95% CI: 44.9 to 71.9) and specificity of 97.3% (95% CI: 90.7 to 99.7). However, using one or both positive antigen band(s) as the criterion for T. b. rhodesiense infection improved the sensitivity to 83.9% (95% CI: 71.7 to 92.4) with a specificity of 85.3% (95% CI: 75.3 to 92.4). These results encourage further development of the dual-antigen device for clinical use.

  14. Identification of sVSG117 as an immunodiagnostic antigen and evaluation of a dual-antigen lateral flow test for the diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Sullivan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense relies mainly on the Card Agglutination Test for Trypanosomiasis (CATT. There is no immunodiagnostic for HAT caused by T. b. rhodesiense. Our principle aim was to develop a prototype lateral flow test that might be an improvement on CATT.Pools of infection and control sera were screened against four different soluble form variant surface glycoproteins (sVSGs by ELISA and one, sVSG117, showed particularly strong immunoreactivity to pooled infection sera. Using individual sera, sVSG117 was shown to be able to discriminate between T. b. gambiense infection and control sera by both ELISA and lateral flow test. The sVSG117 antigen was subsequently used with a previously described recombinant diagnostic antigen, rISG65, to create a dual-antigen lateral flow test prototype. The latter was used blind in a virtual field trial of 431 randomized infection and control sera from the WHO HAT Specimen Biobank.In the virtual field trial, using two positive antigen bands as the criterion for infection, the sVSG117 and rISG65 dual-antigen lateral flow test prototype showed a sensitivity of 97.3% (95% CI: 93.3 to 99.2 and a specificity of 83.3% (95% CI: 76.4 to 88.9 for the detection of T. b. gambiense infections. The device was not as good for detecting T. b. rhodesiense infections using two positive antigen bands as the criterion for infection, with a sensitivity of 58.9% (95% CI: 44.9 to 71.9 and specificity of 97.3% (95% CI: 90.7 to 99.7. However, using one or both positive antigen band(s as the criterion for T. b. rhodesiense infection improved the sensitivity to 83.9% (95% CI: 71.7 to 92.4 with a specificity of 85.3% (95% CI: 75.3 to 92.4. These results encourage further development of the dual-antigen device for clinical use.

  15. Dramatic Stained Glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Describes an art project that is appropriate for students in fifth through twelfth grade in which they create Gothic-style stained-glass windows. Discusses how college students majoring in elementary education created stained-glass windows. Addresses how to adapt this lesson for younger students. (CMK)

  16. Lectin binding patterns and immunohistochemical antigen detection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ibrahim Eldaghayes

    2018-02-09

    Feb 9, 2018 ... examined by histological, lectin-histochemical, immunohistochemical and cultural techniques. B. abortus antigens were immunohistochemically detected in fetal lungs and placenta. An increase in the labeling with UEA-1, DBA,. PNA, RCA-1 and SBA was found in the lungs and an increase in the labeling ...

  17. Lea blood group antigen on human platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunstan, R.A.; Simpson, M.B.; Rosse, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    One- and two-stage radioligand assays were used to determine if human platelets possess the Lea antigen. Goat IgG anti-Lea antibody was purified by multiple adsorptions with Le(a-b-) human red blood cells, followed by affinity chromatography with synthetic Lea substance and labeling with /sup 125/I. Human IgG anti-Lea antibody was used either in a two stage radioassay with /sup 125/I-labeled mouse monoclonal IgG anti-human IgG as the second antibody or, alternatively, purified by Staph protein A chromatography, labeled with /sup 125/I, and used in a one-stage radioassay. Platelets from donors of appropriate red blood cell phenotypes were incubated with the antisera, centrifuged through phthalate esters, and assayed in a gamma scintillation counter. Dose response and saturation curve analysis demonstrate the presence of Lewis a antigen on platelets from Lea+ donors. Furthermore, platelets from an Le(a-b-) donor incubated in Le (a+b-) plasma adsorb Lea antigen in a similar manner to red blood cells. The clinical significance of these antigens in platelet transfusion remains undefined.

  18. A NEW SYNTHETIC FUNCTIONALIZED ANTIGEN CARRIER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DRIJFHOUT, JW; BLOEMHOFF, W

    A new synthetic functionalized antigen carrier is described. It consists of a core of seven branched lysine residues, of which each of the four N-terminal lysine residues contains two N-(S-acetylmercaptoacetyl)-glutamyl residues. After removal of the protecting S-acetyl groups affording eight thiol

  19. Non-lineage antigens: section report

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horváth, Ondřej; Drbal, Karel; Angelisová, Pavla; Hilgert, Ivan; Hořejší, Václav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 236, 1-2 (2005), s. 42-47 ISSN 0008-8749 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0506 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : non-lineage antigens * cytofluorometry * CD molecules Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 1.558, year: 2005

  20. Carcinoembryonic antigen and head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laarman, D. A.; van Kamp, G. J.; Balm, A. J.; Braakhuis, B. J.; Snow, G. B.

    1991-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) concentrations were determined in the sera of 45 patients with a head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and of 13 controls. In 13 patients serial CEA measurements were made during the follow-up period. In 38% of the patients the serum CEA level was slightly elevated

  1. Antigen dynamics of follicular dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesters, B.A.

    2015-01-01

    Stromal-derived follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are a major depot for antigen that are essential for formation of germinal centers, the site where memory and effector B cells differentiate and high-affinity antibody production takes place. Historically, FDCs have been characterized as ‘accessory’

  2. Cloning, expression, purification and antigenic evaluation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Streptococcus pyogenes produce an extracellular hyaluronidase which is associated with the spread of the organism during infection. Enzyme hyaluronidase is capable of degrading hyaluronic acid. The aim of the present study was to clone and express antigenic regions of the hylA of S.pyogenes in Escherichia coli.

  3. Antigenic and genetic variability of human metapneumoviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Herfst (Sander); L. Sprong; P.A. Cane; E. Forleo-Neto; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); R.L. de Swart (Rik); B.G. van den Hoogen (Bernadette)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractHuman metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a member of the subfamily Pneumovirinae within the family Paramyxo- viridae. Other members of this subfamily, respiratory syncytial virus and avian pneumovirus, can be divided into subgroups on the basis of genetic or antigenic differences or both. For

  4. Defined carriers for synthetic antigens: Hinge Peptides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváček, Jan; Niederhafner, Petr; Gut, Vladimír; Hulačová, Hana; Maloň, Petr

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 1 (2005), s. 68 ISSN 0939-4451. [International Congress on Amino Acids and Proteins /9./. 08.08.2005-12.08.2005, Gert Lubec] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/03/1362 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : synthetic carrier * antigen * hinge peptide Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  5. Antigenic characterisation of lyssaviruses in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Ngoepe

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available There are at least six Lyssavirus species that have been isolated in Africa, which include classical rabies virus, Lagos bat virus, Mokola virus, Duvenhage virus, Shimoni bat virus and Ikoma lyssavirus. In this retrospective study, an analysis of the antigenic reactivity patterns of lyssaviruses in South Africa against a panel of 15 anti-nucleoprotein monoclonal antibodies was undertaken. A total of 624 brain specimens, collected between 2005 and 2009, confirmed as containing lyssavirus antigen by direct fluorescent antibody test, were subjected to antigenic differentiation. The lyssaviruses were differentiated into two species, namely rabies virus (99.5% and Mokola virus (0.5%. Furthermore, rabies virus was further delineated into two common rabies biotypes in South Africa: canid and mongoose. Initially, it was found that the canid rabies biotype had two reactivity patterns; differential staining was observed with just one monoclonal antibody. This difference was likely to have been an artefact related to sample quality, as passage in cell culture restored staining. Mongoose rabies viruses were more heterogeneous, with seven antigenic reactivity patterns detected. Although Mokola viruses were identified in this study, prevalence and reservoir host species are yet to be established. These data demonstrate the usefulness of monoclonal antibody typing panels in lyssavirus surveillance with reference to emergence of new species or spread of rabies biotypes to new geographic zones.

  6. Evaluation of an Antigen-Antibody

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    replication would lead to the production of various antigens. Today with BMT history of over 30 years, infection ... Study design: The study involved both retrospective and prospective laboratory-based analysis of ..... core protein of a molecular mass 19 x 103 Da, one picogram (pg) of virus core corresponds to 1.3 x. 105 HCV ...

  7. Lysine acetylation of major Chlamydia trachomatis antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Mihailovic

    2016-03-01

    Our data show that important Ct antigens could be post-translationally modified by acetylation of lysine residues at multiple sites. Further studies are needed to investigate total acetylome of Ct and the impact PTMs might have on Ct biology and pathogenicity.

  8. Leukemia Associated Antigens: Their Dual Role as Biomarkers and Immunotherapeutic Targets for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schmitt

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia associated antigens (LAAs are being increasingly identified by methods such as cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL cloning, serological analysis of recombinant cDNA expression libraries (SEREX and mass spectrometry (MS. In additional, large scale screening techniques such as microarray, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE have expanded our understanding of the role that tumor antigens play in the biological processes which are perturbed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML. It has become increasingly apparent that these antigens play a dual role, not only as targets for immunotherapy, but also as biomarkers of disease state, stage, response to treatment and survival. We need biomarkers to enable the identification of the patients who are most likely to benefit from specific treatments (conventional and/or novel and to help clinicians and scientists improve clinical end points and treatment design. Here we describe the LAAs identified in AML, to date, which have already been shown to play a dual role as biomarkers of AML disease.Abbreviations: AML: acute myeloid leukemia; APL: acute promyelocytic leukemia; ATRA: all-trans-retinoic acid; B-CLL: B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia; CT: cancer-testis; CTL: cytotoxic T-lymphocyte; FAB: French-American-British; HI: hypusination inhibitors; HSP: heat shock protein; ITD: internal tandem duplication; LAA: leukemia associated antigen; MDS: myelodysplastic syndrome; MGEA6: meningioma antigen 6; MPD: myeloproliferative disease; MS: mass spectrometry; NK: natural killer; PRAME: preferentially expressed antigen of melanoma; PRTN3: proteinase 3; RAGE-1: renal antigen 1; RHAMM: receptor for hyaluronic acid-mediated motility; RQ-PCR: real-time PCR; SAGE: serial analysis of gene expression; SCT: stem cell transplant; SEREX: serological analysis of recombinant cDNA expression libraries; SNPs: single nucleotide polymorphisms; UPD

  9. Photochemical Internalization of Peptide Antigens Provides a Novel Strategy to Realize Therapeutic Cancer Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Haug

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Effective priming and activation of tumor-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs is crucial for realizing the potential of therapeutic cancer vaccination. This requires cytosolic antigens that feed into the MHC class I presentation pathway, which is not efficiently achieved with most current vaccination technologies. Photochemical internalization (PCI provides an emerging technology to route endocytosed material to the cytosol of cells, based on light-induced disruption of endosomal membranes using a photosensitizing compound. Here, we investigated the potential of PCI as a novel, minimally invasive, and well-tolerated vaccination technology to induce priming of cancer-specific CTL responses to peptide antigens. We show that PCI effectively promotes delivery of peptide antigens to the cytosol of antigen-presenting cells (APCs in vitro. This resulted in a 30-fold increase in MHC class I/peptide complex formation and surface presentation, and a subsequent 30- to 100-fold more efficient activation of antigen-specific CTLs compared to using the peptide alone. The effect was found to be highly dependent on the dose of the PCI treatment, where optimal doses promoted maturation of immature dendritic cells, thus also providing an adjuvant effect. The effect of PCI was confirmed in vivo by the successful induction of antigen-specific CTL responses to cancer antigens in C57BL/6 mice following intradermal peptide vaccination using PCI technology. We thus show new and strong evidence that PCI technology holds great potential as a novel strategy for improving the outcome of peptide vaccines aimed at triggering cancer-specific CD8+ CTL responses.

  10. Adoptive Immunotherapy for Hematological Malignancies Using T Cells Gene-Modified to Express Tumor Antigen-Specific Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Fujiwara

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating clinical evidence suggests that adoptive T-cell immunotherapy could be a promising option for control of cancer; evident examples include the graft-vs-leukemia effect mediated by donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI and therapeutic infusion of ex vivo-expanded tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL for melanoma. Currently, along with advances in synthetic immunology, gene-modified T cells retargeted to defined tumor antigens have been introduced as “cellular drugs”. As the functional properties of the adoptive immune response mediated by T lymphocytes are decisively regulated by their T-cell receptors (TCRs, transfer of genes encoding target antigen-specific receptors should enable polyclonal T cells to be uniformly redirected toward cancer cells. Clinically, anticancer adoptive immunotherapy using genetically engineered T cells has an impressive track record. Notable examples include the dramatic benefit of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR gene-modified T cells redirected towards CD19 in patients with B-cell malignancy, and the encouraging results obtained with TCR gene-modified T cells redirected towards NY-ESO-1, a cancer-testis antigen, in patients with advanced melanoma and synovial cell sarcoma. This article overviews the current status of this treatment option, and discusses challenging issues that still restrain the full effectiveness of this strategy, especially in the context of hematological malignancy.

  11. Fasting, but Not Aging, Dramatically Alters the Redox Status of Cysteine Residues on Proteins in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja E. Menger

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Altering the redox state of cysteine residues on protein surfaces is an important response to environmental challenges. Although aging and fasting alter many redox processes, the role of cysteine residues is uncertain. To address this, we used a redox proteomic technique, oxidative isotope-coded affinity tags (OxICAT, to assess cysteine-residue redox changes in Drosophila melanogaster during aging and fasting. This approach enabled us to simultaneously identify and quantify the redox state of several hundred cysteine residues in vivo. Cysteine residues within young flies had a bimodal distribution with peaks at ∼10% and ∼85% reversibly oxidized. Surprisingly, these cysteine residues did not become more oxidized with age. In contrast, 24 hr of fasting dramatically oxidized cysteine residues that were reduced under fed conditions while also reducing cysteine residues that were initially oxidized. We conclude that fasting, but not aging, dramatically alters cysteine-residue redox status in D. melanogaster.

  12. Fasting, but Not Aging, Dramatically Alters the Redox Status of Cysteine Residues on Proteins in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menger, Katja E.; James, Andrew M.; Cochemé, Helena M.; Harbour, Michael E.; Chouchani, Edward T.; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M.; Partridge, Linda; Murphy, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Altering the redox state of cysteine residues on protein surfaces is an important response to environmental challenges. Although aging and fasting alter many redox processes, the role of cysteine residues is uncertain. To address this, we used a redox proteomic technique, oxidative isotope-coded affinity tags (OxICAT), to assess cysteine-residue redox changes in Drosophila melanogaster during aging and fasting. This approach enabled us to simultaneously identify and quantify the redox state of several hundred cysteine residues in vivo. Cysteine residues within young flies had a bimodal distribution with peaks at ∼10% and ∼85% reversibly oxidized. Surprisingly, these cysteine residues did not become more oxidized with age. In contrast, 24 hr of fasting dramatically oxidized cysteine residues that were reduced under fed conditions while also reducing cysteine residues that were initially oxidized. We conclude that fasting, but not aging, dramatically alters cysteine-residue redox status in D. melanogaster. PMID:26095360

  13. Tensile Mechanical Properties and Dynamic Collagen Fiber Re-Alignment of the Murine Cervix are Dramatically Altered Throughout Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnum, Carrie E; Fey, Jennifer L; Weiss, Stephanie N; Barila, Guillermo; Brown, Amy G; Connizzo, Brianne K; Shetye, Snehal S; Elovitz, Michal A; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2017-06-01

    The cervix is a unique organ able to dramatically change its shape and function by serving as a physical barrier for the growing fetus and then undergoing dramatic dilation allowing for delivery of a term infant. As a result, the cervix endures changing mechanical forces from the growing fetus. There is an emerging concept that the cervix may change or remodel "early" in many cases of spontaneous preterm birth (sPTB). However, the mechanical role of the cervix in both normal and preterm birth remains unclear. Therefore, the primary objective of this study was to determine the mechanical and structural responses of murine cervical tissue throughout a normal gestational time course. In this study, both tissue structural and material properties were determined via a quasi-static tensile load-to-failure test, while simultaneously obtaining dynamic collagen fiber re-alignment via cross-polarization imaging. This study demonstrated that the majority of the mechanical properties evaluated decreased at midgestation and not just at term, while collagen fiber re-alignment occurred earlier in the loading curve for cervices at term. This suggests that although structural changes in the cervix occur throughout gestation, the differences in material properties function in combination with collagen fiber re-alignment as mechanical precursors to regulate term gestation. This work lays a foundation for investigating cervical biomechanics and the role of the cervix in preterm birth.

  14. Identification of Novel Breast Cancer Antigens Using Phage Antibody Libraries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marks, James

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to use phage antibody libraries to identify novel breast tumor antigens The antibodies could be used for breast cancer immunotherapy and the antigens could be used as cancer vaccines...

  15. Cysteine proteases as potential antigens in antiparasitic DNA vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise von Gersdorff; Buchmann, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner.......En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner....

  16. Dengue viruses cluster antigenically but not as discrete serotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Katzelnick (Leah); J.M. Fonville (Judith); G.D. Gromowski (Gregory D.); J.B. Arriaga (Jose Bustos); A. Green (Angela); S.L. James (Sarah ); L. Lau (Louis); M. Montoya (Magelda); C. Wang (Chunling); L.A. Van Blargan (Laura A.); C.A. Russell (Colin); H.M. Thu (Hlaing Myat); T.C. Pierson (Theodore C.); P. Buchy (Philippe); J.G. Aaskov (John G.); J.L. Muñoz-Jordán (Jorge L.); N. Vasilakis (Nikos); R.V. Gibbons (Robert V.); R.B. Tesh (Robert B.); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); A. Durbin (Anna); C.P. Simmons (Cameron P.); E.C. Holmes (Edward C.); E. Harris (Eva); S.S. Whitehead (Stephen S.); D.J. Smith (Derek James)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThe four genetically divergent dengue virus (DENV) types are traditionally classified as serotypes. Antigenic and genetic differences among the DENV types influence disease outcome, vaccine-induced protection, epidemic magnitude, and viral evolution.We scharacterized antigenic diversity

  17. Co-stimulatory signaling determines tumor antigen sensitivity and persistence of CAR T cells targeting PSCA+ metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priceman, Saul J; Gerdts, Ethan A; Tilakawardane, Dileshni; Kennewick, Kelly T; Murad, John P; Park, Anthony K; Jeang, Brook; Yamaguchi, Yukiko; Yang, Xin; Urak, Ryan; Weng, Lihong; Chang, Wen-Chung; Wright, Sarah; Pal, Sumanta; Reiter, Robert E; Wu, Anna M; Brown, Christine E; Forman, Stephen J

    2018-01-01

    Advancing chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered adoptive T cells for the treatment of solid cancers is a major focus in the field of immunotherapy, given impressive recent clinical responses in hematological malignancies. Prostate cancer may be amenable to T cell-based immunotherapy since several tumor antigens, including prostate stem-cell antigen (PSCA), are widely over-expressed in metastatic disease. While antigen selectivity of CARs for solid cancers is crucial, it is problematic due to the absence of truly restricted tumor antigen expression and potential safety concerns with "on-target off-tumor" activity. Here, we show that the intracellular co-stimulatory signaling domain can determine a CAR's sensitivity for tumor antigen expression. A 4-1BB intracellular co-stimulatory signaling domain in PSCA-CARs confers improved selectivity for higher tumor antigen density, reduced T cell exhaustion phenotype, and equivalent tumor killing ability compared to PSCA-CARs containing the CD28 co-stimulatory signaling domain. PSCA-CARs exhibit robust in vivo anti-tumor activity in patient-derived bone-metastatic prostate cancer xenograft models, and 4-1BB-containing CARs show superior T cell persistence and control of disease compared with CD28-containing CARs. Our study demonstrates the importance of co-stimulation in defining an optimal CAR T cell, and also highlights the significance of clinically relevant models in developing solid cancer CAR T cell therapies.

  18. Co-stimulatory signaling determines tumor antigen sensitivity and persistence of CAR T cells targeting PSCA+ metastatic prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priceman, Saul J.; Gerdts, Ethan A.; Tilakawardane, Dileshni; Kennewick, Kelly T.; Murad, John P.; Park, Anthony K.; Jeang, Brook; Yamaguchi, Yukiko; Urak, Ryan; Weng, Lihong; Chang, Wen-Chung; Wright, Sarah; Pal, Sumanta; Reiter, Robert E.; Brown, Christine E.; Forman, Stephen J.

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Advancing chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered adoptive T cells for the treatment of solid cancers is a major focus in the field of immunotherapy, given impressive recent clinical responses in hematological malignancies. Prostate cancer may be amenable to T cell-based immunotherapy since several tumor antigens, including prostate stem-cell antigen (PSCA), are widely over-expressed in metastatic disease. While antigen selectivity of CARs for solid cancers is crucial, it is problematic due to the absence of truly restricted tumor antigen expression and potential safety concerns with “on-target off-tumor” activity. Here, we show that the intracellular co-stimulatory signaling domain can determine a CAR's sensitivity for tumor antigen expression. A 4-1BB intracellular co-stimulatory signaling domain in PSCA-CARs confers improved selectivity for higher tumor antigen density, reduced T cell exhaustion phenotype, and equivalent tumor killing ability compared to PSCA-CARs containing the CD28 co-stimulatory signaling domain. PSCA-CARs exhibit robust in vivo anti-tumor activity in patient-derived bone-metastatic prostate cancer xenograft models, and 4-1BB-containing CARs show superior T cell persistence and control of disease compared with CD28-containing CARs. Our study demonstrates the importance of co-stimulation in defining an optimal CAR T cell, and also highlights the significance of clinically relevant models in developing solid cancer CAR T cell therapies. PMID:29308300

  19. Enhancing blockade of Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte invasion: assessing combinations of antibodies against PfRH5 and other merozoite antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R Williams

    Full Text Available No vaccine has yet proven effective against the blood-stages of Plasmodium falciparum, which cause the symptoms and severe manifestations of malaria. We recently found that PfRH5, a P. falciparum-specific protein expressed in merozoites, is efficiently targeted by broadly-neutralizing, vaccine-induced antibodies. Here we show that antibodies against PfRH5 efficiently inhibit the in vitro growth of short-term-adapted parasite isolates from Cambodia, and that the EC(50 values of antigen-specific antibodies against PfRH5 are lower than those against PfAMA1. Since antibody responses elicited by multiple antigens are speculated to improve the efficacy of blood-stage vaccines, we conducted detailed assessments of parasite growth inhibition by antibodies against PfRH5 in combination with antibodies against seven other merozoite antigens. We found that antibodies against PfRH5 act synergistically with antibodies against certain other merozoite antigens, most notably with antibodies against other erythrocyte-binding antigens such as PfRH4, to inhibit the growth of a homologous P. falciparum clone. A combination of antibodies against PfRH4 and basigin, the erythrocyte receptor for PfRH5, also potently inhibited parasite growth. This methodology provides the first quantitative evidence that polyclonal vaccine-induced antibodies can act synergistically against P. falciparum antigens and should help to guide the rational development of future multi-antigen vaccines.

  20. Utility of antigen testing for the diagnosis of ocular histoplasmosis in four cats: a case series and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kathryn M; Strom, Ann R; Gilmour, Margi A; LaDouceur, Elise; Reilly, Christopher M; Byrne, Barbara A; Affolter, Verena K; Sykes, Jane E; Maggs, David J

    2017-10-01

    Case series summary This case series describes the clinical utility of antigen testing for the diagnosis of feline ocular histoplasmosis. Four cats with suspected (n = 2) or confirmed (n = 2) ocular histoplasmosis are described: three from Oklahoma and one from California. In one case, serial urine antigen tests, as well as a serum antigen test for Histoplasma capsulatum, were negative; however, light microscopy identified microorganisms consistent with H capsulatum in ocular tissues at necropsy. In a further two cats with recurrent ocular histoplasmosis following long-term systemic antifungal therapy, Histoplasma species urine antigen concentrations were negative, but both cats improved clinically following systemic antifungal therapy and remained in apparent clinical remission after treatment cessation (9-16 months). The final cat displayed profound bilateral endophthalmitis; however, Histoplasma species antigen testing of vitreous humor and subretinal fluid from the left eye was negative. Intralesional organisms were detected on histopathology of both eyes, and H capsulatum was subsequently isolated and sequenced from tissue of one eye. Relevance and novel information These cases highlight the potential difficulty in definitively diagnosing ocular histoplasmosis in cats when conducting antigen testing of serum, urine and even ocular fluids. Although antigen testing has previously proven useful in the diagnosis of disseminated feline histoplasmosis, it may not be adequate in cats with only ocular signs.

  1. Cellular Cancer Vaccines: an Update on the Development of Vaccines Generated from Cell Surface Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr G. Lokhov, Elena E. Balashova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A recent advance in anti-cancer therapies has been the use of cancer cells to develop vaccines. However, immunization with cancer cell-based vaccines has not resulted in significant long-term therapeutic benefits. A possible reason for this is that while cancer cells provide surface antigens that are targets for a desired immune response, they also contain a high abundance of housekeeping proteins, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, lipids, and other intracellular contents that are ubiquitous in all mammalian cells. These ubiquitous molecules are not the intended targets of this therapy approach, and thus, the immune response generated is not sufficient to eliminate the cancer cells present. In this review, a discussion of the cell surface of cancer cells is presented in relation to the goals of improving antigen composition of cancer cell-based vaccines. Strategies to enrich vaccines for cancer-specific antigens are also discussed.

  2. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE CARBOHYDRATE COMPONENTS OF Taenia solium ONCOSPHERE PROTEINS AND THEIR ROLE IN THE ANTIGENICITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arana, Yanina; Verastegui, Manuela; Tuero, Iskra; Grandjean, Louis; Garcia, Hector H.; Gilman, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the carbohydrate composition of Taenia solium whole oncosphere antigens (WOAs), in order to improve the understanding of the antigenicity of the T. solium. Better knowledge of oncosphere antigens is crucial to accurately diagnose previous exposure to T. solium eggs and thus predict the development of neurocysticercosis. A set of seven lectins conjugates with wide carbohydrate specificity were used on parasite fixations and somatic extracts. Lectin fluorescence revealed that D-mannose, D-glucose, D-galactose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine residues were the most abundant constituents of carbohydrate chains on the surface of T. solium oncosphere. Lectin blotting showed that post-translational modification with N-glycosylation was abundant while little evidence of O-linked carbohydrates was observed. Chemical oxidation and enzymatic deglycosylation in situ were performed to investigate the immunoreactivity of the carbohydrate moieties. Linearizing or removing the carbohydrate moieties from the protein backbones did not diminish the immunoreactivity of these antigens, suggesting that a substantial part of the host immune response against T. solium oncosphere is directed against the peptide epitopes on the parasite antigens. Finally, using carbohydrate probes, we demonstrated for the first time that the presence of several lectins on the surface of the oncosphere was specific to carbohydrates found in intestinal mucus, suggesting a possible role in initial attachment of the parasite to host cells. PMID:23982308

  3. Characterization of Tunga penetrans antigens in selected epidemic areas in Murang'a county in Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamleck N Mwangi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tunga penetrans are fleas that cause tungiasis, a condition characterized by high transmission rate due to poor housing conditions, social neglect and inadequate health care in economically disadvantaged communities in developing countries. This study therefore aimed at characterizing jiggers antigens to identify immunodominant ones to help understand immunological behavior of the parasite that would otherwise be important in future control of the parasite. Samples were gravid fleas and blood samples from infested individuals in Kahuro and Murang'a East district in Murang'a County. Freeze and thaw was used to extract soluble proteins from the fleas. Ouchterlony Double immunodiffusion was used to assess antigen-antibody reactions between extracted soluble protein and the serum from immunized rats, Rattus norvegicus prior to analysis of human sera. These results were comparable to results of immunoelectrphoresis. Jigger protein isolates were analyzed in Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis technique (SDS-PAGE, against Pharmacia standard protein markers. Further analysis of jigger antigens against pooled human sera from infested victims in Western blot revealed three immunodominant antigens. Using simple regression analysis molecular weights of the three immunodominant antigens were estimated as 51.795, 23.395 and 15.38 kDa respectively. These results are important since they would help understand immunological behavior of the parasites. This would help to create basis for designing and improving approaches against jiggers such as development of immune prophylaxis to complement social science approaches that is mainly concerned with maintenance of high standards of hygiene.

  4. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product...

  5. Antigen-specific active immunotherapy for ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leffers, Ninke; Daemen, Toos; Helfrich, Wijnand; Boezen, H. Marike; Cohlen, Ben J.; Melief, Cornelis J. M.; Nijman, Hans W.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite advances in chemotherapy, prognosis of ovarian cancer remains poor. Antigen-specific active immunotherapy aims to induce tumour-antigen-specific anti-tumour immune responses as an alternative treatment for ovarian cancer. OBJECTIVES: To assess the feasibility of antigen-specific

  6. Antigen-specific active immunotherapy for ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leffers, N.; Daemen, T.; Helfrich, W.; Boezen, H. M.; Cohlen, B. J.; Melief, Cornelis; Nijman, H. W.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite advances in chemotherapy, prognosis of ovarian cancer remains poor. Antigen-specific active immunotherapy aims to induce a tumour-antigen-specific anti-tumour immune responses as an alternative treatment for ovarian cancer. OBJECTIVES: To assess feasibility of antigen-specific

  7. Role of HLA antigens in Rh (D) alloimmunized pregnant women ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Immunogenetic studies in various diseases provide potential genetic markers. We have studied the incidence of HLA A, B, C, DR and DQ loci antigen in Rh (D) antigen isoimmunized mothers compared to those nonimmunized isoimmunized Rh negative mothers. Seventy six mothers who were immunized to Rh (D) antigen ...

  8. Use of magnetic nanobeads to study intracellular antigen processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin-Cocon, Laure A.; Chesne, Serge; Pignot-Paintrand, Isabelle; Marche, Patrice N.; Villiers, Christian L. E-mail: christian.villiers@cea.fr

    2001-07-01

    Magnetic nanobeads were covalently linked to antigens and used as a tool to simultaneously follow their intracellular transport into the cells and specifically purify the intracellular compartments implicated in antigen processing. The protein content of these vesicles was analysed by 2D-electrophoresis. Furthermore, nanobeads allowed intracellular localisation of the antigen in electron and fluorescence microscopy.

  9. Use of magnetic nanobeads to study intracellular antigen processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrin-Cocon, Laure A.; Chesne, Serge; Pignot-Paintrand, Isabelle; Marche, Patrice N.; Villiers, Christian L.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic nanobeads were covalently linked to antigens and used as a tool to simultaneously follow their intracellular transport into the cells and specifically purify the intracellular compartments implicated in antigen processing. The protein content of these vesicles was analysed by 2D-electrophoresis. Furthermore, nanobeads allowed intracellular localisation of the antigen in electron and fluorescence microscopy

  10. Chimeric antigen receptor engineered stem cells: a novel HIV therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Anjie; Carrillo, Mayra A; Kitchen, Scott G

    2017-03-01

    Despite the success of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) for suppressing HIV and improving patients' quality of life, HIV persists in cART-treated patients and remains an incurable disease. Financial burdens and health consequences of lifelong cART treatment call for novel HIV therapies that result in a permanent cure. Cellular immunity is central in controlling HIV replication. However, HIV adopts numerous strategies to evade immune surveillance. Engineered immunity via genetic manipulation could offer a functional cure by generating cells that have enhanced antiviral activity and are resistant to HIV infection. Recently, encouraging reports from several human clinical trials using an anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T-cell therapy for treating B-cell malignancies have provided valuable insights and generated remarkable enthusiasm in engineered T-cell therapy. In this review, we discuss the development of HIV-specific chimeric antigen receptors and the use of stem cell based therapies to generate lifelong anti-HIV immunity.

  11. Chimeric Antigen Receptor Therapy in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luskin, Marlise R; DeAngelo, Daniel J

    2017-08-01

    Over half of patients diagnosed with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) develop relapsed or refractory disease. Traditional chemotherapy salvage is inadequate, and new therapies are needed. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy is a novel, immunologic approach where T cells are genetically engineered to express a CAR conferring specificity against a target cell surface antigen, most commonly the pan-B-cell marker CD19. After infusion, CAR T cells expand and persist, allowing ongoing tumor surveillance. Several anti-CD19 CAR T cell constructs have induced high response rates in heavily pre-treated populations, although durability of response varied. Severe toxicity (cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity) is the primary constraint to broad implementation of CAR T cell therapy. Here, we review the experience of CAR T cell therapy for ALL and ongoing efforts to modify existing technology to improve efficacy and decrease toxicity. As an anti-CD19 CAR T cell construct may be FDA approved soon, we focus on issues relevant to practicing clinicians.

  12. Active self-healing encapsulation of vaccine antigens in PLGA microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Kashappa-Goud H.; Schwendeman, Steven P.

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we describe the detailed development of a simple and effective method to microencapsulate vaccine antigens in poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) by simple mixing of preformed active self-microencapsulating (SM) PLGA microspheres in a low concentration aqueous antigen solution at modest temperature (10-38 °C). Co-encapsulating protein-sorbing vaccine adjuvants and polymer plasticizers were used to “actively” load the protein in the polymer pores and facilitate polymer self-healing at temperature > hydrated polymer glass transition temperature, respectively. The microsphere formulation parameters and loading conditions to provide optimal active self-healing microencapsulation of vaccine antigen in PLGA was investigated. Active self-healing encapsulation of two vaccine antigens, ovalbumin and tetanus toxoid (TT), in PLGA microspheres was adjusted by preparing blank microspheres containing different vaccine adjuvant (aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH)3) or calcium phosphate). Active loading of vaccine antigen in Al(OH)3-PLGA microspheres was found to: a) increase proportionally with an increasing loading of Al(OH)3 (0.88-3 wt%) and addition of porosigen, b) decrease when the inner Al(OH)3/trehalose phase to 1 mL outer oil phase and size of microspheres was respectively > 0.2 mL and 63 μm, and c) change negligibly by PLGA concentration and initial incubation (loading) temperature. Encapsulation of protein sorbing Al(OH)3 in PLGA microspheres resulted in suppression of self-healing of PLGA pores, which was then overcome by improving polymer chain mobility, which in turn was accomplished by coincorporating hydrophobic plasticizers in PLGA. Active self-healing microencapsulation of manufacturing process-labile TT in PLGA was found to: a) obviate micronization- and organic solvent-induced TT degradation, b) improve antigen loading (1.4-1.8 wt% TT) and encapsulation efficiency (~ 97%), c) provide nearly homogeneous distribution and stabilization of antigen in polymer

  13. Biostratigraphic evidence of dramatic Holocene uplift of Robinson Crusoe Island, Juan Fernández Ridge, SE Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda, P.; Le Roux, J. P.; Lara, L. E.; Orozco, G.; Astudillo, V.

    2014-09-01

    A study of the biostratigraphy and sedimentology of Holocene deposits on Robinson Crusoe Island (RCI) on the Juan Fernández Ridge (JFR) indicates that a~dramatic but localized uplift occurred since 8000 BP, at a rate of about 8.5 mm yr-1. In fact, supratidal flats and sand layers with marine gastropods (mostly Nerita sp.) are now exposed ca. 70 m a.s.l., and covered by transitional dunes. The last volcanic activity on RCI occurred at ca. 0.8 Ma (active hotspot located 280 km further west) and there is no sign of a compensating bulge that explains this uplift, isobaths of the sea floor instead suggesting general subsidence. However, modeling indicates that large-scale landslides followed by isostatic rebound are a viable explanation, partially reflected in the low-resolution bathymetry of the area.

  14. Chekhov’s dramatic art and cinematograph: implementation of author’s assumption in active shot mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bezrukov Andrei Nikolayevich

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the art specificity of Chekhov’s legacy in dramatic art based on implementing in national film industry. Chekhov’s drama is divertive in its interpretation by the reader, the researcher, and in the director’s cut. Eccentricity frequently occurs in his dramaturgy. In literary text this device is not only a part of aesthetic picturing but also the form of overthinking, transformation of reality and changing the attitude to reality. The main division of the text form alters the character’s reality and his life into the moving picture frame, and changes the set visual representation into the symbol. Cinematic art allows to connect Chekhov’s text to the ornamentality of the image.

  15. Moses revisited. August Strindberg’s and Edvard Munch’s dramatic use of the figure of Moses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Storskog

    2011-06-01

     1903 and Den fri Kjærligheds By (The City of Free Love, ca. 1905. In the first case, the focus is on the examination of Moses as an archetypical character. Analogies are subsequently drawn between the biblical hero and other dramatic characters in the production of the Swedish playwright, such as Gustav Vasa or Birger jarl. In the latter case, I outline the strategy for a parodic reuse of the biblical source in Munch’s invention of a modern Moses created to mock his fellow painter and maestro Christian Krohg and the bohemian ideal of free love. Although the qualities of the Moses character take on different and opposite meanings in the two authors, it is of interest that the issue of a return to the common heritage of biblical culture should make itself evident in the years following both Strindberg’s and Munch’s farewell to the secular milieus of the Bohème.

  16. Changing things around: Dramatic aspect in the Pericope Adulterae (Jn 7:53–8:11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piet van Staden

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article the transactional model of narrative as expounded by Louise Rosenblatt, supported by an analysis in terms of dramatic aspect, is employed to show how the interpolated scene in John 7:53–8:11 (known as the Pericope Adulterae and hereafter referred to as PA functions as a pivot of power in the gospel. The content of the scene, as well as its placement within the gospel, serves to promote an aesthetic reading that focusses attention on the experience during the reading event. Awareness of sensations, images, feelings and ideas from past experiences, as well as the sounds and rhythms of the words become important. The reader responds to the aesthetic transaction, the various elements of total experience, rather than simply to the text, during and after the reading event.

  17. The chicken erythrocyte-specific MHC antigen. Characterization and purification of the B-G antigen by monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, J; Skjødt, K; Crone, M

    1987-01-01

    Mouse monoclonal antibodies with B-G antigen (major histocompatibility complex class IV) specificity were obtained after immunization with erythrocytes or partially purified B-G antigen. The specificities of the hybridoma antibodies were determined by precipitation of B-G antigens from 125I-label...

  18. Classification of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) supertypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Mingjun; Claesson, Mogens H

    2014-01-01

    Identification of new antigenic peptides, derived from infectious agents or cancer cells, which bind to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II molecules, is of importance for the development of new effective vaccines capable of activating the cellular arm of the immune response. However......, the barrier to the development of peptide-based vaccines with maximum population coverage is that the restricting HLA genes are extremely polymorphic resulting in a vast diversity of peptide-binding HLA specificities and a low population coverage for any given peptide-HLA specificity. One way to reduce...... this complexity is to group thousands of different HLA molecules into several so-called HLA supertypes: a classification that refers to a group of HLA alleles with largely overlapping peptide binding specificities. In this chapter, we focus on the state-of-the-art classification of HLA supertypes including HLA...

  19. Radionuclide-labelled antigens in serological epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felsenfeld, O.; Parrott, M.W.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of tests using radionuclide-labelled antigens in serological surveys was studied, with particular attention to the likely availability of facilities and personnel in the tropics and arctics, where measurements may be disturbed by climatic influences. The methodology required was to be simple, rapid and suitable for examining large numbers of sera, as for epidemological surveys. In the introduction, limitations of labelled antigen tests are discussed, the choice of radionuclide and measurement methods, test procedures and evaluation of results. Collection, preservation and shipment of speciments (serum, faeces, cerebrospinal fluid, sputum, etc.) are described. Experiments with bacteria and bacterial toxins (Enterobacteriaceae, vibrios, staphylococci, meningococci, etc.), with protozoa and metazoa (Entamoeba hystolytica, Schistosoma mansoni, Trypanosoma cruzi, Plasmodia and other parasites), with viruses (vaccinia, adeno-, polio-, and influenza viruses, etc.), and with fungi are discussed

  20. Methamphetamine inhibits antigen processing, presentation, and phagocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Tallóczy

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (Meth is abused by over 35 million people worldwide. Chronic Meth abuse may be particularly devastating in individuals who engage in unprotected sex with multiple partners because it is associated with a 2-fold higher risk for obtaining HIV and associated secondary infections. We report the first specific evidence that Meth at pharmacological concentrations exerts a direct immunosuppressive effect on dendritic cells and macrophages. As a weak base, Meth collapses the pH gradient across acidic organelles, including lysosomes and associated autophagic organelles. This in turn inhibits receptor-mediated phagocytosis of antibody-coated particles, MHC class II antigen processing by the endosomal-lysosomal pathway, and antigen presentation to splenic T cells by dendritic cells. More importantly Meth facilitates intracellular replication and inhibits intracellular killing of Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans, two major AIDS-related pathogens. Meth exerts previously unreported direct immunosuppressive effects that contribute to increased risk of infection and exacerbate AIDS pathology.

  1. Therapeutic Antibodies against Intracellular Tumor Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Trenevska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies are among the most clinically effective drugs used to treat cancer. However, their target repertoire is limited as there are relatively few tumor-specific or tumor-associated cell surface or soluble antigens. Intracellular molecules represent nearly half of the human proteome and provide an untapped reservoir of potential therapeutic targets. Antibodies have been developed to target externalized antigens, have also been engineered to enter into cells or may be expressed intracellularly with the aim of binding intracellular antigens. Furthermore, intracellular proteins can be degraded by the proteasome into short, commonly 8–10 amino acid long, peptides that are presented on the cell surface in the context of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I molecules. These tumor-associated peptide–MHC-I complexes can then be targeted by antibodies known as T-cell receptor mimic (TCRm or T-cell receptor (TCR-like antibodies, which recognize epitopes comprising both the peptide and the MHC-I molecule, similar to the recognition of such complexes by the TCR on T cells. Advances in the production of TCRm antibodies have enabled the generation of multiple TCRm antibodies, which have been tested in vitro and in vivo, expanding our understanding of their mechanisms of action and the importance of target epitope selection and expression. This review will summarize multiple approaches to targeting intracellular antigens with therapeutic antibodies, in particular describing the production and characterization of TCRm antibodies, the factors influencing their target identification, their advantages and disadvantages in the context of TCR therapies, and the potential to advance TCRm-based therapies into the clinic.

  2. ABO blood group antigens in oral mucosa. What is new?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik

    2002-01-01

    Histo-blood group ABH (O) antigens are major alloantigens in humans. These antigens are widely distributed in human tissues and undergo changes in expression during cellular differentiation and malignant development. The ABH antigens have been characterized as terminal disaccharide determinants...... healing show similarly decreased expression of A/B antigens on migrating epithelial cells. Some studies suggest that the relationship between expression of blood group antigens and cell motility can be explained by different degrees of glycosylation of integrins. Changes in ABO expression in tumours have...

  3. The Antigenic Structure Characterization of Oestrus Ovis Larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Moţ

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of proteic components definition from Oestrus ovis larvae, endowed with antigenic properties, able to induce immune responses in vivo and to react in vitro with induced molecular effectors were been performed: electrophoresis in poliacrilamid gel, western blot technique preceded by immunotransfer, immunoassay test. Total soluble larval antigens of O. ovis were been prepared through ultrasonic disintegration, from all three larval stages. Western blot technique allowed and emphasized the specific antigens with a superior sensitivity in comparison with SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. After antigenic characteristics demonstration of investigated larval antigens were been performed the immunoassay test to emphasized the antibodies dozes for O. ovis infestation diagnosis.

  4. Impact of heat treatment on antigen detection in sera of Angiostrongylus vasorum infected dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis-Germitsch, Nina; Schnyder, Manuela

    2017-09-16

    dogs infected with other parasites than A. vasorum was positive before but negative after treatment. Although heat treatment improves A. vasorum antigen detection between 7 and 10 wpi by immune complex disruption, we do not recommend systematic pretreating sera because of reduced antigen detection between 3 and 6 wpi and impairment of antibody detection, if performed contemporaneously.

  5. Enhancement of DNA vaccine potency through linkage of antigen to filamentous bacteriophage coat protein III domain I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuesta, Àngel M; Suárez, Eduardo; Larsen, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Although DNA-based cancer vaccines have been successfully tested in mouse models, a major drawback of cancer vaccination still remains, namely that tumour antigens are weak and fail to generate a vigorous immune response in tumour-bearing patients. Genetic technology offers strategies for promoting...... immune pathways by adding immune-activating genes to the tumour antigen sequence. In this work, we converted a model non-immunogenic antigen into a vaccine by fusing it to domain I of the filamentous bacteriophage coat protein III gene. Vaccination with a DNA construct encoding the domain I fusion...... generated antigen-specific T helper 1-type cellular immune responses. These results demonstrate that the incorporation of protein III into a DNA vaccine formulation can modulate the gene-mediated immune response and may thus provide a strategy for improving its therapeutic effect....

  6. Rapid and specific biotin labelling of the erythrocyte surface antigens of both cultured and ex-vivo Plasmodium parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Joanne

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sensitive detection of parasite surface antigens expressed on erythrocyte membranes is necessary to further analyse the molecular pathology of malaria. This study describes a modified biotin labelling/osmotic lysis method which rapidly produces membrane extracts enriched for labelled surface antigens and also improves the efficiency of antigen recovery compared with traditional detergent extraction and surface radio-iodination. The method can also be used with ex-vivo parasites. Methods After surface labelling with biotin in the presence of the inhibitor furosemide, detergent extraction and osmotic lysis methods of enriching for the membrane fractions were compared to determine the efficiency of purification and recovery. Biotin-labelled proteins were identified on silver-stained SDS-polyacrylamide gels. Results Detergent extraction and osmotic lysis were compared for their capacity to purify biotin-labelled Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium chabaudi erythrocyte surface antigens. The pellet fraction formed after osmotic lysis of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes is notably enriched in suface antigens, including PfEMP1, when compared to detergent extraction. There is also reduced co-extraction of host proteins such as spectrin and Band 3. Conclusion Biotinylation and osmotic lysis provides an improved method to label and purify parasitised erythrocyte surface antigen extracts from both in vitro and ex vivo Plasmodium parasite preparations.

  7. Polyclonal antibodies for the detection of Trypanosoma cruzi circulating antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith S Málaga-Machaca

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Detection of Trypanosoma cruzi antigens in clinical samples is considered an important diagnostic tool for Chagas disease. The production and use of polyclonal antibodies may contribute to an increase in the sensitivity of immunodiagnosis of Chagas disease.Polyclonal antibodies were raised in alpacas, rabbits, and hens immunized with trypomastigote excreted-secreted antigen, membrane proteins, trypomastigote lysate antigen and recombinant 1F8 to produce polyclonal antibodies. Western blot analysis was performed to determine specificity of the developed antibodies. An antigen capture ELISA of circulating antigens in serum, plasma and urine samples was developed using IgY polyclonal antibodies against T. cruzi membrane antigens (capture antibody and IgG from alpaca raised against TESA. A total of 33 serum, 23 plasma and 9 urine samples were analyzed using the developed test. Among serum samples, compared to serology, the antigen capture ELISA tested positive in 55% of samples. All plasma samples from serology positive subjects were positive in the antigen capture ELISA. All urine positive samples had corresponding plasma samples that were also positive when tested by the antigen capture ELISA.Polyclonal antibodies are useful for detection of circulating antigens in both the plasma and urine of infected individuals. Detection of antigens is direct evidence of the presence of the parasite, and could be a better surrogate of current infection status.

  8. Association of Pneumococcal Protein Antigen Serology With Age and Antigenic Profile of Colonizing Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarian, Taj; Grant, Lindsay R; Georgieva, Maria; Hammitt, Laura L; Reid, Raymond; Bentley, Stephen D; Goldblatt, David; Santosham, Mathuran; Weatherholtz, Robert; Burbidge, Paula; Goklish, Novalene; Thompson, Claudette M; Hanage, William P; O'Brien, Kate L; Lipsitch, Marc

    2017-03-01

    Several Streptococcus pneumoniae proteins play a role in pathogenesis and are being investigated as vaccine targets. It is largely unknown whether naturally acquired antibodies reduce the risk of colonization with strains expressing a particular antigenic variant. Serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) titers to 28 pneumococcal protein antigens were measured among 242 individuals aged - 30 days after serum collection, and the antigen variant in each pneumococcal isolate was determined using genomic data. We assessed the association between preexisting variant-specific antibody titers and subsequent carriage of pneumococcus expressing a particular antigen variant. Antibody titers often increased across pediatric groups before decreasing among adults. Individuals with low titers against group 3 pneumococcal surface protein C (PspC) variants were more likely to be colonized with pneumococci expressing those variants. For other antigens, variant-specific IgG titers do not predict colonization. We observed an inverse association between variant-specific antibody concentration and homologous pneumococcal colonization for only 1 protein. Further assessment of antibody repertoires may elucidate the nature of antipneumococcal antibody-mediated mucosal immunity while informing vaccine development. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Isolate-Specific Differences in the Conformational Dynamics and Antigenicity of HIV-1 gp120

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Thaddeus M.; Guttman, Miklos; Guo, Wenjin; Cleveland, Brad; Kahn, Maria; Hu, Shiu-Lok

    2013-01-01

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) mediates viral entry into host cells and is the sole target of neutralizing antibodies. Much of the sequence diversity in the HIV-1 genome is concentrated within Env, particularly within its gp120 surface subunit. While dramatic functional diversity exists among HIV-1 Env isolates—observable even in the context of monomeric gp120 proteins as differences in antigenicity and immunogenicity—we have little understanding of the structural features that distinguish Env isolates and lead to isolate-specific functional differences, as crystal structures of truncated gp120 “core” proteins from diverse isolates reveal a high level of structural conservation. Because gp120 proteins are used as prospective vaccine immunogens, it is critical to understand the structural factors that influence their reactivity with antibodies. Here, we studied four full-length, glycosylated gp120 monomers from diverse HIV-1 isolates by using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to probe the overall subunit morphology and hydrogen/deuterium-exchange with mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to characterize the local structural order of each gp120. We observed that while the overall subunit architecture was similar among isolates by SAXS, dramatic isolate-specific differences in the conformational stability of gp120 were evident by HDX-MS. These differences persisted even with the CD4 receptor bound. Furthermore, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbance assays (ELISAs) showed that disorder was associated with poorer recognition by antibodies targeting conserved conformational epitopes. These data provide additional insight into the structural determinants of gp120 antigenicity and suggest that conformational dynamics should be considered in the selection and design of optimized Env immunogens. PMID:23903848

  10. Dramatic decrease in prevalence of soil-transmitted helminths and new insights into intestinal protozoa in children living in the Chaco region, Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchioni, Fabio; Segundo, Higinio; Gabrielli, Simona; Totino, Valentina; Gonzales, Patricia Rojas; Salazar, Esteban; Bozo, Ricardo; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Cancrini, Gabriella

    2015-04-01

    We assessed the prevalence of intestinal parasites among 268 2-12-year-old children living in rural areas, small villages, and semi-urban areas of the Chaco region, south-eastern Bolivia. The overall parasitism was 69%. Only protozoa, helminths, or co-infections were observed in 89.2%, 5.9%, or 4.9% of the positive children, respectively. A significant progressive increase in overall parasite prevalence was found when passing from rural areas to small villages and semi-urban areas. The most commonly found species were Entamoeba coli (38.4%), Giardia intestinalis (37.7%), and Blastocystis spp. (16%). Hymenolepis nana was the most prevalent helminth (5.6%), followed by Ascaris lumbricoides and hookworms (1.5% and 0.4%) evidenced only in rural areas and in villages. Molecular diagnostics identified Blastocystis subtypes 9 and 2, and 5 infections by Entamoeba histolytica and 4 by Entamoeba dispar. The dramatic decrease in prevalence of soil-transmitted helminths with respect to that observed about 20 years ago (> 40%) evidences the success of the preventive chemotherapy intervention implemented in 1986. Health education and improved sanitation should be intensified to control protozoan infections. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  11. Dramatic change in a young woman's perception of her diabetes and remarkable reduction in HbA1c after an individual course of Guided Self-Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoffmann, Vibeke; Prip, Anne; Christiansen, Anette Wendelboe

    2015-07-06

    A 24-year-old woman with type 1 diabetes participated in a randomised controlled trial proving effectiveness of a flexible Guided Self-Determination (GSD) intervention. She had for 10 years been living with a complex situation of eating disorder, poor glycaemic control, non-attendance and psychosocial distress. She managed to change her perception of diabetes dramatically and improved her glycaemic control. Considering the complexity of her case, we explored how she achieved these changes. A GSD-trained nurse delivered the intervention, which involves reflection sheets and advanced professional communication. Glycated hemoglobin was reported in the patient's record and an interview conducted by external interviewers was analysed thematically, indicating that a four-stage process of empowerment had taken place: 'focusing on life prior to numbers', 'unpacking a heavy burden', 'breaking out of isolation through communication' and 'finding strength within oneself'. The article emphasises that GSD works by breaking isolation through communication as an appropriate way to achieve good diabetes control. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  12. How advances in immunology provide insight into improving vaccine efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slifka, Mark K.; Amanna, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines represent one of the most compelling examples of how biomedical research has improved society by saving lives and dramatically reducing the burden of infectious disease. Despite the importance of vaccinology, we are still in the early stages of understanding how the best vaccines work and how we can achieve better protective efficacy through improved vaccine design. Most successful vaccines have been developed empirically, but recent advances in immunology are beginning to shed new light on the mechanisms of vaccine-mediated protection and development of long-term immunity. Although natural infection will often elicit lifelong immunity, almost all current vaccines require booster vaccination in order to achieve durable protective humoral immune responses, regardless of whether the vaccine is based on infection with replicating live-attenuated vaccine strains of the specific pathogen or whether they are derived from immunization with inactivated, non-replicating vaccines or subunit vaccines. The form of the vaccine antigen (e.g., soluble or particulate/aggregate) appears to play an important role in determining immunogenicity and the interactions between dendritic cells, B cells and T cells in the germinal center are likely to dictate the magnitude and duration of protective immunity. By learning how to optimize these interactions, we may be able to elicit more effective and long-lived immunity with fewer vaccinations. PMID:24709587

  13. Performance Assessment of a Trypanosoma cruzi Chimeric Antigen in Multiplex Liquid Microarray Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Fred Luciano Neves; Celedon, Paola Alejandra Fiorani; Zanchin, Nilson Ivo Tonin; Leitolis, Amanda; Crestani, Sandra; Foti, Leonardo; de Souza, Wayner Vieira; Gomes, Yara de Miranda; Krieger, Marco Aurélio

    2017-10-01

    Diagnosing chronic Chagas disease (CD) requires antibody-antigen detection methods, which are traditionally based on enzymatic assay techniques whose performance depend on the type and quality of antigen used. Previously, 4 recombinant chimeric proteins from the Instituto de Biologia Molecular do Paraná (IBMP-8.1 to 8.4) comprising immuno-dominant regions of diverse Trypanosoma cruzi antigens showed excellent diagnostic performance in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Considering that next-generation platforms offer improved CD diagnostic accuracy with different T. cruzi -specific recombinant antigens, we assessed the performance of these chimeras in liquid microarrays (LMAs). The chimeric proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by chromatography. Sera from 653 chagasic and 680 healthy individuals were used to assess the performance of these chimeras in detecting specific anti- T. cruzi antibodies. Accuracies ranged from 98.1 to 99.3%, and diagnostic odds ratio values were 3,548 for IBMP-8.3, 4,826 for IBMP-8.1, 7,882 for IBMP-8.2, and 25,000 for IBMP-8.4. A separate sera bank (851 samples) was employed to assess cross-reactivity with other tropical diseases. Leishmania , a pathogen with high similarity to T. cruzi , showed cross-reactivity rates ranging from 0 to 2.17%. Inconclusive results were negligible (0 to 0.71%). Bland-Altman and Deming regression analysis based on 200 randomly selected CD-positive and negative samples demonstrated interchangeability with respect to CD diagnostic performance in both singleplex and multiplex assays. Our results suggested that these chimeras can potentially replace antigens currently used in commercially available assay kits. Moreover, the use of multiplex platforms, such as LMA assays employing 2 or more IBMP antigens, would abrogate the need for 2 different testing techniques when diagnosing CD. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  14. Molecular Characteristics of Carcinoembryonic Antigen and Nonspecific Cross-reacting Antigen(Clinical Application of Tumor Antigen)

    OpenAIRE

    内山, 一晃; Uchiyama, Kazuaki

    1990-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is one of the most famous laboratory tests of tumor markers. CEA was first reported in 1965, but molecular structure of CEA was not clear untill recent years. Amino acid sequence of CEA was reported in 1987, by the success of cDNA clonig of CEA. The CEA molecule is composed of five major domains, called domain N, I, II, III, C from the -NH_2 terminal. But sugar chains of CEA are complicated and have much variety, so there are few informations about them. If CEA ...

  15. Presensitization to Ascaris antigens promotes induction of mite-specific IgE upon mite antigen inhalation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Mayu; Hara, Mutsuko; Ichikawa, Saori; Kamijo, Seiji; Nakazawa, Takuya; Hatanaka, Hideki; Akiyama, Kazuo; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Takai, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    Patients with house dust mite (HDM) allergy or Ascariasis produce serum IgE specific to the antigens of HDM or nematode Ascaris, respectively. Although human IgE cross-reactivity has been reported between HDM and Ascaris antigens, it remains unclear whether it contributes to the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. We herein investigated the induction of cross-reactive antibodies and T cells in mice and effects of airway exposure to HDM antigens after preimmunization with Ascaris antigens. Mice were intraperitoneally immunized with HDM or Ascaris antigens with Alum, followed by the intranasal administration of HDM antigens. Serum antigen-specific IgE and IgG were measured by ELISA. Cytokine release in splenocytes from Ascaris-immunized mice upon in vitro restimulation with HDM antigens were measured by ELISA. Immunization with Ascaris or HDM antigens induced cross-reactive IgG1. Splenocytes from Ascaris-immunized mice released IL-5 and IL-13 in response to the restimulation with HDM antigens. Subsequent airway exposure to HDM antigens promoted the induction of HDM-specific IgE and upregulation of HDM-specific IgG1 in Ascaris-immunized mice, whereas these responses were not detected or smaller without the Ascaris presensitization. We demonstrated that the immunization of naïve mice with Ascaris antigens induced production of antibodies and differentiation of Th2 cells, which were cross-reactive to HDM antigens, and accelerated induction of serum HDM-specific IgE upon subsequent airway exposure to HDM antigens in mice. These results suggest that sensitization to HDM towards IgE-mediated allergic diseases is faster in individuals with a previous history of Ascaris infection than in those without presensitization to Ascaris. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. New diagnostic antigens for early trichinellosis: the excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis intestinal infective larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ge Ge; Liu, Ruo Dan; Wang, Zhong Quan; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Li; Liu, Xiao Lin; Liu, Chun Yin; Zhang, Xi; Cui, Jing

    2015-12-01

    The excretory-secretory (ES) antigens from Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae (ML) are the most commonly used diagnostic antigens for trichinellosis, but anti-Trichinella IgG antibodies cannot be detected until 2-3 weeks after infection; there is an obvious window period between Trichinella infection and antibody positivity. Intestinal infective larvae (IIL) are the first invasive stage during Trichinella infection, and their ES antigens are firstly exposed to the immune system and might be the early diagnostic markers of trichinellosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the early diagnostic values of IIL ES antigens for trichinellosis. The IIL were collected from intestines of infected mice at 6 h postinfection (hpi), and IIL ES antigens were prepared by incubation for 18 h. Anti-Trichinella IgG antibodies in mice infected with 100 ML were detectable by ELISA with IIL ES antigens as soon as 10 days postinfection (dpi), but ELISA with ML ES antigens did not permit detection of infected mice before 12 dpi. When the sera of patients with trichinellosis at 19 dpi were assayed, the sensitivity (100 %) of ELISA with IIL ES antigens was evidently higher than 75 % of ELISA with ML ES antigens (P < 0.05) The specificity (96.86 %) of ELISA with IIL ES antigens was also higher than 89.31 % of ELISA with ML ES antigens (P < 0.05). The IIL ES antigens provided a new source of diagnostic antigens and could be considered as a potential early diagnostic antigen for trichinellosis.

  17. Abnormal antigens in breast cancer tissues and production of monoclonal antibodies against one of these antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, M. E. A.

    2010-02-01

    Breast cancer is associated with up regulation, down regulation of normal antigens or abnormal antigens. These antigens are very useful candidates as targets for the different breast cancer therapies and for vaccination trials. This study was done to characterize abnormal antigens, extract one of them and to produce monoclonal antibodies against the extracted antigen. One hundred and twenty Sudanese female patients were included in this study after informed consent. The mean age was 47. 2 years (16-80). Two tissue samples were obtained from each patient and they were confirmed as normal and cancerous breast tissues microscopically. 2D PAGE was used to analyze the protein content of samples. LC/MS and nr. fast a database search were used for separation and indentification of the abnormal proteins. Three different patterns of 2D Page results were obtained, the first pattern involved detection of four abnormal proteins in 26.7% of the patient cancerous tissues while they were undetected in the normal tissues of the same patients. In the second 2D PAGE result pattern the cancerous and the normal tissues of 67.5% patients were identical and they did not contain the four abnormal proteins while the third 2D PAGE pattern involved the presence of two abnormal antigens (from the four) in the cancerous tissues of 5.8% of the patients and they were absent from the normal tissues of the same patients. The four abnormal proteins were identified as, human Thioredoxin (D60nmutant), x-ray crystal structure of human galectin-1, retrocopy of tropomyosin 3(rc TPM3) and beta-tropomyosin (isoform 2). The primary and the secondary structures were obtained from the SWISSPROT and the PDB databases. Beta tropomyosin spot was extracted and used as antigen for monoclonal antibody production. Monoclonal antibody against beta- tropomyosin with a concentration of 0.35 mg/ml and a G11 anti beta-tropomyosin hybridoma cell line were produced. The monoclonal antibody was with single bad and

  18. Human leukocyte antigen-E alleles and expression in patients with serous ovarian cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Hui; Lu, Renquan; Xie, Suhong; Wen, Xuemei; Wang, Hongling; Gao, Xiang; Guo, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-E (HLA-E) is one of the most extensively studied non-classical MHC class I molecules that is almost non-polymorphic. Only two alleles (HLA-E*0101 and HLA-E*0103) are found in worldwide populations, and suggested to be functional differences between these variants. The HLA-E molecule can contribute to the escape of cancer cells from host immune surveillance. However, it is still unknown whether HLA-E gene polymorphisms might play a role in cancer immune escape. To explo...

  19. Enhanced discrimination of malignant from benign pancreatic disease by measuring the CA 19-9 antigen on specific protein carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Yue

    Full Text Available The CA 19-9 assay detects a carbohydrate antigen on multiple protein carriers, some of which may be preferential carriers of the antigen in cancer. We tested the hypothesis that the measurement of the CA 19-9 antigen on individual proteins could improve performance over the standard CA 19-9 assay. We used antibody arrays to measure the levels of the CA 19-9 antigen on multiple proteins in serum or plasma samples from patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma or pancreatitis. Sample sets from three different institutions were examined, comprising 531 individual samples. The measurement of the CA 19-9 antigen on any individual protein did not improve upon the performance of the standard CA 19-9 assay (82% sensitivity at 75% specificity for early-stage cancer, owing to diversity among patients in their CA 19-9 protein carriers. However, a subset of cancer patients with no elevation in the standard CA 19-9 assay showed elevations of the CA 19-9 antigen specifically on the proteins MUC5AC or MUC16 in all sample sets. By combining measurements of the standard CA 19-9 assay with detection of CA 19-9 on MUC5AC and MUC16, the sensitivity of cancer detection was improved relative to CA 19-9 alone in each sample set, achieving 67-80% sensitivity at 98% specificity. This finding demonstrates the value of measuring glycans on specific proteins for improving biomarker performance. Diagnostic tests with improved sensitivity for detecting pancreatic cancer could have important applications for improving the treatment and management of patients suffering from this disease.

  20. Integration Strategy Is a Key Step in Network-Based Analysis and Dramatically Affects Network Topological Properties and Inferring Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Jin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of experiments have been designed to detect intracellular and intercellular molecular interactions. Based on these molecular interactions (especially protein interactions, molecular networks have been built for using in several typical applications, such as the discovery of new disease genes and the identification of drug targets and molecular complexes. Because the data are incomplete and a considerable number of false-positive interactions exist, protein interactions from different sources are commonly integrated in network analyses to build a stable molecular network. Although various types of integration strategies are being applied in current studies, the topological properties of the networks from these different integration strategies, especially typical applications based on these network integration strategies, have not been rigorously evaluated. In this paper, systematic analyses were performed to evaluate 11 frequently used methods using two types of integration strategies: empirical and machine learning methods. The topological properties of the networks of these different integration strategies were found to significantly differ. Moreover, these networks were found to dramatically affect the outcomes of typical applications, such as disease gene predictions, drug target detections, and molecular complex identifications. The analysis presented in this paper could provide an important basis for future network-based biological researches.

  1. Home in the heat: Dramatic seasonal variation in home range of desert golden eagles informs management for renewable energy development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braham, Melissa A.; Miller, Tricia A.; Duerr, Adam E.; Lanzone, Michael J.; Fesnock, Amy; LaPre, Larry; Driscoll, Daniel; Katzner, Todd E.

    2015-01-01

    Renewable energy is expanding quickly with sometimes dramatic impacts to species and ecosystems. To understand the degree to which sensitive species may be impacted by renewable energy projects, it is informative to know how much space individuals use and how that space may overlap with planned development. We used global positioning system–global system for mobile communications (GPS-GSM) telemetry to measure year-round movements of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) from the Mojave Desert of California, USA. We estimated monthly space use with adaptive local convex hulls to identify the temporal and spatial scales at which eagles may encounter renewable energy projects in the Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan area. Mean size of home ranges was lowest and least variable from November through January and greatest in February–March and May–August. These monthly home range patterns coincided with seasonal variation in breeding ecology, habitat associations, and temperature. The expanded home ranges in hot summer months included movements to cooler, prey-dense, mountainous areas characterized by forest, grasslands, and scrublands. Breeding-season home ranges (October–May) included more lowland semi-desert and rock vegetation. Overlap of eagle home ranges and focus areas for renewable energy development was greatest when eagle home ranges were smallest, during the breeding season. Golden eagles in the Mojave Desert used more space and a wider range of habitat types than expected and renewable energy projects could affect a larger section of the regional population than was previously thought.

  2. Intravenous erythromycin dramatically accelerates gastric emptying in gastroparesis diabeticorum and normals and abolishes the emptying discrimination between solids and liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbain, J.L.; Vantrappen, G.; Janssens, J.; Van Cutsem, E.; Peeters, T.; De Roo, M.

    1990-01-01

    Erythromycin, a macrolide antibiotic, has recently been shown to have a motilin like effect on gastrointestinal muscle strips. In this study, we have evaluated the effect of erythromycin on patients with delayed gastric emptying and healthy subjects using the dual radionuclide technique. Twelve patients with gastroparesis diabeticorum and ten healthy age- and sex-matched controls were studied. Gastric emptying of solids and liquids was determined using 99mTc-SC scrambled egg and 111In-DTPA in water. Following a baseline study and on a separate day, each patient and control received a 15-min i.v. perfusion of erythromycin starting at meal ingestion. Eleven out of the 12 patients were restudied after a 3-wk oral administration. In patients and controls, i.v. erythromycin dramatically accelerated gastric emptying of both solids and liquids which were emptied at the same rate. After chronic oral administration, solid and liquid emptying remained significantly accelerated. Erythromycin appears to be a very powerful gastrokinetic drug. Derived compounds with the gastrokinetic effect and without the antibiotic activity could be useful in dyspeptic patients with delayed gastric emptying

  3. Generation of competent bone marrow-derived antigen presenting cells from the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrell Regina M

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human infections with Sin Nombre virus (SNV and related New World hantaviruses often lead to hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS, a sometimes fatal illness. Lungs of patients who die from HCPS exhibit cytokine-producing mononuclear infiltrates and pronounced pulmonary inflammation. Deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus are the principal natural hosts of SNV, in which the virus establishes life-long persistence without conspicuous pathology. Little is known about the mechanisms SNV employs to evade the immune response of deer mice, and experimental examination of this question has been difficult because of a lack of methodologies for examining such responses during infection. One such deficiency is our inability to characterize T cell responses because susceptible syngeneic deer mice are not available. Results To solve this problem, we have developed an in vitro method of expanding and generating competent antigen presenting cells (APC from deer mouse bone marrow using commercially-available house mouse (Mus musculus granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor. These cells are capable of processing and presenting soluble protein to antigen-specific autologous helper T cells in vitro. Inclusion of antigen-specific deer mouse antibody augments T cell stimulation, presumably through Fc receptor-mediated endocytosis. Conclusions The use of these APC has allowed us to dramatically expand deer mouse helper T cells in culture and should permit extensive characterization of T cell epitopes. Considering the evolutionary divergence between deer mice and house mice, it is probable that this method will be useful to other investigators using unconventional models of rodent-borne diseases.

  4. A single point in protein trafficking by Plasmodium falciparum determines the expression of major antigens on the surface of infected erythrocytes targeted by human antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jo-Anne; Howell, Katherine B; Langer, Christine; Maier, Alexander G; Hasang, Wina; Rogerson, Stephen J; Petter, Michaela; Chesson, Joanne; Stanisic, Danielle I; Duffy, Michael F; Cooke, Brian M; Siba, Peter M; Mueller, Ivo; Bull, Peter C; Marsh, Kevin; Fowkes, Freya J I; Beeson, James G

    2016-11-01

    Antibodies to blood-stage antigens of Plasmodium falciparum play a pivotal role in human immunity to malaria. During parasite development, multiple proteins are trafficked from the intracellular parasite to the surface of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IEs). However, the relative importance of different proteins as targets of acquired antibodies, and key pathways involved in trafficking major antigens remain to be clearly defined. We quantified antibodies to surface antigens among children, adults, and pregnant women from different malaria-exposed regions. We quantified the importance of antigens as antibody targets using genetically engineered P. falciparum with modified surface antigen expression. Genetic deletion of the trafficking protein skeleton-binding protein-1 (SBP1), which is involved in trafficking the surface antigen PfEMP1, led to a dramatic reduction in antibody recognition of IEs and the ability of human antibodies to promote opsonic phagocytosis of IEs, a key mechanism of parasite clearance. The great majority of antibody epitopes on the IE surface were SBP1-dependent. This was demonstrated using parasite isolates with different genetic or phenotypic backgrounds, and among antibodies from children, adults, and pregnant women in different populations. Comparisons of antibody reactivity to parasite isolates with SBP1 deletion or inhibited PfEMP1 expression suggest that PfEMP1 is the dominant target of acquired human antibodies, and that other P. falciparum IE surface proteins are minor targets. These results establish SBP1 as part of a critical pathway for the trafficking of major surface antigens targeted by human immunity, and have key implications for vaccine development, and quantifying immunity in populations.

  5. Rational ‘correction’ of the amino-acid sequence of RbcX protein from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus dramatically improves crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarnawski, Miroslaw; Krzywda, Szymon; Szczepaniak, Andrzej; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2008-01-01

    Recombinant RuBisCO chaperone from T. elongatus, TeRbcX, was aggregated and could not be crystallized. Mutations of an unusual Cys residue in the TeRbcX sequence yielded much better behaved proteins that could rapidly be crystallized. RbcX is a dimeric protein found in cyanobacteria that assists in the assembly of the oligomeric RuBisCO complex. RbcX from the thermophile Thermosynechococcus elongatus (TeRbcX) contains an unusual Cys103 residue in its sequence and when expressed recombinantly the protein aggregates and cannot be crystallized. Site-directed mutagenesis of Cys103 to either Arg or Ala produced non-aggregating proteins that could be readily crystallized in several crystal forms. Synchrotron-radiation X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.96 Å resolution and formed the basis of crystal structure analysis of TeRbcX

  6. Brain-state classification and a dual-state decoder dramatically improve the control of cursor movement through a brain-machine interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Nicholas A.; Ruiz-Torres, Ricardo; Perreault, Eric J.; Miller, Lee E.

    2016-02-01

    Objective. It is quite remarkable that brain machine interfaces (BMIs) can be used to control complex movements with fewer than 100 neurons. Success may be due in part to the limited range of dynamical conditions under which most BMIs are tested. Achieving high-quality control that spans these conditions with a single linear mapping will be more challenging. Even for simple reaching movements, existing BMIs must reduce the stochastic noise of neurons by averaging the control signals over time, instead of over the many neurons that normally control movement. This forces a compromise between a decoder with dynamics allowing rapid movement and one that allows postures to be maintained with little jitter. Our current work presents a method for addressing this compromise, which may also generalize to more highly varied dynamical situations, including movements with more greatly varying speed. Approach. We have developed a system that uses two independent Wiener filters as individual components in a single decoder, one optimized for movement, and the other for postural control. We computed an LDA classifier using the same neural inputs. The decoder combined the outputs of the two filters in proportion to the likelihood assigned by the classifier to each state. Main results. We have performed online experiments with two monkeys using this neural-classifier, dual-state decoder, comparing it to a standard, single-state decoder as well as to a dual-state decoder that switched states automatically based on the cursor’s proximity to a target. The performance of both monkeys using the classifier decoder was markedly better than that of the single-state decoder and comparable to the proximity decoder. Significance. We have demonstrated a novel strategy for dealing with the need to make rapid movements while also maintaining precise cursor control when approaching and stabilizing within targets. Further gains can undoubtedly be realized by optimizing the performance of the individual movement and posture decoders.

  7. LOCALIZATION OF ANTIGEN IN TISSUE CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coons, Albert H.; Leduc, Elizabeth H.; Kaplan, Melvin H.

    1951-01-01

    The fate of three proteins, crystalline hen's egg albumin, crystalline bovine plasma albumin, and human plasma γ-globulin, was traced after intravenous injection into mice. This was done by preparing frozen sections of quick-frozen tissue, allowing what foreign protein might be present in the section to react with homologous antibody labelled with fluorescein, and examining the section under the fluorescence microscope. By this means, which employs the serological specificity of the protein as a natural "marker," all three of these proteins were found in the cells of the reticulo-endothelial system, the connective tissue, the vascular endothelium, the lymphocytes of spleen and lymph node, and the epithelium of the kidney tubules, the liver, and in very small amounts in the adrenal. The central nervous system was not studied. All three persisted longest in the reticulo-endothelial system and the connective tissue, and in the doses employed egg white (10 mg.) was no longer detectable after 1 day, bovine albumin (10 mg.) after 2 days, and human γ-globulin (4 mg.) after 6 days, although in a somewhat higher dose (10 mg.) human γ-globulin persisted longer than 8 days. Egg albumin differed from the others in not being detectable in the cells of the renal glomerulus. It was found that each of the three proteins was present in the nuclei of each cell type enumerated above, often in higher concentration than in the cytoplasm. Further, some of the nuclei not only contained antigen, soon after injection, but were also surrounded by a bright ring associated with the nuclear membrane. By means of photographic records under the fluorescence microscope of sections stained for antigen, and direct observation under the light microscope of the same field subsequently stained with hematoxylin and eosin, it could be determined that the antigen was not adsorbed to chromatin or nucleoli, but was apparently in solution in the nuclear sap. PMID:14803641

  8. Viral interference with antigen presentation: trapping TAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressing, Maaike E; Luteijn, Rutger D; Horst, Daniëlle; Wiertz, Emmanuel J

    2013-09-01

    Following primary infection, herpesviruses persist for life in their hosts, even when vigorous anti-viral immunity has been induced. Failure of the host immune system to eliminate infected cells is facilitated by highly effective immune evasion strategies acquired by these herpesviruses during millions of years of co-evolution with their hosts. Here, we review the mechanisms of action of viral gene products that lead to cytotoxic T cell evasion through interference with the function of the transporter associated with antigen processing, TAP. The viral TAP inhibitors impede transport of peptides from the cytosol into the ER lumen, thereby preventing peptide loading onto MHC class I complexes. Recent insights have revealed a pattern of functional convergent evolution. In every herpesvirus subfamily, inhibitors of TAP function have been identified that are, surprisingly, unrelated in genome location, structure, and mechanism of action. Recently, cowpox virus has also been found to encode a TAP inhibitor. Expanding our knowledge on how viruses perturb antigen presentation, in particular by targeting TAP, not only provides information on viral pathogenesis, but also reveals novel aspects of the cellular processes corrupted by these viruses, notably the translocation of peptides by the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter TAP. As the various TAP inhibitors are anticipated to impede discrete conformational transitions it is expected that crystal structures of TAP-inhibitor complexes will reveal valuable structural information on the actual mechanism of peptide translocation by TAP. Viral TAP inhibitors are also used for various (clinical) applications, for example, as effective tools in antigen presentation studies and as immunomodulators in immunotherapy for cancer, heterologous vaccination, and transplant protection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Prevalence of Principal Rh Blood Group Antigens in Blood Donors at the Blood Bank of a Tertiary Care Hospital in Southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundrajukuppam, Deepthi Krishna; Vijaya, Sreedhar Babu Kinnera; Rajendran, Arun; Sarella, Jothibai Dorairaj

    2016-05-01

    Rhesus (Rh) antigen was discovered in 1940 by Karl Landsteiner and Wiener. Due to its immunogenicity along with A, B antigens, Rh D antigen testing was made mandatory in pre-transfusion testing. Presently there are more than 50 antigens in Rh blood group system but major ones are D, C, E, c, and e. Very few reports are available regarding their prevalence in India and no reports are available from Andhra Pradesh. To study the prevalence of principal Rh blood group antigens like D, C, E, c & e in the voluntary blood donors attending our blood bank. A prospective cross-sectional non interventional study was carried out on 1000 healthy blood donors from August 2013 to July 2014 at our blood bank. Donors were grouped and typed for ABO and Rh major antigens using monoclonal blood grouping reagents as per the manufacturer's instructions. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS version 16. Comparison of categorical data between antigen positive and negative individuals was done using Chi-square test. Descriptive statistics for the categorical variables were performed by computing the frequencies (percentages) in each category. Incidence was given in proportion with 95% confidence interval. A total of 1000 blood samples from donors were phenotyped. Among Rh antigens, e was the most common antigen (98.4%), followed by D-94.1%, C-88%, c-54.9% and E-18.8% with DCe/DCe (R1R1) (43.4%) being the most common phenotype and the least common phenotype is r'r' (0.1%). Database for antigen frequency to at least Rh blood group system in local donors helps to provide antigen negative blood to patients with multiple alloantibodies, minimize alloimmunization rate, and thereby improve blood safety.

  10. Detection of poliovirus antigen by enzyme immunoassay.

    OpenAIRE

    Ukkonen, P; Huovilainen, A; Hovi, T

    1986-01-01

    A solid-phase enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was developed for the detection of poliovirus antigen. Rabbit and guinea pig antisera for the assay were raised against purified poliovirus type 3/Fin (strain 3/Fin/K) isolated from a fecal specimen from a meningitis patient during an outbreak of poliomyelitis in Finland in 1984. The EIA was highly specific for poliovirus type 3, and it was about 30 times more sensitive for strain 3/Fin/K than for strain 3/Saukett used in the inactivated poliovirus vacci...

  11. Early secreted antigen ESAT-6 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis promotes protective T helper 17 cell responses in a toll-like receptor-2-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samit Chatterjee

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite its relatively poor efficacy, Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG has been used as a tuberculosis (TB vaccine since its development in 1921. BCG induces robust T helper 1 (Th1 immune responses but, for many individuals, this is not sufficient for host resistance against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb infection. Here we provide evidence that early secreted antigenic target protein 6 (ESAT-6, expressed by the virulent M. tb strain H37Rv but not by BCG, promotes vaccine-enhancing Th17 cell responses. These activities of ESAT-6 were dependent on TLR-2/MyD88 signalling and involved IL-6 and TGF-β production by dendritic cells. Thus, animals that were previously infected with H37Rv or recombinant BCG containing the RD1 region (BCG::RD1 exhibited improved protection upon re-challenge with virulent H37Rv compared with mice previously infected with BCG or RD1-deficient H37Rv (H37RvΔRD1. However, TLR-2 knockout (TLR-2⁻/⁻ animals neither showed Th17 responses nor exhibited improved protection in response to immunization with H37Rv. Furthermore, H37Rv and BCG::RD1 infection had little effect on the expression of the anti-inflammatory microRNA-146a (miR146a in dendritic cells (DCs, whereas BCG and H37RvΔRD1 profoundly induced its expression in DCs. Consistent with these findings, ESAT-6 had no effect on miR146a expression in uninfected DCs, but dramatically inhibited its upregulation in BCG-infected or LPS-treated DCs. Collectively, our findings indicate that, in addition to Th1 immunity induced by BCG, RD1/ESAT-6-induced Th17 immune responses are essential for optimal vaccine efficacy.

  12. Galactosylated LDL nanoparticles: a novel targeting delivery system to deliver antigen to macrophages and enhance antigen specific T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fang; Wuensch, Sherry A; Azadniv, Mitra; Ebrahimkhani, Mohammad R; Crispe, I Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    We aim to define the role of Kupffer cells in intrahepatic antigen presentation, using the selective delivery of antigen to Kupffer cells rather than other populations of liver antigen-presenting cells. To achieve this we developed a novel antigen delivery system that can target antigens to macrophages, based on a galactosylated low-density lipoprotein nanoscale platform. Antigen was delivered via the galactose particle receptor (GPr), internalized, degraded and presented to T cells. The conjugation of fluoresceinated ovalbumin (FLUO-OVA) and lactobionic acid with LDL resulted in a substantially increased uptake of FLUO-OVA by murine macrophage-like ANA1 cells in preference to NIH3T3 cells, and by primary peritoneal macrophages in preference to primary hepatic stellate cells. Such preferential uptake led to enhanced proliferation of OVA specific T cells, showing that the galactosylated LDL nanoscale platform is a successful antigen carrier, targeting antigen to macrophages but not to all categories of antigen presenting cells. This system will allow targeted delivery of antigen to macrophages in the liver and elsewhere, addressing the question of the role of Kupffer cells in liver immunology. It may also be an effective way of delivering drugs or vaccines directly at macrophages.

  13. Heat shock protein-90 inhibitors enhance antigen expression on melanomas and increase T cell recognition of tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J Haggerty

    Full Text Available In an effort to enhance antigen-specific T cell recognition of cancer cells, we have examined numerous modulators of antigen-expression. In this report we demonstrate that twelve different Hsp90 inhibitors (iHsp90 share the ability to increase the expression of differentiation antigens and MHC Class I antigens. These iHsp90 are active in several molecular and cellular assays on a series of tumor cell lines, including eleven human melanomas, a murine B16 melanoma, and two human glioma-derived cell lines. Intra-cytoplasmic antibody staining showed that all of the tested iHsp90 increased expression of the melanocyte differentiation antigens Melan-A/MART-1, gp100, and TRP-2, as well as MHC Class I. The gliomas showed enhanced gp100 and MHC staining. Quantitative analysis of mRNA levels showed a parallel increase in message transcription, and a reporter assay shows induction of promoter activity for Melan-A/MART-1 gene. In addition, iHsp90 increased recognition of tumor cells by T cells specific for Melan-A/MART-1. In contrast to direct Hsp90 client proteins, the increased levels of full-length differentiation antigens that result from iHsp90 treatment are most likely the result of transcriptional activation of their encoding genes. In combination, these results suggest that iHsp90 improve recognition of tumor cells by T cells specific for a melanoma-associated antigen as a result of increasing the expressed intracellular antigen pool available for processing and presentation by MHC Class I, along with increased levels of MHC Class I itself. As these Hsp90 inhibitors do not interfere with T cell function, they could have potential for use in immunotherapy of cancer.

  14. Phenotype and functional evaluation of ex vivo generated antigen-specific immune effector cells with potential for therapeutic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yichen

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ex vivo activation and expansion of lymphocytes for adoptive cell therapy has demonstrated great success. To improve safety and therapeutic efficacy, increased antigen specificity and reduced non-specific response of the ex vivo generated immune cells are necessary. Here, using a complete protein-spanning pool of pentadecapeptides of the latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, a weak viral antigen which is associated with EBV lymphoproliferative diseases, we investigated the phenotype and function of immune effector cells generated based on IFN-γ or CD137 activation marker selection and dendritic cell (DC activation. These ex vivo prepared immune cells exhibited a donor- and antigen-dependent T cell response; the IFN-γ-selected immune cells displayed a donor-related CD4- or CD8-dominant T cell phenotype; however, the CD137-enriched cells showed an increased ratio of CD4 T cells. Importantly, the pentadecapeptide antigens accessed both class II and class I MHC antigen processing machineries and effectively activated EBV-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. Phenotype and kinetic analyses revealed that the IFN-γ and the CD137 selections enriched more central memory T (Tcm cells than did the DC-activation approach, and after expansion, the IFN-γ-selected effector cells showed the highest level of antigen-specificity and effector activities. While all three approaches generated immune cells with comparable antigen-specific activities, the IFN-γ selection followed by ex vivo expansion produced high quality and quantity of antigen-specific effector cells. Our studies presented the optimal approach for generating therapeutic immune cells with potential for emergency and routine clinical applications.

  15. Tissue distribution of histo-blood group antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, V; Dabelsteen, Erik

    2000-01-01

    The introduction of immunohistochemical techniques and monoclonal antibodies to specific carbohydrate epitopes has made it possible to study in detail the tissue distribution of histo-blood group antigens and related carbohydrate structures. The present paper summarizes the available data...... concerning the histological distribution of histo-blood group antigens and their precursor structures in normal human tissues. Studies performed have concentrated on carbohydrate antigens related to the ABO, Lewis, and TTn blood group systems, i.e. histo-blood group antigens carried by type 1, 2, and 3 chain...... carrier carbohydrate chains. Histo-blood group antigens are found in most epithelial tissues. Meanwhile, several factors influence the type, the amount, and the histological distribution of histoblood group antigens, i.e. the ABO, Lewis, and saliva-secretor type of the individual, and the cell- and tissue...

  16. Tissue distribution of histo-blood group antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, V; Dabelsteen, Erik

    2000-01-01

    carrier carbohydrate chains. Histo-blood group antigens are found in most epithelial tissues. Meanwhile, several factors influence the type, the amount, and the histological distribution of histoblood group antigens, i.e. the ABO, Lewis, and saliva-secretor type of the individual, and the cell- and tissue......The introduction of immunohistochemical techniques and monoclonal antibodies to specific carbohydrate epitopes has made it possible to study in detail the tissue distribution of histo-blood group antigens and related carbohydrate structures. The present paper summarizes the available data...... concerning the histological distribution of histo-blood group antigens and their precursor structures in normal human tissues. Studies performed have concentrated on carbohydrate antigens related to the ABO, Lewis, and TTn blood group systems, i.e. histo-blood group antigens carried by type 1, 2, and 3 chain...

  17. Strategies to enhance immunogenicity of cDNA vaccine encoded antigens by modulation of antigen processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Platteel, Anouk C M; Marit de Groot, A; Andersen, Peter; Ovaa, Huib; Kloetzel, Peter M; Mishto, Michele; Sijts, Alice J A M

    2016-01-01

    Most vaccines are based on protective humoral responses while for intracellular pathogens CD8(+) T cells are regularly needed to provide protection. However, poor processing efficiency of antigens is often a limiting factor in CD8(+) T cell priming, hampering vaccine efficacy. The multistage cDNA

  18. Hepatitis B surface antigen incorporated in dissolvable microneedle array patch is antigenic and thermostable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Danielle; Renaud, Frédéric; Dewar, Vincent; Strodiot, Laurent; Wauters, Florence; Janimak, Jim; Shimada, Toshio; Nomura, Tatsuya; Kabata, Koki; Kuruma, Koji; Kusano, Takayuki; Sakai, Masaki; Nagasaki, Hideo; Oyamada, Takayoshi

    2017-11-01

    Alternatives to syringe-based administration are considered for vaccines. Intradermal vaccination with dissolvable microneedle arrays (MNA) appears promising in this respect, as an easy-to-use and painless method. In this work, we have developed an MNA patch (MNAP) made of hydroxyethyl starch (HES) and chondroitin sulphate (CS). In swines, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) formulated with the saponin QS-21 as adjuvant, both incorporated in HES-based MNAP, demonstrated the same level of immunogenicity as a commercially available aluminum-adjuvanted HBsAg vaccine, after two immunizations 28 days apart. MNAP application was associated with transient skin reactions (erythema, lump, scab), particularly evident when the antigen was delivered with the adjuvant. The thermostability of the adjuvanted antigen when incorporated in the HES-based matrix was also assessed by storing MNAP at 37, 45 or 50 °C for up to 6 months. We could demonstrate that antigenicity was retained at 37 and 45 °C and only a 10% loss was observed after 6 months at 50 °C. Our results are supportive of MNAP as an attractive alternative to classical syringe-based vaccination. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Immunoliposome-PCR: a generic ultrasensitive quantitative antigen detection system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Junkun

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The accurate quantification of antigens at low concentrations over a wide dynamic range is needed for identifying biomarkers associated with disease and detecting protein interactions in high-throughput microarrays used in proteomics. Here we report the development of an ultrasensitive quantitative assay format called immunoliposome polymerase chain reaction (ILPCR that fulfills these requirements. This method uses a liposome, with reporter DNA encapsulated inside and biotin-labeled polyethylene glycol (PEG phospholipid conjugates incorporated into the outer surface of the liposome, as a detection reagent. The antigenic target is immobilized in the well of a microplate by a capture antibody and the liposome detection reagent is then coupled to a biotin-labeled second antibody through a NeutrAvidin bridge. The liposome is ruptured to release the reporter DNA, which serves as a surrogate to quantify the protein target using real-time PCR. Results A liposome detection reagent was prepared, which consisted of a population of liposomes ~120 nm in diameter with each liposome possessing ~800 accessible biotin receptors and ~220 encapsulated reporters. This liposome detection reagent was used in an assay to quantify the concentration of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA in human serum. This ILPCR assay exhibited a linear dose–response curve from 10-10 M to 10-16 M CEA. Within this range the assay coefficient of variance was Conclusions The ILPCR assay has several advantages over other immuno-PCR methods. The reporter DNA and biotin-labeled PEG phospholipids spontaneously incorporate into the liposomes as they form, simplifying preparation of the detection reagent. Encapsulation of the reporter inside the liposomes allows nonspecific DNA in the assay medium to be degraded with DNase I prior to quantification of the encapsulated reporter by PCR, which reduces false-positive results and improves quantitative accuracy. The ability to

  20. Monoclonal antibodies to Nocardia asteroides and Nocardia brasiliensis antigens.

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez, T; Díaz, A M; Zlotnik, H

    1990-01-01

    Nocardia asteroides and Nocardia brasiliensis whole-cell extracts were used as antigens to generate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Six stable hybrid cell lines secreting anti-Nocardia spp. MAbs were obtained. These were characterized by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot (immunoblot), and immunofluorescence assay. Although all the MAbs exhibited different degrees of cross-reactivity with N. asteroides and N. brasiliensis antigens as well as with culture-filtrate antigens from Myco...

  1. Immunoregulation by Taenia crassiceps and Its Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto N. Peón

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Taenia crassiceps is a cestode parasite of rodents (in its larval stage and canids (in its adult stage that can also parasitize immunocompromised humans. We have studied the immune response elicited by this helminth and its antigens in mice and human cells, and have discovered that they have a strong capacity to induce chronic Th2-type responses that are primarily characterized by high levels of Th2 cytokines, low proliferative responses in lymphocytes, an immature and LPS-tolerogenic profile in dendritic cells, the recruitment of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and, specially, alternatively activated macrophages. We also have utilized the immunoregulatory capabilities of this helminth to successfully modulate autoimmune responses and the outcome of other infectious diseases. In the present paper, we review the work of others and ourselves with regard to the immune response induced by T. crassiceps and its antigens, and we compare the advances in our understanding of this parasitic infection model with the knowledge that has been obtained from other selected models.

  2. Monoclonal antibodies to carcino-embryonic antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teh, Jinghee; McKenzie, I.F.C.

    1990-01-01

    With the aim of producing new MoAb to colorectal carcinoma, immunization with cell suspensions of a fresh colonic tumour was performed and MoAb 17C4 was obtained. To produce other MoAb to colon cancer, an immunization protocol using fresh tumour, colonic cell lines and sera from patients with colonic tumours was employed and resulted in MoAb JGT-13, LK-4 and XPX-13. MoAb I-1 and O-1 were raised against sera from patients with colon cancer to produce MoAb directed against circulating tumour associated antigens. The six antibodies gave a range of reactions with normal and malignant tissues, indicating that they most likely reacted with different epitopes. Thus, apart from the reactions of 17C4, LK-4 and XPX-13 with fresh and formalin-fixed granulocytes, none of the antibodies reacted with formalin-fixed normal tissues. Despite the apparent specificity of these MoAb for colon cancer, serum testing using MoAb gave similar results to carcino-embryonic antigen polyclonal antibodies, that is the MoAb gave no obvious advantage. 9 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  3. Glycoconjugates as target antigens in peripheral neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubica Suturkova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Identification and characterization of antigens present at the human peripheral nerve is a great challenge in the field of neuroimmunology. The latest investigations are focused on the understanding of the biology of glycoconjugates present at the peripheral nerve, and their immunological reactivity. Increased titers of antibodies that recognize carbohydrate determinants of glycoconjugates (glycolipids and glycoproteins are associated with distinct neuropathic syndromes. There is considerable cross-reactivity among anti-ganglioside antibodies, resulting from shared oligosaccharide epitopes, possibly explaining the overlap in syndromes observed in many affected patients. Sera from patients with neuropathies (GBS, chronic inflammatory demielynating polyneuropathy - CIDP, multifocal motor neuropathy - MMN, cross-react with glycoproteins isolated from human peripheral nerve and from Campylobacter jejuni O:19. The frequency of occurrence of antibodies against these glycoproteins is different, depending of the type of neuropathy. Identification of the cross-reactive glycoproteins and possible additional auto antigens could be useful in laboratory evaluation of peripheral neuropathies and help to develop a more effective therapeutic approach.

  4. Human pathogen subversion of antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, F M; Lem, L; Solache, A; Bennett, E M

    1999-04-01

    Many pathogens have co-evolved with their human hosts to develop strategies for immune evasion that involve disruption of the intracellular pathways by which antigens are bound by class I and class II molecules of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) for presentation to T cells. Here the molecular events in these pathways are reviewed and pathogen interference is documented for viruses, extracellular and intracellular bacteria and intracellular parasites. In addition to a general review, data from our studies of adenovirus, Chlamydia trachomatis and Coxiella burnetii are summarized. Adenovirus E19 is the first viral gene product described that affects class I MHC molecule expression by two separate mechanisms, intracellular retention of the class I heavy chain by direct binding and by binding to the TAP transporter involved in class I peptide loading. Coxiella and Chlamydia both affect peptide presentation by class II MHC molecules as a result of their residence in endocytic compartments, although the properties of the parasitophorous vacuoles they form are quite different. These examples of active interference with antigen presentation by viral gene products and passive interference by rickettsiae and bacteria are typical of the strategies used by these different classes of pathogens, which need to evade different types of immune responses. Pathogen-host co-evolution is evident in these subversion tactics for which the pathogen crime seems tailored to fit the immune system punishment.

  5. Biostratigraphic evidence for dramatic Holocene uplift of Robinson Crusoe Island, Juan Fernández Ridge, SE Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda, P.; Le Roux, J. P.; Lara, L. E.; Orozco, G.; Astudillo, V.

    2015-03-01

    Hotspot oceanic islands typically experience subsidence due to several processes related to migration of the oceanic plate away from the mantle plume and surface flexural loading. However, many other processes can interrupt subsidence, some of which may be associated with catastrophic events. A study of the biostratigraphy and sedimentology of Holocene deposits on Robinson Crusoe Island (RCI) on the Juan Fernández Ridge (JFR) indicated that dramatic uplift has occurred since 8000 years BP, at a rate of about 8.5mm yr-1. This is evidenced by supratidal flats with tepee structures and sand layers containing marine gastropods (mostly Nerita sp.) that are now exposed ca. 70 m a.s.l. The active hotspot is located 280 km further west and the last volcanic activity on RCI occurred at ca. 800 000 years BP. Long-term subsidence is evidenced by deep submerged marine abrasion terraces at RCI. As no direct evidence was found for the existence of a compensating bulge generated by the present hotspot upon which RCI would be situated, it must be concluded that subsidence in the wake of the mantle plume beneath the migrating plate was interrupted by very rapid uplift, but on a scale that did not fully compensate for the previous subsidence. This can be attributed to large-scale landslides followed by isostatic rebound, although this is only vaguely reflected in the low-resolution bathymetry of the area. To determine if this mechanism produced the uplift, a detailed bathymetric survey of the area will be required. If such a survey confirms this hypothesis, it may have implications for the short-term dynamics of vertical variations of oceanic edifices and their related effects on ecosystems and human population.

  6. ADNP/NAP dramatically increase microtubule end-binding protein-Tau interaction: a novel avenue for protection against tauopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivashko-Pachima, Y; Sayas, C Laura; Malishkevich, A; Gozes, I

    2017-09-01

    Activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP), vital for brain formation and cognitive function, is mutated in autism and linked to neurodegenerative/psychiatric diseases. An eight-amino-acid peptide snippet of ADNP, NAP (NAPVSIPQ), identified as a smallest active fragment, includes the SxIP microtubule (MT) end-binding protein (EB) association motif, and enhances ADNP-EB3 interaction. Depletion of EB1 or EB3 abolishes NAP protection against zinc intoxication. Furthermore, NAP enhances Tau-MT interaction, and Tau regulates the localization and function of EB1 and EB3 in developing neuronal cells. Here, we asked how NAP (ADNP) enhances Tau-MT interactions and whether this is mediated by EBs. We showed, for we believe the first time, that NAP augmented endogenous EB1 comet density in the N1E-115 neuroblastoma neuronal model. This finding was substantiated by cell transfection with fluorescent EB1 and live cell imaging. NAP increased comet amounts, length and speed. At the molecular level, NAP enhanced EB3 homodimer formation, while decreasing EB1-EB3 heterodimer content and driving EB1- and EB3-Tau interactions (dramatic 20-fold increases), leading to recruitment of EB1/EB3 and Tau to MTs under zinc intoxication. Our previous results showed that while NAP protected neuronal-like cells against oxidative stress, it did not protect NIH3T3 fibroblasts. Here, NAP did not protect NIH3T3 cells against zinc intoxication, unless these cells were transfected with Tau. Interestingly, other MT associated proteins (MAPs) may replace Tau, thus, EB-Tau (MAPs) interaction is identified as a novel target for endogenous ADNP neuroprotection, and a future target for drug development, with NAP as a prototype.

  7. Antigen-Experienced CD4lo T Cells Are Linked to Deficient Contraction of the Immune Response in Autoimmune Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Linkes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Following proper activation, naïve “CD4lo” T cells differentiate into effector T cells with enhanced expression of CD4 -“CD4hi” effectors. Autoimmune diabetes-prone NOD mice display a unique set of antigen-experienced “CD4lo” T cells that persist after primary stimulation. Here, we report that a population of such cells remained after secondary and tertiary TCR stimulation and produced cytokines upon antigenic challenge. However, when NOD blasts were induced in the presence of rIL-15, the number of antigen-experienced “CD4lo” T cells was significantly reduced. Clonal contraction, mediated in part by CD95-dependent activation-induced cell death (AICD, normally regulates the accumulation of “CD4hi” effectors. Interestingly, CD95 expression was dramatically reduced on the AICD-resistant NOD “CD4lo” T cells. Thus, while autoimmune disease has often been attributed to the engagement of robust autoimmunity, we suggest that the inability to effectively contract the immune response distinguishes benign autoimmunity from progressive autoimmune diseases that are characterized by chronic T cell-mediated inflammation.

  8. СAPSULAR ANTIGEN OF YERSINIA PESTIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Kadnikova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Plague is a zoonosis caused by gram-negative bacteria Yersinia pestis, which, as a rule, is transmitted to humans from septicemic rodents by the bites of infected fleas. This microbe killed more people than all of the wars in the human history. Y. pestis circulation in the natural plague foci is ensured by the whole number of pathogenicity factors with differing functional orientation. This review is devoted to one of them, Y. pestis capsular antigen (F1 or Caf1. The history of its discovery and studying of its genetic control, biosynthesis, isolation and purification, and physicochemical properties are reviewed. Its roles in plague pathogenesis and its application as a main component of plague vaccines are also discussed. Y. pestis capsule under light microscopy is visually amorphous, while high-resolution electron microscopy displays the structure formed from separate fimbria-like cords up to 200 nm long, diverging from the bacterial surface in different directions. At 37°C Y. pestis produce 800–1000 times more capsular antigen than at 28°C. Genes coding for 17.6-kD Caf1 protein, which contains 170 amino acids, are located in caf1 operon of pFra plasmid. Analysis of caf1 operon nucleotide sequence testified its close phylogenetic relationship with the gene clusters coding for pilus adhesins that were secreted with the help of chaperone/usher systems in enterobacteria including six additional adhesins in Y. pestis. Y. pestis multiplication within macrophages is the obligatory stage of plague pathogenesis, and the plague pathogen virulence correlates not with resistance to phagocyte ingesting but with bacterial ability to survive and multiply within phagolysosomes of phagocytes due to neutralization of antibacterial functions of eukaryotic cells. The capsule formed out of the Caf1 aggregates protects Y. pestis from ingestion by naïve host’s phagocytes and prevents from initiation of the alternative pathway of the complement system

  9. Bayesian nonparametric clustering in phylogenetics: modeling antigenic evolution in influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybis, Gabriela B; Sinsheimer, Janet S; Bedford, Trevor; Rambaut, Andrew; Lemey, Philippe; Suchard, Marc A

    2018-01-30

    Influenza is responsible for up to 500,000 deaths every year, and antigenic variability represents much of its epidemiological burden. To visualize antigenic differences across many viral strains, antigenic cartography methods use multidimensional scaling on binding assay data to map influenza antigenicity onto a low-dimensional space. Analysis of such assay data ideally leads to natural clustering of influenza strains of similar antigenicity that correlate with sequence evolution. To understand the dynamics of these antigenic groups, we present a framework that jointly models genetic and antigenic evolution by combining multidimensional scaling of binding assay data, Bayesian phylogenetic machinery and nonparametric clustering methods. We propose a phylogenetic Chinese restaurant process that extends the current process to incorporate the phylogenetic dependency structure between strains in the modeling of antigenic clusters. With this method, we are able to use the genetic information to better understand the evolution of antigenicity throughout epidemics, as shown in applications of this model to H1N1 influenza. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. SPECIFIC CARCINOEMBRYONIC ANTIGENS OF THE HUMAN DIGESTIVE SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Phil; Freedman, Samuel O.

    1965-01-01

    A wide variety of human adult and fetal tissues were studied by immune-diffusion techniques in agar gel to determine whether they contained the tumor-specific antigen(s) previously found in coionic cancers. In the adult tissues it was demonstrated that identical antigens were present in all tested specimens of malignant tumors of the entodermally derived epithelium of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas, but were absent from all other tested adult tissues. The common antigenic constituents, therefore, represent system-specific cancer antigens of the human digestive system. System-specific cancer antigens have not previously been demonstrated in humans. Experiments with fetal tissues demonstrated that identical antigens were also present in fetal gut, liver, and pancreas between 2 and 6 months of gestation. These components were named "carcinoembryonic" antigens of the human digestive system. On the basis of the present findings and the recent work regarding control of the expression of genetic potentialities in various types of cells, it was concluded that the carcinoembryonic antigens represent cellular constituents which are repressed during the course of differentiation of the normal digestive system epithelium and reappear in the corresponding malignant cells by a process of derepressive-dedifferentiation. PMID:4953873

  11. Cancer-germline antigen vaccines and epigenetic enhancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten Frier; Burns, Jorge; Ditzel, Henrik Jorn

    2010-01-01

    can be achieved using epigenetic modifiers. AREAS COVERED IN THIS REVIEW: We provide an overview of the potential of CG antigens as targets for cancer immunotherapy, including advantages and disadvantages. We also discuss the current state of development of CG antigen vaccines, and the potential...... synergistic effect of combining CG antigen immunotherapeutic strategies with epigenetic modifiers. WHAT THE READER WILL GAIN: The reader will gain an overview of the past, present and future role of CG antigens in cancer immunotherapy. TAKE HOME MESSAGE: Chemoimmunotherapy using epigenetic drugs and CG...

  12. Osteopontin promotes dendritic cell maturation and function in response to HBV antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui GY

    2015-06-01

    HBV antigens. In addition, OPN deficiency in DCs reduced the HBV antigen-induced inflammatory response in the liver of mice. Importantly, OPN administration significantly promoted the maturation of DCs from CHB patients in vitro.Conclusion: These findings suggested that OPN could improve the maturation and functioning of DCs in the immune response to HBV antigens, which might be useful to further improve the effect of DC vaccine. Keywords: osteopontin, dendritic cells, hepatitis B virus

  13. Blood group antigen A type 3 expression is a favorable prognostic factor in advanced NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, L H; Kuemmel, A; Schliemann, C; Schulze, A; Humberg, J; Mohr, M; Görlich, D; Hartmann, W; Bröckling, S; Marra, A; Hillejan, L; Goletz, S; Karsten, U; Berdel, W E; Spieker, T; Wiewrodt, R

    2016-02-01

    Several blood group-related carbohydrate antigens are prognosis-relevant markers of tumor tissues. A type 3 (repetitive A) is a blood group antigen specific for A1 erythrocytes. Its potential expression in tumor tissues has so far not been examined. We have evaluated its expression in normal lung and in lung cancer using a novel antibody (A69-A/E8). For comparison an anti-A antibody specific to A types 1 and 2 was used, because its expression on lung cancer tissue has been previously reported to be of prognostic relevance. Resected tissue samples of 398 NSCLC patients were analyzed in immunohistochemistry using tissue microarrays. Expression of A type 3 was not observed in non-malignant lung tissues. A type 3 was expressed on tumor cells of around half of NSCLC patients of blood group A1 (ptype 1/2 antigen was observed (p=0.562), the expression of A type 3 by tumor cells indicated a highly significant favorable prognosis among advanced NSCLC patients (p=0.011) and in NSCLC patients with lymphatic spread (p=0.014). Univariate prognostic results were confirmed in a Cox proportional hazards model. In this study we present for the first time prognostic data for A type 3 antigen expression in lung cancer patients. Prospective studies should be performed to confirm the prognostic value of A type 3 expression for an improved risk stratification in NSCLC patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Structural and Computational Biology in the Design of Immunogenic Vaccine Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lassi Liljeroos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination is historically one of the most important medical interventions for the prevention of infectious disease. Previously, vaccines were typically made of rather crude mixtures of inactivated or attenuated causative agents. However, over the last 10–20 years, several important technological and computational advances have enabled major progress in the discovery and design of potently immunogenic recombinant protein vaccine antigens. Here we discuss three key breakthrough approaches that have potentiated structural and computational vaccine design. Firstly, genomic sciences gave birth to the field of reverse vaccinology, which has enabled the rapid computational identification of potential vaccine antigens. Secondly, major advances in structural biology, experimental epitope mapping, and computational epitope prediction have yielded molecular insights into the immunogenic determinants defining protective antigens, enabling their rational optimization. Thirdly, and most recently, computational approaches have been used to convert this wealth of structural and immunological information into the design of improved vaccine antigens. This review aims to illustrate the growing power of combining sequencing, structural and computational approaches, and we discuss how this may drive the design of novel immunogens suitable for future vaccines urgently needed to increase the global prevention of infectious disease.

  15. Thermodynamics of antibody-antigen interaction revealed by mutation analysis of antibody variable regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiba, Hiroki; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-07-01

    Antibodies (immunoglobulins) bind specific molecules (i.e. antigens) with high affinity and specificity. In order to understand their mechanisms of recognition, interaction analysis based on thermodynamic and kinetic parameters, as well as structure determination is crucial. In this review, we focus on mutational analysis which gives information about the role of each amino acid residue in antibody-antigen interaction. Taking anti-hen egg lysozyme antibodies and several anti-small molecule antibodies, the energetic contribution of hot-spot and non-hot-spot residues is discussed in terms of thermodynamics. Here, thermodynamics of the contribution from aromatic, charged and hydrogen bond-forming amino acids are discussed, and their different characteristics have been elucidated. The information gives fundamental understanding of the antibody-antigen interaction. Furthermore, the consequences of antibody engineering are analysed from thermodynamic viewpoints: humanization to reduce immunogenicity and rational design to improve affinity. Amino acid residues outside hot-spots in the interface play important roles in these cases, and thus thermodynamic and kinetic parameters give much information about the antigen recognition. Thermodynamic analysis of mutant antibodies thus should lead to advanced strategies to design and select antibodies with high affinity. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Antigen binding characteristics of immunoglobulin free light chains: crosslinking by antigen is essential to induce allergic inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Thio

    Full Text Available Beside the production of complete immunoglobulins IgG, IgE, IgA, IgM and IgD, consisting of tetrameric heterodimers of immunoglobulin heavy and light chains, B cells also secrete immunoglobulin free light chains (Ig-fLC. Previous studies showed that Ig-fLCs are able to induce immediate hypersensitivity reactions. It is apparent that recognition and binding of antigen are crucial steps in the onset of these inflammatory responses. In this study, the binding characteristics of Ig-fLC to antigen were further investigated using various biochemical approaches. In addition, we investigated whether antigen-mediated crosslinking of Ig-fLC is required to initiate allergic skin inflammation in vivo. Our study shows that binding of Ig-fLCs to antigen can be measured with different experimental setups. Surface plasmon resonance analysis showed real-time antigen binding characteristics. Specific antigen binding by Ig-fLCs was further detected using immunoblotting and ELISA. Using the ELISA-based assay, a binding affinity of 76.9±3.8 nM was determined for TNP-specific Ig-fLC. Antigen-induced ear swelling in mice passively sensitized with trinitrophenol-specific Ig-fLC was inhibited when multivalent antigen was combined with excess of monovalent antigen during challenge. We conclude that Ig-fLCs are able to interact with antigen, a prerequisite for antigen-specific cellular activation. In analogy to antigen-specific Fc receptor-induced mast cell activation, crosslinking of Ig-fLCs is necessary to initiate a local allergic response.

  17. Presensitization to Ascaris antigens promotes induction of mite-specific IgE upon mite antigen inhalation in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Mayu; Hara, Mutsuko; Ichikawa, Saori; Kamijo, Seiji; Nakazawa, Takuya; Hatanaka, Hideki; Akiyama, Kazuo; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Takai, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with house dust mite (HDM) allergy or Ascariasis produce serum IgE specific to the antigens of HDM or nematode Ascaris, respectively. Although human IgE cross-reactivity has been reported between HDM and Ascaris antigens, it remains unclear whether it contributes to the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. We herein investigated the induction of cross-reactive antibodies and T cells in mice and effects of airway exposure to HDM antigens after preimmunization with Ascaris an...

  18. Antigenic determinants of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and development of assays specific for different forms of PSA.

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, O.; Peter, A.; Andersson, I.; Nilsson, K.; Grundstr?m, B.; Karlsson, B.

    1997-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were raised against prostate-specific antigen (PSA) by immunization with purified free PSA, i.e. not in complex with any protease inhibitor (F-PSA) and PSA in complex with alpha1-anti-chymotrypsin (PSA-ACT). Epitope mapping of PSA using the established monoclonal antibody revealed a complex pattern of independent and partly overlapping antigenic domains in the PSA molecule. Four independent antigenic domains and at least three partly overlapping domains were exposed both...

  19. T cells expressing VHH-directed oligoclonal chimeric HER2 antigen receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamnani, Fatemeh Rahimi; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy with engineered T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) originated from antibodies is a promising strategy in cancer immunotherapy. Several unsuccessful trials, however, highlight the need for alternative conventional binding domains and the better combination...... of costimulatory endodomains for CAR construction to improve the effector functions of the engineered T cells. Camelid single-domain antibodies (VHHs), which are the smallest single domain antibodies, can endow great targeting ability to CAR-engineered T cells....

  20. One-step synthesis of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} hierarchical porous structure nanosheets with dramatic ultraviolet light photocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Jing; Wang, Yong; Huang, Jianfeng, E-mail: huangjfsust@126.com; Cao, Liyun; Li, Jiayin; Hai, Guojuan; Bai, Zhe

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanosheets with hierarchical porous structure were synthesized via one step. • The band gap of the nanosheets was wider and investigated in detail. • The nanosheets can degrade almost all of the RhB within 9 min. • The photocurrent of the nanosheets is 5.97 times as high as that of the P-25. - Abstract: Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) nanosheets with hierarchical porous structure were synthesized via one-step thermal condensation-oxidation process. The microstructure of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was characterized to explain the dramatic ultraviolet light photocatalytic activity. The results showed that g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} hierarchical aggregates were assembled by nanosheets with a length of 1–2 μm and a thickness of 20–30 nm. And the N{sub 2}-adsorption/desorption isotherms further informed the presence of fissure form mesoporous structure. An enhanced photocurrent of 37.2 μA was obtained, which is almost 5 times higher than that of P-25. Besides, the g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanosheets displayed the degradation of Rhodamine B with 99.4% removal efficiency in only 9 min. Such highly photocatalytic activity could be attributed to the nano platelet morphology which improves electron transport ability along the in-plane direction. In addition, the hierarchical porous structure adapted a wider band gap of C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. Therefore, the photoinduced electron-hole pairs have a stronger oxidation-reduction potential for photocatalysis.

  1. Endothelial cells present antigens in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tellides George

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immune recognition of vascular endothelial cells (EC has been implicated in allograft rejection, protection against pathogens, and lymphocyte recruitment. However, EC pervade nearly all tissues and predominate in none, complicating any direct test of immune recognition. Here, we examined antigen presentation by EC in vivo by testing immune responses against E. coli β-galactosidase (β-gal in two lines of transgenic mice that express β-gal exclusively in their EC. TIE2-lacZ mice express β-gal in all EC and VWF-lacZ mice express β-gal in heart and brain microvascular EC. Results Transgenic and congenic wild type FVB mice immunized with β-gal expression vector DNA or β-gal protein generated high titer, high affinity antisera containing comparable levels of antigen-specific IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes, suggesting equivalent activation of T helper cell subsets. The immunized transgenic mice remained healthy, their EC continued to express β-gal, and their blood vessels showed no histological abnormalities. In response to β-gal in vitro, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from immunized transgenic and FVB mice proliferated, expressed CD25, and secreted IFN-γ. Infection with recombinant vaccinia virus encoding β-gal raised equivalent responses in transgenic and FVB mice. Hearts transplanted from transgenic mice into FVB mice continued to beat and the graft EC continued to express β-gal. These results suggested immunological ignorance of the transgene encoded EC protein. However, skin transplanted from TIE2-lacZ onto FVB mice lost β-gal+ EC and the hosts developed β-gal-specific antisera, demonstrating activation of host immune effector mechanisms. In contrast, skin grafted from TIE2-lacZ onto VWF-lacZ mice retained β-gal+ EC and no antisera developed, suggesting a tolerant host immune system. Conclusion Resting, β-gal+ EC in transgenic mice tolerize specific lymphocytes that would otherwise respond against β-gal expressed by EC within

  2. Use of antigenic cartography in vaccine seed strain selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouchier, Ron A M; Smith, Derek J

    2010-03-01

    Human influenza A viruses are classic examples of antigenically variable pathogens that have a seemingly endless capacity to evade the host's immune response. The viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) proteins are the main targets of our antibody response to combat infections. HA and NA continuously change to escape from humoral immunity, a process known as antigenic drift. As a result of antigenic drift, the human influenza vaccine is updated frequently. The World Health Organization (WHO) coordinates a global influenza surveillance network that, by the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay, routinely characterizes the antigenic properties of circulating strains in order to select new seed viruses for such vaccine updates. To facilitate a quantitative interpretation and easy visualization of HI data, a new computational technique called "antigenic cartography" was developed. Since its development, antigenic cartography has been applied routinely to assist the WHO with influenza surveillance activities. Until recently, antigenic variation was not considered a serious issue with influenza vaccines for poultry. However, because of the diversification of the Asian H5N1 lineage since 1996 into multiple genetic clades and subclades, and because of the long-term use of poultry vaccines against H5 in some parts of the world, this issue needs to be re-addressed. The antigenic properties of panels of avian H5N1 viruses were characterized by HI assay, using mammalian or avian antisera, and analyzed using antigenic cartography methods. These analyses revealed antigenic differences between circulating H5N1 viruses and the H5 viruses used in poultry vaccines. Considerable antigenic variation was also observed within and between H5N1 clades. These observations have important implications for the efficacy and long-term use of poultry vaccines.

  3. Why did watermills not have a dramatic effect on the Anthropocene sediment record of the Zwalm River, Belgium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notebaert, Bastiaan; D'Haese, Wouter

    2016-04-01

    Different studies demonstrated the dramatic effects of watermills on fluvial geomorphology in the Eastern US. Damming of floodplains and milldam lakes increased sediment deposition. Several authors attribute most of the so called post settlement legacy sediment to those milldam lakes. In Europe the role of milldams in the anthropogenic increased floodplain deposition rates during the last 1000 to 2000 years has gotten little attention until now. Therefore we studied the influence of watermills on Holocene floodplain deposition in the Zwalm catchment, Belgium. The Zwalm River is located in western part of the Belgian loess belt in an undulating landscape that had intensive agriculture for most of the last 2000 years. In total 9 watermills were present along the 17 km long main channel during the 19th century, while many were also present on tributaries. Historical records date several of the mills to the 10th century AD, although they might be older, and most of them remain to some degree active today. The influence of watermills on floodplain deposits was tested through coring transects of the Holocene deposits. Detailed transects were performed pairwise upstream and downstream 5 watermills. Samples were taken for grain size analysis using laser diffraction. A possible influence on floodplain topography was tested on a 5 m resolution DTM. Holocene floodplain architecture is similar to other floodplains in the region: a basal early to mid-Holocene peat and gyttja layer is covered by a fine grained sediment layer of more than 5 m thickness. The change between both can be attributed to increased soil erosion due to human land use, and can be considered to be the local legacy sediment. Comparison of transects upstream and downstream mills shows no significant difference in total Holocene or legacy sediment thickness. Texture analysis indicates that floodplain sediments are significant coarser downstream the mills.F Floodplains are not significant steeper around mills

  4. Dramatic effect on Selenium concentration in blood serum due to the difference between the Hungarian and Indian dietary habits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szuecs, Z.; Lahiri, S.; Andrasi, D.; Kovacs, B.

    2012-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The importance of Selenium as trace element in animals, as well as in humans is well known. The deficiency of Selenium was observed in case of several heavy or fatal clinical events such as high infant mortality, premature, malformations and even prostate cancer. Hungary is in the top of their worldwide statistic with parallel of the low concentration of Selenium in soil as well as in food. The direct correlation can explain in Venezuela, where the prostate cancer is 'unknown disease'. The concentration of Selenium in India is higher than the worldwide level. Under the scientific bilateral cooperation 'Speciation dependent studies on physicochemical behavior of some elements in trace scale in natural and synthetic system' the Selenium was determined in human blood serum from the group of Hungarian and group of Indian patients. The samples were given in same time from each group. The main goal of the study was explain the effect of the traditional dietary habit for the level of Selenium. Therefore the samples were taken from the visiting scientist just arrived to the host institute as well as from the host scientists too. After 2 weeks stay the sampling was repeated, when the guest scientists eat the same food as the host scientists. The measurements were done in Thermo-2 ICP-MS from blood-serum separated by centrifuge. The results are summarized in Table 1. Dramatic effect was found for the level of Selenium in blood serum. As it was expected the Hungarian samples showed low concentration of Selenium in starting of the visit, as well as the high concentration was found in Indian sample, comparing to the Hungarian sample. After two weeks the Hungarian sample showed much higher concentration, however it was still less, than in Indian sample. Similar effect was found during the visit the Indian scientists in Hungary, however their Selenium concentration decreased not so spectacular due to the Selenium 'store' in body. The general

  5. Facts on the fragmentation of antigens in presenting cells, on the association of antigen fragments with MHC molecules in cell-free systems, and speculation on the cell biology of antigen processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werdelin, O; Mouritsen, S; Petersen, B L

    1988-01-01

    The processing of a protein antigen is a multi-step event taking place in antigen-presenting cells. Processing is a prerequisite for the recognition of most antigens by T lymphocytes. The antigen is ingested by endocytosis, transported to an acid cellular compartment and subjected to proteolytic...... fragmentation. Some of the antigen fragments bind to MHC class II molecules and are transported to the surface of the antigen-presenting cell where the actual presentation to T lymphocytes occurs. The nature of the processed antigen, how and where it is derived and subsequently becomes associated with MHC...

  6. Ether lipid vesicle-based antigens impart protection against experimental listeriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansari MA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mairaj Ahmed Ansari,1 Swaleha Zubair,2 Saba Tufail,1 Ejaj Ahmad,1 Mohsin Raza Khan,1 Zainuddin Quadri,1 Mohammad Owais,11Interdisciplinary Biotechnology Unit, 2Women's College, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, UP, IndiaBackground: Incidence of food-borne infections from Listeria monocytogenes, a parasite that has adapted intracellular residence to avoid antibody onslaught, has increased dramatically in the past few years. The apparent lack of an effective vaccine that is capable of evoking the desired cytotoxic T cell response to obliterate this intracellular pathogen has encouraged the investigation of alternate prophylactic strategies. It should also be noted that Archaebacteria (Archae lipid-based adjuvants enhance the efficacy of subunit vaccines. In the present study, the adjuvant properties of archaeosomes (liposomes prepared from total polar lipids of archaebacteria, Halobacterium salinarum combined with immunogenic culture supernatant antigens of L. monocytogenes have been exploited in designing a vaccine candidate against experimental listeriosis in murine model.Methods: Archaeosome-entrapped secretory protein antigens (SAgs of L. monocytogenes were evaluated for their immunological responses and tendency to deplete bacterial burden in BALB/c mice challenged with sublethal listerial infection. Various immunological studies involving cytokine profiling, lymphocyte proliferation assay, detection of various surface markers (by flowcytometric analysis, and antibody isotypes (by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used for establishing the vaccine potential of archaeosome-entrapped secretory proteins.Results: Immunization schedule involving archaeosome-encapsulated SAgs resulted in upregulation of Th1 cytokine production along with boosted memory in BALB/c mice. It also showed protective effect by reducing listerial burden in various vital organs (liver and spleen of the infected mice. However, the soluble form of the antigens (SAgs

  7. T cell recognition of breast cancer antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nadia Viborg; Andersen, Sofie Ramskov; Andersen, Rikke Sick

    Recent studies are encouraging research of breast cancer immunogenicity to evaluate the applicability ofimmunotherapy as a treatment strategy. The epitope landscape in breast cancer is minimally described, thus it is necessary to identify T cell targets to develop immune mediated therapies.......This project investigates four proteins commonly upregulated in breast cancer and thus probable tumor associated antigens (TAAs). Aromatase, prolactin, NEK3, and PIAS3 contribute to increase growth, survival, and motility of malignant cells. Aspiring to uncover novel epitopes for cytotoxic T cells, a reverse...... recognition utilizing DNA barcode labeled MHC multimers to screen peripheral blood lymphocytes from breast cancer patients and healthy donor samples. Signif-icantly more TAA specific T cell responses were detected in breast cancer patients than healthy donors for both HLA-A*0201 (P

  8. Engineering antigen-specific immunological tolerance.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontos, Stephan; Grimm, Alizee J.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-05-01

    Unwanted immunity develops in response to many protein drugs, in autoimmunity, in allergy, and in transplantation. Approaches to induce immunological tolerance aim to either prevent these responses or reverse them after they have already taken place. We present here recent developments in approaches, based on engineered peptides, proteins and biomaterials, that harness mechanisms of peripheral tolerance both prophylactically and therapeutically to induce antigenspecific immunological tolerance. These mechanisms are based on responses of B and T lymphocytes to other cells in their immune environment that result in cellular deletion or ignorance to particular antigens, or in development of active immune regulatory responses. Several of these approaches are moving toward clinical development, and some are already in early stages of clinical testing.

  9. Three-day dendritic cells for vaccine development: Antigen uptake, processing and presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schendel Dolores J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antigen-loaded dendritic cells (DC are capable of priming naïve T cells and therefore represent an attractive adjuvant for vaccine development in anti-tumor immunotherapy. Numerous protocols have been described to date using different maturation cocktails and time periods for the induction of mature DC (mDC in vitro. For clinical application, the use of mDC that can be generated in only three days saves on the costs of cytokines needed for large scale vaccine cell production and provides a method to produce cells within a standard work-week schedule in a GMP facility. Methods In this study, we addressed the properties of antigen uptake, processing and presentation by monocyte-derived DC prepared in three days (3d mDC compared with conventional DC prepared in seven days (7d mDC, which represent the most common form of DC used for vaccines to date. Results Although they showed a reduced capacity for spontaneous antigen uptake, 3d mDC displayed higher capacity for stimulation of T cells after loading with an extended synthetic peptide that requires processing for MHC binding, indicating they were more efficient at antigen processing than 7d DC. We found, however, that 3d DC were less efficient at expressing protein after introduction of in vitro transcribed (ivtRNA by electroporation, based on published procedures. This deficit was overcome by altering electroporation parameters, which led to improved protein expression and capacity for T cell stimulation using low amounts of ivtRNA. Conclusions This new procedure allows 3d mDC to replace 7d mDC for use in DC-based vaccines that utilize long peptides, proteins or ivtRNA as sources of specific antigen.

  10. Preparation and evaluation of Salmonella Enteritidis antigen conjugated with nanogold for screening of poultry flocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazem Mohammed Ibrahim

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present work aimed to develop lateral flow immunochromatographic strip (ICS test for detection of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE specific antibodies in chicken sera. Materials and Methods: A rapid lateral flow immunochromatographic test (LFIT has been developed, in which SE Group D antigen labeled with the gold chloride molecules laid on the conjugate pad. Staphylococcus aureus protein A was used as capture antibody at the test line (T of a nitrocellulose (NC membrane and anti-SE antigen-specific rabbit antibodies were used as capture antibody at the control line (C of the NC strip in the lateral flow layout device. Results: Using the developed LFIT, the minimal amount of SE-specific antibodies that can be detected in chicken serum sample was 1427 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA unit/100 μl that was equal to 0.1 μg (Ab/100 μl sample. 100 suspected serum samples collected from a poultry flock were tested with the prepared SE-LFIT kits and the locally prepared stained Salmonella antigen, and the results were compared with those obtained from examination of these samples with Salmonella Group D antibody ELISA kit as the gold standard test. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the prepared SE-LFIT antigen kits were 94.4%, 90%, and 94%, respectively, while those obtained with stained Salmonella antigen were 88.8%, 90%, and 89%, respectively. Conclusion: The developed test is a simple field rapid test of high sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy that can improve and facilitates rapid field surveillance of salmonellosis among chickens.

  11. Application of Antigen Cross-Presentation Research into Patient Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    The activation of adaptive immune responses requires the processing and presentation of protein antigens to lymphocytes. Especially dendritic cells are effective at display of antigen-derived peptides in the form of immunogenic peptide/MHC complexes to CD4 and CD8-positive T cells, and can stimulate

  12. Presentation of phagocytosed antigens by MHC class I and II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantegazza, Adriana R.; Magalhaes, Joao G.; Amigorena, Sebastian; Marks, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Phagocytosis provides innate immune cells with a mechanism to take up and destroy pathogenic bacteria, apoptotic cells and other large particles. In some cases, however, peptide antigens from these particles are preserved for presentation in association with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I or class II molecules in order to stimulate antigen-specific T cells. Processing and presentation of antigens from phagosomes presents a number of distinct challenges relative to antigens internalized by other means; While bacterial antigens were among the first discovered to be presented to T cells, analyses of the cellular mechanisms by which peptides from phagocytosed antigens assemble with MHC molecules and by which these complexes are then expressed at the plasma membrane have lagged behind those of conventional model soluble antigens. In this review, we cover recent advances in our understanding of these processes, including the unique cross-presentation of phagocytosed antigens by MHC class I molecules, and in their control by signaling modalities in phagocytic cells. PMID:23127154

  13. Antigenic analysis of some Nigerian street rabies virus using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The authors studied 12 street rabies virus isolates from 3 states of Nigeria using both the anti-nucleocapsid and anti-glycoprotein monoclonal antibodies and cross-protection tests. It was observed that all the viruses were rabies having divergent antigenic presentation. Also noticed was an antigenic shift when the viruses ...

  14. Expression of Treponema pallidum Antigens in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walfield, Alan M.; Hanff, Philip A.; Lovett, Michael A.

    1982-04-01

    Treponema pallidum DNA was cloned in a bacteriophage. Clones were screened for expression of Treponema pallidum antigens by an in situ radio-immunoassay on nitrocellulose, with the use of subsequent reactions with syphilitic serum and radioiodinated Staphylococcus aureus protein A. One clone, which gave a strong signal, codes for at least seven antigens that react specifically with human antibodies to Treponema pallidum.

  15. Dissecting antigen processing and presentation routes in dermal vaccination strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Platteel, Anouk C M; Henri, Sandrine; Zaiss, Dietmar M; Sijts, Alice J A M

    2017-01-01

    The skin is an attractive site for vaccination due to its accessibility and presence of immune cells surveilling this barrier. However, knowledge of antigen processing and presentation upon dermal vaccination is sparse. In this study we determined antigen processing routes that lead to CD8(+) T cell

  16. The prevalence of hepatitis B virus E antigen among Ghanaian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We studied the prevalence of hepatitis B virus 'e' antigen (HBeAg) among individuals determined to be hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen- positive and analyzed the gender/age category associated with more active HBV infection and whether alteration in the levels of alanine aminotransferase could be associated with ...

  17. ABO blood group antigens in oral mucosa. What is new?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik

    2002-01-01

    healing show similarly decreased expression of A/B antigens on migrating epithelial cells. Some studies suggest that the relationship between expression of blood group antigens and cell motility can be explained by different degrees of glycosylation of integrins. Changes in ABO expression in tumours have...

  18. Comparison of bovine lymphocyte antigen DRB3.2 allele ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The bovine lymphocyte antigen (BoLA-DRB3) gene encodes cell surface glycoproteins that initiate immune responses by presenting processed antigenic peptides to CD4 T helper cells. DRB3 is the most polymorphic bovine MHC class II gene which encodes the peptide-binding groove. Since different alleles favor the ...

  19. Protein modeling of apical membrane antigen-1(AMA-1) of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Apical membrane Antigen-1(AMA-1), an asexual blood stage antigen of Plasmodium cynomolgi, is an important candidate for testing as a component of malarial vaccine. The degree of conservation of. AMA-1 sequences implies a conserved function for this molecule across different species of Plasmodium. Since the AMA-1 ...

  20. Identification of Surface Exposed Elementary Body Antigens of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study sought to identify the surface exposed antigenic components of Cowdria ruminantium elementary body (EB) by biotin labeling, determine effect of reducing and non-reducing conditions and heat on the mobility of these antigens and their reactivity to antibodies from immunized animals by Western blotting.