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Sample records for antigen binds phosphatase

  1. JC virus small T antigen binds phosphatase PP2A and Rb family proteins and is required for efficient viral DNA replication activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Bollag

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human polyomavirus, JC virus (JCV produces five tumor proteins encoded by transcripts alternatively spliced from one precursor messenger RNA. Significant attention has been given to replication and transforming activities of JCV's large tumor antigen (TAg and three T' proteins, but little is known about small tumor antigen (tAg functions. Amino-terminal sequences of tAg overlap with those of the other tumor proteins, but the carboxy half of tAg is unique. These latter sequences are the least conserved among the early coding regions of primate polyomaviruses. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: We investigated the ability of wild type and mutant forms of JCV tAg to interact with cellular proteins involved in regulating cell proliferation and survival. The JCV P99A tAg is mutated at a conserved proline, which in the SV40 tAg is required for efficient interaction with protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, and the C157A mutant tAg is altered at one of two newly recognized LxCxE motifs. Relative to wild type and C157A tAgs, P99A tAg interacts inefficiently with PP2A in vivo. Unlike SV40 tAg, JCV tAg binds to the Rb family of tumor suppressor proteins. Viral DNAs expressing mutant t proteins replicated less efficiently than did the intact JCV genome. A JCV construct incapable of expressing tAg was replication-incompetent, a defect not complemented in trans using a tAg-expressing vector. CONCLUSIONS: JCV tAg possesses unique properties among the polyomavirus small t proteins. It contributes significantly to viral DNA replication in vivo; a tAg null mutant failed to display detectable DNA replication activity, and a tAg substitution mutant, reduced in PP2A binding, was replication-defective. Our observation that JCV tAg binds Rb proteins, indicates all five JCV tumor proteins have the potential to influence cell cycle progression in infected and transformed cells. It remains unclear how these proteins coordinate their unique and overlapping functions.

  2. Defining Starch Binding by Glucan Phosphatases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auger, Kyle; Raththagala, Madushi; Wilkens, Casper

    2015-01-01

    phosphatases. The main objective of this study was to quantify the binding affinity of different enzymes that are involved in this cyclic process. We established a protocol to quickly, reproducibly, and quantitatively measure the binding of the enzymes to glucans utilizing Affinity Gel Electrophoresis (AGE...... glucan phosphatases showed similar affinities for the short oligosaccharide β-cyclodextrin. We performed structure-guided mutagenesis to define the mechanism of these differences. We found that the carbohydrate binding module (CBM) domain provided a stronger binding affinity compared to surface binding...

  3. Defining Starch Binding by Glucan Phosphatases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auger, Kyle; Raththagala, Madushi; Wilkens, Casper;

    2015-01-01

    Starch is a vital energy molecule in plants that has a wide variety of uses in industry, such as feedstock for biomaterial processing and biofuel production. Plants employ a three enzyme cyclic process utilizing kinases, amylases, and phosphatases to degrade starch in a diurnal manner. Starch...... is comprised of the branched glucan amylopectin and the more linear glucan amylose. Our lab has determined the first structures of these glucan phosphatases and we have defined their enzymatic action. Despite this progress, we lacked a means to quickly and efficiently quantify starch binding to glucan...... phosphatases. The main objective of this study was to quantify the binding affinity of different enzymes that are involved in this cyclic process. We established a protocol to quickly, reproducibly, and quantitatively measure the binding of the enzymes to glucans utilizing Affinity Gel Electrophoresis (AGE...

  4. Probing protein phosphatase substrate binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlys-Larsen, Kim B.; Sørensen, Kasper Kildegaard; Jensen, Knud Jørgen;

    2012-01-01

    Proteomics and high throughput analysis for systems biology can benefit significantly from solid-phase chemical tools for affinity pull-down of proteins from complex mixtures. Here we report the application of solid-phase synthesis of phosphopeptides for pull-down and analysis of the affinity...... around the phosphorylated residue are important for the binding affinity of ILKAP. We conclude that solid-phase affinity pull-down of proteins from complex mixtures can be applied in phosphoproteomics and systems biology....

  5. Unique carbohydrate binding platforms employed by the glucan phosphatases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuelle, Shane; Brewer, M Kathryn; Meekins, David A; Gentry, Matthew S

    2016-07-01

    Glucan phosphatases are a family of enzymes that are functionally conserved at the enzymatic level in animals and plants. These enzymes bind and dephosphorylate glycogen in animals and starch in plants. While the enzymatic function is conserved, the glucan phosphatases employ distinct mechanisms to bind and dephosphorylate glycogen or starch. The founding member of the family is a bimodular human protein called laforin that is comprised of a carbohydrate binding module 20 (CBM20) followed by a dual specificity phosphatase domain. Plants contain two glucan phosphatases: Starch EXcess4 (SEX4) and Like Sex Four2 (LSF2). SEX4 contains a chloroplast targeting peptide, dual specificity phosphatase (DSP) domain, a CBM45, and a carboxy-terminal motif. LSF2 is comprised of simply a chloroplast targeting peptide, DSP domain, and carboxy-terminal motif. SEX4 employs an integrated DSP-CBM glucan-binding platform to engage and dephosphorylate starch. LSF2 lacks a CBM and instead utilizes two surface binding sites to bind and dephosphorylate starch. Laforin is a dimeric protein in solution and it utilizes a tetramodular architecture and cooperativity to bind and dephosphorylate glycogen. This chapter describes the biological role of glucan phosphatases in glycogen and starch metabolism and compares and contrasts their ability to bind and dephosphorylate glucans.

  6. Multiple forms of phosphatase from human brain: isolation and partial characterization of affi-gel blue binding phosphatases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, L Y; Wang, J Z; Gong, C X; Pei, J J; Zaidi, T; Grundke-Iqbal, I; Iqbal, K

    2000-01-01

    Implication of protein phosphatases in Alzheimer disease led us to a systemic investigation of the identification of these enzyme activities in human brain. Human brain phosphatases eluted from DEAE-Sephacel with 0.22 M NaCl were resolved into two main groups by affi-gel blue chromatography, namely affi-gel blue-binding phosphatases and affi-gel blue-nonbinding phosphatases. Affi-gel blue-binding phosphatases were further separated into four different phosphatases, designated P1, P2, P3, and P4 by calmodulin-Sepharose 4B and poly-(L-lysine)-agarose chromatographies. These four phosphatases exhibited activities towards nonprotein phosphoester and two of them, P1 and P4, could dephosphorylate phosphoproteins. The activities of the four phosphatases differed in pH optimum, divalent metal ion requirements, sensitivities to various inhibitors and substrate affinities. The apparent molecular masses as estimated by gel-filtration for P1, P2, P3, and P4 were 97, 45, 42, and 125 kDa, respectively. P1 is markedly similar to PP2B from bovine brain and rabbit skeletal muscle. P4 was labeled with anti-PP2A antibody and may represent a new subtype of PP2A. P1 and P4 were also effective in dephosphorylating Alzheimer disease abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau (AD P-tau). The resulting dephosphorylated AD P-tau had its activity restored in promoting assembly of microtubules in vitro. These results suggest that P1 and P4 might be involved in the regulation of phosphorylation of tau in human brain, especially in neurodegenerative conditions like Alzheimer's disease which are characterized by the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of this protein.

  7. Comparative evaluation of Schistosoma mansoni, Schistosoma intercalatum, and Schistosoma haematobium alkaline phosphatase antigenicity by the alkaline phosphatase immunoassay (APIA).

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    Cesari, I M; Ballén, D E; Mendoza, L; Ferrer, A; Pointier, J-P; Kombila, M; Richard-Lenoble, D; Théron, A

    2014-04-01

    To know if alkaline phosphatase (AP) from schistosomes other than Schistosoma mansoni can be used as diagnostic marker for schistosomiasis in alkaline phosphatase immunocapture assay (APIA), we comparatively tested n-butanol extracts of adult worm membranes from a Venezuelan (JL) strain of S. mansoni (Ven/AWBE/Sm); a Cameroonian (EDEN) strain of Schistosoma intercalatum (Cam/AWBE/Si) and a Yemeni strain of Schistosoma haematobium (Yem/AWBE/Sh). APIA was evaluated with sera of patients from Venezuela, Senegal, and Gabon infected with S. mansoni, from Gabon infected with S. intercalatum or S. haematobium, from Chine infected with Schistosoma japonicum and from Cambodian patients infected with Schistosoma mekongi. Results indicate that 92.5% (37/40) of Venezuela sera, 75% (15/20) of Senegal sera, 39.5% (17/43) of S. haematobium sera, and 19.2% (5/26) S. intercalatum sera were APIA-positive with the Ven/AWBE/Sm preparation. APIA with the Cam/AWBE/Si preparation showed that 53.8% of S. intercalatum-positive sera had anti-AP antibodies, and 51.2% S. haematobium-positive sera cross-immunocapturing the S. intercalatum AP. APIA performed with Yem/AWBE/Sh showed that 55.8% S. haematobium sera were positive. Only two out of nine S. japonicum sera were APIA-positive with the Ven/AWBE/Sm and Cam/AWBE/Si, and no reaction was observed with Cambodian S. mekongi-positive sera. AP activity was shown to be present in all the schistosome species/strains studied. The use of APIA as a tool to explore the APs antigenicity and the presence of Schistosoma sp. infections through the detection of anti-Schistosoma sp. AP antibodies in a host, allowed us to demonstrate the antigenicity of APs of S. mansoni, S. intercalatum, and S. haematobium.

  8. Antigen clasping by two antigen-binding sites of an exceptionally specific antibody for histone methylation

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    Hattori, Takamitsu; Lai, Darson; Dementieva, Irina S.; Montaño, Sherwin P.; Kurosawa, Kohei; Zheng, Yupeng; Akin, Louesa R.; Świst-Rosowska, Kalina M.; Grzybowski, Adrian T.; Koide, Akiko; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Strahl, Brian D.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Ruthenburg, Alexander J.; Koide, Shohei

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies have a well-established modular architecture wherein the antigen-binding site residing in the antigen-binding fragment (Fab or Fv) is an autonomous and complete unit for antigen recognition. Here, we describe antibodies departing from this paradigm. We developed recombinant antibodies to trimethylated lysine residues on histone H3, important epigenetic marks and challenging targets for molecular recognition. Quantitative characterization demonstrated their exquisite specificity and high affinity, and they performed well in common epigenetics applications. Surprisingly, crystal structures and biophysical analyses revealed that two antigen-binding sites of these antibodies form a head-to-head dimer and cooperatively recognize the antigen in the dimer interface. This “antigen clasping” produced an expansive interface where trimethylated Lys bound to an unusually extensive aromatic cage in one Fab and the histone N terminus to a pocket in the other, thereby rationalizing the high specificity. A long-neck antibody format with a long linker between the antigen-binding module and the Fc region facilitated antigen clasping and achieved both high specificity and high potency. Antigen clasping substantially expands the paradigm of antibody–antigen recognition and suggests a strategy for developing extremely specific antibodies. PMID:26862167

  9. Receptor tyrosine phosphatase R-PTP-kappa mediates homophilic binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sap, J; Jiang, Y P; Friedlander, D

    1994-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine phosphatases (R-PTPases) feature PTPase domains in the context of a receptor-like transmembrane topology. The R-PTPase R-PTP-kappa displays an extracellular domain composed of fibronectin type III motifs, a single immunoglobulin domain, as well as a recently defined MAM domain (Y.......-P. Jiang, H. Wang, P. D'Eustachio, J.M. Musacchio, J. Schlessinger, and J. Sap, Mol. Cell. Biol. 13:2942-2951, 1993). We report here that R-PTP-kappa can mediate homophilic intercellular interaction. Inducible expression of the R-PTP-kappa protein in heterologous cells results in formation of stable...... cellular aggregates strictly consisting of R-PTP-kappa-expressing cells. Moreover, the purified extracellular domain of R-PTP-kappa functions as a substrate for adhesion by cells expressing R-PTP-kappa and induces aggregation of coated synthetic beads. R-PTP-kappa-mediated intercellular adhesion does...

  10. An iron-binding Trypanosoma cruzi urinary antigen.

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    Corral, R S; Bertot, G M; Petray, P B; Altcheh, J M; Singh, M; Orn, A; Rapoport, M F; Grinstein, S

    1995-12-01

    An 80-kDa Trypanosoma cruzi urinary antigen (UAg) was affinity-purified from the urine of infected dogs. We demonstrated that UAg is structurally and functionally related to proteins belonging to the transferrin family, as shown by amino acid sequence and iron binding experiments. Nevertheless, monoclonal antibodies raised against UAg specifically and selectively recognized this parasite's circulating antigen. The existence of an 80-kDa T. cruzi antigen co-migrating with UAg could be confirmed when epimastigotes were metabolically labelled with [35S] methionine and then immunoprecipitated with the above mentioned antibodies. We conclude that UAg is an iron-binding T. cruzi component eliminated in the urine of the infected host.

  11. Autologous peptides constitutively occupy the antigen binding site on Ia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Sette, A; Colon, S M;

    1988-01-01

    Low molecular weight material associated with affinity-purified class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules of mouse (Ia) had the expected properties of peptides bound to the antigen binding site of Ia. Thus, the low molecular weight material derived from the I-Ad isotype...

  12. A redox-regulated chloroplast protein phosphatase binds to starch diurnally and functions in its accumulation

    OpenAIRE

    Lubomir N. Sokolov; Dominguez-Solis, Jose R.; Allary, Anne-Laure; Buchanan, Bob B.; Luan, Sheng

    2006-01-01

    Starch is the ultimate storage molecule formed in the photosynthetic fixation of carbon dioxide by chloroplasts. Starch accumulates during the day and is degraded at night to intermediates that are exported to heterotrophic organs. The mechanism by which diurnal cycles control the transitory biosynthesis and degradation of chloroplast starch has long remained a mystery. We now report evidence that a dual-specificity protein phosphatase, DSP4, binds to starch granules during the day and dissoc...

  13. The molecular chaperone Hsp70 activates protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) by binding the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain.

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    Connarn, Jamie N; Assimon, Victoria A; Reed, Rebecca A; Tse, Eric; Southworth, Daniel R; Zuiderweg, Erik R P; Gestwicki, Jason E; Sun, Duxin

    2014-01-31

    Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) is auto-inhibited by intramolecular interactions with its tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain. Hsp90 has been shown to bind PP5 to activate its phosphatase activity. However, the functional implications of binding Hsp70 to PP5 are not yet clear. In this study, we find that both Hsp90 and Hsp70 bind to PP5 using a luciferase fragment complementation assay. A fluorescence polarization assay shows that Hsp90 (MEEVD motif) binds to the TPR domain of PP5 almost 3-fold higher affinity than Hsp70 (IEEVD motif). However, Hsp70 binding to PP5 stimulates higher phosphatase activity of PP5 than the binding of Hsp90. We find that PP5 forms a stable 1:1 complex with Hsp70, but the interaction appears asymmetric with Hsp90, with one PP5 binding the dimer. Solution NMR studies reveal that Hsc70 and PP5 proteins are dynamically independent in complex, tethered by a disordered region that connects the Hsc70 core and the IEEVD-TPR contact area. This tethered binding is expected to allow PP5 to carry out multi-site dephosphorylation of Hsp70-bound clients with a range of sizes and shapes. Together, these results demonstrate that Hsp70 recruits PP5 and activates its phosphatase activity which suggests dual roles for PP5 that might link chaperone systems with signaling pathways in cancer and development.

  14. Identical phosphatase mechanisms achieved through distinct modes of binding phosphoprotein substrate

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    Pazy, Y.; Motaleb, M.A.; Guarnieri, M.T.; Charon, N.W.; Zhao, R.; Silversmith, R.E. (WVU); (UNC); (Colorado); (EC Uni.)

    2010-04-05

    Two-component signal transduction systems are widespread in prokaryotes and control numerous cellular processes. Extensive investigation of sensor kinase and response regulator proteins from many two-component systems has established conserved sequence, structural, and mechanistic features within each family. In contrast, the phosphatases which catalyze hydrolysis of the response regulator phosphoryl group to terminate signal transduction are poorly understood. Here we present structural and functional characterization of a representative of the CheC/CheX/FliY phosphatase family. The X-ray crystal structure of Borrelia burgdorferi CheX complexed with its CheY3 substrate and the phosphoryl analogue BeF{sub 3}{sup -} reveals a binding orientation between a response regulator and an auxiliary protein different from that shared by every previously characterized example. The surface of CheY3 containing the phosphoryl group interacts directly with a long helix of CheX which bears the conserved (E - X{sub 2} - N) motif. Conserved CheX residues Glu96 and Asn99, separated by a single helical turn, insert into the CheY3 active site. Structural and functional data indicate that CheX Asn99 and CheY3 Thr81 orient a water molecule for hydrolytic attack. The catalytic residues of the CheX-CheY3 complex are virtually superimposable on those of the Escherichia coli CheZ phosphatase complexed with CheY, even though the active site helices of CheX and CheZ are oriented nearly perpendicular to one other. Thus, evolution has found two structural solutions to achieve the same catalytic mechanism through different helical spacing and side chain lengths of the conserved acid/amide residues in CheX and CheZ.

  15. Substrate and Transition State Binding in Alkaline Phosphatase Analyzed by Computation of Oxygen Isotope Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roston, Daniel; Cui, Qiang

    2016-09-14

    Enzymes are powerful catalysts, and a thorough understanding of the sources of their catalytic power will facilitate many medical and industrial applications. Here we have studied the catalytic mechanism of alkaline phosphatase (AP), which is one of the most catalytically proficient enzymes known. We have used quantum mechanics calculations and hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations to model a variety of isotope effects relevant to the reaction of AP. We have calculated equilibrium isotope effects (EIEs), binding isotope effects (BIEs), and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for a range of phosphate mono- and diester substrates. The results agree well with experimental values, but the model for the reaction's transition state (TS) differs from the original interpretation of those experiments. Our model indicates that isotope effects on binding make important contributions to measured KIEs on V/K, which complicated interpretation of the measured values. Our results provide a detailed interpretation of the measured isotope effects and make predictions that can test the proposed model. The model indicates that the substrate is deformed in the ground state (GS) of the reaction and partially resembles the TS. The highly preorganized active site preferentially binds conformations that resemble the TS and not the GS, which induces the substrate to adapt to the enzyme, rather than the other way around-as with classic "induced fit" models. The preferential stabilization of the TS over the GS is what lowers the barrier to the chemical step.

  16. ANALYSIS OF A CONJUGATE BETWEEN ANTICARCINOEMBRYONIC ANTIGEN MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODY AND ALKALINE-PHOSPHATASE FOR SPECIFIC ACTIVATION OF THE PRODRUG ETOPOSIDE PHOSPHATE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haisma, Hidde; BOVEN, E; VANMUIJEN, M; DEVRIES, R; PINEDO, HM

    1992-01-01

    The selective targeting of tumours by enzymes conjugated to monoclonal antibodies (mAb) may be an ideal approach to convert relatively nontoxic prodrugs into active agents at the tumour site. We used the anti-carcinoembryonic antigen mAb BW431/26 conjugated to alkaline phosphatase (AP) and phosphory

  17. Effects of fucosylated milk of goat and mouse on Helicobacter pylori binding to Lewis b antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Tao Xu; Ning Li; Lennart Hammarstr(o)m; Thomas Borén; Rolf Sj(o)str(o)m; Yao-Feng Zhao; Zheng-Xing Lian; Bao-Liang Fan; Zhi-Hui Zhao; Shu-Yang Yu; Yun-Ping Dai; Li-Li Wang; Hui-Ling Niu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of animal milk containing fucosylated antigens on Helicobacter pylori (Hpylori) binding to Lewis b antigen.METHODS: A mammary gland expression vector containing human α1-3/4-fucosyltransferase cDNA sequences was constructed. Transient expression of human α1-3/4-fucosyltransferase cDNA in goat mammary cell and establishment of transgenic mice were performed. The adhesion inhibitory properties of milk samples were analyzed by using H pylori RESULTS: Goat milk samples were found to inhibit bacterial binding to Lewis b antigen. The highest inhibition was observed 42 h after injection of the plasmid. The binding activity of Hpylori to Lewis b antigen reduced mostly, by 83%, however milk samples from transgenic mice did not inhibit H pylori binding to Lewis b antigen.CONCLUSION: The use of "humanized" animal milk produced by the transgenic introduction of fucosylated antigen can perhaps provide an alternative therapy and preventive measure for H pylori infection.

  18. A toxin-binding alkaline phosphatase fragment synergizes Bt toxin Cry1Ac against susceptible and resistant Helicoverpa armigera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenbo; Liu, Chenxi; Xiao, Yutao; Zhang, Dandan; Zhang, Yongdong; Li, Xianchun; Tabashnik, Bruce E; Wu, Kongming

    2015-01-01

    Evolution of resistance by insects threatens the continued success of pest control using insecticidal crystal (Cry) proteins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) in sprays and transgenic plants. In this study, laboratory selection with Cry1Ac yielded five strains of cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera, with resistance ratios at the median lethal concentration (LC50) of activated Cry1Ac ranging from 22 to 1700. Reduced activity and reduced transcription of an alkaline phosphatase protein that binds Cry1Ac was associated with resistance to Cry1Ac in the four most resistant strains. A Cry1Ac-binding fragment of alkaline phosphatase from H. armigera (HaALP1f) was not toxic by itself, but it increased mortality caused by Cry1Ac in a susceptible strain and in all five resistant strains. Although synergism of Bt toxins against susceptible insects by toxin-binding fragments of cadherin and aminopeptidase N has been reported previously, the results here provide the first evidence of synergism of a Bt toxin by a toxin-binding fragment of alkaline phosphatase. The results here also provide the first evidence of synergism of a Bt toxin by any toxin-binding peptide against resistant insects.

  19. A toxin-binding alkaline phosphatase fragment synergizes Bt toxin Cry1Ac against susceptible and resistant Helicoverpa armigera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbo Chen

    Full Text Available Evolution of resistance by insects threatens the continued success of pest control using insecticidal crystal (Cry proteins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt in sprays and transgenic plants. In this study, laboratory selection with Cry1Ac yielded five strains of cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera, with resistance ratios at the median lethal concentration (LC50 of activated Cry1Ac ranging from 22 to 1700. Reduced activity and reduced transcription of an alkaline phosphatase protein that binds Cry1Ac was associated with resistance to Cry1Ac in the four most resistant strains. A Cry1Ac-binding fragment of alkaline phosphatase from H. armigera (HaALP1f was not toxic by itself, but it increased mortality caused by Cry1Ac in a susceptible strain and in all five resistant strains. Although synergism of Bt toxins against susceptible insects by toxin-binding fragments of cadherin and aminopeptidase N has been reported previously, the results here provide the first evidence of synergism of a Bt toxin by a toxin-binding fragment of alkaline phosphatase. The results here also provide the first evidence of synergism of a Bt toxin by any toxin-binding peptide against resistant insects.

  20. Identification of the structural features that mediate binding specificity in the recognition of STAT proteins by dual-specificity phosphatases.

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    Jardin, Christophe; Sticht, Heinrich

    2012-01-01

    Inactivation of signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) proteins is regulated by dual-specificity phosphatases (DSPs) with high substrate specificity. Although experiments have provided useful information about the phosphatase activity and the specificity for STATs, there is up-to-date no data at a molecular level to explain the specific recognition of STAT substrates by this subfamily of phosphatases. Here, a combined approach of molecular modeling, docking and molecular dynamics simulations was used to address the binding between DSPs and their STAT substrates. We identified a binding interface at the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) domain of the DSP VHR that interacts with the SH2-domain of STAT5. This finding is consistent with previous mutational data and supports a "two-step" mechanism for the dephosphorylation event. Application of the same approach suggests the presence of a similar interface between the viral DSP VH1 and STAT1. Furthermore, the interaction network at this interface provides an explanation for the specificity of the DSP-STAT recognition.

  1. Restricted diversity of antigen binding residues of antibodies revealed by computational alanine scanning of 227 antibody-antigen complexes.

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    Robin, Gautier; Sato, Yoshiteru; Desplancq, Dominique; Rochel, Natacha; Weiss, Etienne; Martineau, Pierre

    2014-11-11

    Antibody molecules are able to recognize any antigen with high affinity and specificity. To get insight into the molecular diversity at the source of this functional diversity, we compiled and analyzed a non-redundant aligned collection of 227 structures of antibody-antigen complexes. Free energy of binding of all the residue side chains was quantified by computational alanine scanning, allowing the first large-scale quantitative description of antibody paratopes. This demonstrated that as few as 8 residues among 30 key positions are sufficient to explain 80% of the binding free energy in most complexes. At these positions, the residue distribution is not only different from that of other surface residues but also dependent on the role played by the side chain in the interaction, residues participating in the binding energy being mainly aromatic residues, and Gly or Ser otherwise. To question the generality of these binding characteristics, we isolated an antibody fragment by phage display using a biased synthetic repertoire with only two diversified complementarity-determining regions and solved its structure in complex with its antigen. Despite this restricted diversity, the structure demonstrated that all complementarity-determining regions were involved in the interaction with the antigen and that the rules derived from the natural antibody repertoire apply to this synthetic binder, thus demonstrating the robustness and universality of our results.

  2. The constant region affects antigen binding of antibodies to DNA by altering secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yumin; Janda, Alena; Eryilmaz, Ertan; Casadevall, Arturo; Putterman, Chaim

    2013-11-01

    We previously demonstrated an important role of the constant region in the pathogenicity of anti-DNA antibodies. To determine the mechanisms by which the constant region affects autoantibody binding, a panel of isotype-switch variants (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b) was generated from the murine PL9-11 IgG3 autoantibody. The affinity of the PL9-11 antibody panel for histone was measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Tryptophan fluorescence was used to determine wavelength shifts of the antibody panel upon binding to DNA and histone. Finally, circular dichroism spectroscopy was used to measure changes in secondary structure. SPR analysis revealed significant differences in histone binding affinity between members of the PL9-11 panel. The wavelength shifts of tryptophan fluorescence emission were found to be dependent on the antibody isotype, while circular dichroism analysis determined that changes in antibody secondary structure content differed between isotypes upon antigen binding. Thus, the antigen binding affinity is dependent on the particular constant region expressed. Moreover, the effects of antibody binding to antigen were also constant region dependent. Alteration of secondary structures influenced by constant regions may explain differences in fine specificity of anti-DNA antibodies between antibodies with similar variable regions, as well as cross-reactivity of anti-DNA antibodies with non-DNA antigens.

  3. Directed evolution of antibody fragments with monovalent femtomolar antigen-binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boder, E T; Midelfort, K S; Wittrup, K D

    2000-09-26

    Single-chain antibody mutants have been evolved in vitro with antigen-binding equilibrium dissociation constant K(d) = 48 fM and slower dissociation kinetics (half-time > 5 days) than those for the streptavidin-biotin complex. These mutants possess the highest monovalent ligand-binding affinity yet reported for an engineered protein by over two orders of magnitude. Optimal kinetic screening of randomly mutagenized libraries of 10(5)-10(7) yeast surface-displayed antibodies enabled a >1,000-fold decrease in the rate of dissociation after four cycles of affinity mutagenesis and screening. The consensus mutations are generally nonconservative by comparison with naturally occurring mouse Fv sequences and with residues that do not contact the fluorescein antigen in the wild-type complex. The existence of these mutants demonstrates that the antibody Fv architecture is not intrinsically responsible for an antigen-binding affinity ceiling during in vivo affinity maturation.

  4. Identification of protein phosphatase interacting proteins from normal and UVA-irradiated HaCaT cell lysates by surface plasmon resonance based binding technique using biotin-microcystin-LR as phosphatase capturing molecule.

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    Bécsi, Bálint; Dedinszki, Dóra; Gyémánt, Gyöngyi; Máthé, Csaba; Vasas, Gábor; Lontay, Beáta; Erdődi, Ferenc

    2014-09-05

    Identification of the interacting proteins of protein phosphatases is crucial to understand the cellular roles of these enzymes. Microcystin-LR (MC-LR), a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatase-1 (PP1), -2A (PP2A), PP4, PP5 and PP6, was biotinylated, immobilized to streptavidin-coupled sensorchip surface and used in surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based binding experiments to isolate phosphatase binding proteins. Biotin-MC-LR captured PP1 catalytic subunit (PP1c) stably and the biotin-MC-LR-PP1c complex was able to further interact with the regulatory subunit (MYPT1) of myosin phosphatase. Increased biotin-MC-LR coated sensorchip surface in the Surface Prep unit of Biacore 3000 captured PP1c, PP2Ac and their regulatory proteins including MYPT1, MYPT family TIMAP, inhibitor-2 as well as PP2A-A and -Bα-subunits from normal and UVA-irradiated HaCaT cell lysates as revealed by dot blot analysis of the recovered proteins. Biotin-MC-LR was used for the subcellular localization of protein phosphatases in HaCaT cells by identification of phosphatase-bound biotin-MC-LR with fluorescent streptavidin conjugates. Partial colocalization of the biotin-MC-LR signals with those obtained using anti-PP1c and anti-PP2Ac antibodies was apparent as judged by confocal microscopy. Our results imply that biotin-MC-LR is a suitable capture molecule in SPR for isolation of protein phosphatase interacting proteins from cell lysates in sufficient amounts for immunological detection.

  5. Functional analysis of the glycogen binding subunit CG9238/Gbs-70E of protein phosphatase 1 in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerekes, Éva; Kókai, Endre; Páldy, Ferenc Sándor; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2014-06-01

    The product of the CG9238 gene that we termed glycogen binding subunit 70E (Gbs-70E) was characterized by biochemical and molecular genetics methods. The interaction between Gbs-70E and all catalytic subunits of protein phosphatase 1 (Pp1-87B, Pp1-9C, Pp1-96A and Pp1-13C) of Drosophila melanogaster was confirmed by pairwise yeast two-hybrid tests, co-immunoprecipitation and pull down experiments. The binding of Gbs-70E to glycogen was demonstrated by sedimentation analysis. With RT-PCR we found that the mRNAs coding for the longer Gbs-70E PB/PC protein were expressed in all developmental stages of the fruit flies while the mRNA for the shorter Gbs-70E PA was restricted to the eggs and the ovaries of the adult females. The development specific expression of the shorter splice variant was not conserved in different Drosophila species. The expression level of the gene was manipulated by P-element insertions and gene deletion to analyze the functions of the gene product. A small or moderate reduction in the gene expression resulted in no significant changes, however, a deletion mutant expressing very low level of the transcript lived shorter and exhibited reduced glycogen content in the imagos. In addition, the gene deletion decreased the fertility of the fruit flies. Our results prove that Gbs-70E functions as the glycogen binding subunit of protein phosphatase 1 that regulates glycogen content and plays a role in the development of eggs in D. melanogaster.

  6. Concentration-dependent effect of fibrinogen on IgG-specific antigen binding and phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Tobias Konrad; Sojar, Hakimuddin; Denardin, Ernesto

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to characterize fibrinogen-IgG interactions, and explore how fibrinogen alters IgG-mediated phagocytosis. Using enzyme-linked binding assays, we found that fibrinogen binding to IgG is optimized for surfaces coated with high levels of IgG. Using a similar method, we have shown that for an antigen unable to specifically bind fibrinogen, fibrinogen enhances binding of antibodies towards that antigen. For binding of IgG antibodies to cells expressing Fc receptors, we found a bimodal binding response, where low levels of fibrinogen enhance binding of antibody to Fc receptors and high levels reduce it. This corresponds to a bimodal effect on phagocytosis of IgG-coated particles, which is inhibited in the presence of excess IgG during coating of the particles with antibodies and fibrinogen. We conclude that fibrinogen can modulate phagocytosis of IgG-coated particles in vitro by changing IgG binding behavior, and that high fibrinogen levels could negatively affect phagocytosis.

  7. Positive cooperativity in substrate binding of human prostatic acid phosphatase entrapped in AOT-isooctane-water reverse micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchter-Wasylewska, Ewa; Iciek, Małgorzata

    2004-05-15

    The kinetics of 1-naphthyl phosphate and phenyl phosphate hydrolysis, catalyzed by human prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) entrapped in AOT-isooctane-water reverse micelles, has been studied over surfactant hydration degree (w0) range 5 to 35. Continuous spectrophotometric acid phosphatase assays, previously prepared, were employed. PAP was catalytically active over the whole w0 studied range. In order to determine steady-state reaction constants the experimental data were fitted to Hill rate equation. Positive cooperativity in substrate binding was observed, as it was earlier found in aqueous solutions. The extent of cooperativity (expressed as the value of the Hill cooperation coefficient h) increased from 1 to 4, when the micellar water-pool size was growing, at fixed enzyme concentration. In the plots of catalytic activity (kcat) versus w0, the maxima have been found at w0=10 (pH 5.6) and 23 (pH 3.8). It is suggested that catalytically active monomeric and dimeric PAP forms are entrapped in reverse micelles of w0=10 and 23, respectively.

  8. Specific Fluorine Labeling of the HyHEL10 Antibody Affects Antigen Binding and Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acchione, Mauro; Lee, Yi-Chien; DeSantis, Morgan E.; Lipschultz, Claudia A.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Li, Mi; Shanmuganathan, Aranganathan; Walter, Richard L.; Smith-Gill, Sandra; Barchi, Jr., Joseph J. (SAIC); (NCI)

    2012-10-16

    To more fully understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for variations in binding affinity with antibody maturation, we explored the use of site specific fluorine labeling and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Several single-chain (scFv) antibodies, derived from an affinity-matured series of anti-hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) mouse IgG1, were constructed with either complete or individual replacement of tryptophan residues with 5-fluorotryptophan ({sup 5F}W). An array of biophysical techniques was used to gain insight into the impact of fluorine substitution on the overall protein structure and antigen binding. SPR measurements indicated that {sup 5F}W incorporation lowered binding affinity for the HEL antigen. The degree of analogue impact was residue-dependent, and the greatest decrease in affinity was observed when {sup 5F}W was substituted for residues near the binding interface. In contrast, corresponding crystal structures in complex with HEL were essentially indistinguishable from the unsubstituted antibody. {sup 19}F NMR analysis showed severe overlap of signals in the free fluorinated protein that was resolved upon binding to antigen, suggesting very distinct chemical environments for each {sup 5F}W in the complex. Preliminary relaxation analysis suggested the presence of chemical exchange in the antibody-antigen complex that could not be observed by X-ray crystallography. These data demonstrate that fluorine NMR can be an extremely useful tool for discerning structural changes in scFv antibody-antigen complexes with altered function that may not be discernible by other biophysical techniques.

  9. Antigen-independent binding of rat immunoglobulins in a radioimmunoassay. Solutions to an unusual background problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, R.; Sjoegren, H.O. (Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Tumor Immunology)

    1984-01-20

    A high non-specific binding of immunoglobulins to plastic surfaces was noted with a number of rat sera, when tested in an indirect /sup 125/I-labelled protein-A assay for detection of cell-surface-bound rat immunoglobulins of various classes and IgG subclasses. This type of non-specific binding was found with all types of Ig. The degree of binding varied with the type of test plate used and fluctuated with time among sera drawn sequentially from the same donors. Coating test wells with fetal calf serum supplemented with BSA, gelatin or fibrinogen did not eliminate the reactions. The immunoglobulins bind directly to the polystyrene and not to antigens present in fetal calf serum or autoantigens in rat serum. Two different approaches were used to eliminate the nonspecific reaction. When living cells were used as target antigens, exclusively cell-bound radioactivity was eluted with the non-ionic detergent Nonidet P40, which solubilizes the cell membrane without breaking the protein-A/rabbit IgG, rabbit IgG/rat Ig, or rat Ig/plastic interactions. When rat serum antibodies are tested on target antigens adsorbed on non-tissue culture grade plates, non-specific binding may be avoided by including 0.05% Tween 20 in the incubation mixture.

  10. Isolation of the phagocytosis-inducing IgG-binding antigen on senescent somatic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Marguerite M. B.

    1981-02-01

    To remove senescent red blood cells (RBCs) from the circulation, macrophages must distinguish them from mature RBCs. That is achieved by a specific recognition system1,2. An antigen that develops on the surface of a senescing RBC is recognized and bound by the Fab region1 of an IgG autoantibody in the serum2. Subsequently the Fc region of the autoantibody is recognized and bound by a macrophage3, which proceeds to phagocytose the RBC. The antigenic molecule can be extracted from senescent but not young RBCs with Triton X-100 (ref. 4), although 10-30% as much antigen can be extracted from middle-aged as from senescent RBCs4. I have now used IgG autoantibodies eluted from senescent RBCs to isolate and purify the IgG-binding antigen on senescent RBCs, andto detect the antigen on other somatic cells. The antigen is a ~=62,000-Mr protein which is present on stored platelets, lymphocytes and neutrophils, and on cultured human adult liver and embryonic kidney cells, as well as senescent RBCs.

  11. Foreign or Domestic CARs: Receptor Ligands as Antigen-Binding Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald R. Shaffer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are increasingly being used in clinical trials to treat a variety of malignant conditions and recent results with CD19-specific CARs showing complete tumor regressions has sparked the interest of researchers and the public alike. Traditional CARs have been generated using single-chain variable fragments (scFv, often derived from murine monoclonal antibodies, for antigen specificity. As the clinical experience with CAR T cells grows, so does the potential for unwanted immune responses against the foreign transgene. Strategies that may reduce the immunogenicity of CAR T cells are humanization of the scFv and the use of naturally occurring receptor ligands as antigen-binding domains. Herein, we review the experience with alternatively designed CARs that contain receptor ligands rather than scFv. While most of the experiences have been in the pre-clinical setting, clinical data is also emerging.

  12. A complex water network contributes to high-affinity binding in an antibody–antigen interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.F. Marino

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This data article presents an analysis of structural water molecules in the high affinity interaction between a potent tumor growth inhibiting antibody (fragment, J22.9-xi, and the tumor marker antigen CD269 (B cell maturation antigen, BCMA. The 1.89 Å X-ray crystal structure shows exquisite details of the binding interface between the two molecules, which comprises relatively few, mostly hydrophobic, direct contacts but many indirect interactions over solvent waters. These are partly or wholly buried in, and therefore part of, the interface. A partial description of the structure is included in an article on the tumor inhibiting effects of the antibody: “Potent anti-tumor response by targeting B cell maturation antigen (BCMA in a mouse model of multiple myeloma”, Mol. Oncol. 9 (7 (2015 pp. 1348–58.

  13. Simulation and Theory of Antibody Binding to Crowded Antigen-Covered Surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano De Michele

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce a fully flexible coarse-grained model of immunoglobulin G (IgG antibodies parametrized directly on cryo-EM data and simulate the binding dynamics of many IgGs to antigens adsorbed on a surface at increasing densities. Moreover, we work out a theoretical model that allows to explain all the features observed in the simulations. Our combined computational and theoretical framework is in excellent agreement with surface-plasmon resonance data and allows us to establish a number of important results. (i Internal flexibility is key to maximize bivalent binding, flexible IgGs being able to explore the surface with their second arm in search for an available hapten. This is made clear by the strongly reduced ability to bind with both arms displayed by artificial IgGs designed to rigidly keep a prescribed shape. (ii The large size of IgGs is instrumental to keep neighboring molecules at a certain distance (surface repulsion, which essentially makes antigens within reach of the second Fab always unoccupied on average. (iii One needs to account independently for the thermodynamic and geometric factors that regulate the binding equilibrium. The key geometrical parameters, besides excluded-volume repulsion, describe the screening of free haptens by neighboring bound antibodies. We prove that the thermodynamic parameters govern the low-antigen-concentration regime, while the surface screening and repulsion only affect the binding at high hapten densities. Importantly, we prove that screening effects are concealed in relative measures, such as the fraction of bivalently bound antibodies. Overall, our model provides a valuable, accurate theoretical paradigm beyond existing frameworks to interpret experimental profiles of antibodies binding to multi-valent surfaces of different sorts in many contexts.

  14. Simulation and Theory of Antibody Binding to Crowded Antigen-Covered Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Michele, Cristiano; De Los Rios, Paolo; Foffi, Giuseppe; Piazza, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a fully flexible coarse-grained model of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies parametrized directly on cryo-EM data and simulate the binding dynamics of many IgGs to antigens adsorbed on a surface at increasing densities. Moreover, we work out a theoretical model that allows to explain all the features observed in the simulations. Our combined computational and theoretical framework is in excellent agreement with surface-plasmon resonance data and allows us to establish a number of important results. (i) Internal flexibility is key to maximize bivalent binding, flexible IgGs being able to explore the surface with their second arm in search for an available hapten. This is made clear by the strongly reduced ability to bind with both arms displayed by artificial IgGs designed to rigidly keep a prescribed shape. (ii) The large size of IgGs is instrumental to keep neighboring molecules at a certain distance (surface repulsion), which essentially makes antigens within reach of the second Fab always unoccupied on average. (iii) One needs to account independently for the thermodynamic and geometric factors that regulate the binding equilibrium. The key geometrical parameters, besides excluded-volume repulsion, describe the screening of free haptens by neighboring bound antibodies. We prove that the thermodynamic parameters govern the low-antigen-concentration regime, while the surface screening and repulsion only affect the binding at high hapten densities. Importantly, we prove that screening effects are concealed in relative measures, such as the fraction of bivalently bound antibodies. Overall, our model provides a valuable, accurate theoretical paradigm beyond existing frameworks to interpret experimental profiles of antibodies binding to multi-valent surfaces of different sorts in many contexts. PMID:26967624

  15. cAMP response element binding protein (CREB activates transcription via two distinct genetic elements of the human glucose-6-phosphatase gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Luisa

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase catalyzes the dephosphorylation of glucose-6-phosphatase to glucose, the final step in the gluconeogenic and glycogenolytic pathways. Expression of the glucose-6-phosphatase gene is induced by glucocorticoids and elevated levels of intracellular cAMP. The effect of cAMP in regulating glucose-6-phosphatase gene transcription was corroborated by the identification of two genetic motifs CRE1 and CRE2 in the human and murine glucose-6-phosphatase gene promoter that resemble cAMP response elements (CRE. Results The cAMP response element is a point of convergence for many extracellular and intracellular signals, including cAMP, calcium, and neurotrophins. The major CRE binding protein CREB, a member of the basic region leucine zipper (bZIP family of transcription factors, requires phosphorylation to become a biologically active transcriptional activator. Since unphosphorylated CREB is transcriptionally silent simple overexpression studies cannot be performed to test the biological role of CRE-like sequences of the glucose-6-phosphatase gene. The use of a constitutively active CREB2/CREB fusion protein allowed us to uncouple the investigation of target genes of CREB from the variety of signaling pathways that lead to an activation of CREB. Here, we show that this constitutively active CREB2/CREB fusion protein strikingly enhanced reporter gene transcription mediated by either CRE1 or CRE2 derived from the glucose-6-phosphatase gene. Likewise, reporter gene transcription was enhanced following expression of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA in the nucleus of transfected cells. In contrast, activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2, known to compete with CREB for binding to the canonical CRE sequence 5'-TGACGTCA-3', did not transactivate reporter genes containing CRE1, CRE2, or both CREs derived from the glucose-6-phosphatase gene. Conclusions Using a constitutively active CREB2

  16. Inhibition of histo-blood group antigen binding as a novel strategy to block norovirus infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu-Fu Zhang

    Full Text Available Noroviruses (NoVs are the most important viral pathogens that cause epidemic acute gastroenteritis. NoVs recognize human histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs as receptors or attachment factors. The elucidation of crystal structures of the HBGA-binding interfaces of a number of human NoVs representing different HBGA binding patterns opens a new strategy for the development of antiviral compounds against NoVs through rational drug design and computer-aided virtual screening methods. In this study, docking simulations and virtual screening were used to identify hit compounds targeting the A and B antigens binding sites on the surface of the capsid P protein of a GII.4 NoV (VA387. Following validation by re-docking of the A and B ligands, these structural models and AutoDock suite of programs were used to screen a large drug-like compound library (derived from ZINC library for inhibitors blocking GII.4 binding to HBGAs. After screening >2 million compounds using multistage protocol, 160 hit compounds with best predicted binding affinities and representing a number of distinct chemical classes have been selected for subsequent experimental validation. Twenty of the 160 compounds were found to be able to block the VA387 P dimers binding to the A and/or B HBGAs at an IC50<40.0 µM, with top 5 compounds blocking the HBGA binding at an IC50<10.0 µM in both oligosaccharide- and saliva-based blocking assays. Interestingly, 4 of the top-5 compounds shared the basic structure of cyclopenta [a] dimethyl phenanthren, indicating a promising structural template for further improvement by rational design.

  17. Defining the erythrocyte binding domains of Plasmodium vivax tryptophan rich antigen 33.5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hema Bora

    Full Text Available Tryptophan-rich antigens play important role in host-parasite interaction. One of the Plasmodium vivax tryptophan-rich antigens called PvTRAg33.5 had earlier been shown to be predominantly of alpha helical in nature with multidomain structure, induced immune responses in humans, binds to host erythrocytes, and its sequence is highly conserved in the parasite population. In the present study, we divided this protein into three different parts i.e. N-terminal (amino acid position 24-106, middle (amino acid position 107-192, and C-terminal region (amino acid position 185-275 and determined the erythrocyte binding activity of these fragments. This binding activity was retained by the middle and C-terminal fragments covering 107 to 275 amino acid region of the PvTRAg33.5 protein. Eight non-overlapping peptides covering this 107 to 275 amino acid region were then synthesized and tested for their erythrocyte binding activity to further define the binding domains. Only two peptides, peptide P4 (at 171-191 amino acid position and peptide P8 (at 255-275 amino acid position, were found to contain the erythrocyte binding activity. Competition assay revealed that each peptide recognizes its own erythrocyte receptor. These two peptides were found to be located on two parallel helices at one end of the protein in the modelled structure and could be exposed on its surface to form a suitable site for protein-protein interaction. Natural antibodies present in the sera of the P. vivax exposed individuals or the polyclonal rabbit antibodies against this protein were able to inhibit the erythrocyte binding activity of PvTRAg33.5, its fragments, and these two synthetic peptides P4 and P8. Further studies on receptor-ligand interaction might lead to the development of the therapeutic reagent.

  18. Echinococcus granulosus antigen B: a Hydrophobic Ligand Binding Protein at the host-parasite interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Álvarez, Valeria; Folle, Ana Maite; Ramos, Ana Lía; Zamarreño, Fernando; Costabel, Marcelo D; García-Zepeda, Eduardo; Salinas, Gustavo; Córsico, Betina; Ferreira, Ana María

    2015-02-01

    Lipids are mainly solubilized by various families of lipid binding proteins which participate in their transport between tissues as well as cell compartments. Among these families, Hydrophobic Ligand Binding Proteins (HLBPs) deserve special consideration since they comprise intracellular and extracellular members, are able to bind a variety of fatty acids, retinoids and some sterols, and are present exclusively in cestodes. Since these parasites have lost catabolic and biosynthetic pathways for fatty acids and cholesterol, HLBPs are likely relevant for lipid uptake and transportation between parasite and host cells. Echinococcus granulosus antigen B (EgAgB) is a lipoprotein belonging to the HLBP family, which is very abundant in the larval stage of this parasite. Herein, we review the literature on EgAgB composition, structural organization and biological properties, and propose an integrated scenario in which this parasite HLBP contributes to adaptation to mammalian hosts by meeting both metabolic and immunomodulatory parasite demands.

  19. Antigen Binding and Site-Directed Labeling of Biosilica-Immobilized Fusion Proteins Expressed in Diatoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Nicole R.; Hecht, Karen A.; Hu, Dehong; Orr, Galya; Xiong, Yijia; Squier, Thomas; Rorrer, Gregory L.; Roesijadi, Guritno

    2016-01-08

    The diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana was genetically modified to express biosilica-targeted fusion proteins incorporating a tetracysteine tag for site-directed labeling with biarsenical affinity probes and either EGFP or single chain antibody to test colocalization of probes with the EGFP-tagged recombinant protein or binding of biosilica-immobilized antibodies to large and small molecule antigens, respectively. Site-directed labeling with the biarsenical probes demonstrated colocalization with EGFP-encoded proteins in nascent and mature biosilica, supporting their use in studying biosilica maturation. Isolated biosilica transformed with a single chain antibody against either the Bacillus anthracis surface layer protein EA1 or small molecule explosive trinitrotoluene (TNT) effectively bound the respective antigens. A marked increase in fluorescence lifetime of the TNT surrogate Alexa Fluor 555-trinitrobenzene reflected the high binding specificity of the transformed isolated biosilica. These results demonstrated the potential use of biosilica-immobilized single chain antibodies as binders for large and small molecule antigens in sensing and therapeutics.

  20. Goodpasture Antigen-binding Protein/Ceramide Transporter Binds to Human Serum Amyloid P-Component and Is Present in Brain Amyloid Plaques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mencarelli, Chiara; Bode, Gerard H.; Losen, Mario; Kulharia, Mahesh; Molenaar, Peter C.; Veerhuis, Robert; Steinbusch, Harry W. M.; De Baets, Marc H.; Nicolaes, Gerry A. F.; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    Serum amyloid P component (SAP) is a non-fibrillar glycoprotein belonging to the pentraxin family of the innate immune system. SAP is present in plasma, basement membranes, and amyloid deposits. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that the Goodpasture antigen-binding protein (GPBP) binds to

  1. Expression and Purification of the Bacillus anthracis Protective Antigen Receptor-binding Domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛猛; 徐俊杰; 李冰; 董大勇; 宋小红; 郭强; 赵剑; 陈薇

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to express the receptor-binding domain of Bacillus anthracis protective antigen in E. coli. Signal sequence of the outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of E. coli was attached to the 5' end of the gene encoding protective antigen receptor-binding domain (the 4th domain of PA, PALM). The plasmid carrying the fusion gene was then transformed into E. coli and induced to express recombinant PAlM by IFFG. The recombinant protein was purified by chromatography and then identified by N-terrainal sequencing and Western blot. The recombinant protein, about 10% of the total bacterial protein in volume, was secreted to the periplasmic space of the cell. After a purification procedure including ionexchange chromatography and gel filtration, about 10 mg of homogenous recombinant PAD4 was obtained from 1 L culture. Data from N-terminal sequencing suggested that the amino acid sequence of recombinant PAD4 was identical with its natural counterpart. And the result of Western blot showed the recombinant protein could bind with anti-PA serum from rabbit. High level secreted expression of PAD4 was obtained in E. coli. The results reported here are parts of a continuing research to evaluate PAD4 as a potential drug for anthrax therapy or a candidate of new vaccine.

  2. Selection of DMA aptamer that specific binding human carcinoembryonic antigen in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To select the specific aptamer of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), one of the most attractive molecule for cancer target therapy and imaging. Methods: Seven rounds in vitro selection were performed against the purified CEA protein. Ligand-mediated target purification and Co-immunoprecipitation were adopted to verify the specific binding of the aptamer to the purified and native protein separately. Results:The CEA-specific aptamer which can bind both the purified and native protein with the high specificity was obtained. Conclusion:This is the first time the CEA specific apatmer was produced. The results in this study provides the preliminary evidence for further investigation and application of CEA-aptamer in the future.

  3. Contribution of the trifluoroacetyl group in the thermodynamics of antigen-antibody binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Masayuki; Saito, Minoru; Tsumuraya, Takeshi; Fujii, Ikuo

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the binding of the 7C8 antibody to the chloramphenicol phosphonate antigens-one containing a trifluoroacetyl group (CP-F) and the other containing an acetyl group (CP-H)-by using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The thermodynamic difference due to the substitution of F by H was evaluated using free energy calculations based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We have previously shown that another antibody, namely, 6D9, binds more weakly to CP-H than to CP-F, mainly due to the different hydration free energies of the dissociated state and not due to the unfavorable hydrophobic interactions with the antibody in the bound state. Unlike in the binding of the trifluoroacetyl group with 6D9, in its binding with 7C8, it is exposed to the solvent, as seen in the crystal structure of the complex of 7C8 with CP-F. The thermodynamic analysis performed in this study showed that the binding affinity of 7C8 for CP-H is similar to that for CP-F, but this binding to CP-H is accompanied with less favorable enthalpy and more favorable entropy changes. The free energy calculations indicated that, upon the substitution of F by H, enthalpy and entropy changes in the associated and dissociated states were decreased, but the magnitude of enthalpy and entropy changes in the dissociated state was larger than that in the associated state. The differences in binding free energy, enthalpy, and entropy changes determined by the free energy calculations for the substitution of F by H are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  4. Characterization of the Duffy-Binding-Like Domain of Plasmodium falciparum Blood-Stage Antigen 332

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Nilsson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies on Pf332, a major Plasmodium falciparum blood-stage antigen, have largely been hampered by the cross-reactive nature of antibodies generated against the molecule due to its high content of repeats, which are present in other malaria antigens. We previously reported the identification of a conserved domain in Pf332 with a high degree of similarity to the Duffy-binding-like (DBL domains of the erythrocyte-binding-like (EBL family. We here describe that antibodies towards Pf332-DBL are induced after repeated exposure to P. falciparum and that they are acquired early in life in areas of intense malaria transmission. Furthermore, a homology model of Pf332-DBL was found to be similar to the structure of the EBL-DBLs. Despite their similarities, antibodies towards Pf332-DBL did not display any cross-reactivity with EBL-proteins as demonstrated by immunofluorescence microscopy, Western blotting, and peptide microarray. Thus the DBL domain is an attractive region to use in further studies on the giant Pf332 molecule.

  5. A Tenebrio molitor GPI-anchored alkaline phosphatase is involved in binding of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa to brush border membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúñiga-Navarrete, Fernando; Gómez, Isabel; Peña, Guadalupe; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberón, Mario

    2013-03-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins recognizes their target cells in part by the binding to glycosyl-phosphatidyl-inositol (GPI) anchored proteins such as aminopeptidase-N (APN) or alkaline phosphatases (ALP). Treatment of Tenebrio molitor brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) with phospholipase C that cleaves out GPI-anchored proteins from the membranes, showed that GPI-anchored proteins are involved in binding of Cry3Aa toxin to BBMV. A 68 kDa GPI-anchored ALP was shown to bind Cry3Aa by toxin overlay assays. The 68 kDa GPI-anchored ALP was preferentially expressed in early instar larvae in comparison to late instar larvae. Our work shows for the first time that GPI-anchored ALP is important for Cry3Aa binding to T. molitor BBMV suggesting that the mode of action of Cry toxins is conserved in different insect orders.

  6. Quantifying cell binding kinetics mediated by surface-bound blood type B antigen to immobilized antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI BaoXia; CHEN Juan; LONG Mian

    2008-01-01

    Cell adhesion is crucial to many biological processes, such as inflammatory responses, tumor metastasis and thrombosis formation. Recently a commercial surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based BIAcore biosensor has been extended to determine cell binding mediated by surface-bound biomolecular interactions. How such cell binding is quantitatively governed by kinetic rates and regulating factors, however, has been poorly understood. Here we developed a novel assay to determine the binding kinetics of surface-bound biomolecular interactions using a commercial BIAcore 3000 biosensor. Human red blood cells (RBCs) presenting blood group B antigen and CM5 chip bearing immobilized anti-B monoclonal antibody (mAb) were used to obtain the time courses of response unit, or sensorgrams, when flowing RBCs over the chip surface. A cellular kinetic model was proposed to correlate the sensorgrams with kinetic rates. Impacts of regulating factors, such as cell concentration,flow duration and rate, antibody-presenting level, as well as Ph value and osmotic pressure of suspending medium were tested systematically, which imparted the confidence that the approach can be applied to kinetic measurements of cell adhesion mediated by surface-bound biomolecular interactions.These results provided a new insight into quantifying cell binding using a commercial SPR-based BIAcore biosensor.

  7. Crystal structure of the anti-(carcinoembryonic antigen) single-chain Fv antibody MFE-23 and a model for antigen binding based on intermolecular contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, M K; Corper, A L; Wan, T; Sohi, M K; Sutton, B J; Thornton, J D; Keep, P A; Chester, K A; Begent, R H; Perkins, S J

    2000-03-01

    MFE-23 is the first single-chain Fv antibody molecule to be used in patients and is used to target colorectal cancer through its high affinity for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a cell-surface member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. MFE-23 contains an N-terminal variable heavy-chain domain joined by a (Gly(4)Ser)(3) linker to a variable light-chain (V(L)) domain (kappa chain) with an 11-residue C-terminal Myc-tag. Its crystal structure was determined at 2.4 A resolution by molecular replacement with an R(cryst) of 19.0%. Five of the six antigen-binding loops, L1, L2, L3, H1 and H2, conformed to known canonical structures. The sixth loop, H3, displayed a unique structure, with a beta-hairpin loop and a bifurcated apex characterized by a buried Thr residue. In the crystal lattice, two MFE-23 molecules were associated back-to-back in a manner not seen before. The antigen-binding site displayed a large acidic region located mainly within the H2 loop and a large hydrophobic region within the H3 loop. Even though this structure is unliganded within the crystal, there is an unusually large region of contact between the H1, H2 and H3 loops and the beta-sheet of the V(L) domain of an adjacent molecule (strands DEBA) as a result of intermolecular packing. These interactions exhibited remarkably high surface and electrostatic complementarity. Of seven MFE-23 residues predicted to make contact with antigen, five participated in these lattice contacts, and this model for antigen binding is consistent with previously reported site-specific mutagenesis of MFE-23 and its effect on CEA binding.

  8. The RFA regulatory sequence-binding protein in the promoter of prostate-specific antigen gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    To assure what sequence associated with the androgen regulation, a 15 bp region at the upstream of the ARE of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) promoter, termed RFA, was found indispensable for androgen receptor (AR)-mediated transactivation of PSA promoter. In transfection and CAT assays, some nucleotides substitution in RFA could significantly decrease the androgen inducibility for PSA promoter. The in vitro DNA binding assay demonstrated that RFA bound specifically with some non-receptor protein factors in prostate cell nucleus, but the mutant type of RFA lost this ability, so RFA might be a novel accessory cis-element. The RFA-binding proteins were isolated and purified by affinity chromatography using RFA probes. SDS-PAGE and preliminary protein identification showed these proteins possessed sequence high homology with multifunctional protein heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1, A2 (hnRNP A1, A2). RFA-binding proteins possibly cooperate with AR-mediated transactivation for PSA promoter as coactivator. The study results will facilitate further understanding the mechanism and tissue specificity of PSA promoter.

  9. Atomic force microscopy measurements reveal multiple bonds between Helicobacter pylori blood group antigen binding adhesin and Lewis b ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreira, P; Shi, Q; Magalhaes, A; Reis, C A; Bugaytsova, J; Borén, T; Leckband, D; Martins, M C L

    2014-12-01

    The strength of binding between the Helicobacter pylori blood group antigen-binding adhesin (BabA) and its cognate glycan receptor, the Lewis b blood group antigen (Le(b)), was measured by means of atomic force microscopy. High-resolution measurements of rupture forces between single receptor-ligand pairs were performed between the purified BabA and immobilized Le(b) structures on self-assembled monolayers. Dynamic force spectroscopy revealed two similar but statistically different bond populations. These findings suggest that the BabA may form different adhesive attachments to the gastric mucosa in ways that enhance the efficiency and stability of bacterial adhesion.

  10. Novel Prostate Specific Antigen plastic antibody designed withcharged binding sites for an improved protein binding and itsapplication in a biosensor of potentiometric transduction

    OpenAIRE

    Rebelo, Tânia S. C. R.; Santos, C.; Costa-Rodrigues, J.; Fernandes, M. H.; Noronha, João P. C.; Sales, M. Goreti F.

    2014-01-01

    This work shows that the synthesis of protein plastic antibodies tailored with selected charged monomersaround the binding site enhances protein binding. These charged receptor sites are placed over a neutralpolymeric matrix, thus inducing a suitable orientation the protein reception to its site. This is confirmed bypreparing control materials with neutral monomers and also with non-imprinted template. This concepthas been applied here to Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA), the protein of choice...

  11. The Leptospiral Antigen Lp49 is a Two-Domain Protein with Putative Protein Binding Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira Giuseppe,P.; Oliveira Neves, F.; Nascimento, A.; Gomes Guimaraes, B.

    2008-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira is the etiological agent of leptospirosis, a life-threatening disease that affects populations worldwide. Currently available vaccines have limited effectiveness and therapeutic interventions are complicated by the difficulty in making an early diagnosis of leptospirosis. The genome of Leptospira interrogans was recently sequenced and comparative genomic analysis contributed to the identification of surface antigens, potential candidates for development of new vaccines and serodiagnosis. Lp49 is a membrane-associated protein recognized by antibodies present in sera from early and convalescent phases of leptospirosis patients. Its crystal structure was determined by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction using selenomethionine-labelled crystals and refined at 2.0 Angstroms resolution. Lp49 is composed of two domains and belongs to the all-beta-proteins class. The N-terminal domain folds in an immunoglobulin-like beta-sandwich structure, whereas the C-terminal domain presents a seven-bladed beta-propeller fold. Structural analysis of Lp49 indicates putative protein-protein binding sites, suggesting a role in Leptospira-host interaction. This is the first crystal structure of a leptospiral antigen described to date.

  12. Structure-Function Analysis of PPP1R3D, a Protein Phosphatase 1 Targeting Subunit, Reveals a Binding Motif for 14-3-3 Proteins which Regulates its Glycogenic Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Rubio-Villena, Carla; Sanz, Pascual; Garcia-Gimeno, Maria Adelaida

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is one of the major protein phosphatases in eukaryotic cells. It plays a key role in regulating glycogen synthesis, by dephosphorylating crucial enzymes involved in glycogen homeostasis such as glycogen synthase (GS) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP). To play this role, PP1 binds to specific glycogen targeting subunits that, on one hand recognize the substrates to be dephosphorylated and on the other hand recruit PP1 to glycogen particles. In this work we have analyz...

  13. A modern approach for epitope prediction: identification of foot-and-mouth disease virus peptides binding bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) class I molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandya, Mital; Rasmussen, Michael; Hansen, Andreas;

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules regulate adaptive immune responses through the presentation of antigenic peptides to CD8+ T cells. Polymorphisms in the peptide binding region of class I molecules determine peptide binding affinity and stability during antigen presentation...

  14. A modern approach for epitope prediction: identification of foot-and-mouth disease virus peptides binding bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) class I molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules regulate adaptive immune responses through the presentation of antigenic peptides to CD8positive T-cells. Polymorphisms in the peptide binding region of class I molecules determine peptide binding affinity and stability during antigen presenta...

  15. Relationship of spermatoscopy, prostatic acid phosphatase activity and prostate-specific antigen (p30) assays with further DNA typing in forensic samples from rape cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Montoya, Lydia; Martínez-Rodríguez, Hugo; Pérez, Miguel Antonio; Argüello-García, Raúl

    2011-03-20

    In the forensic laboratory the biological analyses for rape investigation commonly include vaginal swabs as sample material combined to biochemical tests including sperm cytology (SC) and detection of acid phosphatase activity (AP) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA, p30) for the conclusive identification of semen components. Most reports comparing these tests relied on analysis of semen samples or donor swabs taken under controlled conditions; however their individual or combined efficacy under real live sampling conditions in different laboratories is largely unknown. We carried out SC, APA and PSA analyses in vaginal swabs collected from casework rapes submitted to Mexican Forensic Laboratories at Texcoco and Toluca. On the basis of positive and negative results from each assay and sample, data were classified into eight categories (I-VIII) and compared with those obtained in the two only similar studies reported in Toronto, Canada and Hong Kong, China. SC and APA assays had the higher overall positivity in Toluca and Texcoco samples respectively and otherwise PSA had a lower but very similar positivity between these two laboratories. When compared to the previous studies some similarities were found, namely similar frequencies (at a ratio of approximately 1 out of 3) of samples being positive or negative by all techniques (Categories I and VI respectively) and a comparable overall positivity of APA and SC but higher than that of PSA. Indeed the combined results of using SC, APA and PSA tests was considered as conclusive for semen detection from approximately 1 out of 3 cases (Category I) to approximately 1 out of 2 cases in a scenario where at least SC is positive, strongly presumptive in 2 out of 3 cases (with at least one test positive) and the remainder 1 out of 3 cases (Category VI) suggested absence of semen. By determining Y-STR polymorphisms (12-loci) in additional samples obtained at Toluca laboratory, complete DNA profiles were determined from all

  16. Preliminary selection and evaluation of the binding of aptamers against a Hantavirus antigen using fluorescence spectroscopy and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missailidis, Sotiris; de Oliveira, Renata Carvalho; Silva, Dilson; Cortez, Célia Martins; Guterres, Alexandro; Vicente, Luciana Helena Bassan; de Godoy, Daniela Tupy; Lemos, Elba

    2015-12-01

    In this study we have aimed to develop novel aptamers against the Hantavirus nucleoprotein N, a valid antigen already used in the Hantavirus reference laboratory of the Institute Oswaldo Cruz in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Such aptamers, if they are found to bind with high affinity and specificity for the selected hantavirus antigen, they could be translated into novel diagnostic assays with the ability to provide early detection for hantaviroses and their related disease syndromes. In a preliminary screening, we have managed to identify three aptamer species. We have analyzed a short and a long version of these aptamer using fluorescence spectroscopy and modelled their binding. We have identified Stern-Volmer constants for the selected aptamers, which have shown affinity for their target, with a different binding between the short and the long versions of them. Short aptamers have shown to have a higher Stern-Volmer constant and the ability to potentially bind to more than one binding site on the antigen. The information provided by the spectroscopic screening has been invaluable in allowing us to define candidates for further development into diagnostic assays.

  17. Regulation of hERG and hEAG channels by Src and by SHP-1 tyrosine phosphatase via an ITIM region in the cyclic nucleotide binding domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyanne C Schlichter

    Full Text Available Members of the EAG K(+ channel superfamily (EAG/Kv10.x, ERG/Kv11.x, ELK/Kv12.x subfamilies are expressed in many cells and tissues. In particular, two prototypes, EAG1/Kv10.1/KCNH1 and ERG1/Kv11.1/KCNH2 contribute to both normal and pathological functions. Proliferation of numerous cancer cells depends on hEAG1, and in some cases, hERG. hERG is best known for contributing to the cardiac action potential, and for numerous channel mutations that underlie 'long-QT syndrome'. Many cells, particularly cancer cells, express Src-family tyrosine kinases and SHP tyrosine phosphatases; and an imbalance in tyrosine phosphorylation can lead to malignancies, autoimmune diseases, and inflammatory disorders. Ion channel contributions to cell functions are governed, to a large degree, by post-translational modulation, especially phosphorylation. However, almost nothing is known about roles of specific tyrosine kinases and phosphatases in regulating K(+ channels in the EAG superfamily. First, we show that tyrosine kinase inhibitor, PP1, and the selective Src inhibitory peptide, Src40-58, reduce the hERG current amplitude, without altering its voltage dependence or kinetics. PP1 similarly reduces the hEAG1 current. Surprisingly, an 'immuno-receptor tyrosine inhibitory motif' (ITIM is present within the cyclic nucleotide binding domain of all EAG-superfamily members, and is conserved in the human, rat and mouse sequences. When tyrosine phosphorylated, this ITIM directly bound to and activated SHP-1 tyrosine phosphatase (PTP-1C/PTPN6/HCP; the first report that a portion of an ion channel is a binding site and activator of a tyrosine phosphatase. Both hERG and hEAG1 currents were decreased by applying active recombinant SHP-1, and increased by the inhibitory substrate-trapping SHP-1 mutant. Thus, hERG and hEAG1 currents are regulated by activated SHP-1, in a manner opposite to their regulation by Src. Given the widespread distribution of these channels, Src and SHP

  18. Receptor tyrosine phosphatase beta is expressed in the form of proteoglycan and binds to the extracellular matrix protein tenascin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnea, G; Grumet, M; Milev, P;

    1994-01-01

    The extracellular domain of receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase beta (RPTP beta) exhibits striking sequence similarity with a soluble, rat brain chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (3F8 PG). Immunoprecipitation experiments of cells transfected with RPTP beta expression vector and metabolically...... labeled with [35S]sulfate and [35S]methionine indicate that the transmembrane form of RPTP beta is indeed a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. The 3F8 PG is therefore a variant form composed of the entire extracellular domain of RPTP beta probably generated by alternative RNA splicing. Previous...

  19. Protein phosphatase PPM1G regulates protein translation and cell growth by dephosphorylating 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianyu; Stevens, Payton D; Eshleman, Nichole E; Gao, Tianyan

    2013-08-09

    Protein translation initiation is a tightly controlled process responding to nutrient availability and mitogen stimulation. Serving as one of the most important negative regulators of protein translation, 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) binds to translation initiation factor 4E and inhibits cap-dependent translation in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Although it has been demonstrated previously that the phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 is controlled by mammalian target of rapamycin in the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1, the mechanism underlying the dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1 remains elusive. Here, we report the identification of PPM1G as the phosphatase of 4E-BP1. A coimmunoprecipitation experiment reveals that PPM1G binds to 4E-BP1 in cells and that purified PPM1G dephosphorylates 4E-BP1 in vitro. Knockdown of PPM1G in 293E and colon cancer HCT116 cells results in an increase in the phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 at both the Thr-37/46 and Ser-65 sites. Furthermore, the time course of 4E-BP1 dephosphorylation induced by amino acid starvation or mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition is slowed down significantly in PPM1G knockdown cells. Functionally, the amount of 4E-BP1 bound to the cap-dependent translation initiation complex is decreased when the expression of PPM1G is depleted. As a result, the rate of cap-dependent translation, cell size, and protein content are increased in PPM1G knockdown cells. Taken together, our study has identified protein phosphatase PPM1G as a novel regulator of cap-dependent protein translation by negatively controlling the phosphorylation of 4E-BP1.

  20. Effect of the Protein Corona on Antibody-Antigen Binding in Nanoparticle Sandwich Immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Puig, Helena; Bosch, Irene; Carré-Camps, Marc; Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly

    2017-01-18

    We investigated the effect of the protein corona on the function of nanoparticle (NP) antibody (Ab) conjugates in dipstick sandwich immunoassays. Ab specific for Zika virus nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) were conjugated to gold NPs, and another anti-NS1 Ab was immobilized onto the nitrocellulose membrane. Sandwich immunoassay formation was influenced by whether the strip was run in corona forming conditions, i.e., in human serum. Strips run in buffer or pure solutions of bovine serum albumin exhibited false positives, but those run in human serum did not. Serum pretreatment of the nitrocellulose also eliminated false positives. Corona formation around the NP-Ab in serum was faster than the immunoassay time scale. Langmuir binding analysis determined how the immobilized Ab affinity for the NP-Ab/NS1 was impacted by corona formation conditions, quantified as an effective dissociation constant, KD(eff). Results show that corona formation mediates the specificity and sensitivity of the antibody-antigen interaction of Zika biomarkers in immunoassays, and plays a critical but beneficial role.

  1. The role of monogamous bivalency and Fc interactions in the binding of anti-DNA antibodies to DNA antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, Nancy A; Pisetsky, David S

    2016-05-01

    Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA) are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus. These antibodies can bind DNA avidly by monogamous bivalency, a mechanism which requires the interaction of both Fab combining regions with antigenic determinants on the same polynucleotide. To explore further this mechanism, we tested Fab and F(ab')2 fragments prepared from IgG from patient plasmas in an ELISA with native DNA antigen, detecting antibody with a peroxidase conjugated anti-Fab reagent. These studies showed that Fab fragments, which can only bind monovalently, had negligible activity. Although bivalent F(ab')2 fragments would be predicted to bind DNA, these fragments also showed poor anti-DNA activity. Control studies showed that the fragments retained antibody activity to tetanus toxoid and an EBV antigen preparation. Together, these findings suggest that anti-DNA avidity depends on monogamous bivalency, with the antibody Fc portion also influencing DNA binding, in a mechanism which can be termed Fc-dependent monogamous bivalency.

  2. Structure, Receptor Binding, and Antigenicity of Influenza Virus Hemagglutinins from the 1957 H2N2 Pandemic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Rui; McBride, Ryan; Paulson, James C.; Basler, Christopher F.; Wilson, Ian A. (Sinai); (Scripps)

    2010-03-04

    The hemagglutinin (HA) envelope protein of influenza viruses mediates essential viral functions, including receptor binding and membrane fusion, and is the major viral antigen for antibody neutralization. The 1957 H2N2 subtype (Asian flu) was one of the three great influenza pandemics of the last century and caused 1 million deaths globally from 1957 to 1968. Three crystal structures of 1957 H2 HAs have been determined at 1.60 to 1.75 {angstrom} resolutions to investigate the structural basis for their antigenicity and evolution from avian to human binding specificity that contributed to its introduction into the human population. These structures, which represent the highest resolutions yet recorded for a complete ectodomain of a glycosylated viral surface antigen, along with the results of glycan microarray binding analysis, suggest that a hydrophobicity switch at residue 226 and elongation of receptor-binding sites were both critical for avian H2 HA to acquire human receptor specificity. H2 influenza viruses continue to circulate in birds and pigs and, therefore, remain a substantial threat for transmission to humans. The H2 HA structure also reveals a highly conserved epitope that could be harnessed in the design of a broader and more universal influenza A virus vaccine.

  3. A computational method for identification of vaccine targets from protein regions of conserved human leukocyte antigen binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars Rønn; Simon, Christian; Kudahl, Ulrich J.;

    2015-01-01

    target diverse regions in highly variable viral pathogens and this diversity may need to be addressed through redefinition of suitable peptide targets. Methods: We have developed a method for antigen assessment and target selection for polyvalent vaccines, with which we identified immune epitopes from...... the number of potential vaccine targets compared to the number of targets discovered using the traditional approach where low-frequency peptides are excluded. Conclusions: We developed a webserver with an intuitive visualization scheme for summarizing the T cell-based antigenic potential of any given protein......Background: Computational methods for T cell-based vaccine target discovery focus on selection of highly conserved peptides identified across pathogen variants, followed by prediction of their binding of human leukocyte antigen molecules. However, experimental studies have shown that T cells often...

  4. Oriented Immobilization of Fab Fragments by Site-Specific Biotinylation at the Conserved Nucleotide Binding Site for Enhanced Antigen Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafaoglu, Nur; Alves, Nathan J; Bilgicer, Basar

    2015-09-01

    Oriented immobilization of antibodies and antibody fragments has become increasingly important as a result of the efforts to reduce the size of diagnostic and sensor devices to miniaturized dimensions for improved accessibility to the end-user. Reduced dimensions of sensor devices necessitate the immobilized antibodies to conserve their antigen binding activity for proper operation. Fab fragments are becoming more commonly used in small-scaled diagnostic devices due to their small size and ease of manufacture. In this study, we used the previously described UV-NBS(Biotin) method to functionalize Fab fragments with IBA-EG11-Biotin linker utilizing UV energy to initiate a photo-cross-linking reaction between the nucleotide binding site (NBS) on the Fab fragment and IBA-Biotin molecule. Our results demonstrate that immobilization of biotinylated Fab fragments via UV-NBS(Biotin) method generated the highest level of immobilized Fab on surfaces when compared to other typical immobilization methods while preserving antigen binding activity. UV-NBS(Biotin) method provided 432-fold, 114-fold, and 29-fold improved antigen detection sensitivity than physical adsorption, NHS-Biotin, and ε-NH3(+), methods, respectively. Additionally, the limit of detection (LOD) for PSA utilizing Fab fragments immobilized via UV-NBS(Biotin) method was significantly lower than that of the other immobilization methods, with an LOD of 0.4 pM PSA. In summary, site-specific biotinylation of Fab fragments without structural damage or loss in antigen binding activity provides a wide range of application potential for UV-NBS immobilization technique across numerous diagnostic devices and nanotechnologies.

  5. Sequence similarity between the erythrocyte binding domain 1 of the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein and the V3 loop of HIV-1 strain MN reveals binding residues for the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Robert F

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The surface glycoprotein (SU, gp120 of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV must bind to a chemokine receptor, CCR5 or CXCR4, to invade CD4+ cells. Plasmodium vivax uses the Duffy Binding Protein (DBP to bind the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC and invade reticulocytes. Results Variable loop 3 (V3 of HIV-1 SU and domain 1 of the Plasmodium vivax DBP share a sequence similarity. The site of amino acid sequence similarity was necessary, but not sufficient, for DARC binding and contained a consensus heparin binding site essential for DARC binding. Both HIV-1 and P. vivax can be blocked from binding to their chemokine receptors by the chemokine, RANTES and its analog AOP-RANTES. Site directed mutagenesis of the heparin binding motif in members of the DBP family, the P. knowlesi alpha, beta and gamma proteins abrogated their binding to erythrocytes. Positively charged residues within domain 1 are required for binding of P. vivax and P. knowlesi erythrocyte binding proteins. Conclusion A heparin binding site motif in members of the DBP family may form part of a conserved erythrocyte receptor binding pocket.

  6. Acquisition of Functional Antibodies That Block the Binding of Erythrocyte-Binding Antigen 175 and Protection Against Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, Vashti; Ramsland, Paul A.; Guy, Andrew J.; Siba, Peter M.; Mueller, Ivo; Richards, Jack S.; Beeson, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The targets and mechanisms of human immunity to malaria are poorly understood, which poses a major barrier to malaria vaccine development. Antibodies play a key role in human immunity and may act by inhibiting receptor-binding functions of key merozoite invasion ligands. Antibodies to the major invasion ligand and vaccine candidate, erythrocyte-binding antigen 175 (EBA-175), have been linked with protection, but how these antibodies function has not been established. Methods. We developed 2 new assays that quantify the ability of antibodies to inhibit binding of EBA-175 to its erythrocyte receptor, glycophorin A, using either native or recombinant EBA-175. Binding-inhibitory antibodies were evaluated in a longitudinal cohort study of Papua New Guinean children and related to risk of malaria, age, infection status, and markers of parasite exposure. Results. Binding-inhibition assays (BIAs) were reproducible, and the 2 assays had a high level of agreement. Inhibitory antibodies were common among children, acquired in association with markers of increasing parasite exposure, and high in those children with active infection. Inhibitory antibodies correlated with total immunoglobulin G levels to the EBA-175 binding domain (region II). Importantly, binding-inhibitory antibodies were significantly associated with protection from symptomatic malaria when measured using either BIA. Conclusions. Findings suggest that naturally acquired binding-inhibitory antibodies are an important functional mechanism that contributes to protection against malaria and further supports the potential of EBA-175 as a vaccine candidate. Identifying vaccines and approaches that induce potent binding-inhibitory antibodies may be a valuable strategy in the development of highly efficacious malaria vaccines. PMID:26136391

  7. Direct binding between BubR1 and B56-PP2A phosphatase complexes regulate mitotic progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Thomas; Zhang, Gang; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo;

    2013-01-01

    and mutation of these residues prevents the establishment of a proper metaphase plate and delays cells in mitosis. Furthermore, we show that phosphorylation of S670 and S676 stimulates the binding of B56 to BubR1 and that BubR1 targets a pool of B56 to kinetochores. Our data suggests that BubR1 counteracts...

  8. Prediction of major histocompatibility complex binding regions of protein antigens by sequence pattern analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sette, A; Buus, S; Appella, E;

    1989-01-01

    We have previously experimentally analyzed the structural requirements for interaction between peptide antigens and mouse major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules of the d haplotype. We describe here two procedures devised to predict specifically the capacity of peptide molecules to inter......We have previously experimentally analyzed the structural requirements for interaction between peptide antigens and mouse major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules of the d haplotype. We describe here two procedures devised to predict specifically the capacity of peptide molecules...

  9. Study of antibody/antigen binding kinetics by total internal reflection ellipsometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baleviciute, Ieva; Balevicius, Zigmas; Makaraviciute, Asta; Ramanaviciene, Almira; Ramanavicius, Arunas

    2013-01-15

    Total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE) has been applied for the investigation of (i) kinetics of biosensing layer formation, which was based on the immobilization of fragmented and intact antibodies, and (ii) kinetics of antigen interaction with the immobilized antibodies. It has been demonstrated that ellipsometric parameter Δ(t) showed much higher sensitivity at the initial phase of Au-protein and protein-protein interaction, while the parameter Ψ(t) was more sensitive when the steady-state conditions were established. A new method, which taking into consideration this feature and nonlinear change of Δ(t) and Ψ(t) parameters during various stages of biological layer formation process, was used for the calculation of antibody and antigen adsorption/interaction kinetics. The obtained results were analyzed using a model, which took into account partial reversibility during the formation of both antibody and antigen based monolayers. It was shown that the immobilization rate of antibody during the preparation of the sensing layer was similar for the formation of both intact and fragmented antibody based layers; however, the residence time was 25 times longer for intact antibody based layer formation in comparison to that of fragmented antibody based layer formation. On the contrary, residence time of antigen interaction with immobilized antibodies was about 8 times longer for the sensor based on fragmented antibodies. Moreover, it has been determined that the structural differences of immobilized antibodies (fragmented or intact) significantly influence antibody-antigen interaction rate, the major difference being in the residence time of antigen interaction with both types of immobilized antibodies.

  10. Serum prostate-specific acid phosphatase: development and validation of a specific radioimmunoassay. [/sup 125/I tracer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vihko, P.; Sajanti, E.; Jaenne, O.; Peltonen, L.; Vihko, R.

    1978-11-01

    We describe radioimmunoassay for human prostatic acid phosphatase (orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase (acid optimum), EC 3.1.3.2) in serum, with use of monospecific antisera raised in rabbits against highly purified acid phosphatase from human prostates. The antiserum did not cross react with partly purified acid phosphatases from human spleen, erythrocytes, or synovial tissues. /sup 125/I-labeled acid phosphatase was prepared by a Chloramine T method, and the bound and free antigen was separated in the assay by use of anti-rabbit gamma-globulin raised in sheep. Uniform low nonspecific binding of the (/sup 125/I)acid phosphatase was achieved by using acid-phosphatase-free serum to prepare standard curves and diluted samples of serum with high acid phosphatase activities. Concentrations of immunoreactive acid phosphatase in the serum of healthy men ranged from <1 to 10 ..mu..g/liter and for 12 patients with advanced prostatic carcinoma between 100 and 500 ..mu..g/liter. The concentrations of the enzyme in sera of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia were very similar to those in sera of the reference group.

  11. Binding to histo-blood group antigen-expressing bacteria protects human norovirus from acute heat stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan eLi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate if histo-blood group antigen (HBGA expressing bacteria have any protective role on human norovirus (NoV from acute heat stress. Eleven bacterial strains were included, belonging to Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Clostridium difficile, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, and Bifidobacterium longum. HBGA expression of the bacteria as well as binding of human NoV virus-like particles (VLPs, GI.1 and GII.4 strains to the bacteria were detected by flow cytometry. NoV VLPs pre-incubated with HBGA expressing or non-HBGA expressing bacteria were heated and detected by both direct ELISA and porcine gastric mucin-binding assay. The NoV-binding abilities of the bacteria correlated well with their HBGA expression profiles. Two HBGA expressing E.coli (LMG8223 and LFMFP861, both GI.1 and GII.4 binders and one non-HBGA expressing E.coli (ATCC8739, neither GI.1 nor GII.4 binder were selected for the heat treatment test with NoV VLPs. Compared with the same cell numbers of non-HBGA expressing E.coli, the presence of HBGA-expressing E.coli could always maintain higher antigen integrity, as well as mucin-binding ability of NoV VLPs of both GI.1 and GII.4 after heat-treatment at 90°C for 2 min. These results indicate that HBGA-expressing bacteria may protect NoVs during the food processing treatments, thereby facilitating their transmission.

  12. Identification of a nonstructural DNA-binding protein (DBP as an antigen with diagnostic potential for human adenovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Guo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human adenoviruses (HAdVs have been implicated as important agents in a wide range of human illnesses. To date, 58 distinct HAdV serotypes have been identified and can be grouped into six species. For the immunological diagnosis of adenoviruses, the hexon protein, a structural protein, has been used. The potential of other HAdV proteins has not been fully addressed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, a nonstructural antigenic protein, the DNA binding protein (DBP of human adenovirus 5 and 35 (Ad5, Ad35 - was identified using immunoproteomic technology. The expression of Ad5 and Ad35 DBP in insect cells could be detected by rhesus monkey serum antibodies and healthy adult human serum positive for Ad5 and Ad35. Recombinant DBPs elicited high titer antibodies in mice. Their conserved domain displayed immunological cross-reactions with heterologous DBP antibodies in Western blot assays. DBP-IgM ELISA showed higher sensitivity adenovirus IgM detection than the commercial Adenovirus IgM Human ELISA Kit. A Western blot method developed based on Ad5 DBP was highly consistent with (χ(2 = 44.9, P<0.01 the Western blot assay for the hexon protein in the detection of IgG, but proved even more sensitive. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The HAdV nonstructural protein DBP is an antigenic protein that could serve as an alternative common antigen for adenovirus diagnosis.

  13. Exchanging murine and human immunoglobulin constant chains affects the kinetics and thermodynamics of antigen binding and chimeric antibody autoreactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Torres

    Full Text Available Mouse-human chimeric antibodies composed of murine variable (V and human (C chains are useful therapeutic reagents. Consequently, we investigated whether heterologous C-regions from mice and humans affected specificity and affinity, and determined the contribution of C(H glycosylation to antigen binding. The interaction of a 12-mer peptide mimetic with monoclonal antibody (mAb 18B7 to Cryptococcus neoformans glucuronoxylomannan, and its chimeric (ch and deglycosylated forms were studied by surface plasmon resonance. The equilibrium and rate association constants for the chAb were higher than for mAb 18B7. V region affinity was not affected by C(H region glycosylation whereas heterologous C region of the same isotype altered the Ab binding affinity and the specificity for self-antigens. Structural models displayed local differences that implied changes on the connectivity of residues. These findings suggest that V region conformational changes can be dictated by the C(H domains through an allosteric effect involving networks of highly connected amino acids.

  14. Antigen binding of human IgG Fabs mediate ERK-associated proliferation of human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yue-Jin; Mancino, Anne; Pashov, Anastas; Whitehead, Tracy; Stanley, Joseph; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2005-02-01

    Serum-circulating antibody can be linked to poor outcomes in some cancer patients. To investigate the role of human antibodies in regulating tumor cell growth, we constructed a recombinant cDNA expression library of human IgG Fab from a patient with breast cancer. Clones were screened from the library with breast tumor cell lysate. Sequence analysis of the clones showed somatic hypermutations when compared to their closest VH/VL germ-line genes. Initial characterizations focused on five clones. All tested clones displayed stronger binding to antigen derived from primary breast cancers and established breast cancer cell lines than to normal breast tissues. In vitro functional studies showed that four out of five tested clones could stimulate the growth of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines, and one out of five was able to promote MCF-7 cell growth as well. Involvement of ERK2 pathway was observed. By 1H-NMR spectra and Western blot analysis, it was evident that two tested antibody Fabs are capable of interacting with sialic acid. Our study suggests a possible role for human antibody in promoting tumor cell growth by direct binding of IgG Fab to breast tumor antigen. Such studies prompt speculation regarding the role of serum antibodies in mediating tumor growth as well as their contribution to disease progression.

  15. The role of antigen specificity in the binding of murine monoclonal anti-DNA antibodies to microparticles from apoptotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullal, Anirudh J; Marion, Tony N; Pisetsky, David S

    2014-10-01

    Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA) are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus and markers of underlying immune system disturbances. These antibodies bind to both single-stranded and double-stranded DNA, mediating pathogenesis by forming immune complexes. As shown recently, DNA in blood exists in both free and particulate forms, with DNA representing an important component of microparticles. Microparticles are membrane-bound vesicles containing nuclear molecules, released by membrane blebbing during cell death and activation. A panel of monoclonal NZB/NZW F1 anti-DNA antibodies was tested for binding to microparticles generated from apoptotic THP-1 and Jurkat cells. These studies showed that only certain anti-DNA antibodies in the panel, specific for double-stranded DNA, bound to microparticles. Binding to particles was reduced by soluble DNA or DNase treatment. Together, these results indicate that particle binding is a feature of only certain anti-DNA antibodies, reflecting immunochemical properties of the antibodies and the nature of the exposed DNA antigens.

  16. Structural analysis of the synthetic Duffy Binding Protein (DBP antigen DEKnull relevant for Plasmodium vivax malaria vaccine design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Chen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Plasmodium vivax vaccine candidate Duffy Binding Protein (DBP is a protein necessary for P. vivax invasion of reticulocytes. The polymorphic nature of DBP induces strain-specific immune responses that pose unique challenges for vaccine development. DEKnull is a synthetic DBP based antigen that has been engineered through mutation to enhance induction of blocking inhibitory antibodies. We determined the x-ray crystal structure of DEKnull to identify if any conformational changes had occurred upon mutation. Computational and experimental analyses assessed immunogenicity differences between DBP and DEKnull epitopes. Functional binding assays with monoclonal antibodies were used to interrogate the available epitopes in DEKnull. We demonstrate that DEKnull is structurally similar to the parental Sal1 DBP. The DEKnull mutations do not cause peptide backbone shifts within the polymorphic loop, or at either the DBP dimerization interface or DARC receptor binding pockets, two important structurally conserved protective epitope motifs. All B-cell epitopes, except for the mutated DEK motif, are conserved between DEKnull and DBP. The DEKnull protein retains binding to conformationally dependent inhibitory antibodies. DEKnull is an iterative improvement of DBP as a vaccine candidate. DEKnull has reduced immunogenicity to polymorphic regions responsible for strain-specific immunity while retaining conserved protein folds necessary for induction of strain-transcending blocking inhibitory antibodies.

  17. Structural analysis of peptides capable of binding to more than one Ia antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sette, A; Buus, S; Colon, S;

    1989-01-01

    The Ia binding regions were analyzed for three unrelated peptide Ag (sperm whale myoglobin 106-118, influenza hemagglutinin 130-142, and lambda repressor protein 12-26) for which binding to more than one Ia molecule has previously been demonstrated. By determining the binding profile of three...... separate series of truncated synthetic peptides, it was found that in all three cases the different Ia reactivities mapped to largely overlapping regions of the peptides; although, for two of the peptides, the regions involved in binding the different Ia specificities were distinct. Moreover, subtle...... differences were found to dramatically influence some, but not other, Ia reactivities. Using a large panel of synthetic peptides it was found that a significant correlation exists between the capacity of peptides to interact with different alleles of the same molecule (i.e., IAd and IAk), but no correlation...

  18. Involvement of the Eukaryote-Like Kinase-Phosphatase System and a Protein That Interacts with Penicillin-Binding Protein 5 in Emergence of Cephalosporin Resistance in Cephalosporin-Sensitive Class A Penicillin-Binding Protein Mutants in Enterococcus faecium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlene Desbonnet

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The intrinsic resistance of Enterococcus faecium to ceftriaxone and cefepime (here referred to as “cephalosporins” is reliant on the presence of class A penicillin-binding proteins (Pbps PbpF and PonA. Mutants lacking these Pbps exhibit cephalosporin susceptibility that is reversible by exposure to penicillin and by selection on cephalosporin-containing medium. We selected two cephalosporin-resistant mutants (Cro1 and Cro2 of class A Pbp-deficient E. faecium CV598. Genome analysis revealed changes in the serine-threonine kinase Stk in Cro1 and a truncation in the associated phosphatase StpA in Cro2 whose respective involvements in resistance were confirmed in separate complementation experiments. In an additional effort to identify proteins linked to cephalosporin resistance, we performed tandem affinity purification using Pbp5 as bait in penicillin-exposed E. faecium; these experiments yielded a protein designated Pbp5-associated protein (P5AP. Transcription of the P5AP gene was increased after exposure to penicillin in wild-type strains and in Cro2 and suppressed in Cro2 complemented with the wild-type stpA. Transformation of class A Pbp-deficient strains with the plasmid-carried P5AP gene conferred cephalosporin resistance. These data suggest that Pbp5-associated cephalosporin resistance in E. faecium devoid of typical class A Pbps is related to the presence of P5AP, whose expression is influenced by the activity of the serine-threonine phosphatase/kinase system.

  19. Affinity binding of antibodies to supermacroporous cryogel adsorbents with immobilized protein A for removal of anthrax toxin protective antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingavle, Ganesh C; Baillie, Les W J; Zheng, Yishan; Lis, Elzbieta K; Savina, Irina N; Howell, Carol A; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V; Sandeman, Susan R

    2015-05-01

    Polymeric cryogels are efficient carriers for the immobilization of biomolecules because of their unique macroporous structure, permeability, mechanical stability and different surface chemical functionalities. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the potential use of macroporous monolithic cryogels for biotoxin removal using anthrax toxin protective antigen (PA), the central cell-binding component of the anthrax exotoxins, and covalent immobilization of monoclonal antibodies. The affinity ligand (protein A) was chemically coupled to the reactive hydroxyl and epoxy-derivatized monolithic cryogels and the binding efficiencies of protein A, monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel column were determined. Our results show differences in the binding capacity of protein A as well as monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel adsorbents caused by ligand concentrations, physical properties and morphology of surface matrices. The cytotoxicity potential of the cryogels was determined by an in vitro viability assay using V79 lung fibroblast as a model cell and the results reveal that the cryogels are non-cytotoxic. Finally, the adsorptive capacities of PA from phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were evaluated towards a non-glycosylated, plant-derived human monoclonal antibody (PANG) and a glycosylated human monoclonal antibody (Valortim(®)), both of which were covalently attached via protein A immobilization. Optimal binding capacities of 108 and 117 mg/g of antibody to the adsorbent were observed for PANG attached poly(acrylamide-allyl glycidyl ether) [poly(AAm-AGE)] and Valortim(®) attached poly(AAm-AGE) cryogels, respectively, This indicated that glycosylation status of Valortim(®) antibody could significantly increase (8%) its binding capacity relative to the PANG antibody on poly(AAm-AGE)-protien-A column (p PBS through PANG or Valortim bound poly(AAm-AGE) cryogel were significantly (p PBS over 60 min of circulation. The high adsorption capacity towards anthrax toxin PA of the

  20. Amino Acids in Hemagglutinin Antigenic Site B Determine Antigenic and Receptor Binding Differences between A(H3N2)v and Ancestral Seasonal H3N2 Influenza Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoquan; Ilyushina, Natalia A; Lugovtsev, Vladimir Y; Bovin, Nicolai V; Couzens, Laura K; Gao, Jin; Donnelly, Raymond P; Eichelberger, Maryna C; Wan, Hongquan

    2017-01-15

    Influenza A H3N2 variant [A(H3N2)v] viruses, which have caused human infections in the United States in recent years, originated from human seasonal H3N2 viruses that were introduced into North American swine in the mid-1990s, but they are antigenically distinct from both the ancestral and current circulating H3N2 strains. A reference A(H3N2)v virus, A/Minnesota/11/2010 (MN/10), and a seasonal H3N2 strain, A/Beijing/32/1992 (BJ/92), were chosen to determine the molecular basis for the antigenic difference between A(H3N2)v and the ancestral viruses. Viruses containing wild-type and mutant MN/10 or BJ/92 hemagglutinins (HAs) were constructed and probed for reactivity with ferret antisera against MN/10 and BJ/92 in hemagglutination inhibition assays. Among the amino acids that differ between the MN/10 and BJ/92 HAs, those in antigenic site A had little impact on the antigenic phenotype. Within antigenic site B, mutations at residues 156, 158, 189, and 193 of MN/10 HA to those in BJ/92 switched the MN/10 antigenic phenotype to that of BJ/92. Mutations at residues 156, 157, 158, 189, and 193 of BJ/92 HA to amino acids present in MN/10 were necessary for BJ/92 to become antigenically similar to MN/10. The HA amino acid substitutions responsible for switching the antigenic phenotype also impacted HA binding to sialyl receptors that are usually present in the human respiratory tract. Our study demonstrates that antigenic site B residues play a critical role in determining both the unique antigenic phenotype and receptor specificity of A(H3N2)v viruses, a finding that may facilitate future surveillance and risk assessment of novel influenza viruses.

  1. Genome-wide analysis of host-chromosome binding sites for Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Pu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA1 protein is required for the establishment of EBV latent infection in proliferating B-lymphocytes. EBNA1 is a multifunctional DNA-binding protein that stimulates DNA replication at the viral origin of plasmid replication (OriP, regulates transcription of viral and cellular genes, and tethers the viral episome to the cellular chromosome. EBNA1 also provides a survival function to B-lymphocytes, potentially through its ability to alter cellular gene expression. To better understand these various functions of EBNA1, we performed a genome-wide analysis of the viral and cellular DNA sites associated with EBNA1 protein in a latently infected Burkitt lymphoma B-cell line. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP combined with massively parallel deep-sequencing (ChIP-Seq was used to identify cellular sites bound by EBNA1. Sites identified by ChIP-Seq were validated by conventional real-time PCR, and ChIP-Seq provided quantitative, high-resolution detection of the known EBNA1 binding sites on the EBV genome at OriP and Qp. We identified at least one cluster of unusually high-affinity EBNA1 binding sites on chromosome 11, between the divergent FAM55 D and FAM55B genes. A consensus for all cellular EBNA1 binding sites is distinct from those derived from the known viral binding sites, suggesting that some of these sites are indirectly bound by EBNA1. EBNA1 also bound close to the transcriptional start sites of a large number of cellular genes, including HDAC3, CDC7, and MAP3K1, which we show are positively regulated by EBNA1. EBNA1 binding sites were enriched in some repetitive elements, especially LINE 1 retrotransposons, and had weak correlations with histone modifications and ORC binding. We conclude that EBNA1 can interact with a large number of cellular genes and chromosomal loci in latently infected cells, but that these sites are likely to represent a complex ensemble of direct and indirect EBNA

  2. Structure-Function Analysis of PPP1R3D, a Protein Phosphatase 1 Targeting Subunit, Reveals a Binding Motif for 14-3-3 Proteins which Regulates its Glycogenic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Villena, Carla; Sanz, Pascual; Garcia-Gimeno, Maria Adelaida

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is one of the major protein phosphatases in eukaryotic cells. It plays a key role in regulating glycogen synthesis, by dephosphorylating crucial enzymes involved in glycogen homeostasis such as glycogen synthase (GS) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP). To play this role, PP1 binds to specific glycogen targeting subunits that, on one hand recognize the substrates to be dephosphorylated and on the other hand recruit PP1 to glycogen particles. In this work we have analyzed the functionality of the different protein binding domains of one of these glycogen targeting subunits, namely PPP1R3D (R6) and studied how binding properties of different domains affect its glycogenic properties. We have found that the PP1 binding domain of R6 comprises a conserved RVXF motif (R102VRF) located at the N-terminus of the protein. We have also identified a region located at the C-terminus of R6 (W267DNND) that is involved in binding to the PP1 glycogenic substrates. Our results indicate that although binding to PP1 and glycogenic substrates are independent processes, impairment of any of them results in lack of glycogenic activity of R6. In addition, we have characterized a novel site of regulation in R6 that is involved in binding to 14-3-3 proteins (RARS74LP). We present evidence indicating that when binding of R6 to 14-3-3 proteins is prevented, R6 displays hyper-glycogenic activity although is rapidly degraded by the lysosomal pathway. These results define binding to 14-3-3 proteins as an additional pathway in the control of the glycogenic properties of R6.

  3. Coinvasion of dentinal tubules by Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus gordonii depends upon binding specificity of streptococcal antigen I/II adhesin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, R M; McMillan, M D; Park, Y; Jenkinson, H F

    2000-03-01

    Cell wall-anchored polypeptides of the antigen I/II family are produced by many species of oral streptococci. These proteins mediate adhesion of streptococci to salivary glycoproteins and to other oral microorganisms and promote binding of cells to collagen type I and invasion of dentinal tubules. Since infections of the root canal system have a mixed anaerobic bacterial etiology, we investigated the hypothesis that coadhesion of anaerobic bacteria with streptococci may facilitate invasive endodontic disease. Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 cells were able to invade dentinal tubules when cocultured with Streptococcus gordonii DL1 (Challis) but not when cocultured with Streptococcus mutans NG8. An isogenic noninvasive mutant of S. gordonii, with production of SspA and SspB (antigen I/II family) polypeptides abrogated, was deficient in binding to collagen and had a 40% reduced ability to support adhesion of P. gingivalis. Heterologous expression of the S. mutans SpaP (antigen I/II) protein in this mutant restored collagen binding and tubule invasion but not adhesion to P. gingivalis or the ability to promote P. gingivalis coinvasion of dentin. An isogenic afimbrial mutant of P. gingivalis had 50% reduced binding to S. gordonii cells but was unaffected in the ability to coinvade dentinal tubules with S. gordonii wild-type cells. Expression of the S. gordonii SspA or SspB polypeptide on the surface of Lactococcus lactis cells endowed these bacteria with the abilities to bind P. gingivalis, penetrate dentinal tubules, and promote P. gingivalis coinvasion of dentin. The results demonstrate that collagen-binding and P. gingivalis-binding properties of antigen I/II polypeptides are discrete functions. Specificity of antigen I/II polypeptide recognition accounts for the ability of P. gingivalis to coinvade dentinal tubules with S. gordonii but not with S. mutans. This provides evidence that the specificity of interbacterial coadhesion may influence directly the etiology

  4. Cloning of two members of the SIRP alpha family of protein tyrosine phosphatase binding proteins in cattle that are expressed on monocytes and a subpopulation of dendritic cells and which mediate binding to CD4 T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, G P; Parsons, K R; Howard, C J

    1998-01-01

    Recent experimental studies have greatly clarified the function of cell surface molecules in the induction and modulation of T cell responses by antigen-presenting cells (APC). However, the differences in ability to stimulate T cells evident for different types and subpopulations of the same APC, such as dendritic cell subsets, is less well understood. This report details an investigation of an antigen expressed on monocytes that is also expressed on a subset of cattle afferent lymph veiled cells (ALVC). A cDNA library derived from cattle monocytes was screened with monoclonal antibodies (mAb) for expression in COS-7 cells. Using separate mAb for screening, two cDNA were cloned, the sequences of which showed a single long open reading frame encoding a predicted type I glycoprotein of 506 amino acids that contained three immunoglobulin superfamily domains and a long 112-amino acid cytoplasmic tail. We have termed this antigen MyD-1, reflecting its myeloid and dendritic cell distribution. Analysis of the EMBL database revealed that the molecule is a member of the recently described family of signal regulatory proteins (SIRP). The outeremost Ig domain was of the adhesion/receptor I-type, suggesting that MyD-1 might bind to a ligand on another cell. Evidence for this was subsequently obtained by demonstrating that COS-7 cells transfected with MyD-1 cDNA bound CD4 T cells and this binding was blocked by specific mAb. The potential importance of this interaction was supported by the finding that the proliferation of resting memory CD4 T cells to ovalbumin-pulsed monocytes was significantly reduced in the presence of mAb to MyD-1. A role for the molecule in the modulation of the monocyte/dendritic APC response is also predicted from the existence of multiple potential tyrosine phosphorylation sites in the cytoplasmic domain, including the presence of an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) and the observation that the SIRP alpha family members have been

  5. Carbohydrate structure and differential binding of prostate specific antigen to Maackia amurensis lectin between prostate cancer and benign prostate hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, Chikara; Hosono, Masahiro; Nitta, Kazuo; Oh-eda, Masayoshi; Yoshikawa, Kazuyuki; Habuchi, Tomonori; Arai, Yoichi; Fukuda, Minoru

    2004-08-01

    Serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) assay is widely used for detection of prostate cancer. Because PSA is also synthesized from normal prostate, false positive diagnosis cannot be avoided by the conventional serum PSA test. To apply the cancer-associated carbohydrate alteration to the improvement of PSA assay, we first elucidated the structures of PSA purified from human seminal fluid. The predominant core structure of N-glycans of seminal fluid PSA was a complex type biantennary oligosaccharide and was consistent with the structure reported previously. However, we found the sialic acid alpha2-3 galactose linkage as an additional terminal carbohydrate structure on seminal fluid PSA. We then analyzed the carbohydrate moiety of serum PSA from the patients with prostate cancer and benign prostate hypertrophy using lectin affinity chromatography. Lectin binding was assessed by lectin affinity column chromatography followed by determining the amount of total and free PSA. Concanavalin A, Lens culinaris, Aleuria aurantia, Sambucus nigra, and Maackia amurensis lectins were tested for their binding to the carbohydrates on PSA. Among the lectins examined, the M. amurensis agglutinin-bound fraction of free serum PSA is increased in prostate cancer patients compared to benign prostate hypertrophy patients. The binding of PSA to M. amurensis agglutinin, which recognizes alpha2,3-linked sialic acid, was also confirmed by surface plasmon resonance analysis. These results suggest that the differential binding of free serum PSA to M. amurensis agglutinin lectin between prostate cancer and benign prostate hypertrophy could be a potential measure for diagnosis of prostate cancer.

  6. Using molecular principal axes for structural comparison: determining the tertiary changes of a FAB antibody domain induced by antigenic binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverman B David

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparison of different protein x-ray structures has previously been made in a number of different ways; for example, by visual examination, by differences in the locations of secondary structures, by explicit superposition of structural elements, e.g. α-carbon atom locations, or by procedures that utilize a common symmetry element or geometrical feature of the structures to be compared. Results A new approach is applied to determine the structural changes that an antibody protein domain experiences upon its interaction with an antigenic target. These changes are determined with the use of two different, however comparable, sets of principal axes that are obtained by diagonalizing the second-order tensors that yield the moments-of-geometry as well as an ellipsoidal characterization of domain shape, prior to and after interaction. Determination of these sets of axes for structural comparison requires no internal symmetry features of the domains, depending solely upon their representation in three-dimensional space. This representation may involve atomic, Cα, or residue centroid coordinates. The present analysis utilizes residue centroids. When the structural changes are minimal, the principal axes of the domains, prior to and after interaction, are essentially comparable and consequently may be used for structural comparison. When the differences of the axes cannot be neglected, but are nevertheless slight, a smaller relatively invariant substructure of the domains may be utilized for comparison. The procedure yields two distance metrics for structural comparison. First, the displacements of the residue centroids due to antigenic binding, referenced to the ellipsoidal principal axes, are noted. Second, changes in the ellipsoidal distances with respect to the non-interacting structure provide a direct measure of the spatial displacements of the residue centroids, towards either the interior or exterior of the domain

  7. Genome Sequence of Enterobacter cloacae Strain SENG-6, a Bacterium Producing Histo-Blood Group Antigen-Like Substances That Can Bind with Human Noroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Satoshi; Amarasiri, Mohan; Hashiba, Satoshi; Yang, Peiyi; Okabe, Satoshi; Sano, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Enterobacter sp. strain SENG-6, isolated from healthy human feces, produces histo-blood group antigen (HBGA)-like substances that can bind with human noroviruses. Based on the genome sequence analysis, strain SENG-6 belongs to the species Enterobacter cloacae The genome sequence of this strain should help identify genes associated with the production of HBGA-like substances.

  8. Specific T-cell recognition of the merozoite proteins rhoptry-associated protein 1 and erythrocyte-binding antigen 1 of Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, P H; Hviid, L; Theander, T G;

    1993-01-01

    The merozoite proteins merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP-1) and rhoptry-associated protein 1 (RAP-1) and synthetic peptides containing sequences of MSP-1, RAP-1, and erythrocyte-binding antigen 1, induced in vitro proliferative responses of lymphocytes collected from Ghanaian blood donors living...

  9. Expression and characterization of an enantioselective antigen-binding fragment directed against α-amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleniste, Pierre P.; Hofstetter, Heike; Hofstetter, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    This work describes the design and expression of a stereoselective Fab that possesses binding properties comparable to those displayed by the parent monoclonal antibody. Utilizing mRNA from hybridoma clones that secrete a stereoselective anti-L-amino acid antibody, a corresponding biotechnologically produced Fab was generated. For that, appropriate primers were designed based on extensive literature and databank searches. Using these primers in PCR resulted in successful amplification of the VH, VL, CL and CH1 gene fragments. Overlap PCR was utilized to combine the VH and CH1 sequences and the VL and CL sequences, respectively, to obtain the genes encoding the HC and LC fragments. These sequences were separately cloned into the pEXP5-CT/TOPO expression vector and used for transfection of BL21(DE3) cells. Separate expression of the two chains, followed by assembly in a refolding buffer, yielded an Fab that was demonstrated to bind to L-amino acids but not to recognize the corresponding D-enantiomers. PMID:23827208

  10. Humoral markers of active Epstein-Barr virus infection associate with anti-extractable nuclear antigen autoantibodies and plasma galectin-3 binding protein in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, N S; Nielsen, C T; Houen, G; Jacobsen, S

    2016-12-01

    We investigated if signs of active Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus infections associate with certain autoantibodies and a marker of type I interferon activity in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. IgM and IgG plasma levels against Epstein-Barr virus early antigen diffuse and cytomegalovirus pp52 were applied as humoral markers of ongoing/recently active Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus infections, respectively. Plasma galectin-3 binding protein served as a surrogate marker of type I interferon activity. The measurements were conducted in 57 systemic lupus erythematosus patients and 29 healthy controls using ELISAs. Regression analyses and univariate comparisons were performed for associative evaluation between virus serology, plasma galectin-3 binding protein and autoantibodies, along with other clinical and demographic parameters. Plasma galectin-3 binding protein concentrations were significantly higher in systemic lupus erythematosus patients (P = 0.009) and associated positively with Epstein-Barr virus early antigen diffuse-directed antibodies and the presence of autoantibodies against extractable nuclear antigens in adjusted linear regressions (B = 2.02 and 2.02, P = 0.02 and P = 0.002, respectively). Furthermore, systemic lupus erythematosus patients with anti-extractable nuclear antigens had significantly higher antibody levels against Epstein-Barr virus early antigen diffuse (P = 0.02). Our study supports a link between active Epstein-Barr virus infections, positivity for anti-extractable nuclear antigens and increased plasma galectin-3 binding protein concentrations/type I interferon activity in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

  11. Effects of egg-adaptation on receptor-binding and antigenic properties of recent influenza A (H3N2) vaccine viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Lauren; Wharton, Stephen A; Martin, Stephen R; Cross, Karen; Lin, Yipu; Liu, Yan; Feizi, Ten; Daniels, Rodney S; McCauley, John W

    2016-06-01

    Influenza A virus (subtype H3N2) causes seasonal human influenza and is included as a component of influenza vaccines. The majority of vaccine viruses are isolated and propagated in eggs, which commonly results in amino acid substitutions in the haemagglutinin (HA) glycoprotein. These substitutions can affect virus receptor-binding and alter virus antigenicity, thereby, obfuscating the choice of egg-propagated viruses for development into candidate vaccine viruses. To evaluate the effects of egg-adaptive substitutions seen in H3N2 vaccine viruses on sialic acid receptor-binding, we carried out quantitative measurement of virus receptor-binding using surface biolayer interferometry with haemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays to correlate changes in receptor avidity with antigenic properties. Included in these studies was a panel of H3N2 viruses generated by reverse genetics containing substitutions seen in recent egg-propagated vaccine viruses and corresponding cell culture-propagated wild-type viruses. These assays provide a quantitative approach to investigating the importance of individual amino acid substitutions in influenza receptor-binding. Results show that viruses with egg-adaptive HA substitutions R156Q, S219Y, and I226N, have increased binding avidity to α2,3-linked receptor-analogues and decreased binding avidity to α2,6-linked receptor-analogues. No measurable binding was detected for the viruses with amino acid substitution combination 156Q+219Y and receptor-binding increased in viruses where egg-adaptation mutations were introduced into cell culture-propagated virus. Substitutions at positions 156 and 190 appeared to be primarily responsible for low reactivity in HI assays with post-infection ferret antisera raised against 2012-2013 season H3N2 viruses. Egg-adaptive substitutions at position 186 caused substantial differences in binding avidity with an insignificant effect on antigenicity.

  12. Diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum infection in man: detection of parasite antigens by ELISA*

    OpenAIRE

    Mackey, L. J.; McGregor, I. A.; Paounova, N.; Lambert, P. H.

    1982-01-01

    An ELISA method has been developed for the diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum infection in man. Parasites from in vitro cultures of P. falciparum were used as source of antigen for the solid phase and the source of specific antibody was immune Gambian sera; binding of antibody in antigen-coated wells was registered by means of alkaline phosphatase-conjugated anti-human IgG. Parasites were detected on the basis of inhibition of antibody-binding. The test was applied to the detection of parasit...

  13. Structural Analysis of Histo-Blood Group Antigen Binding Specificity in a Norovirus GII.4 Epidemic Variant: Implications for Epochal Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanker, Sreejesh; Choi, Jae-Mun; Sankaran, Banumathi; Atmar, Robert L.; Estes, Mary K.; Prasad, B.V. Venkataram (Baylor); (LBNL)

    2012-03-23

    Susceptibility to norovirus (NoV), a major pathogen of epidemic gastroenteritis, is associated with histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), which are also cell attachment factors for this virus. GII.4 NoV strains are predominantly associated with worldwide NoV epidemics with a periodic emergence of new variants. The sequence variations in the surface-exposed P domain of the capsid protein resulting in differential HBGA binding patterns and antigenicity are suggested to drive GII.4 epochal evolution. To understand how temporal sequence variations affect the P domain structure and contribute to epochal evolution, we determined the P domain structure of a 2004 variant with ABH and secretor Lewis HBGAs and compared it with the previously determined structure of a 1996 variant. We show that temporal sequence variations do not affect the binding of monofucosyl ABH HBGAs but that they can modulate the binding strength of difucosyl Lewis HBGAs and thus could contribute to epochal evolution by the potentiated targeting of new variants to Lewis-positive, secretor-positive individuals. The temporal variations also result in significant differences in the electrostatic landscapes, likely reflecting antigenic variations. The proximity of some of these changes to the HBGA binding sites suggests the possibility of a coordinated interplay between antigenicity and HBGA binding in epochal evolution. From the observation that the regions involved in the formation of the HBGA binding sites can be conformationally flexible, we suggest a plausible mechanism for how norovirus disassociates from salivary mucin-linked HBGA before reassociating with HBGAs linked to intestinal epithelial cells during its passage through the gastrointestinal tract.

  14. Comparison of purified 12 kDa and recombinant 15 kDa Fasciola hepatica antigens related to a Schistosoma mansoni fatty acid binding protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George V. Hillyer

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines in schistosomiasis using homologous antigens have been studied extensively in experimentally infected mammalian hosts. Vaccines using heterologous antigens have received comparatively less attention. This review summarizes recent work on a heterologous 12 kDa Fasciola hepatica antigenic polypeptide which cross reacts with Schistosoma mansoni. A cDNA has been cloned and sequenced, and the predicted amino acid sequence of the recombinant protein has been shown to have significant (44 identity with a 14 kDa S. mansoni fatty acid binding protein. Thus in the parasitic trematodes fatty acid binding proteins may be potential vaccine candidates. The F. hepatica recombinant protein has been overexpressed and purified and denoted rFh15. Preliminary rFh15 migrates more slowly (i.e. may be slightly larger than nFh12 on SDS-PAGE and has a predicted pI of 6.01 vs. observed pI of 5.45. Mice infected with F. hepatica develop antibodies to nFh12 by 2 weeks of infection vs. 6 weeks of infection to rFh15; on the other hand, mice with schistosomiasis mansoni develop antibodies to both nFh12 and rFh15 by 6 weeks of infection. Both the F. hepatica and S. mansoni cross-reactive antigens may be cross-protective antigens with the protection inducing capability against both species.

  15. An Extended Surface Loop on Toxoplasma gondii Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1 Governs Ligand Binding Selectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L Parker

    Full Text Available Apicomplexan parasites are the causative agents of globally prevalent diseases including malaria and toxoplasmosis. These obligate intracellular pathogens have evolved a sophisticated host cell invasion strategy that relies on a parasite-host cell junction anchored by interactions between apical membrane antigens (AMAs on the parasite surface and rhoptry neck 2 (RON2 proteins discharged from the parasite and embedded in the host cell membrane. Key to formation of the AMA1-RON2 complex is displacement of an extended surface loop on AMA1 called the DII loop. While conformational flexibility of the DII loop is required to expose the mature RON2 binding groove, a definitive role of this substructure has not been elucidated. To establish a role of the DII loop in Toxoplasma gondii AMA1, we engineered a form of the protein where the mobile portion of the loop was replaced with a short Gly-Ser linker (TgAMA1ΔDIIloop. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements with a panel of RON2 peptides revealed an influential role for the DII loop in governing selectivity. Most notably, an Eimeria tenella RON2 (EtRON2 peptide that showed only weak binding to TgAMA1 bound with high affinity to TgAMA1ΔDIIloop. To define the molecular basis for the differential binding, we determined the crystal structure of TgAMA1ΔDIIloop in complex with the EtRON2 peptide. When analyzed in the context of existing AMA1-RON2 structures, spatially distinct anchor points in the AMA1 groove were identified that, when engaged, appear to provide the necessary traction to outcompete the DII loop. Collectively, these data support a model where the AMA1 DII loop serves as a structural gatekeeper to selectively filter out ligands otherwise capable of binding with high affinity in the AMA1 apical groove. These data also highlight the importance of considering the functional implications of the DII loop in the ongoing development of therapeutic intervention strategies targeting the AMA1-RON

  16. Crystallography of a Lewis-binding norovirus, elucidation of strain-specificity to the polymorphic human histo-blood group antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutao Chen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Noroviruses, an important cause of acute gastroenteritis in humans, recognize the histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs as host susceptible factors in a strain-specific manner. The crystal structures of the HBGA-binding interfaces of two A/B/H-binding noroviruses, the prototype Norwalk virus (GI.1 and a predominant GII.4 strain (VA387, have been elucidated. In this study we determined the crystal structures of the P domain protein of the first Lewis-binding norovirus (VA207, GII.9 that has a distinct binding property from those of Norwalk virus and VA387. Co-crystallization of the VA207 P dimer with Le(y or sialyl Le(x tetrasaccharides showed that VA207 interacts with these antigens through a common site found on the VA387 P protein which is highly conserved among most GII noroviruses. However, the HBGA-binding site of VA207 targeted at the Lewis antigens through the α-1, 3 fucose (the Lewis epitope as major and the β-N-acetyl glucosamine of the precursor as minor interacting sites. This completely differs from the binding mode of VA387 and Norwalk virus that target at the secretor epitopes. Binding pocket of VA207 is formed by seven amino acids, of which five residues build up the core structure that is essential for the basic binding function, while the other two are involved in strain-specificity. Our results elucidate for the first time the genetic and structural basis of strain-specificity by a direct comparison of two genetically related noroviruses in their interaction with different HBGAs. The results provide insight into the complex interaction between the diverse noroviruses and the polymorphic HBGAs and highlight the role of human HBGA as a critical factor in norovirus evolution.

  17. Temporally defined neocortical translation and polysome assembly are determined by the RNA-binding protein Hu antigen R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraushar, Matthew L; Thompson, Kevin; Wijeratne, H R Sagara; Viljetic, Barbara; Sakers, Kristina; Marson, Justin W; Kontoyiannis, Dimitris L; Buyske, Steven; Hart, Ronald P; Rasin, Mladen-Roko

    2014-09-09

    Precise spatiotemporal control of mRNA translation machinery is essential to the development of highly complex systems like the neocortex. However, spatiotemporal regulation of translation machinery in the developing neocortex remains poorly understood. Here, we show that an RNA-binding protein, Hu antigen R (HuR), regulates both neocorticogenesis and specificity of neocortical translation machinery in a developmental stage-dependent manner in mice. Neocortical absence of HuR alters the phosphorylation states of initiation and elongation factors in the core translation machinery. In addition, HuR regulates the temporally specific positioning of functionally related mRNAs into the active translation sites, the polysomes. HuR also determines the specificity of neocortical polysomes by defining their combinatorial composition of ribosomal proteins and initiation and elongation factors. For some HuR-dependent proteins, the association with polysomes likewise depends on the eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha kinase 4, which associates with HuR in prenatal developing neocortices. Finally, we found that deletion of HuR before embryonic day 10 disrupts both neocortical lamination and formation of the main neocortical commissure, the corpus callosum. Our study identifies a crucial role for HuR in neocortical development as a translational gatekeeper for functionally related mRNA subgroups and polysomal protein specificity.

  18. Effect of polyethylene glycol conjugation on conformational and colloidal stability of a monoclonal antibody antigen-binding fragment (Fab').

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, Cristopher; Sheung, Anthony; Rahman, Nausheen; Ausar, S Fernando

    2015-02-01

    We have investigated the effects of site specific "hinge" polyethylene glycol conjugation (PEGylation) on thermal, pH, and colloidal stability of a monoclonal antibody antigen-binding fragment (Fab') using a variety of biophysical techniques. The results obtained by circular dichroism (CD), ultraviolet (UV) absorbance, and fluorescence spectroscopy suggested that the physical stability of the Fab' is maximized at pH 6-7 with no apparent differences due to PEGylation. Temperature-induced aggregation experiments revealed that PEGylation was able to increase the transition temperature, as well as prevent the formation of visible and subvisible aggregates. Statistical comparison of the three-index empirical phase diagram (EPD) revealed significant differences in thermal and pH stability signatures between Fab' and PEG-Fab'. Upon mechanical stress, micro-flow imaging (MFI) and measurement of the optical density at 360 nm showed that the PEG-Fab' had significantly higher resistance to surface-induced aggregation compared to the Fab'. Analysis of the interaction parameter, kD, indicated repulsive intermolecular forces for PEG-Fab' and attractive forces for Fab'. In conclusion, PEGylation appears to protect Fab' against thermal and mechanical stress-induced aggregation, likely due to a steric hindrance mechanism.

  19. Hepatitis C Virus Subtype 3a Envelope Protein 1 Binding with Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I Types of Pakistani Population: Candidate Epitopes for Synthetic Peptide Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Nawaz-Tipu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The object of this cross sectional study was to determine the HCV subtype 3a envelope protein binding affinity with Human Leukocyte Antigen. Envelope 1 (E1 protein is one of the structural proteins responsible for entering the cells through the receptors. The binding affinity of E1 protein epitopes to the selected Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA class I alleles was investigated using the computer-based tools. These prediction tools were also used to design the synthetic vaccine’s candidate epitopes and to identify the individuals/populations who are likely to be responder to those vaccines.The mean frequency of HLA I antigens in Pakistani population was calculated. Threealleles each from HLA A and B were selected. E1 protein sequence extracted from HCV 3a isolates was retrieved and twenty-four sequences of it were selected. NetMHCcons 1.0 server was used to determine the binding affinities of HLA alleles to the epitope sequences of 10 amino acids in length.A02, A03, A11, A24, A33, B08, B13, B15, B35 and B40 were the first five antigens moreprevalent in Pakistan each from HLA A and HLA B.. We did not find any binding affinity between HLA A*201, B*1501 and B*4001 and epitopes from E1 sequences in a threshold of50 nM. Totally five various epitopes derived from different isolates were characterized.The prediction of HLA-E1 epitope specific bindings and the forthcoming response can be a useful bioinformatics tool to uncover the right synthetic peptides for vaccine design purposes.

  20. Hepatitis C Virus Subtype 3a Envelope Protein 1 Binding with Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I Types of Pakistani Population: Candidate Epitopes for Synthetic Peptide Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz-Tipu, Hamid

    2015-10-01

    The object of this cross sectional study was to determine the HCV subtype 3a envelope protein binding affinity with Human Leukocyte Antigen. Envelope 1 (E1) protein is one of the structural proteins responsible for entering the cells through the receptors. The binding affinity of E1 protein epitopes to the selected Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class I alleles was investigated using the computer-based tools. These prediction tools were also used to design the synthetic vaccine's candidate epitopes and to identify the individuals/populations who are likely to be responder to those vaccines.The mean frequency of HLA I antigens in Pakistani population was calculated. Three alleles each from HLA A and B were selected. E1 protein sequence extracted from HCV 3a isolates was retrieved and twenty-four sequences of it were selected. NetMHCcons 1.0 server was used to determine the binding affinities of HLA alleles to the epitope sequences of 10 amino acids in length.A02, A03, A11, A24, A33, B08, B13, B15, B35 and B40 were the first five antigens more prevalent in Pakistan each from HLA A and HLA B.. We did not find any binding affinity between HLA A*201, B*1501 and B*4001 and epitopes from E1 sequences in a threshold of 50 nM. Totally five various epitopes derived from different isolates were characterized.The prediction of HLA-E1 epitope specific bindings and the forthcoming response can be a useful bioinformatics tool to uncover the right synthetic peptides for vaccine design purposes.

  1. A binding site for the transcription factor Grainyhead/Nuclear transcription factor-1 contributes to regulation of the Drosophila proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Y; Yamagishi, M; Nishimoto, Y; Taguchi, O; Matsukage, A; Yamaguchi, M

    1999-12-03

    The Drosophila proliferating cell nuclear antigen promoter contains multiple transcriptional regulatory elements, including upstream regulatory element (URE), DNA replication-related element, E2F recognition sites, and three common regulatory factor for DNA replication and DNA replication-related element-binding factor genes recognition sites. In nuclear extracts of Drosophila embryos, we detected a protein factor, the URE-binding factor (UREF), that recognizes the nucleotide sequence 5'-AAACCAGTTGGCA located within URE. Analyses in Drosophila Kc cells and transgenic flies revealed that the UREF-binding site plays an important role in promoter activity both in cultured cells and in living flies. A yeast one-hybrid screen using URE as a bait allowed isolation of a cDNA encoding a transcription factor, Grainyhead/nuclear transcription factor-1 (GRH/NTF-1). The nucleotide sequence required for binding to GRH was indistinguishable from that for UREF detected in embryo nuclear extracts. Furthermore, a specific antibody to GRH reacted with UREF in embryo nuclear extracts. From these results we conclude that GRH is identical to UREF. Although GRH has been thought to be involved in regulation of differentiation-related genes, this study demonstrates, for the first time, involvement of a GRH-binding site in regulation of the DNA replication-related proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene.

  2. Structure-based design of a disulfide-linked oligomeric form of the simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen DNA-binding domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinke, Gretchen; Phelan, Paul [Tufts School of Medicine and the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, 136 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Archambault, Jacques [Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montréal (IRCM), Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Bullock, Peter A., E-mail: peter.bullock@tufts.edu [Tufts School of Medicine and the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, 136 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02111 (United States)

    2011-06-01

    With the aim of forming the ‘lock-washer’ conformation of the origin-binding domain of SV40 large T antigen in solution, using structure-based analysis an intermolecular disulfide bridge was engineered into the origin-binding domain to generate higher order oligomers in solution. The 1.7 Å resolution structure shows that the mutant forms a spiral in the crystal and has the de novo disulfide bond at the protein interface, although structural rearrangements at the interface are observed relative to the wild type. The modular multifunctional protein large T antigen (T-ag) from simian virus 40 orchestrates many of the events needed for replication of the viral double-stranded DNA genome. This protein assembles into single and double hexamers on specific DNA sequences located at the origin of replication. This complicated process begins when the origin-binding domain of large T antigen (T-ag ODB) binds the GAGGC sequences in the central region (site II) of the viral origin of replication. While many of the functions of purified T-ag OBD can be studied in isolation, it is primarily monomeric in solution and cannot assemble into hexamers. To overcome this limitation, the possibility of engineering intermolecular disulfide bonds in the origin-binding domain which could oligomerize in solution was investigated. A recent crystal structure of the wild-type T-ag OBD showed that this domain forms a left-handed spiral in the crystal with six subunits per turn. Therefore, we analyzed the protein interface of this structure and identified two residues that could potentially support an intermolecular disulfide bond if changed to cysteines. SDS–PAGE analysis established that the mutant T-ag OBD formed higher oligomeric products in a redox-dependent manner. In addition, the 1.7 Å resolution crystal structure of the engineered disulfide-linked T-ag OBD is reported, which establishes that oligomerization took place in the expected manner.

  3. Field-Evolved Mode 1 Resistance of the Fall Armyworm to Transgenic Cry1Fa-Expressing Corn Associated with Reduced Cry1Fa Toxin Binding and Midgut Alkaline Phosphatase Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakka, Siva R K; Gong, Liang; Hasler, James; Banerjee, Rahul; Sheets, Joel J; Narva, Kenneth; Blanco, Carlos A; Jurat-Fuentes, Juan L

    2015-12-04

    Insecticidal protein genes from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are expressed by transgenic Bt crops (Bt crops) for effective and environmentally safe pest control. The development of resistance to these insecticidal proteins is considered the most serious threat to the sustainability of Bt crops. Resistance in fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) populations from Puerto Rico to transgenic corn producing the Cry1Fa insecticidal protein resulted, for the first time in the United States, in practical resistance, and Bt corn was withdrawn from the local market. In this study, we used a field-collected Cry1Fa corn-resistant strain (456) of S. frugiperda to identify the mechanism responsible for field-evolved resistance. Binding assays detected reduced Cry1Fa, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Ac but not Cry1Ca toxin binding to midgut brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) from the larvae of strain 456 compared to that from the larvae of a susceptible (Ben) strain. This binding phenotype is descriptive of the mode 1 type of resistance to Bt toxins. A comparison of the transcript levels for putative Cry1 toxin receptor genes identified a significant downregulation (>90%) of a membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase (ALP), which translated to reduced ALP protein levels and a 75% reduction in ALP activity in BBMV from 456 compared to that of Ben larvae. We cloned and heterologously expressed this ALP from susceptible S. frugiperda larvae and demonstrated that it specifically binds with Cry1Fa toxin. This study provides a thorough mechanistic description of field-evolved resistance to a transgenic Bt crop and supports an association between resistance and reduced Cry1Fa toxin binding and levels of a putative Cry1Fa toxin receptor, ALP, in the midguts of S. frugiperda larvae.

  4. Characterization of invasive Neisseria meningitidis from Atlantic Canada, 2009 to 2013: With special reference to the nonpolysaccharide vaccine targets (PorA, factor H binding protein, Neisseria heparin-binding antigen and Neisseria adhesin A)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Raymond SW; Law, Dennis KS; Gad, Rita R; Mailman, Tim; German, Gregory; Needle, Robert

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis (MenB) has always been a major cause of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) in Canada. With the successful implementation of a meningitis C conjugate vaccine, the majority of IMD in Canada is now caused by MenB. OBJECTIVE: To investigate IMD case isolates in Atlantic Canada from 2009 to 2013. Data were analyzed to determine the potential coverage of the newly licensed MenB vaccine. METHODS: Serogroup, serotype and serosubtype antigens were determined from IMD case isolates. Clonal analysis was performed using multilocus sequence typing. The protein-based vaccine antigen genes were sequenced and the predicted peptides were investigated. RESULTS: The majority of the IMD isolates were MenB (82.5%, 33 of 40) and, in particular, sequence type (ST)-154 B:4:P1.4 was responsible for 47.5% (19 of 40) of all IMD case isolates in Atlantic Canada. Isolates of this clone expressed the PorA antigen P1.4 and possessed the nhba genes encoding for Neisseria heparin-binding antigen peptide 2, which together matched exactly with two of the four components of the new four-component meningococcal B vaccine. Nineteen MenB isolates had two antigenic matches, another five MenB and one meningitis Y isolate had one antigenic match. This provided 75.8% (25 of 33) potential coverage for MenB, or a 62.5% (25 of 40) overall potential coverage for IMD. CONCLUSION: From 2009 to 2013, IMD in Atlantic Canada was mainly caused by MenB and, in particular, the B:4:P1.4 ST-154 clone, which accounted for 47.5% of all IMD case isolates. The new four-component meningococcal B vaccine appeared to offer adequate coverage against MenB in Atlantic Canada. PMID:26744586

  5. Structure-based Design of a Disulfide-lined Oligomeric Form of the Simian Virus 40 (SV40) Large T Antigen DNA-Binding Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G Meinke; P Phelan; A Fradet-Turcotte; J Archambault; P Bullock

    2011-12-31

    The modular multifunctional protein large T antigen (T-ag) from simian virus 40 orchestrates many of the events needed for replication of the viral double-stranded DNA genome. This protein assembles into single and double hexamers on specific DNA sequences located at the origin of replication. This complicated process begins when the origin-binding domain of large T antigen (T-ag ODB) binds the GAGGC sequences in the central region (site II) of the viral origin of replication. While many of the functions of purified T-ag OBD can be studied in isolation, it is primarily monomeric in solution and cannot assemble into hexamers. To overcome this limitation, the possibility of engineering intermolecular disulfide bonds in the origin-binding domain which could oligomerize in solution was investigated. A recent crystal structure of the wild-type T-ag OBD showed that this domain forms a left-handed spiral in the crystal with six subunits per turn. Therefore, we analyzed the protein interface of this structure and identified two residues that could potentially support an intermolecular disulfide bond if changed to cysteines. SDS-PAGE analysis established that the mutant T-ag OBD formed higher oligomeric products in a redox-dependent manner. In addition, the 1.7 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the engineered disulfide-linked T-ag OBD is reported, which establishes that oligomerization took place in the expected manner.

  6. Glycosphingolipid antigens from Leishmania (L. amazonensis amastigotes: Binding of anti-glycosphingolipid monoclonal antibodies in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Straus

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Specific glycosphingolipid antigens of Leishmania (L. amazonensis amastigotes reactive with the monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs ST-3, ST-4 and ST-5 were isolated, and their structure was partially elucidated by negative ion fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. The glycan moieties of five antigens presented linear sequences of hexoses and N-acetylhexosamines ranging from four to six sugar residues, and the ceramide moieties were found to be composed by a sphingosine d18:1 and fatty acids 24:1 or 16:0. Affinities of the three monoclonal antibodies to amastigote glycosphingolipid antigens were also analyzed by ELISA. MoAb ST-3 reacted equally well with all glycosphingolipid antigens tested, whereas ST-4 and ST-5 presented higher affinities to glycosphingolipids with longer carbohydrate chains, with five or more sugar units (slow migrating bands on HPTLC. Macrophages isolated from footpad lesions of BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania (L. amazonensis were incubated with MoAb ST-3 and, by indirect immunofluorescence, labeling was only detected on the parasite, whereas no fluorescence was observed on the surface of the infected macrophages, indicating that these glycosphingolipid antigens are not acquired from the host cell but synthesized by the amastigote. Intravenous administration of 125I-labeled ST-3 antibody to infected BALB/c mice showed that MoAb ST-3 accumulated significantly in the footpad lesions in comparison to blood and other tissues

  7. Analysis of the binding loops configuration and surface adaptation of different crystallized single-domain antibodies in response to various antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Qaraghuli, Mohammed M; Ferro, Valerie A

    2017-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have revolutionized the biomedical field through their ubiquitous utilization in different diagnostics and therapeutic applications. Despite this widespread use, their large size and structural complexity have limited their versatility in specific applications. The antibody variable region that is responsible for binding antigen is embodied within domains that can be rescued individually as single-domain antibody (sdAb) fragments. Because of the unique characteristics of sdAbs, such as low molecular weight, high physicochemical stability, and the ability to bind antigens inaccessible to conventional antibodies, they represent a viable alternative to full-length antibodies. Consequently, 149 crystal structures of sdAbs, originating from human (VH), camelids (VHH), or sharks (VNAR), were retrieved from the Protein Data Bank, and their structures were compared. The 3 types of sdAbs displayed complementarity determining regions (CDRs) with different lengths and configurations. CDR3 of the VHH and VNAR domains were dominated by pleated and extended orientations, respectively. Although VNAR showed the smallest average molecular weight and molecular surface area compared with VHH and VH antibodies. However, the solvent accessible surface area measurements of the 3 tested sdAbs types were very similar. All the antihapten VHH antibodies showed pleated CDR3, which were sufficient to create a binding pocket to accommodate haptens (methotrexate and azo dyes) in terms of shape and electrostatic potential. The sdAbs that recognized lysozyme showed more diversity in their CDR3 orientation to enable them to recognize various topographies of lysozyme. Subsequently, the three sdAb classes were different in size and surface area and have shown distinguishable ability to optimize their CDR length and orientation to recognize different antigen classes.

  8. Small molecule inhibition of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1 DNA binding activity interferes with replication and persistence of the viral genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Kyung; Kim, Sun Young; Noh, Ka-Won; Joo, Eun Hye; Zhao, Bo; Kieff, Elliott; Kang, Myung-Soo

    2014-04-01

    The replication and persistence of extra chromosomal Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) episome in latently infected cells are primarily dependent on the binding of EBV-encoded nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) to the cognate EBV oriP element. In continuation of the previous study, herein we characterized EBNA1 small molecule inhibitors (H20, H31) and their underlying inhibitory mechanisms. In silico docking analyses predicted that H20 fits into a pocket in the EBNA1 DNA binding domain (DBD). However, H20 did not significantly affect EBNA1 binding to its cognate sequence. A limited structure-relationship study of H20 identified a hydrophobic compound H31, as an EBNA1 inhibitor. An in vitro EBNA1 EMSA and in vivo EGFP-EBNA1 confocal microscopy analysis showed that H31 inhibited EBNA1-dependent oriP sequence-specific DNA binding activity, but not sequence-nonspecific chromosomal association. Consistent with this, H31 repressed the EBNA1-dependent transcription, replication, and persistence of an EBV oriP plasmid. Furthermore, H31 induced progressive loss of EBV episome. In addition, H31 selectively retarded the growth of EBV-infected LCL or Burkitt's lymphoma cells. These data indicate that H31 inhibition of EBNA1-dependent DNA binding decreases transcription from and persistence of EBV episome in EBV-infected cells. These new compounds might be useful probes for dissecting EBNA1 functions in vitro and in vivo.

  9. The Kaposi Sarcoma Herpesvirus Latency-associated Nuclear Antigen DNA Binding Domain Dorsal Positive Electrostatic Patch Facilitates DNA Replication and Episome Persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shijun; Tan, Min; Juillard, Franceline; Ponnusamy, Rajesh; Correia, Bruno; Simas, J Pedro; Carrondo, Maria A; McVey, Colin E; Kaye, Kenneth M

    2015-11-20

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) has a causative role in several human malignancies. KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) mediates persistence of viral episomes in latently infected cells. LANA mediates KSHV DNA replication and segregates episomes to progeny nuclei. The structure of the LANA DNA binding domain was recently solved, revealing a positive electrostatic patch opposite the DNA binding surface, which is the site of BET protein binding. Here we investigate the functional role of the positive patch in LANA-mediated episome persistence. As expected, LANA mutants with alanine or glutamate substitutions in the central, peripheral, or lateral portions of the positive patch maintained the ability to bind DNA by EMSA. However, all of the substitution mutants were deficient for LANA DNA replication and episome maintenance. Mutation of the peripheral region generated the largest deficiencies. Despite these deficiencies, all positive patch mutants concentrated to dots along mitotic chromosomes in cells containing episomes, similar to LANA. The central and peripheral mutants, but not the lateral mutants, were reduced for BET protein interaction as assessed by co-immunoprecipitation. However, defects in BET protein binding were independent of episome maintenance function. Overall, the reductions in episome maintenance closely correlated with DNA replication deficiencies, suggesting that the replication defects account for the reduced episome persistence. Therefore, the electrostatic patch exerts a key role in LANA-mediated DNA replication and episome persistence and may act through a host cell partner(s) other than a BET protein or by inducing specific structures or complexes.

  10. CD4 binding to major histocompatibility complex class II antigens induces LFA-1-dependent and -independent homotypic adhesion of B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansas, G S; Cambier, J C; Tedder, T F

    1992-01-01

    T helper cells recognize processed antigen (Ag) in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens present on the surface of B cells and other Ag-presenting cells. This interaction is mediated through the T cell receptor complex with associate recognition of class II molecules by the CD4 molecule. In this study, the binding of a soluble recombinant CD4/Ig heavy chain fusion protein (CD4-gamma 3) or monoclonal antibody (mAb) to class II antigens on human B cells was shown to induce rapid and specific homotypic adhesion of B cells and most B lymphoblastoid cell lines. mAb reactive with CD4 inhibited CD4-gamma 3-induced adhesion and a mutant B lymphoblastoid cell line deficient in class II antigens failed to respond. Induction of homotypic adhesion was dependent on energy metabolism and a functional cytoskeleton, and class II+ pre-B cells did not exhibit adhesion in response to these stimuli, suggesting that cross-linking of class II molecules generated a transmembrane signal and did not simply aggregate cells. In addition, MHC class II-induced adhesion was Fc receptor independent, as 15 mAb of different Ig isotypes reactive with HLA-D or HLA-DQ gene products induced adhesion. Anti-class II mAb and CD4-gamma 3 were able to induce adhesion at concentrations as low as 10 ng/ml and 100 ng/ml, respectively. Suboptimal stimulation of B cell lines through HLA-D antigens induced homotypic adhesion that was dependent on the activation of LFA-1 (CD11a/CD18), and which could be blocked by specific mAb. However, at greater signal strengths, adhesion was not blocked by mAb against the known adhesion receptors, suggesting the induction of a novel adhesion pathway. Consistent with this, homotypic adhesion induced by engagement of MHC class II antigens was observed with LFA-1-deficient B cell lines, and was independent of CD49d or CD18 expression. Thus, the direct engagement of B cell class II antigens by CD4 is likely to generate transmembrane signals which

  11. Binding studies of alpha-GalNAc-specific lectins to the alpha-GalNAc (Tn-antigen) form of porcine submaxillary mucin and its smaller fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Tarun K; Gerken, Thomas A; Cavada, Benildo S; Nascimento, Kyria S; Moura, Tales R; Brewer, C Fred

    2007-09-21

    Isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC) and hemagglutination inhibition measurements demonstrate that a chemically and enzymatically prepared form of porcine submaxillary mucin that possesses a molecular mass of approximately 10(6) daltons and approximately 2300 alpha-GalNAc residues (Tn-PSM) binds to the soybean agglutinin (SBA) with a K(d) of 0.2 nm, which is approximately 10(6)-fold enhanced affinity relative to GalNAcalpha1-O-Ser (Tn), the pancarcinoma carbohydrate antigen. The enzymatically derived 81 amino acid tandem repeat domain of Tn-PSM containing approximately 23 alpha-GalNAc residues binds with approximately 10(3)-fold enhanced affinity, while the enzymatically derived 38/40 amino acid cleavage product(s) of Tn-PSM containing approximately 11-12 alpha-GalNAc residues shows approximately 10(2)-fold enhanced affinity. A natural carbohydrate decorated form of PSM (Fd-PSM) containing 40% of the core 1 blood group type A tetrasaccharide, and 58% peptide-linked GalNAcalpha1-O-Ser/Thr residues, with 45% of the peptide-linked alpha-GalNAc residues linked alpha-(2,6) to N-glycolylneuraminic acid, shows approximately 10(4) enhanced affinity for SBA. Vatairea macrocarpa lectin (VML), which is also a GalNAc binding lectin, displays a similar pattern of binding to the four forms of PSM, although there are quantitative differences in its affinities as compared with SBA. The higher affinities of SBA and VML for Tn-PSM relative to Fd-PSM indicate the importance of carbohydrate composition and epitope density of mucins on their affinities for lectins. The higher affinities of SBA and VML for Tn-PSM relative to its two shorter chain analogs demonstrate that the length of a mucin polypeptide and hence total carbohydrate valence determines the affinities of the three Tn-PSM analogs. The results suggest a binding model in which lectin molecules "bind and jump" from alpha-GalNAc residue to alpha-GalNAc residue along the polypeptide chain of Tn-PSM before dissociating

  12. Prostatic acid phosphatase in serum and semen of dogs

    OpenAIRE

    CRF Gadelha; WRR Vicente; APC Ribeiro; Apparicio, M. [UNESP; GJ Covizzi; ACN Campos

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of prostatic malignancy has increased the use of tissue markers to detect cancer. Tissue specific antigens or differentiation antigens are found on the surface of normal cells. Clinically, these antigens are important to diagnose alterations in the tissues and for immunotherapy. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the prostatic acid phosphatase concentration in blood and seminal plasma of intact and healthy dogs at different ages. The evaluation was carried out by...

  13. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class I Restricted Epitope Discovery in Yellow Fewer and Dengue Viruses: Importance of HLA Binding Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Nascimento, Eduardo J. M.; Maciel, Milton, Jr

    2011-01-01

    Epitopes from all available full-length sequences of yellow fever virus (YFV) and dengue fever virus (DENV) restricted by Human Leukocyte Antigen class I (HLA-I) alleles covering 12 HLA-I supertypes were predicted using the NetCTL algorithm. A subset of 179 predicted YFV and 158 predicted DENV...

  14. Insights into the initiation of JC virus DNA replication derived from the crystal structure of the T-antigen origin binding domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretchen Meinke

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available JC virus is a member of the Polyomavirus family of DNA tumor viruses and the causative agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML. PML is a disease that occurs primarily in people who are immunocompromised and is usually fatal. As with other Polyomavirus family members, the replication of JC virus (JCV DNA is dependent upon the virally encoded protein T-antigen. To further our understanding of JCV replication, we have determined the crystal structure of the origin-binding domain (OBD of JCV T-antigen. This structure provides the first molecular understanding of JCV T-ag replication functions; for example, it suggests how the JCV T-ag OBD site-specifically binds to the major groove of GAGGC sequences in the origin. Furthermore, these studies suggest how the JCV OBDs interact during subsequent oligomerization events. We also report that the OBD contains a novel "pocket"; which sequesters the A1 & B2 loops of neighboring molecules. Mutagenesis of a residue in the pocket associated with the JCV T-ag OBD interfered with viral replication. Finally, we report that relative to the SV40 OBD, the surface of the JCV OBD contains one hemisphere that is highly conserved and one that is highly variable.

  15. Cloning, expression and purification of binding domains of lethal factor and protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis in Escherichia coli and evaluation of their related murine antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaee, Mehdi; Honari, Hossein; Kooshk, Mohammad Reza Ashrafi

    2014-01-01

    Anthrax is common disease between human and animals caused by Bacillus anthracis. The cell binding domain of protective antigen (PAD4) and the binding domain of lethal factor (LFD1) have high immunogenicity potential and always were considered as a vaccine candidate against anthrax. The aims of this study are cloning and expressing of PAD4 and LFD1 in Escherichia coli, purification of the recombinant proteins and determination of their immunogenicity through evaluating of the relative produced polyclonal antibodies in mice. PAD4 and LFD1 genes were cloned in pET28a(+) vector and expressed in E. coli Bl21(DE3)PlysS. Expression and purification of the two recombinant proteins were confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting techniques. The PAD4 and LFD1 were purified using Ni(+)-NTA affinity chromatography (95-98 %), yielding 37.5 and 45 mg/l of culture, respectively. The antigens were injected three times into mice and production of relative antibodies was evaluated by ELISA test. The results showed that both PAD4 and LFD1 are immunogenic, but LFD1 has higher potential to stimulate Murine immune system. With regard to the high level of LFD1 and PAD4 expression and also significant increment in produced polyclonal antibodies, these recombinant proteins can be considered as a recombinant vaccine candidate against anthrax.

  16. Structure of the p53 binding domain of HAUSP/USP7 bound to Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 implications for EBV-mediated immortalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saridakis, Vivian; Sheng, Yi; Sarkari, Feroz; Holowaty, Melissa N; Shire, Kathy; Nguyen, Tin; Zhang, Rongguang G; Liao, Jack; Lee, Weontae; Edwards, Aled M; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Frappier, Lori

    2005-04-01

    USP7/HAUSP is a key regulator of p53 and Mdm2 and is targeted by the Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) protein of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). We have determined the crystal structure of the p53 binding domain of USP7 alone and bound to an EBNA1 peptide. This domain is an eight-stranded beta sandwich similar to the TRAF-C domains of TNF-receptor associated factors, although the mode of peptide binding differs significantly from previously observed TRAF-peptide interactions in the sequence (DPGEGPS) and the conformation of the bound peptide. NMR chemical shift analyses of USP7 bound by EBNA1 and p53 indicated that p53 binds the same pocket as EBNA1 but makes less extensive contacts with USP7. Functional studies indicated that EBNA1 binding to USP7 can protect cells from apoptotic challenge by lowering p53 levels. The data provide a structural and conceptual framework for understanding how EBNA1 might contribute to the survival of Epstein-Barr virus-infected cells.

  17. Structure-Based Analysis of the Interaction between the Simian Virus 40 T-Antigen Origin Binding Domain and Single-Stranded DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G Meinke; P Phelan; A Fradet-Turcotte; A Bohm; J Archambault; P Bullock

    2011-12-31

    The origin-binding domain (OBD) of simian virus 40 (SV40) large T-antigen (T-Ag) is essential for many of T-Ag's interactions with DNA. Nevertheless, many important issues related to DNA binding, for example, how single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) transits along the T-Ag OBD, have yet to be established. Therefore, X-ray crystallography was used to determine the costructure of the T-Ag OBD bound to DNA substrates such as the single-stranded region of a forked oligonucleotide. A second structure of the T-Ag OBD crystallized in the presence of poly(dT){sub 12} is also reported. To test the conclusions derived from these structures, residues identified as being involved in binding to ssDNA by crystallography or by an earlier nuclear magnetic resonance study were mutated, and their binding to DNA was characterized via fluorescence anisotropy. In addition, these mutations were introduced into full-length T-Ag, and these mutants were tested for their ability to support replication. When considered in terms of additional homology-based sequence alignments, our studies refine our understanding of how the T-Ag OBDs encoded by the polyomavirus family interact with ssDNA, a critical step during the initiation of DNA replication.

  18. Human milk IgGs contain various combinations of different antigen-binding sites resulting in multiple variants of their bispecificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey E Sedykh

    Full Text Available In the classic paradigm, immunoglobulins represent products of clonal B cell populations, each producing antibodies (Abs recognizing a single antigen. There is a common belief that IgGs in mammalian biological fluids are monovalent molecules having stable structures and two identical antigen-binding sites. However, human milk IgGs to different antigens undergo extensive half-molecule exchange. In the IgGs pool, only 33 ± 5% and 13 ± 5% of Abs contained light chains exclusively of kappa- or lambda-type, respectively, while 54 ± 10% of the IgGs contained both kappa- and lambda- light chains. All Ab preparations contained different amounts of IgGs of all four subclasses. Interestingly, lambda-IgGs contained an increased amount of IgG2 (87% and only 3-6% of each of IgG1, IgG3, and IgG4, while kappa-IgGs consisted of comparable (17-32% amounts of all IgG subtypes. Chimeric kappa-lambda-IgGs consisted of ~74% IgG1, ~16% IgG2, ~5% IgG3 and ~5% IgG4. As the result of the exchange, all IgG fractions eluted from several specific affinity sorbents under the conditions destroying strong immunocomplexes demonstrated high catalytic activities in hydrolysis of ATP, DNA, oligosaccharides, phosphorylation of proteins, lipids, and oligosaccharides. In vitro, an addition of reduced glutathione and milk plasma to two IgG fractions with different affinity for DNA-cellulose led to a transition of 25-60% of Ab of one fraction to the other fraction. Our data are indicative of the possibility of half-molecule exchange between milk IgGs of various subclasses, raised against different antigens (including abzymes, which explains the polyspecificity and cross-reactivity of these IgGs.

  19. Expression and Purification of the DNA Binding Domain of the Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Yu; Ming Shi; Kun He; Jie Wang; Beifen Shen; Ning Guo; Meiru Hu; Ru Wei; Lu Qian

    2008-01-01

    To overexpress EBNA-1 in E.coli and generate the specific antibody,in this study,the antigenicity,epitope and hydrolysis of EBNA-1 were analyzed using the computer design software Biosun.Based on the prediction by computer analysis,the sequence encoding EBNA-1385-557 was amplified by PCR with the specific primers.The expression vector containing EBNA-1385-557coding sequence WaS constructed.His-tagged EBNA-1385-557 was expressed in E.coli.The soluble recombinant protein wag purified using Ni-NTA chromatography.The purified protein was used as antigens to immunize mice and screen the antibodies.which will serve as an important tool for further studies.

  20. Structural mechanisms of plant glucan phosphatases in starch metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meekins, David A; Vander Kooi, Craig W; Gentry, Matthew S

    2016-07-01

    Glucan phosphatases are a recently discovered class of enzymes that dephosphorylate starch and glycogen, thereby regulating energy metabolism. Plant genomes encode two glucan phosphatases, called Starch EXcess4 (SEX4) and Like Sex Four2 (LSF2), that regulate starch metabolism by selectively dephosphorylating glucose moieties within starch glucan chains. Recently, the structures of both SEX4 and LSF2 were determined, with and without phosphoglucan products bound, revealing the mechanism for their unique activities. This review explores the structural and enzymatic features of the plant glucan phosphatases, and outlines how they are uniquely adapted to perform their cellular functions. We outline the physical mechanisms used by SEX4 and LSF2 to interact with starch glucans: SEX4 binds glucan chains via a continuous glucan-binding platform comprising its dual-specificity phosphatase domain and carbohydrate-binding module, while LSF2 utilizes surface binding sites. SEX4 and LSF2 both contain a unique network of aromatic residues in their catalytic dual-specificity phosphatase domains that serve as glucan engagement platforms and are unique to the glucan phosphatases. We also discuss the phosphoglucan substrate specificities inherent to SEX4 and LSF2, and outline structural features within the active site that govern glucan orientation. This review defines the structural mechanism of the plant glucan phosphatases with respect to phosphatases, starch metabolism and protein-glucan interaction, thereby providing a framework for their application in both agricultural and industrial settings.

  1. A KH-Domain RNA-Binding Protein Interacts with FIERY2/CTD Phosphatase-Like 1 and Splicing Factors and Is Important for Pre-mRNA Splicing in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Tao

    2013-10-17

    Eukaryotic genomes encode hundreds of RNA-binding proteins, yet the functions of most of these proteins are unknown. In a genetic study of stress signal transduction in Arabidopsis, we identified a K homology (KH)-domain RNA-binding protein, HOS5 (High Osmotic Stress Gene Expression 5), as required for stress gene regulation and stress tolerance. HOS5 was found to interact with FIERY2/RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) carboxyl terminal domain (CTD) phosphatase-like 1 (FRY2/CPL1) both in vitro and in vivo. This interaction is mediated by the first double-stranded RNA-binding domain of FRY2/CPL1 and the KH domains of HOS5. Interestingly, both HOS5 and FRY2/CPL1 also interact with two novel serine-arginine (SR)-rich splicing factors, RS40 and RS41, in nuclear speckles. Importantly, FRY2/CPL1 is required for the recruitment of HOS5. In fry2 mutants, HOS5 failed to be localized in nuclear speckles but was found mainly in the nucleoplasm. hos5 mutants were impaired in mRNA export and accumulated a significant amount of mRNA in the nuclei, particularly under salt stress conditions. Arabidopsis mutants of all these genes exhibit similar stress-sensitive phenotypes. RNA-seq analyses of these mutants detected significant intron retention in many stress-related genes under salt stress but not under normal conditions. Our study not only identified several novel regulators of pre-mRNA processing as important for plant stress response but also suggested that, in addition to RNAP II CTD that is a well-recognized platform for the recruitment of mRNA processing factors, FRY2/CPL1 may also recruit specific factors to regulate the co-transcriptional processing of certain transcripts to deal with environmental challenges. © 2013 Chen et al.

  2. Crystal Structure of Phosphatidylglycerophosphatase (PGPase), a Putative Membrane-Bound Lipid Phosphatase, Reveals a Novel Binuclear Metal Binding Site and Two Proton Wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumaran,D.; Bonnano, J.; Burley, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphatidylglycerophosphatase (PGPase), an enzyme involved in lipid metabolism, catalyzes formation of phosphatidylglycerol from phosphatidylglycerophosphate. Phosphatidylglycerol is a multifunctional phospholipid, found in the biological membranes of many organisms. Here, we report the crystal structure of Listeria monocytogenes PGPase at 1.8 Angstroms resolution. PGPase, an all-helical molecule, forms a homotetramer. Each protomer contains an independent active site with two metal ions, Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+}, forming a hetero-binuclear center located in a hydrophilic cavity near the surface of the molecule. The binuclear center, conserved ligands, metal-bound water molecules, and an Asp-His dyad form the active site. The catalytic mechanism of this enzyme is likely to proceed via binuclear metal activated nucleophilic water. The binuclear metal-binding active-site environment of this structure should provide insights into substrate binding and metal-dependent catalysis. A long channel with inter-linked linear water chains, termed 'proton wires', is observed at the tetramer interface. Comparison of similar water chain structures in photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs), Cytochrome f, gramicidin, and bacteriorhodopsin, suggests that PGPase may conduct protons via proton wires.

  3. MHC class II-derived peptides can bind to class II molecules, including self molecules, and prevent antigen presentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosloniec, E F; Vitez, L J; Buus, S

    1990-01-01

    found in the first and third polymorphic regions (PMR) of the A alpha k chain (alpha k-1 and alpha k-3) were capable of inhibiting the presentation of three different HEL-derived peptide antigens to their appropriate T cells. In addition, the alpha k-1 peptide inhibited the presentation of the OVA(323......-339) immunodominant peptide to the I-Ad-restricted T cell hybridomas specific for it. Prepulsing experiments demonstrated that the PMR peptides were interacting with the APC and not with the T cell hybridomas. These observations were confirmed and extended by the demonstration that the alpha k-1 and alpha k-3...

  4. Prolonged antigen presentation by immune complex-binding dendritic cells programs the proliferative capacity of memory CD8 T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Beatriz; Ballesteros-Tato, André; Randall, Troy D; Lund, Frances E

    2014-07-28

    The commitment of naive CD8 T cells to effector or memory cell fates can occur after a single day of antigenic stimulation even though virus-derived antigens (Ags) are still presented by DCs long after acute infection is resolved. However, the effects of extended Ag presentation on CD8 T cells are undefined and the mechanisms that regulate prolonged Ag presentation are unknown. We showed that the sustained presentation of two different epitopes from influenza virus by DCs prevented the premature contraction of the primary virus-specific CD8 T cell response. Although prolonged Ag presentation did not alter the number of memory CD8 T cells that developed, it was essential for programming the capacity of these cells to proliferate, produce cytokines, and protect the host after secondary challenge. Importantly, prolonged Ag presentation by DCs was dependent on virus-specific, isotype-switched antibodies (Abs) that facilitated the capture and cross-presentation of viral Ags by FcγR-expressing DCs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that B cells and Abs can regulate the quality and functionality of a subset of antiviral CD8 T cell memory responses and do so by promoting sustained Ag presentation by DCs during the contraction phase of the primary T cell response.

  5. Protein phosphatase 2a (PP2A binds within the oligomerization domain of striatin and regulates the phosphorylation and activation of the mammalian Ste20-Like kinase Mst3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Candace A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Striatin, a putative protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A B-type regulatory subunit, is a multi-domain scaffolding protein that has recently been linked to several diseases including cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM, which causes symptoms ranging from headaches to stroke. Striatin association with the PP2A A/C (structural subunit/catalytic subunit heterodimer alters PP2A substrate specificity, but targets and roles of striatin-associated PP2A are not known. In addition to binding the PP2A A/C heterodimer to form a PP2A holoenzyme, striatin associates with cerebral cavernous malformation 3 (CCM3 protein, the mammalian Mps one binder (MOB homolog, Mob3/phocein, the mammalian sterile 20-like (Mst kinases, Mst3, Mst4 and STK25, and several other proteins to form a large signaling complex. Little is known about the molecular architecture of the striatin complex and the regulation of these sterile 20-like kinases. Results To help define the molecular organization of striatin complexes and to determine whether Mst3 might be negatively regulated by striatin-associated PP2A, a structure-function analysis of striatin was performed. Two distinct regions of striatin are capable of stably binding directly or indirectly to Mob3--one N-terminal, including the coiled-coil domain, and another more C-terminal, including the WD-repeat domain. In addition, striatin residues 191-344 contain determinants necessary for efficient association of Mst3, Mst4, and CCM3. PP2A associates with the coiled-coil domain of striatin, but unlike Mob3 and Mst3, its binding appears to require striatin oligomerization. Deletion of the caveolin-binding domain on striatin abolishes striatin family oligomerization and PP2A binding. Point mutations in striatin that disrupt PP2A association cause hyperphosphorylation and activation of striatin-associated Mst3. Conclusions Striatin orchestrates the regulation of Mst3 by PP2A. It binds Mst3 likely as a dimer with CCM3 via

  6. Multiple forms of phosphatase from human brain: isolation and partial characterization of affi-gel blue nonbinding phosphatase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, L Y; Wang, J Z; Gong, C X; Pei, J J; Zaidi, T; Grundke-Iqbal, I; Iqbal, K

    2001-04-01

    Phosphatases extracted from a human brain were resolved into two main groups, namely affi-gel blue-binding phosphatases and affi-gel blue-nonbinding phosphatases. Affi-gel blue binding phosphatases were further separated into four different phosphatase activities, designated P1-P4, and described previously. In the present study we describe the affi-gel blue-nonbinding phosphatases which were separated into seven different phosphatase activities, designated P5-P11 by poly-(L-lysine)-agarose and aminohexyl Sepharose 4B chromatographies. These seven phosphatase activities were active toward nonprotein phosphoester. P7-P11 and to some extent P5 could also dephosphorylate a phosphoprotein. They displayed different enzyme kinetics. On the basis of activity peak, the apparent molecular mass as estimated by Sephadex G-200 column chromatography for P5 was 49 kDa; P6, 32 kDa; P7, 150 kDa; P8, 250 kDa; P9, 165 kDa; P10, 90 kDa and P11, 165 kDa. Immunoblot analysis indicated that P8-P11 may belong to PP2B family, whereas P7 may associate with PP2A. The phosphatases P7-P11 were found to be effective in the dephosphorylation of Alzheimer's disease abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau. The resulting dephosphorylated tau regained its activity in promoting the microtubule assembly, suggesting that P7-P11 might regulate the phosphorylation of tau protein in the brain.

  7. Comprehensive analysis of blood group antigen binding to classical and El Tor cholera toxin B-pentamers by NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasile, Francesca; Reina, José J; Potenza, Donatella; Heggelund, Julie E; Mackenzie, Alasdair; Krengel, Ute; Bernardi, Anna

    2014-08-01

    Cholera is a diarrheal disease responsible for the deaths of thousands, possibly even hundreds of thousands of people every year, and its impact is predicted to further increase with climate change. It has been known for decades that blood group O individuals suffer more severe symptoms of cholera compared with individuals with other blood groups (A, B and AB). The observed blood group dependence is likely to be caused by the major virulence factor of Vibrio cholerae, the cholera toxin (CT). Here, we investigate the binding of ABH blood group determinants to both classical and El Tor CTB-pentamers using saturation transfer difference NMR and show that all three blood group determinants bind to both toxin variants. Although the details of the interactions differ, we see no large differences between the two toxin genotypes and observe very similar binding constants. We also show that the blood group determinants bind to a site distinct from that of the primary receptor, GM1. Transferred NOESY data confirm that the conformations of the blood group determinants in complex with both toxin variants are similar to those of reported X-ray and solution structures. Taken together, this detailed analysis provides a framework for the interpretation of the epidemiological data linking the severity of cholera infection and an individual's blood group, and brings us one step closer to understanding the molecular basis of cholera blood group dependence.

  8. DNA-PK/Ku complex binds to latency-associated nuclear antigen and negatively regulates Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latent replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Seho [Department of Life Science, Dongguk Univ-Seoul, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Chunghun [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Young [Department of Life Science, Dongguk Univ-Seoul, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Yoon-Jae [Department of Life Science, Kyungwon University, Seongnam-Si, Kyeonggi-Do 461-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Junsoo [Division of Biological Science and Technology, Yonsei University, Wonju 220-100 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Joonho [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Taegun, E-mail: tseo@dongguk.edu [Department of Life Science, Dongguk Univ-Seoul, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-16

    During latent infection, latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) plays important roles in episomal persistence and replication. Several host factors are associated with KSHV latent replication. Here, we show that the catalytic subunit of DNA protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), Ku70, and Ku86 bind the N-terminal region of LANA. LANA was phosphorylated by DNA-PK and overexpression of Ku70, but not Ku86, impaired transient replication. The efficiency of transient replication was significantly increased in the HCT116 (Ku86 +/-) cell line, compared to the HCT116 (Ku86 +/+) cell line, suggesting that the DNA-PK/Ku complex negatively regulates KSHV latent replication.

  9. Aberrant Glycosylation of Anchor-Optimized MUC1 Peptides Can Enhance Antigen Binding Affinity and Reverse Tolerance to Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latha B. Pathangey

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer vaccines have often failed to live up to their promise, although recent results with checkpoint inhibitors are reviving hopes that they will soon fulfill their promise. Although mutation-specific vaccines are under development, there is still high interest in an off-the-shelf vaccine to a ubiquitous antigen, such as MUC1, which is aberrantly expressed on most solid and many hematological tumors, including more than 90% of breast carcinomas. Clinical trials for MUC1 have shown variable success, likely because of immunological tolerance to a self-antigen and to poor immunogenicity of tandem repeat peptides. We hypothesized that MUC1 peptides could be optimized, relying on heteroclitic optimizations of potential anchor amino acids with and without tumor-specific glycosylation of the peptides. We have identified novel MUC1 class I peptides that bind to HLA-A*0201 molecules with significantly higher affinity and function than the native MUC1 peptides. These peptides elicited CTLs from normal donors, as well as breast cancer patients, which were highly effective in killing MUC1-expressing MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Each peptide elicited lytic responses in greater than 6/8 of normal individuals and 3/3 breast cancer patients. The CTLs generated against the glycosylated-anchor modified peptides cross reacted with the native MUC1 peptide, STAPPVHNV, suggesting these analog peptides may offer substantial improvement in the design of epitope-based vaccines.

  10. Overexpression of Hepatitis B Virus-binding Protein, Squamous Cell Carcinoma Antigen 1, Extends Retention of Hepatitis B Virus in Mouse Liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Bin XIA; Xi-Gu CHEN

    2006-01-01

    How receptors mediate the entry of hepatitis B virus (HBV) into the target liver cells is poorly understood. Recently, human squamous cell carcinoma antigen 1 (SCCA1) has been found to mediate binding and internalization of HBV to liver-derived cell lines in vitro. In this report, we investigate if SCCA1 is able to function as an HBV receptor and mediate HBV entry into mouse liver. SCCA1 transgene under the control of Rous sarcoma virus promoter was constructed in a minicircle DNA vector that was delivered to NOD/SCID mouse liver using the hydrodynamic technique. Subsequently, HBV-positive human serum was injected intravenously. We demonstrated that approximately 30% of the mouse liver cells expressed a high level of recombined SCCA1 protein for at least 37 d. The HBV surface antigen was found to persist in mouse liver for up to 17 d. Furthermore, HBV genome also persisted in mouse liver, as determined by polymerase chain reaction, for up to 17 d, and in mouse circulation for 7 d. These results suggest that SCAA1 might serve as an HBV receptor or co-receptor and play an important role in mediating HBV entry into hepatocytes, although its role in human HBV infection remains to be determined.

  11. Structure and calcium binding activity of LipL32, the major surface antigen of pathogenic Leptospira sp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauk, Pricila; Roman-Ramos, Henrique; Ho, Paulo Lee [Instituto Butantan, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Biotecnologia; Guzzo, Cristiane R.; Farah, Chuck S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Bioquimica

    2009-07-01

    Leptospirosis, caused by the spirochaete Leptospira is an important emerging infectious disease. LipL32 is the major exposed outer membrane protein found exclusively in pathogenic leptospira. It is highly immunogenic and has been shown to bind to host extracellular matrix components, including collagens, fibronectin and laminin. In this work we crystallized recombinant LipL32 protein and determined its structure to 2.25 A resolution. Initial phases were determined using the multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion technique with data collected from selenomethionine-containing crystals at the MX2 beamline at the LNLS. The LipL32 monomer is made of a jelly-roll fold core from which protrude several peripheral secondary structures. Some structural features suggested that LipL32 could bind Ca{sup 2+} ions and indeed, spectroscopic data (circular (dichroism. intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and extrinsic 1-amino-2-anaphthol-4-sulfonic acid fluorescence) confirmed the calcium binding properties of LipL32. (author)

  12. Tumor-promoting function and prognostic significance of the RNA-binding protein T-cell intracellular antigen-1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Junichi; Shoda, Katsutoshi; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Fujita, Yuji; Naruto, Takuya; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Miyakami, Yuko; Watanabe, Miki; Kudo, Yasusei; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Otsuji, Eigo; Imoto, Issei

    2016-03-29

    T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA1) is an RNA-binding protein involved in many regulatory aspects of mRNA metabolism. Here, we report previously unknown tumor-promoting activity of TIA1, which seems to be associated with its isoform-specific molecular distribution and regulation of a set of cancer-related transcripts, in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Immunohistochemical overexpression of TIA1 ectopically localized in the cytoplasm of tumor cells was an independent prognosticator for worse overall survival in a cohort of 143 ESCC patients. Knockdown of TIA1 inhibited proliferation of ESCC cells. By exogenously introducing each of two major isoforms, TIA1a and TIA1b, only TIA1a, which was localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm, promoted anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent ESCC cell proliferation. Ribonucleoprotein immunoprecipitation, followed by microarray analysis or massive-parallel sequencing, identified a set of TIA1-binding mRNAs, including SKP2 and CCNA2. TIA1 increased SKP2 and CCNA2 protein levels through the suppression of mRNA decay and translational induction, respectively. Our findings uncover a novel oncogenic function of TIA1 in esophageal tumorigenesis, and implicate its use as a marker for prognostic evaluation and as a therapeutic target in ESCC.

  13. Crystal structure of the antigen-binding fragment of a monoclonal antibody specific for the multidrug-resistance-linked ABC transporter human P-glycoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esser, Lothar; Shukla, Suneet; Zhou, Fei; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Xia, Di

    2016-07-27

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a polyspecific ATP-dependent transporter linked to multidrug resistance in cancers that plays important roles in the pharmacokinetics of a large number of drugs. The drug-resistance phenotype of P-gp can be modulated by the monoclonal antibody UIC2, which specifically recognizes human P-gp in a conformation-dependent manner. Here, the purification, sequence determination and high-resolution structure of the Fab fragment of UIC2 (UIC2/Fab) are reported. Purified UIC2/Fab binds human P-gp with a 1:1 stoichiometry. Crystals of UIC2/Fab are triclinic (space groupP1), with unit-cell parametersa= 40.67,b= 44.91,c= 58.09 Å, α = 97.62, β = 99.10, γ = 94.09°, and diffracted X-rays to 1.6 Å resolution. The structure was determined by molecular replacement and refined to 1.65 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contains one molecule of UIC2/Fab, which exhibits a positively charged antigen-binding surface, suggesting that it might recognize an oppositely charged extracellular epitope of P-gp.

  14. Isolation of a monoclonal antibody that recognizes the origin binding domain of JCV, but not SV40, large T-antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubman, Shelley A; Shin, Jong; Phelan, Paul J; Gong, Aaron; Can, Hande; Dilworth, Ryan; Kini, Sandeep Kuntadi; Gagnon, David; Archambault, Jacques; Meinke, Gretchen; Bohm, Andrew; Jefferson, Douglas M; Bullock, Peter A

    2016-10-01

    Within immunocompromised populations, the JC polyomavirus is the cause of the often-fatal disease Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML). JC virus encodes a protein, termed T-antigen (T-ag), which is essential for its replication and pathogenicity. Previous studies of JCV T-ag have, in general, used antibodies raised against SV40 T-ag. Unfortunately, SV40 T-ag is also detected in humans and therefore there have been concerns about cross-reactivity. To address this issue, we have isolated a monoclonal antibody that binds to the JCV, but not the SV40, T-ag origin-binding domain (OBD). Furthermore, the region on the surface of the JCV T-ag OBD that is recognized by the "anti-JCV OBD mAb" has been mapped. We also demonstrate that the "anti-JCV OBD mAb" will be a useful reagent for standard techniques (e.g., Westerns blots and ELISAs). Finally, we note that additional monoclonal Abs that are specific for the T-ags encoded by the other human polyomaviruses could be generated by adopting the approach described herein.

  15. Neisserial outer membrane vesicles bind the coinhibitory receptor carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule 1 and suppress CD4+ T lymphocyte function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hannah S W; Boulton, Ian C; Reddin, Karen; Wong, Henry; Halliwell, Denise; Mandelboim, Ofer; Gorringe, Andrew R; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2007-09-01

    Pathogenic Neisseria bacteria naturally liberate outer membrane "blebs," which are presumed to contribute to pathology, and the detergent-extracted outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from Neisseria meningitidis are currently employed as meningococcal vaccines in humans. While the composition of these vesicles reflects the bacteria from which they are derived, the functions of many of their constituent proteins remain unexplored. The neisserial colony opacity-associated Opa proteins function as adhesins, the majority of which mediate bacterial attachment to human carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecules (CEACAMs). Herein, we demonstrate that the Opa proteins within OMV preparations retain the capacity to bind the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif-containing coinhibitory receptor CEACAM1. When CD4(+) T lymphocytes were exposed to OMVs from Opa-expressing bacteria, their activation and proliferation in response to a variety of stimuli were effectively halted. This potent immunosuppressive effect suggests that localized infection will generate a "zone of inhibition" resulting from the diffusion of membrane blebs into the surrounding tissues. Moreover, it demonstrates that OMV-based vaccines must be developed from strains that lack CEACAM1-binding Opa variants.

  16. EGCG debilitates the persistence of EBV latency by reducing the DNA binding potency of nuclear antigen 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ya-Lin; Tsai, Hsing-Lyn [Department of Life Sciences, Tzu-Chi University, 701 Chung-Yang Rd. Sec 3, Hualien 97004, Taiwan (China); Peng, Chih-Wen, E-mail: pengcw@mail.tcu.edu.tw [Department of Life Sciences, Tzu-Chi University, 701 Chung-Yang Rd. Sec 3, Hualien 97004, Taiwan (China)

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two cell-based reporter platforms were established for screening of EBNA1 inhibitors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGCG acts as an inhibitor to block EBNA1 binding with the cognate oriP sequence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGCG debilitates EBNA1-dependent transcription enhancement and episome maintenance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGCG impairs persistence of EBV latency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGCG is a potent anti-EBV agent for targeting the latent cascade of EBV. -- Abstract: Because the expression of EBNA1 is prevalent in all EBV-associated tumors, it has become one of the most attractive drug targets for the discovery of anti-EBV compounds. In a cell-based reporter system, EBNA1 consistently upregulated the transcription of an oriP-Luc mini-EBV episome by 6- to 8-fold. The treatment of cells with 50 {mu}M EGCG effectively blocked the binding of EBNA1 to oriP-DNA both in vivo and in vitro, which led to the abrogation of EBNA1-dependent episome maintenance and transcriptional enhancement. Importantly, the anti-EBNA1 effects caused by EGCG ultimately impaired the persistence of EBV latent infection. Our data suggest that the inhibition of EBNA1 activity by EGCG could be a promising starting point for the development of new protocols for anti-EBV therapy.

  17. Specific Binding of 17D3 Anti-pZP mAb to Porcine and Human Zona Pellucida but not to Other Tissue Antigens Identified by ABC Immunohistochemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Objective To characterize the binding effects of 1 7D3 anti-pZP monoclonal antibody (mAb) on porcine and human ZP, ovary and other important tissues Methods The 1 7D3 anti-pZP mAb was produced by immunizing mouse with porcine zona pellucida and hybridoma and monoclonal antibody preparation. An ABCimmunohistochemistry was used to evaluate reaction of mAb 17D3pZP to porcine and human ZP antigens as well as important human tissue antigens.Results mAb 1 7D3pZP specifically bound to porcine and human ZP antigen, but not to other cells of ovaries and other important human tissue antigens.Conclusion 17D3 anti-pZP mAb can recognize porcine and human ZP antigen without cross-reaction with other human tissue antigens including ovary, so it may further help us to abstract and purify corresponding target antigen and settle basis for producing human ZP contraceptive vaccine.

  18. Plasmodium simium, a Plasmodium vivax-related malaria parasite: genetic variability of Duffy binding protein II and the Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargos Costa, Daniela; Pereira de Assis, Gabriela Maíra; de Souza Silva, Flávia Alessandra; Araújo, Flávia Carolina; de Souza Junior, Júlio César; Braga Hirano, Zelinda Maria; Satiko Kano, Flora; Nóbrega de Sousa, Taís; Carvalho, Luzia Helena; Ferreira Alves de Brito, Cristiana

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium simium is a parasite from New World monkeys that is most closely related to the human malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax; it also naturally infects humans. The blood-stage infection of P. vivax depends on Duffy binding protein II (PvDBPII) and its cognate receptor on erythrocytes, the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (hDARC), but there is no information on the P. simium erythrocytic invasion pathway. The genes encoding P. simium DBP (PsDBPII) and simian DARC (sDARC) were sequenced from Southern brown howler monkeys (Alouatta guariba clamitans) naturally infected with P. simium because P. simium may also depend on the DBPII/DARC interaction. The sequences of DBP binding domains from P. vivax and P. simium were highly similar. However, the genetic variability of PsDBPII was lower than that of PvDBPII. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that these genes were strictly related and clustered in the same clade of the evolutionary tree. DARC from A. clamitans was also sequenced and contained three new non-synonymous substitutions. None of these substitutions were located in the N-terminal domain of DARC, which interacts directly with DBPII. The interaction between sDARC and PvDBPII was evaluated using a cytoadherence assay of COS7 cells expressing PvDBPII on their surfaces. Inhibitory binding assays in vitro demonstrated that antibodies from monkey sera blocked the interaction between COS-7 cells expressing PvDBPII and hDARC-positive erythrocytes. Taken together, phylogenetic analyses reinforced the hypothesis that the host switch from humans to monkeys may have occurred very recently in evolution, which sheds light on the evolutionary history of new world plasmodia. Further invasion studies would confirm whether P. simium depends on DBP/DARC to trigger internalization into red blood cells.

  19. Saturated fatty acids induce post-transcriptional regulation of HAMP mRNA via AU-rich element-binding protein, human antigen R (HuR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Sizhao; Mott, Justin L; Harrison-Findik, Duygu Dee

    2015-10-02

    Iron is implicated in fatty liver disease pathogenesis. The human hepcidin gene, HAMP, is the master switch of iron metabolism. The aim of this study is to investigate the regulation of HAMP expression by fatty acids in HepG2 cells. For these studies, both saturated fatty acids (palmitic acid (PA) and stearic acid (SA)) and unsaturated fatty acid (oleic acid (OA)) were used. PA and, to a lesser extent, SA, but not OA, up-regulated HAMP mRNA levels, as determined by real-time PCR. To understand whether PA regulates HAMP mRNA at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level, the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D was employed. PA-mediated induction of HAMP mRNA expression was not blocked by actinomycin D. Furthermore, PA activated HAMP 3'-UTR, but not promoter, activity, as shown by reporter assays. HAMP 3'-UTR harbors a single AU-rich element (ARE). Mutation of this ARE abolished the effect of PA, suggesting the involvement of ARE-binding proteins. The ARE-binding protein human antigen R (HuR) stabilizes mRNA through direct interaction with AREs on 3'-UTR. HuR is regulated by phosphorylation-mediated nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling. PA activated this process. The binding of HuR to HAMP mRNA was also induced by PA in HepG2 cells. Silencing of HuR by siRNA abolished PA-mediated up-regulation of HAMP mRNA levels. PKC is known to phosphorylate HuR. Staurosporine, a broad-spectrum PKC inhibitor, inhibited both PA-mediated translocation of HuR and induction of HAMP expression. Similarly, rottlerin, a novel class PKC inhibitor, abrogated PA-mediated up-regulation of HAMP expression. In conclusion, lipids mediate post-transcriptional regulation of HAMP throughPKC- and HuR-dependent mechanisms.

  20. Characterization of highly frequent epitope-specific CD45RA+/CCR7+/- T lymphocyte responses against p53-binding domains of the human polyomavirus BK large tumor antigen in HLA-A*0201+ BKV-seropositive donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zajac Paul

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human polyomavirus BK (BKV has been implicated in oncogenic transformation. Its ability to replicate is determined by the binding of its large tumor antigen (LTag to products of tumor-suppressor genes regulating cell cycle, as specifically p53. We investigated CD8+ T immune responses to BKV LTag portions involved in p53 binding in HLA-A*0201+ BKV LTag experienced individuals. Peptides selected from either p53-binding region (LTag351–450 and LTag533–626 by current algorithms and capacity to bind HLA-A*0201 molecule were used to stimulate CD8+ T responses, as assessed by IFN-γ gene expression ex vivo and detected by cytotoxicity assays following in vitro culture. We observed epitope-specific immune responses in all HLA-A*0201+ BKV LTag experienced individuals tested. At least one epitope, LTag579–587; LLLIWFRPV, was naturally processed in non professional antigen presenting cells and induced cytotoxic responses with CTL precursor frequencies in the order of 1/20'000. Antigen specific CD8+ T cells were only detectable in the CD45RA+ subset, in both CCR7+ and CCR7- subpopulations. These data indicate that widespread cellular immune responses against epitopes within BKV LTag-p53 binding regions exist and question their roles in immunosurveillance against tumors possibly associated with BKV infection.

  1. Cloning and expression of a widely expressed receptor tyrosine phosphatase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sap, J; D'Eustachio, P; Givol, D;

    1990-01-01

    antigen yielded cDNA clones coding for a 794-amino acid transmembrane protein [hereafter referred to as receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha (R-PTP-alpha)] with an intracellular domain displaying clear homology to the catalytic domains of CD45 and LAR (45% and 53%, respectively). The 142-amino acid...

  2. Prediction of altered 3'- UTR miRNA-binding sites from RNA-Seq data: the swine leukocyte antigen complex (SLA as a model region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Laure Endale Ahanda

    Full Text Available THE SLA (swine leukocyte antigen, MHC: SLA genes are the most important determinants of immune, infectious disease and vaccine response in pigs; several genetic associations with immunity and swine production traits have been reported. However, most of the current knowledge on SLA is limited to gene coding regions. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small molecules that post-transcriptionally regulate the expression of a large number of protein-coding genes in metazoans, and are suggested to play important roles in fine-tuning immune mechanisms and disease responses. Polymorphisms in either miRNAs or their gene targets may have a significant impact on gene expression by abolishing, weakening or creating miRNA target sites, possibly leading to phenotypic variation. We explored the impact of variants in the 3'-UTR miRNA target sites of genes within the whole SLA region. The combined predictions by TargetScan, PACMIT and TargetSpy, based on different biological parameters, empowered the identification of miRNA target sites and the discovery of polymorphic miRNA target sites (poly-miRTSs. Predictions for three SLA genes characterized by a different range of sequence variation provided proof of principle for the analysis of poly-miRTSs from a total of 144 M RNA-Seq reads collected from different porcine tissues. Twenty-four novel SNPs were predicted to affect miRNA-binding sites in 19 genes of the SLA region. Seven of these genes (SLA-1, SLA-6, SLA-DQA, SLA-DQB1, SLA-DOA, SLA-DOB and TAP1 are linked to antigen processing and presentation functions, which is reminiscent of associations with disease traits reported for altered miRNA binding to MHC genes in humans. An inverse correlation in expression levels was demonstrated between miRNAs and co-expressed SLA targets by exploiting a published dataset (RNA-Seq and small RNA-Seq of three porcine tissues. Our results support the resource value of RNA-Seq collections to identify SNPs that may lead to altered mi

  3. Prediction of altered 3'- UTR miRNA-binding sites from RNA-Seq data: the swine leukocyte antigen complex (SLA) as a model region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endale Ahanda, Marie-Laure; Fritz, Eric R; Estellé, Jordi; Hu, Zhi-Liang; Madsen, Ole; Groenen, Martien A M; Beraldi, Dario; Kapetanovic, Ronan; Hume, David A; Rowland, Robert R R; Lunney, Joan K; Rogel-Gaillard, Claire; Reecy, James M; Giuffra, Elisabetta

    2012-01-01

    THE SLA (swine leukocyte antigen, MHC: SLA) genes are the most important determinants of immune, infectious disease and vaccine response in pigs; several genetic associations with immunity and swine production traits have been reported. However, most of the current knowledge on SLA is limited to gene coding regions. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small molecules that post-transcriptionally regulate the expression of a large number of protein-coding genes in metazoans, and are suggested to play important roles in fine-tuning immune mechanisms and disease responses. Polymorphisms in either miRNAs or their gene targets may have a significant impact on gene expression by abolishing, weakening or creating miRNA target sites, possibly leading to phenotypic variation. We explored the impact of variants in the 3'-UTR miRNA target sites of genes within the whole SLA region. The combined predictions by TargetScan, PACMIT and TargetSpy, based on different biological parameters, empowered the identification of miRNA target sites and the discovery of polymorphic miRNA target sites (poly-miRTSs). Predictions for three SLA genes characterized by a different range of sequence variation provided proof of principle for the analysis of poly-miRTSs from a total of 144 M RNA-Seq reads collected from different porcine tissues. Twenty-four novel SNPs were predicted to affect miRNA-binding sites in 19 genes of the SLA region. Seven of these genes (SLA-1, SLA-6, SLA-DQA, SLA-DQB1, SLA-DOA, SLA-DOB and TAP1) are linked to antigen processing and presentation functions, which is reminiscent of associations with disease traits reported for altered miRNA binding to MHC genes in humans. An inverse correlation in expression levels was demonstrated between miRNAs and co-expressed SLA targets by exploiting a published dataset (RNA-Seq and small RNA-Seq) of three porcine tissues. Our results support the resource value of RNA-Seq collections to identify SNPs that may lead to altered miRNA regulation patterns.

  4. Responses of IgE, IgG1, and IgG4 to concanavalin A-binding Blomia tropicalis antigens in allergic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.C. Almeida

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Blomia tropicalis (Bt and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dp are the prevalent house dust mites in tropical countries and are associated with allergic diseases. Glycosylated antigens are highly immunogenic and involved in different pathologies. We evaluated the presence of IgE, IgG1, and IgG4 to concanavalin A-binding antigens (Bt-Con-A isolated from Bt-total extract in sera of allergic and non-allergic subjects. Bt-total and Bt-Con-A extracts were evaluated by SDS-PAGE and ELISA for reacting with IgE, IgG1, and IgG4 in sera of 121 patients with allergic rhinitis and 36 non-allergic individuals. All subjects were skin prick tested with Bt-total extract and inhibition tests were performed for IgE, IgG1, and IgG4 using both extracts (Bt-total and Bt-Con-A. Skin prick test showed that 58% of the patients were sensitized to Bt (Bt+, with 52% reactive to both mites (Bt and Dp and 6% to Bt only. A broad spectrum of proteins (14-152 kDa was visualized in Bt-total and components >27 kDa for the Bt-Con-A extract. ELISA showed a similar profile of IgE, IgG1 and IgG4 levels in response to Bt-total and Bt-Con-A extracts in different groups, although Bt+ patients showed a lower IgG4 reactivity to Bt-Con-A extract. Specific IgG1 levels were higher in Bt+ patients than in control subjects, and IgG4 levels showed no significant difference among groups. ELISA inhibition showed a partial IgE and total IgG1 and IgG4 cross-reactivity with Dp extract for Bt-total and Bt-Con-A extracts. We conclude that Con-A-binding components isolated from Bt constitute major allergens and are involved in both allergen sensitization (IgE response and homeostasis maintenance (IgG1 and IgG4 responses.

  5. Surface co-expression of two different PfEMP1 antigens on single Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes facilitates binding to ICAM1 and PECAM1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Louise; Bengtsson, Dominique C; Bengtsson, Anja;

    2010-01-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) antigens play a major role in cytoadhesion of infected erythrocytes (IE), antigenic variation, and immunity to malaria. The current consensus on control of variant surface antigen expression is that only one PfEMP1 encoded by one var...

  6. Stimulated regeneration of the crushed adult rat optic nerve correlates with attenuated expression of the protein tyrosine phosphatases RPTPalpha, STEP, and LAR.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorber, B.; Berry, M.; Hendriks, W.J.A.J.; Hertog, J.F. den; Pulido, R.; Logan, A.

    2004-01-01

    We have evaluated the spatial and temporal expression patterns of three protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), receptor PTPalpha (RPTPalpha), striatal enriched phosphatase (STEP), and leucocyte common antigen-related phosphatase (LAR), in the retina and optic nerve (ON) of adult rats in which the cru

  7. Lectin-like domain of thrombomodulin binds to its specific ligand Lewis Y antigen and neutralizes lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chung-Sheng; Hsiao, Shi-Ming; Kao, Yuan-Chung; Kuo, Kuan-Lin; Ma, Chih-Yuan; Kuo, Cheng-Hsiang; Chang, Bi-Ing; Chang, Chuan-Fa; Lin, Chun-Hung; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2008-01-01

    Thrombomodulin (TM), a widely expressing glycoprotein originally identified in vascular endothelium, is an important cofactor in the protein C anticoagulant system. TM appears to exhibit anti-inflammatory ability through both protein C–dependent and –independent pathways. We presently have demonstrated that recombinant N-terminal lectinlike domain of TM (rTMD1) functions as a protective agent against sepsis caused by Gram-negative bacterial infections. rTMD1 caused agglutination of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae and enhanced the macrophage phagocytosis of these Gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, rTMD1 bound to the Klebsiella pneumoniae and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by specifically interacting with Lewis Y antigen. rTMD1 inhibited LPS-induced inflammatory mediator production via interference with CD14 and LPS binding. Furthermore, rTMD1 modulated LPS-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway activations and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in macrophages. Administration of rTMD1 protected the host by suppressing inflammatory responses induced by LPS and Gram-negative bacteria, and enhanced LPS and bacterial clearance in sepsis. Thus, rTMD1 can be used to defend against bacterial infection and inhibit LPS-induced inflammatory responses, suggesting that rTMD1 may be valuable in the treatment of severe inflammation in sepsis, especially in Gram-negative bacterial infections. PMID:18711002

  8. DNA polymerases BI and D from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus both bind to proliferating cell nuclear antigen with their C-terminal PIP-box motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tori, Kazuo; Kimizu, Megumi; Ishino, Sonoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2007-08-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is the sliding clamp that is essential for the high processivity of DNA synthesis during DNA replication. Pyrococcus furiosus, a hyperthermophilic archaeon, has at least two DNA polymerases, polymerase BI (PolBI) and PolD. Both of the two DNA polymerases interact with the archaeal P. furiosus PCNA (PfuPCNA) and perform processive DNA synthesis in vitro. This phenomenon, in addition to the fact that both enzymes display 3'-5' exonuclease activity, suggests that both DNA polymerases work in replication fork progression. We demonstrated here that both PolBI and PolD functionally interact with PfuPCNA at their C-terminal PIP boxes. The mutant PolBI and PolD enzymes lacking the PIP-box sequence do not respond to the PfuPCNA at all in an in vitro primer extension reaction. This is the first experimental evidence that the PIP-box motif, located at the C termini of the archaeal DNA polymerases, is actually critical for PCNA binding to form a processive DNA-synthesizing complex.

  9. Heat shock factor 1 upregulates transcription of Epstein-Barr Virus nuclear antigen 1 by binding to a heat shock element within the BamHI-Q promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Feng-Wei [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Wu, Xian-Rui [Department of Surgery, Sixth Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Wen-Ju; Liao, Yi-Ji [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Lin, Sheng [Laboratory of Integrated Biosciences, School of Life Science, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Zong, Yong-Sheng; Zeng, Mu-Sheng; Zeng, Yi-Xin [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Mai, Shi-Juan, E-mail: maishj@sysucc.org.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Xie, Dan, E-mail: xied@mail.sysu.edu.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China)

    2011-12-20

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is essential for maintenance of the episome and establishment of latency. In this study, we observed that heat treatment effectively induced EBNA1 transcription in EBV-transformed B95-8 and human LCL cell lines. Although Cp is considered as the sole promoter used for the expression of EBNA1 transcripts in the lymphoblastoid cell lines, the RT-PCR results showed that the EBNA1 transcripts induced by heat treatment arise from Qp-initiated transcripts. Using bioinformatics, a high affinity and functional heat shock factor 1 (HSF1)-binding element within the - 17/+4 oligonucleotide of the Qp was found, and was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Moreover, heat shock and exogenous HSF1 expression induced Qp activity in reporter assays. Further, RNA interference-mediated HSF1 gene silencing attenuated heat-induced EBNA1 expression in B95-8 cells. These results provide evidence that EBNA1 is a new target for the transcription factor HSF1.

  10. Amino acid regions 572-579 and 657-666 of the spacer domain of ADAMTS13 provide a common antigenic core required for binding of antibodies in patients with acquired TTP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luken, Brenda M; Turenhout, Ellen A M; Kaijen, Paul H P; Greuter, Mascha J; Pos, Wouter; van Mourik, Jan A; Fijnheer, Rob; Voorberg, Jan

    2006-09-01

    Antibodies directed against ADAMTS13 have been detected in the majority of patients with acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). We have previously localized a major antigenic determinant within the spacer domain of ADAMTS13. To identify the amino acid residues of the spacer domain that are involved in binding of anti-ADAMTS13 antibodies, we constructed a series of fifteen hybrids (designated A-O) in which 5-10 amino acids of the spacer domain were exchanged for the corresponding region of ADAMTS1. Plasma from six patients with antibodies directed against the spacer domain was analyzed for reactivity with the ADAMTS13/ADAMTS1 chimeras. Exchange of amino acid residues 572-579 (hybrid C) and 657-666 (hybrid M) completely abolished the binding of antibodies from all six patients analyzed. Regions 580-587 (D), 602-620 (G, H), 629-638 (J), and 667-767 (N) contributed to binding of antibodies from patients 2, 4, and 5 (epitope present within regions CDGHJMN). Antibodies derived from patient 1 required region 602-620 (G, H) for binding (CGHM-epitope). For antibodies of patient 3, residues 564-571 (B), 580-587 (D), and 629-638 (J) were required (BCDJM-epitope), whereas replacement of residues 602-610 (G) and 629-638 (J) greatly diminished binding of antibodies from patient 6 (CGJM-epitope). Despite the presumably polyclonal origin of the antibodies present in plasma of patients, our results suggest that residues 572-579 (C) and 657-666 (M) comprise a common antigenic core region that is crucial for binding of anti-ADAMTS13 antibodies. Other regions that spatially surround this antigenic core further modulate binding of antibodies to the spacer domain.

  11. Comparative DNA binding abilities and phosphatase-like activities of mono-, di-, and trinuclear Ni(II) complexes: the influence of ligand denticity, metal-metal distance, and coordinating solvent/anion on kinetics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Vimal K; Singh, Ajnesh

    2014-10-06

    Six novel Ni(II) complexes, namely, [Ni2(HL(1))(OAc)2] (1), [Ni3L(1)2]·H2O·2CH3CN (2), [Ni2(L(2))(L(3))(CH3CN)] (3), [Ni2(L(2))2(H2O)2] (4), [Ni2(L(2))2(DMF)2]2·2H2O (5), and [Ni(HL(2))2]·H2O (6), were synthesized by reacting nitrophenol-based tripodal (H3L(1)) and dipodal (H2L(2)) Schiff base ligands with Ni(II) metal salts at ambient conditions. All the complexes were fully characterized with different spectroscopic techniques such as elemental analyses, IR, UV-vis spectroscopy, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The solid-state structures of 2, 3, 5, and 6 were determined using single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The compounds 1, 3, 4, and 5 are dinuclear complexes where the two Ni(II) centers have octahedral geometry with bridging phenoxo groups. Compound 2 is a trinuclear complex with two different types of Ni(II) centers. In compound 3 one of the Ni(II) centers has a coordinated acetonitrile molecule, whereas in compound 4, a water molecule has occupied one coordination site of each Ni(II) center. In complex 5, the coordinated water of complex 4 was displaced by the dimethylformamide (DMF) during its crystallization. Complex 6 is mononuclear with two amine-bis(phenolate) ligands in scissorlike fashion around the Ni(II) metal center. The single crystals of 1 and 4 could not be obtained; however, from the spectroscopic data and physicochemical properties (electronic and redox properties) it was assumed that the structures of these complexes are quite similar to other analogues. DNA binding abilities and phosphatase-like activities of all characterized complexes were also investigated. The ligand denticity, coordinated anions/solvents (such as acetate, acetonitrile, water, and DMF), and cooperative action of two metal centers play a significant role in the phosphate ester bond cleavage of 2-hydroxypropyl-p-nitropenylphosphate by transesterification mechanism. Complex 3 exhibits highest activity among complexes 1-6 with 3.86 × 10(5) times

  12. High throughput functional assays of the variant antigen PfEMP1 reveal a single domain in the 3D7 Plasmodium falciparum genome that binds ICAM1 with high affinity and is targeted by naturally acquired neutralizing antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew V Oleinikov

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes bind endothelial receptors to sequester in vascular beds, and binding to ICAM1 has been implicated in cerebral malaria. Binding to ICAM1 may be mediated by the variant surface antigen family PfEMP1: for example, 6 of 21 DBLbetaC2 domains from the IT4 strain PfEMP1 repertoire were shown to bind ICAM1, and the PfEMP1 containing these 6 domains are all classified as Group B or C type. In this study, we surveyed binding of ICAM1 to 16 DBLbetaC2 domains of the 3D7 strain PfEMP1 repertoire, using a high throughput Bioplex assay format. Only one DBL2betaC2 domain from the Group A PfEMP1 PF11_0521 showed strong specific binding. Among these 16 domains, DBL2betaC2(PF11_0521 best preserved the residues previously identified as conserved in ICAM1-binding versus non-binding domains. Our analyses further highlighted the potential role of conserved residues within predominantly non-conserved flexible loops in adhesion, and, therefore, as targets for intervention. Our studies also suggest that the structural/functional DBLbetaC2 domain involved in ICAM1 binding includes about 80 amino acid residues upstream of the previously suggested DBLbetaC2 domain. DBL2betaC2(PF11_0521 binding to ICAM1 was inhibited by immune sera from east Africa but not by control US sera. Neutralizing antibodies were uncommon in children but common in immune adults from east Africa. Inhibition of binding was much more efficient than reversal of binding, indicating a strong interaction between DBL2betaC2(PF11_0521 and ICAM1. Our high throughput approach will significantly accelerate studies of PfEMP1 binding domains and protective antibody responses.

  13. Laforin, a dual specificity phosphatase involved in Lafora disease, is present mainly as monomeric form with full phosphatase activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas V Dukhande

    Full Text Available Lafora Disease (LD is a fatal neurodegenerative epileptic disorder that presents as a neurological deterioration with the accumulation of insoluble, intracellular, hyperphosphorylated carbohydrates called Lafora bodies (LBs. LD is caused by mutations in either the gene encoding laforin or malin. Laforin contains a dual specificity phosphatase domain and a carbohydrate-binding module, and is a member of the recently described family of glucan phosphatases. In the current study, we investigated the functional and physiological relevance of laforin dimerization. We purified recombinant human laforin and subjected the monomer and dimer fractions to denaturing gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, phosphatase assays, protein-protein interaction assays, and glucan binding assays. Our results demonstrate that laforin prevalently exists as a monomer with a small dimer fraction both in vitro and in vivo. Of mechanistic importance, laforin monomer and dimer possess equal phosphatase activity, and they both associate with malin and bind glucans to a similar extent. However, we found differences between the two states' ability to interact simultaneously with malin and carbohydrates. Furthermore, we tested other members of the glucan phosphatase family. Cumulatively, our data suggest that laforin monomer is the dominant form of the protein and that it contains phosphatase activity.

  14. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Labrune Philippe; Gajdos Vincent; Eberschweiler Pascale; Hubert-Buron Aurélie; Petit François; Vianey-Saban Christine; Boudjemline Alix; Piraud Monique; Froissart Roseline

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency), or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI), is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, betw...

  15. Mapping of immunodominant B-cell epitopes and the human serum albumin-binding site in natural hepatitis B virus surface antigen of defined genosubtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobotta, D; Sominskaya, I; Jansons, J; Meisel, H; Schmitt, S; Heermann, K H; Kaluza, G; Pumpens, P; Gerlich, W H

    2000-02-01

    Twelve MAbs were generated by immunization of BALB/c mice with plasma-derived hepatitis B virus surface spherical antigen particles subtype ayw2 (HBsAg/ayw2 genotype D). Their epitopes were mapped by analysis of reactivity with plasma-derived HBsAg/ayw2 and HBsAg/adw2 (genotype A) in enzyme immunoassays and blots. Mapping was supported by nested sets of truncated preS2 proteins and preS2 peptides. Five antibodies were S domain-specific, seven were preS2-specific and 11 had a preference for genotype D. According to our data, group I of the three known epitope groups of preS2 has to be divided into IA and IB. Three preS2-specific MAbs forming the new group IA reacted with genotype D residues 3-15 which have not yet been described as an epitope region. IA antibodies strongly inhibited the binding of polymerized human serum albumin. Two antibodies (group II) reacted with the glycosylated N-terminal region of preS2 in plasma-derived HBsAg, but not with a preparation from transfected murine cells. One group III antibody was subtype-specific and reacted with the highly variable preS2 sequence 38-48. Only one antibody (group IB) mapped to the region (old group I) which was believed to be immunodominant and genotype-independent. Geno(sub)type-specific epitopes of preS2 are obviously the immunodominant components of natural HBsAg in BALB/c mice, but these epitopes may be masked by serum albumins in humans. The data may explain why it is difficult to detect anti-preS2 antibodies in human recipients of preS2-containing vaccines, in spite of the preS2 immunodominance in mice.

  16. Allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells suppress NF-κB and Ets-1 DNA binding activity, and inhibit phosphorylated NF-κB p65 nuclear localization in CD4+ T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Ryuichi; Kawakami, Fumitaka; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Obata, Fumiya; Kubo, Makoto

    2014-08-01

    CD8+ T-cells of asymptomatic HIV-1 carriers (AC) suppress human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in a class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC-I)-restricted and -unrestricted manner. In order to investigate the mechanism of MHC-I-unrestricted CD8+ T-cell-mediated HIV-1 suppression, we previously established allo-antigen stimulated CD8+T-cells from HIV-1-uninfected donors. These allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells suppressed HIV-1 replication in acutely infected autologous CD4+ T-cells when directly co-cultured. To elucidate the mechanism of HIV-1 replication suppression, we analyzed DNA-binding activity and phosphorylation of transcriptional factors associated with HIV-1 replication by electrophoresis mobility shift assay and Western blotting. When CD4+ T-cells were cultured with allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells, the reduction of NF-κB and Ets-1 DNA-binding activity was observed. Nuclear localization of NF-κB p65 and Ets-1 was suppressed in CD4+ T-cells. Although NF-κB p65 and Ets-1 are known to be regulated by protein kinase A (PKA), no difference was observed in the expression and phosphorylation of the PKA catalytic subunit in CD4+ T-cells cultured with PHA-treated CD8+ T-cells or allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells. Cyclic AMP is also known to enter through gap junctions, but the suppression of HIV-1 replication mediated by allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells was not affected by the gap junction inhibitor. The nuclear transport of phosphorylated NF-κB p65 (Ser276) was inhibited only in CD4+ T-cells cultured with allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells. Our results indicate that allo-antigen stimulated CD8+ T-cells suppress the transcriptional activity of NF-κB p65 or Ets-1 in an antigen-nonspecific manner, and inhibit the nuclear transport of phosphorylated NF-κB p65 (Ser276).

  17. Binding of antibodies to the extractable nuclear antigens SS-A/Ro and SS-B/La is induced on the surface of human keratinocytes by ultraviolet light (UVL): Implications for the pathogenesis of photosensitive cutaneous lupus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, F.; Kashihara-Sawami, M.; Lyons, M.B.; Norris, D.A. (Univ. of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Autoantibodies to the non-histone nucleoprotein antigens SS-A/Ro, SS-B/La, and RNP are highly associated with photosensitive cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE). In order to better understand the potential mechanisms of ultraviolet (UV) light on photosensitivity in patients with cutaneous LE, we designed immunopathologic in vitro and in vivo experiments to evaluate the effects of UV on the binding of such autoantibodies to the surface of human keratinocytes, one major target of immunologic damage in photosensitive LE. Short-term 2% paraformaldehyde fixation of suspensions of cultured human keratinocytes previously incubated with monospecific antiserum probes enabled the detection of ENA expression on the cell surface by flow-cytometry analysis. UVB light (280-320 nm) induced the binding of monospecific antibody probes for SS-A/Ro and SS-B/La on keratinocytes in a dose-dependent pattern with maximal induction observed at the dose of 200 mJ/cm2 UVB. Binding of SS-A/Ro, SS-B/La, and RNP antibody was augmented strongly, but binding of anti-Sm was very weak. In contrast, UVA (320-400 nm) light had no effect on the induction of binding of these antibody probes. Identical results were seen by standard immunofluorescence techniques. Hydroxyurea-treated keratinocytes showed similar induction of those antigens by UVB irradiation, which suggested that ENA expression on cultured keratinocytes by UVB were cell-cycle independent. Tunicamycin, an inhibitor of glycosylation of proteins, reduced UVB light effect on the SS-A/Ro and SS-B/La antigen's expression. These in vitro FACS analyses revealed that ENA augmentation on the keratinocyte cell surface was dose dependent, UVB dependent, glycosylation dependent, and cell-cycle independent. In vivo ENA augmentation on the keratinocyte surface was examined in suction blister epidermal roofs.

  18. The catalytic activity of the CD45 membrane-proximal phosphatase domain is required for TCR signaling and regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desai, D M; Sap, J; Silvennoinen, O;

    1994-01-01

    Cell surface expression of CD45, a receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase), is required for T cell antigen receptor (TCR)-mediated signal transduction. Like the majority of transmembrane PTPases, CD45 contains two cytoplasmic phosphatase domains, whose relative in vivo function is not...

  19. Generation of a phage-display library of single-domain camelid VH H antibodies directed against Chlamydomonas reinhardtii antigens, and characterization of VH Hs binding cell-surface antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenzhi; Rosenberg, Julian N; Wauchope, Akelia D; Tremblay, Jacqueline M; Shoemaker, Charles B; Weeks, Donald P; Oyler, George A

    2013-11-01

    Single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) are powerful tools for the detection, quantification, purification and subcellular localization of proteins of interest in biological research. We have generated camelid (Lama pacos) heavy chain-only variable VH domain (VH H) libraries against antigens in total cell lysates from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The sdAbs in the sera from immunized animals and VH H antibody domains isolated from the library show specificity to C. reinhardtii and lack of reactivity to antigens from four other algae: Chlorella variabilis, Coccomyxa subellipsoidea, Nannochloropsis oceanica and Thalassiosira pseudonana. Antibodies were produced against a diverse representation of antigens as evidenced by sera ELISA and protein-blot analyses. A phage-display library consisting of the VH H region contained at least 10(6) individual transformants, and thus should represent a wide range of C. reinhardtii antigens. The utility of the phage library was demonstrated by using live C. reinhardtii cells to pan for VH H clones with specific recognition of cell-surface epitopes. The lead candidate VH H clones (designated B11 and H10) bound to C. reinhardtii with EC50 values ≤ 0.5 nm. Treatment of cells with VH H B11 fused to the mCherry or green fluorescent proteins allowed brilliant and specific staining of the C. reinhardtii cell wall and analysis of cell-wall genesis during cell division. Such high-complexity VH H antibody libraries for algae will be valuable tools for algal researchers and biotechnologists.

  20. Mapping of Monoclonal Antibody Binding Sites on CNBr Fragments of the S- Layer Protein Antigens of Rickettsia Typhi and Rickettsia Prowazekii

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    as the outermost component of several pathogenic gram-negative bacteria (Kay et al., their cell envelope (Palmer t at.. 1974: Ching et a.., 1984 Pei...antigen and expression of the protective crystalline surface layer from Rickettsia ricketsil: transcription and posttranslational protein antigen (SPAs...Publish- in procaryotes . J. Bacteriol. 170, 2891-2897. ing House of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava. Streuli C. H. and Griffin B. E. (1987

  1. Molecular basis for TPR domain-mediated regulation of protein phosphatase 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Roe, S Mark; Cliff, Matthew J; Williams, Mark A; Ladbury, John E; Cohen, Patricia T W; Barford, David

    2005-01-12

    Protein phosphatase 5 (Ppp5) is a serine/threonine protein phosphatase comprising a regulatory tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain N-terminal to its phosphatase domain. Ppp5 functions in signalling pathways that control cellular responses to stress, glucocorticoids and DNA damage. Its phosphatase activity is suppressed by an autoinhibited conformation maintained by the TPR domain and a C-terminal subdomain. By interacting with the TPR domain, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and fatty acids including arachidonic acid stimulate phosphatase activity. Here, we describe the structure of the autoinhibited state of Ppp5, revealing mechanisms of TPR-mediated phosphatase inhibition and Hsp90- and arachidonic acid-induced stimulation of phosphatase activity. The TPR domain engages with the catalytic channel of the phosphatase domain, restricting access to the catalytic site. This autoinhibited conformation of Ppp5 is stabilised by the C-terminal alphaJ helix that contacts a region of the Hsp90-binding groove on the TPR domain. Hsp90 activates Ppp5 by disrupting TPR-phosphatase domain interactions, permitting substrate access to the constitutively active phosphatase domain, whereas arachidonic acid prompts an alternate conformation of the TPR domain, destabilising the TPR-phosphatase domain interface.

  2. ANTI-NUCLEOSOME ANTIBODIES COMPLEXED TO NUCLEOSOMAL ANTIGENS SHOW ANTI-DNA REACTIVITY AND BIND TO RAT GLOMERULAR-BASEMENT-MEMBRANE IN-VIVO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KRAMERS, C; HYLKEMA, MN; VANBRUGGEN, MCJ; VANDELAGEMAAT, R; DIJKMAN, HBPM; ASSMANN, KJM; SMEENK, RJT; BERDEN, JHM; Hylkema, Machteld

    1994-01-01

    Histones can mediate the binding of DNA and anti-DNA to the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). Zn ELISA histone/DNA/anti-DNA complexes are able to bind to heparan sulfate (HS), an intrinsic constituent of the GBM. We questioned whether histone containing immune complexes are able to bind to the GBM

  3. [Alkaline phosphatase in Amoeba proteus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopina, V A

    2005-01-01

    In free-living Amoeba proteus (strain B), 3 phosphatase were found after disc-electrophoresis of 10 microg of protein in PAGE and using 1-naphthyl phosphate as a substrate a pH 9.0. These phosphatases differed in their electrophoretic mobilities - "slow" (1-3 bands), "middle" (one band) and "fast" (one band). In addition to 1-naphthyl phosphate, "slow" phosphatases were able to hydrolyse 2-naphthyl phosphate and p-nitrophenyl phosphate. They were slightly activated by Mg2+, completely inhibited by 3 chelators (EDTA, EGTA and 1,10-phenanthroline), L-cysteine, sodium dodecyl sulfate and Fe2+, Zn2+ and Mn2+ (50 mM), considerably inactivated by orthovanadate, molybdate, phosphatase inhibitor cocktail 1, p-nitrophenyl phosphate, Na2HPO4, DL-dithiothreitol and urea and partly inhibited by H2O2, DL-phenylalanine, 2-mercaptoethanol, phosphatase inhibitor cocktail 2 and Ca2+. Imidazole, L-(+)-tartrate, okadaic acid, NaF and sulfhydryl reagents -p-(hydroxy-mercuri)benzoate and N-ethylmaleimide - had no influence on the activity of "slow" phosphatases. "Middle" and "fast" phosphatases, in contrast to "slow" ones, were not inactivated by 3 chelators. The "middle" phosphatase differed from the "fast" one by smaller resistance to urea, Ca2+, Mn2+, phosphates and H2O2 and greater resistance to dithiothreitol and L-(+)-tartrate. In addition, the "fast" phosphatase was inhibited by L-cysteine but the "middle" one was activated by it. Of 5 tested ions (Mg2+, Cu2+, Mn2+, Ca2+ and Zn2+), only Zn2+ reactivated "slow" phosphatases after their inactivation by EDTA treatment. The reactivation of apoenzyme was only partial (about 35 %). Thus, among phosphatases found in amoebae at pH 9.0, only "slow" ones are Zn-metalloenzymes and may be considered as alkaline phosphatases (EC 3.1.3.1). It still remains uncertain, to which particular phosphatase class "middle" and "fast" phosphatases (pH 9.0) may belong.

  4. Cellular phosphatases facilitate combinatorial processing of receptor-activated signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddiqui Zaved

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although reciprocal regulation of protein phosphorylation represents a key aspect of signal transduction, a larger perspective on how these various interactions integrate to contribute towards signal processing is presently unclear. For example, a key unanswered question is that of how phosphatase-mediated regulation of phosphorylation at the individual nodes of the signaling network translates into modulation of the net signal output and, thereby, the cellular phenotypic response. Results To address the above question we, in the present study, examined the dynamics of signaling from the B cell antigen receptor (BCR under conditions where individual cellular phosphatases were selectively depleted by siRNA. Results from such experiments revealed a highly enmeshed structure for the signaling network where each signaling node was linked to multiple phosphatases on the one hand, and each phosphatase to several nodes on the other. This resulted in a configuration where individual signaling intermediates could be influenced by a spectrum of regulatory phosphatases, but with the composition of the spectrum differing from one intermediate to another. Consequently, each node differentially experienced perturbations in phosphatase activity, yielding a unique fingerprint of nodal signals characteristic to that perturbation. This heterogeneity in nodal experiences, to a given perturbation, led to combinatorial manipulation of the corresponding signaling axes for the downstream transcription factors. Conclusion Our cumulative results reveal that it is the tight integration of phosphatases into the signaling network that provides the plasticity by which perturbation-specific information can be transmitted in the form of a multivariate output to the downstream transcription factor network. This output in turn specifies a context-defined response, when translated into the resulting gene expression profile.

  5. Growth hormone (GH) treatment increases serum insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3, bone isoenzyme alkaline phosphatase and forearm bone mineral content in young adults with GH deficiency of childhood onset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Pedersen, S A; Sørensen, S;

    1994-01-01

    the effect of GH treatment on a marker of bone formation (bone alkaline phosphatase), hepatic excretory function and distal forearm bone mineral content in GH-deficient adults. Growth hormone was administered subcutaneously in 21 adults (13 males and 8 females) with GH deficiency of childhood onset for 4......Recent studies have demonstrated that growth hormone (GH)-deficient adults have a markedly decreased bone mineral content compared to healthy adults. However, there are conflicting results regarding the effects of GH treatment on bone mineral content in GH-deficient adults. Therefore, we evaluated...

  6. Growth hormone (GH) treatment increases serum insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3, bone isoenzyme alkaline phosphatase and forearm bone mineral content in young adults with GH deficiency of childhood onset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Pedersen, S A; Sørensen, S;

    1994-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that growth hormone (GH)-deficient adults have a markedly decreased bone mineral content compared to healthy adults. However, there are conflicting results regarding the effects of GH treatment on bone mineral content in GH-deficient adults. Therefore, we evaluated...... the effect of GH treatment on a marker of bone formation (bone alkaline phosphatase), hepatic excretory function and distal forearm bone mineral content in GH-deficient adults. Growth hormone was administered subcutaneously in 21 adults (13 males and 8 females) with GH deficiency of childhood onset for 4...

  7. Strategies for fragment antigen binding expression in Escherichia coli%大肠杆菌表达抗原结合片段的策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘运洪; 侯宗柳

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low-yields of antigen-binding fragment (Fab) restricts its full scale operation and application, which may be changed by remodeling or optimizing host cells, expression vectors, expression condition and purification conditions.OBJECTIVE: To summarize and introduce new strategies about expression and purification of Fab antibodies in Escherichia coli (E. coli).METHODS: CNKI and Medline databases were searched by the first author using key words of "Escherichia coli, Fab, Expression,antibody, purification" in Chinese or English from year 1990 to 2010. The Fab antibody expression and purification in E. coli were summed up and new researches concerning Fab antibody expression and purification in E. coli were introduced.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Totally 125 papers were found and 30 papers were included. The results show that the Fab antibodies are mainly by cytoplasmic expression and secreted expression in E. coli. Its purification methods are mainly by metal ions and chelating affinity purification and specific proteins affinity purification. The influence factors concerning Fab expression in E. coli are correlated to each other. A substantial increase in current research on the latest Fab antibodies in E. coli expression and purification strategies are not consistent optimal, there is no best, only the most suitable.%背景:抗原结合片段在大肠杆菌中表达量低是制约其大规模生产和应用的主要因素,通过对宿主细胞、表达载体、表达条件和纯化条件等进行改造与优化,将有可能获得基因工程抗体的高效表达.目的:总结并介绍抗原结合片断抗体在大肠杆菌中的表达和纯化的最新策略.方法:由第一作者用计算机检索中国期刊全文数据库(CNKI:1990/2010)和Medline数据库(1990/2010),检索词分别为"大肠杆菌,抗原结合片段,表达,纯化,抗体"和"Escherichia coli,Fab,Expression,antibody,purification",语言分别设定为中文和英文.从Fab抗体在大肠

  8. 华支睾吸虫膜抗原/排泄分泌抗原酸性磷酸酶的克隆、表达、生物学特征分析及组织定位%Cloning, expression, biological characteristics and tissue localization of a Clonorchis sinensis membrane antigen/excretory-secretory antigen, acid phosphatase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑明慧; 胡坤华; 张彤; 刘炜; 余新炳

    2014-01-01

    目的:对华支睾吸虫(Clonorchis sinensis,Cs)成虫酸性磷酸酶(acid phosphatase,AP)进行克隆、表达、生物学特征分析、组织定位及膜抗原/排泄分泌抗原鉴定.方法:对CsAP进行生物信息学、分子生物学、免疫组化及明胶酶谱分析.结果:从Cs cDNA文库中筛选出编码AP新基因,全长1 410 bp,重组并由大肠杆菌表达、纯化,得到分子量为55 kD的重组蛋白GsAP.Western blotting分析表明,CsAP既是膜抗原又是分泌排泄抗原;免疫组化显示,CsAP荧光显示于成虫的表皮层和肠支,在囊蚴也有显示,在雷蚴和尾蚴未显示荧光;ELISA分析表明sAP识别华支睾吸虫病人和日本血吸虫病人存在吸虫间的交叉免疫反应,CsAP及粗抗原识别轻、中、重度感染程度华支睾吸虫病人的差别不明显.重组蛋白免疫大鼠后,总IgG抗体滴度于3周达较高峰,抗体效价大于1∶25 600.明胶降解实验表明:CsAP具降解胶原能力.结论:上述结果表明,CsAP在大肠杆菌中高效表达,具有较好的免疫原性,但血清诊断价值不理想;CsAP可能既是膜抗原,又是排泄分泌抗原.

  9. Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol-5-phosphatase and CCAAT enhancer-binding protein beta are targeted by miR-155 in B cells of Emicro-MiR-155 transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costinean, Stefan; Sandhu, Sukhinder K; Pedersen, Irene M

    2009-01-01

    We showed that Emicro-MiR-155 transgenic mice develop acute lymphoblastic leukemia/high-grade lymphoma. Most of these leukemias start at approximately 9 months irrespective of the mouse strain. They are preceded by a polyclonal pre-B-cell proliferation, have variable clinical presentation......, are transplantable, and develop oligo/monoclonal expansion. In this study, we show that in these transgenic mice the B-cell precursors have the highest MiR-155 transgene expression and are at the origin of the leukemias. We determine that Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol-5-phosphatase (SHIP) and CCAAT...... a chain of events that leads to the accumulation of large pre-B cells and acute lymphoblastic leukemia/high-grade lymphoma....

  10. Structural Genomics of Protein Phosphatases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almo,S.; Bonanno, J.; Sauder, J.; Emtage, S.; Dilorenzo, T.; Malashkevich, V.; Wasserman, S.; Swaminathan, S.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; et al

    2007-01-01

    The New York SGX Research Center for Structural Genomics (NYSGXRC) of the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI) has applied its high-throughput X-ray crystallographic structure determination platform to systematic studies of all human protein phosphatases and protein phosphatases from biomedically-relevant pathogens. To date, the NYSGXRC has determined structures of 21 distinct protein phosphatases: 14 from human, 2 from mouse, 2 from the pathogen Toxoplasma gondii, 1 from Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite responsible for African sleeping sickness, and 2 from the principal mosquito vector of malaria in Africa, Anopheles gambiae. These structures provide insights into both normal and pathophysiologic processes, including transcriptional regulation, regulation of major signaling pathways, neural development, and type 1 diabetes. In conjunction with the contributions of other international structural genomics consortia, these efforts promise to provide an unprecedented database and materials repository for structure-guided experimental and computational discovery of inhibitors for all classes of protein phosphatases.

  11. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labrune Philippe

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency, or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI, is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea. Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty, generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency. GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib. Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21 and SLC37A4 (11q23 respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most

  12. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froissart, Roseline; Piraud, Monique; Boudjemline, Alix Mollet; Vianey-Saban, Christine; Petit, François; Hubert-Buron, Aurélie; Eberschweiler, Pascale Trioche; Gajdos, Vincent; Labrune, Philippe

    2011-05-20

    Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency), or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI), is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea). Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty), generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma) and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency). GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia) which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib). Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21) and SLC37A4 (11q23) respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most commonly confirmed

  13. A Crystallin Fold in the Interleukin-4-inducing Principle of Schistosoma mansoni Eggs (IPSE/α-1) Mediates IgE Binding for Antigen-independent Basophil Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, N Helge; Mayerhofer, Hubert; Tripsianes, Konstantinos; Blindow, Silke; Barths, Daniela; Mewes, Astrid; Weimar, Thomas; Köhli, Thies; Bade, Steffen; Madl, Tobias; Frey, Andreas; Haas, Helmut; Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen; Sattler, Michael; Schramm, Gabriele

    2015-09-04

    The IL-4-inducing principle from Schistosoma mansoni eggs (IPSE/α-1), the major secretory product of eggs from the parasitic worm S. mansoni, efficiently triggers basophils to release the immunomodulatory key cytokine interleukin-4. Activation by IPSE/α-1 requires the presence of IgE on the basophils, but the detailed molecular mechanism underlying activation is unknown. NMR and crystallographic analysis of IPSEΔNLS, a monomeric IPSE/α-1 mutant, revealed that IPSE/α-1 is a new member of the βγ-crystallin superfamily. We demonstrate that this molecule is a general immunoglobulin-binding factor with highest affinity for IgE. NMR binding studies of IPSEΔNLS with the 180-kDa molecule IgE identified a large positively charged binding surface that includes a flexible loop, which is unique to the IPSE/α-1 crystallin fold. Mutational analysis of amino acids in the binding interface showed that residues contributing to IgE binding are important for IgE-dependent activation of basophils. As IPSE/α-1 is unable to cross-link IgE, we propose that this molecule, by taking advantage of its unique IgE-binding crystallin fold, activates basophils by a novel, cross-linking-independent mechanism.

  14. A phage-displayed chicken single-chain antibody fused to alkaline phosphatase detects Fusarium pathogens and their presence in cereal grains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Zu-Quan [Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory of Triticeae Crops, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Li, He-Ping [Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory of Triticeae Crops, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Zhang, Jing-Bo [Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory of Triticeae Crops, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Huang, Tao [Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory of Triticeae Crops, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Liu, Jin-Long; Xue, Sheng [Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory of Triticeae Crops, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Wu, Ai-Bo [Institute for Agri-food Standards and Testing Technology, Laboratory of Quality and Safety Risk Assessment for Agro-products, Ministry of Agriculture, Shanghai Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 1000 Jinqi Road, Shanghai 201403 (China); Liao, Yu-Cai, E-mail: ycliao06@yahoo.com.cn [Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory of Triticeae Crops, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); National Center of Plant Gene Research, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2013-02-18

    Graphical abstract: A phage-displayed chicken scFv antibody, FvSG7, binds on the surface antigen of conidiospores and the mycelia of F. verticillioides. Its fusion with alkaline phosphatase (AP) through a 218 linker displayed a 4-fold higher affinity compared with the parent scFv antibody and efficiently detected toxigenic Fusarium pathogens in cereal grains. Highlights: ► Generation of a highly reactive scFv antibody against F. verticillioides. ► Localization of the antibody binding to the surface target of F. verticillioides. ► Expression of the antibody–alkaline phosphatase (AP) fusion linked by a 218 linker. ► The antibody–AP fusion has a higher affinity than the parental antibody. ► The antibody–AP fusion detects toxigenic Fusarium pathogens in cereal grains. -- Abstract: Fusarium and its poisonous mycotoxins are distributed worldwide and are of particular interest in agriculture and food safety. A simple analytical method to detect pathogens is essential for forecasting diseases and controlling mycotoxins. This article describes a proposed method for convenient and sensitive detection of Fusarium pathogens that uses the fusion of single-chain variable fragment (scFv) and alkaline phosphatase (AP). A highly reactive scFv antibody specific to soluble cell wall-bound proteins (SCWPs) of F. verticillioides was selected from an immunized chicken phagemid library by phage display. The antibody was verified to bind on the surface of ungerminated conidiospores and mycelia of F. verticillioides. The scFv–AP fusion was constructed, and soluble expression in bacteria was confirmed. Both the antibody properties and enzymatic activity were retained, and the antigen-binding capacity of the fusion was enhanced by the addition of a linker. Surface plasmon resonance measurements confirmed that the fusion displayed 4-fold higher affinity compared with the fusion's parental scFv antibody. Immunoblot analyses showed that the fusion had good binding

  15. One-step immunoassay for tetrabromobisphenol a using a camelid single domain antibody-alkaline phosphatase fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Majkova, Zuzana; Bever, Candace R S; Yang, Jun; Gee, Shirley J; Li, Ji; Xu, Ting; Hammock, Bruce D

    2015-01-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is a ubiquitous brominated flame retardant, showing widespread environmental and human exposures. A variable domain of the heavy chain antibody (VHH), naturally occurring in camelids, approaches the lower size limit of functional antigen-binding entities. The ease of genetic manipulation makes such VHHs a superior choice to use as an immunoreagent. In this study, a highly selective anti-TBBPA VHH T3-15 fused with alkaline phosphatase (AP) from E. coli was expressed, showing both an integrated TBBPA-binding capacity and enzymatic activity. A one-step immunoassay based on the fusion protein T3-15-AP was developed for TBBPA in 5% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)/phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4), with a half-maximum signal inhibition concentration (IC50) of 0.20 ng mL(-1). Compared to the parental VHH T3-15, T3-15-AP was able to bind to a wider variety of coating antigens and the assay sensitivity was slightly improved. Cross-reactivity of T3-15-AP with a set of important brominated analogues was negligible (<0.1%). Although T3-15-AP was susceptible to extreme heat (90 °C), much higher binding stability at ambient temperature was observed in the T3-15-AP-based assay for at least 70 days. A simple pretreatment method of diluting urine samples with DMSO was developed for a one-step assay. The recoveries of TBBPA from urine samples via this one-step assay ranged from 96.7% to 109.9% and correlated well with a high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy (HPLC-MS/MS) method. It is expected that the dimerized fusion protein, VHH-AP, will show promising applications in human exposure and environmental monitoring.

  16. Identification of a protein phosphatase-1/phospholamban complex that is regulated by cAMP-dependent phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Vafiadaki

    Full Text Available In human and experimental heart failure, the activity of the type 1 phosphatase is significantly increased, associated with dephosphorylation of phospholamban, inhibition of the sarco(endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+ transport ATPase (SERCA2a and depressed function. In the current study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms controlling protein phosphatase-1 activity. Using recombinant proteins and complementary in vitro binding studies, we identified a multi-protein complex centered on protein phosphatase-1 that includes its muscle specific glycogen-targeting subunit GM and substrate phospholamban. GM interacts directly with phospholamban and this association is mediated by the cytosolic regions of the proteins. Our findings suggest the involvement of GM in mediating formation of the phosphatase-1/GM/phospholamban complex through the direct and independent interactions of GM with both protein phosphatase-1 and phospholamban. Importantly, the protein phosphatase-1/GM/phospholamban complex dissociates upon protein kinase A phosphorylation, indicating its significance in the β-adrenergic signalling axis. Moreover, protein phosphatase-1 activity is regulated by two binding partners, inhibitor-1 and the small heat shock protein 20, Hsp20. Indeed, human genetic variants of inhibitor-1 (G147D or Hsp20 (P20L result in reduced binding and inhibition of protein phosphatase-1, suggesting aberrant enzymatic regulation in human carriers. These findings provide insights into the mechanisms underlying fine-tuned regulation of protein phosphatase-1 and its impact on the SERCA2/phospholamban interactome in cardiac function.

  17. Overexpression and topology of the Shigella flexneri O-antigen polymerase (Rfc/Wzy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, C; Vindurampulle, C; Morona, R

    1998-06-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), particularly the O-antigen component, are one of many virulence determinants necessary for Shigella flexneri pathogenesis. O-antigen biosynthesis is determined mostly by genes located in the rfb region of the chromosome. The rfc/wzy gene encodes the O-antigen polymerase, an integral membrane protein, which polymerizes the O-antigen repeat units of the LPS. The wild-type rfc/wzy gene has no detectable ribosome-binding site (RBS) and four rare codons in the translation initiation region (TIR). Site-directed mutagenesis of the rare codons at positions 4, 9 and 23 to those corresponding to more abundant tRNAs and introduction of a RBS allowed detection of the rfc/wzy gene product via a T7 promoter/polymerase expression assay. Complementation studies using the rfc/wzy constructs allowed visualization of a novel LPS with unregulated O-antigen chain length distribution, and a modal chain length could be restored by supplying the gene for the O-antigen chain length regulator (Rol/Wzz) on a low-copy-number plasmid. This suggests that the O-antigen chain length distribution is determined by both Rfc/Wzy and Rol/Wzz proteins. The effect on translation of mutating the rare codons was determined using an Rfc::PhoA fusion protein as a reporter. Alkaline phosphatase enzyme assays showed an approximately twofold increase in expression when three of the rare codons were mutated. Analysis of the Rfc/Wzy amino acid sequence using TM-PREDICT indicated that Rfc/Wzy had 10-13 transmembrane segments. The computer prediction models were tested by genetically fusing C-terminal deletions of Rfc/Wzy to alkaline phosphatase and beta-galactosidase. Rfc::PhoA fusion proteins near the amino-terminal end were detected by Coomassie blue staining and Western blotting using anti-PhoA serum. The enzyme activities of cells with the rfc/wzy fusions and the location of the fusions in rfc/wzy indicated that Rfc/Wzy has 12 transmembrane segments with two large periplasmic

  18. Comparison of the binding properties of the mushroom Marasmius oreades lectin and Griffonia simplicifolia I-B isolectin to alphagalactosyl carbohydrate antigens in the surface phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Svend; Winter, Harry C; Goldstein, Irwin J

    2004-01-01

    The binding of two alpha-galactophilic lectins, Marasmius oreades agglutinin (MOA), and Griffonia simplicifolia I isolectin B(4) (GS I-B(4)) to neoglycoproteins and natural glycoproteins were compared in a surface phase assay. Neoglycoproteins carrying various alpha-galactosylated glycans and lam...

  19. Interaction of Myosin Phosphatase Target Subunit (MYPT1) with Myosin Phosphatase-RhoA Interacting Protein (MRIP): A Role of Glutamic Acids in the Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunhee; Stafford, Walter F

    2015-01-01

    Scaffold proteins bind to and functionally link protein members of signaling pathways. Interaction of the scaffold proteins, myosin phosphatase target subunit (MYPT1) and myosin phosphatase-RhoA interacting protein (MRIP), causes co-localization of myosin phosphatase and RhoA to actomyosin. To examine biophysical properties of interaction of MYPT1 with MRIP, we employed analytical ultracentrifugation and surface plasmon resonance. In regard to MRIP, its residues 724-837 are sufficient for the MYPT1/MRIP interaction. Moreover, MRIP binds to MYPT1 as either a monomer or a dimer. With respect to MYPT1, its leucine repeat region, LR (residues 991-1030) is sufficient to account for the MYPT1/MRIP interaction. Furthermore, point mutations that replace glutamic acids 998-1000 within LR reduced the binding affinity toward MRIP. This suggests that the glutamic acids of MYPT1 play an important role in the interaction.

  20. Binding of the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K to the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2 enhances viral LMP2A expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Gross

    Full Text Available The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV -encoded EBNA2 protein, which is essential for the in vitro transformation of B-lymphocytes, interferes with cellular processes by binding to proteins via conserved sequence motifs. Its Arginine-Glycine (RG repeat element contains either symmetrically or asymmetrically di-methylated arginine residues (SDMA and ADMA, respectively. EBNA2 binds via its SDMA-modified RG-repeat to the survival motor neurons protein (SMN and via the ADMA-RG-repeat to the NP9 protein of the human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K (HML-2 Type 1. The hypothesis of this work was that the methylated RG-repeat mimics an epitope shared with cellular proteins that is used for interaction with target structures. With monoclonal antibodies against the modified RG-repeat, we indeed identified cellular homologues that apparently have the same surface structure as methylated EBNA2. With the SDMA-specific antibodies, we precipitated the Sm protein D3 (SmD3 which, like EBNA2, binds via its SDMA-modified RG-repeat to SMN. With the ADMA-specific antibodies, we precipitated the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K. Specific binding of the ADMA- antibody to hnRNP K was demonstrated using E. coli expressed/ADMA-methylated hnRNP K. In addition, we show that EBNA2 and hnRNP K form a complex in EBV- infected B-cells. Finally, hnRNP K, when co-expressed with EBNA2, strongly enhances viral latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A expression by an unknown mechanism as we did not detect a direct association of hnRNP K with DNA-bound EBNA2 in gel shift experiments. Our data support the notion that the methylated surface of EBNA2 mimics the surface structure of cellular proteins to interfere with or co-opt their functional properties.

  1. Binding of the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) to the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2) enhances viral LMP2A expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Henrik; Hennard, Christine; Masouris, Ilias; Cassel, Christian; Barth, Stephanie; Stober-Grässer, Ute; Mamiani, Alfredo; Moritz, Bodo; Ostareck, Dirk; Ostareck-Lederer, Antje; Neuenkirchen, Nils; Fischer, Utz; Deng, Wen; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Noessner, Elfriede; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Grässer, Friedrich A

    2012-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) -encoded EBNA2 protein, which is essential for the in vitro transformation of B-lymphocytes, interferes with cellular processes by binding to proteins via conserved sequence motifs. Its Arginine-Glycine (RG) repeat element contains either symmetrically or asymmetrically di-methylated arginine residues (SDMA and ADMA, respectively). EBNA2 binds via its SDMA-modified RG-repeat to the survival motor neurons protein (SMN) and via the ADMA-RG-repeat to the NP9 protein of the human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K (HML-2) Type 1). The hypothesis of this work was that the methylated RG-repeat mimics an epitope shared with cellular proteins that is used for interaction with target structures. With monoclonal antibodies against the modified RG-repeat, we indeed identified cellular homologues that apparently have the same surface structure as methylated EBNA2. With the SDMA-specific antibodies, we precipitated the Sm protein D3 (SmD3) which, like EBNA2, binds via its SDMA-modified RG-repeat to SMN. With the ADMA-specific antibodies, we precipitated the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K). Specific binding of the ADMA- antibody to hnRNP K was demonstrated using E. coli expressed/ADMA-methylated hnRNP K. In addition, we show that EBNA2 and hnRNP K form a complex in EBV- infected B-cells. Finally, hnRNP K, when co-expressed with EBNA2, strongly enhances viral latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) expression by an unknown mechanism as we did not detect a direct association of hnRNP K with DNA-bound EBNA2 in gel shift experiments. Our data support the notion that the methylated surface of EBNA2 mimics the surface structure of cellular proteins to interfere with or co-opt their functional properties.

  2. Purified JC virus T antigen derived from insect cells preferentially interacts with binding site II of the viral core origin under replication conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollag, B; Mackeen, P C; Frisque, R J

    1996-04-01

    The human polyomavirus JC virus (JCV) establishes persistent, asymptomatic infections in most individuals, but in severely immunocompromised hosts it may cause the fatal demyelinating brain disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. In cell culture JCV multiplies inefficiently and exhibits a narrow host range. This restricted behavior occurs, in part, at the level of DNA replication, which is regulated by JCV's multifunctional large tumor protein (TAg). To prepare purified JCV TAg (JCT) for biochemical analyses, the recombinant baculovirus B-JCT was generated by cotransfection of insect cells with wild-type baculovirus and the vector pVL-JCT(Int-) containing the JCT-coding sequence downstream of the efficient polyhedrin promoter. JCT expressed in infected cells was immunoaffinity purified using the anti-JCT monoclonal antibody PAb 2000. Characterization of the viral oncoprotein indicated that it exists in solution as a mixture of monomeric and oligomeric species. With the addition of ATP, the population of monomers decreased and that of hexamers and double hexamers increased. A DNA mobility shift assay indicated that origin binding occurred primarily with the double-hexamer form. A comparison of the specific DNA-binding activities of JCT and SV40 TAg (SVT) revealed that JCT generally exhibited greater affinity for binding site II relative to binding site I (B.S. I) of both viral origin regions, whereas SVT preferentially bound B.S. I. Furthermore, JCT bound nonviral DNA more efficiently than did SVT. These functional differences between the two TAgs may contribute to the reduced DNA replication potential of JCV in vitro, and to the virus' ability to establish persistent infections in vivo.

  3. Radioimmunoassay for prostatic acid phosphatase in human serum. Methodologic aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradalier, N.; Canal, P.; Pujol, A.; Fregevu, Y. (Groupe de Recherches du Centre Claudius-Regaud, Toulouse (France)); Soula, G. (Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques, Toulouse (France))

    1982-01-01

    We propose a double antibody radioimmunoassay for human prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) in serum for diagnosis and management of prostatic adenocarcinoma under treatment. The antigen is purified from human prostatic fluid by a gel-filtration on Sephadex G 100 followed by affinity chromatography on Con A Sepharose. A specific antibody is raised in rabbits and purified by immunoadsorption with a female serum. The described technique offers both radioisotopic sensibility and immunologic specificity. Physiological values determined in the serum of 125 healthy males are below 2 ng/ml. No significative differences are observed with age. The proposed technique also shows significant differences between values evaluated for benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostatic adenocarcinoma.

  4. Structural Based Analyses of the JC Virus T-Antigen F258L Mutant Provides Evidence for DNA Dependent Conformational Changes in the C-Termini of Polyomavirus Origin Binding Domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretchen Meinke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The replication of human polyomavirus JCV, which causes Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy, is initiated by the virally encoded T-antigen (T-ag. The structure of the JC virus T-ag origin-binding domain (OBD was recently solved by X-ray crystallography. This structure revealed that the OBD contains a C-terminal pocket, and that residues from the multifunctional A1 and B2 motifs situated on a neighboring OBD molecule dock into the pocket. Related studies established that a mutation in a pocket residue (F258L rendered JCV T-ag unable to support JCV DNA replication. To establish why this mutation inactivated JCV T-ag, we have solved the structure of the F258L JCV T-ag OBD mutant. Based on this structure, it is concluded that the structural consequences of the F258L mutation are limited to the pocket region. Further analyses, utilizing the available polyomavirus OBD structures, indicate that the F258 region is highly dynamic and that the relative positions of F258 are governed by DNA binding. The possible functional consequences of the DNA dependent rearrangements, including promotion of OBD cycling at the replication fork, are discussed.

  5. Human polyoma JC virus minor capsid proteins, VP2 and VP3, enhance large T antigen binding to the origin of viral DNA replication: evidence for their involvement in regulation of the viral DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saribas, A Sami; Mun, Sarah; Johnson, Jaslyn; El-Hajmoussa, Mohammad; White, Martyn K; Safak, Mahmut

    2014-01-20

    JC virus (JCV) lytically infects the oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system in a subset of immunocompromized patients and causes the demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. JCV replicates and assembles into infectious virions in the nucleus. However, understanding the molecular mechanisms of its virion biogenesis remains elusive. In this report, we have attempted to shed more light on this process by investigating molecular interactions between large T antigen (LT-Ag), Hsp70 and minor capsid proteins, VP2/VP3. We demonstrated that Hsp70 interacts with VP2/VP3 and LT-Ag; and accumulates heavily in the nucleus of the infected cells. We also showed that VP2/VP3 associates with LT-Ag through their DNA binding domains resulting in enhancement in LT-Ag DNA binding to Ori and induction in viral DNA replication. Altogether, our results suggest that VP2/VP3 and Hsp70 actively participate in JCV DNA replication and may play critical roles in coupling of viral DNA replication to virion encapsidation.

  6. Characterization of a single b-type heme, FAD, and metal binding sites in the transmembrane domain of six-transmembrane epithelial antigen of the prostate (STEAP) family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleven, Mark D; Dlakić, Mensur; Lawrence, C Martin

    2015-09-11

    Six-transmembrane epithelial antigen of the prostate 3 (Steap3) is the major ferric reductase in developing erythrocytes. Steap family proteins are defined by a shared transmembrane domain that in Steap3 has been shown to function as a transmembrane electron shuttle, moving cytoplasmic electrons derived from NADPH across the lipid bilayer to the extracellular face where they are used to reduce Fe(3+) to Fe(2+) and potentially Cu(2+) to Cu(1+). Although the cytoplasmic N-terminal oxidoreductase domain of Steap3 and Steap4 are relatively well characterized, little work has been done to characterize the transmembrane domain of any member of the Steap family. Here we identify high affinity FAD and iron biding sites and characterize a single b-type heme binding site in the Steap3 transmembrane domain. Furthermore, we show that Steap3 is functional as a homodimer and that it utilizes an intrasubunit electron transfer pathway through the single heme moiety rather than an intersubunit electron pathway through a potential domain-swapped dimer. Importantly, the sequence motifs in the transmembrane domain that are associated with the FAD and metal binding sites are not only present in Steap2 and Steap4 but also in Steap1, which lacks the N-terminal oxidoreductase domain. This strongly suggests that Steap1 harbors latent oxidoreductase activity.

  7. Okadaic acid: the archetypal serine/threonine protein phosphatase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dounay, A B; Forsyth, C J

    2002-11-01

    As the first recognized member of the "okadaic acid class" of phosphatase inhibitors, the marine natural product okadaic acid is perhaps the most well-known member of a diverse array of secondary metabolites that have emerged as valuable probes for studying the roles of various cellular protein serine/threonine phosphatases. This review provides a historical perspective on the role that okadaic acid has played in stimulating a broad spectrum of modern scientific research as a result of the natural product's ability to bind to and inhibit important classes of protein serine / threonine phosphatases. The relationships between the structure and biological activities of okadaic acid are briefly reviewed, as well as the structural information regarding the particular cellular receptors protein phosphatases 1 (PP1) and 2A. Laboratory syntheses of okadaic acid and its analogs are thoroughly reviewed. Finally, an interpretation of the critical contacts observed between okadaic acid and PP1 by X-ray crystallography is provided, and specific molecular recognition hypotheses that are testable via the synthesis and assay of non-natural analogs of okadaic acid are suggested.

  8. Plant α-glucan phosphatases SEX4 and LSF2 display different affinity for amylopectin and amylose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkens, Casper; Auger, Kyle D.; Anderson, Nolan T.;

    2016-01-01

    The plant glucan phosphatases Starch EXcess 4 (SEX4) and Like Sex Four2 (LSF2) apply different starch binding mechanisms. SEX4 contains a carbohydrate binding module, and LSF2 has two surface binding sites (SBSs). We determined KDapp for amylopectin and amylose, and KD for β-cyclodextrin and vali...

  9. Antigen-antibody selective recognition using LiTaO3 SH-SAW sensors: investigations on macromolecules effects on binding kinetic constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergaoui, Y.; Zerrouki, C.; Fourati, N.; Fougnion, J. M.; Abdelghani, A.

    2011-10-01

    A gravimetric surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor, based on the biotin-streptavidin and antistreptavidin-streptavidin recognitions, has been carried out. A network analyser and a pulse excitation technique were used to monitor both amplitude and phase changes. The SAW biosensor presented a total selective recognition of streptavidin-antistreptavidin and HRPstreptavidin-antistreptavidin. The presence of HRP (Horseradish peroxidase) affects neither the selectivity nor the sensitivity (of order of 0.25°/nM) of the biosensor, nevertheless, it causes a reduction of binding kinetics by a factor ranging between 2 to 5, as well as a diminution of antistreptavidin saturation concentration (of 40%). Results showed that equilibrium constants can be different, depending on evaluation method (from saturation values or from linear part of the output signal variation according to solution concentration).

  10. Prostatic acid phosphatase by radioimmunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindholm, G.R.; Stirton, M.S.; Liedtke, R.J.; Batjer, J.D.

    1980-11-07

    Prostatic acid phosphatase values in 98 patients with prostatic carcinoma were measured by a commmercial radioimmunoassay (RIA) and by enzymatic assay. Forty-three carcinomas were staged by rigorous pathological criteria. Patients (N = 129) with benign prostatic hyperplasia were the control group. At 94% specificity, sensitivities of the RIA vs the enzymatic assay for clinically staged patients were as follows: stage A, 22% vs 6%; B, 29% vs 10%; C, 52% vs 38%; and D, 87% vs 80%. However, none of the seven patients with pathological stage A and B disease had a positive test result, and we suggest that variability in staging criteria accounts for the discrepant sensitivity claims reported. Prostatic acid phosphatase RIA should not be used for screening but as an adjunct for staging known prostatic carcinoma.

  11. Diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum infection in man: detection of parasite antigens by ELISA*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, L. J.; McGregor, I. A.; Paounova, N.; Lambert, P. H.

    1982-01-01

    An ELISA method has been developed for the diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum infection in man. Parasites from in vitro cultures of P. falciparum were used as source of antigen for the solid phase and the source of specific antibody was immune Gambian sera; binding of antibody in antigen-coated wells was registered by means of alkaline phosphatase-conjugated anti-human IgG. Parasites were detected on the basis of inhibition of antibody-binding. The test was applied to the detection of parasites in human red blood cells (RBC) from in vitro cultures of P. falciparum and in RBC from infected Gambians; RBC from 100 Geneva blood donors served as normal, uninfected controls. In titration experiments, the degree of antibody-binding inhibition correlated with the number of parasites in the test RBC. Parasites were detected at a level of 8 parasites/106 RBC. Samples of RBC were tested from 126 Gambians with microscopically proven infection; significant antibody-binding inhibition was found in 86% of these cases, where parasitaemia ranged from 10 to 125 000/μl of blood. The presence of high-titre antibody in the test preparations was found to reduce the sensitivity of parasite detection in infected RBC from in vitro cultures mixed with equal volumes of different antibody-containing sera. The sensitivity was restored in most cases by recovering the RBC by centrifugation before testing. In a preliminary experiment, there was no significant difference in antibody-binding inhibition using fresh infected RBC and RBC dried on filter-paper and recovered by elution, although there was greater variation in the latter samples. PMID:7044589

  12. Diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum infection in man: detection of parasite antigens by ELISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, L J; McGregor, I A; Paounova, N; Lambert, P H

    1982-01-01

    An ELISA method has been developed for the diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum infection in man. Parasites from in vitro cultures of P. falciparum were used as source of antigen for the solid phase and the source of specific antibody was immune Gambian sera; binding of antibody in antigen-coated wells was registered by means of alkaline phosphatase-conjugated anti-human IgG. Parasites were detected on the basis of inhibition of antibody-binding. The test was applied to the detection of parasites in human red blood cells (RBC) from in vitro cultures of P. falciparum and in RBC from infected Gambians; RBC from 100 Geneva blood donors served as normal, uninfected controls. In titration experiments, the degree of antibody-binding inhibition correlated with the number of parasites in the test RBC. Parasites were detected at a level of 8 parasites/10(6) RBC. Samples of RBC were tested from 126 Gambians with microscopically proven infection; significant antibody-binding inhibition was found in 86% of these cases, where parasitaemia ranged from 10 to 125 000/mul of blood. The presence of high-titre antibody in the test preparations was found to reduce the sensitivity of parasite detection in infected RBC from in vitro cultures mixed with equal volumes of different antibody-containing sera. The sensitivity was restored in most cases by recovering the RBC by centrifugation before testing. In a preliminary experiment, there was no significant difference in antibody-binding inhibition using fresh infected RBC and RBC dried on filter-paper and recovered by elution, although there was greater variation in the latter samples.

  13. Small molecule inhibitor of antigen binding and presentation by HLA-DR2b as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Niannian; Somanaboeina, Animesh; Dixit, Aakanksha; Kawamura, Kazuyuki; Hayward, Neil J; Self, Christopher; Olson, Gary L; Forsthuber, Thomas G

    2013-11-15

    The strong association of HLA-DR2b (DRB1*1501) with multiple sclerosis (MS) suggests this molecule as prime target for specific immunotherapy. Inhibition of HLA-DR2b-restricted myelin-specific T cells has the potential to selectively prevent CNS pathology mediated by these MHC molecules without undesired global immunosuppression. In this study, we report development of a highly selective small molecule inhibitor of peptide binding and presentation by HLA-DR2b. PV-267, the candidate molecule used in these studies, inhibited cytokine production and proliferation of myelin-specific HLA-DR2b-restricted T cells. PV-267 had no significant effect on T cell responses mediated by other MHC class II molecules, including HLA-DR1, -DR4, or -DR9. Importantly, PV-267 did not induce nonspecific immune activation of human PBMC. Lastly, PV-267 showed treatment efficacy both in preventing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and in treating established disease. The results suggest that blocking the MS-associated HLA-DR2b allele with small molecule inhibitors may be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of MS.

  14. SF20/IL-25, a novel bone marrow stroma-derived growth factor that binds to mouse thymic shared antigen-1 and supports lymphoid cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulin, E E; Onoda, N; Nakata, Y; Maeda, M; Hasegawa, M; Nomura, H; Kitamura, T

    2001-12-01

    Using a forward genetic approach and phenotype-based complementation screening to search for factors that stimulate cell proliferation, we have isolated a novel secreted bone marrow stroma-derived growth factor, which we termed SF20/IL-25. This protein signals cells to proliferate via its receptor, which we have identified as mouse thymic shared Ag-1 (TSA-1). Enforced expression of TSA-1 in IL-3-dependent Ba/F3 cells that do not express endogenous TSA-1 rendered cells to proliferate in a dose-dependent manner when stimulated with SF20/IL-25. FDCP2, a factor-dependent hemopoietic cell line that expresses endogenous TSA-1, could also be stimulated to proliferate with SF20/IL-25. Binding of SF20 to TSA-1 was blocked by anti-TSA-1 Ab and SF20-induced proliferation of TSA-1-expressing cells was inhibited by anti-TSA-1. In vitro assay revealed that SF20/IL-25 has no detectable myelopoietic activity but supports proliferation of cells in the lymphoid lineage.

  15. Competitive binding inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that uses the secreted aspartyl proteinase of Candida albicans as an antigenic marker for diagnosis of disseminated candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Christine J; Hurst, Steven F; Reiss, Errol

    2003-09-01

    The secreted aspartyl proteinases (Saps) of Candida albicans have been implicated as virulence factors associated with adherence and tissue invasion. The potential use of proteinases as markers of invasive candidiasis led us to develop a competitive binding inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect Sap in clinical specimens. Daily serum and urine specimens were collected from rabbits that had been immunosuppressed with cyclophosphamide and cortisone acetate and infected intravenously with 10(7) C. albicans blastoconidia. Disseminated infection was confirmed by organ culture and histopathology. Although ELISA inhibition was observed when serum specimens from these rabbits were used, more significant inhibition, which correlated with disease progression, occurred when urine specimens were used. Urine collected as early as 1 day after infection resulted in significant ELISA inhibition (mean inhibition +/- standard error [SE] compared with preinfection control urine, 15.7% +/- 2.7% [P ELISA results. Dissemination to the kidney and spleen occurred in one rabbit challenged by intragastric inoculation, and urine from this rabbit demonstrated significant inhibition in the ELISA (mean inhibition +/- SE by day 3 after infection, 32.9% +/- 2.7% [P test sensitivity was 83%, the specificity was 92%, the positive predictive value was 84%, the negative predictive value was 91%, and the efficiency was 89% (166 urine samples from 33 rabbits tested). The specificity, positive predictive value, and efficiency could be increased to 97, 95, and 92%, respectively, if at least two positive test results were required for a true positive designation. The ELISA was sensitive and specific for the detection of Sap in urine specimens from rabbits with disseminated C. albicans infection, discriminated between colonization and invasive disease, reflected disease progression and severity, and has the potential to be a noninvasive means to diagnose disseminated candidiasis.

  16. Secretory component delays the conversion of secretory IgA into antigen-binding competent F(ab')2: a possible implication for mucosal defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crottet, P; Corthésy, B

    1998-11-15

    Secretory component (SC) represents the soluble ectodomain of the polymeric Ig receptor, a membrane protein that transports mucosal Abs across epithelial cells. In the protease-rich environment of the intestine, SC is thought to stabilize the associated IgA by unestablished molecular mechanisms. To address this question, we reconstituted SC-IgA complexes in vitro by incubating dimeric IgA (IgAd) with either recombinant human SC (rSC) or SC isolated from human colostral milk (SCm). Both complexes exhibited an identical degree of covalency when exposed to redox agents, peptidyl disulfide isomerase, and temperature changes. In cross-competition experiments, 50% inhibition of binding to IgAd was achieved at approximately 10 nM SC competitor. Western blot analysis of IgAd digested with intestinal washes indicated that the alpha-chain in IgAd was primarily split into a 40-kDa species, a phenomenon delayed in rSC- or SCm-IgAd complexes. In the same assay, either of the SCs was resistant to degradation only if complexed with IgAd. In contrast, the kappa light chain was not digested at all, suggesting that the F(ab')2 region was left intact. Accordingly, IgAd and SC-IgAd digestion products retained functionality as indicated by Ag reactivity in ELISA. Size exclusion chromatography under native conditions of digested IgAd and rSC-IgAd demonstrates that SC exerts its protective role in secretory IgA by delaying cleavage in the hinge/Fc region of the alpha-chain, not by holding together degraded fragments. The function of integral secretory IgA and F(ab')2 is discussed in terms of mucosal immune defenses.

  17. 乙型肝炎病毒表面抗原特异性结合肽的筛选与鉴定%Screening and identification of HBV surface antigen specific binding peptide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙鸣; 马智勇; 黄朝阳; 胡斌; 沈关心

    2014-01-01

    Objective To select and identify the peptide that specifically binds with HBV surface antigen (HB-sAg) .Methods HBsAg dereved from yeast was coated on milipore plate ,phage was added to screen peptide ran-domly .After four rounds of screening ,15 phage clones were selected randomly ,the phage DNA were extracted and sequenced .And their affinities were identified by the sandwich ELISA ,the specificity was identified by the does de-pendent binding test and competitive inhibition test .Results After four rounds screening ,a predominant phage clone No .3 was obtained which could comparatively strong bind with HBsAg ,and this clone displayed a peptide sequence of SSYAPYVWQPIA .HBsAg dose dependent binding test and competitive inhibition test showed that No .3 binding with HBsAg was specific .Conclusion Peptides specifically binding to HBsAg could be obtained through the screen-ing of phage display peptide library .These peptides may be used in target gene therapy of hepatitis B .It will provide experiment foundation of target gene therapy of HBV infection .%目的:筛选并鉴定与乙型肝炎病毒表面抗原(HBsAg )特异性结合的多肽。方法将酵母表达的HBsAg包被在微孔板上,加入噬菌体进行随机肽库筛选,经过4轮筛选后,随机挑取15个克隆进行DNA测序,并通过夹心ELISA方法鉴定其亲和力,采用剂量依赖结合实验和竞争抑制实验检测其与 HBsAg结合的特异性。结果经过4轮筛选,得到一优势克隆No .3,展示肽段为SSYAPYVWQPIA ,与 HBsAg有较强的亲和力,剂量依赖结合实验和竞争抑制实验证明克隆No .3与HBsAg的结合是特异性的。结论利用噬菌体展示肽库技术可以获得HBsAg特异性结合肽,此多肽可以作为靶向分子用于乙型肝炎的基因治疗,为乙型肝炎的靶向基因治疗奠定实验基础。

  18. [Protein phosphatases: structure and function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanova, E G; Budagian, V M

    1994-01-01

    The process of protein and enzyme systems phosphorylation is necessary for cell growth, differentiation and preparation for division and mitosis. The conformation changes of protein as a result of phosphorylation lead to increased enzyme activity and enhanced affinity to substrates. A large group of enzymes--protein kinases--is responsible for phosphorylation process in cell, which are divided into tyrosine- and serine-threonine-kinases depending on their ability to phosphorylate appropriate amino acid residues. In this review has been considered the functional importance and structure of protein phosphatases--enzymes, which are functional antagonists of protein kinases.

  19. Combination of alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase (APAAP)- and avidin-biotin-alkaline phosphatase complex (ABAP)-techniques for amplification of immunocytochemical staining of human testicular tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidoff, M S; Schulze, W; Holstein, A F

    1991-01-01

    An amplification procedure was developed for the visualization of antigens in human testis using monoclonal antibodies against desmin and vimentin. The technique combines the high sensitive and specific APAAP- and ABAP-methods. Depending on the quality of the antibodies used and the processing of the material prior to the immunocytochemical staining the amplification technique may be applied either as a single APAAP and ABAP- or as a double APAAP and ABAP-combination. Especially after the double amplification reaction a distinct increase of the staining intensity of the vimentin- (in Sertoli cells, myofibroblasts of the lamina propria, and fibroblasts of the interstitium) and desmin- (in myofibroblasts of the lamina propria and smooth muscle cells of the blood vessels) like immunoreactivity was observed. If different diazonium salts were used for the visualization of the alkaline phosphatase activity (e.g. Fast Red TR Salt, Fast Blue BB Salt) desmin- and vimentin-like immunoreactivity can be demonstrated in the same tissue section in a double sequential staining approach. For double staining, the alkaline phosphatase technique may be combined successfully with a technique or a combination that uses peroxidase as a marker.

  20. Displacement affinity chromatography of protein phosphatase one (PP1 complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gourlay Robert

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein phosphatase one (PP1 is a ubiquitously expressed, highly conserved protein phosphatase that dephosphorylates target protein serine and threonine residues. PP1 is localized to its site of action by interacting with targeting or regulatory proteins, a majority of which contains a primary docking site referred to as the RVXF/W motif. Results We demonstrate that a peptide based on the RVXF/W motif can effectively displace PP1 bound proteins from PP1 retained on the phosphatase affinity matrix microcystin-Sepharose. Subsequent co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed that each identified binding protein was either a direct PP1 interactor or was in a complex that contains PP1. Our results have linked PP1 to numerous new nuclear functions and proteins, including Ki-67, Rif-1, topoisomerase IIα, several nuclear helicases, NUP153 and the TRRAP complex. Conclusion This modification of the microcystin-Sepharose technique offers an effective means of purifying novel PP1 regulatory subunits and associated proteins and provides a simple method to uncover a link between PP1 and additional cellular processes.

  1. Characterization of binding capability of human breast milk to hepatitis B surface antigen%母乳与乙型肝炎表面抗原的结合特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘景丽; 冯静; 林晓倩; 胡娅莉; 周乙华

    2016-01-01

    目的 探讨母乳能否与乙型肝炎表面抗原(hepatitis B surface antigen,HBsAg)结合以及结合特性. 方法 采集5例HBsAg和乙型肝炎表面抗体(hepatitis B surface antibody,抗HBs)均阴性产妇产后1~2个月的母乳.分别用母乳全乳、乳脂和乳蛋白与酵母表达的高纯度HBsAg孵育,以牛奶和羊奶作为对照,酶联免疫吸附(enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay,ELISA)法检测各成分与HBsAg的结合能力;化学发光微粒子免疫分析法检测各种乳汁对HBsAg与抗HBs结合的抑制率;温度敏感试验[包括煮沸1 min、巴氏消毒(65℃、30 min)及不加热处理]检测母乳中与HBsAg结合成分的热稳定性.采用单因素方差分析和SNK法进行统计学分析. 结果 本研究选择0.1 μg/ml的HBsAg为适当工作浓度进行试验.5例母乳均能明显与HBsAg结合(A450,1.306±0.300),而牛奶及羊奶与HBsAg的结合能力不明显(分别为2.157±0.150和2.232±0.093),差异有统计学意义(F=34.303,P<0.01).定量试验显示,母乳抑制HBsAg与抗HBs结合的抑制率为(74.26±17.26)%,高于PBS的(0.00±5.50)%,差异有统计学意义(F=57.806,P<0.01).乳脂、脱脂乳及全乳均能与HBsAg结合(A450,分别为0.877±0.486、0.513±0.069和0.376±0.146,F=44.475,P<0.01).经煮沸1 min或巴氏消毒处理后,母乳全乳与HBsAg的结合能力均无明显变化;而脱脂乳结合能力有所降低(F=16.598,P<0.01);母乳全乳和脱脂乳均能明显抑制HBsAg与抗-HBs的结合(F值分别为278.341和269.408,P值均<0.01). 结论 母乳具有与HBsAg结合的特性,其活性成分主要存在于乳蛋白,并具有热稳定性.母乳蛋白具有与HBV结合的能力.%Objective To investigate whether human breast milk may bind to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and its characteristics.Methods Breast milk samples from five women with negative HBsAg and hepatitis B surface antibody (anti-HBs) at one to two months post delivery were fractioned into cream and skimmed

  2. Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus nucleic acid binding proteins BRO-B and BRO-E associate with host T-cell intracellular antigen 1 homologue BmTRN-1 to influence protein synthesis during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, Eiji; Muto, Sayaka; Ijiri, Hiroshi; Mori, Hajime

    2015-07-01

    Previous reports have indicated that the Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) nucleic acid binding proteins BRO-B and BRO-E are expressed during the early stage of infection and that the BRO family likely supports the regulation of mRNA; however, no study has directly examined the function of BRO family proteins in virus-permissive cells. Here, we show that BRO-B and BRO-E associate with cellular T-cell intracellular antigen 1 homologue (BmTRN-1), a translational regulator, and other cellular translation-related proteins in silkworm cells during viral infection. We created BM-N cells that expressed BRO-B/E to study molecular interactions between BmTRN-1 and BRO-B/E and how they influenced protein synthesis. Fluorescent microscopy revealed that BmTRN-1 was localized in cytoplasmic foci during BmNPV infection. Immunofluorescence studies confirmed that BmTRN-1 and BRO-B/E were colocalized in the amorphous conspicuous cytoplasmic foci. Reporter gene studies revealed that co-expression of BRO-B/E synergistically led to a significant decrease in protein synthesis from a designed transcript carrying the 5'untranslated region of a cellular mRNA with no significant change of transcript abundance. Additionally, RNA interference-mediated knockdown of BmTRN-1 resulted in a marked inhibition of the ability of BRO-B/E to regulate the transcript. These results suggested that the association of BmTRN-1 with BRO-B/E is responsible for the inhibitory regulation of certain mRNAs at the post-transcriptional level and add an additional mechanism for how baculoviruses control protein synthesis during infection.

  3. Protein Phosphatase Methyl-Esterase PME-1 Protects Protein Phosphatase 2A from Ubiquitin/Proteasome Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabe, Ryotaro; Miura, Akane; Usui, Tatsuya; Mudrak, Ingrid; Ogris, Egon; Ohama, Takashi; Sato, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a conserved essential enzyme that is implicated as a tumor suppressor based on its central role in phosphorylation-dependent signaling pathways. Protein phosphatase methyl esterase (PME-1) catalyzes specifically the demethylation of the C-terminal Leu309 residue of PP2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac). It has been shown that PME-1 affects the activity of PP2A by demethylating PP2Ac, but also by directly binding to the phosphatase active site, suggesting loss of PME-1 in cells would enhance PP2A activity. However, here we show that PME-1 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) exhibit lower PP2A activity than wild type MEFs. Loss of PME-1 enhanced poly-ubiquitination of PP2Ac and shortened the half-life of PP2Ac protein resulting in reduced PP2Ac levels. Chemical inhibition of PME-1 and rescue experiments with wild type and mutated PME-1 revealed methyl-esterase activity was necessary to maintain PP2Ac protein levels. Our data demonstrate that PME-1 methyl-esterase activity protects PP2Ac from ubiquitin/proteasome degradation.

  4. Expression and Characterization of Recombinant Thermostable Alkaline Phosphatase from a Novel Thermophilic Bacterium Thermus thermophilus XM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianbo LI; Limei XU; Feng YANG

    2007-01-01

    A gene (tap) encoding a thermostable alkaline phosphatase from the thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus XM was cloned and sequenced. It is 1506 bp long and encodes a protein of 501 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 54.7 kDa. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with other alkaline phosphatases showed that the regions in the vicinity of the phosphorylation site and metal binding sites are highly conserved. The recombinant thermostable alkaline phosphatase was expressed as a His6-tagged fusion protein in Escherichia coli and its enzymatic properties were characterized after purification. The pH and temperature optima for the recombinant thermostable alkaline phosphatases activity were pH 12 and 75 ℃. As expected, the enzyme displayed high thermostability, retaining more than 50% activity after incubating for 6 h at 80 ℃. Its catalytic function was accelerated in the presence of 0.1 mM Co2+, Fe2+, Mg2+, or Mn2+ but was strongly inhibited by 2.0 mM Fe2+. Under optimal conditions, the Michaelis constant (Km) for cleavage of p-nitrophenyl-phosphate was 0.034 mM. Although it has much in common with other alkaline phosphatases, the recombinant thermostable alkaline phosphatase possesses some unique features, such as high optimal pH and good thermostability.

  5. Synthetic antigens reveal dynamics of BCR endocytosis during inhibitory signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Adam H; Bennett, Nitasha R; Zwick, Daniel B; Hudon, Jonathan; Kiessling, Laura L

    2014-01-17

    B cells detect foreign antigens through their B cell antigen receptor (BCR). The BCR, when engaged by antigen, initiates a signaling cascade. Concurrent with signaling is endocytosis of the BCR complex, which acts to downregulate signaling and facilitate uptake of antigen for processing and display on the cell surface. The relationship between signaling and BCR endocytosis is poorly defined. Here, we explore the interplay between BCR endocytosis and antigens that either promote or inhibit B cell activation. Specifically, synthetic antigens were generated that engage the BCR alone or both the BCR and the inhibitory co-receptor CD22. The lectin CD22, a member of the Siglec family, binds sialic acid-containing glycoconjugates found on host tissues, inhibiting BCR signaling to prevent erroneous B cell activation. At low concentrations, antigens that can cocluster the BCR and CD22 promote rapid BCR endocytosis; whereas, slower endocytosis occurs with antigens that bind only the BCR. At higher antigen concentrations, rapid BCR endocytosis occurs upon treatment with either stimulatory or inhibitory antigens. Endocytosis of the BCR, in response to synthetic antigens, results in its entry into early endocytic compartments. Although the CD22-binding antigens fail to activate key regulators of antigen presentation (e.g., Syk), they also promote BCR endocytosis, indicating that inhibitory antigens can be internalized. Together, our observations support a functional role for BCR endocytosis in downregulating BCR signaling. The reduction of cell surface BCR levels in the absence of B cell activation should raise the threshold for BCR subsequent activation. The ability of the activating synthetic antigens to trigger both signaling and entry of the BCR into early endosomes suggests strategies for targeted antigen delivery.

  6. Potent inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatases by copper complexes with multi-benzimidazole derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Lu, Liping; Zhu, Miaoli; Wang, Qingming; Yuan, Caixia; Xing, Shu; Fu, Xueqi; Mei, Yuhua

    2011-12-01

    A series of copper complexes with multi-benzimidazole derivatives, including mono- and di-nuclear, were synthesized and characterized by Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, elemental analysis, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The speciation of Cu/NTB in aqueous solution was investigated by potentiometric pH titrations. Their inhibitory effects against human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP), megakaryocyte protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (PTP-MEG2), srchomology phosphatase 1 (SHP-1) and srchomology phosphatase 2 (SHP-2) were evaluated in vitro. The five copper complexes exhibit potent inhibition against PTP1B, TCPTP and PTP-MEG2 with almost same inhibitory effects with IC(50) at submicro molar level and about tenfold weaker inhibition versus SHP-1, but almost no inhibition against SHP-2. Kinetic analysis indicates that they are reversible competitive inhibitors of PTP1B. Fluorescence study on the interaction between PTP1B and complex 2 or 4 suggests that the complexes bind to PTP1B with the formation of a 1:1 complex. The binding constant are about 1.14 × 10(6) and 1.87 × 10(6) M(-1) at 310 K for 2 and 4, respectively.

  7. SHP-1 phosphatase activity counteracts increased T cell receptor affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebeisen, Michael; Baitsch, Lukas; Presotto, Danilo; Baumgaertner, Petra; Romero, Pedro; Michielin, Olivier; Speiser, Daniel E; Rufer, Nathalie

    2013-03-01

    Anti-self/tumor T cell function can be improved by increasing TCR-peptide MHC (pMHC) affinity within physiological limits, but paradoxically further increases (K(d) affinity for the tumor antigen HLA-A2/NY-ESO-1, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying this high-affinity-associated loss of function. As compared with cells expressing TCR affinities generating optimal function (K(d) = 5 to 1 μM), those with supraphysiological affinity (K(d) = 1 μM to 15 nM) showed impaired gene expression, signaling, and surface expression of activatory/costimulatory receptors. Preferential expression of the inhibitory receptor programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) was limited to T cells with the highest TCR affinity, correlating with full functional recovery upon PD-1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) blockade. In contrast, upregulation of the Src homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 (SHP-1/PTPN6) was broad, with gradually enhanced expression in CD8(+) T cells with increasing TCR affinities. Consequently, pharmacological inhibition of SHP-1 with sodium stibogluconate augmented the function of all engineered T cells, and this correlated with the TCR affinity-dependent levels of SHP-1. These data highlight an unexpected and global role of SHP-1 in regulating CD8(+) T cell activation and responsiveness and support the development of therapies inhibiting protein tyrosine phosphatases to enhance T cell-mediated immunity.

  8. Protein-Protein Interactions in Crystals of the Human Receptor-Type Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase ICA512 Ectodomain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primo M. E.; Jakoncic J.; Noguera M.E.; Risso V.A.; Sosa L.; Sica M.P.; Solimena M.; Poskus E. and Ermacora M.

    2011-09-15

    ICA512 (or IA-2) is a transmembrane protein-tyrosine phosphatase located in secretory granules of neuroendocrine cells. Initially, it was identified as one of the main antigens of autoimmune diabetes. Later, it was found that during insulin secretion, the cytoplasmic domain of ICA512 is cleaved and relocated to the nucleus, where it stimulates the transcription of the insulin gene. The role of the other parts of the receptor in insulin secretion is yet to be unveiled. The structures of the intracellular pseudocatalytic and mature extracellular domains are known, but the transmembrane domain and several intracellular and extracellular parts of the receptor are poorly characterized. Moreover the overall structure of the receptor remains to be established. We started to address this issue studying by X-ray crystallography the structure of the mature ectodomain of ICA512 (ME ICA512) and variants thereof. The variants and crystallization conditions were chosen with the purpose of exploring putative association interfaces, metal binding sites and all other structural details that might help, in subsequent works, to build a model of the entire receptor. Several structural features were clarified and three main different association modes of ME ICA512 were identified. The results provide essential pieces of information for the design of new experiments aimed to assess the structure in vivo.

  9. Protein-protein interactions in crystals of the human receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase ICA512 ectodomain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María E Primo

    Full Text Available ICA512 (or IA-2 is a transmembrane protein-tyrosine phosphatase located in secretory granules of neuroendocrine cells. Initially, it was identified as one of the main antigens of autoimmune diabetes. Later, it was found that during insulin secretion, the cytoplasmic domain of ICA512 is cleaved and relocated to the nucleus, where it stimulates the transcription of the insulin gene. The role of the other parts of the receptor in insulin secretion is yet to be unveiled. The structures of the intracellular pseudocatalytic and mature extracellular domains are known, but the transmembrane domain and several intracellular and extracellular parts of the receptor are poorly characterized. Moreover the overall structure of the receptor remains to be established. We started to address this issue studying by X-ray crystallography the structure of the mature ectodomain of ICA512 (ME ICA512 and variants thereof. The variants and crystallization conditions were chosen with the purpose of exploring putative association interfaces, metal binding sites and all other structural details that might help, in subsequent works, to build a model of the entire receptor. Several structural features were clarified and three main different association modes of ME ICA512 were identified. The results provide essential pieces of information for the design of new experiments aimed to assess the structure in vivo.

  10. PEST family phosphatases in immunity, autoimmunity, and autoinflammatory disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veillette, André; Rhee, Inmoo; Souza, Cleiton Martins; Davidson, Dominique

    2009-03-01

    The proline-, glutamic acid-, serine- and threonine-rich (PEST) family of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) includes proline-enriched phosphatase (PEP)/lymphoid tyrosine phosphatase (LYP), PTP-PEST, and PTP-hematopoietic stem cell fraction (HSCF). PEP/LYP is a potent inhibitor of T-cell activation, principally by suppressing the activity of Src family protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs). This function seems to be dependent, at least in part, on the ability of PEP to bind C-terminal Src kinase (Csk), a PTK also involved in inactivating Src kinases. Interestingly, a polymorphism of LYP in humans (R620W) is a significant risk factor for autoimmune diseases including type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and lupus. The R620W mutation may be a 'gain-of-function' mutation. In non-hematopoietic cells, PTP-PEST is a critical regulator of adhesion and migration. This effect correlates with the aptitude of PTP-PEST to dephosphorylate cytoskeletal proteins such as Cas, focal adhesion associated-kinase (FAK), Pyk2, and PSTPIP. While not established, a similar function may also exist in immune cells. Additionally, overexpression studies provided an indication that PTP-PEST may be a negative regulator of lymphocyte activation. Interestingly, mutations in a PTP-PEST- and PTP-HSCF-interacting protein, PSTPIP1, were identified in humans with pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne (PAPA) syndrome and familial recurrent arthritis, two autoinflammatory diseases. These mutations abrogate the ability of PSTPIP1 to bind PTP-PEST and PTP-HSCF, suggesting that these two PTPs may be negative regulators of inflammation.

  11. Protein phosphatase 1 suppresses androgen receptor ubiquitylation and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaming; Han, Weiwei; Gulla, Sarah; Simon, Nicholas I; Gao, Yanfei; Cai, Changmeng; Yang, Hongmei; Zhang, Xiaoping; Liu, Jihong; Balk, Steven P; Chen, Shaoyong

    2016-01-12

    The phosphoprotein phosphatases are emerging as important androgen receptor (AR) regulators in prostate cancer (PCa). We reported previously that the protein phosphatase 1 catalytic subunit (PP1α) can enhance AR activity by dephosphorylating a site in the AR hinge region (Ser650) and thereby decrease AR nuclear export. In this study we show that PP1α increases the expression of wildtype as well as an S650A mutant AR, indicating that it is acting through one or more additional mechanisms. We next show that PP1α binds primarily to the AR ligand binding domain and decreases its ubiquitylation and degradation. Moreover, we find that the PP1α inhibitor tautomycin increases phosphorylation of AR ubiquitin ligases including SKP2 and MDM2 at sites that enhance their activity, providing a mechanism by which PP1α may suppress AR degradation. Significantly, the tautomycin mediated decrease in AR expression was most pronounced at low androgen levels or in the presence of the AR antagonist enzalutamide. Consistent with this finding, the sensitivity of LNCaP and C4-2 PCa cells to tautomycin, as assessed by PSA synthesis and proliferation, was enhanced at low androgen levels or by treatment with enzalutamide. Together these results indicate that PP1α may contribute to stabilizing AR protein after androgen deprivation therapies, and that targeting PP1α or the AR-PP1α interaction may be effective in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).

  12. Molecular field analysis (MFA) and other QSAR techniques in development of phosphatase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Pramod C

    2011-01-01

    Phosphatases are well known drug targets for diseases such as diabetes, obesity and other autoimmune diseases. Their role in cancer is due to unusual expression patterns in different types of cancer. However, there is strong evidence for selective targeting of phosphatases in cancer therapy. Several experimental and in silico techniques have been attempted for design of phosphatase inhibitors, with focus on diseases such as diabetes, inflammation and obesity. Their utility for cancer therapy is limited and needs to be explored vastly. Quantitative Structure Activity relationship (QSAR) is well established in silico ligand based drug design technique, used by medicinal chemists for prediction of ligand binding affinity and lead design. These techniques have shown promise for subsequent optimization of already existing lead compounds, with an aim of increased potency and pharmacological properties for a particular drug target. Furthermore, their utility in virtual screening and scaffold hopping is highlighted in recent years. This review focuses on the recent molecular field analysis (MFA) and QSAR techniques, directed for design and development of phosphatase inhibitors and their potential use in cancer therapy. In addition, this review also addresses issues concerning the binding orientation and binding conformation of ligands for alignment sensitive QSAR approaches.

  13. Classification of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) supertypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Mingjun; Claesson, Mogens H

    2014-01-01

    Identification of new antigenic peptides, derived from infectious agents or cancer cells, which bind to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II molecules, is of importance for the development of new effective vaccines capable of activating the cellular arm of the immune response. However...... this complexity is to group thousands of different HLA molecules into several so-called HLA supertypes: a classification that refers to a group of HLA alleles with largely overlapping peptide binding specificities. In this chapter, we focus on the state-of-the-art classification of HLA supertypes including HLA...

  14. Targeting the active site of the placental isozyme of alkaline phosphatase by phage-displayed scFv antibodies selected by a specific uncompetitive inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kala Mrinalini

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The isozymes of alkaline phosphatase, the tissue non-specific, intestinal and placental, have similar properties and a high degree of identity. The placental isozyme (PLAP is an oncofetal antigen expressed in several malignancies including choriocarcinoma, seminoma and ovarian carcinoma. We had earlier attempted to isolate PLAP-specific scFv from a synthetic human immunoglobulin library but were unable to do so, presumably because of the similarity between the isozymes. In this work, we have employed a PLAP-specific uncompetitive inhibitor, L-Phe-Gly-Gly, to select isozyme specific scFvs. An uncompetitive inhibitor binds to the enzyme in the presence of substrate and stabilizes the enzyme-substrate complex. Several uncompetitive inhibitors have varying degrees of isozyme specificity for human alkaline phosphatase isozymes. A specific uncompetitive inhibitor would be able to unmask conformational differences between the otherwise very similar molecules. Also, such inhibitors would be directed to regions at/close to the active site of the enzyme. In this work, the library was first incubated with PLAP and the bound clones then eluted by incubation with L-Phe-Gly-Gly along with the substrate, para-nitro phenyl phosphate (pNPP. The scFvs were then studied with regard to the biochemical modulation of their binding, isozyme specificity and effect on enzyme activity. Results Of 13 clones studied initially, the binding of 9 was inhibited by L-Phe-Gly-Gly (with pNPP and 2 clones were inhibited by pNPP alone. Two clones had absolute and 2 clones had partial specificity to PLAP. Two clones were cross-reactive with only one other isozyme. Three scFv clones, having an accessible His6-tag, were purified and studied for their modulation of enzyme activity. All the three scFvs inhibited PLAP activity with the kinetics of competitive inhibition. Cell ELISA could demonstrate binding of the specific scFvs to the cell surface expressed PLAP

  15. Structural basis of serine/threonine phosphatase inhibition by the archetypal small molecules cantharidin and norcantharidin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertini, I; Calderone, V; Fragai, M; Luchinat, C; Talluri, E

    2009-08-13

    The inhibition of a subgroup of human serine/threonine protein phosphatases is responsible for the cytotoxicity of cantharidin and norcantharidin against tumor cells. It is shown that the anhydride rings of cantharidin and norcantharidin are hydrolyzed when bound to the catalytic domain of the human serine/threonine protein phosphatases 5 (PP5c), and the high-resolution crystal structures of PP5c complexed with the corresponding dicarboxylic acid derivatives of the two molecules are reported. Norcantharidin shows a unique binding conformation with the catalytically active Mn2PP5c, while cantharidin is characterized by a double conformation in its binding mode to the protein. Different binding modes of norcantharidin are observed depending of whether the starting ligand is in the anhydride or in the dicarboxylic acid form. All these structures will provide the basis for the rational design of new cantharidin-based drugs.

  16. Association of alkaline phosphatase phenotypes with arthritides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmini A

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Arthritides, a symmetrical polyarticular disease of the bone are a heterogenous group of disorders in which hereditary and environmental factors in combination with an altered immune response appear to play a causative and pathogenic role in its occurrence. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP is an enzyme found in all tissues, with particularly high concentrations of ALP observed in the liver, bile ducts, placenta, and bone.Alkaline phosphatase is an orthophosphoric monoester phosphohydrolase catalyzing the hydrolysis of organic esters at alkaline pH, indicating that alkaline phosphatase is involved in fundamental biological processes.1 The present study envisages on identifying the specific electromorphic association of alkaline phosphatase with arthritides. Phenotyping of serum samples was carried out by PAGE (Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis following Davies (19642 protocol on 41 juvenile arthritis, 150 rheumatoid arthritis and 100 osteo arthritis apart from, 25 normal children and 100 adult healthy subjects. Phenotyping of alkaline phosphatase revealed an increase in preponderance of p+ and p++ phenotypes in juvenile, rheumatoid and osteo arthritic patients. However a significant association of these phenotypes was observed only with rheumatoid arthritis condition (c2:17.46. Similarly, a significant increase of p+ phenotypes in female rheumatoid arthritis patients was observed (c2:14.973, suggesting that the decrease in p° (tissue non specific synthesis/secretion of alkaline phosphatase could be associated with decreased mineralization and ossification process in arthritis condition.

  17. Chlamydia trachomatis antigen in female genital tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badrinath S

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty cases of female genital tract infection were investigated for the presence of Chlamydia trachomatis antigen. Endocervical swabs obtained were subjected to antigen detection by enzyme immunoassay. Rabbit antiserum to chlamydial lipopolysaccharide was used in a card test. Anti rabbit immunoglobulin G conjugated to alkaline phosphatase with a chromogenic substrate 5 bromo-4 chloro-3-indolyl phosphate and nitro blue tetrazolium were used for the enzymatic reaction. Chlamydial antigen could be detected in four out of thirty samples (13.3%. In contrast direct immunofluorescence detected 5 cases (16.6%. Although less sensitive, enzyme immunoassay can be used as a rapid diagnostic tool in detecting Chlamydia trachomatis antigen in genital infections.

  18. Allosteric Activation of the Phosphoinositide Phosphatase Sac1 by Anionic Phospholipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Sac family phosphoinositide phosphatases comprise an evolutionarily conserved family of enzymes in eukaryotes. Our recently determined crystal structure of the Sac phosphatase domain of yeast Sac1, the founding member of the Sac family proteins, revealed a unique conformation of the catalytic P-loop and a large positively charged groove at the catalytic site. We now report a unique mechanism for the regulation of its phosphatase activity. Sac1 is an allosteric enzyme that can be activated by its product phosphatidylinositol or anionic phospholipid phosphatidylserine. The activation of Sac1 may involve conformational changes of the catalytic P-loop induced by direct binding with the regulatory anionic phospholipids in the large cationic catalytic groove. These findings highlight the fact that lipid composition of the substrate membrane plays an important role in the control of Sac1 function. PMID:22452743

  19. Complex Antigens Drive Permissive Clonal Selection in Germinal Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuraoka, Masayuki; Schmidt, Aaron G; Nojima, Takuya; Feng, Feng; Watanabe, Akiko; Kitamura, Daisuke; Harrison, Stephen C; Kepler, Thomas B; Kelsoe, Garnett

    2016-03-15

    Germinal center (GC) B cells evolve toward increased affinity by a Darwinian process that has been studied primarily in genetically restricted, hapten-specific responses. We explored the population dynamics of genetically diverse GC responses to two complex antigens-Bacillus anthracis protective antigen and influenza hemagglutinin-in which B cells competed both intra- and interclonally for distinct epitopes. Preferred VH rearrangements among antigen-binding, naive B cells were similarly abundant in early GCs but, unlike responses to haptens, clonal diversity increased in GC B cells as early "winners" were replaced by rarer, high-affinity clones. Despite affinity maturation, inter- and intraclonal avidities varied greatly, and half of GC B cells did not bind the immunogen but nonetheless exhibited biased VH use, V(D)J mutation, and clonal expansion comparable to antigen-binding cells. GC reactions to complex antigens permit a range of specificities and affinities, with potential advantages for broad protection.

  20. Prophylactic treatment with alkaline phosphatase in cardiac surgery induces endogenous alkaline phosphatase release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kats, Suzanne; Brands, Ruud; Hamad, Mohamed A. Soliman; Seinen, Willem; Schamhorst, Volkher; Wulkan, Raymond W.; Schoenberger, Jacques P.; van Oeveren, Wim

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Laboratory and clinical data have implicated endotoxin as an important factor in the inflammatory response to cardiopulmonary bypass. We assessed the effects of the administration of bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase (bIAP), an endotoxin detoxifier, on alkaline phosphatase levels

  1. Recognition of nucleoside monophosphate substrates by Haemophilus influenzae class C acid phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harkewal; Schuermann, Jonathan P; Reilly, Thomas J; Calcutt, Michael J; Tanner, John J

    2010-12-10

    The e (P4) phosphatase from Haemophilus influenzae functions in a vestigial NAD(+) utilization pathway by dephosphorylating nicotinamide mononucleotide to nicotinamide riboside. P4 is also the prototype of class C acid phosphatases (CCAPs), which are nonspecific 5',3'-nucleotidases localized to the bacterial outer membrane. To understand substrate recognition by P4 and other class C phosphatases, we have determined the crystal structures of a substrate-trapping mutant P4 enzyme complexed with nicotinamide mononucleotide, 5'-AMP, 3'-AMP, and 2'-AMP. The structures reveal an anchor-shaped substrate-binding cavity comprising a conserved hydrophobic box that clamps the nucleotide base, a buried phosphoryl binding site, and three solvent-filled pockets that contact the ribose and the hydrogen-bonding edge of the base. The span between the hydrophobic box and the phosphoryl site is optimal for recognizing nucleoside monophosphates, explaining the general preference for this class of substrate. The base makes no hydrogen bonds with the enzyme, consistent with an observed lack of base specificity. Two solvent-filled pockets flanking the ribose are key to the dual recognition of 5'-nucleotides and 3'-nucleotides. These pockets minimize the enzyme's direct interactions with the ribose and provide sufficient space to accommodate 5' substrates in an anti conformation and 3' substrates in a syn conformation. Finally, the structures suggest that class B acid phosphatases and CCAPs share a common strategy for nucleotide recognition.

  2. Human Prostatic Acid Phosphatase: Structure, Function and Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G. Chaney

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Human prostatic acid phosphatase (PAcP is a 100 kDa glycoprotein composed of two subunits. Recent advances demonstrate that cellular PAcP (cPAcP functions as a protein tyrosine phosphatase by dephosphorylating ErbB-2/Neu/HER-2 at the phosphotyrosine residues in prostate cancer (PCa cells, which results in reduced tumorigenicity. Further, the interaction of cPAcP and ErbB-2 regulates androgen sensitivity of PCa cells. Knockdown of cPAcP expression allows androgen-sensitive PCa cells to develop the castration-resistant phenotype, where cells proliferate under an androgen-reduced condition. Thus, cPAcP has a significant influence on PCa cell growth. Interestingly, promoter analysis suggests that PAcP expression can be regulated by NF-κB, via a novel binding sequence in an androgen-independent manner. Further understanding of PAcP function and regulation of expression will have a significant impact on understanding PCa progression and therapy.

  3. Conservation of Meningococcal Antigens in the Genus Neisseria

    OpenAIRE

    Muzzi, Alessandro; Mora, Marirosa; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino; Donati, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neisseria meningitidis, one of the major causes of bacterial meningitis and sepsis, is a member of the genus Neisseria, which includes species that colonize the mucosae of many animals. Three meningococcal proteins, factor H-binding protein (fHbp), neisserial heparin-binding antigen (NHBA), and N. meningitidis adhesin A (NadA), have been described as antigens protective against N. meningitidis of serogroup B, and they have been employed as vaccine components in preclinical and clinic...

  4. A bacterial tyrosine phosphatase inhibits plant pattern recognition receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho, Alberto P; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Brutus, Alexandre; Segonzac, Cécile; Roy, Sonali; Kadota, Yasuhiro; Oh, Man-Ho; Sklenar, Jan; Derbyshire, Paul; Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Malinovsky, Frederikke Gro; Monaghan, Jacqueline; Menke, Frank L; Huber, Steven C; He, Sheng Yang; Zipfel, Cyril

    2014-03-28

    Innate immunity relies on the perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) located on the host cell's surface. Many plant PRRs are kinases. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis receptor kinase EF-TU RECEPTOR (EFR), which perceives the elf18 peptide derived from bacterial elongation factor Tu, is activated upon ligand binding by phosphorylation on its tyrosine residues. Phosphorylation of a single tyrosine residue, Y836, is required for activation of EFR and downstream immunity to the phytopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae. A tyrosine phosphatase, HopAO1, secreted by P. syringae, reduces EFR phosphorylation and prevents subsequent immune responses. Thus, host and pathogen compete to take control of PRR tyrosine phosphorylation used to initiate antibacterial immunity.

  5. Protein-tyrosine phosphatases in zebrafish gastrulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eekelen, M.J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation plays a key role in relaying external stimuli and signals into the cell towards the appropriate responses. This process is mediated by protein-tyrosine kinases adding a phosphor group to a tyrosine residue and protein-tyrosine phosphatases removing a phosphor group f

  6. Enzyme kinetic characterization of protein tyrosine phosphatases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Branner, S.; Møller, K. B.

    2003-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) play a central role in cellular signaling processes, resulting in an increased interest in modulating the activities of PTPs. We therefore decided to undertake a detailed enzyme kinetic evaluation of various transmembrane and cytosolic PTPs (PTPalpha, PTPbeta...

  7. Structural basis of the inhibition of class C acid phosphatases by adenosine 5;#8242;-phosphorothioate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Harkewal; Reilly, Thomas J.; Tanner, John J. (UMC)

    2012-01-20

    The inhibition of phosphatases by adenosine 5'-phosphorothioate (AMPS) was first reported in the late 1960s; however, the structural basis for the inhibition has remained unknown. Here, it is shown that AMPS is a submicromolar inhibitor of class C acid phosphatases, a group of bacterial outer membrane enzymes belonging to the haloacid dehalogenase structural superfamily. Furthermore, the 1.35-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the inhibited recombinant Haemophilus influenzae class C acid phosphatase was determined; this is the first structure of a phosphatase complexed with AMPS. The conformation of AMPS is identical to that of the substrate 5'-AMP, except that steric factors force a rotation of the thiophosphoryl out of the normal phosphoryl-binding pocket. This conformation is catalytically nonproductive, because the P atom is not positioned optimally for nucleophilic attack by Asp64, and the O atom of the scissile O-P bond is too far from the Asp (Asp66) that protonates the leaving group. The structure of 5'-AMP complexed with the Asp64 {yields} Asn mutant enzyme was also determined at 1.35-{angstrom} resolution. This mutation induces the substrate to adopt the same nonproductive binding mode that is observed in the AMPS complex. In this case, electrostatic considerations, rather than steric factors, underlie the movement of the phosphoryl. The structures not only provide an explanation for the inhibition by AMPS, but also highlight the precise steric and electrostatic requirements of phosphoryl recognition by class C acid phosphatases. Moreover, the structure of the Asp64 {yields} Asn mutant illustrates how a seemingly innocuous mutation can cause an unexpected structural change.

  8. Fatty acyl-CoA esters inhibit glucose-6-phosphatase in rat liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulceri, R; Gamberucci, A; Scott, H M; Giunti, R; Burchell, A; Benedetti, A

    1995-01-01

    In native rat liver microsomes glucose 6-phosphatase activity is dependent not only on the activity of the glucose-6-phosphatase enzyme (which is lumenal) but also on the transport of glucose-6-phosphate, phosphate and glucose through the respective translocases T1, T2 and T3. By using enzymic assay techniques, palmitoyl-CoA or CoA was found to inhibit glucose-6-phosphatase activity in intact microsomes. The effect of CoA required ATP and fatty acids to form fatty acyl esters. Increasing concentrations (2-50 microM) of CoA (plus ATP and 20 microM added palmitic acid) or of palmitoyl-CoA progressively decreased glucose-6-phosphatase activity to 50% of the control value. The inhibition lowered the Vmax without significantly changing the Km. A non-hydrolysable analogue of palmitoyl-CoA also inhibited, demonstrating that binding of palmitoyl-CoA rather than hydrolysis produces the inhibition. Light-scattering measurements of osmotically induced changes in the size of rat liver microsomal vesicles pre-equilibrated in a low-osmolality buffer demonstrated that palmitoyl-CoA alone or CoA plus ATP and palmitic acid altered the microsomal permeability to glucose 6-phosphate, but not to glucose or phosphate, indicating that T1 is the site of palmitoyl-CoA binding and inhibition of glucose-6-phosphatase activity in native microsomes. The type of inhibition found suggests that liver microsomes may comprise vesicles heterogeneous with respect to glucose-6-phosphate translocase(s), i.e. sensitive or insensitive to fatty acid ester inhibition. PMID:7733874

  9. Bayesian nonparametric clustering in phylogenetics: modeling antigenic evolution in influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybis, Gabriela B; Sinsheimer, Janet S; Bedford, Trevor; Rambaut, Andrew; Lemey, Philippe; Suchard, Marc A

    2017-01-18

    Influenza is responsible for up to 500,000 deaths every year, and antigenic variability represents much of its epidemiological burden. To visualize antigenic differences across many viral strains, antigenic cartography methods use multidimensional scaling on binding assay data to map influenza antigenicity onto a low-dimensional space. Analysis of such assay data ideally leads to natural clustering of influenza strains of similar antigenicity that correlate with sequence evolution. To understand the dynamics of these antigenic groups, we present a framework that jointly models genetic and antigenic evolution by combining multidimensional scaling of binding assay data, Bayesian phylogenetic machinery and nonparametric clustering methods. We propose a phylogenetic Chinese restaurant process that extends the current process to incorporate the phylogenetic dependency structure between strains in the modeling of antigenic clusters. With this method, we are able to use the genetic information to better understand the evolution of antigenicity throughout epidemics, as shown in applications of this model to H1N1 influenza. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. [Leucocyte alkaline phosphatase in normal and pathological pregnancy (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, K H; Zaki, I; Sobolewski, K

    1981-01-01

    The activities of leucocyte alkaline phosphatase were determined in 511 patients with normal and pathological pregnancy. Mean values were compared and the enzyme followed up, and the conclusion was drawn that leucocyte alkaline phosphatase was no safe indicator of foetal condition. No direct relationship were found to exist between leucocyte alkaline phosphatase, total oestrogens, HSAP, HLAP, HPL, and oxytocinase.

  11. Post-translational generation of constitutively active cores from larger phosphatases in the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum: implications for proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams Brian

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the complete genome sequences of a large number of organisms have been determined, the exact proteomes need to be characterized. More specifically, the extent to which post-translational processes such as proteolysis affect the synthesized proteins has remained unappreciated. We examined this issue in selected protein phosphatases of the protease-rich malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Results P. falciparum encodes a number of Ser/Thr protein phosphatases (PP whose catalytic subunits are composed of a catalytic core and accessory domains essential for regulation of the catalytic activity. Two examples of such regulatory domains are found in the Ca+2-regulated phosphatases, PP7 and PP2B (calcineurin. The EF-hand domains of PP7 and the calmodulin-binding domain of PP2B are essential for stimulation of the phosphatase activity by Ca+2. We present biochemical evidence that P. falciparum generates these full-length phosphatases as well as their catalytic cores, most likely as intermediates of a proteolytic degradation pathway. While the full-length phosphatases are activated by Ca+2, the processed cores are constitutively active and either less responsive or unresponsive to Ca+2. The processing is extremely rapid, specific, and occurs in vivo. Conclusions Post-translational cleavage efficiently degrades complex full-length phosphatases in P. falciparum. In the course of such degradation, enzymatically active catalytic cores are produced as relatively stable intermediates. The universality of such proteolysis in other phosphatases or other multi-domain proteins and its potential impact on the overall proteome of a cell merits further investigation.

  12. Dynamic quantification of antigen molecules with flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskalensky, A.E.; Chernyshev, A.V.; Yurkin, M.A.; Nekrasov, V.M.; Polshchitsin, A.A.; Parks, D.R.; Moore, W.A.; Herzenberg, L.A.; Filatenkov, A.; Maltsev, V.P.; Orlova, D.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional methods for estimating the number of expressed molecules, based on the detection of target antigens bound with fluorescently labeled antibodies, assume that the antigen-antibody reaction reaches equilibrium. A calibration procedure is used to convert the intensity of the fluorescence signal to the number of target molecules. Along with the different limitations of every calibration system, this substantially limits the applicability of the traditional approaches especially in the case of low affinity antibodies. We address this problem here with studies in which we demonstrate a new approach to the antigen molecule quantification problem. Instead of using a static calibration system, we analyzed mean fluorescence values over time by flow cytometry during antibody-antigen binding. Experimental data obtained with an LSRII cytometer were fitted by a diffusion-reaction mathematical model using the Levenberg–Marquardt nonlinear least squares curve-fitting algorithm in order to obtain the number of target antigen molecules per cell. Results were compared with the Quanti-BRITE calibration system. We conclude that, instead of using experiment-specific calibration, the value of the binding rate constant for each particular antibody-antigen reaction can be used to quantify antigen molecules with flow cytometry. The radius of CD8 antibody molecule binding site was found, that allows recalculating the binding rate constant for other conditions (different sizes of reagent molecules, fluorescent label, medium viscosity and temperature). This approach is independent of specially prepared calibration beads, antibody reagents and the specific dye and can be applied to both low and high affinity antibodies, under both saturating and non-saturating binding conditions. The method was demonstrated on a human blood sample dataset investigating CD8α antigen on T cells in stable binding conditions. PMID:25687877

  13. Tyrosine-phosphorylated Galectin-3 Protein Is Resistant to Prostate-specific Antigen (PSA) Cleavage*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Vitaly; Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Kho, Dhong Hyo; Wang, Yi; Raz, Avraham

    2012-01-01

    Galectin-3 is a chimeric carbohydrate-binding protein, which interacts with cell surface carbohydrate-containing molecules and extracellular matrix glycoproteins and has been implicated in various biological processes such as cell growth, angiogenesis, motility, and metastasis. It is expressed in a wide range of tumor cells and is associated with tumor progression. The functions of galectin-3 are dependent on its localization and post-translational modifications such as cleavage and phosphorylation. Recently, we showed that galectin-3 Tyr-107 is phosphorylated by c-Abl; concomitantly, it was also shown that galectin-3 can be cleaved at this site by prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a chymotrypsin-like serine protease, after Tyr-107, resulting in loss of galectin-3 multivalency while preserving its carbohydrate binding activity. Galectin-3 is largely a monomer in solution but may form a homodimer by self-association through its carbohydrate recognition domain, whereas, in the presence of a ligand, galectin-3 polymerizes up to pentamers utilizing its N-terminal domain. Oligomerization is a unique feature of secreted galectin-3, which allows its function by forming ordered galectin-glycan structures, i.e. lattices, on the cell surface or through direct engagement of specific cell surface glycoconjugates by traditional ligand-receptor binding. We questioned whether Tyr-107 phosphorylation by c-Abl affects galectin-3 cleavage by PSA. The data suggest a role for galectin-3 in prostate cells associated with increased activity of c-Abl kinase and loss of phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) activity. In addition, the ratio of phosphorylated/dephosphorylated galectin-3 might be used as a complementary value to that of PSA for prognosis of prostate cancer and a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:22232548

  14. Glycosylation of the major human Pneumocystis carinii surface antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Bettina; Koch, C; Mathiesen, Lars Reinhardt;

    1993-01-01

    It has recently been shown that the major rat P. carinii surface antigen is important for initial host-organism attachment, possibly through binding to fibronectin, mannose-binding protein, or surfactant protein A. Since a carbohydrate/lectin interaction may be involved in adhesion, we undertook...

  15. Novel Anticancer Agents Based on Targeting the Trimer Interface of the PRL Phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yunpeng; Yu, Zhi-Hong; Liu, Sijiu; Zhang, Lujuan; Zhang, Ruo-Yu; Zeng, Li-Fan; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2016-08-15

    Phosphatase of regenerating liver (PRL) oncoproteins are phosphatases overexpressed in numerous types of human cancer. Elevated levels of PRL associate with metastasis and poor clinical outcomes. In principle, PRL phosphatases offer appealing therapeutic targets, but they remain underexplored due to the lack of specific chemical probes. In this study, we address this issue by exploiting a unique property of PRL phosphatases, namely, that they may function as homotrimers. Starting from a sequential structure-based virtual screening and medicinal chemistry strategy, we identified Cmpd-43 and several analogs that disrupt PRL1 trimerization. Biochemical and structural analyses demonstrate that Cmpd-43 and its close analogs directly bind the PRL1 trimer interface and obstruct PRL1 trimerization. Cmpd-43 also specifically blocks the PRL1-induced cell proliferation and migration through attenuation of both ERK1/2 and Akt activity. Importantly, Cmpd-43 exerted potent anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo in a murine xenograft model of melanoma. Our results validate a trimerization-dependent signaling mechanism for PRL and offer proof of concept for trimerization inhibitors as candidate therapeutics to treat PRL-driven cancers. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4805-15. ©2016 AACR.

  16. Dimerization of the glucan phosphatase laforin requires the participation of cysteine 329.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Sánchez-Martín

    Full Text Available Laforin, encoded by a gene that is mutated in Lafora Disease (LD, OMIM 254780, is a modular protein composed of a carbohydrate-binding module and a dual-specificity phosphatase domain. Laforin is the founding member of the glucan-phosphatase family and regulates the levels of phosphate present in glycogen. Multiple reports have described the capability of laforin to form dimers, although the function of these dimers and their relationship with LD remains unclear. Recent evidence suggests that laforin dimerization depends on redox conditions, suggesting that disulfide bonds are involved in laforin dimerization. Using site-directed mutagenesis we constructed laforin mutants in which individual cysteine residues were replaced by serine and then tested the ability of each protein to dimerize using recombinant protein as well as a mammalian cell culture assay. Laforin-Cys329Ser was the only Cys/Ser mutant unable to form dimers in both assays. We also generated a laforin truncation lacking the last three amino acids, laforin-Cys329X, and this truncation also failed to dimerize. Interestingly, laforin-Cys329Ser and laforin-Cys329X were able to bind glucans, and maintained wild type phosphatase activity against both exogenous and biologically relevant substrates. Furthermore, laforin-Cys329Ser was fully capable of participating in the ubiquitination process driven by a laforin-malin complex. These results suggest that dimerization is not required for laforin phosphatase activity, glucan binding, or for the formation of a functional laforin-malin complex. Cumulatively, these results suggest that cysteine 329 is specifically involved in the dimerization process of laforin. Therefore, the C329S mutant constitutes a valuable tool to analyze the physiological implications of laforin's oligomerization.

  17. Assessment and kinetics of soil phosphatase in Brazilian Savanna systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADÃO S. FERREIRA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The activity and kinetics of soil phosphatases are important indicators to evaluate soil quality in specific sites such as the Cerrado (Brazilian Savanna. This study aimed to determine the activity and kinetic parameters of soil phosphatase in Cerrado systems. Soil phosphatase activity was assessed in samples of native Cerrado (NC, no-tillage (NT, conventional tillage (CT and pasture with Brachiaria brizantha (PBb and evaluated with acetate buffer (AB, tris-HCl buffer (TB, modified universal buffer (MUB and low MUB. The Michaelis-Menten equation and Eadie-Hofstee model were applied to obtain the kinetic parameters of soil phosphatase using different concentrations of p-nitrophenol phosphate (p-NPP. MUB showed the lowest soil phosphatase activity in all soils whereas AB in NC and NT presented the highest. Low MUB decreased interferences in the assessment of soil phosphatase activity when compared to MUB, suggesting that organic acids interfere on the soil phosphatase activity. In NC and NT, soil phosphatase activity performed with TB was similar to AB and low MUB. Km values from the Michaels-Menten equation were higher in NC than in NT, which indicate a lower affinity of phosphatase activity for the substrate in NC. Vmax values were also higher in NC than in NT. The Eadie-Hofstee model suggests that NC had more phosphatase isoforms than NT. The study showed that buffer type is of fundamental importance when assessing soil phosphatase activity in Cerrado soils.

  18. [ATPase and phosphatase activity of drone brood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnarchuk, L I; Stakhman, O S

    2004-01-01

    Most researches on insect enzymes concern carbohydrate and nitrogenous exchange. Data on ATPase activity for larval material of drone brood are absent in the available literature. The drone brood is one of the least investigated apiproducts. Allowing for the important role of ATPase in the vital functions of the insect cells our work was aimed at the study of ATPase of the drone blood activity and that of alkaline and acid phosphatases. When studying liophylised preparations of the drone brood homogenate we have found out high activity of Mg2+, Na+, K+-, Ca2+- and Mg2+-ATPase and of alkaline and acid phosphatase, that is the possible explanation of the high-intensity power and plastic processes proceeding during growth and development of larvae.

  19. Eosinofil Sel Penyaji Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safari Wahyu Jatmiko

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sel eosinofil merupakan jenis sel lekosit yang terlibat dalam berbagai patogenesis penyakit. Sel eosinofil pada awalnya dikenal sebagai sel efektor  dari sistem imunitas alamiah. Akan tetapi, kemampuan sel eosinofil dalam memfagositosis patogen menimbulkan dugaan bahwa sel eosinofil ikut berperan sebagai sel penyaji antigen. Hal ini dianalogikan dengan sel makrofag dan sel dendritik yang bisa memfagositosis dan menyajikan antigen sebagai hasil dari degradasi patogen yang difagositosis. Untuk menjawab permasalahan ini, penulis melakukan penelusuran artikel tentang eosinofil sebagai sel penyaji antigen melalui US National Library of Medicine National Institute of Healthdengan kata kunci eoshinophil dan antigen presenting cell. Hasil penelusuran adalah ditemukannya 10 artikel yang relevan dengan topik. Hasil dari sintesis kesepuluh jurnal tersebut adalah sel eosinofil mampu berperan sebagai sel penyaji antigen yang profesional (professionalantigenpresentng cell

  20. Biophysical assay for tethered signaling reactions reveals tether-controlled activity for the phosphatase SHP-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyette, Jesse; Salas, Citlali Solis; Coker-Gordon, Nicola; Bridge, Marcus; Isaacson, Samuel A.; Allard, Jun; Dushek, Omer

    2017-01-01

    Tethered enzymatic reactions are ubiquitous in signaling networks but are poorly understood. A previously unreported mathematical analysis is established for tethered signaling reactions in surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Applying the method to the phosphatase SHP-1 interacting with a phosphorylated tether corresponding to an immune receptor cytoplasmic tail provides five biophysical/biochemical constants from a single SPR experiment: two binding rates, two catalytic rates, and a reach parameter. Tether binding increases the activity of SHP-1 by 900-fold through a binding-induced allosteric activation (20-fold) and a more significant increase in local substrate concentration (45-fold). The reach parameter indicates that this local substrate concentration is exquisitely sensitive to receptor clustering. We further show that truncation of the tether leads not only to a lower reach but also to lower binding and catalysis. This work establishes a new framework for studying tethered signaling processes and highlights the tether as a control parameter in clustered receptor signaling.

  1. Acid Phosphatase Development during Ripening of Avocado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacher, J A

    1975-02-01

    The activity and subcellular distribution of acid phosphatase were assayed during ethylene-induced ripening of whole fruit or thick slices of avocado (Persea americana Mill. var. Fuerte and Hass). The activity increased up to 30-fold during ripening in both the supernatant fraction and the Triton X-100 extract of the precipitate of a 30,000g centrifugation of tissue homogenates from whole fruit or slices ripening in moist air. Enzyme activity in the residual precipitate after Triton extraction remained constant. The development of acid phosphatase in thick slices ripened in moist air was similar to that in intact fruit, except that enzyme development and ripening were accelerated about 24 hours in the slices. The increase in enzyme activity that occurs in slices ripening in moist air was inhibited when tissue sections were infiltrated with solutions, by aspiration for 2 minutes or by soaking for 2 hours, anytime 22 hours or more after addition of ethylene. This inhibition was independent of the presence or absence of cycloheximide or sucrose (0.3-0.5m). However, the large decline in enzyme activity in the presence of cycloheximide, as compared with the controls, indicated that synthesis of acid phosphatase was occurring at all stages of ripening.

  2. The interaction of beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) with mouse class I major histocompatibility antigens and its ability to support peptide binding. A comparison of human and mouse beta 2m

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, L O; Stryhn, A; Holter, T L;

    1995-01-01

    The function of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules is to sample peptides derived from intracellular proteins and to present these peptides to CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In this paper, biochemical assays addressing MHC class I binding of both peptide and beta 2-microglobul...

  3. Expression of a truncated receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase kappa in the brain of an adult transgenic mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, P; Canoll, P D; Sap, J

    1999-01-01

    Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) comprise a family of proteins that feature intracellular phosphatase domains and an ectodomain with putative ligand-binding motifs. Several RPTPs are expressed in the brain, including RPTP-kappa which participates in homophilic cell-cell interactions...... in vitro [Y.-P. Jiang, H. Wang, P. D'Eustachio, J.M. Musacchio, J. Schlessinger, J. Sap, Cloning and characterization of R-PTP-kappa, a new member of the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase family with a proteolytically cleaved cellular adhesion molecule-like extracellular region, Mol. Cell. Biol. 13...... processes such as axonal growth and target recognition, as has been demonstrated for certain Drosophila RPTPs. The brain distribution of RPTP-kappa-expressing cells has not been determined, however. In a gene-trap mouse model with a beta-gal+neo (beta-geo) insertion in the endogenous RPTP-kappa gene...

  4. Synthesis of Highly Selective Submicromolar Microcystin‐Based Inhibitors of Protein Phosphatase (PP)2A over PP1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanillo, Miriam; Zemskov, Ivan; Häfner, Maximilian; Uhrig, Ulrike; Salvi, Francesca; Simon, Bernd; Wittmann, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Research and therapeutic targeting of the phosphoserine/threonine phosphatases PP1 and PP2A is hindered by the lack of selective inhibitors. The microcystin (MC) natural toxins target both phosphatases with equal potency, and their complex synthesis has complicated structure–activity relationship studies in the past. We report herein the synthesis and biochemical evaluation of 11 MC analogues, which was accomplished through an efficient strategy combining solid‐ and solution‐phase approaches. Our approach led to the first MC analogue with submicromolar inhibitory potency that is strongly selective for PP2A over PP1 and does not require the complex lipophilic Adda group. Through mutational and structural analyses, we identified a new key element for binding, as well as reasons for the selectivity. This work gives unprecedented insight into how selectivity between these phosphatases can be achieved with MC analogues. PMID:27723199

  5. Molecular Mimicry Regulates ABA Signaling by SnRK2 Kinases and PP2C Phosphatases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soon, Fen-Fen; Ng, Ley-Moy; Zhou, X. Edward; West, Graham M.; Kovach, Amanda; Tan, M.H. Eileen; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; He, Yuanzheng; Xu, Yong; Chalmers, Michael J.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Zhang, Huiming; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Li, Jun; Yong, Eu-Leong; Cutler, Sean; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Griffin, Patrick R.; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H. Eric (Van Andel); (Scripps); (NWU); (Purdue); (UCR); (Chinese Aca. Sci.); (NU Singapore)

    2014-10-02

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an essential hormone for plants to survive environmental stresses. At the center of the ABA signaling network is a subfamily of type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs), which form exclusive interactions with ABA receptors and subfamily 2 Snfl-related kinase (SnRK2s). Here, we report a SnRK2-PP2C complex structure, which reveals marked similarity in PP2C recognition by SnRK2 and ABA receptors. In the complex, the kinase activation loop docks into the active site of PP2C, while the conserved ABA-sensing tryptophan of PP2C inserts into the kinase catalytic cleft, thus mimicking receptor-PP2C interactions. These structural results provide a simple mechanism that directly couples ABA binding to SnRK2 kinase activation and highlight a new paradigm of kinase-phosphatase regulation through mutual packing of their catalytic sites.

  6. Thioredoxin-related protein 32 (TRP32) specifically reduces oxidized phosphatase of regenerating liver (PRL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Tasuku; Funato, Yosuke; Miki, Hiroaki

    2013-03-08

    PRL family constitutes a unique class of phosphatases associated with metastasis. The phosphatase activity of PRL has been reported to be important for promoting metastasis, and it is inactivated by reversible oxidation of its catalytic cysteine. Here, we show that TRP32 specifically reduces PRL. Reduction of oxidized PRL in cells is inhibited by 2,4-dinitro-1-chlorobenzene, an inhibitor of TRX reductase. In vitro assays for the reduction of PRL show that only TRP32 can potently reduce oxidized PRL, whereas other TRX-related proteins linked to TRX reductase show little or no reducing activity. Indeed, TRP32 knockdown significantly prolongs the H2O2-induced oxidation of PRL. Binding analyses reveal that the unique C-terminal domain of TRP32 is required and sufficient for its direct interaction with PRL. These results suggest that TRP32 maintains the reduced state of PRL and thus regulates the biological function of PRL.

  7. The Eya1 phosphatase promotes Shh signaling during hindbrain development and oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisner, Adriana; Pazyra-Murphy, Maria F; Durresi, Ershela; Zhou, Pengcheng; Zhao, Xuesong; Chadwick, Emily C; Xu, Pin-Xian; Hillman, R Tyler; Scott, Matthew P; Greenberg, Michael E; Segal, Rosalind A

    2015-04-06

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling is critical in development and oncogenesis, but the mechanisms regulating this pathway remain unclear. Although protein phosphorylation clearly affects Shh signaling, little is known about phosphatases governing the pathway. Here, we conducted a small hairpin RNA (shRNA) screen of the phosphatome and identified Eya1 as a positive regulator of Shh signaling. We find that the catalytically active phosphatase Eya1 cooperates with the DNA-binding protein Six1 to promote gene induction in response to Shh and that Eya1/Six1 together regulate Gli transcriptional activators. We show that Eya1, which is mutated in a human deafness disorder, branchio-oto-renal syndrome, is critical for Shh-dependent hindbrain growth and development. Moreover, Eya1 drives the growth of medulloblastoma, a Shh-dependent hindbrain tumor. Together, these results identify Eya1 and Six1 as key components of the Shh transcriptional network in normal development and in oncogenesis.

  8. Species-specific and cross-reactive IgG1 antibody binding to viral capsid protein 1 (VP1 antigens of human rhinovirus species A, B and C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jua Iwasaki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human rhinoviruses (HRV are associated with upper and lower respiratory illnesses, including severe infections causing hospitalization in both children and adults. Although the clinical significance of HRV infections is now well established, no detailed investigation of the immune response against HRV has been performed. The purpose of this study was to assess the IgG1 antibody response to the three known HRV species, HRV-A, -B and -C in healthy subjects. METHODS: Recombinant polypeptides of viral capsid protein 1 (VP1 from two genotypes of HRV-A, -B and -C were expressed as glutathione S-transferase (GST fusion proteins and purified by affinity and then size exclusion chromatography. The presence of secondary structures similar to the natural antigens was verified by circular dichroism analysis. Total and species-specific IgG1 measurements were quantitated by immunoassays and immunoabsorption using sera from 63 healthy adults. RESULTS: Most adult sera reacted with the HRV VP1 antigens, at high titres. As expected, strong cross-reactivity between HRV genotypes of the same species was found. A high degree of cross-reactivity between different HRV species was also evident, particularly between HRV-A and HRV-C. Immunoabsorption studies revealed HRV-C specific titres were markedly and significantly lower than the HRV-A and HRV-B specific titres (P<0.0001. A truncated construct of HRV-C VP1 showed greater specificity in detecting anti-HRV-C antibodies. CONCLUSIONS: High titres of IgG1 antibody were bound by the VP1 capsid proteins of HRV-A, -B and -C, but for the majority of people, a large proportion of the antibody to HRV-C was cross-reactive, especially to HRV-A. The improved specificity found for the truncated HRV-C VP1 indicates species-specific and cross-reactive regions could be defined.

  9. Primary structure of rat secretory acid phosphatase and comparison to other acid phosphatases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roiko, K; Jänne, O A; Vihko, P

    1990-05-14

    Overlapping cDNA clones encoding rat prostatic acid phosphatase (rPAP) were isolated by using two human prostatic acid phosphatase (hPAP)-encoding cDNAs to screen rat prostatic cDNA libraries. The isolated cDNAs encompassed a total of 1626 nucleotides (nt), of which 1143 nt corresponded to the protein coding sequence encoding a mature polypeptide of 350 amino acids (aa) and a 31-aa long signal peptide-like sequence. The deduced Mr of the mature rPAP was 40,599. RNA blot analysis indicated the presence of three mRNA species (4.9, 2.3 and 1.5 kb in size) in the rat prostate. The deduced aa sequences of rPAP and hPAP show 75% identity, whereas the similarity between rPAP and human lysosomal acid phosphatase (hLAP) is only 45%. Furthermore, the sequence similarity between rPAP and rat lysosomal acid phosphatase (rLAP) is 46% at the aa level. Similar to hPAP, but unlike hLAP and rLAP, the rPAP sequence lacks a membrane-anchoring domain indicating the secretory character of this phosphatase. All six cysteines present in the overlapping areas of the mature rPAP, hPAP, rLAP and hLAP proteins are positionally conserved, suggesting that these residues are important for the tertiary structure of acid phosphatases (APs). The previously reported active site residues, two arginines and one histidine, are also conserved in these APs.

  10. The diagnostic value of alpha-fetoprotein, α-L-fucosidase,gamma-glutamyltransferase, alkaline phosphatase and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 in the diagnosis of primary hepatocellular carcinoma%甲胎蛋白、α-L-岩藻糖苷酶、γ-谷氨酰转移酶、碱性磷酸酶及糖类抗原19-9联合检测在原发性肝癌中的诊断价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘倩雄

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the diagnostic value of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP),α-L-fucosidase(AFU),gamma-glutamyltransferase(GGT),alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9(CA19-9) in the diagnosis of primary hepatocellular carcinoma(PHC).Methods Seventy-eight PHC patients as PHC group,76 patients with other liver diseases as other liver diseases group and 60 healthy volunteers as control group.The level of serum AFP,AFU,GGT,ALP,CA19-9 and positive rate in each group were compared.Results The level of AFP,AFU,GGT,ALP,CA19-9 in PHC group were (276.3 ±72.6)μg/L,(63.1 ± 11.7) U/L,(268.5 ±57.2) U/L,(293.4 ±61.7) U/L and (56.9 ± 12.5) μg/L,in other liver diseases group were (81.6 ± 12.1) μg/L,(28.3 ±7.3) U/L,(54.9 ±7.8) U/L,(116.5 ± 23.8) U/L and (27.8 7.1) μ g/L,in control group were (13.8 ± 2.7) μ g/L,(12.6 ± 3.9) U/L,(12.3 ± 3.2) U/L,(47.2 ± 11.3) U/L and (12.9 ± 3.4) μ g/L.The level of above index in PHC group and other liver diseases group were significantly higher than those in control group,while the level of above index in PHC group were significantly higher than those in other liver diseases group (P < 0.01 or < 0.05).The positive rate of AFP,AFU,GGT,ALP,CA19-9 in PHC group were 62.8%(49/78),79.5%(62/78),83.3% (65/78),85.9% (67/78),66.7% (52/78),and significantly higher than those in other liver diseases group[31.6%(24/76),32.9%(25/76),27.6%(21/76),22.4%(17/76),15.8 %(12/76)].The positive rate of AFP in control group was 0,the positive rate of AFU,GGT,ALP,CA19-9 in control group were 1.7% (1/60),3.3% (2/60),1.7% (1/60),8.3% (5/60),which significantly lower than those in other two groups.The positive rate of combined detection in PHC group was 100.0%(78/78),which significantly higher than that in other liver diseases group [40.8%(31/76)] and control group[8.3%(5/60)](P< 0.01).Conclusion The combined detection of AFP,AFU,GGT,ALP,CA19-9 in PHC diagnosis has a higher sensitivity,and thus to make

  11. Bacterial surface antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies used to detect beer spoilage pediococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, M S; Ingledew, W M; Lee, S Y; Ziola, B

    1999-08-01

    Fourteen monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) were isolated that react with surface antigens of Pediococcus beer spoilage organisms, including P. damnosus, P. pentosaceous, P. acidilactici, and unspeciated isolates. Immunoblotting, enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) of protease- and neuraminidase-treated surface antigen extracts, carbohydrate competition EIAs, and cardiolipin EIAs were used to characterize the bacterial antigens involved in Mab binding. Antigen stability in situ was tested by protease treatment or surface antigen extraction of washed bacteria. In most cases, the Mabs bind to Pediococcus surface antigens that appear to be covalently bound cell wall polymers resistant to alteration or removal from the bacterial surface. These bacterial surface antigen reactive Mabs show good potential for rapid, sensitive, and specific immunoassay detection of Pediococcus beer spoilage organisms.

  12. Recognition of Nucleoside Monophosphate Substrates by Haemophilus influenzae Class C Acid Phosphatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Harkewal; Schuermann, Jonathan P.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Calcutt, Michael J.; Tanner, John J. (Cornell); (UMC)

    2010-12-08

    The e (P4) phosphatase from Haemophilus influenzae functions in a vestigial NAD{sup +} utilization pathway by dephosphorylating nicotinamide mononucleotide to nicotinamide riboside. P4 is also the prototype of class C acid phosphatases (CCAPs), which are nonspecific 5{prime},3{prime}-nucleotidases localized to the bacterial outer membrane. To understand substrate recognition by P4 and other class C phosphatases, we have determined the crystal structures of a substrate-trapping mutant P4 enzyme complexed with nicotinamide mononucleotide, 5{prime}-AMP, 3{prime}-AMP, and 2{prime}-AMP. The structures reveal an anchor-shaped substrate-binding cavity comprising a conserved hydrophobic box that clamps the nucleotide base, a buried phosphoryl binding site, and three solvent-filled pockets that contact the ribose and the hydrogen-bonding edge of the base. The span between the hydrophobic box and the phosphoryl site is optimal for recognizing nucleoside monophosphates, explaining the general preference for this class of substrate. The base makes no hydrogen bonds with the enzyme, consistent with an observed lack of base specificity. Two solvent-filled pockets flanking the ribose are key to the dual recognition of 5{prime}-nucleotides and 3{prime}-nucleotides. These pockets minimize the enzyme's direct interactions with the ribose and provide sufficient space to accommodate 5{prime} substrates in an anti conformation and 3{prime} substrates in a syn conformation. Finally, the structures suggest that class B acid phosphatases and CCAPs share a common strategy for nucleotide recognition.

  13. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) B27 Allotype-Specific Binding and Candidate Arthritogenic Peptides Revealed through Heuristic Clustering of Data-independent Acquisition Mass Spectrometry (DIA-MS) Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schittenhelm, Ralf B; Sivaneswaran, Saranjah; Lim Kam Sian, Terry C C; Croft, Nathan P; Purcell, Anthony W

    2016-06-01

    Expression of HLA-B27 is strongly associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and other spondyloarthropathies. While this is true for the majority of HLA-B27 allotypes, HLA-B*27:06 and HLA-B*27:09 are not associated with AS. These two subtypes contain polymorphisms that are ideally positioned to influence the bound peptide repertoire. The existence of disease-inducing peptides (so-called arthritogenic peptides) has therefore been proposed that are exclusively presented by disease-associated HLA-B27 allotypes. However, we have recently demonstrated that this segregation of allotype-bound peptides is not the case and that many peptides that display sequence features predicted to favor binding to disease-associated subtypes are also capable of being presented naturally by protective alleles. To further probe more subtle quantitative changes in peptide presentation, we have used a combination of data-independent acquisition (DIA) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry to quantify the abundance of 1646 HLA-B27 restricted peptides across the eight most frequent HLA-B27 allotypes (HLA-B*27:02-HLA-B*27:09). We utilized K means cluster analysis to group peptides with similar allelic binding preferences across the eight HLA-B27 allotypes, which enabled us to identify the most-stringent binding characteristics for each HLA-B27 allotype and further refined their existing consensus-binding motifs. Moreover, a thorough analysis of this quantitative dataset led to the identification of 26 peptides, which are presented in lower abundance by HLA-B*27:06 and HLA-B*27:09 compared with disease-associated HLA-B27 subtypes. Although these differences were observed to be very subtle, these 26 peptides might encompass the sought-after arthritogenic peptide(s).

  14. Low serum alkaline phosphatase activity in Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, W A; Bhatt, H; Combes, B

    1986-01-01

    Low values for serum alkaline phosphatase activity were observed early in the course of two patients with Wilson's disease presenting with the combination of severe liver disease and Coombs' negative acute hemolytic anemia. A review of other cases of Wilson's disease revealed that 11 of 12 patients presenting with hemolytic anemia had values for serum alkaline phosphatase less than their respective sex- and age-adjusted mean values; in eight, serum alkaline phosphatase activity was less than the lower value for the normal range of the test. Low values for serum alkaline phosphatase were much less common in Wilson's disease patients with more chronic forms of presentation. Copper added in high concentration to serum in vitro did not have an important effect on serum alkaline phosphatase activity. The mechanism responsible for the decrease in serum alkaline phosphatase activity in patients is uncertain.

  15. [Effect of VAM fungi on phosphatase activity in maize rhizosphere].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y; Li, X; Feng, G

    2001-08-01

    The effect of VAM fungi on phosphatase activity in maize rhizosphere was examined by pot culture experiment, in which, three-compartment-pots were used, the central compartment being separated from the outer two by a nylon net with 30 microns mesh. Plants were harvested 70 days after planting. Soil acid and alkaline phosphatase were measured at different distances from root surface. The results showed that VAM increased the activities of soil acid and alkaline phosphatase in the rhizosphere. It was found that different phosphorous sources had different effects on phosphatase activity.

  16. A protein phosphatase methylesterase (PME-1) is one of several novel proteins stably associating with two inactive mutants of protein phosphatase 2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogris, E; Du, X; Nelson, K C; Mak, E K; Yu, X X; Lane, W S; Pallas, D C

    1999-05-14

    Carboxymethylation of proteins is a highly conserved means of regulation in eukaryotic cells. The protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) catalytic (C) subunit is reversibly methylated at its carboxyl terminus by specific methyltransferase and methylesterase enzymes which have been purified, but not cloned. Carboxymethylation affects PP2A activity and varies during the cell cycle. Here, we report that substitution of glutamine for either of two putative active site histidines in the PP2A C subunit results in inactivation of PP2A and formation of stable complexes between PP2A and several cellular proteins. One of these cellular proteins, herein named protein phosphatase methylesterase-1 (PME-1), was purified and microsequenced, and its cDNA was cloned. PME-1 is conserved from yeast to human and contains a motif found in lipases having a catalytic triad-activated serine as their active site nucleophile. Bacterially expressed PME-1 demethylated PP2A C subunit in vitro, and okadaic acid, a known inhibitor of the PP2A methylesterase, inhibited this reaction. To our knowledge, PME-1 represents the first mammalian protein methylesterase to be cloned. Several lines of evidence indicate that, although there appears to be a role for C subunit carboxyl-terminal amino acids in PME-1 binding, amino acids other than those at the extreme carboxyl terminus of the C subunit also play an important role in PME-1 binding to a catalytically inactive mutant.

  17. Zinc ions modulate protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellomo, Elisa; Massarotti, Alberto; Hogstrand, Christer; Maret, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are key enzymes in cellular regulation. The 107 human PTPs are regulated by redox signalling, phosphorylation, dimerisation, and proteolysis. Recent findings of very strong inhibition of some PTPs by zinc ions at concentrations relevant in a cellular environment suggest yet another mechanism of regulation. One of the most extensively investigated PTPs is PTP1B (PTPN1). It regulates the insulin and leptin signalling pathway and is implicated in cancer and obesity/diabetes. The development of novel assay conditions to investigate zinc inhibition of PTP1B provides estimates of about 5.6 nM affinity for inhibitory zinc(II) ions. Analysis of three PTP1B 3D structures (PDB id: 2CM2, 3I80 and 1A5Y) identified putative zinc binding sites and supports the kinetic studies in suggesting an inhibitory zinc only in the closed and cysteinyl-phosphate intermediate forms of the enzyme. These observations gain significance with regard to recent findings of regulatory roles of zinc ions released from the endoplasmic reticulum.

  18. Pharmacophore modeling for protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharatham, Kavitha; Bharatham, Nagakumar; Lee, Keun Woo

    2007-05-01

    A three dimensional chemical feature based pharmacophore model was developed for the inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) using the CATALYST software, which would provide useful knowledge for performing virtual screening to identify new inhibitors targeted toward type II diabetes and obesity. A dataset of 27 inhibitors, with diverse structural properties, and activities ranging from 0.026 to 600 microM, was selected as a training set. Hypol, the most reliable quantitative four featured pharmacophore hypothesis, was generated from a training set composed of compounds with two H-bond acceptors, one hydrophobic aromatic and one ring aromatic features. It has a correlation coefficient, RMSD and cost difference (null cost-total cost) of 0.946, 0.840 and 65.731, respectively. The best hypothesis (Hypol) was validated using four different methods. Firstly, a cross validation was performed by randomizing the data using the Cat-Scramble technique. The results confirmed that the pharmacophore models generated from the training set were valid. Secondly, a test set of 281 molecules was scored, with a correlation of 0.882 obtained between the experimental and predicted activities. Hypol performed well in correctly discriminating the active and inactive molecules. Thirdly, the model was investigated by mapping on two PTP1B inhibitors identified by different pharmaceutical companies. The Hypol model correctly predicted these compounds as being highly active. Finally, docking simulations were performed on few compounds to substantiate the role of the pharmacophore features at the binding site of the protein by analyzing their binding conformations. These multiple validation approaches provided confidence in the utility of this pharmacophore model as a 3D query for virtual screening to retrieve new chemical entities showing potential as potent PTP1B inhibitors.

  19. PTEN phosphatase-independent maintenance of glandular morphology in a predictive colorectal cancer model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagan, Ishaan C; Deevi, Ravi K; Fatehullah, Aliya; Topley, Rebecca; Eves, Joshua; Stevenson, Michael; Loughrey, Maurice; Arthur, Kenneth; Campbell, Frederick Charles

    2013-11-01

    Organotypic models may provide mechanistic insight into colorectal cancer (CRC) morphology. Three-dimensional (3D) colorectal gland formation is regulated by phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) coupling of cell division cycle 42 (cdc42) to atypical protein kinase C (aPKC). This study investigated PTEN phosphatase-dependent and phosphatase-independent morphogenic functions in 3D models and assessed translational relevance in human studies. Isogenic PTEN-expressing or PTEN-deficient 3D colorectal cultures were used. In translational studies, apical aPKC activity readout was assessed against apical membrane (AM) orientation and gland morphology in 3D models and human CRC. We found that catalytically active or inactive PTEN constructs containing an intact C2 domain enhanced cdc42 activity, whereas mutants of the C2 domain calcium binding region 3 membrane-binding loop (M-CBR3) were ineffective. The isolated PTEN C2 domain (C2) accumulated in membrane fractions, but C2 M-CBR3 remained in cytosol. Transfection of C2 but not C2 M-CBR3 rescued defective AM orientation and 3D morphogenesis of PTEN-deficient Caco-2 cultures. The signal intensity of apical phospho-aPKC correlated with that of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor-1 (NHERF-1) in the 3D model. Apical NHERF-1 intensity thus provided readout of apical aPKC activity and associated with glandular morphology in the model system and human colon. Low apical NHERF-1 intensity in CRC associated with disruption of glandular architecture, high cancer grade, and metastatic dissemination. We conclude that the membrane-binding function of the catalytically inert PTEN C2 domain influences cdc42/aPKC-dependent AM dynamics and gland formation in a highly relevant 3D CRC morphogenesis model system.

  20. PTEN Phosphatase-Independent Maintenance of Glandular Morphology in a Predictive Colorectal Cancer Model System

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    Ishaan C. Jagan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Organotypic models may provide mechanistic insight into colorectal cancer (CRC morphology. Three-dimensional (3D colorectal gland formation is regulated by phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN coupling of cell division cycle 42 (cdc42 to atypical protein kinase C (aPKC. This study investigated PTEN phosphatase-dependent and phosphatase-independent morphogenic functions in 3D models and assessed translational relevance in human studies. Isogenic PTEN-expressing or PTEN-deficient 3D colorectal cultures were used. In translational studies, apical aPKC activity readout was assessed against apical membrane (AM orientation and gland morphology in 3D models and human CRC. We found that catalytically active or inactive PTEN constructs containing an intact C2 domain enhanced cdc42 activity, whereas mutants of the C2 domain calcium binding region 3 membrane-binding loop (M-CBR3 were ineffective. The isolated PTEN C2 domain (C2 accumulated in membrane fractions, but C2 M-CBR3 remained in cytosol. Transfection of C2 but not C2 M-CBR3 rescued defective AM orientation and 3D morphogenesis of PTEN-deficient Caco-2 cultures. The signal intensity of apical phospho-aPKC correlated with that of Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor-1 (NHERF-1 in the 3D model. Apical NHERF-1 intensity thus provided readout of apical aPKC activity and associated with glandular morphology in the model system and human colon. Low apical NHERF-1 intensity in CRC associated with disruption of glandular architecture, high cancer grade, and metastatic dissemination. We conclude that the membrane-binding function of the catalytically inert PTEN C2 domain influences cdc42/aPKC-dependent AM dynamics and gland formation in a highly relevant 3D CRC morphogenesis model system.

  1. Involvement of Phosphatases in Proliferation, Maturation, and Hemoglobinization of Developing Erythroid Cells

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    Eitan Fibach

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Production of RBCs is triggered by the action of erythropoietin (Epo through its binding to surface receptors (Epo-R on erythroid precursors in the bone marrow. The intensity and the duration of the Epo signal are regulated by several factors, including the balance between the activities of kinesase and phosphatases. The Epo signal determines the proliferation and maturation of the precursors into hemoglobin (Hb-containing RBCs. The activity of various protein tyrosine phosphatases, including those involved in the Epo pathway, can be inhibited by sodium orthovanadate (Na3VO4, vanadate. Adding vanadate to cultured erythroid precursors of normal donors and patients with β-thalassemia enhanced cell proliferation and arrested maturation. This was associated with an increased production of fetal hemoglobin (HbF. Increased HbF in patients with β-hemoglobinopathies (β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease ameliorates the clinical symptoms of the disease. These results raise the possibility that specific and nontoxic inhibitors of phosphatases may be considered as a therapeutic modality for elevating HbF in patients with β-hemoglobinopathies as well as for intensifying the Epo response in other forms of anemia.

  2. Synthesis, alkaline phosphatase inhibition studies and molecular docking of novel derivatives of 4-quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miliutina, Mariia; Ejaz, Syeda Abida; Khan, Shafi Ullah; Iaroshenko, Viktor O; Villinger, Alexander; Iqbal, Jamshed; Langer, Peter

    2017-01-27

    New and convenient methods for the functionalization of the 4-quinolone scaffold at positions C-1, C-3 and C-6 were developed. The 4-quinolone derivatives were evaluated for their inhibitory potential on alkaline phosphatase isozymes. Most of the compounds exhibit excellent inhibitory activity and moderate selectivity. The IC50 values on tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) were in the range of 1.34 ± 0.11 to 44.80 ± 2.34 μM, while the values on intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) were in the range of 1.06 ± 0.32 to 192.10 ± 3.78 μM. The most active derivative exhibits a potent inhibition on IAP with a ≈14 fold higher selectivity as compared to TNAP. Furthermore, molecular docking calculations were performed for the most potent inhibitors to show their binding interactions within the active site of the respective enzymes.

  3. YbiV from E. coli K12 is a HAD phosphatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Anne; Lee, Seok-Yong; McCullagh, Emma; Silversmith, Ruth E.; Wemmer, David E.

    2004-03-16

    The protein YbiV from Escherichia coli K12 MG1655 is a hypothetical protein with sequence homology to the haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) superfamily of proteins. Although numerous members of this family have been identified, the functions of few are known. Using the crystal structure, sequence analysis, and biochemical assays, we have characterized ybiV as a HAD phosphatase. The crystal structure of YbiV reveals a two domain protein, one with the characteristic HAD hydrolase fold, the other an inserted a/b fold. In an effort to understand the mechanism we also solved and report the structures of YbiV in complex with beryllofluoride (BeF3-) and aluminum trifluoride (AlF3) which have been shown to mimic the phosphorylated intermediate and transition state for hydrolysis, respectively, in analogy to other HAD phosphatases. Analysis of the structures reveals the substrate binding cavity, which is hydrophilic in nature. Both structure and sequence homology indicate ybiV may be a sugar phosphatase, which is supported by biochemical assays which measured the release of free phosphate on a number of sugar-like substrates. We also investigated available genomic and functional data in an effort to determine the physiological substrate.

  4. Protein phosphatase 2A subunit PR70 interacts with pRb and mediates its dephosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magenta, Alessandra; Fasanaro, Pasquale; Romani, Sveva; Di Stefano, Valeria; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Martelli, Fabio

    2008-01-01

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (pRb) regulates cell proliferation and differentiation via phosphorylation-sensitive interactions with specific targets. While the role of cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase complexes in the modulation of pRb phosphorylation has been extensively studied, relatively little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating phosphate removal by phosphatases. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is constituted by a core dimer bearing catalytic activity and one variable B regulatory subunit conferring target specificity and subcellular localization. We previously demonstrated that PP2A core dimer binds pRb and dephosphorylates pRb upon oxidative stress. In the present study, we identified a specific PP2A-B subunit, PR70, that was associated with pRb both in vitro and in vivo. PR70 overexpression caused pRb dephosphorylation; conversely, PR70 knockdown prevented both pRb dephosphorylation and DNA synthesis inhibition induced by oxidative stress. Moreover, we found that intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization was necessary and sufficient to trigger pRb dephosphorylation and PP2A phosphatase activity of PR70 was Ca(2+) induced. These data underline the importance of PR70-Ca(2+) interaction in the signal transduction mechanisms triggered by redox imbalance and leading to pRb dephosphorylation.

  5. TCTEX1D4, a novel protein phosphatase 1 interactor: connecting the phosphatase to the microtubule network

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    Luís Korrodi-Gregório

    2013-03-01

    Reversible phosphorylation plays an important role as a mechanism of intracellular control in eukaryotes. PPP1, a major eukaryotic Ser/Thr-protein phosphatase, acquires its specificity by interacting with different protein regulators, also known as PPP1 interacting proteins (PIPs. In the present work we characterized a physiologically relevant PIP in testis. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen with a human testis cDNA library, we identified a novel PIP of PPP1CC2 isoform, the T-complex testis expressed protein 1 domain containing 4 (TCTEX1D4 that has recently been described as a Tctex1 dynein light chain family member. The overlay assays confirm that TCTEX1D4 interacts with the different spliced isoforms of PPP1CC. Also, the binding domain occurs in the N-terminus, where a consensus PPP1 binding motif (PPP1BM RVSF is present. The distribution of TCTEX1D4 in testis suggests its involvement in distinct functions, such as TGFβ signaling at the blood–testis barrier and acrosome cap formation. Immunofluorescence in human ejaculated sperm shows that TCTEX1D4 is present in the flagellum and in the acrosome region of the head. Moreover, TCTEX1D4 and PPP1 co-localize in the microtubule organizing center (MTOC and microtubules in cell cultures. Importantly, the TCTEX1D4 PPP1BM seems to be relevant for complex formation, for PPP1 retention in the MTOC and movement along microtubules. These novel results open new avenues to possible roles of this dynein, together with PPP1. In essence TCTEX1D4/PPP1C complex appears to be involved in microtubule dynamics, sperm motility, acrosome reaction and in the regulation of the blood–testis barrier.

  6. Neurotrophin-3 Enhances the Synaptic Organizing Function of TrkC–Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase σ in Rat Hippocampal Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and its high-affinity receptor TrkC play crucial trophic roles in neuronal differentiation, axon outgrowth, and synapse development and plasticity in the nervous system. We demonstrated previously that postsynaptic TrkC functions as a glutamatergic synapse-inducing (synaptogenic) cell adhesion molecule trans-interacting with presynaptic protein tyrosine phosphatase σ (PTPσ). Given that NT-3 and PTPσ bind distinct domains of the TrkC extracellular region, here we tested t...

  7. Inositol monophosphate phosphatase genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

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    Parish Tanya

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacteria use inositol in phosphatidylinositol, for anchoring lipoarabinomannan (LAM, lipomannan (LM and phosphatidylinosotol mannosides (PIMs in the cell envelope, and for the production of mycothiol, which maintains the redox balance of the cell. Inositol is synthesized by conversion of glucose-6-phosphate to inositol-1-phosphate, followed by dephosphorylation by inositol monophosphate phosphatases (IMPases to form myo-inositol. To gain insight into how Mycobacterium tuberculosis synthesises inositol we carried out genetic analysis of the four IMPase homologues that are present in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome. Results Mutants lacking either impA (Rv1604 or suhB (Rv2701c were isolated in the absence of exogenous inositol, and no differences in levels of PIMs, LM, LAM or mycothiol were observed. Mutagenesis of cysQ (Rv2131c was initially unsuccessful, but was possible when a porin-like gene of Mycobacterium smegmatis was expressed, and also by gene switching in the merodiploid strain. In contrast, we could only obtain mutations in impC (Rv3137 when a second functional copy was provided in trans, even when exogenous inositol was provided. Experiments to obtain a mutant in the presence of a second copy of impC containing an active-site mutation, in the presence of porin-like gene of M. smegmatis, or in the absence of inositol 1-phosphate synthase activity, were also unsuccessful. We showed that all four genes are expressed, although at different levels, and levels of inositol phosphatase activity did not fall significantly in any of the mutants obtained. Conclusions We have shown that neither impA, suhB nor cysQ is solely responsible for inositol synthesis. In contrast, we show that impC is essential for mycobacterial growth under the conditions we used, and suggest it may be required in the early stages of mycothiol synthesis.

  8. Preparation of immunoliposomes directed against CD34 antigen as target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadal, M; Carrion, C; Domingo, J C; Petriz, J; Garcia, J; de Madariaga, M A

    1998-04-22

    The My-10 monoclonal antibody has facilitated the search of haematopoietic stem cells by recognizing selectively the human CD34 antigen. In the present work, My-10 immunoliposomes directed specifically against CD34+ cells were prepared, characterized and tested in vitro. Binding to target cells at 4 degreesC of immunoliposomes containing carboxyfluorescein as aqueous marker was evaluated by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. These immunoliposomes demonstrated their capacity to bind specifically to CD34+ cells. Studies have shown that 9 antibodies/vesicle were sufficient to obtain a good binding efficiency. The product was stable over one month at 4 degreesC in terms of leakage of encapsulated carboxyfluorescein, particle size and antigen binding capacity.

  9. Structural Basis of the Oncogenic Interaction of Phosphatase PRL-1 with the Magnesium Transporter CNNM2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez-Mascarell, Paula; Oyenarte, Iker; Hardy, Serge; Breiderhoff, Tilman; Stuiver, Marchel; Kostantin, Elie; Diercks, Tammo; Pey, Angel L; Ereño-Orbea, June; Martínez-Chantar, María Luz; Khalaf-Nazzal, Reham; Claverie-Martin, Felix; Müller, Dominik; Tremblay, Michel L; Martínez-Cruz, Luis Alfonso

    2017-01-20

    Phosphatases of regenerating liver (PRLs), the most oncogenic of all protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), play a critical role in metastatic progression of cancers. Recent findings established a new paradigm by uncovering that their association with magnesium transporters of the cyclin M (CNNM) family causes a rise in intracellular magnesium levels that promote oncogenic transformation. Recently, however, essential roles for regulation of the circadian rhythm and reproduction of the CNNM family have been highlighted. Here, we describe the crystal structure of PRL-1 in complex with the Bateman module of CNNM2 (CNNM2BAT), which consists of two cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) domains (IPR000664) and represents an intracellular regulatory module of the transporter. The structure reveals a heterotetrameric association, consisting of a disc-like homodimer of CNNM2BAT bound to two independent PRL-1 molecules, each one located at opposite tips of the disc. The structure highlights the key role played by Asp-558 at the extended loop of the CBS2 motif of CNNM2 in maintaining the association between the two proteins and proves that the interaction between CNNM2 and PRL-1 occurs via the catalytic domain of the phosphatase. Our data shed new light on the structural basis underlying the interaction between PRL phosphatases and CNNM transporters and provides a hypothesis about the molecular mechanism by which PRL-1, upon binding to CNNM2, might increase the intracellular concentration of Mg(2+) thereby contributing to tumor progression and metastasis. The availability of this structure sets the basis for the rational design of compounds modulating PRL-1 and CNNM2 activities.

  10. Direct determination of phosphatase activity from physiological substrates in cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongyuan Ren

    Full Text Available A direct and continuous approach to determine simultaneously protein and phosphate concentrations in cells and kinetics of phosphate release from physiological substrates by cells without any labeling has been developed. Among the enzymes having a phosphatase activity, tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP performs indispensable, multiple functions in humans. It is expressed in numerous tissues with high levels detected in bones, liver and neurons. It is absolutely required for bone mineralization and also necessary for neurotransmitter synthesis. We provided the proof of concept that infrared spectroscopy is a reliable assay to determine a phosphatase activity in the osteoblasts. For the first time, an overall specific phosphatase activity in cells was determined in a single step by measuring simultaneously protein and substrate concentrations. We found specific activities in osteoblast like cells amounting to 116 ± 13 nmol min(-1 mg(-1 for PPi, to 56 ± 11 nmol min(-1 mg(-1 for AMP, to 79 ± 23 nmol min(-1 mg(-1 for beta-glycerophosphate and to 73 ± 15 nmol min(-1 mg(-1 for 1-alpha-D glucose phosphate. The assay was also effective to monitor phosphatase activity in primary osteoblasts and in matrix vesicles. The use of levamisole--a TNAP inhibitor--served to demonstrate that a part of the phosphatase activity originated from this enzyme. An IC50 value of 1.16 ± 0.03 mM was obtained for the inhibition of phosphatase activity of levamisole in osteoblast like cells. The infrared assay could be extended to determine any type of phosphatase activity in other cells. It may serve as a metabolomic tool to monitor an overall phosphatase activity including acid phosphatases or other related enzymes.

  11. Phosphatidylinositol anchor of HeLa cell alkaline phosphatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jemmerson, R.; Low, M.G.

    1987-09-08

    Alkaline phosphatase from cancer cells, HeLa TCRC-1, was biosynthetically labeled with either /sup 3/H-fatty acids or (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography of immunoprecipitated material. Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) released a substantial proportion of the /sup 3/H-fatty acid label from immunoaffinity-purified alkaline phosphatase but had no effect on the radioactivity of (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled material. PI-PLC also liberated catalytically active alkaline phosphatase from viable cells, and this could be selectively blocked by monoclonal antibodies to alkaline phosphatase. However, the alkaline phosphatase released from /sup 3/H-fatty acid labeled cells by PI-PLC was not radioactive. By contrast, treatment with bromelain removed both the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from purified alkaline phosphatase. Subtilisin was also able to remove the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from the purified alkaline phosphatase. The /sup 3/H radioactivity in alkaline phosphatase purified from (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled cells comigrated with authentic (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine by anion-exchange chromatography after acid hydrolysis. The data suggest that the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine are covalently attached to the carboxyl-terminal segment since bromelain and subtilisin both release alkaline phosphatase from the membrane by cleavage at that end of the polypeptide chain. The data are consistent with findings for other proteins recently shown to be anchored in the membrane through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol structure and indicate that a similar structure contributes to the membrane anchoring of alkaline phosphatase.

  12. Voltage sensitive phosphatases: emerging kinship to protein tyrosine phosphatases from structure-function research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirstin eHobiger

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The transmembrane protein Ci-VSP from the ascidian Ciona intestinalis was described as first member of a fascinating family of enzymes, the voltage sensitive phosphatases (VSPs. Ci-VSP and its voltage-activated homologs from other species are stimulated by positive membrane potentials and dephosphorylate the head groups of negatively charged phosphoinositide phosphates (PIPs. In doing so, VSPs act as control centers at the cytosolic membrane surface, because they intervene in signaling cascades that are mediated by PIP lipids. The characteristic motif CX5RT/S in the active site classifies VSPs as members of the huge family of cysteine-based protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs. Although PTPs have already been well characterized regarding both, structure and function, their relationship to VSPs has drawn only limited attention so far. Therefore, the intention of this review is to give a short overview about the extensive knowledge about PTPs in relation to the facts known about VSPs. Here, we concentrate on the structural features of the catalytic domain which are similar between both classes of phosphatases and their consequences for the enzymatic function. By discussing results obtained from crystal structures, molecular dynamics simulations, and mutagenesis studies, a possible mechanism for the catalytic cycle of VSPs is presented based on that one proposed for PTPs. In this way, we want to link the knowledge about the catalytic activity of VSPs and PTPs.

  13. Different designs of kinase-phosphatase interactions and phosphatase sequestration shapes the robustness and signal flow in the MAPK cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarma Uddipan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The three layer mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling cascade exhibits different designs of interactions between its kinases and phosphatases. While the sequential interactions between the three kinases of the cascade are tightly preserved, the phosphatases of the cascade, such as MKP3 and PP2A, exhibit relatively diverse interactions with their substrate kinases. Additionally, the kinases of the MAPK cascade can also sequester their phosphatases. Thus, each topologically distinct interaction design of kinases and phosphatases could exhibit unique signal processing characteristics, and the presence of phosphatase sequestration may lead to further fine tuning of the propagated signal. Results We have built four architecturally distinct types of models of the MAPK cascade, each model with identical kinase-kinase interactions but unique kinases-phosphatases interactions. Our simulations unravelled that MAPK cascade’s robustness to external perturbations is a function of nature of interaction between its kinases and phosphatases. The cascade’s output robustness was enhanced when phosphatases were sequestrated by their target kinases. We uncovered a novel implicit/hidden negative feedback loop from the phosphatase MKP3 to its upstream kinase Raf-1, in a cascade resembling the B cell MAPK cascade. Notably, strength of the feedback loop was reciprocal to the strength of phosphatases’ sequestration and stronger sequestration abolished the feedback loop completely. An experimental method to verify the presence of the feedback loop is also proposed. We further showed, when the models were activated by transient signal, memory (total time taken by the cascade output to reach its unstimulated level after removal of signal of a cascade was determined by the specific designs of interaction among its kinases and phosphatases. Conclusions Differences in interaction designs among the kinases and phosphatases can

  14. Structure of the trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase from Brugia malayi reveals key design principles for anthelmintic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farelli, Jeremiah D; Galvin, Brendan D; Li, Zhiru; Liu, Chunliang; Aono, Miyuki; Garland, Megan; Hallett, Olivia E; Causey, Thomas B; Ali-Reynolds, Alana; Saltzberg, Daniel J; Carlow, Clotilde K S; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Allen, Karen N

    2014-07-01

    Parasitic nematodes are responsible for devastating illnesses that plague many of the world's poorest populations indigenous to the tropical areas of developing nations. Among these diseases is lymphatic filariasis, a major cause of permanent and long-term disability. Proteins essential to nematodes that do not have mammalian counterparts represent targets for therapeutic inhibitor discovery. One promising target is trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (T6PP) from Brugia malayi. In the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, T6PP is essential for survival due to the toxic effect(s) of the accumulation of trehalose 6-phosphate. T6PP has also been shown to be essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of T6PP from B. malayi. The protein structure revealed a stabilizing N-terminal MIT-like domain and a catalytic C-terminal C2B-type HAD phosphatase fold. Structure-guided mutagenesis, combined with kinetic analyses using a designed competitive inhibitor, trehalose 6-sulfate, identified five residues important for binding and catalysis. This structure-function analysis along with computational mapping provided the basis for the proposed model of the T6PP-trehalose 6-phosphate complex. The model indicates a substrate-binding mode wherein shape complementarity and van der Waals interactions drive recognition. The mode of binding is in sharp contrast to the homolog sucrose-6-phosphate phosphatase where extensive hydrogen-bond interactions are made to the substrate. Together these results suggest that high-affinity inhibitors will be bi-dentate, taking advantage of substrate-like binding to the phosphoryl-binding pocket while simultaneously utilizing non-native binding to the trehalose pocket. The conservation of the key residues that enforce the shape of the substrate pocket in T6PP enzymes suggest that development of broad-range anthelmintic and antibacterial therapeutics employing this platform may be possible.

  15. Structure of the trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase from Brugia malayi reveals key design principles for anthelmintic drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremiah D Farelli

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic nematodes are responsible for devastating illnesses that plague many of the world's poorest populations indigenous to the tropical areas of developing nations. Among these diseases is lymphatic filariasis, a major cause of permanent and long-term disability. Proteins essential to nematodes that do not have mammalian counterparts represent targets for therapeutic inhibitor discovery. One promising target is trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (T6PP from Brugia malayi. In the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, T6PP is essential for survival due to the toxic effect(s of the accumulation of trehalose 6-phosphate. T6PP has also been shown to be essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of T6PP from B. malayi. The protein structure revealed a stabilizing N-terminal MIT-like domain and a catalytic C-terminal C2B-type HAD phosphatase fold. Structure-guided mutagenesis, combined with kinetic analyses using a designed competitive inhibitor, trehalose 6-sulfate, identified five residues important for binding and catalysis. This structure-function analysis along with computational mapping provided the basis for the proposed model of the T6PP-trehalose 6-phosphate complex. The model indicates a substrate-binding mode wherein shape complementarity and van der Waals interactions drive recognition. The mode of binding is in sharp contrast to the homolog sucrose-6-phosphate phosphatase where extensive hydrogen-bond interactions are made to the substrate. Together these results suggest that high-affinity inhibitors will be bi-dentate, taking advantage of substrate-like binding to the phosphoryl-binding pocket while simultaneously utilizing non-native binding to the trehalose pocket. The conservation of the key residues that enforce the shape of the substrate pocket in T6PP enzymes suggest that development of broad-range anthelmintic and antibacterial therapeutics employing this platform may be possible.

  16. Voltage-sensing phosphatase modulation by a C2 domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Paul M; Zolman, Kevin D; Kohout, Susy C

    2015-01-01

    The voltage-sensing phosphatase (VSP) is the first example of an enzyme controlled by changes in membrane potential. VSP has four distinct regions: the transmembrane voltage-sensing domain (VSD), the inter-domain linker, the cytosolic catalytic domain, and the C2 domain. The VSD transmits the changes in membrane potential through the inter-domain linker activating the catalytic domain which then dephosphorylates phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) lipids. The role of the C2, however, has not been established. In this study, we explore two possible roles for the C2: catalysis and membrane-binding. The Ci-VSP crystal structures show that the C2 residue Y522 lines the active site suggesting a contribution to catalysis. When we mutated Y522 to phenylalanine, we found a shift in the voltage dependence of activity. This suggests hydrogen bonding as a mechanism of action. Going one step further, when we deleted the entire C2 domain, we found voltage-dependent enzyme activity was no longer detectable. This result clearly indicates the entire C2 is necessary for catalysis as well as for modulating activity. As C2s are known membrane-binding domains, we tested whether the VSP C2 interacts with the membrane. We probed a cluster of four positively charged residues lining the top of the C2 and suggested by previous studies to interact with phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] (Kalli et al., 2014). Neutralizing those positive charges significantly shifted the voltage dependence of activity to higher voltages. We tested membrane binding by depleting PI(4,5)P2 from the membrane using the 5HT2C receptor and found that the VSD motions as measured by voltage clamp fluorometry (VCF) were not changed. These results suggest that if the C2 domain interacts with the membrane to influence VSP function it may not occur exclusively through PI(4,5)P2. Together, this data advances our understanding of the VSP C2 by demonstrating a necessary and critical role for the C2 domain in

  17. T cells expressing VHH-directed oligoclonal chimeric HER2 antigen receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamnani, Fatemeh Rahimi; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali;

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy with engineered T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) originated from antibodies is a promising strategy in cancer immunotherapy. Several unsuccessful trials, however, highlight the need for alternative conventional binding domains and the better combination...

  18. The association of heavy and light chain variable domains in antibodies: implications for antigen specificity.

    KAUST Repository

    Chailyan, Anna

    2011-06-28

    The antigen-binding site of immunoglobulins is formed by six regions, three from the light and three from the heavy chain variable domains, which, on association of the two chains, form the conventional antigen-binding site of the antibody. The mode of interaction between the heavy and light chain variable domains affects the relative position of the antigen-binding loops and therefore has an effect on the overall conformation of the binding site. In this article, we analyze the structure of the interface between the heavy and light chain variable domains and show that there are essentially two different modes for their interaction that can be identified by the presence of key amino acids in specific positions of the antibody sequences. We also show that the different packing modes are related to the type of recognized antigen.

  19. Induced refolding of a temperature denatured llama heavy-chain antibody fragment by its antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolk, E.; Vliet, C. van; Perez, J.M.J.; Vriend, G.; Darbon, H.; Ferrat, G.; Cambillau, C.; Frenken, L.G.J.; Verrips, T.

    2005-01-01

    In a previous study we have shown that llama VHH antibody fragments are able to bind their antigen after a heat shock of 90°C, in contrast to the murine monoclonal antibodies. However, the molecular mechanism by which antibody:antigen interaction occurs under these extreme conditions remains unclear

  20. Zooming into the binding groove of HLA molecules : which positions and which substitutions change peptide binding most?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deutekom, Hanneke W M; Kesmir, C.

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes are the most polymorphic genes in the human genome. Almost all polymorphic residues are located in the peptide-binding groove, resulting in different peptide-binding preferences. Whether a single amino acid change can alter the peptide-binding repertoire of an HLA

  1. Oxidative stress can alter the antigenicity of immunodominant peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiskopf, Daniela; Schwanninger, Angelika; Weinberger, Birgit

    2010-01-01

    APCs operate frequently under oxidative stress induced by aging, tissue damage, pathogens, or inflammatory responses. Phagocytic cells produce peroxides and free-radical species that facilitate pathogen clearance and can in the case of APCs, also lead to oxidative modifications of antigenic...... molecule is not impaired. Additionally, we show that CD8(+) T cells have a decreased proliferation and IFN-gamma production when stimulated with oxidized CMVpp65(495-503) peptide. Spectratyping the antigen-binding site of the TCR of responding T cells demonstrates that the CMVpp65(495-503) and the CMVoxpp...... of antigenic peptides may affect T cell responses severely by binding T cell clones with different affinity. This may lead to an altered immune response against infectious agents as well as against tumor or autoantigens under oxidative stress conditions....

  2. Analysis of cell surface antigens by Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stojanovic, I.; Schasfoort, R.B.M.; Terstappen, L.W.M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is most commonly used to measure bio-molecular interactions. SPR is used significantly less frequent for measuring whole cell interactions. Here we introduce a method to measure whole cells label free using the specific binding of cell surface antigens expressed on th

  3. Structure-Function Analysis of the 3' Phosphatase Component of T4 Polynucleotide Kinase/phosphatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu,H.; Smith, P.; Wang, L.; Shuman, S.

    2007-01-01

    T4 polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase (Pnkp) exemplifies a family of bifunctional enzymes with 5'-kinase and 3' phosphatase activities that function in nucleic acid repair. T4 Pnkp is a homotetramer of a 301-aa polypeptide, which consists of an N-terminal kinase domain of the P-loop phosphotransferase superfamily and a C-terminal phosphatase domain of the DxD acylphosphatase superfamily. The homotetramer is formed via pairs of phosphatase-phosphatase and kinase-kinase homodimer interfaces. Here we identify four side chains-Asp187, Ser211, Lys258, and Asp277-that are required for 3' phosphatase activity. Alanine mutations at these positions abolished phosphatase activity without affecting kinase function or tetramerization. Conservative substitutions of asparagine or glutamate for Asp187 did not revive the 3' phosphatase, nor did arginine or glutamine substitutions for Lys258. Threonine in lieu of Ser211 and glutamate in lieu of Asp277 restored full activity, whereas asparagine at position 277 had no salutary effect. We report a 3.0 A crystal structure of the Pnkp tetramer, in which a sulfate ion is coordinated between Arg246 and Arg279 in a position that we propose mimics one of the penultimate phosphodiesters (5'NpNpNp-3') of the polynucleotide 3'-PO(4) substrate. The amalgam of mutational and structural data engenders a plausible catalytic mechanism for the phosphatase that includes covalent catalysis (via Asp165), general acid-base catalysis (via Asp167), metal coordination (by Asp165, Asp277 and Asp278), and transition state stabilization (via Lys258, Ser211, backbone amides, and the divalent cation). Other critical side chains play architectural roles (Arg176, Asp187, Arg213, Asp254). To probe the role of oligomerization in phosphatase function, we introduced six double-alanine cluster mutations at the phosphatase-phosphatase domain interface, two of which (R297A-Q295A and E292A-D300A) converted Pnkp from a tetramer to a dimer

  4. 22(R)-hydroxycholesterol induces HuR-dependent MAP kinase phosphatase-1 expression via mGluR5-mediated Ca(2+)/PKCα signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunmi; Woo, Joo Hong; Lee, Jee Hoon; Joe, Eun-Hye; Jou, Ilo

    2016-08-01

    MAP kinase phosphatase (MKP)-1 plays a pivotal role in controlling MAP kinase (MAPK)-dependent (patho) physiological processes. Although MKP-1 gene expression is tightly regulated at multiple levels, the underlying mechanistic details remain largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that MKP-1 expression is regulated at the post-transcriptional level by 22(R)-hydroxycholesterol [22(R)-HC] through a novel mechanism. 22(R)-HC induces Hu antigen R (HuR) phosphorylation, cytoplasmic translocation and binding to MKP-1 mRNA, resulting in stabilization of MKP-1 mRNA. The resulting increase in MKP-1 leads to suppression of JNK-mediated inflammatory responses in brain astrocytes. We further demonstrate that 22(R)-HC-induced phosphorylation of nuclear HuR is mediated by PKCα, which is activated in the cytosol by increases in intracellular Ca(2+) levels mediated by the phospholipase C/inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (PLC/IP3R) pathway and translocates from cytoplasm to nucleus. In addition, pharmacological interventions reveal that metabotropic glutamate receptor5 (mGluR5) is responsible for the increases in intracellular Ca(2+) that underlie these actions of 22(R)-HC. Collectively, our findings identify a novel anti-inflammatory mechanism of 22(R)-HC, which acts through PKCα-mediated cytoplasmic shuttling of HuR to post-transcriptionally regulate MKP-1 expression. These findings provide an experimental basis for the development of a RNA-targeted therapeutic agent to control MAPK-dependent inflammatory responses.

  5. The SHP-2 tyrosine phosphatase: Signaling mechanisms and biological functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Cellular biological activities are tightly controlled by intracellular signaling processes initiated by extracellular signals.Protein tyrosine phosphatases, which remove phosphate groups from phosphorylated signaling molecules, play equally important tyrosine roles as protein tyrosine kinases in signal transduction.SHP-2, a cytoplasmic SH2 domain containing protein tyrosine phosphatase, is involved in the signaling pathways of a variety of growth factors and cytokines. Recent studies have clearly demonstrated that this phosphatase plays an important role in transducing signal relay from the cell surface to the nucleus, and is a critical intracellular regulator in mediating cell proliferation and differentiation.

  6. Conformation-controlled binding kinetics of antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanti, Marta; Fanelli, Duccio; Piazza, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are large, extremely flexible molecules, whose internal dynamics is certainly key to their astounding ability to bind antigens of all sizes, from small hormones to giant viruses. In this paper, we build a shape-based coarse-grained model of IgG molecules and show that it can be used to generate 3D conformations in agreement with single-molecule Cryo-Electron Tomography data. Furthermore, we elaborate a theoretical model that can be solved exactly to compute the binding rate constant of a small antigen to an IgG in a prescribed 3D conformation. Our model shows that the antigen binding process is tightly related to the internal dynamics of the IgG. Our findings pave the way for further investigation of the subtle connection between the dynamics and the function of large, flexible multi-valent molecular machines.

  7. Phosphorylcholine Phosphatase: A Peculiar Enzyme of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Domenech

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa synthesizes phosphorylcholine phosphatase (PchP when grown on choline, betaine, dimethylglycine or carnitine. In the presence of Mg2+ or Zn2+, PchP catalyzes the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenylphosphate (p-NPP or phosphorylcholine (Pcho. The regulation of pchP gene expression is under the control of GbdR and NtrC; dimethylglycine is likely the metabolite directly involved in the induction of PchP. Therefore, the regulation of choline metabolism and consequently PchP synthesis may reflect an adaptive response of P. aeruginosa to environmental conditions. Bioinformatic and biochemistry studies shown that PchP contains two sites for alkylammonium compounds (AACs: one in the catalytic site near the metal ion-phosphoester pocket, and another in an inhibitory site responsible for the binding of the alkylammonium moiety. Both sites could be close to each other and interact through the residues 42E, 43E and 82YYY84. Zn2+ is better activator than Mg2+ at pH 5.0 and it is more effective at alleviating the inhibition produced by the entry of Pcho or different AACs in the inhibitory site. We postulate that Zn2+ induces at pH 5.0 a conformational change in the active center that is communicated to the inhibitory site, producing a compact or closed structure. However, at pH 7.4, this effect is not observed because to the hydrolysis of the [Zn2+L2−1L20(H2O2] complex, which causes a change from octahedral to tetrahedral in the metal coordination geometry. This enzyme is also present in P. fluorescens, P. putida, P. syringae, and other organisms. We have recently crystallized PchP and solved its structure.

  8. Protein tyrosine phosphatases: structure-function relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabernero, Lydia; Aricescu, A Radu; Jones, E Yvonne; Szedlacsek, Stefan E

    2008-03-01

    Structural analysis of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) has expanded considerably in the last several years, producing more than 200 structures in this class of enzymes (from 35 different proteins and their complexes with ligands). The small-medium size of the catalytic domain of approximately 280 residues plus a very compact fold makes it amenable to cloning and overexpression in bacterial systems thus facilitating crystallographic analysis. The low molecular weight PTPs being even smaller, approximately 150 residues, are also perfect targets for NMR analysis. The availability of different structures and complexes of PTPs with substrates and inhibitors has provided a wealth of information with profound effects in the way we understand their biological functions. Developments in mammalian expression technology recently led to the first crystal structure of a receptor-like PTP extracellular region. Altogether, the PTP structural work significantly advanced our knowledge regarding the architecture, regulation and substrate specificity of these enzymes. In this review, we compile the most prominent structural traits that characterize PTPs and their complexes with ligands. We discuss how the data can be used to design further functional experiments and as a basis for drug design given that many PTPs are now considered strategic therapeutic targets for human diseases such as diabetes and cancer.

  9. Schizosaccharomyces pombe cell division cycle under limited glucose requires Ssp1 kinase, the putative CaMKK, and Sds23, a PP2A-related phosphatase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanyu, Yuichiro; Imai, Kumiko K; Kawasaki, Yosuke; Nakamura, Takahiro; Nakaseko, Yukinobu; Nagao, Koji; Kokubu, Aya; Ebe, Masahiro; Fujisawa, Asuka; Hayashi, Takeshi; Obuse, Chikashi; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2009-05-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) is required for diverse cellular functions, and similar kinases exist in fungi. Although mammalian CaMK kinase (CaMKK) activates CaMK and also evolutionarily-conserved AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), CaMKK is yet to be established in yeast. We here report that the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe Ssp1 kinase, which controls G2/M transition and response to stress, is the putative CaMKK. Ssp1 has a CaM binding domain (CBD) and associates with 14-3-3 proteins as mammalian CaMKK does. Temperature-sensitive ssp1 mutants isolated are defective in the tolerance to limited glucose, and this tolerance requires the conserved stretch present between the kinase domain and CBD. Sds23, multi-copy suppressor for mutants defective in type 1 phosphatase and APC/cyclosome, also suppresses the ssp1 phenotype, and is required for the tolerance to limited glucose. We demonstrate that Sds23 binds to type 2A protein phosphatases (PP2A) and PP2A-related phosphatase Ppe1, and that Sds23 inhibits Ppe1 phosphatase activity. Ssp1 and Ppe1 thus seem to antagonize in utilizing limited glucose. We also show that Ppk9 and Ssp2 are the catalytic subunits of AMPK and AMPK-related kinases, respectively, which bind to common beta-(Amk2) and gamma-(Cbs2) subunits.

  10. The RCN1-encoded A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A increases phosphatase activity in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deruere, J.; Jackson, K.; Garbers, C.; Soll, D.; Delong, A.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a heterotrimeric serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase, comprises a catalytic C subunit and two distinct regulatory subunits, A and B. The RCN1 gene encodes one of three A regulatory subunits in Arabidopsis thaliana. A T-DNA insertion mutation at this locus impairs root curling, seedling organ elongation and apical hypocotyl hook formation. We have used in vivo and in vitro assays to gauge the impact of the rcn1 mutation on PP2A activity in seedlings. PP2A activity is decreased in extracts from rcn1 mutant seedlings, and this decrease is not due to a reduction in catalytic subunit expression. Roots of mutant seedlings exhibit increased sensitivity to the phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and cantharidin in organ elongation assays. Shoots of dark-grown, but not light-grown seedlings also show increased inhibitor sensitivity. Furthermore, cantharidin treatment of wild-type seedlings mimics the rcn1 defect in root curling, root waving and hypocotyl hook formation assays. In roots of wild-type seedlings, RCN1 mRNA is expressed at high levels in root tips, and accumulates to lower levels in the pericycle and lateral root primordia. In shoots, RCN1 is expressed in the apical hook and the basal, rapidly elongating cells in etiolated hypocotyls, and in the shoot meristem and leaf primordia of light-grown seedlings. Our results show that the wild-type RCN1-encoded A subunit functions as a positive regulator of the PP2A holoenzyme, increasing activity towards substrates involved in organ elongation and differential cell elongation responses such as root curling.

  11. Dephosphorylation of Centrins by Protein Phosphatase 2C and

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Christin Thissen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we identified protein phosphatases dephosphorylating centrins previously phosphorylated by protein kinase CK2. The following phosphatases known to be present in the retina were tested: PP1, PP2A, PP2B, PP2C, PP5, and alkaline phosphatase. PP2C and were capable of dephosphorylating P-Thr138-centrin1 most efficiently. PP2C was inactive and the other retinal phosphatases also had much less or no effect. Similar results were observed for centrins 2 and 4. Centrin3 was not a substrate for CK2. The results suggest PP2C and to play a significant role in regulating the phosphorylation status of centrins in vivo.

  12. Protein Phosphatases Involved in Regulating Mitosis: Facts and Hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Fernandes, Gary; Lee, Chang-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Almost all eukaryotic proteins are subject to post-translational modifications during mitosis and cell cycle, and in particular, reversible phosphorylation being a key event. The recent use of high-throughput experimental analyses has revealed that more than 70% of all eukaryotic proteins are regulated by phosphorylation; however, the mechanism of dephosphorylation, counteracting phosphorylation, is relatively unknown. Recent discoveries have shown that many of the protein phosphatases are involved in the temporal and spatial control of mitotic events, such as mitotic entry, mitotic spindle assembly, chromosome architecture changes and cohesion, and mitotic exit. This implies that certain phosphatases are tightly regulated for timely dephosphorylation of key mitotic phosphoproteins and are essential for control of various mitotic processes. This review describes the physiological and pathological roles of mitotic phosphatases, as well as the versatile role of various protein phosphatases in several mitotic events.

  13. Drugging the Undruggable: Therapeutic Potential of Targeting Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2017-01-17

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are essential signaling enzymes that, together with protein tyrosine kinases, regulate tyrosine phosphorylation inside the cell. Proper level of tyrosine phosphorylation is important for a diverse array of cellular processes, such as proliferation, metabolism, motility, and survival. Aberrant tyrosine phosphorylation, resulting from alteration of PTP expression, misregulation, and mutation, has been linked to the etiology of many human ailments including cancer, diabetes/obesity, autoimmune disorders, and infectious diseases. However, despite the fact that PTPs have been garnering attention as compelling drug targets, they remain a largely underexploited resource for therapeutic intervention. Indeed, PTPs have been widely dismissed as "undruggable", due to concerns that (1) the highly conserved active site (i.e., pTyr-binding pocket) makes it difficult to achieve inhibitor selectivity among closely related family members, and (2) the positive-charged active site prefers negatively charged molecules, which usually lack cell permeability. To address the issue of selectivity, we advanced a novel paradigm for the acquisition of highly potent and selective PTP inhibitors through generation of bivalent ligands that interact with both PTP active site and adjacent unique peripheral pockets. To overcome the bioavailability issue, we have identified nonhydrolyzable pTyr mimetics that are sufficiently polar to bind the PTP active site, yet still capable of efficiently penetrating cell membranes. We show that these pTyr mimetics interact in the desired inhibitory fashion with the PTP active site and tethering them to appropriate molecular fragments to engage less conserved interactions outside of PTP active site can increase PTP inhibitor potency and selectivity. We demonstrate through three pTyr mimetics fragment-based approaches that it is completely feasible to obtain highly potent and selective PTP inhibitors with robust in vivo

  14. Detection of phosphatase activity in aquatic and terrestrial cyanobacterial strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babić Olivera B.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria, as highly adaptable microorganisms, are characterized by an ability to survive in different environmental conditions, in which a significant role belongs to their enzymes. Phosphatases are enzymes produced by algae in relatively large quantities in response to a low orthophosphate concentration and their activity is significantly correlated with their primary production. The activity of these enzymes was investigated in 11 cyanobacterial strains in order to determine enzyme synthesis depending on taxonomic and ecological group of cyanobacteria. The study was conducted with 4 terrestrial cyanobacterial strains, which belong to Nostoc and Anabaena genera, and 7 filamentous water cyanobacteria of Nostoc, Oscillatoria, Phormidium and Microcystis genera. The obtained results showed that the activity of acid and alkaline phosphatases strongly depended on cyanobacterial strain and the environment from which the strain originated. Higher activity of alkaline phosphatases, ranging from 3.64 to 85.14 μmolpNP/s/dm3, was recorded in terrestrial strains compared to the studied water strains (1.11-5.96 μmolpNP/s/dm3. The activity of acid phosphatases was higher in most tested water strains (1.67-6.28 μmolpNP/s/dm3 compared to the activity of alkaline phosphatases (1.11-5.96 μmolpNP/s/dm3. Comparing enzyme activity of nitrogen fixing and non-nitrogen fixing cyanobacteria, it was found that most nitrogen fixing strains had a higher activity of alkaline phosphatases. The data obtained in this work indicate that activity of phosphatases is a strain specific property. The results further suggest that synthesis and activity of phosphatases depended on eco-physiological characteristics of the examined cyanobacterial strains. This can be of great importance for the further study of enzymes and mechanisms of their activity as a part of cyanobacterial survival strategy in environments with extreme conditions. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike

  15. Moraxella catarrhalis synthesizes an autotransporter that is an acid phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoopman, Todd C; Wang, Wei; Brautigam, Chad A; Sedillo, Jennifer L; Reilly, Thomas J; Hansen, Eric J

    2008-02-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis O35E was shown to synthesize a 105-kDa protein that has similarity to both acid phosphatases and autotransporters. The N-terminal portion of the M. catarrhalis acid phosphatase A (MapA) was most similar (the BLAST probability score was 10(-10)) to bacterial class A nonspecific acid phosphatases. The central region of the MapA protein had similarity to passenger domains of other autotransporter proteins, whereas the C-terminal portion of MapA resembled the translocation domain of conventional autotransporters. Cloning and expression of the M. catarrhalis mapA gene in Escherichia coli confirmed the presence of acid phosphatase activity in the MapA protein. The MapA protein was shown to be localized to the outer membrane of M. catarrhalis and was not detected either in the soluble cytoplasmic fraction from disrupted M. catarrhalis cells or in the spent culture supernatant fluid from M. catarrhalis. Use of the predicted MapA translocation domain in a fusion construct with the passenger domain from another predicted M. catarrhalis autotransporter confirmed the translocation ability of this MapA domain. Inactivation of the mapA gene in M. catarrhalis strain O35E reduced the acid phosphatase activity expressed by this organism, and this mutation could be complemented in trans with the wild-type mapA gene. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the mapA gene from six M. catarrhalis strains showed that this protein was highly conserved among strains of this pathogen. Site-directed mutagenesis of a critical histidine residue (H233A) in the predicted active site of the acid phosphatase domain in MapA eliminated acid phosphatase activity in the recombinant MapA protein. This is the first description of an autotransporter protein that expresses acid phosphatase activity.

  16. Low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase (LMWPTP) upregulation mediates malignant potential in colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Hoekstra (Elmer); L.L. Kodach (Liudmila L.); A. Mooppilmadham Das (Asha); R.R. Ruela-de-Sousa (Roberta); C.V. Ferreira (Carmen); J.C. Hardwick (James); C.J. van der Woude (Janneke); M.P. Peppelenbosch (Maikel); T.L.M. ten Hagen (Timo); G.M. Fuhler (Gwenny)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractPhosphatases have long been regarded as tumor suppressors, however there is emerging evidence for a tumor initiating role for some phosphatases in several forms of cancer. Low Molecular Weight Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase (LMWPTP; acid phosphatase 1 [ACP1]) is an 18 kDa enzyme that influ

  17. Mycobacterium leprae antigens involved in human immune responses. I. Identification of four antigens by monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, W.J.; Hellqvist, L.; Basten, A.; Raison, R.L.

    1985-12-01

    Four distinct antigens were identified in soluble sonicates of Mycobacterium leprae by using a panel of 11 monoclonal antibodies. Cross-reactivity studies with other mycobacterial species were conducted by using ELISA and immunoblot assays, and demonstrated that determinants on two of the antigens were present in many mycobacteria, whereas the other two were limited in distribution. Competitive inhibition experiments with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies showed cross-inhibition between antibodies identifying two of the four antigenicbands. These two bands, of M/sub tau/ 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD, were resistant to protease treatment after immunoblotting. In contrast the two other bands of 16 and 70 KD were protease-sensitive. Although all four bands reacted with some human lepromatous leprosy sera in immunoblots, the 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD bands were most prominent. Lepromatous leprosy sera also inhibited the binding of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies to each of the four antigens, with the mean titer causing 50% inhibition being higher for antibodies reacting with the 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD bands. These findings indicated that all four antigens were involved in the human B cell response to M. leprae.

  18. Photoaffinity antigens for human γδ T cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarikonda, Ghanashyam; Wang, Hong; Puan, Kia-Joo; Liu, Xiao-hui; Lee, Hoi K.; Song, Yongcheng; Distefano, Mark D.; Oldfield, Eric; Prestwich, Glenn D.; Morita, Craig T.

    2009-01-01

    Vγ2Vδ2 T cells comprise the major subset of peripheral blood γ δ T cells in humans and expand during infections by recognizing small, nonpeptide prenyl pyrophosphates. These molecules include (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl-pyrophosphate (HMBPP), a microbial isoprenoid intermediate, and isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP), an endogenous isoprenoid intermediate. Recognition of these nonpeptide antigens is mediated by the Vγ2Vδ2 T cell antigen receptor (TCR). Several findings suggest that prenyl pyrophosphates are presented by an antigen presenting molecule: contact between T cells and APCs is required; the antigens do not bind the Vγ2Vδ2 TCR directly; and antigen recognition is abrogated by TCR mutations in CDRs distant from the putative antigen recognition site. Identification of the putative antigen presenting molecule, however, has been hindered by the inability to achieve stable association of nonpeptide prenyl pyrophosphate antigens with the presenting molecule. In this study, we show that photoaffinity analogs of HMBPP, meta/para-benzophenone-(methylene)-prenyl pyrophosphates (m/p-BZ-(C)-C5-OPP), can cross-link to the surface of tumor cell lines and be presented as antigens to γ δ T cells. Mutant tumor cell lines lacking MHC class I, MHC class II, β2-microglobulin, and CD1, as well as tumor cell lines from a variety of tissues and individuals, will all crosslink to and present m-BZ-C5-OPP. Finally, pulsing of BZ-(C)-C5-OPP is inhibited by IPP and an inactive analog, suggesting that they bind to the same molecule. Taken together, these results suggest that nonpeptide antigens are presented by a novel antigen presenting molecule that is widely distributed, non-polymorphic, but not classical MHC class I, MHC class II, or CD1. This is an author-produced version of a manuscript accepted for publication in The Journal of Immunology (The JI). The American Association of Immunologists, Inc. (AAI), publisher of The JI, holds the copyright to this manuscript

  19. [Phosphatase activity in Amoeba proteus at pH 9.0].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopina, V A

    2007-01-01

    In the free-living amoeba Amoeba proteus (strain B), after PAAG disk-electrophoresis of the homogenate supernatant, at using 1-naphthyl phosphate as a substrate and pH 9.0, three forms of phosphatase activity were revealed; they were arbitrarily called "fast", "intermediate", and "slow" phosphatases. The fast phosphatase has been established to be a fraction of lysosomal acid phosphatase that preserves some low activity at alkaline pH. The question as to which particular class the intermediate phosphatase belongs to has remained unanswered: it can be both acid phosphatase and protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP). Based on data of inhibitor analysis, large substrate specificity, results of experiments with reactivation by Zn ions after inactivation with EDTA, other than in the fast and intermediate phosphatases localization in the amoeba cell, it is concluded that only slow phosphatase can be classified as alkaline phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1).

  20. Simultaneous quantitation of diphtheria and tetanus antibodies by double antigen, time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggerbeck, H; Nørgaard-Pedersen, B; Heron, I

    1996-04-19

    A dual, double antigen, time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay (DELFIA) for the simultaneous detection and quantitation of diphtheria (D) and tetanus (T) antibodies in sera has been developed. In the double antigen format one arm of the antibody binds to antigen coated microtitre wells and the other arm binds to labelled antigen to provide a fluorescent signal. This assay was found to be functionally specific for IgG antibodies and showed a good correlation with established toxin neutralization assays. Furthermore, the double antigen set-up was species independent, permitting the direct use of existing international references of animal origin to measure protective antibody levels in humans in international units (IU/ml). The detection limit corresponded to 0.0003 IU/ml with Eu(3+)-labelled toxoids and to 0.0035 IU/ml using Sm(3+)-labelled toxoids. The assay was fast with a high capacity making it a suitable method for serological surveillance studies.

  1. Characterization of binding specificities of bovine leucocyte class I molecules: impacts for rational epitope discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Andreas M.; Rasmussen, Michael; Svitek, Nicholas;

    2014-01-01

    The binding of peptides to classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I proteins is the single most selective step in antigen presentation. However, the peptide-binding specificity of cattle MHC (bovine leucocyte antigen, BoLA) class I (BoLA-I) molecules remains poorly characterized...

  2. Identifying coevolutionary patterns in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaowei; Fares, Mario A

    2010-05-01

    The antigenic peptide, major histocompatibility complex molecule (MHC; also called human leukocyte antigen, HLA), coreceptor CD8, or CD4 and T-cell receptor (TCR) function as a complex to initiate effectors' mechanisms of the immune system. The tight functional and physical interaction among these molecules may have involved strong coevolution links among domains within and between proteins. Despite the importance of unraveling such dependencies to understand the arms race of host-pathogen interaction, no previous studies have aimed at achieving such an objective. Here, we perform an exhaustive coevolution analysis and show that indeed such dependencies are strongly shaping the evolution and probably the function of these molecules. We identify intramolecular coevolution in HLA class I and II at domains important for their immune activity. Most of the amino acid sites identified to be coevolving in HLAI have been also detected to undergo positive Darwinian selection highlighting therefore their adaptive value. We also identify coevolution among antigen-binding pockets (P1-P9) and among these and TCR-binding sites. Conversely to HLAI, coevolution is weaker in HLAII. Our results support that such coevolutionary patterns are due to selective pressures of host-pathogen coevolution and cooperative binding of TCRs, antigenic peptides, and CD8/CD4 to HLAI and HLAII.

  3. Thrombin Increases Expression of Fibronectin Antigen on the Platelet Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Mark H.; Painter, Richard G.; Forsyth, Jane; Birdwell, Charles; Plow, Edward F.

    1980-02-01

    Fibronectins (fn) are adhesive glycoproteins which bind to collagen and to fibrin and appear to be important in cellular adhesion to other cells or surfaces. Fn-related antigen is present in human platelets, suggesting a possible role for fn in the adhesive properties of platelets. We have studied the localization of fn in resting and thrombin-stimulated platelets by immunofluorescence and quantitative binding of radiolabeled antibody. In resting fixed platelets, variable light surface staining for fn was observed. When these cells were made permeable to antibody with detergent, staining for fn was markedly enhanced and was present in a punctate distribution, suggesting intracellular localization. Stimulation with thrombin, which is associated with increased platelet adhesiveness, resulted in increased staining for fn antigen on intact platelets. These stimulated cells did not leak 51Cr nor did they stain for F-actin, thus documenting that the increased fn staining was not due to loss of plasma membrane integrity. The thrombin-induced increase in accessible platelet fn antigen was confirmed by quantitative antibody binding studies in which thrombin-stimulated platelets specifically bound 15 times as much radiolabeled F(ab')2 anti-fn as did resting cells. Thus, thrombin stimulation results in increased expression of fn antigen on the platelet surface. Here it may participate in interactions with fibrin, connective tissue, or other cells.

  4. Differential regulation of glycogenolysis by mutant protein phosphatase-1 glycogen-targeting subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danos, Arpad M; Osmanovic, Senad; Brady, Matthew J

    2009-07-17

    PTG and G(L) are hepatic protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) glycogen-targeting subunits, which direct PP1 activity against glycogen synthase (GS) and/or phosphorylase (GP). The C-terminal 16 amino residues of G(L) comprise a high affinity binding site for GP that regulates bound PP1 activity against GS. In this study, a truncated G(L) construct lacking the GP-binding site (G(L)tr) and a chimeric PTG molecule containing the C-terminal site (PTG-G(L)) were generated. As expected, GP binding to glutathione S-transferase (GST)-G(L)tr was reduced, whereas GP binding to GST-PTG-G(L) was increased 2- to 3-fold versus GST-PTG. In contrast, PP1 binding to all proteins was equivalent. Primary mouse hepatocytes were infected with adenoviral constructs for each subunit, and their effects on glycogen metabolism were investigated. G(L)tr expression was more effective at promoting GP inactivation, GS activation, and glycogen accumulation than G(L). Removal of the regulatory GP-binding site from G(L)tr completely blocked the inactivation of GS seen in G(L)-expressing cells following a drop in extracellular glucose. As a result, G(L)tr expression prevented glycogen mobilization under 5 mm glucose conditions. In contrast, equivalent overexpression of PTG or PTG-G(L) caused a similar increase in glycogen-targeted PP1 levels and GS dephosphorylation. Surprisingly, GP dephosphorylation was significantly reduced in PTG-G(L)-overexpressing cells. As a result, PTG-G(L) expression permitted glycogenolysis under 5 mm glucose conditions that was prevented in PTG-expressing cells. Thus, expression of constructs that contained the high affinity GP-binding site (G(L) and PTG-G(L)) displayed reduced glycogen accumulation and enhanced glycogenolysis compared with their respective controls, albeit via different mechanisms.

  5. Structural elucidation of the NADP(H) phosphatase activity of staphylococcal dual-specific IMPase/NADP(H) phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sudipta; Dutta, Anirudha; Dutta, Debajyoti; Ghosh, Ananta Kumar; Das, Amit Kumar

    2016-02-01

    NADP(H)/NAD(H) homeostasis has long been identified to play a pivotal role in the mitigation of reactive oxygen stress (ROS) in the intracellular milieu and is therefore critical for the progression and pathogenesis of many diseases. NAD(H) kinases and NADP(H) phosphatases are two key players in this pathway. Despite structural evidence demonstrating the existence and mode of action of NAD(H) kinases, the specific annotation and the mode of action of NADP(H) phosphatases remains obscure. Here, structural evidence supporting the alternative role of inositol monophosphatase (IMPase) as an NADP(H) phosphatase is reported. Crystal structures of staphylococcal dual-specific IMPase/NADP(H) phosphatase (SaIMPase-I) in complex with the substrates D-myo-inositol-1-phosphate and NADP(+) have been solved. The structure of the SaIMPase-I-Ca(2+)-NADP(+) ternary complex reveals the catalytic mode of action of NADP(H) phosphatase. Moreover, structures of SaIMPase-I-Ca(2+)-substrate complexes have reinforced the earlier proposal that the length of the active-site-distant helix α4 and its preceding loop are the predisposing factors for the promiscuous substrate specificity of SaIMPase-I. Altogether, the evidence presented suggests that IMPase-family enzymes with a shorter α4 helix could be potential candidates for previously unreported NADP(H) phosphatase activity.

  6. Cancer testis antigen and immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnadas DK

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Deepa Kolaseri Krishnadas, Fanqi Bai, Kenneth G Lucas Department of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Louisville, KY, USA Abstract: The identification of cancer testis (CT antigens has been an important advance in determining potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. Multiple previous studies have shown that CT antigen vaccines, using both peptides and dendritic cell vaccines, can elicit clinical and immunologic responses in several different tumors. This review details the expression of melanoma antigen family A, 1 (MAGE-A1, melanoma antigen family A, 3 (MAGE-A3, and New York esophageal squamous cell carcinoma-1 (NY-ESO-1 in various malignancies, and presents our current understanding of CT antigen based immunotherapy. Keywords: cancer testis antigens, immunotherapy, vaccine

  7. Cdc25 Phosphatases Are Required for Timely Assembly of CDK1-Cyclin B at the G2/M Transition*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, Oleg; Cizmecioglu, Onur; Settele, Florian; Kempf, Tore; Hoffmann, Ingrid

    2010-01-01

    Progression through mitosis requires the coordinated regulation of Cdk1 kinase activity. Activation of Cdk1 is a multistep process comprising binding of Cdk1 to cyclin B, relocation of cyclin-kinase complexes to the nucleus, activating phosphorylation of Cdk1 on Thr161 by the Cdk-activating kinase (CAK; Cdk7 in metazoans), and removal of inhibitory Thr14 and Tyr15 phosphorylations. This dephosphorylation is catalyzed by the dual specific Cdc25 phosphatases, which occur in three isoforms in mammalian cells, Cdc25A, -B, and -C. We find that expression of Cdc25A leads to an accelerated G2/M phase transition. In Cdc25A-overexpressing cells, Cdk1 exhibits high kinase activity despite being phosphorylated on Tyr15. In addition, Tyr15-phosphorylated Cdk1 binds more cyclin B in Cdc25A-overexpressing cells compared with control cells. Consistent with this observation, we demonstrate that in human transformed cells, Cdc25A and Cdc25B, but not Cdc25C phosphatases have an effect on timing and efficiency of cyclin-kinase complex formation. Overexpression of Cdc25A or Cdc25B promotes earlier assembly and activation of Cdk1-cyclin B complexes, whereas repression of these phosphatases by short hairpin RNA has a reverse effect, leading to a substantial decrease in amounts of cyclin B-bound Cdk1 in G2 and mitosis. Importantly, we find that Cdc25A overexpression leads to an activation of Cdk7 and increase in Thr161 phosphorylation of Cdk1. In conclusion, our data suggest that complex assembly and dephosphorylation of Cdk1 at G2/M is tightly coupled and regulated by Cdc25 phosphatases. PMID:20360007

  8. Antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates enable co-delivery of antigen and adjuvant to dendritic cells in cis but only have partial targeting specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kreutz

    Full Text Available Antibody-antigen conjugates, which promote antigen-presentation by dendritic cells (DC by means of targeted delivery of antigen to particular DC subsets, represent a powerful vaccination approach. To ensure immunity rather than tolerance induction the co-administration of a suitable adjuvant is paramount. However, co-administration of unlinked adjuvant cannot ensure that all cells targeted by the antibody conjugates are appropriately activated. Furthermore, antigen-presenting cells (APC that do not present the desired antigen are equally strongly activated and could prime undesired responses against self-antigens. We, therefore, were interested in exploring targeted co-delivery of antigen and adjuvant in cis in form of antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates for the induction of anti-tumour immunity. In this study, we report on the assembly and characterization of conjugates consisting of DEC205-specific antibody, the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN. We show that such conjugates are more potent at inducing cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses than control conjugates mixed with soluble CpG. However, our study also reveals that the nucleic acid moiety of such antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates alters their binding and uptake and allows delivery of the antigen and the adjuvant to cells partially independently of DEC205. Nevertheless, antibody-antigen-adjuvant conjugates are superior to antibody-free antigen-adjuvant conjugates in priming CTL responses and efficiently induce anti-tumour immunity in the murine B16 pseudo-metastasis model. A better understanding of the role of the antibody moiety is required to inform future conjugate vaccination strategies for efficient induction of anti-tumour responses.

  9. Conformational diversity in the TPR domain-mediated interaction of protein phosphatase 5 with Hsp90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff, Matthew J; Harris, Richard; Barford, David; Ladbury, John E; Williams, Mark A

    2006-03-01

    Protein phosphatase 5 (Ppp5) is one of several proteins that bind to the Hsp90 chaperone via a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain. We report the solution structure of a complex of the TPR domain of Ppp5 with the C-terminal pentapeptide of Hsp90. This structure has the "two-carboxylate clamp" mechanism of peptide binding first seen in the Hop-TPR domain complexes with Hsp90 and Hsp70 peptides. However, NMR data reveal that the Ppp5 clamp is highly dynamic, and that there are multiple modes of peptide binding and mobility throughout the complex. Although this interaction is of very high affinity, relatively few persistent contacts are found between the peptide and the Ppp5-TPR domain, thus explaining its promiscuity in binding both Hsp70 and Hsp90 in vivo. We consider the possible implications of this dynamic structure for the mechanism of relief of autoinhibition in Ppp5 and for the mechanisms of TPR-mediated recognition of Hsp90 by other proteins.

  10. Antigen specificity of invariant natural killer T-cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alysia M. Birkholz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer T-cells, with an invariant T-cell antigen receptor α-chain (iNKT cells, are unique and conserved subset of lymphocytes capable of altering the immune system through their rapid and potent cytokine responses. They are reactive to lipid antigens presented by the CD1d molecule, an antigen-presenting molecule that is not highly polymorphic. iNKT cell responses frequently involve mixtures of cytokines that work against each other, and therefore attempts are underway to develop synthetic antigens that elicit only strong interferon-gamma (IFNγ or only strong interleukin-4 responses but not both. Strong IFNγ responses may correlate with tighter binding to CD1d and prolonged stimulation of iNKT cells, and this may be useful for vaccine adjuvants and for stimulating anti-tumor responses. iNKT cells are self-reactive although the structure of the endogenous antigen is controversial. By contrast, bacterial and fungal lipids that engage the T-cell receptor and activate IFNγ from iNKT cells have been identified from both pathogenic and commensal organisms and the responses are in some cases highly protective from pathogens in mice. It is possible that the expanding knowledge of iNKT cell antigens and iNKT cell activation will provide the basis for therapies for patients suffering from infectious and immune diseases and cancer.

  11. Antigen specificity of invariant natural killer T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkholz, Alysia M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2015-12-01

    Natural killer T-cells, with an invariant T-cell antigen receptor α-chain (iNKT cells), are unique and conserved subset of lymphocytes capable of altering the immune system through their rapid and potent cytokine responses. They are reactive to lipid antigens presented by the CD1d molecule, an antigen-presenting molecule that is not highly polymorphic. iNKT cell responses frequently involve mixtures of cytokines that work against each other, and therefore attempts are underway to develop synthetic antigens that elicit only strong interferon-gamma (IFNγ) or only strong interleukin-4 responses but not both. Strong IFNγ responses may correlate with tighter binding to CD1d and prolonged stimulation of iNKT cells, and this may be useful for vaccine adjuvants and for stimulating anti-tumor responses. iNKT cells are self-reactive although the structure of the endogenous antigen is controversial. By contrast, bacterial and fungal lipids that engage the T-cell receptor and activate IFNγ from iNKT cells have been identified from both pathogenic and commensal organisms and the responses are in some cases highly protective from pathogens in mice. It is possible that the expanding knowledge of iNKT cell antigens and iNKT cell activation will provide the basis for therapies for patients suffering from infectious and immune diseases and cancer.

  12. [Phosphatase activity in Amoeba proteus at low pH].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopina, V A

    2009-01-01

    In free-living Amoeba proteus (strain B), three forms of tartrate-sensitive phosphatase were revealed using PAGE of the supernatant of ameba homogenates obtained with 1% Triton X-100 or distilled water and subsequent staining of gels with 2-naphthyl phosphate as substrate (pH 4.0). The form with the highest mobility in the ameba supernatant was sensitive to all tested phosphatase activity modulators. Two other forms with the lower mobilities were completely or significantly inactivated not only by sodium L-(+)-tartrate, but also by L-(+)-tartaric acid, sodium orthovanadate, ammonium molybdate, EDTA, EGTA, o-phospho-L-tyrosine, DL-dithiotreitol, H2O2, 2-mercaptoethanol, and ions of heavy metals - Fe2+, Fe3+, and Cu2+. Based on results of inhibitory analysis, lysosome location in the ameba cell, and wide substrate specificity of these two forms, it has been concluded that they belong to nonspecific acid phosphomonoesterases (AcP, EC 3.1.3.2). This AcP is suggested to have both phosphomonoesterase and phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase activitis. Two ecto-phosphatases were revealed in the culture medium, in which amebas were cultivated. One of them was inhibited by the same reagents as the ameba tartrate-sensitive AcP and seems to be the AcP released into the culture medium in the process of exocytosis of the content of food vacuoles. In the culture medium, apart from this AcP, another phosphatase was revealed, which was not inhibited by any tested inhibitors of AcP and alkaline phosphatase. It cannot be ruled out that this phosphatase belong to the ecto-ATPases found in many protists; however, its ability to hydrolyze ATP has not yet been proven.

  13. The protein tyrosine phosphatase PRL-2 interacts with the magnesium transporter CNNM3 to promote oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, S; Uetani, N; Wong, N; Kostantin, E; Labbé, D P; Bégin, L R; Mes-Masson, A; Miranda-Saavedra, D; Tremblay, M L

    2015-02-19

    The three PRL (phosphatases of regenerating liver) protein tyrosine phosphatases (PRL-1, -2 and -3) have been identified as key contributors to metastasis in several human cancers, yet the molecular basis of their pro-oncogenic property is unclear. Among the subfamily of PRL phosphatases, overexpression of PRL-2 in breast cancer cells has been shown to promote tumor growth by a mechanism that remains to be uncovered. Here we show that PRL-2 regulates intracellular magnesium levels by forming a functional heterodimer with the magnesium transporter CNNM3. We further reveal that CNNM3 is not a phosphorylated substrate of PRL-2, and that the interaction occurs through a loop unique to the CBS pair domains of CNNM3 that exists only in organisms having PRL orthologs. Supporting the role of PRL-2 in cellular magnesium transport is the observation that PRL-2 knockdown results in a substantial decrease of cellular magnesium influx. Furthermore, in PRL-2 knockout mice, serum magnesium levels were significantly elevated as compared with control animals, indicating a pivotal role for PRL-2 in regulating cellular magnesium homeostasis. Although the expression levels of CNNM3 remained unchanged after magnesium depletion of various cancer cell lines, the interaction between endogenous PRL-2 and CNNM3 was markedly increased. Importantly, xenograft tumor assays with CNNM3 and a mutant form that does not associate with PRL-2 confirm that CNNM3 is itself pro-oncogenic, and that the PRL-2/CNNM3 association is important for conferring transforming activities. This finding is further confirmed from data in human breast cancer tissues showing that CNNM3 levels correlate positively with both PRL-2 expression and the tumor proliferative index. In summary, we demonstrate that oncogenic PRL-2 controls tumor growth by modulating intracellular magnesium levels through binding with the CNNM3 magnesium transporter.

  14. Binding Procurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Vaidyanathan, Hari

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of the binding procurement process in purchasing Aerospace Flight Battery Systems. NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) requested NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Working Group to develop a set of guideline requirements document for Binding Procurement Contracts.

  15. Phosphoinositide 5- and 3-phosphatase activities of a voltage-sensing phosphatase in living cells show identical voltage dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keum, Dongil; Kruse, Martin; Kim, Dong-Il; Hille, Bertil; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2016-06-28

    Voltage-sensing phosphatases (VSPs) are homologs of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), a phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate [PI(3,4)P2] and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PI(3,4,5)P3] 3-phosphatase. However, VSPs have a wider range of substrates, cleaving 3-phosphate from PI(3,4)P2 and probably PI(3,4,5)P3 as well as 5-phosphate from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and PI(3,4,5)P3 in response to membrane depolarization. Recent proposals say these reactions have differing voltage dependence. Using Förster resonance energy transfer probes specific for different PIs in living cells with zebrafish VSP, we quantitate both voltage-dependent 5- and 3-phosphatase subreactions against endogenous substrates. These activities become apparent with different voltage thresholds, voltage sensitivities, and catalytic rates. As an analytical tool, we refine a kinetic model that includes the endogenous pools of phosphoinositides, endogenous phosphatase and kinase reactions connecting them, and four exogenous voltage-dependent 5- and 3-phosphatase subreactions of VSP. We show that apparent voltage threshold differences for seeing effects of the 5- and 3-phosphatase activities in cells are not due to different intrinsic voltage dependence of these reactions. Rather, the reactions have a common voltage dependence, and apparent differences arise only because each VSP subreaction has a different absolute catalytic rate that begins to surpass the respective endogenous enzyme activities at different voltages. For zebrafish VSP, our modeling revealed that 3-phosphatase activity against PI(3,4,5)P3 is 55-fold slower than 5-phosphatase activity against PI(4,5)P2; thus, PI(4,5)P2 generated more slowly from dephosphorylating PI(3,4,5)P3 might never accumulate. When 5-phosphatase activity was counteracted by coexpression of a phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase, there was accumulation of PI(4,5)P2 in parallel to PI(3,4,5)P3 dephosphorylation

  16. Protection of pigs against Taenia solium cysticercosis by immunization with novel recombinant antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauci, Charles G; Jayashi, César M; Gonzalez, Armando E; Lackenby, Julia; Lightowlers, Marshall W

    2012-06-06

    Recombinant antigens from the oncosphere stage of the parasite Taenia solium were expressed in Escherichia coli. The TSOL16, TSOL45-1A and TSOL45-1B recombinant antigens, each consisting of fibronectin type III (FnIII) domain S, were produced as fusion proteins with glutathione S-transferase (GST) and maltose binding protein (MBP). Groups of pigs were immunized twice with the GST fusions of the antigens and boosted a third time with the MBP fusions prior to receiving a challenge infection with T. solium eggs. The TSOL16 antigen was found to be capable of inducing high levels of immunity in pigs against a challenge infection with T. solium. Immunological investigations identified differences in immune responses in the pigs vaccinated with the various antigens. The results demonstrate that the TSOL16 antigen could be a valuable adjunct to current porcine vaccination approaches and may allow the further development of new vaccination strategies against T. solium cysticercosis.

  17. Detection of peste des petits ruminants virus antigen using immunofiltration and antigen-competition ELISA methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, G Dhinakar; Rajanathan, T M C; Kumar, C Senthil; Ramathilagam, G; Hiremath, Geetha; Shaila, M S

    2008-06-22

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is one of the most economically important diseases affecting sheep and goats in India. An immunofiltration-based test has been developed using either mono-specific serum/monoclonal antibodies (mAb) prepared against a recombinant truncated nucleocapsid protein of rinderpest virus (RPV) cross-reactive with PPR virus. This method consists of coating ocular swab eluate from suspected animals onto a nitrocellulose membrane housed in a plastic module, which is allowed to react with suitable dilutions of a mAb or a mono-specific polyclonal antibody. The antigen-antibody complex formed on the membrane is then detected by protein A-colloidal gold conjugate, which forms a pink colour. In the immunofiltration test, concordant results were obtained using either PPRV mAb or mono-specific serum. Another test, an antigen-competition ELISA which relies on the competition between plate-coated recombinant truncated 'N' protein of RPV and the PPRV 'N' protein present in ocular swab eluates (sample) for binding to the mono-specific antibody against N protein of RPV (in liquid phase) was developed. The cut-off value for this test was established using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) positive and negative oculo-nasal swab samples. Linear correlation between percent inhibition (PI) values in antigen-competition ELISA and virus infectivity titres was 0.992. Comparison of the immunofiltration test with the antigen-competition ELISA yielded a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 100%. These two tests can serve as a screening (immunofiltration) and confirmatory (antigen-competition ELISA) test, respectively, in the diagnosis of PPR in sheep or goats.

  18. Purification of human seminal plasma no. 7 antigen by immunoaffinity chromatography on bound monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isojima, S; Koyama, K; Fujiwara, N

    1982-01-01

    Human seminal plasma (HSP) No. 7 antigen was purified by immunoaffinity chromatography on bound 1C4 monoclonal antibody (Moab) (Shigeta et al., 1980b). The pooled HSP protein was applied to a CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B column of bound 1C4 Moab gamma globulin and the antibody bound fraction (fr) eluted was further purified by rechromatography in the same way. The purified antigen in the antibody bound fr obtained by rechromatography gave a single band on SDS-PAGE in a position corresponding to a molecular weight of 15,000 daltons. This preparation was 196.2 times more effective than the original HSP protein in neutralizing the sperm immobilizing activity of 1C4 Moab. The purified HSP No. 7 antigen contained iron, but was different from lactoferrin and transferrin. It did not show any enzymatic activities, such as those of acid phosphatase, LDH or trypsin inhibitor, and shared antigenicity with human milk protein. It was present in seminal plasma as a molecule with a higher molecular weight but seemed to be cleaved to a monomer of 15,000 daltons during purification procedures. This antigen is present on spermatozoa as sperm-coating antigen and the corresponding antibody can immobilize spermatozoa with complement. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7127911

  19. Protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit B56α limits phosphatase activity in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Sean C; Curran, Jerry; Makara, Michael A; Kline, Crystal F; Ho, Hsiang-Ting; Xu, Zhaobin; Wu, Xiangqiong; Polina, Iuliia; Musa, Hassan; Meadows, Allison M; Carnes, Cynthia A; Biesiadecki, Brandon J; Davis, Jonathan P; Weisleder, Noah; Györke, Sandor; Wehrens, Xander H; Hund, Thomas J; Mohler, Peter J

    2015-07-21

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a serine/threonine-selective holoenzyme composed of a catalytic, scaffolding, and regulatory subunit. In the heart, PP2A activity is requisite for cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and central in adrenergic signaling. We found that mice deficient in the PP2A regulatory subunit B56α (1 of 13 regulatory subunits) had altered PP2A signaling in the heart that was associated with changes in cardiac physiology, suggesting that the B56α regulatory subunit had an autoinhibitory role that suppressed excess PP2A activity. The increase in PP2A activity in the mice with reduced B56α expression resulted in slower heart rates and increased heart rate variability, conduction defects, and increased sensitivity of heart rate to parasympathetic agonists. Increased PP2A activity in B56α(+/-) myocytes resulted in reduced Ca(2+) waves and sparks, which was associated with decreased phosphorylation (and thus decreased activation) of the ryanodine receptor RyR2, an ion channel on intracellular membranes that is involved in Ca(2+) regulation in cardiomyocytes. In line with an autoinhibitory role for B56α, in vivo expression of B56α in the absence of altered abundance of other PP2A subunits decreased basal phosphatase activity. Consequently, in vivo expression of B56α suppressed parasympathetic regulation of heart rate and increased RyR2 phosphorylation in cardiomyocytes. These data show that an integral component of the PP2A holoenzyme has an important inhibitory role in controlling PP2A enzyme activity in the heart.

  20. Duality of β-glucan microparticles: antigen carrier and immunostimulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baert K

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Kim Baert,1 Bruno G De Geest,2 Henri De Greve,3,4 Eric Cox,1,* Bert Devriendt1,* 1Department of Virology, Parasitology and Immunology, 2Department of Pharmaceutics, Ghent University, Merelbeke, Ghent, Belgium; 3Structural Biology Research Centre, VIB, Brussels, Belgium; 4Structural Biology Brussels, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Designing efficient recombinant mucosal vaccines against enteric diseases is still a major challenge. Mucosal delivery of recombinant vaccines requires encapsulation in potent immunostimulatory particles to induce an efficient immune response. This paper evaluates the capacity of β-glucan microparticles (GPs as antigen vehicles and characterizes their immune-stimulatory effects. The relevant infectious antigen FedF was chosen to be loaded inside the microparticles. The incorporation of FedF inside the particles was highly efficient (roughly 85% and occurred without antigen degradation. In addition, these GPs have immunostimulatory effects as well, demonstrated by the strong reactive oxygen species (ROS production by porcine neutrophils upon their recognition. Although antigen-loaded GPs still induce ROS production, antigen loading decreases this production by neutrophils for reasons yet unknown. However, these antigen-loaded GPs are still able to bind their specific β-glucan receptor, demonstrated by blocking complement receptor 3, which is the major β-glucan receptor on porcine neutrophils. The dual character of these particles is confirmed by a T-cell proliferation assay. FedF-loaded particles induce a significantly higher FedF-specific T-cell proliferation than soluble FedF. Taken together, these results show that GPs are efficient antigen carriers with immune-stimulatory properties. Keywords: β-glucan microparticles, FedF, antigen delivery vehicle, immunostimulants

  1. The catalytic properties of alkaline phosphatases under various conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atyaksheva, L. F.; Chukhrai, E. S.; Poltorak, O. M.

    2008-11-01

    A comparative study was performed to examine the catalytic properties of alkaline phosphatases from bacteria Escherichia coli and bovine and chicken intestines. The activity of enzyme dimers and tetramers was determined. The activity of the dimer was three or four times higher than that of the tetramer. The maximum activity and affinity for 4-nitrophenylphosphate was observed for the bacterial alkaline phosphatase ( K M = 1.7 × 10-5 M, V max = 1800 μmol/(min mg of protein) for dimers and V max = 420 μmol/(min mg of protein) for tetramers). The Michaelis constants were equal for two animal phosphatases in various buffer media (pH 8.5) ((3.5 ± 0.2) × 10-4 M). Five buffer systems were investigated: tris, carbonate, hepes, borate, and glycine buffers, and the lowest catalytic activity of alkaline phosphatases at equal pH was observed in the borate buffer (for enzyme from bovine intestine, V max = 80 μmol/(min mg of protein)). Cu2+ cations formed a complex with tris-(oxymethyl)-aminomethane ( tris-HCl buffer) and inhibited the intestine alkaline phosphatases by a noncompetitive mechanism.

  2. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation in human cataractous lens epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasavada Abhay

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The anterior lens epithelial cells undergo a variety of degenerative and proliferative changes during cataract formation. Acid phosphatase is primarily responsible for tissue regeneration and tissue repair. The lipid hydroperoxides that are obtained by lipid peroxidation of polysaturated or unsaturated fatty acids bring about deterioration of biological membranes at cellular and tissue levels. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation activities were studied on the lens epithelial cells of nuclear cataract, posterior subcapsular cataract, mature cataract, and mixed cataract. Of these, mature cataractous lens epithelium showed maximum activity for acid phosphatase (516.83 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and maximum levels of lipid peroxidation (86.29 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. In contrast, mixed cataractous lens epithelium showed minimum activity of acid phosphatase (222.61 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and minimum levels of lipid peroxidation (54.23 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. From our study, we correlated the maximum activity of acid phosphatase in mature cataractous lens epithelium with the increased areas of superimposed cells associated with the formation of mature cataract. Likewise, the maximum levels of lipid peroxidation in mature cataractous lens epithelium was correlated with increased permeability of the plasma membrane. Conversely, the minimum levels of lipid peroxidation in mixed cataractous lens epithelium makes us presume that factors other than lipid peroxidation may also account for the formation of mixed type of cataract.

  3. Phosphotyrosine Substrate Sequence Motifs for Dual Specificity Phosphatases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan M Zhao

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatases dephosphorylate tyrosine residues of proteins, whereas, dual specificity phosphatases (DUSPs are a subgroup of protein tyrosine phosphatases that dephosphorylate not only Tyr(P residue, but also the Ser(P and Thr(P residues of proteins. The DUSPs are linked to the regulation of many cellular functions and signaling pathways. Though many cellular targets of DUSPs are known, the relationship between catalytic activity and substrate specificity is poorly defined. We investigated the interactions of peptide substrates with select DUSPs of four types: MAP kinases (DUSP1 and DUSP7, atypical (DUSP3, DUSP14, DUSP22 and DUSP27, viral (variola VH1, and Cdc25 (A-C. Phosphatase recognition sites were experimentally determined by measuring dephosphorylation of 6,218 microarrayed Tyr(P peptides representing confirmed and theoretical phosphorylation motifs from the cellular proteome. A broad continuum of dephosphorylation was observed across the microarrayed peptide substrates for all phosphatases, suggesting a complex relationship between substrate sequence recognition and optimal activity. Further analysis of peptide dephosphorylation by hierarchical clustering indicated that DUSPs could be organized by substrate sequence motifs, and peptide-specificities by phylogenetic relationships among the catalytic domains. The most highly dephosphorylated peptides represented proteins from 29 cell-signaling pathways, greatly expanding the list of potential targets of DUSPs. These newly identified DUSP substrates will be important for examining structure-activity relationships with physiologically relevant targets.

  4. Antigen antibody interactions

    CERN Document Server

    DeLisi, Charles

    1976-01-01

    1. 1 Organization of the Immune System One of the most important survival mechanisms of vertebrates is their ability to recognize and respond to the onslaught of pathogenic microbes to which they are conti- ously exposed. The collection of host cells and molecules involved in this recognition­ 12 response function constitutes its immune system. In man, it comprises about 10 cells 20 (lymphocytes) and 10 molecules (immunoglobulins). Its ontogenic development is c- strained by the requirement that it be capable of responding to an almost limitless variety of molecular configurations on foreign substances, while simultaneously remaining inert to those on self components. It has thus evolved to discriminate, with exquisite precision, between molecular patterns. The foreign substances which induce a response, called antigens, are typically large molecules such as proteins and polysaccharides. The portions of these with which immunoglobulins interact are called epitopes or determinants. A typical protein epitope m...

  5. Nur1 dephosphorylation confers positive feedback to mitotic exit phosphatase activation in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly Godfrey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Substrate dephosphorylation by the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk-opposing phosphatase, Cdc14, is vital for many events during budding yeast mitotic exit. Cdc14 is sequestered in the nucleolus through inhibitory binding to Net1, from which it is released in anaphase following Net1 phosphorylation. Initial Net1 phosphorylation depends on Cdk itself, in conjunction with proteins of the Cdc14 Early Anaphase Release (FEAR network. Later on, the Mitotic Exit Network (MEN signaling cascade maintains Cdc14 release. An important unresolved question is how Cdc14 activity can increase in early anaphase, while Cdk activity, that is required for Net1 phosphorylation, decreases and the MEN is not yet active. Here we show that the nuclear rim protein Nur1 interacts with Net1 and, in its Cdk phosphorylated form, inhibits Cdc14 release. Nur1 is dephosphorylated by Cdc14 in early anaphase, relieving the inhibition and promoting further Cdc14 release. Nur1 dephosphorylation thus describes a positive feedback loop in Cdc14 phosphatase activation during mitotic exit, required for faithful chromosome segregation and completion of the cell division cycle.

  6. Protein phosphatase PP1γ2 in sperm morphogenesis and epididymal initiation of sperm motility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rumela Chakrabarti; Lina Cheng; Pawan Puri; David Soler; Srinivasan Viiayaraghavan

    2007-01-01

    The serine/threonine phosphatase (PP1) isoform PP1γ2, predominantly expressed in the testis, is a key enzyme in spermatozoa. High PP1γ2 catalytic activity holds motility in check in immature spermatozoa. Inhibition of PP1γ2 causes motility initiation in immature spermatozoa and motility stimulation and changes in flagellar beat parameters in mature spermatozoa. The PP1γ2 isoform is present in all mammalian spermatozoa studied: mouse, rat, hamster,bovine, non-human primate and man. We have now identified at least four of its regulatory proteins that regulate distinct pools of PP1γ2 within spermatozoa. Our studies provide new insights into biochemical mechanisms underlying development and regulation of sperm motility. We hypothesize that changes in sperm PP1γ2 activity as a result of phosphorylation and reversible binding of the regulatory proteins to the catalytic subunit are critical in the development and regulation of motility and the ability of sperm to fertilize eggs. Targeted disruption of the Ppp1cc gene,which encodes the PP1γ1 or PP1γ2 isoforms, causes male infertility in mice as a result of impaired spermiogenesis.Our observations suggest that, in addition to motility, the protein phosphatase PP1γ2 might play an isoform-specific function in the development of specialized flagellar structures of mammalian spermatozoa.

  7. Acid phosphatase 2 (ACP2) is required for membrane fusion during influenza virus entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jihye; Kim, Jinhee; Son, Kidong; d’Alexandry d’Orengiani, Anne-Laure Pham Humg; Min, Ji-Young

    2017-01-01

    Influenza viruses exploit host factors to successfully replicate in infected cells. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology, we identified six human genes required for influenza A virus (IAV) replication. Here we focused on the role of acid phosphatase 2 (ACP2), as its knockdown showed the greatest inhibition of IAV replication. In IAV-infected cells, depletion of ACP2 resulted in a significant reduction in the expression of viral proteins and mRNA, and led to the attenuation of virus multi-cycle growth. ACP2 knockdown also decreased replication of seasonal influenza A and B viruses and avian IAVs of the H7 subtype. Interestingly, ACP2 depletion had no effect on the replication of Ebola or hepatitis C virus. Because ACP2 is known to be a lysosomal acid phosphatase, we assessed the role of ACP2 in influenza virus entry. While neither binding of the viral particle to the cell surface nor endosomal acidification was affected in ACP2-depleted cells, fusion of the endosomal and viral membranes was impaired. As a result, downstream steps in viral entry were blocked, including nucleocapsid uncoating and nuclear import of viral ribonucleoproteins. Our results established ACP2 as a necessary host factor for regulating the fusion step of influenza virus entry. PMID:28272419

  8. Crystal Structure of the Catalytic Domain of a Serine Threonine Protein Phosphatase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinglel, Mark; Honkanel, Richard; Ciszak, Ewa

    2003-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues is a well-recognized mechanism in eukaryotic cells for the regulation of cell-cycle progression, cell growth and metabolism. Human serine/threonine phosphatases can be placed into two major families, PPP and PPM. To date the structure on one PPP family member (PPl) has been determined. Here we present the structure of a 323-residue catalytic domain of a second phosphatase belonging to the PPP family of enzyme. catalytic domain of the enzyme has been determined to 1.60Angstrom resolution and refined to R=17.5 and Rfree = 20.8%. The catalytic domain possesses a unique fold consisting of a largely monolithic structure, divisible into closely-associated helical and sheet regions. The catalytic site contains two manganese ions that are involved in substrate binding and catalysis. The enzyme crystallizes as a dimer that completely buries catalytic surfaces of both monomers, Also, the structure shows evidence of some flexibility around the active site cleft that may be related to substrate specificity of this enzyme.

  9. Vaginal myofibroblastoma with glands expressing mammary and prostatic antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallenfels, I; Chlumská, A

    2012-01-01

    A case of unusual vaginal myofibroblastoma containing glands which expressed mammary and prostatic markers is described. The tumor occurred in 70-year-old woman in the proximal third of the vagina. It showed morphology and immunophenotype typical of so-called cervicovaginal myofibroblastoma. The peripheral zone of the lesion contained a few groups of glands suggesting vaginal adenosis or prostatic-type glands on initial examination. The glands showed a surprising simultaneous expression of mammary markers mammaglobin and GCDFP-15 and prostatic markers prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and prostate-specific acid phosphatase (PSAP). Immunostains for alpha-smooth muscle actin, p63 and CD10 highlighted the myoepithelial cell layer of the glands. The finding indicates that simultaneous use of both mammary and prostatic markers for examination of unusual glandular lesions in the vulvovaginal location can be helpful for an exact diagnosis, and can contribute to better understanding of prostatic and mammary differentiations in the female lower genital tract.

  10. Antigenic Variation in Bacterial Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Guy H; Bankhead, Troy; Seifert, H Steven

    2016-02-01

    Antigenic variation is a strategy used by a broad diversity of microbial pathogens to persist within the mammalian host. Whereas viruses make use of a minimal proofreading capacity combined with large amounts of progeny to use random mutation for variant generation, antigenically variant bacteria have evolved mechanisms which use a stable genome, which aids in protecting the fitness of the progeny. Here, three well-characterized and highly antigenically variant bacterial pathogens are discussed: Anaplasma, Borrelia, and Neisseria. These three pathogens display a variety of mechanisms used to create the structural and antigenic variation needed for immune escape and long-term persistence. Intrahost antigenic variation is the focus; however, the role of these immune escape mechanisms at the population level is also presented.

  11. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neurath, A.R. (Lindsley F. Kimbell Research Inst., New York, NY); Strick, N.; Baker, L.; Krugman, S.

    1982-07-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid-phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bound adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure.

  12. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neurath, A R; Strick, N; Baker, L; Krugman, S

    1982-01-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bond adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure. Images PMID:6956871

  13. Ultrastructural localization of acid phosphatase in nonhuman primate vaginal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, B F

    1985-01-01

    The vagina of the rhesus monkey is lined by a stratified squamous epithelium. However, little is known regarding the cytochemical composition of its cell organelles and the substances found in the intercellular spaces. In this study we have examined the ultrastructural distribution of acid phosphatase in the vaginal epithelium. In basal and parabasal cells reaction product was found in some Golgi cisternae and vesicles and in a variety of cytoplasmic granules. Reaction product was also found in some, but not all, membrane-coating granules. In the upper layers of the epithelium, the membrane-coating granules extruded their contents and acid phosphatase was localized in the intercellular spaces. The possible roles of acid phosphatase in keratinization, desquamation, or modification of substances in the intercellular compartment are discussed.

  14. Association of erythrocyte acid phosphatase phenotypes with myopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himabindu P

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Acid phosphatase is a polymorphic nonspecific orthophosphate monoesterase which catalyses the cleaving of phosphoric acid and subsequent breakdown of several monophosphoric esters under acidic pH conditions. Acid phosphatase has a physiologic function as a flavin mononucleotide phosphatase (FMN and regulates the intracellular concentrations of flavin coenzymes that are electron carriers in the oxidative phosphorylation pathway. Myopia or nearsightedness is caused by both environmental and genetic factors. Myopic eyes when subjected to excessive oxidative stress results in retinal detachments .In the present study there is a significant elevation of AA phenotype in myopes when compared to controls. The AA phenotype is more susceptible to oxidative stress and its lower enzyme activity is known to be associated with increased intrauterine growth that further results in increased axial length in progressive myopia. The AA phenotype also confers risk for myopia development in males, early age group and cases with parental consanguinity.

  15. Heterogeneous antigen recognition behavior of induced polyspecific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Jordan D; Planchais, Cyril; Kang, Jonghoon; Pashov, Anastas; Vassilev, Tchavdar L; Kaveri, Srinivas V; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sebastien

    2010-07-23

    Polyspecific antibodies represent a significant fraction of the antibody repertoires in healthy animals and humans. Interestingly, certain antibodies only acquire a polyspecific antigen-binding behavior after exposure to protein-modifying conditions, such as those found at inflammation sites, or used in small- and large-scale immunoglobulin purification. This phenomenon is referred to as "criptic polyspecificity". In the present study, we compare the potential of different chemical agents to induce IgG polyspecificity. Depending on the treatment used, quantitative and qualitative differences in the recognition of individual antigens from a standard panel were observed. Antibodies with cryptic polyspecificity utilized common mechanisms for the recognition of structurally unrelated antigens when exposed to a particular inductor of polyspecificity. Our study contributes to the understanding of the mechanisms underlying the cryptic polyspecificity.

  16. Chemical inhibition of bacterial protein tyrosine phosphatase suppresses capsule production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standish, Alistair J; Salim, Angela A; Zhang, Hua; Capon, Robert J; Morona, Renato

    2012-01-01

    Capsule polysaccharide is a major virulence factor for a wide range of bacterial pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae. The biosynthesis of Wzy-dependent capsules in both gram-negative and -positive bacteria is regulated by a system involving a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) and a protein tyrosine kinase. However, how the system functions is still controversial. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, a major human pathogen, the system is present in all but 2 of the 93 serotypes found to date. In order to study this regulation further, we performed a screen to find inhibitors of the phosphatase, CpsB. This led to the observation that a recently discovered marine sponge metabolite, fascioquinol E, inhibited CpsB phosphatase activity both in vitro and in vivo at concentrations that did not affect the growth of the bacteria. This inhibition resulted in decreased capsule synthesis in D39 and Type 1 S. pneumoniae. Furthermore, concentrations of Fascioquinol E that inhibited capsule also lead to increased attachment of pneumococci to a macrophage cell line, suggesting that this compound would inhibit the virulence of the pathogen. Interestingly, this compound also inhibited the phosphatase activity of the structurally unrelated gram-negative PTP, Wzb, which belongs to separate family of protein tyrosine phosphatases. Furthermore, incubation with Klebsiella pneumoniae, which contains a homologous phosphatase, resulted in decreased capsule synthesis. Taken together, these data provide evidence that PTPs are critical for Wzy-dependent capsule production across a spectrum of bacteria, and as such represents a valuable new molecular target for the development of anti-virulence antibacterials.

  17. Chemical inhibition of bacterial protein tyrosine phosphatase suppresses capsule production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair J Standish

    Full Text Available Capsule polysaccharide is a major virulence factor for a wide range of bacterial pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae. The biosynthesis of Wzy-dependent capsules in both gram-negative and -positive bacteria is regulated by a system involving a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP and a protein tyrosine kinase. However, how the system functions is still controversial. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, a major human pathogen, the system is present in all but 2 of the 93 serotypes found to date. In order to study this regulation further, we performed a screen to find inhibitors of the phosphatase, CpsB. This led to the observation that a recently discovered marine sponge metabolite, fascioquinol E, inhibited CpsB phosphatase activity both in vitro and in vivo at concentrations that did not affect the growth of the bacteria. This inhibition resulted in decreased capsule synthesis in D39 and Type 1 S. pneumoniae. Furthermore, concentrations of Fascioquinol E that inhibited capsule also lead to increased attachment of pneumococci to a macrophage cell line, suggesting that this compound would inhibit the virulence of the pathogen. Interestingly, this compound also inhibited the phosphatase activity of the structurally unrelated gram-negative PTP, Wzb, which belongs to separate family of protein tyrosine phosphatases. Furthermore, incubation with Klebsiella pneumoniae, which contains a homologous phosphatase, resulted in decreased capsule synthesis. Taken together, these data provide evidence that PTPs are critical for Wzy-dependent capsule production across a spectrum of bacteria, and as such represents a valuable new molecular target for the development of anti-virulence antibacterials.

  18. The essential role of FKBP38 in regulating phosphatase of regenerating liver 3 (PRL-3) protein stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Myung-Suk; Min, Sang-Hyun; Jung, Haiyoung; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Tae Ho; Lee, Heung Kyu; Yoo, Ook-Joon

    2011-03-11

    The phosphatase of regenerating liver-3 (PRL-3) is a member of protein tyrosine phosphatases and whose deregulation is implicated in tumorigenesis and metastasis of many cancers. However, the underlying mechanism by which PRL-3 is regulated is not known. In this study, we identified the peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase FK506-binding protein 38 (FKBP38) as an interacting protein of PRL-3 using a yeast two-hybrid system. FKBP38 specifically binds to PRL-3 in vivo, and that the N-terminal region of FKBP38 is crucial for binding with PRL-3. FKBP38 overexpression reduces endogenous PRL-3 expression levels, whereas the depletion of FKBP38 by siRNA increases the level of PRL-3 protein. Moreover, FKBP38 promotes degradation of endogenous PRL-3 protein via protein-proteasome pathway. Furthermore, FKBP38 suppresses PRL-3-mediated p53 activity and cell proliferation. These results demonstrate that FKBP38 is a novel regulator of the oncogenic protein PRL-3 abundance and that alteration in the stability of PRL-3 can have a dramatic impact on cell proliferation. Thus, FKBP38 may play a critical role in tumorigenesis.

  19. The dual specificity phosphatase Cdc14B bundles and stabilizes microtubules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plumley, Hyekyung [ORNL; Liu, Yie [ORNL; Gomez, Marla V [ORNL; Wang, Yisong [ORNL

    2005-01-01

    The Cdc14 dual-specificity phosphatases regulate key events in the eukaryotic cell cycle. However, little is known about the function of mammalian CDC14B family members. Here, we demonstrate that subcellular localization of CDC14B protein is cell cycle regulated. CDC14B can bind, bundle, and stabilize microtubules in vitro independently of its catalytic activity. Basic amino acid residues within the nucleolar targeting domain are important for both retaining CDC14B in the nucleolus and preventing microtubule bundling. Overexpression of CDC14B resulted in the formation of cytoplasmic CDC14B and microtubule bundles in interphase cells. These microtubule bundles were resistant to microtubule depolymerization reagents and enriched in acetylated -tubulin. Expression of cytoplasmic forms of CDC14B impaired microtubule nucleation from the microtubule organization center. CDC14B is thus a novel microtubule-bundling and -stabilizing protein, whose regulated subcellular localization may help modulate spindle and microtubule dynamics in mitosis.

  20. Mechanism of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B-mediated inhibition of leptin signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, I K; Hansen, J A; Andersen, H S

    2005-01-01

    Upon leptin binding, the leptin receptor is activated, leading to stimulation of the JAK/STAT signal transduction cascade. The transient character of the tyrosine phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT3 suggests the involvement of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) as negative regulators...... of this signalling pathway. Specifically, recent evidence has suggested that PTP1B might be a key regulator of leptin signalling, based on the resistance to diet-induced obesity and increased leptin signalling observed in PTP1B-deficient mice. The present study was undertaken to investigate the mechanism by which...... PTP1B mediates the cessation of the leptin signal transduction. Leptin-induced activation of a STAT3 responsive reporter was dose-dependently inhibited by co-transfection with PTP1B. No inhibition was observed when a catalytically inactive mutant of PTP1B was used or when other PTPs were co...

  1. Structural basis of interaction between protein tyrosine phosphatase PCP-2 and β-catenin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE; Yaqin; YAN; Hexin; DONG; Hui; ZHANG; Peng; TANG; Liang

    2005-01-01

    PCP-2 is a member of receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase of the MAM domain family. To investigate which part of PCP-2 was involved in its interaction with β-catenin, we constructed various deletion mutants of PCP-2. These PCP-2 mutants and wild-type PCP-2 were co-transfected into BHK-21 cells with β-catenin individually. An in vivo binding assay revealed that the expression of wild-type PCP-2, PCP-2△C1C2 (deleted PCP-2 without both PTP domains) and PCP-2△C2 (deleted PCP-2 without the second PTP domain) could be immunoprecipitated by anti-catenin antibody in every co-transfection, but PCP-2 EXT (deleted PCP-2 without the juxtamembrane region and both PTP domains) was missing, which implied that PCP-2 and β-catenin could associate directly and the juxtamembrane region in PCP-2 was sufficient for the process.

  2. Water molecule network and active site flexibility of apo protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A.K.; Peters, Günther H.J.; Møller, K.B.;

    2004-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) plays a key role as a negative regulator of insulin and leptin signalling and is therefore considered to be an important molecular target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. Detailed structural information about the structure of PTP1B, including...... the conformation and flexibility of active-site residues as well as the water-molecule network, is a key issue in understanding ligand binding and enzyme kinetics and in structure-based drug design. A 1.95 Angstrom apo PTP1B structure has been obtained, showing four highly coordinated water molecules in the active...... of PTP1B and form a novel basis for structure-based inhibitor design....

  3. Stabilization of human prostatic acid phosphatase by coupling with chondroitin sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchter-Wasylewska, E; Dulińska, J; Ostrowski, W S; Torchilin, V P; Trubetskoy, V S

    1991-02-01

    Human prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) (EC 3.1.3.2) was covalently linked to chondroitin sulfate A from whale cartilage. In order to bind the protein amino groups with the preactivated carboxyl groups of chondroitin sulfate, 1-ethyl-3-(3'-dimethylaminepropyl)carbodiimide and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide were used as coupling agents. The product was soluble and enzymatically active. The activity was on average 25% higher than that of the free enzyme. The product was heterogeneous in respect to charge and Mr (50-1500) kDa, as determined by chromatography on Sephacryl S 300 and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The resulting polymers contained covalently bound chondroitin sulfate, as shown by the biotin-avidin test. The modified enzyme is more resistant against various denaturing agents, e.g., urea, ethanol, and heat. Thus covalent modification of PAP by cross-linking to chondroitin sulfate could be the preferred method for stabilization of its biological activity.

  4. Direct Promotion of Collagen Calcification by Alkaline Phosphatase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase promotes hydrolysis of phosphate containing substrates, causes a rise in inorganic phosphate and, therefore, enhances calcification of biological tissues. In this work, the calcification of collagen in a model serum was used as a model of collagenous tissue biomaterials to study the possible calcification promotion mechanism of alkaline phosphatase. In the enzyme concentration range of 0.10.5mg/mL, the enzyme shows a direct calcification promoting effect which is independent of the hydrolysis of its phosphate containing substrates but proportional to the enzyme concentration. Potassium pyrophosphate somewhat inhibits the calcification promotion.

  5. Human placental alkaline phosphatase electrophoretic alleles: Quantitative studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucarelli, Paola; Scacchi, Renato; Corbo, Rosa Maria; Benincasa, Alberto; Palmarino, Ricciotti

    1982-01-01

    Human placental alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity has been determined in specimens obtained from 562 Italian subjects. The mean activities of the three common homozygotes (Pl 2 = 4.70 ± 0.24, Pl 1 = 4.09 ± 0.08, and Pl 3 = 2.15 ± 0.71 μmol of p-nitrophenol produced) were significantly different. The differences among the various allelic forms account for 10% of the total quantitative variation of the human placental alkaline phosphatase. PMID:7072721

  6. Proteome sampling by the HLA class I antigen processing pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilka Hoof

    Full Text Available The peptide repertoire that is presented by the set of HLA class I molecules of an individual is formed by the different players of the antigen processing pathway and the stringent binding environment of the HLA class I molecules. Peptide elution studies have shown that only a subset of the human proteome is sampled by the antigen processing machinery and represented on the cell surface. In our study, we quantified the role of each factor relevant in shaping the HLA class I peptide repertoire by combining peptide elution data, in silico predictions of antigen processing and presentation, and data on gene expression and protein abundance. Our results indicate that gene expression level, protein abundance, and rate of potential binding peptides per protein have a clear impact on sampling probability. Furthermore, once a protein is available for the antigen processing machinery in sufficient amounts, C-terminal processing efficiency and binding affinity to the HLA class I molecule determine the identity of the presented peptides. Having studied the impact of each of these factors separately, we subsequently combined all factors in a logistic regression model in order to quantify their relative impact. This model demonstrated the superiority of protein abundance over gene expression level in predicting sampling probability. Being able to discriminate between sampled and non-sampled proteins to a significant degree, our approach can potentially be used to predict the sampling probability of self proteins and of pathogen-derived proteins, which is of importance for the identification of autoimmune antigens and vaccination targets.

  7. Atypical antigen recognition mode of a shark immunoglobulin new antigen receptor (IgNAR) variable domain characterized by humanization and structural analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, Oleg V; Olland, Andrea; Piché-Nicholas, Nicole; Godbole, Adarsh; King, Daniel; Svenson, Kristine; Calabro, Valerie; Müller, Mischa R; Barelle, Caroline J; Somers, William; Gill, Davinder S; Mosyak, Lidia; Tchistiakova, Lioudmila

    2013-06-14

    The immunoglobulin new antigen receptors (IgNARs) are a class of Ig-like molecules of the shark immune system that exist as heavy chain-only homodimers and bind antigens by their single domain variable regions (V-NARs). Following shark immunization and/or in vitro selection, V-NARs can be generated as soluble, stable, and specific high affinity monomeric binding proteins of ∼12 kDa. We have previously isolated a V-NAR from an immunized spiny dogfish shark, named E06, that binds specifically and with high affinity to human, mouse, and rat serum albumins. Humanization of E06 was carried out by converting over 60% of non-complementarity-determining region residues to those of a human germ line Vκ1 sequence, DPK9. The resulting huE06 molecules have largely retained the specificity and affinity of antigen binding of the parental V-NAR. Crystal structures of the shark E06 and its humanized variant (huE06 v1.1) in complex with human serum albumin (HSA) were determined at 3- and 2.3-Å resolution, respectively. The huE06 v1.1 molecule retained all but one amino acid residues involved in the binding site for HSA. Structural analysis of these V-NARs has revealed an unusual variable domain-antigen interaction. E06 interacts with HSA in an atypical mode that utilizes extensive framework contacts in addition to complementarity-determining regions that has not been seen previously in V-NARs. On the basis of the structure, the roles of various elements of the molecule are described with respect to antigen binding and V-NAR stability. This information broadens the general understanding of antigen recognition and provides a framework for further design and humanization of shark IgNARs.

  8. Invasion of erythrocytes in vitro by Plasmodium falciparum can be inhibited by monoclonal antibody directed against an S antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saul, A; Cooper, J; Ingram, L; Anders, R F; Brown, G V

    1985-11-01

    A monoclonal antibody has been produced which binds to the heat stable S antigen present in the FCQ-27/PNG isolate of Plasmodium falciparum. This monoclonal antibody also inhibits the invasion in vitro of erythrocytes by malarial merozoites thus demonstrating that the S antigens of Plasmodium falciparum may be a target of protective immune responses.

  9. Negative regulation of caspase 3-cleaved PAK2 activity by protein phosphatase 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The p21-activated kinase 2 (PAK2) is activated by binding of small G proteins, Cdc42 and Rac, or through proteolytic cleavage by caspases or caspase-like proteases. Activation by both small G protein and caspase requires autophosphorylation at Thr-402 of PAK2. Although activation of PAK2 has been investigated for nearly a decade, the mechanism of PAK2 downregulation is unclear. In this study, we have applied the kinetic theory of substrate reaction during modification of enzyme activity to study the regulation mechanism of PAK2 activity by the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1α). On the basis of the kinetic equation of the substrate reaction during the reversible phosphorylation of PAK2, all microscopic kinetic constants for the free enzyme and enzyme-substrate(s) complexes have been determined. The results indicate that (1) PP1α can act directly on phosphorylated Thr-402 in the acti-vation loop of PAK2 and down-regulate its kinase activity; (2) binding of the exogenous protein/peptide substrates at the active site of PAK2 decreases both the rates of PAK2 autoactivation and inactivation. The present method provides a novel approach for studying reversible phosphorylation reactions. The advantage of this method is not only its usefulness in study of substrate effects on enzyme modifica-tion but also its convenience in study of modification reaction directly involved in regulation of enzyme activity. This initial study should provide a foundation for future structural and mechanistic work of protein kinases and phosphatases.

  10. Negative regulation of caspase 3-cleaved PAK2 activity by protein phosphatase 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The p21-activated kinase 2 (PAK2) is activated by binding of small G proteins, Cdc42 and Rac, or through proteolytic cleavage by caspases or caspase-like proteases. Activation by both small G protein and caspase requires autophosphorylation at Thr-402 of PAK2. Although activation of PAK2 has been investigated for nearly a decade, the mechanism of PAK2 downregulation is unclear. In this study, we have applied the kinetic theory of substrate reaction during modification of enzyme activity to study the regulation mechanism of PAK2 activity by the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1α). On the basis of the kinetic equation of the substrate reaction during the reversible phosphorylation of PAK2, all microscopic kinetic constants for the free enzyme and enzyme-substrate(s) complexes have been determined. The results indicate that (1) PP1α can act directly on phosphorylated Thr-402 in the activation loop of PAK2 and down-regulate its kinase activity; (2) binding of the exogenous protein/peptide substrates at the active site of PAK2 decreases both the rates of PAK2 autoactivation and inactivation. The present method provides a novel approach for studying reversible phosphorylation reactions. The advantage of this method is not only its usefulness in study of substrate effects on enzyme modification but also its convenience in study of modification reaction directly involved in regulation of enzyme activity. This initial study should provide a foundation for future structural and mechanistic work of protein kinases and phosphatases.

  11. Multiple unfolding intermediates of human placental alkaline phosphatase in equilibrium urea denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, H C; Chang, G G

    2001-12-01

    Alkaline phosphatase is an enzyme with a typical alpha/beta hydrolase fold. The conformational stability of the human placental alkaline phosphatase was examined with the chemical denaturant urea. The red shifts of fluorescence spectra show a complex unfolding process involving multiple equilibrium intermediates indicating differential stability of the subdomains of the enzyme. None of these unfolding intermediates were observed in the presence of 83 mM NaCl, indicating the importance of ionic interactions in the stabilization of the unfolding intermediates. Guanidinium chloride, on the other hand, could stabilize one of the unfolding intermediates, which is not a salt effect. Some of the unfolding intermediates were also observed in circular dichroism spectroscopy, which clearly indicates steady loss of helical structure during unfolding, but very little change was observed for the beta strand content until the late stage of the unfolding process. The enzyme does not lose its phosphate-binding ability after substantial tertiary structure changes, suggesting that the substrate-binding region is more resistant to chemical denaturant than the other structural domains. Global analysis of the fluorescence spectral change demonstrated the following folding-unfolding process of the enzyme: N I(1) I(2) I(3) I(4) I(5) D. These discrete intermediates are stable at urea concentrations of 2.6, 4.1, 4.7, 5.5, 6.6, and 7.7 M, respectively. These intermediates are further characterized by acrylamide and/or potassium iodide quenching of the intrinsic fluorescence of the enzyme and by the hydrophobic probes, 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid and 4,4'-dianilino-1,1'-binaphthyl-5,5'-disulfonic acid. The stepwise unfolding process was interpreted by the folding energy landscape in terms of the unique structure of the enzyme. The rigid central beta-strand domain is surrounded by the peripheral alpha-helical and coil structures, which are marginally stable toward a chemical

  12. PME-1 modulates protein phosphatase 2A activity to promote the malignant phenotype of endometrial cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandzioch, Ewa; Pusey, Michelle; Werda, Amy; Bail, Sophie; Bhaskar, Aishwarya; Nestor, Mariya; Yang, Jing-Jing; Rice, Lyndi M

    2014-08-15

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) negatively regulates tumorigenic signaling pathways, in part, by supporting the function of tumor suppressors like p53. The PP2A methylesterase PME-1 limits the activity of PP2A by demethylating its catalytic subunit. Here, we report the finding that PME-1 overexpression correlates with increased cell proliferation and invasive phenotypes in endometrial adenocarcinoma cells, where it helps maintain activated ERK and Akt by inhibiting PP2A. We obtained evidence that PME-1 could bind and regulate protein phosphatase 4 (PP4), a tumor-promoting protein, but not the related protein phosphatase 6 (PP6). When the PP2A, PP4, or PP6 catalytic subunits were overexpressed, inhibiting PME-1 was sufficient to limit cell proliferation. In clinical specimens of endometrial adenocarcinoma, PME-1 levels were increased and we found that PME-1 overexpression was sufficient to drive tumor growth in a xenograft model of the disease. Our findings identify PME-1 as a modifier of malignant development and suggest its candidacy as a diagnostic marker and as a therapeutic target in endometrial cancer.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of interaction between protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B and a bidentate inhibitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui-xia LIU; Jin-zhi TAN; Chun-ying NIU; Jian-hua SHEN; Xiao-min LUO; Xu SHEN; Kai-xian CHEN; Hua-liang JIANG

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the dynamic properties of protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)1B and reveal the structural factors responsible for the high inhibitory potency and selectivity of the inhibitor SNA for PTP1B. Methods: We performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using a long time-scale for both PTP1B and PTP1B complexed with the inhibitor SNA, the most potent and selective PTP1B inhibitor reported to date. The trajectories were analyzed by using principal component analysis. Results: Trajectory analyses showed that upon binding the ligand, the flexibility of the entire PTP1B molecule decreases. The most notable change is the movement of the WPD-loop. Our simulation results also indicated that electrostatic interactions contribute more to PTP1B-SNA complex conformation than the van der Waals interactions, and that Lys41, Arg47, and Asp48 play important roles in determining the conformation of the inhibitor SNA and in the potency and selectivity of the inhibitor. Of these, Arg47 contributed most. These results were in agreement with previous experimental results. Conclusion: The information presented here suggests that potent and selective PTP1B inhibitors can be designed by targeting the surface residues, for example the region containing Lys41,Arg47, and Asp48, instead of the second phosphate binding site (besides the active phosphate binding site).

  14. Regulation of Ikaros function by casein kinase 2 and protein phosphatase 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amy; K; Erbe; Aleksandar; Savic; Sinisa; Dovat

    2011-01-01

    The Ikaros gene encodes a zinc finger,DNA-binding protein that regulates gene transcription and chromatin remodeling.Ikaros is a master regulator of hematopoiesis and an established tumor suppressor.Moderate alteration of Ikaros activity (e.g.haploinsufficiency) appears to be sufficient to promote malignant transformation in human hematopoietic cells.This raises questions about the mechanisms that normally regulate Ikaros function and the potential of these mechanisms to contribute to the development of leukemia.The focus of this review is the regulation of Ikaros function by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation.Site-specific phosphorylation of Ikaros by casein kinase 2 (CK2) controls Ikaros DNA-binding ability and subcellular localization.As a consequence,the ability of Ikaros to regulate cell cycle progression,chromatin remodeling,target gene expression,and thymocyte differentiation are controlled by CK2.In addition,hyperphosphorylation of Ikaros by CK2 leads to decreased Ikaros levels due to ubiquitinmediated degradation.Dephosphorylation of Ikaros by protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) acts in opposition to CK2 to increase Ikaros stability and restore Ikaros DNA binding ability and pericentromeric localization.Thus,the CK2 and PP1 pathways act in concert to regulate Ikaros activity in hematopoiesis and as a tumor suppressor.This highlights the importance of these signal transduction pathways as potential mediators of leukemogenesis via their role in regulating the activities of Ikaros.

  15. COLONOSCOPY AND CARCINOEMBRYONIC ANTIGEN VARIATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita G SOUSA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Colonoscopy is essential for synchronous and metachronous cancer detection. Carcinoembryonic antigen is a colorectal cancer tumor marker, important as a follow-up tool in patients with previous colorectal cancer. False-positive carcinoembryonic antigen elevation results in multiples exams and in patient anxiety. In literature, there is reference to transient carcinoembryonic antigen increase with colonoscopy. Objective To evaluate the influence of bowel preparation and colonoscopy in carcinoembryonic antigen blood levels. Methods We prospectively studied subjects that underwent routine colonoscopy in our institution. Blood samples were collected (1 before bowel cleaning, (2 before colonoscopy and (3 immediately after colonoscopy. Blood carcinoembryonic antigen levels were determined by “Sandwich” immunoassay. The statistical methods used were the paired t-test and ANOVA. Results Thirty-seven patients (22M/15F were included; age range 28-84 (mean 56 years. Mean carcinoembryonic antigen values were 1.9, 2 and 1.8 for (1, (2 and (3, respectively. An increase in value (2 compared with (1 was observed in 20/37 patients (P = 0.018, mainly in younger patients and in patients requiring more endoluminal interventions. In 29/37 patients, the CEA value decreased from (2 to (3 (P = 1.3x10-7. Conclusions A trend for carcinoembryonic antigen increase after bowel cleaning was observed, especially in younger patients and in patients with more endoluminal interventions, but without clinical meaning.

  16. Suppressor of MEK null (SMEK)/protein phosphatase 4 catalytic subunit (PP4C) is a key regulator of hepatic gluconeogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Young-Sil; Lee, Min-Woo; Ryu, Dongryeol; Kim, Jeong Ho; MA, Hui; Seo, Woo-Young; Kim, Yo-Na; Kim, Su Sung; Lee, Chul Ho; Hunter, Tony; Choi, Cheol Soo; Montminy, Marc R.; Koo, Seung-Hoi

    2010-01-01

    Fasting promotes hepatic gluconeogenesis to maintain glucose homeostasis. The cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB)-regulated transcriptional coactivator 2 (CRTC2) is responsible for transcriptional activation of gluconeogenic genes and is critical for conveying the opposing hormonal signals of glucagon and insulin in the liver. Here, we show that suppressor of MEK null 1 (SMEK1) and SMEK2 [protein phosphatase 4 (PP4) regulatory subunits 3a and 3b, respectively] are directly involved i...

  17. Maximizing Immune Response to Carbohydrate Antigens on Breast Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Emmons, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Little Rock, Arkansas 72205 REPORT DATE: August 2005 TYPE OF REPORT...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Maximizing Immune Response to Carbohydrate Antigens on Breast Tumors 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-01-1-0366 5c. PROGRAM...binding affinities of peptide and carbohyd- Hollingsworth, M. A. 1997. Oligosaccharides expressed on MUCl rate with I-A’ will be illuminating. However

  18. Production of Exocytic Vesicular Antigens by Primary Liver Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-08

    microbial symbionts which occur naturally in the gut and on mucous membranes. Another method invclves the use of synthetic peptides which mimic...Streptococcus pneumoniae, hepatitis B virus, Plasmodium spp. and dengue virus, which are creating tremendous burdens worldwide [32]. Most of the...place in the immune system when an antibody’s unique antigen-binding peptide sequence (the idiotype) stimulates production of another antibody directed

  19. Antigen-activated dendritic cells ameliorate influenza A infections

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A viruses cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. There is a need for alternative or adjunct therapies, as resistance to currently used antiviral drugs is emerging rapidly. We tested ligand epitope antigen presentation system (LEAPS) technology as a new immune-based treatment for influenza virus infection in a mouse model. Influenza-J-LEAPS peptides were synthesized by conjugating the binding ligand derived from the β2-microglobulin chain of the human MHC class I molecu...

  20. Serine / threonine protein phosphatase 5 (PP5 participates in the regulation of glucocorticoid receptor nucleocytoplasmic shuttling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bueno Manuel

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In most cells glucocorticoid receptors (GR reside predominately in the cytoplasm. Upon hormone binding, the GR translocates into the nucleus, where the hormone-activated GR-complex regulates the transcription of GR-responsive genes. Serine/threonine protein phosphatase type 5 (PP5 associates with the GR-heat-shock protein-90 complex, and the suppression of PP5 expression with ISIS 15534 stimulates the activity of GR-responsive reporter plasmids, without affecting the binding of hormone to the GR. Results To further characterize the mechanism by which PP5 affects GR-induced gene expression, we employed immunofluorescence microscopy to track the movement of a GR-green fluorescent fusion protein (GR-GFP that retained hormone binding, nuclear translocation activity and specific DNA binding activity, but is incapable of transactivation. In the absence of glucocorticoids, GR-GFP localized mainly in the cytoplasm. Treatment with dexamethasone results in the efficient translocation of GR-GFPs into the nucleus. The nuclear accumulation of GR-GFP, without the addition of glucocorticoids, was also observed when the expression of PP5 was suppressed by treatment with ISIS 15534. In contrast, ISIS 15534 treatment had no apparent effect on calcium induced nuclear translocation of NFAT-GFP. Conclusion These studies suggest that PP5 participates in the regulation of glucocorticoid receptor nucleocytoplasmic shuttling, and that the GR-induced transcriptional activity observed when the expression of PP5 is suppressed by treatment with ISIS 15534 results from the nuclear accumulation of GR in a form that is capable of binding DNA yet still requires agonist to elicit maximal transcriptional activation.

  1. Prediction of antigenic determinants of trichosanthin by molecular modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HEYONGNING; ZONGXIANGXIA; 等

    1996-01-01

    The antigenic determinants of trichosanthin were predicted by molecular modeling.First,the threedimensional structure model of the antigen-binding fragment of anti-trichosanthin immunoglobulin E was built on the basis of its amino-acid sequence and the known three-dimensional structure of an antibody with similar sequence.Secondly,the preferable antigen-antibody interactions were obtained based on the known three-dimensional structure of trichosanthin and of the hypervariable regions of anti-trichosanthin immunoglobulin E.Two regions in the molecular surface of trichosanthin were found to form extensive interactions with the hypervariable regions of the antibody and have been predicted to be the possible antigenic determinants:one is composed of two polypeptide segments,Ile201-Glu210 and Ile225-Asp229,which are close to each other in the three-dimensional structure;and the other is the segment Lys173-Thr178.The former region seems to be the more reasonable antigenic determinant than the latter one.

  2. Structural Basis of the Oncogenic Interaction of Phosphatase PRL-1 with the Magnesium Transporter CNNM2*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez-Mascarell, Paula; Oyenarte, Iker; Hardy, Serge; Breiderhoff, Tilman; Stuiver, Marchel; Kostantin, Elie; Diercks, Tammo; Pey, Angel L.; Ereño-Orbea, June; Martínez-Chantar, María Luz; Khalaf-Nazzal, Reham; Claverie-Martin, Felix; Müller, Dominik; Tremblay, Michel L.

    2017-01-01

    Phosphatases of regenerating liver (PRLs), the most oncogenic of all protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), play a critical role in metastatic progression of cancers. Recent findings established a new paradigm by uncovering that their association with magnesium transporters of the cyclin M (CNNM) family causes a rise in intracellular magnesium levels that promote oncogenic transformation. Recently, however, essential roles for regulation of the circadian rhythm and reproduction of the CNNM family have been highlighted. Here, we describe the crystal structure of PRL-1 in complex with the Bateman module of CNNM2 (CNNM2BAT), which consists of two cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) domains (IPR000664) and represents an intracellular regulatory module of the transporter. The structure reveals a heterotetrameric association, consisting of a disc-like homodimer of CNNM2BAT bound to two independent PRL-1 molecules, each one located at opposite tips of the disc. The structure highlights the key role played by Asp-558 at the extended loop of the CBS2 motif of CNNM2 in maintaining the association between the two proteins and proves that the interaction between CNNM2 and PRL-1 occurs via the catalytic domain of the phosphatase. Our data shed new light on the structural basis underlying the interaction between PRL phosphatases and CNNM transporters and provides a hypothesis about the molecular mechanism by which PRL-1, upon binding to CNNM2, might increase the intracellular concentration of Mg2+ thereby contributing to tumor progression and metastasis. The availability of this structure sets the basis for the rational design of compounds modulating PRL-1 and CNNM2 activities. PMID:27899452

  3. Bone alkaline phosphatase and mortality in dialysis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Drechsler; M. Verduijn; S. Pilz; R.T. Krediet; F.W. Dekker; C. Wanner; M. Ketteler; E.W. Boeschoten; V. Brandenburg

    2011-01-01

    Serum alkaline phosphatase (AP) is associated with vascular calcification and mortality in hemodialysis patients, but AP derives from various tissues of origin. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of bone-specific AP (BAP) on morbidity and mortality in dialysis patients. From a prospectiv

  4. Biocatalysis with Sol-Gel Encapsulated Acid Phosphatase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Suhasini; Tran, Vu; Ho, Maggie K.-M.; Phan, Chieu; Chin, Elizabeth; Wemmer, Zeke; Sommerhalter, Monika

    2010-01-01

    This experiment was performed in an upper-level undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course. Students learned how to immobilize an enzyme in a sol-gel matrix and how to perform and evaluate enzyme-activity measurements. The enzyme acid phosphatase (APase) from wheat germ was encapsulated in sol-gel beads that were prepared from the precursor…

  5. Induction of glomerular alkaline phosphatase after challenge with lipopolysaccharide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapojos, Jola Jovita; Poelstra, Klaas; Borghuis, Theo; van den Berg, Anke; Baelde, Hans J.; Klok, P.A; Bakker, W.W

    2003-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (AP) can be considered as a host defence molecule since this enzyme is able to detoxify bacterial endotoxin at physiological pH. The question emerged whether this anti-endotoxin principle is inducible in the glomerulus and if so, which glomerular cells might be involved in the e

  6. Chromatographic separation of alkaline phosphatase from dental enamel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moe, D; Kirkeby, S; Salling, E

    1989-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (AP) was prepared from partly mineralized bovine enamel by extraction in phosphate buffer, centrifugation and various chromatographic techniques. Chromatofocusing showed that the enamel enzyme possessed five isoelectric points at the acid pH level ranging from pH 5.7 to pH 4....

  7. Extralysosomal localisation of acid phosphatase in the rat kidney

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudiger, J; Kalicharan, D; Halbhuber, KJ; van der Want, JJL

    1998-01-01

    There is strong evidence that acid phosphatase (AcPase) plays an important role in the catabolism of the glomerular basement membrane (GEM) and the removal of macromolecular debris resulting from ultrafiltration. Recent enzyme histochemical investigations provide new evidence of the antithrombotic a

  8. Dephosphorylation of endotoxin by alkaline phosphatase in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelstra, Klaas; Bakker, W.W; Klok, P.A; Kamps, J.AAM; Hardonk, M.J; Meijer, D.K F

    1997-01-01

    Natural substrates for alkaline phosphatase (AP) are at present not identified despite extensive investigations. Difficulties in imagining a possible physiological function involve its extremely high pH optimum for the usual exogenous substrates and its localization as an ecto-enzyme. As endotoxin i

  9. Yeast Acid Phosphatases and Phytases: Production, Characterization and Commercial Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Parvinder; Satyanarayana, T.

    The element phosphorus is critical to all life forms as it forms the basic component of nucleic acids and ATP and has a number of indispensable biochemical roles. Unlike C or N, the biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus is very slow, and thus making it the growth-limiting element in most soils and aquatic systems. Phosphohydrolases (e.g. acid phosphatases and phytases) are enzymes that break the C-O-P ester bonds and provide available inorganic phosphorus from various inassimilable organic forms of phosphorus like phytates. These enzymes are of significant value in effectively combating phosphorus pollution. Although phytases and acid phosphatases are produced by various plants, animals and micro organisms, microbial sources are more promising for the production on a commercial scale. Yeasts being the simplest eukaryotes are ideal candidates for phytase and phos-phatase research due to their mostly non-pathogenic and GRAS status. They have not, however, been utilized to their full potential. This chapter focuses attention on the present state of knowledge on the production, characterization and potential commercial prospects of yeast phytases and acid phosphatases.

  10. Kinase/phosphatase overexpression reveals pathways regulating hippocampal neuron morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchser, William J; Slepak, Tatiana I; Gutierrez-Arenas, Omar; Bixby, John L; Lemmon, Vance P

    2010-07-01

    Development and regeneration of the nervous system requires the precise formation of axons and dendrites. Kinases and phosphatases are pervasive regulators of cellular function and have been implicated in controlling axodendritic development and regeneration. We undertook a gain-of-function analysis to determine the functions of kinases and phosphatases in the regulation of neuron morphology. Over 300 kinases and 124 esterases and phosphatases were studied by high-content analysis of rat hippocampal neurons. Proteins previously implicated in neurite growth, such as ERK1, GSK3, EphA8, FGFR, PI3K, PKC, p38, and PP1a, were confirmed to have effects in our functional assays. We also identified novel positive and negative neurite growth regulators. These include neuronal-developmentally regulated kinases such as the activin receptor, interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) and neural leucine-rich repeat 1 (LRRN1). The protein kinase N2 (PKN2) and choline kinase alpha (CHKA) kinases, and the phosphatases PPEF2 and SMPD1, have little or no established functions in neuronal function, but were sufficient to promote neurite growth. In addition, pathway analysis revealed that members of signaling pathways involved in cancer progression and axis formation enhanced neurite outgrowth, whereas cytokine-related pathways significantly inhibited neurite formation.

  11. Lysosomal acid phosphatase is internalized via clathrin-coated pits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klumperman, J.; Hille, A.; Geuze, H.J.; Peters, C.; Brodsky, F.M.; Figura, K. von

    1992-01-01

    The presence of lysosomal acid phosphatase (LAP) in coated pits at the plasma membrane was investigated by immunocytochemistry in thymidine kinase negative mouse L-cells (Ltk-) and baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells overexpressing human LAP (Ltk-LAP and BHK-LAP cells). Double immunogold labeling showed

  12. Protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPRR isoforms in cellular signaling and trafficking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dilaver, Gönül

    2005-01-01

    Previous work has revealed the existence of two Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases in mouse, PTPBR7 and PTP-SL, that were in part identical, suggesting that they originated from the same gene, termed Ptprr (1,5,6). In this thesis, I report on the characterization of the various PTPRR isoforms in neuronal

  13. Endotoxin detoxification by alkaline phosphatase in cholestatic livers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelstra, K; Bakker, WW; Hardonk, MJ; Meijer, DKF; Wisse, E; Knook, DL; Balabaud, C

    1997-01-01

    Increased expression of alkaline phosphatase (AP) in the liver is a hallmark of cholestasis but the pathophysiological role of this is not clear. We argue that deprotonation of carboxyl groups at the active site of the enzyme may be a prerequisite for optimal AP activity. Such a creation of negative

  14. A peptide mimic blocks the cross-reaction of anti-DNA antibodies with glomerular antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Y; Eryilmaz, E; Der, E; Pawar, R D; Guo, X; Cowburn, D; Putterman, C

    2016-03-01

    Anti-DNA antibodies play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis by cross-reacting with renal antigens. Previously, we demonstrated that the binding affinity of anti-DNA antibodies to self-antigens is isotype-dependent. Furthermore, significant variability in renal pathogenicity was seen among a panel of anti-DNA isotypes [derived from a single murine immunoglobulin (Ig)G3 monoclonal antibody, PL9-11] that share identical variable regions. In this study, we sought to select peptide mimics that effectively inhibit the binding of all murine and human anti-DNA IgG isotypes to glomerular antigens. The PL9-11 panel of IgG anti-DNA antibodies (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b and IgG3) was used for screening a 12-mer phage display library. Binding affinity was determined by surface plasmon resonance. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), flow cytometry and glomerular binding assays were used for the assessment of peptide inhibition of antibody binding to nuclear and kidney antigens. We identified a 12 amino acid peptide (ALWPPNLHAWVP, or 'ALW') which binds to all PL9-11 IgG isotypes. Preincubation with the ALW peptide reduced the binding of the PL9-11 anti-DNA antibodies to DNA, laminin, mesangial cells and isolated glomeruli significantly. Furthermore, we confirmed the specificity of the amino acid sequence in the binding of ALW to anti-DNA antibodies by alanine scanning. Finally, ALW inhibited the binding of murine and human lupus sera to dsDNA and glomeruli significantly. In conclusion, by inhibiting the binding of polyclonal anti-DNA antibodies to autoantigens in vivo, the ALW peptide (or its derivatives) may potentially be a useful approach to block anti-DNA antibody binding to renal tissue.

  15. Identification of novel PTEN-binding partners: PTEN interaction with fatty acid binding protein FABP4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbenko, O; Panayotou, G; Zhyvoloup, A; Volkova, D; Gout, I; Filonenko, V

    2010-04-01

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor with dual protein and lipid-phosphatase activity, which is frequently deleted or mutated in many human advanced cancers. Recent studies have also demonstrated that PTEN is a promising target in type II diabetes and obesity treatment. Using C-terminal PTEN sequence in pEG202-NLS as bait, yeast two-hybrid screening on Mouse Embryo, Colon Cancer, and HeLa cDNA libraries was carried out. Isolated positive clones were validated by mating assay and identified through automated DNA sequencing and BLAST database searches. Sequence analysis revealed a number of PTEN-binding proteins linking this phosphatase to a number of different signaling cascades, suggesting that PTEN may perform other functions besides tumor-suppressing activity in different cell types. In particular, the interplay between PTEN function and adipocyte-specific fatty-acid-binding protein FABP4 is of notable interest. The demonstrable tautology of PTEN to FABP4 suggested a role for this phosphatase in the regulation of lipid metabolism and adipocyte differentiation. This interaction was further studied using coimmunoprecipitation and gel-filtration assays. Finally, based on Biacore assay, we have calculated the K(D) of PTEN-FABP4 complex, which is around 2.8 microM.

  16. A versatile spectrophotometric protein tyrosine phosphatase assay based on 3-nitrophosphotyrosine containing substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ameijde, Jeroen; Overvoorde, John; Knapp, Stefan; den Hertog, Jeroen; Ruijtenbeek, Rob; Liskamp, Rob M J

    2014-01-01

    A versatile assay for protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) employing 3-nitrophosphotyrosine containing peptidic substrates is described. These therapeutically important phosphatases feature in signal transduction pathways. The assay involves spectrophotometric detection of 3-nitrotyrosine production

  17. Isolation and characterization of antigen-Ia complexes involved in T cell recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Sette, A; Colon, S M

    1986-01-01

    Using equilibrium dialysis, it has been previously demonstrated that immunogenic peptides bind specifically to the Ia molecules serving as restriction elements in the immune response to these antigens. Using gel filtration to study the formation of ovalbumin (OVA) peptide-I-Ad complexes, it is he......Using equilibrium dialysis, it has been previously demonstrated that immunogenic peptides bind specifically to the Ia molecules serving as restriction elements in the immune response to these antigens. Using gel filtration to study the formation of ovalbumin (OVA) peptide-I-Ad complexes...... with glutaraldehyde revealed that the ovalbumin peptide was cross-linked solely to the alpha chain of I-Ad. Planar membranes containing I-Ad-OVA complexes stimulated a T cell response with 2 X 10(4) less antigen than required when uncomplexed antigen was used, thus demonstrating the biologic importance...

  18. Cytotoxicity and binding profiles of activated Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab to three insect cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    While Cry1Ac has been known to bind with larval midgut proteins cadherin, APN (amino peptidase N), ALP (alkaline phosphatase) and ABCC2 (ATP-binding cassette transporter subfamily C2), little is known about the receptors of Cry2Ab. To provide a clue to the receptors of Cry2Ab, we tested the baselin...

  19. A multiplex method for the detection of serum antibodies against in silico-predicted tumor antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuschenbach, Miriam; Dörre, Jonathan; Waterboer, Tim; Kopitz, Jürgen; Schneider, Martin; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jäger, Elke; Kloor, Matthias; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus

    2014-12-01

    Humoral immune responses against tumor antigens are studied as indirect markers of antigen exposure and in cancer vaccine studies. An increasing number of tumor antigens potentially translated from mutant genes is identified by advances in genomic sequencing. They represent an interesting source for yet unknown immunogenic epitopes. We here describe a multiplex method using the Luminex technology allowing for the detection of antibodies against multiple in silico-predicted linear neo-antigens in large sets of sera. The approach included 32 synthetic biotinylated peptides comprising a predicted set of frameshift mutation-induced neo-antigens. The antigens were fused to a FLAG epitope to ensure monitoring antigen binding to avidin-linked microspheres in the absence of monoclonal antibodies. Analytical specificity of measured serum antibody reactivity was proven by the detection of immune responses in immunized rabbits and a colorectal cancer patient vaccinated with peptides included in the assay. The measured antibody responses were comparable to peptide ELISA, and inter-assay reproducibility of the multiplex approach was excellent (R (2) > 0.98) for 20 sera tested against all antigens. Our methodic approach represents a valuable platform to monitor antibody responses against predicted antigens. It may be used in individualized cancer vaccine studies, thereby extending the relevance beyond the model system in the presented approach.

  20. Oncogenic cancer/testis antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Andersen, Mads H; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments have set the stage for immunotherapy as a supplement to conventional cancer treatment. Consequently, a significant effort is required to further improve efficacy and specificity, particularly the identification of optimal therapeutic targets for clinical testing. Cancer....../testis antigens are immunogenic, highly cancer-specific, and frequently expressed in various types of cancer, which make them promising candidate targets for cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccination and adoptive T-cell transfer with chimeric T-cell receptors. Our current understanding of tumor...... immunology and immune escape suggests that targeting oncogenic antigens may be beneficial, meaning that identification of cancer/testis antigens with oncogenic properties is of high priority. Recent work from our lab and others provide evidence that many cancer/testis antigens, in fact, have oncogenic...

  1. High affinity antigen recognition of the dual specific variants of herceptin is entropy-driven in spite of structural plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Bostrom

    Full Text Available The antigen-binding site of Herceptin, an anti-human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2 antibody, was engineered to add a second specificity toward Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF to create a high affinity two-in-one antibody bH1. Crystal structures of bH1 in complex with either antigen showed that, in comparison to Herceptin, this antibody exhibited greater conformational variability, also called "structural plasticity". Here, we analyzed the biophysical and thermodynamic properties of the dual specific variants of Herceptin to understand how a single antibody binds two unrelated protein antigens. We showed that while bH1 and the affinity-improved bH1-44, in particular, maintained many properties of Herceptin including binding affinity, kinetics and the use of residues for antigen recognition, they differed in the binding thermodynamics. The interactions of bH1 and its variants with both antigens were characterized by large favorable entropy changes whereas the Herceptin/HER2 interaction involved a large favorable enthalpy change. By dissecting the total entropy change and the energy barrier for dual interaction, we determined that the significant structural plasticity of the bH1 antibodies demanded by the dual specificity did not translate into the expected increase of entropic penalty relative to Herceptin. Clearly, dual antigen recognition of the Herceptin variants involves divergent antibody conformations of nearly equivalent energetic states. Hence, increasing the structural plasticity of an antigen-binding site without increasing the entropic cost may play a role for antibodies to evolve multi-specificity. Our report represents the first comprehensive biophysical analysis of a high affinity dual specific antibody binding two unrelated protein antigens, furthering our understanding of the thermodynamics that drive the vast antigen recognition capacity of the antibody repertoire.

  2. Suppression of cancer cell migration and invasion by protein phosphatase 2A through dephosphorylation of mu- and m-calpains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lijun; Deng, Xingming

    2006-11-17

    The mu- and m-calpains are major members of the calpain family that play an essential role in regulating cell motility. We have recently discovered that nicotine-activated protein kinase C iota enhances calpain phosphorylation in association with enhanced calpain activity and accelerated migration and invasion of human lung cancer cells. Here we found that specific disruption of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity by expression of SV40 small tumor antigen up-regulates phosphorylation of mu- and m-calpains whereas C2-ceramide, a potent PP2A activator, reduces nicotine-induced calpain phosphorylation, suggesting that PP2A may function as a physiological calpain phosphatase. PP2A co-localizes and interacts with mu- and m-calpains. Purified, active PP2A directly dephosphorylates mu- and m-calpains in vitro. Overexpression of the PP2A catalytic subunit (PP2A/C) suppresses nicotine-stimulated phosphorylation of mu- and m-calpains, which is associated with inhibition of calpain activity, wound healing, cell migration, and invasion. By contrast, depletion of PP2A/C by RNA interference enhances calpain phosphorylation, calpain activity, cell migration, and invasion. Importantly, C2-ceramide-induced suppression of calpain phosphorylation results in decreased secretion of mu- and m-calpains from lung cancer cells into culture medium, which may have potential clinic relevance in controlling metastasis of lung cancer. These findings reveal a novel role for PP2A as a physiological calpain phosphatase that not only directly dephosphorylates but also inactivates mu- and m-calpains, leading to suppression of migration and invasion of human lung cancer cells.

  3. Immunoreactivity of protein tyrosine phosphatase A (PtpA) in sera from sheep infected with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Ratna B; Begg, Douglas J; Purdie, Auriol C; Bach, Horacio; Whittington, Richard J

    2014-07-15

    Evasion of host defense mechanisms and survival inside infected host macrophages are features of pathogenic mycobacteria including Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, the causative agent of Johne's disease in ruminants. Protein tyrosine phosphatase A (PtpA) has been identified as a secreted protein critical for survival of mycobacteria within infected macrophages. The host may mount an immune response to such secreted proteins. In this study, the humoral immune response to purified recombinant M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis PtpA was investigated using sera from a cohort of sheep infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and compared with uninfected healthy controls. A significantly higher level of reactivity to PtpA was observed in sera collected from M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis infected sheep when compared to those from uninfected healthy controls. PtpA could be a potential candidate antigen for detection of humoral immune responses in sheep infected with M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

  4. Prostataspecifikt antigen, sure fosfataser og rektaleksploration i diagnostik af cancer prostatae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, B R; Knorr, U B; Brasso, K;

    1997-01-01

    prostate cancer and benign prostatic conditions. In 105 patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer, scintigraphic evidence of osseous metastases was found in thirty-seven. No patients with a serum PSA value less than three times the upper normal limit of the assay had a positive bone scan. Isotope bone......Eleven hundred and seven patients referred for urological evaluation including measurement of serumprostate specific antigen (PSA) measurement are reviewed. Prostate cancer was diagnosed in 105 patients. PSA was found to be superior to prostatic acid phosphatase in the discrimination between...... scan can be omitted in these patients, if they are not considered candidates for curative treatment....

  5. Protein tyrosine phosphatase SAP-1 protects against colitis through regulation of CEACAM20 in the intestinal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Yoji; Kotani, Takenori; Supriatna, Yana; Kitamura, Yasuaki; Imada, Shinya; Kawahara, Kohichi; Nishio, Miki; Daniwijaya, Edwin Widyanto; Sadakata, Hisanobu; Kusakari, Shinya; Mori, Munemasa; Kanazawa, Yoshitake; Saito, Yasuyuki; Okawa, Katsuya; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko; Okazawa, Hideki; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Azuma, Takeshi; Suzuki, Akira; Matozaki, Takashi

    2015-08-04

    Intestinal epithelial cells contribute to regulation of intestinal immunity in mammals, but the detailed molecular mechanisms of such regulation have remained largely unknown. Stomach-cancer-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SAP-1, also known as PTPRH) is a receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase that is localized specifically at microvilli of the brush border in gastrointestinal epithelial cells. Here we show that SAP-1 ablation in interleukin (IL)-10-deficient mice, a model of inflammatory bowel disease, resulted in a marked increase in the severity of colitis in association with up-regulation of mRNAs for various cytokines and chemokines in the colon. Tyrosine phosphorylation of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) 20, an intestinal microvillus-specific transmembrane protein of the Ig superfamily, was greatly increased in the intestinal epithelium of the SAP-1-deficient animals, suggesting that this protein is a substrate for SAP-1. Tyrosine phosphorylation of CEACAM20 by the protein tyrosine kinase c-Src and the consequent association of CEACAM20 with spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) promoted the production of IL-8 in cultured cells through the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). In addition, SAP-1 and CEACAM20 were found to form a complex through interaction of their ectodomains. SAP-1 and CEACAM20 thus constitute a regulatory system through which the intestinal epithelium contributes to intestinal immunity.

  6. Synthetic oligonucleotide antigens modified with locked nucleic acids detect disease specific antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsen, Simone V.; Solov’yov, Ilia A.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Mellins, Elizabeth; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    New techniques to detect and quantify antibodies to nucleic acids would provide a significant advance over current methods, which often lack specificity. We investigate the potential of novel antigens containing locked nucleic acids (LNAs) as targets for antibodies. Particularly, employing molecular dynamics we predict optimal nucleotide composition for targeting DNA-binding antibodies. As a proof of concept, we address a problem of detecting anti-DNA antibodies that are characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus, a chronic autoimmune disease with multiple manifestations. We test the best oligonucleotide binders in surface plasmon resonance studies to analyze binding and kinetic aspects of interactions between antigens and target DNA. These DNA and LNA/DNA sequences showed improved binding in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using human samples of pediatric lupus patients. Our results suggest that the novel method is a promising tool to create antigens for research and point-of-care monitoring of anti-DNA antibodies. PMID:27775006

  7. Synthetic oligonucleotide antigens modified with locked nucleic acids detect disease specific antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsen, Simone V.; Solov'Yov, Ilia A.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Mellins, Elizabeth; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-10-01

    New techniques to detect and quantify antibodies to nucleic acids would provide a significant advance over current methods, which often lack specificity. We investigate the potential of novel antigens containing locked nucleic acids (LNAs) as targets for antibodies. Particularly, employing molecular dynamics we predict optimal nucleotide composition for targeting DNA-binding antibodies. As a proof of concept, we address a problem of detecting anti-DNA antibodies that are characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus, a chronic autoimmune disease with multiple manifestations. We test the best oligonucleotide binders in surface plasmon resonance studies to analyze binding and kinetic aspects of interactions between antigens and target DNA. These DNA and LNA/DNA sequences showed improved binding in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using human samples of pediatric lupus patients. Our results suggest that the novel method is a promising tool to create antigens for research and point-of-care monitoring of anti-DNA antibodies.

  8. Antigenic Relatedness of Norovirus GII.4 Variants Determined by Human Challenge Sera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Chun Dai

    Full Text Available The GII.4 noroviruses (NoVs are a single genotype that is responsible for over 50% of NoV gastroenteritis epidemics worldwide. However, GII.4 NoVs have been found to undergo antigenic drifts, likely selected by host herd immunity, which raises an issue for vaccine strategies against NoVs. We previously characterized GII.4 NoV antigenic variations and found significant levels of antigenic relatedness among different GII.4 variants. Further characterization of the genetic and antigenic relatedness of recent GII.4 variants (2008b and 2010 cluster was performed in this study. The amino acid sequences of the receptor binding interfaces were highly conserved among all GII.4 variants from the past two decades. Using serum samples from patients enrolled in a GII.4 virus challenge study, significant cross-reactivity between major GII.4 variants from 1998 to 2012 was observed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and HBGA receptor blocking assays. The overall abilities of GII.4 NoVs to bind to the A/B/H HBGAs were maintained while their binding affinities to individual ABH antigens varied. These results highlight the importance of human HBGAs in NoV evolution and how conserved antigenic types impact vaccine development against GII.4 variants.

  9. Suppression of breast tumor growth by DNA vaccination against phosphatase of regenerating liver 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, J; Liu, C; Huang, H; Meng, L; Jiang, B; Cao, Y; Zhou, Z; She, T; Qu, L; Wei Song, S; Shou, C

    2013-08-01

    Phosphatase of regenerating liver (PRL)-3 is highly expressed in multiple cancers and has important roles in cancer development. Some small-molecule inhibitors and antibodies targeting PRL-3 have been recently reported to inhibit tumor growth effectively. To determine whether PRL-3-targeted DNA vaccination can induce immune response to prevent or inhibit the tumor growth, we established mouse D2F2 breast cancer cells expressing PRL-3 (D2F2/PRL-3) and control cells (D2F2/NC) with lentivirus, and constructed pVAX1-Igκ-PRL-3 plasmid (named as K-P3) as DNA vaccine to immunize BALB/c mice. We found that the K-P3 vaccine delivered by gene gun significantly prevented the growth of D2F2/PRL-3 compared with pVAX1-vector (Padjuvants, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis heat-shock protein, CTL antigen 4 and M. tuberculosis T-cell stimulatory epitope (MT), into K-P3 vaccine for expressing the fusion proteins. We found that these adjuvant molecules did not significantly improve the antitumor activity of PRL-3 vaccine, but enhanced the production of PRL-3 antibodies in immunized mice. Summarily, our findings demonstrate that PRL-3-targeted DNA vaccine can generate significantly preventive and therapeutic effects on the growth of breast cancer expressing PRL-3 through the induction of cellular immune responses to PRL-3.

  10. Expression of Catalytic Domain of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B and Preparation of Its Polyclonal Antibody

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This study focuses on the expression of human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B(PTP1B) catalytic domain (△PTP1B) and preparation of polyclonal antibody against △PTP1B. △PTP1B gene was PCR amplified with the cDNA of human PTP1B as the template, and cloned into the pT7 expression vector. The recombinant pT7-△PTP1B was expressed in E. coli Rosetta( DE3 ) host cells and purified. The antiserum was prepared by immunizing rabbit with purified recombinant △PTP1B. The polyclonal antibody against △PTP1B was purified by PVDF immobilized antigen affinity chromatography. △PTP1B was correctly cloned, expressed, and purified as confirmed by PCR, DNA sequence ratio) and 0. 1 ng, respectively. This study provides an important basis for further studying the biological function of PTP1B and its relationship with human diseases.

  11. Variation in antigen-antibody affinity among serotypes of Salmonella O4 serogroup, determined using specific antisera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aribam, Swarmistha Devi; Elsheimer-Matulova, Marta; Matsui, Hidenori; Hirota, Jiro; Shiraiwa, Kazumasa; Ogawa, Yohsuke; Hikono, Hirokazu; Shimoji, Yoshihiro; Eguchi, Masahiro

    2015-11-01

    Serotyping is widely used for typing Salmonella during surveillance, and depends on determining the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-antigen and the flagellar protein (H-antigens) components. As the O-antigen is highly variable, and structurally unique to each serotype, we investigated the binding affinities of LPS from Salmonella serotypes of O4 serogroup with specific anti-antigen serum via immunoblot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Since the serotypes from O4 serogroup also express the O-antigen factor 12, O12 antiserum was also used for the analysis. LPS from the different serotypes showed different binding affinities with the antisera. Therefore, based on the antigen-antibody affinity, a modified agglutination assay was carried out by using O4 and O12 antisera. Although serotypes from O4 serogroup have the common O-antigen factors 4 and 12, the analysis showed that the degree of agglutination reaction is different for each of the serotypes. We suggest that Salmonella serogroup O4 serotypes exhibit different binding affinities with specific antisera despite the presence of common O-antigen factors 4 and 12.

  12. Purification and characterization of a native zinc-binding high molecular weight multiprotein complex from human seminal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vikash Kumar; Kumar, Vijay; Chhikara, Nirmal; Kumar, Sanjay; Manral, Pallavi; Kashav, Tara; Saini, Savita; Srinivasan, A; Singh, Sarman; Singh, Tej P; Yadav, Savita

    2011-05-01

    The seminal plasma comprises secretions from various accessory sex glands. During fertilization spermatozoa undergo complex sequences of precisely timed events that are regulated by the activation of different intracellular signaling pathways. The precision and efficacy of these pathways are often influenced by the assembly and interactions of multiprotein complexes, thereby directing the flow of regulatory information. Our knowledge about these protein complexes present in human seminal plasma (HuSP) is limited. Here we report the identification and characterization of a native high molecular weight zinc-binding multiprotein complex from HuSP by utilizing 2-DE followed by MS. Twenty-six proteins representing isoforms and/or fragments of 11 different proteins were found to be assembled in this complex. Prostate-specific antigen, zinc α2-glycoprotein, prostatic acid phosphatase, and prolactin inducible protein were the major proteins of this complex. Dynamic light scattering experiments revealed changes in aggregation pattern accompanied with deviation from physiological pH and in presence of SDS. However, no significant changes were observed in the presence of physiological ligands such as zinc and fructose. The present study will be useful and contribute to guide the future studies performed for elucidation of biological significance of this native complex in HuSP.

  13. High-resolution crystal structure of the PDZ1 domain of human protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP-Bas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Ok; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Ku, Bonsu; Bae, Kwang-Hee; Lee, Sang Chul; Lim, Heon M; Kim, Seung Jun; Chi, Seung-Wook

    2016-09-23

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase-Basophil (PTP-Bas) is a membrane-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase with five PDZ domains and is involved in apoptosis, tumorigenesis, and insulin signaling. The interaction between PTP-Bas and tandem-PH-domain-containing protein 1/2 (TAPP1/2) plays an essential role in the regulation of insulin signaling. Despite its high sequence homology with the other PDZ domains, only the PDZ1 domain of PTP-Bas showed distinct binding specificity for TAPP1/2. Although the interaction between PTP-Bas PDZ1 and TAPP1/2 is a therapeutic target for diabetes, the structural basis for the interaction has not been elucidated. In the present study, we determined the crystal structure of the PTP-Bas PDZ1 domain at 1.6 Å resolution. In addition, we calculated the structural models of complexes of PTP-Bas PDZ1 and the C-terminal peptides of TAPP1/2 (referred to as TAPP1p/2p). Structural comparison with the PTP-Bas PDZ2/RA-GEF2 peptide complex revealed a structural basis for distinct binding specificity of PTP-Bas PDZ1 for TAPP1p/2p peptides. Our high-resolution crystal structure of PTP-Bas PDZ1 will serve as a useful template for rational structure-based design of novel anti-diabetes therapeutics.

  14. 5, 8, 11, 14-eicosatetraynoic acid suppresses CCL2/MCP-1 expression in IFN-γ-stimulated astrocytes by increasing MAPK phosphatase-1 mRNA stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jee

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-α activator, 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA, is an arachidonic acid analog. It is reported to inhibit up-regulation of pro-inflammatory genes; however, its underlying mechanism of action is largely unknown. In the present study, we focused on the inhibitory action of ETYA on the expression of the chemokine, CCL2/MCP-1, which plays a key role in the initiation and progression of inflammation. Methods To determine the effect of ETYA, primary cultured rat astrocytes and microglia were stimulated with IFN-γ in the presence of ETYA and then, expression of CCL2/MCP-1 and MAPK phosphatase (MKP-1 were determined using RT-PCR and ELISA. MKP-1 mRNA stability was evaluated by treating actinomycin D. The effect of MKP-1 and human antigen R (HuR was analyzed by using specific siRNA transfection system. The localization of HuR was analyzed by immunocytochemistry and subcellular fractionation experiment. Results We found that ETYA suppressed CCL2/MCP-1 transcription and secretion of CCL2/MCP-1 protein through up-regulation of MKP-1mRNA levels, resulting in suppression of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK phosphorylation and activator protein 1 (AP1 activity in IFN-γ-stimulated brain glial cells. Moreover, these effects of ETYA were independent of PPAR-α. Experiments using actinomycin D revealed that the ETYA-induced increase in MKP-1 mRNA levels reflected an increase in transcript stability. Knockdown experiments using small interfering RNA demonstrated that this increase in MKP-1 mRNA stability depended on HuR, an RNA-binding protein known to promote enhanced mRNA stability. Furthermore, ETYA-induced, HuR-mediated mRNA stabilization resulted from HuR-MKP-1 nucleocytoplasmic translocation, which served to protect MKP-1 mRNA from the mRNA degradation machinery. Conclusion ETYA induces MKP-1 through HuR at the post-transcriptional level in a receptor-independent manner. The mechanism

  15. The perivascular phagocyte of the mouse pineal gland: An antigen-presenting cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Morten; Rath, Martin F; Klein, David C

    2006-01-01

    The perivascular space of the rat pineal gland is known to contain phagocytic cells that are immunoreactive for leukocyte antigens, and thus they appear to belong to the macrophage/microglial cell line. These cells also contain MHC class II proteins. We investigated this cell type in the pineal...... gland of mice. Actively phagocytosing cells with a prominent lysosomal system were found in the pericapillary spaces of the mouse pineal gland following intravenous injection of horseradish peroxidase. The cells also exhibited strong acid phosphatase activity. Perivascular cells were immunopositive...... for MHC class II protein and for CD68, a marker of monocytes/phagocytes. This study verifies that perivascular phagocytes with antigen-presenting properties are present in the mouse pineal gland....

  16. Inactivation of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases by Peracids Correlates with the Hydrocarbon Chain Length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Kuban-Jankowska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Protein tyrosine phosphatases are crucial enzymes controlling numerous physiological and pathophysiological events and can be regulated by oxidation of the catalytic domain cysteine residue. Peracids are highly oxidizing compounds, and thus may induce inactivation of PTPs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the inhibitory effect of peracids with different length of hydrocarbon chain on the activity of selected PTPs. Methods: The enzymatic activity of human CD45, PTP1B, LAR, bacterial YopH was assayed under the cell-free conditions, and activity of cellular CD45 in human Jurkat cell lysates. The molecular docking and molecular dynamics were performed to evaluate the peracids binding to the CD45 active site. Results: Here we demonstrate that peracids reduce enzymatic activity of recombinant CD45, PTP1B, LAR, YopH and cellular CD45. Our studies indicate that peracids are more potent inhibitors of CD45 than hydrogen peroxide (with an IC50 value equal to 25 nM for peroctanoic acid and 8 µM for hydrogen peroxide. The experimental data show that the inactivation caused by peracids is dependent on hydrocarbon chain length of peracids with maximum inhibitory effect of medium-chain peracids (C8-C12 acyl chain, which correlates with calculated binding affinities to the CD45 active site. Conclusion: Peracids are potent inhibitors of PTPs with the strongest inhibitory effect observed for medium-chain peracids.

  17. Use of intein-mediated phosphoprotein arrays to study substrate specificity of protein phosphatases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochinyan, Samvel; Sun, Luo; Ghosh, Inca; Barshevsky, Tanya; Xu, Jie; Xu, Ming-Qun

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic peptides incorporating various chemical moieties, for example, phosphate groups, are convenient tools for investigating protein modification enzymes, such as protein phosphatases (PPs). However, short peptides are sometimes poor substrates, and their binding to commonly used matrices is unpredictable and variable. In general, protein substrates for PPs are superior for enzymatic assays, binding to various matrices, and Western blot analysis. The preparation and characterization of phosphoproteins, however can be difficult and technically demanding. In this study, the intein-mediated protein ligation (IPL) technique was used to readily generate phosphorylated protein substrates by ligating a synthetic phosphopeptide to an intein-generated carrier protein (CP) possessing a carboxyl-terminal thioester with a one-to-one stoichiometry. The ligated phosphoprotein (LPP) substrate was treated with a PP and subsequently subjected to array or Western blot analysis with a phospho-specific antibody. This approach is highly effective in producing arrays of protein substrates containing phosphorylated amino acid residues and has been applied for screening of PPs with specificity toward phosphorylated tyrosine, serine, or threonine residues, resulting in an approximately 240-fold increase in sensitivity in dot blot analysis compared with the use of synthetic peptides. The IPL technique overcomes the disadvantages of current methods and is a versatile system for the facile production of protein substrates containing well-defined structural motifs for the study of protein modification enzymes.

  18. Protein phosphatase 2A plays a critical role in interleukin-2-induced beta 2-integrin dependent homotypic adhesion in human CD4+ T cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brockdorff, J; Nielsen, M; Svejgaard, A

    1997-01-01

    Besides its function as a growth factor for T lymphocytes, interleukin 2 (IL-2) induces beta 2-integrin mediated adhesion, migration, and extravasation of T lymphocytes. It is, however, largely unknown how IL-2 receptors (IL-2R) are coupled to the beta 2-integrin adhesion pathway. Because IL-2 mo...... no inhibitory effect on cytokine induced adhesion at concentrations which strongly inhibited phosphatase activity. In conclusion, these data provide evidence that PP2A plays a critical role in IL-2-induced beta 2-integrin-dependent adhesion of human T cell lines.......Besides its function as a growth factor for T lymphocytes, interleukin 2 (IL-2) induces beta 2-integrin mediated adhesion, migration, and extravasation of T lymphocytes. It is, however, largely unknown how IL-2 receptors (IL-2R) are coupled to the beta 2-integrin adhesion pathway. Because IL-2...... modulates enzymatic activity and/or subcellular distribution of serine/threonine phosphatases 1 and 2A (PP1/PP2A) in T cells, we examined the role of these phosphatases in IL-2 induced homotypic adhesion in antigen specific human CD4+ T cell lines. We show that calyculin A, a potent inhibitor of PP1 and PP2...

  19. Purification and Characterization of the Catalytic Domain of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase SHP-1 and the Preparation of Anti-△SHP-1 Antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wan-nan; ZHUANG Yan; LI He; SUN Ying; FU Yao; WU Xiao-xia; ZHAO Zhi-zhuang; FU Xue-qi

    2008-01-01

    This study is focused on the expression of an SH2 domain-truncated form of protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1(designated △SHP-1) and the preparation of its polyelonal antibodies.A cDNA fragment encoding △SHP-1 was amplified by PCR and then cloned into the pT7 expression vector.The recombinant pT7-△SHP-1 plasmid was used to transform Rosetta(DE3) E.coll cells.△SHP-1 was distributed in the exclusion body of E.coll cell extracts and was purified through a two-column chromatographic procedure.The purified enzyme exhibited an expected molecular weight on SDS-gels and HPLC gel filtration columns.It possesses robust tyrosine phosphatase activity and shows typical enzymatic characteristics of classic tyrosine phosphatases.To generate polyclonal anti-△SHP-1 antibodies,purified recombinant △SHP-1 was used to immunize a rabbit.The resultant anti-serum was subjected to purification on △SHP-1 antigen affinity chromatography.The purified polyclonal antibody displayed a high sensitivity and specificity toward △SHP-1.This study thus provides the essential materials for further investigating the biological function and pathological implication of SHP-1 and screening the inhibitors and activators of the enzyme for therapeutic drug development.

  20. The dendritic cell-specific C-type lectin DC-SIGN is a receptor for Schistosoma mansoni egg antigens and recognizes the glycan antigen Lewis x.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Die, van I.M.; Vliet, van SJ; Nyame, AK; Cummings, RD; Bank, CM; Appelmelk, B.J.; Geijtenbeek, T.B.H.; Kooijk, van Y.

    2003-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni soluble egg antigens (SEAs) are crucially involved in modulating the host immune response to infection by S. mansoni. We report that human dendritic cells bind SEAs through the C-type lectin dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN). Monoclonal antibodies agai

  1. Protein phosphatase 2A, a key player in Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong LIU; Qing TIAN

    2009-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is the pre-dominant serine/threonine phosphatase in eukaryotic cells. In the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), decreased PP2A activities were observed, which is suggested to be involved in neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) formation, disturbed amyloid precursor protein (APP) secretion and neurodegeneration in AD brain. Based on our research and other previous findings, decreased PP2Ac level, decreased PP2A holoenzyme composition, increased level of PP2A inhibitors, increased PP2Ac Leu309 demethylation and Tyr307 phosphorylation underlie PP2A inactivation in AD. β-amyloid (Aβ) over-production, estrogen deficiency and impaired homocys-teine metabolism are the possible up-stream factors that inactivate PP2A in AD neurons. Further studies are required to disclose the role of PP2A in Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Assembly and structure of protein phosphatase 2A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) represents a conserved family of important protein serine/threonine phosphatases in species ranging from yeast to human. The PP2A core enzyme comprises a scaffold subunit and a catalytic subunit. The heterotrimeric PP2A holoenzyme consists of the core enzyme and a variable regulatory subunit. The catalytic subunit of PP2A is subject to reversible methylation, medi-ated by two conserved enzymes. Both the PP2A core and holoenzymes are regulated through interac-tion with a large number of cellular cofactors. Recent biochemical and structural investigation reveals critical insights into the assembly and function of the PP2A core enzyme as well as two families of holoenzyme. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms revealed by these latest advances.

  3. Assembly and structure of protein phosphatase 2A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI YiGong

    2009-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) represents a conserved family of important protein serinetthreonine phosphatases in species ranging from yeast to human. The PP2A core enzyme comprises a scaffold subunit and a catalytic subunit. The heterotrimeric PP2A holoenzyme consists of the core enzyme and a variable regulatory subunit. The catalytic subunit of PP2A is subject to reversible methylation, mediated by two conserved enzymes. Both the PP2A core and holoenzymes are regulated through interaction with a large number of cellular cofactors. Recent biochemical and structural investigation reveals critical insights into the assembly and function of the PP2A core enzyme as well as two families of holoenzyme. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms revealed by these latest advances.

  4. Effect of phenylmercuric acetate injections on phosphatase activity in chickens resistant and susceptible to Leukosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, V.L.; Bearse, G.E.; Csonka, E.

    1972-01-01

    The weighted means of liver and kidney alkaline phosphatase activity was greater in three strains of chickens classified as susceptible to limphoid leukosis than in five strains classified as resistant. On the same basis, four strains classified as susceptible to Marek's disease had more liver alkaline phosphatase activity than four strains classified as resistant. The weighted means of liver and kidney acid phosphatase activity were not different among the same strains of chickens classified similarly. Kidney alkaline phosphatase activity was the most generally inhibited by phenylmercuric acetate injections, followed by liver acid and alkaline phosphatase. Kidney acid phosphatase activity was enhanced by phenylmercuric acetate injections in three strains of chickens classified as resistant to both lymphoid leukosis and Marek's disease. Liver acid phosphatase activity was depressed in three strains classed as resistant to lymphoid leukosis.

  5. Phosphatase-inert glucosamine 6-phosphate mimics serve as actuators of the glmS riboswitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Xiang; Holmes, Thomas; Diddle, Julianna; Hintz, Lauren; Delaney, Dan; Stock, Alex; Renner, Danielle; McDevitt, Molly; Berkowitz, David B; Soukup, Juliane K

    2014-12-19

    The glmS riboswitch is unique among gene-regulating riboswitches and catalytic RNAs. This is because its own metabolite, glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P), binds to the riboswitch and catalytically participates in the RNA self-cleavage reaction, thereby providing a novel negative feedback mechanism. Given that a number of pathogens harbor the glmS riboswitch, artificial actuators of this potential RNA target are of great interest. Structural/kinetic studies point to the 2-amino and 6-phosphate ester functionalities in GlcN6P as being crucial for this actuation. As a first step toward developing artificial actuators, we have synthesized a series of nine GlcN6P analogs bearing phosphatase-inert surrogates in place of the natural phosphate ester. Self-cleavage assays with the Bacillus cereus glmS riboswitch give a broad SAR. Two analogs display significant activity, namely, the 6-deoxy-6-phosphonomethyl analog (5) and the 6-O-malonyl ether (13). Kinetic profiles show a 22-fold and a 27-fold higher catalytic efficiency, respectively, for these analogs vs glucosamine (GlcN). Given their nonhydrolyzable phosphate surrogate functionalities, these analogs are arguably the most robust artificial glmS riboswitch actuators yet reported. Interestingly, the malonyl ether (13, extra O atom) is much more effective than the simple malonate (17), and the "sterically true" phosphonate (5) is far superior to the chain-truncated (7) or chain-extended (11) analogs, suggesting that positioning via Mg coordination is important for activity. Docking results are consistent with this view. Indeed, the viability of the phosphonate and 6-O-malonyl ether mimics of GlcN6P points to a potential new strategy for artificial actuation of the glmS riboswitch in a biological setting, wherein phosphatase-resistance is paramount.

  6. Adsorption of Acid Phosphatase on Minerals and Soil Colloids in Presence of Citrate and Phosphate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the influence of phosphate and citrate, which are common inorganic andorganic anions in soils, on the adsorption of acid phosphatase by kaolin, goethite and the colloids separatedfrom yellow-brown soil (YBS) and latosol (LS) in central-south China. The YBS colloid has the major claymineral composition of 1.4 nm mineral, illite and kaolinite while the LS colloid mainly contains kaolinite andoxides. The adsorption isotherm of acid phosphatase on the examined soil colloids and minerals fitted tothe Langmuir model. The amount of enzyme adsorbed in the absence of ligands was in the order of YBScolloid >LS colloid>kaolin≈goethite. In the presence of phosphate or citrate, the amounts of the enzymeadsorbed followed the sequence YBS colloid>kaolin>LS colloid>goethite. The presence of ligands alsodecreased the binding energy between the enzyme and soil colloids or minerals. With the increase of ligandconcentration from 10 mmol L-1 to 400 m mol L-1, different behaviors for the adsorption of enzyme werefound in the colloid and mineral systems studied. A sharp decrease in enzyme adsorption was observed ongoethite while gradual decreases of enzyme adsorption were recorded in the two soil colloid systems. However,no any decrease was found for the amount of enzyme adsorbed on kaolin at higher ligand concentrations.When phosphate or citrate was introduced to the system before the addition of enzyme, the ligands usuallyenhanced the adsorption of enzyme. The results obtained in this study suggested the important role ofkaolinite mineral in the adsorption of enzyme molecules in acidic soils in the presence of various ligands.

  7. Mammalian-like Purple Acid Phosphatases in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Introduction Purple acid phosphatases (PAPs) comprise of a family of binuclear metal-containing hydrolases, some members of which have been isolated and characterized from animal, plant and fungal sources[1]. PAPs not only catalyze the hydrolyses of a wide range of phosphate esters and anhydrides under acidic reaction conditions,but also catalyze the generation of hydroxyl radicals in a Fenton-like reaction, by virtue of the presence of a redox-active binuclear metal center.

  8. phoD Alkaline Phosphatase Gene Diversity in Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragot, Sabine A; Kertesz, Michael A; Bünemann, Else K

    2015-10-01

    Phosphatase enzymes are responsible for much of the recycling of organic phosphorus in soils. The PhoD alkaline phosphatase takes part in this process by hydrolyzing a range of organic phosphoesters. We analyzed the taxonomic and environmental distribution of phoD genes using whole-genome and metagenome databases. phoD alkaline phosphatase was found to be spread across 20 bacterial phyla and was ubiquitous in the environment, with the greatest abundance in soil. To study the great diversity of phoD, we developed a new set of primers which targets phoD genes in soil. The primer set was validated by 454 sequencing of six soils collected from two continents with different climates and soil properties and was compared to previously published primers. Up to 685 different phoD operational taxonomic units were found in each soil, which was 7 times higher than with previously published primers. The new primers amplified sequences belonging to 13 phyla, including 71 families. The most prevalent phoD genes identified in these soils were affiliated with the orders Actinomycetales (13 to 35%), Bacillales (1 to 29%), Gloeobacterales (1 to 18%), Rhizobiales (18 to 27%), and Pseudomonadales (0 to 22%). The primers also amplified phoD genes from additional orders, including Burkholderiales, Caulobacterales, Deinococcales, Planctomycetales, and Xanthomonadales, which represented the major differences in phoD composition between samples, highlighting the singularity of each community. Additionally, the phoD bacterial community structure was strongly related to soil pH, which varied between 4.2 and 6.8. These primers reveal the diversity of phoD in soil and represent a valuable tool for the study of phoD alkaline phosphatase in environmental samples.

  9. Influence of triethyl phosphate on phosphatase activity in shooting range soil: Isolation of a zinc-resistant bacterium with an acid phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Sandra; Brigmon, Robin L

    2017-03-01

    Phosphatase-mediated hydrolysis of organic phosphate may be a viable means of stabilizing heavy metals via precipitation as a metal phosphate in bioremediation applications. We investigated the effect of triethyl phosphate (TEP) on soil microbial-phosphatase activity in a heavy-metal contaminated soil. Gaseous TEP has been used at subsurface sites for bioremediation of organic contaminants but not applied in heavy-metal contaminated areas. Little is known about how TEP affects microbial activity in soils and it is postulated that TEP can serve as a phosphate source in nutrient-poor groundwater and soil/sediments. Over a 3-week period, TEP amendment to microcosms containing heavy-metal contaminated soil resulted in increased activity of soil acid-phosphatase and repression of alkaline phosphatase, indicating a stimulatory effect on the microbial population. A soil-free enrichment of microorganisms adapted to heavy-metal and acidic conditions was derived from the TEP-amended soil microcosms using TEP as the sole phosphate source and the selected microbial consortium maintained a high acid-phosphatase activity with repression of alkaline phosphatase. Addition of 5mM zinc to soil-free microcosms had little effect on acid phosphatase but inhibited alkaline phosphatase. One bacterial member from the consortium, identified as Burkholderia cepacia sp., expressed an acid-phosphatase activity uninhibited by high concentrations of zinc and produced a soluble, indigo pigment under phosphate limitation. The pigment was produced in a phosphate-free medium and was not produced in the presence of TEP or phosphate ion, indicative of purple acid-phosphatase types that are pressed by bioavailable phosphate. These results demonstrate that TEP amendment was bioavailable and increased overall phosphatase activity in both soil and soil-free microcosms supporting the possibility of positive outcomes in bioremediation applications.

  10. Crystallization of recombinant Haemophilus influenzaee (P4) acid phosphatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ou, Zhonghui [Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Felts, Richard L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Reilly, Thomas J. [Department of Veterinary Pathobiology and Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Nix, Jay C. [Molecular Biology Consortium, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Tanner, John J., E-mail: tannerjj@missouri.edu [Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)

    2006-05-01

    Lipoprotein e (P4) is a class C acid phosphatase and a potential vaccine candidate for nontypeable H. influenzae infections. This paper reports the crystallization of recombinant e (P4) and the acquisition of a 1.7 Å resolution native X-ray diffraction data set. Haemophilus influenzae infects the upper respiratory tract of humans and can cause infections of the middle ear, sinuses and bronchi. The virulence of the pathogen is thought to involve a group of surface-localized macromolecular components that mediate interactions at the host–pathogen interface. One of these components is lipoprotein e (P4), which is a class C acid phosphatase and a potential vaccine candidate for nontypeable H. influenzae infections. This paper reports the crystallization of recombinant e (P4) and the acquisition of a 1.7 Å resolution native X-ray diffraction data set. The space group is P4{sub 2}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 65.6, c = 101.4 Å, one protein molecule per asymmetric unit and 37% solvent content. This is the first report of the crystallization of a class C acid phosphatase.

  11. Searching for the role of protein phosphatases in eukaryotic microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da-Silva A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Preference for specific protein substrates together with differential sensitivity to activators and inhibitors has allowed classification of serine/threonine protein phosphatases (PPs into four major types designated types 1, 2A, 2B and 2C (PP1, PP2A, PP2B and PP2C, respectively. Comparison of sequences within their catalytic domains has indicated that PP1, PP2A and PP2B are members of the same gene family named PPP. On the other hand, the type 2C enzyme does not share sequence homology with the PPP members and thus represents another gene family, known as PPM. In this report we briefly summarize some of our studies about the role of serine/threonine phosphatases in growth and differentiation of three different eukaryotic models: Blastocladiella emersonii, Neurospora crassa and Dictyostelium discoideum. Our observations suggest that PP2C is the major phosphatase responsible for dephosphorylation of amidotransferase, an enzyme that controls cell wall synthesis during Blastocladiella emersonii zoospore germination. We also report the existence of a novel acid- and thermo-stable protein purified from Neurospora crassa mycelia, which specifically inhibits the PP1 activity of this fungus and mammals. Finally, we comment on our recent results demonstrating that Dictyostelium discoideum expresses a gene that codes for PP1, although this activity has never been demonstrated biochemically in this organism.

  12. PTPL1: a large phosphatase with a split personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaan, Ogan D; Toretsky, Jeffrey A

    2008-06-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase, PTPL1, (also known as PTPN13, FAP-1, PTP-BAS, PTP1E) is a non-receptor type PTP and, at 270 kDa, is the largest phosphatase within this group. In addition to the well-conserved PTP domain, PTPL1 contains at least 7 putative macromolecular interaction domains. This structural complexity indicates that PTPL1 may modulate diverse cellular functions, perhaps exerting both positive and negative effects. In accordance with this idea, while certain studies suggest that PTPL1 can act as a tumor-promoting gene other experimental studies have suggested that PTPL1 may function as a tumor suppressor. The role of PTPL1 in the cancer cell is therefore likely to be both complex and context dependent with possible roles including the modulation of growth, stress-response, and cytoskeletal remodeling pathways. Understanding the nature of molecular complexes containing PTPL1, its interaction partners, substrates, regulation and subcellular localization are key to unraveling the complex personality of this protein phosphatase.

  13. Activation of Calf Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase by Trifluoroethanol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹志方; 徐真; 朴龙斗; 周海梦

    2001-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase is a stable enzyme which is strongly resistant to urea, guanidine hydrochloride, acid pH, and heat. But there have been few studies on the effect of organic cosolvents on the activity and structure of alkaline phosphatase. The activity of calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase (CIAP) is markedly increased when incubated in solutions with elevated trifluoroethanol (TFE) concentrations. The activation is a time dependent course. There is a very fast phase in the activation kinetics in the mixing dead time (30 s) using convential methods. Further activation after the very fast phase follows biphasic kinetics. The structural basis of the activation has been monitored by intrinsic fluorescence and far ultraviolet circular dichroism. TFE (0 - 60%) did not lead to any significant change in the intrinsic fluorescence emission maximum, indicating no significant change in the tertiary structure of CIAP. But TFE did significantly change the secondary structure of CIAP, especially increasing α-helix content. We conclude that the activation of ClAP is due to its secondary structural change. The time for the secondary structure change induced by TFE preceds that of the activity increase. These results suggest that a rapid conformational change of ClAP induced by TFE results in the enhancement of ClAP activity, followed by further increase of this activity because of the further slightly slower rearrangements of the activated conformation. It is concluded that the higher catalytic activity of ClAP can be attained with various secondary structures.

  14. The role of phosphatases in the initiation of skeletal mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán, José Luis

    2013-10-01

    Endochondral ossification is a carefully orchestrated process mediated by promoters and inhibitors of mineralization. Phosphatases are implicated, but their identities and functions remain unclear. Mutations in the tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) gene cause hypophosphatasia, a heritable form of rickets and osteomalacia, caused by an arrest in the propagation of hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals onto the collagenous extracellular matrix due to accumulation of extracellular inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi), a physiological TNAP substrate and a potent calcification inhibitor. However, TNAP knockout (Alpl(-/-)) mice are born with a mineralized skeleton and have HA crystals in their chondrocyte- and osteoblast-derived matrix vesicles (MVs). We have shown that PHOSPHO1, a soluble phosphatase with specificity for two molecules present in MVs, phosphoethanolamine and phosphocholine, is responsible for initiating HA crystal formation inside MVs and that PHOSPHO1 and TNAP have nonredundant functional roles during endochondral ossification. Double ablation of PHOSPHO1 and TNAP function leads to the complete absence of skeletal mineralization and perinatal lethality, despite normal systemic phosphate and calcium levels. This strongly suggests that the Pi needed for initiation of MV-mediated mineralization is produced locally in the perivesicular space. As both TNAP and nucleoside pyrophosphohydrolase-1 (NPP1) behave as potent ATPases and pyrophosphatases in the MV compartment, our current model of the mechanisms of skeletal mineralization implicate intravesicular PHOSPHO1 function and Pi influx into MVs in the initiation of mineralization and the functions of TNAP and NPP1 in the extravesicular progression of mineralization.

  15. A new Kupffer cell receptor mediating plasma clearance of carcinoembryonic antigen by the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, C A; Thomas, P; Broitman, S A; Zamcheck, N

    1982-05-15

    Native human carcinoembryonic antigen is rapidly removed from the circulation by the rat liver Kupffer cell after intravenous injection. The molecule is subsequently transferred to the hepatocyte in an immunologically identifiable form. Carcinoembryonic antigen has a circulatory half-life of 3.7 (+/- 0.8) min, and cellular entry is by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Non-specific fluid pinocytosis and phagocytosis can be excluded as possible mechanisms by the kinetics of clearance and failure of colloidal carbon to inhibit uptake. Substances with known affinity for the hepatic receptors for mannose, N-acetylglucosamine, fucose and galactose all fail to inhibit carcinoembryonic antigen clearance. After two cycles of the Smith degradation, carcinoembryonic antigen is still able to inhibit clearance of the native molecule. Receptor specificity is apparently not dependent on those non-reducing terminal sugars of the native molecule. Performic acid-oxidized carcinoembryonic antigen also inhibits clearance of carcinoembryonic antigen in vivo. Receptor binding is not dependent on tertiary protein conformation. Non-specific cross-reacting antigen, a glycoprotein structurally similar to carcinoembryonic antigen, is cleared by the same mechanism.

  16. THE SEARCH OF OPTIMAL COMBINATION OF ANTIGENS FOR SEROLOGICAL DIAGNOSTICS OF TUBERCULOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Vasilyeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The four chimeric recombinant antigens CBD-CFP10, CBD-ESAT6, ESAT6-CFP10 and CBD-P38 contained aminoacid sequences of full-size proteins ESAT6, CFP10 and matured protein P38 of M. tuberculosis, joined with aminoacid sequences of cellulose bind domain of endogluconase A (CBD from Cellumonas fimi have been obtained by gene engineering methods. Recombinant proteins were purified by affine chromatography in column with Ni-NTA-sepharose 6В-CL and as PPDN-3 were used for detection of their antigenic activity in indirect ELISA for TB serological diagnostics. The sera from patients with lung tuberculosis (n = 321, from persons who had professional contacts with TB patients (n = 42, from healthy blood donors (n = 366 and from patients with lung diseases of non-TB etiology were tested. It was detected that there was positive correlation between antibodies level for all studied antigens compared by pair. It has been demonstrated that although antigens were different by antigenic and immunobiological characteristics they add each other in the content of antigenic diagnostics compositions. Thus, all these antigens can be used in the test kits for serological diagnostics of TB. Using of these antigens will allow to detect persons infected by TB and patients with active tuberculosis. 

  17. HLA-Modeler: Automated Homology Modeling of Human Leukocyte Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Amari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The three-dimensional (3D structures of human leukocyte antigen (HLA molecules are indispensable for the studies on the functions at molecular level. We have developed a homology modeling system named HLA-modeler specialized in the HLA molecules. Segment matching algorithm is employed for modeling and the optimization of the model is carried out by use of the PFROSST force field considering the implicit solvent model. In order to efficiently construct the homology models, HLA-modeler uses a local database of the 3D structures of HLA molecules. The structure of the antigenic peptide-binding site is important for the function and the 3D structure is highly conserved between various alleles. HLA-modeler optimizes the use of this structural motif. The leave-one-out cross-validation using the crystal structures of class I and class II HLA molecules has demonstrated that the rmsds of nonhydrogen atoms of the sites between homology models and crystal structures are less than 1.0 Å in most cases. The results have indicated that the 3D structures of the antigenic peptide-binding sites can be reproduced by HLA-modeler at the level almost corresponding to the crystal structures.

  18. HLA-Modeler: Automated Homology Modeling of Human Leukocyte Antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amari, Shinji; Kataoka, Ryoichi; Ikegami, Takashi; Hirayama, Noriaki

    2013-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) structures of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules are indispensable for the studies on the functions at molecular level. We have developed a homology modeling system named HLA-modeler specialized in the HLA molecules. Segment matching algorithm is employed for modeling and the optimization of the model is carried out by use of the PFROSST force field considering the implicit solvent model. In order to efficiently construct the homology models, HLA-modeler uses a local database of the 3D structures of HLA molecules. The structure of the antigenic peptide-binding site is important for the function and the 3D structure is highly conserved between various alleles. HLA-modeler optimizes the use of this structural motif. The leave-one-out cross-validation using the crystal structures of class I and class II HLA molecules has demonstrated that the rmsds of nonhydrogen atoms of the sites between homology models and crystal structures are less than 1.0 Å in most cases. The results have indicated that the 3D structures of the antigenic peptide-binding sites can be reproduced by HLA-modeler at the level almost corresponding to the crystal structures.

  19. A new application of scanning electrochemical microscopy for the label-free interrogation of antibody-antigen interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, Joanne L.; Davis, Frank; Collyer, Stuart D. [Cranfield Health, Cranfield University, Cranfield, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Higson, Seamus P.J., E-mail: s.p.j.higson@cranfield.ac.uk [Cranfield Health, Cranfield University, Cranfield, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-18

    Within this work we present a 'proof of principle' study for the use of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) to detect and image biomolecular interactions in a label-free assay as a potential alternative to current fluorescence techniques. Screen-printed carbon electrodes were used as the substrate for the deposition of a dotted array, where the dots consist of biotinylated polyethyleneimine. These were then further derivatised, first with neutravidin and then with a biotinylated antibody to the protein neuron specific enolase (NSE). SECM using a ferrocene carboxylic acid mediator showed clear differences between the array and the surrounding unmodified carbon. Imaging of the arrays before and following exposure to various concentrations of the antigen showed clear evidence for specific binding of the NSE antigen to the antibody derivatised dots. Non-specific binding was quantified. Control experiments with other proteins showed only non-specific binding across the whole of the substrate, thereby confirming that specific binding does occur between the antibody and antigen at the surface of the dots. Binding of the antigen was accompanied by a measured increase in current response, which may be explained in terms of protein electrostatic interaction and hydrophobic interactions to the mediator, thereby increasing the localised mediator flux. A calibration curve was obtained between 500 fg mL{sup -1} to 200 pg mL{sup -1} NSE which demonstrated a logarithmic relationship between the current change upon binding and antigen concentration without the need for any labelling of the substrate.

  20. Analysis of Two Putative Candida albicans Phosphopantothenoylcysteine Decarboxylase / Protein Phosphatase Z Regulatory Subunits Reveals an Unexpected Distribution of Functional Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrényi, Katalin; Molero, Cristina; Kónya, Zoltán; Erdődi, Ferenc; Ariño, Joaquin; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase Z (Ppz) is a fungus specific enzyme that regulates cell wall integrity, cation homeostasis and oxidative stress response. Work on Saccharomyces cerevisiae has shown that the enzyme is inhibited by Hal3/Vhs3 moonlighting proteins that together with Cab3 constitute the essential phosphopantothenoylcysteine decarboxylase (PPCDC) enzyme. In Candida albicans CaPpz1 is also involved in the morphological changes and infectiveness of this opportunistic human pathogen. To reveal the CaPpz1 regulatory context we searched the C. albicans database and identified two genes that, based on the structure of their S. cerevisiae counterparts, were termed CaHal3 and CaCab3. By pull down analysis and phosphatase assays we demonstrated that both of the bacterially expressed recombinant proteins were able to bind and inhibit CaPpz1 as well as its C-terminal catalytic domain (CaPpz1-Cter) with comparable efficiency. The binding and inhibition were always more pronounced with CaPpz1-Cter, indicating a protective effect against inhibition by the N-terminal domain in the full length protein. The functions of the C. albicans proteins were tested by their overexpression in S. cerevisiae. Contrary to expectations we found that only CaCab3 and not CaHal3 rescued the phenotypic traits that are related to phosphatase inhibition by ScHal3, such as tolerance to LiCl or hygromycin B, requirement for external K+ concentrations, or growth in a MAP kinase deficient slt2 background. On the other hand, both of the Candida proteins turned out to be essential PPCDC components and behaved as their S. cerevisiae counterparts: expression of CaCab3 and CaHal3 rescued the cab3 and hal3 vhs3 S. cerevisiae mutations, respectively. Thus, both CaHal3 and CaCab3 retained the PPCDC related functions and have the potential for CaPpz1 inhibition in vitro. The fact that only CaCab3 exhibits its phosphatase regulatory potential in vivo suggests that in C. albicans CaCab3, but not CaHal3, acts as a

  1. The intrinsic cysteine and histidine residues of the anti-Salmonella antibody Se155-4: a model for the introduction of new functions into antibody-binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, N Martin; Watson, David C; Cunningham, Anna M; MacKenzie, C Roger

    2014-10-01

    New functions can be incorporated into anti-hapten or anti-protein antibodies by mutating selected residues in the binding-site region either to Cys, to allow alkylation with reagents bearing the desired functional groups, or to His, to create metal-binding sites or to make antigen binding pH-sensitive. However, choosing suitable sites for these mutations has been hampered by the lack of antibodies with these features, to serve as models. Remarkably, the anti-carbohydrate antibody Se155-4, specific for the Salmonella group B lipopolysaccharide, already has a Cys and two pairs of His residues close to the antigen-binding pocket in its structure, and shows pH-dependent antigen binding. We therefore investigated modification of its Cys94L in an scFv version of the antibody with the aims of creating a 'reagentless' fluorescent sensor and attaching a metal-binding group that might confer lyase activity. These groups were successfully introduced, as judged by mass spectrometry, and had only slightly reduced antigen binding in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The fluorescent product was sensitive to addition of antigen in a solution format, unlike a modification of a more distant Cys introduced into the VH CDR4 loop. Two other routes to modulate antigen binding were also explored, metal binding by the His pair alongside the antigen-binding pocket and insertions into CDR4 to extend the antigen-contact area. His residues adjacent to the antigen-binding pocket bound copper, causing a 5-fold decrease in antigen binding. In CDR4 of the VH domain, the preferred insert length was four residues, which gave stable antigen-binding products but did not improve overall antigen affinity.

  2. Have We Overlooked the Importance of Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatases in Pancreatic Beta-Cells? Role Played by Protein Phosphatase 2A in Insulin Secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esser V

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Genetic predisposition and environmental influences insidiously converge to cause glucose intolerance and hyperglycemia. Beta-cell compensates by secreting more insulin and when it fails, overt diabetes mellitus ensues. The need to understand the mechanisms involved in insulin secretion cannot be stressed enough. Phosphorylation of proteins plays an important role in regulating insulin secretion. In order to understand how a particular cellular process is regulated by protein phosphorylation the nature of the protein kinases and protein phosphatases involved and the mechanisms that determine when and where these enzymes are active should be investigated. While the actions of protein kinases have been intensely studied within the beta-cell, less emphasis has been placed on protein phosphatases even though they play an important regulatory role. This review focuses on the importance of protein phosphatase 2A in insulin secretion. Most of the present knowledge on protein phosphatase 2A originates from protein phosphatase inhibitor studies on islets and beta-cell lines. The ability of protein phosphatase 2A to change its activity in the presence of glucose and inhibitors provides clues to its role in regulating insulin secretion. An aggressive approach to elucidate the substrates and mechanisms of action of protein phosphatases is crucial to the understanding of phosphorylation events within the beta-cell. Characterizing protein phosphatase 2A within the beta-cell will certainly help us in understanding the mechanisms involved in insulin secretion and provide valuable information for drug development.

  3. Antigen retrieval techniques in immunohistochemistry: comparison of different methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pileri, S A; Roncador, G; Ceccarelli, C; Piccioli, M; Briskomatis, A; Sabattini, E; Ascani, S; Santini, D; Piccaluga, P P; Leone, O; Damiani, S; Ercolessi, C; Sandri, F; Pieri, F; Leoncini, L; Falini, B

    1997-09-01

    Routine sections of normal and pathological samples fixed in 10 per cent buffered formalin or B5, including EDTA-decalcified bone-marrow biopsies, were tested with 61 antibodies following heating in three different fluids: 0.01 M citrate buffer (pH 6.0), 0.1 M Tris-HCl (pH 8.0), and 1 mM EDTA-NaOH solution (pH 8.0). The sections underwent either three cycles of microwave treatment (5 min each) or pressure cooking for 1-2 min. The alkaline phosphatase/anti-alkaline phosphatase (APAAP) technique was used as the standard detection method; with 16 antibodies a slightly modified streptavidin-biotin complex (SABC)-immunoperoxidase technique was applied in parallel. The results obtained were compared with those observed without any antigen retrieval (AR), or following section digestion with 0.05 per cent protease XIV at 37 degrees C for 5 min. Chess-board titration tests showed that all antibodies but one profited by AR. Protease XIV digestion represented the gold standard for five antibodies, while 55 produced optimal results following the application of heat-based AR. By comparison with the other fluids, EDTA appeared to be superior in terms of both staining intensity and the number of marked cells. These results were independent of tissue processing, immunohistochemical approach, and heating device. Pressure cooking was found to be more convenient on practical grounds, as it allowed the simultaneous handling of a large number of slides and a time saving of 1 min 30 s, representing the proper time for the treatment.

  4. Evaluation of Prostatic Acid Phosphatase (PAP) as a Candidate Antigen for the Development of Cancer Vaccines for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-01

    colony-stimulating factor as a vaccine adjuvant elicits both a cellular and humoral response to recombinant human granu - locyte-macrophage colony...cells in recruiting CD8+ CTLs (4) and other inflammatory cells such as macrophages and eosinophils (5). CTLs have generally been believed to be the... eosinophils . Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) have long been considered to be the primary effector cell population critical for effective antitumor immunity

  5. СAPSULAR ANTIGEN OF YERSINIA PESTIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Kadnikova

    2015-01-01

    . Molecular usher Caf1A responsible for capsular antigen anchoring on the surface of bacterial cell has a high affinity to human interleukin 1β. Caf1 can compete with interleukins 1α, 1β, and 1ra in binding to receptors on lymphoid cells preventing development of adequate immune response. Immunodiagnosis of plague is based on detection of Caf1 or anti-Caf1 antibodies since this Y. pestis antigen is species specific. Covering bacterial surfaces capsular antigen is also the paramount component of all modern plague vaccines. Its leading role in induction of intense immunity in mice, rats, monkeys, and men was shown clearly. However, non-capsulated (Caf1– variants of Y. pestis keeping their virulence at the level of the wild-type strains might be selected and accumulated in immune animals. This indicates inadmissibility of application of monoantigen plague vaccines and necessity for design of immunoprophylactic preparations aimed at two or three molecular targets. 

  6. Gallium nitrate inhibits alkaline phosphatase activity in a differentiating mesenchymal cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boskey, A L; Ziecheck, W; Guidon, P; Doty, S B

    1993-02-01

    The effect of gallium nitrate on alkaline phosphatase activity in a differentiating chick limb-bud mesenchymal cell culture was monitored in order to gain insight into the observation that rachitic rats treated with gallium nitrate failed to show the expected increase in serum alkaline phosphatase activity. Cultures maintained in media containing 15 microM gallium nitrate showed drastically decreased alkaline phosphatase activities in the absence of significant alterations in total protein synthesis and DNA content. However, addition of 15 microM gallium nitrate to cultures 18 h before assay for alkaline phosphatase activity had little effect. At the light microscopic and electron microscopic level, gallium-treated cultures differed morphologically from gallium-free cultures: with gallium present, there were fewer hypertrophic chondrocytes and cartilage nodules were flatter and further apart. Because of altered morphology, staining with an antibody against chick cartilage alkaline phosphatase appeared less extensive; however, all nodules stained equivalently relative to gallium-free controls. Histochemical staining for alkaline phosphatase activity was negative in gallium-treated cultures, demonstrating that the alkaline phosphatase protein present was not active. The defective alkaline phosphatase activity in cultures maintained in the presence of gallium was also evidenced when cultures were supplemented with the alkaline phosphatase substrate, beta-glycerophosphate (beta GP). The data presented suggest that gallium inhibits alkaline phosphatase activity in this culture system and that gallium causes alterations in the differentiation of mesenchymal cells into hypertrophic chondrocytes.

  7. Specificity of the proteasome cleavage to the antigen protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In the MHC classⅠmolecule binding antigenic peptides processing and presentation pathway,the ubiquitin-proteasome system plays a key role in degrading the protein substrate.For the purpose of studying the specificities of proteasomal cleavage sites,partial least squares method is used to predict the proteasomal cleavage sites,and the predictive accuracy of the model is 82.8%.The specificities of the cleavage sites and the adjacent positions come from the contribution of the amino acids of the samples to the cleavage sites,showing the information of proteasome interacting with antigen protein.It demonstrates that the proteasome cleaving to target protein is selective,but not random.

  8. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holers, V.M.; Kotzin, B.L.

    1985-09-01

    The authors used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases.

  9. Novel antigen design for the generation of antibodies to G-protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, K; Hofström, C; Lindskog, C; Hansson, M; Angelidou, P; Hökfelt, T; Uhlén, M; Wernérus, H; Gräslund, T; Hober, S

    2011-07-29

    Antibodies are important tools for the study of G-protein-coupled receptors, key proteins in cellular signaling. Due to their large hydrophobic membrane spanning regions and often very short loops exposed on the surface of the cells, generation of antibodies able to recognize the receptors in the endogenous environment has been difficult. Here, we describe an antigen-design method where the extracellular loops and N-terminus are combined to a single antigen for generation of antibodies specific to three selected GPCRs: NPY5R, B2ARN and GLP1R. The design strategy enabled straightforward antigen production and antibody generation. Binding of the antibodies to intact receptors was analyzed using flow cytometry and immunofluorescence based confocal microscopy on A-431 cells overexpressing the respective GPCR. The antibody-antigen interactions were characterized using epitope mapping, and the antibodies were applied in immunohistochemical staining of human tissues. Most of the antibodies showed specific binding to their respective overexpressing cell line but not to the non-transfected cells, thus indicating binding to their respective target receptor. The epitope mapping showed that sub-populations within the purified antibody pool recognized different regions of the antigen. Hence, the genetic combination of several different epitopes enables efficient generation of specific antibodies with potential use in several applications for the study of endogenous receptors.

  10. Mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of arsenic compounds on protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehman, Kanwal [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Chen, Zhe [Zhejiang Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou (China); Wang, Wen Wen; Wang, Yan Wei [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Sakamoto, Akira [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chiba 260‐8675 (Japan); Zhang, Yan Fang [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Naranmandura, Hua, E-mail: narenman@zju.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Suzuki, Noriyuki [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chiba 260‐8675 (Japan)

    2012-09-15

    Arsenic binding to biomolecules is considered one of the major toxic mechanisms, which may also be related to the carcinogenic risks of arsenic in humans. At the same time, arsenic is also known to activate the phosphorylation-dependent signaling pathways including the epidermal growth factor receptor, the mitogen-activated protein kinase and insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 pathways. These signaling pathways originate at the level of receptor tyrosine kinases whose phosphorylation status is regulated by opposing protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity. Reversible tyrosine phosphorylation, which is governed by the balanced action of protein tyrosine kinases and phosphatases, regulates important signaling pathways that are involved in the control of cell proliferation, adhesion and migration. In the present study, we have focused on the interaction of cellular PTPs with toxic trivalent arsenite (iAs{sup III}) and its intermediate metabolites such as monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}) in vitro, and then determined the arsenic binding site in PTP by the use of recombinant PTPs (e.g., PTP1B and CD45). Interestingly, the activities of PTP1B (cytoplasm-form) or CD45 (receptor-linked form) were observed to be strongly inhibited by both methylated metabolites (i.e., MMA{sup III} and DMA{sup III}) but not by iAs{sup III}. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has clearly confirmed that the organic intermediate, DMA{sup III} directly bound to the active site cysteine residue of PTP1B (e.g., Cys215), resulting in inhibition of enzyme activity. These results suggest that arsenic exposure may disturb the cellular signaling pathways through PTP inactivation. Highlights: ► This study focused on the interaction of PTPs with trivalent arsenicals in vitro. ► We for the first time confirmed that DMA{sup III} strongly inhibited activity of PTP1B. ► DMA{sup III} directly

  11. Concepts and applications for influenza antigenic cartography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Influenza antigenic cartography projects influenza antigens into a two or three dimensional map based on immunological datasets, such as hemagglutination inhibition and microneutralization assays. A robust antigenic cartography can facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection since the antigenic map can simplify data interpretation through intuitive antigenic map. However, antigenic cartography construction is not trivial due to the challenging features embedded in the immunological data, such as data incompleteness, high noises, and low reactors. To overcome these challenges, we developed a computational method, temporal Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS), by adapting the low rank MC concept from the movie recommendation system in Netflix and the MDS method from geographic cartography construction. The application on H3N2 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A viruses demonstrates that temporal MC-MDS is effective and efficient in constructing influenza antigenic cartography. The web sever is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap. PMID:21761589

  12. A complex between contactin-1 and the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPRZ controls the development of oligodendrocyte precursor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamprianou, Smaragda; Chatzopoulou, Elli; Thomas, Jean-Léon; Bouyain, Samuel; Harroch, Sheila (IP-Korea); (UPMC); (UMKC)

    2013-09-23

    The six members of the contactin (CNTN) family of neural cell adhesion molecules are involved in the formation and maintenance of the central nervous system (CNS) and have been linked to mental retardation and neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism. Five of the six CNTNs bind to the homologous receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases gamma (PTPRG) and zeta (PTPRZ), but the biological roles of these interactions remain unclear. We report here the cocrystal structure of the carbonic anhydrase-like domain of PTPRZ bound to tandem Ig repeats of CNTN1 and combine these structural data with binding assays to show that PTPRZ binds specifically to CNTN1 expressed at the surface of oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Furthermore, analyses of glial cell populations in wild-type and PTPRZ-deficient mice show that the binding of PTPRZ to CNTN1 expressed at the surface of oligodendrocyte precursor cells inhibits their proliferation and promotes their development into mature oligodendrocytes. Overall, these results implicate the PTPRZ/CNTN1 complex as a previously unknown modulator of oligodendrogenesis.

  13. Promoting Uranium Immobilization by the Activities of Microbial Phosphatases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert J. Martinez; Melanie J. Beazley; Samuel M. Webb; Martial Taillefert (co-PI); and Patricia A. Sobecky

    2007-04-19

    The overall objective of this project is to examine the activity of nonspecific phosphohydrolases present in naturally occurring subsurface microorganisms for the purpose of promoting the immobilization of radionuclides through the production of uranium [U(VI)] phosphate precipitates. Specifically, we hypothesize that the precipitation of U(VI) phosphate minerals may be promoted through the microbial release and/or accumulation of PO4 3- as a means to detoxify radionuclides and heavy metals. An experimental approach was designed to determine the extent of phosphatase activity in bacteria previously isolated from contaminated subsurface soils collected at the ERSP Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge, TN. Screening of 135 metal resistant isolates for phosphatase activity indicated the majority (75 of 135) exhibited a phosphatase-positive phenotype. During this phase of the project, a PCR based approach has also been designed to assay FRC isolates for the presence of one or more classes of the characterized non-specific acid phophastase (NSAP) genes likely to be involved in promoting U(VI) precipitation. Testing of a subset of Pb resistant (Pbr) Arthrobacter, Bacillus and Rahnella strains indicated 4 of the 9 Pbr isolates exhibited phosphatase phenotypes suggestive of the ability to bioprecipitate U(VI). Two FRC strains, a Rahnella sp. strain Y9602 and a Bacillus sp. strain Y9-2, were further characterized. The Rahnella sp. exhibited enhanced phosphatase activity relative to the Bacillus sp. Whole-cell enzyme assays identified a pH optimum of 5.5, and inorganic phosphate accumulated in pH 5.5 synthetic groundwater (designed to mimic FRC conditions) incubations of both strains in the presence of a model organophosphorus substrate provided as the sole C and P source. Kinetic experiments showed that these two organisms can grow in the presence of 200 μM dissolved uranium and that Rahnella is much more efficient in precipitating U(VI) than Bacillus sp. The

  14. INNOVATIVE STRATEGIES TO IDENTIFY M. TUBERCULOSIS ANTIGENS AND EPITOPES USING GENOME-WIDE ANALYSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemieke eGeluk

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In view of the fact that only a small part of the Mtb expressome has been explored for identification of antigens capable of activating human T-cell responses, which is critically required for the design of better TB vaccination strategies, more emphasis should be placed on innovative ways to discover new Mtb antigens and explore their function at the several stages of infection. Better protective antigens for TB vaccines are urgently needed, also in view of the disappointing results of the MVA85 vaccine which failed to induce additional protection in BCG vaccinated infants [54]. Moreover, immune responses to relevant antigens may be useful to identify TB-specific biomarker signatures. Here we describe the potency of novel tools and strategies to reveal such Mtb antigens. Using proteins specific for different Mtb infection phases, many new antigens of the latency-associated Mtb DosR regulon as well as Rpf proteins, associated with resuscitating TB, were discovered that were recognized by CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. Furthermore, by employing MHC binding algorithms and bioinformatics combined with high throughput human T-cell screens and tetramers, HLA-class Ia restricted poly-functional CD8+ T-cells were identified in TB patients. Comparable methods, led to the identification of HLA-E-restricted Mtb epitopes recognized by CD8+ T-cells. A genome-wide unbiased antigen discovery approach was applied to analyse the in vivo Mtb gene expression profiles in the lungs of mice, resulting in the identification of IVE-TB antigens, which are expressed during infection in the lung, the main target organ of Mtb. IVE-TB antigens induce strong T cell responses in long-term latently Mtb infected individuals, and represent an interesting new group of TB antigens for vaccination. In summary, new tools have helped expand our view on the Mtb antigenome involved in human cellular immunity and provided new candidates for TB vaccination.

  15. Effect of carbon source on alkaline phosphatase production and excretion in Aspergillus caespitosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Luis Henrique Souza; Jorge, João Atilio; Terenzi, Héctor Francisco; Jamur, Maria Célia; Oliver, Constance; De Lourdes Teixeira De Moraes Polizeli, Maria

    2003-01-01

    The effect of several carbon sources on the production of alkaline phosphatase by the thermotolerant Aspergillus caespitosus was analysed. The fungus released high levels of alkaline phosphatases into the medium after being cultured for long periods with xylan or industrial residues such as wheat raw and sugar cane bagasse in the culture media. In contrast, the alkaline phosphatase activities were found only intracellulary when the fungus was cultured in glucose-supplemented media. The pH of the medium likely affects the process of enzyme secretion according to the carbon source used. Addition of xylan or industrial residues in the culture medium stimulated the secretion of phosphatases. In contrast, media supplemented with glucose or disaccharides promoted retention of these enzymes into the cells. The subcellular location activities of alkaline phosphatases were studied using histochemical and immunochemical methods and showed that alkaline phosphatases were present in the mycelial walls and septa.

  16. Characterization of the protein tyrosine phosphatase PRL from Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Tapia, Ana Lilia; Baylón-Pacheco, Lidia; Espíritu-Gordillo, Patricia; Rosales-Encina, José Luis

    2015-12-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase of regenerating liver (PRL) is a group of phosphatases that has not been broadly studied in protozoan parasites. In humans, PRLs are involved in metastatic cancer, the promotion of cell migration and invasion. PTPs have been increasingly recognized as important effectors of host-pathogen interactions. We characterized the only putative protein tyrosine phosphatase PRL (PTP EhPRL) in the eukaryotic human intestinal parasite Entamoeba histolytica. Here, we reported that the EhPRL protein possessed the classical HCX5R catalytic motif of PTPs and the CAAX box characteristic of the PRL family and exhibited 31-32% homology with the three human PRL isoforms. In amebae, the protein was expressed at low but detectable levels. The recombinant protein (rEhPRL) had enzymatic activity with the 3-o-methyl fluorescein phosphate (OMFP) substrate; this enzymatic activity was inhibited by the PTP inhibitor o-vanadate. Using immunofluorescence we showed that native EhPRL was localized to the cytoplasm and plasma membrane. When the trophozoites interacted with collagen, EhPRL relocalized over time to vesicle-like structures. Interaction with fibronectin increased the presence of the enzyme in the cytoplasm. Using RT-PCR, we demonstrated that EhPRL mRNA expression was upregulated when the trophozoites interacted with collagen but not with fibronectin. Trophozoites recovered from amoebic liver abscesses showed higher EhPRL mRNA expression levels than normal trophozoites. These results strongly suggest that EhPRL may play an important role in the biology and adaptive response of the parasite to the host environment during amoebic liver abscess development, thereby participating in the pathogenic mechanism.

  17. Unique interplay between sugar and lipid in determining the antigenic potency of bacterial antigens for NKT cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Girardi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells are an evolutionary conserved T cell population characterized by features of both the innate and adaptive immune response. Studies have shown that iNKT cells are required for protective responses to Gram-positive pathogens such as Streptococcus pneumoniae, and that these cells recognize bacterial diacylglycerol antigens presented by CD1d, a non-classical antigen-presenting molecule. The combination of a lipid backbone containing an unusual fatty acid, vaccenic acid, as well as a glucose sugar that is weaker or not stimulatory when linked to other lipids, is required for iNKT cell stimulation by these antigens. Here we have carried out structural and biophysical studies that illuminate the reasons for the stringent requirement for this unique combination. The data indicate that vaccenic acid bound to the CD1d groove orients the protruding glucose sugar for TCR recognition, and it allows for an additional hydrogen bond of the glucose with CD1d when in complex with the TCR. Furthermore, TCR binding causes an induced fit in both the sugar and CD1d, and we have identified the CD1d amino acids important for iNKT TCR recognition and the stability of the ternary complex. The studies show also how hydrogen bonds formed by the glucose sugar can account for the distinct binding kinetics of the TCR for this CD1d-glycolipid complex. Therefore, our studies illuminate the mechanism of glycolipid recognition for antigens from important pathogens.

  18. Defining the HLA class I-associated viral antigen repertoire from HIV-1-infected human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ternette, Nicola; Yang, Hongbing; Partridge, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    % of the identified sequences originated from viral protein regions for which T-cell responses have previously been reported but for which the precise HLA class I-binding sequences have not yet been defined. These results validate and expand the current knowledge of virus-specific antigenic peptide presentation...

  19. [Detection and antigenic characteristics of the recombinant nucleocapsid proteins of Lassa and Marburg viruses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladyko, A S; Scheslenok, E P; Fomina, E G; Semizhon, P A; Ignat'ev, G M; Shkolina, T V; Kras'ko, A G; Semenov, S F; Vinokurov, N V

    2012-01-01

    Two plasmid vectors, which allow the recombinant polypeptides of Lassa and Marburg viruses to be expressed in prokaryotic cells E. coli strain BL21 (DE3), were produced. The two recombinant polypeptides are able to bind specific antibodies. This provides an opportunity to use them as antigenic components of immunoassay diagnostic test kits.

  20. Interaction forces between salivary proteins and Streptococcus mutans with and without antigen I/II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, C.P.; Belt-Gritter, van de B.; Dijkstra, R.J.B.; Norde, W.; Mei, van der H.C.; Busscher, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    The antigen I/II family of surface proteins is expressed by oral streptococci, including Streptococcus mutans, and mediates specific binding to, among others, salivary films. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction forces between salivary proteins and S. mutans with (LT11) and witho

  1. A simple and safe method for single HLA-antigen-typing by a solid phase assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häcker-Shahin, B; Giannitsis, D J

    1991-01-01

    A rapid solid phase assay for detection of single HLA-antigens on platelets was developed. The platelets were attached to the surface of polystyrene microtitre plate wells by means of a sodium carbonate buffer and centrifugation. Uncovered areas were blocked by a gelatin blocking buffer. After incubation with commercially available anti-HLA-sera the bound anti-HLA-specific antibodies directed against HLA-antigens present on the platelets were made visible by anti-IgG-coated indicator red cells and a brief centrifugation. A positive result, meaning the presence of an HLA-antigen, was indicated by a slight red cell adherence over the reaction surface. In the absence of the HLA-antigen no binding occurred and the indicator red cells formed a small red disc-like pellet.

  2. ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY AS A MARKER OF DOG SEMEN FREEZABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOSINIAK-KAMYSZ K.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The investigation was performed to evaluate the dog semen freezability and itsquality after thawing allowing its use for artificial insemination (AI. On the basis ofsperm motility, concentration and alkaline phosphatase (AP activity in semenplasma it was possible to establish that AP activity corresponds with the basic factorof semen examination. Significant statistical differences occurred between thequality of ejaculates which were qualified or disqualified to deep freezing and AI.These results show that AP activity in raw dog semen plasma can be used as amarker for the dog semen qualification for deep freezing and AI with 95%probability of the prognosis of the results.

  3. Promoting Uranium Immobilization by the Activities of Microbial Phosphatases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Robert J.; Beazley, Melanie J.; Wilson, Jarad J.; Taillefert, Martial; Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2005-04-05

    The overall goal of this project is to examine the role of nonspecific phosphohydrolases present in naturally occurring subsurface microorganisms for the purpose of promoting the immobilization of radionuclides through the production of uranium [U(VI)] phosphate precipitates. Specifically, we hypothesize that the precipitation of U(VI) phosphate minerals may be promoted through the microbial release and/or accumulation of PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}. During this phase of the project we have been conducting assays to determine the effects of pH, inorganic anions and organic ligands on U(VI) mineral formation and precipitation when FRC bacterial isolates were grown in simulated groundwater medium. The molecular characterization of FRC isolates has also been undertaken during this phase of the project. Analysis of a subset of gram-positive FRC isolates cultured from FRC soils (Areas 1, 2 and 3) and background sediments have indicated a higher percentage of isolates exhibiting phosphatase phenotypes (i.e., in particular those surmised to be PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}-irrepressible) relative to isolates from the reference site. A high percentage of strains that exhibited such putatively PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}-irrepressible phosphatase phenotypes were also resistant to the heavy metals lead and cadmium. Previous work on FRC strains, including Arthrobacter, Bacillus and Rahnella spp., has demonstrated differences in tolerance to U(VI) toxicity (200 {micro}M) in the absence of organophosphate substrates. For example, Arthrobacter spp. exhibited the greatest tolerance to U(VI) while the Rahnella spp. have been shown to facilitate the precipitation of U(VI) from solution and the Bacillus spp. demonstrate the greatest sensitivity to acidic conditions and high concentrations of U(VI). PCR-based detection of FRC strains are being conducted to determine if non-specific acid phosphatases of the known molecular classes [i.e., classes A, B and C] are present in these FRC isolates. Additionally, these

  4. Structure determination of T-cell protein-tyrosine phosphatase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, L.F.; Møller, K. B.; Pedersen, A.K.;

    2002-01-01

    homologous T cell protein-tyrosine phosphatase (TC-PTP) has received much less attention, and no x-ray structure has been provided. We have previously co-crystallized PTP1B with a number of low molecular weight inhibitors that inhibit TC-PTP with similar efficiency. Unexpectedly, we were not able to co...... the high degree of functional and structural similarity between TC-PTP and PTP1B, we have been able to identify areas close to the active site that might be addressed to develop selective inhibitors of each enzyme....

  5. PROTEN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY IN RAT ASCITES HEPATOMA CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Saadat

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases regulate tyrosine phosphorylation of target proteins involved in several aspects of cellular functions. Enzyme activities of the PTPases in cytosolic and particulate fractions of rat ascites hepatoma cell lines were determined and compared with those of normal rat liver. Our present data revealed that although there was no neoplatic-specific alteration of the PTPase activity in examined hepatomas, the activity in particulate fractions of island type of hepatomas was remarkably decreased compared with either rat liver or free type hepatomas.

  6. Tandem CAR T cells targeting HER2 and IL13Rα2 mitigate tumor antigen escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Meenakshi; Mukherjee, Malini; Grada, Zakaria; Pignata, Antonella; Landi, Daniel; Navai, Shoba A; Wakefield, Amanda; Fousek, Kristen; Bielamowicz, Kevin; Chow, Kevin K H; Brawley, Vita S; Byrd, Tiara T; Krebs, Simone; Gottschalk, Stephen; Wels, Winfried S; Baker, Matthew L; Dotti, Gianpietro; Mamonkin, Maksim; Brenner, Malcolm K; Orange, Jordan S; Ahmed, Nabil

    2016-08-01

    In preclinical models of glioblastoma, antigen escape variants can lead to tumor recurrence after treatment with CAR T cells that are redirected to single tumor antigens. Given the heterogeneous expression of antigens on glioblastomas, we hypothesized that a bispecific CAR molecule would mitigate antigen escape and improve the antitumor activity of T cells. Here, we created a CAR that joins a HER2-binding scFv and an IL13Rα2-binding IL-13 mutein to make a tandem CAR exodomain (TanCAR) and a CD28.ζ endodomain. We determined that patient TanCAR T cells showed distinct binding to HER2 or IL13Rα2 and had the capability to lyse autologous glioblastoma. TanCAR T cells exhibited activation dynamics that were comparable to those of single CAR T cells upon encounter of HER2 or IL13Rα2. We observed that TanCARs engaged HER2 and IL13Rα2 simultaneously by inducing HER2-IL13Rα2 heterodimers, which promoted superadditive T cell activation when both antigens were encountered concurrently. TanCAR T cell activity was more sustained but not more exhaustible than that of T cells that coexpressed a HER2 CAR and an IL13Rα2 CAR, T cells with a unispecific CAR, or a pooled product. In a murine glioblastoma model, TanCAR T cells mitigated antigen escape, displayed enhanced antitumor efficacy, and improved animal survival. Thus, TanCAR T cells show therapeutic potential to improve glioblastoma control by coengaging HER2 and IL13Rα2 in an augmented, bivalent immune synapse that enhances T cell functionality and reduces antigen escape.

  7. Plasma calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, and alkaline phosphatase levels in normal British schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Round, J M

    1973-07-21

    In a cross-sectional survey 624 schoolchildren were screened for plasma calcium, inorganic phosphate, and alkaline phosphatase levels. Plasma magnesium and alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes were also estimated in some cases.No significant difference was found between adult and childhood values for calcium and magnesium. Levels of alkaline phosphatase and inorganic phosphorus varied with both age and sex. The magnitude of these variations in normal ranges is of clear importance in assessing data from individual paediatric or adolescent patients.

  8. BIOCHEMICAL STUDIES ON SO-CALLED SYPHILIS ANTIGEN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, H; Bronfenbrenner, J

    1911-01-01

    The liver tissues of man and certain animals (dogs, rabbits, guinea pigs, etc.) yield, upon alcoholic extraction, various substances which may be divided by their physical and chemical properties into several groups. While many substances are present in the alcoholic extract, the ones possessing antigenic properties are comparatively few. The latter are responsible for the antigenic properties exhibited by the whole alcoholic extract. The substances extracted with alcohol were fractionated into the following four groups. (a) Substances Insoluble in Ether and Hot Alcohol.-These are chiefly proteins and salts. The proteins are probably the minute particles of larger molecules held in apparent suspension in alcohol until all other substances are removed. The water extracted from the tissues and admixed with alcohol is also an essential factor in extracting these particles in an alcoholic solution. The salts present are the usual physiological constituents of the liver, notably, sodium chloride. The quantity of these substances extracted with alcohol varies greatly with different specimens. Biologically considered, they are neither markedly hemolytic nor anticomplementary and possess no antigenic property for the Wassermann reaction. It is important, however, to note that the proteins bind complement when mixed with certain active human sera. For this reason a preparation of antigen containing this group of substances is unsuitable for use in combination with an active serum, and should, therefore, be rejected. (b) Substances Insoluble in Ether and Soluble in Hot Alcohol.-This group contains soaps, cleavage products of proteins, and small amounts of the bile salts. Soaps and bile salts are very strongly hemolytic and are absolutely unfit for use as antigen. Moreover, their antigenic properties are very slight. It is best to eliminate this group of substances from the preparation of antigen. The quantity of the substances of this group extracted from different specimens

  9. Antigen Export Reduces Antigen Presentation and Limits T Cell Control of M. tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Smita; Grace, Patricia S; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-01-13

    Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis results from bacterial strategies that manipulate host adaptive immune responses. Infected dendritic cells (DCs) transport M. tuberculosis to local lymph nodes but activate CD4 T cells poorly, suggesting bacterial manipulation of antigen presentation. However, M. tuberculosis antigens are also exported from infected DCs and taken up and presented by uninfected DCs, possibly overcoming this blockade of antigen presentation by infected cells. Here we show that the first stage of this antigen transfer, antigen export, benefits M. tuberculosis by diverting bacterial proteins from the antigen presentation pathway. Kinesin-2 is required for antigen export and depletion of this microtubule-based motor increases activation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells by infected cells and improves control of intracellular infection. Thus, although antigen transfer enables presentation by bystander cells, it does not compensate for reduced antigen presentation by infected cells and represents a bacterial strategy for CD4 T cell evasion.

  10. 人支气管平滑肌细胞内mRNA结合蛋白人抗原R对α-平滑肌肌动蛋白表达的影响%mRNA-binding protein Human-antigen R regulates α-SMA expression in human bronchia smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫迪; 顾宪民; 姜淑娟; 王玉红

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of mRNA binding protein Human-antigen R (HuR) in the over-expression of α-Smooth muscle actin (ot-SMA) stimulated by Platelet-derived Growth Factor (PDGF) in cultured human bronchia smooth muscle cells.Methods Human bronchia smooth muscle cells cultured in vitro were divided into 0,6,12 and 24 h groups according to the time of PDGF treatment.Total HuR protein and total α-SMA protein expression were detected by Western blot.Total HuR mRNA and total α-SMA mRNA level were determined by quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction.RNA interference technology was used to down-regulate HuR protein level to study the protective effect of HuR in PDGFstimulated α-SMA protein expression.Results PDGF up-regulated the expression of HuR in a timedependent manner.The relative expression levels of whole-cell HuR protein and mRNA in 0,6,12,24 h groups were0.23 ±0.09,0.42 ±0.11,0.93 ±0.21,1.37 ±0.28;1.00 ±0.00,1.09 ±0.03,1.16± 0.03,1.27 ± 0.02 (all P < 0.05).The relative expression levels of α-SMA protein and mRNA in 0,6,12,24 h group also showed an increase trend marked in a time-dependent manner (1.03 ± 0.08,1.20 ± 0.09,1.39 ±0.11,1.58 ±0.10;1.00±0.00,1.17 ±0.02,1.23 ±0.02,1.45 ±0.03;all P<0.05).Using RNA interference technology to down-regulate HuR protein level,there was a decrease in α-SMA protein expression.Conclusion PDGF stimulation can increase the expression of HuR and α-SMA in the smooth muscle cells,and HuR protein is involved in the expression of c-SMA protein stimulated by PDGF.%目的 观察人支气管平滑肌细胞(HBSMC)内mRNA结合蛋白人抗原R(HuR)对α-平滑肌肌动蛋白(α-SMA)表达的影响.方法 体外培养HBSMC,根据血小板源性生长因子(PDGF)对其刺激时间分别记为0、6、12、24 h组.采用实时荧光定量PCR法检测各组HuR与α-SMA mRNA的表达、Western印迹法检测各组HuR与α-SMA蛋白的表达.干扰RNA法观察抑制HuR蛋白表达后PDGF刺激下对

  11. Characterization and site-directed mutagenesis of Wzb, an O-phosphatase from Lactobacillus rhamnosus

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    Gilbert Christophe

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reversible phosphorylation events within a polymerisation complex have been proposed to modulate capsular polysaccharide synthesis in Streptococcus pneumoniae. Similar phosphatase and kinase genes are present in the exopolysaccharide (EPS biosynthesis loci of numerous lactic acid bacteria genomes. Results The protein sequence deduced from the wzb gene in Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 9595 reveals four motifs of the polymerase and histidinol phosphatase (PHP superfamily of prokaryotic O-phosphatases. Native and modified His-tag fusion Wzb proteins were purified from Escherichia coli cultures. Extracts showed phosphatase activity towards tyrosine-containing peptides. The purified fusion protein Wzb was active on p-nitrophenyl-phosphate (pNPP, with an optimal activity in presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA 1% at pH 7.3 and a temperature of 75°C. At 50°C, residual activity decreased to 10 %. Copper ions were essential for phosphatase activity, which was significantly increased by addition of cobalt. Mutated fusion Wzb proteins exhibited reduced phosphatase activity on p-nitrophenyl-phosphate. However, one variant (C6S showed close to 20% increase in phosphatase activity. Conclusion These characteristics reveal significant differences with the manganese-dependent CpsB protein tyrosine phosphatase described for Streptococcus pneumoniae as well as with the polysaccharide-related phosphatases of Gram negative bacteria.

  12. Alkaline Phosphatase Assay for Freshwater Sediments: Application to Perturbed Sediment Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayler, Gary S.; Puziss, Marla; Silver, Martin

    1979-01-01

    The p-nitrophenyl phosphate hydrolysis-phosphatase assay was modified for use in freshwater sediment. Laboratory studies indicated that the recovery of purified alkaline phosphatase activity was 100% efficient in sterile freshwater sediments when optimized incubation and sonication conditions were used. Field studies of diverse freshwater sediments demonstrated the potential use of this assay for determining stream perturbation. Significant correlations between phosphatase and total viable cell counts, as well as adenosine triphosphate biomass, suggested that alkaline phosphatase activity has utility as an indicator of microbial population density and biomass in freshwater sediments. PMID:16345464

  13. THE LYMPH SELF ANTIGEN REPERTOIRE

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    Laura eSantambrogio

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The lymphatic fluid originates from the interstitial fluid which bathes every parenchymal organ and reflects the omic composition of the tissue from which it originates in its physiological or pathological signature. Several recent proteomic analyses have mapped the proteome-degradome and peptidome of this immunologically relevant fluid pointing to the lymph as an important source of tissue-derived self-antigens. A vast array of lymph-circulating peptides have been mapped deriving from a variety of processing pathways including caspases, cathepsins, MMPs, ADAMs, kallikreins, calpains and granzymes, among others. These self peptides can be directly loaded on circulatory dendritic cells and expand the self-antigenic repertoire available for central and peripheral tolerance.

  14. Sds22, a PP1 phosphatase regulatory subunit, regulates epithelial cell polarity and shape [Sds22 in epithelial morphology

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    Sung Hsin-Ho

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How epithelial cells adopt their particular polarised forms is poorly understood. In a screen for genes regulating epithelial morphology in Drosophila, we identified sds22, a conserved gene previously characterised in yeast. Results In the columnar epithelia of imaginal discs or follicle cells, mutation of sds22 causes contraction of cells along their apical-basal axis, resulting in a more cuboidal morphology. In addition, the mutant cells can also display altered cell polarity, forming multiple layers in follicle cells and leaving the epithelium in imaginal discs. In yeast, sds22 encodes a PP1 phosphatase regulatory subunit. Consistent with this, we show that Drosophila Sds22 binds to all four Drosophila PP1s and shares an overlapping phenotype with PP1beta9c. We also show that two previously postulated PP1 targets, Spaghetti Squash and Moesin are hyper-phosphorylated in sds22 mutants. This function is shared by the human homologue of Sds22, PPP1R7. Conclusion Sds22 is a conserved PP1 phosphatase regulatory subunit that controls cell shape and polarity.

  15. [Studies on the immunodiagnosis of rabbit clonorchiasis II. Immunoaffinity purification of whole worm antigen and characterization of egg, metacercaria and adult antigens of Clonorchis sinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ok Ran; Chung, Pyung Rim; Nam, Hae Seon

    1988-06-01

    The sensitivity and specificity of crude and affinity-purified antigens of Clonorchis sinensis obtained from the infected rabbits were studied. Stage-specific antigenic proteins from the eggs, metacercariae and adult worms were characterized by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) The results were as follows: The antibody-binding antigen (ABA) purified from whole worm crude antigen (WWA) by CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B affinity chromatography made 4 specific bands against rabbit anti-sera on Ouchterlony gel diffusion plate, while WWA made 7 bands. Major WWA protein bands by SDS-PAGE were found at 16,300-18,500 and 28,000-29,000 daltons, while major ABA protein bands were at 18,000-21,000 and 29,000-31,000 daltons. The reactivity of ABA with rabbit anti-sera in ELISA was remarkably less sensitive than that of WWA. Molecular weights of egg antigen (EGA), metacercarial antigen (MEA) and adult worm antigen (WWA) of C. sinensis ranged from 15,000-200,000 daltons, 15,000-100,000 daltons and 11,000-80,000 daltons, respectively. Major WWA proteins consisted mainly of polypeptide bands of low molecular weight, less than 31,000 daltons, while those of EGA and MEA consisted of higher molecular weights than 30,000 daltons. The ELISA reactivities of WWA to rabbit anti-sera were remarkably greater than those of MEA. EGA showed negative reaction throughout the experiments. WWA showed higher optical density (O.D.) than 1.0, when reacted with rabbit anti-sera obtained at 4-6 weeks after the infection. In the rabbit anti-sera later than 12 weeks after the infection, the O.D. reacting with WWA showed a plateau without variation. MEA showed relatively low O.D. values (0.6) in heavily infected groups. MEA reacted with rabbit anti-sera showed negative results on Ouchterlony gel diffusion plates. Summarizing the above results, it is suggested that the whole worm antigen prepared from the adult worms of C. sinensis is most highly

  16. Bacterial phospholipide antigens and their taxonomic significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karalnik, B V; Razbash, M P; Akhmetova, E A

    1981-01-01

    The investigation of interrelationships between the phospholipides of various microorganisms (33 strains of corynebacteria, mycobacteria and staphylococci) using crossed antibody neutralization reactions with phospholipide antigenic erythrocyte diagnostic was used for the assessment of the degree of antigenic propinquity and antigenic differences between the phospholipides of bacteria of the same species, genus, and of different genera. The role of the determinants of the corresponding (their own) and "foreign" genera in the antigenic differences between the phospholipides of the microorganisms investigated was established. On the basis of the results obtained the conclusion has been drawn that the method of assessment of antigenic interrelationships between phospholipides can be used for the study of some taxonomic problems.

  17. [HLA antigens in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumba, I V; Sochnev, A M; Kukaĭne, E M; Burshteĭn, A M; Benevolenskaia, L I

    1990-01-01

    Antigens of I class HLA system (locus A and B) were investigated in 67 patients of Latvian nationality suffering from juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). Associations of HLA antigens with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis partially coincided with the ones revealed earlier. Typing established an increased incidence of antigen B27 (p less than 0.01) and gaplotype A2, B40 (p less than 0.01). Antigen B15 possessed a protective action with respect to JRA. Interlocus combinations demonstrated a closer association with the disease than a single antigen. The authors also revealed markers of various clinico-anatomical variants of JRA.

  18. Identification of a non-purple tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase: an evolutionary link to Ser/Thr protein phosphatases?

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    Hume David A

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatases (TRAcPs, also known as purple acid phosphatases (PAPs, are a family of binuclear metallohydrolases that have been identified in plants, animals and fungi. The human enzyme is a major histochemical marker for the diagnosis of bone-related diseases. TRAcPs can occur as a small form possessing only the ~35 kDa catalytic domain, or a larger ~55 kDa form possessing both a catalytic domain and an additional N-terminal domain of unknown function. Due to its role in bone resorption the 35 kDa TRAcP has become a promising target for the development of anti-osteoporotic chemotherapeutics. Findings A new human gene product encoding a metallohydrolase distantly related to the ~55 kDa plant TRAcP was identified and characterised. The gene product is found in a number of animal species, and is present in all tissues sampled by the RIKEN mouse transcriptome project. Construction of a homology model illustrated that six of the seven metal-coordinating ligands in the active site are identical to that observed in the TRAcP family. However, the tyrosine ligand associated with the charge transfer transition and purple color of TRAcPs is replaced by a histidine. Conlusion The gene product identified here may represent an evolutionary link between TRAcPs and Ser/Thr protein phosphatases. Its biological function is currently unknown but is unlikely to be associated with bone metabolism.

  19. Cloning and characterization of R-PTP-kappa, a new member of the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase family with a proteolytically cleaved cellular adhesion molecule-like extracellular region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Y P; Wang, H; D'Eustachio, P;

    1993-01-01

    We describe a new member of the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase family, R-PTP-kappa, cDNA cloning predicts that R-PTP-kappa is synthesized from a precursor protein of 1,457 amino acids. Its intracellular domain displays the classical tandemly repeated protein tyrosine phosphatase homology......, separated from the transmembrane segment by an uncharacteristically large juxta-membrane region. The extracellular domain of the R-PTP-kappa precursor protein contains an immunoglobulin-like domain and four fibronectin type III-like repeats, preceded by a signal peptide and a region of about 150 amino acids...... with similarity to the Xenopus A5 antigen, a putative neuronal recognition molecule (S. Takagi, T. Hsrata, K. Agata, M. Mochii, G. Eguchi, and H. Fujisawa, Neuron 7:295-307, 1991). Antibodies directed against the intra- and extracellular domains reveal that the R-PTP-kappa precursor protein undergoes proteolytic...

  20. Engineering less immunogenic and antigenic FVIII proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Kathleen P.

    2017-01-01

    The development of neutralizing antibodies against blood coagulation factor VIII (FVIII), referred to clinically as “inhibitors”, is the most challenging and deleterious adverse event to occur following intravenous infusions of FVIII to treat hemophilia A. Inhibitors occlude FVIII surfaces that must bind to activated phospholipid membranes, the serine proteinase factor IXa, and other components of the ‘intrinsic tenase complex’ in order to carry out its important role in accelerating blood coagulation. Inhibitors develop in up to one of every three patients, yet remarkably, a substantial majority of severe hemophilia A patients, who circulate no detectable FVIII antigen or activity, acquire immune tolerance to FVIII during initial infusions or else after intensive FVIII therapy to overcome their inhibitor. The design of less immunogenic FVIII proteins through identification and modification (“de-immunization”) of immunodominant T-cell epitopes is an important goal. For patients who develop persistent inhibitors, modification of B-cell epitopes through substitution of surface-exposed amino acid side chains and/or attachment of bulky moieties to interfere with FVIII attachment to antibodies and memory B cells is a promising approach. Both experimental and computational methods are being employed to achieve these goals. Future therapies for hemophilia A, as well as other monogenic deficiency diseases, are likely to involve administration of less immunogenic proteins in conjunction with other novel immunotherapies to promote a regulatory cellular environment promoting durable immune tolerance. PMID:26566286

  1. Neurofibromatosis type 2 tumor suppressor protein, NF2, induces proteasome-mediated degradation of JC virus T-antigen in human glioblastoma.

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    Sarah Beltrami

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type 2 protein (NF2 has been shown to act as tumor suppressor primarily through its functions as a cytoskeletal scaffold. However, NF2 can also be found in the nucleus, where its role is less clear. Previously, our group has identified JC virus (JCV tumor antigen (T-antigen as a nuclear binding partner for NF2 in tumors derived from JCV T-antigen transgenic mice. The association of NF2 with T-antigen in neuronal origin tumors suggests a potential role for NF2 in regulating the expression of the JCV T-antigen. Here, we report that NF2 suppresses T-antigen protein expression in U-87 MG human glioblastoma cells, which subsequently reduces T-antigen-mediated regulation of the JCV promoter. When T-antigen mRNA was quantified, it was determined that increasing expression of NF2 correlated with an accumulation of T-antigen mRNA; however, a decrease in T-antigen at the protein level was observed. NF2 was found to promote degradation of ubiquitin bound T-antigen protein via a proteasome dependent pathway concomitant with the accumulation of the JCV early mRNA encoding T-antigen. The interaction between T-antigen and NF2 maps to the FERM domain of NF2, which has been shown previously to be responsible for its tumor suppressor activity. Co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed a ternary complex among NF2, T-antigen, and the tumor suppressor protein, p53 within a glioblastoma cell line. Further, these proteins were detected in various degrees in patient tumor tissue, suggesting that these associations may occur in vivo. Collectively, these results demonstrate that NF2 negatively regulates JCV T-antigen expression by proteasome-mediated degradation, and suggest a novel role for NF2 as a suppressor of JCV T-antigen-induced cell cycle regulation.

  2. Purification and Characterization of PRL Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhao-fa; WANG Yan; LI Qing-shan; ZHAO Zhi-zhuang Joe; FU Xue-qi; LI Yu-lin; LI Yi-lei

    2005-01-01

    PRLs constitute a subfamily of protein tyrosine phosphatases(PTPs). In the present paper are reported the molecular cloning, expression, purification, and characterization of all the three members of the PRL enzymes in human and the only PRL in C.elegans. These enzymes were expressed as glutathione S-transferase(GST) fusion proteins in DE3pLysS E.coli cells, and the recombinant fusion proteins were purified on glutathione-Sepharose affinity columns. Having been cleaved with thrombin, GST-free enzymes were further purified on an S-100 Sepharose gel filtration column. The purified proteins show single polypeptide bands on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. With para-nitrophenyl phosphate(p-NPP) as a substrate, PRLs exhibit classical Michaelis-Menten kinetics with Vmax values two orders of magnitude smaller than those of classic PTPs. The responses of PRLs to ionic strength, metal ions and phosphatase inhibitors are similar to those of other characterized PTPs, but their optimal pH values are different. These data thus reveal distinct common biochemical properties of PRL subfamily PTPs as well.

  3. Kinetic aspects of human placental alkaline phosphatase enzyme membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig, M G; Serrano, M A; Bello, J F; Cachaza, J M; Kennedy, J F

    1991-01-01

    The crosslinking of alkaline phosphatase of human placenta with human serum albumin has been optimized. During the physico-chemical characterization of this immobilized biocatalyst, special attention was paid to attributes such as the irreversibility of the enzyme support bonding, the stability of the catalytic activity, and the effects of pH and temperature on this activity. Regarding stability, patterns of denaturation are proposed, to account for inactivation curves over time and under storage/operation conditions. These patterns, in some cases, indicate the existence of different populations of immobilized enzyme molecules, with a different degree of sensitivity to denaturation. The activity vs pH profiles are clearly modified by the immobilization process. This is because the pH of the free homogeneous solution, measurable with a pH-meter, differs from the real pH of the immediate microenvironment of the immobilized enzyme molecules due to the effects of proton accumulation in the microenvironment (in the reaction catalysed by alkaline phosphatase, protons are produced), to limitations to the free diffusion of H+ and to the possible partition effects of H+ due to polar interactions with residues or molecules of the enzyme membrane. In the experimental working conditions, the apparent optimum temperatures are centered at 40 degrees C, inactivation (thermal denaturation) occurring above this temperature. In the temperature range 10-40 degrees C, the kinetic control over the overall activity of the immobilized enzyme was observed, causing the Arrhenius profiles to be linear.

  4. Protein phosphatase Z modulates oxidative stress response in fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Éva; González, Asier; Erdei, Éva; Casado, Carlos; Kovács, László; Ádám, Csaba; Oláh, Judit; Miskei, Márton; Molnar, Monika; Farkas, Ilona; Hamari, Zsuzsanna; Ariño, Joaquín; Pócsi, István; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2012-09-01

    The genome of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans harbors the gene ppzA that codes for the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase Z (PPZ), and the closely related opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus encompasses a highly similar PPZ gene (phzA). When PpzA and PhzA were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae or Schizosaccharomyces pombe they partially complemented the deleted phosphatases in the ppz1 or the pzh1 mutants, and they also mimicked the effect of Ppz1 overexpression in slt2 MAP kinase deficient S. cerevisiae cells. Although ppzA acted as the functional equivalent of the known PPZ enzymes its disruption in A. nidulans did not result in the expected phenotypes since it failed to affect salt tolerance or cell wall integrity. However, the inactivation of ppzA resulted in increased sensitivity to oxidizing agents like tert-butylhydroperoxide, menadione, and diamide. To demonstrate the general validity of our observations we showed that the deletion of the orthologous PPZ genes in other model organisms, such as S. cerevisiae (PPZ1) or Candida albicans (CaPPZ1) also caused oxidative stress sensitivity. Thus, our work reveals a novel function of the PPZ enzyme in A. nidulans that is conserved in very distantly related fungi.

  5. Activity of alkaline phosphatase adsorbed and grafted on "polydopamine" films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Vincent

    2014-09-01

    The oxidation of dopamine in slightly basic solutions and in the presence of oxygen as an oxidant allows for the deposition of dopamine-eumelanin ("polydopamine") films on almost all kinds of materials allowing for an easy secondary functionalization. Molecules carrying nucleophilic groups like thiols and amines can be easily grafted on those films. Herein we show that alkaline phosphatase (ALP), as a model enzyme, adsorbs to "polydopamine" films and part of the adsorbed enzyme is rapidly desorbed in contact with Tris buffer. However a significant part of the enzyme remains irreversibly adsorbed and keeps some enzymatic activity for at least 2 weeks whereas ALP adsorbed on quartz slides is rapidly and quantitatively deactivated. In addition we estimated the Michaelis constant Km of the enzyme irreversibly bound to the "polydopamine" film. The Michaelis constant, and hence the affinity constant between paranitrophenol phosphate and ALP are almost identical between the enzyme bound on the film and the free enzyme in solution. Complementarily, it was found that "polydopamine" films display some phosphatase like catalytic activity.

  6. DNA vaccine encoding prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) elicits long-term T-cell responses in patients with recurrent prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Jordan T; Olson, Brian M; Johnson, Laura E; Davies, James G; Dunphy, Edward J; McNeel, Douglas G

    2010-01-01

    Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) is a tumor antigen in prostate cancer and the target of several anti-tumor vaccines in earlier clinical trials. Ultimately, the goal of anti-tumor vaccines is to elicit a sustainable immune response, able to eradicate a tumor, or at least restrain its growth. We have investigated plasmid DNA vaccines and have previously conducted a phase 1 trial in which patients with recurrent prostate cancer were vaccinated with a DNA vaccine encoding PAP. In this study, we investigated the immunologic efficacy of subsequent booster immunizations, and conducted more detailed longitudinal immune analysis, to answer several questions aimed at guiding optimal schedules of vaccine administration for future clinical trials. We report that antigen-specific cytolytic T-cell responses were amplified after immunization in 7 of 12 human leukocyte antigen-A2-expressing individuals, and that multiple immunizations seemed necessary to elicit PAP-specific interferon-gamma-secreting immune responses detectable by enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay. Moreover, among individuals who experienced a >/=200% increase in prostate-specific antigen doubling time, long-term PAP-specific interferon-gamma-secreting T-cell responses were detectable in 6 of 8, but in only 1 of 14 individuals without an observed change in prostate-specific antigen doubling time (P=0.001). Finally, we identified that immune responses elicited could be further amplified by subsequent booster immunizations. These results suggest that future trials using this DNA vaccine, and potentially other anti-tumor DNA vaccines, could investigate ongoing schedules of administration with periodic booster immunizations. Moreover, these results suggest that DNA vaccines targeting PAP could potentially be combined in heterologous immunization strategies with other vaccines to further augment PAP-specific T-cell immunity.

  7. Stable solid-phase Rh antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yared, M A; Moise, K J; Rodkey, L S

    1997-12-01

    Numerous investigators have attempted to isolate the Rh antigens in a stable, immunologically reactive form since the discovery of the Rh system over 56 years ago. We report here a successful and reproducible approach to solubilizing and adsorbing the human Rh antigen(s) to a solid-phase matrix in an antigenically active form. Similar results were obtained with rabbit A/D/F red blood cell antigens. The antigen preparation was made by dissolution of the red blood cell membrane lipid followed by fragmentation of the residual cytoskeleton in an EDTA solution at low ionic strength. The antigenic activity of the soluble preparations was labile in standard buffers but was stable in zwitterionic buffers for extended periods of time. Further studies showed that the antigenic activity of these preparations was enhanced, as was their affinity for plastic surfaces, in the presence of acidic zwitterionic buffers. Adherence to plastic surfaces at low pH maintained antigenic reactivity and specificity for antibody was retained. The data show that this approach yields a stable form of antigenically active human Rh D antigen that could be used in a red blood cell-free assay for quantitative analysis of Rh D antibody and for Rh D antibody immunoadsorption and purification.

  8. Common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Daneshpour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different research groups reported a negative correlation between cancers and parasitical infections. As an example, the prevalence of a hydatid cyst among patients with cancer was significantly lower than its prevalence among normal population. Tn antigens exist both in cancer and hydatid cyst. This common antigen may be involved in the effect of parasite on cancer growth. So in this work, common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers have been investigated. Materials and Methods: Different hydatid cyst antigens including hydatid fluid, laminated and germinal layer antigens, and excretory secretory antigens of protoscolices were run in SDS PAGE and transferred to NCP paper. In western immunoblotting, those antigens were probed with sera of patients with different cancer and also sera of non-cancer patients. Also, cross reaction among excretory secretory products of cancer cells and antisera raised against different hydatid cyst antigen was investigated. Results: In western immunoblotting, antisera raised against laminated and germinal layers of hydatid cyst reacted with excretory secretory products of cancer cells. Also, a reaction was detected between hydatid cyst antigens and sera of patients with some cancers. Conclusion: Results of this work emphasize existence of common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers. More investigation about these common antigens is recommended.

  9. Common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshpour, Shima; Bahadoran, Mehran; Hejazi, Seyed Hossein; Eskandarian, Abas Ali; Mahmoudzadeh, Mehdi; Darani, Hossein Yousofi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Different research groups reported a negative correlation between cancers and parasitical infections. As an example, the prevalence of a hydatid cyst among patients with cancer was significantly lower than its prevalence among normal population. Tn antigens exist both in cancer and hydatid cyst. This common antigen may be involved in the effect of parasite on cancer growth. So in this work, common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers have been investigated. Materials and Methods: Different hydatid cyst antigens including hydatid fluid, laminated and germinal layer antigens, and excretory secretory antigens of protoscolices were run in SDS PAGE and transferred to NCP paper. In western immunoblotting, those antigens were probed with sera of patients with different cancer and also sera of non-cancer patients. Also, cross reaction among excretory secretory products of cancer cells and antisera raised against different hydatid cyst antigen was investigated. Results: In western immunoblotting, antisera raised against laminated and germinal layers of hydatid cyst reacted with excretory secretory products of cancer cells. Also, a reaction was detected between hydatid cyst antigens and sera of patients with some cancers. Conclusion: Results of this work emphasize existence of common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers. More investigation about these common antigens is recommended. PMID:26962511

  10. Epitope distance to the target cell membrane and antigen size determine the potency of T cell-mediated lysis by BiTE antibodies specific for a large melanoma surface antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluemel, Claudia; Hausmann, Susanne; Fluhr, Petra; Sriskandarajah, Mirnalini; Stallcup, William B; Baeuerle, Patrick A; Kufer, Peter

    2010-08-01

    Melanoma chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (MCSP; also called CSPG4, NG2, HMW-MAA, MSK16, MCSPG, MEL-CSPG, or gp240) is a surface antigen frequently expressed on human melanoma cells, which is involved in cell adhesion, invasion and spreading, angiogenesis, complement inhibition, and signaling. MCSP has therefore been frequently selected as target antigen for development of antibody- and vaccine-based therapeutic approaches. We have here used a large panel of monoclonal antibodies against human MCSP for generation of single-chain MCSP/CD3-bispecific antibodies of the BiTE (for bispecific T cell engager) class. Despite similar binding affinity to MCSP, respective BiTE antibodies greatly differed in their potency of redirected lysis of CHO cells stably transfected with full-length human MCSP, or with various MCSP deletion mutants and fusion proteins. BiTE antibodies binding to the membrane proximal domain D3 of MCSP were more potent than those binding to more distal domains. This epitope distance effect was corroborated with EpCAM/CD3-bispecific BiTE antibody MT110 by testing various fusion proteins between MCSP and EpCAM as surface antigens. CHO cells expressing small surface target antigens were generally better lysed than those expressing larger target antigens, indicating that antigen size was also an important determinant for the potency of BiTE antibody. The present study for the first time relates the positioning of binding domains and size of surface antigens to the potency of target cell lysis by BiTE-redirected cytotoxic T cells. In case of the MCSP antigen, this provides the basis for selection of a maximally potent BiTE antibody candidate for development of a novel melanoma therapy.

  11. Isolation and Identification of Concanavalin A Binding Glycoproteins from Human Seminal Plasma: A Step Towards Identification of Male Infertility Marker Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Anil Kumar; Sooch, Balwinder Singh; Raj, Isha; Singh, Sarman; Singh, Tej P.; Yadav, Savita

    2011-01-01

    Human seminal plasma contains a large array of proteins of clinical importance which are essentially needed to maintain the reproductive physiology of spermatozoa and for successful fertilization. Thus, isolation and identification of seminal plasma proteins is of paramount significance for their biophysical characterization and functional analysis in reproductive physiological processes. In this study, we have isolated Concanavalin-A binding glycoproteins from human seminal plasma and subsequently identified them by MALDI-TOF/MS analysis. The major proteins, as identified in this study, are Aminopeptidase N, lactoferrin, prostatic acid phosphatase, zinc-alpha-2-glycoprotein, prostate specific antigen, progestagen-associated endometrial protein, Izumo sperm-egg fusion protein and prolactin inducible protein. This paper also reports preliminary studies to identify altered expression of these proteins in oligospermia and azoospermia in comparison to normospermia. In oligospermia, five proteins were found to be downregulated while in azoospermia, four proteins were downregulated and two proteins were upregulated. Thus, this study is of immense biomedical interest towards identification of potential male infertility marker proteins in seminal plasma. PMID:22182811

  12. Isolation and Identification of Concanavalin A Binding Glycoproteins from Human Seminal Plasma: A Step Towards Identification of Male Infertility Marker Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Tomar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Human seminal plasma contains a large array of proteins of clinical importance which are essentially needed to maintain the reproductive physiology of spermatozoa and for successful fertilization. Thus, isolation and identification of seminal plasma proteins is of paramount significance for their biophysical characterization and functional analysis in reproductive physiological processes. In this study, we have isolated Concanavalin-A binding glycoproteins from human seminal plasma and subsequently identified them by MALDI-TOF/MS analysis. The major proteins, as identified in this study, are Aminopeptidase N, lactoferrin, prostatic acid phosphatase, zinc-alpha-2-glycoprotein, prostate specific antigen, progestagen-associated endometrial protein, Izumo sperm-egg fusion protein and prolactin inducible protein. This paper also reports preliminary studies to identify altered expression of these proteins in oligospermia and azoospermia in comparison to normospermia. In oligospermia, five proteins were found to be downregulated while in azoospermia, four proteins were downregulated and two proteins were upregulated. Thus, this study is of immense biomedical interest towards identification of potential male infertility marker proteins in seminal plasma.

  13. OB protein binds specifically to the choroid plexus of mice and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devos, R; Richards, J G; Campfield, L A; Tartaglia, L A; Guisez, Y; van der Heyden, J; Travernier, J; Plaetinck, G; Burn, P

    1996-05-28

    Binding studies were conducted to identify the anatomical location of brain target sites for OB protein, the ob gene product. 125I-labeled recombinant mouse OB protein or alkaline phosphatase-OB fusion proteins were used for in vitro and in vivo binding studies. Coronal brain sections or fresh tissue from lean, obese ob/ob, and obese db/db mice as well as lean and obese Zucker rats were probed to identify potential central OB protein-binding sites. We report here that recombinant OB protein binds specifically to the choroid plexus. The binding of OB protein (either radiolabeled or the alkaline phosphatase-OB fusion protein) and its displacement by unlabeled OB protein was similar in lean, obese ob/ob, and obese db/db mice as well as lean and obese Zucker rats. These findings suggest that OB protein binds with high affinity to a specific receptor in the choroid plexus. After binding to the choroid plexus receptor, OB protein may then be transported across the blood-brain barrier into the cerebrospinal fluid. Alternatively, binding of OB protein to a specific receptor in the choroid plexus may activate afferent neural inputs to the neural network that regulates feeding behavior and energy balance or may result in the clearance or degradation of OB protein. The identification of the choroid plexus as a brain binding site for OB protein will provide the basis for the construction of expression libraries and facilitate the rapid cloning of the choroid plexus OB receptor.

  14. Interleukin 1-induced down-regulation of antibody binding to CD4 molecules on human lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvede, N; Christensen, L D; Ødum, Niels;

    1988-01-01

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) is involved in the early activation of T lymphocytes. The CD4 antigen, described as a phenotypic marker of helper T cells, is also important in early T-cell activation by its ability to bind to MHC class II molecules on antigen-presenting cells, and to transmit positive (and......+ cells. Under optimal growth conditions, the initial reduction in antibody binding to CD4 was followed by an apparent re-expression of the CD4 antigen even in the presence of high concentrations of IL-1. This re-expression did not occur if the cells were cultured at 4 degrees C, or after treatment...

  15. New approaches with different types of circulating cathodic antigen for the diagnosis of patients with low Schistosoma mansoni load.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaella Grenfell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosomiasis mansoni is a debilitating and sometimes fatal disease. Accurate diagnosis plays a key role in patient management and infection control. However, currently available parasitological methods are laborious and lack sensitivity. The selection of target antigen candidates has turned out to be a promising tool for the development of more sensitive diagnostic methods. In our previous investigations, the use of crude antigens led to false-positive results. Recently, focus has been given to highly purified Schistosoma mansoni antigens, especially to circulating antigens. METHOD: Thus, our main goal was to test different types of circulating cathodic antigen glycoprotein (CCA, as "crude antigen," the protein chain of recombinant CCA and two individual peptides. These schistosome proteins/peptides were tested in a new diagnostic method employing immunomagnetic separation based on the improvement of antigen