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Sample records for antigen determines antigen-presenting

  1. Original encounter with antigen determines antigen-presenting cell imprinting of the quality of the immune response in mice.

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    Valérie Abadie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obtaining a certain multi-functionality of cellular immunity for the control of infectious diseases is a burning question in immunology and in vaccine design. Early events, including antigen shuttling to secondary lymphoid organs and recruitment of innate immune cells for adaptive immune response, determine host responsiveness to antigens. However, the sequence of these events and their impact on the quality of the immune response remain to be elucidated. Here, we chose to study Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA which is now replacing live Smallpox vaccines and is proposed as an attenuated vector for vaccination strategies against infectious diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed in vivo mechanisms triggered following intradermal (i.d. and intramuscular (i.m. Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA administration. We demonstrated significant differences in the antigen shuttling to lymphoid organs by macrophages (MPhis, myeloid dendritic cells (DCs, and neutrophils (PMNs. MVA i.d. administration resulted in better antigen distribution and more sustained antigen-presenting cells (APCs recruitment into draining lymph nodes than with i.m. administration. These APCs, which comprise both DCs and MPhis, were differentially involved in T cell priming and shaped remarkably the quality of cytokine-producing virus-specific T cells according to the entry route of MVA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study improves our understanding of the mechanisms of antigen delivery and their consequences on the quality of immune responses and provides new insights for vaccine development.

  2. Properties of glycolipid-enriched membrane rafts in antigen presentation.

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    Rodgers, William; Smith, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    Presentation of antigen to T cells represents one of the central events in the engagement of the immune system toward the defense of the host against pathogens. Accordingly, understanding the mechanisms by which antigen presentation occurs is critical toward our understanding the properties of host defense against foreign antigen, as well as insight into other features of the immune system, such as autoimmune disease. The entire antigen-presentation event is complex, and many features of it remain poorly understood. However, recent studies have provided evidence showing that glycolipid-enriched membrane rafts are important for efficient antigen presentation; the studies suggest that one such function of rafts is trafficking of antigen-MHC II complexes to the presentation site on the surface of the antigen-presenting cell. Here, we present a critical discussion of rafts and their proposed functions in antigen presentation. Emerging topics of rafts and antigen presentation that warrant further investigation are also highlighted.

  3. [Mucose associated lymphoid tissue. Antigen presenting cells].

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    Luzardo-Baptista, Mario J; Luzardo, José Rafael

    2013-12-01

    We studied samples of normal and abnormal human mucosae, including oral tissue and uterine cervix, using electron microscopy. Special attention was given to the functions and mechanisms of defense carried out by the epithelial (EC) and dendritic cells (DC). Activated epithelial cells posses the capacity to uptake and process antigens, in order to present them, subsequently, to the dendritic cells. The structures and elements of the cells intervening on this function are: micropinocytic vesicles, multivesicular bodies, lysosomes, phagosomes, clathrin-covered vesicles, dense granules covered by a unit membrane, granules with onion likes leaves, microbodies, and dense granules with acid phosphatase activity. When they first arrive within the epithelial layers, the DC are clear with long cytoplasmic projections, which later become short, and the density of their cytoplasm increases. They possess mycropinocytic vesicles, some clathrine-covered vesicles, lysososmes and Birbeck granules. At this moment, they are known as Langerhans cells. EC and DC present many surface folds rich in micropynocytic vesicles. Between EC and DC there are many contacts (close junctions or tight junctions), through which antigens, phagocitized and processed by the EC, are given to the DC. These cells join them to major histocompatibility complex molecules or to other molecules with similar functions (CD1). Then the Langerhans cells travel to the lymphatic node to activate T cells and continue the immunologic task. So, in this way, both the EC and the DC are a link between the natural and the acquired immunological mechanisms. PMID:24502183

  4. The role of FcRn in antigen presentation

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    Kristi eBaker

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulins are unique molecules capable of simultaneously recognizing a diverse array of antigens and themselves being recognized by a broad array of receptors. The abundance specifically of the IgG subclass and the variety of signaling receptors to which it binds render this an important immunomodulatory molecule. In addition to the classical Fcγ receptors (FcγR which bind IgG at the cell surface, the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn is a lifelong resident of the endolysosomal system of most hematopoietic cells where it determines the intracellular fate of both IgG and IgG-containing immune complexes (IgG IC. Crosslinking of FcRn by multivalent IgG IC within antigen presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DC initiates specific mechanisms which result in trafficking of the antigen-bearing IgG IC into compartments from which the antigen can successfully be processed into peptide epitopes compatible with loading onto both MHC class I and II molecules. In turn, this enables the synchronous activation of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses against the cognate antigen, thereby bridging the gap between the humoral and cellular branches of the adaptive immune response. Critically, FcRn-driven T cell priming is efficient at very low doses of antigen due to the exquisite sensitivity of the IgG-mediated antigen delivery system through which it operates. FcRn-mediated antigen presentation has important consequences in tissue compartments replete with IgG and serves not only to determine homeostatic immune activation at a variety of sites but also to induce inflammatory responses upon exposure to antigens perceived as foreign. Therapeutically targeting the pathway by which FcRn enables T cell activation in response to IgG IC is thus a highly attractive prospect not only for the treatment of diseases that are driven by immune complexes but also for manipulating local immune responses against defined antigens such as those present during infections and

  5. The Antigen Presenting Cells Instruct Plasma Cell Differentiation

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    Wei eXu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The professional antigen presenting cells (APCs, including many subsets of dendritic cells and macrophages, not only mediate prompt but nonspecific response against microbes, but also bridge the antigen-specific adaptive immune response through antigen presentation. In the latter, typically activated B cells acquire cognate signals from T helper cells in the germinal center of lymphoid follicles to differentiate into plasma cells, which generate protective antibodies. Recent advances have revealed that many APC subsets provide not only signal 1 (the antigen, but also signal 2 to directly instruct the differentiation process of plasma cells in a T cell-independent manner. Herein, the different signals provided by these APC subsets to direct B cell proliferation, survival, class switching and terminal differentiation are discussed. We furthermore propose that the next generation of vaccines for boosting antibody response could be designed by targeting APCs.

  6. Fibroblasts as Efficient Antigen-Presenting Cells in Lymphoid Organs

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    Kundig, Thomas M.; Bachmann, Martin F.; Dipaolo, Claudio; Simard, John J. L.; Battegay, Manuel; Lother, Heinz; Gessner, Andre; Kuhlcke, Klaus; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Hengartner, Hans; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.

    1995-06-01

    Only so-called "professional" antigen-presenting cells (APCs) of hematopoietic origin are believed capable of inducing T lymphocyte responses. However, fibroblasts transfected with viral proteins directly induced antiviral cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses in vivo, without involvement of host APCs. Fibroblasts induced T cells only in the milieu of lymphoid organs. Thus, antigen localization affects self-nonself discrimination and cell-based vaccine strategies.

  7. ONCOLYTIC VIRUS-MEDIATED REVERSAL OF IMPAIRED TUMOR ANTIGEN PRESENTATION

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    Shashi Ashok Gujar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anti-tumor immunity can eliminate existing cancer cells and also maintain a constant surveillance against possible relapse. Such an antigen-specific adaptive response begins when tumor-specific T cells become activated. T cell activation requires two signals on antigen presenting cells (APCs: antigen presentation through MHC molecules and co-stimulation. In the absence of one or both of these signals, T cells remain inactivated or can even become tolerized. Cancer cells and their associated microenvironment strategically hinder the processing and presentation of tumor antigens and consequently prevent the development of anti-tumor immunity. Many studies, however, demonstrate that interventions that overturn tumor-associated immune evasion mechanisms can establish anti-tumor immune responses of therapeutic potential. One such intervention is oncolytic virus (OV-based anti-cancer therapy. Here we discuss how OV-induced immunological events override tumor-associated antigen presentation impairment and promote appropriate T cell:APC interaction. Detailed understanding of this phenomenon is pivotal for devising the strategies that will enhance the efficacy of OV-based anti-cancer therapy by complementing its inherent oncolytic

  8. MHC Class Ⅰ Antigen Presentation- Recently Trimmed and Well Presented

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Barry Flutter; Bin Gao

    2004-01-01

    Presentation of antigenic peptide to T cells by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class Ⅰ molecules is the key to the cellular immune response. Non-self intracellular proteins are processed into short peptides and transported into endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where they are assembled with class Ⅰ molecules assisted by several chaperone proteins to form trimeric complex. MHC class Ⅰ complex loaded with optimised peptides travels to the cell surface of antigen presentation cells to be recognised by T cells. The cells presenting non-self peptides are cleared by CD8 positive T cells. In order to ensure that T cells detect an infection or mutation within the target cells the process of peptide loading and class Ⅰ expression must be carefully regulated. Many of the cellular components involved in antigen processing and class Ⅰ presentation are known and their various functions are now becoming clearer. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(1):22-30.

  9. MHC Class I Antigen Presentation- Recently Trimmed and Well Presented

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BarryFlutter; BinGao

    2004-01-01

    Presentation of antigenic peptide to T cells by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules is the key to the cellular immune response. Non-self intracellular proteins are processed into short peptides and transported into endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where they are assembled with class I molecules assisted by several chaperone proteins to form trimeric complex. MHC class I complex loaded with optimised peptides travels to the cell surface of antigen presentation cells to be recognised by T cells. The cells presenting non-self peptides are cleared by CD8 positive T cells. In order to ensure that T cells detect an infection or mutation within the target cells the process of peptide loading and class I expression must be carefully regulated. Many of the cellular components involved in antigen processing and class I presentation are known and their various functions are now becoming clearer. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(1):22-30.

  10. Antigen Export Reduces Antigen Presentation and Limits T Cell Control of M. tuberculosis.

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    Srivastava, Smita; Grace, Patricia S; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-01-13

    Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis results from bacterial strategies that manipulate host adaptive immune responses. Infected dendritic cells (DCs) transport M. tuberculosis to local lymph nodes but activate CD4 T cells poorly, suggesting bacterial manipulation of antigen presentation. However, M. tuberculosis antigens are also exported from infected DCs and taken up and presented by uninfected DCs, possibly overcoming this blockade of antigen presentation by infected cells. Here we show that the first stage of this antigen transfer, antigen export, benefits M. tuberculosis by diverting bacterial proteins from the antigen presentation pathway. Kinesin-2 is required for antigen export and depletion of this microtubule-based motor increases activation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells by infected cells and improves control of intracellular infection. Thus, although antigen transfer enables presentation by bystander cells, it does not compensate for reduced antigen presentation by infected cells and represents a bacterial strategy for CD4 T cell evasion.

  11. Survival and signaling changes in antigen presenting cell subsets after radiation

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    Parker, Jennifer Janell

    Radiation therapy is a widely used cancer treatment that has the potential to influence anti-tumor immune responses. Both myeloablative and non-myeloablative radiation are often used as part of preparatory regimens for hematopoetic stem cell transplantation, in combination with other chemotherapy or immuno-modulatory (e.g. Anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG)) therapies for both cytotoxic and immune modulatory purposes. However, the mechanisms responsible for the effect of radiation on antigen presenting cell (APC) responsiveness and radioresistance are poorly understood. The first studies described in this thesis were designed to identify and characterize early radiation-induced signaling changes in antigen presenting cells and to determine the effects of these signaling changes on APC receptor expression and function. The NFkappaB pathway in antigen presenting cells was chosen for study because it is activated by radiation in a wide range of other cell types and plays a vital role in the maintenance and regulation of the immune system. The effects of therapeutically relevant doses radiation (2 and 20 Gy) were compared at various timepoints in the human monocytic cell line (U937) using phospho-flow cytometry staining methods and cytometric analysis. These studies demonstrated that radiation-induced changes in the phosphorylation state of NFkappaB family members that were p53 independent. However, these changes were dependent upon activation of ATM in response to single or double-stranded breaks in DNA, as shown in experiments using an inhibitor of ATM and ATM siRNA knockdown U937 cells. In addition, studies examining the effect of radiation on co-stimulatory receptors with and without inhibition of the NFkappaB pathway via phospho-flow cytometry revealed that radiation-induced phosphorylation of NEMO promoted the activation and functional maturation of U937 cells. Furthermore, functional studies using both phospho-flow cytometry and/or mixed lymphocyte reactions to

  12. Regulation of antigen presentation by acidic pH

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    The effect of pH on functional association of peptide antigens with APC membranes was investigated by using aldehyde-fixed B cells and class II- restricted T cell hybridomas to assess antigen/MHC complex formation. The results indicated that the rate and extent of functional peptide binding was markedly increased at pH 5.0 as compared with pH 7.3. The pH dependence of binding was preserved after pretreatment of fixed APC with pH 5.0 buffer, suggesting that pH had a direct effect on the intera...

  13. Cross-dressing: an alternative mechanism for antigen presentation.

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    Campana, Stefania; De Pasquale, Claudia; Carrega, Paolo; Ferlazzo, Guido; Bonaccorsi, Irene

    2015-12-01

    Cross-dressing involves the transfer of preformed functional peptide-MHC complexes from the surface of donor cells to recipient cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs). These cross-dressed cells might eventually present the intact, unprocessed peptide-MHC complexes to T lymphocytes. In this review we will discuss some recent findings concerning the intercellular transfer of preformed MHC complexes and the possible mechanisms by which the transfer may occur. We will report evidences showing that both MHC class I and MHC class II functional complexes might be transferred, highlighting the physiological relevance of these cross-dressed cells for the presentation of exogenous antigens to both cytotoxic and helper T lymphocytes.

  14. A role for NADPH oxidase in antigen presentation

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    Gail J Gardiner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase expressed in phagocytes is a multi-subunit enzyme complex that generates superoxide (O2.-. This radical is an important precursor of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and other reactive oxygen species (ROS needed for microbicidal activity during innate immune responses. Inherited defects in NADPH oxidase give rise to chronic granulomatous disease (CGD, a primary immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent infections and granulomatous inflammation. Interestingly, CGD, CGD carrier status, and oxidase gene polymorphisms have all been associated with autoinflammatory and autoimmune disorders, suggesting a potential role for NADPH oxidase in regulating adaptive immune responses. Here, NADPH oxidase function in antigen processing and presentation is reviewed. NADPH oxidase influences dendritic cell (DC crosspresentation by major histocompatibility complex class I molecules (MHC-I through regulation of the phagosomal microenvironment, while in B lymphocytes, NADPH oxidase alters epitope selection by major histocompatibility complex class II molecules (MHC-II.

  15. Antigen Presentation Ability of Salmonella Carrying DNA Vaccine Model and MCP-3 gene

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    Endang Winiati Bachtiar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to determine the antigen presentation ability of a DNA vaccine model that is co-delivered with that of recombinant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (STM1 expressing chemokine macrophage chemotactic protein-3 (MCP-3. The DNA vaccine, pVROVA, was constructed by amplification of the ovalbumin coding region from sOVA-C1. Dendritic cells (DCs were obtained from IL-4 and GMCSF stimulated mouse bone marrow stem cell. Cultured DCs were incubated with STM1 carrying a model ovalbumin gene (pVROVA. Furthermore, MHC class I antigen presentation of a dominant OVA peptide was assayed in vitro. The experiments were designed to determine the effect of co-delivering MCP-3 with that of ovalbumin in STM1. Our results show that a plasmid pROVA-carrying ovalbumin gene was succesfully constructed and sequence analysis of the ovalbumin-coding revealed an identity match of 100% with that of the chicken ovalbumin DNA sequences from the GenBank database. We also found that the presence of the MCP-3 encoding plasmid in STM1 or E. coli DH1 could increase the recovery of both STM1 and E. coli DH1 over those that carry the empty plasmids. Antigen presentation assay also indicates that MCP-3 can positively influence the presentation of ovalbumin. Conclusion: the infection of DCs by STM1-carrying DNA vaccine and MCP-3 results in an increase of processing and presentation of ovalbumin in vitro.Keywords : DNA vaccine, MCP-3, APC, Salmonella, Dendritic cells

  16. SPONGIOTIC DERMATITIS WITH A MIXED INFLAMMATORY INFILTRATE OF LYMPHOCYTES, ANTIGEN PRESENTING CELLS, IMMUNOGLOBULINS AND COMPLEMENT

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    Abreu Velez Ana Maria

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical and histological presentation of spongiotic dermatitis and its inflammatory infiltrates warrant further investigation. In this case documentation of a patient with cutaneous spongiotic reactivity, we aim to characterize antigen presenting cells, as well as the skin-specific cutaneous lymphocyte antigen population by multiple techniques. Case report: A 30 year old Caucasian female presented with a two week history of blistering and erosions around the vaginal, rectal and axillary areas. Material and Methods: We utilized hematoxylin and eosin histology, direct immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy methods to evaluate the immune reaction patterns of the cutaneous inflammatory cells. Results: In the primary histologic areas of spongiotic dermatitis, a mixed population of B and T lymphocytes was seen. Ki-67 antigen proliferative index staining was accentuated in these areas, correlating with the presence of large numbers of epidermal and dermal antigen presenting cells. Among the antigen presenting cell population, we detected strong positivities with CD1a, Factor XIIIa, myeloid/hystoid antigen, S100, HAM-56, and CD68. Interestingly, immunoglobulins G, D and M and Complement factors C1q and C3 were also strongly expressed in antigen presenting cell areas, including positivity within the spongiotic epidermis and around dermal vessels. Conclusions: We document a heterogeneous population of B and T lymphocytes and the presence of multiple classes of antigen presenting cells, immunoglobulins and complement in and surrounding histologically spongiotic areas; these findings further correlated with increased levels of expression of Ki-67.

  17. Effect of multiple genetic polymorphisms on antigen presentation and susceptibility to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

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    Chang, Stewart T; Linderman, Jennifer J; Kirschner, Denise E

    2008-07-01

    Several molecules related to antigen presentation, including gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), are encoded by polymorphic genes. Some polymorphisms were found to affect susceptibility to tuberculosis (TB) when they were considered singly in epidemiological studies, but how multiple polymorphisms interact to determine susceptibility to TB in an individual remains an open question. We hypothesized that polymorphisms in some genes may counteract or intensify the effects of polymorphisms in other genes. For example, an increase in IFN-gamma expression may counteract the weak binding that a particular MHC variant displays for a peptide from Mycobacterium tuberculosis to establish the same T-cell response as another, more strongly binding MHC variant. To test this hypothesis, we developed a mathematical model of antigen presentation based on experimental data for the known effects of genetic polymorphisms and simulated time courses when multiple polymorphisms were present. We found that polymorphisms in different genes could affect antigen presentation to the same extent and therefore compensate for each other. Furthermore, we defined the conditions under which such relationships could exist. For example, increased IFN-gamma expression compensated for decreased peptide-MHC affinity in the model only above a certain threshold of expression. Below this threshold, changes in IFN-gamma expression were ineffectual compared to changes in peptide-MHC affinity. The finding that polymorphisms exhibit such relationships could explain discrepancies in the epidemiological literature, where some polymorphisms have been inconsistently associated with susceptibility to TB. Furthermore, the model allows polymorphisms to be ranked by effect, providing a new tool for designing association studies.

  18. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells.

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    Vela Ramirez, J E; Roychoudhury, R; Habte, H H; Cho, M W; Pohl, N L B; Narasimhan, B

    2014-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells (APCs), and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by DCs. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and APCs and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  19. Current status of multiple antigen-presenting peptide vaccine systems: Application of organic and inorganic nanoparticles

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    Taguchi Hiroaki

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many studies are currently investigating the development of safe and effective vaccines to prevent various infectious diseases. Multiple antigen-presenting peptide vaccine systems have been developed to avoid the adverse effects associated with conventional vaccines (i.e., live-attenuated, killed or inactivated pathogens, carrier proteins and cytotoxic adjuvants. Recently, two main approaches have been used to develop multiple antigen-presenting peptide vaccine systems: (1 the addition of functional components, e.g., T-cell epitopes, cell-penetrating peptides, and lipophilic moieties; and (2 synthetic approaches using size-defined nanomaterials, e.g., self-assembling peptides, non-peptidic dendrimers, and gold nanoparticles, as antigen-displaying platforms. This review summarizes the recent experimental studies directed to the development of multiple antigen-presenting peptide vaccine systems.

  20. Towards efficient cancer immunotherapy: advances in developing artificial antigen-presenting cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggermont, L.J.; Paulis, L.E.M.; Tel, J.; Figdor, C.G.

    2014-01-01

    Active anti-cancer immune responses depend on efficient presentation of tumor antigens and co-stimulatory signals by antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Therapy with autologous natural APCs is costly and time-consuming and results in variable outcomes in clinical trials. Therefore, development of artif

  1. Vaccine delivery by penetratin: mechanism of antigen presentation by dendritic cells.

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    Pouniotis, Dodie; Tang, Choon-Kit; Apostolopoulos, Vasso; Pietersz, Geoffrey

    2016-08-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) or membrane-translocating peptides such as penetratin from Antennapedia homeodomain or TAT from human immunodeficiency virus are useful vectors for the delivery of protein antigens or their cytotoxic (Tc) or helper (Th) T cell epitopes to antigen-presenting cells. Mice immunized with CPP containing immunogens elicit antigen-specific Tc and/or Th responses and could be protected from tumor challenges. In the present paper, we investigate the mechanism of class I and class II antigen presentation of ovalbumin covalently linked to penetratin (AntpOVA) by bone marrow-derived dendritic cells with the use of biochemical inhibitors of various pathways of antigen processing and presentation. Results from our study suggested that uptake of AntpOVA is via a combination of energy-independent (membrane fusion) and energy-dependent pathways (endocytosis). Once internalized by either mechanism, multiple tap-dependent or independent antigen presentation pathways are accessed while not completely dependent on proteasomal processing but involving proteolytic trimming in the ER and Golgi compartments. Our study provides an understanding on the mechanism of antigen presentation mediated by CPP and leads to greater insights into future development of vaccine formulations. PMID:27138940

  2. Hepatitis C virus and ethanol alter antigen presentation in liver cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Natalia A Osna

    2009-01-01

    Alcoholic patients have a high incidence of hepatitis Cvirus (HCV) infection. Alcohol consumption enhances the severity of the HCV disease course and worsens the outcome of chronic hepatitis C. The accumulation of virally infected cells in the liver is related to the HCVinduced inability of the immune system to recognizeinfected cells and to develop the immune responses. This review covers the effects of HCV proteins and ethanol on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) classⅠ- and class Ⅱ-restricted antigen presentation. Here, we discuss the liver which functions as an immune privilege organ; factors, which affect cleavage and loading of antigenic peptides onto MHC classⅠand class Ⅱ in hepatocytes and dendritic cells, and the modulating effects of ethanol and HCV on antigen presentation by liver cells. Altered antigen presentation in the liver limits the ability of the immune system to clear HCV and infected cells and contributes to disease progression. HCV by itself affects dendritic cell function, switching their cytokine profile to the suppressive phenotype of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) predominance,preventing cell maturation and allostimulation capacity.The synergistic action of ethanol with HCV results in the suppression of MHC class Ⅱ-restricted antigen presentation. In addition, ethanol metabolism and HCV proteins reduce proteasome function and interferon signaling, thereby suppressing the generation of peptides for MHC classⅠ-restricted antigen presentation.Collectively, ethanol exposure further impairs antigen presentation in HCV-infected liver cells, which may provide a partial explanation for exacerbations and the poor outcome of HCV infection in alcoholics.

  3. Antigen presentation by liposomes bearing class II MHC and membrane IL-1.

    OpenAIRE

    Bakouche, O; LACHMAN, L.B.

    1990-01-01

    Liposomes containing membrane IL-1, Iak, and the antigen conalbumin were evaluated as "synthetic antigen presenting cells." The role of these three molecules in macrophage-T cell interaction was studied by testing their ability to induce the proliferation of a T-cell clone specific to conalbumin (the D10 cell line) or immune spleen cells sensitized three times in vivo with conalbumin. In the latter case, splenic macrophages were eliminated by adherence and a lysomotropic agent. The antigen co...

  4. Circulating human basophils lack the features of professional antigen presenting cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Meenu; Hegde, Pushpa; Aimanianda, Vishukumar; Beau, Remi; Sénéchal, Helene; Poncet, Pascal; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Kaveri, Srini V; Bayry, Jagadeesh

    2013-01-01

    Recent reports in mice demonstrate that basophils function as antigen presenting cells (APC). They express MHC class II and co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86, capture and present soluble antigens or IgE-antigen complexes and polarize Th2 responses. Therefore, we explored whether human circulating basophils possess the features of professional APC. We found that unlike dendritic cells (DC) and monocytes, steady-state circulating human basophils did not express HLA-DR and co-stimulatory mo...

  5. Pros and Cons of Antigen-Presenting Cell Targeted Tumor Vaccines

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    Cleo Goyvaerts

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In therapeutic antitumor vaccination, dendritic cells play the leading role since they decide if, how, when, and where a potent antitumor immune response will take place. Since the disentanglement of the complexity and merit of different antigen-presenting cell subtypes, antitumor immunotherapeutic research started to investigate the potential benefit of targeting these subtypes in situ. This review will discuss which antigen-presenting cell subtypes are at play and how they have been targeted and finally question the true meaning of targeting antitumor-based vaccines.

  6. Suppression of autophagy and antigen presentation by Mycobacterium tuberculosis PE_PGRS47.

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    Saini, Neeraj K; Baena, Andres; Ng, Tony W; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M; Kennedy, Steven C; Kunnath-Velayudhan, Shajo; Carreño, Leandro J; Xu, Jiayong; Chan, John; Larsen, Michelle H; Jacobs, William R; Porcelli, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    Suppression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen presentation is believed to be among the major mechanisms used by Mycobacterium tuberculosis to escape protective host immune responses. Through a genome-wide screen for the genetic loci of M. tuberculosis that inhibit MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation by mycobacteria-infected dendritic cells, we identified the PE_PGRS47 protein as one of the responsible factors. Targeted disruption of the PE_PGRS47 (Rv2741) gene led to attenuated growth of M. tuberculosis in vitro and in vivo, and a PE_PGRS47 mutant showed enhanced MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation during in vivo infection of mice. Analysis of the effects of deletion or over-expression of PE_PGRS47 implicated this protein in the inhibition of autophagy in infected host phagocytes. Our findings identify PE_PGRS47 as a functionally relevant, non-redundant bacterial factor in the modulation of innate and adaptive immunity by M. tuberculosis, suggesting strategies for improving antigen presentation and the generation of protective immunity during vaccination or infection. PMID:27562263

  7. Suppression of autophagy and antigen presentation by Mycobacterium tuberculosis PE_PGRS47.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Neeraj K; Baena, Andres; Ng, Tony W; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M; Kennedy, Steven C; Kunnath-Velayudhan, Shajo; Carreño, Leandro J; Xu, Jiayong; Chan, John; Larsen, Michelle H; Jacobs, William R; Porcelli, Steven A

    2016-08-15

    Suppression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen presentation is believed to be among the major mechanisms used by Mycobacterium tuberculosis to escape protective host immune responses. Through a genome-wide screen for the genetic loci of M. tuberculosis that inhibit MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation by mycobacteria-infected dendritic cells, we identified the PE_PGRS47 protein as one of the responsible factors. Targeted disruption of the PE_PGRS47 (Rv2741) gene led to attenuated growth of M. tuberculosis in vitro and in vivo, and a PE_PGRS47 mutant showed enhanced MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation during in vivo infection of mice. Analysis of the effects of deletion or over-expression of PE_PGRS47 implicated this protein in the inhibition of autophagy in infected host phagocytes. Our findings identify PE_PGRS47 as a functionally relevant, non-redundant bacterial factor in the modulation of innate and adaptive immunity by M. tuberculosis, suggesting strategies for improving antigen presentation and the generation of protective immunity during vaccination or infection.

  8. Antigen-presenting cells in human cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania major

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ElHassan, A M; Gaafar, A; Theander, T G

    1995-01-01

    In this study biopsies from skin lesions and draining lymph nodes of patients suffering from cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania major were examined by immunohistochemistry, and by light and electron microscopy to identify the types of antigen-presenting cells (APC) and their location. APC...

  9. Salt bridge residues between I-Ak dimer of dimers alpha-chains modulate antigen presentation.

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    Yadati, S; Nydam, T; Demian, D; Wade, T K; Gabriel, J L; Barisas, B G; Wade, W F

    1999-03-15

    Class II dimers of dimers are predicted to have functional significance in antigen presentation. The putative contact amino acids of the I-Ak class II dimer of dimers have been identified by molecular modeling based on the DR1 crystal structure (Nydam et al., Int. Immunol. 10, 1237,1998). We have previously reported the role in antigen presentation of dimer of dimers contact amino acids located in the C-terminal domains of the alpha- and beta-chains of class II. Our calculations show that residues Ealpha89 and Ralpha145 in the alpha2-domain form an inter alpha-chain salt bridge between pairs of alphabeta-heterodimers. Other residues, Qalpha92 and Nalpha115, may be involved in close association in that part of the alpha-chain. We investigated the role of these amino acids on class II expression and antigen presentation. Class II composed of an Ealpha89K substituted alpha-chain paired with a wt beta-chain exhibited inhibited antigen presentation and expression of alpha-chain serologic epitopes. In contrast, mutation of Ralpha145E had less affect on antigen presentation and did not affect I-Ak serologic epitopes. Interchanging charges of the salt bridge residues by expressing both Ralpha145E and Ealpha89K on the same chain obviated the large negative effect of the Ealpha89K mutation on antigen presentation but not on the serologic epitopes. Our results are similar for those reported for mutation of DR3's inter-chain salt bridge with the exception that double mutants did not moderate the DR3 defect. Interestingly, the amino acids differences between I-A and DR change the location of the inter-chain salt bridges. In DR1 these residues are located at positions Ealpha88 and Kalpha111; in I-Ak these residues are located at position Ealpha89 and Ralpha145. Inter alpha-chain salt bridges are thus maintained in various class II molecules by amino acids located in different parts of the alpha2-domain. This conservation of structure suggests that considerable functional

  10. Interaction between antigen presenting cells and autoreactive T cells derived from BXSB mice with murine lupus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Yang; Bo Li; Ping Lv; Yan Zhang; XiaoMing Gao

    2007-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a typical autoimmune disease involving multiple systems and organs. Ample evidence suggests that autoreactive T cells play a pivotal role in the development of this autoimmune disorder. This study was undertaken to investigate the mechanisms of interaction between antigen presenting cells (APCs) and an autoreactive T cell (ATL1) clone obtained from lupus-prone BXSB mice. ATL1 cells, either before or after γ-ray irradiation, were able to activate naive B cells, as determined by B cell proliferation assays. Macrophages from BXSB mice were able to stimulate the proliferation of resting ATL1 cells at a responder/stimulator (R/S) ratio of 1/2.5. Dendritic cells (DCs) were much more powerful stimulators for ATL1 cells on a per cell basis. The T cell stimulating ability of macrophages and B cells, but not DCs, was sensitive toγ-ray irradiation. Monoclonal antibodies against mouse MHC-Ⅱand CD4 were able to block DC-mediated stimulation of ATL1 proliferation, indicating cognate recognition between ATL1 and APCs. Our data suggest that positive feedback loops involving macrophages, B cells and autoreactive T cells may play a pivotal role in keeping the momentum of autoimmune responses leading to autoimmune diseases.

  11. Effects of antigen presentation of eosinophils on lung Th1/Th2 imbalance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Zheng-fu; SHI Huan-zhong; QIN Xue-jun; KANG Lan-fu; HUANG Chun-ping; CHEN Yi-qiang

    2005-01-01

    Background Antigen-loaded eosinophils (EOSs) instilled intratracheally into mice were capable of inducing Th2-type cytokine production in the draining lymph nodes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether EOSs within the tracheobronchial lumen can stimulate Th2 cell expansion in the lung tissues.Methods Airway EOSs were recovered from ovalbumin-sensitized and -challenged BALB/c mice, these EOSs were then cocultured with CD4+ cells isolated from sensitized mice in the absence or presence of anti-CD80 or/and -CD86 monoclonal antibodies. Airway EOSs were instilled into the trachea of sensitized mice. At the day 3 thereafter, the lung tissues were removed and prepared into cell suspensions for culture. Cell-free culture supernatants were collected for detection of cytokines.Results Airway EOSs functioned as CD80- and CD86-dependent antigen-presenting cells to stimulate lung CD4+ lymphocytes to produce interleukin-4, interleukin-5 and interleukin-13, but not interferon-γ in in vitro assay. When instilled intratracheally in sensitized recipient mice, airway EOSs primed lung Th2 cells in vivo for interleukin-4, interleukin-5 and interleukin-13, but not interferon-γ, production during the in vitro culture that was also CD80- and CD86-dependent. Conclusion EOSs within the lumina of airways could process inhaled antigen and function in vitro and in vivo as antigen-presenting cells to promote expansion of Th2 cells in the lungs.

  12. Antigen-presenting cells transfected with Hsp65 messenger RNA fail to treat experimental tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last several years, the use of dendritic cells has been studied as a therapeutic strategy against tumors. Dendritic cells can be pulsed with peptides or full-length protein, or they can be transfected with DNA or RNA. However, comparative studies suggest that transfecting dendritic cells with messenger RNA (mRNA) is superior to other antigen-loading techniques in generating immunocompetent dendritic cells. In the present study, we evaluated a new therapeutic strategy to fight tuberculosis using dendritic cells and macrophages transfected with Hsp65 mRNA. First, we demonstrated that antigen-presenting cells transfected with Hsp65 mRNA exhibit a higher level of expression of co-stimulatory molecules, suggesting that Hsp65 mRNA has immunostimulatory properties. We also demonstrated that spleen cells obtained from animals immunized with mock and Hsp65 mRNA-transfected dendritic cells were able to generate a mixed Th1/Th2 response with production not only of IFN-γ but also of IL-5 and IL-10. In contrast, cells recovered from mice immunized with Hsp65 mRNA-transfected macrophages were able to produce only IL-5. When mice were infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and treated with antigen-presenting cells transfected with Hsp65 mRNA (therapeutic immunization), we did not detect any decrease in the lung bacterial load or any preservation of the lung parenchyma, indicating the inability of transfected cells to confer curative effects against tuberculosis. In spite of the lack of therapeutic efficacy, this study reports for the first time the use of antigen-presenting cells transfected with mRNA in experimental tuberculosis

  13. Antigen-presenting cells transfected with Hsp65 messenger RNA fail to treat experimental tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, C.D.; Trombone, A.P.F.; Lorenzi, J.C.C.; Almeida, L.P.; Gembre, A.F.; Padilha, E. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Ramos, S.G. [Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Silva, C.L.; Coelho-Castelo, A.A.M. [Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2012-09-21

    In the last several years, the use of dendritic cells has been studied as a therapeutic strategy against tumors. Dendritic cells can be pulsed with peptides or full-length protein, or they can be transfected with DNA or RNA. However, comparative studies suggest that transfecting dendritic cells with messenger RNA (mRNA) is superior to other antigen-loading techniques in generating immunocompetent dendritic cells. In the present study, we evaluated a new therapeutic strategy to fight tuberculosis using dendritic cells and macrophages transfected with Hsp65 mRNA. First, we demonstrated that antigen-presenting cells transfected with Hsp65 mRNA exhibit a higher level of expression of co-stimulatory molecules, suggesting that Hsp65 mRNA has immunostimulatory properties. We also demonstrated that spleen cells obtained from animals immunized with mock and Hsp65 mRNA-transfected dendritic cells were able to generate a mixed Th1/Th2 response with production not only of IFN-γ but also of IL-5 and IL-10. In contrast, cells recovered from mice immunized with Hsp65 mRNA-transfected macrophages were able to produce only IL-5. When mice were infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and treated with antigen-presenting cells transfected with Hsp65 mRNA (therapeutic immunization), we did not detect any decrease in the lung bacterial load or any preservation of the lung parenchyma, indicating the inability of transfected cells to confer curative effects against tuberculosis. In spite of the lack of therapeutic efficacy, this study reports for the first time the use of antigen-presenting cells transfected with mRNA in experimental tuberculosis.

  14. Antigen presenting cells in the skin of a patient with hair loss and systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Hair loss is one of the most striking clinical features of active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, however, very few studies have investigated the immunological features of this process. Case report: We describe a 33 years old female who presented with scalp hair loss and arthralgias. Physical examination revealed erythematous plaques on the nose and scalp, with bitemporal hair loss. Scalp biopsies revealed epidermal hyperkeratosis, with a mild interface infiltrate of lymphocytes and histiocytes and a superficial and deep, perivascular and periadnexal infiltrate of mostly CD4 positive cells. Antibodies to HAM 56, CD68, CD1a, S-100, mast cell tryptase and c-kit/CD117 were strongly positive around the hair follicles, and in the adjacent sebaceous glands. Conclusion : We present the first report showing a significant presence of several antigen presenting cells around the hair follicular units in a patient with alopecia in active SLE. Today, antigen presenting cells and dendritic cells (DC are modeled as the master regulators of human immunity. One aspect that has become clearly appreciated is the great diversity of DC subtypes, each with considerable functional differences. Thus, we suggest that APC and DCs are equipped with Pattern Recognition Receptors (PRRs to some hair follicular unit antigens; that these innate sensors recognize conserved molecular patterns on self- tissue, and play a significant role in the pathophysiology of alopecia in SLE patients

  15. Antigen presentation by murine epidermal langerhans cells and its alteration by ultraviolet B light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mice that are chronically exposed in vivo to ultraviolet B light (UV-B) display altered immunologic reactivity to various antigenic stimuli. A possible mode of UV-B action is that it exerts adverse effects on antigen-presenting cell function. Because the epidermis is the only tissue that is naturally subject to UV exposure we investigated if murine epidermal cells (EC) could perform an antigen presentation function and, if so, could this function be altered by UV-B irradiation. For this purpose, T cells immune to purified protein derivative of tuberculin (PPD) and dinitrophenylated ovalbumin (DNP6-OVA) from either BALB/c or C3H/He mice were incubated with syngeneic, semisyngeneic, or allogeneic EC or, for control purposes, with peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) that had been pulse-exposed to either the immunizing antigens or, as controls, left unpulsed, or pulsed to human serum albumin (HSA). After 4 days of culture, T cell proliferation was assessed by 3H-thymidine incorporation. PPD- and DNP/6-OVA pulsed, but not HSA-pulsed EC and PEC, induced vigorous proliferation of syngeneic and semisyngeneic, but not allogeneic, immune T cells. Pretreatment of stimulator cells with specific anti-Ia serum and complement virtually abolished this response, which indicated that among EC, Ia-bearing Langerhans cells are the critical stimulators. Exposure of EC either before or after pulsing to UV-B resulted in a dose-dependent impairment of antigen-specific T cell proliferation; the T proliferative response was abolished after administration of 20 mJ/cm2 UV-B. UV-B in the dose range employed did not produce immediate lethal cell damage, premature death of cultured EC, or toxic factors inhibitory for T cell proliferation

  16. MHC-restricted antigen presentation and recognition: constraints on gene, recombinant and peptide vaccines in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunha-Neto E.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The target of any immunization is to activate and expand lymphocyte clones with the desired recognition specificity and the necessary effector functions. In gene, recombinant and peptide vaccines, the immunogen is a single protein or a small assembly of epitopes from antigenic proteins. Since most immune responses against protein and peptide antigens are T-cell dependent, the molecular target of such vaccines is to generate at least 50-100 complexes between MHC molecule and the antigenic peptide per antigen-presenting cell, sensitizing a T cell population of appropriate clonal size and effector characteristics. Thus, the immunobiology of antigen recognition by T cells must be taken into account when designing new generation peptide- or gene-based vaccines. Since T cell recognition is MHC-restricted, and given the wide polymorphism of the different MHC molecules, distinct epitopes may be recognized by different individuals in the population. Therefore, the issue of whether immunization will be effective in inducing a protective immune response, covering the entire target population, becomes an important question. Many pathogens have evolved molecular mechanisms to escape recognition by the immune system by variation of antigenic protein sequences. In this short review, we will discuss the several concepts related to selection of amino acid sequences to be included in DNA and peptide vaccines.

  17. Ethanol Metabolism Alters Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I-Restricted Antigen Presentation In Liver Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osna, Natalia A.; White, Ronda L.; Thiele, Geoffrey M.; Donohue, Terrence M.

    2009-01-01

    The proteasome is a major enzyme that cleaves proteins for antigen presentation. Cleaved peptides traffic to the cell surface, where they are presented in the context of MHC class I. Recognition of these complexes by cytotoxic T lymphocytes is crucial for elimination of cells bearing “non-self” proteins. Our previous studies revealed that ethanol suppresses proteasome function in ethanol-metabolizing liver cells. We hypothesized that proteasome suppression reduces the hydrolysis of antigenic peptides, thereby decreasing the presentation of the peptide-MHC class I-complexes on the cell surface. To test this, we used the mouse hepatocyte cell line (CYP2E1/ADH-transfected HepB5 cells) or primary mouse hepatocytes, both derived from livers of C57Bl/6 mice, which present the ovalbumin peptide, SIINFEKL, complexed with H2Kb. To induce H2Kb expression, HepB5 cells were treated with interferon gamma (IFNγ) and then exposed to ethanol. In these cells, ethanol metabolism decreased not only proteasome activity, but also hydrolysis of the C-extended peptide, SIINFEKL-TE and the presentation of SIINFEKL-H2Kb complexes measured after the delivery of SIINFEKL-TE to cytoplasm. The suppressive effects of ethanol were, in part, attributed to ethanol-elicited impairment of IFNγ signaling. However, in primary hepatocytes, even in the absence of IFNγ, we observed a similar decline in proteasome activity and antigen presentation after ethanol exposure. We conclude that proteasome function is directly suppressed by ethanol metabolism and indirectly, by preventing the activating effects of IFNγ. Ethanol-elicited reduction in proteasome activity contributes to the suppression of SIINFEKL-H2Kb presentation on the surface of liver cells. Immune response to viral antigens plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of hepatitis C or B viral infections (HCV and HBV, respectively). Professional antigen-presenting cells (dendritic cells and macrophages) are responsible for priming the

  18. Modulation of Immune Responses by Exosomes Derived from Antigen-Presenting Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoda, Botros B.; Ajit, Seena K.

    2016-01-01

    Exosome-mediated signaling is important in mediating the inflammatory response. To exert their biological or pathophysiological functions in the recipient cells, exosomes deliver a diverse array of biomacromolecules including long and short coding and non-coding RNAs, proteins, and lipids. Exosomes secreted by antigen-presenting cells can confer therapeutic benefits by attenuating or stimulating the immune response. Exosomes play a crucial role in carrying and presenting functional major histocompatibility peptide complexes to modulate antigen-specific T cell responses. Exosomes from Dendritic Cells (DCs) can activate T and B cells and have been explored for their immunostimulatory properties in cancer therapy. The immunosuppressive properties of exosomes derived from macrophages and DCs can reduce inflammation in animal models for several inflammatory disorders. This review focuses on the protective role of exosomes in attenuating inflammation or augmenting immune response, emphasizing studies on exosomes derived from DCs and macrophages. PMID:27660518

  19. The perivascular phagocyte of the mouse pineal gland: An antigen-presenting cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Morten; Rath, Martin F; Klein, David C

    2006-01-01

    The perivascular space of the rat pineal gland is known to contain phagocytic cells that are immunoreactive for leukocyte antigens, and thus they appear to belong to the macrophage/microglial cell line. These cells also contain MHC class II proteins. We investigated this cell type in the pineal...... gland of mice. Actively phagocytosing cells with a prominent lysosomal system were found in the pericapillary spaces of the mouse pineal gland following intravenous injection of horseradish peroxidase. The cells also exhibited strong acid phosphatase activity. Perivascular cells were immunopositive for...... MHC class II protein and for CD68, a marker of monocytes/phagocytes. This study verifies that perivascular phagocytes with antigen-presenting properties are present in the mouse pineal gland....

  20. An Overview of B-1 Cells as Antigen-Presenting Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popi, Ana F.; Longo-Maugéri, Ieda M.; Mariano, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The role of B cells as antigen-presenting cells (APCs) has been extensively studied, mainly in relation to the activation of memory T cells. Considering the B cell subtypes, the role of B-1 cells as APCs is beginning to be explored. Initially, it was described that B-1 cells are activated preferentially by T-independent antigens. However, some reports demonstrated that these cells are also involved in a T-dependent response. The aim of this review is to summarize information about the ability of B-1 cells to play a role as APCs and to briefly discuss the role of the BCR and toll-like receptor signals in this process. Furthermore, some characteristics of B-1 cells, such as natural IgM production and phagocytic ability, could interfere in the participation of these cells in the onset of an adaptive response. PMID:27148259

  1. Modulation of Immune Responses by Exosomes Derived from Antigen-Presenting Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoda, Botros B; Ajit, Seena K

    2016-01-01

    Exosome-mediated signaling is important in mediating the inflammatory response. To exert their biological or pathophysiological functions in the recipient cells, exosomes deliver a diverse array of biomacromolecules including long and short coding and non-coding RNAs, proteins, and lipids. Exosomes secreted by antigen-presenting cells can confer therapeutic benefits by attenuating or stimulating the immune response. Exosomes play a crucial role in carrying and presenting functional major histocompatibility peptide complexes to modulate antigen-specific T cell responses. Exosomes from Dendritic Cells (DCs) can activate T and B cells and have been explored for their immunostimulatory properties in cancer therapy. The immunosuppressive properties of exosomes derived from macrophages and DCs can reduce inflammation in animal models for several inflammatory disorders. This review focuses on the protective role of exosomes in attenuating inflammation or augmenting immune response, emphasizing studies on exosomes derived from DCs and macrophages. PMID:27660518

  2. ImmunoChip study implicates antigen presentation to T cells in narcolepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliette Faraco

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the identification of susceptibility genes and environmental exposures provide broad support for a post-infectious autoimmune basis for narcolepsy/hypocretin (orexin deficiency. We genotyped loci associated with other autoimmune and inflammatory diseases in 1,886 individuals with hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy and 10,421 controls, all of European ancestry, using a custom genotyping array (ImmunoChip. Three loci located outside the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA region on chromosome 6 were significantly associated with disease risk. In addition to a strong signal in the T cell receptor alpha (TRA@, variants in two additional narcolepsy loci, Cathepsin H (CTSH and Tumor necrosis factor (ligand superfamily member 4 (TNFSF4, also called OX40L, attained genome-wide significance. These findings underline the importance of antigen presentation by HLA Class II to T cells in the pathophysiology of this autoimmune disease.

  3. Antigen presenting cells costimulatory signaling during pre-implantation pregnancy 

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    Anna Sławek

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available  Success of pregnancy depends on many factors. Three phenomena inducing immune tolerance against semi-allogeneic conceptus may play a crucial role in the pre-implantation period of pregnancy: influence of sex hormones in sex cycle, presence of oocyte or embryo and the presence of semen in the female reproductive tract. On the other hand dendritic cells are the most effective antigen-presenting cells in regulation of immune phenomena and also are considered as potent participants in inducing immune tolerance in the pregnancy. They communicate with T cells in cell contact-dependent manner or via cytokines. During cell-cell contacts, costimulatory molecules play a key role and their expression is often dependent on cytokines milieu. Both costimulatory molecules and cytokines influence generation of T regulatory cells. Interactions of these molecules are closely related. In this paper we would like to pay attention to the importance of antigen presenting cells costimulatory potency in immune regulation during a pre-implantation period of pregnancy.

  4. Antigen-presenting cells in parotid glands contain cystatin D originating from acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashida, Tomoko; Sato, Ritsuko; Haga-Tsujimura, Maiko; Yoshie, Sumio; Yoshimura, Ken; Imai, Akane; Shimomura, Hiromi

    2013-02-01

    Cystatin D encoded by Cst5 is a salivary classified type II cystatin. We investigated the dynamism of cystatin D by examining the distribution of cystatin D protein and mRNA in rats, to identify novel functions. The simultaneous expression of Cst5 and cystatin D was observed in parotid glands, however in situ hybridization showed that only acinar cells produced cystatin D. Synthesized cystatin D was localized in small vesicles and secreted from the apical side to the saliva, and from the basolateral side to the extracellular region, a second secretory pathway for cystatin D. We also identified antigen-presenting cells in the parotid glands that contained cystatin D without the expression of Cst5, indicating the uptake of cystatin D from the extracellular region. Cystatin D was detected in blood serum and renal tubular cells with megalin, indicating the circulation of cystatin D through the body and uptake by renal tubular cells. Thus, the novel dynamism of cystatin D was shown and a function for cystatin D in the regulation of antigen-presenting cell activity was proposed.

  5. No major role for insulin-degrading enzyme in antigen presentation by MHC molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodan Culina

    Full Text Available Antigen presentation by MHC class I molecules requires degradation of epitope source proteins in the cytosol. Although the preeminent role of the proteasome is clearly established, evidence suggesting a significant role for proteasome-independent generation of class I ligands has been reported repeatedly. However, an enzyme responsible for such a role has not been identified. Recently insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE was shown to produce an antigenic peptide derived from the tumor antigen MAGE-A3 in an entirely proteasome-independent manner, raising the question of the global impact of IDE in MHC class I antigen processing. Here we report that IDE knockdown in human cell lines, or knockout in two different mouse strains, has no effect on cell surface expression of various MHC class I molecules, including allomorphs such as HLA-A3 and HLA-B27 suggested to be loaded in an at least a partly proteasome-independent manner. Moreover, reduced or absent IDE expression does not affect presentation of five epitopes including epitopes derived from beta amyloid and proinsulin, two preferred IDE substrates. Thus, IDE does not play a major role in MHC class I antigen processing, confirming the dominant and almost exclusive role of the proteasome in cytosolic production of MHC class I ligands.

  6. No major role for insulin-degrading enzyme in antigen presentation by MHC molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culina, Slobodan; Mauvais, François-Xavier; Hsu, Hsiang-Ting; Burgevin, Anne; Guénette, Suzanne; Moser, Anna; van Endert, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Antigen presentation by MHC class I molecules requires degradation of epitope source proteins in the cytosol. Although the preeminent role of the proteasome is clearly established, evidence suggesting a significant role for proteasome-independent generation of class I ligands has been reported repeatedly. However, an enzyme responsible for such a role has not been identified. Recently insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) was shown to produce an antigenic peptide derived from the tumor antigen MAGE-A3 in an entirely proteasome-independent manner, raising the question of the global impact of IDE in MHC class I antigen processing. Here we report that IDE knockdown in human cell lines, or knockout in two different mouse strains, has no effect on cell surface expression of various MHC class I molecules, including allomorphs such as HLA-A3 and HLA-B27 suggested to be loaded in an at least a partly proteasome-independent manner. Moreover, reduced or absent IDE expression does not affect presentation of five epitopes including epitopes derived from beta amyloid and proinsulin, two preferred IDE substrates. Thus, IDE does not play a major role in MHC class I antigen processing, confirming the dominant and almost exclusive role of the proteasome in cytosolic production of MHC class I ligands.

  7. Cinnamon extract suppresses experimental colitis through modulation of antigen-presenting cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ho-Keun Kwon; Zee Yong Park; Sin-Hyeog Im; Ji-Sun Hwang; Choong-Gu Lee; Jae-Seon So; Anupama Sahoo; Chang-Rok Im; Won Kyung Jeon; Byoung Seob Ko; Sung Haeng Lee

    2011-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of cinnamon extract and elucidate its mechanisms for targeting the function of antigen presenting cells. METHODS:Cinnamon extract was used to treat murine macrophage cell line (Raw 264.7),mouse primary antigen-presenting cells (APCs,MHCII+) and CD11c+ dendritic cells to analyze the effects of cinnamon extract on APC function.The mechanisms of action of cinnamon extract on APCs were investigated by analyzing cytokine production,and expression of MHC antigens and co-stimulatory molecules by quantitative real-time PCR and flow cytometry.In addition,the effect of cinnamon extract on antigen presentation capacity and APC-dependent T-cell differentiation were analyzed by [H3]-thymidine incorporation and cytokine analysis,respectively. To confirm the anti-inflammatory effects of cinnamon extract in vivo ,cinnamon or PBS was orally administered to mice for 20 d followed by induction of experimental colitis with 2,4,6 trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid.The protective effects of cinnamon extract against experimental colitis were measured by checking clinical symptoms,histological analysis and cytokine expression profiles in inflamed tissue. RESULTS:Treatment with cinnamon extract inhibited maturation of MHCII+ APCs or CD11c+ dendritic cells (DCs) by suppressing expression of co-stimulatory molecules (B7.1,B7.2,ICOS-L),MHCII and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2.Cinnamon extract induced regulatory DCs (rDCs) that produce low levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1β,IL-6,IL-12,interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α] while expressing high levels of immunoregulatory cytokines (IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β).In addition, rDCs generated by cinnamon extract inhibited APC-dependent T-cell proliferation,and converted CD4+ T cells into IL-10high CD4+ T cells.Furthermore,oral administration of cinnamon extract inhibited development and progression of intestinal colitis by inhibiting expression of COX-2 and pro

  8. HAM56 and CD68 antigen presenting cells surrounding a sarcoidal granulomatous tattoo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context : Tattoos are produced by introducing colorants of various compositions into the skin, either accidentally or for cosmetic purposes. Case Report: A 62-year-old male presented with a cosmetic tattoo and requested a total excision of the lesion. Dermatopathologic analysis of the excised tissue with hematoxylin and eosin examination, as well as immunohistochemistry was performed. H&E staining demonstrated classic histologic features of a tattoo. Utilizing immunohistochemistry, dermal histiocytic antigen presenting cells stained with HAM56 and CD68 antibodies; the staining was present surrounding the tattoo pigment. Conclusions : We identified two macrophage markers (HAM56 and CD68 surrounding dermal tattoo pigment. A minimal dermal inflammatory immune was noted to the tattoo pigment. Moreover, the immune response and/or tolerance to tattoos is not well characterized. We suggest that tattoo materials and techniques could be utilized in therapeutic delivery for diseases such recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, potentially preventing immune rejection of gene therapy agents.

  9. Modulation of innate antigen-presenting cell function by pre-patent schistosome infection.

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    Christine E Ferragine

    Full Text Available Schistosomes are intravascular helminths that infect over 200 million people worldwide. Deposition of eggs by adult schistosomes stimulates Th2 responses to egg antigens and induces granulomatous pathology that is a hallmark of schistosome infection. Paradoxically, schistosomes require host immune function for their development and reproduction and for egress of parasite eggs from the host. To identify potential mechanisms by which immune cells might influence parasite development prior to the onset of egg production, we assessed immune function in mice infected with developing schistosomes. We found that pre-patent schistosome infection is associated with a loss of T cell responsiveness to other antigens and is due to a diminution in the ability of innate antigen-presenting cells to stimulate T cells. Diminution of stimulatory capacity by schistosome worms specifically affected CD11b(+ cells and did not require concomitant adaptive responses. We could not find evidence for production of a diffusible inhibitor of T cells by innate cells from infected mice. Rather, inhibition of T cell responsiveness by accessory cells required cell contact and only occurred when cells from infected mice outnumbered competent APCs by more than 3∶1. Finally, we show that loss of T cell stimulatory capacity may in part be due to suppression of IL-12 expression during pre-patent schistosome infection. Modulation of CD4(+ T cell and APC function may be an aspect of host immune exploitation by schistosomes, as both cell types influence parasite development during pre-patent schistosome infection.

  10. Pollen-induced antigen presentation by mesenchymal stem cells and T cells from allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Mauli B; Gavrilova, Tatyana; Liu, Jianjun; Patel, Shyam A; Kartan, Saritha; Greco, Steven J; Capitle, Eugenio; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2013-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising cellular suppressor of inflammation. This function of MSCs is partly due to their licensing by inflammatory mediators. In cases with reduced inflammation, MSCs could become immune-enhancer cells. MSCs can suppress the inflammatory response of antigen-challenged lymphocytes from allergic asthma. Although allergic rhinitis (AR) is also an inflammatory response, it is unclear if MSCs can exert similar suppression. This study investigated the immune effects (suppressor vs enhancer) of MSCs on allergen-stimulated lymphocytes from AR subjects (grass or weed allergy). In contrast to subjects with allergic asthma, MSCs caused a significant (Pcells (antigen-presenting cells (APCs)). This correlated with increased production of inflammatory cytokines from T cells, and increased expressions of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-II and CD86 on MSCs. The specificity of APC function was demonstrated in APC assay using MSCs that were knocked down for the master regulator of MHC-II transcription, CIITA. The difference in the effects of MSCs on allergic asthma and AR could not be explained by the sensitivity to the allergen, based on skin tests. Thus, we deduced that the contrasting immune effects of MSCs for antigen-challenged lymphocytes on AR and allergic asthma could be disease specific. It is possible that the enhanced inflammation from asthma might be required to license the MSCs to become suppressor cells. This study underscores the need for robust preclinical studies to effectively translate MSCs for any inflammatory disorder. PMID:25505949

  11. Selective susceptibility of human skin antigen presenting cells to productive dengue virus infection.

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    Daniela Cerny

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is a growing global concern with 390 million people infected each year. Dengue virus (DENV is transmitted by mosquitoes, thus host cells in the skin are the first point of contact with the virus. Human skin contains several populations of antigen-presenting cells which could drive the immune response to DENV in vivo: epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs, three populations of dermal dendritic cells (DCs, and macrophages. Using samples of normal human skin we detected productive infection of CD14(+ and CD1c(+ DCs, LCs and dermal macrophages, which was independent of DC-SIGN expression. LCs produced the highest viral titers and were less sensitive to IFN-β. Nanostring gene expression data showed significant up-regulation of IFN-β, STAT-1 and CCL5 upon viral exposure in susceptible DC populations. In mice infected intra-dermally with DENV we detected parallel populations of infected DCs originating from the dermis and migrating to the skin-draining lymph nodes. Therefore dermal DCs may simultaneously facilitate systemic spread of DENV and initiate the adaptive anti-viral immune response.

  12. Antigen presenting cell abnormalities in the Cln3(-/-) mouse model of juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersrud, Samantha L; Kovács, Attila D; Pearce, David A

    2016-07-01

    Mutations of the CLN3 gene lead to juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL), an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder that causes progressive neurodegeneration in children and adolescents. There is evidence of immune system involvement in pathology that has been only minimally investigated. We characterized bone marrow stem cell-derived antigen presenting cells (APCs), peritoneal macrophages, and leukocytes from spleen and blood, harvested from the Cln3(-/-) mouse model of JNCL. We detected dramatically elevated CD11c surface levels and increased total CD11c protein in Cln3(-/-) cell samples compared to wild type. This phenotype was specific to APCs and also to a loss of CLN3, as surface levels did not differ from wild type in other leukocyte subtypes nor in cells from two other NCL mouse models. Subcellularly, CD11c was localized to lipid rafts, indicating that perturbation of surface levels is attributable to derangement of raft dynamics, which has previously been shown in Cln3 mutant cells. Interrogation of APC function revealed that Cln3(-/-) cells have increased adhesiveness to CD11c ligands as well as an abnormal secretory pattern that closely mimics what has been previously reported for Cln3 mutant microglia. Our results show that CLN3 deficiency alters APCs, which can be a major contributor to the autoimmune response in JNCL. PMID:27101989

  13. HIV-1 Trans Infection of CD4+ T Cells by Professional Antigen Presenting Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles R. Rinaldo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1990s we have known of the fascinating ability of a complex set of professional antigen presenting cells (APCs; dendritic cells, monocytes/macrophages, and B lymphocytes to mediate HIV-1 trans infection of CD4+ T cells. This results in a burst of virus replication in the T cells that is much greater than that resulting from direct, cis infection of either APC or T cells, or trans infection between T cells. Such APC-to-T cell trans infection first involves a complex set of virus subtype, attachment, entry, and replication patterns that have many similarities among APC, as well as distinct differences related to virus receptors, intracellular trafficking, and productive and nonproductive replication pathways. The end result is that HIV-1 can sequester within the APC for several days and be transmitted via membrane extensions intracellularly and extracellularly to T cells across the virologic synapse. Virus replication requires activated T cells that can develop concurrently with the events of virus transmission. Further research is essential to fill the many gaps in our understanding of these trans infection processes and their role in natural HIV-1 infection.

  14. A novel laser vaccine adjuvant increases the motility of antigen presenting cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyuan Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Development of a potent vaccine adjuvant without introduction of any side effects remains an unmet challenge in the field of the vaccine research. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that laser at a specific setting increased the motility of antigen presenting cells (APCs and immune responses, with few local or systemic side effects. This laser vaccine adjuvant (LVA effect was induced by brief illumination of a small area of the skin or muscle with a nondestructive, 532 nm green laser prior to intradermal (i.d. or intramuscular (i.m. administration of vaccines at the site of laser illumination. The pre-illumination accelerated the motility of APCs as shown by intravital confocal microscopy, leading to sufficient antigen (Ag-uptake at the site of vaccine injection and transportation of the Ag-captured APCs to the draining lymph nodes. As a result, the number of Ag(+ dendritic cells (DCs in draining lymph nodes was significantly higher in both the 1° and 2° draining lymph nodes in the presence than in the absence of LVA. Laser-mediated increases in the motility and lymphatic transportation of APCs augmented significantly humoral immune responses directed against a model vaccine ovalbumin (OVA or influenza vaccine i.d. injected in both primary and booster vaccinations as compared to the vaccine itself. Strikingly, when the laser was delivered by a hair-like diffusing optical fiber into muscle, laser illumination greatly boosted not only humoral but also cell-mediated immune responses provoked by i.m. immunization with OVA relative to OVA alone. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The results demonstrate the ability of this safe LVA to augment both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. In comparison with all current vaccine adjuvants that are either chemical compounds or biological agents, LVA is novel in both its form and mechanism; it is risk-free and has distinct advantages over traditional vaccine adjuvants.

  15. Distribution of primed T cells and antigen-loaded antigen presenting cells following intranasal immunization in mice.

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    Annalisa Ciabattini

    Full Text Available Priming of T cells is a key event in vaccination, since it bears a decisive influence on the type and magnitude of the immune response. T-cell priming after mucosal immunization via the nasal route was studied by investigating the distribution of antigen-loaded antigen presenting cells (APCs and primed antigen-specific T cells. Nasal immunization studies were conducted using the model protein antigen ovalbumin (OVA plus CpG oligodeoxynucleotide adjuvant. Trafficking of antigen-specific primed T cells was analyzed in vivo after adoptive transfer of OVA-specific transgenic T cells in the presence or absence of fingolimod, a drug that causes lymphocytes sequestration within lymph nodes. Antigen-loaded APCs were observed in mediastinal lymph nodes, draining the respiratory tract, but not in distal lymph nodes. Antigen-specific proliferating T cells were first observed within draining lymph nodes, and later in distal iliac and mesenteric lymph nodes and in the spleen. The presence at distal sites was due to migration of locally primed T cells as shown by fingolimod treatment that caused a drastic reduction of proliferated T cells in non-draining lymph nodes and an accumulation of extensively divided T cells within draining lymph nodes. Homing of nasally primed T cells in distal iliac lymph nodes was CD62L-dependent, while entry into mesenteric lymph nodes depended on both CD62L and α4β7, as shown by in vivo antibody-mediated inhibition of T-cell trafficking. These data, elucidating the trafficking of antigen-specific primed T cells to non-draining peripheral and mucosa-associated lymph nodes following nasal immunization, provide relevant insights for the design of vaccination strategies based on mucosal priming.

  16. Antigen presenting cell-selective drug delivery by glycan-decorated nanocarriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenz, Theresa; Grabski, Elena; Durán, Verónica; Hozsa, Constantin; Stępczyńska, Anna; Furch, Marcus; Gieseler, Robert K; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2015-09-01

    Targeted drug delivery systems hold promise for selective provision of active compounds to distinct tissues or cell subsets. Thus, locally enhanced drug concentrations are obtained that would confer improved efficacy. As a consequence adverse effects should be diminished, as innocent bystander cells are less affected. Currently, several controlled drug delivery systems based on diverse materials are being developed. Some systems exhibit material-associated toxic effects and/or show low drug loading capacity. In contrast, liposomal nanocarriers are particularly favorable because they are well tolerated, poorly immunogenic, can be produced in defined sizes, and offer a reasonable payload capacity. Compared with other immune cells, professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) demonstrate enhanced liposome uptake mediated by macropinocytosis, phagocytosis and presumably also by clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis. In order to further enhance the targeting efficacy toward APCs, receptor-mediated uptake appears advisable. Since APC subsets generally do not express single linage-specific receptors, members of the C-type lectin receptor (CLR) family are compelling targets. Examples of CLR expressed by APCs include DEC-205 (CD205) expressed by myeloid dendritic cells (DC) and monocytes, the mannose receptor C type 1 (MR, CD206) expressed by DC, monocytes and macrophages, DC-SIGN (CD209) expressed by DC, and several others. These receptors bind glycans, which are typically displayed by pathogens and thus support pathogen uptake and endocytosis. Further research will elucidate whether glycan-decorated liposomes will not only enhance APCs targeting but also enable preferential delivery of their payload to discrete subcellular compartments. PMID:25701806

  17. "Danger" conditions increase sulfamethoxazole-protein adduct formation in human antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavergne, S N; Wang, H; Callan, H E; Park, B K; Naisbitt, D J

    2009-11-01

    Antigen-presenting cells (APC) are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of drug-induced immune reactions. Various pathological factors can activate APC and therefore influence the immune equilibrium. It is interesting that several diseases have been associated with an increased rate of drug allergy. The aim of this project was to evaluate the impact of such "danger signals" on sulfamethoxazole (SMX) metabolism in human APC (peripheral blood mononuclear cells, Epstein-Barr virus-modified B lymphocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells, and two cell lines). APC were incubated with SMX (100 microM-2 mM; 5 min-24 h), in the presence of pathological factors: bacterial endotoxins (lipopolysaccharide and staphylococcal enterotoxin B), flu viral proteins, cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, IL-10; tumor necrosis factor-alpha; interferon-gamma; and transforming growth factor-beta], inflammatory molecules (prostaglandin E2, human serum complement, and activated protein C), oxidants (buthionine sulfoximine and H(2)O(2)), and hyperthermia (37.5-39.5 degrees C). Adduct formation was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and confocal microscopy. SMX-protein adduct formation was time- and concentration-dependent for each cell type tested, in both physiological and danger conditions. A danger environment significantly increased the formation of SMX-protein adducts and significantly shortened the delay for their detection. An additive effect was observed with a combination of danger signals. Dimedone (chemical selectively binding cysteine sulfenic acid) and antioxidants decreased both baseline and danger-enhanced SMX-adduct formation. Various enzyme inhibitors were associated with a significant decrease in SMX-adduct levels, with a pattern varying depending on the cell type and the culture conditions. These results illustrate that danger signals enhance the formation of intracellular SMX-protein adducts in human APC. These findings might be relevant

  18. Rationally designed inhibitor targeting antigen-trimming aminopeptidases enhances antigen presentation and cytotoxic T-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zervoudi, Efthalia; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Birtley, James R; Seregin, Sergey S; Reeves, Emma; Kokkala, Paraskevi; Aldhamen, Yasser A; Amalfitano, Andrea; Mavridis, Irene M; James, Edward; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios

    2013-12-01

    Intracellular aminopeptidases endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases 1 and 2 (ERAP1 and ERAP2), and as well as insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) process antigenic epitope precursors for loading onto MHC class I molecules and regulate the adaptive immune response. Their activity greatly affects the antigenic peptide repertoire presented to cytotoxic T lymphocytes and as a result can regulate cytotoxic cellular responses contributing to autoimmunity or immune evasion by viruses and cancer cells. Therefore, pharmacological regulation of their activity is a promising avenue for modulating the adaptive immune response with possible applications in controlling autoimmunity, in boosting immune responses to pathogens, and in cancer immunotherapy. In this study we exploited recent structural and biochemical analysis of ERAP1 and ERAP2 to design and develop phosphinic pseudopeptide transition state analogs that can inhibit this family of enzymes with nM affinity. X-ray crystallographic analysis of one such inhibitor in complex with ERAP2 validated our design, revealing a canonical mode of binding in the active site of the enzyme, and highlighted the importance of the S2' pocket for achieving inhibitor potency. Antigen processing and presentation assays in HeLa and murine colon carcinoma (CT26) cells showed that these inhibitors induce increased cell-surface antigen presentation of transfected and endogenous antigens and enhance cytotoxic T-cell responses, indicating that these enzymes primarily destroy epitopes in those systems. This class of inhibitors constitutes a promising tool for controlling the cellular adaptive immune response in humans by modulating the antigen processing and presentation pathway. PMID:24248368

  19. Seoul virus suppresses NF-κB-mediated inflammatory responses of antigen presenting cells from Norway rats

    OpenAIRE

    Au, Rebecca Y.; Jedlicka, Anne E.; Li, Wei; Pekosz, Andrew; Klein, Sabra L.

    2010-01-01

    Hantavirus infection reduces antiviral defenses, increases regulatory responses, and causes persistent infection in rodent hosts. To address whether hantaviruses alter the maturation and functional activity of antigen presenting cells (APCs), rat bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) and macrophages (BMDMs) were generated and infected with Seoul virus (SEOV) or stimulated with TLR ligands. SEOV infected both DCs and macrophages, but copies of viral RNA, viral antigen, and infectious vir...

  20. CD8+ T cell priming by dendritic cell vaccines requires antigen transfer to endogenous antigen presenting cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice W Yewdall

    Full Text Available Immunotherapeutic strategies to stimulate anti-tumor immunity are promising approaches for cancer treatment. A major barrier to their success is the immunosuppressive microenvironment of tumors, which inhibits the functions of endogenous dendritic cells (DCs that are necessary for the generation of anti-tumor CD8+ T cells. To overcome this problem, autologous DCs are generated ex vivo, loaded with tumor antigens, and activated in this non-suppressive environment before administration to patients. However, DC-based vaccines rarely induce tumor regression.We examined the fate and function of these DCs following their injection using murine models, in order to better understand their interaction with the host immune system. Contrary to previous assumptions, we show that DC vaccines have an insignificant role in directly priming CD8+ T cells, but instead function primarily as vehicles for transferring antigens to endogenous antigen presenting cells, which are responsible for the subsequent activation of T cells.This reliance on endogenous immune cells may explain the limited success of current DC vaccines to treat cancer and offers new insight into how these therapies can be improved. Future approaches should focus on creating DC vaccines that are more effective at directly priming T cells, or abrogating the tumor induced suppression of endogenous DCs.

  1. The T-cell anergy induced by Leishmania amazonensis antigens is related with defective antigen presentation and apoptosis

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    Roberta O. Pinheiro

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania amazonensis is the main agent of diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis, a disease associated with anergic immune responses. In this study we show that the crude antigen of Leishmania amazonensis (LaAg but not L. braziliensis promastigotes (LbAg contains substances that suppress mitogenic and spontaneous proliferative responses of T cells. The suppressive substances in LaAg are thermoresistant (100ºC/1h and partially dependent on protease activity. T cell anergy was not due to a decreased production of growth factors as it was not reverted by addition of exogenous IL-2, IL-4, IFN-gamma or IL-12. LaAg did not inhibit anti-CD3-induced T cell activation, suggesting that anergy was due to a defect in antigen presentation. It was also not due to cell necrosis, but was accompanied by expressive DNA fragmentation in lymph node cells, indicative of apoptosis. Although pre-incubation of macrophages with LaAg prevented their capacity to present antigens, this effect was not due to apoptosis of the former. These results suggest that the T cell anergy found in diffuse leishmaniasis may be the result of parasite antigen-driven apoptosis of those cells following defective antigen presentation.A Leishmania amazonensis é o principal agente etiológico da leishmaniose cutânea difusa, uma doença associada a respostas imunes anérgicas. Neste estudo nós mostramos que o extrato bruto de promastigotas de Leishmania amazonensis (LaAg, mas não de L. braziliensis (LbAg, contém substâncias que suprimem respostas proliferativas, espontâneas e mitogênicas, de células T. As substâncias supressoras no LaAg são termo-resistentes (100°C/1h e parcialmente dependentes da atividade de proteases. A anergia de células T não foi devida à diminuição na produção de fatores de crescimento, uma vez que não foi revertida pela adição de: IL-2, IL-4, IFN-gama ou IL-12. O LaAg não inibiu a ativação de células T induzida por anti-CD3, sugerindo que a anergia

  2. Human parvovirus B19 induced apoptotic bodies contain altered self-antigens that are phagocytosed by antigen presenting cells.

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    Kanoktip Thammasri

    Full Text Available Human parvovirus B19 (B19V from the erythrovirus genus is known to be a pathogenic virus in humans. Prevalence of B19V infection has been reported worldwide in all seasons, with a high incidence in the spring. B19V is responsible for erythema infectiosum (fifth disease commonly seen in children. Its other clinical presentations include arthralgia, arthritis, transient aplastic crisis, chronic anemia, congenital anemia, and hydrops fetalis. In addition, B19V infection has been reported to trigger autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. However, the mechanisms of B19V participation in autoimmunity are not fully understood. B19V induced chronic disease and persistent infection suggests B19V can serve as a model for viral host interactions and the role of viruses in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Here we investigate the involvement of B19V in the breakdown of immune tolerance. Previously, we demonstrated that the non-structural protein 1 (NS 1 of B19V induces apoptosis in non-permissive cells lines and that this protein can cleave host DNA as well as form NS1-DNA adducts. Here we provide evidence that through programmed cell death, apoptotic bodies (ApoBods are generated by B19V NS1 expression in a non-permissive cell line. Characterization of purified ApoBods identified potential self-antigens within them. In particular, signature self-antigens such as Smith, ApoH, DNA, histone H4 and phosphatidylserine associated with autoimmunity were present in these ApoBods. In addition, when purified ApoBods were introduced to differentiated macrophages, recognition, engulfment and uptake occurred. This suggests that B19V can produce a source of self-antigens for immune cell processing. The results support our hypothesis that B19V NS1-DNA adducts, and nucleosomal and lysosomal antigens present in ApoBods created in non-permissive cell lines, are a source of self-antigens.

  3. Comparison of microglia and infiltrating CD11c+ cells as antigen presenting cells for T cell proliferation and cytokine response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka; Løbner, Morten; Cédile, Oriane;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tissue-resident antigen-presenting cells (APC) exert a major influence on the local immune environment. Microglia are resident myeloid cells in the central nervous system (CNS), deriving from early post-embryonic precursors, distinct from adult hematopoietic lineages. Dendritic cells...... (DC) and macrophages infiltrate the CNS during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Microglia are not considered to be as effective APC as DC or macrophages. METHODS: In this work we compared the antigen presenting capacity of CD11c+ and CD11c- microglia subsets with infiltrating CD11c...... for cytokine expression. They were co-cultured with primed T cells to measure induction of T cell proliferation and cytokine response. RESULTS: The number of CD11c+ microglia cells increased dramatically in EAE. They expressed equivalent levels of major histocompatibility complex and co-stimulatory ligands CD...

  4. Malassezia yeasts activate the NLRP3 inflammasome in antigen-presenting cells via Syk-kinase signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistowska, Magdalena; Fenini, Gabriele; Jankovic, Dragana; Feldmeyer, Laurence; Kerl, Katrin; Bosshard, Philipp; Contassot, Emmanuel; French, Lars E

    2014-12-01

    Although being a normal part of the skin flora, yeasts of the genus Malassezia are associated with several common dermatologic conditions including pityriasis versicolour, seborrhoeic dermatitis (SD), folliculitis, atopic eczema/dermatitis (AE/AD) and dandruff. While Malassezia spp. are aetiological agents of pityriasis versicolour, a causal role of Malassezia spp. in AE/AD and SD remains to be established. Previous reports have shown that fungi such as Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus are able to efficiently activate the NLRP3 inflammasome leading to robust secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β. To date, innate immune responses to Malassezia spp. are not well characterized. Here, we show that different Malassezia species could induce NLRP3 inflammasome activation and subsequent IL-1β secretion in human antigen-presenting cells. In contrast, keratinocytes were not able to secrete IL-1β when exposed to Malassezia spp. Moreover, we demonstrate that IL-1β secretion in antigen-presenting cells was dependent on Syk-kinase signalling. Our results identify Malassezia spp. as potential strong inducers of pro-inflammatory responses when taken up by antigen-presenting cells and identify C-type lectin receptors and the NLRP3 inflammasome as crucial actors in this process. PMID:25267545

  5. Hepatitis B virus-like particles access major histocompatibility class I and II antigen presentation pathways in primary dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Jessica M; Cheong, Wan-Shoo; Villadangos, José A; Mintern, Justine D; Netter, Hans J

    2013-04-26

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) represent high density displays of viral proteins that efficiently trigger immunity. VLPs composed of the small hepatitis B virus envelope protein (HBsAgS) are useful vaccine platforms that induce humoral and cellular immune responses. Notably, however, some studies suggest HBsAgS VLPs impair dendritic cell (DC) function. Here we investigated HBsAgS VLP interaction with DC subsets and antigen access to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II antigen presentation pathways in primary DCs. HBsAgS VLPs impaired plasmacytoid DC (pDC) interferon alpha (IFNα) production in response to CpG in vitro, but did not alter conventional DC (cDC) or pDC phenotype when administered in vivo. To assess cellular immune responses, HBsAgS VLPs were generated containing the ovalbumin (OVA) model epitopes OVA(257-264) and OVA(323-339) to access MHCI and MHCII antigen presentation pathways, respectively; both in vitro and following immunisation in vivo. HBsAgS VLP-OVA(257-264) elicited CTL responses in vivo that were not enhanced by inclusion of an additional MHCII helper epitope. HBsAgS VLP-OVA(257-264) administered in vivo was cross-presented by CD8(+) DCs, but not CD8(-) DCs. Therefore, HBsAgS VLPs can deliver antigen to both MHCI and MHCII antigen presentation pathways in primary DCs and promote cytotoxic and helper T cell priming despite their suppressive effect on pDCs. PMID:23473776

  6. Luciferase mRNA Transfection of Antigen Presenting Cells Permits Sensitive Nonradioactive Measurement of Cellular and Humoral Cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tana A. Omokoko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy is rapidly evolving as an effective treatment option for many cancers. With the emerging fields of cancer vaccines and adoptive cell transfer therapies, there is an increasing demand for high-throughput in vitro cytotoxicity assays that efficiently analyze immune effector functions. The gold standard 51Cr-release assay is very accurate but has the major disadvantage of being radioactive. We reveal the development of a versatile and nonradioactive firefly luciferase in vitro transcribed (IVT RNA-based assay. Demonstrating high efficiency, consistency, and excellent target cell viability, our optimized luciferase IVT RNA is used to transfect dividing and nondividing primary antigen presenting cells. Together with the long-lasting expression and minimal background, the direct measurement of intracellular luciferase activity of living cells allows for the monitoring of killing kinetics and displays paramount sensitivity. The ability to cotransfect the IVT RNA of the luciferase reporter and the antigen of interest into the antigen presenting cells and its simple read-out procedure render the assay high-throughput in nature. Results generated were comparable to the 51Cr release and further confirmed the assay’s ability to measure antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. The assay’s combined simplicity, practicality, and efficiency tailor it for the analysis of antigen-specific cellular and humoral effector functions during the development of novel immunotherapies.

  7. Increased generation of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells by manipulating antigen presentation in the thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiqiang; Yang, Lu; Silva, Hernandez Moura; Trzeciak, Alissa; Choi, Yongwon; Schwab, Susan R; Dustin, Michael L; Lafaille, Juan J

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T-cell (Treg) selection in the thymus is essential to prevent autoimmune diseases. Although important rules for Treg selection have been established, there is controversy regarding the degree of self-reactivity displayed by T-cell receptors expressed by Treg cells. In this study we have developed a model of autoimmune skin inflammation, to determine key parameters in the generation of skin-reactive Treg cells in the thymus (tTreg). tTreg development is predominantly AIRE dependent, with an AIRE-independent component. Without the knowledge of antigen recognized by skin-reactive Treg cells, we are able to enhance skin-specific tTreg cell generation using three approaches. First, we increase medullary thymic epithelial cells by using mice lacking osteoprotegerin or by adding TRANCE (RANKL, Tnfsf11). Second, we inject intrathymically peripheral dendritic cells from skin-draining sites. Finally, we inject skin tissue lysates intrathymically. These findings have implications for enhancing the generation of organ-specific Treg cells in autoimmune diseases. PMID:26923114

  8. Neonatal colonisation expands a specific intestinal antigen-presenting cell subset prior to CD4 T-cell expansion, without altering T-cell repertoire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte F Inman

    Full Text Available Interactions between the early-life colonising intestinal microbiota and the developing immune system are critical in determining the nature of immune responses in later life. Studies in neonatal animals in which this interaction can be examined are central to understanding the mechanisms by which the microbiota impacts on immune development and to developing therapies based on manipulation of the microbiome. The inbred piglet model represents a system that is comparable to human neonates and allows for control of the impact of maternal factors. Here we show that colonisation with a defined microbiota produces expansion of mucosal plasma cells and of T-lymphocytes without altering the repertoire of alpha beta T-cells in the intestine. Importantly, this is preceded by microbially-induced expansion of a signal regulatory protein α-positive (SIRPα(+ antigen-presenting cell subset, whilst SIRPα(-CD11R1(+ antigen-presenting cells (APCs are unaffected by colonisation. The central role of intestinal APCs in the induction and maintenance of mucosal immunity implicates SIRPα(+ antigen-presenting cells as orchestrators of early-life mucosal immune development.

  9. A Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain that improves stimulation of antigen-presenting cells does not enhance vaccine efficacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deanna M Schmitt

    Full Text Available Vaccination is a proven strategy to mitigate morbidity and mortality of infectious diseases. The methodology of identifying and testing new vaccine candidates could be improved with rational design and in vitro testing prior to animal experimentation. The tularemia vaccine, Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS, does not elicit complete protection against lethal challenge with a virulent type A Francisella strain. One factor that may contribute to this poor performance is limited stimulation of antigen-presenting cells. In this study, we examined whether the interaction of genetically modified LVS strains with human antigen-presenting cells correlated with effectiveness as tularemia vaccine candidates. Human dendritic cells infected with wild-type LVS secrete low levels of proinflammatory cytokines, fail to upregulate costimulatory molecules, and activate human T cells poorly in vitro. One LVS mutant, strain 13B47, stimulated higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines from dendritic cells and macrophages and increased costimulatory molecule expression on dendritic cells compared to wild type. Additionally, 13B47-infected dendritic cells activated T cells more efficiently than LVS-infected cells. A deletion allele of the same gene in LVS displayed similar in vitro characteristics, but vaccination with this strain did not improve survival after challenge with a virulent Francisella strain. In vivo, this mutant was attenuated for growth and did not stimulate T cell responses in the lung comparable to wild type. Therefore, stimulation of antigen-presenting cells in vitro was improved by genetic modification of LVS, but did not correlate with efficacy against challenge in vivo within this model system.

  10. Probiotic metabolites from Bacillus coagulans GanedenBC30TM support maturation of antigen-presenting cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kathleen F Benson; Kimberlee A Redman; Steve G Carter; David Keller; Sean Farmer; John R Endres; Gitte S Jensen

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To study the effects of probiotic metabolites on maturation stage of antigen-presenting immune cells.METHODS:Ganeden Bacillus coagulans 30 (GBC30)bacterial cultures in log phase were used to isolate the secreted metabolite (MET) fraction.A second fraction was made to generate a crude cell-wall-enriched fraction,by centrifugation and lysis,followed by washing.A preparation of MET was subjected to size exclusion centrifugation,generating three fractions:< 3 kDa,3-30 kDa,and 30-200 kDa and activities were tested in comparison to crude MET and cell wall in primary cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) as a source of antigen-presenting mononuclear phagocytes.The maturation status of mononudear phagocytes was evaluated by staining with monoclonal antibodies towards CD14,CD16,CD80 and CD86 and analyzed by flow cytometry.RESULTS:Treatment of PBMC with MET supported maturation of mononuclear phagocytes toward both macrophage and dendritic cell phenotypes.The biological activity unique to the metabolites included a reduction of CD14+ CD16+ pro-inflammatory ceils,and this property was associated with the high molecular weight metabolite fraction.Changes were also seen for the dendritic cell maturation markers CD80 and CD86.On CD14dim cells,an increase in both CD80 and CD86 expression was seen,in contrast to a selective increase in CD86 expression on CD14bright cells.The co-expression of CD80 and CD86 indicates effective antigen presentation to T cells and support of T helper cell differentiation.The selective expression of CD86 in the absence of CD80 points to a role in generating T regulatory cells.CONCLUSION:The data show that a primary mechanism of action of GBC30 metabolites involves support of more mature phenotypes of antigen-presenting cells,important for immunological decision-making.

  11. Shedding light on anti-estrogen resistance and antigen presentation through biophysical techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwart, Willem Teunis

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is composed of two parts part one: The study on anti-estrogen resistance and defining criteria a cell has to meet in order to become resistant to anti-estrogenic compounds. part two: the study of antigen-loading, vesicle positioning and costimulation.

  12. Robust and Accurate Discrimination of Self/Non-Self Antigen Presentations by Regulatory T Cell Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Chikara; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    The immune response by T cells usually discriminates self and non-self antigens, even though the negative selection of self-reactive T cells is imperfect and a certain fraction of T cells can respond to self-antigens. In this study, we construct a simple mathematical model of T cell populations to analyze how such self/non-self discrimination is possible. The results demonstrate that the control of the immune response by regulatory T cells enables a robust and accurate discrimination of self and non-self antigens, even when there is a significant overlap between the affinity distribution of T cells to self and non-self antigens. Here, the number of regulatory T cells in the system acts as a global variable controlling the T cell population dynamics. The present study provides a basis for the development of a quantitative theory for self and non-self discrimination in the immune system and a possible strategy for its experimental verification. PMID:27668873

  13. Adjuvant effects of liposomes containing lipid A: enhancement of liposomal antigen presentation and recruitment of macrophages.

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, J N; Rao, M.; Amselem, S; Krzych, U; Alving, C R; Green, S J; Wassef, N M

    1992-01-01

    Liposomes containing lipid A induced potent humoral immune responses in mice against an encapsulated malaria antigen (R32NS1) containing NANP epitopes. The immune response was not enhanced by lipid A alone or by empty liposomes containing lipid A. Experiments to investigate the adjuvant mechanisms of liposomes and lipid A revealed that liposome-encapsulated R32NS1 was actively presented by bone marrow-derived macrophages to NANP-specific cloned T cells. The degree of presentation was related ...

  14. Corruption of dendritic cell antigen presentation during acute GVHD leads to regulatory T-cell failure and chronic GVHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Koyama, Motoko; Le Texier, Laetitia; Markey, Kate A; Cheong, Melody; Kuns, Rachel D; Lineburg, Katie E; Teal, Bianca E; Alexander, Kylie A; Clouston, Andrew D; Blazar, Bruce R; Hill, Geoffrey R; MacDonald, Kelli P A

    2016-08-11

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a major cause of late mortality following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and is characterized by tissue fibrosis manifesting as scleroderma and bronchiolitis obliterans. The development of acute GVHD (aGVHD) is a powerful clinical predictor of subsequent cGVHD, suggesting that aGVHD may invoke the immunologic pathways responsible for cGVHD. In preclinical models in which sclerodermatous cGVHD develops after a preceding period of mild aGVHD, we show that antigen presentation within major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II of donor dendritic cells (DCs) is markedly impaired early after BMT. This is associated with a failure of regulatory T-cell (Treg) homeostasis and cGVHD. Donor DC-restricted deletion of MHC class II phenocopied this Treg deficiency and cGVHD. Moreover, specific depletion of donor Tregs after BMT also induced cGVHD, whereas adoptive transfer of Tregs ameliorated it. These data demonstrate that the defect in Treg homeostasis seen in cGVHD is a causative lesion and is downstream of defective antigen presentation within MHC class II that is induced by aGVHD. PMID:27338097

  15. Corruption of dendritic cell antigen presentation during acute GVHD leads to regulatory T-cell failure and chronic GVHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Koyama, Motoko; Le Texier, Laetitia; Markey, Kate A; Cheong, Melody; Kuns, Rachel D; Lineburg, Katie E; Teal, Bianca E; Alexander, Kylie A; Clouston, Andrew D; Blazar, Bruce R; Hill, Geoffrey R; MacDonald, Kelli P A

    2016-08-11

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a major cause of late mortality following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and is characterized by tissue fibrosis manifesting as scleroderma and bronchiolitis obliterans. The development of acute GVHD (aGVHD) is a powerful clinical predictor of subsequent cGVHD, suggesting that aGVHD may invoke the immunologic pathways responsible for cGVHD. In preclinical models in which sclerodermatous cGVHD develops after a preceding period of mild aGVHD, we show that antigen presentation within major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II of donor dendritic cells (DCs) is markedly impaired early after BMT. This is associated with a failure of regulatory T-cell (Treg) homeostasis and cGVHD. Donor DC-restricted deletion of MHC class II phenocopied this Treg deficiency and cGVHD. Moreover, specific depletion of donor Tregs after BMT also induced cGVHD, whereas adoptive transfer of Tregs ameliorated it. These data demonstrate that the defect in Treg homeostasis seen in cGVHD is a causative lesion and is downstream of defective antigen presentation within MHC class II that is induced by aGVHD.

  16. Antigen presentation by small intestinal epithelial cells uniquely enhances IFN-γ secretion from CD4+ intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs). •sIECs are able to induce antigen specific proliferation of CD4+ IELs. •sIECs induce markedly enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4+ IELs. •Induction of enhanced IFN-γ secretion by sIECs is uniquely observed in CD4+ IELs. -- Abstract: Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs) express major histocompatibility complex class II molecules even in a normal condition, and are known to function as antigen presenting cells (APCs) at least in vitro. These findings raised the possibility that sIECs play an important role in inducing immune responses against luminal antigens, especially those of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs). We herein showed that antigenic stimulation with sIECs induced markedly greater secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) by CD4+ IELs, but not interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-17 although the proliferative response was prominently lower than that with T cell-depleted splenic APCs. In contrast, no enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4+ LPLs and primed splenic CD4+ T cells was observed when stimulated with sIECs. Taken together, these results suggest that sIECs uniquely activate CD4+ IELs and induce remarkable IFN-γ secretion upon antigenic stimulation in vivo

  17. Antigen presentation by small intestinal epithelial cells uniquely enhances IFN-γ secretion from CD4{sup +} intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Ryo; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Iwamoto, Taku; Maeda, Nana; Emoto, Tetsuro; Shimizu, Makoto; Totsuka, Mamoru, E-mail: atotuka@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs). •sIECs are able to induce antigen specific proliferation of CD4{sup +} IELs. •sIECs induce markedly enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} IELs. •Induction of enhanced IFN-γ secretion by sIECs is uniquely observed in CD4{sup +} IELs. -- Abstract: Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs) express major histocompatibility complex class II molecules even in a normal condition, and are known to function as antigen presenting cells (APCs) at least in vitro. These findings raised the possibility that sIECs play an important role in inducing immune responses against luminal antigens, especially those of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs). We herein showed that antigenic stimulation with sIECs induced markedly greater secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) by CD4{sup +} IELs, but not interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-17 although the proliferative response was prominently lower than that with T cell-depleted splenic APCs. In contrast, no enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} LPLs and primed splenic CD4{sup +} T cells was observed when stimulated with sIECs. Taken together, these results suggest that sIECs uniquely activate CD4{sup +} IELs and induce remarkable IFN-γ secretion upon antigenic stimulation in vivo.

  18. Emerging roles for antigen presentation in establishing host-microbiome symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessman, Nicholas J; Sonnenberg, Gregory F

    2016-07-01

    Trillions of beneficial bacteria inhabit the intestinal tract of healthy mammals from birth. Accordingly, mammalian hosts have evolved a series of complementary and redundant pathways to limit pathologic immune responses against these bacteria, while simultaneously protecting against enteric pathogen invasion. These pathways can be generically responsive to the presence of any commensal bacteria and innate in nature, as for IL-22-related pathways. Alternatively, specific bacterial antigens can drive a distinct set of adaptive immune cell responses, including IgA affinity maturation and secretion, and a recently described pathway of intestinal selection whereby MHCII(+) ILC3 deletes commensal bacteria-reactive CD4 T cells. These pathways can either promote or inhibit colonization by specific subsets of commensal bacteria, and cooperatively maintain intestinal homeostasis. In this review, we will highlight recent developments in understanding how these diverse pathways complement each other to cooperatively shape the symbiotic relationship between commensal bacteria and mammalian hosts. PMID:27319348

  19. Loss of proliferation and antigen presentation activity following internalization of polydispersed carbon nanotubes by primary lung epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandavi Kumari

    Full Text Available Interactions between poly-dispersed acid functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (AF-SWCNTs and primary lung epithelial (PLE cells were studied. Peritoneal macrophages (PMs, known phagocytic cells were used as positive controls in this study. Recovery of live cells from cultures of PLE cells and PMs was significantly reduced in the presence of AF-SWCNTs, in a time and dose dependent manner. Both PLE cells as well as PMs could take up fluorescence tagged AF-SWCNTs in a time dependent manner and this uptake was significantly blocked by cytochalasin D, an agent that blocks the activity of acto-myosin fibers and therefore the phagocytic activity of cells. Confocal microscopic studies confirmed that AF-SWCNTs were internalized by both PLE cells and PMs. Intra-trachially instilled AF-SWCNTs could also be taken up by lung epithelial cells as well as alveolar macrophages. Freshly isolated PLE cells had significant cell division activity and cell cycling studies indicated that treatment with AF-SWCNTs resulted in a marked reduction in S-phase of the cell cycle. In a previously standardized system to study BCG antigen presentation by PLE cells and PMs to sensitized T helper cells, AF-SWCNTs could significantly lower the antigen presentation ability of both cell types. These results show that mouse primary lung epithelial cells can efficiently internalize AF-SWCNTs and the uptake of nanotubes interfered with biological functions of PLE cells including their ability to present BCG antigens to sensitized T helper cells.

  20. Inflammatory environment and oxidized LDL convert circulating human proangiogenic cells into functional antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinci, Maria Cristina; Piacentini, Luca; Chiesa, Mattia; Saporiti, Federica; Colombo, Gualtiero I; Pesce, Maurizio

    2015-09-01

    The function of human circulating PACs has been described extensively. However, little focus has been placed on understanding how these cells differ in their functions in the presence of microenvironments mimicking vascular inflammation. We hypothesized that exposure to proinflammatory cytokines or the oxLDL, an autoantigen abundant in advanced atherosclerotic plaques, converts PACs into immune-modulating/proinflammatory cells. Hence, we examined the effect of oxLDL and inflammatory stimuli on their phenotype by use of a functional genomics model based on secretome and whole genome transcriptome profiling. PACs obtained from culturing a PBMC fraction in angiogenic medium were primed with DC differentiation cytokines and then exposed to proinflammatory cytokines or oxLDL. Under these conditions, PACs converted into APCs, expressed maturation markers CD80 and CD83, and showed an increased up-regulation of CD86. APCcy and APCox induced a robust T cell BrdU incorporation. Despite a similar ability to induce lymphocyte proliferation, APCcy and APCox differed for the secretory pathway and mRNA expression. Analysis of the differentially expressed genes identified 4 gene "clusters," showing reciprocal modulation in APCcy vs. APCox, justifying, according to functional genomics analyses, a different putative function of the cells in antigen processing. Together, these data show that treatment with inflammatory cytokines or oxLDL converts human PAC phenotypes and functions into that of APCs with similar lymphocyte-activating ability but distinct maturation degree and paracrine functions.

  1. Minimum information about tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (MITAP): a first step towards reproducibility and standardisation of cellular therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Phillip; Spiering, Rachel; Aguillon, Juan C; Anderson, Amy E; Appel, Silke; Benitez-Ribas, Daniel; Ten Brinke, Anja; Broere, Femke; Cools, Nathalie; Cuturi, Maria Cristina; Diboll, Julie; Geissler, Edward K; Giannoukakis, Nick; Gregori, Silvia; van Ham, S Marieke; Lattimer, Staci; Marshall, Lindsay; Harry, Rachel A; Hutchinson, James A; Isaacs, John D; Joosten, Irma; van Kooten, Cees; Lopez Diaz de Cerio, Ascension; Nikolic, Tatjana; Oral, Haluk Barbaros; Sofronic-Milosavljevic, Ljiljana; Ritter, Thomas; Riquelme, Paloma; Thomson, Angus W; Trucco, Massimo; Vives-Pi, Marta; Martinez-Caceres, Eva M; Hilkens, Catharien M U

    2016-01-01

    Cellular therapies with tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (tolAPC) show great promise for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and for the prevention of destructive immune responses after transplantation. The methodologies for generating tolAPC vary greatly between different laboratories, making it difficult to compare data from different studies; thus constituting a major hurdle for the development of standardised tolAPC therapeutic products. Here we describe an initiative by members of the tolAPC field to generate a minimum information model for tolAPC (MITAP), providing a reporting framework that will make differences and similarities between tolAPC products transparent. In this way, MITAP constitutes a first but important step towards the production of standardised and reproducible tolAPC for clinical application. PMID:27635311

  2. Cytokine profiles and phenotype regulation of antigen presenting cells by genotype-I porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gimeno Mariona

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study examined the immunological response of antigen presenting cells (APC to genotype-I isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV infection by analysing the cytokine profile induced and evaluating the changes taking place upon infection on immunologically relevant cell markers (MHCI, MHCII, CD80/86, CD14, CD16, CD163, CD172a, SWC9. Several types of APC were infected with 39 PRRSV isolates. The results show that different isolates were able to induce different patterns of IL-10 and TNF-α. The four possible phenotypes based on the ability to induce IL-10 and/or TNF-α were observed, although different cell types seemed to have different capabilities. In addition, isolates inducing different cytokine-release profiles on APC could induce different expression of cell markers.

  3. Minimum information about tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (MITAP): a first step towards reproducibility and standardisation of cellular therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiering, Rachel; Aguillon, Juan C.; Anderson, Amy E.; Appel, Silke; Benitez-Ribas, Daniel; ten Brinke, Anja; Broere, Femke; Cools, Nathalie; Cuturi, Maria Cristina; Diboll, Julie; Geissler, Edward K.; Giannoukakis, Nick; Gregori, Silvia; van Ham, S. Marieke; Lattimer, Staci; Marshall, Lindsay; Harry, Rachel A.; Hutchinson, James A.; Isaacs, John D.; Joosten, Irma; van Kooten, Cees; Lopez Diaz de Cerio, Ascension; Nikolic, Tatjana; Oral, Haluk Barbaros; Sofronic-Milosavljevic, Ljiljana; Ritter, Thomas; Riquelme, Paloma; Thomson, Angus W.; Trucco, Massimo; Vives-Pi, Marta; Martinez-Caceres, Eva M.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular therapies with tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (tolAPC) show great promise for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and for the prevention of destructive immune responses after transplantation. The methodologies for generating tolAPC vary greatly between different laboratories, making it difficult to compare data from different studies; thus constituting a major hurdle for the development of standardised tolAPC therapeutic products. Here we describe an initiative by members of the tolAPC field to generate a minimum information model for tolAPC (MITAP), providing a reporting framework that will make differences and similarities between tolAPC products transparent. In this way, MITAP constitutes a first but important step towards the production of standardised and reproducible tolAPC for clinical application. PMID:27635311

  4. Self-Antigen Presentation by Keratinocytes in the Inflamed Adult Skin Modulates T-Cell Auto-Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Michael; Tounsi, Amel; Gaffal, Evelyn; Bald, Tobias; Papatriantafyllou, Maria; Ludwig, Julia; Pougialis, Georg; Bestvater, Felix; Klotz, Luisa; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Tüting, Thomas; Hämmerling, Günter J; Arnold, Bernd; Oelert, Thilo

    2015-08-01

    Keratinocytes have a pivotal role in the regulation of immune responses, but the impact of antigen presentation by these cells is still poorly understood, particularly in a situation where the antigen will be presented only in adult life. Here, we generated a transgenic mouse model in which keratinocytes exclusively present a myelin basic protein (MBP) peptide covalently linked to the major histocompatibility complex class II β-chain, solely under inflammatory conditions. In these mice, inflammation caused by epicutaneous contact sensitizer treatment resulted in keratinocyte-mediated expansion of MBP-specific CD4(+) T cells in the skin. Moreover, repeated contact sensitizer application preceding a systemic MBP immunization reduced the reactivity of the respective CD4(+) T cells and lowered the symptoms of the resulting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. This downregulation was CD4(+) T-cell-mediated and dependent on the presence of the immune modulator Dickkopf-3. Thus, presentation of a neo self-antigen by keratinocytes in the inflamed, adult skin can modulate CD4(+) T-cell auto-aggression at a distal organ. PMID:25835957

  5. A novel system of artificial antigen-presenting cells efficiently stimulates Flu peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Adoptive immunotherapy depends on relevant numbers of cytolytic T lymphocytes. → An ideal artificial APCs system was successfully prepared in vivo. → Controlled release of IL-2 leads to much more T-cell expansion. → This system is better than general cellular APCs on T-cell expansion. -- Abstract: Therapeutic numbers of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are key effectors in successful adoptive immunotherapy. However, efficient and reproducible methods to meet the qualification remain poor. To address this issue, we designed the artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) system based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). A modified emulsion method was used for the preparation of PLGA particles encapsulating interleukin-2 (IL-2). Biotinylated molecular ligands for recognition and co-stimulation of T cells were attached to the particle surface through the binding of avidin-biotin. These formed the aAPC system. The function of aAPCs in the proliferation of specific CTLs against human Flu antigen was detected by enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT) and MTT staining methods. Finally, we successfully prepared this suitable aAPC system. The results show that IL-2 is released from aAPCs in a sustained manner over 30 days. This dramatically improves the stimulatory capacity of this system as compared to the effect of exogenous addition of cytokine. In addition, our aAPCs promote the proliferation of Flu antigen-specific CTLs more effectively than the autologous cellular APCs. Here, this aAPC platform is proved to be suitable for expansion of human antigen-specific T cells.

  6. A novel system of artificial antigen-presenting cells efficiently stimulates Flu peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Hui [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Peking University People' s Hospital, Beijing 100044 (China); Peng, Ji-Run, E-mail: pengjr@medmail.com.cn [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Peking University People' s Hospital, Beijing 100044 (China); Chen, Peng-Cheng; Gong, Lei [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Peking University People' s Hospital, Beijing 100044 (China); Qiao, Shi-Shi [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China); Wang, Wen-Zhen; Cui, Zhu-Qingqing; Yu, Xin; Wei, Yu-Hua [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Peking University People' s Hospital, Beijing 100044 (China); Leng, Xi-Sheng, E-mail: lengxs2003@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Peking University People' s Hospital, Beijing 100044 (China)

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} Adoptive immunotherapy depends on relevant numbers of cytolytic T lymphocytes. {yields} An ideal artificial APCs system was successfully prepared in vivo. {yields} Controlled release of IL-2 leads to much more T-cell expansion. {yields} This system is better than general cellular APCs on T-cell expansion. -- Abstract: Therapeutic numbers of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are key effectors in successful adoptive immunotherapy. However, efficient and reproducible methods to meet the qualification remain poor. To address this issue, we designed the artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) system based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). A modified emulsion method was used for the preparation of PLGA particles encapsulating interleukin-2 (IL-2). Biotinylated molecular ligands for recognition and co-stimulation of T cells were attached to the particle surface through the binding of avidin-biotin. These formed the aAPC system. The function of aAPCs in the proliferation of specific CTLs against human Flu antigen was detected by enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT) and MTT staining methods. Finally, we successfully prepared this suitable aAPC system. The results show that IL-2 is released from aAPCs in a sustained manner over 30 days. This dramatically improves the stimulatory capacity of this system as compared to the effect of exogenous addition of cytokine. In addition, our aAPCs promote the proliferation of Flu antigen-specific CTLs more effectively than the autologous cellular APCs. Here, this aAPC platform is proved to be suitable for expansion of human antigen-specific T cells.

  7. A Lipid Based Antigen Delivery System Efficiently Facilitates MHC Class-I Antigen Presentation in Dendritic Cells to Stimulate CD8+ T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Mithun; Mazumder, Saumyabrata; Bhattacharya, Souparno; Choudhury, Somsubhra Thakur; Sabur, Abdus; Shadab, Md.; Bhattacharya, Pradyot; Ali, Nahid

    2016-06-01

    The most effective strategy for protection against intracellular infections such as Leishmania is vaccination with live parasites. Use of recombinant proteins avoids the risks associated with live vaccines. However, due to low immunogenicity, they fail to trigger T cell responses particularly of CD8+ cells requisite for persistent immunity. Previously we showed the importance of protein entrapment in cationic liposomes and MPL as adjuvant for elicitation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses for long-term protection. In this study we investigated the role of cationic liposomes on maturation and antigen presentation capacity of dendritic cells (DCs). We observed that cationic liposomes were taken up very efficiently by DCs and transported to different cellular sites. DCs activated with liposomal rgp63 led to efficient presentation of antigen to specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, lymphoid CD8+ T cells from liposomal rgp63 immunized mice demonstrated better proliferative ability when co-cultured ex vivo with stimulated DCs. Addition of MPL to vaccine enhanced the antigen presentation by DCs and induced more efficient antigen specific CD8+ T cell responses when compared to free and liposomal antigen. These liposomal formulations presented to CD8+ T cells through TAP-dependent MHC-I pathway offer new possibilities for a safe subunit vaccine.

  8. Tunable chemokine production by antigen presenting dendritic cells in response to changes in regulatory T cell frequency in mouse reactive lymph nodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Dal Secco

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although evidence exists that regulatory T cells (Tregs can suppress the effector phase of immune responses, it is clear that their major role is in suppressing T cell priming in secondary lymphoid organs. Recent experiments using two photon laser microscopy indicate that dendritic cells (DCs are central to Treg cell function and that the in vivo mechanisms of T cell regulation are more complex than those described in vitro. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we have sought to determine whether and how modulation of Treg numbers modifies the lymph node (LN microenvironment. We found that pro-inflammatory chemokines -- CCL2 (MCP-1 and CCL3 (MIP-la -- are secreted in the LN early (24 h after T cell activation, that this secretion is dependent on antigen-specific DC-T cell interactions, and that it was inversely related to the frequency of Tregs specific for the same antigen. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Tregs modify the chemoattractant properties of antigen-presenting DCs, which, as the frequency of Tregs increases, fail to produce CCL2 and CCL3 and to attract antigen-specific T cells. CONCLUSIONS: These results substantiate a major role of Tregs in LN patterning during antigen-specific immune responses.

  9. Dynamic imaging of experimental Leishmania donovani-induced hepatic granulomas detects Kupffer cell-restricted antigen presentation to antigen-specific CD8 T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynette Beattie

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Kupffer cells (KCs represent the major phagocytic population within the liver and provide an intracellular niche for the survival of a number of important human pathogens. Although KCs have been extensively studied in vitro, little is known of their in vivo response to infection and their capacity to directly interact with antigen-specific CD8(+ T cells. Here, using a combination of approaches including whole mount and thin section confocal microscopy, adoptive cell transfer and intra-vital 2-photon microscopy, we demonstrate that KCs represent the only detectable population of mononuclear phagocytes within granulomas induced by Leishmania donovani infection that are capable of presenting parasite-derived peptide to effector CD8(+ T cells. This restriction of antigen presentation to KCs within the Leishmania granuloma has important implications for the identification of new candidate vaccine antigens and for the design of novel immuno-therapeutic interventions.

  10. CD8(+ T cells restrict Yersinia pseudotuberculosis infection: bypass of anti-phagocytosis by targeting antigen-presenting cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly A Bergman

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available All Yersinia species target and bind to phagocytic cells, but uptake and destruction of bacteria are prevented by injection of anti-phagocytic Yop proteins into the host cell. Here we provide evidence that CD8(+ T cells, which canonically eliminate intracellular pathogens, are important for restricting Yersinia, even though bacteria are primarily found in an extracellular locale during the course of disease. In a model of infection with attenuated Y. pseudotuberculosis, mice deficient for CD8(+ T cells were more susceptible to infection than immunocompetent mice. Although exposure to attenuated Y. pseudotuberculosis generated T(H1-type antibody responses and conferred protection against challenge with fully virulent bacteria, depletion of CD8(+ T cells during challenge severely compromised protective immunity. Strikingly, mice lacking the T cell effector molecule perforin also succumbed to Y. pseudotuberculosis infection. Given that the function of perforin is to kill antigen-presenting cells, we reasoned that cell death marks bacteria-associated host cells for internalization by neighboring phagocytes, thus allowing ingestion and clearance of the attached bacteria. Supportive of this model, cytolytic T cell killing of Y. pseudotuberculosis-associated host cells results in engulfment by neighboring phagocytes of both bacteria and target cells, bypassing anti-phagocytosis. Our findings are consistent with a novel function for cell-mediated immune responses protecting against extracellular pathogens like Yersinia: perforin and CD8(+ T cells are critical for hosts to overcome the anti-phagocytic action of Yops.

  11. Intracellular transport of MHC class II and associated invariant chain in antigen presenting cells from AP-3-deficient mocha mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevilla, L M; Richter, S S; Miller, J

    2001-06-15

    MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation requires trafficking of newly synthesized class II-invariant chain complexes from the trans-Golgi network to endosomal, peptide-loading compartments. This transport is mediated by dileucine-like motifs within the cytosolic tail of the invariant chain. Although these signals have been well characterized, the cytosolic proteins that interact with these dileucine signals and mediate Golgi sorting and endosomal transport have not been identified. Recently, an adaptor complex, AP-3, has been identified that interacts with dileucine motifs and mediates endosomal/lysosomal transport in yeast, Drosophila, and mammals. In this report, we have assessed class II-invariant chain trafficking in a strain of mice (mocha) which lacks expression of AP-3. Our studies demonstrate that the lack of AP-3 does not affect the kinetics of invariant chain degradation, the route of class II-invariant chain transport, or the rate and extent of class II-peptide binding as assessed by the generation of SDS-stable dimers. The possible role of other known or unknown adaptor complexes in class II-invariant chain transport is discussed. PMID:11520080

  12. Immune tolerance maintained by cooperative interactions between T cells and antigen presenting cells shapes a diverse TCR repertoire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine eBest

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The T cell population in an individual needs to avoid harmful activation by self-peptides while maintaining the ability to respond to an unknown set of foreign peptides. This property is acquired by a combination of thymic and extra-thymic mechanisms. We extend current models for the development of self/non-self discrimination to consider the acquisition of self-tolerance as an emergent system level property of the overall T cell receptor repertoire. We propose that tolerance is established at the level of the antigen presenting cell/T cell cluster, which facilitates and integrates co-operative interactions between T cells of different specificity. The threshold for self-reactivity is therefore imposed at a population level, and not at the level of the individual T cell/antigen encounter. Mathematically, the model can be formulated as a linear programming optimisation problem, which can be implemented as a multiplicative update algorithm which shows a rapid convergence to a stable state. The model constrains self-reactivity within a predefined threshold, but maintains the diversity and cross reactivity which are key characteristics of human T cell immunity. We show further that the size of individual clones in the model repertoire remains heterogeneous, and that new clones can establish themselves even when the repertoire is stable. Our study combines the salient features of the danger model of self/non-self discrimination with the concepts of quorum sensing, and extends repertoire generation models to encompass the establishment of tolerance. Furthermore, the dynamic and continuous repertoire reshaping which underlies tolerance in this model suggests opportunities for therapeutic intervention to achieve long-term tolerance following transplantation.

  13. Artificial antigen-presenting cells plus IL-15 and IL-21 efficiently induce melanoma-specific cytotoxic CD8+CD28+ T lymphocyte responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Yu; Yuan Fang; Xi Li; Nuo Zhou; Yong-Xiang Zhao; Xiao-Ling Lu; Jian He; Sodaly Mongkhoune; Yi Peng; Yuan Xie; Jing Su; Su-Fang Zhou; Xiao-Xun Xie; Guo-Rong Luo

    2013-01-01

    To develop a novel artificial antigen-presenting system for efficiently inducing melanoma-specific CD8+CD28+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. Methods: Cell-sized Dynabeads® M-450 Epoxy beads coated with H-2Kb:Ig-TRP2180-188 and anti-CD28 antibody were used as artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) to induce melanoma-specific CD8+CD28+CTL responses with the help of IL-21 and IL-15. Dimer staining, proliferation, ELISPOT, and cytotoxicity experiments were conducted to evaluate the frequency and activity of induced CTLs. Results: Dimer staining demonstrated that the new artificial antigen-presenting system efficiently induced melanoma TRP2-specific CD8+CD28+ CTLs. Proliferation and ELISPOT assays indicated that the induced CTLs rapidly proliferate and produce increased IFN-γ under the stimulation of H-2Kb:Ig-TRP2-aAPCs, IL-15, and IL-21. In addition, cytotoxicity experiments showed that induced CTLs have specific killing activity of target cells. Conclusions: The new artificial antigen-presenting system including aAPCs plus IL-21 and IL-15 can induce a large number of antigen-specific CD8+CD28+ CTLs against the melanoma. Our study provides evidence for a novel adoptive immunotherapy against tumors.

  14. Balancing selection maintains a form of ERAP2 that undergoes nonsense-mediated decay and affects antigen presentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida M Andrés

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A remarkable characteristic of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC is its extreme genetic diversity, which is maintained by balancing selection. In fact, the MHC complex remains one of the best-known examples of natural selection in humans, with well-established genetic signatures and biological mechanisms for the action of selection. Here, we present genetic and functional evidence that another gene with a fundamental role in MHC class I presentation, endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 2 (ERAP2, has also evolved under balancing selection and contains a variant that affects antigen presentation. Specifically, genetic analyses of six human populations revealed strong and consistent signatures of balancing selection affecting ERAP2. This selection maintains two highly differentiated haplotypes (Haplotype A and Haplotype B, with frequencies 0.44 and 0.56, respectively. We found that ERAP2 expressed from Haplotype B undergoes differential splicing and encodes a truncated protein, leading to nonsense-mediated decay of the mRNA. To investigate the consequences of ERAP2 deficiency on MHC presentation, we correlated surface MHC class I expression with ERAP2 genotypes in primary lymphocytes. Haplotype B homozygotes had lower levels of MHC class I expressed on the surface of B cells, suggesting that naturally occurring ERAP2 deficiency affects MHC presentation and immune response. Interestingly, an ERAP2 paralog, endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1, also shows genetic signatures of balancing selection. Together, our findings link the genetic signatures of selection with an effect on splicing and a cellular phenotype. Although the precise selective pressure that maintains polymorphism is unknown, the demonstrated differences between the ERAP2 splice forms provide important insights into the potential mechanism for the action of selection.

  15. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 inhibits proliferation but not the suppressive function of regulatory T cells in the absence of antigen-presenting cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoo, A.L.; Joosten, I.; Michels, M.; Woestenenk, R.M.; Preijers, F.W.M.B.; He, X.; Netea, M.G.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Koenen, H.J.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin D3 is known to induce regulatory T (Treg) cells by rendering antigen-presenting cells tolerogenic, its direct effect on human naturally occurring Treg cells is unclear. Here, we investigated if and how 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1,25(OH)2D3] can directly affect the proliferation and functio

  16. Epigenetic regulations in the IFNγ signalling pathway: IFNγ-mediated MHC class I upregulation on tumour cells is associated with DNA demethylation of antigen-presenting machinery genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlková, Veronika; Štěpánek, Ivan; Hrušková, Veronika; Šenigl, Filip; Mayerová, Veronika; Šrámek, Martin; Šímová, Jana; Bieblová, Jana; Indrová, Marie; Hejhal, Tomáš; Dérian, Nicolas; Klatzmann, David; Six, Adrien; Reiniš, Milan

    2014-08-30

    Downregulation of MHC class I expression on tumour cells, a common mechanism by which tumour cells can escape from specific immune responses, can be associated with coordinated silencing of antigen-presenting machinery genes. The expression of these genes can be restored by IFNγ. In this study we documented association of DNA demethylation of selected antigen-presenting machinery genes located in the MHC genomic locus (TAP-1, TAP-2, LMP-2, LMP-7) upon IFNγ treatment with MHC class I upregulation on tumour cells in several MHC class I-deficient murine tumour cell lines (TC-1/A9, TRAMP-C2, MK16 and MC15). Our data also documented higher methylation levels in these genes in TC-1/A9 cells, as compared to their parental MHC class I-positive TC-1 cells. IFNγ-mediated DNA demethylation was relatively fast in comparison with demethylation induced by DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-azacytidine, and associated with increased histone H3 acetylation in the promoter regions of APM genes. Comparative transcriptome analysis in distinct MHC class I-deficient cell lines upon their treatment with either IFNγ or epigenetic agents revealed that a set of genes, significantly enriched for the antigen presentation pathway, was regulated in the same manner. Our data demonstrate that IFNγ acts as an epigenetic modifier when upregulating the expression of antigen-presenting machinery genes.

  17. Peptide-beta2-microglobulin-major histocompatibility complex expressing cells are potent antigen-presenting cells that can generate specific T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermann, Sonja; Petrykowska, Susanne; Manns, Michael P; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F

    2007-09-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy represents a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer. Successful adoptive immunotherapy depends on the ex vivo priming and expansion of antigen-specific T cells. However, the in vitro generation of adequate numbers of functional antigen-specific T cell remains a major obstacle. It is important to develop efficient and reproducible methods to generate high numbers of antigen-specific T cells for adoptive T-cell transfer. We have developed a new artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) by transfection of major histocompatibility (MHC) class I negative Daudi cells with a peptide-beta2-microglobulin-MHC fusion construct (single-chain aAPC) ensuring presentation of the peptide-MHC complex of interest. Using this artificial antigen-presenting cell, we could generate up to 9.2 x 10(8) antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells from 10 ml blood. In vitro generated T cells lysed endogenously presented antigens. Direct comparison of the single-chain aAPC with autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells demonstrated that these cells were equally efficient in stimulation of T cells. Finally, we were able to generate antigen-specific T cell lines from perpheral blood mononuclear cells of patients receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy. The use of single-chain aAPC represent a promising option for the generation of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells, which could be used for adoptive T-cell therapy.

  18. Peptide-β2-microglobulin-major histocompatibility complex expressing cells are potent antigen-presenting cells that can generate specific T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermann, Sonja; Petrykowska, Susanne; Manns, Michael P; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F

    2007-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy represents a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer. Successful adoptive immunotherapy depends on the ex vivo priming and expansion of antigen-specific T cells. However, the in vitro generation of adequate numbers of functional antigen-specific T cell remains a major obstacle. It is important to develop efficient and reproducible methods to generate high numbers of antigen-specific T cells for adoptive T-cell transfer. We have developed a new artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) by transfection of major histocompatibility (MHC) class I negative Daudi cells with a peptide-β2-microglobulin–MHC fusion construct (single-chain aAPC) ensuring presentation of the peptide–MHC complex of interest. Using this artificial antigen-presenting cell, we could generate up to 9·2 × 108 antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cells from 10 ml blood. In vitro generated T cells lysed endogenously presented antigens. Direct comparison of the single-chain aAPC with autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells demonstrated that these cells were equally efficient in stimulation of T cells. Finally, we were able to generate antigen-specific T cell lines from perpheral blood mononuclear cells of patients receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy. The use of single-chain aAPC represent a promising option for the generation of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells, which could be used for adoptive T-cell therapy. PMID:17472719

  19. Aedes aegypti saliva alters leukocyte recruitment and cytokine signaling by antigen-presenting cells during West Nile virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley S Schneider

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is transmitted during mosquito bloodfeeding. Consequently, the first vertebrate cells to contact WNV are cells in the skin, followed by those in the draining lymph node. Macrophages and dendritic cells are critical early responders in host defense against WNV infection, not just because of their role in orchestrating the immune response, but also because of their importance as sites of early peripheral viral replication. Antigen-presenting cell (APC signals have a profound effect on host antiviral responses and disease severity. During transmission, WNV is intimately associated with mosquito saliva. Due to the ability of mosquito saliva to affect inflammation and immune responses, and the importance of understanding early events in WNV infection, we investigated whether mosquito saliva alters APC signaling during arbovirus infection, and if alterations in cell recruitment occur when WNV infection is initiated with mosquito saliva. Accordingly, experiments were performed with cultured dendritic cells and macrophages, flow cytometry was used to characterize infiltrating cell types in the skin and lymph nodes during early infection, and real-time RT-PCR was employed to evaluate virus and cytokine levels. Our in vitro results suggest that mosquito saliva significantly decreases the expression of interferon-beta and inducible nitric oxide synthase in macrophages (by as much as 50 and 70%, respectively, whilst transiently enhancing interleukin-10 (IL-10 expression. In vivo results indicate that the predominate effect of mosquito feeding is to significantly reduce the recruitment of T cells, leading the inoculation site of mice exposed to WNV alone to have up to 2.8 fold more t cells as mice infected in the presence of mosquito saliva. These shifts in cell population are associated with significantly elevated IL-10 and WNV (up to 4.0 and 10 fold, respectively in the skin and draining lymph nodes. These results suggest that mosquito

  20. Ubiquitination by March-I prevents MHC class II recycling and promotes MHC class II turnover in antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyung-Jin; Walseng, Even; Ishido, Satoshi; Roche, Paul A

    2015-08-18

    MHC class II (MHC-II)-dependent antigen presentation by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) is carefully controlled to achieve specificity of immune responses; the regulated assembly and degradation of antigenic peptide-MHC-II complexes (pMHC-II) is one aspect of such control. In this study, we have examined the role of ubiquitination in regulating pMHC-II biosynthesis, endocytosis, recycling, and turnover in APCs. By using APCs obtained from MHC-II ubiquitination mutant mice, we find that whereas ubiquitination does not affect pMHC-II formation in dendritic cells (DCs), it does promote the subsequent degradation of newly synthesized pMHC-II. Acute activation of DCs or B cells terminates expression of the MHC-II E3 ubiquitin ligase March-I and prevents pMHC-II ubiquitination. Most importantly, this change results in very efficient pMHC-II recycling from the surface of DCs and B cells, thereby preventing targeting of internalized pMHC-II to lysosomes for degradation. Biochemical and functional assays confirmed that pMHC-II turnover is suppressed in MHC-II ubiquitin mutant DCs or by acute activation of wild-type DCs. These studies demonstrate that acute APC activation blocks the ubiquitin-dependent turnover of pMHC-II by promoting efficient pMHC-II recycling and preventing lysosomal targeting of internalized pMHC-II, thereby enhancing pMHC-II stability for efficient antigen presentation to CD4 T cells.

  1. Parasite Manipulation of the Invariant Chain and the Peptide Editor H2-DM Affects Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Antigen Presentation during Toxoplasma gondii Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, Louis-Philippe; Nishi, Manami; El-Hage, Sandy; Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J; Dzierszinski, Florence S

    2015-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite. This apicomplexan is the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, a leading cause of central nervous system disease in AIDS. It has long been known that T. gondii interferes with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) antigen presentation to attenuate CD4(+) T cell responses and establish persisting infections. Transcriptional downregulation of MHC-II genes by T. gondii was previously established, but the precise mechanisms inhibiting MHC-II function are currently unknown. Here, we show that, in addition to transcriptional regulation of MHC-II, the parasite modulates the expression of key components of the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway, namely, the MHC-II-associated invariant chain (Ii or CD74) and the peptide editor H2-DM, in professional antigen-presenting cells (pAPCs). Genetic deletion of CD74 restored the ability of infected dendritic cells to present a parasite antigen in the context of MHC-II in vitro. CD74 mRNA and protein levels were, surprisingly, elevated in infected cells, whereas MHC-II and H2-DM expression was inhibited. CD74 accumulated mainly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and this phenotype required live parasites, but not active replication. Finally, we compared the impacts of genetic deletion of CD74 and H2-DM genes on parasite dissemination toward lymphoid organs in mice, as well as activation of CD4(+) T cells and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) levels during acute infection. Cyst burdens and survival during the chronic phase of infection were also evaluated in wild-type and knockout mice. These results highlight the fact that the infection is influenced by multiple levels of parasite manipulation of the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway. PMID:26195549

  2. Antigen-bound C3b and C4b enhance antigen-presenting cell function in activation of human T-cell clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvieux, J; Yssel, H; Colomb, M G

    1988-10-01

    The effect of complement fragments C3b and C4b, on the triggering of antigen-specific human T-cell clones by Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human lymphoblastoid B cells (LCL) when these fragments are covalently coupled to the antigen tetanus toxin (TT) is described. TT was chemically cross-linked to purified C3b [(TT-C3b)n], C4b [(TT-C4b)n] or bovine serum albumin [(TT-BSA)n] as a control. T-cell activation was quantified by tritiated thymidine incorporation and 51Cr release. (TT-C3b)n and (TT-C4b)n induced proliferative responses comparable to (TT-BSA)n but at 18-25 and 4-6 lower concentrations, respectively. This enhancing effect required the covalent cross-linking of the complement fragments to the antigen and involved intracellular processing of the latter by LCL. Antigen presentation was similarly enhanced when measuring the cytotoxic activity of a helper T-cell clone against LCL previously pulsed with (TT-C3b)n or (TT-C4b)n compared with (TT-BSA)n. Binding studies, carried out on LCL using TT radiolabelled with 125I before cross-linking, indicated that (TT-C3b)n and (TT-C4b)n gave three- to four-fold more binding than (TT-BSA)n. Addition of antibodies against CR1 and CR2 or proteolytic removal of these complement receptors with trypsin inhibited by about 60% the enhancing effect of TT-bound C3b and C4b in both binding and functional assays. These results indicate that binding of C3b or C4b to antigen enhances antigen-specific proliferative and cytotoxic responses of T cells by targeting opsonized antigen onto complement receptors CR1 and CR2 of LCL. The putative significance of these findings in terms of regulation of immune responses by complement is discussed. PMID:2973431

  3. Antigen-bound C3b and C4b enhance antigen-presenting cell function in activation of human T-cell clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvieux, J; Yssel, H; Colomb, M G

    1988-10-01

    The effect of complement fragments C3b and C4b, on the triggering of antigen-specific human T-cell clones by Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human lymphoblastoid B cells (LCL) when these fragments are covalently coupled to the antigen tetanus toxin (TT) is described. TT was chemically cross-linked to purified C3b [(TT-C3b)n], C4b [(TT-C4b)n] or bovine serum albumin [(TT-BSA)n] as a control. T-cell activation was quantified by tritiated thymidine incorporation and 51Cr release. (TT-C3b)n and (TT-C4b)n induced proliferative responses comparable to (TT-BSA)n but at 18-25 and 4-6 lower concentrations, respectively. This enhancing effect required the covalent cross-linking of the complement fragments to the antigen and involved intracellular processing of the latter by LCL. Antigen presentation was similarly enhanced when measuring the cytotoxic activity of a helper T-cell clone against LCL previously pulsed with (TT-C3b)n or (TT-C4b)n compared with (TT-BSA)n. Binding studies, carried out on LCL using TT radiolabelled with 125I before cross-linking, indicated that (TT-C3b)n and (TT-C4b)n gave three- to four-fold more binding than (TT-BSA)n. Addition of antibodies against CR1 and CR2 or proteolytic removal of these complement receptors with trypsin inhibited by about 60% the enhancing effect of TT-bound C3b and C4b in both binding and functional assays. These results indicate that binding of C3b or C4b to antigen enhances antigen-specific proliferative and cytotoxic responses of T cells by targeting opsonized antigen onto complement receptors CR1 and CR2 of LCL. The putative significance of these findings in terms of regulation of immune responses by complement is discussed.

  4. Manufacture of clinical-grade CD19-specific T cells stably expressing chimeric antigen receptor using Sleeping Beauty system and artificial antigen presenting cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harjeet Singh

    Full Text Available Adoptive transfer of T cells expressing a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR is being evaluated in multiple clinical trials. Our current approach to adoptive immunotherapy is based on a second generation CAR (designated CD19RCD28 that signals through a CD28 and CD3-ζ endodomain. T cells are electroporated with DNA plasmids from the Sleeping Beauty (SB transposon/transposase system to express this CAR. Stable integrants of genetically modified T cells can then be retrieved when co-cultured with designer artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC in the presence of interleukin (IL-2 and 21. Here, we reveal how the platform technologies of SB-mediated transposition and CAR-dependent propagation on aAPC were adapted for human application. Indeed, we have initiated clinical trials in patients with high-risk B-lineage malignancies undergoing autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT. We describe the process to manufacture clinical grade CD19-specific T cells derived from healthy donors. Three validation runs were completed in compliance with current good manufacturing practice for Phase I/II trials demonstrating that by 28 days of co-culture on γ-irradiated aAPC ∼10(10 T cells were produced of which >95% expressed CAR. These genetically modified and propagated T cells met all quality control testing and release criteria in support of infusion.

  5. Parasite Manipulation of the Invariant Chain and the Peptide Editor H2-DM Affects Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Antigen Presentation during Toxoplasma gondii Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Leroux, Louis-Philippe; Nishi, Manami; El-Hage, Sandy; Fox, Barbara A.; Bzik, David J.; Dzierszinski, Florence S.

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite. This apicomplexan is the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, a leading cause of central nervous system disease in AIDS. It has long been known that T. gondii interferes with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) antigen presentation to attenuate CD4+ T cell responses and establish persisting infections. Transcriptional downregulation of MHC-II genes by T. gondii was previously established, but the precise mechanisms...

  6. Autophagy and ATP-induced anti-apoptosis in antigen presenting cells (APC) follows the cytokine storm in patients after major trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, E Marion; Flacke, Sarah; Liu, Fengguang; Lorenz, Myriam R.; Schilling, Patricia; Nass, Max E.; Foehr, Karl J.; Huber-Lang, Markus; Weiss, Manfred E.

    2011-01-01

    Severe trauma and the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) occur as a result of a cytokine storm which is in part due to ATP released from damaged tissue. This pathology also leads to increased numbers of immature antigen presenting cells (APC) sharing properties of dendritic cells (DC) or macrophages (MΦ). The occurrence of immature APC appears to coincide with the reactivation of herpes virus infections such as Epstein Barr virus (EBV). The aim of this study was the comparative an...

  7. Artificial antigen-presenting cells transduced with telomerase efficiently expand epitope-specific, human leukocyte antigen-restricted cytotoxic T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Jakob; Latouche, Jean-Baptiste; Ma, Chia; Sadelain, Michel

    2005-06-15

    Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is overexpressed in most human tumors, making it a potential target for cancer immunotherapy. hTERT-derived CTL epitopes have been identified previously, including p865 (RLVDDFLLV) and p540 (ILAKFLHWL), which are restricted by the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I A*0201 allele. However, it remains a major challenge to efficiently and consistently expand hTERT-specific CTLs from donor peripheral blood T lymphocytes. To bypass the need for generating conventional antigen-presenting cells (APC) on an autologous basis, we investigated the potential ability of fibroblast-derived artificial APCs (AAPC) to activate and expand HLA-A*0201-restricted CTLs. We show here that AAPCs stably expressing HLA-A*0201, human beta(2)-microglobulin, B7.1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and LFA-3, together with either p540 and p865 minigenes or the full-length hTERT, effectively stimulate tumoricidal, hTERT-specific CTLs. hTERT-expressing AAPCs stimulated both p540 and p865 CTLs as shown by peptide-specific cytolysis and tetramer staining, indicating that hTERT is processed by the AAPCs and that the two peptides are presented as codominant epitopes. The level of cytotoxic activity against a panel of tumors comprising hematologic and epithelial malignancies varied, correlating overall with the level of HLA-A2 and hTERT expression by the target cell. Starting from 100 mL blood, approximately 100 million hTERT-specific CTLs could be generated over the course of five sequential stimulations, representing an expansion of approximately 1 x 10(5). Our data show that AAPCs process hTERT antigen and efficiently stimulate hTERT-specific CTLs from human peripheral blood T lymphocytes and suggest that sufficient expansion could be achieved to be clinically useful for adoptive cell therapy.

  8. Antigen presentation by non-immune B-cell hybridoma clones: presentation of synthetic antigenic sites reveals clones that exhibit no specificity and clones that present only one epitope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohly, H. H.; Morrison, D. R.; Atassi, M. Z.

    1989-01-01

    Recently, we reported the preparation and antigen-presenting properties of hybridoma B-cell clones obtained after fusing non-secreting, non-antigen presenting Balb/c 653-myeloma cells with non-immune SJL spleen cells. It was found that antigen presentation at the clonal level can be specific or non-specific, depending on the particular B-cell clone. In the present work, one specific and one general presenter B-cell clones were tested for their epitope presentation ability to SJL T-cells that were specific to lysozyme or myoglobin. B-cell clone A1G12, a general presenter which presented both lysozyme and myoglobin to their respective T-cell lines, was found to present all five myoglobin epitopes while clone A1L16, a lysozyme specific presenter presented only one of the three epitopes of lysozyme. The latter reveals a hitherto unknown submolecular specificity (to a given epitope within a protein) for antigen presenting cells at the clonal level. Therefore, the specificity of T-cell recognition does not only derive from the T-cell but may also be dependent on the epitope specificity of the antigen-presenting B-cell.

  9. Analysis of detergent-free lipid rafts isolated from CD4+ T cell line: interaction with antigen presenting cells promotes coalescing of lipid rafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Colleen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipid rafts present on the plasma membrane play an important role in spatiotemporal regulation of cell signaling. Physical and chemical characterization of lipid raft size and assessment of their composition before, and after cell stimulation will aid in developing a clear understanding of their regulatory role in cell signaling. We have used visual and biochemical methods and approaches for examining individual and lipid raft sub-populations isolated from a mouse CD4+ T cell line in the absence of detergents. Results Detergent-free rafts were analyzed before and after their interaction with antigen presenting cells. We provide evidence that the average diameter of lipid rafts isolated from un-stimulated T cells, in the absence of detergents, is less than 100 nm. Lipid rafts on CD4+ T cell membranes coalesce to form larger structures, after interacting with antigen presenting cells even in the absence of a foreign antigen. Conclusions Findings presented here indicate that lipid raft coalescence occurs during cellular interactions prior to sensing a foreign antigen.

  10. Cathepsin B in antigen-presenting cells controls mediators of the Th1 immune response during Leishmania major infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris J Gonzalez-Leal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Resistance and susceptibility to Leishmania major infection in the murine model is determined by the capacity of the host to mount either a protective Th1 response or a Th2 response associated with disease progression. Previous reports involving the use of cysteine cathepsin inhibitors indicated that cathepsins B (Ctsb and L (Ctsl play important roles in Th1/Th2 polarization during L. major infection in both susceptible and resistant mouse strains. Although it was hypothesized that these effects are a consequence of differential patterns of antigen processing, the mechanisms underlying these differences were not further investigated. Given the pivotal roles that dendritic cells and macrophages play during Leishmania infection, we generated bone-marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC and macrophages (BMM from Ctsb-/- and Ctsl-/- mice, and studied the effects of Ctsb and Ctsl deficiency on the survival of L. major in infected cells. Furthermore, the signals used by dendritic cells to instruct Th cell polarization were addressed: the expression of MHC class II and co-stimulatory molecules, and cytokine production. We found that Ctsb-/- BMDC express higher levels of MHC class II molecules than wild-type (WT and Ctsl-/- BMDC, while there were no significant differences in the expression of co-stimulatory molecules between cathepsin-deficient and WT cells. Moreover, both BMDC and BMM from Ctsb-/- mice significantly up-regulated the levels of interleukin 12 (IL-12 expression, a key Th1-inducing cytokine. These findings indicate that Ctsb-/- BMDC display more pro-Th1 properties than their WT and Ctsl-/- counterparts, and therefore suggest that Ctsb down-regulates the Th1 response to L. major. Moreover, they propose a novel role for Ctsb as a regulator of cytokine expression.

  11. Establishment and Characterization of a Cell Based Artificial Antigen-Presenting Cell for Expansion and Activation of CD8+ T Cells Ex Vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weijuan Gong; Mingchun Ji; Zhengfeng Cao; Liheng Wang; Yayun Qian; Maozhi Hu; Li Qian; Xingyuan Pan

    2008-01-01

    Atificial antigen-presenting cells are expected to stimulate the expansion and acquisition of optimal therapeutic features of T cells before infusion. Here CD32 that binds to a crystallizable fragment of IgG monoclonal antibody was genetically expressed on human K562 leukemia cells to provide a ligand for T-cell receptor. CD86 and 4-1BBL, which are ligands of CO. stimulating receptors of CD28 and 4-1BB. respectively, were also expressed on K562 cells. Then we accomplished the artificial antigen-presenting cells by coupling K32, CD86/4-IBBL cell with OKT3 monoclonal antibody against CD3.named K32/CD86/4-lBBL/OKT3 cells. These artificial modified cells had the abilities of inducing CD8+ T cell activation. promoting CD8+ T cell proliferation, division, and long-term growth, inhibiting CD8+ T cell apoptosis, and enhancing CD8+ T cell secretion of IFN-Y and perforin. Furthermore, antigen. secific cytotoxic T lymphocytes could be retained in the culture stimulated with K32/CD86/4-1BBL/OKT3 cells at least within 28 day This approach was robust, simple, reproducible and economical for expansion and activation of CD8+ T cells and may have important therapeutic implications for adoptive immunotherapy. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.2007;5(1):47-53.

  12. Effects of low dose X-ray irradiation on antigen presentation and IL-12 secretion in human dendritic cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the effects of low dose X-ray irradiation on the ability of antigen presentation and IL-12 secretion in human dendritic cells that had been cultured for different time in vitro. Methods: The human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were collected and differentiated to dendritic cells (DCs) by rhGM-CSF and rhIL-4 treatment in vitro. The DCs were divided into 3 groups, group A: DCs were cultured for 2 d and then irradiated with 0.05, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.5 Gy X-rays; group B: DCs were cultured for 6 d and then irradiated as above; group C:DCs were cultured without irradiation.At 8 d of cell culture, the DCs were applied to activate T cells and CCK-8 was used to detect MLR (mixed lymphocyte reaction), and the antigen presentation ability of DCs was evaluated. MTT assay was also used to test the cell-killing effect of the activated T-cells on A549 cells. IL-12 in the culture medium of DCs was detected by ELISA. Results: After irradiation with 0.2 and 0.5 Gy X-rays, the antigen presentation ability of DCs was decreased in group A (t=2.79 and 3.71, P<0.05), but significantly increased in group B (t=3.60 and 3.11, P<0.05). The ability of the T cell activation was detected and the proliferation of A549 cells was slightly inhibited by the DCs in group A (t=2.89 and 2.91, P<0.05), but was obviously inhibited by the DCs in group B (t=2.91 and 2.82, P<0.05). Meanwhile,the level of IL-12 was dramatically decreased in group A (t=4.44 and 6.93, P<0.05), but was increased in group B (t=3.51 and 4.12, P<0.05). Conclusions: The abilities of antigen presentation and proliferation inhibition of DCs could be down-regulated by low dose (<0.5 Gy) of X-ray irradiation at the early stage of DCs, but was up-regulated at the late stage of DCs culture. (authors)

  13. Gene Related to Anergy in Lymphocytes (GRAIL) Expression in CD4+ T Cells Impairs Actin Cytoskeletal Organization during T Cell/Antigen-presenting Cell Interactions*

    OpenAIRE

    Schartner, Jill M.; Simonson, William T; Wernimont, Sarah A.; Nettenstrom, Lauren M.; Huttenlocher, Anna; Seroogy, Christine M.

    2009-01-01

    GRAIL (gene related to anergy in lymphocytes), is an E3 ubiquitin ligase with increased expression in anergic CD4+ T cells. The expression of GRAIL has been shown to be both necessary and sufficient for the induction of T cell (T) anergy. To date, several subsets of anergic T cells have demonstrated altered interactions with antigen-presenting cells (APC) and perturbed TCR-mediated signaling. The role of GRAIL in mediating these aspects of T cell anergy remains unclear. We used flow cytometry...

  14. CD80 and CD86 Differentially Regulate Mechanical Interactions of T-Cells with Antigen-Presenting Dendritic Cells and B-Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tong Seng Lim; James Kang Hao Goh; Alessandra Mortellaro; Chwee Teck Lim; Hämmerling, Günter J.; Paola Ricciardi-Castagnoli

    2012-01-01

    Functional T-cell responses are initiated by physical interactions between T-cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs), including dendritic cells (DCs) and B-cells. T-cells are activated more effectively by DCs than by B-cells, but little is known about the key molecular mechanisms that underpin the particular potency of DC in triggering T-cell responses. To better understand the influence of physical intercellular interactions on APC efficacy in activating T-cells, we used single cell force ...

  15. Aetiology and pathogenesis of reactive arthritis: role of non-antigen-presenting effects of HLA-B27

    OpenAIRE

    Vähämiko, Sanna; Penttinen, Markus A.; Granfors, Kaisa

    2005-01-01

    Spondyloarthropathies are inflammatory diseases closely associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 by unknown mechanisms. One of these diseases is reactive arthritis (ReA), which is typically triggered by Gram-negative bacteria, which have lipopolysaccharide as an integral component of their outer membrane. Several findings in vivo and in vitro obtained from patients with ReA and from different model systems suggest that HLA-B27 modulates the interaction between ReA-triggering bacteria...

  16. Identification of putative cathepsin S in mangrove red snapper Lutjanus argentimaculatus and its role in antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin; Li, Lei; Cai, Zhong-Hua

    2012-05-01

    Cathepsin S (CTSS) is a key enzyme employed in the histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-restricted antigens, which are presented by processing class II-associated invariant chains and loaded antigen peptides into class II molecules. To date, little is known about the character and function of CTSS in fish. In the present study, we screened and identified a CTSS cDNA sequence from the mangrove red snapper head kidney cDNA library. The full-length CTSS cDNA contained 1339-bp nucleotide acids encoding 337 amino acids. The sequence shared high identity and similarity with other known cathepsins, especially CTSS (about 56-78% and 79-89%, respectively). Like other cathepsins, the deduced peptide consisted of regions with N-terminal signal peptides, propeptides, and mature peptides. A typical ERWNIN motif in L-like cathepsins and three conservative catalytic activity sites forming a catalytic triad active center were respectively identified in the pro-peptide and mature peptide regions of CTSS. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that mangrove red snapper CTSS was located in the CTSS clade belonging to the L-like cathepsin group, and evolved from the same ancestry. To further characterize the biological activity of the putative CTSS of mangrove snapper, CTSS was expressed in Escherichia coli M15 strains. Like other mammalian CTSS, the recombinant CTSS (rCTSS) had autocatalytic activation properties, can remove pro-peptides, and can release active mature peptides. Active CTSS had the ability to catalyze Z-Phe-Arg-AMC substrates in acidic conditions (pH 5.0) and weak alkaline environments (pH 7.5); this activity could be blocked by the cysteine protease inhibitor E-64. Active CTSS can process recombinant Ii chains (invariant chains) in a stepwise manner in vitro. The results indicate that mangrove red snapper CTSS is a lysosomal cysteine protease family member with a key role in antigen processing in fish.

  17. Particle-based transcutaneous administration of HIV-1 p24 protein to human skin explants and targeting of epidermal antigen presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancan, Fiorenza; Amselgruber, Sarah; Hadam, Sabrina; Munier, Sevérine; Pavot, Vincent; Verrier, Bernard; Hackbarth, Steffen; Combadiere, Behazine; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Vogt, Annika

    2014-02-28

    Transcutaneous immunization is a promising vaccination strategy for the treatment of infectious diseases and cancer. In this study, we investigate the combination of cyanoacrylate skin surface stripping (CSSS) and particle-based antigen delivery to target the HIV-1 p24 protein to skin antigen presenting cells (APC). The CSSS treatment pre-activates skin APC and opens hair follicles, where protein-loaded particles accumulate and allow for sustained delivery of the loaded antigen to perifollicular APC. We found that poly-lactic acid (PLA) and polystyrene (PS) particles targeted the adsorbed HIV-1 p24 protein to the hair follicles. Small amounts of PS and PLA particles were found to translocate to the epidermis and be internalized by skin cells, whereas most of the particles aggregated in the hair follicle canal, where they released the loaded antigen. The p24 protein diffused to the epidermis and dermis and was detected in skin cells, especially in Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. Furthermore, the combination of CSSS and particle-based delivery resulted in activation and maturation of Langerhans cells (HLA-DR, CD80 and CD83). We conclude that particle-based antigen delivery across partially disrupted skin barrier is a feasible and effective approach to needle-free transcutaneous vaccination.

  18. Tumor Destruction and In Situ Delivery of Antigen Presenting Cells Promote Anti-Neoplastic Immune Responses: Implications for the Immunotherapy of Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfredi AA

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Antigen presenting cells (APCs activate helper and cytotoxic T cells specific for antigens expressed by tissue cells, including neoplastic cells. This event occurs after the antigen transfer from tissue cells to APC, and is referred to as "cross-presentation". The number and the state of activation of APC in the tumor control the outcome of cross-presentation, including the establishment of protective immune responses. Cell death favors cross-presentation. Cancer cells normally die, either spontaneously or as a consequence of targeted therapies. The transfer of tumor antigens from dying tumor cells to APCs in vivo, exploiting the cross-presentation pathway, has the potential of yielding novel immunotherapeutic strategies. Their success will depend on at least two factors: the induction of synchronized cell death in the tumor, and the recruitment of activated dendritic cells in the tumor. Under normal conditions, pancreatic cancer represents a privileged environment; its profound chemoresistance reflects limited apoptosis after chemotherapy. Moreover, it usually contains only a few cells endowed with APC function. Endoscopic ultrasonography offers attractive possibilities of circumventing this privilege, including the delivery of ultrasound, radiofrequency or radiation in order to destroy the tumor and the delivery in situ of autologous APC or appropriate chemotactic signals. In general, loco-regional approaches offer the possibility of using the tumor of each patient as a complex antigen source, thus limiting the risk of tumor escape and reducing the need for extensive ex vivo handling of the neoplasm and of the patient APCs.

  19. Particle-based transcutaneous administration of HIV-1 p24 protein to human skin explants and targeting of epidermal antigen presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancan, Fiorenza; Amselgruber, Sarah; Hadam, Sabrina; Munier, Sevérine; Pavot, Vincent; Verrier, Bernard; Hackbarth, Steffen; Combadiere, Behazine; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Vogt, Annika

    2014-02-28

    Transcutaneous immunization is a promising vaccination strategy for the treatment of infectious diseases and cancer. In this study, we investigate the combination of cyanoacrylate skin surface stripping (CSSS) and particle-based antigen delivery to target the HIV-1 p24 protein to skin antigen presenting cells (APC). The CSSS treatment pre-activates skin APC and opens hair follicles, where protein-loaded particles accumulate and allow for sustained delivery of the loaded antigen to perifollicular APC. We found that poly-lactic acid (PLA) and polystyrene (PS) particles targeted the adsorbed HIV-1 p24 protein to the hair follicles. Small amounts of PS and PLA particles were found to translocate to the epidermis and be internalized by skin cells, whereas most of the particles aggregated in the hair follicle canal, where they released the loaded antigen. The p24 protein diffused to the epidermis and dermis and was detected in skin cells, especially in Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. Furthermore, the combination of CSSS and particle-based delivery resulted in activation and maturation of Langerhans cells (HLA-DR, CD80 and CD83). We conclude that particle-based antigen delivery across partially disrupted skin barrier is a feasible and effective approach to needle-free transcutaneous vaccination. PMID:24384300

  20. Identification of the major T-cell antigens present in the Brucella melitensis B115 protein preparation, Brucellergene OCB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denoel, P A; Vo, T K; Weynants, V E; Tibor, A; Gilson, D; Zygmunt, M S; Limet, J N; Letesson, J J

    1997-09-01

    Brucellergene is a commercial allergen prepared from Brucella melitensis strain B115 and containing at least 20 cytoplasmic proteins. These proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE. The unstained gel was divided into 18 fractions and proteins were eluted from the gel fractions. The capacity of the separated proteins to elicit delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) in infected guinea-pigs or to induce the production of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) by blood cells from infected cattle was evaluated. The biological activity of the corresponding protein fractions blotted on to nitrocellulose was measured in a lymphocyte blastogenesis assay. Among the 18 fractions tested, two-spanning the mol. wt ranges 17-22 (fraction 8) and 35-42-kDa (fraction 17)-showed the maximum biological activity in the three tests. These fractions contain two antigens, the Brucella bacterioferritin (BFR) and P39 proteins. Both proteins are good candidates for the detection of cellular immunity to Brucella. PMID:9291893

  1. Transfection of B7-1 cDNA empowers antigen presentation of blood malignant cells for activation of anti-tumor T cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    克晓燕; 贾丽萍; 王晶; 王德炳

    2003-01-01

    Objective To define roles of B7-1 co-stimulation factor expressed in human malignant cell lines in mediating anti-tumor T cell immune responses. Methods Examining human leucocyte antigen (HLA) and B7 expressions on 8 human blood malignancies cell lines by flow cytometry. Transfecting B7-1 gene to B7-1 negative (B7*!-) Raji and B7*!- Jurkat cell lines by liposome, and comparing the potencies of blood malignant cell lines in the induction of T cell activation by examination of T cell cytokine mRNAs before and after transfection using semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results High level of HLA Ⅰ and Ⅱ molecules were expressed in most human blood malignant cell lines examined, and the co-stimulatory factor B7-2 was also highly expressed. In contrast, another member of B7 family: B7-1 was either not expressed or very limitedly expressed in most of these hematopoietic malignant cell lines. Most importantly, transfection of B7-1 gene to B7*!-. Raji and B7*!-. Jurkat cell lines made these cell lines better antigen presenting cells for stimulation of anti-tumor T cell activation, which was demonstrated by up regulation of expression of T cell cytokines IL-2, IL-4 and INF-γ mRNAs after incubation of these tumor cells with T cells for 24 h. Conclusions B7 co-stimulation plays an important role in anti-tumor immunity. Transfection of B7-1 gene to the human hematopoietic malignant cell lines that are deficient in the B7-1 expression empowers their antigen presentation potency for activation of anti-tumor T cells. Our results suggested that repairing the deficiency of B7-1 co-stimulatory pathway in tumor cells might be a novel immunotherapeutic approach for human hematopoietic malignancies.

  2. ESAT-6 Targeting to DEC205+ Antigen Presenting Cells Induces Specific-T Cell Responses against ESAT-6 and Reduces Pulmonary Infection with Virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarón Silva-Sánchez

    Full Text Available Airways infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb is contained mostly by T cell responses, however, Mtb has developed evasion mechanisms which affect antigen presenting cell (APC maturation/recruitment delaying the onset of Ag-specific T cell responses. Hypothetically, bypassing the natural infection routes by delivering antigens directly to APCs may overcome the pathogen's naturally evolved evasion mechanisms, thus facilitating the induction of protective immune responses. We generated a murine monoclonal fusion antibody (α-DEC-ESAT to deliver Early Secretory Antigen Target (ESAT-6 directly to DEC205+ APCs and to assess its in vivo effects on protection associated responses (IFN-γ production, in vivo CTL killing, and pulmonary mycobacterial load. Treatment with α-DEC-ESAT alone induced ESAT-6-specific IFN-γ producing CD4+ T cells and prime-boost immunization prior to Mtb infection resulted in early influx (d14 post-infection and increased IFN-γ+ production by specific T cells in the lungs, compared to scarce IFN-γ production in control mice. In vivo CTL killing was quantified in relevant tissues upon transferring target cells loaded with mycobacterial antigens. During infection, α-DEC-ESAT-treated mice showed increased target cell killing in the lungs, where histology revealed cellular infiltrate and considerably reduced bacterial burden. Targeting the mycobacterial antigen ESAT-6 to DEC205+ APCs before infection expands specific T cell clones responsible for early T cell responses (IFN-γ production and CTL activity and substantially reduces lung bacterial burden. Delivering mycobacterial antigens directly to APCs provides a unique approach to study in vivo the role of APCs and specific T cell responses to assess their potential anti-mycobacterial functions.

  3. Distinct Gut-Derived Bacteria Differentially Affect Three Types of Antigen-Presenting Cells and Impact on NK- and T-Cell Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Hansen, Anne Marie Valentin; Frøkiær, Hanne

    Objectives Gut bacteria are assumed essential for development and maintenance of a balanced immune system. Specifically, stimulation of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) by gut bacteria is important for polarisation of the immune response. This experiment was designed to reveal similarities...... from monocytes. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells constitute a commonly used model of dendritic cell function. The APCs were cultured for 18 h with four different gut bacteria: Lactobacillus acidophilus X37, Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 12246, E. coli Nissle 1917 or Bifidobacterium longum Q46. Results...... & Discussion To examine the polarising effect of gut bacteria on APCs, surface markers and cytokines were measured. The co-stimulatory molecules CD40 and CD86 were induced to a different extent together with CD83. Interleukin-12 (a Th1 cytokine) was only induced by Lactobacillus acidophilus. Interleukin-10...

  4. Human antigen-presenting cells respond differently to gut-derived probiotic bacteria but mediate similar strain-dependent NK and T cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Zeuthen, Louise Hjerrild; Ferlazzo, Guido;

    2007-01-01

    (APC) was compared; blood myeloid dendritic cells (DC), monocyte-derived DC and monocytes, and the effector response of natural killer cells and naïve T cells was characterized. Maturation induced by gut-derived bacteria differed between APC, with blood DC and monocytes responding with the production...... of IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha to bacteria, which elicited mainly IL-10 in monocyte-derived DC. In contrast, comparable IFN-gamma production patterns were found in both natural killer cells and T cells induced by all bacteria-matured APC. An inhibitory effect of certain strains on this IFN......, in vitro assessment of the immunomodulatory effects of distinct strains may depend strongly on the cell type used as a model. To select the most appropriate model for screening of beneficial bacteria in human cells, the response to strains of intestinal bacteria of three types of antigen-presenting cells...

  5. Rainbow trout CK9, a CCL25-like ancient chemokine that attracts and regulates B cells and macrophages, the main antigen presenting cells in fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilino, Carolina; Granja, Aitor G.; Castro, Rosario; Wang, Tiehui; Abos, Beatriz; Parra, David; Secombes, Christopher J.; Tafalla, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    CK9 is a rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) CC chemokine phylogenetically related to mammalian CCL25. Although CK9 is known to be transcriptionally regulated in response to inflammation particularly in mucosal tissues, its functionality has never been revealed. In the current work, we have demonstrated that CK9 is chemoattractant for antigen presenting cells (APCs) expressing major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) on the cell surface. Among these APCs, CK9 has a strong chemotactic capacity for both B cells (IgM+ and IgT+) and macrophages. Along with its chemotactic capacities, CK9 modulated the MHC II turnover of B lymphocytes and up-regulated the phagocytic capacity of both IgM+ cells and macrophages. Although CK9 had no lymphoproliferative effects, it increased the survival of IgT+ lymphocytes. Furthermore, we have established that the chemoattractant capacity of CK9 is strongly increased after pre-incubation of leukocytes with a T-independent antigen, whereas B cell receptor (BCR) cross-linking strongly abrogated their capacity to migrate to CK9, indicating that CK9 preferentially attracts B cells at the steady state or under BCR-independent stimulation. These results point to CK9 being a key regulator of B lymphocyte trafficking in rainbow trout, able to modulate innate functions of teleost B lymphocytes and macrophages. PMID:27003360

  6. The immunodominant Eimeria acervulina sporozoite antigen previously described as p160/p240 is a 19-kilodalton antigen present in several Eimeria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, F; Bourdieu, C; Kazanji, M; Yvoré, P; Péry, P

    1994-01-01

    A lambda Zap II cDNA expression library, constructed from Eimeria acervulina (PAPa46 strain) sporulated oocyst stage, was screened with sera raised to E. acervulina or Eimeria tenella oocysts in order to isolate clones coding for antigens common to the two species. Most of the clones isolated were derived from the same gene. Antisera raised to a recombinant glutathione-S-transferase fusion protein 1P reacted with an antigen of 19 kDa in immunoblot of E. acervulina sporulated and unsporulated oocysts. Immunofluorescence of E. acervulina sporozoites indicated that the antigen is located in the cytoplasm. The anti-1P antisera reacted on immunoblots of E. tenella with a 19-kDa antigen and by immunofluorescence on E. tenella, Eimeria maxima and Eimeria falciformis sporozoites, indicating that the antigen is conserved in Eimeria species. DNA sequencing indicated that the sequence was almost identical to that of clone cSZ1 previously described by Jenkins et al. using E. acervulina strain #12. The 1P insert hybridized to a 1150-nt mRNA from E. acervulina PAPa46 strain and strain #12, a size consistent with the observed molecular weight of the protein.

  7. Pharmacologic IKK/NF-κB inhibition causes antigen presenting cells to undergo TNFα dependent ROS-mediated programmed cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilstra, Jeremy S.; Gaddy, Daniel F.; Zhao, Jing; Davé, Shaival H.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Plevy, Scott E.; Robbins, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Monocyte-derived antigen presenting cells (APC) are central mediators of the innate and adaptive immune response in inflammatory diseases. As such, APC are appropriate targets for therapeutic intervention to ameliorate certain diseases. APC differentiation, activation and functions are regulated by the NF-κB family of transcription factors. Herein, we examined the effect of NF-κB inhibition, via suppression of the IκB Kinase (IKK) complex, on APC function. Murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and dendritic cells (DC), as well as macrophage and DC lines, underwent rapid programmed cell death (PCD) after treatment with several IKK/NF-κB inhibitors through a TNFα-dependent mechanism. PCD was induced proximally by reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, which causes a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of a caspase signaling cascade. NF-κB-inhibition-induced PCD of APC may be a key mechanism through which therapeutic targeting of NF-κB reduces inflammatory pathologies.

  8. Rapid detection of dendritic cell and monocyte disorders using CD4 as a lineage marker of the human peripheral blood antigen presenting cell compartment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eJardine

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs and monocytes are critical regulators and effectors of innate and adaptive immune responses. Monocyte expansion has been described in many pathological states while monocyte and DC deficiency syndromes are relatively recent additions to the catalogue of human primary immunodeficiency disorders. Clinically applicable screening tests to diagnose and monitor these conditions are lacking. Conventional strategies for identifying human DCs and monocytes have been based on the use of a lineage gate to exclude lymphocytes, thus preventing simultaneous detection of DCs, monocytes and lymphocyte subsets. Here we demonstrate that CD4 is a reliable lineage marker for the human peripheral blood antigen presenting cell compartment that can be used to identify DCs and monocytes in parallel with lymphocytes. Based on this principle, simple modification of a standard lymphocyte phenotyping assay permits simultaneous enumeration of four lymphocyte and five DC/monocyte populations from a single sample. This approach is applicable to clinical samples and facilitates the diagnosis of DC and monocyte disorders in a wide range of clinical settings, including genetic deficiency, neoplasia and inflammation.

  9. Human antigen-presenting cells respond differently to gut-derived probiotic bacteria but mediate similar strain-dependent NK and T cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Lisbeth N; Zeuthen, Louise H; Ferlazzo, Guido; Frøkiaer, Hanne

    2007-12-01

    The intestinal microbiota is essential for homeostasis of the local and systemic immune system, and particularly strains of lactic acid bacteria and Escherichia coli have been shown to have balancing effects on inflammatory conditions such as allergy and inflammatory bowel disease. However, in vitro assessment of the immunomodulatory effects of distinct strains may depend strongly on the cell type used as a model. To select the most appropriate model for screening of beneficial bacteria in human cells, the response to strains of intestinal bacteria of three types of antigen-presenting cells (APC) was compared; blood myeloid dendritic cells (DC), monocyte-derived DC and monocytes, and the effector response of natural killer cells and naïve T cells was characterized. Maturation induced by gut-derived bacteria differed between APC, with blood DC and monocytes responding with the production of IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha to bacteria, which elicited mainly IL-10 in monocyte-derived DC. In contrast, comparable IFN-gamma production patterns were found in both natural killer cells and T cells induced by all bacteria-matured APC. An inhibitory effect of certain strains on this IFN-gamma production was also mediated by all types of APC. The most potent responses were induced by monocyte-derived DC, which thus constitute a sensitive screening model. PMID:17903206

  10. Antigen presenting B cells facilitate CD4 T cell cooperation resulting in enhanced generation of effector and memory CD4 T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Kroeger

    Full Text Available We show that the in vivo generation of cytokine-producing CD4 T cells specific for a given major histocompatibility class-II (MHCII-binding peptide of hen egg lysozyme (HEL is facilitated when mice are immunized with splenic antigen presenting cells (APC pulsed with this HEL peptide and another peptide that binds a different MHCII molecule. This enhanced generation of peptide-specific effector CD4 T cells requires that the same splenic APC be pulsed with both peptides. Pulsed B cells, but not pulsed dendritic cells (DCs, can mediate CD4 T cell cooperation, which can be blocked by disrupting OX40-OX40L (CD134-CD252 interactions. In addition, the generation of HEL peptide-specific CD4 T cell memory is greater when mice are primed with B cells pulsed with the two peptides than with B cells pulsed with the HEL- peptide alone. Based on our findings, we suggest CD4 T cell cooperation is important for vaccine design, underlies the phenomenon of "epitope-spreading" seen in autoimmunity, and that the efficacy of B cell-depletion in the treatment of human cell-mediated autoimmune disease is due to the abrogation of the interactions between autoimmune CD4 T cells that facilitates their activation.

  11. Nanoparticle-based targeting of vaccine compounds to skin antigen-presenting cells by hair follicles and their transport in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahe, Brice; Vogt, Annika; Liard, Christelle; Duffy, Darragh; Abadie, Valérie; Bonduelle, Olivia; Boissonnas, Alexandre; Sterry, Wolfram; Verrier, Bernard; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Combadiere, Behazine

    2009-05-01

    Particle-based drug delivery systems target active compounds to the hair follicle and may result in a better penetration and higher efficiency of compound uptake by skin resident cells. As previously proposed, such delivery systems could be important tools for vaccine delivery. In this study, we investigated the penetration of solid fluorescent 40 or 200 nm polystyrene nanoparticles (NPs) as well as virus particles in murine skin to further investigate the efficacy of transcutaneously (TC) applied particulate vaccine delivery route. We demonstrated that 40 and 200 nm NPs and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) expressing the green-fluorescent protein penetrated deeply into hair follicles and were internalized by perifollicular antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Fibered-based confocal microscopy analyses allowed visualizing in vivo particle penetration along the follicular duct, diffusion into the surrounding tissue, uptake by APCs and transport to the draining lymph nodes. The application of small particles, such as ovalbumin coding DNA or MVA, induced both humoral and cellular immune responses. Furthermore, TC applied MVA induced protection against vaccinia virus challenge. Our results strengthen the concept of TC targeting of cutaneous APCs by hair follicles and will contribute to the development of advanced vaccination protocols using NPs or viral vectors.

  12. Meningitis Caused by Toscana Virus Is Associated with Strong Antiviral Response in the CNS and Altered Frequency of Blood Antigen-Presenting Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Varani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Toscana virus (TOSV is a Phlebotomus-transmitted RNA virus and a frequent cause of human meningitis and meningoencephalitis in Southern Europe during the summer season. While evidence for TOSV-related central nervous system (CNS cases is increasing, little is known about the host defenses against TOSV. We evaluated innate immune response to TOSV by analyzing frequency and activation of blood antigen-presenting cells (APCs and cytokine levels in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from patients with TOSV neuroinvasive infection and controls. An altered frequency of different blood APC subsets was observed in TOSV-infected patients, with signs of monocytic deactivation. Nevertheless, a proper or even increased responsiveness of toll-like receptor 3 and 7/8 was observed in blood APCs of these patients as compared to healthy controls. Systemic levels of cytokines remained low in TOSV-infected patients, while levels of anti-inflammatory and antiviral mediators were significantly higher in CSF from TOSV-infected patients as compared to patients with other infectious and noninfectious neurological diseases. Thus, the early host response to TOSV appears effective for viral clearance, by proper response to TLR3 and TLR7/8 agonists in peripheral blood and by a strong and selective antiviral and anti-inflammatory response in the CNS.

  13. Nanoparticle-based targeting of vaccine compounds to skin antigen-presenting cells by hair follicles and their transport in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahe, Brice; Vogt, Annika; Liard, Christelle; Duffy, Darragh; Abadie, Valérie; Bonduelle, Olivia; Boissonnas, Alexandre; Sterry, Wolfram; Verrier, Bernard; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Combadiere, Behazine

    2009-05-01

    Particle-based drug delivery systems target active compounds to the hair follicle and may result in a better penetration and higher efficiency of compound uptake by skin resident cells. As previously proposed, such delivery systems could be important tools for vaccine delivery. In this study, we investigated the penetration of solid fluorescent 40 or 200 nm polystyrene nanoparticles (NPs) as well as virus particles in murine skin to further investigate the efficacy of transcutaneously (TC) applied particulate vaccine delivery route. We demonstrated that 40 and 200 nm NPs and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) expressing the green-fluorescent protein penetrated deeply into hair follicles and were internalized by perifollicular antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Fibered-based confocal microscopy analyses allowed visualizing in vivo particle penetration along the follicular duct, diffusion into the surrounding tissue, uptake by APCs and transport to the draining lymph nodes. The application of small particles, such as ovalbumin coding DNA or MVA, induced both humoral and cellular immune responses. Furthermore, TC applied MVA induced protection against vaccinia virus challenge. Our results strengthen the concept of TC targeting of cutaneous APCs by hair follicles and will contribute to the development of advanced vaccination protocols using NPs or viral vectors. PMID:19052565

  14. Runx1 Regulates Myeloid Precursor Differentiation Into Osteoclasts Without Affecting Differentiation Into Antigen Presenting or Phagocytic Cells in Both Males and Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglia, David N; Yang, Xiaochuan; Kalinowski, Judith; Jastrzebski, Sandra; Drissi, Hicham; Lorenzo, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    Runt-related transcription factor 1 (Runx1), a master regulator of hematopoiesis, is expressed in preosteoclasts. Previously we evaluated the bone phenotype of CD11b-Cre Runx1(fl/fl) mice and demonstrated enhanced osteoclasts and decreased bone mass in males. However, an assessment of the effects of Runx1 deletion in female osteoclast precursors was impossible with this model. Moreover, the role of Runx1 in myeloid cell differentiation into other lineages is unknown. Therefore, we generated LysM-Cre Runx1(fl/fl) mice, which delete Runx1 equally (∼80% deletion) in myeloid precursor cells from both sexes and examined the capacity of these cells to differentiate into osteoclasts and phagocytic and antigen-presenting cells. Both female and male LysM-Cre Runx1(fl/fl) mice had decreased trabecular bone mass (72% decrease in bone volume fraction) and increased osteoclast number (2-3 times) (P nuclear factor-κB ligand to stimulate osteoclast formation and fusion in female and male mice without affecting other myeloid cell fates. In turn, increased osteoclast activity in LysM-Cre Runx1(fl/fl) mice likely contributed to a decrease in bone mass. These dramatic effects were not due to increased osteoclast precursors in the deleted mutants and argue that inhibition of Runx1 in multipotential myeloid precursor cells is important for osteoclast formation and function. PMID:27267711

  15. Suppressive effects of Bifidobacterium longum on the production of Th2-attracting chemokines induced with T cell-antigen-presenting cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Noritoshi; Xiao, Jin-Zhong; Yonezawa, Sumiko; Yaeshima, Tomoko; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Hachimura, Satoshi

    2009-04-01

    In human trials, Bifidobacterium longum BB536 alleviates subjective symptoms of Japanese cedar pollinosis, an IgE-mediated type I allergy caused by exposure to Japanese cedar, and significantly suppresses the increase of plasma thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) associated with pollen dispersion. In the present study, we investigated the suppressive effects of BB536 on the production of T helper type 2 (Th2)-attracting chemokines, such as TARC and macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC), together with the mechanisms of their production. Murine splenocytes were cultured with heat-killed BB536, and the levels of Th2-attracting chemokines in the supernatants were measured. TARC and MDC were produced in cultures without stimulation, and the production was significantly suppressed by BB536. These chemokines were produced by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) of splenocytes stimulated with an anti-CD40 antibody. Furthermore, TARC production was induced with granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor that was produced by T cells and dendritic cells. BB536 suppressed MDC production induced with the anti-CD40 antibody by APCs from the spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) and Peyer's patches, and it suppressed TARC production by APCs from the spleen and MLNs. These results indicate that BB536 suppresses the production of Th2-attracting chemokines induced by the T cell-APC interaction, suggesting a novel mechanism for alleviating symptoms of allergic disorders by probiotics.

  16. Mitomycin C-treated antigen-presenting cells as a tool for control of allograft rejection and autoimmunity: from bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terness, Peter; Kleist, Christian; Simon, Helmut; Sandra-Petrescu, Flavius; Ehser, Sandra; Chuang, Jing-Jing; Mohr, Elisabeth; Jiga, Lucian; Greil, Johann; Opelz, Gerhard

    2009-07-01

    Cells have been previously used in experimental models for tolerance induction in organ transplantation and autoimmune diseases. One problem with the therapeutic use of cells is standardization of their preparation. We discuss an immunosuppressive strategy relying on cells irreversibly transformed by a chemotherapeutic drug. Dendritic cells (DCs) of transplant donors pretreated with mitomycin C (MMC) strongly prolonged rat heart allograft survival when injected into recipients before transplantation. Likewise, MMC-DCs loaded with myelin basic protein suppressed autoreactive T cells of MS patients in vitro and prevented experimental autoimmune encephalitis in mice. Comprehensive gene microarray analysis identified genes that possibly make up the suppressive phenotype, comprising glucocorticoid leucine zipper, immunoglobulin-like transcript 3, CD80, CD83, CD86, and apoptotic genes. Based on these findings, a hypothetical model of tolerance induction by MMC-treated DCs is delineated. Finally, we describe the first clinical application of MMC-treated monocyte-enriched donor cells in an attempt to control the rejection of a haploidentical stem cell transplant in a sensitized recipient and discuss the pros and cons of using MMC-treated antigen-presenting cells for tolerance induction. Although many questions remain, MMC-treated cells are a promising clinical tool for controlling allograft rejection and deleterious immune responses in autoimmune diseases. PMID:19393276

  17. Induction of antigen-presenting capacity in tumor cells upon infection with non-replicating recombinant vaccinia virus encoding murine MHC class II and costimulatory molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, W R; Oertli, D; Meko, J B; Norton, J A; Tsung, K

    1997-01-15

    The possibility of inducing antigen-presenting capacity in cells normally lacking such capacity, currently represents a major goal in vaccine research. To address this issue we attempted to generate 'artificial' APC able to stimulate CD4+ T cell responses when tumor cells were infected with a single, recombinant, vaccinia virus (rVV) containing the two genes encoding murine MHC class II I-Ak and a third gene encoding the murine B7-1 (mB7-1) costimulatory molecule. To minimize the cytopathic effect and to improve safety, in view of possible in vivo applications, we made this rVV replication incompetent by Psoralen and long wave UV treatment. Tumor cells infected with rVV encoding I-Ak alone, pulsed with hen egg white lysozyme peptide (HEL46-61), induced IL-2 secretion by an antigen-specific T hybridoma. Tumor cells infected with the rVV encoding mB7-1 provided costimulation for activating resting CD4+ T cells in the presence of ConA. Tumor cells infected with the rVV encoding I-Ak and mB7-1, and pulsed with chicken ovotransferrin peptide (conalbumin133-145), induced a significantly higher response in a specific Th2 cell clone (D10.G4.1) as compared to cells infected with rVV encoding I-Ak molecules only. Thus, this replication incompetent rVV represents a safe, multiple gene, vector system able to confer in one single infection step effective APC capacity to non-professional APCs.

  18. CD80 and CD86 differentially regulate mechanical interactions of T-cells with antigen-presenting dendritic cells and B-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Seng Lim

    Full Text Available Functional T-cell responses are initiated by physical interactions between T-cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs, including dendritic cells (DCs and B-cells. T-cells are activated more effectively by DCs than by B-cells, but little is known about the key molecular mechanisms that underpin the particular potency of DC in triggering T-cell responses. To better understand the influence of physical intercellular interactions on APC efficacy in activating T-cells, we used single cell force spectroscopy to characterize and compare the mechanical forces of interactions between DC:T-cells and B:T-cells. Following antigen stimulation, intercellular interactions of DC:T-cell conjugates were stronger than B:T-cell interactions. DCs induced higher levels of T-cell calcium mobilization and production of IL-2 and IFNγ than were elicited by B-cells, thus suggesting that tight intercellular contacts are important in providing mechanically stable environment to initiate T-cell activation. Blocking antibodies targeting surface co-stimulatory molecules CD80 or CD86 weakened intercellular interactions and dampen T-cell activation, highlighting the amplificatory roles of CD80/86 in regulating APC:T-cell interactions and T-cell functional activation. The variable strength of mechanical forces between DC:T-cells and B:T-cell interactions were not solely dependent on differential APC expression of CD80/86, since DCs were superior to B-cells in promoting strong interactions with T-cells even when CD80 and CD86 were inhibited. These data provide mechanical insights into the effects of co-stimulatory molecules in regulating APC:T-cell interactions.

  19. CD80 and CD86 differentially regulate mechanical interactions of T-cells with antigen-presenting dendritic cells and B-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Tong Seng; Goh, James Kang Hao; Mortellaro, Alessandra; Lim, Chwee Teck; Hämmerling, Günter J; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Functional T-cell responses are initiated by physical interactions between T-cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs), including dendritic cells (DCs) and B-cells. T-cells are activated more effectively by DCs than by B-cells, but little is known about the key molecular mechanisms that underpin the particular potency of DC in triggering T-cell responses. To better understand the influence of physical intercellular interactions on APC efficacy in activating T-cells, we used single cell force spectroscopy to characterize and compare the mechanical forces of interactions between DC:T-cells and B:T-cells. Following antigen stimulation, intercellular interactions of DC:T-cell conjugates were stronger than B:T-cell interactions. DCs induced higher levels of T-cell calcium mobilization and production of IL-2 and IFNγ than were elicited by B-cells, thus suggesting that tight intercellular contacts are important in providing mechanically stable environment to initiate T-cell activation. Blocking antibodies targeting surface co-stimulatory molecules CD80 or CD86 weakened intercellular interactions and dampen T-cell activation, highlighting the amplificatory roles of CD80/86 in regulating APC:T-cell interactions and T-cell functional activation. The variable strength of mechanical forces between DC:T-cells and B:T-cell interactions were not solely dependent on differential APC expression of CD80/86, since DCs were superior to B-cells in promoting strong interactions with T-cells even when CD80 and CD86 were inhibited. These data provide mechanical insights into the effects of co-stimulatory molecules in regulating APC:T-cell interactions.

  20. CD80 and CD86 differentially regulate mechanical interactions of T-cells with antigen-presenting dendritic cells and B-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Tong Seng; Goh, James Kang Hao; Mortellaro, Alessandra; Lim, Chwee Teck; Hämmerling, Günter J; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Functional T-cell responses are initiated by physical interactions between T-cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs), including dendritic cells (DCs) and B-cells. T-cells are activated more effectively by DCs than by B-cells, but little is known about the key molecular mechanisms that underpin the particular potency of DC in triggering T-cell responses. To better understand the influence of physical intercellular interactions on APC efficacy in activating T-cells, we used single cell force spectroscopy to characterize and compare the mechanical forces of interactions between DC:T-cells and B:T-cells. Following antigen stimulation, intercellular interactions of DC:T-cell conjugates were stronger than B:T-cell interactions. DCs induced higher levels of T-cell calcium mobilization and production of IL-2 and IFNγ than were elicited by B-cells, thus suggesting that tight intercellular contacts are important in providing mechanically stable environment to initiate T-cell activation. Blocking antibodies targeting surface co-stimulatory molecules CD80 or CD86 weakened intercellular interactions and dampen T-cell activation, highlighting the amplificatory roles of CD80/86 in regulating APC:T-cell interactions and T-cell functional activation. The variable strength of mechanical forces between DC:T-cells and B:T-cell interactions were not solely dependent on differential APC expression of CD80/86, since DCs were superior to B-cells in promoting strong interactions with T-cells even when CD80 and CD86 were inhibited. These data provide mechanical insights into the effects of co-stimulatory molecules in regulating APC:T-cell interactions. PMID:23024807

  1. The ESAT-6 Protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Interacts with Beta-2-Microglobulin (β2M) Affecting Antigen Presentation Function of Macrophage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parveen, Nazia; Jha, Vishwanath; Valluri, Vijaya Lakshmi; Ghosh, Sudip; Mukhopadhyay, Sangita

    2014-01-01

    ESAT-6, an abundantly secreted protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) is an important virulence factor, inactivation of which leads to reduced virulence of M. tuberculosis. ESAT-6 alone, or in complex with its chaperone CFP-10 (ESAT-6:CFP-10), is known to modulate host immune responses; however, the detailed mechanisms are not well understood. The structure of ESAT-6 or ESAT-6:CFP-10 complex does not suggest presence of enzymatic or DNA-binding activities. Therefore, we hypothesized that the crucial role played by ESAT-6 in the virulence of mycobacteria could be due to its interaction with some host cellular factors. Using a yeast two-hybrid screening, we identified that ESAT-6 interacts with the host protein beta-2-microglobulin (β2M), which was further confirmed by other assays, like GST pull down, co-immunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance. The C-terminal six amino acid residues (90–95) of ESAT-6 were found to be essential for this interaction. ESAT-6, in complex with CFP-10, also interacts with β2M. We found that ESAT-6/ESAT-6:CFP-10 can enter into the endoplasmic reticulum where it sequesters β2M to inhibit cell surface expression of MHC-I-β2M complexes, resulting in downregulation of class I-mediated antigen presentation. Interestingly, the ESAT-6:β2M complex could be detected in pleural biopsies of individuals suffering from pleural tuberculosis. Our data highlight a novel mechanism by which M. tuberculosis may undermine the host adaptive immune responses to establish a successful infection. Identification of such novel interactions may help us in designing small molecule inhibitors as well as effective vaccine design against tuberculosis. PMID:25356553

  2. The ESAT-6 protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis interacts with beta-2-microglobulin (β2M affecting antigen presentation function of macrophage.

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    Gopalkrishna Sreejit

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available ESAT-6, an abundantly secreted protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis is an important virulence factor, inactivation of which leads to reduced virulence of M. tuberculosis. ESAT-6 alone, or in complex with its chaperone CFP-10 (ESAT-6:CFP-10, is known to modulate host immune responses; however, the detailed mechanisms are not well understood. The structure of ESAT-6 or ESAT-6:CFP-10 complex does not suggest presence of enzymatic or DNA-binding activities. Therefore, we hypothesized that the crucial role played by ESAT-6 in the virulence of mycobacteria could be due to its interaction with some host cellular factors. Using a yeast two-hybrid screening, we identified that ESAT-6 interacts with the host protein beta-2-microglobulin (β2M, which was further confirmed by other assays, like GST pull down, co-immunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance. The C-terminal six amino acid residues (90-95 of ESAT-6 were found to be essential for this interaction. ESAT-6, in complex with CFP-10, also interacts with β2M. We found that ESAT-6/ESAT-6:CFP-10 can enter into the endoplasmic reticulum where it sequesters β2M to inhibit cell surface expression of MHC-I-β2M complexes, resulting in downregulation of class I-mediated antigen presentation. Interestingly, the ESAT-6:β2M complex could be detected in pleural biopsies of individuals suffering from pleural tuberculosis. Our data highlight a novel mechanism by which M. tuberculosis may undermine the host adaptive immune responses to establish a successful infection. Identification of such novel interactions may help us in designing small molecule inhibitors as well as effective vaccine design against tuberculosis.

  3. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Expressed by Recombinant Respiratory Syncytial Virus Attenuates Viral Replication and Increases the Level of Pulmonary Antigen-Presenting Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukreyev, Alexander; Belyakov, Igor M.; Berzofsky, Jay A.; Murphy, Brian R.; Collins, Peter L.

    2001-01-01

    An obstacle to developing a vaccine against human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is that natural infection typically does not confer solid immunity to reinfection. To investigate methods to augment the immune response, recombinant RSV (rRSV) was constructed that expresses murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (mGM-CSF) from a transcription cassette inserted into the G-F intergenic region. Replication of rRSV/mGM-CSF in the upper and lower respiratory tracts of BALB/c mice was reduced 23- to 74- and 5- to 588-fold, respectively, compared to that of the parental rRSV. Despite this strong attenuation of replication, the level of RSV-specific serum antibodies induced by rRSV/mGM-CSF was comparable to, or marginally higher than, that of the parental rRSV. The induction of RSV-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T cells was moderately reduced during the initial infection, which might be a consequence of reduced antigen expression. Mice infected with rRSV/mGM-CSF had elevated levels of pulmonary mRNA for gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin 12 (IL-12) p40 compared to animals infected by wild-type rRSV. Elevated synthesis of IFN-γ could account for the restriction of RSV replication, as was observed previously with an IFN-γ-expressing rRSV. The accumulation of total pulmonary mononuclear cells and total CD4+ T lymphocytes was accelerated in animals infected with rRSV/mGM-CSF compared to that in animals infected with the control virus, and the level of IFN-γ-positive or IL-4-positive pulmonary CD4+ cells was elevated approximately twofold. The number of pulmonary lymphoid and myeloid dendritic cells and macrophages was increased up to fourfold in mice infected with rRSV/mGM-CSF compared to those infected with the parental rRSV, and the mean expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, a marker of activation, was significantly increased in the two subsets of dendritic cells. Enhanced antigen presentation likely accounts for the

  4. Candida soluble cell wall β-glucan facilitates ovalbumin-induced allergic airway inflammation in mice: Possible role of antigen-presenting cells

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    Tamura Hiroshi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although fungi have been implicated as initiating/deteriorating factors for allergic asthma, their contributing components have not been fully elucidated. We previously isolated soluble β-glucan from Candida albicans (CSBG (Ohno et al., 2007. In the present study, the effects of CSBG exposure on airway immunopathology in the presence or absence of other immunogenic allergen was investigated in vivo, and their cellular mechanisms were analyzed both in vivo and in vitro. Methods In vivo, ICR mice were divided into 4 experimental groups: vehicle, CSBG (25 μg/animal, ovalbumin (OVA: 2 μg/animal, and CSBG + OVA were repeatedly administered intratracheally. The bronchoalveolar lavage cellular profile, lung histology, levels of cytokines and chemokines in the lung homogenates, the expression pattern of antigen-presenting cell (APC-related molecules in the lung digests, and serum immunoglobulin values were studied. In vitro, the impacts of CSBG (0–12.5 μg/ml on the phenotype and function of immune cells such as splenocytes and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs were evaluated in terms of cell proliferation, the surface expression of APC-related molecules, and OVA-mediated T-cell proliferating activity. Results In vivo, repeated pulmonary exposure to CSBG induced neutrophilic airway inflammation in the absence of OVA, and markedly exacerbated OVA-related eosinophilic airway inflammation with mucus metaplasia in mice, which was concomitant with the amplified lung expression of Th2 cytokines and IL-17A and chemokines related to allergic response. Exposure to CSBG plus OVA increased the number of cells bearing MHC class II with or without CD80 in the lung compared to that of others. In vitro, CSBG significantly augmented splenocyte proliferation in the presence or absence of OVA. Further, CSBG increased the expression of APC-related molecules such as CD80, CD86, and DEC205 on BMDCs and amplified OVA-mediated T

  5. Characterization of Yellow Fever Virus Infection of Human and Non-human Primate Antigen Presenting Cells and Their Interaction with CD4+ T Cells.

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    Yu Cong

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Humans infected with yellow fever virus (YFV, a mosquito-borne flavivirus, can develop illness ranging from a mild febrile disease to hemorrhagic fever and death. The 17D vaccine strain of YFV was developed in the 1930s, has been used continuously since development and has proven very effective. Genetic differences between vaccine and wild-type viruses are few, yet viral or host mechanisms associated with protection or disease are not fully understood. Over the past 20 years, a number of cases of vaccine-associated disease have been identified following vaccination with 17D; these cases have been correlated with reduced immune status at the time of vaccination. Recently, several studies have evaluated T cell responses to vaccination in both humans and non-human primates, but none have evaluated the response to wild-type virus infection. In the studies described here, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM and dendritic cells (MoDC from both humans and rhesus macaques were evaluated for their ability to support infection with either wild-type Asibi virus or the 17D vaccine strain and the host cytokine and chemokine response characterized. Human MoDC and MDM were also evaluated for their ability to stimulate CD4+ T cells. It was found that MoDC and MDM supported viral replication and that there were differential cytokine responses to infection with either wild-type or vaccine viruses. Additionally, MoDCs infected with live 17D virus were able to stimulate IFN-γ and IL-2 production in CD4+ T cells, while cells infected with Asibi virus were not. These data demonstrate that wild-type and vaccine YFV stimulate different responses in target antigen presenting cells and that wild-type YFV can inhibit MoDC activation of CD4+ T cells, a critical component in development of protective immunity. These data provide initial, but critical insight into regulatory capabilities of wild-type YFV in development of disease.

  6. Differential Impact of PD-1 and/or Interleukin-10 Blockade on HIV-1-Specific CD4 T Cell and Antigen-Presenting Cell Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porichis, Filippos; Hart, Meghan G.; Zupkosky, Jennifer; Barblu, Lucie; Kwon, Douglas S.; McMullen, Ashley; Brennan, Thomas; Ahmed, Rafi; Freeman, Gordon J.; Kavanagh, Daniel G.

    2014-01-01

    that a population of white blood cells called CD4 T cells that targets the virus fails to work properly. At least part of this impairment is under the control of inhibitory mechanisms that can be blocked to improve the function of these CD4 T cells. In this report, we show that blocking one or two of the molecules involved, called PD-1 and IL-10, has different effects on the individual functions of these cells and that one is strongly improved. We investigate how these effects are caused by interactions between CD4 T cells and antigen-presenting cells. These observations can have implications for new therapeutic approaches in HIV infection. PMID:24352453

  7. Production of CXC and CC chemokines by human antigen-presenting cells in response to Lassa virus or closely related immunogenic viruses, and in cynomolgus monkeys with lassa fever.

    OpenAIRE

    Delphine Pannetier; Stéphanie Reynard; Marion Russier; Xavier Carnec; Sylvain Baize

    2014-01-01

    International audience The pathogenesis of Lassa fever (LF), a hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa, remains unclear. We previously compared Lassa virus (LASV) with its genetically close, but nonpathogenic homolog Mopeia virus (MOPV) and demonstrated that the strong activation of antigen-presenting cells (APC), including type I IFN production, observed in response to MOPV probably plays a crucial role in controlling infection. We show here that human macrophages (MP) produce large amou...

  8. CD80 and CD86 Costimulatory Molecules Differentially Regulate OT-II CD4+ T Lymphocyte Proliferation and Cytokine Response in Cocultures with Antigen-Presenting Cells Derived from Pregnant and Pseudopregnant Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Tomasz; Slawek, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Immune phenomena during the preimplantation period of pregnancy are poorly understood. The aim of our study was to assess the capacity for antigen presentation of splenic antigen-presenting cells (APCs) derived from pregnant and pseudopregnant mice in in vitro conditions. Therefore, sorted CD11c+ dendritic cells and macrophages F4/80+ and CD11b+ presenting ovalbumin (OVA) were cocultured with CD4+ T cells derived from OT-II mice's (C57BL6/J-Tg(TcraTcrb)1100Mjb/J) spleen. After 132 hours of cell culture, proliferation of lymphocytes (ELISA-BrdU), activation of these cells (flow cytometry), cytokine profile (ELISA), and influence of costimulatory molecules blocking on these parameters were measured. We did not detect any differences in regulation of Th1/Th2 cytokine balance. CD86 seems to be the main costimulatory molecule involved in the proliferation response but CD80 is the main costimulatory molecule influencing cytokine secretion in pregnant mice. In conclusion, this study showed that CD80 and CD86 costimulatory molecules regulate OT-II CD4+ T lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine response in cocultures with antigen-presenting cells derived from pregnant and pseudopregnant mice. The implications of these changes still remain unclear. PMID:24771983

  9. CD80 and CD86 Costimulatory Molecules Differentially Regulate OT-II CD4+ T Lymphocyte Proliferation and Cytokine Response in Cocultures with Antigen-Presenting Cells Derived from Pregnant and Pseudopregnant Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Maj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune phenomena during the preimplantation period of pregnancy are poorly understood. The aim of our study was to assess the capacity for antigen presentation of splenic antigen-presenting cells (APCs derived from pregnant and pseudopregnant mice in in vitro conditions. Therefore, sorted CD11c+ dendritic cells and macrophages F4/80+ and CD11b+ presenting ovalbumin (OVA were cocultured with CD4+ T cells derived from OT-II mice’s (C57BL6/J-Tg(TcraTcrb1100Mjb/J spleen. After 132 hours of cell culture, proliferation of lymphocytes (ELISA-BrdU, activation of these cells (flow cytometry, cytokine profile (ELISA, and influence of costimulatory molecules blocking on these parameters were measured. We did not detect any differences in regulation of Th1/Th2 cytokine balance. CD86 seems to be the main costimulatory molecule involved in the proliferation response but CD80 is the main costimulatory molecule influencing cytokine secretion in pregnant mice. In conclusion, this study showed that CD80 and CD86 costimulatory molecules regulate OT-II CD4+ T lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine response in cocultures with antigen-presenting cells derived from pregnant and pseudopregnant mice. The implications of these changes still remain unclear.

  10. Turnover of Ia-peptide complexes is facilitated in viable antigen-presenting cells: biosynthetic turnover of Ia vs. peptide exchange.

    OpenAIRE

    Harding, C V; Roof, R W; Unanue, E R

    1989-01-01

    Macrophages and B cells process antigens to produce antigenic peptides that associate with class II major histocompatibility complex molecules (e.g., Ia molecules); these Ia-peptide complexes are recognized by CD4+ T lymphocytes. Processing of the antigen hen egg white lysozyme was inhibited by cycloheximide in peritoneal exudate cells (PECs, largely macrophages), but not in TA3 B-lymphoma cells. The uptake and metabolism of hen egg white lysozyme was largely intact in cycloheximide-treated P...

  11. Hepatitis B virus induces IL-23 production in antigen presenting cells and causes liver damage via the IL-23/IL-17 axis.

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    Qinghong Wang

    Full Text Available IL-23 regulates myriad processes in the innate and adaptive immune systems, and is a critical mediator of the proinflammatory effects exerted by Th17 cells in many diseases. In this study, we investigated whether and how hepatitis B virus (HBV causes liver damage directly through the IL-23 signaling pathway. In biopsied liver tissues from HBV-infected patients, expression of both IL-23 and IL-23R was remarkably elevated. In vivo observations also indicated that the main sources of IL-23 were myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs and macrophages. Analysis of in vitro differentiated immature DCs and macrophages isolated from healthy donors revealed that the HBV surface antigen (HBsAg efficiently induces IL-23 secretion in a mannose receptor (MR-dependent manner. Culture with an endosomal acidification inhibitor and the dynamin inhibitor showed that, upon binding to the MR, the HBsAg is taken up by mDCs and macrophages through an endocytosis mechanism. In contrast, although the HBV core antigen (HBcAg can also stimulate IL-23 secretion from mDCs, the process was MR- and endocytosis-independent. In addition, IL-23 was shown to be indispensible for HBsAg-stimulated differentiation of naïve CD4(+ T cells into Th17 cells, which were determined to be the primary source of IL-17 in HBV-infected livers. The cognate receptor, IL-17R, was found to exist on the hepatic stellate cells and mDCs, both of which might represent the potential target cells of IL-17 in hepatitis B disease. These data provide novel insights into a yet unrecognized mechanism of HBV-induced hepatitis, by which increases in IL-23 expression, through an MR/endocytosis-dependent or -independent manner, produce liver damage through the IL-23/IL-17 axis.

  12. Interleukin-19: a constituent of the regulome that controls antigen presenting cells in the lungs and airway responses to microbial products.

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    Carol Hoffman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interleukin (IL-19 has been reported to enhance chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma but the in vivo mechanism is incompletely understood. Because IL-19 is produced by and regulates cells of the monocyte lineage, our studies focused on in vivo responses of CD11c positive (CD11c+ alveolar macrophages and lung dendritic cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: IL-19-deficient (IL-19-/- mice were studied at baseline (naïve and following intranasal challenge with microbial products, or recombinant cytokines. Naïve IL-19-/- mixed background mice had a decreased percentage of CD11c+ cells in the bronchoalveolar-lavage (BAL due to the deficiency in IL-19 and a trait inherited from the 129-mouse strain. BAL CD11c+ cells from fully backcrossed IL-19-/- BALB/c or C57BL/6 mice expressed significantly less Major Histocompatibility Complex class II (MHCII in response to intranasal administration of lipopolysaccharide, Aspergillus antigen, or IL-13, a pro-allergic cytokine. Neurogenic-locus-notch-homolog-protein-2 (Notch2 expression by lung monocytes, the precursors of BAL CD11c+ cells, was dysregulated: extracellular Notch2 was significantly decreased, transmembrane/intracellular Notch2 was significantly increased in IL-19-/- mice relative to wild type. Instillation of recombinant IL-19 increased extracellular Notch2 expression and dendritic cells cultured from bone marrow cells in the presence of IL-19 showed upregulated extracellular Notch2. The CD205 positive subset among the CD11c+ cells was 3-5-fold decreased in the airways and lungs of naïve IL-19-/- mice relative to wild type. Airway inflammation and histological changes in the lungs were ameliorated in IL-19-/- mice challenged with Aspergillus antigen that induces T lymphocyte-dependent allergic inflammation but not in IL-19-/- mice challenged with lipopolysaccharide or IL-13. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Because MHCII is the molecular platform that displays peptides to T

  13. A Neoglycoconjugate Containing the Human Milk Sugar LNFPIII Drives Anti-Inflammatory Activation of Antigen Presenting Cells in a CD14 Dependent Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tundup, Smanla; Srivastava, Leena; Norberg, Thomas; Watford, Wendy; Harn, Donald

    2015-01-01

    The milk pentasaccharide LNFPIII has therapeutic action for metabolic and autoimmune diseases and prolongs transplant survival in mice when presented as a neoglycoconjugate. Within LNFPIII is the Lewisx trisaccharide, expressed by many helminth parasites. In humans, LNFPIII is found in human milk and also known as stage-specific embryonic antigen-1. LNFPIII-NGC drives alternative activation of macrophages and dendritic cells via NFκB activation in a TLR4 dependent mechanism. However, the connection between LNFPIII-NGC activation of APCs, TLR4 signaling and subsequent MAP kinase signaling leading to anti-inflammatory activation of APCs remains unknown. In this study we determined that the innate receptor CD14 was essential for LNFPIII-NGC induction of both ERK and NFkB activation in APCs. Induction of ERK activation by LNFPIII-NGC was completely dependent on CD14/TLR4-Ras-Raf1/TPL2-MEK axis in bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). In addition, LNFPIII-NGC preferentially induced the production of Th2 "favoring" chemokines CCL22 and matrix metalloprotease protein-9 in a CD14 dependent manner in BMDCs. In contrast, LNFPIII-NGC induces significantly lower levels of Th1 "favoring" chemokines, MIP1α, MIP1β and MIP-2 compared to levels in LPS stimulated cells. Interestingly, NGC of the identical human milk sugar LNnT, minus the alpha 1-3 linked fucose, failed to activate APCs via TLR4/MD2/CD14 receptor complex, suggesting that the alpha 1-3 linked fucose in LNFPIII and not on LNnT, is required for this process. Using specific chemical inhibitors of the MAPK pathway, we found that LNFPIII-NGC induction of CCL22, MMP9 and IL-10 production was dependent on ERK activation. Over all, this study suggests that LNFPIII-NGC utilizes CD14/TLR4-MAPK (ERK) axis in modulating APC activation to produce anti-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines in a manner distinct from that seen for the pro-inflammatory PAMP LPS. These pathways may explain the in vivo therapeutic effect of

  14. A Neoglycoconjugate Containing the Human Milk Sugar LNFPIII Drives Anti-Inflammatory Activation of Antigen Presenting Cells in a CD14 Dependent Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smanla Tundup

    Full Text Available The milk pentasaccharide LNFPIII has therapeutic action for metabolic and autoimmune diseases and prolongs transplant survival in mice when presented as a neoglycoconjugate. Within LNFPIII is the Lewisx trisaccharide, expressed by many helminth parasites. In humans, LNFPIII is found in human milk and also known as stage-specific embryonic antigen-1. LNFPIII-NGC drives alternative activation of macrophages and dendritic cells via NFκB activation in a TLR4 dependent mechanism. However, the connection between LNFPIII-NGC activation of APCs, TLR4 signaling and subsequent MAP kinase signaling leading to anti-inflammatory activation of APCs remains unknown. In this study we determined that the innate receptor CD14 was essential for LNFPIII-NGC induction of both ERK and NFkB activation in APCs. Induction of ERK activation by LNFPIII-NGC was completely dependent on CD14/TLR4-Ras-Raf1/TPL2-MEK axis in bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs. In addition, LNFPIII-NGC preferentially induced the production of Th2 "favoring" chemokines CCL22 and matrix metalloprotease protein-9 in a CD14 dependent manner in BMDCs. In contrast, LNFPIII-NGC induces significantly lower levels of Th1 "favoring" chemokines, MIP1α, MIP1β and MIP-2 compared to levels in LPS stimulated cells. Interestingly, NGC of the identical human milk sugar LNnT, minus the alpha 1-3 linked fucose, failed to activate APCs via TLR4/MD2/CD14 receptor complex, suggesting that the alpha 1-3 linked fucose in LNFPIII and not on LNnT, is required for this process. Using specific chemical inhibitors of the MAPK pathway, we found that LNFPIII-NGC induction of CCL22, MMP9 and IL-10 production was dependent on ERK activation. Over all, this study suggests that LNFPIII-NGC utilizes CD14/TLR4-MAPK (ERK axis in modulating APC activation to produce anti-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines in a manner distinct from that seen for the pro-inflammatory PAMP LPS. These pathways may explain the in vivo

  15. Differential Impact of PD-1 and/or Interleukin-10 Blockade on HIV-1-Specific CD4 T Cell and Antigen-Presenting Cell Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Porichis, Filippos; Hart, Meghan G.; Zupkosky, Jennifer; Barblu, Lucie; Kwon, Douglas S; McMullen, Ashley; Brennan, Thomas; Ahmed, Rafi; Freeman, Gordon J.; Kavanagh, Daniel G.; Kaufmann, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    Antigen persistence in chronic infections and cancer upregulates inhibitory networks, such as the PD-1 and interleukin-10 (IL-10) pathways, that impair immunity and lead to disease progression. These pathways are attractive targets for immunotherapy, as demonstrated by recent clinical trials of PD-1/PD-L1 blockade in cancer patients. However, in HIV-1 infection not all subjects respond to inhibition of either pathway and the mechanistic interactions between these two networks remain to be bet...

  16. Antigenic presentation of heterologous epitopes engineered into the outer surface-exposed helix 4 loop region of human papillomavirus L1 capsomeres

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    Murata Yoshihiko

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV L1 capsid proteins can self-assemble into pentamers (capsomeres that are immunogenic and can elicit neutralizing antibodies. Structural modelling of L1 inter-pentameric interactions predicts that helix 4 (h4 of each of the five L1 monomers project laterally and outwards from the pentamer. We sought to utilize HPV L1 capsomeres as a vaccine platform by engineering heterologous epitopes within L1 derivatives deleted for h4 domain. Results We used baculovirus – infected Trichoplusia ni cells and ultracentrifugation to synthesize and purify three 16L1 derivatives: one bearing a short deletion (amino acids 404–436 encompassing the h4 domain, and two others, each bearing a conserved neutralizing epitope of the human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV fusion (F protein (residues 255–278 and 423–436 that was substituted for the deleted L1 h4 domain residues. Each of the three capsomere derivatives was recognized by anti-L1 antibodies, while two bearing the RSV F-derived moieties were recognized by anti-RSV F antibodies. All three L1 derivatives formed ring-like structures that were similar in morphology and size to those described for native 16L1 capsomeres. When injected into mice, each of the capsomere derivatives was immunogenic with respect to L1 protein, and immunization with chimeric L1-RSV F pentamers resulted in RSV non-neutralizing antisera that recognized purified RSV F protein in immunoblots. Conclusion HPV L1 monomers bearing heterologous epitopes within the L1 h4 region can self-assemble into capsomeres that elicit antibody response against such non-HPV encoded epitopes. Thus, the L1 h4 region can function as a novel antigen display site within the L1 pentamer, which in turn may serve as a potential vaccine template.

  17. Modulation of Th1/Th2 Immune Responses by Killed Propionibacterium acnes and Its Soluble Polysaccharide Fraction in a Type I Hypersensitivity Murine Model: Induction of Different Activation Status of Antigen-Presenting Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussalem, Juliana Sekeres; Ishimura, Mayari Eika; Longo-Maugéri, Ieda Maria

    2015-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) is a gram-positive anaerobic bacillus present in normal human skin microbiota, which exerts important immunomodulatory effects, when used as heat- or phenol-killed suspensions. We previously demonstrated that heat-killed P. acnes or its soluble polysaccharide (PS), extracted from the bacterium cell wall, suppressed or potentiated the Th2 response to ovalbumin (OVA) in an immediate hypersensitivity model, depending on the treatment protocol. Herein, we investigated the mechanisms responsible for these effects, using the same model and focusing on the activation status of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). We verified that higher numbers of APCs expressing costimulatory molecules and higher expression levels of these molecules are probably related to potentiation of the Th2 response to OVA induced by P. acnes or PS, while higher expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs) seems to be related to Th2 suppression. In vitro cytokines production in cocultures of dendritic cells and T lymphocytes indicated that P. acnes and PS seem to perform their effects by acting directly on APCs. Our data suggest that P. acnes and PS directly act on APCs, modulating the expression of costimulatory molecules and TLRs, and these differently activated APCs drive distinct T helper patterns to OVA in our model. PMID:25973430

  18. 三肽基肽酶Ⅱ(TPPⅡ)对抗原的提呈作用机制研究进展%Progress on mechanism of tripeptidyl-peptidase Ⅱ in the antigenic presentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴玢; 吕凤林; 孔祥军; 任勇刚

    2012-01-01

    Ripetidyl peptidase Ⅱ is a multi-purpose macromolecule serine protease existing in the cytoplasm, which can assists proteasome and other extracellular enzyme participating in the protein metabolism cycle. Recent figures showed that TPP Ⅱ plays a vital contradictory role both in the generation and destroy of MHC- Ⅰ antigen ligands. However, the mechanism involved in these processes remains unclear. In this paper, we first explore the cell biology characteristics of TPP Ⅱ , and then focus on the role of TPPⅡ in the process of MHC - Ⅰ antigen presentation. Finally, we presume that TPP Ⅱ has the important meaning in the new vaccine design.%三肽基肽酶Ⅱ (Ripetidyl PeptidaseⅡ,TPPⅡ)是存在于细胞质中的一种多功能丝氨酸蛋白酶,主要协助蛋白酶体和其他的胞外酶并且参与蛋白周期代谢,最近的数据显示,TPPⅡ对MHC-Ⅰ类分子抗原表位的产生与破坏均有重要作用,但是TPPⅡ在MHC- Ⅰ类抗原递呈中的具体作用机制尚有待进一步研究.本文综述TPPⅡ的细胞生物学特征,着重探究TPPⅡ在MHC- Ⅰ类抗原递呈中作用,并且指出TPPⅡ在新型疫苗设计上具有重要的指导意义.

  19. Production of CXC and CC chemokines by human antigen-presenting cells in response to Lassa virus or closely related immunogenic viruses, and in cynomolgus monkeys with lassa fever.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Pannetier

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of Lassa fever (LF, a hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa, remains unclear. We previously compared Lassa virus (LASV with its genetically close, but nonpathogenic homolog Mopeia virus (MOPV and demonstrated that the strong activation of antigen-presenting cells (APC, including type I IFN production, observed in response to MOPV probably plays a crucial role in controlling infection. We show here that human macrophages (MP produce large amounts of CC and CXC chemokines in response to MOPV infection, whereas dendritic cells (DC release only moderate amounts of CXC chemokines. However, in the presence of autologous T cells, DCs produced CC and CXC chemokines. Chemokines were produced in response to type I IFN synthesis, as the levels of both mediators were strongly correlated and the neutralization of type I IFN resulted in an inhibition of chemokine production. By contrast, LASV induced only low levels of CXCL-10 and CXCL-11 production. These differences in chemokine production may profoundly affect the generation of virus-specific T-cell responses and may therefore contribute to the difference of pathogenicity between these two viruses. In addition, a recombinant LASV (rLASV harboring the NP-D389A/G392A mutations, which abolish the inhibition of type I IFN response by nucleoprotein (NP, induced the massive synthesis of CC and CXC chemokines in both DC and MP, confirming the crucial role of arenavirus NP in immunosuppression and pathogenicity. Finally, we confirmed, using PBMC samples and lymph nodes obtained from LASV-infected cynomolgus monkeys, that LF was associated with high levels of CXC chemokine mRNA synthesis, suggesting that the very early synthesis of these mediators may be correlated with a favourable outcome.

  20. Polymorphisms of transporter associated with antigen presentation, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-10 and their implications for protection and susceptibility to severe forms of dengue fever in patients in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anira N Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: To date, a clear understanding of dengue disease pathogenesis remains elusive. Some infected individuals display no symptoms while others develop severe life-threatening forms of the disease. It is widely believed that host genetic factors influence dengue severity. Aims: This study evaluates the relationship between certain polymorphisms and dengue severity in Sri Lankan patients. Settings and Design: Polymorphism studies are carried out on genes for; transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP, promoter of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and promoter of interleukin-10 (IL-10. In other populations, TAP1 (333, TAP2 (379, TNF-α (−308, and IL-10 (−1082, −819, −592 have been associated with dengue and a number of different diseases. Data have not been collected previously for these polymorphisms for dengue patients in Sri Lanka. Materials and Methods: The polymorphisms were typed by amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction in 107 dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF patients together with 62 healthy controls. Statistical Analysis Used: Pearson′s Chi-square contingency table analysis with Yates′ correction. Results: Neither the TAP nor the IL-10 polymorphisms considered individually can define dengue disease outcome with regard to severity. However, the genotype combination, IL-10 (−592/−819/−1082 CCA/ATA was significantly associated with development of severe dengue in these patients, suggesting a risk factor to developing DHF. Also, identified is the genotype combination IL-10 (−592/−819/−1082 ATA/ATG which suggested a possibility for protection from DHF. The TNF-α (−308 GG genotype was also significantly associated with severe dengue, suggesting a significant risk factor. Conclusions: The results reported here are specific to the Sri Lankan population. Comparisons with previous reports imply that data may vary from population to population.

  1. Production of CXC and CC chemokines by human antigen-presenting cells in response to Lassa virus or closely related immunogenic viruses, and in cynomolgus monkeys with lassa fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannetier, Delphine; Reynard, Stéphanie; Russier, Marion; Carnec, Xavier; Baize, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Lassa fever (LF), a hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa, remains unclear. We previously compared Lassa virus (LASV) with its genetically close, but nonpathogenic homolog Mopeia virus (MOPV) and demonstrated that the strong activation of antigen-presenting cells (APC), including type I IFN production, observed in response to MOPV probably plays a crucial role in controlling infection. We show here that human macrophages (MP) produce large amounts of CC and CXC chemokines in response to MOPV infection, whereas dendritic cells (DC) release only moderate amounts of CXC chemokines. However, in the presence of autologous T cells, DCs produced CC and CXC chemokines. Chemokines were produced in response to type I IFN synthesis, as the levels of both mediators were strongly correlated and the neutralization of type I IFN resulted in an inhibition of chemokine production. By contrast, LASV induced only low levels of CXCL-10 and CXCL-11 production. These differences in chemokine production may profoundly affect the generation of virus-specific T-cell responses and may therefore contribute to the difference of pathogenicity between these two viruses. In addition, a recombinant LASV (rLASV) harboring the NP-D389A/G392A mutations, which abolish the inhibition of type I IFN response by nucleoprotein (NP), induced the massive synthesis of CC and CXC chemokines in both DC and MP, confirming the crucial role of arenavirus NP in immunosuppression and pathogenicity. Finally, we confirmed, using PBMC samples and lymph nodes obtained from LASV-infected cynomolgus monkeys, that LF was associated with high levels of CXC chemokine mRNA synthesis, suggesting that the very early synthesis of these mediators may be correlated with a favourable outcome. PMID:24421914

  2. Production of CXC and CC Chemokines by Human Antigen-Presenting Cells in Response to Lassa Virus or Closely Related Immunogenic Viruses, and in Cynomolgus Monkeys with Lassa Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russier, Marion; Carnec, Xavier; Baize, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Lassa fever (LF), a hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa, remains unclear. We previously compared Lassa virus (LASV) with its genetically close, but nonpathogenic homolog Mopeia virus (MOPV) and demonstrated that the strong activation of antigen-presenting cells (APC), including type I IFN production, observed in response to MOPV probably plays a crucial role in controlling infection. We show here that human macrophages (MP) produce large amounts of CC and CXC chemokines in response to MOPV infection, whereas dendritic cells (DC) release only moderate amounts of CXC chemokines. However, in the presence of autologous T cells, DCs produced CC and CXC chemokines. Chemokines were produced in response to type I IFN synthesis, as the levels of both mediators were strongly correlated and the neutralization of type I IFN resulted in an inhibition of chemokine production. By contrast, LASV induced only low levels of CXCL-10 and CXCL-11 production. These differences in chemokine production may profoundly affect the generation of virus-specific T-cell responses and may therefore contribute to the difference of pathogenicity between these two viruses. In addition, a recombinant LASV (rLASV) harboring the NP-D389A/G392A mutations, which abolish the inhibition of type I IFN response by nucleoprotein (NP), induced the massive synthesis of CC and CXC chemokines in both DC and MP, confirming the crucial role of arenavirus NP in immunosuppression and pathogenicity. Finally, we confirmed, using PBMC samples and lymph nodes obtained from LASV-infected cynomolgus monkeys, that LF was associated with high levels of CXC chemokine mRNA synthesis, suggesting that the very early synthesis of these mediators may be correlated with a favourable outcome. PMID:24421914

  3. Efficient targeting of protein antigen to the dendritic cell receptor DEC-205 in the steady state leads to antigen presentation on major histocompatibility complex class I products and peripheral CD8+ T cell tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifaz, Laura; Bonnyay, David; Mahnke, Karsten; Rivera, Miguel; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Steinman, Ralph M

    2002-12-16

    To identify endocytic receptors that allow dendritic cells (DCs) to capture and present antigens on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I products in vivo, we evaluated DEC-205, which is abundant on DCs in lymphoid tissues. Ovalbumin (OVA) protein, when chemically coupled to monoclonal alphaDEC-205 antibody, was presented by CD11c+ lymph node DCs, but not by CD11c- cells, to OVA-specific, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Receptor-mediated presentation was at least 400 times more efficient than unconjugated OVA and, for MHC class I, the DCs had to express transporter of antigenic peptides (TAP) transporters. When alphaDEC-205:OVA was injected subcutaneously, OVA protein was identified over a 4-48 h period in DCs, primarily in the lymph nodes draining the injection site. In vivo, the OVA protein was selectively presented by DCs to TCR transgenic CD8+ cells, again at least 400 times more effectively than soluble OVA and in a TAP-dependent fashion. Targeting of alphaDEC-205:OVA to DCs in the steady state initially induced 4-7 cycles of T cell division, but the T cells were then deleted and the mice became specifically unresponsive to rechallenge with OVA in complete Freund's adjuvant. In contrast, simultaneous delivery of a DC maturation stimulus via CD40, together with alphaDEC-205:OVA, induced strong immunity. The CD8+ T cells responding in the presence of agonistic alphaCD40 antibody produced large amounts of interleukin 2 and interferon gamma, acquired cytolytic function in vivo, emigrated in large numbers to the lung, and responded vigorously to OVA rechallenge. Therefore, DEC-205 provides an efficient receptor-based mechanism for DCs to process proteins for MHC class I presentation in vivo, leading to tolerance in the steady state and immunity after DC maturation.

  4. Efficient Targeting of Protein Antigen to the Dendritic Cell Receptor DEC-205 in the Steady State Leads to Antigen Presentation on Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Products and Peripheral CD8+ T Cell Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifaz, Laura; Bonnyay, David; Mahnke, Karsten; Rivera, Miguel; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Steinman, Ralph M.

    2002-01-01

    To identify endocytic receptors that allow dendritic cells (DCs) to capture and present antigens on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I products in vivo, we evaluated DEC-205, which is abundant on DCs in lymphoid tissues. Ovalbumin (OVA) protein, when chemically coupled to monoclonal αDEC-205 antibody, was presented by CD11c+ lymph node DCs, but not by CD11c− cells, to OVA-specific, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Receptor-mediated presentation was at least 400 times more efficient than unconjugated OVA and, for MHC class I, the DCs had to express transporter of antigenic peptides (TAP) transporters. When αDEC-205:OVA was injected subcutaneously, OVA protein was identified over a 4–48 h period in DCs, primarily in the lymph nodes draining the injection site. In vivo, the OVA protein was selectively presented by DCs to TCR transgenic CD8+ cells, again at least 400 times more effectively than soluble OVA and in a TAP-dependent fashion. Targeting of αDEC-205:OVA to DCs in the steady state initially induced 4–7 cycles of T cell division, but the T cells were then deleted and the mice became specifically unresponsive to rechallenge with OVA in complete Freund's adjuvant. In contrast, simultaneous delivery of a DC maturation stimulus via CD40, together with αDEC-205:OVA, induced strong immunity. The CD8+ T cells responding in the presence of agonistic αCD40 antibody produced large amounts of interleukin 2 and interferon γ, acquired cytolytic function in vivo, emigrated in large numbers to the lung, and responded vigorously to OVA rechallenge. Therefore, DEC-205 provides an efficient receptor-based mechanism for DCs to process proteins for MHC class I presentation in vivo, leading to tolerance in the steady state and immunity after DC maturation. PMID:12486105

  5. Calcipotriol inhibits the proliferation of hyperproliferative CD29 positive keratinocytes in psoriatic epidermis in the absence of an effect on the function and number of antigen-presenting cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A.M.; Llado, Minna Fyhn Lykke; Skov, L.;

    1998-01-01

    for infiltrating leucocytes (CD45+) and Langerhans cells (CD1a+). Flow cytometric analysis showed that calcipotriol did not alter the number of CD45+ cells or Langerhans cells in psoriatic skin. These results indicate that calcipotriol does not alter either the number of the function of epidermal antigen......The aim of this study was to elucidate some of the possible mechanisms of action of the vitamin D analogue calcipotriol in vivo. Calcipotriol is finding increasing use in the treatment of psoriasis, but the primary target cell in vivo has not yet been identified. We treated psoriatic patients...... and healthy volunteers with calcipotriol and placebo ointment for 4 and 7 days, and obtained epidermal cell suspensions from treated areas. Epidermal cells were cocultured with autologous T cells, isolated from peripheral blood, in the absence or the presence of a classical antigen or a superantigen. In both...

  6. NLRC5, AT THE HEART OF ANTIGEN PRESENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eNeerincx

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing receptors (NLRs are intracellular proteins mainly involved in pathogen recognition, inflammatory responses, and cell death. Until recently, the function of the family member NLR caspase recruitment domain (CARD containing 5 (NLRC5 has been a matter of debate. It is now clear that NLRC5 acts as a transcriptional regulator of the major-histocompatibility complex (MHC class I. In this review we detail the development of our understanding of NLRC5 function, discussing both the accepted and the controversial aspects of NLRC5 activity. We give insight into the molecular mechanisms, and the potential implications, of NLRC5 function in health and disease.

  7. Autoinflammation and HLA-B27: Beyond Antigen Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Cailin H

    2016-08-01

    HLA-B27 associated disorders comprise a group of inflammatory conditions which have in common an association with the HLA class I molecule, HLA-B27. Given this association, these diseases are classically considered disorders of adaptive immunity. However, mounting data are challenging this assumption and confirming that innate immunity plays a more prominent role in pathogenesis than previously suspected. In this review, the concept of autoinflammation is discussed and evidence is presented from human and animal models to support a key role for innate immunity in HLA-B27 associated disorders. PMID:27229619

  8. 小剂量X射线照射对人树突状细胞抗原递呈及白介素-12分泌的影响%Effects of low dose X-ray irradiation on antigen presentation and IL-12 secretion in human dendritic cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫鹏; 江其生; 李峰生; 何蕊; 王翠兰; 李晓

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of low dose X-ray irradiation on the ability of antigen presentation and IL-12 secretion in human dendritic cells that had been cultured for different time in vitro.Methods The human peripheral blood mononuclear cells ( PBMC ) were collected and differentiated to dendritic cells (DCs) by rhGM-CSF and rhIL-4 treatment in vitro.The DCs were divided into 3 groups,group A:DCs were cultured for 2 d and then irradiated with 0.05,0.1,0.2 and 0.5 Gy X-rays; group B:DCs were cultured for 6 d and then irradiated as above; group C:DCs were cultured without irradiation.At 8 d of cell culture,the DCs were applied to activate T cells and CCK-8 was used to detect MLR ( mixed lymphocyte reaction),and the antigen presentation ability of DCs was evaluated.MTT assay was also used to test the cell-killing effect of the activated T-cells on A549 cells.IL-12 in the culture medium of DCs was detected by ELISA.Results After irradiation with 0.2 and 0.5 Gy X-rays,the antigen presentation ability of DCs was decreased in group A (t =2.79 and 3.71,P < 0.05 ),but significantly increased in group B (t =3.60 and 3.11,P < 0.05).The ability of the T cell activation was detected and the proliferation of A549 cells was slightly inhibited by the DCs in group A (t =2.89 and 2.91,P < 0.05),but was obviously inhibited by the DCs in group B (t =2.91 and 2.82,P <0.05).Meanwhile,the level of IL-12 was dramatically decreased in group A (t =4.44 and 6.93,P < 0.05),but was increased in group B (t =3.51 and 4.12,P <0.05).Conclusions The abilities of antigen presentation and proliferation inhibition of DCs could be down-regulated by low dose( < 0.5 Gy) of X-ray irradiation at the early stage of DCs,but was up-regulated at the late stage of DCs culture.%目的 探讨小剂量x射线照射对体外不同培养时间的人外周血树突状细胞( dendritic cell,DC)抗原递呈及白介素-12(IL-12)分泌的影响.方法 分离人外周血单个核细胞(PBMC),以人

  9. Regulation of T cell response to leishmania antigens by determinants of histocompatibility leukocyte class I and II molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bacellar O.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that HLA class I molecules play a significant role in the regulation of the proliferation of T cells activated by mitogens and antigens. We evaluated the ability of mAb to a framework determinant of HLA class I molecules to regulate T cell proliferation and interferon gamma (IFN-g production against leishmania, PPD, C. albicans and tetanus toxoid antigens in patients with tegumentary leishmaniasis and healthy subjects. The anti-major histocompatibility complex (MHC mAb (W6/32 suppressed lymphocyte proliferation by 90% in cultures stimulated with aCD3, but the suppression was variable in cultures stimulated with leishmania antigen. This suppression ranged from 30-67% and was observed only in 5 of 11 patients. IFN-g production against leishmania antigen was also suppressed by anti-HLA class I mAb. In 3 patients IFN-g levels were suppressed by more than 60%, while in the other 2 cultures IFN-g levels were 36 and 10% lower than controls. The suppression by HLA class I mAb to the proliferative response in leishmaniasis patients and in healthy controls varied with the antigens and the patients or donors tested. To determine whether the suppression is directed at antigen presenting cells (APCs or at the responding T cells, experiments with antigen-primed non-adherent cells, separately incubated with W6/32, were performed. Suppression of proliferation was only observed when the W6/32 mAb was added in the presence of T cells. These data provide evidence that a mAb directed at HLA class I framework determinants can suppress proliferation and cytokine secretion in response to several antigens.

  10. Determination of Diagnostic Antigens in Cattle Amphistomiasis Using Western Blotting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Halajian

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Mixed infection with amphistomes seems common in native cattle of Iran. The aim of this study was to determine diagnostic antigens in cattle mixed amphistomiasis."nMethods: Specific antigens of Cotylophoron cotylophorum, Gastrothylax crumenifer and Paramphisto­mum cervi (mixed infection, the most common species, were collected from cattle was deter­mined. Adult trematodes were collected from the rumen of naturally infected cattle at meat inspec­tion. After their homogenization and centrifugation, somatic antigens were prepared and ana­lyzed by SDS-PAGE. Specific antigens were determinated by western blot with homologous and heterolo­gous sera. SDS-PAGE of whole worms extract was performed at different concentrations and subse­quent gels staining. Immunoblotting analysis using sera from cattle naturally infected with am­phistomes, Dicrocoelium dendriticum, Fasciola spp. and hydatid cyst was performed."nResults: Electrophorese analysis of somatic antigens revealed the presence of 10 and 21 protein bands at 4 µgr/ml and 8 µgr/ml with molecular weights ranging from 25-120 and 25-150 kDa, respectively. The best result was taken at 8 mg/ml concentration. Although western blot of these proteins demon­strate 5 major antigenic polypeptides ranging from 50 to 100 kDa which were recognized by serum of cat­tle naturally infected with mixed amphistomes.

  11. Prediction of antigenic determinants of trichosanthin by molecular modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HEYONGNING; ZONGXIANGXIA; 等

    1996-01-01

    The antigenic determinants of trichosanthin were predicted by molecular modeling.First,the threedimensional structure model of the antigen-binding fragment of anti-trichosanthin immunoglobulin E was built on the basis of its amino-acid sequence and the known three-dimensional structure of an antibody with similar sequence.Secondly,the preferable antigen-antibody interactions were obtained based on the known three-dimensional structure of trichosanthin and of the hypervariable regions of anti-trichosanthin immunoglobulin E.Two regions in the molecular surface of trichosanthin were found to form extensive interactions with the hypervariable regions of the antibody and have been predicted to be the possible antigenic determinants:one is composed of two polypeptide segments,Ile201-Glu210 and Ile225-Asp229,which are close to each other in the three-dimensional structure;and the other is the segment Lys173-Thr178.The former region seems to be the more reasonable antigenic determinant than the latter one.

  12. The role of CD4 in antigen-independent activation of isolated single T lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelso, A; Owens, T

    1988-01-01

    The membrane molecule CD4 (L3T4) is thought to facilitate activation of Class II H-2-restricted T cells by binding to Ia determinants on antigen-presenting cells. Recent reports suggest that CD4 can also contribute to antigen-independent activation by anti-T cell receptor (TCR) antibodies. An assay...

  13. Developing a novel hepatitis B core – based antigen presentation system

    OpenAIRE

    Peyret, Hadrien

    2014-01-01

    Plant-produced proteins of pharmaceutical interest are beginning to reach the market, and the advantages of transient plant expression systems are gaining increasing recognition. In parallel, the use of virus-like particles (VLPs) has become standard in vaccine design. The pEAQ-HT vector derived from the cowpea mosaic virus – based CPMV-HT expression system has been shown to allow the production of large amounts of recombinant proteins, including VLPs, in Nicotiana benthamiana. Moreover, prev...

  14. The Plasticity of γδT Cells: Innate Immunity, Antigen Presentation and New Immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rita Casetti; Angelo Martino

    2008-01-01

    Several signals influence dendritic cell (DC) functions and consequent the immune responses to infectious pathogens. Our recent findings provide a new model of intervention on DCs implicating human γδ T cell stimuli. Vγ9Vδ2 T cells represent the major subset of circulating human γδ T cells and can be activated by non-peptidic molecules derived from different microorganisms or abnormal metabolic routes. With activated-Vγ9Vδ2 T cell co-culture, immature DCs acquire features of mature DCs, such as increasing the migratory activity, up-regulating the chemokine receptors, and triggering the Thl immune response. Similar to the NK-derived signals, DC activation is mediated by soluble factors as well as cell-to-cell contact. Many non-peptidic molecules including nitrogen- containing bisphosphonates and pyrophosphomonoester drugs, can stimulate the activity of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells in vitro and in vivo. The relatively low in vivo toxicity of many of these drugs makes possible novel vaccine and immune-based strategies against infectious diseases. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2008;5(3):161-170.

  15. Manipulations of the ubiquitin proteasome system and their effects on antigen presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothuis, Tom Alphonsus Maria

    2006-01-01

    Surgery is the most effective cancer therapy, followed by radiotherapy. These techniques usually target tumour specific tissue only, unlike most forms of chemotherapy as is best illustrated by the relatively moderate side effects of such treatments. When the immune system could find and destroy tumo

  16. Tubulin and actin interplay at the T cell and Antigen-presenting cell interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa B Martín-Cófreces

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available T cells reorganize their actin and tubulin-based cytoskeletons to provide a physical basis to the immune synapse. However, growing evidence shows that their roles on T cell activation are more dynamic than merely serving as tracks or scaffold for different molecules. The cross-talk between both skeletons may be important for the formation and movement of the lamella at the IS by increasing the adhesion of the T cell to the APC, thus favoring the transport of components towards the plasma membrane and in turn regulating the T-APC intercellular communication. Microtubules and F-actin appear to be essential for the transport of the different signaling microclusters along the membrane, therefore facilitating the propagation of the signal. Finally, they can also be important for regulating the endocytosis, recycling and degradation of the TCR signaling machinery, thus helping both to sustain the activated state and to switch it off.

  17. Defects in Antigen-Presenting Cells in the BB-DP Rat Model of Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Sommandas (Vinod)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractType-1 diabetes is the result of a T cell mediated immune response against the insulin-producing β cells in the islet of Langerhans. In humans, until now, the disease is only clearly detectable at the onset of the disease. Therefore studies to identify initial factors involved in

  18. ImmunoChip Study Implicates Antigen Presentation to T Cells in Narcolepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faraco, J.; Lin, L.; Kornum, B.R.; Kenny, E.E.; Trynka, G.; Einen, M.; Rico, T.J.; Lichtner, P.; Dauvilliers, Y.; Arnulf, I.; Lecendreux, M.; Javidi, S.; Geisler, P.; Mayer, G.; Pizza, F.; Poli, F.; Plazzi, G.; Overeem, S.; Lammers, G.J.; Kemlink, D.; Sonka, K.; Nevsimalova, S.; Rouleau, G.; Desautels, A.; Montplaisir, J.; Frauscher, B.; Ehrmann, L.; Hogl, B.; Jennum, P.; Bourgin, P.; Peraita-Adrados, R.; Iranzo, A.; Bassetti, C.; Chen, W.M.; Concannon, P.; Thompson, S.D.; Damotte, V.; Fontaine, B.; Breban, M.; Gieger, C.; Klopp, N.; Deloukas, P.; Wijmenga, C.; Hallmayer, J.; Onengut-Gumuscu, S.; Rich, S.S.; Winkelmann, J.; Mignot, E.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the identification of susceptibility genes and environmental exposures provide broad support for a post-infectious autoimmune basis for narcolepsy/hypocretin (orexin) deficiency. We genotyped loci associated with other autoimmune and inflammatory diseases in 1,886 individuals with

  19. ImmunoChip Study Implicates Antigen Presentation to T Cells in Narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faraco, Juliette; Lin, Ling; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek;

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the identification of susceptibility genes and environmental exposures provide broad support for a post-infectious autoimmune basis for narcolepsy/hypocretin (orexin) deficiency. We genotyped loci associated with other autoimmune and inflammatory diseases in 1,886 individuals w...

  20. Sinks, suppressors and antigen presenters: how lymphodepletion enhances T cell-mediated tumor immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Khong, Hung T.; Antony, Paul A.; Douglas C Palmer; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2005-01-01

    Lymphodepletion followed by adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of autologous, tumor-reactive T cells boosts antitumor immunotherapeutic activity in mouse and in humans. In the most recent clinical trials, lymphodepletion together with ACT has an objective response rate of 50% in patients with solid metastatic tumors. The mechanisms underlying this recent advance in cancer immunotherapy are beginning to be elucidated and include: the elimination of cellular cytokine ‘sinks’ for homeostatic γC-cytoki...

  1. Demonstration of two distinct antigenic determinants on hepatitis B e antigen by monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imai, M.; Nomura, M.; Gotanda, T.; Sano, T.; Tachibana, K.; Miyamoto, H.; Takahashi, K.; Toyama, S.; Miyakawa, Y.; Mayumi, M.

    1982-01-01

    Mice were immunized against hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) isolated from sera of asymptomatic carriers of hepatitis B virus. Their spleen cells were fused with mouse myeloma (NS-1) cells, and 5 clones of hybridoma cells secreting antibody against HBeAg (anti-HBe) were isolated. For the production of anti-HBe in large scale, cells were cultivated both in vitro and in the peritoneal cavity of ascitic mice. Although monoclonal antibodies produced by these clones showed a strong reactivity of anti-HBe in hemagglutination tests, individual monoclonal anti-HBe did not reveal any precipitin line in immunodiffusion. When 2 of the 5 monoclonal antibodies were mixed together, however, some combinations showed a precipitin line against HBeAg, whereas others did not. Utilizing solid-phase radioimmunoassay involving a number of combinations of monoclonal antibodies used for solid-phase and radiolabeling, the 5 antibodies were classified into 2 groups. Three of the anti-HBe antibodies were found to be directed to 1 determinant of HBeAg (determinant a); the remaining 2 to the other determinant (determinant b). Determinants a and b were detected on HBeAg in the serum, as well as on the polypeptide of 19,000 daltons (P19) derived from the nucleocapsid of hepatitis B virus. Monoclonal anti-HBe antibodies with different specificities may provide useful tools in delineating the antigenic structure of HBeAg and also in evaluating immune responses of the host directed to its subdeterminants.

  2. P System antigenic determiners expression in Ascaris lumbricoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponce De León Patricia

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The P System antigens have been detected in numerous parasites, bacterias and viruses, nevertheless the clinical significance is still unknown. The aim was to study the presence of P1 antigenic determiners in A. lumbricoides extracts by means of the use of 6 different monoclonal antibodies of well-known concentrations and Ig class. We worked with 14 A. lumbricoides extracts. Inhibition Agglutination Test was made in a bromelin enzymatic medium and 4 masculineC temperature. Titre, Score and Sensitivity Parameter were determined for each monoclonal antibody against red cells suspension used as revealing system. Ten extracts inhibited the agglutination of all anti P1 monoclonal antibodies. The 4 remaining extracts only inhibited the agglutination of some of them. It is demonstrated that the extracts have P1 activity. This activity is independent of titre, Score, Sensitivity Parameter, concentration and Ig class and it depends on the epitope at which the monoclonal antibody is directed.

  3. [ELISA method for the determination of factor VII antigen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorquera, J I; Aznar, J A; Monteagudo, J; Montoro, J M; Casaña, P; Pascual, I; Bañuls, E; Curats, R; Llopis, F

    1989-12-01

    The low plasma concentration of clotting factor VII makes it difficult to assay its antigenic fraction by the conventional methods of precipitation with specific antigens. Simple and peroxidase-conjugated antisera are currently available from commercial sources, thus allowing one to determine F VII:Ag by enzyme immunoassay. An ELISA method has been developed in this laboratory which provides sensitivity limits about 0.1% of the plasma concentration of F VII and correlates significantly with its functional activity (r = 0.603, n = 44, p less than 0.001). This technique can be highly helpful in characterising molecular variants of F VII, as well as in detecting acquired deficiencies of this factor.

  4. A rapid radioimmunoassay for determination of tumor antigens with reference to carcinoembryonic antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel experimental procedure for the determination of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) by a solid phase microradioimmunoassay has been developed. Goat anti-CEA antibodies were immobilized by coupling to cyanogen bromide activated filter paper discs. The inhibition of binding of radioiodinated CEA to the discs was proportional to the amount of unlabelled CEA present in the test sample. The experimental procedure involved two steps: (i) the test material containing unlabelled CEA was allowed to react with the antibody coated discs at 37 deg C for 2 hrs., and (ii) a standard amount of 125I-CEA was added to the reaction mixture and incubated for 24 hours at 37 deg C or room temperature. The discs were then washed 4 times and the radioactivity of each disc was determined. The sensitivity of the test in its present state of development was 2.5 ng/ml. (author)

  5. Antigen Processing by Autoreactive B Cells Promotes Determinant Spreading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang D.Dai; George Carayanniotis; Eli Sercarz

    2005-01-01

    Acute primary immune responses tend to focus on few immunodominant determinants using a very limited number of T cell clones for expansion, whereas chronic inflammatory responses generally recruit a large number of different T cell clones to attack a broader range of determinants of the invading pathogens or the inflamed tissues.In T cell-mediated organ-specific autoimmune disease, a transition from the acute to the chronic phase contributes to pathogenesis, and the broadening process is called determinant spreading. The cellular components catalyzing the spreading reaction are not identified. It has been suggested that autoreactive B cells may play a central role in diversifying autoreactive T cell responses, possibly through affecting antigen processing and presentation. The clonal identity and diversity of the B cells and antibodies seem critical in regulating T cell activity and subsequent tissue damage or repair. Here, we use two autoimmune animal models, experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT)and type 1 diabetes (T1D), to discuss how autoreactive B cells or antibodies alter the processing and presentation of autoantigens to regulate specific T cell response.

  6. DEMONSTRATION OF MULTIPLE ANTIGENIC DETERMINANTS ON 'MYCOPLASMA PNEUMONIAE' ATTACHMENT PROTEIN BY MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distinct multiple antigenic determinants of the attachment protein of Mycoplasma pneumoniae have been identified by limited proteolytic cleavage using specific monoclonal antibodies. Western blots prepared from the gels containing the cleaved fragments were probed with antiserum ...

  7. Carcinoembryonic antigen continuous epitopes determined by the spot method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solassol, I; Granier, C; Pèlegrin, A

    2001-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a heavily glycosylated tumor-associated protein with an N-A1-B1-A2-B2-A3-B3 domain structure. Circulating CEA immunoassays are used for monitoring digestive cancer patients, and radiolabeled anti-CEA monoclonal antibodies (MAb) are used for the diagnosis and therapy of CEA-positive tumors. The five major nonoverlapping epitopes (Gold 1-5) have been broadly correlated with the domain organization, but there is no precise localization of the epitopes at the sequence level. In an attempt to identify the peptide sequences corresponding to the five Gold epitopes on the CEA molecule, we prepared a set of 227 overlapping fifteen-mer peptides corresponding to the complete CEA sequence with the SPOT method. Using five high affinity MAbs directed against the five CEA Gold epitopes, we demonstrated that none of these epitopes could be mimicked by a fifteen-mer peptide sequence. However, using rabbit and goat anti-CEA sera, we identified six major continuous antigenic regions. All are included in the Ig-like domains of the CEA: two in the A1 domain (residues 120-134 and 153-164), one each in the A2 (329-337) and A3 domains (508-513), one at the junction between the A3 and B3 domains (553-561) and one in the B3 domain (565-573). A very homologous sequence (common residues VSPRL) was mapped in each of the three A domains. Thus, in terms of occurrence of continuous epitopes, the Ig-like domains A1, A2, A3 and B3 seem to be the most antigenic parts of CEA. These peptide sequences should be good candidates for the future development of site-specific anti-CEA MAbs. PMID:11275797

  8. Reagents for radioimmunological determination of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work was undertaken to prepare the reagents for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) radioimmunoassay with double antibody method. The CEA standard of high immunoreactivity was prepared and purified. The purified CEA was used for immunozation of goats. The goat anti - CEA sera were received. IgG fraction from normal goat serum was purified and used for the production of horse anti-goat IgG serum which was then used in the radioimmunoassay of CEA. The labelling of CEA with iodine-125 has been carried out be means of the enzymatic method.(Z.R.)

  9. From Antigen Presenting Cells to Antigen Presenting Vesicles:philosophic thinking on cancer immunotherapy%从抗原提呈细胞到抗原提呈小体

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张红梅; 张利旺; 刘文超

    2006-01-01

    树突状细胞是体内专职抗原提呈细胞,在抗肿瘤免疫治疗中发挥重要作用.而exosome是树突状细胞分泌的一种膜性微囊小体,富含树突状细胞的MHC-Ⅰ/Ⅱ类分子、协同刺激分子等多种生物活性分子,亦在抗肿瘤免疫应答中发挥重要作用.从树突状细胞到exosome,是细胞性瘤苗向非细胞性瘤苗的飞跃,对免疫治疗研究产生极为深远的影响.

  10. Large adipocytes function as antigen-presenting cells to activate CD4+ T cells via upregulating MHCII in obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, L; Yang, X.; Lin, Y.; Li, S.; Jiang, J; Qian, S.(State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing, China); Tang, Q; He, R; Li, X.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Although obesity is associated with low-grade inflammation and metabolic disorders, clinical studies suggested some obese people were metabolically healthy with smaller adipocyte size compared with metabolically abnormal obese (MAO). This indicated adipocyte size may be an important predictor underlay the distinction between MAO and metabolically healthy obese. As recent study has shown that adipocytes expressed class II major histocompatibility complex (MHCII), which f...

  11. Constitutive expression of a costimulatory ligand on antigen-presenting cells in the nervous system drives demyelinating disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zehntner, Simone P; Brisebois, Marcel; Tran, Elise;

    2003-01-01

    that transgenic mice constitutively expressing the costimulatory ligand B7.2/CD86 on microglia in the central nervous system (CNS) and on related cells in the proximal peripheral nervous tissue spontaneously develop autoimmune demyelinating disease. Disease-affected nervous tissue in transgenic mice showed...

  12. Novel CD47: SIRPα dependent mechanism for the activation of STAT3 in antigen-presenting cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natan Toledano

    Full Text Available Cell surface CD47 interacts with its receptor, signal-regulatory-protein α (SIRPα that is expressed predominantly on macrophages, to inhibit phagocytosis of normal, healthy cells. This "don't eat me" signal is mediated through tyrosine phosphorylation of SIRPα at the cytoplasmic ITIM motifs and the recruitment of the phosphatase, SHP-1. We previously revealed a novel mechanism for the activation of the STAT3 pathway and the regulation of human APC maturation and function that is based on cell:cell interaction. In this study, we present evidence supporting the notion that CD47:SIRPα serves as a cell surface receptor: ligand pair involved in this contact-dependent STAT3 activation and regulation of APC maturation. We show that upon co-culturing APC with various primary and tumor cell lines STAT3 phosphorylation and IL-10 expression are induced, and such regulation could be suppressed by specific CD47 siRNAs and shRNAs. Significantly, >50% reduction in CD47 expression abolished the contact-dependent inhibition of T cell activation. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed a physical association between SIRPα and STAT3. Thus, we suggest that in addition to signaling through the ITIM-SHP-1 complex that transmit an anti-phagocytotic, CD47:SIRPα also triggers STAT3 signaling that is linked to an immature APC phenotype and peripheral tolerance under steady state and pathological conditions.

  13. Antigen-presenting cells represent targets for R5 HIV-1 infection in the first trimester pregnancy uterine mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Marlin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During the first trimester of pregnancy, HIV-1 mother-to-child transmission is relatively rare despite the permissivity of placental cells to cell-to-cell HIV-1 infection. The placenta interacts directly with maternal uterine cells (decidual cells but the physiological role of the decidua in the control of HIV-1 transmission and whether decidua could be a source of infected cells is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To answer to this question, decidual mononuclear cells were exposed to HIV-1 in vitro. Decidual cells were shown to be more susceptible to infection by an R5 HIV-1, as compared to an X4 HIV-1. Infected cells were identified by flow cytometry analysis. The results showed that CD14(+ cells were the main targets of HIV-1 infection in the decidua. These infected CD14(+ cells expressed DC-SIGN, CD11b, CD11c, the Fc gamma receptor CD16, CD32 and CD64, classical MHC class-I and class-II and maturation and activation molecules CD83, CD80 and CD86. The permissivity of decidual tissue was also evaluated by histoculture. Decidual tissue was not infected by X4 HIV-1 but was permissive to R5 HIV-1. Different profiles of infection were observed depending on tissue localization. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The presence of HIV-1 target cells in the decidua in vitro and the low rate of in utero mother-to-child transmission during the first trimester of pregnancy suggest that a natural control occurs in vivo limiting cell-to-cell infection of the placenta and consequently infection of the fetus.

  14. Airway eosinophils accumulate in the mediastinal lymph nodes but lack antigen-presenting potential for naive T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.S. van Rijt (Leonie); N. Vos (Nanda); D. Hijdra; V.C. de Vries (Victor); H.C. Hoogsteden (Henk); B.N.M. Lambrecht (Bart)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractAsthma is characterized by infiltration of the airway wall with eosinophils. Although eosinophils are considered to be effector cells, recent studies have reported their ability to activate primed Th2 cells. In this study, we investigated whether eosinophils are capable

  15. White button mushroom enhances maturation of bone marrow derived dendritic cells and their antigen presenting function in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushrooms have been shown to enhance immune response, which contributes to their anti-tumor property. White button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) (WBM) constitute 90 percent of the total mushrooms consumed in the United States; however, the health benefit of this strain in general is not well studied...

  16. An alternative and effective HIV vaccination approach based on inhibition of antigen presentation attenuators in dendritic cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao-Tong Song; Kevin Evel-Kabler; Lisa Rollins; Melissa Aldrich; Feng Gao; Xue F Huang; Si-Yi Chen

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current efforts to develop HIV vaccines that seek to stimulate immune responses have been disappointing, underscoring the inability of natural immune responses to control HIV-1 infection. Here we tested an alternative strategy to induce anti-HIV immune responses by inhibiting a host's natural immune inhibitor. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used small interfering RNA (siRNA) to inhibit suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) 1, a key negative regulator of the JAK/STAT pathway, and inves...

  17. Balancing selection maintains a form of ERAP2 that undergoes nonsense-mediated decay and affects antigen presentation.

    OpenAIRE

    Andrés, Aida M.; Megan Y Dennis; Warren W Kretzschmar; Cannons, Jennifer L.; Shih-Queen Lee-Lin; Belen Hurle; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.; Williamson, Scott H.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Rasmus Nielsen; Clark, Andrew G.; Green, Eric D.

    2010-01-01

    A remarkable characteristic of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is its extreme genetic diversity, which is maintained by balancing selection. In fact, the MHC complex remains one of the best-known examples of natural selection in humans, with well-established genetic signatures and biological mechanisms for the action of selection. Here, we present genetic and functional evidence that another gene with a fundamental role in MHC class I presentation, endoplasmic reticulum amino...

  18. Balancing selection maintains a form of ERAP2 that undergoes nonsense-mediated decay and affects antigen presentation

    OpenAIRE

    de Andrés, A.; Dennis, M.; Kretzschmar, W; Cannons, J.; Lee-Lin, S.; Hurle, B.; Schwartzberg, P; Williamson, S.; Bustamante, C; Nielsen, R; Clark, A.; Green, E.

    2010-01-01

    A remarkable characteristic of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is its extreme genetic diversity, which is maintained by balancing selection. In fact, the MHC complex remains one of the best-known examples of natural selection in humans, with well-established genetic signatures and biological mechanisms for the action of selection. Here, we present genetic and functional evidence that another gene with a fundamental role in MHC class I presentation, endoplasmic reticulum amino...

  19. Human Leukocyte Antigen-Presented Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Is a Surface Biomarker and Potential Therapeutic Target for Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Andrea M; Kaabinejadian, Saghar; McMurtrey, Curtis P; Bardet, Wilfried; Jackson, Ken W; Zuna, Rosemary E; Husain, Sanam; Adams, Gregory P; MacDonald, Glen; Dillon, Rachelle L; Ames, Harold; Buchli, Rico; Hawkins, Oriana E; Weidanz, Jon A; Hildebrand, William H

    2016-02-01

    T cells recognize cancer cells via HLA/peptide complexes, and when disease overtakes these immune mechanisms, immunotherapy can exogenously target these same HLA/peptide surface markers. We previously identified an HLA-A2-presented peptide derived from macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and generated antibody RL21A against this HLA-A2/MIF complex. The objective of the current study was to assess the potential for targeting the HLA-A2/MIF complex in ovarian cancer. First, MIF peptide FLSELTQQL was eluted from the HLA-A2 of the human cancerous ovarian cell lines SKOV3, A2780, OV90, and FHIOSE118hi and detected by mass spectrometry. By flow cytometry, RL21A was shown to specifically stain these four cell lines in the context of HLA-A2. Next, partially matched HLA-A*02:01+ ovarian cancer (n = 27) and normal fallopian tube (n = 24) tissues were stained with RL21A by immunohistochemistry to assess differential HLA-A2/MIF complex expression. Ovarian tumor tissues revealed significantly increased RL21A staining compared with normal fallopian tube epithelium (P < 0.0001), with minimal staining of normal stroma and blood vessels (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.001 compared with tumor cells) suggesting a therapeutic window. We then demonstrated the anticancer activity of toxin-bound RL21A via the dose-dependent killing of ovarian cancer cells. In summary, MIF-derived peptide FLSELTQQL is HLA-A2-presented and recognized by RL21A on ovarian cancer cell lines and patient tumor tissues, and targeting of this HLA-A2/MIF complex with toxin-bound RL21A can induce ovarian cancer cell death. These results suggest that the HLA-A2/MIF complex should be further explored as a cell-surface target for ovarian cancer immunotherapy.

  20. CNS myelin induces regulatory functions of DC-SIGN-expressing, antigen-presenting cells via cognate interaction with MOG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Garcia-Vallejo; J.M. Ilarregui; H. Kalay; S. Chamorro; N. Koning; W.W. Unger; M. Ambrosini; V. Montserrat; R.J. Fernandes; S.C.M. Bruijns; J.R.T. van Weering; N.J. Paauw; T. O'Toole; J. van Horssen; P. van der Valk; K. Nazmi; J.G.M. Bolscher; J. Bajramovic; C.D. Dijkstra; B.A. 't Hart; Y. van Kooyk

    2014-01-01

    Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), a constituent of central nervous system myelin, is an important autoantigen in the neuroinflammatory disease multiple sclerosis (MS). However, its function remains unknown. Here, we show that, in healthy human myelin, MOG is decorated with fucosylated N-gly

  1. A Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain That Improves Stimulation of Antigen-Presenting Cells Does Not Enhance Vaccine Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt, Deanna M; Dawn M O'Dee; Joseph Horzempa; Paul E Carlson; Russo, Brian C.; Bales, Jacqueline M.; Brown, Matthew J.; Nau, Gerard J.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination is a proven strategy to mitigate morbidity and mortality of infectious diseases. The methodology of identifying and testing new vaccine candidates could be improved with rational design and in vitro testing prior to animal experimentation. The tularemia vaccine, Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS), does not elicit complete protection against lethal challenge with a virulent type A Francisella strain. One factor that may contribute to this poor performance is limited s...

  2. Fatal Attraction: Interactions between antigen-presenting cells and islets of Langerhans in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G.M. Rosmalen (Judith)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe onset of diabetes mellitus is characterized by various symptoms, all the result of a disturbed glucose metabolism. The main symptoms are thirst and an excessive production of urine. The disturbed glucose metabolism underlying these symptoms is due to an absolute deficiency of insulin

  3. Availability of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 to antigen presenting cells controls the balance between regulatory and inflammatory T cell responses

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffery, Louisa E.; Wood, Alice M; Qureshi, Omar S.; Hou, Tie Zheng; Gardner, David; Briggs, Zoe; Kaur, Satdip; Raza, Karim; Sansom, David M

    2012-01-01

    1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), the active form of vitamin D, exerts potent effects on several tissues including cells of the immune system, where it affects T cell activation, differentiation and migration. The circulating, inactive form of vitamin D, 25(OH)D3, is generally used as an indication of “vitamin D status”. However, utilization of this precursor depends on its uptake by cells and subsequent conversion by the enzyme 25(OH)D3-1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1) into active 1,25(OH)2D3....

  4. Discovering naturally processed antigenic determinants that confer protective T cell immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilchuk, Pavlo; Spencer, Charles T; Conant, Stephanie B;

    2013-01-01

    CD8+ T cells (TCD8) confer protective immunity against many infectious diseases, suggesting that microbial TCD8 determinants are promising vaccine targets. Nevertheless, current T cell antigen identification approaches do not discern which epitopes drive protective immunity during active infectio...

  5. A new virion precipitation test for oncovirus envelope antigens which detects common antigenic determinants in mammalian type-C viruses and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altstein, A D; Zakharova, L G; Zhdanov, V M

    1979-03-15

    A method for the study of oncovirus envelope antigens was developed, bases on the precipitation of intact virions by a double antibody technique. The amount of precipitated virus was then measured as reverse transcriptase activity. The method was designated the virion precipitation test (VPT). It has been used for titration of antibodies to envelope antigens of oncoviruses. The study of envelop antigens of 11 different oncoviruses permitted their differentiation into the following groups: (1) murine type-C viruses: (2) feline type-C viruses; (3) simian type-C viruses; (4) the RD-114/BEV group; (5) Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV); (6) bovine leukemia virus; (7) avian type-C viruses; (8) mouse mammary tumor virus. No common antigenic determinants were detected in the last three groups. Mammalian type-C viruses (RD-114, NIH-MuLV, G-MuLV) had common antigenic determinants in the envelope, as demonstrated with an anti-RD-114 serum. Mammalian type-C viruses also shared antigenic determinants with M-PMV. The relationship of type-C viruses to M-PMV decreased in the following order: RD-114--NIH-MuLV--G-MuLV. It was also shown that the endogenous xenotropic feline RD-114 virus was more closely related to xenotropic NIH-MuLV than to ecotropic G-MuLV. The nature of the common antigenic determinants, as demonstrated by VPT on the surface of mammalian type-C viruses and M-PMV, and their significance for the concept of oncovirus evolution are discussed.

  6. Detection of specific IgE antibodies to major and minor antigenic determinants in sera of penicillin allergic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵永星; 乔海灵

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the mechanism (s) of penicillins allergic reaction.Methods The radioallergosorbent test (RAST) was used to detect 9 specific IgE antibodies, including major antigenic determinants: benzylpenicilloyl (BPO), ampicilloyl (APO), amoxicilloyl (AXO), phenoxomethylpenicilloyl (PVO) and flucloxacilloyl (FLUO), and minor antigenic determinants: benzylpenicillanyl (BPA), amoxicillanyl (AXA), 6-aminopenicillanic (APA) and phenoxomethylpenicillany (PVA), in the sera of 32 penicillin allergic patients. The relationship between specific IgE antibodies and penicillins chemical structures was studied by radioallergosorbent inhibition test.Results Nineteen of 32 patients (59.4%) were RAST positive, among whom, five cases were positive only to one or two antigenic minor determinants, and three cases were positive only to one or three major antigenic determinants. The remaining 11 patients were positive not only to major antigenic determinants but also minor antigenic determinants. In 9 specific IgE antibodies, the positive rate of PVA-IgE was the highest (34.38%), followed by BPO-IgE (31.25%). The positive rate of FLUO-IgE was the lowest (15.63%). Of the total patient group, 53.13% were positive to one or more minor antigenic determinants, while 37.5% (12/32) were positive to one or more major antigenic determinants. The percentage of patients with urticarial reactions who were positive to minor antigenic determinants (63.16%) was significantly higher than observed in the anaphylactic shock group (38.5%, P<0.05).Conclusions The minor antigenic determinant was important in allergic reaction. The combining sites of the specific IgE antibodies were likely to be the side-chain of drug or the overwhelming drug molecule.

  7. Study of H-Y antigen in abnormal sex determination with monoclonal antibody and an ELISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira-Filho, C A; Wachtel, S S

    1985-03-01

    A newly developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has been applied to the study of H-Y antigen in cases of XY, XYY, and X,dicY gonadal dysgenesis, testicular feminization syndrome, XXXXY syndrome, and XX true hermaphroditism. Monoclonal H-Y antibody was absorbed with cells from each of eight patients and from normal male and female controls, and then reacted with a plated antigen source in a system subsuming the addition of biotinylated secondary antibody, avidin-biotin-enzyme complex and substrate, and thereby the generation of a color. Positive absorption decreased the reaction, and this allowed sensitive measurement of H-Y phenotype in an electronic optical density reader. The ELISA obviates many of the technical difficulties encountered in complement-mediated cytotoxicity systems and can be used in the study of clinical cases of aberrant sex determination and in the evaluation of current models of the genetics of sex determination.

  8. Case report: diffuse splenic metastasis of occult breast cancer with incompatible blood group antigenic determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranyay, Ferenc

    2009-01-01

    Cancer cells with immunogenic properties having altered protein glycosilation, modified blood group substances have been widely studied [Kannagi R, Miyake M, Zenita KM, Itai S, Hiraiwa N, Shigeta K, et al. Cancer-associated carbohydrate antigens: modified blood group substances and oncodevelopmental antigens on tumor cells. Gann Monogr Cancer Res 1988; 34: p. 15-28; Hakomori S. Antigen structure and genetic basis of histo-blood groups A, B and O their changes associated with human cancer. Biochem Biophys Acta 1999; 1473: p. 247-266; Brooks SA, Carter TM, Royle L, Harvey DJ, Fry SA, Kinch C, et al. Altered glycosilation of proteins in cancer: what is the potential for new anti-tumour strategies. Anticancer Agents Med Chem 2008; 8: p. 2-21]. In the study reported here, a 78-year-old female patient was admitted to the hospital with circulatory failure. At autopsy, the spleen (weight: 420 g) was extremely firm with a diffusely blackberry-colored cut surface. There were no signs of carcinomatous process at autopsy. By histology, the spleen showed diffuse metastatic carcinomatous infiltration. Using immunohistochemistry, an antibody to breast carcinoma antigen (BioGenex) labelled metastatic cells of the spleen and bone marrow. The patient was blood group O. Labelling for binding of lectins with and without blood group antigen specificity and monoclonal antibodies was carried out. The B blood group specific Banderiaea simplicifolia agglutinin I and an anti-B blood group monoclonal antibody labelled all the metastatic cells of spleen and bone marrow intensely. There was no detection of blood group A antigen by either binding of Dolichos biflorus agglutinin or anti-blood group A monoclonal antibodies. These observations raise the possibility that the detected incompatible B blood group antigen determinants on the metastatic cells were immunogenic. The surviving carcinoma cells may have found a place of refuge from immune surveillance in the spleen and in the bone marrow

  9. Migration of antigen-presenting B cells from peripheral to mucosal lymphoid tissues may induce intestinal antigen-specific IgA following parenteral immunization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coffin, SE; Clark, SL; Bos, NA; Brubaker, JO; Offit, PA

    1999-01-01

    Parenterally administered immunizations have long been used to induce protection from mucosal pathogens such as Bordetella pertussis and influenza virus. We previously found that i.m. inoculation of mice with the intestinal pathogen, rotavirus, induced virus-specific Ab production by intestinal lymp

  10. Virosomes for antigen and DNA delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daemen, T; de Mare, A; Bungener, L; de Jonge, J; Huckriede, A; Wilschut, J

    2005-01-01

    Specific targeting and delivery as well as the display of antigens on the surface of professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are key issues in the design and development of new-generation vaccines aimed at the induction of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity. Prophylactic vaccination agains

  11. The importance of determining human leucocyte antigens in preventing intestinal lymphoma in patients with celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel Samasca; Mihaela Iancu; Angela Butnariu; Andreica Mariana; Ileana Constantinescu; Doru Dejica

    2010-01-01

    Identification of celiac disease, by determining human leucocyte antigens DQ2/DQ8, is important since recent long-term studies have shown that the mortality of celiac disease is increased, if it is unrecognized and untreated. In this sense, we wanted to see the usefulness of genetic tests in celiac disease diagnosis and screening. Material and methods. During 2010 we determined by PCR, DQ2/DQ8 haplotype, in a group of 27 children with celiac disease and 9 of their brothers, serolo...

  12. Antigenic peptide trimming by ER aminopeptidases--insights from structural studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratikos, Efstratios; Stern, Lawrence J

    2013-10-01

    Generation and destruction of antigenic peptides by ER resident aminopeptidases ERAP1 and ERAP2 have been shown in the last few years to be important for the correct functioning and regulation of the adaptive immune response. These two highly homologous aminopeptidases appear to have evolved complex mechanisms well suited for their biological role in antigen presentation. Furthermore, polymorphic variability in these enzymes appears to affect their function and predispose individuals to disease. This review discusses our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind ERAP1/2 function as suggested by several recently determined crystallographic structures of these enzymes. PMID:23545452

  13. Facts on the fragmentation of antigens in presenting cells, on the association of antigen fragments with MHC molecules in cell-free systems, and speculation on the cell biology of antigen processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werdelin, O; Mouritsen, S; Petersen, B L;

    1988-01-01

    The processing of a protein antigen is a multi-step event taking place in antigen-presenting cells. Processing is a prerequisite for the recognition of most antigens by T lymphocytes. The antigen is ingested by endocytosis, transported to an acid cellular compartment and subjected to proteolytic ...

  14. Variation in antigen-antibody affinity among serotypes of Salmonella O4 serogroup, determined using specific antisera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aribam, Swarmistha Devi; Elsheimer-Matulova, Marta; Matsui, Hidenori; Hirota, Jiro; Shiraiwa, Kazumasa; Ogawa, Yohsuke; Hikono, Hirokazu; Shimoji, Yoshihiro; Eguchi, Masahiro

    2015-11-01

    Serotyping is widely used for typing Salmonella during surveillance, and depends on determining the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-antigen and the flagellar protein (H-antigens) components. As the O-antigen is highly variable, and structurally unique to each serotype, we investigated the binding affinities of LPS from Salmonella serotypes of O4 serogroup with specific anti-antigen serum via immunoblot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Since the serotypes from O4 serogroup also express the O-antigen factor 12, O12 antiserum was also used for the analysis. LPS from the different serotypes showed different binding affinities with the antisera. Therefore, based on the antigen-antibody affinity, a modified agglutination assay was carried out by using O4 and O12 antisera. Although serotypes from O4 serogroup have the common O-antigen factors 4 and 12, the analysis showed that the degree of agglutination reaction is different for each of the serotypes. We suggest that Salmonella serogroup O4 serotypes exhibit different binding affinities with specific antisera despite the presence of common O-antigen factors 4 and 12.

  15. [Stability of the structure and antigenic determinants of adenovirus type 1 native hexon to proteases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiseleva, E K; Khil'ko, S N; Grigor'ev, V G; Diachenko, N S; Vantsak, N P

    1986-08-01

    Hexon capsomers of human adenovirus type 1 (h1) labeled by iodine 125 were digested in a native state (trimers) by trypsin, chymotrypsin or papain, and the resulting hydrolysates were analyzed by SDS-PAGE. In each case, a discrete and temporally stable pattern of relatively large fragments was revealed. The degree of hexon polypeptide hydrolysis was maximal for papain, intermediate for chymotrypsin and minimal for trypsin, the largest fragments in the digest being 32, 40 and 80 kD, respectively. At room temperature, all the electrophoretically discernible hexon proteolytical fragments were held together in structures resembling intact hexon trimers and could be regarded as "hexon cores", of which papain hexon cores were the most stable during SDS-PAGE. Radioimmunoprecipitation analysis revealed a complete absence of native hexon antigenicity in thermodenaturated fragments of hexon protease digests, while native trypsin, chymotrypsin and papain hexon cores could be precipitated by hexon-specific antibodies. The immunoprecipitated material contained all of the hexon fragments found in appropriate hexon cores and retained the structure of the original cores. Trypsin, chymotrypsin and papain hexon cores were shown to possess at least part of native Ad h1 hexon antigenic determinants of each of the following specificities: species-specific (epsilon), cross-reactive with hexon of human adenoviruses (h3 and h6), simian adenovirus (sim 16), bovine adenoviruses (bos 3 and bos 7) and avian adenovirus (Aviadenovirus gal 1 or CELO). Thus, the full spectrum of known hexon antigenic determinants (species-specific to intergenus-crossreactive) is at least portly stable against protease attack of native hexon capsomers.

  16. Mallory bodies in alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver disease contain a common antigenic determinant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, K A; Morton, J A; Barbatis, C; Burns, J; Canning, S; McGee, J O

    1981-05-01

    An immunohistochemical technique is described for the detection of Mallory bodies (MBs) in paraffin sections of liver tissue. This is based on proteolytic digestion of sections before exposure to an antiserum which recognises a unique antigenic determinant in MBs. With the use of this procedure it has been shown in alcoholic liver disease, primary biliary cirrhosis. Indian childhood cirrhosis, Wilson's disease, diabetes mellitus, and hepatocellular cancer that the MBs found in these disorders contain this unique antigenic determinant. It is postulated, therefore, that the mechanism of formation of MBs is similar in liver diseases of diverse aetiology. In addition, it has been demonstrated that the immunohistochemical procedure is more sensitive than routine staining; MBs were detected in five out of 12 fatty livers by immunohistochemical and only in one by H and E staining. As MBs in fatty livers were not associated with polymorph filtration or fibrogenesis it is argued that MB formation is not an absolute prerequisite for the progression of acute to chronic liver disease.

  17. A new role for complement C3: regulation of antigen processing through an inhibitory activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Villiers, Christian; Cretin, François,; Lefebvre, Nicole; Marche, Patrice; Villiers, Marie-Bernadette

    2008-01-01

    International audience Increasing evidence underlines the involvement of complement component C3 in the establishment of acquired immunity which appears to play a complex role and to act at different levels. As antigen proteolysis by antigen presenting cells is a key event in the control of antigen presentation efficiency, and consequently in the quality of the immune response, we investigated whether C3 could modulate this step. Our results demonstrate for the first time that C3 can inter...

  18. Determinants of antigenicity and specificity in immune response for protein sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Cheng

    2011-06-01

    . Conclusions Together our results suggest that antigenicity is a local property of the protein sequences and that protein sequence properties of composition, secondary structure, solvent accessibility and evolutionary conservation are the determinants of antigenicity and specificity in immune response. Moreover, specificity in immune response could also be accurately predicted for large protein regions without the knowledge of the protein tertiary structure or the presence of discontinuous epitopes. The dataset prepared in this work and the classifier models are available for download at https://sites.google.com/site/oracleclassifiers/.

  19. [Determination of a Candida albicans antigen using an amperometric immunoenzyme sensor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutyreva, M P; Mediantseva, E P; Khaldeeva, E V; Glushko, N I; Budnikov, G K

    1998-01-01

    Determination new variant enzyme immunoassay with amperometric enzyme immunosensor, including the immobilizing enzyme-choline esterase and antibodies against Candida albicans (CA) in biosensitivity part of sensor, for diagnose disease of CA. The method for determination of CA based on combination immunochemical reactions and voltammetric indication of analytical signal was developed. Amperometric enzyme immunosensor developed has been used as detector. Differences dilutions of antibody (Ab) against antigen (Ag) of CA immobilizing in common with choline esterase (CE). The method of immobilization developed allows to receive the sensor with including the immobilized CE and Ab in common. The method of determination of CA based on combination the reaction of forming immune complex tAb-AgI with enzyme immunosensor for its detection. The dynamic range of concentrations determined of Ag depends on degree of dilution of Ab used for manufactory biosensitivity part of sensor. The data indicate that the [Ab-Ag] immune complexes are stable. This is also confirmed by the values of [Ab-Ag] binding constants, obtained in Scatchard coordinates. This method of determination doesn't require special preparation of a sample. Selectivity, sensitivity, simplicity and quickness are characterize of this method which could be used for manufacturing test-sistem for determination CA in blood.

  20. [Determination of a Candida albicans antigen using an amperometric immunoenzyme sensor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutyreva, M P; Mediantseva, E P; Khaldeeva, E V; Glushko, N I; Budnikov, G K

    1998-01-01

    Determination new variant enzyme immunoassay with amperometric enzyme immunosensor, including the immobilizing enzyme-choline esterase and antibodies against Candida albicans (CA) in biosensitivity part of sensor, for diagnose disease of CA. The method for determination of CA based on combination immunochemical reactions and voltammetric indication of analytical signal was developed. Amperometric enzyme immunosensor developed has been used as detector. Differences dilutions of antibody (Ab) against antigen (Ag) of CA immobilizing in common with choline esterase (CE). The method of immobilization developed allows to receive the sensor with including the immobilized CE and Ab in common. The method of determination of CA based on combination the reaction of forming immune complex tAb-AgI with enzyme immunosensor for its detection. The dynamic range of concentrations determined of Ag depends on degree of dilution of Ab used for manufactory biosensitivity part of sensor. The data indicate that the [Ab-Ag] immune complexes are stable. This is also confirmed by the values of [Ab-Ag] binding constants, obtained in Scatchard coordinates. This method of determination doesn't require special preparation of a sample. Selectivity, sensitivity, simplicity and quickness are characterize of this method which could be used for manufacturing test-sistem for determination CA in blood. PMID:9634720

  1. Amino acid sequence of the serine-repeat antigen (SERA) of Plasmodium falciparum determined from cloned cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzik, D J; Li, W B; Horii, T; Inselburg, J

    1988-09-01

    We report the isolation of cDNA clones for a Plasmodium falciparum gene that encodes the complete amino acid sequence of a previously identified exported blood stage antigen. The Mr of this antigen protein had been determined by sodium dodecylsulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis, by different workers, to be 113,000, 126,000, and 140,000. We show, by cDNA nucleotide sequence analysis, that this antigen gene encodes a 989 amino acid protein (111 kDa) that contains a potential signal peptide, but not a membrane anchor domain. In the FCR3 strain the serine content of the protein was 11%, of which 57% of the serine residues were localized within a 201 amino acid sequence that included 35 consecutive serine residues. The protein also contained three possible N-linked glycosylation sites and numerous possible O-linked glycosylation sites. The mRNA was abundant during late trophozoite-schizont parasite stages. We propose to identity this antigen, which had been called p126, by the acronym SERA, serine-repeat antigen, based on its complete structure. The usefulness of the cloned cDNA as a source of a possible malaria vaccine is considered in view of the previously demonstrated ability of the antigen to induce parasite-inhibitory antibodies and a protective immune response in Saimiri monkeys. PMID:2847041

  2. Human leukocyte antigen-DO regulates surface presentation of human leukocyte antigen class II-restricted antigens on B cell malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, A.N.; Meijden, E.D. van der; Honders, M.W.; Pont, M.J.; Goeman, J.J.; Falkenburg, J.H.F.; Griffioen, M.

    2014-01-01

    Hematological malignancies often express surface HLA class II, making them attractive targets for CD4+ T cell therapy. We previously demonstrated that HLA class II ligands can be divided into DM-resistant and DM-sensitive antigens. In contrast to presentation of DM-resistant antigens, presentation o

  3. Localization of immunodominant epitopes within the "a" determinant of hepatitis B surface antigen using monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golsaz-Shirazi, Forough; Mohammadi, Hamed; Amiri, Mohammad Mehdi; Khoshnoodi, Jalal; Kardar, Gholam Ali; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Shokri, Fazel

    2016-10-01

    The common "a" determinant is the major immunodominant region of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) shared by all serotypes and genotypes of hepatitis B virus (HBV). Antibodies against this region are thought to confer protection against HBV and are essential for viral clearance. Mutations within the "a" determinant may lead to conformational changes in this region, which can affect the binding of neutralizing antibodies. There is an increasing concern about identification and control of mutant viruses which is possible by comprehensive structural investigation of the epitopes located within this region. Anti-HBs monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against different epitopes of HBsAg are a promising tool to meet this goal. In the present study, 19 anti-HBs mAbs were employed to map epitopes localized within the "a" determinant, using a panel of recombinant mutant HBsAgs. The topology of the epitopes was analyzed by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Our results indicate that all of the mAbs seem to recognize epitopes within or in the vicinity of the "a" determinant of HBsAg. Different patterns of binding with mutant forms were observed with different mAbs. Amino acid substitutions at positions 123, 126, 129, 144, and 145 dramatically reduced the reactivity of antibodies with HBsAg. The T123N mutation had the largest impact on antibody binding to HBsAg. The reactivity pattern of our panel of mAbs with mutant forms of HBsAg could have important clinical implications for immunoscreening, diagnosis of HBV infection, design of a new generation of recombinant HB vaccines, and immunoprophylaxis of HBV infection as an alternative to therapy with hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG). PMID:27439498

  4. Antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates enable co-delivery of antigen and adjuvant to dendritic cells in cis but only have partial targeting specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreutz, M.; Giquel, B.; Hu, Q.; Abuknesha, R.; Uematsu, S.; Akira, S.; Nestle, F.O.; Diebold, S.S.

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-antigen conjugates, which promote antigen-presentation by dendritic cells (DC) by means of targeted delivery of antigen to particular DC subsets, represent a powerful vaccination approach. To ensure immunity rather than tolerance induction the co-administration of a suitable adjuvant is par

  5. Protein antigen delivery by gene gun-mediated epidermal antigen incorporation (EAI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiblhofer, Sandra; Ritter, Uwe; Thalhamer, Josef; Weiss, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The gene gun technology can not only be employed for efficient transfer of gene vaccines into upper layers of the skin, but also for application of protein antigens. As a tissue rich in professional antigen presenting cells, the skin represents an attractive target for immunizations. In this chapter we present a method for delivery of the model antigen ovalbumin into the skin of mice termed epidermal antigen incorporation and describe in detail how antigen-specific proliferation in draining lymph nodes can be followed by flow cytometry.

  6. A Role For Mitochondria In Antigen Processing And Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifaz, Lc; Cervantes-Silva, Mp; Ontiveros-Dotor, E; López-Villegas, Eo; Sánchez-García, Fj

    2014-09-23

    Immune synapse formation is critical for T lymphocyte activation, and mitochondria have a role in this process, by localizing close to the immune synapse, regulating intracellular calcium concentration, and providing locally required ATP. The interaction between antigen presenting cells (APCs) and T lymphocytes is a two-way signaling process. However, the role of mitochondria in antigen presenting cells during this process remains unknown. For APCs to be able to activate T lymphocytes, they must first engage in an antigen-uptake, -processing, and -presentation process. Here we show that HEL-loaded B lymphocytes, as a type of APCs, undergo a small but significant mitochondrial depolarization by 1-2 h following antigen exposure thus suggesting an increase in their metabolic demands. Inhibition of ATP synthase (oligomycin) or mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) (Ruthenium red) had no effect on antigen uptake. Therefore, antigen processing and antigen presentation were further analyzed. Oligomycin treatment reduced the amount of specific MHC-peptide complexes but not total MHC II on the cell membrane of B lymphocytes which correlated with a decrease in antigen presentation. However, oligomycin also reduced antigen presentation by B lymphocytes that endogenously express HEL and by B lymphocytes loaded with the HEL48-62 peptide, although to a lesser extent. ATP synthase inhibition and MCU inhibition had a clear inhibitory effect on antigen processing (DQ-OVA). Taking together these results suggest that ATP synthase and MCU are relevant for antigen processing and presentation. Finally, APCs mitochondria were found to re-organize towards the APC-T immune synapse. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Peritoneal lavage cytology and carcinoembryonic antigen determination in predicting peritoneal metastasis and prognosis of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-Kun Li; Miao Zheng; Chuan-Wen Miao; Jian-Hai Zhang; Guang-Han Ding; Wen-Shen Wu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the role of peritoneal lavage cytology (PLC) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) determination of peritoneal washes (pCEA) in predicting the peritoneal metastasis and prognosis after curative resection of gastric cancer.METHODS: PLC and radioimmunoassay of CEA were performed in peritoneal washes from 64 patients with gastric cancer and 8 patients with benign diseases.RESULTS: The positive rate of pCEA (40.6%) was significantly higher than that of PLC (23.4%) (P<0.05).The positive rates of PLC and pCEA correlated with the depth of tumor invasion and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05). pCEA was found to have a higher sensitivity and a lower false-positive rate in predicting peritoneal metastasis after curative resection of gastric cancer as compared to PLC. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates of patients with positive cytologic findings or positive pCEA results were significantly lower than those of patients with negative cytologic findings or negative pCEA results (P<0.05). Multivariate analysis indicated that pCEA was an independent prognostic factor for the survival of patients with gastric cancer.CONCLUSION: Intraoperative pCEA is a more sensitive and reliable predictor of peritoneal metastasis as well as prognosis in patients with gastric cancer as compared to PLC method.

  8. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 major neutralizing determinant exposed on hepatitis B surface antigen particles is highly immunogenic in primates.

    OpenAIRE

    Schlienger, K; M. Mancini; Rivière, Y; Dormont, D; Tiollais, P; Michel, M L

    1992-01-01

    Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) produced by recombinant DNA technology is now widely and safely used worldwide for hepatitis B vaccination. We used the HBsAg particle as a carrier molecule for presentation of selected human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) determinants to the immune system. Immunization of rhesus monkeys with an HBsAg chimera carrying the HIV-1 envelope major neutralizing determinant allowed us to generate proliferative T-cell responses and, in some cases, neutralizi...

  9. Preparation, Characterization, and Determination of Immunological Activities of Transfer Factor Specific to Human Sperm Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwei Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The objective of this study was to prepare, characterize, and determine immunological activities of specific transfer factor (STF specific to human sperm antigen (HSA for the preparation of antisperm contraceptive vaccine that can be used as an immunocontraceptive. Methods. HSA-STF was prepared using the spleens of rabbits vaccinated with HSA. The specific immunological activities were examined by lymphocyte proliferation test (LPT, leukocyte adhesion inhibition test (LAIT, and by determining the concentrations of IL-4, γ-IFN, and IL-21. HSA-STF was a helveolous substance, having a pH value of 7.0±0.4 and UV absorption maxima at 258 ± 6 nm. It contained seventeen amino acids; glycine and glutamic acids were the highest in terms of concentrations (38.8 μg/mL and 36.3 μg/mL, resp.. Results. The concentration of polypeptide was 2.34±0.31 mg/mL, and ribose was 0.717±0.043 mg/mL. The stimulation index for lymphocyte proliferation test was 1.84, and the leukocyte adhesion inhibition rate was 37.7%. There was a statistically significant difference between the cultural lymphocytes with HSA-STF and non-HSA-STF for γ-IFN and IL-21 (P0.05. Conclusion. HSA-STF was prepared and characterized successfully. It had immunological activity which could transfer the immune response specific to HSA and prove to be a potential candidate for the development of male immunocontraceptive agents.

  10. Antigenic Relatedness of Norovirus GII.4 Variants Determined by Human Challenge Sera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Chun Dai

    Full Text Available The GII.4 noroviruses (NoVs are a single genotype that is responsible for over 50% of NoV gastroenteritis epidemics worldwide. However, GII.4 NoVs have been found to undergo antigenic drifts, likely selected by host herd immunity, which raises an issue for vaccine strategies against NoVs. We previously characterized GII.4 NoV antigenic variations and found significant levels of antigenic relatedness among different GII.4 variants. Further characterization of the genetic and antigenic relatedness of recent GII.4 variants (2008b and 2010 cluster was performed in this study. The amino acid sequences of the receptor binding interfaces were highly conserved among all GII.4 variants from the past two decades. Using serum samples from patients enrolled in a GII.4 virus challenge study, significant cross-reactivity between major GII.4 variants from 1998 to 2012 was observed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and HBGA receptor blocking assays. The overall abilities of GII.4 NoVs to bind to the A/B/H HBGAs were maintained while their binding affinities to individual ABH antigens varied. These results highlight the importance of human HBGAs in NoV evolution and how conserved antigenic types impact vaccine development against GII.4 variants.

  11. Skewed Helper T-Cell Responses to IL-12 Family Cytokines Produced by Antigen-Presenting Cells and the Genetic Background in Behcet’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Shimizu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Behcet’s disease (BD is a multisystemic inflammatory disease and is characterized by recurrent attacks on eyes, brain, skin, and gut. There is evidence that skewed T-cell responses contributed to its pathophysiology in patients with BD. Recently, we found that Th17 cells, a new helper T (Th cell subset, were increased in patients with BD, and both Th type 1 (Th1 and Th17 cell differentiation signaling pathways were overactivated. Several researches revealed that genetic polymorphisms in Th1/Th17 cell differentiation signaling pathways were associated with the onset of BD. Here, we summarize current findings on the Th cell subsets, their contribution to the pathogenesis of BD and the genetic backgrounds, especially in view of IL-12 family cytokine production and pattern recognition receptors of macrophages/monocytes.

  12. Frequent lack of translation of antigen presentation-associated molecules MHC class I, CD1a and Beta(2)-microglobulin in Reed-Sternberg cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, A.; Visser, L; Eberwine, J; Dadvand, L; Poppema, S

    2000-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is present in Reed-Sternberg (RS) cells of a substantial proportion of Hodgkin's lymphoma cases. Most EBV-positive cases are also MHC class I-positive, whereas the majority of EBV-negative cases lack detectable levels of MHC class I expression. Application of the SAGE techni

  13. Antigen-presenting cells exposed to Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, Bifidobacterium bifidum BI-98, and BI-504 reduce regulatory T cell activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Esben Gjerløff Wedebye; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Jensen, Simon Skjøde;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: The effect in vitro of six different probiotic strains including Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, Lactobacillus salivarius Ls-33, Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei YS8866441, Lactobacillus plantarum Lp-115, Bifidobacterium bifidum BI-504 and BI-98 was studied on splenic...

  14. CD40-induced aggregation of MHC class II and CD80 on the cell surface leads to an early enhancement in antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clatza, Abigail; Bonifaz, Laura C; Vignali, Dario A A; Moreno, José

    2003-12-15

    Ligation of CD40 on B cells increases their ability to present Ag and to activate MHC class II (MHC-II)-restricted T cells. How this occurs is not entirely clear. In this study we demonstrate that CD40 ligation on Ag-presenting B cells (APC) for a short period between 30 min and 3 h has a rapid, augmenting effect on the ability of a B cell line and normal B cells to activate T cells. This is not due to alterations in Ag processing or to an increase in surface expression of CD80, CD86, ICAM-1, or MHC-II. This effect is particularly evident with naive, resting T lymphocytes and appears to be more pronounced under limiting Ag concentrations. Shortly after CD40 ligation on a B cell line, MHC-II and CD80 progressively accumulated in cholesterol-enriched microdomains on the cell surface, which correlated with an initial enhancement in their Ag presentation ability. Moreover, CD40 ligation induced a second, late, more sustained enhancement of Ag presentation, which correlates with a significant increase in CD80 expression by APC. Thus, CD40 signaling enhances the efficiency with which APC activate T cells by at least two related, but distinct, mechanisms: an early stage characterized by aggregation of MHC-II and CD80 clusters, and a late stage in which a significant increase in CD80 expression is observed. These results raise the possibility that one important role of CD40 is to contribute to the formation of the immunological synapse on the APC side.

  15. Activation of human antigen-presenting cells by the mycobacterial cord factor and its glycolipid adjuvant analogue trehalose-6,6’-dibehenate

    OpenAIRE

    Ostrop, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    The mycobacterial cord factor trehalose-6,6’-dimycolate (TDM) is an abundant cell wall glycolipid of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other mycobacteria. It causes inflammation and adjuvanticity, but it is also a major virulence factor of M. tuberculosis. Its synthetic analogue trehalose-6,6’-dibehenate (TDB) has robust adjuvant activity and induces a Th1/Th17 T cell response in animal models. The TDB-containing liposomal adjuvant formulation Caf01 has entered phase I clinical studies in humans...

  16. Monoclonal Antibody Production against Human Spermatozoal Surface Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Jedi-Tehrani

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As monoclonal antibodies are potential tools for characterization of soluble or cellular surface antigens, use of these proteins has always been considered in infertility and reproduction research. Therefore, in this study, monoclonal antibodies against human sperm surface antigens were produced. Material and Methods: To produce specific clones against human sperm surface antigens, proteins were extracted using solubilization methods. Balb/c mice were immunized intraperitoneally with the proteins using complete Freund’s adjuvant in the first injection and incomplete Adjuvant in the following booster injections. Hybridoma cells producing ASA were cloned by limiting dilution. Results: Five stable ASA producing hybridoma clones were achieved and their antibody isotypes were determined by ELISA. All the isotypes were of IgG class. Their cross reactivity with rat and mice spermatozoa was examined but they did not have any cross reactivity. Conclusion: The produced antibodies can be used in further studies to characterize and evaluate each of the antigens present on human sperm surface and determining their role in fertilization.

  17. Novel selective inhibitors of aminopeptidases that generate antigenic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakyriakou, Athanasios; Zervoudi, Efthalia; Theodorakis, Emmanuel A; Saveanu, Loredana; Stratikos, Efstratios; Vourloumis, Dionisios

    2013-09-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases, ERAP1 and ERAP2, as well as Insulin regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) play key roles in antigen processing, and have recently emerged as biologically important targets for manipulation of antigen presentation. Taking advantage of the available structural and substrate-selectivity data for these enzymes, we have rationally designed a new series of inhibitors that display low micromolar activity. The selectivity profile for these three highly homologous aminopeptidases provides a promising avenue for modulating intracellular antigen processing. PMID:23916253

  18. [Detection of common determinants of HLA antigens A2 and B17 by absorption using human HLA serum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Májský, A; Korínková, P

    1983-01-01

    Attempts of cross absorption where sera of anti-HLA A2 + B17, anti-HLA A2 and anti-HLA B17 with thrombocytes were absorbed from donors of HLA A2 positive, B17 negative and HLA A2 negative, B17 positive, revealed that anti-HLA A2 and anti-HLA B17 could be eliminated from the sera of both HLA types on the platelets. Thus, the findings allow the existence of a common determinant of HLA A2 and B17-antigens to be assumed. This is the first case where the evidence of a cross reaction between antigens of two different HLA loci with human sera could be established.

  19. Determination of antibody to hepatitis B core antigen by radioimmunoassay in chronic liver disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizuno,Motowo

    1980-06-01

    Full Text Available Antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc was measured by radioimmunoassay using CORAB (Abbott Laboratories in 10 cases of chronic persistent hepatitis (CPH, 46 cases of chronic aggressive hepatitis (CAH, 33 cases of liver cirrhosis (LC and 53 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC in relation to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg and its antibody (anti-HBs. Ninety-eight point four percent of patients with HBsAg and 93.8% of patients with anti-HBs were positive for anti-HBc and the titers of anti-HBc in patients with HBsAg were significantly higher than those with anti-HBs. Thirty-five point five percent of patients negative for either HBsAg or anti-HBs were positive for anti-HBc. The titers of anti-HBc in patients with CPH, CAH and LC were relatively low, whereas 7 (46.8% of the HCC patients negative for either HBsAg or anti-HBc had high titers of anti-HBc. The significance of the presence of anti-HBc alone is discussed.

  20. Development of indirect sandwich ELISA for determination of excretory-secretory antigens of Fasciola hepatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libertad Alzamora-Gonzales

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Fasciolosis is a cosmopolitan parasitosis medical-veterinary importance caused by Fasciola hepatica, which affects sheep, goats and cattle; and it affects man accidentally causing an epidemic-endemic infection difficult to diagnose. The aim was to develop an indirect sandwich ELISA with 3 antibodies for detecting excretory-secretory antigens of Fasciola hepatica (ESFh. For the development of indirect sandwich ELISA were used, as capture antibody, mouse polyclonal antibodies anti ESFh and polyclonal antibodies rabbit anti-ESFh as detection antibody, at the concentrations of 10 and 5 µg/mL respectively. The conjugate used was mouse monoclonal anti- total immunoglobulins rabbit linked to peroxidase (1/1000. Were analized 31 sheep fecal samples, and the results were compared with those obtained by direct coproparasitological examination (DC and counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIEP. The detection limit obtained for indirect sandwich ELISA was 100 ng/mL. The test had a 100% sensitivity, 96.6% specificity, positive and negative predictive values of 50% and 96.6% respectively, in relation to DC test. Comparing with CIEP the specificity obtained for indirect sandwich ELISA was 93.5% and a negative predictive value of 100%. We concluded that indirect sandwich ELISA designed is able to detect metabolic antigens in ovine feces samples and can be used for Fasciola hepatica diagnosis.

  1. Radiation and chemical effects on viral transformation and tumor antigen expression. Annual progress report, August 1, 1978--May 1, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies aimed at the biological, biochemical, and immunologic characterization of fetal antigens (EA) in hamsters and mice and locating and determining the distribution of fetal antigens in tumor tissues and in developing fetuses have been underway for several months. Progress has been made in isolating embryonic or fetal antigens from fetuses and from tumor cells. We have developed and reported a reliable lymphocyte transformation assay (LTA) which meets our needs in routinely assaying cell free tumor associated antigen (TAA) preparations from fetal and tumor cells. The assay correlated with transplantation resistance assays and has appropriate specificity. We have also developed the staph-A protein binding assay utilizing anti-serum derived against embryonic antigens present on SV40 tumor cells. In other studies, we have reported increases and perturbations in thymocytes during viral and chemical oncogenesis in hamsters, have developed a simple technique for preserving functional lymphocytes sensitized against TAA by freezing for use in our model system work, have reported the cross-reactivity of tranplantation resistance antigen on a spectrum of chemically induced tumors previously believed to only contain individually specific TSTAs and have recently reported the cross-reactivity of papovavirus induced transplantation resistance antigen in sarcoma cells induced by different viruses. We have concluded our studies of glycosyltransferases in the membranes of developing fetuses and noted no differences in their levels with advancing days of gestation using whold embryo cell populations

  2. Development of solid phase immunoradiometric assay for determination of carcinoembryonic antigen as a tumor marker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of solid phase coated tube immunoradiometric assay for estimation of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was the aim of the present study. Labeling of CEA was carried out using Ch-T and iodogen as oxidizing agents and 125I. The tracers were used to test the presence of antibodies produced by immunization. Production of polyclonal antibody was carried out through immunization of four mice. After purification step, the tubes were coated by purified polyclonal antibodies. Immunoradiometric that system was performed using the commercial IZOTOP 125I-anti hCEA tracer then the validity studies were carried out. The results show that the local coated tubes made the assay is more than sufficient to fulfill the clinical requirement of CEA as a tumor marker. (author)

  3. Use of bacterial expression cloning to define the amino acid sequences of antigenic determinants on the G2 glycoprotein of Rift Valley fever virus.

    OpenAIRE

    K. Keegan; Collett, M S

    1986-01-01

    Four distinct antigenic determinants along the G2 glycoprotein encoded by the M segment RNA of the Phlebovirus Rift Valley fever virus were localized. These epitopes were defined by four monoclonal antibodies, three of which were capable of neutralizing virus infectivity; one was nonneutralizing. Immunoprecipitation by these monoclonal antibodies of either denatured or native antigen characterized the epitopes as having linear or higher order structure. Molecular cloning of G2 glycoprotein-co...

  4. Selective transport of internalized antigens to the cytosol for MHC class I presentation in dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez, A; Regnault, A; Kleijmeer, M; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, P; Amigorena, S

    1999-01-01

    In order for cytotoxic T cells to initiate immune responses, peptides derived from internalized antigens must be presented to the cytotoxic T cells on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Here we show that dendritic cells, the only antigen-presenting cells that initiate immune r

  5. Multivalent glycopeptide dendrimers for the targeted delivery of antigens to dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. García-Vallejo; M. Ambrosini; A. Overbeek; W.E. van Riel; K. Bloem; W.W.J. Unger; F. Chiodo; J.G. Bolscher; K. Nazmi; H. Kalay; Y. van Kooyk

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells are the most powerful type of antigen presenting cells. Current immunotherapies targeting dendritic cells have shown a relative degree of success but still require further improvement. One of the most important issues to solve is the efficiency of antigen delivery to dendritic cells

  6. Exposure to Sarcocystis spp. in horses from Spain determined by Western blot analysis using Sarcocystis neurona merozoites as heterologous antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, M; Yeargan, M; Francisco, I; Dangoudoubiyam, S; Becerra, P; Francisco, R; Sánchez-Andrade, R; Paz-Silva, A; Howe, D K

    2012-04-30

    Horses serve as an intermediate host for several species of Sarcocystis, all of which utilize canids as the definitive host. Sarcocystis spp. infection and formation of latent sarcocysts in horses often appears to be subclinical, but morbidity can occur, especially when the parasite burden is large. A serological survey was conducted to determine the presence of antibodies against Sarcocystis spp. in seemingly healthy horses from the Galicia region of Spain. Western blot analyses using Sarcocystis neurona merozoites as heterologous antigen suggested greater than 80% seroprevalance of Sarcocystis spp. in a sample set of 138 horses. The serum samples were further tested with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) based on recombinant S. neurona-specific surface antigens (rSnSAGs). As expected for horses from the Eastern Hemisphere, less than 4% of the serum samples were positive when analyzed with either the rSnSAG2 or the rSnSAG4/3 ELISAs. An additional 246 horses were tested using the rSnSAG2 ELISA, which revealed that less than 3% of the 384 samples were seropositive. Collectively, the results of this serologic study suggested that a large proportion of horses from this region of Spain are exposed to Sarcocystis spp. Furthermore, the anti-Sarcocystis seroreactivity in these European horses could be clearly distinguished from anti-S. neurona antibodies using the rSnSAG2 and rSnSAG4/3 ELISAs. PMID:22019182

  7. The proportion of two b locus allotypic determinants in rabbit antisera raised against pneumococcal polysaccharide SSS III antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catty, D.; Humphrey, J. H.; Gell, P. G. H.

    1969-01-01

    An agar gel radial diffusion technique has been devised to examine the amount of IgG and relative amounts of As 4 and As 5 in the sera of twenty heterozygous As/4,5 rabbits immunized with Type III pneumococci. Serial absorption of the sera with the polysaccharide SSS III antigen before reaction with anti-IgG and anti-allotypic sera was used to show how much specific IgG antibody was present in each serum and the distribution of this antibody between molecules bearing one or other or neither of the allotypic determinants. The results indicate that anti-SSS III antibody generally occurred as As 4 rather than As 5 molecules although in some animals this preference was reversed. Non-allotypic (b-minus) molecules contributed significantly to the antibody response. PMID:4388904

  8. IMMUNOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTIC OF SYNTHETIC PEPTIDES SIMILAR TO ACTUAL HIV ANTIGEN DETERMINANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Korobova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of HIV vaccine remains an important goal in prophylaxis and therapy of HIV/ AIDS epidemics. There are various approaches for development of а candidate vaccine based on induction of neutralizing antibodies and cell-mediated immunity. Synthetic peptides are considered promising vaccine antigens since they are capable of activating both humoral and cellular immune response. HIV-1 envelope gp120 is the target for neutralizing antiviral antibodies. The V3 region of the HIV-1 gp120 is highly immunogenic and important for the virus-coreceptor interaction. In a RV144 vaccine trial, the levels of vaccine-induced IgG antibodies recognizing V1V2 regions from multiple HIV-1 subtypes show inverse correlations with a risk for HIV-1 infection. Meanwhile, HIV is characterized by high diversity. The consensus and mosaic immunogens are complete but artificial proteins, which are computationally designed to elicit immune responses with improved cross-reactive broadness. We have been studied immunogenic properties of synthetic peptides derived from V1, V2, V3 loop regions of the consensus M HIV1 (CON-S sequence group of the gp 120 envelope protein and V3 loop derived from a Russian RUA022a2 isolate. These peptides specifically reacted to HIV-positive sera in ELISA, thus indicating their similarity to appropriate HIV proteins. The peptides proved to be weakly immunogenic. Therefore, Freund complete adjuvant was used to enhance peptide immunogenicity. To assess the immunogenicity, the mice were immunized with a peptide mixture. Antibodies have been developed to every peptide from the mixture, being, predominantly, of IgG isotype. The antibody titers depended on the length of peptide sequences. However, the sera from immunized mice did not have a HIV neutralizing activity. The serum neutralization was assessed by pseudovirus-based assay, using a molecular clone of virus isolates CAP 45.2.00.G3 and QH.209.14.M.EnvA2. The virus neutralization is a

  9. Exosomes Derived from M. Bovis BCG Infected Macrophages Activate Antigen-Specific CD4+ and CD8+ T Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Giri, Pramod K.; Schorey, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    Activation of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells is required for an effective immune response to an M. tuberculosis infection. However, infected macrophages are poor antigen presenting cells and may be spatially separated from recruited T cells, thus limiting antigen presentation within a granuloma. Our previous studies showed that infected macrophages release from cells small membrane-bound vesicles called exosomes which contain mycobacterial lipid components and showed that these exosomes could...

  10. Group B streptococcal Ibc protein antigen: distribution of two determinants in wild-type strains of common serotypes.

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, D R; Ferrieri, P

    1984-01-01

    Studies were carried out on the distribution of the Ibc protein antigenic marker in wild-type strains of group B streptococci of diverse serotypes isolated from epidemiological studies. Rabbits were immunized with group B streptococcal strain H36B, a prototype Ib strain, to produce antibody to the Ibc protein antigens. One antiserum (no. 970) contained antibody only against the trypsin-sensitive (TS) portion of the Ibc antigen. A second antiserum (no. 973), however, contained antibody to both...

  11. Peptide-conjugated hapten groups are the major antigenic determinants for trinitrophenyl-specific cytotoxic T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bonin, A; Ortmann, B; Martin, S; Weltzien, H U

    1992-08-01

    Several trinitrophenyl (TNP)-specific mouse cytotoxic T cell (CTL) clones recognize TNP-conjugated peptides in association with class I MHC molecules ('hapten-peptide determinants'). However, cell modification with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) also leads to the formation of TNP determinants covalently attached to MHC molecules ('altered self'). To determine the importance of 'peptide' versus 'altered self' determinants, we used the mutant cell line RMA-S which expresses peptide-free ('empty') Kb and Db molecules at 26 degrees C. Additionally, we stabilized Kb molecules on RMA-S cells at 37 degrees C using the Kb binding heptapeptide N53-59 derived from the vesicular stomatitis virus nucleoprotein. Lacking lysine, this peptide remains unmodified by TNBS and, therefore, only allows the formation of 'altered self' TNP determinants on occupied Kb molecules. RMA-S targets, pretreated or untreated with N53-59, upon TNBS modification were only lysed poorly or not at all by four different TNP-specific CTL. In contrast, all of these clones efficiently lysed TNBS-treated, unmutated RMA cells, and three of them strongly reacted with RMA or RMA-S cells in the presence of tryptic TNP-BSA peptides. Moreover, the clone unreactive for TNP-BSA peptides also recognized TNP self-peptides extracted from TNBS-treated syngeneic spleen cells. Taken together, these data clearly show that TNP residues linked to MHC via associated peptides but not by covalent bondage represent the dominant antigenic epitopes for class I MHC-restricted, hapten-specific T cells. PMID:1384686

  12. Overnight resting of PBMC changes functional signatures of antigen specific T- cell responses: impact for immune monitoring within clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Kutscher

    Full Text Available Polyfunctional CD4 or CD8 T cells are proposed to represent a correlate of immune control for persistent viruses as well as for vaccine mediated protection against infection. A well-suited methodology to study complex functional phenotypes of antiviral T cells is the combined staining of intracellular cytokines and phenotypic marker expression using polychromatic flow cytometry. In this study we analyzed the effect of an overnight resting period at 37 °C on the quantity and functionality of HIV-1, EBV, CMV, HBV and HCV specific CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses in a cohort of 21 individuals. We quantified total antigen specific T cells by multimer staining and used 10-color intracellular cytokine staining (ICS to determine IFNγ, TNFα, IL2 and MIP1β production. After an overnight resting significantly higher numbers of functionally active T cells were detectable by ICS for all tested antigen specificities, whereas the total number of antigen specific T cells determined by multimer staining remained unchanged. Overnight resting shifted the quality of T-cell responses towards polyfunctionality and increased antigen sensitivity of T cells. Our data suggest that the observed effect is mediated by T cells rather than by antigen presenting cells. We conclude that overnight resting of PBMC prior to ex vivo analysis of antiviral T-cell responses represents an efficient method to increase sensitivity of ICS-based methods and has a prominent impact on the functional phenotype of T cells.

  13. Determination of the genus-specific antigens in outer membrane proteins from the strains of Leptospira interrogans and Leptospira biflexa with different virulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗依惠; 严杰; 毛亚飞; 李淑萍

    2004-01-01

    Objective:To determine the existence of genus-specific antigens in outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of leptospira with different virulence. Methods: Microscope agglutination test (MAT) was applied to detect the agglutination between commercial rabbit antiserum against leptospiral genus-specific TR/Patoc I antigen and 17 strains of Leptospira interrongans belonging to 15 serogroups and 2 strains of Leptospira biflexa belonging to 2 serogroups.The outer envelopes (OEs) of L.interrogans serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae serovar lai strain lai (56601) with strong virulence and serogroup Pomona serovar pomona strain Luo (56608) with low virulence,and L.biflexa serogroup Semaranga serovar patoc strain Patoc I without virulence were prepared by using the method reported in Auran et al.(1972).OMPs in the OEs were obtained by treatment with sodium deoxycholate. SDS-PAGE and western blot were used for analyzing the features of the OMPs on electrophoretic pattern and the immunoreactivity to the antiserum against TR/Patoc I antigen, respectively. Results:All the tested strains belonging to different leptospiral serogroups agglutinated to the antiserum against leptospiral genus-specific TR/Patoc I antigen with agglutination titers ranging from 1:256-1:512. A similar SDS-PAGE pattern of the OMPs from the three strains of leptospira with different virulence was shown and the molecular weight of a major protein fragment in the OMPs was found to be approximately 60 KDa.A positive protein fragment with approximately 32 KDa confirmed by Western blot,was able to react with the antiserum against leptospiral genus-specific TR/Patoc I antigen, and was found in each the OMPs of the three stains of leptospira.Conclusion: There are genus-specific antigens on the surface of L.interrogans and L.biflexa. The OMP with molecular weight of 32 KDa may be one of the genus-specific protein antigens of leptospira.

  14. Determination of the genus-specific antigens in outer membrane proteins from the strains of Leptospira interrogans and Leptospira biflexa with different virulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗依惠; 严杰; 毛亚飞; 李淑萍

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the existence of genus-specific antigens in outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of leptospira with different virulence. Methods: Microscope agglutination test (MAT) was applied to detect the agglutination between commercial rabbit antiserum against leptospiral genus-specific TR/Patoc I antigen and 17 strains of Leptospira interrongans belonging to 15 serogroups and 2 strains of Leptospira biflexa belonging to 2 serogroups. The outer envelopes (OEs) of L.interrogans serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae serovar lai strain lai (56601) with strong virulence and serogroup Pomona serovar pomona strain Luo (56608) with low virulence, and L.biflexa serogroup Semaranga serovar patoc strain Patoc I without virulence were prepared by using the method reported in Auran et al.(1972). OMPs in the OEs were obtained by treatment with sodium deoxycholate. SDS-PAGE and western blot were used for analyzing the features of the OMPs on electrophoretic pattern and the immunoreactivity to the antiserum against TR/Patoc I antigen, respectively. Results: All the tested strains belonging to different leptospiral serogroups agglutinated to the antiserum against leptospiral genus-specific TR/Patoc I antigen with agglutination titers ranging from 1:256-1:512. A similar SDS-PAGE pattern of the OMPs from the three strains of leptospira with different virulence was shown and the molecular weight of a major protein fragment in the OMPs was found to be approximately 60 KDa. A positive protein fragment with approximately 32 KDa confirmed by Western blot, was able to react with the antiserum against leptospiral genus-specific TR/Patoc I antigen, and was found in each the OMPs of the three stains of leptospira. Conclusion: There are genus-specific antigens on the surface of L.interrogans and L.biflexa. The OMP with molecular weight of 32 KDa may be one of the genus-specific protein antigens of leptospira.

  15. Cross-presentation through langerin and DC-SIGN targeting requires different formulations of glycan-modified antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fehres, Cynthia M.; Kalay, Hakan; Bruijns, Sven C M; Musaafir, Sara A M; Ambrosini, Martino; Van Bloois, Louis; Van Vliet, Sandra J.; Storm, Gert; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J.; Van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) and Langerhans cells (LC) are professional antigen presenting cells (APCs) that initiate humoral and cellular immune responses. Targeted delivery of antigen towards DC- or LC-specific receptors enhances vaccine efficacy. In this study, we compared the efficiency of glycan-based

  16. Cross-presentation through langerin and DC-SIGN targeting requires different formulation of glycan-modified antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fehres, Cynthia M.; Kalay, Hakan; Bruijns, Sven C.M.; Musaafir, Sara A.M.; Ambrosini, Martino; Bloois, van Louis; Vliet, van Sandra J.; Storm, Gert; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J.; Kooyk, van Yvette

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) and Langerhans cells (LC) are professional antigen presenting cells (APCs) that initiate humoral and cellular immune responses. Targeted delivery of antigen towards DC- or LC-specific receptors enhances vaccine efficacy. In this study, we compared the efficiency of glycan-based

  17. Markedly prolonged incubation period of hepatitis B in a chimpanzee passively immunized with a human monoclonal antibody to the a determinant of hepatitis B surface antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Ogata, N.; Ostberg, L; Ehrlich, P H; Wong, D C; Miller, R H; Purcell, R H

    1993-01-01

    The protective efficacy of a human monoclonal antibody directed against the a determinant of hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen was studied in a chimpanzee. A single high dose of 5 mg/kg (body weight) of monoclonal antibody SDZ OST 577 was intravenously administered to a chimpanzee, followed by intravenous challenge with 10(3.5) chimpanzee infectious doses of a wild-type HBV, the MS-2 strain (ayw subtype). The passively acquired antibody to HBV surface antigen could be detected for 40 we...

  18. Attempts to locate residues in complementarity-determining regions of antibody combining sites that make contact with antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, E A; Wu, T T; Bilofsky, H

    1976-02-01

    From collected data on variable region sequences of heavy chains of immunoglobulins, the probability of random associations of any two amino-acid residues in the complementarity-determining segments was computed, and pairs of residues occurring significantly more frequently than expected were selected by computer. Significant associations between Phe 32 and Tyr 33, Phe 32 and Glu 35, and Tyr 33 and Glu 35 were found in six proteins, all of which were mouse myeloma proteins which bound phosphorylcholine (= phosphocholine). From the x-ray structure of McPC603, Tyr 33 and Glu 35 are contacting residues; a seventh phosphorylcholine-binding mouse myeloma protein also contained Phe 32 and Tyr 33 but position 35 had only been determined as Glx and thus this position had not been selected. Met 34 occurred in all seven phosphorylcholine-binding myeoma proteins but was also present at this position in 29 other proteins and thus was not selected; it is seen in the x-ray structure not to be a contacting residue. The role of Phe 32 is not obvious but it could have some conformational influence. A human phosphorylcholine-binding myeloma protien also had Phe, Tyr, and Met at positions 32, 33, and 34, but had Asp instead of Glu at position 35 and showed a lower binding constant. The ability to use sequence data to locate residues in complementarity-determing segments making contact with antigenic determinants and those playing essentially a structural role would contribute substantially to the understanding of antibody specificity.

  19. Self-Adjuvanting Bacterial Vectors Expressing Pre-Erythrocytic Antigens Induce Sterile Protection against Malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke eBergmann-Leitner

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Genetically inactivated, Gram-negative bacteria that express malaria vaccine candidates represent a promising novel self-adjuvanting vaccine approach. Antigens expressed on particulate bacterial carriers not only target directly to antigen-presenting cells but also provide a strong danger signal thus circumventing the requirement for potent extraneous adjuvants. E. coli expressing malarial antigens resulted in the induction of either Th1 or Th2 biased responses that were dependent on both antigen and sub-cellular localization. Some of these constructs induced higher quality humoral responses compared to recombinant protein and most importantly they were able to induce sterile protection against sporozoite challenge in a murine model of malaria. In light of these encouraging results, two major Plasmodium falciparum pre-erythrocytic malaria vaccine targets, the Cell-Traversal protein for Ookinetes and Sporozoites (CelTOS fused to the Maltose-binding protein in the periplasmic space and the Circumsporozoite Protein (CSP fused to the Outer membrane protein A in the outer membrane were expressed in a clinically relevant, attenuated Shigella strain (Shigella flexneri 2a. This type of live attenuated vector has previously undergone clinical investigations as a vaccine against shigellosis. Using this novel delivery platform for malaria, we find that vaccination with the whole organism represents an effective vaccination alternative that induces protective efficacy against sporozoite challenge. Shigella GeMI-Vax expressing malaria targets warrant further evaluation to determine their full potential as a dual disease, multivalent, self-adjuvanting vaccine system, against both shigellosis and malaria.

  20. A method for determining a prostate-specific antigen cure after radiation therapy for clinically localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A method that allows the determination of a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) cure after definitive management for prostate carcinoma with radiation therapy is presented and tested. Methods and Materials: The method involves a calculation of the patient's theoretical baseline PSA prior to the development of prostate cancer by using three serial rising PSA determinations obtained prior to the institution of therapy. The rate of rise of the PSA prior to therapy and the rate of decline of the PSA posttherapy are calculated, using an exponential model. Two criteria must be satisfied to define a PSA cure. First, the PSA nadir after treatment should be less than the calculated theoretical baseline PSA. Second, the rate of decline of PSA posttreatment should be greater than the rate of rise of the PSA prior to treatment. Results: Applying these two criteria to the patient data base (n 16) at a median follow-up of 19 months enabled the accurate prediction of 6 out of 6 (100%) of patients with documented PSA failure and 7 out of 10 (70%) of patients without PSA failure. Therefore, despite short follow-up, all six patients with PSA failure were predicted. Further follow-up is needed to ascertain if the seven patients predicted to be cured will remain PSA failure free and if the three patients currently without PSA failure in whom the model predicts failure, will subsequently fail. Conclusion: Therefore, using each patient's PSA history as the natural control may eliminate the error that is introduced with defining a PSA cure by using a single value for the PSA nadir at a specified time after radiation therapy

  1. Murine antigen-induced arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, W.B. van den; Joosten, L.A.B.; Lent, P.L.E.M. van

    2007-01-01

    Antigen induced arthritis is a unilateral T-cell driven model caused by direct injection of an antigen into the knee joint of a FCA preimmunized animal. The chronicity is determined by antigen retention in avascular structures of the joint through charge mediated binding or antibody mediated trappin

  2. Targeted delivery of lipid antigen to macrophages via the CD169/sialoadhesin endocytic pathway induces robust invariant natural killer T cell activation

    OpenAIRE

    Kawasaki, Norihito; Vela, Jose Luis; Nycholat, Corwin M.; Rademacher, Christoph; Khurana, Archana; van Rooijen, Nico; Crocker, Paul R.; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Paulson, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells induce a protective immune response triggered by foreign glycolipid antigens bound to CD1d on antigen-presenting cells (APCs). A limitation of using glycolipid antigens to stimulate immune responses in human patients has been the inability to target them to the most effective APCs. Recent studies have implicated phagocytic CD169+ macrophages as major APCs in lymph nodes for priming iNKT cells in mice immunized with glycolipid antigen in particulate form...

  3. Independent clinical significance of HIV antigen determination and CD4 counts in anti-HIV positive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skinhøj, P; Hofmann, B; Jacobsen, K D;

    1989-01-01

    HIV antigenemia was found in 52/243 HIV antibody positive individuals attending 2 AIDS-screening clinics, giving a prevalence of 13, 25 and 76% in CDC groups II, III and IV, respectively. No correlation was found to decreased CD4 lymphocyte values in the individual groups. HIV antigen therefore...... identified a separate subpopulation. For 138 asymptomatic patients followed prospectively both laboratory parameters predicted HIV-related events, the relative risk factor being 4 for low CD4 value and 6 for presence of HIV antigen. Individuals presenting with HIV antigen and decreased CD4 count all...... developed disease within 18 months, the relative risk factor being 24. Thus the 2 markers, when measured together, effectively separated asymptomatic HIV-infected patients into 1 of 3 risk categories....

  4. CD28 and T cell antigen receptor signal transduction coordinately regulate interleukin 2 gene expression in response to superantigen stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Activation of an immune response requires intercellular contact between T lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells (APC). Interaction of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) with antigen in the context of major histocompatibility molecules mediates signal transduction, but T cell activation appears to require the induction of a second costimulatory signal transduction pathway. Recent studies suggest that interaction of CD28 with B7 on APC might deliver such a costimulatory signal. To investigate...

  5. ANTIGEN PROCESSING BY ENDOSOMAL PROTEASES DETERMINES WHICH SITES OF SPERM-WHALE MYOGLOBIN ARE EVENTUALLY RECOGNIZED BY T-CELLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANNOORT, JM; BOON, J; VANDERDRIFT, ACM; WAGENAAR, JPA; BOOTS, AMH; BOOG, CJP; Boots, Annemieke

    1991-01-01

    This study reports an identification of the major processing products of an exogenous protein antigen, viz. sperm-whale myoglobin, as obtained after cell-free processing with partially purified macrophage endosomes. It is demonstrated that such a system yields fragments that are indistinguishable by

  6. Alternative Ii-independent antigen-processing pathway in leukemic blasts involves TAP-dependent peptide loading of HLA class II complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. van Luijn; M.E.D. Chamuleau; M.E. Ressing; E.J. Wiertz; S. Ostrand-Rosenberg; Y. Souwer; A. Zevenbergen; G.J. Ossenkoppele; A.A. van de Loosdrecht; S.M. Ham

    2010-01-01

    During HLA class II synthesis in antigen-presenting cells, the invariant chain (Ii) not only stabilizes HLA class II complexes in the endoplasmic reticulum, but also mediates their transport to specialized lysosomal antigen-loading compartments termed MIICs. This study explores an alternative HLA cl

  7. Antigen-activated dendritic cells ameliorate influenza A infections

    OpenAIRE

    Boonnak, Kobporn; Vogel, Leatrice; Orandle, Marlene; Zimmerman, Daniel; Talor, Eyal; Subbarao, Kanta

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A viruses cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. There is a need for alternative or adjunct therapies, as resistance to currently used antiviral drugs is emerging rapidly. We tested ligand epitope antigen presentation system (LEAPS) technology as a new immune-based treatment for influenza virus infection in a mouse model. Influenza-J-LEAPS peptides were synthesized by conjugating the binding ligand derived from the β2-microglobulin chain of the human MHC class I molecu...

  8. Tumor Antigen-Derived Peptides Delivery for Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenxue, Ma

    2014-02-05

    Tumor antigenic peptides therapeutics is a promising field for cancer immunotherapy. Benefits include the ease and rapid synthesis of antigenic peptides and capacity for modifications. In the past years, many peptide-based cancer vaccines have been tested in clinical trials with a limited success because of the difficulties associated with peptide stability and delivery approaches, consequently, resulting in inefficient antigen presentation and low response rates in patients with cancer. The development of suitable and efficient vaccine carrier systems still remains a major challenge. This article aims to describe a new delivery approach for tumor antigenic peptides and rationales of dendritic cells (DCs)-based vaccination. In order to elicit enhanced immune responses, poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), which has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the use of drug delivery, diagnostics and other applications of clinical and basic science research were employed for the formulation of making nanoparticles (NPs) while delivering tumor antigenic peptides.

  9. MYCN: From Oncoprotein To Tumor-Associated Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito ePistoia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available MYCN is a well known oncogene overexpressed in different human malignancies including neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, medulloblastoma, astrocytoma, Wilms’ tumor and small cell lung cancer. In the case of neuroblastoma (NB, MYCN amplification is an established biomarker of poor prognosis. MYCN belongs to a family of transcription factors (the most important of which is CMYC that show a high degree of homology. Downregulation of MYC protein expression leads to tumor regression in animal models, indicating that MYC proteins represent interesting therapeutic targets.Pre-requisites for a candidate tumor-associated antigen (TAA to be targeted by immunotherapeutic approaches are the following, i expression should be tumor-restricted, ii the putative TAA should be up-regulated in cancer cells and iii protein should be processed into immunogenic peptides capable of associating to MHC molecules with high affinity. Indeed, the MYCN protein is not expressed in human adult tissues and upregulated variably in NB cells, and MYCN peptides capable of associating to HLA-A1 or –A2 molecules with high affinity have been identified. Thus the MYCN protein qualifies as putative TAA in NB.Additional issues that determine the feasibility of targeting a putative TAA with cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL and will be here discussed are the following, i the inadequacy of tumor cells per se to act as antigen-presenting cells witnessed, in the case of NB cells, by the low to absent expression of HLA- class I molecules, the lack of costimulatory molecules and multiple defects in the HLA class I related antigen processing machinery, and ii the immune evasion mechanisms operated by cancer cells to fool the host immune system, such as up-regulation of soluble immunosuppressive molecules (e.g. soluble MICA and HLA-G in the case of NB or generation of immunosuppressive cells in the tumor microenvironment. A final issue that deserves consideration is the strategy used to generate

  10. Genetic susceptibility to Hodgkin's lymphoma associated with the human leukocyte antigen region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepstra, A; Niens, M; te Meerman, GJ; Poppema, S; van den Berg, Anke

    2005-01-01

    Based on the presence of an abundant inflammatory infiltrate, expression of a broad spectrum of cytokines and the professional antigen presenting phenotype of Hodgkin Reed-Sternberg cells it can be anticipated that immunological mechanisms play a major role in the pathogenesis of Hodgkin's lymphoma

  11. Antigenic peptide trimming by ER aminopeptidases – insights from structural studies

    OpenAIRE

    Stratikos, Efstratios; Stern, Lawrence J.

    2013-01-01

    Generation and destruction of antigenic peptides by ER resident aminopeptidases ERAP1 and ERAP2 have been shown in the last few years to be important for the correct functioning and regulation of the adaptive immune response. These two highly homologous aminopeptidases appear to have evolved complex mechanisms well suited for their biological role in antigen presentation. Furthermore, polymorphic variability in these enzymes appears to affect their function and predispose individuals to disea...

  12. Insights into the biological features of the antigenic determinants recognized by four monoclonal antibodies in redia and adult stages of the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, Annia; Sánchez, Jorge; Hernández, Hilda; Mosqueda, Maryani; Rodríguez, Suanel Y; Capó, Virginia; Otero, Oscar; Alfonso, Carlos; Marcet, Ricardo; Sarracent, Jorge

    2016-09-01

    Fasciola hepatica is a digenean trematode which infects a wide variety of domestic animals and also humans. Previous studies have demonstrated that four monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) against the total extract of F. hepatica redia (named as 1E4, 6G11, 4E5 and 4G11) also recognized the excretion - secretion antigens (ES Ag) of adult parasites, which is a biologically-relevant mixture of molecules with functional roles during infection and immune evasion on definitive hosts. In the present report we describe the partial characterization of the epitopes recognized by these Mabs by heat treatment, mercaptoethanol reduction, pronase proteolysis and sodium peryodate oxidation, which suggested their predominant protein and conformational nature. Also, a comparative study using immunodetection assays on crude extracts and on histological sections of both rediae and adults of F. hepatica were performed to explore the expression pattern of the antigenic determinants in these developmental stages. From these experiments it was found that the Mabs reacted most likely with the same proteins of approximately 64 and 105 kDa present on both rediae and adult's extracts. However, the 1E4, 6G11 and 4E5 Mabs also recognized other molecules of the total extract of F. hepatica adults, a fact that constitutes an evidence of the antigenic variation between both stages and points at a certain biological relevance of the recognized antigenic determinants. Immunolocalization studies on histological sections revealed that all Mabs reacted with the tegument of F. hepatica in both rediae and adults stages, while the epitopes recognized by 1E4, 6G11 and 4E5 antibodies were also preferentially localized in the intestinal caeca and in different organs of the reproductive system of adult specimens. The immunogenicity of these antigenic determinants, their conserved status among different stages of the life cycle of F. hepatica and their presence in both tegument and ES Ag of adult parasites

  13. Production of a monoclonal antibody specific for high molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) in wheat and its antigenic determinant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hanqian; ZHANG Xueyong; WANG Hongmei; PANG Binshuang

    2005-01-01

    Wheat high molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) 1Bx14 and 1By15 isolated by preparative SDS-PAGE are used as antigen to immunize BALB/c mice. Subcutaneous inoculation of the antigen is performed. The intra-peritoneal injection is completed 3 days before fusion with myeloma cell (SP2/0) via PEG-1500. The fusion cells are selected by indirect enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA). Positive hybrid cells are further verified three times by limit dilution of the culture cells. A hybridoma cell line is successfully obtained. The monoclonal antibody belongs to IgG1 subclass. In immunoblotting, the antibody binds to all HMW-GS of T.aestivum cultivars, but does not bind to other storage proteins in seeds of wheat. This result is consisting with the high homology in amino acid sequences among the HMW glutenin subunits in wheat. The antibody also binds to HMW-GS storage proteins in Aegilops squarrosa and T. durum (durum wheat). Furthermore, it also binds to HMW storage proteins in Secale cereale (rye),Hordeum vulgare (barley). However, it never binds seed storage proteins in other cereals such as maize, oat, rice, foxtail millet, sorghum etc. The antigen determinant recognized by the antibody has been located within hexapeptide [PGQGQQ] or / and nonapeptide [GYYPTSPQQ] in the central repetitive region of HMW-GS.

  14. Antigen processing and remodeling of the endosomal pathway: requirements for antigen cross-presentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewoud Bernardus Compeer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen as peptide/class I MHC complexes plays a central role in the elicitation of CD8+ T cell clones that mediate anti-viral and anti-tumor immune responses. While it has been clear that there are specific subsets of professional antigen presenting cells (APC capable of antigen cross-presentation, description of mechanisms involved is still ongoing. Especially amongst dendritic cells (DC, there are specialized subsets that are highly proficient at antigen cross-presentation. We here present a focused survey on the cell biological processes in the endosomal pathway that support antigen cross-presentation. This review highlight DC-intrinsic mechanisms that facilitate the cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen, including receptor-mediated uptake, recycling and maturation including the sorting of membrane proteins, dynamic remodeling of endosomal structures and cell-surface directed endosomal trafficking. We will conclude with description of pathogen-induced deviation of endosomal processing, and discuss how immune evasion strategies pertaining endosomal trafficking may preclude antigen cross-presentation.

  15. Nephritogenic antigen determinants in epidermal and renal basement membranes of kindreds with Alport-type familial nephritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Kashtan, C; Fish, A. J.; Kleppel, M; Yoshioka, K; Michael, A. F.

    1986-01-01

    We probed epidermal basement membranes (EBM) of acid-urea denatured skin from members of kindreds with Alport-type familial nephritis (FN) for the presence of antigens reactive with Goodpasture sera (GPS) and serum (FNS) from an Alport patient who developed anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis in a renal allograft. By immunoblotting, GPS reacted primarily with the 28,000 molecular weight (mol wt) monomer but also the 24,000 mol wt and 26,000 mol wt monomers of the noncollagenous ...

  16. Antigen availability determines CD8⁺ T cell-dendritic cell interaction kinetics and memory fate decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrickson, Sarah E; Perro, Mario; Loughhead, Scott M; Senman, Balimkiz; Stutte, Susanne; Quigley, Michael; Alexe, Gabriela; Iannacone, Matteo; Flynn, Michael P; Omid, Shaida; Jesneck, Jonathan L; Imam, Sabrina; Mempel, Thorsten R; Mazo, Irina B; Haining, W Nicholas; von Andrian, Ulrich H

    2013-09-19

    T cells are activated by antigen (Ag)-bearing dendritic cells (DCs) in lymph nodes in three phases. The duration of the initial phase of transient, serial DC-T cell interactions is inversely correlated with Ag dose. The second phase, characterized by stable DC-T cell contacts, is believed to be necessary for full-fledged T cell activation. Here we have shown that this is not the case. CD8⁺ T cells interacting with DCs presenting low-dose, short-lived Ag did not transition to phase 2, whereas higher Ag dose yielded phase 2 transition. Both antigenic constellations promoted T cell proliferation and effector differentiation but yielded different transcriptome signatures at 12 hr and 24 hr. T cells that experienced phase 2 developed long-lived memory, whereas conditions without stable contacts yielded immunological amnesia. Thus, T cells make fate decisions within hours after Ag exposure, resulting in long-term memory or abortive effector responses, correlating with T cell-DCs interaction kinetics. PMID:24054328

  17. Antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates enable co-delivery of antigen and adjuvant to dendritic cells in cis but only have partial targeting specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kreutz

    Full Text Available Antibody-antigen conjugates, which promote antigen-presentation by dendritic cells (DC by means of targeted delivery of antigen to particular DC subsets, represent a powerful vaccination approach. To ensure immunity rather than tolerance induction the co-administration of a suitable adjuvant is paramount. However, co-administration of unlinked adjuvant cannot ensure that all cells targeted by the antibody conjugates are appropriately activated. Furthermore, antigen-presenting cells (APC that do not present the desired antigen are equally strongly activated and could prime undesired responses against self-antigens. We, therefore, were interested in exploring targeted co-delivery of antigen and adjuvant in cis in form of antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates for the induction of anti-tumour immunity. In this study, we report on the assembly and characterization of conjugates consisting of DEC205-specific antibody, the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN. We show that such conjugates are more potent at inducing cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses than control conjugates mixed with soluble CpG. However, our study also reveals that the nucleic acid moiety of such antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates alters their binding and uptake and allows delivery of the antigen and the adjuvant to cells partially independently of DEC205. Nevertheless, antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates are superior to antibody-free antigen-adjuvant conjugates in priming CTL responses and efficiently induce anti-tumour immunity in the murine B16 pseudo-metastasis model. A better understanding of the role of the antibody moiety is required to inform future conjugate vaccination strategies for efficient induction of anti-tumour responses.

  18. Post-Transcriptional and Epigenetic Regulation of Antigen Processing Machinery (APM) Components and HLA-I in Cervical Cancers from Uighur Women

    OpenAIRE

    HASIM, AYSHAMGUL; Abudula, Mangnishahan; Aimiduo, Reshalaiti; Ma, Jun-Qi; JIAO, Zhen; Akula, Gulzareye; Wang, Ting; ABUDULA, ABULIZI

    2012-01-01

    Normal function of human leukocyte antigen class I (HLA-I) and antigen processing machinery (APM) proteins is required for T cell-mediated anti-tumor or antiviral immunity, whereas the tumor survival indicates a failure of the host in immune surveillance associated with the dysfunction in antigen presentation, mainly due to the deregulation in HLA-I and APM expression or function. The posttranscriptional regulation of HLA-I and APM expression may associate with epigenetic modifications in can...

  19. Normal adult ramified microglia separated from other central nervous system macrophages by flow cytometric sorting: Phenotypic differences defined and direct ex vivo antigen presentation to myelin basic protein-reactive CD4{sup +} T cells compared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, A.L.; Goodsall, A.L.; Sedgwick, J.D. [Centenary Institute of Cancer Medicine and Cell Biology, Sydney (Australia)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    Ramified microglia in the adult central nervous system (CNS) are the principal glial element up-regulating MHC class I and II expression in response to inflammatory events or neuronal damage. A proportion of these cells also express MHC class II constitutively in the normal CNS. The role of microglia as APCs for CD4{sup +} cells extravasating into the CNS remains undefined. In this study, using irradiation bone marrow chimeras in CD45-congenic rats, the phenotype CD45{sup low}CD11b/c{sup +} is shown to identify microglial cells specifically within the CNS. Highly purified populations of microglia and nonmicroglial but CNS-associated macrophages (CD45{sup high}CD11b/c{sup +}) have been obtained directly from the adult CNS, by using flow cytometric sorting. Morphologically, freshly isolated microglia vs other CNS macrophages are quite distinct. Of the two populations recovered from the normal CNS, it is the minority CD45{sup high}CD11 b/c{sup +} transitional macrophage population, and not microglia, that is the effective APC for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis-inducing CD4{sup +} myelin basic protein (MBP)-reactive T cells. CD45{sup high}CD11b/c{sup +} CNS macrophages also stimulate MBP-reactive T cells without addition of MBP to culture suggesting presentation of endogenous Ag. This is the first study in which microglia vs other CNS macrophages have been analyzed for APC ability directly from the CNS, with substantial cross-contamination between the two populations eliminated. The heterogeneity of these populations in terms of APC function is clearly demonstrated. Evidence is still lacking that adult CNS microglia have the capacity to interact with and stimulate CD4{sup +} T cells to proliferate or secrete IL-2. 60 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. 抗原提呈细胞在银屑病发病机制中的作用%The role of antigen presenting cell in the pathogenesis of psoriasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹炳辉; 王蓉蓉; 张虎祥; 陈霖; 李秉煦; 朱启建

    2010-01-01

    目的:观察银屑病皮损组织内郎格罕氏细胞(LC)、真皮树突细胞(DDC)、巨噬细胞的变化及角阮细胞HPV感染情况,探讨LC、DDC、巨噬细胞及HPV与银屑病发病的关系.方法:选用我院病理科2003-2008年期间确诊为银屑病的病理切片,采用免疫组织化学方法观察银屑病皮损组织表皮CD1a、真皮CD1a、真皮CD68+的表达.用Image-Pro Plus 6.0图像处理软件测定每个高倍视野表皮中CD1 α+的LC的数目,真皮内CD1 α+的DDC的数目、CD68+的巨噬细胞的数目.采用原住杂交方法,检测银屑病表皮组织内HPV13、HPV16、HPV32 DNA.结果:银屑病组皮损组织郎格罕氏细胞数目明显增多,急性进行期为(15.82±1.48)个,慢性静止期为(14.96±1.74)个,正常对照组为(4.23±1.42)个,与正常组比较,差异均有显著性(P<0.05).银屑病DDC、巨噬细胞数目明显增多,分别为(9.08±2.48)个、(27.19±4.3)个,正常对照组分别为(2.45±1.04)个、(6.7±1.43)个,两组比较差异有显著性(P<0.05).银屑病表皮组织内未检测HPV13、HPV16、HPV32 DNA.结论:LC、DDC、巨噬细胞与银屑病的发病密切相关,而与HPV的感染可能无关.

  1. Cancer testis antigen and immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnadas DK

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Deepa Kolaseri Krishnadas, Fanqi Bai, Kenneth G Lucas Department of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Louisville, KY, USA Abstract: The identification of cancer testis (CT antigens has been an important advance in determining potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. Multiple previous studies have shown that CT antigen vaccines, using both peptides and dendritic cell vaccines, can elicit clinical and immunologic responses in several different tumors. This review details the expression of melanoma antigen family A, 1 (MAGE-A1, melanoma antigen family A, 3 (MAGE-A3, and New York esophageal squamous cell carcinoma-1 (NY-ESO-1 in various malignancies, and presents our current understanding of CT antigen based immunotherapy. Keywords: cancer testis antigens, immunotherapy, vaccine

  2. Challenge with innate and protein antigens induces CCR7 expression by microglia in vitro and in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, I. M.; de Haas, A. H.; Brouwer, N.; Boddeke, H. W. G. M.; Biber, K.

    2006-01-01

    Since activated microglia are able to phagocytose damaged cells and subsequently express major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) and co-stimulatory proteins, they are considered to function as antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the central nervous system. The maturation and migratory pote

  3. Screening of early antigen genes of adult-stage Trichinella spiralis using pig serum from different stages of early infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this work was to identify novel, early antigens present in Trichinella spiralis. To this end, a cDNA library generated from 3-day old adult worms (Ad3) was immunologically screened using serum from a pig infected with 20,000 muscle larvae. The serum was obtained from multiple, time cours...

  4. Proteasomal targeting and minigene repetition improve cell-surface presentation of a transfected, modified melanoma tumour antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, A B; Zocca, M-B; Bonefeld, C M;

    2004-01-01

    on the density of specific major histocompatibility complex-peptide complexes on the surface of the antigen-presenting cell. In this study, we explored the cell-surface presentation of a substituted MART-1 peptide encoded by transfected minigenes. We investigated the potential of proteasomal targeting compared...

  5. Monoclonal immunoglobulin M antibody to Japanese encephalitis virus that can react with a nuclear antigen in mammalian cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Gould, E A; Chanas, A C; Buckley, A.; Clegg, C S

    1983-01-01

    An immunoglobulin M (IgM) class monoclonal antibody raised against Japanese encephalitis virus reacted with an epitope on the nonstructural virus protein P74 (NV4 in the old nomenclature) of several flaviviruses and also with an antigen present in the nuclei of a variety of mammalian cell types. This antigen had a characteristic granular distribution by immunofluorescence and may correspond to a polypeptide of molecular weight 56,000 seen in nitrocellulose transfers of sodium dodecyl sulfate-...

  6. A novel 95-kilodalton antigen of Wuchereria bancrofti infective larvae identified by species-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Burkot, T. R.; Kwan-Lim, G E; R. M. Maizels

    1996-01-01

    CBA and BALB/c mice produced polyspecific and monospecific polyclonal antibody responses, respectively, following immunization with Wuchereria bancrofti stage-3 larvae. Two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were produced from the immunized BALB/c mouse. These MAbs (both isotype M) recognized a previously undescribed highly expressed W. bancrofti antigen present in stage-3 larvae. The epitopes bound by the MAbs appear to be species specific for W. bancrofti since the MAbs did not bind to antigens o...

  7. Determinants of VH1-46 Cross-Reactivity to Pemphigus Vulgaris Autoantigen Desmoglein 3 and Rotavirus Antigen VP6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Michael Jeffrey; Ellebrecht, Christoph T; Hammers, Christoph M; Mukherjee, Eric M; Sapparapu, Gopal; Boudreaux, Crystal E; McDonald, Sarah M; Crowe, James E; Payne, Aimee S

    2016-08-15

    Shared VH1-46 gene usage has been described in B cells reacting to desmoglein 3 (Dsg3) in the autoimmune disease pemphigus vulgaris (PV), as well as B cells responding to rotavirus capsid protein VP6. In both diseases, VH1-46 B cells bearing few to no somatic mutations can recognize the disease Ag. This intriguing connection between an autoimmune response to self-antigen and an immune response to foreign Ag prompted us to investigate whether VH1-46 B cells may be predisposed to Dsg3-VP6 cross-reactivity. Focused testing of VH1-46 mAbs previously isolated from PV and rotavirus-exposed individuals indicates that cross-reactivity is rare, found in only one of seven VH1-46 IgG clonotypes. High-throughput screening of IgG B cell repertoires from two PV patients identified no additional cross-reactive clonotypes. Screening of IgM B cell repertoires from one non-PV and three PV patients identified specific cross-reactive Abs in one PV patient, but notably all six cross-reactive clonotypes used VH1-46. Site-directed mutagenesis studies indicate that amino acid residues predisposing VH1-46 Abs to Dsg3 reactivity reside in CDR2. However, somatic mutations only rarely promote Dsg3-VP6 cross-reactivity; most mutations abolish VP6 and/or Dsg3 reactivity. Nevertheless, functional testing identified two cross-reactive VH1-46 Abs that both disrupt keratinocyte adhesion and inhibit rotavirus replication, indicating the potential for VH1-46 Abs to have both pathologic autoimmune and protective immune functions. Taken together, these studies suggest that certain VH1-46 B cell populations may be predisposed to Dsg3-VP6 cross-reactivity, but multiple mechanisms prevent the onset of autoimmunity after rotavirus exposure. PMID:27402694

  8. Determinants of VH1-46 Cross-Reactivity to Pemphigus Vulgaris Autoantigen Desmoglein 3 and Rotavirus Antigen VP6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Michael Jeffrey; Ellebrecht, Christoph T; Hammers, Christoph M; Mukherjee, Eric M; Sapparapu, Gopal; Boudreaux, Crystal E; McDonald, Sarah M; Crowe, James E; Payne, Aimee S

    2016-08-15

    Shared VH1-46 gene usage has been described in B cells reacting to desmoglein 3 (Dsg3) in the autoimmune disease pemphigus vulgaris (PV), as well as B cells responding to rotavirus capsid protein VP6. In both diseases, VH1-46 B cells bearing few to no somatic mutations can recognize the disease Ag. This intriguing connection between an autoimmune response to self-antigen and an immune response to foreign Ag prompted us to investigate whether VH1-46 B cells may be predisposed to Dsg3-VP6 cross-reactivity. Focused testing of VH1-46 mAbs previously isolated from PV and rotavirus-exposed individuals indicates that cross-reactivity is rare, found in only one of seven VH1-46 IgG clonotypes. High-throughput screening of IgG B cell repertoires from two PV patients identified no additional cross-reactive clonotypes. Screening of IgM B cell repertoires from one non-PV and three PV patients identified specific cross-reactive Abs in one PV patient, but notably all six cross-reactive clonotypes used VH1-46. Site-directed mutagenesis studies indicate that amino acid residues predisposing VH1-46 Abs to Dsg3 reactivity reside in CDR2. However, somatic mutations only rarely promote Dsg3-VP6 cross-reactivity; most mutations abolish VP6 and/or Dsg3 reactivity. Nevertheless, functional testing identified two cross-reactive VH1-46 Abs that both disrupt keratinocyte adhesion and inhibit rotavirus replication, indicating the potential for VH1-46 Abs to have both pathologic autoimmune and protective immune functions. Taken together, these studies suggest that certain VH1-46 B cell populations may be predisposed to Dsg3-VP6 cross-reactivity, but multiple mechanisms prevent the onset of autoimmunity after rotavirus exposure.

  9. Differential expression of function-related antigens on blood monocytes in children with hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Gabriela C; Ramos, María V; Gómez, Sonia A; Dran, Graciela I; Exeni, Ramón; Alduncín, Marta; Grimoldi, Irene; Vallejo, Graciela; Elías-Costa, Christian; Isturiz, Martín A; Palermo, Marina S

    2005-10-01

    Monocytes (Mo) mediate central functions in inflammation and immunity. Different subpopulations of Mo with distinct phenotype and functional properties have been described. Here, we investigate the phenotype and function of peripheral Mo from children with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). For this purpose, blood samples from patients in the acute period of HUS (HUS AP) were obtained on admission before dialysis and/or transfusion. The Mo phenotypic characterization was performed on whole blood by flow cytometry, and markers associated to biological functions were selected: CD14 accounting for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) responsiveness, CD11b for adhesion, Fc receptor for immunoglobulin G type I (FcgammaRI)/CD64 for phagocytosis and cytotoxicity, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR for antigen presentation. Some of these functions were also determined. Moreover, the percentage of CD14+ CD16+ Mo was evaluated. We found that the entire HUS AP Mo population exhibited reduced CD14, CD64, and CD11b expression and decreased LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor production and Fcgamma-dependent cytotoxicity. HUS AP showed an increased percentage of CD14+ CD16+ Mo with higher CD16 and lower CD14 levels compared with the same subset from healthy children. Moreover, the CD14++ CD16- Mo subpopulation of HUS AP had a decreased HLA-DR expression, which correlated with severity. In conclusion, the Mo population from HUS AP patients presents phenotypic and functional alterations. The contribution to the pathogenesis and the possible scenarios that led to these changes are discussed.

  10. Liposome-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccines: Formulation Strategies for Subunit Antigens and Immunostimulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Signe Tandrup; Foged, Camilla; Korsholm, Karen Smith;

    2016-01-01

    be classified into delivery systems or immunostimulators. Liposomes are versatile delivery systems for antigens, and they can carefully be customized towards desired immune profiles by combining them with immunostimulators and optimizing their composition, physicochemical properties and antigen-loading mode...... for which no effective vaccines exist. The subunit vaccine technology exploits pathogen subunits as antigens, e.g., recombinant proteins or synthetic peptides, allowing for highly specific immune responses against the pathogens. However, such antigens are usually not sufficiently immunogenic to induce...... protective immunity, and they are often combined with adjuvants to ensure robust immune responses. Adjuvants are capable of enhancing and/or modulating immune responses by exposing antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) concomitantly with conferring immune activation signals. Few adjuvant systems have...

  11. Use of a resin-bound synthetic peptide for identifying a neutralizing antigenic determinant associated with the human immunodeficiency virus envelope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, R C; Dreesman, G R; Chanh, T C; Boswell, R N; Allan, J S; Lee, T H; Essex, M; Sparrow, J T; Ho, D D; Kanda, P

    1987-04-25

    A polyamide-based solid-phase support containing an acid-stable p-(oxymethyl)benzoic acid handle to anchor the COOH-terminal amino acid was utilized in the production of synthetic peptides analogous to amino acid sequences 503-532 from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope glycoprotein. The resin-bound peptide was used to induce an antibody response to the native form of glycoprotein 120 in both rabbits and mice. This epitope was detected on the surface of HIV-infected cells and was capable of inducing an in vitro neutralizing HIV antibody response. In addition, sera from some individuals exposed to HIV react with this peptide bound to the resin in a solid-phase immunoassay. These data indicate that we have identified a neutralizing antigenic determinant present on the amino-terminal glycoprotein 120 subunits of HIV by utilizing resin-bound synthetic peptides.

  12. Human antigen-specific regulatory T cells generated by T cell receptor gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd M Brusko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Therapies directed at augmenting regulatory T cell (Treg activities in vivo as a systemic treatment for autoimmune disorders and transplantation may be associated with significant off-target effects, including a generalized immunosuppression that may compromise beneficial immune responses to infections and cancer cells. Adoptive cellular therapies using purified expanded Tregs represents an attractive alternative to systemic treatments, with results from animal studies noting increased therapeutic potency of antigen-specific Tregs over polyclonal populations. However, current methodologies are limited in terms of the capacity to isolate and expand a sufficient quantity of endogenous antigen-specific Tregs for therapeutic intervention. Moreover, FOXP3+ Tregs fall largely within the CD4+ T cell subset and are thus routinely MHC class II-specific, whereas class I-specific Tregs may function optimally in vivo by facilitating direct tissue recognition. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To overcome these limitations, we have developed a novel means for generating large numbers of antigen-specific Tregs involving lentiviral T cell receptor (TCR gene transfer into in vitro expanded polyclonal natural Treg populations. Tregs redirected with a high-avidity class I-specific TCR were capable of recognizing the melanoma antigen tyrosinase in the context of HLA-A*0201 and could be further enriched during the expansion process by antigen-specific reactivation with peptide loaded artificial antigen presenting cells. These in vitro expanded Tregs continued to express FOXP3 and functional TCRs, and maintained the capacity to suppress conventional T cell responses directed against tyrosinase, as well as bystander T cell responses. Using this methodology in a model tumor system, murine Tregs designed to express the tyrosinase TCR effectively blocked antigen-specific effector T cell (Teff activity as determined by tumor cell growth and luciferase reporter

  13. Exosomes derived from M. Bovis BCG infected macrophages activate antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod K Giri

    Full Text Available Activation of both CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells is required for an effective immune response to an M. tuberculosis infection. However, infected macrophages are poor antigen presenting cells and may be spatially separated from recruited T cells, thus limiting antigen presentation within a granuloma. Our previous studies showed that infected macrophages release from cells small membrane-bound vesicles called exosomes which contain mycobacterial lipid components and showed that these exosomes could stimulate a pro-inflammatory response in naïve macrophages. In the present study we demonstrate that exosomes stimulate both CD4(+ and CD8(+ splenic T cells isolated from mycobacteria-sensitized mice. Although the exosomes contain MHC I and II as well as costimulatory molecules, maximum stimulation of T cells required prior incubation of exosomes with antigen presenting cells. Exosomes isolated from M. bovis and M. tuberculosis infected macrophages also stimulated activation and maturation of mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Interestingly, intranasal administration of mice with exosomes isolated from M. bovis BCG infected macrophages induce the generation of memory CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells. The isolated T cells also produced IFN-gamma upon restimulation with BCG antigens. The release of exosomes from infected macrophages may overcome some of the defects in antigen presentation associated with mycobacterial infections and we suggest that exosomes may be a promising M. tuberculosis vaccine candidate.

  14. Viral sequestration of antigen subverts cross presentation to CD8(+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric F Tewalt

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Virus-specific CD8(+ T cells (T(CD8+ are initially triggered by peptide-MHC Class I complexes on the surface of professional antigen presenting cells (pAPC. Peptide-MHC complexes are produced by two spatially distinct pathways during virus infection. Endogenous antigens synthesized within virus-infected pAPC are presented via the direct-presentation pathway. Many viruses have developed strategies to subvert direct presentation. When direct presentation is blocked, the cross-presentation pathway, in which antigen is transferred from virus-infected cells to uninfected pAPC, is thought to compensate and allow the generation of effector T(CD8+. Direct presentation of vaccinia virus (VACV antigens driven by late promoters does not occur, as an abortive infection of pAPC prevents production of these late antigens. This lack of direct presentation results in a greatly diminished or ablated T(CD8+ response to late antigens. We demonstrate that late poxvirus antigens do not enter the cross-presentation pathway, even when identical antigens driven by early promoters access this pathway efficiently. The mechanism mediating this novel means of viral modulation of antigen presentation involves the sequestration of late antigens within virus factories. Early antigens and cellular antigens are cross-presented from virus-infected cells, as are late antigens that are targeted to compartments outside of the virus factories. This virus-mediated blockade specifically targets the cross-presentation pathway, since late antigen that is not cross-presented efficiently enters the MHC Class II presentation pathway. These data are the first to describe an evasion mechanism employed by pathogens to prevent entry into the cross-presentation pathway. In the absence of direct presentation, this evasion mechanism leads to a complete ablation of the T(CD8+ response and a potential replicative advantage for the virus. Such mechanisms of viral modulation of antigen presentation

  15. A neuronal antigen in the brains of Alzheimer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolozin, B L; Pruchnicki, A; Dickson, D W; Davies, P

    1986-05-01

    A monoclonal antibody was prepared against pooled homogenates of brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease. This antibody recognizes an antigen present in much higher concentration in certain brain regions of Alzheimer patients than in normal brain. The antigen appears to be a protein present in neurons involved in the formation of neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, and in some morphologically normal neurons in sections from Alzheimer brains. Partial purification and Western blot analysis revealed the antigen from Alzheimer brain to be a single protein with a molecular weight of 68,000. Application of the same purification procedure to normal brain tissue results in the detection of small amounts of a protein of lower molecular weight. PMID:3083509

  16. Artificial Loading of ASC Specks with Cytosolic Antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Can Sahillioğlu

    Full Text Available Inflammasome complexes form upon interaction of Nod Like Receptor (NLR proteins with pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAPMS inside the cytosol. Stimulation of a subset of inflammasome receptors including NLRP3, NLRC4 and AIM2 triggers formation of the micrometer-sized spherical supramolecular complex called the ASC speck. The ASC speck is thought to be the platform of inflammasome activity, but the reason why a supramolecular complex is preferred against oligomeric platforms remains elusive. We observed that a set of cytosolic proteins, including the model antigen ovalbumin, tend to co-aggregate on the ASC speck. We suggest that co-aggregation of antigenic proteins on the ASC speck during intracellular infection might be instrumental in antigen presentation.

  17. A small antigenic determinant of the Chikungunya virus E2 protein is sufficient to induce neutralizing antibodies which are partially protective in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Weber

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The mosquito-borne Chikungunya virus (CHIKV causes high fever and severe joint pain in humans. It is expected to spread in the future to Europe and has recently reached the USA due to globalization, climate change and vector switch. Despite this, little is known about the virus life cycle and, so far, there is no specific treatment or vaccination against Chikungunya infections. We aimed here to identify small antigenic determinants of the CHIKV E2 protein able to induce neutralizing immune responses.E2 enables attachment of the virus to target cells and a humoral immune response against E2 should protect from CHIKV infections. Seven recombinant proteins derived from E2 and consisting of linear and/or structural antigens were created, and were expressed in and purified from E. coli. BALB/c mice were vaccinated with these recombinant proteins and the mouse sera were screened for neutralizing antibodies. Whereas a linear N-terminally exposed peptide (L and surface-exposed parts of the E2 domain A (sA alone did not induce neutralizing antibodies, a construct containing domain B and a part of the β-ribbon (called B+ was sufficient to induce neutralizing antibodies. Furthermore, domain sA fused to B+ (sAB+ induced the highest amount of neutralizing antibodies. Therefore, the construct sAB+ was used to generate a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA, MVA-CHIKV-sAB+. Mice were vaccinated with MVA-CHIKV-sAB+ and/or the recombinant protein sAB+ and were subsequently challenged with wild-type CHIKV. Whereas four vaccinations with MVA-CHIKV-sAB+ were not sufficient to protect mice from a CHIKV infection, protein vaccination with sAB+ markedly reduced the viral titers of vaccinated mice.The recombinant protein sAB+ contains important structural antigens for a neutralizing antibody response in mice and its formulation with appropriate adjuvants might lead to a future CHIKV vaccine.

  18. Rate of Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Pregnant Women Determined by a Monoclonal Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Immunoassay

    OpenAIRE

    Gotstein, Melissa G.; Aide, Paula M.; Coleman, Paul F.; Sanborn, Mark R.

    2002-01-01

    The rate of HBsAg in 6,976 B-human chorionic gonadotropin (B-hCG)-positive specimens, as determined by the Auszyme Monoclonal assay (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, Ill.), was 0.56% (39 of 6,986 repeatedly reactive [RR] and confirmed-positive specimens). All RR and confirmed specimens were hepatitis B virus positive by at least one additional test, yielding an assay specificity of 99.96%. The findings argue against unique attributes in the pregnant population that might produce inaccurate a...

  19. Rate of hepatitis B virus infection in pregnant women determined by a monoclonal hepatitis B surface antigen immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotstein, Melissa G; Aide, Paula M; Coleman, Paul F; Sanborn, Mark R

    2002-09-01

    The rate of HBsAg in 6,976 B-human chorionic gonadotropin (B-hCG)-positive specimens, as determined by the Auszyme Monoclonal assay (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, Ill.), was 0.56% (39 of 6,986 repeatedly reactive [RR] and confirmed-positive specimens). All RR and confirmed specimens were hepatitis B virus positive by at least one additional test, yielding an assay specificity of 99.96%. The findings argue against unique attributes in the pregnant population that might produce inaccurate assay results. PMID:12202601

  20. Development of a Recombinant Cell-Based Indirect Immunofluorescence Assay for the Determination of Autoantibodies against Soluble Liver Antigen in Autoimmune Hepatitis

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    Christiane Radzimski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoantibodies against soluble liver antigen (SLA are specific markers for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH type 1. In contrast to the determination of other AIH-associated autoantibodies by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA, detection of anti-SLA relied up to now on ELISA or immunoblot based on bacterially expressed recombinant protein. In order to develop a complementary IFA substrate, SLA isoform 1 was recombinantly produced in the human cell line HEK293 and controlled by a rabbit hyperimmune serum against SLA. The recombinant cells were used in IFA (RC-IFA to analyze sera from 20 AIH patients with anti-SLA positivity predetermined by ELISA together with 80 controls (20 anti-SLA negative AIH, 15 primary biliary cirrhosis, 15 HCV, and 30 healthy blood donors. Using RC-IFA, anti-SLA was detected in all ELISA positive AIH sera but in none of the controls. Furthermore, a cytosolic fraction of HEK293 containing SLA was able to neutralize the autoantibodies in all positive sera in a dose-dependent manner. HEK293 cells expressing SLA are a valid substrate for the serodiagnosis of AIH relevant autoantibodies by IFA. In concert with cryosections of primate liver, rat kidney, rat liver, rat stomach, and HEp-2 cells, they enable the parallel determination of all autoantibodies associated with autoimmune liver diseases.

  1. Cross-presentation of cell-associated antigens by MHC class I in dendritic cell subsets

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    Enric eGutiérrez-Martínez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells have the unique ability to pick up dead cells carrying antigens in tissue and migrate to the lymph nodes where they can cross-present cell-associated antigens by MHC class I to CD8+ T cells. There is strong in vivo evidence that the mouse XCR1+ dendritic cells subset acts as a key player in this process. The intracellular processes underlying cross-presentation remain controversial and several pathways have been proposed. Indeed, a wide number of studies have addressed the cellular process of cross-presentation in vitro using a variety of sources of antigen and antigen presenting cells. Here we review the in vivo and in vitro evidence supporting the current mechanistic models and disscuss their physiological relevance to the cross-presentation of cell-associated antigens by dendritic cells subsets

  2. Regulation of protein synthesis and autophagy in activated dendritic cells: implications for antigen processing and presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüello, Rafael J; Reverendo, Marisa; Gatti, Evelina; Pierre, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    Antigenic peptides presented in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules originate from the degradation of both self and non-self proteins. T cells can therefore recognize at the surface of surveyed cells, the self-peptidome produced by the cell itself (mostly inducing tolerance) or immunogenic peptides derived from exogenous origins. The initiation of adaptive immune responses by dendritic cells (DCs), through the antigenic priming of naïve T cells, is associated to microbial pattern recognition receptors engagement. Activation of DCs by microbial product or inflammatory cytokines initiates multiple processes that maximize DC capacity to present exogenous antigens and stimulate T cells by affecting major metabolic and membrane traffic pathways. These include the modulation of protein synthesis, the regulation of MHC and co-stimulatory molecules transport, as well as the regulation of autophagy, that, all together promote exogenous antigen presentation while limiting the display of self-antigens by MHC molecules.

  3. Toward a network model of MHC class II-restricted antigen processing

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    Laurence C Eisenlohr

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The standard model of Major Histocompatibility Complex class II (MHCII-restricted antigen processing depicts a straightforward, linear pathway: Internalized antigens are converted into peptides that load in a chaperone dependent manner onto nascent MHCII in the late endosome, the complexes subsequently trafficking to the cell surface for recognition by CD4+ T cells (TCD4+. Several variations on this theme, both moderate and radical, have come to light but these alternatives have remained peripheral, the conventional pathway generally presumed to be the primary driver of TCD4+ responses. Here we continue to press for the conceptual repositioning of these alternatives toward the center while proposing that MHCII processing be thought of less in terms of discrete pathways and more in terms of a network whose major and minor conduits are variable depending upon many factors, including the epitope, the nature of the antigen, the source of the antigen, and the identity of the antigen-presenting cell.

  4. Evaluacion de la tecnica de contraimmunoelectroforesis para determinar la potencia antigena de las vacunas antirrabicas Evaluation ot the counterimmunoelectrophoresis technique to determine the antigenic potency of antirrabic vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Miceli

    1993-12-01

    paper presents the results obtained when using a counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE techniques to determine the antigens content in samples of 84 and 40 samples of lots of suckling mouse rabies and tissue culture rabies vaccines, respectively. The evaluation of rabies vaccines under, at, near and up to 0.3 UI by the NIH and CIE tests showed that for practical use, a CIE titer of 1:4 would match the minimum of NIH potency test requirement. Low degree of CIE test variability within our laboratory was observed, when two working reference and 7 lots of rabies vaccines from different origin and activity were tested in five independent assays. All titres fell within one double dilution what is an indication of its reproducibility. Good sensitivity to detect antigen deterioration in thermal degradation test was observed when samples of 3 lots of liquid suckling mouse rabies vaccine were held stored at 4ºC or at 37ºC for 4 weeks and assays by CIE and NIH tests. Finally, CIE test could apply by manufactures to follow the concentration procedures to determine the final end point which could match a desired antigenic value in the NIH potency test.

  5. Cross-presentation through langerin and DC-SIGN targeting requires different formulations of glycan-modified antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehres, Cynthia M; Kalay, Hakan; Bruijns, Sven C M; Musaafir, Sara A M; Ambrosini, Martino; van Bloois, Louis; van Vliet, Sandra J; Storm, Gert; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-04-10

    Dendritic cells (DCs) and Langerhans cells (LC) are professional antigen presenting cells (APCs) that initiate humoral and cellular immune responses. Targeted delivery of antigen towards DC- or LC-specific receptors enhances vaccine efficacy. In this study, we compared the efficiency of glycan-based antigen targeting to both the human DC-specific C-type lectin receptor (CLR) DC-SIGN and the LC-specific CLR langerin. Since DC-SIGN and langerin are able to recognize the difucosylated oligosaccharide Lewis Y (Le(Y)), we prepared neoglycoconjugates bearing this glycan epitope to allow targeting of both lectins. Le(Y)-modified liposomes, with an approximate diameter of 200nm, were significantly endocytosed by DC-SIGN(+) DCs and mediated efficient antigen presentation to CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Surprisingly, although langerin bound to Le(Y)-modified liposomes, LCs exposed to Le(Y)-modified liposomes could not endocytose liposomes nor mediate antigen presentation to T cells. However, LCs mediated an enhanced cross-presentation when antigen was delivered through langerin using Le(Y)-modified synthetic long peptides. In contrast, Le(Y)-modified synthetic long peptides were recognized by DC-SIGN, but did not trigger antigen internalization nor antigen cross-presentation. These data demonstrate that langerin and DC-SIGN have different size requirements for antigen uptake. Although using glycans remains an interesting option in the design of anti-cancer vaccines targeting multiple CLRs, aspects such as molecule size and conformation need to be taken in consideration. PMID:25656175

  6. Cerium oxide-deposited mesoporous silica nanoparticles for the determination of carcinoembryonic antigen in serum using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, H.W. [Department of Chemistry, NSBI, Dankook University, 126 Jukjeon-dong, Suji-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 448-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, K.H.; Hur, N.H. [Department of Chemistry, Sogang University, Shinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, H.B., E-mail: plasma@dankook.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, NSBI, Dankook University, 126 Jukjeon-dong, Suji-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 448-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-17

    Highlights: • Sandwich-type immunoassay using ICP-MS and nanoparticles to determine biomarkers. • CeO{sub 2}-deposited mesoporous silica nanoparticles were synthesized as a probe. • Ratiometric measurement significantly improved the calibration linearity. • Excellent detection limit was achieved by signal amplification. - Abstract: CeO{sub 2}-deposited mesoporous silica nanoparticles were synthesized as a probe to determine carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in serum by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The prepared mesoporous nanoparticles were modified and tagged to the target for sandwich-type immunoassay. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were also synthesized and immobilized with antibody to extract the target biomarker. The calibration curve of the synthesized CeO{sub 2}-deposited silica nanoparticles, which was plotted by the signal ratio of {sup 140}Ce/{sup 57}Fe measured by ICP-MS vs. the concentration of CEA, showed excellent linearity and sensitivity owing to the signal amplification and low spectral interference. Under optimal conditions, the sandwich-type analytical method was applied to determine CEA in serum spiked in the range of 0.001–5 ng mL{sup −1} and showed a limit of detection of 0.36 ng mL{sup −1}. Since the deposited CeO{sub 2} in the mesoporous silica layer can be substituted by other metal compounds, various kinds of metal-deposited nanoparticles can be prepared as probe materials for multiplex detection in bioanalysis.

  7. Hybrid human immunodeficiency virus Gag particles as an antigen carrier system: induction of cytotoxic T-cell and humoral responses by a Gag:V3 fusion.

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, J C; Harris, S. J.; Layton, G T; Berrie, E L; French, T J; Burns, N R; Adams, S E; Kingsman, A J

    1993-01-01

    In attempts to increase the immunogenicity of recombinant antigens, a number of particulate antigen presentation systems have been developed. In this study, we used human immunodeficiency virus Gag particles as carriers for the human immunodeficiency virus envelope V3 region. Gag:V3 fusion proteins were expressed from baculovirus expression vectors; they migrated to the insect cell membrane and budded from the cells as hybrid particles. An immunization study carried out with rats showed that ...

  8. An indirect immunofluorescence assay using a cell culture-derived antigen for detection of antibodies to the agent of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholson, W L; Comer, J A; Sumner, J W; Gingrich-Baker, C; Coughlin, R T; Magnarelli, L A; Olson, J G; Childs, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    An indirect immunofluorescence assay for the detection of human antibodies to the agent of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE) was developed and standardized. Antigen was prepared from a human promyelocytic leukemia cell line (HL-60) infected with a tick-derived isolate of the HGE agent (USG3). Suitable antigen presentation and preservation of cellular morphology were obtained when infected cells were applied and cultured on the slide, excess medium was removed, and cells were fixed with ac...

  9. Induction of Immune Tolerance in Asthmatic Mice by Vaccination with DNA Encoding an Allergen–Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-Associated Antigen 4 Combination ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Fang; Huang, Gang; Hu, Bo; Song, Yong; Shi, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy is a potential treatment for allergic diseases. We constructed an allergen–cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4)-encoding DNA vaccine, administered it directly to antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and investigated its ability and mechanisms to ameliorate allergic airway inflammation in an asthmatic mouse model. An allergen-CTLA-4 DNA plasmid (OVA-CTLA-4-pcDNA3.1) encoding an ovalbumin (OVA) and the mouse CTLA-4 extracellular domain was constructed...

  10. CD8+ T Cell Fate and Function Influenced by Antigen-Specific Virus-Like Nanoparticles Co-Expressing Membrane Tethered IL-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Wojta-Stremayr

    Full Text Available A variety of adjuvants fostering humoral immunity are known as of today. However, there is a lack of adjuvants or adjuvant strategies, which directly target T cellular effector functions and memory. We here determined whether systemically toxic cytokines such as IL-2 can be restricted to the site of antigen presentation and used as 'natural adjuvants'. Therefore, we devised antigen-presenting virus-like nanoparticles (VNP co-expressing IL-2 attached to different membrane-anchors and assessed their potency to modulate CD8+ T cell responses in vitro and in vivo. Efficient targeting of IL-2 to lipid rafts and ultimately VNP was achieved by fusing IL-2 at its C-terminus to a minimal glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-anchor acceptor sequence. To identify optimal membrane-anchor dimensions we inserted one (1Ig, two (2Ig or four (4Ig immunoglobulin(Ig-like domains of CD16b between IL-2 and the minimal GPI-anchor acceptor sequence of CD16b (GPI. We found that the 2IgGPI version was superior to all other evaluated IL-2 variants (IL-2v in terms of its i degree of targeting to lipid rafts and to the VNP surface, ii biological activity, iii co-stimulation of cognate T cells in the absence of bystander activation and iv potency to induce differentiation and acquisition of CD8+ T cell effector functions in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, the GPI version rather favored memory precursor cell formation. These results exemplify novel beneficial features of membrane-bound IL-2, which in addition to its mere T cell stimulatory capacity include the induction of differential effector and memory functions in CD8+ T lymphocytes.

  11. COLONOSCOPY AND CARCINOEMBRYONIC ANTIGEN VARIATIONS

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    Rita G SOUSA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Colonoscopy is essential for synchronous and metachronous cancer detection. Carcinoembryonic antigen is a colorectal cancer tumor marker, important as a follow-up tool in patients with previous colorectal cancer. False-positive carcinoembryonic antigen elevation results in multiples exams and in patient anxiety. In literature, there is reference to transient carcinoembryonic antigen increase with colonoscopy. Objective To evaluate the influence of bowel preparation and colonoscopy in carcinoembryonic antigen blood levels. Methods We prospectively studied subjects that underwent routine colonoscopy in our institution. Blood samples were collected (1 before bowel cleaning, (2 before colonoscopy and (3 immediately after colonoscopy. Blood carcinoembryonic antigen levels were determined by “Sandwich” immunoassay. The statistical methods used were the paired t-test and ANOVA. Results Thirty-seven patients (22M/15F were included; age range 28-84 (mean 56 years. Mean carcinoembryonic antigen values were 1.9, 2 and 1.8 for (1, (2 and (3, respectively. An increase in value (2 compared with (1 was observed in 20/37 patients (P = 0.018, mainly in younger patients and in patients requiring more endoluminal interventions. In 29/37 patients, the CEA value decreased from (2 to (3 (P = 1.3x10-7. Conclusions A trend for carcinoembryonic antigen increase after bowel cleaning was observed, especially in younger patients and in patients with more endoluminal interventions, but without clinical meaning.

  12. Class II-targeted antigen is superior to CD40-targeted antigen at stimulating humoral responses in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frleta, D; Demian, D; Wade, W F

    2001-02-01

    We examined the efficacy of using monoclonal antibodies to target antigen (avidin) to different surface molecules expressed on antigen presenting cells (APC). In particular, we targeted CD40 to test whether the "adjuvant" properties of CD40 signaling combined with targeted antigen would result in enhanced serologic responses. We targeted avidin to class II as a positive control and to CD11c as a negative control. These surface proteins represent an ensemble of surface molecules that signal upon ligation and that are expressed on professional APC, in particular dendritic cells (DC). We observed that targeting class II molecules on APC was superior to targeting CD40, or CD11c. However, CD40 and CD11c could function as targets for antigen bound monoclonal antibodies under certain conditions. Interestingly, inclusion of anti-CD40 mAb with the targeting anti-class II-targeted antigens negatively affects humoral response, suggesting that CD40 signaling under certain conditions may suppress processing and/or presentation of targeted antigen. PMID:11360928

  13. Characterization of an antigenic site that contains a dominant, type-specific neutralization determinant on the envelope protein domain III (ED3) of dengue 2 virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface of the mature dengue virus (DENV) particle consists of 90 envelope (E) protein dimers that mediate both receptor binding and fusion. The E protein ectodomain can be divided into three structural domains designated ED1, ED2, and ED3, of which ED3 contains the critical and dominant virus-specific neutralization sites. In this study the ED3 epitopes recognized by seven, murine, IgG1 DENV-2 type-specific, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were determined using site-directed mutagenesis of a recombinant DENV-2 ED3 (rED3) protein. A total of 41 single amino acid substitutions were introduced into the rED3 at 30 different surface accessible residues. The affinity of each MAb with the mutant rED3s was assessed by indirect ELISA and the results indicate that all seven MAbs recognize overlapping epitopes with residues K305 and P384 critical for binding. These residues are conserved among DENV-2 strains and cluster together on the upper lateral face of ED3. A linear relationship was observed between relative occupancy of ED3 on the virion by MAb and neutralization of the majority of virus infectivity (∼ 90%) for all seven MAbs. Depending on the MAb, it is predicted that between 10% and 50% relative occupancy of ED3 on the virion is necessary for virus neutralization and for all seven MAbs occupancy levels approaching saturation were required for 100% neutralization of virus infectivity. Overall, the conserved antigenic site recognized by all seven MAbs is likely to be a dominant DENV-2 type-specific, neutralization determinant

  14. Synthetic pathogens for integrated biophysical and genetic dissection of antigen cross-presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Freitas, Rui Pedro da Silva Albuquerque e, 1980-

    2010-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento, Ciências Biomédicas (Ciências Morfológicas), Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Medicina, 2010 The study of host-pathogen interactions is crucial to unveil the diversity of the immune response outcome. Dendritic Cells (DCs) play a central role in the initiation and regulation of T-Cell immunity, functioning as master switches that control whether the outcome of antigen presentation results in tolerance, or immunity. Antigen cross-presentation is a necessary mechanis...

  15. Editing of CD1d-Bound Lipid Antigens by Endosomal Lipid Transfer Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Dapeng; Cantu, Carlos; Sagiv, Yuval; Schrantz, Nicolas; Kulkarni, Ashok B.; Qi, Xiaoyang; Mahuran, Don J.; Carlos R Morales; Grabowski, Gregory A.; Benlagha, Kamel; Savage, Paul; Bendelac, Albert; Teyton, Luc

    2003-01-01

    It is now established that CD1 molecules present lipid antigens to T cells, although it is not clear how the exchange of lipids between membrane compartments and the CD1 binding groove is assisted. We report that mice deficient in prosaposin, the precursor to a family of endosomal lipid transfer proteins (LTP), exhibit specific defects in CD1d-mediated antigen presentation and lack Vα14 NKT cells. In vitro, saposins extracted monomeric lipids from membranes and from CD1, thereby promoting the...

  16. T lymphocytes from irradiation chimeras repopulated with 13-day fetal liver cells recognize antigens only in association with self-MHC products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nisbet-Brown, E.; Diener, E. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))

    1986-01-01

    The restriction specificities of maturing thymocytes are determined by the Class II MHC antigens expressed by non-lymphoid thymic tissues. The proliferative response of mature T lymphocytes to antigen-presenting cells (APC) and antigen requires that the APC express the same MHC antigens as the thymus in which the T cells differentiated. Thus, in the two-way bone marrow chimera (A + B----(A x B)F1), T lymphocyte populations of A and B haplotypes have each acquired the potential to recognize antigens associated with either parental haplotype. In spite of the large body of work on MHC restriction, we still do not have a clear understanding of the mechanisms which impose self restriction. The chimeric model systems used previously to study MHC restriction have used adult bone marrow cells as the source of lymphoid precursors. During normal ontogeny, T cells are derived from precursors in the fetal liver and we felt that a direct comparison of T cells from fetal liver and bone marrow-repopulated animals would shed light on the development of MHC restriction specificities during T cell ontogeny in the thymus or prethymically. We found that parental T lymphocyte populations isolated from two-way fetal liver chimeras cooperated only with syngeneic APC, while those from bone marrow chimeras cooperated with APC of either parental haplotype. This suggests that fetal liver and bone marrow may not be equivalent sources of stem cells. Our results may be due to fundamental differences between thymocyte precursors in fetal liver and bone marrow, including the time course of their expression of T cell receptor gene products.

  17. T lymphocytes from irradiation chimeras repopulated with 13-day fetal liver cells recognize antigens only in association with self-MHC products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The restriction specificities of maturing thymocytes are determined by the Class II MHC antigens expressed by non-lymphoid thymic tissues. The proliferative response of mature T lymphocytes to antigen-presenting cells (APC) and antigen requires that the APC express the same MHC antigens as the thymus in which the T cells differentiated. Thus, in the two-way bone marrow chimera [A + B----(A x B)F1], T lymphocyte populations of A and B haplotypes have each acquired the potential to recognize antigens associated with either parental haplotype. In spite of the large body of work on MHC restriction, we still do not have a clear understanding of the mechanisms which impose self restriction. The chimeric model systems used previously to study MHC restriction have used adult bone marrow cells as the source of lymphoid precursors. During normal ontogeny, T cells are derived from precursors in the fetal liver and we felt that a direct comparison of T cells from fetal liver and bone marrow-repopulated animals would shed light on the development of MHC restriction specificities during T cell ontogeny in the thymus or prethymically. We found that parental T lymphocyte populations isolated from two-way fetal liver chimeras cooperated only with syngeneic APC, while those from bone marrow chimeras cooperated with APC of either parental haplotype. This suggests that fetal liver and bone marrow may not be equivalent sources of stem cells. Our results may be due to fundamental differences between thymocyte precursors in fetal liver and bone marrow, including the time course of their expression of T cell receptor gene products

  18. Cell-mediated immune response of synovial fluid lymphocytes to ureaplasma antigen in Reiter's syndrome

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    Pavlica Ljiljana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Reiter's syndrome (RS is an seronegative arthritis that occurs after urogenital or enteric infection which in addition with occular and/or mucocutaneous manifestations presents complete form of disease. According to previous understanding arthritis in the RS is the reactive one, which means that it is impossible to isolate its causative agent. However, there are the more and more authors suggesting that arthritis in the urogenital form of disease is caused by the infective agent in the affected joint. This suggestion is based on numerous studies on the presence of Chlmaydia trachomatis and Ureaplasma urealyticum in the inflamed joint by using new diagnostic methods in molecular biology published in the recent literature [1-3]. Besides, numerous studies of the humoral and cell-mediated immune response to "triggering" bacteria in the affected joint have supported previous suggestions [4-7]. Aim of the study was to determine whether synovial fluid T-cells specifically recognize the "triggering" bacteria presumably responsible for the Reiter's syndrome. METHOD The 3H-thymidine uptake procedure for measuring lymphocyte responses was applied to lymphocytes derived concurrently from synovial fluid (SF and from peripheral blood (PB [8]. Ureaplasma antigen and mitogen PHA stimulated lymphocytes in 24 RS patients (24 PB samples, 9 SF samples and the results were compared with those found in 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA (10 PB samples, 5 SF samples. Preparation of ureaplasma antigen. Ureaplasma was cultured on cell-free liquid medium [9]. Sample of 8 ml was heat-inactivated for 15 minutes at 601C and permanently stirred with magnetic mixer. The sample was centrifuged at 2000 x g for 40 minutes and than deposits carefully carried to other sterile glass tubes (Corex and recentrifuged at 9000 x g for 30 minutes. The deposit was washed 3 times in sterile 0.9% NaCl, and final sediment was resuspended in 1.2 ml sterile 0.9% Na

  19. A single point in protein trafficking by Plasmodium falciparum determines the expression of major antigens on the surface of infected erythrocytes targeted by human antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jo-Anne; Howell, Katherine B; Langer, Christine; Maier, Alexander G; Hasang, Wina; Rogerson, Stephen J; Petter, Michaela; Chesson, Joanne; Stanisic, Danielle I; Duffy, Michael F; Cooke, Brian M; Siba, Peter M; Mueller, Ivo; Bull, Peter C; Marsh, Kevin; Fowkes, Freya J I; Beeson, James G

    2016-11-01

    Antibodies to blood-stage antigens of Plasmodium falciparum play a pivotal role in human immunity to malaria. During parasite development, multiple proteins are trafficked from the intracellular parasite to the surface of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IEs). However, the relative importance of different proteins as targets of acquired antibodies, and key pathways involved in trafficking major antigens remain to be clearly defined. We quantified antibodies to surface antigens among children, adults, and pregnant women from different malaria-exposed regions. We quantified the importance of antigens as antibody targets using genetically engineered P. falciparum with modified surface antigen expression. Genetic deletion of the trafficking protein skeleton-binding protein-1 (SBP1), which is involved in trafficking the surface antigen PfEMP1, led to a dramatic reduction in antibody recognition of IEs and the ability of human antibodies to promote opsonic phagocytosis of IEs, a key mechanism of parasite clearance. The great majority of antibody epitopes on the IE surface were SBP1-dependent. This was demonstrated using parasite isolates with different genetic or phenotypic backgrounds, and among antibodies from children, adults, and pregnant women in different populations. Comparisons of antibody reactivity to parasite isolates with SBP1 deletion or inhibited PfEMP1 expression suggest that PfEMP1 is the dominant target of acquired human antibodies, and that other P. falciparum IE surface proteins are minor targets. These results establish SBP1 as part of a critical pathway for the trafficking of major surface antigens targeted by human immunity, and have key implications for vaccine development, and quantifying immunity in populations.

  20. Human Leukocyte Antigen Diversity: A Southern African Perspective

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    Mqondisi Tshabalala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasingly well-documented evidence of high genetic, ethnic, and linguistic diversity amongst African populations, there is limited data on human leukocyte antigen (HLA diversity in these populations. HLA is part of the host defense mechanism mediated through antigen presentation to effector cells of the immune system. With the high disease burden in southern Africa, HLA diversity data is increasingly important in the design of population-specific vaccines and the improvement of transplantation therapeutic interventions. This review highlights the paucity of HLA diversity data amongst southern African populations and defines a need for information of this kind. This information will support disease association studies, provide guidance in vaccine design, and improve transplantation outcomes.

  1. A simple and safe method for single HLA-antigen-typing by a solid phase assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häcker-Shahin, B; Giannitsis, D J

    1991-01-01

    A rapid solid phase assay for detection of single HLA-antigens on platelets was developed. The platelets were attached to the surface of polystyrene microtitre plate wells by means of a sodium carbonate buffer and centrifugation. Uncovered areas were blocked by a gelatin blocking buffer. After incubation with commercially available anti-HLA-sera the bound anti-HLA-specific antibodies directed against HLA-antigens present on the platelets were made visible by anti-IgG-coated indicator red cells and a brief centrifugation. A positive result, meaning the presence of an HLA-antigen, was indicated by a slight red cell adherence over the reaction surface. In the absence of the HLA-antigen no binding occurred and the indicator red cells formed a small red disc-like pellet.

  2. PATHWAYS OF RECOGNITION OF FOREIGN ANTIGENS IN THE ADAPTIVE IMMUNE RESPONSE TO ALLOGENEIC ORGAN TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Berkos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunological allograft rejection is based on the process of recognition of donor antigens by T-cell receptors. Antigens are generally represented by molecules of major hystocompatibility complex (MHC, expressed by the donor organ tissue cells. Immune response to allogeneic transplant in its activity is greatly higher than response to conventional infection wherein the basic mechanisms of recognition of infectious antigens and alloantigens seem to be similar. In this review we have analyzed three main pathways of recognition of alloantigens. Those pathways are differentiated by the nature of antigen presenting cells, kinetics and duration of its influence on the formation of alloimmunity: direct, indirect and semidirect. Establishing the relationship between mechanisms of allorecognition and manifestations of graft rejection is of great clinical importance. 

  3. Molecular cloning and expression in Escherichia coli K-12 of chromosomal genes determining the O7 lipopolysaccharide antigen of a human invasive strain of E. coli O7:K1.

    OpenAIRE

    Valvano, M A; Crosa, J H

    1989-01-01

    We have cloned and studied the expression in Escherichia coli K-12 of chromosomal rfb genes determining the biosynthesis of the O7 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antigen from E. coli K1 strain VW187. Two E. coli K-12 strains carrying recombinant cosmids gave positive coagglutination reactions with protein A-rich staphylococcal particles bearing an O7-specific rabbit polyclonal antiserum. Silver-stained polyacrylamide gels of total membranes extracted with hot phenol showed O side chain material whi...

  4. Antigen-specific immune reactions to ischemic stroke

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    Xabier eUrra

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Brain proteins are detected in the CSF and blood of stroke patients and their concentration is related to the extent of brain damage. Antibodies against brain antigens develop after stroke, suggesting a humoral immune response to the brain injury. Furthermore, induced immune tolerance is beneficial in animal models of cerebral ischemia. The presence of circulating T cells sensitized against brain antigens, and antigen presenting cells (APCs carrying brain antigens in draining lymphoid tissue of stroke patients support the notion that stroke might induce antigen-specific immune responses. After stroke, brain proteins that are normally hidden from the periphery, inflammatory mediators, and danger signals can exit the brain through several efflux routes. They can reach the blood after leaking out of the damaged blood-brain barrier or following the drainage of interstitial fluid to the dural venous sinus, or reach the cervical lymph nodes through the nasal lymphatics following CSF drainage along the arachnoid sheaths of nerves across the nasal submucosa. The route and mode of access of brain antigens to lymphoid tissue could influence the type of response. Central and peripheral tolerance prevents autoimmunity, but the actual mechanisms of tolerance to brain antigens released into the periphery in the presence of inflammation, danger signals, and APCs, are not fully characterized. Stroke does not systematically trigger autoimmunity, but under certain circumstances, such as pronounced systemic inflammation or infection, autoreactive T cells could escape the tolerance controls. Further investigation is needed to elucidate whether antigen-specific immune events could underlie neurological complications impairing stroke outcome.

  5. Trypanosoma cruzi as an effective cancer antigen delivery vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Caroline; Santos, Luara I; Galvão-Filho, Bruno; Teixeira, Santuza M; Rodrigues, Flávia G; DaRocha, Wanderson D; Chiari, Egler; Jungbluth, Achim A; Ritter, Gerd; Gnjatic, Sacha; Old, Lloyd J; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T

    2011-12-01

    One of the main challenges in cancer research is the development of vaccines that induce effective and long-lived protective immunity against tumors. Significant progress has been made in identifying members of the cancer testis antigen family as potential vaccine candidates. However, an ideal form for antigen delivery that induces robust and sustainable antigen-specific T-cell responses, and in particular of CD8(+) T lymphocytes, remains to be developed. Here we report the use of a recombinant nonpathogenic clone of Trypanosoma cruzi as a vaccine vector to induce vigorous and long-term T cell-mediated immunity. The rationale for using the highly attenuated T. cruzi clone was (i) the ability of the parasite to persist in host tissues and therefore to induce a long-term antigen-specific immune response; (ii) the existence of intrinsic parasite agonists for Toll-like receptors and consequent induction of highly polarized T helper cell type 1 responses; and (iii) the parasite replication in the host cell cytoplasm, leading to direct antigen presentation through the endogenous pathway and consequent induction of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells. Importantly, we found that parasites expressing a cancer testis antigen (NY-ESO-1) were able to elicit human antigen-specific T-cell responses in vitro and solid protection against melanoma in a mouse model. Furthermore, in a therapeutic protocol, the parasites expressing NY-ESO-1 delayed the rate of tumor development in mice. We conclude that the T. cruzi vector is highly efficient in inducing T cell-mediated immunity and protection against cancer cells. More broadly, this strategy could be used to elicit a long-term T cell-mediated immunity and used for prophylaxis or therapy of chronic infectious diseases.

  6. Internalization and presentation of myelin antigens by the brain endothelium guides antigen-specific T cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes Pinheiro, Melissa A; Kamermans, Alwin; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J; van het Hof, Bert; Wierts, Laura; O'Toole, Tom; Boeve, Daniël; Verstege, Marleen; van der Pol, Susanne MA; van Kooyk, Yvette; de Vries, Helga E; Unger, Wendy WJ

    2016-01-01

    Trafficking of myelin-reactive CD4+ T-cells across the brain endothelium, an essential step in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), is suggested to be an antigen-specific process, yet which cells provide this signal is unknown. Here we provide direct evidence that under inflammatory conditions, brain endothelial cells (BECs) stimulate the migration of myelin-reactive CD4+ T-cells by acting as non-professional antigen presenting cells through the processing and presentation of myelin-derived antigens in MHC-II. Inflamed BECs internalized myelin, which was routed to endo-lysosomal compartment for processing in a time-dependent manner. Moreover, myelin/MHC-II complexes on inflamed BECs stimulated the trans-endothelial migration of myelin-reactive Th1 and Th17 2D2 cells, while control antigen loaded BECs did not stimulate T-cell migration. Furthermore, blocking the interaction between myelin/MHC-II complexes and myelin-reactive T-cells prevented T-cell transmigration. These results demonstrate that endothelial cells derived from the brain are capable of enhancing antigen-specific T cell recruitment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13149.001 PMID:27336724

  7. Repeated BCG treatment of mouse bladder selectively stimulates small GTPases and HLA antigens and inhibits single-spanning uroplakins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Donnell Michael A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite being a mainstay for treating superficial bladder carcinoma and a promising agent for interstitial cystitis, the precise mechanism of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG remains poorly understood. It is particularly unclear whether BCG is capable of altering gene expression beyond its well-recognized pro-inflammatory effects and how this relates to its therapeutic efficacy. The objective of this study was to determine differentially expressed genes in the mouse bladder following repeated intravesical BCG therapy. Methods Mice were transurethrally instilled with BCG or pyrogen-free on days 1, 7, 14, and 21. Seven days after the last instillation, urothelia along with the submucosa was removed and amplified ds-DNA was prepared from control- and BCG-treated bladder mucosa and used to generate suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH. Plasmids from control- and BCG-specific differentially expressed clones and confirmed by Virtual Northern were then purified and the inserts were sequenced and annotated. Finally, chromatin immune precipitation combined with real-time polymerase chain reaction assay (ChIP/Q-PCR was used to validate SSH-selected transcripts. Results Repeated intravesical BCG treatment induced an up regulation of genes associated with antigen presentation (B2M, HLA-A, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB2, HLA-E, HLA-G, IGHG, and IGH and representatives of two IFNγ-induced small GTPase families: the GBPs (GBP1, GBP2, and GBP5 and the p47GTPases (IIGTP1, IIGTP2, and TGTP. Genes expressed in saline-treated bladders but down-regulated by BCG included: the single-spanning uroplakins (UPK3a and UPK2, SPRR2G, GSTM5, and RSP 19. Conclusion Here we introduced a hypothesis-generator approach to determine key genes involved in the urothelium/sumbmucosa responses to BCG therapy. Urinary bladder responds to repeated BCG treatment by up-regulating not only antigen presentation-related genes, but also GBP and p47 small GTPases, both potentially

  8. Hybrid human immunodeficiency virus Gag particles as an antigen carrier system: induction of cytotoxic T-cell and humoral responses by a Gag:V3 fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, J C; Harris, S J; Layton, G T; Berrie, E L; French, T J; Burns, N R; Adams, S E; Kingsman, A J

    1993-06-01

    In attempts to increase the immunogenicity of recombinant antigens, a number of particulate antigen presentation systems have been developed. In this study, we used human immunodeficiency virus Gag particles as carriers for the human immunodeficiency virus envelope V3 region. Gag:V3 fusion proteins were expressed from baculovirus expression vectors; they migrated to the insect cell membrane and budded from the cells as hybrid particles. An immunization study carried out with rats showed that the particles elicited a strong anti-Gag antibody response and a weak antibody response to the V3 region. A strong anti-V3 cytolytic T-cell response was elicited in immunized mice. These data show that retroviral Gag particles can be used as antigen presentation vehicles. PMID:8497047

  9. Determinants of variant surface antigen antibody response in severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria in an area of low and unstable malaria transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A-Elgadir, T M E; Theander, T G; Elghazali, G;

    2006-01-01

    The variant surface antigens (VSA) of infected erythrocytes are important pathogenic markers, a set of variants (VSA(SM)), were assumed to be associated with severe malaria (SM), while SM constitutes clinically diverse forms, such as, severe malarial anemia (SMA) and cerebral malaria (CM). This s...

  10. Macrophages transfer antigens to dendritic cells by releasing exosomes containing dead-cell-associated antigens partially through a ceramide-dependent pathway to enhance CD4(+) T-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yingping; Liu, Yi; Yang, Chunqing; Kang, Li; Wang, Meixiang; Hu, Jingxia; He, Hao; Song, Wengang; Tang, Hua

    2016-10-01

    Defects in rapid clearance of apoptotic cells lead to an accumulation of dead cells (late apoptotic or secondary necrotic cells), which results in an aberrant immune response. However, little is known about whether and how macrophages (Mφs) cooperate with dendritic cells (DCs) in the presentation of dead-cell-associated antigens in this process. By transferring high numbers of dead cells to mimic a failure of apoptotic cell clearance in vivo, we found that Mφs and neutrophils were the predominant phagocytes in the uptake of dead cells in the spleen. Moreover, both Mφs and DCs were required for an optimal CD4(+) T-cell response triggered by dead-cell-associated antigens. Importantly, although Mφs alone had a poor capacity for antigen presentation, they could transfer phagocytosed antigens to DCs for potent antigen presentation to enhance T-cell responses. Finally, we found that exosomes released from Mφs acted as a transmitter to convey antigens to DCs partially in a ceramide-dependent manner, since treatment with the neutral sphingomyelinase inhibitor GW4869 and spiroepoxide resulted in a significant reduction of T-cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. These findings point to a novel pathway of cross-talk between Mφs and DCs, which will be helpful to explain possible mechanisms for autoimmune diseases characterized by increased rates of apoptosis.

  11. Reactivity of Monoclonal Antibodies Directed against Lung Cancer Antigens with Human Lung, Breast and Colon Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udo Schumacher

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A panel of monoclonal antibodies (n=72 including controls directed against lung cancer antigens was screened immunohistochemically against a panel of seven human lung cancer cell lines (including small cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma and mesothelioma, six human breast cancer cell lines and one human colon cancer cell line, The majority of the antibodies (n=42 reacted also with antigens present on breast and colon cancer cell lines, This cross reactivity especially between lung and breast cancer cell lines is not altogether unexpected since antigens common to breast and lung tissue including their neoplasms such as MUC1 antigen have been described, Our results indicate that epitopes shared by lung and breast cancers are probably more common than previously thought. The relevance for prognosis and therapy of these shared antigens, especially as disease markers in breast cancer, has to be investigated.

  12. Efficient induction of CD25- iTreg by co-immunization requires strongly antigenic epitopes for T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jinyao

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously showed that co-immunization with a protein antigen and a DNA vaccine coding for the same antigen induces CD40low IL-10high tolerogenic DCs, which in turn stimulates the expansion of antigen-specific CD4+CD25-Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (CD25- iTreg. However, it was unclear how to choose the antigen sequence to maximize tolerogenic antigen presentation and, consequently, CD25- iTreg induction. Results In the present study, we demonstrated the requirement of highly antigenic epitopes for CD25- iTreg induction. Firstly, we showed that the induction of CD25- iTreg by tolerogenic DC can be blocked by anti-MHC-II antibody. Next, both the number and the suppressive activity of CD25- iTreg correlated positively with the overt antigenicity of an epitope to activate T cells. Finally, in a mouse model of dermatitis, highly antigenic epitopes derived from a flea allergen not only induced more CD25- iTreg, but also more effectively prevented allergenic reaction to the allergen than did weakly antigenic epitopes. Conclusions Our data thus indicate that efficient induction of CD25- iTreg requires highly antigenic peptide epitopes. This finding suggests that highly antigenic epitopes should be used for efficient induction of CD25- iTreg for clinical applications such as flea allergic dermatitis.

  13. Autoantibodies in autoimmune thyroid disease promote immune complex formation with self antigens and increase B cell and CD4+ T cell proliferation in response to self antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Leslie, Robert Graham Quinton

    2004-01-01

    B cells are centrally involved as antigen-presenting cells in certain autoimmune diseases. To establish whether autoantibodies form immune complexes (IC) with self-antigens in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and promote B cell uptake of self-antigen, sera from patients with Hashimoto......'s thyroiditis (HT), Graves' disease (GD) and healthy controls were incubated with human thyroglobulin (Tg) before adding normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The deposition of immunoglobulins and C3 fragments on B cells was then assessed. Inclusion of Tg in serum from HT patients promoted B cell capture...... of IgG and C3 fragments. Furthermore, the binding of Tg to B cells in preparations of normal blood cells was higher in HT serum than in serum from controls and correlated positively with the serum anti-Tg activity, as did the B and CD4+ T cell proliferation. Disruption of the three-dimensional structure...

  14. Non-covalent pomegranate (Punica granatum) hydrolyzable tannin-protein complexes modulate antigen uptake, processing and presentation by a T-cell hybridoma line co-cultured with murine peritoneal macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrigal-Carballo, Sergio; Haas, Linda; Vestling, Martha; Krueger, Christian G; Reed, Jess D

    2016-12-01

    In this work we characterize the interaction of pomegranate hydrolyzable tannins (HT) with hen egg-white lysozyme (HEL) and determine the effects of non-covalent tannin-protein complexes on macrophage endocytosis, processing and presentation of antigen. We isolated HT from pomegranate and complex to HEL, the resulting non-covalent tannin-protein complex was characterized by gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF MS. Finally, cell culture studies and confocal microscopy imaging were conducted on the non-covalent pomegranate HT-HEL protein complexes to evaluate its effect on macrophage antigen uptake, processing and presentation to T-cell hybridomas. Our results indicate that non-covalent pomegranate HT-HEL protein complexes modulate uptake, processing and antigen presentation by mouse peritoneal macrophages. After 4 h of pre-incubation, only trace amounts of IL-2 were detected in the co-cultures treated with HEL alone, whereas a non-covalent pomegranate HT-HEL complex had already reached maximum IL-2 expression. Pomegranate HT may increase rate of endocytose of HEL and subsequent expression of IL-2 by the T-cell hybridomas. PMID:27406472

  15. Characterization of highly frequent epitope-specific CD45RA+/CCR7+/- T lymphocyte responses against p53-binding domains of the human polyomavirus BK large tumor antigen in HLA-A*0201+ BKV-seropositive donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zajac Paul

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human polyomavirus BK (BKV has been implicated in oncogenic transformation. Its ability to replicate is determined by the binding of its large tumor antigen (LTag to products of tumor-suppressor genes regulating cell cycle, as specifically p53. We investigated CD8+ T immune responses to BKV LTag portions involved in p53 binding in HLA-A*0201+ BKV LTag experienced individuals. Peptides selected from either p53-binding region (LTag351–450 and LTag533–626 by current algorithms and capacity to bind HLA-A*0201 molecule were used to stimulate CD8+ T responses, as assessed by IFN-γ gene expression ex vivo and detected by cytotoxicity assays following in vitro culture. We observed epitope-specific immune responses in all HLA-A*0201+ BKV LTag experienced individuals tested. At least one epitope, LTag579–587; LLLIWFRPV, was naturally processed in non professional antigen presenting cells and induced cytotoxic responses with CTL precursor frequencies in the order of 1/20'000. Antigen specific CD8+ T cells were only detectable in the CD45RA+ subset, in both CCR7+ and CCR7- subpopulations. These data indicate that widespread cellular immune responses against epitopes within BKV LTag-p53 binding regions exist and question their roles in immunosurveillance against tumors possibly associated with BKV infection.

  16. Histocompatibility antigen test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more common in certain autoimmune diseases . For example, HLA-B27 antigen is found in many people (but not ... More Ankylosing spondylitis Autoimmune disorders Bone marrow transplant HLA-B27 antigen Kidney transplant Reactive arthritis Update Date 2/ ...

  17. Prevalence of antibody to hantaviruses in humans and rodents in the Caribbean region of Colombia determined using Araraquara and Maciel virus antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Guzmán

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We tested sera from 286 agricultural workers and 322 rodents in the department of Córdoba, northeastern Colombia, for antibodies against two hantaviruses. The sera were analysed by indirect ELISA using the lysate of Vero E6 cells infected with Maciel virus (MACV or the N protein of Araraquara virus (ARAV as antigens for the detection of antibodies against hantaviruses. Twenty-four human sera were IgG positive using one or both antigens. We detected anti-MACV IgG antibodies in 10 sera (3.5% and anti-ARAV antibodies in 21 sera (7.34%. Of the 10 samples that were positive for MACV, seven (70% were cross-reactive with ARAV; seven of the 21 ARAV-positive samples were cross-reactive with MACV. Using an ARAV IgM ELISA, two of the 24 human sera (8.4% were positive. We captured 322 rodents, including 210 Cricetidae (181 Zygodontomys brevicauda, 28 Oligoryzomys fulvescens and 1 Oecomys trinitatis, six Heteromys anomalus (Heteromyidae, one Proechimys sp. (Echimyidae and 105 Muridae (34 Rattus rattus and 71 Mus musculus. All rodent sera were negative for both antigens. The 8.4% detection rate of hantavirus antibodies in humans is much higher than previously found in serosurveys in North America, suggesting that rural agricultural workers in northeastern Colombia are frequently exposed to hantaviruses. Our results also indicate that tests conducted with South American hantavirus antigens could have predictive value and could represent a useful alternative for the diagnosis of hantavirus infection in Colombia.

  18. A Review of Intra- and Extracellular Antigen Delivery Systems for Virus Vaccines of Finfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munang'andu, Hetron Mweemba; Evensen, Øystein

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine efficacy in aquaculture has for a long time depended on evaluating relative percent survival and antibody responses after vaccination. However, current advances in vaccine immunology show that the route in which antigens are delivered into cells is deterministic of the type of adaptive immune response evoked by vaccination. Antigens delivered by the intracellular route induce MHC-I restricted CD8+ responses while antigens presented through the extracellular route activate MHC-II restricted CD4+ responses implying that the route of antigen delivery is a conduit to induction of B- or T-cell immune responses. In finfish, different antigen delivery systems have been explored that include live, DNA, inactivated whole virus, fusion protein, virus-like particles, and subunit vaccines although mechanisms linking these delivery systems to protective immunity have not been studied in detail. Hence, in this review we provide a synopsis of different strategies used to administer viral antigens via the intra- or extracellular compartments. Further, we highlight the differences in immune responses induced by antigens processed by the endogenous route compared to exogenously processed antigens. Overall, we anticipate that the synopsis put together in this review will shed insights into limitations and successes of the current vaccination strategies used in finfish vaccinology.

  19. A Review of Intra- and Extracellular Antigen Delivery Systems for Virus Vaccines of Finfish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hetron Mweemba Munang’andu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine efficacy in aquaculture has for a long time depended on evaluating relative percent survival and antibody responses after vaccination. However, current advances in vaccine immunology show that the route in which antigens are delivered into cells is deterministic of the type of adaptive immune response evoked by vaccination. Antigens delivered by the intracellular route induce MHC-I restricted CD8+ responses while antigens presented through the extracellular route activate MHC-II restricted CD4+ responses implying that the route of antigen delivery is a conduit to induction of B- or T-cell immune responses. In finfish, different antigen delivery systems have been explored that include live, DNA, inactivated whole virus, fusion protein, virus-like particles, and subunit vaccines although mechanisms linking these delivery systems to protective immunity have not been studied in detail. Hence, in this review we provide a synopsis of different strategies used to administer viral antigens via the intra- or extracellular compartments. Further, we highlight the differences in immune responses induced by antigens processed by the endogenous route compared to exogenously processed antigens. Overall, we anticipate that the synopsis put together in this review will shed insights into limitations and successes of the current vaccination strategies used in finfish vaccinology.

  20. Cytotoxic-T-Lymphocyte Antigen 4 Receptor Signaling for Lymphocyte Adhesion Is Mediated by C3G and Rap1

    OpenAIRE

    Kloog, Yoel; Mor, Adam

    2014-01-01

    T-lymphocyte adhesion plays a critical role in both inflammatory and autoimmune responses. The small GTPase Rap1 is the key coordinator mediating T-cell adhesion to endothelial cells, antigen-presenting cells, and virus-infected cells. We describe a signaling pathway, downstream of the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) receptor, leading to Rap1-mediated adhesion. We identified a role for the Rap1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor C3G in the regulation of T-cell adhesion and showed th...

  1. CD4+ T cell-mediated presentation of non-infectious HIV-1virion antigens to HIV-specific CD8+ T cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jian-qing; Franco Lori; Julianna Lisziewicz

    2006-01-01

    Background The mechanism of chronic immune activation and impairment of HIV-specific immune responses during chronic infection is not fully understood. However, it is known that high immune activation leads to more rapid progression to AIDS. We hypothesize that CD4+ T cell-mediated viral antigen presentation contributes to this pathologic immune activation in HIV-infected individuals.Methods HIV-specific T cells, responding to noninfectious HIV-1 virions as antigen, were measured by flow cytometric assays. These experimental conditions reflect the in vivo condition where noninfectious HIV-1 represents more than 99% of the antigens.Results CD4+ T cells purified from HIV-infected individuals were capable of cross presenting exogenous noninfectious HIV-1 virions to HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells. Cross presentation required the entry of HIV-1 to CD4+ T cells and antigen translocation from endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex. Blocking CD4+mediated activation of HIV-specific CD8+ T cells and redirecting the viral antigens to antigen presenting cells improved HIV-specific T cell responses.Conclusions One possible cause of chronic immune activation and impairment of HIV-1 specific T cell responses is represented by HIV-1 harboring CD4+ T cells cross presenting HIV-1 antigen to activate CD8+ T cells. This new mechanism provides the first evidence that cross presentation of noninfectious HIV-1. Virions play a role in the immunopathogenesis of HIV-1 infection.

  2. Antigen antibody interactions

    CERN Document Server

    DeLisi, Charles

    1976-01-01

    1. 1 Organization of the Immune System One of the most important survival mechanisms of vertebrates is their ability to recognize and respond to the onslaught of pathogenic microbes to which they are conti- ously exposed. The collection of host cells and molecules involved in this recognition­ 12 response function constitutes its immune system. In man, it comprises about 10 cells 20 (lymphocytes) and 10 molecules (immunoglobulins). Its ontogenic development is c- strained by the requirement that it be capable of responding to an almost limitless variety of molecular configurations on foreign substances, while simultaneously remaining inert to those on self components. It has thus evolved to discriminate, with exquisite precision, between molecular patterns. The foreign substances which induce a response, called antigens, are typically large molecules such as proteins and polysaccharides. The portions of these with which immunoglobulins interact are called epitopes or determinants. A typical protein epitope m...

  3. Determination of carcinoembryonic antigen using a novel amperometric enzyme-electrode based on layer-by-layer assembly of gold nanoparticles and thionine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Ruo; ZHUO Ying; CHAI YaQin; ZHANG Ying; SUN AiLi

    2007-01-01

    Electrochemical sensing of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) on a gold electrode modified by the sequential incorporation of the mediator, thionine (Thi), and gold nanoparticles (nano-Au), through covalent linkage and electrostatic interactions onto a self-assembled monolayer configuration is described in this paper. The enzyme, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), was employed to block the possible remaining active sites of the nano-Au monolayer, avoid the non-specific adsorption, instead of bovine serum albumin (BSA), and amplify the response of the antigen-antibody reaction. Electrochemical experiments indicated highly efficient electron transfer by the imbedded Thi mediator and adsorbed nano-Au. The HRP kept its activity after immobilization, and the studied electrode showed sensitive response to CEA and high stability during a long period of storage. The working range for the system was 2.5 to 80.0 ng/mL with a detection limit of 0.90 ng/mL. The model membrane system in this work is a potential biosensor for mimicking the other immunosensor and enzyme sensor.

  4. Determination of carcinoembryonic antigen using a novel amperometric enzyme-electrode based on layer-by-layer assembly of gold nanoparticles and thionine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Electrochemical sensing of carcinoembryonic antigen(CEA)on a gold electrode modified by the se- quential incorporation of the mediator,thionine(Thi),and gold nanoparticles(nano-Au),through co- valent linkage and electrostatic interactions onto a self-assembled monolayer configuration is de- scribed in this paper.The enzyme,horseradish peroxidase(HRP),was employed to block the possible remaining active sites of the nano-Au monolayer,avoid the non-specific adsorption,instead of bovine serum albumin(BSA),and amplify the response of the antigen-antibody reaction.Electrochemical ex- periments indicated highly efficient electron transfer by the imbedded Thi mediator and adsorbed nano-Au.The HRP kept its activity after immobilization,and the studied electrode showed sensitive response to CEA and high stability during a long period of storage.The working range for the system was 2.5 to 80.0 ng/mL with a detection limit of 0.90 ng/mL.The model membrane system in this work is a potential biosensor for mimicking the other immunosensor and enzyme sensor.

  5. Diminished Memory T-Cell Expansion Due to Delayed Kinetics of Antigen Expression by Lentivectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Furmanov

    Full Text Available Memory CD8(+ T lymphocytes play a central role in protective immunity. In attempt to increase the frequencies of memory CD8(+ T cells, repeated immunizations with viral vectors are regularly explored. Lentivectors have emerged as a powerful vaccine modality with relatively low pre-existing and anti-vector immunity, thus, thought to be ideal for boosting memory T cells. Nevertheless, we found that lentivectors elicited diminished secondary T-cell responses that did not exceed those obtained by priming. This was not due to the presence of anti-vector immunity, as limited secondary responses were also observed following heterologous prime-boost immunizations. By dissecting the mechanisms involved in this process, we demonstrate that lentivectors trigger exceptionally slow kinetics of antigen expression, while optimal activation of lentivector-induced T cells relays on durable expression of the antigen. These qualities hamper secondary responses, since lentivector-encoded antigen is rapidly cleared by primary cytotoxic T cells that limit its presentation by dendritic cells. Indeed, blocking antigen clearance by cytotoxic T cells via FTY720 treatment, fully restored antigen presentation. Taken together, while low antigen expression is expected during secondary immunization with any vaccine vector, our results reveal that the intrinsic delayed expression kinetics of lentiviral-encoded antigen, further dampens secondary CD8(+ T-cell expansion.

  6. [Detection of T-antigen in colorectal adenocarcinoma and polyps].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S; Lu, Y; Wang, Q

    1995-10-01

    Galactose oxidase method was employed to detect the beta-D-Gal (1-->3) -D-Gal NAc residue of T-antigen present in the large intestinal mucus of 156 subjects. The positive rates of the test were 84.4%, 29.1%, and 7.2% in the mucus samples obtained from 32 patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas, 55 with polyps and 69 controls respectively. Chi-square test demonstrated that there were significant differences between the group of carcinoma and control (P < 0.001) as well as between also polyp and control (P < 0.01). The test had a high sensitivity (84.4%) and specificity (92.8%) in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer and may be used as a practical mass screening test for colorectal neoplasms.

  7. [Detection of T-antigen in colorectal adenocarcinoma and polyps].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S; Lu, Y; Wang, Q

    1995-10-01

    Galactose oxidase method was employed to detect the beta-D-Gal (1-->3) -D-Gal NAc residue of T-antigen present in the large intestinal mucus of 156 subjects. The positive rates of the test were 84.4%, 29.1%, and 7.2% in the mucus samples obtained from 32 patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas, 55 with polyps and 69 controls respectively. Chi-square test demonstrated that there were significant differences between the group of carcinoma and control (P < 0.001) as well as between also polyp and control (P < 0.01). The test had a high sensitivity (84.4%) and specificity (92.8%) in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer and may be used as a practical mass screening test for colorectal neoplasms. PMID:8731834

  8. Molecular characterization of antigen-peptide pulsed dendritic cells: immature dendritic cells develop a distinct molecular profile when pulsed with antigen peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy X Yang

    Full Text Available As dendritic cells (DCs are the most potent professional antigen-presenting cells, they are being tested as cancer vaccines for immunotherapy of established cancers. Although numerous studies have characterized DCs by their phenotype and function, few have identified potential molecular markers of antigen presentation prior to vaccination of host. In this study we generated pre-immature DC (piDC, immature DC (iDC, and mature DC (mDC from human peripheral blood monocytes (PBMC obtained from HLA-A2 healthy donors, and pulsed them with human papillomavirus E7 peptide (p11-20, a class I HLA-A2 binding antigen. We then characterized DCs for cell surface phenotype and gene expression profile by microarray technology. We identified a set of 59 genes that distinguished three differentiation stages of DCs (piDC, iDC and mDC. When piDC, iDC and mDC were pulsed with E7 peptide for 2 hrs, the surface phenotype did not change, however, iDCs rather than mDCs showed transcriptional response by up-regulation of a set of genes. A total of 52 genes were modulated in iDC upon antigen pulsing. Elongation of pulse time for iDCs to 10 and 24 hrs did not significantly bring further changes in gene expression. The E7 peptide up-modulated immune response (KPNA7, IGSF6, NCR3, TREM2, TUBAL3, IL8, NFKBIA, pro-apoptosis (BTG1, SEMA6A, IGFBP3 and SRGN, anti-apoptosis (NFKBIA, DNA repair (MRPS11, RAD21, TXNRD1, and cell adhesion and cell migration genes (EPHA1, PGF, IL8 and CYR61 in iDCs. We confirmed our results by Q-PCR analysis. The E7 peptide but not control peptide (PADRE induced up-regulation of NFKB1A gene only in HLA-A2 positive iDCs and not in HLA-A2 negative iDCs. These results suggest that E7 up-regulation of genes is specific and HLA restricted and that these genes may represent markers of antigen presentation and help rapidly assess the quality of dendritic cells prior to administration to the host.

  9. The Hidden Conformation of Lewis x, a Human Histo-Blood Group Antigen, Is a Determinant for Recognition by Pathogen Lectins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topin, Jérémie; Lelimousin, Mickaël; Arnaud, Julie; Audfray, Aymeric; Pérez, Serge; Varrot, Annabelle; Imberty, Anne

    2016-07-15

    Histo-blood group epitopes are fucosylated branched oligosaccharides with well-defined conformations in solution that are recognized by receptors, such as lectins from pathogens. We report here the results of a series of experimental and computational endeavors revealing the unusual distortion of histo-blood group antigens by bacterial and fungal lectins. The Lewis x trisaccharide adopts a rigid closed conformation in solution, while crystallography and molecular dynamics reveal several higher energy open conformations when bound to the Ralstonia solanacearum lectin, which is in agreement with thermodynamic and kinetic measurements. Extensive molecular dynamics simulations confirm rare transient Le(x) openings in solution, frequently assisted by distortion of the central N-acetyl-glucosamine ring. Additional directed molecular dynamic trajectories revealed the role of a conserved tryptophan residue in guiding the fucose into the binding site. Our findings show that conformational adaptation of oligosaccharides is of paramount importance in cell recognition and should be considered when designing anti-infective glyco-compounds. PMID:27198630

  10. Early quantification of HCV core antigen may help to determine the duration of therapy for chronic genotype 2 or 3 HCV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsiö, A; Jannesson, A; Langeland, N;

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the utility of hepatitis C virus (HCV) core antigen (coreAg) assessment for the identification of candidates for short-term therapy. Plasma samples from HCV genotype 2 or 3-infected patients participating in the NORDynamIC trial (n = 382) comparing 12...... and 24 weeks of combination treatment with pegylated interferon-α2a and a fixed dose of 800 mg ribavirin daily were analyzed for coreAg. Among the 126 patients (33% of the intention-to-treat population) achieving HCV coreAg levels in plasma below 0.2 pg/mL when assayed on treatment day 3, sustained viral...... were 89% and 95%, respectively. Twelve weeks of combination treatment may be sufficient for genotype 2 or 3-infected patients achieving HCV coreAg levels below 0.2 pg/mL by day 3, signaling a rapid clearance of HCV viremia....

  11. Dendritic cells cross-present HIV antigens from live as well as apoptotic infected CD4+ T lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marañón, Concepción; Desoutter, Jean-François; Hoeffel, Guillaume; Cohen, William; Hanau, Daniel; Hosmalin, Anne

    2004-04-01

    A better understanding of the antigen presentation pathways that lead to CD8+ T cell recognition of HIV epitopes in vivo is needed to achieve better immune control of HIV replication. Here, we show that cross-presentation of very small amounts of HIV proteins from apoptotic infected CD4+ T lymphocytes by dendritic cells to CD8+ T cells is much more efficient than other known HIV presentation pathways, i.e., direct presentation of infectious virus or cross-presentation of defective virus. Unexpectedly, dendritic cells also take up actively antigens into endosomes from live infected CD4+ T lymphocytes and cross-present them as efficiently as antigens derived from apoptotic infected cells. Moreover, live infected CD4+ T cells costimulate cross-presenting dendritic cells in the process. Therefore, dendritic cells can present very small amounts of viral proteins from infected T cells either after apoptosis, which is frequent during HIV infection, or not. Thus, if HIV expression is transiently induced while costimulation is enhanced (for instance after IL-2 and IFN immune therapy), this HIV antigen presentation pathway could be exploited to eradicate latently infected reservoirs, which are poorly recognized by patients' immune systems.

  12. Antigen-Specific Th17 Cells Are Primed by Distinct and Complementary Dendritic Cell Subsets in Oropharyngeal Candidiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Trautwein-Weidner

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Candida spp. can cause severe and chronic mucocutaneous and systemic infections in immunocompromised individuals. Protection from mucocutaneous candidiasis depends on T helper cells, in particular those secreting IL-17. The events regulating T cell activation and differentiation toward effector fates in response to fungal invasion in different tissues are poorly understood. Here we generated a Candida-specific TCR transgenic mouse reactive to a novel endogenous antigen that is conserved in multiple distant species of Candida, including the clinically highly relevant C. albicans and C. glabrata. Using TCR transgenic T cells in combination with an experimental model of oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC we investigated antigen presentation and Th17 priming by different subsets of dendritic cells (DCs present in the infected oral mucosa. Candida-derived endogenous antigen accesses the draining lymph nodes and is directly presented by migratory DCs. Tissue-resident Flt3L-dependent DCs and CCR2-dependent monocyte-derived DCs collaborate in antigen presentation and T cell priming during OPC. In contrast, Langerhans cells, which are also present in the oral mucosa and have been shown to prime Th17 cells in the skin, are not required for induction of the Candida-specific T cell response upon oral challenge. This highlights the functional compartmentalization of specific DC subsets in different tissues. These data provide important new insights to our understanding of tissue-specific antifungal immunity.

  13. Subdominant H60 antigen-specific CD8 T-cell response precedes dominant H4 antigen-specific response during the initial phase of allogenic skin graft rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Kang Il; Jeon, Ji Yeong; Ryu, Su Jeong; Nam, Giri; Youn, Hyewon; Choi, Eun Young

    2015-02-13

    In allogeneic transplantation, including the B6 anti-BALB.B settings, H60 and H4 are two representative dominant minor histocompatibility antigens that induce strong CD8 T-cell responses. With different distribution patterns, H60 expression is restricted to hematopoietic cells, whereas H4 is ubiquitously expressed. H60-specific CD8 T-cell response has been known to be dominant in most cases of B6 anti-BALB.B allo-responses, except in the case of skin transplantation. To understand the mechanism underlying the subdominance of H60 during allogeneic skin transplantation, we investigated the dynamics of the H60-specific CD8 T cells in B6 mice transplanted with allogeneic BALB.B tail skin. Unexpectedly, longitudinal bioluminescence imaging and flow cytometric analyses revealed that H60-specific CD8 T cells were not always subdominant to H4-specific cells but instead showed a brief dominance before the H4 response became predominant. H60-specific CD8 T cells could expand in the draining lymph node and migrate to the BALB.B allografts, indicating their active participation in the anti-BALB.B allo-response. Enhancing the frequencies of H60-reactive CD8 T cells prior to skin transplantation reversed the immune hierarchy between H60 and H4. Additionally, H60 became predominant when antigen presentation was limited to the direct pathway. However, when antigen presentation was restricted to the indirect pathway, the expansion of H60-specific CD8 T cells was limited, whereas H4-specific CD8 T cells expanded significantly, suggesting that the temporary immunodominance and eventual subdominance of H60 could be due to their reliance on the direct antigen presentation pathway. These results enhance our understanding of the immunodominance phenomenon following allogeneic tissue transplantation.

  14. The intensity of T cell receptor engagement determines the cytokine pattern of human allergen-specific T helper cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballido, J M; Faith, A; Carballido-Perrig, N; Blaser, K

    1997-02-01

    Enhanced production of T helper (Th)2 cytokines by allergen-specific Th cells plays a major role in the induction and maintenance of IgE-mediated allergic disorders. The mechanism that triggers this type of response in atopic individuals is not fully understood. Allergen-specific human Th cell clones produce interleukin (IL)-4 and low or undetectable levels of interferon (IFN)-gamma after stimulation with low concentrations of antigen. However, these Th cell clones are capable of generating significant amounts of IFN-gamma after optimal activation through their T cell receptor (TcR). Allergen-specific Th cell clones isolated from allergic individuals required higher doses of antigen to reach the plateau of proliferation and to generate Th0 cytokine responses than their counterparts isolated from nonallergic subjects. On the other hand, if allergen was replaced by anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb), both allergic and nonallergic Th cell clones attained the highest level of proliferation and significant IFN-gamma production in response to equivalent concentrations of anti-CD3 mAb. These results indicate that the strength of T cell ligation, which can be modulated by the availability of the TcR ligand, controls the balance of Thl/Th2 cytokines produced by memory Th cells in vitro. In the particular case of bee venom phospholipase A2, it is shown that the expression of allergen-specific surface Ig on antigen-presenting B cells has little influence on antigen uptake and therefore in determining the levels of T cell activation and cytokine production. Alternatively, the affinity of particular major histocompatibility complex class II molecules on antigen-presenting cells for allergen-derived peptides might determine the amount of specific ligand presented to the Th cells and play a decisive role skewing the Th cell cytokine production towards Th1 or Th2 phenotypes. These findings, which are consistent with the changes in cytokine patterns observed following clinical

  15. Common antigens of streptococcal and non-streptococcal oral bacteria: immunochemical studies of extracellular and cell-wall-associated antigens from Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus salivarius, and Actinomyces viscosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöller, M; Klein, J P; Frank, R M

    1981-01-01

    Soluble extracellular antigens (ESA) were prepared from the culture supernatant of exponential growing cells of Streptococcus sanguis OMZ 9 by a combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation and chromatography on a Bio-Gel P6 column. Soluble cell wall antigens (WEA) were obtained from the bacterial pellet by extraction with 1 M phosphate buffer (pH 6). Antisera against whole cells of S. sanguis and S. mutans of different serotypes, 10% trichloroacetic extracts of bacterial cell walls, dextran, ESA, and WEA were prepared by injecting the different antigens several times in rabbits. ESA and WEA were prepared from a representative strain of Bratthall's seven serological groups, Lactobacillus salivarius, and Actinomyces viscosus. All sera showed various agglutinin titers against heat-killed cells, and titers were generally higher with homologous cells. The comparison of the different antigens using agar gel diffusion and immunoelectrophoresis showed the presence of extracellular common antigens in both ESA and WEA between the different strains. Absorption of anti-ESA sera with WEA, and anti-WEA sera with ESA, showed the existence of a specific antigen common to all bacteria in each fraction. Enzymatic treatment of the antigen before immunodiffusion demonstrated the protein nature of the two antigens present in ESA and WEA. Images PMID:6783541

  16. Studies of the antigenicity and immunogenicity of bromelain-pretreated red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, K O; Baddams, H; Evans, A

    1977-02-01

    The effects of the proteolytic enzyme bromelain (Br) on the antigenicity and immunogenicity of sheep and mouse red blood cells (RBC) have been investigated. The results presented support the previous claim that there are antigens present on Br RBC that are not present in an exposed form on untreated RBC and that Br RBC have lost some of the antigens present on the surface of normal RBC. The susceptibility of Br RBC to osmotic lysis was very similar to that of normal RBC, implying that the modified RBC were not more fragile than normal RBC. Injection of mice with Br mouse-RBC did not increase the unusually high "background" number of cells producing IgM antibodies against Br mouse-RBC and mice did not mount delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions against Br mouse-RBC, either before or after sensitizing injections of Br mouse-RBC. However, mouse-RBC and Br mouse-RBC elicited similar antibody responses in rabbits and guinea pigs. Although mice appeared unresponsive to Br mouse-RBC injections, delayed-type hypersensitivity responses and antibody production in primary and secondary responses were of similar levels irrespective of whether sheep-RBC or Br sheep-RBC were used as immunogens. From these studies it appears that mice have B-cells producing antibodies against the "new" antigens on Br mouse-RBC, but there are no T-cells that respond to these antigens by way of "helper" activity in antibody production or by way of cell-mediated immune reactions.

  17. Discovery of T cell antigens by high-throughput screening of synthetic minigene libraries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian D Hondowicz

    Full Text Available The identification of novel T cell antigens is central to basic and translational research in autoimmunity, tumor immunology, transplant immunology, and vaccine design for infectious disease. However, current methods for T cell antigen discovery are low throughput, and fail to explore a wide range of potential antigen-receptor interactions. To overcome these limitations, we developed a method in which programmable microarrays are used to cost-effectively synthesize complex libraries of thousands of minigenes that collectively encode the content of hundreds of candidate protein targets. Minigene-derived mRNA are transfected into autologous antigen presenting cells and used to challenge complex populations of purified peripheral blood CD8+ T cells in multiplex, parallel ELISPOT assays. In this proof-of-concept study, we apply synthetic minigene screening to identify two novel pancreatic islet autoantigens targeted in a patient with Type I Diabetes. To our knowledge, this is the first successful screen of a highly complex, synthetic minigene library for identification of a T cell antigen. In principle, responses against the full protein complement of any tissue or pathogen can be assayed by this approach, suggesting that further optimization of synthetic libraries holds promise for high throughput antigen discovery.

  18. Determination of HIV status of infants born to HIV-infected mothers: A review of the diagnostic methods with special focus on the applicability of p24 antigen testing in developing countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessman, Maria J; Theilgaard, Zahra Persson; Katzenstein, Terese L

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In 2009, 2.5 million children under the age of 15 y were living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS); 370,000 were diagnosed with HIV and 260,000 died due to AIDS. More than 90% of the children infected with HIV live in sub-Saharan Africa. Most....... The p24 antigen Perkin Elmer assay currently most often used has a sensitivity of 98.8% and a specificity of 100% (infants 6 weeks of age). Larger-scale studies should be performed in resource-limited settings to confirm these findings....... children infected with HIV contract the infection in utero, during delivery, or via breast milk. This review outlines the current diagnostic methods to determine the HIV status of infants born to HIV-infected mothers. The HIV DNA and RNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests are highly accurate...

  19. Influenza A virus infection of human primary dendritic cells impairs their ability to cross-present antigen to CD8 T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Smed-Sörensen

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV infection is normally controlled by adaptive immune responses initiated by dendritic cells (DCs. We investigated the consequences of IAV infection of human primary DCs on their ability to function as antigen-presenting cells. IAV was internalized by both myeloid DCs (mDCs and plasmacytoid DCs but only mDCs supported viral replication. Although infected mDCs efficiently presented endogenous IAV antigens on MHC class II, this was not the case for presentation on MHC class I. Indeed, cross-presentation by uninfected cells of minute amounts of endocytosed, exogenous IAV was -300-fold more efficient than presentation of IAV antigens synthesized by infected cells and resulted in a statistically significant increase in expansion of IAV-specific CD8 T cells. Furthermore, IAV infection also impaired cross-presentation of other exogenous antigens, indicating that IAV infection broadly attenuates presentation on MHC class I molecules. Our results suggest that cross-presentation by uninfected mDCs is a preferred mechanism of antigen-presentation for the activation and expansion of CD8 T cells during IAV infection.

  20. Influenza A virus infection of human primary dendritic cells impairs their ability to cross-present antigen to CD8 T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smed-Sörensen, Anna; Chalouni, Cécile; Chatterjee, Bithi; Cohn, Lillian; Blattmann, Peter; Nakamura, Norihiro; Delamarre, Lélia; Mellman, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) infection is normally controlled by adaptive immune responses initiated by dendritic cells (DCs). We investigated the consequences of IAV infection of human primary DCs on their ability to function as antigen-presenting cells. IAV was internalized by both myeloid DCs (mDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs but only mDCs supported viral replication. Although infected mDCs efficiently presented endogenous IAV antigens on MHC class II, this was not the case for presentation on MHC class I. Indeed, cross-presentation by uninfected cells of minute amounts of endocytosed, exogenous IAV was -300-fold more efficient than presentation of IAV antigens synthesized by infected cells and resulted in a statistically significant increase in expansion of IAV-specific CD8 T cells. Furthermore, IAV infection also impaired cross-presentation of other exogenous antigens, indicating that IAV infection broadly attenuates presentation on MHC class I molecules. Our results suggest that cross-presentation by uninfected mDCs is a preferred mechanism of antigen-presentation for the activation and expansion of CD8 T cells during IAV infection. PMID:22412374

  1. Identifying Patient-Specific Epstein-Barr Nuclear Antigen-1 Genetic Variation and Potential Autoreactive Targets Relevant to Multiple Sclerosis Pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Tschochner

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infection represents a major environmental risk factor for multiple sclerosis (MS, with evidence of selective expansion of Epstein-Barr Nuclear Antigen-1 (EBNA1-specific CD4+ T cells that cross-recognize MS-associated myelin antigens in MS patients. HLA-DRB1*15-restricted antigen presentation also appears to determine susceptibility given its role as a dominant risk allele. In this study, we have utilised standard and next-generation sequencing techniques to investigate EBNA-1 sequence variation and its relationship to HLA-DR15 binding affinity, as well as examining potential cross-reactive immune targets within the central nervous system proteome.Sanger sequencing was performed on DNA isolated from peripheral blood samples from 73 Western Australian MS cases, without requirement for primary culture, with additional FLX 454 Roche sequencing in 23 samples to identify low-frequency variants. Patient-derived viral sequences were used to predict HLA-DRB1*1501 epitopes (NetMHCII, NetMHCIIpan and candidates were evaluated for cross recognition with human brain proteins.EBNA-1 sequence variation was limited, with no evidence of multiple viral strains and only low levels of variation identified by FLX technology (8.3% nucleotide positions at a 1% cut-off. In silico epitope mapping revealed two known HLA-DRB1*1501-restricted epitopes ('AEG': aa 481-496 and 'MVF': aa 562-577, and two putative epitopes between positions 502-543. We identified potential cross-reactive targets involving a number of major myelin antigens including experimentally confirmed HLA-DRB1*15-restricted epitopes as well as novel candidate antigens within myelin and paranodal assembly proteins that may be relevant to MS pathogenesis.This study demonstrates the feasibility of obtaining autologous EBNA-1 sequences directly from buffy coat samples, and confirms divergence of these sequences from standard laboratory strains. This approach has identified a number of

  2. Two-Photon Imaging of Lymphocyte Motility and Antigen Response in Intact Lymph Node

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mark J.; Wei, Sindy H.; Parker, Ian; Cahalan, Michael D.

    2002-06-01

    Lymphocyte motility is vital for trafficking within lymphoid organs and for initiating contact with antigen-presenting cells. Visualization of these processes has previously been limited to in vitro systems. We describe the use of two-photon laser microscopy to image the dynamic behavior of individual living lymphocytes deep within intact lymph nodes. In their native environment, T cells achieved peak velocities of more than 25 micrometers per minute, displaying a motility coefficient that is five to six times that of B cells. Antigenic challenge changed T cell trajectories from random walks to ``swarms'' and stable clusters. Real-time two-photon imaging reveals lymphocyte behaviors that are fundamental to the initiation of the immune response.

  3. Small organic compounds enhance antigen loading of class II major histocompatibility complex proteins by targeting the polymorphic P1 pocket

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höpner, Sabine; Dickhaut, Katharina; Hofstätter, Maria;

    2006-01-01

    immune responses by catalyzing the peptide loading of human class II MHC molecules HLA-DR. Here we show now that they achieve this by interacting with a defined binding site of the HLA-DR peptide receptor. Screening of a compound library revealed a set of adamantane derivatives that strongly accelerated......, transient occupation of this pocket by the organic compound stabilizes the peptide-receptive conformation permitting rapid antigen loading. This interaction appeared restricted to the larger Gly(beta86) pocket and allowed striking enhancements of T cell responses for antigens presented by these "adamantyl......Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are a key element of the cellular immune response. Encoded by the MHC they are a family of highly polymorphic peptide receptors presenting peptide antigens for the surveillance by T cells. We have shown that certain organic compounds can amplify...

  4. Cell wall anchoring of the Campylobacter antigens to Lactococcus lactis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrycja Anna Kobierecka

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is the most frequent cause of human food-borne gastroenteritis and chicken meat is the main source of infection. Recent studies showed that broiler chicken immunization against Campylobacter should be the most efficient way to lower the number of human infections by this pathogen. Induction of the mucosal immune system after oral antigen administration should provide protective immunity to chickens. In this work we tested the usefulness of Lactococcus lactis, the most extensively studied lactic acid bacterium, as a delivery vector for Campylobacter antigens. First we constructed hybrid protein – CjaA antigen presenting CjaD peptide epitopes on its surface. We showed that specific rabbit anti-rCjaAD serum reacted strongly with both CjaA and CjaD produced by a wild type Campylobacter jejuni strain. Next, rCjaAD and CjaA were fused to the C-terminus of the L. lactis YndF containing the LPTXG motif. The genes expressing these proteins were transcribed under control of the L. lactis Usp45 promoter and their products contain the Usp45 signal sequences. This strategy ensures a cell surface location of both analysed proteins, which was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay. In order to evaluate the impact of antigen location on vaccine prototype efficacy, a L. lactis strain producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD was also generated. Animal experiments showed a decrease of Campylobacter cecal load in vaccinated birds as compared with the control group and showed that the L. lactis harboring the surface-exposed rCjaAD antigen afforded greater protection than the L. lactis producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to employ LAB (Lactic Acid Bacteria strains as a mucosal delivery vehicle for chicken immunization. Although the observed reduction of chicken colonization by Campylobacter resulting from vaccination was rather moderate, the experiments showed that LAB strains can be considered

  5. Tumor-Associated Antigens for Specific Immunotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiessling, Andrea [Biologics Safety and Disposition, Preclinical Safety, Translational Sciences, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Novartis Pharma AG, Werk Klybeck, Klybeckstraße 141, Basel CH-4057 (Switzerland); Wehner, Rebekka [Institute of Immunology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany); Füssel, Susanne [Department of Urology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany); Bachmann, Michael [Institute of Immunology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany); Wirth, Manfred P. [Department of Urology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany); Schmitz, Marc, E-mail: marc.schmitz@tu-dresden.de [Institute of Immunology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany)

    2012-02-22

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common noncutaneous cancer diagnosis and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in the United States. Effective treatment modalities for advanced metastatic PCa are limited. Immunotherapeutic strategies based on T cells and antibodies represent interesting approaches to prevent progression from localized to advanced PCa and to improve survival outcomes for patients with advanced disease. CD8{sup +} cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) efficiently recognize and destroy tumor cells. CD4{sup +} T cells augment the antigen-presenting capacity of dendritic cells and promote the expansion of tumor-reactive CTLs. Antibodies mediate their antitumor effects via antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, activation of the complement system, improving the uptake of coated tumor cells by phagocytes, and the functional interference of biological pathways essential for tumor growth. Consequently, several tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) have been identified that represent promising targets for T cell- or antibody-based immunotherapy. These TAAs comprise proteins preferentially expressed in normal and malignant prostate tissues and molecules which are not predominantly restricted to the prostate, but are overexpressed in various tumor entities including PCa. Clinical trials provide evidence that specific immunotherapeutic strategies using such TAAs represent safe and feasible concepts for the induction of immunological and clinical responses in PCa patients. However, further improvement of the current approaches is required which may be achieved by combining T cell- and/or antibody-based strategies with radio-, hormone-, chemo- or antiangiogenic therapy.

  6. Tumor-Associated Antigens for Specific Immunotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common noncutaneous cancer diagnosis and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in the United States. Effective treatment modalities for advanced metastatic PCa are limited. Immunotherapeutic strategies based on T cells and antibodies represent interesting approaches to prevent progression from localized to advanced PCa and to improve survival outcomes for patients with advanced disease. CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) efficiently recognize and destroy tumor cells. CD4+ T cells augment the antigen-presenting capacity of dendritic cells and promote the expansion of tumor-reactive CTLs. Antibodies mediate their antitumor effects via antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, activation of the complement system, improving the uptake of coated tumor cells by phagocytes, and the functional interference of biological pathways essential for tumor growth. Consequently, several tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) have been identified that represent promising targets for T cell- or antibody-based immunotherapy. These TAAs comprise proteins preferentially expressed in normal and malignant prostate tissues and molecules which are not predominantly restricted to the prostate, but are overexpressed in various tumor entities including PCa. Clinical trials provide evidence that specific immunotherapeutic strategies using such TAAs represent safe and feasible concepts for the induction of immunological and clinical responses in PCa patients. However, further improvement of the current approaches is required which may be achieved by combining T cell- and/or antibody-based strategies with radio-, hormone-, chemo- or antiangiogenic therapy

  7. Assembly and Immunological Processing of Polyelectrolyte Multilayers Composed of Antigens and Adjuvants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    While biomaterials provide a platform to control the delivery of vaccines, the recently discovered intrinsic inflammatory characteristics of many polymeric carriers can also complicate rational design because the carrier itself can alter the response to other vaccine components. To address this challenge, we recently developed immune-polyelectrolyte multilayer (iPEMs) capsules electrostatically assembled entirely from peptide antigen and molecular adjuvants. Here, we use iPEMs built from SIINFEKL model antigen and polyIC, a stimulatory toll-like receptor agonist, to investigate the impact of pH on iPEM assembly, the processing and interactions of each iPEM component with primary immune cells, and the role of these interactions during antigen-specific T cell responses in coculture and mice. We discovered that iPEM assembly is pH dependent with respect to both the antigen and adjuvant component. Controlling the pH also allows tuning of the relative loading of SIINFEKL and polyIC in iPEM capsules. During in vitro studies with primary dendritic cells (DCs), iPEM capsules ensure that greater than 95% of cells containing at least one signal (i.e., antigen, adjuvant) also contained the other signal. This codelivery leads to DC maturation and SIINFEKL presentation via the MHC-I antigen presentation pathway, resulting in antigen-specific T cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. In mice, iPEM capsules potently expand antigen-specific T cells compared with equivalent admixed formulations. Of note, these enhancements become more pronounced with successive booster injections, suggesting that iPEMs functionally improve memory recall response. Together our results reveal some of the features that can be tuned to modulate the properties of iPEM capsules, and how these modular vaccine structures can be used to enhance interactions with immune cells in vitro and in mice. PMID:27380137

  8. Liposome-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccines: Formulation Strategies for Subunit Antigens and Immunostimulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe Tandrup Schmidt

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of subunit vaccines has become very attractive in recent years due to their superior safety profiles as compared to traditional vaccines based on live attenuated or whole inactivated pathogens, and there is an unmet medical need for improved vaccines and vaccines against pathogens for which no effective vaccines exist. The subunit vaccine technology exploits pathogen subunits as antigens, e.g., recombinant proteins or synthetic peptides, allowing for highly specific immune responses against the pathogens. However, such antigens are usually not sufficiently immunogenic to induce protective immunity, and they are often combined with adjuvants to ensure robust immune responses. Adjuvants are capable of enhancing and/or modulating immune responses by exposing antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APCs concomitantly with conferring immune activation signals. Few adjuvant systems have been licensed for use in human vaccines, and they mainly stimulate humoral immunity. Thus, there is an unmet demand for the development of safe and efficient adjuvant systems that can also stimulate cell-mediated immunity (CMI. Adjuvants constitute a heterogeneous group of compounds, which can broadly be classified into delivery systems or immunostimulators. Liposomes are versatile delivery systems for antigens, and they can carefully be customized towards desired immune profiles by combining them with immunostimulators and optimizing their composition, physicochemical properties and antigen-loading mode. Immunostimulators represent highly diverse classes of molecules, e.g., lipids, nucleic acids, proteins and peptides, and they are ligands for pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs, which are differentially expressed on APC subsets. Different formulation strategies might thus be required for incorporation of immunostimulators and antigens, respectively, into liposomes, and the choice of immunostimulator should ideally be based on knowledge regarding the

  9. Metal based nanoparticles as cancer antigen delivery vehicles for macrophage based antitumor vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Sourav; Dash, Sandeep Kumar; Mandal, Debasis; Das, Balaram; Tripathy, Satyajit; Dey, Aditi; Pramanik, Panchanan; Roy, Somenath

    2016-02-10

    In the present study, we would like to evaluate the efficacy of modified metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) as cancer antigen delivery vehicles for macrophage (MФs) based antitumor vaccine. The cobalt oxide nanoparticles (CoO NPs) were promising tools for delivery of antigens to antigen presenting cells and have induced an antitumor immune response. Synthesized CoO NPs were modified by N-phosphonomethyliminodiacetic acid (PMIDA), facilitated the conjugation of lysate antigen, i.e. cancer antigen derived from lysis of cancer cells. The cancer cell lysate antigen conjugated PMIDA-CoO NPs (Ag-PMIDA-CoO NPs) successfully activated macrophage (MФ) evident by the increasing the serum IFN-γ and TNF-α level. Immunization of mice with the Ag-PMIDA-CoO NPs constructed an efficient immunological adjuvant induced anticancer IgG responses, and increased the antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) response than only lysate antigen treated group to combat the cancer cell. The nanocomplexes enhanced the anticancer CD4(+)T cell response in mice. The result showed that Ag-PMIDA-CoO NPs can stimulate the immune responses over only lysate antigens, which are the most important findings in this study. These NP-mediated Ag deliveries may significantly improve the anticancer immune response by activating MФs and may act as adjuvant and will balance the pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory immunoresponse. The crosstalk between the activated MФ with other immune competent cells will be monitored by measuring the cytokines which illustrate the total immunological network setups.

  10. Antigen-Antibody Interaction Database (AgAbDb): a compendium of antigen-antibody interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni-Kale, Urmila; Raskar-Renuse, Snehal; Natekar-Kalantre, Girija; Saxena, Smita A

    2014-01-01

    Antigen-Antibody Interaction Database (AgAbDb) is an immunoinformatics resource developed at the Bioinformatics Centre, University of Pune, and is available online at http://bioinfo.net.in/AgAbDb.htm. Antigen-antibody interactions are a special class of protein-protein interactions that are characterized by high affinity and strict specificity of antibodies towards their antigens. Several co-crystal structures of antigen-antibody complexes have been solved and are available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). AgAbDb is a derived knowledgebase developed with an objective to compile, curate, and analyze determinants of interactions between the respective antigen-antibody molecules. AgAbDb lists not only the residues of binding sites of antigens and antibodies, but also interacting residue pairs. It also helps in the identification of interacting residues and buried residues that constitute antibody-binding sites of protein and peptide antigens. The Antigen-Antibody Interaction Finder (AAIF), a program developed in-house, is used to compile the molecular interactions, viz. van der Waals interactions, salt bridges, and hydrogen bonds. A module for curating water-mediated interactions has also been developed. In addition, various residue-level features, viz. accessible surface area, data on epitope segment, and secondary structural state of binding site residues, are also compiled. Apart from the PDB numbering, Wu-Kabat numbering and explicit definitions of complementarity-determining regions are provided for residues of antibodies. The molecular interactions can be visualized using the program Jmol. AgAbDb can be used as a benchmark dataset to validate algorithms for prediction of B-cell epitopes. It can as well be used to improve accuracy of existing algorithms and to design new algorithms. AgAbDb can also be used to design mimotopes representing antigens as well as aid in designing processes leading to humanization of antibodies. PMID:25048123

  11. In situ Delivery of Tumor Antigen- and Adjuvant-Loaded Liposomes Boosts Antigen-Specific T-Cell Responses by Human Dermal Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boks, Martine A; Bruijns, Sven C M; Ambrosini, Martino; Kalay, Hakan; van Bloois, Louis; Storm, Gert; de Gruijl, Tanja; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have an important role in tumor control via the induction of tumor-specific T-cell responses and are therefore an ideal target for immunotherapy. The human skin is an attractive site for tumor vaccination as it contains various DC subsets. The simultaneous delivery of tumor antigen with an adjuvant is beneficial for cross-presentation and the induction of tumor-specific T-cell responses. We therefore developed liposomes that contain the melanoma-associated antigen glycoprotein 100280-288 peptide and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) ligand monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) as adjuvant. These liposomes are efficiently taken up by monocyte-derived DCs, and antigen presentation to CD8(+) T cells was significantly higher with MPLA-modified liposomes as compared with non-modified liposomes or the co-administration of soluble MPLA. We used a human skin explant model to evaluate the efficiency of intradermal delivery of liposomes. Liposomes were efficiently taken up by CD1a(+) and especially CD14(+) dermal DCs. Induction of CD8(+) T-cell responses by emigrated dermal DCs was significantly higher when MPLA was incorporated into the liposomes as compared with non-modified liposomes or co-administration of soluble MPLA. Thus, the modification of antigen-carrying liposomes with TLR ligand MPLA significantly enhances tumor-specific T-cell responses by dermal DCs and is an attractive vaccination strategy in human skin. PMID:26083554

  12. Amino acid residues 56 to 69 of HLA-A2 specify an antigenic determinant shared by HLA-A2 and HLA-B17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ways, J P; Rothbard, J B; Parham, P

    1986-07-01

    The mouse monoclonal antibody MA2.1 was previously used to define an epitope shared by native HLA-A2 and HLA-B17 molecules and amino acid sequence comparison of nine HLA-A,B,C molecules identified residues 62 to 65 as the region most likely to form this epitope. An unabsorbed rabbit antiserum raised against a peptide corresponding to residues 56 to 69 of HLA-A2 gives highly specific reactions with HLA-A2 and HLA-B17 heavy chains in Western blots. No interactions with native HLA-A2 and B17 molecules were detected in a variety of assays. Although the topographic relationship between the epitopes recognized by the rabbit antiserum and the monoclonal antibody could not be determined, the results show that residues 56 to 69 of HLA-A2 can form epitopes with specificity for HLA-A2 and HLA-B17.

  13. Effective Delivery of Antigen-Encapsulin Nanoparticle Fusions to Dendritic Cells Leads to Antigen-Specific Cytotoxic T Cell Activation and Tumor Rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bongseo; Moon, Hyojin; Hong, Sung Joon; Shin, Changsik; Do, Yoonkyung; Ryu, Seongho; Kang, Sebyung

    2016-08-23

    In cancer immunotherapy, robust and efficient activation of cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell immune responses is a promising, but challenging task. Dendritic cells (DCs) are well-known professional antigen presenting cells that initiate and regulate antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells that kill their target cells directly as well as secrete IFN-γ, a cytokine critical in tumor rejection. Here, we employed recently established protein cage nanoparticles, encapsulin (Encap), as antigenic peptide nanocarriers by genetically incorporating the OT-1 peptide of ovalbumin (OVA) protein to the three different positions of the Encap subunit. With them, we evaluated their efficacy in activating DC-mediated antigen-specific T cell cytotoxicity and consequent melanoma tumor rejection in vivo. DCs efficiently engulfed Encap and its variants (OT-1-Encaps), which carry antigenic peptides at different positions, and properly processed them within phagosomes. Delivered OT-1 peptides were effectively presented by DCs to naïve CD8(+) T cells successfully, resulting in the proliferation of antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells. OT-1-Encap vaccinations in B16-OVA melanoma tumor bearing mice effectively activated OT-1 peptide specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells before or even after tumor generation, resulting in significant suppression of tumor growth in prophylactic as well as therapeutic treatments. A large number of cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells that actively produce both intracellular and secretory IFN-γ were observed in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes collected from B16-OVA tumor masses originally vaccinated with OT-1-Encap-C upon tumor challenges. The approaches we describe herein may provide opportunities to develop epitope-dependent vaccination systems that stimulate and/or modulate efficient and epitope-specific cytotoxic T cell immune responses in nonpathogenic diseases.

  14. Targeting of tumor-associated antigens (TAA) in experimental immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have previously shown the superiority of tumor-associated antigens (TAA) to function as effective immunogens when administered with bilayer membrane vesicles called liposomes. The ability of liposomes to target TAA to host antigen-presenting cells is analyzed here. 1-Butanol extracted TAA from two syngeneic rat colon cancer tumors (WB 2054 and W 1756) was radioiodinated (131I-TAA). Free 131I and 131I-TAA (2.8 X 10(7) cpm and 75 micrograms TAA per rat) were used as tracers, with or without incorporation into liposomes (composition: sphingomyelin, cholesterol, dicetyl phosphate at 70:24:6 molar ratio). Six groups of male rats (BN X WF for WB2054 and Wistar/Furth for W1756, n = 18 each group) were injected iv with either free tracers or the tracers incorporated into liposomes. Whole blood clearance curve was biphasic (half-life alpha = 5 min; half life beta = 12 hr), suggesting a two-compartmental model of distribution. Seven animals from each group were sacrificed at set times (15 min to 48 hr), organs harvested and cpm/g of tissue estimated. Liposome 131I and liposome 131I-TAA were targeted to and retained preferentially in liver and spleen. Four animals from each group were imaged serially using a gamma camera. Matched pair analysis of regions showed persistently higher activity in liver-spleen area when liposomes were used (P less than 0.001). The uptake of radiolabeled antigens by plastic adherent mononuclear cells in liver and spleen was significantly higher when presented with liposomes (macrophage uptake index: liver = 1.65 vs 0.55; spleen = 5.85 vs 1.15; with and without liposomes, respectively)

  15. Determination of Circulating Antigen in Neurocysticercosis Patients by Monoclonal Antibody%应用单克隆抗体检测脑囊虫病患者的循环抗原

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭增柱; 黄敏君; 安亦军; 黄松; 姜洪杰

    2005-01-01

    目的评价单克隆抗体检测循环抗原 (Cag)诊断脑囊虫病的价值.方法用猪囊尾蚴囊液抗原制备单克隆抗体 4B6,以 ELISA方法检测患者和对照者血清和 /或脑脊液中的猪囊虫抗原. 结果 82例脑囊虫病患者血清 Cag阳性率为 79.2% (65/82),脑脊液 Cag阳性率为 100%( 26/26),治疗一个疗程后血清 Cag转阴率为 85%( 17/20).从对照者标本中未检出猪囊虫 Cag. 4B6和包虫抗原有轻微交叉反应.结论 Cag检测,尤其是脑脊液 Cag检测有助于脑囊虫病的诊断,而血清 Cag检测则有助于疗效考核.%Objective To detect circulating antigen (Cag) for diagnosing neurocysticercosis. Method ELISA was performed with monoclonal antibody 4B6 against the cyst fluid antigen of Cyticercus cellulosae for detecting Cag in serum and/or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with neurocysticercosis or with other diseases. Results In the group of 82 cases of neurocysticercosis, the positive rate of serum Cag was 79.2% (65/82) and the positive rate of CSF Cag was 100% (26/26). After chemotherapy for 20 cases with positive serum Cag, the titer of serum Cag in 17 cases dropped to zero(85% ). Cag could not be detected in specimens from patients with other diseases. Conclusion These results indicate that the determination of Cag, especially of the CSF Cag, is useful for the diagnosis of neurocysticercosis and the drop in serum Cag is a good parameter for the evaluation of the effectiveness of chemotherapy.

  16. Antigenic typing Polish isolates of canine parvovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizak, B. [National Veterinary Research Institute, Pulawy (Poland); Plucienniczak, A. [Polish Academy ofd Sciences. Microbiology and Virology Center, Lodz (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    Polish strains of canine parvovirus isolated between 1982 and 1993 were examined to determine the extent to which the virus has evolved antigenically and genetically over eleven years. Two CPV isolates obtained in Warsaw in 1982 and Pulawy in 1993, were examined using monoclonal antibody typing, restriction analysis and sequencing VP-2 protein gene. Five other isolates from Warsaw and Pulawy were tested with the panel of monoclonal antibodies specific to CPV-2, CPV-2a and common for canine parvovirus, feline panleukopenia virus and milk enteritis virus. Results of the studies demonstrated that all isolates tested represented CPV-2a antigenic type. Rapid antigenic strain replacement recorded by Parrish and Senda in the U.S.A and Japan was not confirmed in Poland. (author). 30 refs, 2 tabs.

  17. Idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and HLA antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbase-DeLima, M; Pereira-Santos, A; Sesso, R; Temin, J; Aragão, E S; Ajzen, H

    1998-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate a possible association between HLA class II antigens and idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). HLA-A, -B, -DR and -DQ antigens were determined in 19 Brazilian patients (16 white subjects and three subjects of Japanese origin) with biopsy-proven FSGS. Comparison of the HLA antigen frequencies between white patients and white local controls showed a significant increase in HLA-DR4 frequency among FSGS patients (37.7 vs 17.2%, P < 0.05). In addition, the three patients of Japanese extraction, not included in the statistical analysis, also presented HLA-DR4. In conclusion, our data confirm the association of FSGS with HLA-DR4 previously reported by others, thus providing further evidence for a role of genes of the HLA complex in the susceptibility to this disease. PMID:9698788

  18. Idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and HLA antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gerbase-DeLima

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate a possible association between HLA class II antigens and idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS. HLA-A, -B, -DR and -DQ antigens were determined in 19 Brazilian patients (16 white subjects and three subjects of Japanese origin with biopsy-proven FSGS. Comparison of the HLA antigen frequencies between white patients and white local controls showed a significant increase in HLA-DR4 frequency among FSGS patients (37.7 vs 17.2%, P<0.05. In addition, the three patients of Japanese extraction, not included in the statistical analysis, also presented HLA-DR4. In conclusion, our data confirm the association of FSGS with HLA-DR4 previously reported by others, thus providing further evidence for a role of genes of the HLA complex in the susceptibility to this disease

  19. Nonclassical antigen-processing pathways are required for MHC class II-restricted direct tumor recognition by NY-ESO-1-specific CD4(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel; Old, Lloyd J; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2014-04-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells that directly recognize cancer cells are important for orchestrating antitumor immune responses at the local tumor sites. However, the mechanisms of direct MHC class II (MHC-II) presentation of intracellular tumor antigen by cancer cells are poorly understood. We found that two functionally distinct subsets of CD4(+) T cells were expanded after HLA-DPB1*04 (DP04)-binding NY-ESO-1157-170 peptide vaccination in patients with ovarian cancer. Although both subsets recognized exogenous NY-ESO-1 protein pulsed on DP04(+) target cells, only one type recognized target cells with intracellular expression of NY-ESO-1. The tumor-recognizing CD4(+) T cells more efficiently recognized the short 8-9-mer peptides than the non-tumor-recognizing CD4(+) T cells. In addition to endosomal/lysosomal proteases that are typically involved in MHC-II antigen presentation, several pathways in the MHC class I presentation pathways, such as the proteasomal degradation and transporter-associated with antigen-processing-mediated peptide transport, were also involved in the presentation of intracellular NY-ESO-1 on MHC-II. The presentation was inhibited significantly by primaquine, a small molecule that inhibits endosomal recycling, consistent with findings that pharmacologic inhibition of new protein synthesis enhances antigen presentation. Together, our data demonstrate that cancer cells selectively present peptides from intracellular tumor antigens on MHC-II by multiple nonclassical antigen-processing pathways. Harnessing the direct tumor-recognizing ability of CD4(+) T cells could be a promising strategy to enhance antitumor immune responses in the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment.

  20. Human Leukocyte Antigens Influence the Antibody Response to Hepatitis B Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarzadeh, Abdollah; Bagheri-Jamebozorgi, Masoome; Nemati, Maryam; Golsaz-Shirazi, Forough; Shokri, Fazel

    2015-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and its sequelae such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma has remained a serious public health problem throughout the world. The WHO strategy for effective control of HBV infection and its complications is mass vaccination of neonates and children within the framework of Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI). Vaccination with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) induces protective antibody response (anti-HBs ≥ 10 IU/L) in 90-99% of vaccinees. The lack of response to HBsAg has been attributed to a variety of immunological mechanisms, including defect in antigen presentation, defect in HBsAg-specific T and/or B cell repertoires, T-cell suppression, increase in the regulatory T cell count, lack of necessary help of T-cells for production of anti-HBs by B cells, defect in Th1 and/or Th2 cytokine production and selective killing of HBsAg-specific B-cells by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The HLA complex plays an important role in many of these immunological processes. A variety of HLA class I, II, and III alleles and antigens have been reported to be associated with antibody response to HBsAg vaccination in different ethnic populations. Moreover, some HLA haplotypes were also associated with responsiveness to HBsAg. In this review the association of the HLA specificities with antibody response to hepatitis B (HB) vaccine is discussed. PMID:26546891

  1. Differential antigenic protein recovery from Taenia solium cyst tissues using several detergents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete-Perea, José; Orozco-Ramírez, Rodrigo; Moguel, Bárbara; Sciutto, Edda; Bobes, Raúl J; Laclette, Juan P

    2015-07-01

    Human and porcine cysticercosis is caused by the larval stage of the flatworm Taenia solium (Cestoda). The protein extracts of T. solium cysts are complex mixtures including cyst's and host proteins. Little is known about the influence of using different detergents in the efficiency of solubilization-extraction of these proteins, including relevant antigens. Here, we describe the use of CHAPS, ASB-14 and Triton X-100, alone or in combination in the extraction buffers, as a strategy to notably increase the recovery of proteins that are usually left aside in insoluble fractions of cysts. Using buffer with CHAPS alone, 315 protein spots were detected through 2D-PAGE. A total of 255 and 258 spots were detected using buffers with Triton X-100 or ASB-14, respectively. More protein spots were detected when detergents were combined, i.e., 2% CHAPS, 1% Triton X-100 and 1% ASB-14 allowed detection of up to 368 spots. Our results indicated that insoluble fractions of T. solium cysts were rich in antigens, including several glycoproteins that were sensitive to metaperiodate treatment. Host proteins, a common component in protein extracts of cysts, were present in larger amounts in soluble than insoluble fractions of cysts proteins. Finally, antigens present in the insoluble fraction were more appropriate as a source of antigens for diagnostic procedures.

  2. Evaluation of Salmonella enterica type III secretion system effector proteins as carriers for heterologous vaccine antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazy, Wael Abdel Halim; Xu, Xin; Metelitsa, Leonid; Hensel, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Live attenuated strains of Salmonella enterica have a high potential as carriers of recombinant vaccines. The type III secretion system (T3SS)-dependent translocation of S. enterica can be deployed for delivery of heterologous antigens to antigen-presenting cells. Here we investigated the efficacy of various effector proteins of the Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI2)-encoded T3SS for the translocation of model antigens and elicitation of immune responses. The SPI2 T3SS effector proteins SifA, SteC, SseL, SseJ, and SseF share an endosomal membrane-associated subcellular localization after translocation. We observed that all effector proteins could be used to translocate fusion proteins with the model antigens ovalbumin and listeriolysin into the cytosol of host cells. Under in vitro conditions, fusion proteins with SseJ and SteC stimulated T-cell responses that were superior to those triggered by fusion proteins with SseF. However, in mice vaccinated with Salmonella carrier strains, only fusion proteins based on SseJ or SifA elicited potent T-cell responses. These data demonstrate that the selection of an optimal SPI2 effector protein for T3SS-mediated translocation is a critical parameter for the rational design of effective Salmonella-based recombinant vaccines.

  3. Antigenic community between Schistosoma mansoni and Biomphalaria glabrata: on the search of candidate antigens for vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Chacón

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available We have previously confirmed the presence of common antigens between Schistosoma mansoni and its vector, Biomphalaria glabrata. Cross-reactive antigens may be important as possible candidates for vaccine and diagnosis of schistosomiasis. Sera from outbred mice immunized with a soluble Biomphalaria glabrata antigen (SBgA of non-infected B. glabrata snails recognized molecules of SBgA itself and S. mansoni AWA by Western blot. Recognition of several molecules of the SBgA were inhibited by pre-incubation with AWA (16, 30, 36, 60 and 155 kDa. The only specific molecule of AWA, inhibited by SBgA, was a 120 kDa protein. In order to determine which epitopes of SBgA were glycoproteins, the antigen was treated with sodium metaperiodate and compared with non-treated antigen. Molecules of 140, 60 and 24 kDa in the SBgA appear to be glycoproteins. Possible protective effects of the SBgA were evaluated immunizing outbred mice in two different experiments using Freund's Adjuvant. In the first one (12 mice/group, we obtained a significant level of protection (46% in the total worm load, with a high variability in worm recovery. In the second experiment (22 mice/group, no significant protection was observed, neither in worm load nor in egg production per female. Our results suggest that SBgA constitutes a rich source of candidate antigens for diagnosis and prophylactic studies.

  4. The Changing and Significance of Antigen Presentation Ability of Decidual Macrophage from Unexplained Spontaneous Abortion%不明原因自然流产患者蜕膜巨噬细胞抗原递呈功能的改变及意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭宗建; 李尚为; 曹泽毅; 李蕾; 马黔红; 黄仲英

    2008-01-01

    目的:探讨不明原因自然流产患者(USA)蜕膜巨噬细胞抗原递呈功能的改变及意义.方法:选取有卡介苗接种史的30例USA患者作为研究对象,以孕龄相当的正常妊娠人工流产妇女作为对照.通过淋巴细胞体外抗原特异性转化实验,分别以不同浓度的实验组及对照组蜕膜巨噬细胞作为抗原递呈细胞,相应的外周血T细胞作为反应细胞,以PPD、USA组(U-Ag)及对照组滋养细胞抗原(N-Ag)作为抗原,MTT法检测T细胞增殖的情况,以刺激指数(SI)反应T细胞增殖强度.流式细胞仪检测HLA-DR在巨噬细胞上的表达.结果:USA组在PPD、U-Ag和N-Ag这3种抗原分别诱导下,T细胞的刺激指数(SI)在巨噬细胞8×105/ml和16×105/ml浓度时均明显高于2×105/ml和4×105/ml,差异有显著性(P<0.05);对照组在这3种抗原诱导下,T细胞的SI在各浓度巨噬细胞组间比较,差异无显著性(P>0.05);两组在相同抗原和相同细胞浓度下.当巨噬细胞浓度为2×105/ml时,T细胞的SI比较差异无显著性(P>0.05)外,其余各浓度USA组的T细胞SI均高于对照组,差异均有显著性(P<0.05).HLA-DR在USA组蜕膜巨噬细胞上的表达为87.5±25.6%,而对照组为84.2±30.3%,两者比较差异无显著性(P>0.05).结论:USA组的蜕膜巨噬细胞具有抗原递呈功能,滋养细胞抗原通过蜕膜局部的巨噬细胞递呈给母体免疫系统使T细胞激活,这很有可能是导致USA的重要机制.

  5. Mosaic VSGs and the scale of Trypanosoma brucei antigenic variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P J Hall

    Full Text Available A main determinant of prolonged Trypanosoma brucei infection and transmission and success of the parasite is the interplay between host acquired immunity and antigenic variation of the parasite variant surface glycoprotein (VSG coat. About 0.1% of trypanosome divisions produce a switch to a different VSG through differential expression of an archive of hundreds of silent VSG genes and pseudogenes, but the patterns and extent of the trypanosome diversity phenotype, particularly in chronic infection, are unclear. We applied longitudinal VSG cDNA sequencing to estimate variant richness and test whether pseudogenes contribute to antigenic variation. We show that individual growth peaks can contain at least 15 distinct variants, are estimated computationally to comprise many more, and that antigenically distinct 'mosaic' VSGs arise from segmental gene conversion between donor VSG genes or pseudogenes. The potential for trypanosome antigenic variation is probably much greater than VSG archive size; mosaic VSGs are core to antigenic variation and chronic infection.

  6. Carcino-Embryonic Antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumour marker analysis has increased our understanding of the presence of tumours in the body. Carcino-embryonic antigen, CEA, is one of the best studied tumour markers and has proved an ideal diagnostic adjuvant. It has helped in quantifying the amount of disease present in a patient and thence to make accurate prognosis on the various diagnosed ailments. At UCH, it is observed that there is an increase in cancer related ailments and therefore the need for early diagnosis is more compelling in our environment to mitigate future cost of managing advanced manifestation

  7. A Fusion Protein between Streptavidin and the Endogenous TLR4 Ligand EDA Targets Biotinylated Antigens to Dendritic Cells and Induces T Cell Responses In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Arribillaga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of tools for efficient targeting of antigens to antigen presenting cells is of great importance for vaccine development. We have previously shown that fusion proteins containing antigens fused to the extra domain A from fibronectin (EDA, an endogenous TLR4 ligand, which targets antigens to TLR4-expressing dendritic cells (DC, are highly immunogenic. To facilitate the procedure of joining EDA to any antigen of choice, we have prepared the fusion protein EDAvidin by linking EDA to the N terminus of streptavidin, allowing its conjugation with biotinylated antigens. We found that EDAvidin, as streptavidin, forms tetramers and binds biotin or biotinylated proteins with a Kd ~ 2.6 × 10−14 mol/L. EDAvidin favours the uptake of biotinylated green fluorescent protein by DC. Moreover, EDAvidin retains the proinflammatory properties of EDA, inducing NF-κβ by TLR4-expressing cells, as well as the production of TNF-α by the human monocyte cell line THP1 and IL-12 by DC. More importantly, immunization of mice with EDAvidin conjugated with the biotinylated nonstructural NS3 protein from hepatitis C virus induces a strong anti-NS3 T cell immune response. These results open a new way to use the EDA-based delivery tool to target any antigen of choice to DC for vaccination against infectious diseases and cancer.

  8. A fusion protein between streptavidin and the endogenous TLR4 ligand EDA targets biotinylated antigens to dendritic cells and induces T cell responses in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arribillaga, Laura; Durantez, Maika; Lozano, Teresa; Rudilla, Francesc; Rehberger, Federico; Casares, Noelia; Villanueva, Lorea; Martinez, Marta; Gorraiz, Marta; Borrás-Cuesta, Francisco; Sarobe, Pablo; Prieto, Jesús; Lasarte, Juan José

    2013-01-01

    The development of tools for efficient targeting of antigens to antigen presenting cells is of great importance for vaccine development. We have previously shown that fusion proteins containing antigens fused to the extra domain A from fibronectin (EDA), an endogenous TLR4 ligand, which targets antigens to TLR4-expressing dendritic cells (DC), are highly immunogenic. To facilitate the procedure of joining EDA to any antigen of choice, we have prepared the fusion protein EDAvidin by linking EDA to the N terminus of streptavidin, allowing its conjugation with biotinylated antigens. We found that EDAvidin, as streptavidin, forms tetramers and binds biotin or biotinylated proteins with a Kd ~ 2.6 × 10(-14) mol/L. EDAvidin favours the uptake of biotinylated green fluorescent protein by DC. Moreover, EDAvidin retains the proinflammatory properties of EDA, inducing NF- κβ by TLR4-expressing cells, as well as the production of TNF- α by the human monocyte cell line THP1 and IL-12 by DC. More importantly, immunization of mice with EDAvidin conjugated with the biotinylated nonstructural NS3 protein from hepatitis C virus induces a strong anti-NS3 T cell immune response. These results open a new way to use the EDA-based delivery tool to target any antigen of choice to DC for vaccination against infectious diseases and cancer. PMID:24093105

  9. Understanding MHC class I presentation of viral antigens by human dendritic cells as a basis for rational design of therapeutic vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine eVan Montfoort

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Effective viral clearance requires the induction of virus-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL. Since dendritic cells (DC have a central role in initiating and shaping virus-specific CTL responses, it is important to understand how DC initiate virus-specific CTL responses. Some viruses can directly infect DC, which theoretically allows direct presentation of viral antigens to CTL, but many viruses target other cells than DC and thus the host depends on the cross-presentation of viral antigens by DC to activate virus-specific CTL.Research in mouse models has highly enhanced our understanding of the mechanisms underlying cross-presentation and the DC subsets involved, however, these results cannot be readily translated towards the role of human DC in MHC class I antigen presentation of human viruses. Here, we summarize the insights gained in the past 20 years on MHC class I presentation of viral antigen by human DC and add to the current debate on the capacities of different human DC subsets herein. Furthermore, possible sources of viral antigens and essential DC characteristics for effective induction of virus-specific CTL are evaluated.We conclude that cross-presentation is not only an efficient mechanism exploited by DC to initiate immunity to viruses that do not infect DC but also to viruses that do infect DC, because cross-presentation has many conceptual advantages and bypasses direct immune modulatory effects of the virus on its infected target cells. Since knowledge on the mechanism of viral antigen presentation and the preferred DC subsets is crucial for rational vaccine design, the obtained insights are very instrumental for the development of effective anti-viral immunotherapy.

  10. Exploiting in situ antigen generation and immune modulation to enhance chemotherapy response in advanced melanoma: A combination nanomedicine approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yao; Wang, Yuhua; Miao, Lei; Haynes, Matthew; Xiang, Guangya; Huang, Leaf

    2016-08-28

    Therapeutic anticancer vaccine development must address a number of barriers to achieve successful tumor specific killing, including effective antigen presentation and antigen-specific T-cell activation to mediate cytotoxic cellular effects, inhibition of an immune-suppressive tumor microenvironment in order to facilitate and enhance CTL activity, and induction of memory T-cells to prolong tumor rejection. While traditional as well as modern vaccines rely upon delivery of both antigen and adjuvant, a variety of clinically relevant cancers lack ideal immunogenic antigens. Building upon recent efforts, we instead chose to exploit chemotherapy-induced apoptosis to allow for in situ antigen generation in a combination, nanomedicine-based approach. Specifically, lipid-coated cisplatin nanoparticles (LPC) and CpG-encapsulated liposomes (CpG-Lipo) were prepared for the temporally-controlled and multifaceted treatment of an advanced in vivo model of melanoma. Such combination therapy established strong synergistic effects, both in apoptotic extent and subsequent abrogation of tumor growth, which were due largely to both an enhanced cytotoxic T-cell recruitment and a reduction of immune-suppressive mediators in the microenvironments of both spleens and tumor. These results underlie a prolonged host lifespan in the combination approach (45 days) as compared with control (25 days, p < 0.02), providing promise toward a personalized approach to nanomedicine by establishing effect synergy in host-specific immunotherapy following chemotherapy. PMID:27235608

  11. Vaccination with human induced pluripotent stem cells creates an antigen-specific immune response against HIV-1 gp160

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    Shinji eYoshizaki

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs are artificially derived from somatic cells that have been transduced with defined reprogramming factors. A previous report has indicated the possibility of using iPSCs as an immune stimulator to generate antigen-specific immunity. In our current study, we have investigated whether human iPSCs (hiPSCs have the ability to enhance specific immune response against a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 antigen in a xenogenic mouse model. Our results show that BALB/c mice immunized with hiPSCs transduced with an adenoviral vector encoding HIV-1 gp160 exhibited prominent antigen-specific cellular immune responses. We further found that pre-treatment of hiPSCs with ionizing radiation promotes the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1α, IL-12 and IL-18. These cytokines might promote the activation of antigen-presenting cells and the effective induction of cellular immunity. Our present findings thus demonstrate that a hiPSCs-based vaccine has the potential to generate cellular immunity against viral antigens such as HIV-1 gp160 in a xenogenic condition.

  12. Human leucocyte antigens in tympanosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, G; Acar, A; Turgay, M; Calgüner, M

    1997-02-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the association between certain HLA antigens and tympanosclerosis. The serum concentrations of HLA antigens were measured by a microlymphocytotoxicity technique in patients with tympanosclerosis and compared with a healthy control group. The serum levels of HLA-B35 and -DR3 were significantly higher in the patients with tympanosclerosis. This result suggests that certain types of HLA antigens may play an important role as an indicator or mediator in the pathogenesis of tympanosclerosis. PMID:9088683

  13. HLA antigens and asthma in Greeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolakis, J; Toumbis, M; Konstantopoulos, K; Kamaroulias, D; Anagnostakis, J; Georgoulias, V; Fessas, P; Zervas, J

    1996-04-01

    HLA-A and -B antigens were determined in a group of 76 Greek asthmatic patients: 35 children (1.5-15 years) and 41 adults (18-73 years). The results were compared to those of 400 healthy unrelated controls from the same population. The standard NIH lymphocytotoxicity test was applied. When all 76 patients were compared to the controls, a statistically significant lower frequency of HLA-B5 and -B35 antigens was noted. When adults were analysed alone, an increased frequency of HLA-B8 was found. On the other hand, in the asthmatic children sub-group, the HLA-A10 antigen was significantly higher and the HLA-B5 was significantly lower than in the controls. These data imply that different HLA antigens may be involved in the pathogenesis of several clinical forms of asthma and that, in order to study the role of immunogenetic factor(s) in the pathogenesis of this disease, more adequate grouping criteria are needed.

  14. Lea blood group antigen on human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One- and two-stage radioligand assays were used to determine if human platelets possess the Lea antigen. Goat IgG anti-Lea antibody was purified by multiple adsorptions with Le(a-b-) human red blood cells, followed by affinity chromatography with synthetic Lea substance and labeling with 125I. Human IgG anti-Lea antibody was used either in a two stage radioassay with 125I-labeled mouse monoclonal IgG anti-human IgG as the second antibody or, alternatively, purified by Staph protein A chromatography, labeled with 125I, and used in a one-stage radioassay. Platelets from donors of appropriate red blood cell phenotypes were incubated with the antisera, centrifuged through phthalate esters, and assayed in a gamma scintillation counter. Dose response and saturation curve analysis demonstrate the presence of Lewis a antigen on platelets from Lea+ donors. Furthermore, platelets from an Le(a-b-) donor incubated in Le (a+b-) plasma adsorb Lea antigen in a similar manner to red blood cells. The clinical significance of these antigens in platelet transfusion remains undefined

  15. Engineering antigen-specific T cells from genetically modified human hematopoietic stem cells in immunodeficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott G Kitchen

    Full Text Available There is a desperate need for effective therapies to fight chronic viral infections. The immune response is normally fastidious at controlling the majority of viral infections and a therapeutic strategy aimed at reestablishing immune control represents a potentially powerful approach towards treating persistent viral infections. We examined the potential of genetically programming human hematopoietic stem cells to generate mature CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes that express a molecularly cloned, "transgenic" human anti-HIV T cell receptor (TCR. Anti-HIV TCR transduction of human hematopoietic stem cells directed the maturation of a large population of polyfunctional, HIV-specific CD8+ cells capable of recognizing and killing viral antigen-presenting cells. Thus, through this proof-of-concept we propose that genetic engineering of human hematopoietic stem cells will allow the tailoring of effector T cell responses to fight HIV infection or other diseases that are characterized by the loss of immune control.

  16. Thyrotropin Receptor Epitope and Human Leukocyte Antigen in Graves' Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Hidefumi; De Groot, Leslie J; Akamizu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease, and thyrotropin (TSH) receptor (TSHR) is a major autoantigen in this condition. Since the extracellular domain of human TSHR (TSHR-ECD) is shed into the circulation, TSHR-ECD is a preferentially immunogenic portion of TSHR. Both genetic factors and environmental factors contribute to development of GD. Inheritance of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes, especially HLA-DR3, is associated with GD. TSHR-ECD protein is endocytosed into antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and processed to TSHR-ECD peptides. These peptide epitopes bind to HLA-class II molecules, and subsequently the complex of HLA-class II and TSHR-ECD epitope is presented to CD4+ T cells. The activated CD4+ T cells secrete cytokines/chemokines that stimulate B-cells to produce TSAb, and in turn hyperthyroidism occurs. Numerous studies have been done to identify T- and B-cell epitopes in TSHR-ECD, including (1) in silico, (2) in vitro, (3) in vivo, and (4) clinical experiments. Murine models of GD and HLA-transgenic mice have played a pivotal role in elucidating the immunological mechanisms. To date, linear or conformational epitopes of TSHR-ECD, as well as the molecular structure of the epitope-binding groove in HLA-DR, were reported to be related to the pathogenesis in GD. Dysfunction of central tolerance in the thymus, or in peripheral tolerance, such as regulatory T cells, could allow development of GD. Novel treatments using TSHR antagonists or mutated TSHR peptides have been reported to be effective. We review and update the role of immunogenic TSHR epitopes and HLA in GD, and offer perspectives on TSHR epitope specific treatments. PMID:27602020

  17. Determining Specificity of Fab Antibody against Mouse Serologically Detected Male Antigen%血清学检测的雄性特异性抗原Fab抗体的特异性鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王乃东; 袁安文; 邓治邦; 屠迪; 许道军; 夏南松; 杨大为; 薛立群

    2011-01-01

    旨在研究血清学检测的雄性特异性抗原噬菌体Fab抗体的特异性.以从噬菌体Fab抗体库中筛选到具有较高雄性特异性结合活性的重组噬菌体克隆为基础,构建Fab抗体的可溶性表达噬质粒,并诱导和纯化该抗体片段,利用免疫荧光FITC/DAPI共染技术和ELISA分析其特异性.结果表明,该抗体在约49 ku处有条带出现.在Fab抗体和H-Y抗血清的细胞免疫荧光比较分析试验中发现,从雌、雄鼠脾细胞的阳性细胞数量和平均荧光强度的角度分析,Fab抗体的雄性特异性强于抗血清.石蜡切片免疫荧光定量分析显示,Fab抗体与雄鼠肝脏的结合活性明显高于对应雌鼠,差异极显著(t=20.73,P=0.002 3<0.01),而H-Y抗血清与雄鼠肝脏的结合活性略高于对应雌鼠,差异显著(t=7.11,P=0.019 2<0.05).以C57BL/6雄鼠脾细胞、睾丸细胞作为抗原的ELISA分析显示,Fab抗体具有雄性特异性,但Fab抗体的OD值低于抗血清.结果提示,Fab抗体的雄性特异性高于H-Y抗血清,但其雄性特异性结合活性低于H-Y抗血清,Fab抗体在具备雄性特异性的同时,仍有少量雌性非特异性结合,Fab抗体的体外亲和力成熟可作为后续研究工作,以获得高亲和力、高雄性特异性的可溶性Fab抗体分子.%To study specificity of Fab antibody against mouse serologically detected male antigen, based on recombinant phage clone with male specific activity screened from phage Fab antibody library, expression plasmid of soluble Fab antibody was constructed, antibody fragment was induced and purified, the antibody specificity was determined by immunofluorescence staining with FITC/DAPI and ELISA. The results showed that an about 49 ku band appeared in the SDS-PAGE, comparison of cell immunofluorescence staining of Fab antibody and H-Y antiserum showed that male specificity and binding activity of Fab antibody was higher than that of antiserum, based on number of positive cells and mean

  18. Quantitative RT-PCR assays for the determination of urokinase-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 mRNA in primary tumor tissue of breast cancer patients: comparison to antigen quantification by ELISA.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biermann, J.C.; Holzscheiter, L.; Kotzsch, M.; Luther, T.; Kiechle-Bahat, M.; Sweep, F.C.; Span, P.N.; Schmitt, M.; Magdolen, V.

    2008-01-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) play a key role in tumor-associated processes such as the degradation of extracellular matrix proteins, tissue remodeling, cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. High antigen levels of uPA an

  19. Immature CD4+ dendritic cells conditioned with donor kidney antigen prolong renal allograft survival in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Tao; XU Lin; LI Heng; HUANG Zheng-yu; ZHANG Sheng-ping; MIAO Bin; NA Ning

    2012-01-01

    Background AIIogeneic transplant rejection is currently a major problem encountered during organ transplantation.The dendritic cell (DC) is the most effective powerful known professional antigen-presenting cell,and recent studies have found that DCs can also induce immune tolerance,and avoid or reduce the degree of transplant rejection.The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of transfused immature CD4+ DCs on renal allografts in the rat model.Methods In this study,we induced CD4+ immature DCs from rat bone marrow cells by a cytokine cocktail.The immature CD4+ DCs were identified by morphological analysis and then the suppressive activity of these cells conditioned with donor kidney antigen was evaluated in vitro and in vivo.Results Immature CD4+ DCs conditioned with donor kidney antigen possessed immunosuppressive activity in vitro and they were able to prolong renal transplant survival in an allograft rat model in vivo.Conclusions Our study provides new information on efficacious renal transplantation,which might be useful for understanding the function of immature CD4+ DCs in modulating renal transplant rejection and improving clinical outcome in future studies.

  20. Dynamic visualization of dendritic cell-antigen interactions in the skin following transcutaneous immunization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teerawan Rattanapak

    Full Text Available Delivery of vaccines into the skin provides many advantages over traditional parenteral vaccination and is a promising approach due to the abundance of antigen presenting cells (APC residing in the skin including Langerhans cells (LC and dermal dendritic cells (DDC. However, the main obstacle for transcutaneous immunization (TCI is the effective delivery of the vaccine through the stratum corneum (SC barrier to the APC in the deeper skin layers. This study therefore utilized microneedles (MN and a lipid-based colloidal delivery system (cubosomes as a synergistic approach for the delivery of vaccines to APC in the skin. The process of vaccine uptake and recruitment by specific types of skin APC was investigated in real-time over 4 hours in B6.Cg-Tg (Itgax-EYFP 1 Mnz/J mice by two-photon microscopy. Incorporation of the vaccine into a particulate delivery system and the use of MN preferentially increased vaccine antigen uptake by a highly motile subpopulation of skin APC known as CD207⁺ DC. No uptake of antigen or any response to immunisation by LC could be detected.

  1. Antigenic Relationships among Human Pathogenic Orientia tsutsugamushi Isolates from Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawtaisong, Pruksa; Tanganuchitcharnchai, Ampai; Smith, Derek J.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Paris, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Scrub typhus is a common cause of undiagnosed febrile illness in certain tropical regions, but can be easily treated with antibiotics. The causative agent, Orientia tsutsugamushi, is antigenically variable which complicates diagnosis and efforts towards vaccine development. Methodology/Principal Findings This study aimed to dissect the antigenic and genetic relatedness of O. tsutsugamushi strains and investigate sero-diagnostic reactivities by titrating individual patient sera against their O. tsutsugamushi isolates (whole-cell antigen preparation), in homologous and heterologous serum-isolate pairs from the same endemic region in NE Thailand. The indirect immunofluorescence assay was used to titrate Orientia tsutsugamushi isolates and human sera, and a mathematical technique, antigenic cartography, was applied to these data to visualise the antigenic differences and cross-reactivity between strains and sera. No functional or antigen-specific analyses were performed. The antigenic variation found in clinical isolates was much less pronounced than the genetic differences found in the 56kDa type-specific antigen genes. The Karp-like sera were more broadly reactive than the Gilliam-like sera. Conclusions/Significance Antigenic cartography worked well with scrub typhus indirect immunofluorescence titres. The data from humoral responses suggest that a Karp-like strain would provide broader antibody cross-reactivity than a Gilliam-like strain. Although previous exposure to O. tsutsugamushi could not be ruled out, scrub typhus patient serum antibody responses were characterised by strong homologous, but weak heterologous antibody titres, with little evidence for cross-reactivity by Gilliam-like sera, but a broader response from some Karp-like sera. This work highlights the importance of antigenic variation in O. tsutsugamushi diagnosis and determination of new serotypes. PMID:27248711

  2. Antigenic Relationships among Human Pathogenic Orientia tsutsugamushi Isolates from Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L James

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus is a common cause of undiagnosed febrile illness in certain tropical regions, but can be easily treated with antibiotics. The causative agent, Orientia tsutsugamushi, is antigenically variable which complicates diagnosis and efforts towards vaccine development.This study aimed to dissect the antigenic and genetic relatedness of O. tsutsugamushi strains and investigate sero-diagnostic reactivities by titrating individual patient sera against their O. tsutsugamushi isolates (whole-cell antigen preparation, in homologous and heterologous serum-isolate pairs from the same endemic region in NE Thailand. The indirect immunofluorescence assay was used to titrate Orientia tsutsugamushi isolates and human sera, and a mathematical technique, antigenic cartography, was applied to these data to visualise the antigenic differences and cross-reactivity between strains and sera. No functional or antigen-specific analyses were performed. The antigenic variation found in clinical isolates was much less pronounced than the genetic differences found in the 56kDa type-specific antigen genes. The Karp-like sera were more broadly reactive than the Gilliam-like sera.Antigenic cartography worked well with scrub typhus indirect immunofluorescence titres. The data from humoral responses suggest that a Karp-like strain would provide broader antibody cross-reactivity than a Gilliam-like strain. Although previous exposure to O. tsutsugamushi could not be ruled out, scrub typhus patient serum antibody responses were characterised by strong homologous, but weak heterologous antibody titres, with little evidence for cross-reactivity by Gilliam-like sera, but a broader response from some Karp-like sera. This work highlights the importance of antigenic variation in O. tsutsugamushi diagnosis and determination of new serotypes.

  3. Simple solid-phase radioimmunoassay for human leukemia-associated cell membrane antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, a simple solid-phase radioimmunoassay was developed to determine detergent-extracted human leukemia-associated cell membrane antigens. In the assay, 96-well microtiter plates are coated with human leukemia cell membrane antigens containing a T cell leukemia or a non-T cell leukemia antigen in the presence of a detergent, and treated with 1.6% bovine serum albumin solution. The coated antigens were reacted with an appropriate murine monoclonal antibody (mAb). The bound mAb is determined by a second reaction with 125I-labeled F(ab')2 of goat anti-mouse Ig. The best antigen dose-dependent antibody binding results were obtained using the plates coated with antigens in the presence of taurocholate. In addition, the usefulness of the present assay with taurocholate during the purification of the antigens was demonstrated. (Auth.)

  4. Cancer associated aberrant protein O-glycosylation can modify antigen processing and immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline B Madsen

    Full Text Available Aberrant glycosylation of mucins and other extracellular proteins is an important event in carcinogenesis and the resulting cancer associated glycans have been suggested as targets in cancer immunotherapy. We assessed the role of O-linked GalNAc glycosylation on antigen uptake, processing, and presentation on MHC class I and II molecules. The effect of GalNAc O-glycosylation was monitored with a model system based on ovalbumin (OVA-MUC1 fusion peptides (+/- glycosylation loaded onto dendritic cells co-cultured with IL-2 secreting OVA peptide-specific T cell hybridomas. To evaluate the in vivo response to a cancer related tumor antigen, Balb/c or B6.Cg(CB-Tg(HLA-A/H2-D2Enge/J (HLA-A2 transgenic mice were immunized with a non-glycosylated or GalNAc-glycosylated MUC1 derived peptide followed by comparison of T cell proliferation, IFN-γ release, and antibody induction. GalNAc-glycosylation promoted presentation of OVA-MUC1 fusion peptides by MHC class II molecules and the MUC1 antigen elicited specific Ab production and T cell proliferation in both Balb/c and HLA-A2 transgenic mice. In contrast, GalNAc-glycosylation inhibited the presentation of OVA-MUC1 fusion peptides by MHC class I and abolished MUC1 specific CD8+ T cell responses in HLA-A2 transgenic mice. GalNAc glycosylation of MUC1 antigen therefore facilitates uptake, MHC class II presentation, and antibody response but might block the antigen presentation to CD8+ T cells.

  5. Antibody avidity in swine lymphocyte antigen-defined miniature pigs.

    OpenAIRE

    Appleyard, G D; Mallard, B A; Kennedy, B. W.; Wilkie, B. N.

    1992-01-01

    Antibody avidity to hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) was measured by thiocyanate ion elution enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in swine lymphocyte antigen (SLA) defined miniature pigs. Serum antibody avidity was evaluated on day 14 and 30 after primary (day 0) and secondary (day 14) immunizations in eight to ten week old miniature pigs previously typed for swine lymphocyte antigen genotype. The effect of SLA genotype, litter, and gender on anti-HEWL antibody avidity was determined by lea...

  6. Antigenic distinctiveness, heterogeneity, and relationships of Methanothrix spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Macario, A J; Conway de Macario, E

    1987-01-01

    A detailed immunologic analysis of Methanothrix soehngenii Opfikon (the type species of the genus), Methanothrix sp. strain CALS-1, and Methanothrix concilii GP6 was performed. A variety of poly- and monoclonal antibody probes for a comprehensive panel of reference organisms were used to determine immunogenicity, antigenicity, and relationships. The three organisms are antigenically distinct but interrelated, forming an immunologically cohesive group, weakly related to methanosarcinae. A prom...

  7. Limited transplantation of antigen-expressing hematopoietic stem cells induces long-lasting cytotoxic T cell responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren L Denning

    Full Text Available Harnessing the ability of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs to recognize and eradicate tumor or pathogen-infected cells is a critical goal of modern immune-based therapies. Although multiple immunization strategies efficiently induce high levels of antigen-specific CTLs, the initial increase is typically followed by a rapid contraction phase resulting in a sharp decline in the frequency of functional CTLs. We describe a novel approach to immunotherapy based on a transplantation of low numbers of antigen-expressing hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs following nonmyeloablative or partially myeloablative conditioning. Continuous antigen presentation by a limited number of differentiated transgenic hematopoietic cells results in an induction and prolonged maintenance of fully functional effector T cell responses in a mouse model. Recipient animals display high levels of antigen-specific CTLs four months following transplantation in contrast to dendritic cell-immunized animals in which the response typically declines at 4-6 weeks post-immunization. Majority of HSC-induced antigen-specific CD8+ T cells display central memory phenotype, efficiently kill target cells in vivo, and protect recipients against tumor growth in a preventive setting. Furthermore, we confirm previously published observation that high level engraftment of antigen-expressing HSCs following myeloablative conditioning results in tolerance and an absence of specific cytotoxic activity in vivo. In conclusion, the data presented here supports potential application of immunization by limited transplantation of antigen-expressing HSCs for the prevention and treatment of cancer and therapeutic immunization of chronic infectious diseases such as HIV-1/AIDS.

  8. In situ Delivery of Antigen to DC-SIGN(+)CD14(+) Dermal Dendritic Cells Results in Enhanced CD8(+) T-Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehres, Cynthia M; van Beelen, Astrid J; Bruijns, Sven C M; Ambrosini, Martino; Kalay, Hakan; van Bloois, Louis; Unger, Wendy W J; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J; Storm, Gert; de Gruijl, Tanja D; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-09-01

    CD14(+) dendritic cells (DCs) present in the dermis of human skin represent a large subset of dermal DCs (dDCs) that are considered macrophage-like cells with poor antigen (cross)-presenting capacity and limited migratory potential to the lymph nodes. CD14(+) dDC highly express DC-specific ICAM-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN), a receptor containing potent endocytic capacity, facilitating intracellular routing of antigens to major histocompatibility complex I and II (MHC-I andII) loading compartments for the presentation to antigen-specific CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. Here we show using a human skin explant model that the in situ targeting of antigens to DC-SIGN using glycan-modified liposomes enhances the antigen-presenting capacity of CD14(+) dDCs. Intradermal vaccination of liposomes modified with the DC-SIGN-targeting glycan Lewis(X), containing melanoma antigens (MART-1 or Gp100), accumulated in CD14(+) dDCs and resulted in enhanced Gp100- or MART-1-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses. Simultaneous intradermal injection of the cytokines GM-CSF and IL-4 as adjuvant enhanced the migration of the skin DCs and increased the expression of DC-SIGN on the CD14(+) and CD1a(+) dDCs. These data demonstrate that human CD14(+) dDCs exhibit potent cross-presenting capacity when targeted in situ through DC-SIGN. PMID:25885805

  9. Forcing Tumor Cells to Present Their Own Tumor Antigens to the Immune System: a Necessary Design for an Efficient Tumor Immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert E.Humphreys; Gilda G.Hillman; Eric von Hofe; Minzhen Xu

    2004-01-01

    The general principle for tumor cells to escape from immune surveillance is to prevent tumor antigens from being recognized by the immune system. Many methods have been developed to increase the immunogenecity of the tumor cells. The most efficient methods are able to force tumor cells to present their own tumor antigens to the immune system. Stimulating Th cells by converting tumor cells into MHC class Ⅱ+/Ii- antigen presenting cells is one of the most efficient technologies. Using antisense methods, we suppress the expression of the Ii protein that normally co-expresses with MHC class Ⅱ molecules and blocks the antigenic peptide binding site of MHC class Ⅱ molecules during synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum. In such tumor cells, the "unprotected" MHC class Ⅱ molecules pick up endogenous tumor antigenic peptides, which have been transported into the ER for binding to MHC class Ⅰ molecules. Simultaneous presentation of tumor antigens by both MHC class Ⅰ and Ⅱ molecules generates a robust and long-lasting anti-tumor immune response. MHC class Ⅱ+/Ii- tumor cells are potent tumor cell vaccines and also cure a significant number of animals with renal and prostate tumors. We have developed analogous human gene vectors that are suitable for most patients and cancers.

  10. Forcing Tumor Cells to Present Their Own Tumor Antigens to the Immune System: a Necessary Design for an Efficient Tumor Immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RobertE.Humphreys; GildaG.Hillman; EricyonHofe; MinzhenXu

    2004-01-01

    The general principle for tumor cells to escape from immune surveillance is to prevent tumor antigens from being recognized by the immune system. Many methods have been developed to increase the immunogenecity of the tumor cells. The most efficient methods are able to force tumor cells to present their own tumor antigens to the immune system. Stimulating Th cells by converting tumor cells into MHC class II+/Ii- antigen presenting cells is one of the most efficient technologies. Using antisense methods, we suppress the expression of the Ii protein that normally co-expresses with MHC class II molecules and blocks the antigenic peptide binding site of MHC class II molecules during synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum. In such tumor cells, the"unprotected" MHC class II molecules pick up endogenous tumor antigenic peptides, which have been transported into the ER for binding to MHC class I molecules. Simultaneous presentation of tumor antigens by both MHC class I and II molecules generates a robust and long-lasting anti-tumor immune response. MHC class II+/Ii- tumor cells are potent tumor cell vaccines and also cure a significant number of animals with renal and prostate tumors. We have developed analogous human gene vectors that are suitable for most patients and cancers.

  11. Centrosomal localisation of the cancer/testis (CT) antigens NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 is regulated by proteasome activity in tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagotto, Anna; Caballero, Otavia L; Volkmar, Norbert; Devalle, Sylvie; Simpson, Andrew J G; Lu, Xin; Christianson, John C

    2013-01-01

    The Cancer/Testis (CT) antigen family of genes are transcriptionally repressed in most human tissues but are atypically re-expressed in many malignant tumour types. Their restricted expression profile makes CT antigens ideal targets for cancer immunotherapy. As little is known about whether CT antigens may be regulated by post-translational processing, we investigated the mechanisms governing degradation of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 in selected cancer cell lines. Inhibitors of proteasome-mediated degradation induced the partitioning of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 into a detergent insoluble fraction. Moreover, this treatment also resulted in increased localisation of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 at the centrosome. Despite their interaction, relocation of either NY-ESO-1 or MAGE-C1 to the centrosome could occur independently of each other. Using a series of truncated fragments, the regions corresponding to NY-ESO-1(91-150) and MAGE-C1(900-1116) were established as important for controlling both stability and localisation of these CT antigens. Our findings demonstrate that the steady state levels of NY-ESO-1 and MAGE-C1 are regulated by proteasomal degradation and that both behave as aggregation-prone proteins upon accumulation. With proteasome inhibitors being increasingly used as front-line treatment in cancer, these data raise issues about CT antigen processing for antigenic presentation and therefore immunogenicity in cancer patients.

  12. [Antigenic response against PPD and antigen 60 in tubercular patients: single antigen versus the combined test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Máttar, S; Broquetas, J M; Gea, J; Aran, X; el-Banna, N; Sauleda, J; Torres, J M

    1992-05-01

    We analyze serum samples from 70 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 50 healthy individuals. The antigenic activity (IgG) against protein purified antigen (PPD) and antigen 60 (A60) from M. tuberculosis. Thirteen patients were also HIV infected, and three patients had AIDS defined by the presence of disseminated tuberculosis. The test using antigen alone showed a 77% sensitivity and 74% specificity when PPD is used. When A60 was used, both values improved (81% sensitivity, 94% specificity). The use of a combined test (PPD and A60) improves the sensitivity (89%) but reduces the specificity (82%). The HIV infected patients showed similar responses to those of other patients. The combined use of different antigens might be useful for diagnosing tuberculosis. PMID:1390996

  13. Molecular mimics of the tumour antigen MUC1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharappel C James

    Full Text Available A key requirement for the development of cancer immunotherapy is the identification of tumour-associated antigens that are differentially or exclusively expressed on the tumour and recognized by the host immune system. However, immune responses to such antigens are often muted or lacking due to the antigens being recognized as "self", and further complicated by the tumour environment and regulation of immune cells within. In an effort to circumvent the lack of immune responses to tumour antigens, we have devised a strategy to develop potential synthetic immunogens. The strategy, termed mirror image phage display, is based on the concept of molecular mimicry as demonstrated by the idiotype/anti-idiotype paradigm in the immune system. Here as 'proof of principle' we have selected molecular mimics of the well-characterised tumour associated antigen, the human mucin1 protein (MUC1 from two different peptide phage display libraries. The putative mimics were compared in structure and function to that of the native antigen. Our results demonstrate that several of the mimic peptides display T-cell stimulation activity in vitro when presented by matured dendritic cells. The mimic peptides and the native MUC1 antigenic epitopes can cross-stimulate T-cells. The data also indicate that sequence homology and/or chemical properties to the original epitope are not the sole determining factors for the observed immunostimulatory activity of the mimic peptides.

  14. T cells from fully H-2 allogeneic (A replaced by B) radiation bone marrow chimeras are functionally competent and host restricted but are alloreactive against hybrid Ia determinants expressed on (A x B)F1 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this communication it is demonstrated that T cells from fully allogeneic A replaced by B radiation bone marrow chimeras are alloreactive against the hybrid Ia molecules expressed on the surface of heterozygous A X B cells. These results suggested that previous failures to generate cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses from fully allogeneic chimeras by sensitizing the chimeric T cells to antigen in an (A X B)F1-priming environment might have been confounded by an ongoing alloreaction against determinants created by hybrid Ia molecules expressed on F1 cells. Consequently, the ability to generate CTL responses from fully allogeneic chimeras was re-examined by sensitizing the chimeric T cells to antigen presented by homozygous rather that F1 stimulator cells. It was found that T cells of donor bone marrow origin that mediate cytotoxic responses to trinitrophenyl-modified self determinants do differentiate into functional competence in an H-2-incompatible host environment and are restricted to the host H-2 haplotype

  15. Carbon nanotubes' surface chemistry determines their potency as vaccine nanocarriers in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Hatem A.F.M.; Smyth, Lesley; Rubio, Noelia; Ratnasothy, Kulachelvy; Wang, Julie T.-W.; Bansal, Sukhvinder S.; Summers, Huw D.; Diebold, Sandra S.; Lombardi, Giovanna; Al-Jamal, Khuloud T.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown marked capabilities in enhancing antigen delivery to antigen presenting cells. However, proper understanding of how altering the physical properties of CNTs may influence antigen uptake by antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs), has not been established yet. We hypothesized that altering the physical properties of multi-walled CNTs (MWNTs)-antigen conjugates, e.g. length and surface charge, can affect the internalization of MWNT-antigen by DCs, hence the induced immune response potency. For this purpose, pristine MWNTs (p-MWNTs) were exposed to various chemical reactions to modify their physical properties then conjugated to ovalbumin (OVA), a model antigen. The yielded MWNTs-OVA conjugates were long MWNT-OVA (~ 386 nm), bearing net positive charge (5.8 mV), or short MWNTs-OVA (~ 122 nm) of increasing negative charges (− 23.4, − 35.8 or − 39 mV). Compared to the short MWNTs-OVA bearing high negative charges, short MWNT-OVA with the lowest negative charge demonstrated better cellular uptake and OVA-specific immune response both in vitro and in vivo. However, long positively-charged MWNT-OVA showed limited cellular uptake and OVA specific immune response in contrast to short MWNT-OVA displaying the least negative charge. We suggest that reduction in charge negativity of MWNT-antigen conjugate enhances cellular uptake and thus the elicited immune response intensity. Nevertheless, length of MWNT-antigen conjugate might also affect the cellular uptake and immune response potency; highlighting the importance of physical properties as a consideration in designing a MWNT-based vaccine delivery system. PMID:26802552

  16. Research on immunosensor for the determination of carcinoembryonic antigen and its application%免疫传感器在癌胚抗原检测中的构建与应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马霄; 莫利明; 虞成; 逯岭松; 杨攀

    2014-01-01

    目的:设计一种新型的基于丝网印刷技术的癌胚抗原(CEA)免疫传感器,用于癌胚抗原浓度的床边检测。方法:在丝网印刷电极(SPE)上层层修饰上多壁碳纳米管(MWNTs)N,N-二甲基甲酰胺(DMF)分散液与壳聚糖纳米二氧化铈(Chitosan-Nano CeO2)溶液两种纳米材料,利用纳米铈固载癌胚抗原抗体(anti-CEA),最后用牛血清白蛋白(BSA)封闭纳米铈上非特异位点,构建一种新型的癌胚抗原免疫传感器。采用透射电镜(TEM)及循环伏安法(CV)对修饰过程进行表征。结果:探讨不同pH、孵育温度及孵育时间对该免疫传感器性能的影响,该传感器在最适条件下对CEA响应良好,其线性范围为0~80 ng/ml,线性相关系数r=0.99825,检出限为0.08 ng/ml。结论:CEA免疫传感器具有稳定性好、灵敏度高、特异性好、结果准确可靠和可再生等优点,可应用于临床检测。%Objective: To design immunosensor for the determination of Carcinoembryonic Antigen(CEA) and be used in the piont-of-care test of the concentration of CEA. Methods:The immunosensor was developed by modifying multi-wall carbon nanotubes(MWNTs)which dispersed in N, N-dimethyl-formamide(DMF)on the Screen-Printed Electrodes (SPE), then Chitosan-NanoCeO2 were immobilized self-assembly. And then the antibody of CEA (anti-CEA) was absorbed on the surface of NanoCeO2 monolayer. Finally, Albumin from bovine serum (BSA) blocked the non-specific adsorption site.The modification process was characterized by transmisCeOn electronmicroscope(TEM)and cyclic voltammetry(CV). The factors possibly influenced the performance of the proposed immunosensor were studied in detail. Results:Under optimal conditions,the obtained immunosensor exhibited good electrochemical behavior to CEA in a linear range of 0 to 80 ng/ml (r=0.99825), with a detection limit of 0.08 ng/ml. Conclusion: The immunosensor prepared using this method has advantages of good

  17. Amino Acids Analysis in Different Antigens and Relationship with Immunoreactivity in Cysticercus cellulosae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Yi; QIAO Dai-rong; JIANG Yan; YANG Tao

    2002-01-01

    The six antigens of Cysticercus cellulosae: CFag, CSag, CBWag, CWag, UCWag and TSag were prepared respectively. The amino acids of the antigens were determined quantitative by automatic amino acid analyzer. The relationship of original reaction was confirmed between amino acids and antigens. The results showed that there were 17 amino acids among all of the antigens. There were no significant difference (P >0.05) of Asp, Glu, Lys, His in composition of all antigens by data analysis software SPSS. There are also no significant difference ( P > 0.05) in the composition of all amino acids between CSag and CBWag. The composition of Thr, Ser, Tyr, Ved, Pro in UCWag shows significant difference (P < 0.05) with other antigens.The sensitivity and peculiarity of UCWag are higher than that of the others. Pro and Glu show significant linear correspondence with sensitivity and peculiarity of antigens respectively.

  18. Abnormal antigens in breast cancer tissues and production of monoclonal antibodies against one of these antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    approximately 30 KDa molecular weight. However, some tests were done to determine the specificity of the produced monoclonal antibody. In conclusion, breast cancer tissues are associated with abnormal antigens, but with low incidence rate, this strongly favors the individualization of breast cancer diagnosis and treatment. (Author)

  19. Rapid titration of retroviral vectors encoding intracellular antigens by flow cytometry.

    OpenAIRE

    Sladek, T L; Jacobberger, J W

    1990-01-01

    Flow cytometry was used to detect cells infected with retroviral vectors encoding both simian virus 40 large T antigen and G418 resistance after indirect immunofluorescence staining using a T-antigen-specific monoclonal antibody and a fluorescein-conjugated secondary antibody. Titers of viral stocks determined by flow cytometry were equivalent to those determined by quantitation of G418-resistant colonies.

  20. A "new" primed lymphocyte typing (PLT) defined DP-antigen associated with a private HLA--DR antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, N; Jakobsen, B K; Platz, P;

    1980-01-01

    We have recently described a "new" private HLA-DR antigen, DR"LTM", which has a frequency of approximately 0.6% in Danes. Primed Lymphocyte Typing (PLT) cells directed towards DR"LTM"-associated determinants were generated in vitro by haplotype primings in two unrelated families with DR...... total agreement between the results obtained by HLA-DR typing with the antiserum "LTM" and by PLT-typing with these two haplotype primed PLT-cells. None of the DP"LTM"-positive individuals carried more than one of the antigens HLA-Dw/-DRw/DP1-8 and the local specificity D/DP"H". Accordingly, this "new......" PLT-defined antigen, DP"LTM", most probably belongs to the series of HLA-D/DR-associated DP-antigens previously described....

  1. Yeast retrotransposon particles as antigen delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsman, A J; Burns, N R; Layton, G T; Adams, S E

    1995-05-31

    The development of technologies to produce recombinant proteins for use in the pharmaceutical industry has made substantial advances, in particular in the area of generating antigens containing multiple copies of important immunological regions. One such antigen-carrier system is based on the ability of a protein encoded by the yeast retrotransposon, Ty, to self-assemble into virus-like particles. Ty-fusion proteins retain this ability to form particles, and a range of hybrid VLPs carrying a variety of heterologous antigens have been produced and shown to induce potent immune responses. In particular, hybrid VLPs carrying the core protein p24 of HIV (p24-VLPs) have been shown to induce antibody and T-cell proliferative responses in both experimental animals and human volunteers, and immunization of rabbits with VLPs carrying the principal neutralizing determinant of HIV (V3-VLPs) resulted in the induction of neutralizing antibody responses and T-cell proliferation. Further studies with V3-VLPs have shown that this particulate antigen stimulates enhanced V3-specific lymphoproliferative responses as compared to whole recombinant gp120 or to V3 peptide conjugated to albumin. The V3-VLPs also induce potent CTL responses following immunization of mice in the absence of adjuvant. These responses are MHC class I restricted and are mediated by CD8-positive cells. These observations therefore demonstrate that hybrid Ty-VLPs induce both humoral and cellular immune responses against HIV and suggest that these immunogens may be important in combatting AIDS and other infections. PMID:7625653

  2. Human Leukocyte Antigens Influence the Antibody Response to Hepatitis B Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollah Jafarzadeh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection and its sequelae such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma has remained a serious public health problem throughout the world. The WHO strategy for effective control of HBV infection and its complications is mass vaccination of neonates and children within the framework of Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI. Vaccination with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg induces protective antibody response (anti-HBs ≥ 10 IU/L in 90-99% of vaccinees.The lack of  response to  HBsAg has  been attributed  to a variety of  immunological mechanisms, including defect in antigen presentation, defect in HBsAg-specific T and/or B cell repertoires, T-cell suppression, increase in the regulatory T cell count, lack of necessary help of T-cells for production of anti-HBs by B cells, defect in Th1 and/or Th2 cytokine production  and  selective  killing  of  HBsAg-specific  B-cells  by  human  leukocyte  antigen (HLA-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The HLA complex plays an important role in many of these immunological processes.A variety of HLA class I, II, and III alleles and antigens have been reported to beassociated with antibody response to HBsAg vaccination in different ethnic populations. Moreover, some HLA haplotypes were also associated with responsiveness to HBsAg.In this review the association of the HLA specificities with antibody response to hepatitis B (HB vaccine is discussed.

  3. Oxidation by neutrophils-derived HOCl increases immunogenicity of proteins by converting them into ligands of several endocytic receptors involved in antigen uptake by dendritic cells and macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Biedroń

    Full Text Available The initiation of adaptive immune responses to protein antigens has to be preceded by their uptake by antigen presenting cells and intracellular proteolytic processing. Paradoxically, endocytic receptors involved in antigen uptake do not bind the majority of proteins, which may be the main reason why purified proteins stimulate at most weak immune responses. A shared feature of different types of adjuvants, capable of boosting immunogenicity of protein vaccines, is their ability to induce acute inflammation, characterized by early influx of activated neutrophils. Neutrophils are also rapidly recruited to sites of tissue injury or infection. These cells are the source of potent oxidants, including hypochlorous acid (HOCl, causing oxidation of proteins present in inflammatory foci. We demonstrate that oxidation of proteins by endogenous, neutrophils-derived HOCl increases their immunogenicity. Upon oxidation, different, randomly chosen simple proteins (yeast alcohol dehydrogenase, human and bovine serum albumin and glycoproteins (human apo-transferrin, ovalbumin gain the ability to bind with high affinity to several endocytic receptors on antigen presenting cells, which seems to be the major mechanism of their increased immunogenicity. The mannose receptor (CD206, scavenger receptors A (CD204 and CD36 were responsible for the uptake and presentation of HOCl-modified proteins by murine dendritic cells and macrophages. Other scavenger receptors, SREC-I and LOX-1, as well as RAGE were also able to bind HOCl-modified proteins, but they did not contribute significantly to these ligands uptake by dendritic cells because they were either not expressed or exhibited preference for more heavily oxidised proteins. Our results indicate that oxidation by neutrophils-derived HOCl may be a physiological mechanism of conferring immunogenicity on proteins which in their native forms do not bind to endocytic receptors. This mechanism might enable the immune system

  4. Mechanism of Adherence of Streptococcus mutans to Smooth Surfaces I. Roles of Insoluble Dextran-Levan Synthetase Enzymes and Cell Wall Polysaccharide Antigen in Plaque Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukasa, Hidehiko; Slade, Hutton D.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanism of adherence of Streptococcus mutans to smooth glass surfaces has been studied. The results with both viable and heat-killed cells showed that the process required (i) the synthesis of a water-insoluble dextran-levan polymer by cell-bound enzymes and (ii) the participation of a binding site on the surface of the S. mutans cell. Synthesis of the polymer from sucrose in the presence of the cells was required for adherence, and indicates that an “active” form of the polymer was required. Polymer synthesized by cell-free S. mutans enzymes when added to S. mutans cells did not produce adherence. Purified antibody globulin, specific for the a-d site in the polysaccharide S. mutans group a antigen, completely inhibited adherence. Antibody to the second antigen present in the polysaccharide molecule, the a antigen, did not inhibit adherence. The evidence indicates that adherence did not require an antigenic binding site which might be common to all S. mutans strains. The orientation of the synthetase enzyme(s), antigenic binding site, and dextran-levan polymer on the cell surface is under study. Images PMID:4582634

  5. IgE epitope proximity determines immune complex shape and effector cell activation capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieras, Anna; Linhart, Birgit; Roux, Kenneth H.; Dutta, Moumita; Khodoun, Marat; Zafred, Domen; Cabauatan, Clarissa R.; Lupinek, Christian; Weber, Milena; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Keller, Walter; Finkelman, Fred D.; Valenta, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Background IgE-allergen complexes induce mast cell and basophil activation and thus immediate allergic inflammation. They are also important for IgE-facilitated allergen presentation to T cells by antigen-presenting cells. Objective To investigate whether the proximity of IgE binding sites on an allergen affects immune complex shape and subsequent effector cell activation in vitro and in vivo. Methods We constructed artificial allergens by grafting IgE epitopes in different numbers and proximity onto a scaffold protein. The shape of immune complexes formed between artificial allergens and the corresponding IgE was studied by negative-stain electron microscopy. Allergenic activity was determined using basophil activation assays. Mice were primed with IgE, followed by injection of artificial allergens to evaluate their in vivo allergenic activity. Severity of systemic anaphylaxis was measured by changes in body temperature. Results We could demonstrate simultaneous binding of 4 IgE antibodies in close vicinity to each other. The proximity of IgE binding sites on allergens influenced the shape of the resulting immune complexes and the magnitude of effector cell activation and in vivo inflammation. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the proximity of IgE epitopes on an allergen affects its allergenic activity. We thus identified a novel mechanism by which IgE-allergen complexes regulate allergic inflammation. This mechanism should be important for allergy and other immune complex–mediated diseases. PMID:26684291

  6. Prevalence of Weak D Antigen In Western Indian Population

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    Tanvi Sadaria

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Discovery of Rh antigens in 1939 by Landsteiner and Weiner was the revolutionary stage in blood banking. Of these antigens, D, which decides Rh positivity or negativity, is the most antigenic. A problem is encountered when an individual has a weakened expression of D (Du, i.e., fewer numbers of D antigens on red cell membrane. Aims and Objectives: To know the prevalence of weak D in Indian population because incidence varies in different population. To determine the risk of alloimmunization among Rh D negative patients who receives the blood of weak D positive donors. Material and Methods: Rh grouping of 38,962 donors who came to The Department of Immunohematology and Blood Transfusion of Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad from 1st January 2013 to 30th September 2014 was done using the DIAGAST (Automated Grouping. The samples that tested negative for D antigen were further analysed for weak D (Du by indirect antiglobulin test using blend of Ig G and Ig M Anti D. This was done using Column agglutination method in ID card (gel card. Results: The total number of donors studied was 38,962. Out of these 3360(8.6% were tested Rh D negative. All Rh D negative donors were tested for weak D (Du. 22 (0.056% of total donors and 0.65% of Rh negative donors turned out to be weak D (Du positive. Conclusion: The prevalence of weak D (Du in Western Indian population is 0.056 %, So the risk of alloimmunization in our setting due to weak D (Du antigen is marginal. But, testing of weak D antigen is necessary in blood bank because weak D antigen is immunogenic and can produce alloimmunization if transfused to Rh D negative subjects.

  7. Amiloride enhances antigen specific CTL by faciliting HBV DNA vaccine entry into cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Geng

    Full Text Available The induction of relatively weak immunity by DNA vaccines in humans can be largely attributed to the low efficiency of transduction of somatic cells. Although formulation with liposomes has been shown to enhance DNA transduction of cultured cells, little, if any, effect is observed on the transduction of somatic tissues and cells. To improve the rate of transduction, DNA vaccine delivery by gene gun and the recently developed electroporation techniques have been employed. We report here that to circumvent requirement for such equipment, amiloride, a drug that is prescribed for hypertension treatment, can accelerate plasmid entry into antigen presenting cells (APCs both in vitro and in vivo. The combination induced APCs more dramatically in both maturation and cytokine secretion. Amiloride enhanced development of full CD8 cytolytic function including induction of high levels of antigen specific CTL and expression of IFN-γ+perforin+granzymeB+ in CD8+ T cells. Thus, amiloride is a facilitator for DNA transduction into host cells which in turn enhances the efficiency of the immune responses.

  8. Antigen-oriented T cell migration contributes to myelin peptide induced-EAE and immune tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Peiguo; Fu, Hanxiao; Wei, Gaohui; Wei, Zhongwei; Zhang, Junhua; Ma, Xuehan; Rui, Dong; Meng, Xianchun; Ming, Liang

    2016-08-01

    Treatment with soluble myelin peptide can efficiently and specifically induce tolerance to demyelination autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, however the mechanism underlying this therapeutic effect remains to be elucidated. In actively induced mouse model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) we analyzed T cell and innate immune cell responses in the central nervous system (CNS) and spleen after intraperitoneal (i.p.) infusion of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). We found that i.p. MOG infusion blocked effector T cell recruitment to the CNS and protected mice from EAE and lymphoid organ atrophy. Innate immune CD11b(+) cells preferentially recruited MOG-specific effector T cells, particularly when activated to become competent antigen presenting cells (APCs). During EAE development, mature APCs were enriched in the CNS rather than in the spleen, attracting effector T cells to the CNS. Increased myelin antigen exposure induced CNS-APC maturation, recruiting additional effector T cells to the CNS, causing symptoms of disease. MOG triggered functional maturation of splenic APCs. MOG presenting APCs interacted with MOG-specific T cells in the spleen, aggregating to cluster around CD11b(+) cells, and were trapped in the periphery. This process was MHC II dependent as an MHC II directed antibody blocked CD4(+) T cell cluster formation. These findings highlight the role of myelin peptide-loaded APCs in myelin peptide-induced EAE and immune tolerance. PMID:27327113

  9. Antigen recognition and presentation in periapical tissues: a role for TLR expressing cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, S V; Love, R M; Rich, A M; Seymour, G J

    2011-02-01

    Bacteria are the prime cause of periapical diseases and root canal microbiology is a well-researched area of endodontics. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are present in periapical lesions of endodontic origin and play a substantial role in recognizing, processing and presenting pathogenic antigens to the adaptive immune system such as an effective and long-lasting immune response is generated against the specific pathogens. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are germ-line encoded pathogen recognition receptors (PRR) expressed by various APCs which induce their maturation, lead to gene transcription in the nucleus and the production of several pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Thirteen TLRs have been discovered, 10 of which have been identified in humans so far. Preliminary studies of dental pulp tissue have demonstrated various cell types expressing different TLRs in response to commonly encountered microorganisms. However, there is little information available regarding the expression and function of the various TLRs in human periapical lesions. This review discusses the interactions of various APCs in periapical lesions and the possible roles of different TLRs and APCs in pulp/periapical pathogen recognition and presentation to the adaptive immune system in the initiation and sustaining of periapical diseases.

  10. Cell Wall-Associated Protein Antigens of Streptococcus salivarius: Purification, Properties, and Function in Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerkamp, Anton H.; Jacobs, Ton

    1982-01-01

    Three cell wall-associated protein antigens (antigens b, c, and d) were isolated from mutanolysin-solubilized cell walls of Streptococcus salivarius HB and purified to apparent homogeneity by a combination of ion-exchange chromatography, gel filtration, and immunoadsorption chromatography. Antigens b and c were also isolated from culture supernatants. Antigen b consisted of more than 80% protein and had an apparent molecular weight as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of 320,000. Antigen c consisted of 57% protein, about 30% neutral sugar, and about 13% amino sugar, and its glycoprotein nature was confirmed by specific staining techniques. During sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis antigen c resolved into two or more bands, depending on the source or the isolation procedure, in the molecular weight range from 220,000 to 280,000. Antigen d consisted of 95% protein and was observed in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis as two bands with molecular weights of 129,000 and 121,000. Under nondenaturing conditions all three antigens had molecular weights in the range from 1 × 106 to 3 × 106 as determined by gel filtration. The amino acid compositions of antigens b, c, and d were characterized by low amounts of basic amino acids and relatively high levels of nonpolar amino acids. Among oral streptococcal species antigens b and c were virtually restricted to strains of S. salivarius and most often to serotype I strains. Antigen b was recognized as the factor that mediates coaggregation of S. salivarius with Veillonella strains. The purified protein retained its biological activity. Antigen c could be linked to functions relating to adhesion of the streptococci to host tissues on the basis of its absence in mutant strains and blocking by specific antisera. The purified molecule had no detectable biological activity. Antigen d could not be linked to an established adhesion function. Images

  11. Frequency of serum anti-cysticercus antibodies in the population of a rural Brazilian community (Cássia dos Coqueiros, SP determined by ELISA and immunoblotting using Taenia crassiceps antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRAGAZZA Lúcia M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the impact of cysticercosis on public health, especially the neurologic form of the disease, neurocysticercosis (NC, we studied the frequency of positivity of anti-Taenia solium cysticercus antibodies in serum samples from 1,863 inhabitants of Cássia dos Coqueiros, SP, a municipal district located 80 km from Ribeirão Preto, an area considered endemic for cysticercosis. The 1,863 samples were tested by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA using an antigenic extract from Taenia crassiceps vesicular fluid (Tcra. The reactive and inconclusive ELISA samples were tested by immunoblotting. Of the 459 samples submitted to immunoblotting, 40 were strongly immunoreactive to the immunodominant 18 and 14 kD peptides. Considering the use of immunoblotting as confirmatory due to its high specificity, the anti-cysticercus serum prevalence in this population was 2.1%.

  12. Expression, Purification and Characterization of Ricin vectors used for exogenous antigen delivery into the MHC Class I presentation pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Daniel C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Disarmed versions of the cytotoxin ricin can deliver fused peptides into target cells leading to MHC class I-restricted antigen presentation [Smith et al. J Immunol 2002; 169:99-107]. The ricin delivery vector must contain an attenuated catalytic domain to prevent target cell death, and the fused peptide epitope must remain intact for delivery and functional loading to MHC class I molecules. Expression in E. coli and purification by cation exchange chromatography of the fusion protein is described. Before used for delivery, the activity of the vector must be characterized in vitro, via an N-glycosidase assay, and in vivo, by a cytotoxicity assay. The presence of an intact epitope must be confirmed using mass spectrometry by comparing the actual mass with the predicted mass.

  13. [Farmer's lung antigens in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennekamp, J; Joest, M; Sander, I; Engelhart, S; Raulf-Heimsoth, M

    2012-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that besides the long-known farmer's lung antigen sources Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula (Micropolyspora faeni), Thermoactinomyces vulgaris, and Aspergillus fumigatus, additionally the mold Absidia (Lichtheimia) corymbifera as well as the bacteria Erwinia herbicola (Pantoea agglomerans) and Streptomyces albus may cause farmer's lung in Germany. In this study the sera of 64 farmers with a suspicion of farmer's lung were examined for the following further antigens: Wallemia sebi, Cladosporium herbarum, Aspergillus versicolor, and Eurotium amstelodami. Our results indicate that these molds are not frequent causes of farmer's lung in Germany. PMID:22477566

  14. Vitreous Cavity-Associated Immune Deviation Induced by Retinal S Antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhijie Li; Guanghua Peng; Chen Li

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the vitreous cavity(VC) supports the induction of deviant immune responses to retinal soluble(S) antigen and to observe the influence of interleukin-1 (IL-1) on the immunologic properties of the VC. Methods: Retinal S antigen was inoculated into the anterior chamber(AC) and the VC in Wistar rats. Seven days after antigen inoculation, the recipient animals were immunized with S antigen and complete Freund's adjuvant. Delayed-type hypersen- sitivity(DTH) was assessed by footpad challenge. To alter systemic immune conditions,IL-1 was administrated by intraperitoneal injection.Results: Antigen-specific DTH did not develop in rats in which S antigen was injected into the AC and the VC. By contrast, when IL-1 administrated systemically, S antigen was injected into the AC and VC elicited strong DTH.Conclusion: The VC supports immune deviation for soluble antigen by acitivity suppressing antigen-Specific DTH. Systemic administration of exogenous IL-1 eliminates the capacity of the VC to support immune deviation to soluble antigen locally injected.

  15. Interferon Alpha Signalling and Its Relevance for the Upregulatory Effect of Transporter Proteins Associated with Antigen Processing (TAP in Patients with Malignant Melanoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Heise

    Full Text Available Interferon alpha (IFNα is routinely used in the clinical practice for adjuvant systemic melanoma therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanism of IFNα effects and prediction of response in the IFNα therapy regime allows initiation and continuation of IFNα treatment for responder and exclusion of non-responder to avoid therapy inefficacy and side-effects. The transporter protein associated with antigen processing-1 (TAP1 is part of the MHC class I peptide-loading complex, and important for antigen presentation in tumor and antigen presenting cells. In the context of personalized medicine, we address this potential biomarker TAP1 as a target of IFNα signalling.We could show that IFNα upregulates TAP1 expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of patients with malignant melanoma receiving adjuvant high-dose immunotherapy. IFNα also induced expression of TAP1 in mouse blood and tumor tissue and suppressed the formation of melanoma metastasis in an in vivo B16 tumor model. Besides its expression, TAP binding affinity and transport activity is induced by IFNα in human monocytic THP1 cells. Furthermore, our data revealed that IFNα clearly activates phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT3 in THP1 and A375 melanoma cells. Inhibition of Janus kinases abrogates the IFNα-induced TAP1 expression. These results suggest that the JAK/STAT pathway is a crucial mediator for TAP1 expression elicited by IFNα treatment.We suppose that silencing of TAP1 expression provides tumor cells with a mechanism to escape cytotoxic T-lymphocyte recognition. The observed benefit of IFNα treatment could be mediated by the shown dual effect of TAP1 upregulation in antigen presenting cells on the one hand, and of TAP1 upregulation in 'silent' metastatic melanoma cells on the other hand. In conclusion, this work contributes to a better understanding of the mode of action of IFNα which is essential to identify markers to predict, assess and monitor therapeutic

  16. Evidence for glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchoring of Toxoplasma gondii major surface antigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomavo, S.; Schwarz, R.T.; Dubremetz, J.F. (Institut National de la Recheche Medicale, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France))

    1989-10-01

    The four major surface antigens of Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites (P43, P35, P30, and P22) were made water soluble by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). These antigens were biosynthetically labeled with {sup 3}H-fatty acids, ({sup 3}H)ethanolamine, and ({sup 3}H)carbohydrates. Treatment of {sup 3}H-fatty-acid-labeled parasite lysates with PI-PLC removed the radioactive label from these antigens. A cross-reacting determinant was exposed on these antigens after PI-PLC treatment.

  17. Modeling the presentation of C3d-coated antigen by B lymphocytes: enhancement by CR1/2-BCR co-ligation is selective for the co-ligating antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prechl, József; Baiu, Dana C; Horváth, Attila; Erdei, Anna

    2002-03-01

    We have used a set of single-chain variable fragment antibodies (sc) genetically fused with an influenza hemagglutinin-derived peptide as a means to investigate the role of CR1 and CR2 in antigen presentation by B cells. When incubated with the B cell lymphoma 2PK3, peptide-containing sc specific for either CR1 or CR1/2 mediated activation of the hemagglutinin peptide-specific T cell line IP-12-7, as assessed by IL-2 production. Efficient presentation was dependent on the binding of the constructs to CR1/2, implying that receptor-mediated endocytosis is responsible for the effect. Cross-linkage of CR1/2 or CD19 by mAb did not increase the extent of T cell activation. However, when CR1/2 was co-ligated with the BCR--using either polyclonal goat anti-mouse IgG or recombinant protein LA--the antigen concentration required to activate T cells decreased by two orders of magnitude. Moreover, this enhancement was selective for the antigen included in these complexes and did not affect the presentation of a free peptide or of antigen bound to CR1/2 excluded from the complexes. These results suggest that B cells may bind various C3d-coated antigens at a time, but only the one which reacts with the BCR will be processed with high efficiency. This mechanism may ensure the specificity of cognate T cell help. PMID:11867560

  18. Failure of a novel, rapid antigen and antibody combination test to detect antigen-positive HIV infection in African adults with early HIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Kilembe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute HIV infection (prior to antibody seroconversion represents a high-risk window for HIV transmission. Development of a test to detect acute infection at the point-of-care is urgent. METHODS: Volunteers enrolled in a prospective study of HIV incidence in four African cities, Kigali in Rwanda and Ndola, Kitwe and Lusaka in Zambia, were tested regularly for HIV by rapid antibody test and p24 antigen ELISA. Five subgroups of samples were also tested by the Determine Ag/Ab Combo test 1 Antigen positive, antibody negative (acute infection; 2 Antigen positive, antibody positive; 3 Antigen negative, antibody positive; 4 Antigen negative, antibody negative; and 5 Antigen false positive, antibody negative (HIV uninfected. A sixth group included serial dilutions from a p24 antigen-positive control sample. Combo test results were reported as antigen positive, antibody positive, or both. RESULTS: Of 34 group 1 samples with VL between 5x105 and >1.5x107 copies/mL (median 3.5x106, 1 (2.9% was detected by the Combo antigen component, 7 (20.6% others were positive by the Combo antibody component. No group 2 samples were antigen positive by the Combo test (0/18. Sensitivity of the Combo antigen test was therefore 1.9% (1/52, 95% CI 0.0, 9.9. One false positive Combo antibody result (1/30, 3.3% was observed in group 4. No false-positive Combo antigen results were observed. The Combo antigen test was positive in group 6 at concentrations of 80 pg/mL, faintly positive at 40 and 20 pg/mL, and negative thereafter. The p24 ELISA antigen test remained positive at 5 pg/mL. CONCLUSIONS: Although the antibody component of the Combo test detected antibodies to HIV earlier than the comparison antibody tests used, less than 2% of the cases of antigen-positive HIV infection were detected by the Combo antigen component. The development of a rapid point-of-care test to diagnose acute HIV infection remains an urgent goal.

  19. Detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei O-antigen serotypes in near-neighbor species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone Joshua K

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is the etiological agent of melioidosis and a CDC category B select agent with no available effective vaccine. Previous immunizations in mice have utilized the lipopolysaccharide (LPS as a potential vaccine target because it is known as one of the most important antigenic epitopes in B. pseudomallei. Complicating this strategy are the four different B. pseudomallei LPS O-antigen types: A, B, B2, and rough. Sero-crossreactivity is common among O-antigens of Burkholderia species. Here, we identified the presence of multiple B. pseudomallei O-antigen types and sero-crossreactivity in its near-neighbor species. Results PCR screening of O-antigen biosynthesis genes, phenotypic characterization using SDS-PAGE, and immunoblot analysis showed that majority of B. mallei and B. thailandensis strains contained the typical O-antigen type A. In contrast, most of B. ubonensis and B. thailandensis-like strains expressed the atypical O-antigen types B and B2, respectively. Most B. oklahomensis strains expressed a distinct and non-seroreactive O-antigen type, except strain E0147 which expressed O-antigen type A. O-antigen type B2 was also detected in B. thailandensis 82172, B. ubonensis MSMB108, and Burkholderia sp. MSMB175. Interestingly, B. thailandensis-like MSMB43 contained a novel serotype B positive O-antigen. Conclusions This study expands the number of species which express B. pseudomallei O-antigen types. Further work is required to elucidate the full structures and how closely these are to the B. pseudomallei O-antigens, which will ultimately determine the efficacy of the near-neighbor B serotypes for vaccine development.

  20. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graves, C.J.; Ros, V.I.D.; Stevenson, B.; Sniegowski, P.D.; Brisson, D.

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide

  1. Oncogenic cancer/testis antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Andersen, Mads H; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2015-01-01

    /testis antigens are immunogenic, highly cancer-specific, and frequently expressed in various types of cancer, which make them promising candidate targets for cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccination and adoptive T-cell transfer with chimeric T-cell receptors. Our current understanding of tumor...

  2. Concepts and applications for influenza antigenic cartography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Influenza antigenic cartography projects influenza antigens into a two or three dimensional map based on immunological datasets, such as hemagglutination inhibition and microneutralization assays. A robust antigenic cartography can facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection since the antigenic map can simplify data interpretation through intuitive antigenic map. However, antigenic cartography construction is not trivial due to the challenging features embedded in the immunological data, such as data incompleteness, high noises, and low reactors. To overcome these challenges, we developed a computational method, temporal Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS), by adapting the low rank MC concept from the movie recommendation system in Netflix and the MDS method from geographic cartography construction. The application on H3N2 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A viruses demonstrates that temporal MC-MDS is effective and efficient in constructing influenza antigenic cartography. The web sever is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap. PMID:21761589

  3. The Impacts of Helicobacter Pylori Antigen Positivity on Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Erkol Ižnal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We aimed to clarify the impacts of H. pylori infection on disease activity and clinical findings of AS. Material and Method: Forty-eight patients with AS were included in this study. The demographic data including age, sex, durations of the disease and medication of the patients were recorded. The laboratory analysis comprised Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C-reactive protein (CRP and H. pylori antigen determination in gaita. The disease activity, functional disability and clinical status were assessed using the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI, The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional index (BASFI and The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI respectively. We divided patients according to H. pylori antigen positivity in gaita as H. pylori positive and negative patients.Results: The mean age of patients was 41.9 11.8. CRP levels were slightly but not significantly higher in patients with positive H. pylori antigen compared to those in patients without H. pylori antigen in gaita (p=0.08. There was no significant difference in terms of ESR levels, BASDAI, BASFI and BASMI scores in patients with positive H. pylori antigen compared to those in patients with negative H. pylori antigen in gaita (p-values were >0.05 for all. In regression model BASDAI score was found to have no relationship with H. pylori antigen positivity, ESR and CRP levels (p-values were >0.05 for all. Discussion: H. pylori seemed to have probable impacts on the disease activity of AS. Studies with greater patient population and longer follow-up periods are warranted to enlighten this issue.

  4. Clinical significant of combined determination of serum CEA and carbohydrate antigen tumor markers in 85 patients with lung adenocarcinoma%肺腺癌患者血清CEA和糖链抗原肿瘤标记物联合测定的临床意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈粉秧

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical significant of combined determination of serum CEA and car-bohydrate antigen (CA125, CA199, CA153) tumor markers in patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Methods The serum CEA and carbohydrate antigen (CA125, CA199 and CA153) levels were determined with chemilumescence immunoassay in 85 patients with lung adenocarcinoma, 35 patients with lung squanous carcinoma, 42 patients with small cell lung cancer and 49 patients with benign lung disease. Results In 162 patients with lung cancer, the ser-um CEA and carbohydrate antigen levels were significantly higher in 85 patients with lung adenocarcinoma, 35 pa-tients with lung squanous carcinoma and 42 patients with small cell lung cancer than those in 49 patients with benign lung disease (P<0. 001) and the level of 85 patients with lung adenocarcinoma was the highest. So did the serum carbohydrate antigen levels. The sensitivity (95. 29%) and accuracy (83. 76%) in the four tumor markers combined determination were significantly higher than those in single item ( P all<0. 01 ) , and the specificity was 75. 23%. Conclusion The combined detection of serum CEA and carbohydrate antigen levels is helpful for the diagnosis of lung adenocarcinoma, with higher sensitivity and accuracy.%目的:为了探讨85例肺腺癌患者血清CEA和糖链抗原肿瘤标记物水平联合测定的临床意义。方法化学发光免疫分析测定85例肺腺癌、35例肺鳞癌、42例小细胞肺癌和49例良性肺部疾病血清CEA和糖链抗原(CA125、CA199和CA153)水平,并进行了比较性研究。结果162例肺癌患者中,85例肺腺癌、35例肺鳞癌、42例小细胞肺癌患者血清CEA水平较之49例良性肺部疾病明显增高( P<0.001、P<0.01和P<0.001),以肺腺癌增高最为明显。血清糖链抗原(CA125、CA199和 CA153)水平亦然,也以肺腺癌血清CA125、CA199和CA153水平增高最为显著。四项肿瘤标记物的联合测定对85例肺腺癌的敏感性为95.29

  5. Modified tumour antigen-encoding mRNA facilitates the analysis of naturally occurring and vaccine-induced CD4 and CD8 T cells in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knights, Ashley J; Nuber, Natko; Thomson, Christopher W; de la Rosa, Olga; Jäger, Elke; Tiercy, Jean-Marie; van den Broek, Maries; Pascolo, Steve; Knuth, Alexander; Zippelius, Alfred

    2009-03-01

    The development of effective anti-cancer vaccines requires precise assessment of vaccine-induced immunity. This is often hampered by low ex vivo frequencies of antigen-specific T cells and limited defined epitopes. This study investigates the applicability of modified, in vitro-transcribed mRNA encoding a therapeutically relevant tumour antigen to analyse T cell responses in cancer patients. In this study transfection of antigen presenting cells, by mRNA encoding the tumour antigen NY-ESO-1, was optimised and applied to address spontaneous and vaccine-induced T cell responses in cancer patients. Memory CD8+ T cells from lung cancer patients having detectable humoral immune responses directed towards NY-ESO-1 could be efficiently detected in peripheral blood. Specific T cells utilised a range of different T cell receptors, indicating a polyclonal response. Specific killing of a panel of NY-ESO-1 expressing tumour cell lines indicates recognition restricted to several HLA allelic variants, including a novel HLA-B49 epitope. Using a modified mRNA construct targeting the translated antigen to the secretory pathway, detection of NY-ESO-1-specific CD4+ T cells in patients could be enhanced, which allowed the in-depth characterisation of established T cell clones. Moreover, broad CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses covering multiple epitopes were detected following mRNA stimulation of patients treated with a recombinant vaccinia/fowlpox NY-ESO-1 vaccine. This approach allows for a precise monitoring of responses to tumour antigens in a setting that addresses the breadth and magnitude of antigen-specific T cell responses, and that is not limited to a particular combination of known epitopes and HLA-restrictions. PMID:18663444

  6. HLA ANTIGENS AND VOGT-KOYANAGI- HARADA'S DISEASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1991-01-01

    Thirty patients with Vogt-Koyanagi-Haradas disease were typed for HLA-A and HLA-B antigenic determinants by a microlymphocytotoxicity technique. HLA-B22 antigen showed an increased frequency of 43.3% in the patient group(relative risk=8.69; exact P<0.0001; corrected P<0.0025) compared with normal control group(frequency=7.69%). This association suggests that immunogenetic factor may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada's disease.

  7. Genome Scale Identification of Treponema pallidum Antigens

    OpenAIRE

    McKevitt, Matthew; Brinkman, Mary Beth; McLoughlin, Melanie; Perez, Carla; Howell, Jerrilyn K.; Weinstock, George M.; Norris, Steven J; Palzkill, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    Antibody responses for 882 of the 1,039 proteins in the proteome of Treponema pallidum were examined. Sera collected from infected rabbits were used to systematically identify 106 antigenic proteins, including 22 previously identified antigens and 84 novel antigens. Additionally, sera collected from rabbits throughout the course of infection demonstrated a progression in the breadth and intensity of humoral immunoreactivity against a representative panel of T. pallidum antigens.

  8. COTA (colon-ovarian tumor antigen). An immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, K D; Fenoglio-Preiser, C M; Berry, C O; Zamora, P O; Ram, M D; Fulks, R M; Rhodes, B A

    1986-07-01

    A goat anti-serum was prepared against mucinous ovarian cyst fluid and absorbed with normal colon and a variety of normal tissues until the only residual immunoreactivity was directed against colon cancer and ovarian tumor mucin. The set of antigenic determinants defined by this anti-serum has been called COTA, standing for colon-ovarian-tumor-antigen. This highly absorbed anti-serum (anti-COTA) was used for immunohistochemical staining of 42 different tissues in parallel with staining with a goat anti-CEA, which was also highly absorbed. The results suggest that COTA is a highly sensitive and specific antigen for colon carcinoma and may have potential for the early detection of malignant changes predictive of cancer of the colon.

  9. Production of Trichophyton mentagrophytes antigens and their characterization in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Venturini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The participation of dermatophytic antigens in the host-parasite balance is still poorly understood. One of the difficulties encountered by researchers is the lack of dominant and specific antigens that can be used in such studies. In order to contribute to a better understanding of this aspect of infection, the present study identifies antigen fractions obtained from exoantigen and cytoplasmic extracts of Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE revealed the presence of 13 proteins in the exoantigen extract, whose molecular weight ranged from 12.5 to 90 kDa. The cytoplasmic extract contained 18 protein fractions ranging from 11 to 110 kDa. Immunoblotting showed the presence of immunodominant antigens against IgG, IgM and IgA antibodies. This affinity was observed in three proteins of the exoantigen extract and in three proteins of the cytoplasmic extract, with respective molecular weights of 33, 39 and 59, and 40, 55 and 82 kDa. These results are promising, especially when considering that these extracts contain antigenically distinct protein fractions which, once determined, may contribute to a better understanding of dermatophytoses, and may thus help in the development of alternative strategies for the diagnosis and treatment of this condition.

  10. Phase variable O antigen biosynthetic genes control expression of the major protective antigen and bacteriophage receptor in Vibrio cholerae O1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberley D Seed

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Vibrio cholerae lipopolysaccharide O1 antigen is a major target of bacteriophages and the human immune system and is of critical importance for vaccine design. We used an O1-specific lytic bacteriophage as a tool to probe the capacity of V. cholerae to alter its O1 antigen and identified a novel mechanism by which this organism can modulate O antigen expression and exhibit intra-strain heterogeneity. We identified two phase variable genes required for O1 antigen biosynthesis, manA and wbeL. manA resides outside of the previously recognized O1 antigen biosynthetic locus, and encodes for a phosphomannose isomerase critical for the initial step in O1 antigen biosynthesis. We determined that manA and wbeL phase variants are attenuated for virulence, providing functional evidence to further support the critical role of the O1 antigen for infectivity. We provide the first report of phase variation modulating O1 antigen expression in V. cholerae, and show that the maintenance of these phase variable loci is an important means by which this facultative pathogen can generate the diverse subpopulations of cells needed for infecting the host intestinal tract and for escaping predation by an O1-specific phage.

  11. Human TRAV1-2-negative MR1-restricted T cells detect S. pyogenes and alternatives to MAIT riboflavin-based antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meermeier, Erin W; Laugel, Bruno F; Sewell, Andrew K; Corbett, Alexandra J; Rossjohn, Jamie; McCluskey, James; Harriff, Melanie J; Franks, Tamera; Gold, Marielle C; Lewinsohn, David M

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are thought to detect microbial antigens presented by the HLA-Ib molecule MR1 through the exclusive use of a TRAV1-2-containing TCRα. Here we use MR1 tetramer staining and ex vivo analysis with mycobacteria-infected MR1-deficient cells to demonstrate the presence of functional human MR1-restricted T cells that lack TRAV1-2. We characterize an MR1-restricted clone that expresses the TRAV12-2 TCRα, which lacks residues previously shown to be critical for MR1-antigen recognition. In contrast to TRAV1-2(+) MAIT cells, this TRAV12-2-expressing clone displays a distinct pattern of microbial recognition by detecting infection with the riboflavin auxotroph Streptococcus pyogenes. As known MAIT antigens are derived from riboflavin metabolites, this suggests that TRAV12-2(+) clone recognizes unique antigens. Thus, MR1-restricted T cells can discriminate between microbes in a TCR-dependent manner. We postulate that additional MR1-restricted T-cell subsets may play a unique role in defence against infection by broadening the recognition of microbial metabolites. PMID:27527800

  12. Enhanced vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell responses to malaria antigen ME-TRAP by fusion to MHC class ii invariant chain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra J Spencer

    Full Text Available The orthodox role of the invariant chain (CD74; Ii is in antigen presentation to CD4+ T cells, but enhanced CD8+ T cells responses have been reported after vaccination with vectored viral vaccines encoding a fusion of Ii to the antigen of interest. In this study we assessed whether fusion of the malarial antigen, ME-TRAP, to Ii could increase the vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell response. Following single or heterologous prime-boost vaccination of mice with a recombinant chimpanzee adenovirus vector, ChAd63, or recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA, higher frequencies of antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were observed, with the largest increases observed following a ChAd63-MVA heterologous prime-boost regimen. Studies in non-human primates confirmed the ability of Ii-fusion to augment the T cell response, where a 4-fold increase was maintained up to 11 weeks after the MVA boost. Of the numerous different approaches explored to increase vectored vaccine induced immunogenicity over the years, fusion to the invariant chain showed a consistent enhancement in CD8+ T cell responses across different animal species and may therefore find application in the development of vaccines against human malaria and other diseases where high levels of cell-mediated immunity are required.

  13. STUDY ON MECHANISM OF MODIFICATION OF HLA ANTIGEN CAMOUFLAGED BY DIVERSE mPEGs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张印则; 周华友; 兰炯采; 李伟; 张志欣; 章扬培

    2004-01-01

    Objective To study mechanism of various effects of HLA antigen camouflaged by different mPEGs. Methods Effects of the modification of HLA antigen camouflaged by various mPEGs were detected by microlymphocytotoxicity test. The ability of modification was detected by SDS-PAGE. The mechanism of the modification was depicted by the three-dimensional structure of HLA antigen. Results The specific reaction between HLA-A2 antigen and its antibody were completely blocked by mPEG-BTC and mPEG-SPA. mPEG-MAL did not camouflage HLA antigen. The diversity of the modification of HLA antigen camouflaged by varied mPEGs was closely associated with the amides displayed on the surface of HLA antigen. Conclusion Only the amides which were exposed to the surface of HLA antigen can be camouflaged by mPEG. The amides on the surface of three-dimensional structure of HLA-A2 antigen determine the effect of the modification by various mPEGs.

  14. Antigenic Variation in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petter, Michaela; Duffy, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is the protozoan parasite that causes most malaria-associated morbidity and mortality in humans with over 500,000 deaths annually. The disease symptoms are associated with repeated cycles of invasion and asexual multiplication inside red blood cells of the parasite. Partial, non-sterile immunity to P. falciparum malaria develops only after repeated infections and continuous exposure. The successful evasion of the human immune system relies on the large repertoire of antigenically diverse parasite proteins displayed on the red blood cell surface and on the merozoite membrane where they are exposed to the human immune system. Expression switching of these polymorphic proteins between asexual parasite generations provides an efficient mechanism to adapt to the changing environment in the host and to maintain chronic infection. This chapter discusses antigenic diversity and variation in the malaria parasite and our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that direct the expression of these proteins. PMID:26537377

  15. [HLA antigens in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumba, I V; Sochnev, A M; Kukaĭne, E M; Burshteĭn, A M; Benevolenskaia, L I

    1990-01-01

    Antigens of I class HLA system (locus A and B) were investigated in 67 patients of Latvian nationality suffering from juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). Associations of HLA antigens with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis partially coincided with the ones revealed earlier. Typing established an increased incidence of antigen B27 (p less than 0.01) and gaplotype A2, B40 (p less than 0.01). Antigen B15 possessed a protective action with respect to JRA. Interlocus combinations demonstrated a closer association with the disease than a single antigen. The authors also revealed markers of various clinico-anatomical variants of JRA.

  16. Stable solid-phase Rh antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yared, M A; Moise, K J; Rodkey, L S

    1997-12-01

    Numerous investigators have attempted to isolate the Rh antigens in a stable, immunologically reactive form since the discovery of the Rh system over 56 years ago. We report here a successful and reproducible approach to solubilizing and adsorbing the human Rh antigen(s) to a solid-phase matrix in an antigenically active form. Similar results were obtained with rabbit A/D/F red blood cell antigens. The antigen preparation was made by dissolution of the red blood cell membrane lipid followed by fragmentation of the residual cytoskeleton in an EDTA solution at low ionic strength. The antigenic activity of the soluble preparations was labile in standard buffers but was stable in zwitterionic buffers for extended periods of time. Further studies showed that the antigenic activity of these preparations was enhanced, as was their affinity for plastic surfaces, in the presence of acidic zwitterionic buffers. Adherence to plastic surfaces at low pH maintained antigenic reactivity and specificity for antibody was retained. The data show that this approach yields a stable form of antigenically active human Rh D antigen that could be used in a red blood cell-free assay for quantitative analysis of Rh D antibody and for Rh D antibody immunoadsorption and purification.

  17. Approach for Identifying Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-DR Bound Peptides from Scarce Clinical Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyder, Tina; Kohler, Maxie; Tarasova, Nataliya K; Haag, Sabrina; Rutishauser, Dorothea; Rivera, Natalia V; Sandin, Charlotta; Mia, Sohel; Malmström, Vivianne; Wheelock, Åsa M; Wahlström, Jan; Holmdahl, Rikard; Eklund, Anders; Zubarev, Roman A; Grunewald, Johan; Ytterberg, A Jimmy

    2016-09-01

    Immune-mediated diseases strongly associating with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles are likely linked to specific antigens. These antigens are presented to T cells in the form of peptides bound to HLA molecules on antigen presenting cells, e.g. dendritic cells, macrophages or B cells. The identification of HLA-DR-bound peptides presents a valuable tool to investigate the human immunopeptidome. The lung is likely a key player in the activation of potentially auto-aggressive T cells prior to entering target tissues and inducing autoimmune disease. This makes the lung of exceptional interest and presents an ideal paradigm to study the human immunopeptidome and to identify antigenic peptides.Our previous investigation of HLA-DR peptide presentation in the lung required high numbers of cells (800 × 10(6) bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells). Because BAL from healthy nonsmokers typically contains 10-15 × 10(6) cells, there is a need for a highly sensitive approach to study immunopeptides in the lungs of individual patients and controls.In this work, we analyzed the HLA-DR immunopeptidome in the lung by an optimized methodology to identify HLA-DR-bound peptides from low cell numbers. We used an Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) immortalized B cell line and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells obtained from patients with sarcoidosis, an inflammatory T cell driven disease mainly occurring in the lung. Specifically, membrane complexes were isolated prior to immunoprecipitation, eluted peptides were identified by nanoLC-MS/MS and processed using the in-house developed ClusterMHCII software. With the optimized procedure we were able to identify peptides from 10 × 10(6) cells, which on average correspond to 10.9 peptides/million cells in EBV-B cells and 9.4 peptides/million cells in BAL cells. This work presents an optimized approach designed to identify HLA-DR-bound peptides from low numbers of cells, enabling the investigation of the BAL immunopeptidome from individual patients

  18. Epstein-Barr virus early antigen diffuse (EBV-EA/D)-directed immunoglobulin A antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draborg, A H; Jørgensen, J M; Müller, H;

    2012-01-01

    We sought to determine whether the serological response towards lytic cycle antigens of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is altered in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients.......We sought to determine whether the serological response towards lytic cycle antigens of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is altered in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients....

  19. ANTIGEN MG7 IN GASTRIC CANCER AND GASTRIC PRECANCEROUS LESIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭冬丽; 宁佩芳; 袁媛

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the dynamic change and its diagnostic significance of MG7 expression in the process of gastric cancer development. Methods: The expression level of antigen MG7 was determined by immunohistochemistry method in 406 cases of gastric mucosa. The classification of intestinal metaplasia of gastric mucosa was determined by histochemistry method in 82 cases. Results: The positive rate of MG7 expression in normal gastric mucosa, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia of gastric mucosa and gastric cancer were increased gradually (P<0.01). The positive rate of MG7 expression in superficial gastritis, atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer were increased on sequence (P<0.01). The positive rate of antigen MG7 expression in type Ⅲ intestinal metaplasia of gastric mucosa had significant difference,compared with that in type Ⅰ an Ⅱ intestinal metaplasia (P<0.05). Conclusion: MG7 antigen had close relationship with gastric cancer. Type Ⅲ intestinal metaplasia, atrophic gastritis and dysplasia should be followed up in order to improve the early detection of gastric cancer. MG7 antigen had great clinical value in the dynamic follow-up of gastric precursors.

  20. An accurate radioimmunoassay of human growth hormone with separation on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of free antigen, antigen-antibody complex and damaged labelled antigen. Further study of damaged labelled antigen to obtain long-lasting labelled products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work was to obtain a radioimmunoassay that would be sufficiently accurate and precise to provide a suitable means of determining human growth hormone (hGH) in both extracts and physiological fluids for specific research purposes rather than for routine clinical assays where the labelled products could be used as long as possible. The only technique found that could satisfy these requirements was polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), though in some respects it is more laborious than other techniques. By introducing some modifications to the original method of Davis it was possible, with 11-cm tubes, to separate the free, the antibody-bound, and the damaged labelled antigen on the same gel. The method, being able to detect separately and independently these three components and to give a better control of the analytically dangerous ''damaged'' antigens, furnished accurate and reproducible curves. An example of a determination is the one on KABI-Crescormon which compares the results obtained with the present technique with those presented by another laboratory. Thanks to this method, the labelled antigen could be used for up to one month, after which re-purification on Sephadex enabled the same labelled product to be used profitably for two more months. Parallel to this work, a study has been performed on the various components originating in this so-called process of ''damaging'', and particular importance has been given to a more precise knowledge of the amount of antigen, in terms of mass, present in an assay. (author)

  1. Human Leukocyte Antigen-G Is Frequently Expressed in a Multicentric Study on Glioblastoma and May Be Induced in Vitro by Combined 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and Interferon-γ Treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wastowski, Isabela J; Simões, Renata T; Yaghi, Layale;

    2012-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a nonclassical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecule involved in immune tolerance processes, playing an important role in the maintenance of the semi-allogeneic fetus. Although HLA-G expression is restricted in normal tissues, it is broadly......-G protein expression was associated with a better long-term survival rate. The mechanisms underlying HLA-G gene expression were investigated in glioma cell lines U251MG, D247MG, and U138MG. Induction of HLA-G transcriptional activity was dependent of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment and enhanced...... by interferon-γ. HLA-G protein expression was observed in U251MG cells only. These cells exhibited a permissive chromatin state at the HLA-G gene promoter and the highest levels of induced HLA-G transcriptional activity following 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment. Several antigen-presenting machinery components...

  2. Production of interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-10 accompanies T helper cell type 1 (Th1) cytokine responses to a major thyroid self-antigen, thyroglobulin, in health and autoimmune thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; Hegedüs, L; Rieneck, Klaus;

    2007-01-01

    mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), Graves' disease (GD) and healthy controls, upon exposure to a thyroid self-antigen, human thyroglobulin (Tg), in the presence of autologous serum. Initially, TNF-alpha and IL-2 were produced in all three groups, accompanied by IL-10....... Release of IFN-gamma, IL-4 and, notably, IL-5 ensued. Both patient groups exhibited increased TNF-alpha, IL-2, IFN-gamma and IL-10 responses, and PBMC from HT patients secreted lower amounts of IL-5 than male, but not female, controls. Enhanced TNF-alpha production by HT cells also occurred......-gamma, IL-5 and IL-10 responses were markedly inhibited by partial denaturation of Tg by boiling. We hypothesize that autoantibodies and complement may promote mixed Th1/Th2 cell cytokine responses by enhancing the uptake of autoantigens by antigen-presenting cells...

  3. Production of interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-10 accompanies T helper cell type 1 (Th1) cytokine responses to a major thyroid self-antigen, thyroglobulin, in health and autoimmune thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Hegedüs, L; Rieneck, K;

    2007-01-01

    mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), Graves' disease (GD) and healthy controls, upon exposure to a thyroid self-antigen, human thyroglobulin (Tg), in the presence of autologous serum. Initially, TNF-alpha and IL-2 were produced in all three groups, accompanied by IL-10....... Release of IFN-gamma, IL-4 and, notably, IL-5 ensued. Both patient groups exhibited increased TNF-alpha, IL-2, IFN-gamma and IL-10 responses, and PBMC from HT patients secreted lower amounts of IL-5 than male, but not female, controls. Enhanced TNF-alpha production by HT cells also occurred......-gamma, IL-5 and IL-10 responses were markedly inhibited by partial denaturation of Tg by boiling. We hypothesize that autoantibodies and complement may promote mixed Th1/Th2 cell cytokine responses by enhancing the uptake of autoantigens by antigen-presenting cells....

  4. [Duffy blood group antigens: structure, serological properties and function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łukasik, Ewa; Waśniowska, Kazimiera

    2016-01-01

    Duffy (Fy) blood group antigens are located on seven-transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on erythrocytes and endothelial cells, which acts as atypical chemokine receptor (ACKR1) and malarial receptor. The biological role of the Duffy glycoprotein has not been explained yet. It is suggested that Duffy protein modulate the intensity of the inflammatory response. The Duffy blood group system consists of two major antigens, Fy(a) and Fy(b), encoded by two codominant alleles designated FY*A and FY*B which differ by a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at position 125G>A of the FY gene that results in Gly42Asp amino acid change in the Fy(a) and Fy(b) antigens, respectively. The presence of antigen Fy(a) and/or Fy(b) on the erythrocytes determine three Duffy-positive phenotypes: Fy(a+b-), Fy(a-b+) and Fy(a+b+), identified in Caucasian population. The Duffy-negative phenotype Fy(a-b-), frequent in Africans, but very rare in Caucasians, is defined by the homozygous state of FY*B-33 alleles. The FY*B-33 allele is associated with a SNP -33T>C in the promoter region of the FY gene, which suppresses erythroid expression of this gene without affecting its expression in other tissues. The FY*X allele, found in Caucasians, is correlated with weak expression of Fy(b) antigen. Fy(x) antigen differs from the native Fy(b) by the Arg89Cys and Ala100Thr amino acid substitutions due to SNPs: 265C>T and 298G>A in FY*B allele. The frequency of the FY alleles shows marked geographic disparities, the FY*B-33 allele is predominant in Africans, the FY*B in Caucasians, while the FY*A allele is dominant in Asians and it is the most prevalent allele globally. PMID:26943312

  5. Duffy blood group antigens: structure, serological properties and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Łukasik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Duffy (Fy blood group antigens are located on seven-transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on erythrocytes and endothelial cells, which acts as atypical chemokine receptor (ACKR1 and malarial receptor. The biological role of the Duffy glycoprotein has not been explained yet. It is suggested that Duffy protein modulate the intensity of the inflammatory response. The Duffy blood group system consists of two major antigens, Fya and Fyb, encoded by two codominant alleles designated FY*A and FY*B which differ by a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP at position 125G>A of the FY gene that results in Gly42Asp amino acid change in the Fya and Fyb antigens, respectively. The presence of antigen Fya and/or Fyb on the erythrocytes determine three Duffy-positive phenotypes: Fy(a+b-, Fy(a-b+ and Fy(a+b+, identified in Caucasian population. The Duffy-negative phenotype Fy(a-b-, frequent in Africans, but very rare in Caucasians, is defined by the homozygous state of FY*B-33 alleles. The FY*B-33 allele is associated with a SNP -33T>C in the promoter region of the FY gene, which suppresses erythroid expression of this gene without affecting its expression in other tissues. The FY*X allele, found in Caucasians, is correlated with weak expression of Fyb antigen. Fyx antigen differs from the native Fyb by the Arg89Cys and Ala100Thr amino acid substitutions due to SNPs: 265C>T and 298G>A in FY*B allele. The frequency of the FY alleles shows marked geographic disparities, the FY*B-33 allele is predominant in Africans, the FY*B in Caucasians, while the FY*A allele is dominant in Asians and it is the most prevalent allele globally. Tytuł główny Tak

  6. Immunization with antigenic peptides complexed with β-glucan induces potent cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity in combination with CpG-ODNs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Shinichi; Morishita, Hiromi; Kobiyama, Kouji; Aoshi, Taiki; Ishii, Ken J; Sakurai, Kazuo

    2015-12-28

    The induction of antigen-specific immune responses requires immunization with not only antigens, but also adjuvants. CpG oligonucleotides (CpG-ODNs) are well-known ligands for Toll-like receptor 9 and a potent adjuvant that induces both Th1-type humoral and cellular immune responses including cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses. We previously demonstrated that β-glucan schizophyllan (SPG) can form complexes with CpG-ODNs with attached dA40 (CpG-dA/SPG), which can accumulate in macrophages in the draining inguinal lymph nodes and induce strong immune responses by co-administration of antigenic proteins, namely ovalbumin (OVA). Immunization with antigenic peptides, OVA257-264, did not induce these antigen-specific immune responses even in combination with CpG-dA/SPG, indicating that peptides require a carrier to antigen presenting cells. In this study, we prepared conjugates comprising OVA257-264 and dA40, and made complexes with SPG. Immunization with OVA257-264-dA/SPG induced peptide-specific immune responses in combination with CpG-dA regardless of complexation with SPG both in vitro and in vivo. When splenocytes from immunized mice were incubated with E.G7-OVA tumor model cells presenting OVA peptides, the number of cells drastically decreased after 24h. Furthermore, mice pre-immunized with OVA257-264-dA/SPG and CpG-ODNs exhibited a long delay in tumor growth after tumor inoculation. Therefore, these peptide-dA/SPG and CpG-dA/SPG complexes could be used as a potent vaccine for the treatment of cancers and infectious diseases. PMID:26562685

  7. DNA-based nanoparticle tension sensors reveal that T-cell receptors transmit defined pN forces to their antigens for enhanced fidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Blanchfield, Lori; Ma, Victor Pui-Yan; Andargachew, Rakieb; Galior, Kornelia; Liu, Zheng; Evavold, Brian; Salaita, Khalid

    2016-05-17

    T cells are triggered when the T-cell receptor (TCR) encounters its antigenic ligand, the peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC), on the surface of antigen presenting cells (APCs). Because T cells are highly migratory and antigen recognition occurs at an intermembrane junction where the T cell physically contacts the APC, there are long-standing questions of whether T cells transmit defined forces to their TCR complex and whether chemomechanical coupling influences immune function. Here we develop DNA-based gold nanoparticle tension sensors to provide, to our knowledge, the first pN tension maps of individual TCR-pMHC complexes during T-cell activation. We show that naïve T cells harness cytoskeletal coupling to transmit 12-19 pN of force to their TCRs within seconds of ligand binding and preceding initial calcium signaling. CD8 coreceptor binding and lymphocyte-specific kinase signaling are required for antigen-mediated cell spreading and force generation. Lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) mediated adhesion modulates TCR-pMHC tension by intensifying its magnitude to values >19 pN and spatially reorganizes the location of TCR forces to the kinapse, the zone located at the trailing edge of migrating T cells, thus demonstrating chemomechanical crosstalk between TCR and LFA-1 receptor signaling. Finally, T cells display a dampened and poorly specific response to antigen agonists when TCR forces are chemically abolished or physically "filtered" to a level below ∼12 pN using mechanically labile DNA tethers. Therefore, we conclude that T cells tune TCR mechanics with pN resolution to create a checkpoint of agonist quality necessary for specific immune response.

  8. Tracking the Antigenic Evolution of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Reeve

    Full Text Available Quantifying and predicting the antigenic characteristics of a virus is something of a holy grail for infectious disease research because of its central importance to the emergence of new strains, the severity of outbreaks, and vaccine selection. However, these characteristics are defined by a complex interplay of viral and host factors so that phylogenetic measures of viral similarity are often poorly correlated to antigenic relationships. Here, we generate antigenic phylogenies that track the phenotypic evolution of two serotypes of foot-and-mouth disease virus by combining host serology and viral sequence data to identify sites that are critical to their antigenic evolution. For serotype SAT1, we validate our antigenic phylogeny against monoclonal antibody escape mutants, which match all of the predicted antigenic sites. For serotype O, we validate it against known sites where available, and otherwise directly evaluate the impact on antigenic phenotype of substitutions in predicted sites using reverse genetics and serology. We also highlight a critical and poorly understood problem for vaccine selection by revealing qualitative differences between assays that are often used interchangeably to determine antigenic match between field viruses and vaccine strains. Our approach provides a tool to identify naturally occurring antigenic substitutions, allowing us to track the genetic diversification and associated antigenic evolution of the virus. Despite the hugely important role vaccines have played in enhancing human and animal health, vaccinology remains a conspicuously empirical science. This study advances the field by providing guidance for tuning vaccine strains via site-directed mutagenesis through this high-resolution tracking of antigenic evolution of the virus between rare major shifts in phenotype.

  9. Tracking the Antigenic Evolution of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Richard; Borley, Daryl W; Maree, Francois F; Upadhyaya, Sasmita; Lukhwareni, Azwidowi; Esterhuysen, Jan J; Harvey, William T; Blignaut, Belinda; Fry, Elizabeth E; Parida, Satya; Paton, David J; Mahapatra, Mana

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying and predicting the antigenic characteristics of a virus is something of a holy grail for infectious disease research because of its central importance to the emergence of new strains, the severity of outbreaks, and vaccine selection. However, these characteristics are defined by a complex interplay of viral and host factors so that phylogenetic measures of viral similarity are often poorly correlated to antigenic relationships. Here, we generate antigenic phylogenies that track the phenotypic evolution of two serotypes of foot-and-mouth disease virus by combining host serology and viral sequence data to identify sites that are critical to their antigenic evolution. For serotype SAT1, we validate our antigenic phylogeny against monoclonal antibody escape mutants, which match all of the predicted antigenic sites. For serotype O, we validate it against known sites where available, and otherwise directly evaluate the impact on antigenic phenotype of substitutions in predicted sites using reverse genetics and serology. We also highlight a critical and poorly understood problem for vaccine selection by revealing qualitative differences between assays that are often used interchangeably to determine antigenic match between field viruses and vaccine strains. Our approach provides a tool to identify naturally occurring antigenic substitutions, allowing us to track the genetic diversification and associated antigenic evolution of the virus. Despite the hugely important role vaccines have played in enhancing human and animal health, vaccinology remains a conspicuously empirical science. This study advances the field by providing guidance for tuning vaccine strains via site-directed mutagenesis through this high-resolution tracking of antigenic evolution of the virus between rare major shifts in phenotype. PMID:27448206

  10. Levels of estrogen, carcinoembryonic antigen and cancer antigen of breast in breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted during the period from february 2004 to July 2004; with the objective of measuring the levels of estrogen (E2), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and cancer antigen of breast (CA-15.3) so as to facilitate the early diagnosis of breast cancer and determine the involvement of these parameters as risk factors for breast cancer. Ninety blood samples were collected from Sudanese females, divided into two groups; control group and patient groups. The patients group was sixty Sudanese females visiting the Radio Isotope Center, Khartoum (RICK) and they were confirmed as breast cancer patient by histopathology. The levels of the above mentioned parameters were determined by using radioimmunoassay technique. The results showed that, no significant (p=0.05) difference between the levels of the estrogen in patients compared to the control, on the other hand there was non significant (p>0.05) elevation in CEA levels in the patients with breast cancer compared to the control. The level of CA15.3 was significantly (p<0.0001) higher in the breast cancer patients compared to the control.(Author)

  11. Expression and characterization of a parasite-specific antigen on macrophages after infection with Leishmania donovani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, N; Kole, L; Ghosh, A; Das, P K

    1994-03-16

    A rabbit polyclonal antibody to crude soluble antigen of Leishmania donovani promastigotes recognized a determinant expressed on the surface membrane of mouse peritoneal macrophages and human monocyte derived macrophages infected in vitro. The determinant was recognized on infected macrophage surface only when F(ab')2 fragments of anti-leishmanial antiserum was employed in immunofluorescence. F(ab')2 fragments of human patient sera also could recognize the determinant. The expression of this antigen was not stage-specific for the parasite. Immunochemical analyses revealed this antigen to be of 51 kDa protein. Specific leaching of membrane proteins by trypsin showed three bands of expressed antigens of 26, 11 and 10 kDa, which in all likelihood might be arising from the 51 kDa antigen. The antigen was not expressed until 12 h of post infection, reached a maximum level at 24 h and thereafter attained a steady state level as studied upto 96 h of post infection. This type of antigen might have a great potential in immunodiagnostics and site-specific drug targeting. PMID:8078503

  12. Blood group antigen distribution in Lao blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keokhamphoui, C; Urwijitaroon, Y; Kongphaly, D; Thammavong, T

    2012-01-01

    Blood group antigens can be distributed differently within different nationalities. Therefore, information about the prevalence of blood group antigens in the Lao population will be useful for providing better blood transfusion services in the Lao People's Democratic Republic. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of blood group antigens in Lao blood donors. Blood samples from 464 Lao national volunteer blood donors were typed for antigens in various blood group systems including ABO, MNS, P1PK, Rh, Kell, Lewis, Duffy, Kidd, and Diego. The results show similar antigen prevalence to that among Northeast Thais for ABO, MNS, P1PK, Rh, Kell, and Duffy systems. In the ABO system, 0 was the highest at 37.72 percent,followed by 35.56 percent B, 19.83 percent A1, 6.47 percent A1B,and 0.43 percent A2B. The common phenotypes were D+C+E-ce+at 60.43 percent, M+N-S-s+ at 46.55 percent, Fy(a+b-) at 80.82 percent, Jk(a+b+) at 39.44 percent, and kk at 99.72 percent.Interestingly, Le(a-b-) was found at 50.43 percent, which was significantly higher than previous reports in Thais and Taiwanese.The P1 antigen was found in only 18.97 percent, which is much lower than in Whites and Blacks. Rare phenotypes were Fy(a-b+)and Jk(a-b-), found at 0.22 percent and 4.31 percent, respectively.In terms of negative antigens the study shows 0.22 percent Fy(a-), 35.34 percent Jk(a-), 29.53 percent Jk(b-), 3.04 percent C-, 2.39 percent e-, and 5.17 percent M-. The high prevalence of C, e, and Fy" and immunogenicity of these antigens may induce alloimmunization in transfusion-dependent patients, creating difficulties providing blood from Lao donors. The information obtained from this study will be useful for improving transfusion therapy in the country, especially for estimation of the availability of compatible blood for patients who have produced antibodies. PMID:23421543

  13. European collaborative evaluation of Enzygnost HBsAg 6.0: performance on hepatitis B virus surface antigen variants

    OpenAIRE

    Avellón, Ana; Echevarría, Jose-Manuel; Weber, Bernard; Weik, Michael; Schobel, Uwe-Peter; Willems, Wulf R.; Gerlich, Wolfram

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Amino acid changes within the major antigenic determinant of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen (HBsAg) may eventually modify the antigenic properties of the protein and may have impact on the sensitivity of diagnostic assays. Modifications in the design of an assay can, however, improve significantly its capability to detect these mutants. One-hundred and forty-seven clinical samples containing HBsAg variants, and 54 supernatants of cells expressing recombinant H...

  14. Antigen Incorporation on Cryptosporidium parvum Oocyst Walls

    OpenAIRE

    Entrala Emilio; Sbihi Younes; Sánchez-Moreno Manuel; Mascaró Carmen

    2001-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts are the infective stages responsible for transmission and survival of the organism in the environment. In the present work we show that the oocyst wall, far from being a static structure, is able to incorporate antigens by a mechanism involving vesicle fusion with the wall, and the incorporation of the antigen to the outer oocyst wall. Using immunoelectron microscopy we show that the antigen recognized by a monoclonal antibody used for diagnosis of cryptosporidi...

  15. Histocompatibility antigens in coal miners with pneumoconiosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Soutar, C A; Coutts, I.; Parkes, W R; Dodi, I. A.; Gauld, S; Castro, J E; Turner-Warwick, M

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-five histocompatibility antigens have been measured in 100 coal miners with pneumoconiosis attending a pneumoconiosis medical panel and the results compared with a panel of 200 normal volunteers not exposed to dust. Chest radiographs were read independently by three readers according to the ILO U/C classification. On a combined score, 40 men were thought to have simple pneumoconiosis and 60 men complicated pneumoconiosis. The number of antigens tested and associations between antigens ...

  16. Antigenic and allergenic analysis of psyllium seed components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlian, L G; Vyszenski-Moher, D L; Lawrence, A T; Schrotel, K R; Ritz, H L

    1992-04-01

    The outer portions (husk) of psyllium seeds are a concentrated source of natural fiber used in some bulk-fiber laxatives and cereals. They are known to elicit respiratory allergic reactions after inhalation or ingestion among sensitized individuals. Antigenic and allergenic characterization of three psyllium-seed fractions (husk, endosperm, and embryo) was conducted with crossed immunoelectrophoresis (CIE), crossed radioimmunoelectrophoresis, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to determine the source of psyllium allergenicity. Homologous CIE demonstrated psyllium endosperm and embryo extracts contained seven and four antigens, respectively. Husk extracts were too gelatinous to react by CIE. However, heterologous CIE profiles of endosperm or embryo extracts, reacted with antihusk antibodies, resulted in antigen-antibody precipitin peaks that matched the heavy staining precipitin lines of homologous reactions for endosperm and embryo, respectively. These results indicated that commercial-grade husk, endosperm, and embryo contained similar antigens. Extracts of all three seed components contained antigens that bound IgE antibodies in the sera of 11 psyllium RAST-positive individuals, as determined by crossed radioimmunoelectrophoresis. The few prominent husk protein/peptide bands resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were common in either embryo or endosperm. Immunoblots revealed common IgE reactive bands in all three seed fractions. Microscopic examination of the powdered commercial-grade psyllium (95% pure) revealed it contained endosperm and embryo particles. These immunologic, biochemical, and microscopic findings suggest that other contaminating seed components are primarily responsible for the allergenicity of commercial-grade psyllium-husk powder rather than the husk itself. PMID:1560169

  17. Intra-uterine exposure of horses to Sarcocystis spp. antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Antonello

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the intra-uterine exposure to Sarcocystis spp. antigens, determining the number of foals with detectable concentrations of antibodies against these agents in the serum, before colostrum ingestion and collect data about exposure of horses to the parasite. Serum samples were collected from 195 thoroughbred mares and their newborns in two farms from southern Brazil. Parasite specific antibody responses to Sarcocystis antigens were detected using the indirect immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT and immunoblot analysis. In 84.1% (159/189 of the pregnant mares and in 7.4% (14/189 of foals we detected antibodies anti-Sarcocystis spp. by IFAT. All samples seropositive from foals were also positive in their respective mares. Serum samples of seropositive foals by IFAT, showed no reactivity on the immunoblot, having as antigens S. neurona merozoites. In conclusion, the intra-uterine exposure to Sarcocystis spp. antigens in horses was demonstrated, with occurrence not only in mares, but also in their foals, before colostrum ingestion these occurrences were reduced.

  18. Partial chemical characterization of antigenic preparations of chromoblastomycosis agents Caracterização química parcial de preparações antigênicas de agentes da cromoblastomicose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Fraga BARROS

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Antigenic preparations (saline, methylic, metabolic and exoantigens of four agents of chromoblastomycosis, Fonsecaea pedrosoi, Phialophora verrucosa, Cladophialophora (Cladosporium carrionii and Rhinocladiella aquaspersa were obtained. Partial chemical characterization of these antigenic preparations was obtained by determination of the levels of total lipids, protein, and carbohydrates, and identification of the main sterols and carbohydrates. Methylic antigens presented the highest lipid contents, whereas metabolic antigens showed the highest carbohydrate content. Total lipid, protein, and carbohydrate levels were in the range of 2.33 to 2.00mg/ml, 0.04 to 0.02 mg/ml and 0.10 to 0.02 mg/ml, respectively, in the methylic antigens and in the range of 0.53 to 0.18mg/ml, 0.44 to 0.26mg/ml, and 1.82 to 1.02 mg/ml, respectively, in saline antigens. Total lipid, protein, and carbohydrate contents were in the range of 0.55 to 0.20mg/ml, 0.69 to 0.57mg/ml and 10.73 to 5.93mg/ml, respectively, in the metabolic antigens, and in the range of 0.55 to 0.15mg/ml, 0.62 to 0.20mg/ml and 3.55 to 0.42mg/ml, respectively, in the exoantigens. Phospholipids were not detected in the preparations. Saline and metabolic antigens and exoantigens presented hexose and the methylic antigen revealed additional pentose units in their composition. The UV light absorption spectra of the sterols revealed squalene and an ergosterol fraction in the antigens. The characterization of these antigenic preparations may be useful for serological evaluation of patients of chromoblastomycosis.Preparações antigênicas (antígenos salinos, metílicos, metabólicos e exoantígenos de quatro agentes da cromoblastomicose, Fonsecaea pedrosoi, Phialophora verrucosa, Cladophialophora (Cladosporium carrionii e Rhinocladiella aquaspersa foram obtidos e foi determinada a caracterização química parcial dos mesmos. Os antígenos metílicos apresentaram os maiores teores de lípides enquanto os

  19. Targeting tumor-associated antigens to the MHC class I presentation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, G; Margalit, A

    2007-06-01

    There is little doubt that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) can kill tumor cells in-vivo. However, most CTL-inducing immunization protocols examined so far in cancer patients have yielded only limited clinical benefits, underscoring the urge to improve current approaches for the effective induction of tumor-reactive CTLs. The tumor side of the immunological frontline is armed with large masses, high mutability and an arsenal of immune evasion and suppression mechanisms. Accordingly, the confronting CTLs should come in large numbers, recognize an assortment of MHC class I (MHC-I) bound tumor-associated peptides and be brought into action under effective immunostimulatory conditions. Naïve CTLs are activated to become effector cells in secondary lymphoid organs, following their productive encounter with MHC-I-bound peptides at the surface of dendritic cells (DCs). Therefore, many cancer vaccines under development focus on the optimization of peptide presentation by DCs at this critical stage. The elucidation of discrete steps and the subsequent identification of inherent bottlenecks in the MHC-I antigen presentation pathway have fueled elaborate efforts to enhance vaccine efficacy by the rational targeting of proteins or peptides, formulated into these vaccines, to this pathway. Protein- and gene-based strategies are accordingly devised to deliver tumor-associated peptides to selected cellular compartments, which are essential for the generation of functional CTL ligands. Many of these strategies target the conventional, endogenous route, while others harness the unique pathways that enable DCs to present exogenous antigens, known as cross-presentation. Here we dissect the intricate machinery that produces CTL ligands and examine how knowledge-based cancer vaccines can target the sequence of workstations, biochemical utensils and molecular intermediates comprising this production line.

  20. Targeting tumor-associated antigens to the MHC class I presentation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, G; Margalit, A

    2007-06-01

    There is little doubt that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) can kill tumor cells in-vivo. However, most CTL-inducing immunization protocols examined so far in cancer patients have yielded only limited clinical benefits, underscoring the urge to improve current approaches for the effective induction of tumor-reactive CTLs. The tumor side of the immunological frontline is armed with large masses, high mutability and an arsenal of immune evasion and suppression mechanisms. Accordingly, the confronting CTLs should come in large numbers, recognize an assortment of MHC class I (MHC-I) bound tumor-associated peptides and be brought into action under effective immunostimulatory conditions. Naïve CTLs are activated to become effector cells in secondary lymphoid organs, following their productive encounter with MHC-I-bound peptides at the surface of dendritic cells (DCs). Therefore, many cancer vaccines under development focus on the optimization of peptide presentation by DCs at this critical stage. The elucidation of discrete steps and the subsequent identification of inherent bottlenecks in the MHC-I antigen presentation pathway have fueled elaborate efforts to enhance vaccine efficacy by the rational targeting of proteins or peptides, formulated into these vaccines, to this pathway. Protein- and gene-based strategies are accordingly devised to deliver tumor-associated peptides to selected cellular compartments, which are essential for the generation of functional CTL ligands. Many of these strategies target the conventional, endogenous route, while others harness the unique pathways that enable DCs to present exogenous antigens, known as cross-presentation. Here we dissect the intricate machinery that produces CTL ligands and examine how knowledge-based cancer vaccines can target the sequence of workstations, biochemical utensils and molecular intermediates comprising this production line. PMID:17584150

  1. Ether lipid vesicle-based antigens impart protection against experimental listeriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansari MA

    2012-06-01

    and their physical mixture with sham (empty archaeosomes, besides showing feeble Th1 response, were unable to protect the animals against virulent listerial infection.Conclusion: On the basis of the evidence provided by the current data, it is inferred that archaeosome-entrapped SAgs formulation not only enhances cytotoxic T cell response but also helps in the clearance of pathogens and thereby increases the survival of the immunized animals.Keywords: archaeosome, culture supernatant, antigen-presenting cells, Th1 cytokines, co-stimulatory markers, lymphocyte proliferation, protection studies

  2. A computational framework for influenza antigenic cartography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhipeng Cai

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses have been responsible for large losses of lives around the world and continue to present a great public health challenge. Antigenic characterization based on hemagglutination inhibition (HI assay is one of the routine procedures for influenza vaccine strain selection. However, HI assay is only a crude experiment reflecting the antigenic correlations among testing antigens (viruses and reference antisera (antibodies. Moreover, antigenic characterization is usually based on more than one HI dataset. The combination of multiple datasets results in an incomplete HI matrix with many unobserved entries. This paper proposes a new computational framework for constructing an influenza antigenic cartography from this incomplete matrix, which we refer to as Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS. In this approach, we first reconstruct the HI matrices with viruses and antibodies using low-rank matrix completion, and then generate the two-dimensional antigenic cartography using multidimensional scaling. Moreover, for influenza HI tables with herd immunity effect (such as those from Human influenza viruses, we propose a temporal model to reduce the inherent temporal bias of HI tables caused by herd immunity. By applying our method in HI datasets containing H3N2 influenza A viruses isolated from 1968 to 2003, we identified eleven clusters of antigenic variants, representing all major antigenic drift events in these 36 years. Our results showed that both the completed HI matrix and the antigenic cartography obtained via MC-MDS are useful in identifying influenza antigenic variants and thus can be used to facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection. The webserver is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap.

  3. A computational framework for influenza antigenic cartography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2010-10-07

    Influenza viruses have been responsible for large losses of lives around the world and continue to present a great public health challenge. Antigenic characterization based on hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay is one of the routine procedures for influenza vaccine strain selection. However, HI assay is only a crude experiment reflecting the antigenic correlations among testing antigens (viruses) and reference antisera (antibodies). Moreover, antigenic characterization is usually based on more than one HI dataset. The combination of multiple datasets results in an incomplete HI matrix with many unobserved entries. This paper proposes a new computational framework for constructing an influenza antigenic cartography from this incomplete matrix, which we refer to as Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS). In this approach, we first reconstruct the HI matrices with viruses and antibodies using low-rank matrix completion, and then generate the two-dimensional antigenic cartography using multidimensional scaling. Moreover, for influenza HI tables with herd immunity effect (such as those from Human influenza viruses), we propose a temporal model to reduce the inherent temporal bias of HI tables caused by herd immunity. By applying our method in HI datasets containing H3N2 influenza A viruses isolated from 1968 to 2003, we identified eleven clusters of antigenic variants, representing all major antigenic drift events in these 36 years. Our results showed that both the completed HI matrix and the antigenic cartography obtained via MC-MDS are useful in identifying influenza antigenic variants and thus can be used to facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection. The webserver is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap.

  4. Effects of Co60 gamma radiation on the immunogenic and antigenic properties of Bothrops jararacussu venom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation has been successfully employed to attenuate animals toxins and venoms for immunizing antisera producing animals. However, the radiation effects on antigenicity and immunogenecity have not yet been elucidated. In the present work, we investigated the effects of gamma rays on the antigenic and immunogenicity have not yet been elucidated. In the present work, we investigated the effects of gamma rays on the antigenic and immunogenic behaviour of Bothrops jararacussu venon. Venom samples (2mg/ml in 150 mM NaCl) were irradiated with 500, 1000 and 2000 Gy of 60 Co gamma rays. These samples were submitted to antigen capture ELISA on plates coated with commercial bothropic antiserum. Results suggest a loss of reactivity of the 1000 and 2000 Gy irradiated samples. Antibodies against native and 2000 Gy irradiated venoms were produced in rabbits. Both sera able to bind native venom with a slightly higher titer for anti-irradiated serum. These data suggest that radiation promoted structural modification on the antigen molecules. However since the antibodies produced against irradiated antivenom were able to recognize native venom, there must have been preservation of some antigenic determinants. It has already been demosntrated that irradiation of proteins leads to structural modifications and unfolding of the molecules. Our data suggest that irradiation led to conformational epitopes destruction with preservation of linear epitopes and that the response against irradiated venom may be attributed to these linear antigenic determinants. (author). 8 refs., 3 figs

  5. Biological function and molecular mapping of M antigen in yeast phase of Histoplasma capsulatum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Jefferson Guimarães

    Full Text Available Histoplasmosis, due to the intracellular fungus Histoplasma capsulatum, can be diagnosed by demonstrating the presence of antibodies specific to the immunodominant M antigen. However, the role of this protein in the pathogenesis of histoplasmosis has not been elucidated. We sought to structurally and immunologically characterize the protein, determine yeast cell surface expression, and confirm catalase activity. A 3D-rendering of the M antigen by homology modeling revealed that the structures and domains closely resemble characterized fungal catalases. We generated monoclonal antibodies (mAbs to the protein and determined that the M antigen is present on the yeast cell surface and in cell wall/cell membrane preparations. Similarly, we found that the majority of catalase activity was in extracts containing fungal surface antigens and that the M antigen is not significantly secreted by live yeast cells. The mAbs also identified unique epitopes on the M antigen. The localization of the M antigen to the cell surface of H. capsulatum yeast and the characterization of the protein's major epitopes have important implications since it demonstrates that although the protein may participate in protecting the fungus against oxidative stress it is also accessible to host immune cells and antibody.

  6. The role of antigens and HLA class I haplotypes in indigenous women in Tashkent with hysteromyoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landish Isanbaeva

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunogenetic analysis on HLA I class in 177 indigenous women with uterine myoma showed the positive association in the risk of uterine fibroids with antigens HLA-B8/B22 and haplotype A28/B22; antigens HLA-A28, Cw5 and haplotype B17-Sw5 played role of auxiliary markers. HLA-antigens A2, B35, Cw4 and haplotypes A2-B35, B5-Cw4 showed the negative association. Carrying immunogenetic studies may be useful to search for individual genes involved in the determination of the disease - uterine fibroids, especially among patients with hereditary anamnesis.

  7. Natural micropolymorphism in human leukocyte antigens provides a basis for genetic control of antigen recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archbold, Julia K.; Macdonald, Whitney A.; Gras, Stephanie; Ely, Lauren K.; Miles, John J.; Bell, Melissa J.; Brennan, Rebekah M.; Beddoe, Travis; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Clements, Craig S.; Purcell, Anthony W.; McCluskey, James; Burrows, Scott R.; Rossjohn, Jamie; (Monash); (Queensland Inst. of Med. Rsrch.); (Melbourne)

    2009-07-10

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene polymorphism plays a critical role in protective immunity, disease susceptibility, autoimmunity, and drug hypersensitivity, yet the basis of how HLA polymorphism influences T cell receptor (TCR) recognition is unclear. We examined how a natural micropolymorphism in HLA-B44, an important and large HLA allelic family, affected antigen recognition. T cell-mediated immunity to an Epstein-Barr virus determinant (EENLLDFVRF) is enhanced when HLA-B*4405 was the presenting allotype compared with HLA-B*4402 or HLA-B*4403, each of which differ by just one amino acid. The micropolymorphism in these HLA-B44 allotypes altered the mode of binding and dynamics of the bound viral epitope. The structure of the TCR-HLA-B*4405EENLLDFVRF complex revealed that peptide flexibility was a critical parameter in enabling preferential engagement with HLA-B*4405 in comparison to HLA-B*4402/03. Accordingly, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphism can alter the dynamics of the peptide-MHC landscape, resulting in fine-tuning of T cell responses between closely related allotypes.

  8. Is HCV core antigen a reliable marker of viral load? An evaluation of HCV core antigen automated immunoassay

    OpenAIRE

    Hadziyannis, Emilia; Minopetrou, Martha; Georgiou, Anastasia; Spanou, Fotini; Koskinas, John

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C viral (HCV) load detection and quantification is routinely accomplished by HCV RNA measurement, an expensive but essential test, both for the diagnosis and treatment of chronic hepatitis C (CHC). HCV core antigen (Ag) testing has been suggested as an attractive alternative to molecular diagnostics. The aim of the study was to evaluate an automated chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA) for HCV core Ag measurement in comparison to quantitative HCV RNA determination. Methods...

  9. Antigen-Specific Antibody Glycosylation Is Regulated via Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Alison E; Jennewein, Madeleine F; Suscovich, Todd; Dionne, Kendall; Tedesco, Jacquelynne; Chung, Amy W; Streeck, Hendrik; Pau, Maria; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Francis, Don; Fast, Patricia; Laufer, Dagna; Walker, Bruce D; Baden, Lindsey; Barouch, Dan H; Alter, Galit

    2016-03-01

    Antibody effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, complement deposition, and antibody-dependent phagocytosis, play a critical role in immunity against multiple pathogens, particularly in the absence of neutralizing activity. Two modifications to the IgG constant domain (Fc domain) regulate antibody functionality: changes in antibody subclass and changes in a single N-linked glycan located in the CH2 domain of the IgG Fc. Together, these modifications provide a specific set of instructions to the innate immune system to direct the elimination of antibody-bound antigens. While it is clear that subclass selection is actively regulated during the course of natural infection, it is unclear whether antibody glycosylation can be tuned, in a signal-specific or pathogen-specific manner. Here, we show that antibody glycosylation is determined in an antigen- and pathogen-specific manner during HIV infection. Moreover, while dramatic differences exist in bulk IgG glycosylation among individuals in distinct geographical locations, immunization is able to overcome these differences and elicit antigen-specific antibodies with similar antibody glycosylation patterns. Additionally, distinct vaccine regimens induced different antigen-specific IgG glycosylation profiles, suggesting that antibody glycosylation is not only programmable but can be manipulated via the delivery of distinct inflammatory signals during B cell priming. These data strongly suggest that the immune system naturally drives antibody glycosylation in an antigen-specific manner and highlights a promising means by which next-generation therapeutics and vaccines can harness the antiviral activity of the innate immune system via directed alterations in antibody glycosylation in vivo.  .

  10. Antigen-Specific Antibody Glycosylation Is Regulated via Vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison E Mahan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Antibody effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, complement deposition, and antibody-dependent phagocytosis, play a critical role in immunity against multiple pathogens, particularly in the absence of neutralizing activity. Two modifications to the IgG constant domain (Fc domain regulate antibody functionality: changes in antibody subclass and changes in a single N-linked glycan located in the CH2 domain of the IgG Fc. Together, these modifications provide a specific set of instructions to the innate immune system to direct the elimination of antibody-bound antigens. While it is clear that subclass selection is actively regulated during the course of natural infection, it is unclear whether antibody glycosylation can be tuned, in a signal-specific or pathogen-specific manner. Here, we show that antibody glycosylation is determined in an antigen- and pathogen-specific manner during HIV infection. Moreover, while dramatic differences exist in bulk IgG glycosylation among individuals in distinct geographical locations, immunization is able to overcome these differences and elicit antigen-specific antibodies with similar antibody glycosylation patterns. Additionally, distinct vaccine regimens induced different antigen-specific IgG glycosylation profiles, suggesting that antibody glycosylation is not only programmable but can be manipulated via the delivery of distinct inflammatory signals during B cell priming. These data strongly suggest that the immune system naturally drives antibody glycosylation in an antigen-specific manner and highlights a promising means by which next-generation therapeutics and vaccines can harness the antiviral activity of the innate immune system via directed alterations in antibody glycosylation in vivo.  .

  11. Proteome sampling by the HLA class I antigen processing pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilka Hoof

    Full Text Available The peptide repertoire that is presented by the set of HLA class I molecules of an individual is formed by the different players of the antigen processing pathway and the stringent binding environment of the HLA class I molecules. Peptide elution studies have shown that only a subset of the human proteome is sampled by the antigen processing machinery and represented on the cell surface. In our study, we quantified the role of each factor relevant in shaping the HLA class I peptide repertoire by combining peptide elution data, in silico predictions of antigen processing and presentation, and data on gene expression and protein abundance. Our results indicate that gene expression level, protein abundance, and rate of potential binding peptides per protein have a clear impact on sampling probability. Furthermore, once a protein is available for the antigen processing machinery in sufficient amounts, C-terminal processing efficiency and binding affinity to the HLA class I molecule determine the identity of the presented peptides. Having studied the impact of each of these factors separately, we subsequently combined all factors in a logistic regression model in order to quantify their relative impact. This model demonstrated the superiority of protein abundance over gene expression level in predicting sampling probability. Being able to discriminate between sampled and non-sampled proteins to a significant degree, our approach can potentially be used to predict the sampling probability of self proteins and of pathogen-derived proteins, which is of importance for the identification of autoimmune antigens and vaccination targets.

  12. Antigenic cartography of H9N2 virus and its impact on the vaccine efficacy in chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    The H9 subtype of avian influenza virus (AIV) is wide-spread in Asia and the Middle East. The efficacy of vaccines is enhanced by the antigenic match of the hemagglutinin protein (HA) between the vaccine and the field strain. To determine how antigenic variations affect the vaccine efficacy, speci...

  13. Calorimetric comparison of the interactions between salivary proteins and Streptococcus mutans with and without antigen I/II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Chun-Ping; de Belt-Gritter, Betsy van; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Norde, Willem

    2007-01-01

    Antigen I/II can be found on streptococcal cell surfaces and is involved in their interaction with salivary proteins. In this paper, we determine the adsorption enthalpies of salivary proteins to Streptococcus mutans LT 11 and S. mutans IB03987 with and without antigen I/II, respectively, using isot

  14. Real-time PCR analysis of genes encoding tumor antigens in esophageal tumors and a cancer vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinert, Brian T; Krishnadath, Kausilia K; Milano, Francesca;

    2009-01-01

    with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR) to determine whether this treatment could improve the profile of tumor antigen genes expressed in these cells. In addition, the presence of MAGE-A tumor antigen protein was evaluated in the purified tumor cell lysate used...

  15. ANTIGENICITY OF COW'S MILK PROTEINS IN TWO ANIMAL MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.R. Neyestani

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Antigenicity of proteins found in cow's milk is age dependent. This is primarily due to infants possessing a more permeable intestinal wall than that in adults. Thus infants may acquire cow's milk allergy during their first year of life. While milk antigen specific IgE may cause allergy in susceptible subjects, there is some evidence indicating that milk antigen specific IgG may play some role in chronic disease development. The puropose of this study was to determine the antigenicity of cow's milk proteins in two animal models and to recommend the more sensitivie one, as an evaluation tool, to assess the antigenicity of a poteintial hypoallergenic formula. A crude extract of cow's milk was injected either to young male rabbits or BALB/C mice in four doses. Pure standard proteins of cow's milk were also injected to separate groups of animals to use their anti sera in later stages. The polyclonal pooled serum was then used to evaluate the antigenicity of the extract by indirect enzyme-linked immunossorbeni assay (LEISA. and Western blotting. Both the rabbit and BALB/C murine mode! demonstrated strong ELISA titres against casein and BSA proteins. However, the rabbit model also had a high antibody response against beta-lactoglobulin (/Mg. The lowest antibody response was found against alpha-kictalbumin («-la in both animal models and no response against immunoglobulins (Igs in either model. In Western blotting, rabbit antiserum showed four bands («-la, /Mg, caseins and BSA compared to two bands (caseins and BSA for mouse antiserum. Considering the allergenicity of these proteins in genetically prone subjects, it may be wise to exclude food sources of caseins as well as major whey proteins (BSA, from the diet of infants with a family history of atopy during the first year of life. The rabbit hyperimmunization model was more sensitive than the murine mode! in detecting antibodies against milk proteins. Thus, the rabbii model should be employed when

  16. Macrophages play an essential role in antigen-specific immune suppression mediated by T CD8⁺ cell-derived exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazimek, Katarzyna; Ptak, Wlodzimierz; Nowak, Bernadeta; Ptak, Maria; Askenase, Philip W; Bryniarski, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    Murine contact sensitivity (CS) reaction could be antigen-specifically regulated by T CD8(+) suppressor (Ts) lymphocytes releasing microRNA-150 in antibody light-chain-coated exosomes that were formerly suggested to suppress CS through action on macrophages (Mφ). The present studies investigated the role of Mφ in Ts cell-exosome-mediated antigen-specific suppression as well as modulation of Mφ antigen-presenting function in humoral and cellular immunity by suppressive exosomes. Mice depleted of Mφ by clodronate liposomes could not be tolerized and did not produce suppressive exosomes. Moreover, isolated T effector lymphocytes transferring CS were suppressed by exosomes only in the presence of Mφ, demonstrating the substantial role of Mφ in the generation and action of Ts cell regulatory exosomes. Further, significant decrease of number of splenic B cells producing trinitrophenyl (TNP) -specific antibodies with the alteration of the ratio of serum titres of IgM to IgG was observed in recipients of exosome-treated, antigen-pulsed Mφ and the significant suppression of CS was demonstrated in recipients of exosome-treated, TNP-conjugated Mφ. Additionally, exosome-pulsed, TNP-conjugated Mφ mediated suppression of CS in mice pre-treated with a low-dose of cyclophosphamide, suggesting de novo induction of T regulatory (Treg) lymphocytes. Treg cell involvement in the effector phase of the studied suppression mechanism was proved by unsuccessful tolerization of DEREG mice depleted of Treg lymphocytes. Furthermore, the inhibition of proliferation of CS effector cells cultured with exosome-treated Mφ in a transmembrane manner was observed. Our results demonstrated the essential role of Mφ in antigen-specific immune suppression mediated by Ts cell-derived exosomes and realized by induction of Treg lymphocytes and inhibition of T effector cell proliferation. PMID:25808106

  17. Macrophages play an essential role in antigen-specific immune suppression mediated by T CD8⁺ cell-derived exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazimek, Katarzyna; Ptak, Wlodzimierz; Nowak, Bernadeta; Ptak, Maria; Askenase, Philip W; Bryniarski, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    Murine contact sensitivity (CS) reaction could be antigen-specifically regulated by T CD8(+) suppressor (Ts) lymphocytes releasing microRNA-150 in antibody light-chain-coated exosomes that were formerly suggested to suppress CS through action on macrophages (Mφ). The present studies investigated the role of Mφ in Ts cell-exosome-mediated antigen-specific suppression as well as modulation of Mφ antigen-presenting function in humoral and cellular immunity by suppressive exosomes. Mice depleted of Mφ by clodronate liposomes could not be tolerized and did not produce suppressive exosomes. Moreover, isolated T effector lymphocytes transferring CS were suppressed by exosomes only in the presence of Mφ, demonstrating the substantial role of Mφ in the generation and action of Ts cell regulatory exosomes. Further, significant decrease of number of splenic B cells producing trinitrophenyl (TNP) -specific antibodies with the alteration of the ratio of serum titres of IgM to IgG was observed in recipients of exosome-treated, antigen-pulsed Mφ and the significant suppression of CS was demonstrated in recipients of exosome-treated, TNP-conjugated Mφ. Additionally, exosome-pulsed, TNP-conjugated Mφ mediated suppression of CS in mice pre-treated with a low-dose of cyclophosphamide, suggesting de novo induction of T regulatory (Treg) lymphocytes. Treg cell involvement in the effector phase of the studied suppression mechanism was proved by unsuccessful tolerization of DEREG mice depleted of Treg lymphocytes. Furthermore, the inhibition of proliferation of CS effector cells cultured with exosome-treated Mφ in a transmembrane manner was observed. Our results demonstrated the essential role of Mφ in antigen-specific immune suppression mediated by Ts cell-derived exosomes and realized by induction of Treg lymphocytes and inhibition of T effector cell proliferation.

  18. Global analysis of a class of HIV models with immune response and antigenic variation

    CERN Document Server

    Souza, Max O

    2008-01-01

    We study the global stability of two models for the HIV virus dynamics, that take into account the CTL immune response and antigenic variation. We show that both models are globally asymptotically stable, by using appropriate Lyapunov functions. For both models, we characterise the stable equilibrium points for the entire biologically relevant parameter range. In the model with antigenic variation, which can have a large number of equilibrium points, this allows us to determine what is the diversity of the persistent strains.

  19. Variability in expression of cell surface antigens of Candida albicans during morphogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Brawner, D L; Cutler, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    The location and expression of two different cell surface antigens on germinating and nongerminating Candida albicans cells was examined by using transmission electron microscopy after labeling with monoclonal antibodies (H9 or C6) and immunocolloidal gold. Immunodeterminant expression of the two carbohydrate antigens was followed from early germination events through 20 h of development. The determinant detected by H9 antibody, which was initially lost from the mother cell surface and prefer...

  20. Hepatitis B surface antigen variants in voluntary blood donors in Nanjing, China

    OpenAIRE

    Yong-lin Yang; Qiang Fu; Ming-shun Zhang; Jie Cai; Gui-ming Ma; Zu-hu Huang; Xu-bing Cai

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is still one of the serious infectious risks for the blood transfusion safety in China. One plausible reason is the emergence of the variants in the major antigenic alpha determinant within the major hydrophilic region (MHR) of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), which have been assumed to evade the immune surveillance and pose a challenge to the disease diagnosis. It is well documented that some commercial ELISA kits could detect the wild-type but...