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Sample records for antifreeze protein nmr

  1. Antifreeze Proteins of Bacteria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 12. Antifreeze Proteins of Bacteria. M K Chattopadhyay. General Article Volume 12 Issue 12 December 2007 pp 25-30. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/012/12/0025-0030 ...

  2. Antifreeze Proteins of Bacteria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 12. Antifreeze Proteins of Bacteria. M K Chattopadhyay. General Article Volume 12 Issue 12 December 2007 pp 25-30. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/012/12/0025-0030. Keywords.

  3. Characterization of threonine side chain dynamics in an antifreeze protein using natural abundance {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daley, Margaret E.; Sykes, Brian D. [University of Alberta, Department of Biochemistry, CIHR Group in Protein Structure and Function and Protein Engineering Network of Centres of Excellence (Canada)

    2004-06-15

    The dynamics of threonine side chains of the Tenebrio molitor antifreeze protein (TmAFP) were investigated using natural abundance {sup 13}C NMR. In TmAFP, the array of threonine residues on one face of the protein is responsible for conferring its ability to bind crystalline ice and inhibit its growth. Heteronuclear longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates and the {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C NOE were determined in this study. The C{alpha}H relaxation measurements were compared to the previously measured {sup 15}N backbone parameters and these are found to be in agreement. For the analysis of the threonine side chain motions, the model of restricted rotational diffusion about the {chi}{sub 1} dihedral angle was employed [London and Avitabile (1978) J. Am. Chem. Soc., 100, 7159-7165]. We demonstrate that the motion experienced by the ice binding threonine side chains is highly restricted, with an approximate upper limit of less than {+-}25 deg.

  4. Reversible binding of the HPLC6 isoform of type I antifreeze proteins to ice surfaces and the antifreeze mechanism studied by multiple quantum filtering-spin exchange NMR experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Yong; Wongskhaluang, Jeff; Li, Jiabo

    2003-01-15

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) protect organisms from freezing damage by inhibiting the growth of seed-ice crystals. It has long been hypothesized that irreversible binding of AFPs to ice surfaces is responsible for inhibiting the growth of seed-ice crystals as such a mechanism supports the popularly accepted Kelvin effect for the explanation of local freezing-point depression. However, whether the binding is reversible or irreversible is still under debate due to the lack of direct experimental evidence. Here, we report the first direct experimental result, by using the newly developed multiple quantum (MQ) filtering-spin exchange NMR experiment, that shows that the binding of HPLC6 peptides to ice surfaces is reversible. It was found that the reversible process can be explained by the model of monolayer adsorption. These results suggest that the Kelvin effect is not suitable for explaining the antifreeze mechanism, and direct interactions between the peptides and the ice-surface binding sites are the driving forces for the binding of AFPs to ice surfaces. We propose that there exists a concentration gradient of AFP from an ice-binding surface to the solution due to the affinity of ice surfaces to AFPs. This concentration gradient creates a dense layer of AFP in contact with the ice-binding surface, which depresses the local freezing point because of the colligative property, but not the Kelvin effect.

  5. Natural and Artificial Antifreeze Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Soichi; Hirao, Noriko

    In the blood of winter polar fish an antifreeze glycoprotein (AFGP) occurs which acts to protect the fish from freezing to death. The AFGP has a unique hydrophilic hydrophobic conformation, involved in non-colligative depression of the freezing temperature of water without altering the melting point of ice. This phenomenon is reportedly a reflection of the ice crystal growth inhibition by the adsorption of the AFGP onto a-axial surfaces of the ice crystal. The authors, on the other hand, have developed an enzymatically modified protein (EMG-12) by covalent attachment of leucine dodecyl ester to the C-terminal position of gelation with the aid of a reverse reaction catalyzed by a protease. EMG-12, having a hydrophilic-hydrophobic structure, is highly surface-active and acts to stabilize a supercooling state of water by antinucleation. Discussions are made on similarities and dissimilarities of structure-function relationships of these natural and artificial antifreeze proteins. The significance of using them as antifreeze agents is also discussed.

  6. Antifreeze proteins of teleost fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, G L; Hew, C L; Davies, P L

    2001-01-01

    Marine teleosts at high latitudes can encounter ice-laden seawater that is approximately 1 degrees C colder than the colligative freezing point of their body fluids. They avoid freezing by producing small antifreeze proteins (AFPs) that adsorb to ice and halt its growth, thereby producing an additional non-colligative lowering of the freezing point. AFPs are typically secreted by the liver into the blood. Recently, however, it has become clear that AFP isoforms are produced in the epidermis (skin, scales, fin, and gills) and may serve as a first line of defense against ice propagation into the fish. The basis for the adsorption of AFPs to ice is something of a mystery and is complicated by the extreme structural diversity of the five antifreeze types. Despite the recent acquisition of several AFP three-dimensional structures and the definition of their ice-binding sites by mutagenesis, no common ice-binding motif or even theme is apparent except that surface-surface complementarity is important for binding. The remarkable diversity of antifreeze types and their seemingly haphazard phylogenetic distribution suggest that these proteins might have evolved recently in response to sea level glaciation occurring just 1-2 million years ago in the northern hemisphere and 10-30 million years ago around Antarctica. Not surprisingly, the expression of AFP genes from different origins can also be quite dissimilar. The most intensively studied system is that of the winter flounder, which has a built-in annual cycle of antifreeze expression controlled by growth hormone (GH) release from the pituitary in tune with seasonal cues. The signal transduction pathway, transcription factors, and promoter elements involved in this process are just beginning to be characterized.

  7. Antivirulence Properties of an Antifreeze Protein

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    Martin Heisig

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available As microbial drug-resistance increases, there is a critical need for new classes of compounds to combat infectious diseases. The Ixodes scapularis tick antifreeze glycoprotein, IAFGP, functions as an antivirulence agent against diverse bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Recombinant IAFGP and a peptide, P1, derived from this protein bind to microbes and alter biofilm formation. Transgenic iafgp-expressing flies and mice challenged with bacteria, as well as wild-type animals administered P1, were resistant to infection, septic shock, or biofilm development on implanted catheter tubing. These data show that an antifreeze protein facilitates host control of bacterial infections and suggest therapeutic strategies for countering pathogens.

  8. Antifreeze proteins enable plants to survive in freezing conditions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Overwintering plants secrete antifreeze proteins (AFPs) to provide freezing tolerance. These proteins bind to and inhibit the growth of ice crystals that are formed in the apoplast during subzero temperatures. Antifreeze activity has been detected in more than 60 plants and AFPs have been purified from 15 of these, including ...

  9. Antifreeze activity enhancement by site directed mutagenesis on an antifreeze protein from the beetle Rhagium mordax

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Dennis Steven; Kristiansen, Erlend; von Solms, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The ice binding motifs of insect antifreeze proteins (AFPs) mainly consist of repetitive TxT motifs aligned on a flat face of the protein. However, these motifs often contain non-threonines that disrupt the TxT pattern. We substituted two such disruptive amino acids located in the ice binding face...... of an AFP from Rhagium mordax with threonine. Furthermore, a mutant with an extra ice facing TxT motif was constructed. These mutants showed enhanced antifreeze activity compared to the wild type at low concentrations. However, extrapolating the data indicates that the wild type will become the most active...

  10. Antifreeze Proteins from Diverse Organisms and their Applications: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Ng, Tzi Bun; Wong, Jack Ho

    2017-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins are ice-binding or ice-structuring proteins that prevent water from freezing by adsorbing to the ice surface and stopping the growth of minute ice crystals to large crystals in a non-colligative manner. The antifreeze proteins are found in species like fish, arthropods, plants, algae, fungi, yeasts and bacteria. The diversity, distribution and classification of antifreeze proteins were highlighted in this review. Antifreeze proteins help the organisms adapt to and survive in subzero temperature environments. The distribution of antifreeze proteins in different species appears to be the outcome of a combination of independent evolutionary events, probably the convergent evolution or horizontal gene transfer. Benefits can be derived from the frost resistance of these organisms. Their potential applications have been recognized in food processing, cryopreservation, cryosurgery, fishery and agricultural industries and anti-icing materials development. This review includes information on the current understanding of antifreeze proteins. A discussion on interactions and mechanisms involving ice recognition and adsorption was also included. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Structural basis of antifreeze activity of a bacterial multi-domain antifreeze protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Wang

    Full Text Available Antifreeze proteins (AFPs enhance the survival of organisms inhabiting cold environments by affecting the formation and/or structure of ice. We report the crystal structure of the first multi-domain AFP that has been characterized. The two ice binding domains are structurally similar. Each consists of an irregular β-helix with a triangular cross-section and a long α-helix that runs parallel on one side of the β-helix. Both domains are stabilized by hydrophobic interactions. A flat plane on the same face of each domain's β-helix was identified as the ice binding site. Mutating any of the smaller residues on the ice binding site to bulkier ones decreased the antifreeze activity. The bulky side chain of Leu174 in domain A sterically hinders the binding of water molecules to the protein backbone, partially explaining why antifreeze activity by domain A is inferior to that of domain B. Our data provide a molecular basis for understanding differences in antifreeze activity between the two domains of this protein and general insight on how structural differences in the ice-binding sites affect the activity of AFPs.

  12. Two domains of RD3 antifreeze protein diffuse independently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Nolan B; Nishimiya, Yoshiyuki; Tsuda, Sakae; Sönnichsen, Frank D

    2008-06-03

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) make up a class of structurally diverse proteins that help to protect many organisms from freezing temperatures by inhibiting ice crystal growth at temperatures below the colligative freezing point. AFPs are typically small proteins with a relatively flat, slightly hydrophobic binding region that matches the lattice structure of a specific ice crystal plane. The only known two-domain AFP is RD3 from the Antarctic eel pout. It consists of two nearly identical type III domains connected by a nine-residue linker. This protein exhibits higher activity than the single-domain protein at low concentrations. The initial solution structure of RD3 revealed that the domains were aligned so that the binding regions were nearly coplanar, effectively doubling the surface area for binding. A more recent report suggests that the domains may not be aligned in solution but rather diffuse independently. To resolve the issue, we have measured the NMR residual dipolar couplings using alignment media of stretched gels and filamentous phage to determine the relative orientation of the domains. We find that the two domains of RD3 are free to move relative to each other, within the constraint of the flexible nine-residue linker. Our data show that there is no strongly preferred alignment in solution. Furthermore, the flexibility and length of the linker are sufficient to allow the two domains to have their binding faces in the same orientation and coplanar for simultaneous binding to an ice crystal surface.

  13. Antifreeze Protein Mimetic Metallohelices with Potent Ice Recrystallization Inhibition Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Daniel E; Clarkson, Guy; Fox, David J; Vipond, Rebecca A; Scott, Peter; Gibson, Matthew I

    2017-07-26

    Antifreeze proteins are produced by extremophile species to control ice formation and growth, and they have potential applications in many fields. There are few examples of synthetic materials which can reproduce their potent ice recrystallization inhibition property. We report that self-assembled enantiomerically pure, amphipathic metallohelicies inhibited ice growth at just 20 μM. Structure-property relationships and calculations support the hypothesis that amphipathicity is the key motif for activity. This opens up a new field of metallo-organic antifreeze protein mimetics and provides insight into the origins of ice-growth inhibition.

  14. Antifreeze proteins enable plants to survive in freezing conditions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-10-20

    Oct 20, 2014 ... 0.52°C. TH. Zhang et al. 2011. 4. Daucus carrota. Tap. Root extract. 36. Apoplastic. Polygalacturonase inhibitor protein. N-glycosylated,. TH-0.36 at. 150 μ ...... na R 2011 A framework for classification of antifreeze proteins in over wintering plants based on their sequence and structural features. J. Bioinform.

  15. Studies on new antifreeze protein from the psychrophilic diatom ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are found in a wide range of species including fishes, plants, etc. They have very characteristic feature that inhibit the growth and recrystallization of ice that forms in intercellular spaces. Two expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were previously identified from salt stress cDNA library in Fragilariopsis ...

  16. In silico characterization of antifreeze proteins using computational ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, seventeen different fish Antifreeze Proteins (AFPs) retrieved from Swiss-Prot database are analysed and characterized using In silico tools. ... Department of Chemistry, Sri Chandrasekharendra Saraswathi Viswa Maha Vidyalaya (Deemed University), Enathur, Kanchipuram 631 561; EXCEL and Polymer ...

  17. Structure and application of antifreeze proteins from Antarctic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Patricio A; Márquez, Sebastián L; González-Nilo, Fernando D; Márquez-Miranda, Valeria; Blamey, Jenny M

    2017-08-07

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) production is a survival strategy of psychrophiles in ice. These proteins have potential in frozen food industry avoiding the damage in the structure of animal or vegetal foods. Moreover, there is not much information regarding the interaction of Antarctic bacterial AFPs with ice, and new determinations are needed to understand the behaviour of these proteins at the water/ice interface. Different Antarctic places were screened for antifreeze activity and microorganisms were selected for the presence of thermal hysteresis in their crude extracts. Isolates GU1.7.1, GU3.1.1, and AFP5.1 showed higher thermal hysteresis and were characterized using a polyphasic approach. Studies using cucumber and zucchini samples showed cellular protection when samples were treated with partially purified AFPs or a commercial AFP as was determined using toluidine blue O and neutral red staining. Additionally, genome analysis of these isolates revealed the presence of genes that encode for putative AFPs. Deduced amino acids sequences from GU3.1.1 (gu3A and gu3B) and AFP5.1 (afp5A) showed high similarity to reported AFPs which crystal structures are solved, allowing then generating homology models. Modelled proteins showed a triangular prism form similar to β-helix AFPs with a linear distribution of threonine residues at one side of the prism that could correspond to the putative ice binding side. The statistically best models were used to build a protein-water system. Molecular dynamics simulations were then performed to compare the antifreezing behaviour of these AFPs at the ice/water interface. Docking and molecular dynamics simulations revealed that gu3B could have the most efficient antifreezing behavior, but gu3A could have a higher affinity for ice. AFPs from Antarctic microorganisms GU1.7.1, GU3.1.1 and AFP5.1 protect cellular structures of frozen food showing a potential for frozen food industry. Modeled proteins possess a β-helix structure, and

  18. MINING THE PROTEIN REPERTOIRE OF A HIMALAYAN SHRUB, HIPPOPHAE RHAMNOIDES FOR ANTIFREEZE PROTEINS

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    Bhavana Sharma

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Seabuckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides, a cold desert shrub, can survive freezing temperature conditions and is considered as frost and drought tolerant. Earlier, antifreeze activity was reported in seabuckthorn seedlings grown under laboratory conditions. No reports are available on the cold hardiness of this huge bioresource available naturally in the Himalayan region. Detection of antifreeze activity in leaves and berries (splat assay and nanoliter osmometer confirmed the presence of putative antifreeze proteins (AFPs which may help in the survival of this plant under freezing conditions. Flower shaped ice crystals were observed in both leaves and berries while hexagonal ice crystals in seedlings indicated comparatively higher antifreeze activity in the wild parts. Splat assay results confirmed highest IRI activity in leaf (a 2.75 fold decrease in mean grain size of ice crystal after annealing followed by berry (with 1.75 fold decrease and least in the seedlings (with 1.5 fold decrease. Gel filtration chromatography resolved leaf fractions exhibited antifreeze activity in 34, 36 and 41 kDa while in berry fractions a 41 kDa polypeptide showed antifreeze activity. This is the first report showing presence of AFPs in (H. rhamnoides leaf and berry. Shotgun proteomic analysis using Q-Exactive Orbitrap High Resolution Mass Spectrometer and functional annotation of leaf and berry proteins revealed their association with primary, secondary metabolism, defence/stress, redox regulation, signalling and structural remodelling majority of which are affected during cold stress. Further purification of these AFPs could open gates for commercial utilization of this plant growing abundantly in Himalayan regions of India.

  19. Solvation structure of ice-binding antifreeze proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen-Goos, Hendrik; Wettlaufer, John

    2009-03-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) can be found in organisms which survive at subzero temperatures. They were first discovered in polar fishes since the 1950's [1] and have been isolated meanwhile also from insects, plants, and bacteria. While AFPs shift the freezing point of water below the bulk melting point and hence can prevent recrystallization; the effect is non-colligative and there is a pronounced hysteresis between freezing and melting. For many AFPs it is generally accepted that they function through an irreversible binding to the ice-water interface which leads to a piecewise convex growth front with a lower nonequilibrium freezing point due to the Kelvin effect. Recent molecular dynamics simulations of the AFP from Choristoneura fumiferana reveal that the solvation structures of water at ice-binding and non-ice-binding faces of the protein are crucial for understanding how the AFP binds to the ice surface and how it is protected from being overgrown [2]. We use density functional theory of classical fluids in order to assess the microscopic solvent structure in the vicinity of protein faces with different surface properties. With our method, binding energies of different protein faces to the water-ice-interface can be computed efficiently in a simplified model. [1] Y. Yeh and R.E. Feeney, Chem. Rev. 96, 601 (1996). [2] D.R. Nutt and J.C. Smith, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 130, 13066 (2008).

  20. Antifreeze proteins: Adsorption to ice, silica and gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Huang; Brown, Alan; Wathen, Brent; Ripmeester, John A.; Walker, VIrginia K.

    2005-07-01

    Certain organisms survive under freezing conditions that could otherwise prove fatal by the synthesis of antifreeze proteins (AFPs). AFPs adsorb to the surface of microscopic ice crystals and prevent further ice growth, resulting in a noncolligative freezing point depression. Type I AFP from the winter flounder (wfAFP) is an alfa-helical, alanine-rich serum protein that helps protect against innoculative freezing from ice-laden seas. The AFP of a moth from the boreal forest, Choristoneura fumiferana (Cf), is a beta-helical threonine-rich protein that helps prevent freezing at the overwintering, caterpillar stage. In contrast, the beta-roll AFP from the grass, Lolium perenne (Lp), confers little freezing point depression and the plants readily freeze. Remarkably, AFPs also adsorb to tetrahyrofuran (THF) hydrate, changing the hydrate's octahedral morphology and, as well, inhibiting the growth of THF and gas hydrates. The hyperactive CfAFP, with 30-100 times the activity of wfAFP toward ice, showed far greater nucleation inhibition for THF hydrate than did a commercial hydrate inhibitor, poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP). Active AFPs were also judged to be superior to PVP in that they inhibited the memory effect, a phenomenon whereby hydrate reforms at a faster rate soon after melting. An inactive mutant wfAFP, with an amino acid substitution at the ice-binding site, also reduced the growth of THF hydrate but was ineffective at suppressing hydrate reformation. These results suggest that the molecular properties important for ice adsorption and inhibition of hydrate reformation may be similar, and are distinct from those required for hydrate growth inhibition. The different AFPs also show markedly different aggregations on a third hydrophilic substrate, silica. Together these studies suggest that AFP adsorption to ice, hydrates and silica depends on the overall structure, specific residues and protein-protein interactions. (Author)

  1. Using Antifreeze Proteins to understand ice microstructure evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer-Giraldi, Maddalena; Azuma, Nobuhiko; Takata, Morimasa; Weikusat, Christian; Kondo, Hidemasa; Kipfstuhl, Sepp

    2017-04-01

    Polar ice sheets are considered a unique climate archive. The chemical analysis of its impurities and the development of its microstructure with depth give insight in past climate conditions as well as in the development of the ice sheet with time and deformation. Microstructural patterns like small grain size observed in specific depths are thought to be linked to the retarding effect of impurities on ice grain growth. Clear evidence of size or chemical composition of the impurities causing this effect is missing, but in this context a major role of nanoparticles has been suggested. In order to shed light on different mechanisms by which nanoparticles can control microstructure development we used antifreeze proteins (AFPs) as proxies for particles in ice. These proteins are small nanoparticles, approx. 5 nm in size, with the special characteristics of firmly binding to ice through several hydrogen bonds. We used AFPs from the sea-ice microalgae Fragilariopsis cylindrus (fcAFPs) in bubble-free, small-grained polycrystalline ice obtained by the phase-transition size refinement method. We explain how fcAFP bind to ice by presenting the 3-D-protein structure model inferred by X-ray structure analysis, and show the importance of the chemical interaction between particles and ice in controlling normal grain growth, comparing fcAFPs to other protein nanoparticles. We used modifications of fcAFPs for particle localization through fluorescence spectroscopy. Furthermore, the effect of fcAFPs on the driving factors for ice deformation during creep, i.e. on internal dislocations due to incorporation within the lattice and on the mobility of grain boundaries due to pinning, makes these proteins particularly interesting in studying the process of ice deformation.

  2. Anchored Clathrate Waters Bind Antifreeze Proteins to Ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C Garnham; R Campbell; P Davies

    2011-12-31

    The mechanism by which antifreeze proteins (AFPs) irreversibly bind to ice has not yet been resolved. The ice-binding site of an AFP is relatively hydrophobic, but also contains many potential hydrogen bond donors/acceptors. The extent to which hydrogen bonding and the hydrophobic effect contribute to ice binding has been debated for over 30 years. Here we have elucidated the ice-binding mechanism through solving the first crystal structure of an Antarctic bacterial AFP. This 34-kDa domain, the largest AFP structure determined to date, folds as a Ca{sup 2+}-bound parallel beta-helix with an extensive array of ice-like surface waters that are anchored via hydrogen bonds directly to the polypeptide backbone and adjacent side chains. These bound waters make an excellent three-dimensional match to both the primary prism and basal planes of ice and in effect provide an extensive X-ray crystallographic picture of the AFP{vert_ellipsis}ice interaction. This unobstructed view, free from crystal-packing artefacts, shows the contributions of both the hydrophobic effect and hydrogen bonding during AFP adsorption to ice. We term this mode of binding the 'anchored clathrate' mechanism of AFP action.

  3. Blocking rapid ice crystal growth through nonbasal plane adsorption of antifreeze proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olijve, Luuk L C; Meister, Konrad; DeVries, Arthur L; Duman, John G; Guo, Shuaiqi; Bakker, Huib J; Voets, Ilja K

    2016-04-05

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a unique class of proteins that bind to growing ice crystal surfaces and arrest further ice growth. AFPs have gained a large interest for their use in antifreeze formulations for water-based materials, such as foods, waterborne paints, and organ transplants. Instead of commonly used colligative antifreezes such as salts and alcohols, the advantage of using AFPs as an additive is that they do not alter the physicochemical properties of the water-based material. Here, we report the first comprehensive evaluation of thermal hysteresis (TH) and ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) activity of all major classes of AFPs using cryoscopy, sonocrystallization, and recrystallization assays. The results show that TH activities determined by cryoscopy and sonocrystallization differ markedly, and that TH and IRI activities are not correlated. The absence of a distinct correlation in antifreeze activity points to a mechanistic difference in ice growth inhibition by the different classes of AFPs: blocking fast ice growth requires rapid nonbasal plane adsorption, whereas basal plane adsorption is only relevant at long annealing times and at small undercooling. These findings clearly demonstrate that biomimetic analogs of antifreeze (glyco)proteins should be tailored to the specific requirements of the targeted application.

  4. Expression and purification of sea raven type II antifreeze protein from Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotter, Andrew J; Kuntz, Douglas A; Saul, Michelle; Graham, Laurie A; Davies, Peter L; Rose, David R

    2006-06-01

    We present a system for the expression and purification of recombinant sea raven type II antifreeze protein, a cysteine-rich, C-type lectin-like globular protein that has proved to be a difficult target for recombinant expression and purification. The cDNAs encoding the pro- and mature forms of the sea raven protein were cloned into a modified pMT Drosophila expression vector. These constructs produced N-terminally His(6)-tagged pro- and mature forms of the type II antifreeze protein under the control of a metallothionein promoter when transfected into Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells. Upon induction of stable cell lines the two proteins were expressed at high levels and secreted into the medium. The proteins were then purified from the cell medium in a simple and rapid protocol using immobilized metal affinity chromatography and specific protease cleavage by tobacco etch virus protease. The proteins demonstrated antifreeze activity indistinguishable from that of wild-type sea raven antifreeze protein purified from serum as illustrated by ice affinity purification, ice crystal morphology, and their ability to inhibit ice crystal growth. This expression and purification system gave yields of 95 mg/L of fully active mature sea raven type II AFP and 9.6 mg/L of the proprotein. This surpasses all previous attempts to express this protein in Escherichia coli, baculovirus-infected fall armyworm cells and Pichia pastoris and will provide sufficient protein for structural analysis.

  5. Structural characteristics of a novel antifreeze protein from the longhorn beetle Rhagium inquisitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, E; Ramløv, Hans; Højrup, Peter

    2011-01-01

    beetle Rhagium inquisitor is known to express AFPs in its body fluids. In this work we report on the primary structure and structural characteristics of a 12.8 kDa AFP from this beetle (RiAFP). It has a high capacity to evoke antifreeze activity as compared to other known insect AFPs......Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are characterized by their capacity to inhibit the growth of ice and are produced by a variety of polar fish, terrestrial arthropods and other organisms inhabiting cold environments. This capacity reflects their role as stabilizers of supercooled body fluids. The longhorn...

  6. Cloning, expression, and activity of type IV antifreeze protein from cultured subtropical olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Kyu Lee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Antifreeze proteins (AFPs lower the freezing point but not the melting point of aqueous solutions by inhibiting the growth of ice crystals via an adsorption-inhibition mechanism. However, the function of type IV AFP (AFP IV is questionable, as its antifreeze activity is on the verge of detectable limits, its physiological concentration in adult fish blood is too low to function as a biological antifreeze, and its homologues are present even in fish from tropic oceans as well as freshwater. Therefore, we speculated that AFP IV may have gained antifreeze activity not by selective pressure but by chance. To test this hypothesis, we cloned, expressed, and assayed AFP IV from cultured subtropical olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus, which do not require antifreeze protein for survival. Among the identified expressed sequence tags of the flounder liver sample, a 5′-deleted complementary DNA (cDNA sequence similar to the afp4 gene of the longhorn sculpin was identified, and its full-length cDNA and genome structure were examined. The deduced amino acid sequence of flounder AFP IV shared 55, 53, 52, and 49 % identity with those of Pleuragramma antarcticum, Myoxocephalus octodecemspinosus, Myoxocephalus scorpius, and Notothenia coriiceps, respectively. Furthermore, the genomic structure of this gene was conserved with those of other known AFP IVs. Notably, the recombinant AFP IV showed a weak but distinct thermal hysteresis of 0.07 ± 0.01 °C at the concentration of 0.5 mg/mL, and ice crystals in an AFP IV solution grew star-shaped, which are very similar to those obtained from other polar AFP IVs. Taken together, our results do not support the hypothesis of evolution of AFP IV by selective pressure, suggesting that the antifreeze activity of AFP IV may have been gained by chance.

  7. NMR of unfolded proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2005-01-03

    Jan 3, 2005 ... out' response to environmental changes with structural complexity ... of 3D structure at atomic resolution of folded proteins ...... 5.14 HIV-1 protease. NMR identification of local structural preferences in. HIV-1 protease in the 'unfolded state' at 6 M gua- nidine hydrochloride has been reported.49 Analyses.

  8. Cloning and expression of a novel antifreeze protein AFP72 from the beetle Tenebrio molitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qing-Hua; Yang, Li; Wang, Qing; Zhang, Hui-Rong; Shao, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    A novel antifreeze protein AFP72 cDNA (GenBbank accession No. AY929389) was obtained by RT-PCR from Tenebrio molitor. The 216 bp fragment encodes a protein of 72 amino acid residues. Sequence analysis revealed that the cDNA displays a high degree of homology with T. molitor antifreeze proteins, ranging up to 90.78%. Recombinant plasmids pMAL-p2X-afp72 and pMAL-c2X-afp72 were transferred into E. coil TBI to induce a MBP fusion protein by IPTG. The target fusion protein was released from the periplasm and cytoplasm by the cold osmotic shock procedure and sonication respectively. The content of the fusion protein came up to 38.9 and 41.5% of the total dissolved protein, respectively. The fusion protein was purified through an amylose affinity column, and incised by factor Xa. Molecular sieve chromatography was used to achieve a high state of purity of the target protein. The purified target protein displayed a single band in SDS-PAGE. The fusion protein was shown to increase resistance to low temperatures in bacteria. This finding could help in further investigations of the properties and function of antifreeze proteins.

  9. Applications of type I antifreeze proteins: studies with model membranes & cryoprotectant properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Steven R; Turner, Jennifer J; Harding, Margaret M

    2006-12-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) and antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs), found in the body fluids of many species of polar fish allow them to survive in waters colder than the equilibrium freezing point of their blood and other internal fluids. Despite their structural diversity, all AF(G)Ps kinetically depress the temperature at which ice grows in a non-colligative manner and hence exhibit thermal hysteresis. AF(G)Ps also share the ability to interact with and protect mammalian cells and tissues from hypothermic damage (e.g., improved storage of human blood platelets at low temperatures), and are able to stabilize or disrupt membrane composition during low temperature and freezing stress (e.g., cryoprotectant properties in stabilization of sperm and oocytes). This review will summarize studies of AFPs with phospholipids and plant lipids, proposed mechanisms for inhibition of leakage from membranes, and cryoprotectant studies with biological samples. The major focus will be on the alpha-helical type I antifreeze proteins, and synthetic mutants, that have been most widely studied. For completeness, data on glycoproteins will also be presented. While a number of models to explain stabilization and destabilization of different lipid systems have been proposed, it is currently not possible to predict whether a particular AFP will stabilize or destabilize a given lipid system. Furthermore the relationship between the antifreeze property of thermal hysteresis and membrane stabilization is unknown. This lack of detailed knowledge about how AFPs function in the presence of different types of materials has hampered progress toward the development of antifreezes for cold storage of cells, tissues, and organs.

  10. Interaction of Tenebrio Molitor Antifreeze Protein with Ice Crystal: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramya, L; Ramakrishnan, Vigneshwar

    2016-07-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFP) observed in cold-adapting organisms bind to ice crystals and prevent further ice growth. However, the molecular mechanism of AFP-ice binding and AFP-inhibited ice growth remains unclear. Here we report the interaction of the insect antifreeze protein (Tenebrio molitor, TmAFP) with ice crystal by molecular dynamics simulation studies. Two sets of simulations were carried out at 263 K by placing the protein near the primary prism plane (PP) and basal plane (BL) of the ice crystal. To delineate the effect of temperatures, both the PP and BL simulations were carried out at 253 K as well. The analyses revealed that the protein interacts strongly with the ice crystal in BL simulation than in PP simulation both at 263 K and 253 K. Further, it was observed that the interactions are primarily mediated through the interface waters. We also observed that as the temperature decreases, the interaction between the protein and the ice increases which can be attributed to the decreased flexibility and the increased structuring of the protein at low temperature. In essence, our study has shed light on the interaction mechanism between the TmAFP antifreeze protein and the ice crystal. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. HEAT INDUCIBLE EXPRESSION OF ANTIFREEZE PROTEIN GENES FROM THE BEETLES Tenebrio molitor AND Microdera punctipennis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jieqiong; Ma, Wenjing; Ma, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) play important roles in protecting poikilothermic organisms from cold damage. The expression of AFP genes (afps) is induced by low temperature. However, it is reported that heat can influence the expression of afps in the desert beetle Microdera punctipennis. To further detect whether heat also induce the expression of afps in other insects, and to determine the expression profiling of insect afps at different temperatures. The expression of antifreeze protein genes in the two beetles, Microdera punctipennis and Tenebrio molitor that have quite different living environment, under different temperatures were studied by using real-time quantitative PCR. Mild low temperatures (5~15 degree C), high temperature (38~47 degree C for M. punctipennis, or 37~42 degree C for T. molitor) and temperature difference (10~30 degree C) all stimulated strongly to the expression of AFP genes (Mpafps) in M. punctipennis which lives in the wild filed in desert. The mRNA level of Mpafps after M. punctipennis were exposed to these temperatures for 1h~5h was at least 30-fold of the control at 25 degree C. For T. molitor which is breeding in door with wheat bran all these temperatures stimulated significantly to the expression of Tmafps, while the extent and degree of the temperature stimulation on Tmafps expression were much lower than on Mpafps. After T. molitor were exposed to 5 degree C and 15 degree C for 1h~5h, the mRNA level of Tmafps was over 6-fold and 45-fold of the control at 25 degree C. High temperature (37~42 degree C) for 1h~3h treatments increased Tmafps mRNA level 4.8-fold of the control. Temperature difference of 10 degree C was effective in stimulating Tmafps expression. The expression of insect antifreeze protein genes both in M. punctipennis and T. molitor was induced by heat, suggesting that this phenomenon may be common in insects; the extent and degree of the influence differ in species that have different living conditions. The heat

  12. Marine Antifreeze Proteins: Structure, Function, and Application to Cryopreservation as a Potential Cryoprotectant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hak Jun Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Antifreeze proteins (AFPs are biological antifreezes with unique properties, including thermal hysteresis(TH,ice recrystallization inhibition(IRI,and interaction with membranes and/or membrane proteins. These properties have been utilized in the preservation of biological samples at low temperatures. Here, we review the structure and function of marine-derived AFPs, including moderately active fish AFPs and hyperactive polar AFPs. We also survey previous and current reports of cryopreservation using AFPs. Cryopreserved biological samples are relatively diverse ranging from diatoms and reproductive cells to embryos and organs. Cryopreserved biological samples mainly originate from mammals. Most cryopreservation trials using marine-derived AFPs have demonstrated that addition of AFPs can improve post-thaw viability regardless of freezing method (slow-freezing or vitrification, storage temperature, and types of biological sample type.

  13. Electro-Optical Properties Characterization of Fish Type III Antifreeze Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Salvay, Andrés G.; Santos, Javier; Howard, Eduardo I.

    2007-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are ice-binding proteins that depress the freezing point of water in a non-colligative manner without a significant modification of the melting point. Found in the blood and tissues of some organisms (such as fish, insects, plants, and soil bacteria), AFPs play an important role in subzero temperature survival. Fish Type III AFP is present in members of the subclass Zoarcoidei. AFPIII are small 7-kDa—or 14-kDa tandem—globular proteins. In the present work, we study ...

  14. Fundamentals of Protein NMR Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Rule, Gordon S

    2006-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has proven to be a powerful technique to study the structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules. Fundamentals of Protein NMR Spectroscopy is a comprehensive textbook that guides the reader from a basic understanding of the phenomenological properties of magnetic resonance to the application and interpretation of modern multi-dimensional NMR experiments on 15N/13C-labeled proteins. Beginning with elementary quantum mechanics, a set of practical rules is presented and used to describe many commonly employed multi-dimensional, multi-nuclear NMR pulse sequences. A modular analysis of NMR pulse sequence building blocks also provides a basis for understanding and developing novel pulse programs. This text not only covers topics from chemical shift assignment to protein structure refinement, as well as the analysis of protein dynamics and chemical kinetics, but also provides a practical guide to many aspects of modern spectrometer hardware, sample preparation, experimental set-up, and data pr...

  15. Animal ice-binding (antifreeze) proteins and glycolipids: an overview with emphasis on physiological function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duman, John G

    2015-06-01

    Ice-binding proteins (IBPs) assist in subzero tolerance of multiple cold-tolerant organisms: animals, plants, fungi, bacteria etc. IBPs include: (1) antifreeze proteins (AFPs) with high thermal hysteresis antifreeze activity; (2) low thermal hysteresis IBPs; and (3) ice-nucleating proteins (INPs). Several structurally different IBPs have evolved, even within related taxa. Proteins that produce thermal hysteresis inhibit freezing by a non-colligative mechanism, whereby they adsorb onto ice crystals or ice-nucleating surfaces and prevent further growth. This lowers the so-called hysteretic freezing point below the normal equilibrium freezing/melting point, producing a difference between the two, termed thermal hysteresis. True AFPs with high thermal hysteresis are found in freeze-avoiding animals (those that must prevent freezing, as they die if frozen) especially marine fish, insects and other terrestrial arthropods where they function to prevent freezing at temperatures below those commonly experienced by the organism. Low thermal hysteresis IBPs are found in freeze-tolerant organisms (those able to survive extracellular freezing), and function to inhibit recrystallization - a potentially damaging process whereby larger ice crystals grow at the expense of smaller ones - and in some cases, prevent lethal propagation of extracellular ice into the cytoplasm. Ice-nucleator proteins inhibit supercooling and induce freezing in the extracellular fluid at high subzero temperatures in many freeze-tolerant species, thereby allowing them to control the location and temperature of ice nucleation, and the rate of ice growth. Numerous nuances to these functions have evolved. Antifreeze glycolipids with significant thermal hysteresis activity were recently identified in insects, frogs and plants. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. The role of endogenous antifreeze protein enhancers in the hemolymph thermal hysteresis activity of the beetle Dendroides canadensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duman, John G.; Serianni, Anthony S.

    2002-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) lower the freezing point of water by a non-colligative mechanism, but do not lower the melting point, therefore producing a difference between the freezing and melting points termed thermal hysteresis. Thermal hysteresis activity (THA) of AFPs from overwintering larvae of the beetle Dendroides canadensis is dependent upon AFP concentration and the presence of enhancers of THA which may be either other proteins or low molecular mass enhancers. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative contributions of endogenous enhancers in winter D. canadensis hemolymph.Winter hemolymph collected over four successive winters (1997-1998 to 2000-2001) was tested. The first three of these winters were the warmest on record in this area, while December of the final year was the coldest on record. Protein and low molecular mass enhancers raised hemolymph THA 60-97% and 35-55%, respectively, based on hemolymph with peak THA for each year collected over the four successive winters. However, the hemolymph AFPs were not maximally enhanced since addition of the potent enhancer citrate (at non-physiologically high levels) resulted in large increases in THA. (13)NMR showed that glycerol was the only low molecular mass solute present in sufficiently high concentrations in the hemolymph to function as an enhancer. Maximum THA appears to be approximately 8.5 degrees C.

  17. An insight into the molecular basis for convergent evolution in fish antifreeze Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Abhigyan; Chaube, Radha; Subbiah, Karthikeyan

    2013-08-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) prevent the growth of ice-crystals in order to enable certain organisms to survive under sub-zero temperature surroundings. These AFPs have evolved from different types of proteins without having any significant structural and sequence similarities among them. However, all the AFPs perform the same function of anti-freeze activity and are a classical example of convergent evolution. We have analyzed fish AFPs at the sequence level, the residue level and the physicochemical property group composition to discover molecular basis for this convergent evolution. Our study on amino acid distribution does not reveal any distinctive feature among AFPs, but comparative study of the AFPs with their close non-AFP homologs based on the physicochemical property group residues revealed some useful information. In particular (a) there is a similar pattern of avoidance and preference of amino acids in Fish AFP subtypes II, III and IV-Aromatic residues are avoided whereas small residues are preferred, (b) like other psychrophilic proteins, AFPs have a similar pattern of preference/avoidance for most of the residues except for Ile, Leu and Arg, and (c) most of the computed amino acids in preferred list are the key functional residues as obtained in previous predicted model of Doxey et al. For the first time this study revealed common patterns of avoidance/preference in fish AFP subtypes II, III and IV. These avoidance/preference lists can further facilitate the identification of key functional residues and can shed more light into the mechanism of antifreeze function. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Perdeuteration, purification, crystallization and preliminary neutron diffraction of an ocean pout type III antifreeze protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit-Haertlein, Isabelle; Blakeley, Matthew P.; Howard, Eduardo; Hazemann, Isabelle; Mitschler, Andre; Haertlein, Michael; Podjarny, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Perdeuterated type III antifreeze protein has been expressed, purified and crystallized. Preliminary neutron data collection showed diffraction to 1.85 Å resolution from a 0.13 mm 3 crystal. The highly homologous type III antifreeze protein (AFP) subfamily share the capability to inhibit ice growth at subzero temperatures. Extensive studies by X-ray crystallography have been conducted, mostly on AFPs from polar fishes. Although interactions between a defined flat ice-binding surface and a particular lattice plane of an ice crystal have now been identified, the fine structural features underlying the antifreeze mechanism still remain unclear owing to the intrinsic difficulty in identifying H atoms using X-ray diffraction data alone. Here, successful perdeuteration (i.e. complete deuteration) for neutron crystallographic studies of the North Atlantic ocean pout (Macrozoarces americanus) AFP in Escherichia coli high-density cell cultures is reported. The perdeuterated protein (AFP D) was expressed in inclusion bodies, refolded in deuterated buffer and purified by cation-exchange chromatography. Well shaped perdeuterated AFP D crystals have been grown in D 2 O by the sitting-drop method. Preliminary neutron Laue diffraction at 293 K using LADI-III at ILL showed that with a few exposures of 24 h a very low background and clear small spots up to a resolution of 1.85 Å were obtained using a ‘radically small’ perdeuterated AFP D crystal of dimensions 0.70 × 0.55 × 0.35 mm, corresponding to a volume of 0.13 mm 3

  19. Revealing Surface Waters on an Antifreeze Protein by Fusion Protein Crystallography Combined with Molecular Dynamic Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tianjun; Gauthier, Sherry Y; Campbell, Robert L; Davies, Peter L

    2015-10-08

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) adsorb to ice through an extensive, flat, relatively hydrophobic surface. It has been suggested that this ice-binding site (IBS) organizes surface waters into an ice-like clathrate arrangement that matches and fuses to the quasi-liquid layer on the ice surface. On cooling, these waters join the ice lattice and freeze the AFP to its ligand. Evidence for the generality of this binding mechanism is limited because AFPs tend to crystallize with their IBS as a preferred protein-protein contact surface, which displaces some bound waters. Type III AFP is a 7 kDa globular protein with an IBS made up two adjacent surfaces. In the crystal structure of the most active isoform (QAE1), the part of the IBS that docks to the primary prism plane of ice is partially exposed to solvent and has clathrate waters present that match this plane of ice. The adjacent IBS, which matches the pyramidal plane of ice, is involved in protein-protein crystal contacts with few surface waters. Here we have changed the protein-protein contacts in the ice-binding region by crystallizing a fusion of QAE1 to maltose-binding protein. In this 1.9 Å structure, the IBS that fits the pyramidal plane of ice is exposed to solvent. By combining crystallography data with MD simulations, the surface waters on both sides of the IBS were revealed and match well with the target ice planes. The waters on the pyramidal plane IBS were loosely constrained, which might explain why other isoforms of type III AFP that lack the prism plane IBS are less active than QAE1. The AFP fusion crystallization method can potentially be used to force the exposure to solvent of the IBS on other AFPs to reveal the locations of key surface waters.

  20. Operation of Kelvin Effect in the Activities of an Antifreeze Protein: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midya, Uday Sankar; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2018-03-29

    Ice growth and melting inhibition activities of antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are better explained by the adsorption-inhibition mechanism. Inhibition occurs as a result of the Kelvin effect induced by adsorbed protein molecules onto the surface of seed ice crystal. However, the Kelvin effect has not been explored by the state-of-the-art experimental techniques. In this work, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out with Tenebrio molitor antifreeze protein ( TmAFP) placed at ice-water interface to probe the Kelvin effect in the mechanism of AFPs. Simulations show that, below equilibrium melting temperature, ice growth is inhibited through the convex ice-water interface formation toward the water phase and, above equilibrium melting temperature, ice melting is inhibited through the concave ice-water interface formation inward to ice phase. Simulations further reveal that the radius of curvature of the interface formed to stop the ice growth increases with decrease in the degree of supercooling. Our results are in qualitative agreement with the theoretical prediction of the Kelvin effect and thus reveal its operation in the activities of AFPs.

  1. In silico characterization of antifreeze proteins using computational ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    GRAVY, Grand Average Hydropathy. structure of protein (3D coordinates data). The 3D structure of AFPs Q01758 and P05140 were gener- ated by homology modelling using Esypred34 server. The similar 3D structures (for the AFPs Q01758 and. P05140 sequences) in the Protein Data bank. (www.rscb.org) were identified ...

  2. Ice-surface adsorption enhanced colligative effect of antifreeze proteins in ice growth inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yougang; Ba, Yong

    2006-09-01

    This Communication describes a mechanism to explain antifreeze protein's function to inhibit the growth of ice crystals. We propose that the adsorption of antifreeze protein (AFP) molecules on an ice surface induces a dense AFP-water layer, which can significantly decrease the mole fraction of the interfacial water and, thus, lower the temperature for a seed ice crystal to grow in a super-cooled AFP solution. This mechanism can also explain the nearly unchanged melting point for the ice crystal due to the AFP's ice-surface adsorption. A mathematical model combining the Langmuir theory of adsorption and the colligative effect of thermodynamics has been proposed to find the equilibrium constants of the ice-surface adsorptions, and the interfacial concentrations of AFPs through fitting the theoretical curves to the experimental thermal hysteresis data. This model has been demonstrated by using the experimental data of serial size-mutated beetle Tenebrio molitor (Tm) AFPs. It was found that the AFP's ice-surface adsorptions could increase the interfacial AFP's concentrations by 3 to 4 orders compared with those in the bulk AFP solutions.

  3. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of modified antifreeze protein gene in strawberry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srisulak Dheeranupattana

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The optimum condition for shoot regeneration from leaf explants of strawberry cultivar Tiogar was investigated. It was found that the best regeneration condition was MS medium containing N6-Benzyladenine (BA and 2,4-Dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D at concentrations of 1 mg.l-1 and 0.2 mg.l-1, respectively. Antibiotics sensitivity test found that shoot regeneration from leaf explant was inhibited more than 90% at the concentration of kanamycin (Km as low as 5 mg.l-1. The modified gene encoding antifreeze protein isoform HPLC 6 was successfully constructed using codons which were optimally expressed in the strawberry plant. The antifreeze protein genes, naturally in plasmid pSW1 and modified in plasmid BB, were transformed to strawberry leaf explants by Agrobacterium tumefaciens LBA 4404. The strawberry plants, transformed with both AFP genes, were able to root in MS media containing 50 mg.l-1 Km, while no roots grew from nontransformed plant in this condition. Polymerase chain reaction indicated that the transgenes were integrated in the genome of transformants.

  4. Low thermodynamic but high kinetic stability of an antifreeze protein from Rhagium mordax

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Dennis Steven; Johnsen, Johannes Lørup; Kristiansen, Erlend

    2014-01-01

    , the RmAFP1 has only one disulfide bridge. The melting temperature, Tm, of the protein is determined to be 28.5°C (pH 7.4), which is much lower than most of those reported for AFPs or globular proteins in general. Despite its low melting temperature, both biophysical and activity measurements show......The equilibrium heat stability and the kinetic heat tolerance of a recombinant antifreeze protein (AFP) from the beetle Rhagium mordax (RmAFP1) are studied through differential scanning calorimetry and circular dichroism spectroscopy. In contrast to other insect AFPs studied with this respect...... that the protein almost completely refolds into the native state after repeated exposure of 70°C. RmAFP1 thus appears to be kinetically stable even far above its melting temperature. Thermodynamically, the insect AFPs seem to be dividable in three groups, relating to their content of disulfide bridges and widths...

  5. An Effective Antifreeze Protein Predictor with Ensemble Classifiers and Comprehensive Sequence Descriptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runtao Yang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Antifreeze proteins (AFPs play a pivotal role in the antifreeze effect of overwintering organisms. They have a wide range of applications in numerous fields, such as improving the production of crops and the quality of frozen foods. Accurate identification of AFPs may provide important clues to decipher the underlying mechanisms of AFPs in ice-binding and to facilitate the selection of the most appropriate AFPs for several applications. Based on an ensemble learning technique, this study proposes an AFP identification system called AFP-Ensemble. In this system, random forest classifiers are trained by different training subsets and then aggregated into a consensus classifier by majority voting. The resulting predictor yields a sensitivity of 0.892, a specificity of 0.940, an accuracy of 0.938 and a balanced accuracy of 0.916 on an independent dataset, which are far better than the results obtained by previous methods. These results reveal that AFP-Ensemble is an effective and promising predictor for large-scale determination of AFPs. The detailed feature analysis in this study may give useful insights into the molecular mechanisms of AFP-ice interactions and provide guidance for the related experimental validation. A web server has been designed to implement the proposed method.

  6. Re-evaluation of a bacterial antifreeze protein as an adhesin with ice-binding activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuaiqi Guo

    Full Text Available A novel role for antifreeze proteins (AFPs may reside in an exceptionally large 1.5-MDa adhesin isolated from an Antarctic Gram-negative bacterium, Marinomonas primoryensis. MpAFP was purified from bacterial lysates by ice adsorption and gel electrophoresis. We have previously reported that two highly repetitive sequences, region II (RII and region IV (RIV, divide MpAFP into five distinct regions, all of which require mM Ca(2+ levels for correct folding. Also, the antifreeze activity is confined to the 322-residue RIV, which forms a Ca(2+-bound beta-helix containing thirteen Repeats-In-Toxin (RTX-like repeats. RII accounts for approximately 90% of the mass of MpAFP and is made up of ∼120 tandem 104-residue repeats. Because these repeats are identical in DNA sequence, their number was estimated here by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Structural homology analysis by the Protein Homology/analogY Recognition Engine (Phyre2 server indicates that the 104-residue RII repeat adopts an immunoglobulin beta-sandwich fold that is typical of many secreted adhesion proteins. Additional RTX-like repeats in RV may serve as a non-cleavable signal sequence for the type I secretion pathway. Immunodetection shows both repeated regions are uniformly distributed over the cell surface. We suggest that the development of an AFP-like domain within this adhesin attached to the bacterial outer surface serves to transiently bind the host bacteria to ice. This association would keep the bacteria within the upper reaches of the water column where oxygen and nutrients are potentially more abundant. This novel envirotactic role would give AFPs a third function, after freeze avoidance and freeze tolerance: that of transiently binding an organism to ice.

  7. The mysteries of memory effect and its elimination with antifreeze proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, V.; Gordienko, R.; Kuiper, M.; Huva, E.; Wu, Z. [Queen' s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Biology; Zeng, H.; Ripmeester, J. [Queen' s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Biology]|[National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Steacie Inst. for Molecular Sciences

    2008-07-01

    With the decline in easily accessible and conventional hydrocarbon supplies, exploration will focus on hydrocarbons in deep offshore waters, in permafrost or in crystalline water as gas hydrates. Crystallization of water or water-encaged gas molecules takes place when nuclei reach a critical size, but the crystal growth may be inhibited by certain antifreeze proteins (AFPs). In this study, the authors hypothesized that the crystal lattice of gas hydrates may act as an alternative for substrate antifreeze proteins (AFPs). AFP-mediated inhibition of ice and clathrate hydrate crystallization was examined. Since the AFPs had a notable ability to eliminate the memory effect (ME) or the faster reformation of clathrate hydrates after melting, the authors were prompted to examine heterogeneous nucleation. Silica, served as a model nucleator hydrophilic surface. Quartz crystal microbalance-dissipation (QCM-D) experiments showed that an active AFP was tightly adsorbed to the silica surface. However, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and polyvinylcaprolactam (PVCap), 2 commercial hydrate kinetic inhibitors that do not eliminate ME, were not as tightly adsorbed. A mutant AFP inhibited tetrahydrofuran clathrate hydrate growth, but not ME. QCM-D analysis showed that adsorption of the mutant AFP was more similar to PVCap than the active AFP. It was concluded that although there is no evidence for memory in ice reformation, the crystallization of ice and hydrates, and the elimination of the more rapid recrystallization of hydrates, can be mediated by the same proteins. The properties of adsorbed layers can be effectively monitored by QCM-D. These study results provided useful information about the inhibition mechanism of heterogeneous nucleation of clathrate hydrate. The technique facilitates the screening of potential low dose hydrate inhibitors and residues in AFPs that are involved in silica adsorption. 24 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  8. NMR of unfolded proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2005-01-03

    Jan 3, 2005 ... emerged as the sole, most powerful technique to help characterize these disordered protein systems. In ... tion of a protein is related to its significant and ...... This is likely to allow a number of both charged and hydrophobic groups to be presented to fibronectin for highly spe- cific binding.76. 5.3 Lysozyme.

  9. NMR of unfolded proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the post-genomic era, as more and more genome sequences are becoming known and hectic efforts are underway to decode the information content in them, it is becoming increasingly evident that flexibility in proteins plays a crucial role in many of the biological functions. Many proteins have intrinsic disorder either ...

  10. Purification, crystal structure determination and functional characterization of type III antifreeze proteins from the European eelpout Zoarces viviparus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkens, Casper; Poulsen, Jens-Christian Navarro; Ramløv, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are essential components of many organisms adaptation to cold temperatures. Fish type III AFPs are divided into two groups, SP isoforms being much less active than QAE1 isoforms. Two type III AFPs from Zoarces viviparus, a QAE1 (ZvAFP13) and an SP (ZvAFP6) isoform...... this is the first report of dimerization of AFP type III proteins....

  11. The effect of surface charge on the thermal stability and ice recrystallization inhibition activity of antifreeze protein III (AFP III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deller, R C; Carter, B M; Zampetakis, I; Scarpa, F; Perriman, A W

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of chemical cationization on the structure and function of antifreeze protein III (AFP III) over an extreme temperature range (-40°C to +90°C) using far-UV synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) and ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) assays. Chemical cationization was able to produce a modified AFP III with a net cationic charge at physiological pH that had enhanced resistance to denaturation at elevated temperatures, with no immediate negative impact on protein structure at subzero temperatures. Furthermore, cationized AFP III retained an IRI activity similar to that of native AFP III. Consequently, chemical cationization may provide a pathway to the development of more robust antifreeze proteins as supplementary cryoprotectants in the cryopreservation of clinically relevant cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Growth-melt asymmetry in ice crystals under the influence of spruce budworm antifreeze protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pertaya, Natalya [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Celik, Yeliz [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); DiPrinzio, Carlos L [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Wettlaufer, J S [Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8109 (United States); Davies, Peter L [Department of Biochemistry, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Braslavsky, Ido [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States)

    2007-10-17

    Here we describe studies of the crystallization behavior of ice in an aqueous solution of spruce budworm antifreeze protein (sbwAFP) at atmospheric pressure. SbwAFP is an ice binding protein with high thermal hysteresis activity, which helps protect Choristoneura fumiferana (spruce budworm) larvae from freezing as they overwinter in the spruce and fir forests of the north eastern United States and Canada. Different types of ice binding proteins have been found in many other species. They have a wide range of applications in cryomedicine and cryopreservation, as well as the potential to protect plants and vegetables from frost damage through genetic engineering. However, there is much to learn regarding the mechanism of action of ice binding proteins. In our experiments, a solution containing sbwAFP was rapidly frozen and then melted back, thereby allowing us to produce small single crystals. These maintained their hexagonal shapes during cooling within the thermal hysteresis gap. Melt-growth-melt sequences in low concentrations of sbwAFP reveal the same shape transitions as are found in pure ice crystals at low temperature (-22 deg. C) and high pressure (2000 bar) (Cahoon et al 2006 Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 255502); while both growth and melt shapes display faceted hexagonal morphology, they are rotated 30 deg. relative to one another. Moreover, the initial melt shape and orientation is recovered in the sequence. To visualize the binding of sbwAFP to ice, we labeled the antifreeze protein with enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and observed the sbwAFP-GFP molecules directly on ice crystals using confocal microscopy. When cooling the ice crystals, facets form on the six primary prism planes (slowest growing planes) that are evenly decorated with sbwAFP-GFP. During melting, apparent facets form on secondary prism planes (fastest melting planes), leaving residual sbwAFP at the six corners of the hexagon. Thus, the same general growth-melt behavior of an apparently

  13. Balance between hydration enthalpy and entropy is important for ice binding surfaces in Antifreeze Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauperl, Michael; Podewitz, Maren; Ortner, Teresa S; Waibl, Franz; Thoeny, Alexander; Loerting, Thomas; Liedl, Klaus R

    2017-09-19

    Antifreeze Proteins (AFPs) inhibit the growth of an ice crystal by binding to it. The detailed binding mechanism is, however, still not fully understood. We investigated three AFPs using Molecular Dynamics simulations in combination with Grid Inhomogeneous Solvation Theory, exploring their hydration thermodynamics. The observed enthalpic and entropic differences between the ice-binding sites and the inactive surface reveal key properties essential for proteins in order to bind ice: While entropic contributions are similar for all sites, the enthalpic gain for all ice-binding sites is lower than for the rest of the protein surface. In contrast to most of the recently published studies, our analyses show that enthalpic interactions are as important as an ice-like pre-ordering. Based on these observations, we propose a new, thermodynamically more refined mechanism of the ice recognition process showing that the appropriate balance between entropy and enthalpy facilitates ice-binding of proteins. Especially, high enthalpic interactions between the protein surface and water can hinder the ice-binding activity.

  14. Influence of Block Copolymerization on the Antifreeze Protein Mimetic Ice Recrystallization Inhibition Activity of Poly(vinyl alcohol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congdon, Thomas R; Notman, Rebecca; Gibson, Matthew I

    2016-09-12

    Antifreeze (glyco) proteins are produced by many cold-acclimatized species to enable them to survive subzero temperatures. These proteins have multiple macroscopic effects on ice crystal growth which makes them appealing for low-temperature applications-from cellular cryopreservation to food storage. Poly(vinyl alcohol) has remarkable ice recrystallization inhibition activity, but its mode of action is uncertain as is the extent at which it can be incorporated into other high-order structures. Here the synthesis and characterization of well-defined block copolymers containing poly(vinyl alcohol) and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) by RAFT/MADIX polymerization is reported, as new antifreeze protein mimetics. The effect of adding a large second hydrophilic block is studied across a range of compositions, and it is found to be a passive component in ice recrystallization inhibition assays, enabling retention of all activity. In the extreme case, a block copolymer with only 10% poly(vinyl alcohol) was found to retain all activity, where statistical copolymers of PVA lose all activity with very minor changes to composition. These findings present a new method to increase the complexity of antifreeze protein mimetic materials, while retaining activity, and also to help understand the underlying mechanisms of action.

  15. Electro-optical properties characterization of fish type III antifreeze protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvay, Andrés G; Santos, Javier; Howard, Eduardo I

    2007-12-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are ice-binding proteins that depress the freezing point of water in a non-colligative manner without a significant modification of the melting point. Found in the blood and tissues of some organisms (such as fish, insects, plants, and soil bacteria), AFPs play an important role in subzero temperature survival. Fish Type III AFP is present in members of the subclass Zoarcoidei. AFPIII are small 7-kDa-or 14-kDa tandem-globular proteins. In the present work, we study the behavior of several physical properties, such as the low-frequency dielectric permittivity spectrum, circular dichroism, and electrical conductivity of Fish Type III AFP solutions measured at different concentrations. The combination of the information obtained from these measurements could be explained through the formation of AFP molecular aggregates or, alternatively, by the existence of some other type of interparticle interactions. Thermal stability and electro-optical behavior, when proteins are dissolved in deuterated water, were also investigated.

  16. Antifreeze poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    The poisonous ingredients in antifreeze are: Ethylene glycol Methanol Propylene glycol ... For ethylene glycol: Death may occur within the first 24 hours. If ... little as 2 tablespoons (1 ounce or 30 milliliters) can kill a ...

  17. Fluorescence and confocal microscopy studies of the ice surface - antifreeze protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertaya, N.; Thomson, E.; Davies, P. L.; Braslavsky, I.

    2005-03-01

    Biomineralization is a phenomenon in which biological material influences mineral growth on the molecular level. A compelling example involves antifreeze proteins (AFPs) known to prevent fish and insects from freezing. AFPs have many potential applications in agriculture, biomedical science, and can be used as a model platform to understand biomineralization processes for future nanotechnology applications. Here we describe a new approach to study the interaction between AFPs and ice using fluorescence and confocal microscopy combined with a unique ice growth cell. After conjugating green fluorescent protein (GFP) to Type III AFP, we imaged the fluorescence signal around and inside of the ice crystals that emerged from the cooled AFP-GFP solution, and have observed an enhanced fluorescence signal at the edge of the ice crystal. In a second cell we observed a dramatic change in the ice growth morphology when AFPs were introduced into an initially pure system. Further developments of these methods will permit the direct imaging of the location and concentration of the AFPs on ice surfaces and enable a better understanding of their operation. Supported by CIHR, the Bosack and Kruger Foundation, Ohio and Yale Universities.

  18. ANTIFREEZE PROTEINS IN PLANTS: AN OVERVIEW WITH AN INSIGHT INTO THE DETECTION TECHNIQUES INCLUDING NANOBIOTECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavana Sharma

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Antifreeze proteins (AFPs are a class of polypeptides which enables various organisms to survive subzero temperatures and have been found in vertebrates, invertebrates, plants, fungi and lichens. AFPs possess the characteristic thermal hysteresis (TH and ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI properties which allow them to adsorb the surface of ice crystals and inhibit their growth and recrystallization. AFPs are also known as ice restructuring proteins due to their ability to modify ice crystal morphology which leads to formation of hexagonal shape ice crystals in the presence of AFPs and disc shape AFPs in its absence. AFPs have various applications in medical, agricultural, industrial and biotechnological field. This review provides an overview of the AFPs, their TH and IRI properties and potential biotechnological applications of AFPs. Various conventional detection methods like Capillary assay and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC with their advantages and disadvantages are discussed in detail along with the commonly used Splat assay and Nanoliter osmometer. Moreover, a novel, high-throughput and efficient nanobiotechnological method for AFP detection is also discussed. The method is based on colorimetric detection of freeze-labile gold nanoparticles and can provide an alternative to overcome the limitations of conventional methods by providing quick and easy way to screen AFPs in multiple systems simultaneously

  19. Hydration behavior at the ice-binding surface of the Tenebrio molitor antifreeze protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midya, Uday Sankar; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2014-05-08

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out at two different temperatures (300 and 220 K) to study the conformational rigidity of the hyperactive Tenebrio molitor antifreeze protein (TmAFP) in aqueous medium and the structural arrangements of water molecules hydrating its surface. It is found that irrespective of the temperature the ice-binding surface (IBS) of the protein is relatively more rigid than its nonice-binding surface (NIBS). The presence of a set of regularly arranged internally bound water molecules is found to play an important role in maintaining the flat rigid nature of the IBS. Importantly, the calculations reveal that the strategically located hydroxyl oxygens of the threonine (Thr) residues in the IBS influence the arrangements of five sets of ordered waters around it on two parallel planes that closely resemble the basal plane of ice. As a result, these waters can register well with the ice basal plane, thereby allowing the IBS to preferentially bind at the ice interface and inhibit its growth. This provides a possible molecular reason behind the ice-binding activity of TmAFP at the basal plane of ice.

  20. Calorimetric determination of inhibition of ice crystal growth by antifreeze protein in hydroxyethyl starch solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, T N; Carpenter, J F

    1993-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry and cryomicroscopy were used to investigate the effects of type I antifreeze protein (AFP) from winter flounder on 58% solutions of hydroxyethyl starch. The glass, devitrification, and melt transitions noted during rewarming were unaffected by 100 micrograms/ml AFP. Isothermal annealing experiments were undertaken to detect the effects of AFP-induced inhibition of ice crystal growth using calorimetry. A premelt endothermic peak was detected during warming after the annealing procedure. Increasing the duration or the temperature of the annealing for the temperature range from -28 and -18 degrees C resulted in a gradual increase in the enthalpy of the premelt endotherm. This transition was unaffected by 100 micrograms/ml AFP. Annealing between -18 and -10 degrees C resulted in a gradual decrease in the premelt peak enthalpy. This process was inhibited by 100 micrograms/ml AFP. Cryomicroscopic examination of the samples revealed that AFP inhibited ice recrystallization during isothermal annealing at -10 degrees C. Annealing at lower temperatures resulted in minimal ice recrystallization and no visible effect of AFP. Thus, the 100 micrograms/ml AFP to have a detectable influence on thermal events in the calorimeter, conditions must be used that result in significant ice growth without AFP and visible inhibition of this process by AFP. Images FIGURE 8 PMID:7690257

  1. Solution NMR structure determination of proteins revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billeter, Martin; Wagner, Gerhard; Wuethrich, Kurt

    2008-01-01

    This 'Perspective' bears on the present state of protein structure determination by NMR in solution. The focus is on a comparison of the infrastructure available for NMR structure determination when compared to protein crystal structure determination by X-ray diffraction. The main conclusion emerges that the unique potential of NMR to generate high resolution data also on dynamics, interactions and conformational equilibria has contributed to a lack of standard procedures for structure determination which would be readily amenable to improved efficiency by automation. To spark renewed discussion on the topic of NMR structure determination of proteins, procedural steps with high potential for improvement are identified

  2. Lateral transfer of a lectin-like antifreeze protein gene in fishes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie A Graham

    Full Text Available Fishes living in icy seawater are usually protected from freezing by endogenous antifreeze proteins (AFPs that bind to ice crystals and stop them from growing. The scattered distribution of five highly diverse AFP types across phylogenetically disparate fish species is puzzling. The appearance of radically different AFPs in closely related species has been attributed to the rapid, independent evolution of these proteins in response to natural selection caused by sea level glaciations within the last 20 million years. In at least one instance the same type of simple repetitive AFP has independently originated in two distant species by convergent evolution. But, the isolated occurrence of three very similar type II AFPs in three distantly related species (herring, smelt and sea raven cannot be explained by this mechanism. These globular, lectin-like AFPs have a unique disulfide-bonding pattern, and share up to 85% identity in their amino acid sequences, with regions of even higher identity in their genes. A thorough search of current databases failed to find a homolog in any other species with greater than 40% amino acid sequence identity. Consistent with this result, genomic Southern blots showed the lectin-like AFP gene was absent from all other fish species tested. The remarkable conservation of both intron and exon sequences, the lack of correlation between evolutionary distance and mutation rate, and the pattern of silent vs non-silent codon changes make it unlikely that the gene for this AFP pre-existed but was lost from most branches of the teleost radiation. We propose instead that lateral gene transfer has resulted in the occurrence of the type II AFPs in herring, smelt and sea raven and allowed these species to survive in an otherwise lethal niche.

  3. Synthetic antifreeze peptide

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    A synthetic antifreeze peptide and a synthetic gene coding for the antifreeze peptide have been produced. The antifreeze peptide has a greater number of repeating amino acid sequences than is present in the native antifreeze peptides from winter flounder upon which the synthetic antifreeze peptide was modeled. Each repeating amino acid sequence has two polar amino acid residues which are spaced a controlled distance apart so that the antifreeze peptide may inhibit ice formation. The synthetic...

  4. De novo DESIGN AND SYNTHESIS OF AN ICE-BINDING, DENDRIMERIC, POLYPEPTIDE BASED ON INSECT ANTIFREEZE PROTEINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Vera Bravo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A new strategy is presented for the designand synthesis of peptides that exhibitice-binding and antifreeze activity. Apennant-type dendrimer polypeptidescaffold combining an α-helical backbonewith four short β-strand branches wassynthesized in solid phase using Fmocchemistry in a divergent approach. The51-residue dendrimer was characterizedby reverse phase high performance liquidchromatography, mass spectrometry andcircular dichroism. Each β-strand branchcontained three overlapping TXT aminoacid repeats, an ice-binding motif foundin the ice-binding face of the sprucebudworm (Choristoneura fumiferanaand beetle (Tenebrio molitor antifreezeproteins. Ice crystals in the presence ofthe polypeptide monomer displayed flat,hexagonal plate morphology, similar tothat produced by weakly active antifreezeproteins. An oxidized dimeric form of thedendrimer polypeptide also produced flathexagonal ice crystals and was capableof inhibiting ice crystal growth upontemperature reduction, a phenomenontermed thermal hysteresis, a definingproperty of antifreeze proteins. Linkageof the pennant-type dendrimer to a trifunctionalcascade-type polypeptideproduced a trimeric macromolecule thatgave flat hexagonal ice crystals withhigher thermal hysteresis activity thanthe dimer or monomer and an ice crystal burst pattern similar to that producedby samples containing insect antifreezeproteins. This macromolecule was alsocapable of inhibiting ice recrystallization.

  5. Gold Nanoparticle Aggregation as a Probe of Antifreeze (Glyco) Protein-Inspired Ice Recrystallization Inhibition and Identification of New IRI Active Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Daniel E; Congdon, Thomas; Rodger, Alison; Gibson, Matthew I

    2015-10-26

    Antifreeze (glyco)proteins are found in polar fish species and act to slow the rate of growth of ice crystals; a property known as ice recrystallization inhibition. The ability to slow ice growth is of huge technological importance especially in the cryopreservation of donor cells and tissue, but native antifreeze proteins are often not suitable, nor easily available. Therefore, the search for new materials that mimic this function is important, but currently limited by the low-throughout assays associated with the antifreeze properties. Here 30 nm gold nanoparticles are demonstrated to be useful colorimetric probes for ice recrystallization inhibition, giving a visible optical response and is compatible with 96 well plates for high-throughout studies. This method is faster, requires less infrastructure, and has easier interpretation than the currently used 'splat' methods. Using this method, a series of serum proteins were identified to have weak, but specific ice recrystallization inhibition activity, which was removed upon denaturation. It is hoped that high-throughput tools such as this will accelerate the discovery of new antifreeze mimics.

  6. MAS NMR of HIV-1 protein assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Quinn, Caitlin M.; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-01

    The negative global impact of the AIDS pandemic is well known. In this perspective article, the utility of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy to answer pressing questions related to the structure and dynamics of HIV-1 protein assemblies is examined. In recent years, MAS NMR has undergone major technological developments enabling studies of large viral assemblies. We discuss some of these evolving methods and technologies and provide a perspective on the current state of MAS NMR as applied to the investigations into structure and dynamics of HIV-1 assemblies of CA capsid protein and of Gag maturation intermediates.

  7. Effects of three different types of antifreeze proteins on mouse ovarian tissue cryopreservation and transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewang Lee

    Full Text Available Ovarian tissue (OT cryopreservation is effective in preserving fertility in cancer patients who have concerns about fertility loss due to cancer treatment. However, the damage incurred at different steps during the cryopreservation procedure may cause follicular depletion; hence, preventing chilling injury would help maintain ovarian function.This study was designed to investigate the beneficial effects of different antifreeze proteins (AFPs on mouse ovarian tissue cryopreservation and transplantation.Ovaries were obtained from 5-week-old B6D2F1 mice, and each ovary was cryopreserved using two-step vitrification and four-step warming procedures. In Experiment I, ovaries were randomly allocated into fresh, vitrification control, and nine experimental groups according to the AFP type (FfIBP, LeIBP, type III and concentration (0.1, 1, 10 mg/mL used. After vitrification and warming, 5,790 ovarian follicles were evaluated using histology and TUNEL assays, and immunofluorescence for τH2AX and Rad51 was used to detect DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs and repair (DDR, respectively. In Experiment II, 20 mice were randomly divided into two groups: one where the vitrification and warming media were supplemented with 10 mg/mL LeIBP, and the other where media alone were used (control. Ovaries were then autotransplanted under both kidney capsules 7 days after vitrification together with the addition of 10 mg/mL LeIBP in the vitrification-warming media. After transplantation, the ovarian follicles, the percentage of apoptotic follicles, the extent of the CD31-positive area, and the serum FSH levels of the transplanted groups were compared.In Experiment I, the percentage of total grade 1 follicles was significantly higher in the 10 mg/mL LeIBP group than in the vitrification control, while all AFP-treated groups had significantly improved grade 1 primordial follicle numbers compared with those of the vitrification control. The number of apoptotic (TUNEL

  8. Recent excitements in protein NMR: Large proteins and biologically ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-10-14

    Oct 14, 2016 ... quality. These problems severely limit NMR studies of large molecules, which is directly reflected in a fewer number of. NMR-derived protein structures with ...... Energy landscape of CAP* showing the two states, inactive (I) and active (A), and their fractional populations (93% and 7%, respectively).

  9. Recent excitements in protein NMR: Large proteins and biologically ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The advent of Transverse Relaxation Optimized SpectroscopY (TROSY) and perdeuteration allowed biomolecularNMR spectroscopists to overcome the size limitation barrier (~20 kDa) in de novo structure determination of proteins.The utility of these techniques was immediately demonstrated on large proteins and protein ...

  10. Freeze resistance in rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax): seasonal pattern of glycerol and antifreeze protein levels and liver enzyme activity associated with glycerol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Johanne M; Ewart, K Vanya; Driedzic, William R

    2004-01-01

    Rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) inhabit inshore waters along the North American Atlantic coast. During the winter, these waters are frequently ice covered and can reach temperatures as low as -1.9 degrees C. To prevent freezing, smelt accumulate high levels of glycerol, which lower the freezing point via colligative means, and antifreeze proteins (AFP). The up-regulation of the antifreeze response (both glycerol and AFP) occurs in early fall, when water temperatures are 5 degrees -6 degrees C. The accumulation of glycerol appears to be the main mechanism of freeze resistance in smelt because it contributes more to the lowering of the body's freezing point than the activity of the AFP (0.5 degrees C vs. 0.25 degrees C for glycerol and AFP, respectively) at a water temperature of -1.5 degrees C. Moreover, AFP in smelt appears to be a safeguard mechanism to prevent freezing when glycerol levels are low. Significant increases in activities of the liver enzymes glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH), alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) during the initiation of glycerol production and significant correlations between enzyme activities and plasma glycerol levels suggest that these enzymes are closely associated with the synthesis and maintenance of elevated glycerol levels for use as an antifreeze. These findings add further support to the concept that carbon for glycerol is derived from amino acids.

  11. Characterizing carbohydrate-protein interactions by NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewley, Carole A.; Shahzad-ul-Hussan, Syed

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between proteins and soluble carbohydrates and/or surface displayed glycans are central to countless recognition, attachment and signaling events in biology. The physical chemical features associated with these binding events vary considerably, depending on the biological system of interest. For example, carbohydrate-protein interactions can be stoichiometric or multivalent, the protein receptors can be monomeric or oligomeric, and the specificity of recognition can be highly stringent or rather promiscuous. Equilibrium dissociation constants for carbohydrate binding are known to vary from micromolar to millimolar, with weak interactions being far more prevalent; and individual carbohydrate binding sites can be truly symmetrical or merely homologous, and hence, the affinities of individual sites within a single protein can vary, as can the order of binding. Several factors, including the weak affinities with which glycans bind their protein receptors, the dynamic nature of the glycans themselves, and the non-equivalent interactions among oligomeric carbohydrate receptors, have made NMR an especially powerful tool for studying and defining carbohydrate-protein interactions. Here we describe those NMR approaches that have proven to be the most robust in characterizing these systems, and explain what type of information can (or cannot) be obtained from each. Our goal is to provide to the reader the information necessary for selecting the correct experiment or sets of experiments to characterize their carbohydrate-protein interaction of interest. PMID:23784792

  12. Protein NMR structures refined without NOE data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Hyojung; Kim, Tae-Rae; Ahn, SeonJoo; Ji, Sunyoung; Lee, Jinhyuk

    2014-01-01

    The refinement of low-quality structures is an important challenge in protein structure prediction. Many studies have been conducted on protein structure refinement; the refinement of structures derived from NMR spectroscopy has been especially intensively studied. In this study, we generated flat-bottom distance potential instead of NOE data because NOE data have ambiguity and uncertainty. The potential was derived from distance information from given structures and prevented structural dislocation during the refinement process. A simulated annealing protocol was used to minimize the potential energy of the structure. The protocol was tested on 134 NMR structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) that also have X-ray structures. Among them, 50 structures were used as a training set to find the optimal "width" parameter in the flat-bottom distance potential functions. In the validation set (the other 84 structures), most of the 12 quality assessment scores of the refined structures were significantly improved (total score increased from 1.215 to 2.044). Moreover, the secondary structure similarity of the refined structure was improved over that of the original structure. Finally, we demonstrate that the combination of two energy potentials, statistical torsion angle potential (STAP) and the flat-bottom distance potential, can drive the refinement of NMR structures.

  13. A kinetic description of antifreeze glycoprotein activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcham, T S; Osuga, D T; Yeh, Y; Feeney, R E

    1986-05-15

    The antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGP) of polar fish have the ability to depress the freezing temperature of water approximately 500 times the amount expected based on the number of AFGP molecules in solution; yet AFGP solutions have a purely colligative melting point depression. The difference of solution melting and freezing temperatures is the antifreeze activity of AFGP. One characteristic of AFGP activity that requires further examination is the effect of concentration on antifreeze activity, especially whether the activity saturates at high concentrations or the measured activity increases ad infinitum. This study first surveys the activity of the various antifreeze components from both Pagothenia borchgrevinki and the Arg-containing antifreeze glycoprotein from Eleginus gracilis (EgAF). It was found that all AFGP components examined have a plateau in activity at high concentration, but the actual value of the plateau activity differs between the different length AFGP components and between AFGP and EgAF. While the low molecular weight components of both AFGP and EgAF lose activity at deep supercooling, at high concentration activity is restored. The activity data is then shown to fit a reversible kinetic model of AFGP activity, and the coefficients obtained are used to compare the activity differences between AFGP components and between AFGP and EgAF. The model is also shown to describe the activity of the antifreeze protein of the fish Pseudopleuronectes americanus and the thermal hysteresis protein of the insect, Tenebrio molitor.

  14. NMR Studies of Protein Hydration and Protein-Ligand Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Yuan

    Water on the surface of a protein is called hydration water. Hydration water is known to play a crucial role in a variety of biological processes including protein folding, enzymatic activation, and drug binding. Although the significance of hydration water has been recognized, the underlying mechanism remains far from being understood. This dissertation employs a unique in-situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique to study the mechanism of protein hydration and the role of hydration in alcohol-protein interactions. Water isotherms in proteins are measured at different temperatures via the in-situ NMR technique. Water is found to interact differently with hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups on the protein. Water adsorption on hydrophilic groups is hardly affected by the temperature, while water adsorption on hydrophobic groups strongly depends on the temperature around 10 C, below which the adsorption is substantially reduced. This effect is induced by the dramatic decrease in the protein flexibility below 10 C. Furthermore, nanosecond to microsecond protein dynamics and the free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of protein hydration are studied as a function of hydration level and temperature. A crossover at 10 C in protein dynamics and thermodynamics is revealed. The effect of water at hydrophilic groups on protein dynamics and thermodynamics shows little temperature dependence, whereas water at hydrophobic groups has stronger effect above 10 C. In addition, I investigate the role of water in alcohol binding to the protein using the in-situ NMR detection. The isotherms of alcohols are first measured on dry proteins, then on proteins with a series of controlled hydration levels. The free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of alcohol binding are also determined. Two distinct types of alcohol binding are identified. On the one hand, alcohols can directly bind to a few specific sites on the protein. This type of binding is independent of temperature and can be

  15. High-Sensitivity Rheo-NMR Spectroscopy for Protein Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Daichi; Walinda, Erik; Iwakawa, Naoto; Nishizawa, Mayu; Kawata, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Akihiko; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Scheler, Ulrich; Sugase, Kenji

    2017-07-18

    Shear stress can induce structural deformation of proteins, which might result in aggregate formation. Rheo-NMR spectroscopy has the potential to monitor structural changes in proteins under shear stress at the atomic level; however, existing Rheo-NMR methodologies have insufficient sensitivity to probe protein structure and dynamics. Here we present a simple and versatile approach to Rheo-NMR, which maximizes sensitivity by using a spectrometer equipped with a cryogenic probe. As a result, the sensitivity of the instrument ranks highest among the Rheo-NMR spectrometers reported so far. We demonstrate that the newly developed Rheo-NMR instrument can acquire high-quality relaxation data for a protein under shear stress and can trace structural changes in a protein during fibril formation in real time. The described approach will facilitate rheological studies on protein structural deformation, thereby aiding a physical understanding of shear-induced amyloid fibril formation.

  16. Saccharide antifreeze compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walters, Kent; Duman, John G; Serianni, Anthony S

    2013-12-10

    The invention provides an antifreeze glycolipid compounds and composition comprising a polysaccharide moiety of Formula I; ##STR00001## wherein D-Manp represents a D-mannopyranose moiety, D-Xylp represents a D-xylopyranose moiety, and n is about 5 to about 70; and one or more lipid moieties covalently linked to the polysaccharide moiety of Formula I or electrostatically associated with the polysaccaride moiety for Formula I. The antifreeze glycolipid compounds and compositions can be used for a variety of industrial, agricultural, medical, and cosmetic applications where recrystallization-inhibition, cyroprotection, or cryopreservation is desired. The antifreeze glycolipid compounds or compositions can be used as, for example, as cryoprotectants for tissue preservation and transplantation, improving the texture of processed frozen food and frozen meats, frostbit protection, crop protection, and green alternatives for land vehicle antifreeze and aircraft de-icing.

  17. Fast mapping of global protein folding states by multivariate NMR:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmendal, Anders; Underhaug, Jarl; Otzen, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    that provides such an overview. GPS NMR exploits the unique ability of NMR to simultaneously record signals from individual hydrogen atoms in complex macromolecular systems and of multivariate analysis to describe spectral variations from these by a few variables for establishment of, and positioning in......, protein-folding state maps. The method is fast, sensitive, and robust, and it works without isotope-labelling. The unique capabilities of GPS NMR to identify different folding states and to compare different unfolding processes are demonstrated by mapping of the equilibrium folding space of bovine alpha......To obtain insight into the functions of proteins and their specific roles, it is important to establish efficient procedures for exploring the states that encapsulate their conformational space. Global Protein folding State mapping by multivariate NMR (GPS NMR) is a powerful high-throughput method...

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of Ca{sup 2+}-independent and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent species of the type II antifreeze protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimiya, Yoshiyuki; Kondo, Hidemasa [Functional Protein Research Group, Research Institute of Genome-based Biofactory, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2-17-2-1 Tsukisamu-Higashi, Toyohira, Sapporo 062-8517 (Japan); Yasui, Masanori [Functional Protein Research Group, Research Institute of Genome-based Biofactory, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2-17-2-1 Tsukisamu-Higashi, Toyohira, Sapporo 062-8517 (Japan); Division of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, N8W5, Kita, Sapporo 060-0808 (Japan); Sugimoto, Hiroshi [Biometal Science Laboratory, Riken SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Noro, Natsuko; Sato, Ryoko [Functional Protein Research Group, Research Institute of Genome-based Biofactory, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2-17-2-1 Tsukisamu-Higashi, Toyohira, Sapporo 062-8517 (Japan); Suzuki, Mamoru [Insititute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Miura, Ai [Functional Protein Research Group, Research Institute of Genome-based Biofactory, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2-17-2-1 Tsukisamu-Higashi, Toyohira, Sapporo 062-8517 (Japan); Tsuda, Sakae, E-mail: s.tsuda@aist.go.jp [Functional Protein Research Group, Research Institute of Genome-based Biofactory, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2-17-2-1 Tsukisamu-Higashi, Toyohira, Sapporo 062-8517 (Japan); Division of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, N8W5, Kita, Sapporo 060-0808 (Japan)

    2006-06-01

    Crystallization and X-ray data analyses were successful for both Ca{sup 2+}-independent and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent species of the type II antifreeze protein. The resolution of the crystal was 1.35 Å for the Ca{sup 2+}-independent species, and was 1.25 and 1.06 Å for the Ca{sup 2+}-dependent species in the Ca{sup 2+}-free and -bound states, respectively. Ca{sup 2+}-independent and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent species of the type II antifreeze protein (AFP) were both crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. It appeared that the crystal of the Ca{sup 2+}-independent species from Brachyosis rostratus belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 43.3, b = 48.4, c = 59.7 Å, and diffraction data were collected to 1.34 Å resolution. For the Ca{sup 2+}-dependent type II AFP species from Hypomesus nipponensis, crystallization was carried out for its Ca{sup 2+}-free and Ca{sup 2+}-bound states. 1.25 Å resolution data were collected from the crystal in the Ca{sup 2+}-free state, which exhibited P3{sub 1}21 (or P3{sub 2}21) symmetry, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 66.0, c = 50.3 Å. Data collection could be extended to 1.06 Å resolution for the crystal in the Ca{sup 2+} -bound state, which appeared to be isomorphous to the crystal in the Ca{sup 2+}-free state (unit-cell parameters a = b = 66.0, c = 49.8 Å). These data will allow us to determine the high-resolution structures of the two species of type II AFP.

  19. Unraveling the meaning of chemical shifts in protein NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berjanskii, Mark V; Wishart, David S

    2017-11-01

    Chemical shifts are among the most informative parameters in protein NMR. They provide wealth of information about protein secondary and tertiary structure, protein flexibility, and protein-ligand binding. In this report, we review the progress in interpreting and utilizing protein chemical shifts that has occurred over the past 25years, with a particular focus on the large body of work arising from our group and other Canadian NMR laboratories. More specifically, this review focuses on describing, assessing, and providing some historical context for various chemical shift-based methods to: (1) determine protein secondary and super-secondary structure; (2) derive protein torsion angles; (3) assess protein flexibility; (4) predict residue accessible surface area; (5) refine 3D protein structures; (6) determine 3D protein structures and (7) characterize intrinsically disordered proteins. This review also briefly covers some of the methods that we previously developed to predict chemical shifts from 3D protein structures and/or protein sequence data. It is hoped that this review will help to increase awareness of the considerable utility of NMR chemical shifts in structural biology and facilitate more widespread adoption of chemical-shift based methods by the NMR spectroscopists, structural biologists, protein biophysicists, and biochemists worldwide. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biophysics in Canada, edited by Lewis Kay, John Baenziger, Albert Berghuis and Peter Tieleman. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. NMR-based screening of membrane protein ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yanamala, Naveena; Dutta, Arpana; Beck, Barbara; Van Fleet, Bart; Hay, Kelly; Yazbak, Ahmad; Ishima, Rieko; Doemling, Alexander; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2010-01-01

    Membrane proteins pose problems for the application of NMR-based ligand-screening methods because of the need to maintain the proteins in a membrane mimetic environment such as detergent micelles: they add to the molecular weight of the protein, increase the viscosity of the solution, interact with

  1. Cell signaling, post-translational protein modifications and NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theillet, Francois-Xavier [In-cell NMR Group, Department of NMR-Supported Structural Biology, Leibniz Institute of Molecular Pharmacology (FMP Berlin) (Germany); Smet-Nocca, Caroline [Universite Lille Nord de France, CNRS UMR 8576 (France); Liokatis, Stamatios; Thongwichian, Rossukon; Kosten, Jonas [In-cell NMR Group, Department of NMR-Supported Structural Biology, Leibniz Institute of Molecular Pharmacology (FMP Berlin) (Germany); Yoon, Mi-Kyung; Kriwacki, Richard W. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Structural Biology (United States); Landrieu, Isabelle; Lippens, Guy [Universite Lille Nord de France, CNRS UMR 8576 (France); Selenko, Philipp, E-mail: selenko@fmp-berlin.de [In-cell NMR Group, Department of NMR-Supported Structural Biology, Leibniz Institute of Molecular Pharmacology (FMP Berlin) (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    Post-translationally modified proteins make up the majority of the proteome and establish, to a large part, the impressive level of functional diversity in higher, multi-cellular organisms. Most eukaryotic post-translational protein modifications (PTMs) denote reversible, covalent additions of small chemical entities such as phosphate-, acyl-, alkyl- and glycosyl-groups onto selected subsets of modifiable amino acids. In turn, these modifications induce highly specific changes in the chemical environments of individual protein residues, which are readily detected by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. In the following, we provide a concise compendium of NMR characteristics of the main types of eukaryotic PTMs: serine, threonine, tyrosine and histidine phosphorylation, lysine acetylation, lysine and arginine methylation, and serine, threonine O-glycosylation. We further delineate the previously uncharacterized NMR properties of lysine propionylation, butyrylation, succinylation, malonylation and crotonylation, which, altogether, define an initial reference frame for comprehensive PTM studies by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy.

  2. De novo protein structure determination using sparse NMR data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowers, Peter M.; Strauss, Charlie E.M.; Baker, David

    2000-01-01

    We describe a method for generating moderate to high-resolution protein structures using limited NMR data combined with the ab initio protein structure prediction method Rosetta. Peptide fragments are selected from proteins of known structure based on sequence similarity and consistency with chemical shift and NOE data. Models are built from these fragments by minimizing an energy function that favors hydrophobic burial, strand pairing, and satisfaction of NOE constraints. Models generated using this procedure with ∼1 NOE constraint per residue are in some cases closer to the corresponding X-ray structures than the published NMR solution structures. The method requires only the sparse constraints available during initial stages of NMR structure determination, and thus holds promise for increasing the speed with which protein solution structures can be determined

  3. NMR spectroscopy of muscle proteins; Spektroskopia MRJ bialek miesniowych

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slosarek, G. [Inst. Fizyki, Univ. A. Mickiewicza, Poznan (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    Author reviews various experimental techniques used for study of the structure of muscle proteins. Difficulties of application of NMR are described. Studies of the influence of Ca{sup 2+} on flexibility of actin polymer are presented. 11 refs, 3 figs.

  4. Efficient cellular solid-state NMR of membrane proteins by targeted protein labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, Lindsay A.; Daniëls, Mark; Cruijsen, Elwin A. W. van der; Folkers, Gert E.; Baldus, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy (ssNMR) has made significant progress towards the study of membrane proteins in their native cellular membranes. However, reduced spectroscopic sensitivity and high background signal levels can complicate these experiments. Here, we describe a method for ssNMR to specifically label a single protein by repressing endogenous protein expression with rifampicin. Our results demonstrate that treatment of E. coli with rifampicin during induction of recombinant membrane protein expression reduces background signals for different expression levels and improves sensitivity in cellular membrane samples. Further, the method reduces the amount of time and resources needed to produce membrane protein samples, enabling new strategies for studying challenging membrane proteins by ssNMR

  5. Carbohydrate-protein interactions: a 3D view by NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldós, Virginia; Cañada, F Javier; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús

    2011-05-02

    This review focuses on the application of NMR methods for understanding, at the molecular and atomic levels, the diverse mechanisms by which sugar molecules are recognised by the binding sites of lectins, antibodies and enzymes. Given the intrinsic chemical natures of sugars and their flexibility, it is well established that NMR parameters should be complemented by computational methods in attempts to unravel the structural and conformational features of the molecular recognition process unambiguously. We therefore aim here to describe new and significant advances in the knowledge of carbohydrate-protein interactions, obtained by employing state-of-the-art NMR and molecular modelling. We have not attempted to prepare an exhaustive review but have tried to focus on describing the key aspects that should be considered when tackling a problem within this research topic. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Contemporary NMR Studies of Protein Electrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, Mathias A S; Mulder, Frans A A

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatics play an important role in many aspects of protein chemistry. However, the accurate determination of side chain proton affinity in proteins by experiment and theory remains challenging. In recent years the field of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has advanced the way that protonation states are measured, allowing researchers to examine electrostatic interactions at an unprecedented level of detail and accuracy. Experiments are now in place that follow pH-dependent (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts as spatially close as possible to the sites of protonation, allowing all titratable amino acid side chains to be probed sequence specifically. The strong and telling response of carefully selected reporter nuclei allows individual titration events to be monitored. At the same time, improved frameworks allow researchers to model multiple coupled protonation equilibria and to identify the underlying pH-dependent contributions to the chemical shifts.

  7. Antifreeze glycoprotein agents: structural requirements for activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal-Rondanelli, Patricio A; Marshall, Sergio H; Guzman, Fanny

    2011-11-01

    Antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs) are considered to be the most efficient means to reduce ice damage to cell tissues since they are able to inhibit growth and crystallization of ice. The key element of antifreeze proteins is to act in a non-colligative manner which allows them to function at concentrations 300-500 times lowers than other dissolved solutes. During the past decade, AFGPs have demonstrated tremendous potential for many pharmaceutical and food applications. Presently, the only route to obtain AFGPs involves the time consuming and expensive process of isolation and purification from deep-sea polar fishes. Unfortunately, it is not amenable to mass production and commercial applications. The lack of understanding of the mechanism through which the AFGPs inhibit ice growth has also hampered the realization of industrial and biotechnological applications. Here we report the structural motifs that are essential for antifreeze activity of AFGPs, and propose a unified mechanism based on both recent studies of short alanine peptides and structure activity relationship of synthesized AFGPs. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Peakr: simulating solid-state NMR spectra of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Robert; Odronitz, Florian; Hammesfahr, Bjorn; Hellkamp, Marcel; Kollmar, Martin

    2013-01-01

    When analyzing solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of proteins, assignment of resonances to nuclei and derivation of restraints for 3D structure calculations are challenging and time-consuming processes. Simulated spectra that have been calculated based on, for example, chemical shift predictions and structural models can be of considerable help. Existing solutions are typically limited in the type of experiment they can consider and difficult to adapt to different settings. Here, we present Peakr, a software to simulate solid-state NMR spectra of proteins. It can generate simulated spectra based on numerous common types of internuclear correlations relevant for assignment and structure elucidation, can compare simulated and experimental spectra and produces lists and visualizations useful for analyzing measured spectra. Compared with other solutions, it is fast, versatile and user friendly. (authors)

  9. Stable transmission and transcription of newfoundland ocean pout type III fish antifreeze protein (AFP) gene in transgenic mice and hypothermic storage of transgenic ovary and testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagis, Haydar; Aktoprakligil, Digdem; Mercan, Hande Odaman; Yurdusev, Nevzat; Turgut, Gazi; Sekmen, Sakir; Arat, Sezen; Cetin, Seyfettin

    2006-11-01

    Here we describe the generation of transgenic mice carrying type III fish antifreeze protein (AFP) gene and evaluate whether AFP type III protects transgenic mouse ovaries and testes from hypothermic storage. AFPs exist in many different organisms. In fish, AFPs protect the host from freezing at temperatures below the colligative freezing point by adsorbing to the surface of nucleating ice crystals and inhibiting their growth. The transgenic expression of AFP holds great promise for conferring freeze-resistant plant and animal species. AFP also exhibits a potential for the cryopreservation of tissues and cells. In this study, we have generated 42 founder mice harboring the Newfoundland ocean pout (OP5A) type III AFP transgene and established one transgenic line (the line #6). This study demonstrated that AFP gene construct has been stably transmitted to the mouse progeny in the F3 generations in the line #6. Furthermore, the presence of AFP transcripts was confirmed by RT-PCR analysis on cDNAs from liver, kidney, ovarian, and testis tissues of the mouse from F3 generation in this line. These results indicate that ocean pout type III AFP gene could be integrated and transmitted to the next generation and stably transcribed in transgenic mice. In histological analysis of testis and ovarian tissues of nontransgenic control and AFP transgenic mice it has been shown that both tissues of AFP transgenic mice were protected from hypothermic storage (+4 degrees C). The AFP III transgenic mice obtained for the first time in this study would be useful for investigating the biological functions of AFP in mammalian systems and also its potential role in cryopreservation.

  10. NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneeland, J.B.; Lee, B.C.P.; Whalen, J.P.; Knowles, R.J.R.; Cahill, P.T.

    1984-01-01

    Although still quite new, NMR imaging has already emerged as a safe, noninvasive, painless, and effective diagnostic modality requiring no ionizing radiation. Also, NMR appears already to have established itself as the method of choice for the examination of the brain spinal cord (excluding herniated disks). Another area in which NMR excels is in the examination of the pelvis. The use of surface coils offers the promise of visualizing structures with resolution unobtainable by any other means. In addition, NMR, with its superb visualization of vascular structures and potential ability to measure flow, may soon revolutionize the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. Finally, NMR, through biochemically and physiologically based T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ indices or through spectroscopy, may provide a means of monitoring therapeutic response so as to permit tailoring of treatment to the individual patient. In short, NMR is today probably at the same stage as the x-ray was in Roentgen's day

  11. Testing antifreeze protein from the longhorn beetle Rhagium mordax as a kinetic gas hydrate inhibitor using a high-pressure micro differential scanning calorimeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daraboina, Nagu; Perfeldt, Christine Malmos; von Solms, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    pressure micro differential scanning calorimeter HP-mu DSC VII (Setaram Inc.) containing two 50 cc high pressure cells (maximum operating pressure 40 MPa; temperature range -40 to 120 degrees C) was employed to observe methane hydrate formation and decomposition in the presence of hyperactive antifreeze...

  12. Magic-Angle-Spinning Solid-State NMR of Membrane Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baker, Lindsay A.; Folkers, Gert E.; Sinnige, Tessa; Houben, Klaartje; Kaplan, M.; van der Cruijsen, Elwin A W; Baldus, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy (ssNMR) provides increasing possibilities to examine membrane proteins in different molecular settings, ranging from synthetic bilayers to whole cells. This flexibility often enables ssNMR experiments to be directly correlated with membrane protein function. In this

  13. Systematic comparison of crystal and NMR protein structures deposited in the protein data bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikic, Kresimir; Tomic, Sanja; Carugo, Oliviero

    2010-09-03

    Nearly all the macromolecular three-dimensional structures deposited in Protein Data Bank were determined by either crystallographic (X-ray) or Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopic methods. This paper reports a systematic comparison of the crystallographic and NMR results deposited in the files of the Protein Data Bank, in order to find out to which extent these information can be aggregated in bioinformatics. A non-redundant data set containing 109 NMR - X-ray structure pairs of nearly identical proteins was derived from the Protein Data Bank. A series of comparisons were performed by focusing the attention towards both global features and local details. It was observed that: (1) the RMDS values between NMR and crystal structures range from about 1.5 Å to about 2.5 Å; (2) the correlation between conformational deviations and residue type reveals that hydrophobic amino acids are more similar in crystal and NMR structures than hydrophilic amino acids; (3) the correlation between solvent accessibility of the residues and their conformational variability in solid state and in solution is relatively modest (correlation coefficient = 0.462); (4) beta strands on average match better between NMR and crystal structures than helices and loops; (5) conformational differences between loops are independent of crystal packing interactions in the solid state; (6) very seldom, side chains buried in the protein interior are observed to adopt different orientations in the solid state and in solution.

  14. Optimization of protein samples for NMR using thermal shift assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozak, Sandra [European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Hamburg Outstation, SPC Facility (Germany); Lercher, Lukas; Karanth, Megha N. [European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), SCB Unit (Germany); Meijers, Rob [European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Hamburg Outstation, SPC Facility (Germany); Carlomagno, Teresa, E-mail: teresa.carlomagno@oci.uni-hannover.de [European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), SCB Unit (Germany); Boivin, Stephane, E-mail: sboivin77@hotmail.com, E-mail: s.boivin@embl-hamburg.de [European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Hamburg Outstation, SPC Facility (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    Maintaining a stable fold for recombinant proteins is challenging, especially when working with highly purified and concentrated samples at temperatures >20 °C. Therefore, it is worthwhile to screen for different buffer components that can stabilize protein samples. Thermal shift assays or ThermoFluor{sup ®} provide a high-throughput screening method to assess the thermal stability of a sample under several conditions simultaneously. Here, we describe a thermal shift assay that is designed to optimize conditions for nuclear magnetic resonance studies, which typically require stable samples at high concentration and ambient (or higher) temperature. We demonstrate that for two challenging proteins, the multicomponent screen helped to identify ingredients that increased protein stability, leading to clear improvements in the quality of the spectra. Thermal shift assays provide an economic and time-efficient method to find optimal conditions for NMR structural studies.

  15. Improved viability and reduced apoptosis in sub-zero 21-hour preservation of transplanted rat hearts using anti-freeze proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Gabriel; Rubinsky, Boris; Basheer, Sheick Yousif; Horowitz, Liana; Jonathan, Leor; Feinberg, Micha S; Smolinsky, Aram K; Lavee, Jacob

    2005-11-01

    Freeze-tolerant fish survive sub-zero temperatures by non-colligatively lowering the freezing temperature of their body fluids using anti-freeze proteins (AFPs). We sought to evaluate and compare the effects of prolonged sub-zero cryopreservation of transplanted rat hearts using AFP I or AFP III. Two heterotopic rat heart transplantation protocols were used. In Protocol 1 (n = 104), hearts (n = 8/group) were preserved for 12, 18 and 24 hours in University of Wisconsin solution (UW) at 4 degrees C, UW at -1.3 degrees C, UW/AFP I at -1.3 degrees C and UW/AFP III at -1.3 degrees C, with and without nucleation. Post-operative evaluation consisted of visual viability scoring of the hearts after 60 minutes. Protocol 2 (n = 58) involved evaluation of 24-hour post-transplant viability, echocardiography (fractional shortening [FS], left ventricular end-systolic and -diastolic diameter [ESD, EDD] and anterior and posterior wall systolic and diastolic thickness [AWT-S, AWT-D, PWT-S, PWT-D]), TUNEL staining and electron microscopy (EM) findings for hearts preserved for 18, 21 and 24 hours in UW at 4 degrees C or UW/AFP III at -1.3 degrees C. Hearts preserved in UW at -1.3 degrees C with nucleation froze and died. Three of 8 hearts preserved in UW at 4 degrees C for 24 hours died, whereas all hearts preserved at -1.3 degrees C survived. Hearts preserved in UW/AFP for 18 and 24 hours at -1.3 degrees C had superior viability scores compared with those in UW at 4 degrees C. Hearts in AFP III at -1.3 degrees C displayed greater AWT-S and AWT-D (3.5 +/- 0.2 vs 2.4 +/- 0.2, p hour preservation. In the 21-hour preservation group, AFP-treated hearts displayed improved echocardiographic systolic contraction indices, including: improved FS (27 +/- 3.7 vs 15 +/- 4, p = 0.04); diminished ESD (0.28 +/- 0.57 vs 0.47 +/- 0.6, p zero cryopreservation, AFPs protect the heart from freezing, improve survival and hemodynamics, and reduce apoptotic cell death.

  16. Hydration layer dynamics and association mechanisms of food and antifreeze proteins : A Molecular Dynamics and Transition Path Sampling study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brotzakis, Z.F.

    2017-01-01

    By the time the reader reads this line, billions of protein association events just occurred in our body, such as the ones regulating cell communication, signaling pathways, or in initiating a self-assembly processes, such as tissue fabrication, etc. The timescale of such transitions is slow,

  17. Efficient protein production method for NMR using soluble protein tags with cold shock expression vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kokoro; Kojima, Chojiro

    2010-01-01

    The E. coli protein expression system is one of the most useful methods employed for NMR sample preparation. However, the production of some recombinant proteins in E. coli is often hampered by difficulties such as low expression level and low solubility. To address these problems, a modified cold-shock expression system containing a glutathione S-transferase (GST) tag, the pCold-GST system, was investigated. The pCold-GST system successfully expressed 9 out of 10 proteins that otherwise could not be expressed using a conventional E. coli expression system. Here, we applied the pCold-GST system to 84 proteins and 78 proteins were successfully expressed in the soluble fraction. Three other cold-shock expression systems containing a maltose binding protein tag (pCold-MBP), protein G B1 domain tag (pCold-GB1) or thioredoxin tag (pCold-Trx) were also developed to improve the yield. Additionally, we show that a C-terminal proline tag, which is invisible in 1 H- 15 N HSQC spectra, inhibits protein degradation and increases the final yield of unstable proteins. The purified proteins were amenable to NMR analyses. These data suggest that pCold expression systems combined with soluble protein tags can be utilized to improve the expression and purification of various proteins for NMR analysis.

  18. Real-time protein NMR spectroscopy and investigation of assisted protein folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Balbach, Jochen

    2015-10-01

    During protein-folding reactions toward the native structure, short-lived intermediate states can be populated. Such intermediates expose hydrophobic patches and can self-associate leading to non-productive protein misfolding. A major focus of current research is the characterization of short-lived intermediates and how molecular chaperones enable productive folding. Real-time NMR spectroscopy, together with the development of advanced methods, is reviewed here and the potential these methods have to characterize intermediate states as well as interactions with molecular chaperone proteins at single-residue resolution is highlighted. Various chaperone interactions can guide the protein-folding reaction and thus are important for protein structure formation, stability, and activity of their substrates. Chaperone-assisted protein folding, characterization of intermediates, and their molecular interactions using real-time NMR spectroscopy will be discussed. Additionally, recent advances in NMR methods employed for characterization of high-energy intermediates will be discussed. Real-time NMR combines high resolution with kinetic information of protein reactions, which can be employed not only for protein-folding studies and the characterization of folding intermediates but also to investigate the molecular mechanisms of assisted protein folding. Real-time NMR spectroscopy remains an effective tool to reveal structural details about the interaction between chaperones and transient intermediates. Methodologically, it provides in-depth understanding of how kinetic intermediates and their thermodynamics contribute to the protein-folding reaction. This review summarizes the most recent advances in this field. This article is part of a Special Issue titled Proline-directed Foldases: Cell Signaling Catalysts and Drug Targets. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Protein NMR Structure Refinement based on Bayesian Inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeya, Teppei; Ikeda, Shiro; Kigawa, Takanori; Ito, Yutaka; Güntert, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a tool to investigate threedimensional (3D) structures and dynamics of biomacromolecules at atomic resolution in solution or more natural environments such as living cells. Since NMR data are principally only spectra with peak signals, it is required to properly deduce structural information from the sparse experimental data with their imperfections and uncertainty, and to visualize 3D conformations by NMR structure calculation. In order to efficiently analyse the data, Rieping et al. proposed a new structure calculation method based on Bayes’ theorem. We implemented a similar approach into the program CYANA with some modifications. It allows us to handle automatic NOE cross peak assignments in unambiguous and ambiguous usages, and to create a prior distribution based on a physical force field with the generalized Born implicit water model. The sampling scheme for obtaining the posterior is performed by a hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm combined with Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) by the Gibbs sampler, and molecular dynamics simulation (MD) for obtaining a canonical ensemble of conformations. Since it is not trivial to search the entire function space particularly for exploring the conformational prior due to the extraordinarily large conformation space of proteins, the replica exchange method is performed, in which several MCMC calculations with different temperatures run in parallel as replicas. It is shown with simulated data or randomly deleted experimental peaks that the new structure calculation method can provide accurate structures even with less peaks, especially compared with the conventional method. In particular, it dramatically improves in-cell structures of the proteins GB1 and TTHA1718 using exclusively information obtained in living Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells.

  20. A probabilistic approach for validating protein NMR chemical shift assignments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bowei; Wang, Yunjun; Wishart, David S.

    2010-01-01

    It has been estimated that more than 20% of the proteins in the BMRB are improperly referenced and that about 1% of all chemical shift assignments are mis-assigned. These statistics also reflect the likelihood that any newly assigned protein will have shift assignment or shift referencing errors. The relatively high frequency of these errors continues to be a concern for the biomolecular NMR community. While several programs do exist to detect and/or correct chemical shift mis-referencing or chemical shift mis-assignments, most can only do one, or the other. The one program (SHIFTCOR) that is capable of handling both chemical shift mis-referencing and mis-assignments, requires the 3D structure coordinates of the target protein. Given that chemical shift mis-assignments and chemical shift re-referencing issues should ideally be addressed prior to 3D structure determination, there is a clear need to develop a structure-independent approach. Here, we present a new structure-independent protocol, which is based on using residue-specific and secondary structure-specific chemical shift distributions calculated over small (3-6 residue) fragments to identify mis-assigned resonances. The method is also able to identify and re-reference mis-referenced chemical shift assignments. Comparisons against existing re-referencing or mis-assignment detection programs show that the method is as good or superior to existing approaches. The protocol described here has been implemented into a freely available Java program called 'Probabilistic Approach for protein Nmr Assignment Validation (PANAV)' and as a web server (http://redpoll.pharmacy.ualberta.ca/PANAVhttp://redpoll.pharmacy.ualberta.ca/PANAV) which can be used to validate and/or correct as well as re-reference assigned protein chemical shifts.

  1. Effects of NMR spectral resolution on protein structure calculation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhas Tikole

    Full Text Available Adequate digital resolution and signal sensitivity are two critical factors for protein structure determinations by solution NMR spectroscopy. The prime objective for obtaining high digital resolution is to resolve peak overlap, especially in NOESY spectra with thousands of signals where the signal analysis needs to be performed on a large scale. Achieving maximum digital resolution is usually limited by the practically available measurement time. We developed a method utilizing non-uniform sampling for balancing digital resolution and signal sensitivity, and performed a large-scale analysis of the effect of the digital resolution on the accuracy of the resulting protein structures. Structure calculations were performed as a function of digital resolution for about 400 proteins with molecular sizes ranging between 5 and 33 kDa. The structural accuracy was assessed by atomic coordinate RMSD values from the reference structures of the proteins. In addition, we monitored also the number of assigned NOESY cross peaks, the average signal sensitivity, and the chemical shift spectral overlap. We show that high resolution is equally important for proteins of every molecular size. The chemical shift spectral overlap depends strongly on the corresponding spectral digital resolution. Thus, knowing the extent of overlap can be a predictor of the resulting structural accuracy. Our results show that for every molecular size a minimal digital resolution, corresponding to the natural linewidth, needs to be achieved for obtaining the highest accuracy possible for the given protein size using state-of-the-art automated NOESY assignment and structure calculation methods.

  2. (S)Pinning down protein interactions by NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Kaare; Kunze, Micha Ben Achim; Erlendsson, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Protein molecules are highly diverse communication platforms and their interaction repertoire stretches from atoms over small molecules such as sugars and lipids to macromolecules. An important route to understanding molecular communication is to quantitatively describe their interactions....... These types of analyses determine the amounts and proportions of individual constituents that participate in a reaction as well as their rates of reactions and their thermodynamics. Although many different methods are available, there is currently no single method able to quantitatively capture and describe...... all types of protein reactions, which can span orders of magnitudes in affinities, reaction rates and lifetimes of states. As the more versatile technique, solution NMR spectroscopy offers a remarkable catalogue of methods that can be successfully applied to the quantitative as well as qualitative...

  3. Optimizing ssNMR experiments for dilute proteins in heterogeneous mixtures at high magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, Seth A; Gor'kov, Peter L; Struppe, Jochem; Brey, William W; Long, Joanna R

    2007-12-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy at high magnetic fields is proving to be an effective technique in structural biology, particularly for proteins which are not amenable to traditional X-ray and solution NMR approaches. Several parameters can be selected to provide optimal sensitivity, improve sample stability, and ensure biological relevance for ssNMR measurements on protein samples. These include selection of sample conditions, NMR probe design, and design of pulse experiments. Here, we demonstrate and evaluate several engineering and experimental approaches for pursuing measurements on dilute proteins in heterogeneous mixtures. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. NMR Structure of the Myristylated Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Matrix Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lola A. Brown

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2 is mediated by Gag’s N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV, a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S. These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly.

  5. NMR Structure of the Myristylated Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Matrix Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lola A.; Cox, Cassiah; Baptiste, Janae; Summers, Holly; Button, Ryan; Bahlow, Kennedy; Spurrier, Vaughn; Kyser, Jenna; Luttge, Benjamin G.; Kuo, Lillian; Freed, Eric O.; Summers, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2) is mediated by Gag’s N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA) domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S). These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-)MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5)P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly. PMID:25941825

  6. Synthetic antifreeze peptide and synthetic gene coding for its production

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    A synthetic antifreeze peptide and a synthetic gene coding for the antifreeze peptide have been produced. The antifreeze peptide has a greater number of repeating amino acid sequences than is present in the native antifreeze peptides from winter flounder upon which the synthetic antifreeze peptide was modeled. Each repeating amino acid sequence has two polar amino acid residues which are spaced a controlled distance apart so that the antifreeze peptide may inhibit ice formation. The synthetic...

  7. Antifreeze life cycle assessment (LCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesić Jelena

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Antifreeze based on ethylene glycol is a commonly used commercial product The classification of ethylene glycol as a toxic material increased the disposal costs for used antifreeze and life cycle assessment became a necessity. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA considers the identification and quantification of raw materials and energy inputs and waste outputs during the whole life cycle of the analyzed product. The objectives of LCA are the evaluation of impacts on the environment and improvements of processes in order to reduce and/or eliminate waste. LCA is conducted through a mathematical model derived from mass and energy balances of all the processes included in the life cycle. In all energy processes the part of energy that can be transformed into some other kind of energy is called exergy. The concept of exergy considers the quality of different types of energy and the quality of different materials. It is also a connection between energy and mass transformations. The whole life cycle can be described by the value of the total loss of exergy. The physical meaning of this value is the loss of material and energy that can be used. The results of LCA are very useful for the analyzed products and processes and for the determined conditions under which the analysis was conducted. The results of this study indicate that recycling is the most satisfactory solution for the treatment of used antifreeze regarding material and energy consumption but the re-use of antifreeze should not be neglected as a solution.

  8. PDBStat: a universal restraint converter and restraint analysis software package for protein NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tejero, Roberto; Snyder, David; Mao, Binchen; Aramini, James M.; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2013-01-01

    The heterogeneous array of software tools used in the process of protein NMR structure determination presents organizational challenges in the structure determination and validation processes, and creates a learning curve that limits the broader use of protein NMR in biology. These challenges, including accurate use of data in different data formats required by software carrying out similar tasks, continue to confound the efforts of novices and experts alike. These important issues need to be addressed robustly in order to standardize protein NMR structure determination and validation. PDBStat is a C/C++ computer program originally developed as a universal coordinate and protein NMR restraint converter. Its primary function is to provide a user-friendly tool for interconverting between protein coordinate and protein NMR restraint data formats. It also provides an integrated set of computational methods for protein NMR restraint analysis and structure quality assessment, relabeling of prochiral atoms with correct IUPAC names, as well as multiple methods for analysis of the consistency of atomic positions indicated by their convergence across a protein NMR ensemble. In this paper we provide a detailed description of the PDBStat software, and highlight some of its valuable computational capabilities. As an example, we demonstrate the use of the PDBStat restraint converter for restrained CS-Rosetta structure generation calculations, and compare the resulting protein NMR structure models with those generated from the same NMR restraint data using more traditional structure determination methods. These results demonstrate the value of a universal restraint converter in allowing the use of multiple structure generation methods with the same restraint data for consensus analysis of protein NMR structures and the underlying restraint data

  9. Selectively Labeling the Heterologous Protein in Escherichia coli for NMR Studies: A Strategy to Speed Up NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, F. C. L.; Amorim, G. C.; Moreau, V. H.; Sousa, V. O.; Creazola, A. T.; Américo, T. A.; Pais, A. P. N.; Leite, A.; Netto, L. E. S.; Giordano, R. J.; Valente, A. P.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is an important tool for high-resolution structural studies of proteins. It demands high protein concentration and high purity; however, the expression of proteins at high levels often leads to protein aggregation and the protein purification step can correspond to a high percentage of the overall time in the structural determination process. In the present article we show that the step of sample optimization can be simplified by selective labeling the heterologous protein expressed in Escherichia coli by the use of rifampicin. Yeast thioredoxin and a coix transcription factor Opaque 2 leucine zipper (LZ) were used to show the effectiveness of the protocol. The 1H/15N heteronuclear correlation two-dimensional NMR spectrum (HMQC) of the selective 15N-labeled thioredoxin without any purification is remarkably similar to the spectrum of the purified protein. The method has high yields and a good 1H/15N HMQC spectrum can be obtained with 50 ml of M9 growth medium. Opaque 2 LZ, a difficult protein due to the lower expression level and high hydrophobicity, was also probed. The 15N-edited spectrum of Opaque 2 LZ showed only the resonances of the protein of heterologous expression (Opaque 2 LZ) while the 1H spectrum shows several other resonances from other proteins of the cell lysate. The demand for a fast methodology for structural determination is increasing with the advent of genome/proteome projects. Selective labeling the heterologous protein can speed up NMR structural studies as well as NMR-based drug screening. This methodology is especially effective for difficult proteins such as hydrophobic transcription factors, membrane proteins, and others.

  10. Determination of the Electron Self-Exchange Rates of Blue Copper Proteins by Super-WEFT NMR Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Lixin; Philipp, Else Astrid; Led, Jens J.

    2001-01-01

    Anabaena variabilis plastocyanin, blue copper proteins, electron self-exchange rates, electron transfer, super-WEFT NMR......Anabaena variabilis plastocyanin, blue copper proteins, electron self-exchange rates, electron transfer, super-WEFT NMR...

  11. Backbone NMR assignment of a hypothetical protein MJ0754 from Methanococcus jannaschii DSM 2661

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang Yeon Hwang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available MJ0754 is an unknown hypothetical protein from hyperthermophilic archaeon Methanococcus jannaschii DSM 2661. Here we report the protein purification and NMR spectroscopic study of the N-terminal deleted truncated form of recombinant MJ0754 protein (Δ10-MJ0754. We aquired 3D NMR spectra and assigned all the backbone chemical shifts including Cα, Cβ, CO, HN, and N of Δ10-MJ0754. The secondary structure of Δ10-MJ0754 was estimated from the assigned backbone chemical shifts. This NMR result is very useful for further structural and functional study of MJ0754 protein.

  12. Solid-state NMR analysis of membrane proteins and protein aggregates by proton detected spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Donghua H.; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Berthold, Deborah A.; Comellas, Gemma; Sperling, Lindsay J.; Tang, Ming; Shah, Gautam J.; Brea, Elliott J.; Lemkau, Luisel R.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state NMR has emerged as an important tool for structural biology and chemistry, capable of solving atomic-resolution structures for proteins in membrane-bound and aggregated states. Proton detection methods have been recently realized under fast magic-angle spinning conditions, providing large sensitivity enhancements for efficient examination of uniformly labeled proteins. The first and often most challenging step of protein structure determination by NMR is the site-specific resonance assignment. Here we demonstrate resonance assignments based on high-sensitivity proton-detected three-dimensional experiments for samples of different physical states, including a fully-protonated small protein (GB1, 6 kDa), a deuterated microcrystalline protein (DsbA, 21 kDa), a membrane protein (DsbB, 20 kDa) prepared in a lipid environment, and the extended core of a fibrillar protein (α-synuclein, 14 kDa). In our implementation of these experiments, including CONH, CO(CA)NH, CANH, CA(CO)NH, CBCANH, and CBCA(CO)NH, dipolar-based polarization transfer methods have been chosen for optimal efficiency for relatively high protonation levels (full protonation or 100 % amide proton), fast magic-angle spinning conditions (40 kHz) and moderate proton decoupling power levels. Each H–N pair correlates exclusively to either intra- or inter-residue carbons, but not both, to maximize spectral resolution. Experiment time can be reduced by at least a factor of 10 by using proton detection in comparison to carbon detection. These high-sensitivity experiments are especially important for membrane proteins, which often have rather low expression yield. Proton-detection based experiments are expected to play an important role in accelerating protein structure elucidation by solid-state NMR with the improved sensitivity and resolution.

  13. A nonprotein thermal hysteresis-producing xylomannan antifreeze in the freeze-tolerant Alaskan beetle Upis ceramboides

    OpenAIRE

    Walters, Kent R.; Serianni, Anthony S.; Sformo, Todd; Barnes, Brian M.; Duman, John G.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal hysteresis (TH), a difference between the melting and freezing points of a solution that is indicative of the presence of large-molecular-mass antifreezes (e.g., antifreeze proteins), has been described in animals, plants, bacteria, and fungi. Although all previously described TH-producing biomolecules are proteins, most thermal hysteresis factors (THFs) have not yet been structurally characterized, and none have been characterized from a freeze-tolerant animal. We isolated a highly a...

  14. SPINS: Standardized ProteIn NMR Storage. A data dictionary and object-oriented relational database for archiving protein NMR spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baran, Michael C.; Moseley, Hunter N.B.; Sahota, Gurmukh; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2002-01-01

    Modern protein NMR spectroscopy laboratories have a rapidly growing need for an easily queried local archival system of raw experimental NMR datasets. SPINS (Standardized ProteIn Nmr Storage) is an object-oriented relational database that provides facilities for high-volume NMR data archival, organization of analyses, and dissemination of results to the public domain by automatic preparation of the header files required for submission of data to the BioMagResBank (BMRB). The current version of SPINS coordinates the process from data collection to BMRB deposition of raw NMR data by standardizing and integrating the storage and retrieval of these data in a local laboratory file system. Additional facilities include a data mining query tool, graphical database administration tools, and a NMRStar v2.1.1 file generator. SPINS also includes a user-friendly internet-based graphical user interface, which is optionally integrated with Varian VNMR NMR data collection software. This paper provides an overview of the data model underlying the SPINS database system, a description of its implementation in Oracle, and an outline of future plans for the SPINS project

  15. A tracked approach for automated NMR assignments in proteins (TATAPRO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atreya, H.S.; Sahu, S.C.; Chary, K.V.R.; Govil, Girjesh [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Department of Chemical Sciences (India)

    2000-06-15

    A novel automated approach for the sequence specific NMR assignments of {sup 1}H{sup N}, {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}, {sup 13}C{sup {beta}}, {sup 13}C'/{sup 1}H{sup {alpha}} and {sup 15}N spins in proteins, using triple resonance experimental data, is presented. The algorithm, TATAPRO (Tracked AuTomated Assignments in Proteins) utilizes the protein primary sequence and peak lists from a set of triple resonance spectra which correlate {sup 1}H{sup N} and {sup 15}N chemical shifts with those of {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}, {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} and {sup 13}C'/{sup 1}H{sup {alpha}}. The information derived from such correlations is used to create a 'master{sub l}ist' consisting of all possible sets of {sup 1}H{sup N}{sub i}, {sup 15}N{sub i}, {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}{sub i}, {sup 13}C{sup {beta}}{sub i}, {sup 13}C'{sub i}/{sup 1}H{sup {alpha}}{sub i}, {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}{sub i-1}, {sup 13}C{sup {beta}}{sub i-1} and {sup 13}C'{sub i-1}/ {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}}{sub i-1} chemical shifts. On the basis of an extensive statistical analysis of {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shift data of proteins derived from the BioMagResBank (BMRB), it is shown that the 20 amino acid residues can be grouped into eight distinct categories, each of which is assigned a unique two-digit code. Such a code is used to tag individual sets of chemical shifts in the master{sub l}ist and also to translate the protein primary sequence into an array called pps{sub a}rray. The program then uses the master{sub l}ist to search for neighbouring partners of a given amino acid residue along the polypeptide chain and sequentially assigns a maximum possible stretch of residues on either side. While doing so, each assigned residue is tracked in an array called assig{sub a}rray, with the two-digit code assigned earlier. The assig{sub a}rray is then mapped onto the pps{sub a}rray for sequence specific resonance assignment. The program has been tested using

  16. Improving NMR protein structure quality by Rosetta refinement: a molecular replacement study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramelot, Theresa A; Raman, Srivatsan; Kuzin, Alexandre P; Xiao, Rong; Ma, Li-Chung; Acton, Thomas B; Hunt, John F; Montelione, Gaetano T; Baker, David; Kennedy, Michael A

    2009-04-01

    The structure of human protein HSPC034 has been determined by both solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. Refinement of the NMR structure ensemble, using a Rosetta protocol in the absence of NMR restraints, resulted in significant improvements not only in structure quality, but also in molecular replacement (MR) performance with the raw X-ray diffraction data using MOLREP and Phaser. This method has recently been shown to be generally applicable with improved MR performance demonstrated for eight NMR structures refined using Rosetta (Qian et al., Nature 2007;450:259-264). Additionally, NMR structures of HSPC034 calculated by standard methods that include NMR restraints have improvements in the RMSD to the crystal structure and MR performance in the order DYANA, CYANA, XPLOR-NIH, and CNS with explicit water refinement (CNSw). Further Rosetta refinement of the CNSw structures, perhaps due to more thorough conformational sampling and/or a superior force field, was capable of finding alternative low energy protein conformations that were equally consistent with the NMR data according to the Recall, Precision, and F-measure (RPF) scores. On further examination, the additional MR-performance shortfall for NMR refined structures as compared with the X-ray structure were attributed, in part, to crystal-packing effects, real structural differences, and inferior hydrogen bonding in the NMR structures. A good correlation between a decrease in the number of buried unsatisfied hydrogen-bond donors and improved MR performance demonstrates the importance of hydrogen-bond terms in the force field for improving NMR structures. The superior hydrogen-bond network in Rosetta-refined structures demonstrates that correct identification of hydrogen bonds should be a critical goal of NMR structure refinement. Inclusion of nonbivalent hydrogen bonds identified from Rosetta structures as additional restraints in the structure calculation results in

  17. (3,2)D GFT-NMR experiments for fast data collection from proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Youlin; Zhu Guang; Veeraraghavan, Sudha; Gao Xiaolian

    2004-01-01

    High throughput structure determination of proteins will contribute to the success of proteomics investigations. The G-Matrix Fourier Transformation NMR (GFT-NMR) method significantly shortens experimental time by reducing the number of the dimensions of data acquisition for isotopically labeled proteins (Kim, S. and Szyperski, T. (2003) J. Am. Chem. Soc.125, 1385). We demonstrate herein a suite of ten 3D → 2D or (3,2)D GFT-NMR experiments using 13 C/ 15 N-labeled ubiquitin. These experiments were completed within 18 hours, representing a 4- to 18-fold reduction in data acquisition time compared to the corresponding conventional 3D experiments. A subset of the GFT-NMR experiments, (3,2)D HNCO, HNCACB, HN(CO)CACB, and 2D 1 H- 15 N HSQC, which are necessary for backbone assignments, were carried out within 6 hours. To facilitate the analysis of the GFT-NMR spectra, we developed automated procedures for viewing and analyzing the GFT-NMR spectra. Our overall strategy allows (3,2)D GFT-NMR experiments to be readily performed and analyzed. Nevertheless, the increase in spectral overlap and the reduction in signal sensitivity in these fast NMR experiments presently limit their application to relatively small proteins

  18. The eigenmode perspective of NMR spin relaxation in proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, Yury E., E-mail: shapiro@nmrsgi4.ls.biu.ac.il, E-mail: eva.meirovitch@biu.ac.il; Meirovitch, Eva, E-mail: shapiro@nmrsgi4.ls.biu.ac.il, E-mail: eva.meirovitch@biu.ac.il [The Mina and Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900-02 (Israel)

    2013-12-14

    We developed in recent years the two-body (protein and probe) coupled-rotator slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) approach for elucidating protein dynamics from NMR spin relaxation. So far we used as descriptors the set of physical parameters that enter the SRLS model. They include the global (protein-related) diffusion tensor, D{sub 1}, the local (probe-related) diffusion tensor, D{sub 2}, and the local coupling/ordering potential, u. As common in analyzes based on mesoscopic dynamic models, these parameters have been determined with data-fitting techniques. In this study, we describe structural dynamics in terms of the eigenmodes comprising the SRLS time correlation functions (TCFs) generated by using the best-fit parameters as input to the Smoluchowski equation. An eigenmode is a weighted exponential with decay constant given by an eigenvalue of the Smoluchowski operator, and weighting factor determined by the corresponding eigenvector. Obviously, both quantities depend on the SRLS parameters as determined by the SRLS model. Unlike the set of best-fit parameters, the eigenmodes represent patterns of motion of the probe-protein system. The following new information is obtained for the typical probe, the {sup 15}N−{sup 1}H bond. Two eigenmodes, associated with the protein and the probe, dominate when the time scale separation is large (i.e., D{sub 2} ≫ D{sub 1}), the tensorial properties are simple, and the local potential is either very strong or very weak. When the potential exceeds these limits while the remaining conditions are preserved, new eigenmodes arise. The multi-exponentiality of the TCFs is associated in this case with the restricted nature of the local motion. When the time scale separation is no longer large, the rotational degrees of freedom of the protein and the probe become statistically dependent (coupled dynamically). The multi-exponentiality of the TCFs is associated in this case with the restricted nature of both the local and the

  19. The eigenmode perspective of NMR spin relaxation in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Yury E.; Meirovitch, Eva

    2013-12-01

    We developed in recent years the two-body (protein and probe) coupled-rotator slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) approach for elucidating protein dynamics from NMR spin relaxation. So far we used as descriptors the set of physical parameters that enter the SRLS model. They include the global (protein-related) diffusion tensor, D1, the local (probe-related) diffusion tensor, D2, and the local coupling/ordering potential, u. As common in analyzes based on mesoscopic dynamic models, these parameters have been determined with data-fitting techniques. In this study, we describe structural dynamics in terms of the eigenmodes comprising the SRLS time correlation functions (TCFs) generated by using the best-fit parameters as input to the Smoluchowski equation. An eigenmode is a weighted exponential with decay constant given by an eigenvalue of the Smoluchowski operator, and weighting factor determined by the corresponding eigenvector. Obviously, both quantities depend on the SRLS parameters as determined by the SRLS model. Unlike the set of best-fit parameters, the eigenmodes represent patterns of motion of the probe-protein system. The following new information is obtained for the typical probe, the 15N-1H bond. Two eigenmodes, associated with the protein and the probe, dominate when the time scale separation is large (i.e., D2 ≫ D1), the tensorial properties are simple, and the local potential is either very strong or very weak. When the potential exceeds these limits while the remaining conditions are preserved, new eigenmodes arise. The multi-exponentiality of the TCFs is associated in this case with the restricted nature of the local motion. When the time scale separation is no longer large, the rotational degrees of freedom of the protein and the probe become statistically dependent (coupled dynamically). The multi-exponentiality of the TCFs is associated in this case with the restricted nature of both the local and the global motion. The effects of local

  20. In-cell NMR spectroscopy of proteins inside Xenopus laevis oocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Tomomi; Tochio, Hidehito; Tenno, Takeshi; Ito, Yutaka; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Hiroaki, Hidekazu; Shirakawa, Masahiro

    2006-01-01

    In-cell NMR is an application of solution NMR that enables the investigation of protein conformations inside living cells. We have measured in-cell NMR spectra in oocytes from the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis. 15 N-labeled ubiquitin, its derivatives and calmodulin were injected into Xenopus oocytes and two-dimensional 1 H- 15 N correlation spectra of the proteins were obtained. While the spectrum of wild-type ubiquitin in oocytes had rather fewer cross-peaks compared to its in vitro spectrum, ubiquitin derivatives that are presumably unable to bind to ubiquitin-interacting proteins gave a markedly larger number of cross-peaks. This observation suggests that protein-protein interactions between ubiquitin and ubiquitin-interacting proteins may cause NMR signal broadening, and hence spoil the quality of the in-cell HSQC spectra. In addition, we observed the maturation of ubiquitin precursor derivative in living oocytes using the in-cell NMR technique. This process was partly inhibited by pre-addition of ubiquitin aldehyde, a specific inhibitor for ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase (UCH). Our work demonstrates the potential usefulness of in-cell NMR with Xenopus oocytes for the investigation of protein conformations and functions under intracellular environmental conditions

  1. Riboflavin synthase of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Protein dynamics revealed by 19F NMR protein perturbation experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cushman Mark

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Riboflavin synthase catalyzes the transformation of 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine into riboflavin in the last step of the riboflavin biosynthetic pathway. Gram-negative bacteria and certain yeasts are unable to incorporate riboflavin from the environment and are therefore absolutely dependent on endogenous synthesis of the vitamin. Riboflavin synthase is therefore a potential target for the development of antiinfective drugs. Results A cDNA sequence from Schizosaccharomyces pombe comprising a hypothetical open reading frame with similarity to riboflavin synthase of Escherichia coli was expressed in a recombinant E. coli strain. The recombinant protein is a homotrimer of 23 kDa subunits as shown by sedimentation equilibrium centrifugation. The protein sediments at an apparent velocity of 4.1 S at 20°C. The amino acid sequence is characterized by internal sequence similarity indicating two similar folding domains per subunit. The enzyme catalyzes the formation of riboflavin from 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine at a rate of 158 nmol mg-1 min-1 with an apparent KM of 5.7 microM. 19F NMR protein perturbation experiments using fluorine-substituted intermediate analogs show multiple signals indicating that a given ligand can be bound in at least 4 different states. 19F NMR signals of enzyme-bound intermediate analogs were assigned to ligands bound by the N-terminal respectively C-terminal folding domain on basis of NMR studies with mutant proteins. Conclusion Riboflavin synthase of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is a trimer of identical 23-kDa subunits. The primary structure is characterized by considerable similarity of the C-terminal and N-terminal parts. Riboflavin synthase catalyzes a mechanistically complex dismutation of 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine affording riboflavin and 5-amino-6-ribitylamino-2,4(1H,3H-pyrimidinedione. The 19F NMR data suggest large scale dynamic mobility in the trimeric protein which may play an important

  2. Uniform and selective deuteration in two-dimensional NMR of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeMaster, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the practicality of isotopic labeling, particularly deuteration, that has received considerable impetus from advances in molecular biology, which have allowed ready production of NMR quantities of labeled proteins. Protein expression in Escherichia coli allows use of the considerable metabolic genetics known for the organism in shaping the biosynthetic process to meet the labeling demands of the NMR experiments. In addition to deuteration's common use in spectral assignment problems, it also offers considerable potential for enhancing the quality of the nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) distance and dihedral angle constraints used for solution structural analysis of proteins. Recent reviews emphasize the sample preparation and spectral benefits of protein deuteration

  3. [Antifreeze glycoproteins in fishes: structure, mode of action and possible applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöhrmann, A

    1996-02-01

    Two types of antifreezes have been isolated from polar and northern temperate fishes so far. They are either glycopeptides or peptides. Whereas these proteins have only a very small effect on the melting temperature of ice, the temperature of these fish can fall to nearly 1 degree below the melting point before ice crystals grow. This phenomenon is called thermal hysteresis, in contrast to the normal colligative effect of solutes. All Antarctic notothenioids (perches) investigated so far have the typical antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGP) with the tripeptide Ala-Ala-Thr and the disaccharide Gal-GalNAc. In the Antarctic silverfish Pleuragramma antarcticum there could be found a novel GlcNAc containing antifreeze glycoprotein, the PAGP. The antifreezes not only lower the freezing temperature, but they also retard recrystallization on frozen storage. Antifreeze proteins thus could be useful for biotechnology and cryomedicine in the future. Since some are now synthesized chemically or by genetic engineering, they no longer have to be isolated from fish blood.

  4. Differential Epitope Mapping by STD NMR Spectroscopy To Reveal the Nature of Protein-Ligand Contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, Serena; Tailford, Louise E; Juge, Nathalie; Angulo, Jesus

    2017-11-27

    Saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy is extensively used to obtain epitope maps of ligands binding to protein receptors, thereby revealing structural details of the interaction, which is key to direct lead optimization efforts in drug discovery. However, it does not give information about the nature of the amino acids surrounding the ligand in the binding pocket. Herein, we report the development of the novel method differential epitope mapping by STD NMR (DEEP-STD NMR) for identifying the type of protein residues contacting the ligand. The method produces differential epitope maps through 1) differential frequency STD NMR and/or 2) differential solvent (D 2 O/H 2 O) STD NMR experiments. The two approaches provide different complementary information on the binding pocket. We demonstrate that DEEP-STD NMR can be used to readily obtain pharmacophore information on the protein. Furthermore, if the 3D structure of the protein is known, this information also helps in orienting the ligand in the binding pocket. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  5. STD-NMR-Based Protein Engineering of the Unique Arylpropionate-Racemase AMDase G74C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaßmeyer, Sarah Katharina; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Enoki, Junichi; Hülsemann, Nadine; Stoll, Raphael; Miyamoto, Kenji; Kourist, Robert

    2015-06-23

    Structure-guided protein engineering achieved a variant of the unique racemase AMDase G74C, with 40-fold increased activity in the racemisation of several arylaliphatic carboxylic acids. Substrate binding during catalysis was investigated by saturation-transfer-difference NMR (STD-NMR) spectroscopy. All atoms of the substrate showed interactions with the enzyme. STD-NMR measurements revealed distinct nuclear Overhauser effects in experiments with and without molecular conversion. The spectroscopic analysis led to the identification of several amino acid residues whose substitutions increased the activity of G74C. Single amino acid exchanges increased the activity moderately; structure-guided saturation mutagenesis yielded a quadruple mutant with a 40 times higher reaction rate. This study presents STD-NMR as versatile tool for the analysis of enzyme-substrate interactions in catalytically competent systems and for the guidance of protein engineering. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Protein-observed (19)F-NMR for fragment screening, affinity quantification and druggability assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Clifford T; Arntson, Keith E; Urick, Andrew K; Mishra, Neeraj K; Hawk, Laura M L; Wisniewski, Andrea J; Pomerantz, William C K

    2016-08-01

    NMR spectroscopy can be used to quantify the binding affinity between proteins and low-complexity molecules, termed 'fragments'; this versatile screening approach allows researchers to assess the druggability of new protein targets. Protein-observed (19)F-NMR (PrOF NMR) using (19)F-labeled amino acids generates relatively simple spectra that are able to provide dynamic structural information toward understanding protein folding and function. Changes in these spectra upon the addition of fragment molecules can be observed and quantified. This protocol describes the sequence-selective labeling of three proteins (the first bromodomains of Brd4 and BrdT, and the KIX domain of the CREB-binding protein) using commercially available fluorinated aromatic amino acids and fluorinated precursors as example applications of the method developed by our research group. Fragment-screening approaches are discussed, as well as Kd determination, ligand-efficiency calculations and druggability assessment, i.e., the ability to target these proteins using small-molecule ligands. Experiment times on the order of a few minutes and the simplicity of the NMR spectra obtained make this approach well-suited to the investigation of small- to medium-sized proteins, as well as the screening of multiple proteins in the same experiment.

  7. Saturation-Transfer Difference (STD) NMR: A Simple and Fast Method for Ligand Screening and Characterization of Protein Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, Aldino; Manso, Joao; Nobrega, Franklin L.; Cabrita, Eurico J.

    2011-01-01

    Saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR has emerged as one of the most popular ligand-based NMR techniques for the study of protein-ligand interactions. The success of this technique is a consequence of its robustness and the fact that it is focused on the signals of the ligand, without any need of processing NMR information about the receptor…

  8. Algal autolysate medium to label proteins for NMR in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuccio, Carmelo; Luchinat, Enrico; Barbieri, Letizia [University of Florence, Magnetic Resonance Center (CERM) (Italy); Neri, Sara [Giotto Biotech S.R.L. (Italy); Fragai, Marco, E-mail: fragai@cerm.unifi.it [University of Florence, Magnetic Resonance Center (CERM) (Italy)

    2016-04-15

    In-cell NMR provides structural and functional information on proteins directly inside living cells. At present, the high costs of the labeled media for mammalian cells represent a limiting factor for the development of this methodology. Here we report a protocol to prepare a homemade growth medium from Spirulina platensis autolysate, suitable to express uniformly labeled proteins inside mammalian cells at a reduced cost-per-sample. The human proteins SOD1 and Mia40 were overexpressed in human cells grown in {sup 15}N-enriched S. platensis algal-derived medium, and high quality in-cell NMR spectra were obtained.

  9. Functional importance of short-range binding and long-range solvent interactions in helical antifreeze peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbinghaus, Simon; Meister, Konrad; Prigozhin, Maxim B; Devries, Arthur L; Havenith, Martina; Dzubiella, Joachim; Gruebele, Martin

    2012-07-18

    Short-range ice binding and long-range solvent perturbation both have been implicated in the activity of antifreeze proteins and antifreeze glycoproteins. We study these two mechanisms for activity of winter flounder antifreeze peptide. Four mutants are characterized by freezing point hysteresis (activity), circular dichroism (secondary structure), Förster resonance energy transfer (end-to-end rigidity), molecular dynamics simulation (structure), and terahertz spectroscopy (long-range solvent perturbation). Our results show that the short-range model is sufficient to explain the activity of our mutants, but the long-range model provides a necessary condition for activity: the most active peptides in our data set all have an extended dynamical hydration shell. It appears that antifreeze proteins and antifreeze glycoproteins have reached different evolutionary solutions to the antifreeze problem, utilizing either a few precisely positioned OH groups or a large quantity of OH groups for ice binding, assisted by long-range solvent perturbation. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. CASD-NMR 2: robust and accurate unsupervised analysis of raw NOESY spectra and protein structure determination with UNIO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerry, Paul; Duong, Viet Dung; Herrmann, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    UNIO is a comprehensive software suite for protein NMR structure determination that enables full automation of all NMR data analysis steps involved—including signal identification in NMR spectra, sequence-specific backbone and side-chain resonance assignment, NOE assignment and structure calculation. Within the framework of the second round of the community-wide stringent blind NMR structure determination challenge (CASD-NMR 2), we participated in two categories of CASD-NMR 2, namely using either raw NMR spectra or unrefined NOE peak lists as input. A total of 15 resulting NMR structure bundles were submitted for 9 out of 10 blind protein targets. All submitted UNIO structures accurately coincided with the corresponding blind targets as documented by an average backbone root mean-square deviation to the reference proteins of only 1.2 Å. Also, the precision of the UNIO structure bundles was virtually identical to the ensemble of reference structures. By assessing the quality of all UNIO structures submitted to the two categories, we find throughout that only the UNIO–ATNOS/CANDID approach using raw NMR spectra consistently yielded structure bundles of high quality for direct deposition in the Protein Data Bank. In conclusion, the results obtained in CASD-NMR 2 are another vital proof for robust, accurate and unsupervised NMR data analysis by UNIO for real-world applications

  11. Identifying secondary structures in proteins using NMR chemical shift 3D correlation maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Amrita; Dorai, Kavita

    2013-06-01

    NMR chemical shifts are accurate indicators of molecular environment and have been extensively used as aids in protein structure determination. This work focuses on creating empirical 3D correlation maps of backbone chemical shift nuclei for use as identifiers of secondary structure elements in proteins. A correlated database of backbone nuclei chemical shifts was constructed from experimental structural data gathered from entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) as well as isotropic chemical shift values from the RefDB database. Rigorous statistical analysis of the maps led to the conclusion that specific correlations between triplets of backbone chemical shifts are best able to differentiate between different secondary structures such as α-helices, β-strands and turns. The method is compared with similar techniques that use NMR chemical shift information as aids in biomolecular structure determination and performs well in tests done on experimental data determined for different types of proteins, including large multi-domain proteins and membrane proteins.

  12. Comparison of NMR and crystal structures highlights conformational isomerism in protein active sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, Pedro; Pedrini, Bill; Geralt, Michael; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Horst, Reto; Herrmann, Torsten; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    Tools for systematic comparisons of NMR and crystal structures developed by the JCSG were applied to two proteins with known functions: the T. maritima anti-σ factor antagonist TM1081 and the mouse γ-glutamylamine cyclotransferase A2LD1 (gi:13879369). In an attempt to exploit the complementarity of crystal and NMR data, the combined use of the two structure-determination techniques was explored for the initial steps in the challenge of searching proteins of unknown functions for putative active sites. The JCSG has recently developed a protocol for systematic comparisons of high-quality crystal and NMR structures of proteins. In this paper, the extent to which this approach can provide function-related information on the two functionally annotated proteins TM1081, a Thermotoga maritima anti-σ factor antagonist, and A2LD1 (gi:13879369), a mouse γ-glutamylamine cyclotransferase, is explored. The NMR structures of the two proteins have been determined in solution at 313 and 298 K, respectively, using the current JCSG protocol based on the software package UNIO for extensive automation. The corresponding crystal structures were solved by the JCSG at 100 K and 1.6 Å resolution and at 100 K and 1.9 Å resolution, respectively. The NMR and crystal structures of the two proteins share the same overall molecular architectures. However, the precision of the structure determination along the amino-acid sequence varies over a significantly wider range in the NMR structures than in the crystal structures. Thereby, in each of the two NMR structures about 65% of the residues have displacements below the average and in both proteins the less well ordered residues include large parts of the active sites, in addition to some highly solvent-exposed surface areas. Whereas the latter show increased disorder in the crystal and in solution, the active-site regions display increased displacements only in the NMR structures, where they undergo local conformational exchange on the

  13. 3D Computational Modeling of Proteins Using Sparse Paramagnetic NMR Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilla, Kala Bharath; Otting, Gottfried; Huber, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Computational modeling of proteins using evolutionary or de novo approaches offers rapid structural characterization, but often suffers from low success rates in generating high quality models comparable to the accuracy of structures observed in X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. A computational/experimental hybrid approach incorporating sparse experimental restraints in computational modeling algorithms drastically improves reliability and accuracy of 3D models. This chapter discusses the use of structural information obtained from various paramagnetic NMR measurements and demonstrates computational algorithms implementing pseudocontact shifts as restraints to determine the structure of proteins at atomic resolution.

  14. Solution NMR of membrane proteins in bilayer mimics: small is beautiful, but sometimes bigger is better.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poget, Sébastien F; Girvin, Mark E

    2007-12-01

    Considerable progress has been made recently on solution NMR studies of multi-transmembrane helix membrane protein systems of increasing size. Careful correlation of structure with function has validated the physiological relevance of these studies in detergent micelles. However, larger micelle and bicelle systems are sometimes required to stabilize the active forms of dynamic membrane proteins, such as the bacterial small multidrug resistance transporters. Even in these systems with aggregate molecular weights well over 100 kDa, solution NMR structural studies are feasible-but challenging.

  15. Ring current shifts in {sup 19}F-NMR of membrane proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Dongsheng, E-mail: liudsh@shanghaitech.edu.cn; Wüthrich, Kurt, E-mail: kwuthrich@shanghaitech.edu.cn [ShanghaiTech University, iHuman Institute (China)

    2016-05-15

    Fluorine-19 NMR markers are attractive reporter groups for use in studies of complex biomacromolecular systems, in particular also for studies of function-related conformational equilibria and rate processes in membrane proteins. Advantages of {sup 19}F-NMR probes include high sensitivity of the {sup 19}F chemical shifts to variations in the non-covalent environment. Nonetheless, in studies of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) we encountered situations where {sup 19}F chemical shifts were not responsive to conformational changes that had been implicated by other methods. This prompted us to examine possible effects of aromatic ring current fields on the chemical shifts of {sup 19}F-NMR probes used in GPCRs. Analysis of previously reported {sup 19}F-NMR data on the β{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor and mammalian rhodopsin showed that all {sup 19}F-labeling sites which manifested conformational changes are located near aromatic residues. Although ring current effects are small when compared to other known non-covalent effects on {sup 19}F chemical shifts, there is thus an indication that their contributions are significant when studying activation processes in GPCRs, since the observed activation-related {sup 19}F-NMR chemical shifts are comparable in size to the calculated ring current shifts. Considering the impact of ring current shifts may thus be helpful in identifying promising indigenous or engineered labeling sites for future {sup 19}F-NMR studies of GPCR activation, and novel information may be obtained on the nature of conformational rearrangements near the {sup 19}F-labels. It will then also be interesting to see if the presently indicated role of ring current shifts in membrane protein studies with {sup 19}F-NMR markers can be substantiated by a more extensive data base resulting from future studies.

  16. Median Modified Wiener Filter for nonlinear adaptive spatial denoising of protein NMR multidimensional spectra

    KAUST Repository

    Cannistraci, Carlo Vittorio

    2015-01-26

    Denoising multidimensional NMR-spectra is a fundamental step in NMR protein structure determination. The state-of-the-art method uses wavelet-denoising, which may suffer when applied to non-stationary signals affected by Gaussian-white-noise mixed with strong impulsive artifacts, like those in multi-dimensional NMR-spectra. Regrettably, Wavelet\\'s performance depends on a combinatorial search of wavelet shapes and parameters; and multi-dimensional extension of wavelet-denoising is highly non-trivial, which hampers its application to multidimensional NMR-spectra. Here, we endorse a diverse philosophy of denoising NMR-spectra: less is more! We consider spatial filters that have only one parameter to tune: the window-size. We propose, for the first time, the 3D extension of the median-modified-Wiener-filter (MMWF), an adaptive variant of the median-filter, and also its novel variation named MMWF*. We test the proposed filters and the Wiener-filter, an adaptive variant of the mean-filter, on a benchmark set that contains 16 two-dimensional and three-dimensional NMR-spectra extracted from eight proteins. Our results demonstrate that the adaptive spatial filters significantly outperform their non-adaptive versions. The performance of the new MMWF* on 2D/3D-spectra is even better than wavelet-denoising. Noticeably, MMWF* produces stable high performance almost invariant for diverse window-size settings: this signifies a consistent advantage in the implementation of automatic pipelines for protein NMR-spectra analysis.

  17. Complete NMR Assignment of Succinimide and Its Detection and Quantification in Peptides and Intact Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Luigi; Regl, Christof; Wildner, Sabrina; Gadermaier, Gabriele; Huber, Christian G; Cabrele, Chiara; Schubert, Mario

    2017-11-21

    Detecting and quantifying post-translational modifications (PTMs) in full-length proteins is a challenge, especially in the case of spontaneously occurring, nonenzymatic PTMs. Such a PTM is the formation of succinimide (Snn) in a protein that occurs spontaneously in prone primary sequences and leads typically to an equilibrium between Snn and its hydrolysis products isoaspartate (isoAsp) and aspartate. In order to detect these modifications in proteins by NMR spectroscopy, chemical shift assignments of reference compounds are required. We used peptide synthesis and 2D NMR spectroscopy to assign all 1 H and 13 C chemical shifts of Snn and isoAsp and found characteristic chemical shift correlations. To provide chemical shift reference data suitable for comparison with data of denatured proteins, we repeated the assignment in 7 M urea (pH 2.3) and in DMSO. Most characteristic of Snn are the two downfield shifted carbonyl chemical shifts, the chemical shift correlations of Cβ-Hβ of Snn and Cα-Hα of the succeeding residue which are clearly distinct from random coil chemical shift correlations. The characteristic 2D NMR fingerprints of Snn were used to detect and quantify this PTM in the model protein lysozyme, the biotherapeutic filgrastim, and the Fc part of immunoglobulin G1. Mass spectrometry (MS) was applied as an additional independent method. The orthogonality of the NMR and MS techniques allows cross-validation, which is especially important to search for subtle PTMs in proteins. Studying PTMs by NMR spectroscopy is a promising method to analyze proteins and peptides from natural sources, recombinant expression, or chemical synthesis.

  18. Mapping of unfolding states of integral helical membrane proteins by GPS-NMR and scattering techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calcutta, Antonello; Jessen, Christian Moestrup; Behrens, Manja Annette

    2012-01-01

    Membrane proteins are vital for biological function, and their action is governed by structural properties critically depending on their interactions with the membranes. This has motivated considerable interest in studies of membrane protein folding and unfolding. Here the structural changes...... induced by unfolding of an integral membrane protein, namely TFE-induced unfolding of KcsA solubilized by the n-dodecyl ß-d-maltoside (DDM) surfactant is investigated by the recently introduced GPS-NMR (Global Protein folding State mapping by multivariate NMR) (Malmendal et al., PlosONE 5, e10262 (2010...... addressing detergent properties and protein conformations at the same time. The mapping of the states reveals that KcsA undergoes a series of rearrangements which include expansion of the tetramer in several steps followed by dissociation into monomers at 29% TFE. Supplementary studies of DDM and TFE...

  19. Practical aspects of NMR signal assignment in larger and challenging proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frueh, Dominique P.

    2014-01-01

    NMR has matured into a technique routinely employed for studying proteins in near physiological conditions. However, applications to larger proteins are impeded by the complexity of the various correlation maps necessary to assign NMR signals. This article reviews the data analysis techniques traditionally employed for resonance assignment and describes alternative protocols necessary for overcoming challenges in large protein spectra. In particular, simultaneous analysis of multiple spectra may help overcome ambiguities or may reveal correlations in an indirect manner. Similarly, visualization of orthogonal planes in a multidimensional spectrum can provide alternative assignment procedures. We describe examples of such strategies for assignment of backbone, methyl, and nOe resonances. We describe experimental aspects of data acquisition for the related experiments and provide guidelines for preliminary studies. Focus is placed on large folded monomeric proteins and examples are provided for 37, 48, 53, and 81 kDa proteins. PMID:24534088

  20. Refinement of the protein backbone angle ψ in NMR structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprangers, R.; Bottomley, M.J.; Linge, J.P.; Schultz, J.; Nilges, M.; Sattler, M.

    2000-01-01

    Cross-correlated relaxation rates involving the C α -H α dipolar interaction and the carbonyl (C') chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) have been measured using two complementary 3D experiments. We show that the protein backbone angle ψ can be directly refined against such cross-correlated relaxation rates (Γ HαCα,C' ) and the three-bond H/D isotope effect on the C α chemical shifts ( 3 ΔC α (ND) ). By simultaneously using both experimental parameters as restraints during NMR structure calculations, a unique value for the backbone angle ψ is defined. We have applied the new refinement method to the α-Spectrin SH3 domain (a β-sheet protein) and to the Sgs1p HRDC domain (an α-helical protein) and show that the quality of the NMR structures is substantially improved, judging from the atomic coordinate precision and the Ramachandran map. In addition, the ψ-refined NMR structures of the SH3 domain deviate less from the 1.8 A crystal structure, suggesting an improved accuracy. The proposed refinement method can be used to significantly improve the quality of NMR structures and will be applicable to larger proteins

  1. Cys-Ph-TAHA: a lanthanide binding tag for RDC and PCS enhanced protein NMR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Fabian; Maestre-Martinez, M.; Leonov, A.; Kovacic, L.; Becker, S.; Boelens, R.; Griesinger, C.

    2011-01-01

    Here we present Cys-Ph-TAHA, a new nonadentate lanthanide tag for the paramagnetic labelling of proteins. The tag can be easily synthesized and is stereochemically homogenous over a wide range of temperatures, yielding NMR spectra with a single set of peaks. Bound to ubiquitin, it induced large

  2. A novel strategy for NMR resonance assignment and protein structure determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemak, Alexander; Gutmanas, Aleksandras; Chitayat, Seth; Karra, Murthy; Farès, Christophe; Sunnerhagen, Maria; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2011-01-01

    The quality of protein structures determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is contingent on the number and quality of experimentally-derived resonance assignments, distance and angular restraints. Two key features of protein NMR data have posed challenges for the routine and automated structure determination of small to medium sized proteins; (1) spectral resolution – especially of crowded nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) spectra, and (2) the reliance on a continuous network of weak scalar couplings as part of most common assignment protocols. In order to facilitate NMR structure determination, we developed a semi-automated strategy that utilizes non-uniform sampling (NUS) and multidimensional decomposition (MDD) for optimal data collection and processing of selected, high resolution multidimensional NMR experiments, combined it with an ABACUS protocol for sequential and side chain resonance assignments, and streamlined this procedure to execute structure and refinement calculations in CYANA and CNS, respectively. Two graphical user interfaces (GUIs) were developed to facilitate efficient analysis and compilation of the data and to guide automated structure determination. This integrated method was implemented and refined on over 30 high quality structures of proteins ranging from 5.5 to 16.5 kDa in size.

  3. Blind testing of routine, fully automated determination of protein structures from NMR data.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosato, A.; Aramini, J.M.; Arrowsmith, C.; Bagaria, A.; Baker, D.; Cavalli, A.; Doreleijers, J.; Eletsky, A.; Giachetti, A.; Guerry, P.; Gutmanas, A.; Guntert, P.; He, Y.; Herrmann, T.; Huang, Y.J.; Jaravine, V.; Jonker, H.R.; Kennedy, M.A.; Lange, O.F.; Liu, G.; Malliavin, T.E.; Mani, R.; Mao, B.; Montelione, G.T.; Nilges, M.; Rossi, P.; Schot, G. van der; Schwalbe, H.; Szyperski, T.A.; Vendruscolo, M.; Vernon, R.; Vranken, W.F.; Vries, S.D. de; Vuister, G.W.; Wu, B.; Yang, Y.; Bonvin, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The protocols currently used for protein structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) depend on the determination of a large number of upper distance limits for proton-proton pairs. Typically, this task is performed manually by an experienced researcher rather than automatically by

  4. Blind Testing of Routine, Fully Automated Determination of Protein Structures from NMR Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosato, A.; Aramini, J.M.; van der Schot, G.; de Vries, S.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837717; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113691238

    2012-01-01

    The protocols currently used for protein structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) depend on the determination of a large number of upper distance limits for proton-proton pairs. Typically, this task is performed manually by an experienced researcher rather than automatically by

  5. A novel strategy for NMR resonance assignment and protein structure determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemak, Alexander; Gutmanas, Aleksandras; Chitayat, Seth; Karra, Murthy; Farès, Christophe; Sunnerhagen, Maria; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H

    2011-01-01

    The quality of protein structures determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is contingent on the number and quality of experimentally-derived resonance assignments, distance and angular restraints. Two key features of protein NMR data have posed challenges for the routine and automated structure determination of small to medium sized proteins; (1) spectral resolution - especially of crowded nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) spectra, and (2) the reliance on a continuous network of weak scalar couplings as part of most common assignment protocols. In order to facilitate NMR structure determination, we developed a semi-automated strategy that utilizes non-uniform sampling (NUS) and multidimensional decomposition (MDD) for optimal data collection and processing of selected, high resolution multidimensional NMR experiments, combined it with an ABACUS protocol for sequential and side chain resonance assignments, and streamlined this procedure to execute structure and refinement calculations in CYANA and CNS, respectively. Two graphical user interfaces (GUIs) were developed to facilitate efficient analysis and compilation of the data and to guide automated structure determination. This integrated method was implemented and refined on over 30 high quality structures of proteins ranging from 5.5 to 16.5 kDa in size.

  6. A Method for Systematic Assessment of Intrinsically Disordered Protein Regions by NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natsuko Goda

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs that lack stable conformations and are highly flexible have attracted the attention of biologists. Therefore, the development of a systematic method to identify polypeptide regions that are unstructured in solution is important. We have designed an “indirect/reflected” detection system for evaluating the physicochemical properties of IDPs using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR. This approach employs a “chimeric membrane protein”-based method using the thermostable membrane protein PH0471. This protein contains two domains, a transmembrane helical region and a C-terminal OB (oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding-fold domain (named NfeDC domain, connected by a flexible linker. NMR signals of the OB-fold domain of detergent-solubilized PH0471 are observed because of the flexibility of the linker region. In this study, the linker region was substituted with target IDPs. Fifty-three candidates were selected using the prediction tool POODLE and 35 expression vectors were constructed. Subsequently, we obtained 15N-labeled chimeric PH0471 proteins with 25 IDPs as linkers. The NMR spectra allowed us to classify IDPs into three categories: flexible, moderately flexible, and inflexible. The inflexible IDPs contain membrane-associating or aggregation-prone sequences. This is the first attempt to use an indirect/reflected NMR method to evaluate IDPs and can verify the predictions derived from our computational tools.

  7. Detergent Optimized Membrane Protein Reconstitution in Liposomes for Solid State NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    For small helical membrane proteins, their structures are highly sensitive to their environment, and solid state NMR is a structural technique that can characterize these membrane proteins in native-like lipid bilayers and proteoliposomes. To date, a systematic method by which to evaluate the effect of the solubilizing detergent on proteoliposome preparations for solid state NMR of membrane proteins has not been presented in the literature. A set of experiments are presented aimed at determining the conditions most amenable to dialysis mediated reconstitution sample preparation. A membrane protein from M. tuberculosis is used to illustrate the method. The results show that a detergent that stabilizes the most protein is not always ideal and sometimes cannot be removed by dialysis. By focusing on the lipid and protein binding properties of the detergent, proteoliposome preparations can be readily produced, which provide double the signal-to-noise ratios for both the oriented sample and magic angle spinning solid state NMR. The method will allow more membrane protein drug targets to be structurally characterized in lipid bilayer environments. PMID:24665863

  8. ABACUS, a direct method for protein NMR structure computation via assembly of fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishaev, A; Steren, C A; Wu, B; Pineda-Lucena, A; Arrowsmith, C; Llinás, M

    2005-10-01

    The ABACUS algorithm obtains the protein NMR structure from unassigned NOESY distance restraints. ABACUS works as an integrated approach that uses the complete set of available NMR experimental information in parallel and yields spin system typing, NOE spin pair identities, sequence specific resonance assignments, and protein structure, all at once. The protocol starts from unassigned molecular fragments (including single amino acid spin systems) derived from triple-resonance (1)H/(13)C/(15)N NMR experiments. Identifications of connected spin systems and NOEs precede the full sequence specific resonance assignments. The latter are obtained iteratively via Monte Carlo-Metropolis and/or probabilistic sequence selections, molecular dynamics structure computation and BACUS filtering (A. Grishaev and M. Llinás, J Biomol NMR 2004;28:1-10). ABACUS starts from scratch, without the requirement of an initial approximate structure, and improves iteratively the NOE identities in a self-consistent fashion. The procedure was run as a blind test on data recorded on mth1743, a 70-amino acid genomic protein from M. thermoautotrophicum. It converges to a structure in ca. 15 cycles of computation on a 3-GHz processor PC. The calculated structures are very similar to the ones obtained via conventional methods (1.22 A backbone RMSD). The success of ABACUS on mth1743 further validates BACUS as a NOESY identification protocol. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Requirements on paramagnetic relaxation enhancement data for membrane protein structure determination by NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottstein, Daniel; Reckel, Sina; Dötsch, Volker; Güntert, Peter

    2012-06-06

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure calculations of the α-helical integral membrane proteins DsbB, GlpG, and halorhodopsin show that distance restraints from paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) can provide sufficient structural information to determine their structure with an accuracy of about 1.5 Å in the absence of other long-range conformational restraints. Our systematic study with simulated NMR data shows that about one spin label per transmembrane helix is necessary for obtaining enough PRE distance restraints to exclude wrong topologies, such as pseudo mirror images, if only limited other NMR restraints are available. Consequently, an experimentally realistic amount of PRE data enables α-helical membrane protein structure determinations that would not be feasible with the very limited amount of conventional NOESY data normally available for these systems. These findings are in line with our recent first de novo NMR structure determination of a heptahelical integral membrane protein, proteorhodopsin, that relied extensively on PRE data. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. NMRNet: A deep learning approach to automated peak picking of protein NMR spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klukowski, Piotr; Augoff, Michal; Zieba, Maciej; Drwal, Maciej; Gonczarek, Adam; Walczak, Michal J

    2018-03-14

    Automated selection of signals in protein NMR spectra, known as peak picking, has been studied for over 20 years, nevertheless existing peak picking methods are still largely deficient. Accurate and precise automated peak picking would accelerate the structure calculation, and analysis of dynamics and interactions of macromolecules. Recent advancement in handling big data, together with an outburst of machine learning techniques, offer an opportunity to tackle the peak picking problem substantially faster than manual picking and on par with human accuracy. In particular, deep learning has proven to systematically achieve human-level performance in various recognition tasks, and thus emerges as an ideal tool to address automated identification of NMR signals. We have applied a convolutional neural network for visual analysis of multidimensional NMR spectra. A comprehensive test on 31 manually-annotated spectra has demonstrated top-tier average precision (AP) of 0.9596, 0.9058 and 0.8271 for backbone, side-chain and NOESY spectra, respectively. Furthermore, a combination of extracted peak lists with automated assignment routine, FLYA, outperformed other methods, including the manual one, and led to correct resonance assignment at the levels of 90.40%, 89.90% and 90.20% for three benchmark proteins. The proposed model is a part of a Dumpling software (platform for protein NMR data analysis), and is available at https://dumpling.bio/. michaljerzywalczak@gmail.compiotr.klukowski@pwr.edu.pl. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  11. NMR-based detection of hydrogen/deuterium exchange in liposome-embedded membrane proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejun Yao

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins play key roles in biology. Determination of their structure in a membrane environment, however, is highly challenging. To address this challenge, we developed an approach that couples hydrogen/deuterium exchange of membrane proteins to rapid unfolding and detection by solution-state NMR spectroscopy. We show that the method allows analysis of the solvent protection of single residues in liposome-embedded proteins such as the 349-residue Tom40, the major protein translocation pore in the outer mitochondrial membrane, which has resisted structural analysis for many years.

  12. Solid-state NMR of the Yersinia pestis outer membrane protein Ail in lipid bilayer nanodiscs sedimented by ultracentrifugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Yi; Fujimoto, L. Miya; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M.

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state NMR studies of sedimented soluble proteins has been developed recently as an attractive approach for overcoming the size limitations of solution NMR spectroscopy while bypassing the need for sample crystallization or precipitation (Bertini et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108(26):10396–10399, 2011). Inspired by the potential benefits of this method, we have investigated the ability to sediment lipid bilayer nanodiscs reconstituted with a membrane protein. In this study, we show that nanodiscs containing the outer membrane protein Ail from Yersinia pestis can be sedimented for solid-state NMR structural studies, without the need for precipitation or lyophilization. Optimized preparations of Ail in phospholipid nanodiscs support both the structure and the fibronectin binding activity of the protein. The same sample can be used for solution NMR, solid-state NMR and activity assays, facilitating structure–activity correlation experiments across a wide range of timescales

  13. Solid-state NMR of the Yersinia pestis outer membrane protein Ail in lipid bilayer nanodiscs sedimented by ultracentrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; Fujimoto, L Miya; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M

    2015-04-01

    Solid-state NMR studies of sedimented soluble proteins has been developed recently as an attractive approach for overcoming the size limitations of solution NMR spectroscopy while bypassing the need for sample crystallization or precipitation (Bertini et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108(26):10396-10399, 2011). Inspired by the potential benefits of this method, we have investigated the ability to sediment lipid bilayer nanodiscs reconstituted with a membrane protein. In this study, we show that nanodiscs containing the outer membrane protein Ail from Yersinia pestis can be sedimented for solid-state NMR structural studies, without the need for precipitation or lyophilization. Optimized preparations of Ail in phospholipid nanodiscs support both the structure and the fibronectin binding activity of the protein. The same sample can be used for solution NMR, solid-state NMR and activity assays, facilitating structure-activity correlation experiments across a wide range of timescales.

  14. Solid-state NMR of the Yersinia pestis outer membrane protein Ail in lipid bilayer nanodiscs sedimented by ultracentrifugation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Yi; Fujimoto, L. Miya; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M., E-mail: fmarassi@sbmri.org [Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Solid-state NMR studies of sedimented soluble proteins has been developed recently as an attractive approach for overcoming the size limitations of solution NMR spectroscopy while bypassing the need for sample crystallization or precipitation (Bertini et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108(26):10396–10399, 2011). Inspired by the potential benefits of this method, we have investigated the ability to sediment lipid bilayer nanodiscs reconstituted with a membrane protein. In this study, we show that nanodiscs containing the outer membrane protein Ail from Yersinia pestis can be sedimented for solid-state NMR structural studies, without the need for precipitation or lyophilization. Optimized preparations of Ail in phospholipid nanodiscs support both the structure and the fibronectin binding activity of the protein. The same sample can be used for solution NMR, solid-state NMR and activity assays, facilitating structure–activity correlation experiments across a wide range of timescales.

  15. Present and future of NMR for RNA-protein complexes: A perspective of integrated structural biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlomagno, Teresa

    2014-04-01

    Nucleic acids are gaining enormous importance as key molecules in almost all biological processes. Most nucleic acids do not act in isolation but are generally associated with proteins to form high-molecular-weight nucleoprotein complexes. In this perspective article I focus on the structural studies of supra-molecular ribonucleoprotein (RNP) assemblies in solution by a combination of state-of-the-art TROSY-based NMR experiments and other structural biology techniques. I discuss ways how to combine sparse NMR data with low-resolution structural information from small-angle scattering, fluorescence and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to obtain the structure of large RNP particles by an integrated structural biology approach. In the last section I give a perspective for the study of RNP complexes by solid-state NMR.

  16. Application of virus-like particles (VLP) to NMR characterization of viral membrane protein interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antanasijevic, Aleksandar; Kingsley, Carolyn [University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics (United States); Basu, Arnab; Bowlin, Terry L. [Microbiotix Inc. (United States); Rong, Lijun [University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Microbiology and Immunology (United States); Caffrey, Michael, E-mail: caffrey@uic.edu [University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics (United States)

    2016-03-15

    The membrane proteins of viruses play critical roles in the virus life cycle and are attractive targets for therapeutic intervention. Virus-like particles (VLP) present the possibility to study the biochemical and biophysical properties of viral membrane proteins in their native environment. Specifically, the VLP constructs contain the entire protein sequence and are comprised of native membrane components including lipids, cholesterol, carbohydrates and cellular proteins. In this study we prepare VLP containing full-length hemagglutinin (HA) or neuraminidase (NA) from influenza and characterize their interactions with small molecule inhibitors. Using HA-VLP, we first show that VLP samples prepared using the standard sucrose gradient purification scheme contain significant amounts of serum proteins, which exhibit high potential for non-specific interactions, thereby complicating NMR studies of ligand-target interactions. We then show that the serum contaminants may be largely removed with the addition of a gel filtration chromatography step. Next, using HA-VLP we demonstrate that WaterLOGSY NMR is significantly more sensitive than Saturation Transfer Difference (STD) NMR for the study of ligand interactions with membrane bound targets. In addition, we compare the ligand orientation to HA embedded in VLP with that of recombinant HA by STD NMR. In a subsequent step, using NA-VLP we characterize the kinetic and binding properties of substrate analogs and inhibitors of NA, including study of the H274Y-NA mutant, which leads to wide spread resistance to current influenza antivirals. In summary, our work suggests that VLP have high potential to become standard tools in biochemical and biophysical studies of viral membrane proteins, particularly when VLP are highly purified and combined with control VLP containing native membrane proteins.

  17. NMR structure of hypothetical protein MG354 from Mycoplasmagenitalium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Shi, Jianxia; Yokotoa, Hisao; Kim, Rosalind; Wemmer, David E.

    2005-04-12

    Mycoplasma genitalium (Mg) and M. pneumoniae (Mp) are human pathogens with two of the smallest genomes sequenced to date ({approx} 480 and 680 genes, respectively). The Berkeley Structural Genomics Center is determining representative structures for gene products in these organisms, helping to understand the set of protein folds needed to sustain this minimal organism. The protein coded by gene MG354 (gi3844938) from M. genitalium has a relatively unique sequence, related only to MPN530 from M. pneumoniae (68% identity, coverage 99%) and MGA{_}0870 from the avian pathogen M. gallisepticum (23% identity, coverage 94%), has no homologue with a determined structure, and no functional annotations.

  18. Antifreeze Glycoproteins Alter the Molecular Scale Surface Morphology of Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepeda, Salvador; Orme, Christine A.; Qiu, Roger; Yeh, Yin

    2003-03-01

    Trematomas borchgrevinki live in the harsh super-cooled waters of the Antarctic. Critical to their survival are antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs) that further suppress the freezing temperature of their blood serum in addition to the colligative action of salts found in the ocean. These proteins also modify ice crystal growth habits as well as inhibit recrystallization in polycrystalline ice. To date many other types of antifreeze proteins have been identified in cold weather insects, plants, and other fish, but the exact mechanism is not entirely understood. The mechanism is non-colligative since only a few mg/ml are required for ice crystal growth inhibition and a non-equilibrium melting/freezing point hysteresis is observed. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can yield a wealth of surface information that can reveal molecular scale information of biomineralization processes. We use AFM to directly probe the surface of ice crystals grown from the vapor in the pure phase and in the presence of growth inhibitors/modifiers, AFGPs. Results show that the AFGPs heavily pin the surface of ice.

  19. Paramagnetic labelling of proteins and oligonucleotides for NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Xuncheng; Otting, Gottfried

    2010-01-01

    Paramagnetic effects offer a rich source of long-range structural restraints. Here we review current methods for site-specific tagging of proteins and oligonucleotides with paramagnetic molecules. The paramagnetic tags include nitroxide radicals and metal chelators. Particular emphasis is placed on tags suitable for site-specific and rigid attachment of lanthanide ions to macromolecules.

  20. EPR and NMR spectroscopy on spin-labeled proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finiguerra, Michelina Giuseppina

    2011-01-01

    Spin labeling and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) have been employed to study structure and dynamics of proteins. The surface polarity of four single cysteine mutants of the Zn-azurin in frozen solution were studied using 275 GHz EPR (J-band), with the advantage compared to 9 GHz (X-band) and

  1. Site-specific labeling of proteins with NMR-active unnatural amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, David H.; Cellitti, Susan E.; Hao Xueshi; Zhang Qiong; Jahnz, Michael; Summerer, Daniel; Schultz, Peter G.; Uno, Tetsuo; Geierstanger, Bernhard H.

    2010-01-01

    A large number of amino acids other than the canonical amino acids can now be easily incorporated in vivo into proteins at genetically encoded positions. The technology requires an orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pair specific for the unnatural amino acid that is added to the media while a TAG amber or frame shift codon specifies the incorporation site in the protein to be studied. These unnatural amino acids can be isotopically labeled and provide unique opportunities for site-specific labeling of proteins for NMR studies. In this perspective, we discuss these opportunities including new photocaged unnatural amino acids, outline usage of metal chelating and spin-labeled unnatural amino acids and expand the approach to in-cell NMR experiments.

  2. More reliable protein NMR peak assignment via improved 2-interval scheduling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Zhong; Lin, Guohui; Rizzi, Romeo; Wen, Jianjun; Xu, Dong; Xu, Ying; Jiang, Tao

    2005-03-01

    Protein NMR peak assignment refers to the process of assigning a group of "spin systems" obtained experimentally to a protein sequence of amino acids. The automation of this process is still an unsolved and challenging problem in NMR protein structure determination. Recently, protein NMR peak assignment has been formulated as an interval scheduling problem (ISP), where a protein sequence P of amino acids is viewed as a discrete time interval I (the amino acids on P one-to-one correspond to the time units of I), each subset S of spin systems that are known to originate from consecutive amino acids from P is viewed as a "job" j(s), the preference of assigning S to a subsequence P of consecutive amino acids on P is viewed as the profit of executing job j(s) in the subinterval of I corresponding to P, and the goal is to maximize the total profit of executing the jobs (on a single machine) during I. The interval scheduling problem is max SNP-hard in general; but in the real practice of protein NMR peak assignment, each job j(s) usually requires at most 10 consecutive time units, and typically the jobs that require one or two consecutive time units are the most difficult to assign/schedule. In order to solve these most difficult assignments, we present an efficient 13/7-approximation algorithm for the special case of the interval scheduling problem where each job takes one or two consecutive time units. Combining this algorithm with a greedy filtering strategy for handling long jobs (i.e., jobs that need more than two consecutive time units), we obtain a new efficient heuristic for protein NMR peak assignment. Our experimental study shows that the new heuristic produces the best peak assignment in most of the cases, compared with the NMR peak assignment algorithms in the recent literature. The above algorithm is also the first approximation algorithm for a nontrivial case of the well-known interval scheduling problem that breaks the ratio 2 barrier.

  3. An evaluation of detergents for NMR structural studies of membrane proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger-Koplin, Ray D.; Sorgen, Paul L.; Krueger-Koplin, Suzanne T.; Rivera-Torres, Ivan O.; Cahill, Sean M. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Biochemistry Department (United States); Hicks, David B. [Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Biological Chemistry, Mt (United States); Grinius, Leo [Cincinnati State Technical College (United States); Krulwich, Terry A. [Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Biological Chemistry, Mt (United States); Girvin, Mark E. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Biochemistry Department (United States)

    2004-01-15

    Structural information on membrane proteins lags far behind that on soluble proteins, in large part due to difficulties producing homogeneous, stable, structurally relevant samples in a membrane-like environment. In this study 25 membrane mimetics were screened using 2D {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N heteronuclear single quantum correlation NMR experiments to establish sample homogeneity and predict fitness for structure determination. A single detergent, 1-palmitoyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-RAC-(1-glycerol)] (LPPG), yielded high quality NMR spectra with sample lifetimes greater than one month for the five proteins tested - R. sphaeroides LH1 {alpha} and {beta} subunits, E. coli and B. pseudofirmus OF4 ATP synthase c subunits, and S. aureus small multidrug resistance transporter - with 1, 2, or 4 membrane spanning {alpha}-helices, respectively. Site-specific spin labeling established interhelical distances in the drug transporter and genetically fused dimers of c subunits in LPPG consistent with in vivo distances. Optical spectroscopy showed that LH1 {beta} subunits form native-like complexes with bacteriochlorphyll a in LPPG. All the protein/micelle complexes were estimated to exceed 100 kDaltons by translational diffusion measurements. However, analysis of {sup 15}N transverse, longitudinal and {sup 15}N{l_brace}{sup 1}H{r_brace} nuclear Overhauser effect relaxation measurements yielded overall rotational correlation times of 8 to 12 nsec, similar to a 15-20 kDalton protein tumbling isotropically in solution, and consistent with the high quality NMR data observed.

  4. APSY-NMR for protein backbone assignment in high-throughput structural biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Samit Kumar; Serrano, Pedro; Proudfoot, Andrew; Geralt, Michael [The Scripps Research Institute, Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology (United States); Pedrini, Bill [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), SwissFEL Project (Switzerland); Herrmann, Torsten [Université de Lyon, Institut des Sciences Analytiques, Centre de RMN à Très Hauts Champs, UMR 5280 CNRS, ENS Lyon, UCB Lyon 1 (France); Wüthrich, Kurt, E-mail: wuthrich@scripps.edu [The Scripps Research Institute, Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology (United States)

    2015-01-15

    A standard set of three APSY-NMR experiments has been used in daily practice to obtain polypeptide backbone NMR assignments in globular proteins with sizes up to about 150 residues, which had been identified as targets for structure determination by the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG) under the auspices of the Protein Structure Initiative (PSI). In a representative sample of 30 proteins, initial fully automated data analysis with the software UNIO-MATCH-2014 yielded complete or partial assignments for over 90 % of the residues. For most proteins the APSY data acquisition was completed in less than 30 h. The results of the automated procedure provided a basis for efficient interactive validation and extension to near-completion of the assignments by reference to the same 3D heteronuclear-resolved [{sup 1}H,{sup 1}H]-NOESY spectra that were subsequently used for the collection of conformational constraints. High-quality structures were obtained for all 30 proteins, using the J-UNIO protocol, which includes extensive automation of NMR structure determination.

  5. Structural studies of bacterial transcriptional regulatory proteins by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkman, Brian Finley [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to elucidate detailed structural information for peptide and protein molecules. A small peptide was designed and synthesized, and its three-dimensional structure was calculated using distance information derived from two-dimensional NMR measurements. The peptide was used to induce antibodies in mice, and the cross-reactivity of the antibodies with a related protein was analyzed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Two proteins which are involved in regulation of transcription in bacteria were also studied. The ferric uptake regulation (Fur) protein is a metal-dependent repressor which controls iron uptake in bacteria. Two- and three-dimensional NMR techniques, coupled with uniform and selective isotope labeling allowed the nearly complete assignment of the resonances of the metal-binding domain of the Fur protein. NTRC is a transcriptional enhancer binding protein whose N-terminal domain is a "receiver domain" in the family of "two-component" regulatory systems. Phosphorylation of the N-terminal domain of NTRC activates the initiation of transcription of aeries encoding proteins involved in nitrogen regulation. Three- and four-dimensional NMR spectroscopy methods have been used to complete the resonance assignments and determine the solution structure of the N-terminal receiver domain of the NTRC protein. Comparison of the solution structure of the NTRC receiver domain with the crystal structures of the homologous protein CheY reveals a very similar fold, with the only significant difference being the position of helix 4 relative to the rest of the protein. The determination of the structure of the NTRC receiver domain is the first step toward understanding a mechanism of signal transduction which is common to many bacterial regulatory systems.

  6. Cys-Ph-TAHA: a lanthanide binding tag for RDC and PCS enhanced protein NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, Fabian; Maestre-Martinez, Mitcheell; Leonov, Andrei; Kovačič, Lidija; Becker, Stefan; Boelens, Rolf; Griesinger, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Here we present Cys-Ph-TAHA, a new nonadentate lanthanide tag for the paramagnetic labelling of proteins. The tag can be easily synthesized and is stereochemically homogenous over a wide range of temperatures, yielding NMR spectra with a single set of peaks. Bound to ubiquitin, it induced large residual dipolar couplings and pseudocontact shifts that could be measured easily and agreed very well with the protein structure. We show that Cys-Ph-TAHA can be used to label large proteins that are biochemically challenging such as the Lac repressor in a 90 kDa ternary complex with DNA and inducer.

  7. Ice growth in supercooled solutions of antifreeze glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, K; Hallett, J; Burcham, T S; Feeney, R E; Kerr, W L; Yeh, Y

    Inhibition of ice growth in supercooled solution by certain proteins is vital to the survival of many living organisms. Some fish, native to both subzero northern and southern waters, have special proteins or glycoproteins in their blood serum that inhibit ice formation. Whereas these proteins have only a very small effect on the melting temperature of ice, the temperature of these fish can fall to nearly 1 K below the melting point before ice crystals grow. This phenomenon is called freezing hysteresis, in contrast to the normal colligative effect of solutes that depresses the equilibrium temperature, around which small changes lead to crystal growth or melting depending on sign. Some insects also exhibit a serum freezing hysteresis. We report the effects of different degrees of supercooling on the habit and rates of growth of ice crystals from solutions of these antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs). We find that the crystallization rate is up to five times greater than that in pure water.

  8. Efficiency of Composite Binders with Antifreezing Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogurtsova, Y. N.; Zhernovsky, I. V.; Botsman, L. N.

    2017-11-01

    One of the non-heating methods of cold-weather concreting is using concretes hardening at negative temperatures. This method consists in using chemical additives which reduce the freezing temperature of the liquid phase and provide for concrete hardening at negative temperatures. The non-heating cold-weather concreting, due to antifreezing agents, allows saving heat and electric energy at the more flexible work performance technology. At selecting the antifreezing components, the possibility of concreting at temperatures up to minus 20 °C and combination with a plasticizer contained in the composite binder were taken into account. The optimal proportions of antifreezing and complex agents produced by MC-Bauchemie Russia for fine-grained concretes were determined. So, the introduction of antifreezing and complex agents allows obtaining a structure of composite characteristic for cement stone in the conditions of below zero temperatures at using different binders; the hydration of such composite proceeded naturally. Low-water-demand binders (LWDB) based composites are characterized by a higher density and homogeneity due to a high dispersity of a binder and its complicated surface providing for a lot of crystallization centers. LWDB contains small pores keeping water in a liquid form and promoting a more complete hydration process.

  9. Microscopic insights into the NMR relaxation based protein conformational entropy meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasinath, Vignesh; Sharp, Kim A.; Wand, A. Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Conformational entropy is a potentially important thermodynamic parameter contributing to protein function. Quantitative measures of conformational entropy are necessary for an understanding of its role but have been difficult to obtain. An empirical method that utilizes changes in conformational dynamics as a proxy for changes in conformational entropy has recently been introduced. Here we probe the microscopic origins of the link between conformational dynamics and conformational entropy using molecular dynamics simulations. Simulation of seven pro! teins gave an excellent correlation with measures of side-chain motion derived from NMR relaxation. The simulations show that the motion of methyl-bearing side-chains are sufficiently coupled to that of other side chains to serve as excellent reporters of the overall side-chain conformational entropy. These results tend to validate the use of experimentally accessible measures of methyl motion - the NMR-derived generalized order parameters - as a proxy from which to derive changes in protein conformational entropy. PMID:24007504

  10. [Interactions between proteins and cation exchange adsorbents analyzed by NMR and hydrogen/deuterium exchange technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kang; Hao, Dongxia; Qi, Shuting; Ma, Guanghui

    2014-09-01

    In silico acquirement of the accurate residue details of protein on chromatographic media is a bottleneck in protein chromatography separation and purification. Here we developed a novel approach by coupling with H/D exchange and nuclear magnetic resonance to observe hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) unfolding behavior adsorbed on cation exchange media (SP Sepharose FF). Analysis of 1D 1H-NMR shows that protein unfolding accelerated H/D exchange rate, leading to more loss of signal of amide hydrogen owing to exposure of residues and the more unfolding of protein. Analysis of two-dimensional hydrogen-hydrogen total correlation spectroscopy shows that lysozyme lost more signals and experienced great unfolding during its adsorption on media surface. However, for several distinct fragments, the protection degrees varied, the adsorbed lysozyme lost more signal intensity and was less protected at disorder structures (coil, bend, and turn), but was comparatively more protected against exchange at secondary structure domains (α-helix, β-sheet). Finally, the binding site was determined by electrostatic calculations using computer simulation methods in conjunction with hydrogen deuterium labeled protein and NMR. This study would help deeply understand the microscopic mechanism of protein chromatography and guide the purposely design of chromatographic process and media. Moreover, it also provide an effective tool to study the protein and biomaterials interaction in other applications.

  11. Segmental isotope labeling of proteins for NMR structural study using a protein S tag for higher expression and solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Swapna, G. V. T.; Wu, Kuen-Phon; Afinogenova, Yuliya; Conover, Kenith; Mao, Binchen; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Inouye, Masayori

    2012-01-01

    A common obstacle to NMR studies of proteins is sample preparation. In many cases, proteins targeted for NMR studies are poorly expressed and/or expressed in insoluble forms. Here, we describe a novel approach to overcome these problems. In the protein S tag-intein (PSTI) technology, two tandem 92-residue N-terminal domains of protein S (PrS 2 ) from Myxococcus xanthus is fused at the N-terminal end of a protein to enhance its expression and solubility. Using intein technology, the isotope-labeled PrS 2 -tag is replaced with non-isotope labeled PrS 2 -tag, silencing the NMR signals from PrS 2 -tag in isotope-filtered 1 H-detected NMR experiments. This method was applied to the E. coli ribosome binding factor A (RbfA), which aggregates and precipitates in the absence of a solubilization tag unless the C-terminal 25-residue segment is deleted (RbfAΔ25). Using the PrS 2 -tag, full-length well-behaved RbfA samples could be successfully prepared for NMR studies. PrS 2 (non-labeled)-tagged RbfA (isotope-labeled) was produced with the use of the intein approach. The well-resolved TROSY-HSQC spectrum of full-length PrS 2 -tagged RbfA superimposes with the TROSY-HSQC spectrum of RbfAΔ25, indicating that PrS 2 -tag does not affect the structure of the protein to which it is fused. Using a smaller PrS-tag, consisting of a single N-terminal domain of protein S, triple resonance experiments were performed, and most of the backbone 1 H, 15 N and 13 C resonance assignments for full-length E. coli RbfA were determined. Analysis of these chemical shift data with the Chemical Shift Index and heteronuclear 1 H– 15 N NOE measurements reveal the dynamic nature of the C-terminal segment of the full-length RbfA protein, which could not be inferred using the truncated RbfAΔ25 construct. CS-Rosetta calculations also demonstrate that the core structure of full-length RbfA is similar to that of the RbfAΔ25 construct.

  12. NMR measurements of proton exchange between solvent and peptides and proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojcik, J.; Ruszczynska, K.; Zhukov, I.; Ejchart, A.

    1999-01-01

    Scope and limitations of the NMR based methods, equilibration and magnetization transfer, for measuring proton exchange rates of amide protons in peptides and proteins with water protons are discussed. Equilibration is applied to very slow processes detected by hydrogen-deuterium exchange after a solute is dissolved in D 2 O. Magnetization transfer allows to study moderately rapid processes in H 2 O. A number of precautions should be undertaken in order to avoid systemic errors inherent in the magnetization transfer method. (author)

  13. Magic Angle Spinning NMR Structure Determination of Proteins from Pseudocontact Shifts

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jianping

    2013-06-05

    Magic angle spinning solid-state NMR is a unique technique to study atomic-resolution structure of biomacromolecules which resist crystallization or are too large to study by solution NMR techniques. However, difficulties in obtaining sufficient number of long-range distance restraints using dipolar coupling based spectra hamper the process of structure determination of proteins in solid-state NMR. In this study it is shown that high-resolution structure of proteins in solid phase can be determined without the use of traditional dipolar-dipolar coupling based distance restraints by combining the measurements of pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) with Rosetta calculations. The PCSs were generated by chelating exogenous paramagnetic metal ions to a tag 4-mercaptomethyl-dipicolinic acid, which is covalently attached to different residue sites in a 56-residue immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G (GB1). The long-range structural restraints with metal-nucleus distance of up to ∼20 Å are quantitatively extracted from experimentally observed PCSs, and these are in good agreement with the distances back-calculated using an X-ray structure model. Moreover, we demonstrate that using several paramagnetic ions with varied paramagnetic susceptibilities as well as the introduction of paramagnetic labels at different sites can dramatically increase the number of long-range restraints and cover different regions of the protein. The structure generated from solid-state NMR PCSs restraints combined with Rosetta calculations has 0.7 Å root-mean-square deviation relative to X-ray structure. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  14. Automated sequence-specific protein NMR assignment using the memetic algorithm MATCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volk, Jochen [ETH Zuerich, Institut fuer Molekularbiologie und Biophysik (Switzerland); Herrmann, Torsten [Universite de Lyon, CNRS/ENS Lyon/UCB-Lyon 1 (France); Wuethrich, Kurt [ETH Zuerich, Institut fuer Molekularbiologie und Biophysik (Switzerland)], E-mail: wuthrich@mol.biol.ethz.ch

    2008-07-15

    MATCH (Memetic Algorithm and Combinatorial Optimization Heuristics) is a new memetic algorithm for automated sequence-specific polypeptide backbone NMR assignment of proteins. MATCH employs local optimization for tracing partial sequence-specific assignments within a global, population-based search environment, where the simultaneous application of local and global optimization heuristics guarantees high efficiency and robustness. MATCH thus makes combined use of the two predominant concepts in use for automated NMR assignment of proteins. Dynamic transition and inherent mutation are new techniques that enable automatic adaptation to variable quality of the experimental input data. The concept of dynamic transition is incorporated in all major building blocks of the algorithm, where it enables switching between local and global optimization heuristics at any time during the assignment process. Inherent mutation restricts the intrinsically required randomness of the evolutionary algorithm to those regions of the conformation space that are compatible with the experimental input data. Using intact and artificially deteriorated APSY-NMR input data of proteins, MATCH performed sequence-specific resonance assignment with high efficiency and robustness.

  15. Automated Protein NMR Structure Determination Using Wavelet De-noised NOESY Spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dancea, Felician; Guenther, Ulrich

    2005-01-01

    A major time-consuming step of protein NMR structure determination is the generation of reliable NOESY cross peak lists which usually requires a significant amount of manual interaction. Here we present a new algorithm for automated peak picking involving wavelet de-noised NOESY spectra in a process where the identification of peaks is coupled to automated structure determination. The core of this method is the generation of incremental peak lists by applying different wavelet de-noising procedures which yield peak lists of a different noise content. In combination with additional filters which probe the consistency of the peak lists, good convergence of the NOESY-based automated structure determination could be achieved. These algorithms were implemented in the context of the ARIA software for automated NOE assignment and structure determination and were validated for a polysulfide-sulfur transferase protein of known structure. The procedures presented here should be commonly applicable for efficient protein NMR structure determination and automated NMR peak picking

  16. Automated sequence-specific protein NMR assignment using the memetic algorithm MATCH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volk, Jochen; Herrmann, Torsten; Wuethrich, Kurt

    2008-01-01

    MATCH (Memetic Algorithm and Combinatorial Optimization Heuristics) is a new memetic algorithm for automated sequence-specific polypeptide backbone NMR assignment of proteins. MATCH employs local optimization for tracing partial sequence-specific assignments within a global, population-based search environment, where the simultaneous application of local and global optimization heuristics guarantees high efficiency and robustness. MATCH thus makes combined use of the two predominant concepts in use for automated NMR assignment of proteins. Dynamic transition and inherent mutation are new techniques that enable automatic adaptation to variable quality of the experimental input data. The concept of dynamic transition is incorporated in all major building blocks of the algorithm, where it enables switching between local and global optimization heuristics at any time during the assignment process. Inherent mutation restricts the intrinsically required randomness of the evolutionary algorithm to those regions of the conformation space that are compatible with the experimental input data. Using intact and artificially deteriorated APSY-NMR input data of proteins, MATCH performed sequence-specific resonance assignment with high efficiency and robustness

  17. NMR spectroscopic and analytical ultracentrifuge analysis of membrane protein detergent complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choe Senyon

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural studies of integral membrane proteins (IMPs are hampered by inherent difficulties in their heterologous expression and in the purification of solubilized protein-detergent complexes (PDCs. The choice and concentrations of detergents used in an IMP preparation play a critical role in protein homogeneity and are thus important for successful crystallization. Results Seeking an effective and standardized means applicable to genomic approaches for the characterization of PDCs, we chose 1D-NMR spectroscopic analysis to monitor the detergent content throughout their purification: protein extraction, detergent exchange, and sample concentration. We demonstrate that a single NMR measurement combined with a SDS-PAGE of a detergent extracted sample provides a useful gauge of the detergent's extraction potential for a given protein. Furthermore, careful monitoring of the detergent content during the process of IMP production allows for a high level of reproducibility. We also show that in many cases a simple sedimentation velocity measurement provides sufficient data to estimate both the oligomeric state and the detergent-to-protein ratio in PDCs, as well as to evaluate the homogeneity of the samples prior to crystallization screening. Conclusion The techniques presented here facilitate the screening and selection of the extraction detergent, as well as help to maintain reproducibility in the detergent exchange and PDC concentration procedures. Such reproducibility is particularly important for the optimization of initial crystallization conditions, for which multiple purifications are routinely required.

  18. Chimeric Avidin--NMR structure and dynamics of a 56 kDa homotetrameric thermostable protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Tossavainen

    Full Text Available Chimeric avidin (ChiAVD is a product of rational protein engineering remarkably resistant to heat and harsh conditions. In quest of the fundamentals behind factors affecting stability we have elucidated the solution NMR spectroscopic structure of the biotin-bound form of ChiAVD and characterized the protein dynamics through 15N relaxation and hydrogen/deuterium (H/D exchange of this and the biotin-free form. To surmount the challenges arising from the very large size of the protein for NMR spectroscopy, we took advantage of its high thermostability. Conventional triple resonance experiments for fully protonated proteins combined with methyl-detection optimized experiments acquired at 58°C were adequate for the structure determination of this 56 kDa protein. The model-free parameters derived from the 15N relaxation data reveal a remarkably rigid protein at 58°C in both the biotin-bound and the free forms. The H/D exchange experiments indicate a notable increase in hydrogen protection upon biotin binding.

  19. Preparation, characterization, and NMR spectroscopy of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low viscosity fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babu, Charles R.; Flynn, Peter F.; Wand, A. Joshua

    2003-01-01

    Encapsulating a protein in a reverse micelle and dissolving it in a low-viscosity solvent can lower the rotational correlation time of a protein and thereby provides a novel strategy for studying proteins in a variety of contexts. The preparation of the sample is a key element in this approach and is guided by a number of competing parameters. Here we examine the applicability of several strategies for the preparation and characterization of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low viscosity fluids that are suitable for high performance NMR spectroscopy. Ubiquitin is used as a model system to explore various issues such as the homogeneity of the encapsulation, characterization of the hydrodynamic performance of reverse micelles containing protein molecules, and the effective pH of the water environment of the reverse micelle

  20. Studies on the MxiH protein in T3SS needles using DNP-enhanced ssNMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Pascal; Demers, Jean-Philippe; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2014-01-13

    Bacterial T3SS needles formed by the protein MxiH are studied using DNP-enhanced ssNMR spectroscopy at 14.1 T (600 MHz). This technique provides spectra of good resolution, allowing us to draw conclusions about the protein dynamics. With the obtained signal enhancement, samples of limited quantity now get within reach of ssNMR studies. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. MD Data for Patterns in protein flexibility: a comparison of NMR "ensembles", MD trajectories and crystallographic B-factors

    OpenAIRE

    Snyder, David A.; Riga, Anthony; Rivera, Jasmin

    2017-01-01

    This data set comprises three zipped directories that contain the scripts and intermediate molecular dynamics (MD) results used in (as of April 24, 2017) a soon to be submitted paper, "Patterns in protein flexibility: a comparison of NMR 'ensembles', MD trajectories and crystallographic B-factors" written by the authors of this entry. This paper explores patterns in coordinate variance and coordinate uncertainty in MD trajectories and in protein structures derived from NMR and compares co...

  2. On the relationship between NMR-derived amide order parameters and protein backbone entropy changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Kim A; O'Brien, Evan; Kasinath, Vignesh; Wand, A Joshua

    2015-05-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to analyze the relationship between NMR-derived squared generalized order parameters of amide NH groups and backbone entropy. Amide order parameters (O(2) NH ) are largely determined by the secondary structure and average values appear unrelated to the overall flexibility of the protein. However, analysis of the more flexible subset (O(2) NH  entropy than that reported by the side chain methyl axis order parameters, O(2) axis . A calibration curve for backbone entropy vs. O(2) NH is developed, which accounts for both correlations between amide group motions of different residues, and correlations between backbone and side chain motions. This calibration curve can be used with experimental values of O(2) NH changes obtained by NMR relaxation measurements to extract backbone entropy changes, for example, upon ligand binding. In conjunction with our previous calibration for side chain entropy derived from measured O(2) axis values this provides a prescription for determination of the total protein conformational entropy changes from NMR relaxation measurements. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. NMR structure of the N-terminal domain of the replication initiator protein DnaA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wemmer, David E.; Lowery, Thomas J.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Chandonia, John-Marc; Kim, Rosalind; Yokota, Hisao; Wemmer, David E.

    2007-08-07

    DnaA is an essential component in the initiation of bacterial chromosomal replication. DnaA binds to a series of 9 base pair repeats leading to oligomerization, recruitment of the DnaBC helicase, and the assembly of the replication fork machinery. The structure of the N-terminal domain (residues 1-100) of DnaA from Mycoplasma genitalium was determined by NMR spectroscopy. The backbone r.m.s.d. for the first 86 residues was 0.6 +/- 0.2 Angstrom based on 742 NOE, 50 hydrogen bond, 46 backbone angle, and 88 residual dipolar coupling restraints. Ultracentrifugation studies revealed that the domain is monomeric in solution. Features on the protein surface include a hydrophobic cleft flanked by several negative residues on one side, and positive residues on the other. A negatively charged ridge is present on the opposite face of the protein. These surfaces may be important sites of interaction with other proteins involved in the replication process. Together, the structure and NMR assignments should facilitate the design of new experiments to probe the protein-protein interactions essential for the initiation of DNA replication.

  4. Automating unambiguous NOE data usage in NVR for NMR protein structure-based assignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmedov, Murodzhon; Çatay, Bülent; Apaydın, Mehmet Serkan

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy is an important technique that allows determining protein structure in solution. An important problem in protein structure determination using NMR spectroscopy is the mapping of peaks to corresponding amino acids, also known as the assignment problem. Structure-Based Assignment (SBA) is an approach to solve this problem using a template structure that is homologous to the target. Our previously developed approach Nuclear Vector Replacement-Binary Integer Programming (NVR-BIP) computed the optimal solution for small proteins, but was unable to solve the assignments of large proteins. NVR-Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) extended the applicability of the NVR approach for such proteins. One of the input data utilized in these approaches is the Nuclear Overhauser Effect (NOE) data. NOE is an interaction observed between two protons if the protons are located close in space. These protons could be amide protons, protons attached to the alpha-carbon atom in the backbone of the protein, or side chain protons. NVR only uses backbone protons. In this paper, we reformulate the NVR-BIP model to distinguish the type of proton in NOE data and use the corresponding proton coordinates in the extended formulation. In addition, the threshold value over interproton distances is set in a standard manner for all proteins by extracting the NOE upper bound distance information from the data. We also convert NOE intensities into distance thresholds. Our new approach thus handles the NOE data correctly and without manually determined parameters. We accordingly adapt NVR-ACO solution methodology to these changes. Computational results show that our approaches obtain optimal solutions for small proteins. For the large proteins our ant colony optimization-based approach obtains promising results.

  5. A tabu search approach for the NMR protein structure-based assignment problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavuşlar, Gizem; Çatay, Bülent; Apaydın, Mehmet Serkan

    2012-01-01

    Spectroscopy is an experimental technique which exploits the magnetic properties of specific nuclei and enables the study of proteins in solution. The key bottleneck of NMR studies is to map the NMR peaks to corresponding nuclei, also known as the assignment problem. Structure-Based Assignment (SBA) is an approach to solve this computationally challenging problem by using prior information about the protein obtained from a homologous structure. NVR-BIP used the Nuclear Vector Replacement (NVR) framework to model SBA as a binary integer programming problem. In this paper, we prove that this problem is NP-hard and propose a tabu search (TS) algorithm (NVR-TS) equipped with a guided perturbation mechanism to efficiently solve it. NVR-TS uses a quadratic penalty relaxation of NVR-BIP where the violations in the Nuclear Overhauser Effect constraints are penalized in the objective function. Experimental results indicate that our algorithm finds the optimal solution on NVRBIP’s data set which consists of seven proteins with 25 templates (31 to 126 residues). Furthermore, it achieves relatively high assignment accuracies on two additional large proteins, MBP and EIN (348 and 243 residues, respectively), which NVR-BIP failed to solve. The executable and the input files are available for download at http://people.sabanciuniv.edu/catay/NVR-TS/NVR-TS.html.

  6. Isolation of an antifreeze peptide from the Antarctic sponge Homaxinella balfourensis

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkins, S. P.; Blum, A. J.; Burkepile, D. E.; Rutland, T. J.; Wierzbicki, A.; Kelly, M.; Hamann, M.T.

    2002-01-01

    Polar plants and animals survive in subzero waters (−2°C) and many of these marine organisms produce antifreeze proteins (AFPs) to better adapt themselves to these conditions. AFPs prevent the growth of ice crystals which disrupt cellular membranes and destroy cells by inhibiting crystallization of water within the organism. The hydrophilic extract of an Antarctic sponge Homaxinella balfourensis exhibited a non-colligative freezing point depression effect on the crystal morphology of water. T...

  7. High-field Solution NMR Spectroscopy as a Tool for Assessing Protein Interactions with Small Molecule Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Andria L.; Laurence, Jennifer S.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of a small molecule to bind and modify the activity of a protein target at a specific site greatly impacts the success of drugs in the pharmaceutical industry. One of the most important tools for evaluating these interactions has been high-field solution NMR because of its unique ability to examine even weak protein-drug interactions at high resolution. NMR can be used to evaluate the structural, thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of a binding reaction. The basis of NMR screening experiments is that binding causes a perturbation in the physical properties of both molecules. Unique properties of small and macromolecules allow selective detection of either the protein target or ligand, even in a mixture of compounds. This review outlines current methodologies for assessing protein-ligand interactions from the perspectives of the protein target and ligand and delineates the fundamental principles for understanding NMR approaches in drug research. Advances in instrumentation, pulse sequences, isotopic labeling strategies, and the development of competition experiments support the study of higher molecular weight protein targets, facilitate higher-throughput and expand the range of binding affinities that can be evaluated, enhancing the utility of NMR for identifying and characterizing potential therapeutics to druggable protein targets. PMID:18351634

  8. PINE-SPARKY.2 for automated NMR-based protein structure research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woonghee; Markley, John L

    2018-05-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, along with X-ray crystallography and cryoelectron microscopy, is one of the three major tools that enable the determination of atomic-level structural models of biological macromolecules. Of these, NMR has the unique ability to follow important processes in solution, including conformational changes, internal dynamics and protein-ligand interactions. As a means for facilitating the handling and analysis of spectra involved in these types of NMR studies, we have developed PINE-SPARKY.2, a software package that integrates and automates discrete tasks that previously required interaction with separate software packages. The graphical user interface of PINE-SPARKY.2 simplifies chemical shift assignment and verification, automated detection of secondary structural elements, predictions of flexibility and hydrophobic cores, and calculation of three-dimensional structural models. PINE-SPARKY.2 is available in the latest version of NMRFAM-SPARKY from the National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison (http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/download_packages.html), the NMRbox Project (https://nmrbox.org) and to subscribers to the SBGrid (https://sbgrid.org). For a detailed description of the program, see http://www.nmrfam.wisc.edu/pine-sparky2.htm. whlee@nmrfam.wisc.edu or markley@nmrfam.wisc.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  9. Efficient DNP NMR of Membrane Proteins: Sample Preparation Protocols, Sensitivity, and Radical Location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Shu Y.; Lee, Myungwoon; Wang, Tuo; Sergeyev, Ivan V.; Hong, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Although dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has dramatically enhanced solid-state NMR spectral sensitivities of many synthetic materials and some biological macromolecules, recent studies of membrane-protein DNP using exogenously doped paramagnetic radicals as polarizing agents have reported varied and sometimes surprisingly limited enhancement factors. This motivated us to carry out a systematic evaluation of sample preparation protocols for optimizing the sensitivity of DNP NMR spectra of membrane-bound peptides and proteins at cryogenic temperatures of ~110 K. We show that mixing the radical with the membrane by direct titration instead of centrifugation gives a significant boost to DNP enhancement. We quantify the relative sensitivity enhancement between AMUPol and TOTAPOL, two commonly used radicals, and between deuterated and protonated lipid membranes. AMUPol shows ~4 fold higher sensitivity enhancement than TOTAPOL, while deuterated lipid membrane does not give net higher sensitivity for the membrane peptides than protonated membrane. Overall, a ~100 fold enhancement between the microwave-on and microwave-off spectra can be achieved on lipid-rich membranes containing conformationally disordered peptides, and absolute sensitivity gains of 105–160 can be obtained between low-temperature DNP spectra and high-temperature non-DNP spectra. We also measured the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement of lipid signals by TOTAPOL and AMUPol, to determine the depths of these two radicals in the lipid bilayer. Our data indicate a bimodal distribution of both radicals, a surface-bound fraction and a membrane-bound fraction where the nitroxides lie at ~10 Å from the membrane surface. TOTAPOL appears to have a higher membrane-embedded fraction than AMUPol. These results should be useful for membrane-protein solid-state NMR studies under DNP conditions and provide insights into how biradicals interact with phospholipid membranes. PMID:26873390

  10. Prediction of protein continuum secondary structure with probabilistic models based on NMR solved structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey Timothy L

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The structure of proteins may change as a result of the inherent flexibility of some protein regions. We develop and explore probabilistic machine learning methods for predicting a continuum secondary structure, i.e. assigning probabilities to the conformational states of a residue. We train our methods using data derived from high-quality NMR models. Results Several probabilistic models not only successfully estimate the continuum secondary structure, but also provide a categorical output on par with models directly trained on categorical data. Importantly, models trained on the continuum secondary structure are also better than their categorical counterparts at identifying the conformational state for structurally ambivalent residues. Conclusion Cascaded probabilistic neural networks trained on the continuum secondary structure exhibit better accuracy in structurally ambivalent regions of proteins, while sustaining an overall classification accuracy on par with standard, categorical prediction methods.

  11. NMR structure of the mouse prion protein domain PrP(121-231).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riek, R; Hornemann, S; Wider, G; Billeter, M; Glockshuber, R; Wüthrich, K

    1996-07-11

    The 'protein only' hypothesis states that a modified form of normal prion protein triggers infectious neurodegenerative diseases, such as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), or Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans. Prion proteins are thought to exist in two different conformations: the 'benign' PrPcform, and the infectious 'scrapie form', PrPsc. Knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of PrPc is essential for understanding the transition to PrPsc. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure of the autonomously folding PrP domain comprising residues 121-231 (ref. 6) contains a two-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet and three alpha-helices. This domain contains most of the point-mutation sites that have been linked, in human PrP, to the occurrence of familial prion diseases. The NMR structure shows that these mutations occur within, or directly adjacent to, regular secondary structures. The presence of a beta-sheet in PrP(121-231) is in contrast with model predictions of an all-helical structure of PrPc (ref. 8), and may be important for the initiation of the transition from PrPc to PrPsc.

  12. Protein Structure Elucidation from NMR Data with the Program Xplor-NIH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo, Guillermo A; Schwieters, Charles D

    2018-01-01

    Xplor-NIH is a popular software package for biomolecular structure determination from NMR (and other) experimental data. This chapter illustrates its use with the de novo structure determination of the B1 domain of streptococcal protein G (GB1), based on distances from nuclear Overhauser effects, torsion angles from scalar couplings, and bond-vector orientations from residual dipolar couplings. Including Xplor-NIH's latest developments, a complete structure calculation script is discussed in detail, and is intended to serve as a basis for other applications.

  13. Application of data mining tools for classification of protein structural class from residue based averaged NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arun V; Ali, Rehana F M; Cao, Yu; Krishnan, V V

    2015-10-01

    The number of protein sequences deriving from genome sequencing projects is outpacing our knowledge about the function of these proteins. With the gap between experimentally characterized and uncharacterized proteins continuing to widen, it is necessary to develop new computational methods and tools for protein structural information that is directly related to function. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides powerful means to determine three-dimensional structures of proteins in the solution state. However, translation of the NMR spectral parameters to even low-resolution structural information such as protein class requires multiple time consuming steps. In this paper, we present an unorthodox method to predict the protein structural class directly by using the residue's averaged chemical shifts (ACS) based on machine learning algorithms. Experimental chemical shift information from 1491 proteins obtained from Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank (BMRB) and their respective protein structural classes derived from structural classification of proteins (SCOP) were used to construct a data set with 119 attributes and 5 different classes. Twenty four different classification schemes were evaluated using several performance measures. Overall the residue based ACS values can predict the protein structural classes with 80% accuracy measured by Matthew correlation coefficient. Specifically protein classes defined by mixed αβ or small proteins are classified with >90% correlation. Our results indicate that this NMR-based method can be utilized as a low-resolution tool for protein structural class identification without any prior chemical shift assignments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Exploring abiotic stress on asynchronous protein metabolism in single kernels of wheat studied by NMR spectroscopy and chemometrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winning, H.; Viereck, N.; Wollenweber, B.

    2009-01-01

    at terminal spikelet, during grain-filling or at both stages. Principal component trajectories of the total protein content and the protein fractions of flour as well as the H-1 NMR spectra of single wheat kernels, wheat flour, and wheat methanol extracts were analysed to elucidate the metabolic development...... indicating that protein metabolism is influenced by multiple drought events, the H-1 NMR spectra of the methanol extracts of flour from mature grains revealed that the amount of fumaric acid is particularly sensitive to water deficits....

  15. 1H-Detected Solid-State NMR Studies of Water-Inaccessible Proteins In Vitro and In Situ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medeiros-Silva, João; Mance, Deni; Daniëls, Mark; Jekhmane, Miranda; Houben, Klaartje; Baldus, Marc; Weingarth, Markus

    2016-01-01

    1H detection can significantly improve solid-state NMR spectral sensitivity and thereby allows studying more complex proteins. However, the common prerequisite for 1H detection is the introduction of exchangeable protons in otherwise deuterated proteins, which has thus far significantly hampered

  16. Relative stability of protein structures determined by X-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy : A molecular dynamics simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, H; Mark, AE

    2003-01-01

    The relative stability of protein structures determined by either X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been investigated by using molecular dynamics simulation techniques. Published structures of 34 proteins containing between 50 and 100 residues have been

  17. NMR Structural Studies of Domain 1 of Receptor-associated Protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yibing; Migliorini, Molly; Walsh, Joseph; Yu Ping; Strickland, Dudley K.; Wang Yunxing

    2004-01-01

    The 39 kDa receptor-associated protein (RAP) is an endoplasmic reticulum resident protein that binds tightly to the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) as well as to other members of the low-density lipoprotein receptor superfamily. The association of RAP with LRP prevents this receptor from interacting with ligands. RAP is a three-domain protein that contains two independent LRP binding sites; one located within domains 1 and 2, and one located within domain 3. As the first step toward defining the structure of the full-length protein and understanding the interaction between RAP and this family of receptors, we have determined the 3D structure of domain 1 using constraints derived from heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR spectra, including NOEs, dihedral angles, J-couplings and chemical shifts, as well as two sets of non-correlated residual dipolar couplings measured from the protein solutions in anisotropic media of Pf1 and 6% polyacrylamide gel. The backbone C α rmsd between the current structure and a homo-nuclear NOE-based structure is about 2 A. The large rmsd mainly reflects the significant differences in helical orientation and in the structural details of the long helix (helix 2) between the two structures

  18. The AUDANA algorithm for automated protein 3D structure determination from NMR NOE data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Woonghee; Petit, Chad M.; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Stark, Jaime L.; Markley, John L.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce AUDANA (Automated Database-Assisted NOE Assignment), an algorithm for determining three-dimensional structures of proteins from NMR data that automates the assignment of 3D-NOE spectra, generates distance constraints, and conducts iterative high temperature molecular dynamics and simulated annealing. The protein sequence, chemical shift assignments, and NOE spectra are the only required inputs. Distance constraints generated automatically from ambiguously assigned NOE peaks are validated during the structure calculation against information from an enlarged version of the freely available PACSY database that incorporates information on protein structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). This approach yields robust sets of distance constraints and 3D structures. We evaluated the performance of AUDANA with input data for 14 proteins ranging in size from 6 to 25 kDa that had 27–98 % sequence identity to proteins in the database. In all cases, the automatically calculated 3D structures passed stringent validation tests. Structures were determined with and without database support. In 9/14 cases, database support improved the agreement with manually determined structures in the PDB and in 11/14 cases, database support lowered the r.m.s.d. of the family of 20 structural models.

  19. Equilibrium simulations of proteins using molecular fragment replacement and NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomsma, Wouter; Tian, Pengfei; Frellsen, Jes; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Hamelryck, Thomas; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2014-09-23

    Methods of protein structure determination based on NMR chemical shifts are becoming increasingly common. The most widely used approaches adopt the molecular fragment replacement strategy, in which structural fragments are repeatedly reassembled into different complete conformations in molecular simulations. Although these approaches are effective in generating individual structures consistent with the chemical shift data, they do not enable the sampling of the conformational space of proteins with correct statistical weights. Here, we present a method of molecular fragment replacement that makes it possible to perform equilibrium simulations of proteins, and hence to determine their free energy landscapes. This strategy is based on the encoding of the chemical shift information in a probabilistic model in Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations. First, we demonstrate that with this approach it is possible to fold proteins to their native states starting from extended structures. Second, we show that the method satisfies the detailed balance condition and hence it can be used to carry out an equilibrium sampling from the Boltzmann distribution corresponding to the force field used in the simulations. Third, by comparing the results of simulations carried out with and without chemical shift restraints we describe quantitatively the effects that these restraints have on the free energy landscapes of proteins. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the molecular fragment replacement strategy can be used in combination with chemical shift information to characterize not only the native structures of proteins but also their conformational fluctuations.

  20. The AUDANA algorithm for automated protein 3D structure determination from NMR NOE data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woonghee; Petit, Chad M; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Stark, Jaime L; Markley, John L

    2016-06-01

    We introduce AUDANA (Automated Database-Assisted NOE Assignment), an algorithm for determining three-dimensional structures of proteins from NMR data that automates the assignment of 3D-NOE spectra, generates distance constraints, and conducts iterative high temperature molecular dynamics and simulated annealing. The protein sequence, chemical shift assignments, and NOE spectra are the only required inputs. Distance constraints generated automatically from ambiguously assigned NOE peaks are validated during the structure calculation against information from an enlarged version of the freely available PACSY database that incorporates information on protein structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). This approach yields robust sets of distance constraints and 3D structures. We evaluated the performance of AUDANA with input data for 14 proteins ranging in size from 6 to 25 kDa that had 27-98 % sequence identity to proteins in the database. In all cases, the automatically calculated 3D structures passed stringent validation tests. Structures were determined with and without database support. In 9/14 cases, database support improved the agreement with manually determined structures in the PDB and in 11/14 cases, database support lowered the r.m.s.d. of the family of 20 structural models.

  1. The AUDANA algorithm for automated protein 3D structure determination from NMR NOE data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woonghee, E-mail: whlee@nmrfam.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison and Biochemistry Department (United States); Petit, Chad M. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics (United States); Cornilescu, Gabriel; Stark, Jaime L.; Markley, John L., E-mail: markley@nmrfam.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison and Biochemistry Department (United States)

    2016-06-15

    We introduce AUDANA (Automated Database-Assisted NOE Assignment), an algorithm for determining three-dimensional structures of proteins from NMR data that automates the assignment of 3D-NOE spectra, generates distance constraints, and conducts iterative high temperature molecular dynamics and simulated annealing. The protein sequence, chemical shift assignments, and NOE spectra are the only required inputs. Distance constraints generated automatically from ambiguously assigned NOE peaks are validated during the structure calculation against information from an enlarged version of the freely available PACSY database that incorporates information on protein structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). This approach yields robust sets of distance constraints and 3D structures. We evaluated the performance of AUDANA with input data for 14 proteins ranging in size from 6 to 25 kDa that had 27–98 % sequence identity to proteins in the database. In all cases, the automatically calculated 3D structures passed stringent validation tests. Structures were determined with and without database support. In 9/14 cases, database support improved the agreement with manually determined structures in the PDB and in 11/14 cases, database support lowered the r.m.s.d. of the family of 20 structural models.

  2. Characterization and elimination of undesirable protein residues in plant cell walls for enhancing lignin analysis by solution-state 2D gel-NMR methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proteins exist in every plant cell wall. Certain protein residues interfere with lignin characterization and quantification. The current solution-state 2D-NMR technique (gel-NMR) for whole plant cell wall structural profiling provides detailed information regarding cell walls and proteins. However, ...

  3. Protein backbone and sidechain torsion angles predicted from NMR chemical shifts using artificial neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Yang; Bax, Ad, E-mail: bax@nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States)

    2013-07-15

    A new program, TALOS-N, is introduced for predicting protein backbone torsion angles from NMR chemical shifts. The program relies far more extensively on the use of trained artificial neural networks than its predecessor, TALOS+. Validation on an independent set of proteins indicates that backbone torsion angles can be predicted for a larger, {>=}90 % fraction of the residues, with an error rate smaller than ca 3.5 %, using an acceptance criterion that is nearly two-fold tighter than that used previously, and a root mean square difference between predicted and crystallographically observed ({phi}, {psi}) torsion angles of ca 12 Masculine-Ordinal-Indicator . TALOS-N also reports sidechain {chi}{sup 1} rotameric states for about 50 % of the residues, and a consistency with reference structures of 89 %. The program includes a neural network trained to identify secondary structure from residue sequence and chemical shifts.

  4. Protein backbone and sidechain torsion angles predicted from NMR chemical shifts using artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Yang; Bax, Ad

    2013-01-01

    A new program, TALOS-N, is introduced for predicting protein backbone torsion angles from NMR chemical shifts. The program relies far more extensively on the use of trained artificial neural networks than its predecessor, TALOS+. Validation on an independent set of proteins indicates that backbone torsion angles can be predicted for a larger, ≥90 % fraction of the residues, with an error rate smaller than ca 3.5 %, using an acceptance criterion that is nearly two-fold tighter than that used previously, and a root mean square difference between predicted and crystallographically observed (φ, ψ) torsion angles of ca 12º. TALOS-N also reports sidechain χ 1 rotameric states for about 50 % of the residues, and a consistency with reference structures of 89 %. The program includes a neural network trained to identify secondary structure from residue sequence and chemical shifts

  5. NMR structure of the single QALGGH zinc finger domain from the Arabidopsis thaliana SUPERMAN protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isernia, Carla; Bucci, Enrico; Leone, Marilisa; Zaccaro, Laura; Di Lello, Paola; Digilio, Giuseppe; Esposito, Sabrina; Saviano, Michele; Di Blasio, Benedetto; Pedone, Carlo; Pedone, Paolo V; Fattorusso, Roberto

    2003-03-03

    Zinc finger domains of the classical type represent the most abundant DNA binding domains in eukaryotic transcription factors. Plant proteins contain from one to four zinc finger domains, which are characterized by high conservation of the sequence QALGGH, shown to be critical for DNA-binding activity. The Arabidopsis thaliana SUPERMAN protein, which contains a single QALGGH zinc finger, is necessary for proper spatial development of reproductive floral tissues and has been shown to specifically bind to DNA. Here, we report the synthesis and UV and NMR spectroscopic structural characterization of a 37 amino acid SUPERMAN region complexed to a Zn(2+) ion (Zn-SUP37) and present the first high-resolution structure of a classical zinc finger domain from a plant protein. The NMR structure of the SUPERMAN zinc finger domain consists of a very well-defined betabetaalpha motif, typical of all other Cys(2)-His(2) zinc fingers structurally characterized. As a consequence, the highly conserved QALGGH sequence is located at the N terminus of the alpha helix. This region of the domain of animal zinc finger proteins consists of hypervariable residues that are responsible for recognizing the DNA bases. Therefore, we propose a peculiar DNA recognition code for the QALGGH zinc finger domain that includes all or some of the amino acid residues at positions -1, 2, and 3 (numbered relative to the N terminus of the helix) and possibly others at the C-terminal end of the recognition helix. This study further confirms that the zinc finger domain, though very simple, is an extremely versatile DNA binding motif.

  6. Detergent/Nanodisc Screening for High-Resolution NMR Studies of an Integral Membrane Protein Containing a Cytoplasmic Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslennikov, Innokentiy; Choe, Senyon; Riek, Roland

    2013-01-01

    Because membrane proteins need to be extracted from their natural environment and reconstituted in artificial milieus for the 3D structure determination by X-ray crystallography or NMR, the search for membrane mimetic that conserve the native structure and functional activities remains challenging. We demonstrate here a detergent/nanodisc screening study by NMR of the bacterial α-helical membrane protein YgaP containing a cytoplasmic rhodanese domain. The analysis of 2D [15N,1H]-TROSY spectra shows that only a careful usage of low amounts of mixed detergents did not perturb the cytoplasmic domain while solubilizing in parallel the transmembrane segments with good spectral quality. In contrast, the incorporation of YgaP into nanodiscs appeared to be straightforward and yielded a surprisingly high quality [15N,1H]-TROSY spectrum opening an avenue for the structural studies of a helical membrane protein in a bilayer system by solution state NMR. PMID:23349867

  7. Resonance assignment for a particularly challenging protein based on systematic unlabeling of amino acids to complement incomplete NMR data sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellstedt, Peter; Seiboth, Thomas; Häfner, Sabine; Kutscha, Henriette; Ramachandran, Ramadurai; Görlach, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    NMR-based structure determination of a protein requires the assignment of resonances as indispensable first step. Even though heteronuclear through-bond correlation methods are available for that purpose, challenging situations arise in cases where the protein in question only yields samples of limited concentration and/or stability. Here we present a strategy based upon specific individual unlabeling of all 20 standard amino acids to complement standard NMR experiments and to achieve unambiguous backbone assignments for the fast precipitating 23 kDa catalytic domain of human aprataxin of which only incomplete standard NMR data sets could be obtained. Together with the validation of this approach utilizing the protein GB1 as a model, a comprehensive insight into metabolic interconversion ('scrambling”) of NH and CO groups in a standard Escherichia coli expression host is provided

  8. A natural and readily available crowding agent: NMR studies of proteins in hen egg white.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martorell, Gabriel; Adrover, Miquel; Kelly, Geoff; Temussi, Piero Andrea; Pastore, Annalisa

    2011-05-01

    In vitro studies of biological macromolecules are usually performed in dilute, buffered solutions containing one or just a few different biological macromolecules. Under these conditions, the interactions among molecules are diffusion limited. On the contrary, in living systems, macromolecules of a given type are surrounded by many others, at very high total concentrations. In the last few years, there has been an increasing effort to study biological macromolecules directly in natural crowded environments, as in intact bacterial cells or by mimicking natural crowding by adding proteins, polysaccharides, or even synthetic polymers. Here, we propose the use of hen egg white (HEW) as a simple natural medium, with all features of the media of crowded cells, that could be used by any researcher without difficulty and inexpensively. We present a study of the stability and dynamics behavior of model proteins in HEW, chosen as a prototypical, readily accessible natural medium that can mimic cytosol. We show that two typical globular proteins, dissolved in HEW, give NMR spectra very similar to those obtained in dilute buffers, although dynamic parameters are clearly affected by the crowded medium. The thermal stability of one of these proteins, measured in a range comprising both heat and cold denaturation, is also similar to that in buffer. Our data open new possibilities to the study of proteins in natural crowded media. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. NMR spectroscopy reveals unexpected structural variation at the protein-protein interface in MHC class I molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beerbaum, Monika; Ballaschk, Martin; Erdmann, Natalja [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) (Germany); Schnick, Christina [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Institut fuer Immungenetik, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Diehl, Anne [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) (Germany); Uchanska-Ziegler, Barbara; Ziegler, Andreas [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Institut fuer Immungenetik, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Schmieder, Peter, E-mail: schmieder@fmp-berlin.de [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    {beta}{sub 2}-Microglobulin ({beta}{sub 2}m) is a small, monomorphic protein non-covalently bound to the heavy chain (HC) in polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Given the high evolutionary conservation of structural features of {beta}{sub 2}m in various MHC molecules as shown by X-ray crystallography, {beta}{sub 2}m is often considered as a mere scaffolding protein. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we investigate here whether {beta}{sub 2}m residues at the interface to the HC exhibit changes depending on HC polymorphisms and the peptides bound to the complex in solution. First we show that human {beta}{sub 2}m can effectively be produced in deuterated form using high-cell-density-fermentation and we employ the NMR resonance assignments obtained for triple-labeled {beta}{sub 2}m bound to the HLA-B*27:09 HC to examine the {beta}{sub 2}m-HC interface. We then proceed to compare the resonances of {beta}{sub 2}m in two minimally distinct subtypes, HLA-B*27:09 and HLA-B*27:05, that are differentially associated with the spondyloarthropathy Ankylosing Spondylitis. Each of these subtypes is complexed with four distinct peptides for which structural information is already available. We find that only the resonances at the {beta}{sub 2}m-HC interface show a variation of their chemical shifts between the different complexes. This indicates the existence of an unexpected plasticity that enables {beta}{sub 2}m to accommodate changes that depend on HC polymorphism as well as on the bound peptide through subtle structural variations of the protein-protein interface.

  10. A new carbamidemethyl-linked lanthanoid chelating tag for PCS NMR spectroscopy of proteins in living HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hikone, Yuya [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering (Japan); Hirai, Go [RIKEN, Synthetic Organic Chemistry Laboratory (Japan); Mishima, Masaki [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering (Japan); Inomata, Kohsuke [RIKEN, Quantitative Biology Center (Japan); Ikeya, Teppei; Arai, Souichiro [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering (Japan); Shirakawa, Masahiro [Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development, AMED-CREST (Japan); Sodeoka, Mikiko [RIKEN, Synthetic Organic Chemistry Laboratory (Japan); Ito, Yutaka, E-mail: ito-yutaka@tmu.ac.jp [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    Structural analyses of proteins under macromolecular crowding inside human cultured cells by in-cell NMR spectroscopy are crucial not only for explicit understanding of their cellular functions but also for applications in medical and pharmaceutical sciences. In-cell NMR experiments using human cultured cells however suffer from low sensitivity, thus pseudocontact shifts from protein-tagged paramagnetic lanthanoid ions, analysed using sensitive heteronuclear two-dimensional correlation NMR spectra, offer huge potential advantage in obtaining structural information over conventional NOE-based approaches. We synthesised a new lanthanoid-chelating tag (M8-CAM-I), in which the eight-fold, stereospecifically methylated DOTA (M8) scaffold was retained, while a stable carbamidemethyl (CAM) group was introduced as the functional group connecting to proteins. M8-CAM-I successfully fulfilled the requirements for in-cell NMR: high-affinity to lanthanoid, low cytotoxicity and the stability under reducing condition inside cells. Large PCSs for backbone N–H resonances observed for M8-CAM-tagged human ubiquitin mutant proteins, which were introduced into HeLa cells by electroporation, demonstrated that this approach readily provides the useful information enabling the determination of protein structures, relative orientations of domains and protein complexes within human cultured cells.

  11. A new carbamidemethyl-linked lanthanoid chelating tag for PCS NMR spectroscopy of proteins in living HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hikone, Yuya; Hirai, Go; Mishima, Masaki; Inomata, Kohsuke; Ikeya, Teppei; Arai, Souichiro; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Sodeoka, Mikiko; Ito, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Structural analyses of proteins under macromolecular crowding inside human cultured cells by in-cell NMR spectroscopy are crucial not only for explicit understanding of their cellular functions but also for applications in medical and pharmaceutical sciences. In-cell NMR experiments using human cultured cells however suffer from low sensitivity, thus pseudocontact shifts from protein-tagged paramagnetic lanthanoid ions, analysed using sensitive heteronuclear two-dimensional correlation NMR spectra, offer huge potential advantage in obtaining structural information over conventional NOE-based approaches. We synthesised a new lanthanoid-chelating tag (M8-CAM-I), in which the eight-fold, stereospecifically methylated DOTA (M8) scaffold was retained, while a stable carbamidemethyl (CAM) group was introduced as the functional group connecting to proteins. M8-CAM-I successfully fulfilled the requirements for in-cell NMR: high-affinity to lanthanoid, low cytotoxicity and the stability under reducing condition inside cells. Large PCSs for backbone N–H resonances observed for M8-CAM-tagged human ubiquitin mutant proteins, which were introduced into HeLa cells by electroporation, demonstrated that this approach readily provides the useful information enabling the determination of protein structures, relative orientations of domains and protein complexes within human cultured cells.

  12. Synthesis of Structures Related to Antifreeze Glycoproteins

    OpenAIRE

    Fyrner, Timmy

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, synthesis of structures related to antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs) are presented. Synthetic routes to a protected carbohydrate derivative, 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-benzyl-β-galactopyranosyl-(1→3)-2-deoxy-2-azido-4,6-di-O-benzyl-β-D-thio-1-galactopyranoside, and a tBu-Ala-Thr-Ala-Fmoc tripeptide, are described. These compounds are meant to be used in the assembly of AFGPs and analogues thereof. A Gal-GlcN disaccharide was synthesized via glycosylation between the donor, bromo-2-O-benzo...

  13. De novo gene evolution of antifreeze glycoproteins in codfishes revealed by whole genome sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baalsrud, Helle Tessand; Tørresen, Ole Kristian; Hongrø Solbakken, Monica; Salzburger, Walter; Hanel, Reinhold; Jakobsen, Kjetill S; Jentoft, Sissel

    2017-12-05

    New genes can arise through duplication of a pre-existing gene or de novo from non-coding DNA, providing raw material for evolution of new functions in response to a changing environment. A prime example is the independent evolution of antifreeze glycoprotein genes (afgps) in the Arctic codfishes and Antarctic notothenioids to prevent freezing. However, the highly repetitive nature of these genes complicates studies of their organization. In notothenioids, afgps evolved from an extant gene, yet the evolutionary origin of afgps in codfishes is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that afgps in codfishes have evolved de novo from non-coding DNA 13-18 Ma, coinciding with the cooling of the Northern Hemisphere. Using whole-genome sequence data from several codfishes and notothenioids, we find higher copy number of afgp in species exposed to more severe freezing suggesting a gene dosage effect. Notably, antifreeze function is lost in one lineage of codfishes analogous to the afgp losses in non-Antarctic notothenioids. This indicates that selection can eliminate the antifreeze function when freezing is no longer imminent. Additionally, we show that evolution of afgp-assisting antifreeze potentiating protein genes (afpps) in notothenioids coincides with origin and lineage-specific losses of afgp. The origin of afgps in codfishes is one of the first examples of an essential gene born from non-coding DNA in a non-model species. Our study underlines the power of comparative genomics to uncover past molecular signatures of genome evolution, and further highlights the impact of de novo gene origin in response to a changing selection regime. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  14. Quantifying protein dynamics in the ps–ns time regime by NMR relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernández, Griselda; LeMaster, David M., E-mail: david.lemaster@health.ny.gov [University at Albany - SUNY, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health and Department of Biomedical Sciences, School of Public Health (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Both {sup 15}N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) and sufficiently rapid exchange linebroadening transitions exhibit relaxation contributions that are proportional to the square of the magnetic field. Deconvoluting these contributions is further complicated by residue-dependent variations in protein amide {sup 15}N CSA values which have proven difficult to accurately measure. Exploiting recently reported improvements for the implementation of T{sub 1} and T{sub 1ρ} experiments, field strength-dependent studies have been carried out on the B3 domain of protein G (GB3) as well as on the immunophilin FKBP12 and a H87V variant of that protein in which the major conformational exchange linebroadening transition is suppressed. By applying a zero frequency spectral density rescaling analysis to the relaxation data collected at magnetic fields from 500 to 900 MHz {sup 1}H, differential residue-specific {sup 15}N CSA values have been obtained for GB3 which correlate with those derived from solid state and liquid crystalline NMR measurements to a level similar to the correlation among those previously reported studies. Application of this analysis protocol to FKBP12 demonstrated an efficient quantitation of both weak exchange linebroadening contributions and differential residue-specific {sup 15}N CSA values. Experimental access to such differential residue-specific {sup 15}N CSA values should significantly facilitate more accurate comparisons with molecular dynamics simulations of protein motion that occurs within the timeframe of global molecular tumbling.

  15. Zero in on Key Open Problems in Automated NMR Protein Structure Determination

    KAUST Repository

    Abbas, Ahmed

    2015-11-12

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is one of the main approaches for protein struc- ture determination. The biggest advantage of this approach is that it can determine the three-dimensional structure of the protein in the solution phase. Thus, the natural dynamics of the protein can be studied. However, NMR protein structure determina- tion is an expertise intensive and time-consuming process. If the structure determi- nation process can be accelerated or even automated by computational methods, that will significantly advance the structural biology field. Our goal in this dissertation is to propose highly efficient and error tolerant methods that can work well on real and noisy data sets of NMR. Our first contribution in this dissertation is the development of a novel peak pick- ing method (WaVPeak). First, WaVPeak denoises the NMR spectra using wavelet smoothing. A brute force method is then used to identify all the candidate peaks. Af- ter that, the volume of each candidate peak is estimated. Finally, the peaks are sorted according to their volumes. WaVPeak is tested on the same benchmark data set that was used to test the state-of-the-art method, PICKY. WaVPeak shows significantly better performance than PICKY in terms of recall and precision. Our second contribution is to propose an automatic method to select peaks pro- duced by peak picking methods. This automatic method is used to overcome the limitations of fixed number-based methods. Our method is based on the Benjamini- Hochberg (B-H) algorithm. The method is used with both WaVPeak and PICKY to automatically select the number of peaks to return from out of hundreds of candidate peaks. The volume (in WaVPeak) and the intensity (in PICKY) are converted into p-values. Peaks that have p-values below some certain threshold are selected. Ex- perimental results show that the new method is better than the fixed number-based method in terms of recall. To improve precision, we tried to eliminate false peaks using

  16. Antifreeze glycopeptides: from structure and activity studies to current approaches in chemical synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbańczyk, Małgorzata; Góra, Jerzy; Latajka, Rafał; Sewald, Norbert

    2017-02-01

    Antifreeze glycopeptides (AFGPs) are a class of biological antifreeze agents found predominantly in Arctic and Antarctic species of fish. They possess the ability to regulate ice nucleation and ice crystal growth, thus creating viable life conditions at temperatures below the freezing point of body fluids. AFGPs usually consist of 4-55 repetitions of the tripeptide unit Ala-Ala-Thr that is O-glycosylated at the threonine side chains with β-D-galactosyl-(1 → 3)-α-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine. Due to their interesting properties and high antifreeze activity, they have many potential applications, e.g., in food industry and medicine. Current research is focused towards understanding the relationship between the structural preferences and the activity of the AFGPs, as well as developing time and cost efficient ways of synthesis of this class of molecules. Recent computational studies in conjunction with experimental results from NMR and THz spectroscopies were a possible breakthrough in understanding the mechanism of action of AFGPs. At the moment, as a result of these findings, the focus of research is shifted towards the analysis of behaviour of the hydration shell around AFGPs and the impact of water-dynamics retardation caused by AFGPs on ice crystal growth. In the field of organic synthesis of AFGP analogues, most of the novel protocols are centered around solid-phase peptide synthesis and multiple efforts are made to optimize this approach. In this review, we present the current state of knowledge regarding the structure and activity of AFGPs, as well as approaches to organic synthesis of these molecules with focus on the most recent developments.

  17. Resolution-by-proxy: a simple measure for assessing and comparing the overall quality of NMR protein structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berjanskii, Mark; Zhou Jianjun; Liang Yongjie; Lin Guohui; Wishart, David S.

    2012-01-01

    In protein X-ray crystallography, resolution is often used as a good indicator of structural quality. Diffraction resolution of protein crystals correlates well with the number of X-ray observables that are used in structure generation and, therefore, with protein coordinate errors. In protein NMR, there is no parameter identical to X-ray resolution. Instead, resolution is often used as a synonym of NMR model quality. Resolution of NMR structures is often deduced from ensemble precision, torsion angle normality and number of distance restraints per residue. The lack of common techniques to assess the resolution of X-ray and NMR structures complicates the comparison of structures solved by these two methods. This problem is sometimes approached by calculating “equivalent resolution” from structure quality metrics. However, existing protocols do not offer a comprehensive assessment of protein structure as they calculate equivalent resolution from a relatively small number (<5) of protein parameters. Here, we report a development of a protocol that calculates equivalent resolution from 25 measurable protein features. This new method offers better performance (correlation coefficient of 0.92, mean absolute error of 0.28 Å) than existing predictors of equivalent resolution. Because the method uses coordinate data as a proxy for X-ray diffraction data, we call this measure “Resolution-by-Proxy” or ResProx. We demonstrate that ResProx can be used to identify under-restrained, poorly refined or inaccurate NMR structures, and can discover structural defects that the other equivalent resolution methods cannot detect. The ResProx web server is available at http://www.resprox.cahttp://www.resprox.ca.

  18. NMR structural characterization of the N-terminal domain of the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from Dictyostelium discoideum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavoungou, Chrystelle [Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry (Germany); Israel, Lars [Ludwig Maximilians-University, Adolf Butenandt Institute, Cell Biology (Germany); Rehm, Till; Ksiazek, Dorota; Krajewski, Marcin; Popowicz, Grzegorz [Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry (Germany); Noegel, Angelika A. [University of Cologne, Institute for Biochemistry (Germany); Schleicher, Michael [Ludwig Maximilians-University, Adolf Butenandt Institute, Cell Biology (Germany); Holak, Tad A. [Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry (Germany)

    2004-05-15

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are highly conserved, ubiquitous actin binding proteins that are involved in microfilament reorganization. The N-termini of CAPs play a role in Ras signaling and bind adenylyl cyclase; the C-termini bind to G-actin. We report here the NMR characterization of the amino-terminal domain of CAP from Dictyostelium discoideum (CAP(1-226)). NMR data, including the steady state {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N heteronuclear NOE experiments, indicate that the first 50 N-terminal residues are unstructured and that this highly flexible serine-rich fragment is followed by a stable, folded core starting at Ser 51. The NMR structure of the folded core is an {alpha}-helix bundle composed of six antiparallel helices, in a stark contrast to the recently determined CAP C-terminal domain structure, which is solely built by {beta}-strands.

  19. Sensitivity enhancement using paramagnetic relaxation in MAS solid-state NMR of perdeuterated proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linser, Rasmus; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Diehl, Anne; Reif, Bernd

    2007-12-01

    Previously, Ishii et al., could show that chelated paramagnetic ions can be employed to significantly decrease the recycle delay of a MAS solid-state NMR experiment [N.P. Wickramasinghe, M. Kotecha, A. Samoson, J. Past, Y. Ishii, Sensitivity enhancement in C-13 solid-state NMR of protein microcrystals by use of paramagnetic metal ions for optimizing H-1 T-1 relaxation, J. Magn. Reson. 184 (2007) 350-356]. Application of the method is limited to very robust samples, for which sample stability is not compromised by RF induced heating. In addition, probe integrity might be perturbed in standard MAS PRE experiments due to the use of very short duty cycles. We show that these deleterious effects can be avoided if perdeuterated proteins are employed that have been re-crystallized from D 2O:H 2O = 9:1 containing buffer solutions. The experiments are demonstrated using the SH3 domain of chicken α-spectrin as a model system. The labeling scheme allows to record proton detected 1H, 15N correlation spectra with very high resolution in the absence of heteronuclear dipolar decoupling. Cu-edta as a doping reagent yields a reduction of the recycle delay by up to a factor of 15. In particular, we find that the 1H T1 for the bulk H N magnetization is reduced from 4.4 s to 0.3 s if the Cu-edta concentration is increased from 0 mM to 250 mM. Possible perturbations like chemical shift changes or line broadening due to the paramagnetic chelate complex are minimal. No degradation of our samples was observed in the course of the experiments.

  20. Solid-state NMR studies of the prion protein H1 fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, J.; Kolbert, A. C.; Larsen, R.; Ernst, M.; Bekker, T.; Baldwin, M.; Prusiner, S. B.; Pines, A.; Wemmer, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    Conformational changes in the prion protein (PrP) seem to be responsible for prion diseases. We have used conformation-dependent chemical-shift measurements and rotational-resonance distance measurements to analyze the conformation of solid-state peptides lacking long-range order, corresponding to a region of PrP designated H1. This region is predicted to undergo a transformation of secondary structure in generating the infectious form of the protein. Solid-state NMR spectra of specifically 13C-enriched samples of H1, residues 109-122 (MKHMAGAAAAGAVV) of Syrian hamster PrP, have been acquired under cross-polarization and magic-angle spinning conditions. Samples lyophilized from 50% acetonitrile/50% water show chemical shifts characteristic of a beta-sheet conformation in the region corresponding to residues 112-121, whereas samples lyophilized from hexafluoroisopropanol display shifts indicative of alpha-helical secondary structure in the region corresponding to residues 113-117. Complete conversion to the helical conformation was not observed and conversion from alpha-helix back to beta-sheet, as inferred from the solid-state NMR spectra, occurred when samples were exposed to water. Rotational-resonance experiments were performed on seven doubly 13C-labeled H1 samples dried from water. Measured distances suggest that the peptide is in an extended, possibly beta-strand, conformation. These results are consistent with the experimental observation that PrP can exist in different conformational states and with structural predictions based on biological data and theoretical modeling that suggest that H1 may play a key role in the conformational transition involved in the development of prion diseases. PMID:8844854

  1. Quantitative measurement of water diffusion lifetimes at a protein/DNA interface by NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruschus, James M.; Ferretti, James A.

    2001-01-01

    Hydration site lifetimes of slowly diffusing water molecules at the protein/DNA interface of the vnd/NK-2 homeodomain DNA complex were determined using novel three-dimensional NMR techniques. The lifetimes were calculated using the ratios of ROE and NOE cross-relaxation rates between the water and the protein backbone and side chain amides. This calculation of the lifetimes is based on a model of the spectral density function of the water-protein interaction consisting of three timescales of motion: fast vibrational/rotational motion, diffusion into/out of the hydration site, and overall macromolecular tumbling. The lifetimes measured ranged from approximately 400 ps to more than 5 ns, and nearly all the slowly diffusing water molecules detected lie at the protein/DNA interface. A quantitative analysis of relayed water cross-relaxation indicated that even at very short mixing times, 5 ms for ROESY and 12 ms for NOESY, relay of magnetization can make a small but detectable contribution to the measured rates. The temperature dependences of the NOE rates were measured to help discriminate direct dipolar cross-relaxation from chemical exchange. Comparison with several X-ray structures of homeodomain/DNA complexes reveals a strong correspondence between water molecules in conserved locations and the slowly diffusing water molecules detected by NMR. A homology model based on the X-ray structures was created to visualize the conserved water molecules detected at the vnd/NK-2 homeodomain DNA interface. Two chains of water molecules are seen at the right and left sides of the major groove, adjacent to the third helix of the homeodomain. Two water-mediated hydrogen bond bridges spanning the protein/DNA interface are present in the model, one between the backbone of Phe8 and a DNA phosphate, and one between the side chain of Asn51 and a DNA phosphate. The hydrogen bond bridge between Asn51 and the DNA might be especially important since the DNA contact made by the invariant

  2. Protein samples for NMR: expression and analysis without purification, and stabilization by covalent cyclization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otting, G.; Ozawa, K.; Prosselkov, P.; Williams, N.K.; Dixon, N.E.; Liepinsh, E.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: A modified cell-free in vitro expression system was established for the expression of milligram quantities of protein per mL reaction medium. Expression levels of the E coli cytoplasmic peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase, PpiB, in 0 6 mL reaction medium were sufficient for the direct recording of clean 15N-HSQC spectra without chromatographic purification or sample concentration steps, using a 600 MHz NMR spectrometer with cryoprobe. Besides providing a route to high-throughput sample preparation, in vitro expression systems are known to be highly economic in their utilization of selectively labelled ammo acids. Using dual-selective labelling with 15N- and 13C-labelled amino acids, the 15N-HSQC cross peaks of strategically selected ammo acids can readily be identified and monitored for their response to the presence of ligand molecules, again without sample purification. 2) The N-terminal domain of E coli DnaB is a protein of ca 110 residues with a structured core composed of 6 helices. Additional segments of 10 residues each at the N- and C-termini are highly mobile. Both ends are close in space and can be linked together in a covalent peptide bond using intern technology. The core structures of linear (lin-DnaB-N) and cyclized (cz-DnaB-N) protein are conserved, as evidenced by superimposable NOESY spectra and chemical shifts. The linker segment in cz-DnaB-N is mobile as shown by 1H-15N NOEs. Yet, the cyclic protein melts about 10 degrees higher than the linear version. A stabilization free energy of ca 2 kcal/mol is in agreement with predictions based on the reduced entropy in the unfolded state. Amide proton exchange rates are much slower in the cyclic protein and reveal cooperative exchange through total, global unfolding at a rate of once every 100 minutes in the linear protein

  3. Probing membrane protein structure using water polarization transfer solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jonathan K; Hong, Mei

    2014-10-01

    Water plays an essential role in the structure and function of proteins, lipid membranes and other biological macromolecules. Solid-state NMR heteronuclear-detected (1)H polarization transfer from water to biomolecules is a versatile approach for studying water-protein, water-membrane, and water-carbohydrate interactions in biology. We review radiofrequency pulse sequences for measuring water polarization transfer to biomolecules, the mechanisms of polarization transfer, and the application of this method to various biological systems. Three polarization transfer mechanisms, chemical exchange, spin diffusion and NOE, manifest themselves at different temperatures, magic-angle-spinning frequencies, and pulse irradiations. Chemical exchange is ubiquitous in all systems examined so far, and spin diffusion plays the key role in polarization transfer within the macromolecule. Tightly bound water molecules with long residence times are rare in proteins at ambient temperature. The water polarization-transfer technique has been used to study the hydration of microcrystalline proteins, lipid membranes, and plant cell wall polysaccharides, and to derive atomic-resolution details of the kinetics and mechanism of ion conduction in channels and pumps. Using this approach, we have measured the water polarization transfer to the transmembrane domain of the influenza M2 protein to obtain information on the structure of this tetrameric proton channel. At short mixing times, the polarization transfer rates are site-specific and depend on the pH, labile protons, sidechain conformation, as well as the radial position of the residues in this four-helix bundle. Despite the multiple dependences, the initial transfer rates reflect the periodic nature of the residue positions from the water-filled pore, thus this technique provides a way of gleaning secondary structure information, helix tilt angle, and the oligomeric structure of membrane proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All

  4. Resolution-by-proxy: a simple measure for assessing and comparing the overall quality of NMR protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berjanskii, Mark; Zhou, Jianjun; Liang, Yongjie; Lin, Guohui; Wishart, David S

    2012-07-01

    In protein X-ray crystallography, resolution is often used as a good indicator of structural quality. Diffraction resolution of protein crystals correlates well with the number of X-ray observables that are used in structure generation and, therefore, with protein coordinate errors. In protein NMR, there is no parameter identical to X-ray resolution. Instead, resolution is often used as a synonym of NMR model quality. Resolution of NMR structures is often deduced from ensemble precision, torsion angle normality and number of distance restraints per residue. The lack of common techniques to assess the resolution of X-ray and NMR structures complicates the comparison of structures solved by these two methods. This problem is sometimes approached by calculating "equivalent resolution" from structure quality metrics. However, existing protocols do not offer a comprehensive assessment of protein structure as they calculate equivalent resolution from a relatively small number (development of a protocol that calculates equivalent resolution from 25 measurable protein features. This new method offers better performance (correlation coefficient of 0.92, mean absolute error of 0.28 Å) than existing predictors of equivalent resolution. Because the method uses coordinate data as a proxy for X-ray diffraction data, we call this measure "Resolution-by-Proxy" or ResProx. We demonstrate that ResProx can be used to identify under-restrained, poorly refined or inaccurate NMR structures, and can discover structural defects that the other equivalent resolution methods cannot detect. The ResProx web server is available at http://www.resprox.ca.

  5. Tritium NMR spectroscopy of ligand binding to maltose-binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehring, K.; Williams, P.G.; Pelton, J.G.; Morimoto, H.; Wemmer, D.E. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1991-06-04

    Tritium-labeled {alpha}- and {beta}-maltodextrins have been used to study their complexes with maltose-binding protein (MBP), a 40-kDa bacterial protein. Five substrates, from maltose to maltohexaose, were labeled at their reducing ends and their binding studied. Tritium NMR specctroscopy of the labeled sugars showed large upfield chamical shift changes upon binding and strong anomeric specficity. At 10{degrees}C, MBP bound {alpha}-maltose with 2.7 {plus minus} 0.5-fold higher affinity than {beta}-maltose, and, for longer maltodextrins, the ratio of affinities was even larger. The maximum chemical shift change was 2.2 ppm, suggesting that the reducing end of bound {alpha}-maltodextrin makes close contact with an aromatic residue in the MBP-binding site. Experiments with maltotriose (and longer maltodextrins) also revealed the presence of two bound {beta}-maltotriose resonances in rapid exchange. The authors interpret these two resonances as arising from two distinct sugar-protein complexes. In one complex, the {beta}-maltodextrin is bound by its reducing end, and, in the other complex, the {beta}-maltodextrin is bound by the middle glucose residue(s). This interpretation also suggests how MBP is able to bind both linear and circular maltodextrins.

  6. Exploiting Uniformly13C-Labeled Carbohydrates for Probing Carbohydrate-Protein Interactions by NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestor, Gustav; Anderson, Taigh; Oscarson, Stefan; Gronenborn, Angela M

    2017-05-03

    NMR of a uniformly 13 C-labeled carbohydrate was used to elucidate the atomic details of a sugar-protein complex. The structure of the 13 C-labeled Manα(1-2)Manα(1-2)ManαOMe trisaccharide ligand, when bound to cyanovirin-N (CV-N), was characterized and revealed that in the complex the glycosidic linkage torsion angles between the two reducing-end mannoses are different from the free trisaccharide. Distances within the carbohydrate were employed for conformational analysis, and NOE-based distance mapping between sugar and protein revealed that Manα(1-2)Manα(1-2)ManαOMe is bound more intimately with its two reducing-end mannoses into the domain A binding site of CV-N than with the nonreducing end unit. Taking advantage of the 13 C spectral dispersion of 13 C-labeled carbohydrates in isotope-filtered experiments is a versatile means for a simultaneous mapping of the binding interactions on both, the carbohydrate and the protein.

  7. Main-chain-directed strategy for the assignment of 1H NMR spectra of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Englander, S.W.; Wand, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    A strategy for assigning the resonances in two-dimensional (2D) NMR spectra of proteins is described. The method emphasizes the analysis of through-space relationships between protons by use of the two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) experiment. NOE patterns used in the algorithm were derived from a statistical analysis of the combinations of short proton-proton distances observed in the high-resolution crystal structures of 21 proteins. One starts with a search for authentic main-chain NH-C/sub α/H-C/sub β/H J-coupled units, which can be found with high reliability. The many main-chain units of a protein are then placed in their proper juxtaposition by recognition of predefined NOE connectivity patterns. To discover these connectivities, the 2D NOE spectrum is examined, in a prescribed order, for the distinct NOE patterns characteristic of helices, sheets, turns, and extended chain. Finally, the recognition of a few amino acid side-chain types places the discovered secondary structure elements within the polypeptide sequences. Unlike the sequential assignment approach, the main-chain-directed strategy does not rely on the difficult task of recognizing many side-chain spin systems in J-correlated spectra, the assignment process is not in general sequential with the polypeptide chain, and the prescribed connectivity patterns are cyclic rather than linear. The latter characteristic avoids ambiguous branch points in the analysis and imposed an internally confirmatory property on each forward step

  8. 1H magic-angle spinning NMR evolves as a powerful new tool for membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubeis, Tobias; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Andreas, Loren B.; Pintacuda, Guido

    2018-02-01

    Building on a decade of continuous advances of the community, the recent development of very fast (60 kHz and above) magic-angle spinning (MAS) probes has revolutionised the field of solid-state NMR. This new spinning regime reduces the 1H-1H dipolar couplings, so that direct detection of the larger magnetic moment available from 1H is now possible at high resolution, not only in deuterated molecules but also in fully-protonated substrates. Such capabilities allow rapid "fingerprinting" of samples with a ten-fold reduction of the required sample amounts with respect to conventional approaches, and permit extensive, robust and expeditious assignment of small-to-medium sized proteins (up to ca. 300 residues), and the determination of inter-nuclear proximities, relative orientations of secondary structural elements, protein-cofactor interactions, local and global dynamics. Fast MAS and 1H detection techniques have nowadays been shown to be applicable to membrane-bound systems. This paper reviews the strategies underlying this recent leap forward in sensitivity and resolution, describing its potential for the detailed characterization of membrane proteins.

  9. Tritium NMR spectroscopy of ligand binding to maltose-binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehring, K.; Williams, P.G.; Pelton, J.G.; Morimoto, H.; Wemmer, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    Tritium-labeled α- and β-maltodextrins have been used to study their complexes with maltose-binding protein (MBP), a 40-kDa bacterial protein. Five substrates, from maltose to maltohexaose, were labeled at their reducing ends and their binding studied. Tritium NMR specctroscopy of the labeled sugars showed large upfield chamical shift changes upon binding and strong anomeric specficity. At 10 degrees C, MBP bound α-maltose with 2.7 ± 0.5-fold higher affinity than β-maltose, and, for longer maltodextrins, the ratio of affinities was even larger. The maximum chemical shift change was 2.2 ppm, suggesting that the reducing end of bound α-maltodextrin makes close contact with an aromatic residue in the MBP-binding site. Experiments with maltotriose (and longer maltodextrins) also revealed the presence of two bound β-maltotriose resonances in rapid exchange. The authors interpret these two resonances as arising from two distinct sugar-protein complexes. In one complex, the β-maltodextrin is bound by its reducing end, and, in the other complex, the β-maltodextrin is bound by the middle glucose residue(s). This interpretation also suggests how MBP is able to bind both linear and circular maltodextrins

  10. Sensitivity enhancement and contrasting information provided by free radicals in oriented-sample NMR of bicelle-reconstituted membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesch, Deanna M; Nevzorov, Alexander A

    2014-02-01

    Elucidating structure and topology of membrane proteins (MPs) is essential for unveiling functionality of these important biological constituents. Oriented-sample solid-state NMR (OS-NMR) is capable of providing such information on MPs under nearly physiological conditions. However, two dimensional OS-NMR experiments can take several days to complete due to long longitudinal relaxation times combined with the large number of scans to achieve sufficient signal sensitivity in biological samples. Here, free radicals 5-DOXYL stearic acid, TEMPOL, and CAT-1 were added to uniformly (15)N-labeled Pf1 coat protein reconstituted in DMPC/DHPC bicelles, and their effect on the longitudinal relaxation times (T1Z) was investigated. The dramatically shortened T1Z's allowed for the signal gain per unit time to be used for either: (i) up to a threefold reduction of the total experimental time at 99% magnetization recovery or (ii) obtaining up to 74% signal enhancement between the control and radical samples during constant experimental time at "optimal" relaxation delays. In addition, through OS-NMR and high-field EPR studies, free radicals were able to provide positional constraints in the bicelle system, which provide a description of the location of each residue in Pf1 coat protein within the bicellar membranes. This information can be useful in the determination of oligomerization states and immersion depths of larger membrane proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Sensitivity enhancement and contrasting information provided by free radicals in oriented-sample NMR of bicelle-reconstituted membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesch, Deanna M.; Nevzorov, Alexander A.

    2014-02-01

    Elucidating structure and topology of membrane proteins (MPs) is essential for unveiling functionality of these important biological constituents. Oriented-sample solid-state NMR (OS-NMR) is capable of providing such information on MPs under nearly physiological conditions. However, two dimensional OS-NMR experiments can take several days to complete due to long longitudinal relaxation times combined with the large number of scans to achieve sufficient signal sensitivity in biological samples. Here, free radicals 5-DOXYL stearic acid, TEMPOL, and CAT-1 were added to uniformly 15N-labeled Pf1 coat protein reconstituted in DMPC/DHPC bicelles, and their effect on the longitudinal relaxation times (T1Z) was investigated. The dramatically shortened T1Z's allowed for the signal gain per unit time to be used for either: (i) up to a threefold reduction of the total experimental time at 99% magnetization recovery or (ii) obtaining up to 74% signal enhancement between the control and radical samples during constant experimental time at “optimal” relaxation delays. In addition, through OS-NMR and high-field EPR studies, free radicals were able to provide positional constraints in the bicelle system, which provide a description of the location of each residue in Pf1 coat protein within the bicellar membranes. This information can be useful in the determination of oligomerization states and immersion depths of larger membrane proteins.

  12. REDOR NMR Reveals Multiple Conformers for a Protein Kinase C Ligand in a Membrane Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bryostatin 1 (henceforth bryostatin is in clinical trials for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and for HIV/AIDS eradication. It is also a preclinical lead for cancer immunotherapy and other therapeutic indications. Yet nothing is known about the conformation of bryostatin bound to its protein kinase C (PKC target in a membrane microenvironment. As a result, efforts to design more efficacious, better tolerated, or more synthetically accessible ligands have been limited to structures that do not include PKC or membrane effects known to influence PKC–ligand binding. This problem extends more generally to many membrane-associated proteins in the human proteome. Here, we use rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR solid-state NMR to determine the conformations of PKC modulators bound to the PKCδ-C1b domain in the presence of phospholipid vesicles. The conformationally limited PKC modulator phorbol diacetate (PDAc is used as an initial test substrate. While unanticipated partitioning of PDAc between an immobilized protein-bound state and a mobile state in the phospholipid assembly was observed, a single conformation in the bound state was identified. In striking contrast, a bryostatin analogue (bryolog was found to exist exclusively in a protein-bound state, but adopts a distribution of conformations as defined by three independent distance measurements. The detection of multiple PKCδ-C1b-bound bryolog conformers in a functionally relevant phospholipid complex reveals the inherent dynamic nature of cellular systems that is not captured with single-conformation static structures. These results indicate that binding, selectivity, and function of PKC modulators, as well as the design of new modulators, are best addressed using a dynamic multistate model, an analysis potentially applicable to other membrane-associated proteins.

  13. Recommendations for the presentation of NMR structures of proteins and nucleic acids - IUPAC-IUBMB-IUPAB Inter-Union Task Group on the Standardization of Data Bases of Protein and Nucleic Acid Structures Determined by NMR Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markley, John L.; Bax, Ad; Arata, Yoji; Hilbers, C. W.; Kaptein, Robert; Sykes, Brian D.; Wright, Peter E.; Wuethrich, Kurt

    1998-01-01

    The recommendations presented here are designed to support easier communication of NMR data and NMR structures of proteins and nucleic acids through unified nomenclature and reporting standards. Much of this document pertains to the reporting of data in journal articles; however, in the interest of the future development of structural biology, it is desirable that the bulk of the reported information be stored in computer-accessible form and be freely accessible to the scientific community in standardized formats for data exchange. These recommendations stem from an IUPAC-IUBMB-IUPAB inter-union venture with the direct involvement of ICSU and CODATA. The Task Group has reviewed previous formal recommendations and has extended them in the light of more recent developments in the field of biomolecular NMR spectroscopy. Drafts of the recommendations presented here have been examined critically by more than 50 specialists in the field and have gone through two rounds of extensive modification to incorporate suggestions and criticisms

  14. NMR spin relaxation in proteins: The patterns of motion that dissipate power to the bath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Yury E.; Meirovitch, Eva

    2014-04-01

    We developed in recent years the two-body coupled-rotator slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) approach for the analysis of NMR relaxation in proteins. The two bodies/rotators are the protein (diffusion tensor D1) and the spin-bearing probe, e.g., the 15N-1H bond (diffusion tensor, D2), coupled by a local potential (u). A Smoluchowski equation is solved to yield the generic time correlation functions (TCFs), which are sums of weighted exponentials (eigenmodes). By Fourier transformation one obtains the generic spectral density functions (SDFs) which underlie the experimental relaxation parameters. The typical paradigm is to characterize structural dynamics in terms of the best-fit values of D1, D2, and u. Additional approaches we pursued employ the SRLS TCFs, SDFs, or eigenmodes as descriptors. In this study we develop yet another perspective. We consider the SDF as function of the angular velocity associated with the fluctuating fields underlying NMR relaxation. A parameter called j-fraction, which represents the relative contribution of eigenmode, i, to a given value of the SDF function at a specific frequency, ω, is defined. j-fraction profiles of the dominant eigenmodes are derived for 0 ≤ ω ≤ 1012 rad/s. They reveal which patterns of motion actuate power dissipation at given ω-values, what are their rates, and what is their relative contribution. Simulations are carried out to determine the effect of timescale separation, D1/D2, axial potential strength, and local diffusion axiality. For D1/D2 ≤ 0.01 and strong local potential of 15 kBT, power is dissipated by global diffusion, renormalized (by the strong potential) local diffusion, and probe diffusion on the surface of a cone (to be called cone diffusion). For D1/D2 = 0.1, power is dissipated by mixed eigenmodes largely of a global-diffusion-type or cone-diffusion-type, and a nearly bare renormalized-local-diffusion eigenmode. For D1/D2 > 0.1, most eigenmodes are of a mixed type. The analysis is

  15. Probing Early Misfolding Events in Prion Protein Mutants by NMR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Ilc

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The post-translational conversion of the ubiquitously expressed cellular form of the prion protein, PrPC, into its misfolded and pathogenic isoform, known as prion or PrPSc, plays a key role in prion diseases. These maladies are denoted transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs and affect both humans and animals. A prerequisite for understanding TSEs is unraveling the molecular mechanism leading to the conversion process whereby most α-helical motifs are replaced by β-sheet secondary structures. Importantly, most point mutations linked to inherited prion diseases are clustered in the C-terminal domain region of PrPC and cause spontaneous conversion to PrPSc. Structural studies with PrP variants promise new clues regarding the proposed conversion mechanism and may help identify “hot spots” in PrPC involved in the pathogenic conversion. These investigations may also shed light on the early structural rearrangements occurring in some PrPC epitopes thought to be involved in modulating prion susceptibility. Here we present a detailed overview of our solution-state NMR studies on human prion protein carrying different pathological point mutations and the implications that such findings may have for the future of prion research.

  16. Selective and extensive 13C labeling of a membrane protein for solid-state NMR investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, M.; Jakes, K.

    1999-01-01

    The selective and extensive 13C labeling of mostly hydrophobic amino acid residues in a 25 kDa membrane protein, the colicin Ia channel domain, is reported. The novel 13C labeling approach takes advantage of the amino acid biosynthetic pathways in bacteria and suppresses the synthesis of the amino acid products of the citric acid cycle. The selectivity and extensiveness of labeling significantly simplify the solid-state NMR spectra, reduce line broadening, and should permit the simultaneous measurement of multiple structural constraints. We show the assignment of most 13C resonances to specific amino acid types based on the characteristic chemical shifts, the 13C labeling pattern, and the amino acid composition of the protein. The assignment is partly confirmed by a 2D homonuclear double-quantum-filter experiment under magic-angle spinning. The high sensitivity and spectral resolution attained with this 13C-labeling protocol, which is termed TEASE for ten-amino acid selective and extensive labeling, are demonstrated

  17. Stable and rigid DTPA-like paramagnetic tags suitable for in vitro and in situ protein NMR analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia-Liang; Zhao, Yu; Gong, Yan-Jun; Pan, Bin-Bin; Wang, Xiao; Su, Xun-Cheng

    2018-02-01

    Organic synthesis of a ligand with high binding affinities for paramagnetic lanthanide ions is an effective way of generating paramagnetic effects on proteins. These paramagnetic effects manifested in high-resolution NMR spectroscopy are valuable dynamic and structural restraints of proteins and protein-ligand complexes. A paramagnetic tag generally contains a metal chelating moiety and a reactive group for protein modification. Herein we report two new DTPA-like tags, 4PS-PyDTTA and 4PS-6M-PyDTTA that can be site-specifically attached to a protein with a stable thioether bond. Both protein-tag adducts form stable lanthanide complexes, of which the binding affinities and paramagnetic tensors are tunable with respect to the 6-methyl group in pyridine. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) effects of Gd(III) complex on protein-tag adducts were evaluated in comparison with pseudocontact shift (PCS), and the results indicated that both 4PS-PyDTTA and 4PS-6M-PyDTTA tags are rigid and present high-quality PREs that are crucially important in elucidation of the dynamics and interactions of proteins and protein-ligand complexes. We also show that these two tags are suitable for in-situ protein NMR analysis.

  18. High resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy of the Yersinia pestis outer membrane protein Ail in lipid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Yong; Dutta, Samit Kumar; Park, Sang Ho; Rai, Ratan; Fujimoto, L. Miya; Bobkov, Andrey A.; Opella, Stanley J.; Marassi, Francesca M.

    2017-01-01

    The outer membrane protein Ail (Adhesion invasion locus) is one of the most abundant proteins on the cell surface of Yersinia pestis during human infection. Its functions are expressed through interactions with a variety of human host proteins, and are essential for microbial virulence. Structures of Ail have been determined by X-ray diffraction and solution NMR spectroscopy, but those samples contained detergents that interfere with functionality, thus, precluding analysis of the structural basis for Ail’s biological activity. Here, we demonstrate that high-resolution solid-state NMR spectra can be obtained from samples of Ail in detergent-free phospholipid liposomes, prepared with a lipid to protein molar ratio of 100. The spectra, obtained with 13 C or 1 H detection, have very narrow line widths (0.40–0.60 ppm for 13 C, 0.11–0.15 ppm for 1 H, and 0.46–0.64 ppm for 15 N) that are consistent with a high level of sample homogeneity. The spectra enable resonance assignments to be obtained for N, CO, CA and CB atomic sites from 75 out of 156 residues in the sequence of Ail, including 80% of the transmembrane region. The 1 H-detected solid-state NMR 1 H/ 15 N correlation spectra obtained for Ail in liposomes compare very favorably with the solution NMR 1 H/ 15 N TROSY spectra obtained for Ail in nanodiscs prepared with a similar lipid to protein molar ratio. These results set the stage for studies of the molecular basis of the functional interactions of Ail with its protein partners from human host cells, as well as the development of drugs targeting Ail.

  19. High resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy of the Yersinia pestis outer membrane protein Ail in lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yong; Dutta, Samit Kumar; Park, Sang Ho; Rai, Ratan; Fujimoto, L Miya; Bobkov, Andrey A; Opella, Stanley J; Marassi, Francesca M

    2017-03-01

    The outer membrane protein Ail (Adhesion invasion locus) is one of the most abundant proteins on the cell surface of Yersinia pestis during human infection. Its functions are expressed through interactions with a variety of human host proteins, and are essential for microbial virulence. Structures of Ail have been determined by X-ray diffraction and solution NMR spectroscopy, but those samples contained detergents that interfere with functionality, thus, precluding analysis of the structural basis for Ail's biological activity. Here, we demonstrate that high-resolution solid-state NMR spectra can be obtained from samples of Ail in detergent-free phospholipid liposomes, prepared with a lipid to protein molar ratio of 100. The spectra, obtained with 13 C or 1 H detection, have very narrow line widths (0.40-0.60 ppm for 13 C, 0.11-0.15 ppm for 1 H, and 0.46-0.64 ppm for 15 N) that are consistent with a high level of sample homogeneity. The spectra enable resonance assignments to be obtained for N, CO, CA and CB atomic sites from 75 out of 156 residues in the sequence of Ail, including 80% of the transmembrane region. The 1 H-detected solid-state NMR 1 H/ 15 N correlation spectra obtained for Ail in liposomes compare very favorably with the solution NMR 1 H/ 15 N TROSY spectra obtained for Ail in nanodiscs prepared with a similar lipid to protein molar ratio. These results set the stage for studies of the molecular basis of the functional interactions of Ail with its protein partners from human host cells, as well as the development of drugs targeting Ail.

  20. High resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy of the Yersinia pestis outer membrane protein Ail in lipid membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Yong; Dutta, Samit Kumar [Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (United States); Park, Sang Ho; Rai, Ratan [University of California San Diego, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Fujimoto, L. Miya; Bobkov, Andrey A. [Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (United States); Opella, Stanley J. [University of California San Diego, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Marassi, Francesca M., E-mail: fmarassi@sbp.edu [Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (United States)

    2017-03-15

    The outer membrane protein Ail (Adhesion invasion locus) is one of the most abundant proteins on the cell surface of Yersinia pestis during human infection. Its functions are expressed through interactions with a variety of human host proteins, and are essential for microbial virulence. Structures of Ail have been determined by X-ray diffraction and solution NMR spectroscopy, but those samples contained detergents that interfere with functionality, thus, precluding analysis of the structural basis for Ail’s biological activity. Here, we demonstrate that high-resolution solid-state NMR spectra can be obtained from samples of Ail in detergent-free phospholipid liposomes, prepared with a lipid to protein molar ratio of 100. The spectra, obtained with {sup 13}C or {sup 1}H detection, have very narrow line widths (0.40–0.60 ppm for {sup 13}C, 0.11–0.15 ppm for {sup 1}H, and 0.46–0.64 ppm for {sup 15}N) that are consistent with a high level of sample homogeneity. The spectra enable resonance assignments to be obtained for N, CO, CA and CB atomic sites from 75 out of 156 residues in the sequence of Ail, including 80% of the transmembrane region. The {sup 1}H-detected solid-state NMR {sup 1}H/{sup 15}N correlation spectra obtained for Ail in liposomes compare very favorably with the solution NMR {sup 1}H/{sup 15}N TROSY spectra obtained for Ail in nanodiscs prepared with a similar lipid to protein molar ratio. These results set the stage for studies of the molecular basis of the functional interactions of Ail with its protein partners from human host cells, as well as the development of drugs targeting Ail.

  1. Novel strategies to overcome expression problems encountered with toxic proteins: application to the production of Lac repressor proteins for NMR studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romanuka, J.; van den Bulke, H.; Kaptein, R.; Boelens, R.; Folkers, G.E.

    2009-01-01

    NMR studies of structural aspects of allosteric regulation by the Lac repressor requires overexpression and isotope labeling of the protein. The size of the repressor makes it a challenging target, putting constraints on both expression conditions and sample preparation methods to overcome problems

  2. An open source cryostage and software analysis method for detection of antifreeze activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lørup Buch, Johannes; Ramløv, H

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide the reader with a simple setup that can detect antifreeze proteins (AFP) by inhibition of ice recrystallisation in very small sample sizes. This includes an open source cryostage, a method for preparing and loading samples as well as a software analysis method....... The entire setup was tested using hyperactive AFP from the cerambycid beetle, Rhagium mordax. Samples containing AFP were compared to buffer samples, and the results are visualised as crystal radius evolution over time and in absolute change over 30 min. Statistical analysis showed that samples containing...

  3. Solution NMR structure of selenium-binding protein from Methanococcus vannielii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Motoshi; Lee, Duck-Yeon; Inyamah, Nwakaego; Stadtman, Thressa C; Tjandra, Nico

    2008-09-19

    Selenium is an important nutrient. The lack of selenium will suppress expression of various enzymes that will lead to cell abnormality and diseases. However, high concentrations of free selenium are toxic to the cell because it adversely affects numerous cell metabolic pathways. In Methanococcus vannielii, selenium transport in the cell is established by the selenium-binding protein, SeBP. SeBP sequesters selenium during transport, thus regulating the level of free selenium in the cell, and delivers it specifically to the selenophosphate synthase enzyme. In solution, SeBP is an oligomer of 8.8-kDa subunits. It is a symmetric pentamer. The solution structure of SeBP was determined by NMR spectroscopy. Each subunit of SeBP is composed of an alpha-helix on top of a 4-stranded twisted beta-sheet. The stability of the five subunits stems mainly from hydrophobic interactions and supplemented by hydrogen bond interactions. The loop containing Cys(59) has been shown to be important for selenium binding, is flexible, and adopts multiple conformations. However, the cysteine accessibility is restricted in the structure, reducing the possibility of the binding of free selenium readily. Therefore, a different selenium precursor or other factors might be needed to facilitate opening of this loop to expose Cys(59) for selenium binding.

  4. Identifying critical unrecognized sugar-protein interactions in GH10 xylanases from Geobacillus stearothermophilus using STD NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balazs, Yael S; Lisitsin, Elina; Carmiel, Oshrat; Shoham, Gil; Shoham, Yuval; Schmidt, Asher

    2013-09-01

    (1)H solution NMR spectroscopy is used synergistically with 3D crystallographic structures to map experimentally significant hydrophobic interactions upon substrate binding in solution under thermodynamic equilibrium. Using saturation transfer difference spectroscopy (STD NMR), a comparison is made between wild-type xylanase XT6 and its acid/base catalytic mutant E159Q--a non-active, single-heteroatom alteration that has been previously utilized to measure binding thermodynamics across a series of xylooligosaccharide-xylanase complexes [Zolotnitsky et al. (2004) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 101, 11275-11280). In this study, performing STD NMR of one substrate screens binding interactions to two proteins, avoiding many disadvantages inherent to the technique and clearly revealing subtle changes in binding induced upon mutation of the catalytic Glu. To visualize and compare the binding epitopes of xylobiose-xylanase complexes, a 'SASSY' plot (saturation difference transfer spectroscopy) is used. Two extraordinarily strong, but previously unrecognized, non-covalent interactions with H2-5 of xylobiose were observed in the wild-type enzyme but not in the E159Q mutant. Based on the crystal structure, these interactions were assigned to tryptophan residues at the -1 subsite. The mutant selectively binds only the β-xylobiose anomer. The (1)H solution NMR spectrum of a xylotriose-E159Q complex displays non-uniform broadening of the NMR signals. Differential broadening provides a unique subsite assignment tool based on structural knowledge of face-to-face stacking with a conserved tyrosine residue at the +1 subsite. The results obtained herein by substrate-observed NMR spectroscopy are discussed further in terms of methodological contributions and mechanistic understanding of substrate-binding adjustments upon a charge change in the E159Q construct. © 2013 FEBS.

  5. Gravity-driven pH adjustment for site-specific protein pKa measurement by solution-state NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei

    2017-12-01

    To automate pH adjustment in site-specific protein pKa measurement by solution-state NMR, I present a funnel with two caps for the standard 5 mm NMR tube. The novelty of this simple-to-build and inexpensive apparatus is that it allows automatic gravity-driven pH adjustment within the magnet, and consequently results in a fully automated NMR-monitored pH titration without any hardware modification on the NMR spectrometer.

  6. Structure determination of membrane proteins in their native phospholipid bilayer environment by rotationally aligned solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opella, Stanley J

    2013-09-17

    One of the most important topics in experimental structural biology is determining the structures of membrane proteins. These structures represent one-third of all of the information expressed from a genome, distinguished by their locations within the phospholipid bilayer of cells, organelles, or enveloped viruses. Their highly hydrophobic nature and insolubility in aqueous media means that they require an amphipathic environment. They have unique functions in transport, catalysis, channel formation, and signaling. Researchers are particularly interested in G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) because they modulate many biological processes, and about half of the approximately 800 of these proteins within the human genome are or can be turned into drug receptors that affect a wide range of diseases. Because of experimental difficulties, researchers have studied membrane proteins using a wide variety of artificial media that mimic membranes, such as mixed organic solvents or detergents. More sophisticated mimics include bilayer discs (bicelles) and the lipid cubic phase (LCP), but both of these contain a very large detergent component, which can disrupt the stability and function of membrane proteins. To have confidence in the resulting structures and their biological functions and to avoid disrupting these delicate proteins, the structures of membrane proteins should be determined in their native environment of liquid crystalline phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions. This Account describes a recently developed general method for determining the structures of unmodified membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Because it relies on the natural, rapid rotational diffusion of these proteins about the bilayer normal, this method is referred to as rotationally aligned (RA) solid-state NMR. This technique elaborates on oriented sample (OS) solid-state NMR, its complementary predecessor. These methods exploit the power of

  7. Two-dimensional sup 1 H NMR studies on HPr protein from Staphylococcus aureus: Complete sequential assignments and secondary structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalbitzer, H.R.; Neidig, K.P. (Max-Planck-Inst. for Medical Research, Heidelberg (West Germany)); Hengstenberg, W. (Univ. of Bochum (West Germany))

    1991-11-19

    Complete sequence-specific assignments of the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of HPr protein from Staphylococcus aureus were obtained by two-dimensional NMR methods. Important secondary structure elements that can be derived from the observed nuclear Overhauser effects are a large antiparallel {beta}-pleated sheet consisting of four strands, A, B, C, D, a segment S{sub AB} consisting of an extended region around the active-center histidine (His-15) and an {alpha}-helix, a half-turn between strands B and C, a segment S{sub CD} which shows no typical secondary structure, and the {alpha}-helical, C-terminal segment S{sub term}. These general structural features are similar to those found earlier in HPr proteins from different microorganisms such as Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Streptococcus faecalis.

  8. NMR spin relaxation in proteins: The patterns of motion that dissipate power to the bath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, Yury E., E-mail: eva.meirovitch@biu.ac.il, E-mail: yuryeshapiro@gmail.com; Meirovitch, Eva, E-mail: eva.meirovitch@biu.ac.il, E-mail: yuryeshapiro@gmail.com [The Mina and Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900-02 (Israel)

    2014-04-21

    We developed in recent years the two-body coupled-rotator slowly relaxing local structure (SRLS) approach for the analysis of NMR relaxation in proteins. The two bodies/rotators are the protein (diffusion tensor D{sub 1}) and the spin-bearing probe, e.g., the {sup 15}N−{sup 1}H bond (diffusion tensor, D{sub 2}), coupled by a local potential (u). A Smoluchowski equation is solved to yield the generic time correlation functions (TCFs), which are sums of weighted exponentials (eigenmodes). By Fourier transformation one obtains the generic spectral density functions (SDFs) which underlie the experimental relaxation parameters. The typical paradigm is to characterize structural dynamics in terms of the best-fit values of D{sub 1}, D{sub 2}, and u. Additional approaches we pursued employ the SRLS TCFs, SDFs, or eigenmodes as descriptors. In this study we develop yet another perspective. We consider the SDF as function of the angular velocity associated with the fluctuating fields underlying NMR relaxation. A parameter called j-fraction, which represents the relative contribution of eigenmode, i, to a given value of the SDF function at a specific frequency, ω, is defined. j-fraction profiles of the dominant eigenmodes are derived for 0 ≤ ω ≤ 10{sup 12} rad/s. They reveal which patterns of motion actuate power dissipation at given ω-values, what are their rates, and what is their relative contribution. Simulations are carried out to determine the effect of timescale separation, D{sub 1}/D{sub 2}, axial potential strength, and local diffusion axiality. For D{sub 1}/D{sub 2} ≤ 0.01 and strong local potential of 15 k{sub B}T, power is dissipated by global diffusion, renormalized (by the strong potential) local diffusion, and probe diffusion on the surface of a cone (to be called cone diffusion). For D{sub 1}/D{sub 2} = 0.1, power is dissipated by mixed eigenmodes largely of a global-diffusion-type or cone-diffusion-type, and a nearly bare renormalized

  9. Target-specific NMR detection of protein-ligand interactions with antibody-relayed 15N-group selective STD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetényi, Anasztázia; Hegedűs, Zsófia; Fajka-Boja, Roberta; Monostori, Éva; Kövér, Katalin E; Martinek, Tamás A

    2016-12-01

    Fragment-based drug design has been successfully applied to challenging targets where the detection of the weak protein-ligand interactions is a key element. 1 H saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy is a powerful technique for this work but it requires pure homogeneous proteins as targets. Monoclonal antibody (mAb)-relayed 15 N-GS STD spectroscopy has been developed to resolve the problem of protein mixtures and impure proteins. A 15 N-labelled target-specific mAb is selectively irradiated and the saturation is relayed through the target to the ligand. Tests on the anti-Gal-1 mAb/Gal-1/lactose system showed that the approach is experimentally feasible in a reasonable time frame. This method allows detection and identification of binding molecules directly from a protein mixture in a multicomponent system.

  10. Exploiting E. coli auxotrophs for leucine, valine, and threonine specific methyl labeling of large proteins for NMR applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monneau, Yoan R. [Rutgers University, Center for Integrative Proteomics Research and Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology (United States); Ishida, Yojiro [Rutgers University, Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine (United States); Rossi, Paolo; Saio, Tomohide; Tzeng, Shiou-Ru [Rutgers University, Center for Integrative Proteomics Research and Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology (United States); Inouye, Masayori, E-mail: inouye@cabm.rutgers.edu [Rutgers University, Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine (United States); Kalodimos, Charalampos G., E-mail: ckalodim@umn.edu [Rutgers University, Center for Integrative Proteomics Research and Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology (United States)

    2016-06-15

    A simple and cost effective method to independently and stereo-specifically incorporate [{sup 1}H,{sup 13}C]-methyls in Leu and Val in proteins is presented. Recombinant proteins for NMR studies are produced using a tailored set of auxotrophic E. coli strains. NMR active isotopes are routed to either Leu or Val methyl groups from the commercially available and scrambling-free precursors α-ketoisovalerate and acetolactate. The engineered strains produce deuterated proteins with stereospecific [{sup 1}H,{sup 13}C]-methyl labeling separately at Leu or Val amino acids. This is the first method that achieves Leu-specific stereospecific [{sup 1}H,{sup 13}C]-methyl labeling of proteins and scramble-free Val-specific labeling. Use of auxotrophs drastically decreases the amount of labeled precursor required for expression without impacting the yield. The concept is extended to Thr methyl labeling by means of a Thr-specific auxotroph that provides enhanced efficiency for use with the costly L-[4-{sup 13}C,2,3-{sup 2}H{sub 2},{sup 15}N]-Thr reagent. The Thr-specific strain allows for the production of Thr-[{sup 13}CH{sub 3}]{sup γ2} labeled protein with an optimal isotope incorporation using up to 50 % less labeled Thr than the traditional E. coli strain without the need for {sup 2}H-glycine to prevent scrambling.

  11. Unraveling a phosphorylation event in a folded protein by NMR spectroscopy: phosphorylation of the Pin1 WW domain by PKA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smet-Nocca, Caroline; Launay, Hélène; Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel; Lippens, Guy; Landrieu, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    The Pin1 protein plays a critical role in the functional regulation of the hyperphosphorylated neuronal Tau protein in Alzheimer’s disease and is by itself regulated by phosphorylation. We have used Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to both identify the PKA phosphorylation site in the Pin1 WW domain and investigate the functional consequences of this phosphorylation. Detection and identification of phosphorylation on serine/threonine residues in a globular protein, while mostly occurring in solvent-exposed flexible loops, does not lead to chemical shift changes as obvious as in disordered proteins and hence does not necessarily shift the resonances outside the spectrum of the folded protein. Other complications were encountered to characterize the extent of the phosphorylation, as part of the 1 H, 15 N amide resonances around the phosphorylation site are specifically broadened in the unphosphorylated state. Despite these obstacles, NMR spectroscopy was an efficient tool to confirm phosphorylation on S16 of the WW domain and to quantify the level of phosphorylation. Based on this analytical characterization, we show that WW phosphorylation on S16 abolishes its binding capacity to a phosphorylated Tau peptide. A reduced conformational heterogeneity and flexibility of the phospho-binding loop upon S16 phosphorylation could account for part of the decreased affinity for its phosphorylated partner. Additionally, a structural model of the phospho-WW obtained by molecular dynamics simulation and energy minimization suggests that the phosphate moiety of phospho-S16 could compete with the phospho-substrate.

  12. Effects of preheating on ice growth in antifreeze polypeptides solutions in a narrow space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, T.; Nishi, N.; Waku, T.; Tanaka, N.; Hagiwara, Y.

    2016-09-01

    We conducted measurements on the unidirectional freezing of aqueous solutions of polypeptide or of winter flounder antifreeze protein. The polypeptide was based on a part of the antifreeze protein. We measured temperatures in the solutions and ice with a small thermocouple, and defined the interface temperature as the temperature at the tip of the serrated or pectinate interface. It was found that the interface temperature of these solutions was lower than that of pure water. To vary the activity of these solutes, we preheated the solutions and cooled them before conducting the measurements. We found that preheating for several hours caused further decreases in the interface temperature and a decrease in the interface velocity. In addition, the inclined interfaces became wider as a result of the preheating. Thus, the supercooled states in the solutions were enhanced by the preheating. To investigate the reasons for these changes, we measured the aggregates of the solutes in the solutions. These aggregates became larger as a result of preheating. It can therefore be concluded that these large aggregates attenuated the ice growth by their interaction with the ice surfaces.

  13. Flow-through lipid nanotube arrays for structure-function studies of membrane proteins by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekmenev, Eduard Y; Gor'kov, Peter L; Cross, Timothy A; Alaouie, Ali M; Smirnov, Alex I

    2006-10-15

    A novel method for studying membrane proteins in a native lipid bilayer environment by solid-state NMR spectroscopy is described and tested. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) substrates with flow-through 175 nm wide and 60-mum-long nanopores were employed to form macroscopically aligned peptide-containing lipid bilayers that are fluid and highly hydrated. We demonstrate that the surfaces of both leaflets of such bilayers are fully accessible to aqueous solutes. Thus, high hydration levels as well as pH and desirable ion and/or drug concentrations could be easily maintained and modified as desired in a series of experiments with the same sample. The method allows for membrane protein NMR experiments in a broad pH range that could be extended to as low as 1 and as high as 12 units for a period of up to a few hours and temperatures as high as 70 degrees C without losing the lipid alignment or bilayers from the nanopores. We demonstrate the utility of this method by a solid-state 19.6 T (17)O NMR study of reversible binding effects of mono- and divalent ions on the chemical shift properties of the Leu(10) carbonyl oxygen of transmembrane pore-forming peptide gramicidin A (gA). We further compare the (17)O shifts induced by binding metal ions to the binding of protons in the pH range from 1 to 12 and find a significant difference. This unexpected result points to a difference in mechanisms for ion and proton conduction by the gA pore. We believe that a large number of solid-state NMR-based studies, including structure-function, drug screening, proton exchange, pH, and other titration experiments, will benefit significantly from the method described here.

  14. Towards fully automated structure-based NMR resonance assignment of 15N-labeled proteins from automatically picked peaks

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Richard

    2011-03-01

    In NMR resonance assignment, an indispensable step in NMR protein studies, manually processed peaks from both N-labeled and C-labeled spectra are typically used as inputs. However, the use of homologous structures can allow one to use only N-labeled NMR data and avoid the added expense of using C-labeled data. We propose a novel integer programming framework for structure-based backbone resonance assignment using N-labeled data. The core consists of a pair of integer programming models: one for spin system forming and amino acid typing, and the other for backbone resonance assignment. The goal is to perform the assignment directly from spectra without any manual intervention via automatically picked peaks, which are much noisier than manually picked peaks, so methods must be error-tolerant. In the case of semi-automated/manually processed peak data, we compare our system with the Xiong-Pandurangan-Bailey- Kellogg\\'s contact replacement (CR) method, which is the most error-tolerant method for structure-based resonance assignment. Our system, on average, reduces the error rate of the CR method by five folds on their data set. In addition, by using an iterative algorithm, our system has the added capability of using the NOESY data to correct assignment errors due to errors in predicting the amino acid and secondary structure type of each spin system. On a publicly available data set for human ubiquitin, where the typing accuracy is 83%, we achieve 91% accuracy, compared to the 59% accuracy obtained without correcting for such errors. In the case of automatically picked peaks, using assignment information from yeast ubiquitin, we achieve a fully automatic assignment with 97% accuracy. To our knowledge, this is the first system that can achieve fully automatic structure-based assignment directly from spectra. This has implications in NMR protein mutant studies, where the assignment step is repeated for each mutant. © Copyright 2011, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  15. MERA: a webserver for evaluating backbone torsion angle distributions in dynamic and disordered proteins from NMR data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantsyzov, Alexey B. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Fundamental Medicine (Russian Federation); Shen, Yang; Lee, Jung Ho [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States); Hummer, Gerhard [Max Planck Institute of Biophysics (Germany); Bax, Ad, E-mail: bax@nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States)

    2015-09-15

    MERA (Maximum Entropy Ramachandran map Analysis from NMR data) is a new webserver that generates residue-by-residue Ramachandran map distributions for disordered proteins or disordered regions in proteins on the basis of experimental NMR parameters. As input data, the program currently utilizes up to 12 different parameters. These include three different types of short-range NOEs, three types of backbone chemical shifts ({sup 15}N, {sup 13}C{sup α}, and {sup 13}C′), six types of J couplings ({sup 3}J{sub HNHα}, {sup 3}J{sub C′C′}, {sup 3}J{sub C′Hα}, {sup 1}J{sub HαCα}, {sup 2}J{sub CαN} and {sup 1}J{sub CαN}), as well as the {sup 15}N-relaxation derived J(0) spectral density. The Ramachandran map distributions are reported in terms of populations of their 15° × 15° voxels, and an adjustable maximum entropy weight factor is available to ensure that the obtained distributions will not deviate more from a newly derived coil library distribution than required to account for the experimental data. MERA output includes the agreement between each input parameter and its distribution-derived value. As an application, we demonstrate performance of the program for several residues in the intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein, as well as for several static and dynamic residues in the folded protein GB3.

  16. Development of Solid State NMR Methods for the Structural Characterization of Membrane Proteins: Applications to Understand Multiple Sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosman, M; Tran, A T; Ulloa, J; Maxwell, R S

    2003-03-04

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a relapsing-remitting disorder of the central nervous system that results in the loss of the myelin sheaths insulating nerve fibers (axons). Strong evidence suggests that MS is an autoimmune disease mediated by T-cell and antibody responses against myelin antigens. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is a 26 kD to 28 kD an integral membrane protein of the central nervous system implicated as a target for autoaggressive antibodies in MS. To date, the conformation of MOG in association with the myelin membrane is unknown and the exact nature of the interactions between this protein and disease-inducing immune responses have not been determined. Since membrane associated proteins are typically characterized by decreased correlation times, solution state NMR methodologies are often impracticable. Membrane proteins are also often difficult to crystallize for X-ray diffraction studies, Consequently, there is an urgent need to develop new structure characterization tools for this important class of biomolecules. The research described here overviews the initial stages of our effort to develop an integrated, NMR based approach to structural studies of MOG over the many structural domains it is postulated to posses. The structural knowledge gained about this important MS antigen in its native environment will contribute significantly to our understanding of its function in vivo. This project will also aid in the development of therapeutics to inhibit the antigedantibody interaction and thus prevent demyelination in MS patients.

  17. A robust heteronuclear dipolar recoupling method comparable to TEDOR for proteins in magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengfeng; Li, Jianping; Chen, Yanke; Xie, Huayong; Yang, Jun

    2017-12-01

    In this letter, we propose a robust heteronuclear dipolar recoupling method for proteins in magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR. This method is as simple, robust and efficient as the well-known TEDOR in the aspect of magnetization transfer between 15N and 13C. Deriving from our recent band-selective dual back-to-back pulses (DBP) (Zhang et al., 2016), this method uses new phase-cycling schemes to realize broadband DBP (Bro-DBP). For broadband 15N-13C magnetization transfer (simultaneous 15N → 13C‧ and 15N → 13Cα), Bro-DBP has almost the same 15N → 13Cα efficiency while offers 30-40% enhancement on 15N → 13C‧ transfer, compared to TEDOR. Besides, Bro-DBP can also be used as a carbonyl (13C‧)-selected method, whose 15N → 13C‧ efficiency is up to 1.7 times that of TEDOR and is also higher than that of band-selective DBP. The performance of Bro-DBP is demonstrated on the N-formyl-[U-13C,15N]-Met-Leu-Phe-OH (fMLF) peptide and the U-13C, 15N labeled β1 immunoglobulin binding domain of protein G (GB1) microcrystalline protein. Since Bro-DBP is as robust, simple and efficient as TEDOR, we believe it is very useful for protein studies in MAS solid-state NMR.

  18. Application of NMR screening techniques for observing ligand binding with a protein receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimotakahara, Sakurako; Furihata, Kazuo; Tashiro, Mitsuru

    2005-01-01

    Water ligand observed via gradient spectroscopy (WaterLOGSY), saturation transfer difference and NOE pumping NMR techniques were used to identify ligand binding with a receptor. Although these experiments were originally designed to observe ligands in complexes, their application is limited by the affinity of ligands towards target molecules. Here the improved WaterLOGSY pulse sequence was developed by incorporating the double pulsed field gradient spin-echo and gradient-tailored excitation WATERGATE sequences. The efficiency of these ligand-observed NMR screening techniques was investigated using the ribonuclease T1-inhibitor system. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Renal conservation of antifreeze peptide in Antarctic eelpout, Rhigophila dearborni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, J T; De Vries, A L; Coalson, R E; Nordquist, R E; Boyd, R B

    1979-11-08

    In Antarctic notothenioid fishes large amounts (3% w/v) of small molecular weights of 2,600-23,500 and would be expected to be filtered into the urine, they remain in the blood because the kidneys of these fishes contain only aglomerular nephrons. Unlike the situation in most fishes, urine formation is the result of secretion rather than filtration and reabsorption. On the other hand, the peptide antifreezes in Northern Hemisphere fishes such as the winter flounder. Pseudopleuronectes americanus, are retained by the glomerular kidney even though inulin, of comparable weight, is rapidly filtered from the blood into the urine. The Antarctic eelpout (zoarcid), Rhigophila dearborni, which is unrelated to either the Antarctic notothenioids or P. americanus, also uses a peptide antifreeze (molecular weight 6,000) which is maintained at a concentration of 3% (w/v) in the blood plasma. We report here that the lack of antifreeze in the urine of R. dearborni probably reflects the fact that the glomeruli are not functional and cannot filter. We support this conclusion with morphological and physiological evidence and relate our findings to the conservation of biological antifreeze necessary for life in ice-laden polar waters.

  20. NMR-based metabolomics and breath studies show lipid and protein catabolism during low dose chronic T(1)AM treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haviland, J A; Reiland, H; Butz, D E; Tonelli, M; Porter, W P; Zucchi, R; Scanlan, T S; Chiellini, G; Assadi-Porter, F M

    2013-12-01

    3-Iodothyronamine (T1 AM), an analog of thyroid hormone, is a recently discovered fast-acting endogenous metabolite. Single high-dose treatments of T1 AM have produced rapid short-term effects, including a reduction of body temperature, bradycardia, and hyperglycemia in mice. The effect of daily low doses of T1 AM (10 mg/kg) for 8 days on weight loss and metabolism in spontaneously overweight mice was monitored. The experiments were repeated twice (n = 4). Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of plasma and real-time analysis of exhaled (13) CO2 in breath by cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) were used to detect T1 AM-induced lipolysis. CRDS detected increased lipolysis in breath shortly after T1 AM administration that was associated with a significant weight loss but independent of food consumption. NMR spectroscopy revealed alterations in key metabolites in serum: valine, glycine, and 3-hydroxybutyrate, suggesting that the subchronic effects of T1 AM include both lipolysis and protein breakdown. After discontinuation of T1 AM treatment, mice regained only 1.8% of the lost weight in the following 2 weeks, indicating lasting effects of T1 AM on weight maintenance. CRDS in combination with NMR and (13) C-metabolic tracing constitute a powerful method of investigation in obesity studies for identifying in vivo biochemical pathway shifts and unanticipated debilitating side effects. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  1. NMR determines transient structure and dynamics in the disordered C-terminal domain of WASp interacting protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Noam Y; Gross, Renana; Novacek, Jiri; Shaked, Hadassa; Zidek, Lukas; Barda-Saad, Mira; Chill, Jordan H

    2013-07-16

    WASp-interacting protein (WIP) is a 503-residue proline-rich polypeptide expressed in human T cells. The WIP C-terminal domain binds to Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) and regulates its activation and degradation, and the WIP-WASp interaction has been shown to be critical for actin polymerization and implicated in the onset of WAS and X-linked thrombocytopenia. WIP is predicted to be an intrinsically disordered protein, a class of polypeptides that are of great interest because they violate the traditional structure-function paradigm. In this first (to our knowledge) study of WIP in its unbound state, we used NMR to investigate the biophysical behavior of WIP(C), a C-terminal domain fragment of WIP that includes residues 407-503 and contains the WASp-binding site. In light of the poor spectral dispersion exhibited by WIP(C) and the high occurrence (25%) of proline residues, we employed 5D-NMR(13)C-detected NMR experiments with nonuniform sampling to accomplish full resonance assignment. Secondary chemical-shift analysis, (15)N relaxation rates, and protection from solvent exchange all concurred in detecting transient structure located in motifs that span the WASp-binding site. Residues 446-456 exhibited a propensity for helical conformation, and an extended conformation followed by a short, capped helix was observed for residues 468-478. The (13)C-detected approach allows chemical-shift assignment in the WIP(C) polyproline stretches and thus sheds light on their conformation and dynamics. The effects of temperature on chemical shifts referenced to a denatured sample of the polypeptide demonstrate that heating reduces the structural character of WIP(C). Thus, we conclude that the disordered WIP(C) fragment is comprised of regions with latent structure connected by flexible loops, an architecture with implications for binding affinity and function. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Nano-mole scale sequential signal assignment by 1 H-detected protein solid-state NMR

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Songlin

    2015-01-01

    We present a 3D 1H-detected solid-state NMR (SSNMR) approach for main-chain signal assignments of 10-100 nmol of fully protonated proteins using ultra-fast magic-angle spinning (MAS) at ∼80 kHz by a novel spectral-editing method, which permits drastic spectral simplification. The approach offers ∼110 fold time saving over a traditional 3D 13C-detected SSNMR approach. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015.

  3. NMR identification of the binding surfaces involved in the Salmonella and Shigella Type III secretion tip-translocon protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McShan, Andrew C; Kaur, Kawaljit; Chatterjee, Srirupa; Knight, Kevin M; De Guzman, Roberto N

    2016-08-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is essential for the pathogenesis of many bacteria including Salmonella and Shigella, which together are responsible for millions of deaths worldwide each year. The structural component of the T3SS consists of the needle apparatus, which is assembled in part by the protein-protein interaction between the tip and the translocon. The atomic detail of the interaction between the tip and the translocon proteins is currently unknown. Here, we used NMR methods to identify that the N-terminal domain of the Salmonella SipB translocon protein interacts with the SipD tip protein at a surface at the distal region of the tip formed by the mixed α/β domain and a portion of its coiled-coil domain. Likewise, the Shigella IpaB translocon protein and the IpaD tip protein interact with each other using similar surfaces identified for the Salmonella homologs. Furthermore, removal of the extreme N-terminal residues of the translocon protein, previously thought to be important for the interaction, had little change on the binding surface. Finally, mutations at the binding surface of SipD reduced invasion of Salmonella into human intestinal epithelial cells. Together, these results reveal the binding surfaces involved in the tip-translocon protein-protein interaction and advance our understanding of the assembly of the T3SS needle apparatus. Proteins 2016; 84:1097-1107. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. RAPID TEST METHOD FOR EVALUATION OF ANTIFREEZE ADDITIVE EFFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Gushchin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Usage of chemical additives while executing concrete works at negative temperatures is considered as a convenient and economical method. Range of the used antifreeze additives is rather wide. A great number of new additives are advertised but their characteristics have not been practically studied. Evaluation of the antifreeze additive efficiency is unfortunately rather long process and it does not provide comprehensive data on concrete structure formation processes. Due to this development of rapid and comprehensive methodology for construction companies is urgently required.Freezing processes of antifreeze additive aqueous solutions and hardening of cement paste with them have been investigated in the paper. The paper proposes a methodology for determination of freezing point for aqueous solutions of chemical additives of various applications. Identity of  freezing point for a chemical additive aqueous solution and cement paste with an equal concentration of the additive in the paste pore fluid has been determined while taking  calcium nitrate and sodium formate additives as an example. The paper demonstrates the possibility to evaluate efficiency of antifreeze additive action on the basis of kinetics in temperature changes of the cement paste with additives by its consecutive freezing and defrosting.  A methodology for operational evaluation in the field of chemical additive application for concreting items at negative temperatures has been offered in the paper.  The methodology does not require  deficient and expensive test-equipment. It can be applied at ordinary construction companies and it is comprehensible for personnel of low-qualification.  The paper shows the possibility to develop an original methodology for designing concrete structure which is based on operating efficiency determinations  for single and integrated antifreeze additives.

  5. Interaction between a recombinant prion protein and organo-mineral complexes as evidenced by CPMAS 13C-NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, F.; Scotti, R.; Gianfreda, L.; Conte, P.; Rao, M. A.

    2009-04-01

    Prion proteins (PrP) are the main responsible for Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSE). The TSE etiological agent is a misfolded form of the normal cellular prion protein. The amyloidal aggregates accumulated in the brain of infected animals and mainly composed of PrPSc exhibit resistance to protease attack and many conventional inactivating procedures. The prion protein diseases cause an environmental issue because the environment and in particular the soil compartment can be contaminated and then become a potential reservoir and diffuser of TSEs infectivity as a consequence of (i) accidental dispersion from storage plants of meat and bone meal, (ii) incorporation of contaminated material in fertilizers, (iii) possible natural contamination of pasture soils by grazing herds, and (v) burial of carcasses. The environmental problem can be even more relevant because very low amounts of PrPSc are able to propagate the disease. Several studies evidenced that infectious prion protein remains active in soils for years. Contaminated soils result, thus, a possible critical route of TSE transmission in wild animals. Soil can also protect prion protein toward degradation processes due to the presence of humic substances and inorganic components such as clays. Mineral and organic colloids and the more common association between clay minerals and humic substances can contribute to the adsorption/entrapment of molecules and macromolecules. The polymerization of organic monomeric humic precursors occurring in soil in the presence of oxidative enzymes or manganese and iron oxides, is considered one of the most important processes contributing to the formation of humic substances. The process is very fast and produces a population of polymeric products of different molecular structures, sizes, shapes and complexity. Other molecules and possibly biomacromolecules such as proteins may be involved. The aim of the present work was to study by CPMAS 13C-NMR the interactions

  6. Combining NMR and small angle X-ray and neutron scattering in the structural analysis of a ternary protein-RNA complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennig, Janosch; Wang, Iren; Sonntag, Miriam; Gabel, Frank; Sattler, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Many processes in the regulation of gene expression and signaling involve the formation of protein complexes involving multi-domain proteins. Individual domains that mediate protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions are typically connected by flexible linkers, which contribute to conformational dynamics and enable the formation of complexes with distinct binding partners. Solution techniques are therefore required for structural analysis and to characterize potential conformational dynamics. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) provides such information but often only sparse data are obtained with increasing molecular weight of the complexes. It is therefore beneficial to combine NMR data with additional structural restraints from complementary solution techniques. Small angle X-ray/neutron scattering (SAXS/SANS) data can be efficiently combined with NMR-derived information, either for validation or by providing additional restraints for structural analysis. Here, we show that the combination of SAXS and SANS data can help to refine structural models obtained from data-driven docking using HADDOCK based on sparse NMR data. The approach is demonstrated with the ternary protein-protein-RNA complex involving two RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of Sex-lethal, the N-terminal cold shock domain of Upstream-to-N-Ras, and msl-2 mRNA. Based on chemical shift perturbations we have mapped protein-protein and protein-RNA interfaces and complemented this NMR-derived information with SAXS data, as well as SANS measurements on subunit-selectively deuterated samples of the ternary complex. Our results show that, while the use of SAXS data is beneficial, the additional combination with contrast variation in SANS data resolves remaining ambiguities and improves the docking based on chemical shift perturbations of the ternary protein-RNA complex.

  7. Loss of conformational entropy in protein folding calculated using realistic ensembles and its implications for NMR-based calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxa, Michael C.; Haddadian, Esmael J.; Jumper, John M.; Freed, Karl F.; Sosnick, Tobin R.

    2014-01-01

    The loss of conformational entropy is a major contribution in the thermodynamics of protein folding. However, accurate determination of the quantity has proven challenging. We calculate this loss using molecular dynamic simulations of both the native protein and a realistic denatured state ensemble. For ubiquitin, the total change in entropy is TΔSTotal = 1.4 kcal⋅mol−1 per residue at 300 K with only 20% from the loss of side-chain entropy. Our analysis exhibits mixed agreement with prior studies because of the use of more accurate ensembles and contributions from correlated motions. Buried side chains lose only a factor of 1.4 in the number of conformations available per rotamer upon folding (ΩU/ΩN). The entropy loss for helical and sheet residues differs due to the smaller motions of helical residues (TΔShelix−sheet = 0.5 kcal⋅mol−1), a property not fully reflected in the amide N-H and carbonyl C=O bond NMR order parameters. The results have implications for the thermodynamics of folding and binding, including estimates of solvent ordering and microscopic entropies obtained from NMR. PMID:25313044

  8. NMR of proteins (4Fe-4S): structural properties and intramolecular electron transfer; RMN de proteines (4Fe-4S): proprietes structurales et transfert electronique intramoleculaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, J.G.

    1996-10-17

    NMR started to be applied to Fe-S proteins in the seventies. Its use has recently been enlarged as the problems arising from the paramagnetic polymetallic clusters ware overcome. Applications to [4Fe-4S] are presented herein. The information derived thereof deepens the understanding of the redox properties of these proteins which play a central role in the metabolism of bacterial cells. The secondary structure elements and the overall folding of Chromatium vinosum ferredoxin (Cv Fd) in solution have been established by NMR. The unique features of this sequence have been shown to fold as an {alpha} helix at the C-terminus and as a loop between two cysteines ligand of one cluster: these two parts localize in close proximity from one another. The interaction between nuclear and electronic spins is a source of additional structural information for (4Fe-AS] proteins. The conformation of the cysteine-ligands, as revealed by the Fe-(S{sub {gamma}}-C{sub {beta}}-H{sub {beta}})Cys dihedral angles, is related to the chemical shifts of the signals associated with the protons of these residues. The longitudinal relaxation times of the protons depend on their distance to the cluster. A quantitative relationship has been established and used to show that the solution structure of the high-potential ferredoxin from Cv differs significantly from the crystal structure around Phe-48. Both parameters (chemical shifts and longitudinal relaxation times) give also insight into the electronic and magnetic properties of the [4Fe-4S] clusters. The rate of intramolecular electron transfer between the two [4FE-4S] clusters of ferredoxins has been measured by NMR. It is far slower in the case of Cv Fd than for shorter ferredoxins. The difference may be associated with changes in the magnetic and/or electronic properties of one cluster. The strong paramagnetism of the [4Fe-4S] clusters, which originally limited the applicability of NMR to proteins containing these cofactors, has been proven

  9. Determination of muscle protein synthesis rates in fish using (2)H2O and (2)H NMR analysis of alanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Cátia; Viegas, Filipa; Rito, João; Jones, John; Viegas, Ivan

    2016-09-15

    Following administration of deuterated water ((2)H2O), the fractional synthetic rate (FSR) of a given endogenous protein can be estimated by (2)H-enrichment quantification of its alanine residues. Currently, this is measured by mass spectrometry following a derivatization procedure. Muscle FSR was measured by (1)H/(2)H NMR analysis of alanine from seabass kept for 6 days in 5% (2)H-enriched saltwater, following acid hydrolysis and amino acid isolation by cation-exchange chromatography of muscle tissue. The analysis is simple and robust, and provides precise measurements of excess alanine (2)H-enrichment in the 0.1-0.4% range from 50 mmol of alanine recovered from muscle protein. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A suite of Mathematica notebooks for the analysis of protein main chain 15N NMR relaxation data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spyracopoulos, Leo

    2006-01-01

    A suite of Mathematica notebooks has been designed to ease the analysis of protein main chain 15 N NMR relaxation data collected at a single magnetic field strength. Individual notebooks were developed to perform the following tasks: nonlinear fitting of 15 N-T 1 and -T 2 relaxation decays to a two parameter exponential decay, calculation of the principal components of the inertia tensor from protein structural coordinates, nonlinear optimization of the principal components and orientation of the axially symmetric rotational diffusion tensor, model-free analysis of 15 N-T 1 , -T 2 , and { 1 H}- 15 N NOE data, and reduced spectral density analysis of the relaxation data. The principle features of the notebooks include use of a minimal number of input files, integrated notebook data management, ease of use, cross-platform compatibility, automatic visualization of results and generation of high-quality graphics, and output of analyses in text format

  11. Specific labeling and assignment strategies of valine methyl groups for NMR studies of high molecular weight proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mas, Guillaume; Crublet, Elodie; Hamelin, Olivier; Gans, Pierre; Boisbouvier, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    The specific protonation of valine and leucine methyl groups in proteins is typically achieved by overexpressing proteins in M9/D 2 O medium supplemented with either labeled α-ketoisovalerate for the labeling of the four prochiral methyl groups or with 2-acetolactate for the stereospecific labeling of the valine and leucine side chains. However, when these labeling schemes are applied to large protein assemblies, significant overlap between the correlations of the valine and leucine methyl groups occurs, hampering the analysis of 2D methyl-TROSY spectra. Analysis of the leucine and valine biosynthesis pathways revealed that the incorporation of labeled precursors in the leucine pathway can be inhibited by the addition of exogenous l-leucine-d 10 . We exploited this property to label stereospecifically the pro-R and pro-S methyl groups of valine with minimal scrambling to the leucine residues. This new labeling protocol was applied to the 468 kDa homododecameric peptidase TET2 to decrease the complexity of its NMR spectra. All of the pro-S valine methyl resonances of TET2 were assigned by combining mutagenesis with this innovative labeling approach. The assignments were transferred to the pro-R groups using an optimally labeled sample and a set of triple resonance experiments. This improved labeling scheme enables us to overcome the main limitation of overcrowding in the NMR spectra of prochiral methyl groups, which is a prerequisite for the site-specific measurement of the structural and dynamic parameters or for the study of interactions in very large protein assemblies

  12. Specific labeling and assignment strategies of valine methyl groups for NMR studies of high molecular weight proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mas, Guillaume; Crublet, Elodie [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Institut de Biologie Structurale (IBS) (France); Hamelin, Olivier [CNRS (France); Gans, Pierre; Boisbouvier, Jérôme, E-mail: jerome.boisbouvier@ibs.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Institut de Biologie Structurale (IBS) (France)

    2013-09-28

    The specific protonation of valine and leucine methyl groups in proteins is typically achieved by overexpressing proteins in M9/D{sub 2}O medium supplemented with either labeled α-ketoisovalerate for the labeling of the four prochiral methyl groups or with 2-acetolactate for the stereospecific labeling of the valine and leucine side chains. However, when these labeling schemes are applied to large protein assemblies, significant overlap between the correlations of the valine and leucine methyl groups occurs, hampering the analysis of 2D methyl-TROSY spectra. Analysis of the leucine and valine biosynthesis pathways revealed that the incorporation of labeled precursors in the leucine pathway can be inhibited by the addition of exogenous l-leucine-d{sub 10}. We exploited this property to label stereospecifically the pro-R and pro-S methyl groups of valine with minimal scrambling to the leucine residues. This new labeling protocol was applied to the 468 kDa homododecameric peptidase TET2 to decrease the complexity of its NMR spectra. All of the pro-S valine methyl resonances of TET2 were assigned by combining mutagenesis with this innovative labeling approach. The assignments were transferred to the pro-R groups using an optimally labeled sample and a set of triple resonance experiments. This improved labeling scheme enables us to overcome the main limitation of overcrowding in the NMR spectra of prochiral methyl groups, which is a prerequisite for the site-specific measurement of the structural and dynamic parameters or for the study of interactions in very large protein assemblies.

  13. Direct detection of carbon and nitrogen nuclei for high-resolution analysis of intrinsically disordered proteins using NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, E B; Kriwacki, R W

    2018-01-16

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) is a powerful technique for characterizing the structural and dynamic properties of intrinsically disordered proteins and protein regions (IDPs & IDRs). However, the application of NMR to IDPs has been limited by poor chemical shift dispersion in two-dimensional (2D) 1 H- 15 N heteronuclear correlation spectra. Among the various detection schemes available for heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy, 13 C direct-detection has become a mainstay for investigations of IDPs owing to the favorable chemical shift dispersion in 2D 13 C'- 15 N correlation spectra. Recent advances in cryoprobe technology have enhanced the sensitivity for direct detection of both 13 C and 15 N resonances at high magnetic field strengths, thus prompting the development of 15 N direct-detect experiments to complement established 13 C-detection experiments. However, the application of 15 N-detection has not been widely explored for IDPs. Here we compare 1 H, 13 C, and 15 N detection schemes for a variety of 2D heteronuclear correlation spectra and evaluate their performance on the basis of resolution, chemical shift dispersion, and sensitivity. We performed experiments with a variety of disordered systems ranging in size and complexity; from a small IDR (99 amino acids), to a large low complexity IDR (185 amino acids), and finally a ∼73 kDa folded homopentameric protein that also contains disordered regions (133 amino acids/monomer). We conclude that, while requiring high sample concentration and long acquisition times, 15 N-detection often offers enhanced resolution over other detection schemes in studies of disordered protein regions with low complexity sequences. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Solution NMR structures reveal a distinct architecture and provide first structures for protein domain family PF04536.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eletsky, Alexander; Acton, Thomas B; Xiao, Rong; Everett, John K; Montelione, Gaetano T; Szyperski, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    The protein family (Pfam) PF04536 is a broadly conserved domain family of unknown function (DUF477), with more than 1,350 members in prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins. High-quality NMR structures of the N-terminal domain comprising residues 41-180 of the 684-residue protein CG2496 from Corynebacterium glutamicum and the N-terminal domain comprising residues 35-182 of the 435-residue protein PG0361 from Porphyromonas gingivalis both exhibit an α/β fold comprised of a four-stranded β-sheet, three α-helices packed against one side of the sheet, and a fourth α-helix attached to the other side. In spite of low sequence similarity (18%) assessed by structure-based sequence alignment, the two structures are globally quite similar. However, moderate structural differences are observed for the relative orientation of two of the four helices. Comparison with known protein structures reveals that the α/β architecture of CG2496(41-180) and PG0361(35-182) has previously not been characterized. Moreover, calculation of surface charge potential and identification of surface clefts indicate that the two domains very likely have different functions.

  15. A cost-effective protocol for the parallel production of libraries of 13CH3-specifically labeled mutants for NMR studies of high molecular weight proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crublet, Elodie; Kerfah, Rime; Mas, Guillaume; Noirclerc-Savoye, Marjolaine; Lantez, Violaine; Vernet, Thierry; Boisbouvier, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing interest in applying NMR spectroscopy to the study of large protein assemblies. Development of methyl-specific labeling protocols combined with improved NMR spectroscopy enable nowadays studies of proteins complexes up to 1 MDa. For such large complexes, the major interest lies in obtaining structural, dynamic and interaction information in solution, which requires sequence-specific resonance assignment of NMR signals. While such analysis is quite standard for small proteins, it remains one of the major bottlenecks when the size of the protein increases. Here, we describe implementation and latest improvements of SeSAM, a fast and user-friendly approach for assignment of methyl resonances in large proteins using mutagenesis. We have improved culture medium to boost the production of methyl-specifically labeled proteins, allowing us to perform small-scale parallel production and purification of a library of (13)CH3-specifically labeled mutants. This optimized protocol is illustrated by assignment of Alanine, Isoleucine, and Valine methyl groups of the homododecameric aminopeptidase PhTET2. We estimated that this improved method allows assignment of ca. 100 methyl cross-peaks in 2 weeks, including 4 days of NMR time and less than 2 k€ of isotopic materials.

  16. Measurement of backbone hydrogen-deuterium exchange in the type III secretion system needle protein PrgI by solid-state NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevelkov, Veniamin; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2017-10-01

    In this report we present site-specific measurements of amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates in a protein in the solid state phase by MAS NMR. Employing perdeuteration, proton detection and a high external magnetic field we could adopt the highly efficient Relax-EXSY protocol previously developed for liquid state NMR. According to this method, we measured the contribution of hydrogen exchange on apparent 15N longitudinal relaxation rates in samples with differing D2O buffer content. Differences in the apparent T1 times allowed us to derive exchange rates for multiple residues in the type III secretion system needle protein.

  17. Solution structures of proteins from NMR data and modeling: Alternative folds for neutrophil peptide 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, R.M.; Bassolino, D.A.; Kitchen, D.B.; Pardi, A.

    1989-01-01

    The structure of neutrophil peptide 5 in solution has recently reported. The structure determination was accomplished by using a distance geometry algorithm and 107 interproton distances constrains obtained from 2D NMR data. In each of the eight independent solutions to the distance geometry equations, the overall fold of the polypeptide backbone was identical and the root mean square (rms) deviation between backbone atoms of the superimposed structures was small. In this paper the authors report additional NP-5 structures obtained by using a new structure generation algorithm: a Monte Carlo search in torsion angle space. These structures have a large rms backbone deviation from the distance geometry structures. The backbone topologies differ in significant respects from the distance geometry structures and from each other. Structures are found that are pseudo mirror images of part or all of the fold corresponding to that first obtained with the distance geometry procedure. The results demonstrate that the previously accepted criteria for defining the accuracy and precision of a peptide structure generated from NMR data are inadequate. An energetic analysis of structures corresponding to the different folding topologies has been carried out. The molecular mechanics energies obtained by minimization and molecular dynamics refinement provide sufficient information to eliminate certain alternative structures. On the basis of a careful comparison of the different trial structures with the experimental data, it is concluded that the NP-5 peptide fold which was originally reported is most consistent with the data

  18. Isolation of an antifreeze peptide from the Antarctic sponge Homaxinella balfourensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, S P; Blum, A J; Burkepile, D E; Rutland, T J; Wierzbicki, A; Kelly, M; Hamann, M T

    2002-12-01

    Polar plants and animals survive in subzero waters (-2 degrees C) and many of these marine organisms produce antifreeze proteins (AFPs) to better adapt themselves to these conditions. AFPs prevent the growth of ice crystals which disrupt cellular membranes and destroy cells by inhibiting crystallization of water within the organism. The hydrophilic extract of an Antarctic sponge Homaxinella balfourensis exhibited a non-colligative freezing point depression effect on the crystal morphology of water. The extract was purified by repeated reverse phase high-pressure liquid chromatography, then assayed and shown to contain several AFPs. The major peptide was isolated, analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry and the partial structure of the peptide identified through amino acid sequencing. AFPs have potential applications in agriculture, medicine and the food industry.

  19. Transient interactions studied by NMR : iron sulfur proteins and their interaction partners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Xingfu

    2009-01-01

    The interactions between proteins are of central importance for virtually every process in a living cell. It has long been a mystery how two proteins associate to form a complex in a complicated cellular context. Recently, it was found that an intermediate state called encounter state, of a protein

  20. Potential Antifreeze Compounds in Present-Day Martian Seepage Groundwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiin-Shuh Jean

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Is the recently found seepage groundwater on Mars pure H2O, or mixed with salts and other antifreeze compounds? Given the surface conditions of Mars, it is unlikely that pure water could either exist in its liquid state or have shaped Mars¡¦ fluid erosional landforms (gullies, channels, and valley networks. More likely is that Mars¡¦ seepage groundwater contains antifreeze and salt compounds that resist freezing and suppress evaporation. This model better accounts for Mars¡¦ enigmatic surface erosion. This paper suggests 17 antifreeze compounds potentially present in Martian seepage groundwater. Given their liquid state and physical properties, triethylene glycol, diethylene glycol, ethylene glycol, and 1,3-propylene glycol are advanced as the most likely candidate compounds. This paper also explores how a mixing of glycol or glycerol with salts in the Martian seepage groundwater may have lowered water¡¦s freezing point and raised its boiling point, with consequences that created fluid gully and channel erosion. Ethylene glycol and related hydrocarbon compounds have been identified in Martian and other interstellar meteorites. We suggest that these compounds and their proportions to water be included for detection in future explorations.

  1. NMR-Based Amide Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Measurements for Complex Membrane Proteins: Development and Critical Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerski, Lech; Vinogradova, Olga; Sanders, Charles R.

    2000-01-01

    A method for measuring site-specific amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates for membrane proteins in bilayers is reported and evaluated. This method represents an adaptation and extension of the approach of Dempsey and co-workers (Biophys. J. 70, 1777-1788 (1996)) and is based on reconstituting 15N-labeled membrane proteins into phospholipid bilayers, followed by lyophilization and rehydration with D2O or H2O (control). Following incubation for a time t under hydrated conditions, samples are again lyophilized and then solubilized in an organic solvent system, where 1H-15N HSQC spectra are recorded. Comparison of spectra from D2O-exposed samples to spectra from control samples yields the extent of the H-D exchange which occurred in the bilayers during time t. Measurements are site specific if specific 15N labeling is used. The first part of this paper deals with the search for a suitable solvent system in which to solubilize complex membrane proteins in an amide "exchange-trapped" form for NMR quantitation of amide peak intensities. The second portion of the paper documents application of the overall procedure to measuring site-specific amide exchange rates in diacylglycerol kinase, a representative integral membrane protein. Both the potential usefulness and the significant limitations of the new method are documented.

  2. NMR studies of the structural dynamics and intermolecular interactions of colicin E9 and its inhibitor protein

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, E S

    2001-01-01

    reveal the anisotropic character of the molecule. The thesis concludes with a general discussion in chapter six that considers the current model for the uptake of colicin E9 into a bacterium in the light of the NMR data. The subject of this work is the structural dynamics of colicin E9, a plasmid-encoded toxin produced by Escherichia coli, and its immunity protein lm9. Colicin proteins, their mode of action and their structures are introduced in chapter one. Chapter two describes the relaxation properties of protein backbone NH groups, their measurement and how they can give information about the dynamics of a protein. Experimental work is reported in chapters three, four and five. Chapter three deals with lm9, showing that the relaxation times of its backbone NH groups are determined primarily by the overall rotational diffusion of the molecule. This chapter includes a critical evaluation of model-free analysis of the lm9 relaxation data. Chapter four examines the DNase domain of colicin E9 showing it to hav...

  3. Advanced solid-state NMR techniques for characterization of membrane protein structure and dynamics: application to Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Meaghan E; Brown, Leonid S; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    Studies of the structure, dynamics, and function of membrane proteins (MPs) have long been considered one of the main applications of solid-state NMR (SSNMR). Advances in instrumentation, and the plethora of new SSNMR methodologies developed over the past decade have resulted in a number of high-resolution structures and structural models of both bitopic and polytopic α-helical MPs. The necessity to retain lipids in the sample, the high proportion of one type of secondary structure, differential dynamics, and the possibility of local disorder in the loop regions all create challenges for structure determination. In this Perspective article we describe our recent efforts directed at determining the structure and functional dynamics of Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin, a heptahelical transmembrane (7TM) protein. We review some of the established and emerging methods which can be utilized for SSNMR-based structure determination, with a particular focus on those used for ASR, a bacterial protein which shares its 7TM architecture with G-protein coupled receptors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. BioMagResBank (BMRB) as a partner in the Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB): new policies affecting biomolecular NMR depositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markley, John L.; Ulrich, Eldon L.; Berman, Helen M.; Henrick, Kim; Nakamura, Haruki; Akutsu, Hideo

    2008-01-01

    We describe the role of the BioMagResBank (BMRB) within the Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) and recent policies affecting the deposition of biomolecular NMR data. All PDB depositions of structures based on NMR data must now be accompanied by experimental restraints. A scheme has been devised that allows depositors to specify a representative structure and to define residues within that structure found experimentally to be largely unstructured. The BMRB now accepts coordinate sets representing three-dimensional structural models based on experimental NMR data of molecules of biological interest that fall outside the guidelines of the Protein Data Bank (i.e., the molecule is a peptide with 23 or fewer residues, a polynucleotide with 3 or fewer residues, a polysaccharide with 3 or fewer sugar residues, or a natural product), provided that the coordinates are accompanied by representation of the covalent structure of the molecule (atom connectivity), assigned NMR chemical shifts, and the structural restraints used in generating model. The BMRB now contains an archive of NMR data for metabolites and other small molecules found in biological systems

  5. Hydrogen bond strength in membrane proteins probed by time-resolved 1 H-detected solid-state NMR and MD simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medeiros-silva, João; Jekhmane, Miranda; Baldus, Marc; Weingarth, Markus

    2017-01-01

    1H-detected solid-state NMR in combination with 1H/2D exchange steps allows for the direct identification of very strong hydrogen bonds in membrane proteins. On the example of the membrane-embedded potassium channel KcsA, we quantify the longevity of such very strong hydrogen bonds by combining

  6. An Introduction to Drug Discovery by Probing Protein-Substrate Interactions Using Saturation Transfer Difference-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (STD-NMR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guegan, Jean-Paul; Daniellou, Richard

    2012-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for characterizing and identifying molecules and nowadays is even used to characterize complex systems in biology. In the experiment presented here, students learned how to apply this modern technique to probe interactions between small molecules and proteins. With the use of simple organic synthesis, students…

  7. A J-modulated protonless NMR experiment characterizes the conformational ensemble of the intrinsically disordered protein WIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozentur-Shkop, Eva; Goobes, Gil; Chill, Jordan H., E-mail: Jordan.Chill@biu.ac.il [Bar Ilan University, Department of Chemistry (Israel)

    2016-12-15

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are multi-conformational polypeptides that lack a single stable three-dimensional structure. It has become increasingly clear that the versatile IDPs play key roles in a multitude of biological processes, and, given their flexible nature, NMR is a leading method to investigate IDP behavior on the molecular level. Here we present an IDP-tailored J-modulated experiment designed to monitor changes in the conformational ensemble characteristic of IDPs by accurately measuring backbone one- and two-bond J({sup 15}N,{sup 13}Cα) couplings. This concept was realized using a unidirectional (H)NCO {sup 13}C-detected experiment suitable for poor spectral dispersion and optimized for maximum coverage of amino acid types. To demonstrate the utility of this approach we applied it to the disordered actin-binding N-terminal domain of WASp interacting protein (WIP), a ubiquitous key modulator of cytoskeletal changes in a range of biological systems. One- and two-bond J({sup 15}N,{sup 13}Cα) couplings were acquired for WIP residues 2–65 at various temperatures, and in denaturing and crowding environments. Under native conditions fitted J-couplings identified in the WIP conformational ensemble a propensity for extended conformation at residues 16–23 and 45–60, and a helical tendency at residues 28–42. These findings are consistent with a previous study of the based upon chemical shift and RDC data and confirm that the WIP{sup 2–65} conformational ensemble is biased towards the structure assumed by this fragment in its actin-bound form. The effects of environmental changes upon this ensemble were readily apparent in the J-coupling data, which reflected a significant decrease in structural propensity at higher temperatures, in the presence of 8 M urea, and under the influence of a bacterial cell lysate. The latter suggests that crowding can cause protein unfolding through protein–protein interactions that stabilize the unfolded

  8. NMR structure determination of the binding site for ribosomal protein S8 from Escherichia coli 16 S rRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalurachchi, K; Nikonowicz, E P

    1998-07-24

    Many cellular processes involve the preferential interaction of an RNA molecule with a specific protein. A detailed analysis of the individual protein and RNA components of these interactions can provide unique insights into the structural features important for protein-RNA recognition. Ribosomal protein S8 of Escherichia coli plays a key role in 30 S ribosomal subunit assembly through its interaction with 16 S rRNA. The binding site for protein S8 comprises a portion of helix 21, nucleotides G588 to G604 and C634 to C651. This region forms a base-paired helix that is interrupted by a non-Watson-Crick segment composed of nine phylogenetically conserved nucleotides. We have investigated the detailed structure of the conserved segment and the interaction of this region with metal ions using NMR spectroscopy. Twenty-four of the 40 calculated structures converged to similar conformations and were grouped into two families. The main difference between the families is the orientation of the base of U641. The rms deviation between the heavy-atoms of the ten lowest-energy structures is 1.24 A. The orientations of the G597.C643 base-pair and A595.(A596.U644) base-triple within the conserved core have been defined and appear to extend the proximal segment of helix 21 into the phylogenetically conserved core. The base of A642 terminates this helix by stacking against C643 and the base of U641 forms hydrogen bonds with core nucleotides. The conserved core also contains a Mg2+-binding site that promotes stabilization of the secondary and tertiary structure elements of the core. A model for the interaction of S8 with its RNA-binding site is proposed. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  9. NMR elucidation of monomer-dimer transition and conformational heterogeneity in histone-like DNA binding protein of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Nancy; Raikwal, Nisha; Pandey, Himanshu; Agarwal, Nipanshu; Arora, Ashish; Poluri, Krishna Mohan; Kumar, Dinesh

    2017-12-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonizes under harsh acidic/oxidative stress conditions of human gastrointestinal tract and can survive there for infinitely longer durations of host life. The bacterium expresses several harbinger proteins to facilitate its persistent colonization under such conditions. One such protein in H. pylori is histone-like DNA binding protein (Hup), which in its homo-dimeric form binds to DNA to perform various DNA dependent cellular activities. Further, it also plays an important role in protecting the genomic DNA from oxidative stress and acidic denaturation. Legitimately, if the binding of Hup to DNA is suppressed, it will directly impact on the survival of the bacterium, thus making Hup a potential therapeutic target for developing new anti-H. pylori agents. However, to inhibit the binding of Hup to DNA, it is necessary to gain detailed insights into the molecular and structural basis of Hup-dimerization and its binding mechanism to DNA. As a first step in this direction, we report here the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assignments and structural features of Hup at pH 6.0. The study revealed the occurrence of dynamic equilibrium between its monomer and dimer conformations. The dynamic equilibrium was found to shifting towards dimer both at low temperature and low pH; whereas DNA binding studies evidenced that the protein binds to DNA in its dimeric form. These preliminary investigations correlate very well with the diverse functionality of protein and will form the basis for future studies aiming to develop novel anti-H. pylori agents employing structure-based-rational drug discovery approach. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Cell-free expression, purification, and membrane reconstitution for NMR studies of the nonstructural protein 4B from hepatitis C virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogeron, Marie-Laure [Université de Lyon, Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Protéines, Bases Moléculaires et Structurales des Systèmes Infectieux, Labex Ecofect, UMR 5086 CNRS (France); Jirasko, Vlastimil; Penzel, Susanne [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Paul, David [Heidelberg University, Department of Infectious Diseases, Molecular Virology (Germany); Montserret, Roland; Danis, Clément; Lacabanne, Denis; Badillo, Aurélie [Université de Lyon, Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Protéines, Bases Moléculaires et Structurales des Systèmes Infectieux, Labex Ecofect, UMR 5086 CNRS (France); Gouttenoire, Jérôme; Moradpour, Darius [University of Lausanne, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (Switzerland); Bartenschlager, Ralf [Heidelberg University, Department of Infectious Diseases, Molecular Virology (Germany); Penin, François [Université de Lyon, Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Protéines, Bases Moléculaires et Structurales des Systèmes Infectieux, Labex Ecofect, UMR 5086 CNRS (France); Meier, Beat H., E-mail: beme@ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); and others

    2016-06-15

    We describe the expression of the hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein 4B (NS4B), which is an integral membrane protein, in a wheat germ cell-free system, the subsequent purification and characterization of NS4B and its insertion into proteoliposomes in amounts sufficient for multidimensional solid-state NMR spectroscopy. First spectra of the isotopically [{sup 2}H,{sup 13}C,{sup 15}N]-labeled protein are shown to yield narrow {sup 13}C resonance lines and a proper, predominantly α-helical fold. Clean residue-selective leucine, isoleucine and threonine-labeling is demonstrated. These results evidence the suitability of the wheat germ-produced integral membrane protein NS4B for solid-state NMR. Still, the proton linewidth under fast magic angle spinning is broader than expected for a perfect sample and possible causes are discussed.

  11. Characterization of Protein Detergent Complexes by NMR, Light Scattering, and Analytical Ultracentrifugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslennikov, Innokentiy; Krupa, Martin; Dickson, Christopher; Esquivies, Luis; Blain, Katherine; Kefala, Georgia; Choe, Senyon; Kwiatkowski, Witek

    2009-01-01

    Bottlenecks in expression, solubilization, purification and crystallization hamper the structural study of integral membrane proteins (IMPs). Successful crystallization is critically dependent on the purity, stability and oligomeric homogeneity of an IMP sample. These characteristics are in turn strongly influenced by the type and concentration of the detergents used in IMP preparation. By utilizing the techniques and analytical tools we earlier developed for the characterization of protein-detergent complexes (PDCs) (Maslennikov et al., 2007), we demonstrate that for successful protein extraction from E. coli membrane fractions, the solubilizing detergent associates preferentially to IMPs rather than to membrane lipids. Notably, this result is contrary to the generally accepted mechanism of detergent-mediated IMP solubilization. We find that for one particular member of the family of proteins studied (E. coli receptor kinases, which is purified in mixed multimeric states and oligomerizes through its transmembrane region), the protein oligomeric composition is largely unaffected by a 10-fold increase in protein concentration, by alteration of micelle properties through addition of other detergents to the PDC sample, or by a 20-fold variation in the detergent concentration used for solubilization of the IMP from the membrane. We observed that the conditions used for expression of the IMP, which impact protein density in the membrane, has the greatest influence on the IMP oligomeric structure. Finally, we argue that for concentrating PDCs smaller than 30 kDa, stirred concentration cells are less prone to over-concentration of detergent and are therefore more effective than centrifugal ultrafiltration devices. PMID:19214777

  12. Equilibrium simulations of proteins using molecular fragment replacement and NMR chemical shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boomsma, Wouter; Tian, Pengfei; Frellsen, J.

    2014-01-01

    Significance Chemical shifts are the most fundamental parameters measured in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Since these parameters are exquisitely sensitive to the local atomic environment, they can provide detailed information about the three-dimensional structures of proteins. It has...... recently been shown that using such information directly as input in molecular simulations based on the molecular fragment replacement strategy can help the process of protein structure determination. Here, we show how to implement this strategy to determine not only the structures of proteins but also...

  13. Water-Protein Hydrogen Exchange in the Micro-Crystalline Protein Crh as Observed by Solid State NMR Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeckmann, Anja; Juy, Michel; Bettler, Emmanuel; Emsley, Lyndon; Galinier, Anne; Penin, Francois; Lesage, Anne

    2005-01-01

    We report site-resolved observation of hydrogen exchange in the micro-crystalline protein Crh. Our approach is based on the use of proton T 2 ' -selective 1 H- 13 C- 13 C correlation spectra for site-specific assignments of carbons nearby labile protein protons. We compare the proton T 2 ' selective scheme to frequency selective water observation in deuterated proteins, and discuss the impacts of deuteration on 13 C linewidths in Crh. We observe that in micro-crystalline proteins, solvent accessible hydroxyl and amino protons show comparable exchange rates with water protons as for proteins in solution, and that structural constraints, such as hydrogen bonding or solvent accessibility, more significantly reduce exchange rates

  14. Solution NMR structure of the HLTF HIRAN domain: a conserved module in SWI2/SNF2 DNA damage tolerance proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korzhnev, Dmitry M. [University of Connecticut Health, Department of Molecular Biology and Biophysics (United States); Neculai, Dante [Zhejiang University, School of Medicine (China); Dhe-Paganon, Sirano [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Cancer Biology (United States); Arrowsmith, Cheryl H. [University of Toronto, Structural Genomics Consortium (Canada); Bezsonova, Irina, E-mail: bezsonova@uchc.edu [University of Connecticut Health, Department of Molecular Biology and Biophysics (United States)

    2016-11-15

    HLTF is a SWI2/SNF2-family ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzyme that acts in the error-free branch of DNA damage tolerance (DDT), a cellular mechanism that enables replication of damaged DNA while leaving damage repair for a later time. Human HLTF and a closely related protein SHPRH, as well as their yeast homologue Rad5, are multi-functional enzymes that share E3 ubiquitin-ligase activity required for activation of the error-free DDT. HLTF and Rad5 also function as ATP-dependent dsDNA translocases and possess replication fork reversal activities. Thus, they can convert Y-shaped replication forks into X-shaped Holliday junction structures that allow error-free replication over DNA lesions. The fork reversal activity of HLTF is dependent on 3′-ssDNA-end binding activity of its N-terminal HIRAN domain. Here we present the solution NMR structure of the human HLTF HIRAN domain, an OB-like fold module found in organisms from bacteria (as a stand-alone domain) to plants, fungi and metazoan (in combination with SWI2/SNF2 helicase-like domain). The obtained structure of free HLTF HIRAN is similar to recently reported structures of its DNA bound form, while the NMR analysis also reveals that the DNA binding site of the free domain exhibits conformational heterogeneity. Sequence comparison of N-terminal regions of HLTF, SHPRH and Rad5 aided by knowledge of the HLTF HIRAN structure suggests that the SHPRH N-terminus also includes an uncharacterized structured module, exhibiting weak sequence similarity with HIRAN regions of HLTF and Rad5, and potentially playing a similar functional role.

  15. Characterizing the secondary protein structure of black widow dragline silk using solid-state NMR and X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Janelle E; Sampath, Sujatha; Butler, Emily; Kim, Jihyun; Henning, Robert W; Holland, Gregory P; Yarger, Jeffery L

    2013-10-14

    This study provides a detailed secondary structural characterization of major ampullate dragline silk from Latrodectus hesperus (black widow) spiders. X-ray diffraction results show that the structure of black widow major ampullate silk fibers is comprised of stacked β-sheet nanocrystallites oriented parallel to the fiber axis and an amorphous region with oriented (anisotropic) and isotropic components. The combination of two-dimensional (2D) (13)C-(13)C through-space and through-bond solid-state NMR experiments provide chemical shifts that are used to determine detailed information about the amino acid motif secondary structure in black widow spider dragline silk. Individual amino acids are incorporated into different repetitive motifs that make up the majority of this protein-based biopolymer. From the solid-state NMR measurements, we assign distinct secondary conformations to each repetitive amino acid motif and, hence, to the amino acids that make up the motifs. Specifically, alanine is incorporated in β-sheet (poly(Alan) and poly(Gly-Ala)), 3(1)-helix (poly(Gly-Gly-Xaa), and α-helix (poly(Gln-Gln-Ala-Tyr)) components. Glycine is determined to be in β-sheet (poly(Gly-Ala)) and 3(1)-helical (poly(Gly-Gly-X(aa))) regions, while serine is present in β-sheet (poly(Gly-Ala-Ser)), 3(1)-helix (poly(Gly-Gly-Ser)), and β-turn (poly(Gly-Pro-Ser)) structures. These various motif-specific secondary structural elements are quantitatively correlated to the primary amino acid sequence of major ampullate spidroin 1 and 2 (MaSp1 and MaSp2) and are shown to form a self-consistent model for black widow dragline silk.

  16. /sup 31/P NMR probes of sipunculan erythrocytes containing the O/sub 2/-carying protein hemerythrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robitaille, P.M.L.; Kurtz, D.M. Jr

    1988-06-14

    Reported are the first examinations by /sup 31/P NMR of erythrocytes containing the non-heme iron O/sub 2/ carrying protein hemerythrin (Hr). Intact coelomic erythrocytes from the sipunculids Phascolopsis gouldii and Themiste zostericola were shown by /sup 31/P NMR to contain O-phosphorylethanolamine and 2-amino-ethylphosphonate as the major soluble phosphorus metabolites. This combination of major metabolites appears to be unique to sipunculan erythrocytes. Nucleoside triphosphates and mannose 1-phosphate were present in lower concentrations. The concentration of O-phosphorylethanolamine within P. gouldii erythrocytes was established to be > 20 mM. T. zostericola erythrocytes contained relatively high levels of 2-amino-ethylphosphonate and lower levels of O-phosphorylethanolamine compared with those of P. gouldii. For P. gouldii and T. zostericola the intracellular pHs were determined to be 7.2 +/- 0.1 and 7.1 +/- 0.1, respectively, in air-equilibrated erythrocytes, and 6.5 +/- 0.1 in anaerobic P. gouldii erythrocytes. O-Phosphorylethanolamine was found to bind weakly to P. gouldii metHr. This interaction is best characterized by either negative cooperativity or nonspecific binding. O-phosphorylethanolamine strongly inhibits azide binding to the iron site of P. gouldii metHr at pH 7.2. The rate of azide binding decreases by approx. 85-fold in the presence of 0.33 M O-phosphorylethanolamine. However, neither O-phosphorylethanolamine nor 2-aminoethylphosphonate at 0.33 M was found to have any significant effect on O/sub 2/ affinity of P. gouldii deoxyHr. Alternative functions for the two metabolites are suggested.

  17. Determination of the electron self-exchange rates of blue copper proteins by super-WEFT NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Lixin; Philipp, Else; Led, Jens J. [University of Copenhagen, H.C. Orsted Institute, Department of Chemistry (Denmark)

    2001-03-15

    An NMR approach for determining the electron self-exchange (ESE) rate constants in blue copper proteins is presented. The approach uses the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement of resonances in 1D {sup 1}H super-WEFT spectra of partly oxidized (paramagnetic) proteins. These spectra allow a more precise determination of the relevant paramagnetic linebroadenings than conventional 1D {sup 1}H spectra and, thus, permit a more detailed investigation of the applicability of the linebroadenings for determining the electron exchange rates. The approach was used to estimate the ESE rate constant of plastocyanin from Anabaena variabilis. It was found that, although the rate constant can be determined accurately from a series of resonances, precise but erroneous constants are obtained from the resonances of the copper-bound residues, unless a narrow splitting of these resonances caused by the presence of two conformations is taken into account. As demonstrated here, this complication can be overcome by a correct analysis of the paramagnetic broadening of the combined double signals. Because of the high resolution and specific sensitivity of the approach it should be generally applicable to estimate electron transfer rates, k, if the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement R{sub 2p} of the resonances can be determined, and the conditions k<<>k>>R{sub 2p} are fulfilled, {delta}{omega}{sub p} being the frequency separation between corresponding diamagnetic and paramagnetic sites.

  18. Protein residue linking in a single spectrum for magic-angle spinning NMR assignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreas, Loren B.; Stanek, Jan; Marchand, Tanguy Le; Bertarello, Andrea; Paepe, Diane Cala-De; Lalli, Daniela; Krejčíková, Magdaléna; Doyen, Camille; Öster, Carl [Université de Lyon, Centre de RMN à Très Hauts Champs, Institut des Sciences Analytiques (CNRS, ENS Lyon, UCB Lyon 1) (France); Knott, Benno; Wegner, Sebastian; Engelke, Frank [Bruker Biospin (Germany); Felli, Isabella C.; Pierattelli, Roberta [University of Florence, Department of Chemistry “Ugo Schiff“and Magnetic Resonance Center (CERM) (Italy); Dixon, Nicholas E. [University of Wollongong, School of Chemistry (Australia); Emsley, Lyndon; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido, E-mail: guido.pintacuda@ens-lyon.fr [Université de Lyon, Centre de RMN à Très Hauts Champs, Institut des Sciences Analytiques (CNRS, ENS Lyon, UCB Lyon 1) (France)

    2015-07-15

    Here we introduce a new pulse sequence for resonance assignment that halves the number of data sets required for sequential linking by directly correlating sequential amide resonances in a single diagonal-free spectrum. The method is demonstrated with both microcrystalline and sedimented deuterated proteins spinning at 60 and 111 kHz, and a fully protonated microcrystalline protein spinning at 111 kHz, with as little as 0.5 mg protein sample. We find that amide signals have a low chance of ambiguous linkage, which is further improved by linking in both forward and backward directions. The spectra obtained are amenable to automated resonance assignment using general-purpose software such as UNIO-MATCH.

  19. CSI 3.0: a web server for identifying secondary and super-secondary structure in proteins using NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafsa, Noor E; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S

    2015-07-01

    The Chemical Shift Index or CSI 3.0 (http://csi3.wishartlab.com) is a web server designed to accurately identify the location of secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains using only nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) backbone chemical shifts and their corresponding protein sequence data. Unlike earlier versions of CSI, which only identified three types of secondary structure (helix, β-strand and coil), CSI 3.0 now identifies total of 11 types of secondary and super-secondary structures, including helices, β-strands, coil regions, five common β-turns (type I, II, I', II' and VIII), β hairpins as well as interior and edge β-strands. CSI 3.0 accepts experimental NMR chemical shift data in multiple formats (NMR Star 2.1, NMR Star 3.1 and SHIFTY) and generates colorful CSI plots (bar graphs) and secondary/super-secondary structure assignments. The output can be readily used as constraints for structure determination and refinement or the images may be used for presentations and publications. CSI 3.0 uses a pipeline of several well-tested, previously published programs to identify the secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains. Comparisons with secondary and super-secondary structure assignments made via standard coordinate analysis programs such as DSSP, STRIDE and VADAR on high-resolution protein structures solved by X-ray and NMR show >90% agreement between those made with CSI 3.0. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Multiple acquisition of magic angle spinning solid-state NMR experiments using one receiver: Application to microcrystalline and membrane protein preparations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, T.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2015-04-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy of proteins is a notoriously low-throughput technique. Relatively low-sensitivity and poor resolution of protein samples require long acquisition times for multidimensional NMR experiments. To speed up data acquisition, we developed a family of experiments called Polarization Optimized Experiments (POE), in which we utilized the orphan spin operators that are discarded in classical multidimensional NMR experiments, recovering them to allow simultaneous acquisition of multiple 2D and 3D experiments, all while using conventional probes with spectrometers equipped with one receiver. POE allow the concatenation of multiple 2D or 3D pulse sequences into a single experiment, thus potentially combining all of the aforementioned advances, boosting the capability of ssNMR spectrometers at least two-fold without the addition of any hardware. In this perspective, we describe the first generation of POE, such as dual acquisition MAS (or DUMAS) methods, and then illustrate the evolution of these experiments into MEIOSIS, a method that enables the simultaneous acquisition of multiple 2D and 3D spectra. Using these new pulse schemes for the solid-state NMR investigation of biopolymers makes it possible to obtain sequential resonance assignments, as well as distance restraints, in about half the experimental time. While designed for acquisition of heteronuclei, these new experiments can be easily implemented for proton detection and coupled with other recent advancements, such as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), to improve signal to noise. Finally, we illustrate the application of these methods to microcrystalline protein preparations as well as single and multi-span membrane proteins reconstituted in lipid membranes.

  1. Multiple acquisition of magic angle spinning solid-state NMR experiments using one receiver: application to microcrystalline and membrane protein preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, T; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2015-04-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy of proteins is a notoriously low-throughput technique. Relatively low-sensitivity and poor resolution of protein samples require long acquisition times for multidimensional NMR experiments. To speed up data acquisition, we developed a family of experiments called Polarization Optimized Experiments (POE), in which we utilized the orphan spin operators that are discarded in classical multidimensional NMR experiments, recovering them to allow simultaneous acquisition of multiple 2D and 3D experiments, all while using conventional probes with spectrometers equipped with one receiver. POE allow the concatenation of multiple 2D or 3D pulse sequences into a single experiment, thus potentially combining all of the aforementioned advances, boosting the capability of ssNMR spectrometers at least two-fold without the addition of any hardware. In this perspective, we describe the first generation of POE, such as dual acquisition MAS (or DUMAS) methods, and then illustrate the evolution of these experiments into MEIOSIS, a method that enables the simultaneous acquisition of multiple 2D and 3D spectra. Using these new pulse schemes for the solid-state NMR investigation of biopolymers makes it possible to obtain sequential resonance assignments, as well as distance restraints, in about half the experimental time. While designed for acquisition of heteronuclei, these new experiments can be easily implemented for proton detection and coupled with other recent advancements, such as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), to improve signal to noise. Finally, we illustrate the application of these methods to microcrystalline protein preparations as well as single and multi-span membrane proteins reconstituted in lipid membranes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mapping protein–protein interactions by double-REDOR-filtered magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Changmiao; Hou, Guangjin, E-mail: hou@udel.edu; Lu, Xingyu; Polenova, Tatyana, E-mail: tpolenov@udel.edu [University of Delaware, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States)

    2017-02-15

    REDOR-based experiments with simultaneous {sup 1}H–{sup 13}C and {sup 1}H−{sup 15}N dipolar dephasing are explored for investigating intermolecular protein–protein interfaces in complexes formed by a U–{sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeled protein and its natural abundance binding partner. The application of a double-REDOR filter (dREDOR) results in a complete dephasing of proton magnetization in the U–{sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-enriched molecule while the proton magnetization of the unlabeled binding partner is not dephased. This retained proton magnetization is then transferred across the intermolecular interface by {sup 1}H–{sup 13}C or {sup 1}H–{sup 15}N cross polarization, permitting to establish the residues of the U–{sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeled protein, which constitute the binding interface. To assign the interface residues, this dREDOR-CPMAS element is incorporated as a building block into {sup 13}C–{sup 13}C correlation experiments. We established the validity of this approach on U–{sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-histidine and on a structurally characterized complex of dynactin’s U–{sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-CAP-Gly domain with end-binding protein 1 (EB1). The approach introduced here is broadly applicable to the analysis of intermolecular interfaces when one of the binding partners in a complex cannot be isotopically labeled.

  3. GFT projection NMR based resonance assignment of membrane proteins: application to subunit C of E. coli F(1)F (0) ATP synthase in LPPG micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Atreya, Hanudatta S; Kamen, Douglas E; Girvin, Mark E; Szyperski, Thomas

    2008-03-01

    G-matrix FT projection NMR spectroscopy was employed for resonance assignment of the 79-residue subunit c of the Escherichia coli F(1)F(0) ATP synthase embedded in micelles formed by lyso palmitoyl phosphatidyl glycerol (LPPG). Five GFT NMR experiments, that is, (3,2)D HNNCO, L-(4,3)D HNNC (alphabeta) C (alpha), L-(4,3)D HNN(CO)C (alphabeta) C (alpha), (4,2)D HACA(CO)NHN and (4,3)D HCCH, were acquired along with simultaneous 3D (15)N, (13)C(aliphatic), (13)C(aromatic)-resolved [(1)H,(1)H]-NOESY with a total measurement time of approximately 43 h. Data analysis resulted in sequence specific assignments for all routinely measured backbone and (13)C(beta) shifts, and for 97% of the side chain shifts. Moreover, the use of two G(2)FT NMR experiments, that is, (5,3)D HN{N,CO}{C (alphabeta) C (alpha)} and (5,3)D {C (alphabeta) C (alpha)}{CON}HN, was explored to break the very high chemical shift degeneracy typically encountered for membrane proteins. It is shown that the 4D and 5D spectral information obtained rapidly from GFT and G(2)FT NMR experiments enables one to efficiently obtain (nearly) complete resonance assignments of membrane proteins.

  4. A Unique and Simple Approach to Improve Sensitivity in 15N-NMR Relaxation Measurements for NH3+ Groups: Application to a Protein-DNA Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dan; Lokesh, Ganesh L.R.; Volk, David E.; Iwahara, Junji

    2017-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for research on protein dynamics. In the past decade, there has been significant progress in the development of NMR methods for studying charged side chains. In particular, NMR methods for lysine side-chain NH3+ groups have been proven to be powerful for investigating the dynamics of hydrogen bonds or ion pairs that play important roles in biological processes. However, relatively low sensitivity has been a major practical issue in NMR experiments on NH3+ groups. In this paper, we present a unique and simple approach to improve sensitivity in 15N relaxation measurements for NH3+ groups. In this approach, the efficiency of coherence transfers for the desired components are maximized, whereas undesired anti-phase or multi-spin order components are purged through pulse schemes and rapid relaxation. For lysine side-chain NH3+ groups of a protein-DNA complex, we compared the data obtained with the previous and new pulse sequences under the same conditions and confirmed that the 15N relaxation parameters were consistent for these datasets. While retaining accuracy in measuring 15N relaxation, our new pulse sequences for NH3+ groups allowed an 82% increase in detection sensitivity of 15N longitudinal and transverse relaxation measurements. PMID:28809801

  5. A Unique and Simple Approach to Improve Sensitivity in15N-NMR Relaxation Measurements for NH₃⁺ Groups: Application to a Protein-DNA Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dan; Lokesh, Ganesh L R; Volk, David E; Iwahara, Junji

    2017-08-15

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for research on protein dynamics. In the past decade, there has been significant progress in the development of NMR methods for studying charged side chains. In particular, NMR methods for lysine side-chain NH₃⁺ groups have been proven to be powerful for investigating the dynamics of hydrogen bonds or ion pairs that play important roles in biological processes. However, relatively low sensitivity has been a major practical issue in NMR experiments on NH₃⁺ groups. In this paper, we present a unique and simple approach to improve sensitivity in 15 N relaxation measurements for NH₃⁺ groups. In this approach, the efficiency of coherence transfers for the desired components are maximized, whereas undesired anti-phase or multi-spin order components are purged through pulse schemes and rapid relaxation. For lysine side-chain NH₃⁺ groups of a protein-DNA complex, we compared the data obtained with the previous and new pulse sequences under the same conditions and confirmed that the 15 N relaxation parameters were consistent for these datasets. While retaining accuracy in measuring 15 N relaxation, our new pulse sequences for NH₃⁺ groups allowed an 82% increase in detection sensitivity of 15 N longitudinal and transverse relaxation measurements.

  6. J-UNIO protocol used for NMR structure determination of the 206-residue protein NP-346487.1 from Streptococcus pneumoniae TIGR4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaudzems, Kristaps [Latvian Institute of Organic Synthesis (Latvia); Pedrini, Bill [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), SwissFEL Project (Switzerland); Geralt, Michael; Serrano, Pedro; Wüthrich, Kurt, E-mail: wuthrich@scripps.edu [The Scripps Research Institute, Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The NMR structure of the 206-residue protein NP-346487.1 was determined with the J-UNIO protocol, which includes extensive automation of the structure determination. With input from three APSY-NMR experiments, UNIO-MATCH automatically yielded 77 % of the backbone assignments, which were interactively validated and extended to 97 %. With an input of the near-complete backbone assignments and three 3D heteronuclear-resolved [{sup 1}H,{sup 1}H]-NOESY spectra, automated side chain assignment with UNIO-ATNOS/ASCAN resulted in 77 % of the expected assignments, which was extended interactively to about 90 %. Automated NOE assignment and structure calculation with UNIO-ATNOS/CANDID in combination with CYANA was used for the structure determination of this two-domain protein. The individual domains in the NMR structure coincide closely with the crystal structure, and the NMR studies further imply that the two domains undergo restricted hinge motions relative to each other in solution. NP-346487.1 is so far the largest polypeptide chain to which the J-UNIO structure determination protocol has successfully been applied.

  7. Comprehensive Determination of Protein Tyrosine pK(a) Values for Photoactive Yellow Protein Using Indirect C-13 NMR Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oktaviani, Nur Alia; Pool, Trijntje J.; Kamikubo, Hironari; Slager, Jelle; Scheek, Ruud M.; Kataoka, Mikio; Mulder, Frans A. A.

    2012-01-01

    Upon blue-light irradiation, the bacterium Halorhodospira halophila is able to modulate the activity of its flagellar motor and thereby evade potentially harmful UV radiation. The 14 kDa soluble cytosolic photoactive yellow protein (PYP) is believed to be the primary mediator of this photophobic

  8. NMR studies on the mechanism of structural destabilization of the globular proteins and DNA by aliphatic alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubas, B.; Witman, B.; Wieniewska, T.; Soltysik, M.

    1977-01-01

    The concept that the mechanism of structural destabilization of the biologically active macromolecules by typical denaturing agents should find a reflection in the NMR spectra of the denaturants themselves has been followed by proton NMR for some aliphatic alcohols in the system containing the serum albumin of DNA. (author)

  9. Triple resonance 15N NMR relaxation experiments for studies of intrinsically disordered proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Srb, Pavel; Nováček, J.; Kadeřávek, P.; Rabatinová, Alžběta; Krásný, Libor; Žídková, Jitka; Bobálová, Janette; Sklenář, V.; Žídek, L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 3 (2017), s. 133-146 ISSN 0925-2738 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-16842S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1304 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388971 ; RVO:68081715 Keywords : nuclear magnetic resonance * relaxation * non-uniform sampling * intrinsically disordered proteins Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation; EE - Microbiology, Virology (MBU-M); CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation (UIACH-O) OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry; Microbiology (MBU-M); Analytical chemistry (UIACH-O) Impact factor: 2.410, year: 2016

  10. 1H-detected MAS solid-state NMR experiments enable the simultaneous mapping of rigid and dynamic domains of membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, T.; Nelson, Sarah E. D.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2017-12-01

    Magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy is emerging as a unique method for the atomic resolution structure determination of native membrane proteins in lipid bilayers. Although 13C-detected ssNMR experiments continue to play a major role, recent technological developments have made it possible to carry out 1H-detected experiments, boosting both sensitivity and resolution. Here, we describe a new set of 1H-detected hybrid pulse sequences that combine through-bond and through-space correlation elements into single experiments, enabling the simultaneous detection of rigid and dynamic domains of membrane proteins. As proof-of-principle, we applied these new pulse sequences to the membrane protein phospholamban (PLN) reconstituted in lipid bilayers under moderate MAS conditions. The cross-polarization (CP) based elements enabled the detection of the relatively immobile residues of PLN in the transmembrane domain using through-space correlations; whereas the most dynamic region, which is in equilibrium between folded and unfolded states, was mapped by through-bond INEPT-based elements. These new 1H-detected experiments will enable one to detect not only the most populated (ground) states of biomacromolecules, but also sparsely populated high-energy (excited) states for a complete characterization of protein free energy landscapes.

  11. Visualizing the principal component of 1H,15N-HSQC NMR spectral changes that reflect protein structural or functional properties: application to troponin C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Ian M.; Boyko, Robert F.; Sykes, Brian D.

    2011-01-01

    Laboratories often repeatedly determine the structure of a given protein under a variety of conditions, mutations, modifications, or in a number of states. This approach can be cumbersome and tedious. Given then a database of structures, identifiers, and corresponding 1 H, 15 N-HSQC NMR spectra for homologous proteins, we investigated whether structural information could be ascertained for a new homolog solely from its 1 H, 15 N-HSQC NMR spectrum. We addressed this question with two different approaches. First, we used a semi-automated approach with the program, ORBplus. ORBplus looks for patterns in the chemical shifts and correlates these commonalities to the explicit property of interest. ORBplus ranks resonances based on consistency of the magnitude and direction of the chemical shifts within the database, and the chemical shift correlation of the unknown protein with the database. ORBplus visualizes the results by a histogram and a vector diagram, and provides residue specific predictions on structural similarities with the database. The second method we used was partial least squares (PLS), which is a multivariate statistical technique used to correlate response and predictor variables. We investigated the ability of these methods to predict the tertiary structure of the contractile regulatory protein troponin C. Troponin C undergoes a closed-to-open conformational change, which is coupled to its function in muscle. We found that both ORBplus and PLS were able to identify patterns in the 1 H, 15 N-HSQC NMR data from different states of troponin C that correlated to its conformation.

  12. Secondary structure determination by NMR spectroscopy of an immunoglobulin-like domain from the giant muscle protein titin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfuhl, M; Gautel, M; Politou, A S; Joseph, C; Pastore, A

    1995-07-01

    We present the complete 15N and 1H NMR assignment and the secondary structure of an immunoglobulin-like domain from the giant muscle protein titin. The assignment was obtained using homonuclear and 15N heteronuclear 2D and 3D experiments. The complementarity of 3D TOCSY-NOESY and 3D 15N NOESY-HSQC experiments, using WATERGATE for water suppression, allowed an efficient assignment of otherwise ambiguous cross peaks and was helpful in overcoming poor TOCSY transfer for some amino acids. The secondary structure is derived from specific NOEs between backbone alpha- and amide protons, secondary chemical shifts of alpha-protons and chemical exchange for the backbone amide protons. It consists of eight beta-strands, forming two beta-sheets with four strands each, similar to the classical beta-sandwich of the immunoglobulin superfamily, as previously predicted by sequence analysis. Two of the beta-strands are connected by type II beta-turns; the first beta-strand forms a beta-bulge. The whole topology is very similar to the only intracellular immunoglobulin-like domain for which a structure has been determined so far, i.e., telokin.

  13. Quantification of protein backbone hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates by solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Amo, Juan-Miguel Lopez; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd

    2010-12-01

    We present the quantification of backbone amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates (HDX) for immobilized proteins. The experiments make use of the deuterium isotope effect on the amide nitrogen chemical shift, as well as on proton dilution by deuteration. We find that backbone amides in the microcrystalline α-spectrin SH3 domain exchange rather slowly with the solvent (with exchange rates negligible within the individual (15)N-T (1) timescales). We observed chemical exchange for 6 residues with HDX exchange rates in the range from 0.2 to 5 s(-1). Backbone amide (15)N longitudinal relaxation times that we determined previously are not significantly affected for most residues, yielding no systematic artifacts upon quantification of backbone dynamics (Chevelkov et al. 2008b). Significant exchange was observed for the backbone amides of R21, S36 and K60, as well as for the sidechain amides of N38, N35 and for W41ε. These residues could not be fit in our previous motional analysis, demonstrating that amide proton chemical exchange needs to be considered in the analysis of protein dynamics in the solid-state, in case D(2)O is employed as a solvent for sample preparation. Due to the intrinsically long (15)N relaxation times in the solid-state, the approach proposed here can expand the range of accessible HDX rates in the intermediate regime that is not accessible so far with exchange quench and MEXICO type experiments.

  14. Quantification of protein backbone hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates by solid state NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez del Amo, Juan-Miguel; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    We present the quantification of backbone amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates (HDX) for immobilized proteins. The experiments make use of the deuterium isotope effect on the amide nitrogen chemical shift, as well as on proton dilution by deuteration. We find that backbone amides in the microcrystalline α-spectrin SH3 domain exchange rather slowly with the solvent (with exchange rates negligible within the individual 15 N-T 1 timescales). We observed chemical exchange for 6 residues with HDX exchange rates in the range from 0.2 to 5 s -1 . Backbone amide 15 N longitudinal relaxation times that we determined previously are not significantly affected for most residues, yielding no systematic artifacts upon quantification of backbone dynamics (Chevelkov et al. 2008b). Significant exchange was observed for the backbone amides of R21, S36 and K60, as well as for the sidechain amides of N38, N35 and for W41ε. These residues could not be fit in our previous motional analysis, demonstrating that amide proton chemical exchange needs to be considered in the analysis of protein dynamics in the solid-state, in case D 2 O is employed as a solvent for sample preparation. Due to the intrinsically long 15 N relaxation times in the solid-state, the approach proposed here can expand the range of accessible HDX rates in the intermediate regime that is not accessible so far with exchange quench and MEXICO type experiments.

  15. Anti-freeze proteins: characteristics, mechanism of action and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolle-Smits, T.; Kreuwels, M.J.J.; Wichers, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    Antivrieseiwitten hebben de eigenschap om het vriespunt te verlagen en rekristallisatie van ijs tegen te gaan. Deze eiwitten komen voor in poolvissen, insekten, planten en micro-organismen. Bovendien geven ze de ijskristallen een andere morfologie

  16. Antifreeze proteins enable plants to survive in freezing conditions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1. Acaenamagellanica. Prickly burr. Doucet et al. 2000. 2. Acer saccharoides. Maple. Doucet et al. 2000. 3. Agrostistenuis. Creeping bentgrass. Doucet et al. 2000. 4. Alliarapetiolata. Garlic mustard. Urrutia et al. 1992. 5. Ammopiptanthusmongolicus. Evergreen legume. Wang et al. 2003. 6. Aster cordifolius. Wood aster.

  17. In silico characterization of antifreeze proteins using computational ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    organs.12 Chao et al13 have reported the relative effi- cacy of AFP types I, II and III in protecting the red blood cells. Numerous structure and function studies ..... Table 7. PDB templates (first 2 hits with maximum % identity) obtained using BLASTP search against the Pro- tein Data Bank. Accession number. PDB code.

  18. Studies on new antifreeze protein from the psychrophilic diatom ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-12

    Sep 12, 2011 ... forward primer and XhoI to reverse primer for cloning into pET vector. Bacterial and plant expressions. PCR products were analyzed and resolved on 1% agarose gel. (w/v). Bands with expected lengths were excised from the gel with razor blade and purified using the QIAquick gel extraction kit. (Qiagen, CA ...

  19. Antifreeze proteins enable plants to survive in freezing conditions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Common name. References. 28. Hordeumvulgare. Barley. Antikainen and Griffith 1997. 29. Hydrophyllumvirginianum. Virginia waterleaf. Urrutia et al. 1992. 30. Juncussquarrosus. Heath rush. Doucet et al. 2000. 31. Loliumperenne. Perennial ryegrass. Sidebottom et al. 2000; Pudney et al. 2003. 32. Northofagusantarctica.

  20. Structure/Function Studies of Insect Antifreeze Proteins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Duman, John

    1997-01-01

    ...-x5-x6-Cys-X8-X9-Ala-X11-Th-X13 where X3 and X1 tend toward charged residues, X5 toward threonine or serine, X9 toward asparagine or aspartate, X6 toward asparagine or lysine, and X13 toward alanine...

  1. Selectively dispersed isotope labeling for protein structure determination by magic angle spinning NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eddy, Matthew T. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry (United States); Belenky, Marina [Brandeis University, Department of Chemistry (United States); Sivertsen, Astrid C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory (United States); Griffin, Robert G. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry (United States); Herzfeld, Judith, E-mail: herzfeld@brandeis.edu [Brandeis University, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2013-10-15

    The power of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy derives from its site-specific access to chemical, structural and dynamic information. However, the corresponding multiplicity of interactions can be difficult to tease apart. Complimentary approaches involve spectral editing on the one hand and selective isotope substitution on the other. Here we present a new 'redox' approach to the latter: acetate is chosen as the sole carbon source for the extreme oxidation numbers of its two carbons. Consistent with conventional anabolic pathways for the amino acids, [1-{sup 13}C] acetate does not label {alpha} carbons, labels other aliphatic carbons and the aromatic carbons very selectively, and labels the carboxyl carbons heavily. The benefits of this labeling scheme are exemplified by magic angle spinning spectra of microcrystalline immunoglobulin binding protein G (GB1): the elimination of most J-couplings and one- and two-bond dipolar couplings provides narrow signals and long-range, intra- and inter-residue, recoupling essential for distance constraints. Inverse redox labeling, from [2-{sup 13}C] acetate, is also expected to be useful: although it retains one-bond couplings in the sidechains, the removal of CA-CO coupling in the backbone should improve the resolution of NCACX spectra.

  2. Structures of Biomolecules by NMR Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    solution makes NMR more suitable for studying the dynamic behavior of macromolecules. The first high resolution protein structure by NMR spectroscopy was carried out in mid-1980s [3]. Before the beginning of this millennium, NMR spectroscopy was limited to solving 3D struc- tures of proteins with molecular masses less ...

  3. Proton NMR Studies of a Large Protein. pH, Substrate Titrations, and NOESY Experiments with Perdeuterated Yeast Phosphoglycerate Kinase Containing [ 1H]Histidine Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappu, K. M.; Serpersu, E. H.

    Fully deuterated yeast phosphoglycerate kinase ([ 2H]PGK) was prepared biosynthetically with only histidine side chains of normal ( 1H) isotopic composition. The 1H NMR spectrum of this enzyme([ 1H]His[ 2H]PGK) showed that the histidine side chains are clearly visible as sharp signals. Thus detailed structural studies by 1H NMR became feasible with isotope-hybrid phosphoglycerate kinase which is otherwise too large ( Mr ˜ 46,000) for conventional 1H NMR studies. Proton signals of bound substrates were visible in the 1H NMR spectrum even with a substrate-to-enzyme ratio of less than 1/2 (mol/mol). The 2D NOESY spectrum of enzyme-MgdATP-glycerol 3-phosphate complex showed that, although protein concentration was very high (1.5 m M), no intraprotein cross peaks were observed other than those of intraresidue histidine NOE cross peaks. In addition, intrasubstrate NOEs and intermolecular NOEs between histidine and substrate protons were visible at a 1.5/1 substrate/enzyme (mol/mol) ratio. Paramagnetic effects of a substrate analog, Cr(III)ATP, on some of the histidine side chains indicated that the formation of the ternary enzyme-substrate complex causes large conformational changes in the enzyme.

  4. Hydrophobic clustering in nonnative states of a protein: Interpretation of chemical shifts in NMR spectra of denatured states of lysozyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, P.A.; Topping, K.D.; Woolfson, D.N.; Dobson, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Chemical shifts of resonances of specific protons in the 1H NMR spectrum of thermally denatured hen lysozyme have been determined by exchange correlation with assigned native state resonances in 2D NOESY spectra obtained under conditions where the two states are interconverting. There are subtle but widespread deviations of the measured shifts from the values which would be anticipated for a random coil; in the case of side chain protons these are virtually all net upfield shifts and it is shown that this may be the averaged effect of interactions with aromatic rings in a partially collapsed denatured state. In a very few cases, notably that of two sequential tryptophan residues, it is possible to interpret these effects in terms of specific, local interresidue interactions. Generally, however, there is no correlation with either native state shift perturbations or with sequence proximity to aromatic groups. Diminution of most of the residual shift perturbations on reduction of the disulfide cross-links confirms that they are not simply effects of residues adjacent in the sequence. Similar effects of chemical denaturants, with the disulfides intact, demonstrate that the shift perturbations reflect an enhanced tendency to side chain clustering in the thermally denatured state. The temperature dependences of the shift perturbations suggest that this clustering is noncooperative and is driven by small, favorable enthalpy changes. While the extent of conformational averaging is clearly much greater than that observed for a homologous protein, alpha-lactalbumin, in its partially folded molten globule state, the results clearly show that thermally denatured lysozyme differs substantially from a random coil, principally in that it is partially hydrophobically collapsed

  5. NMR insight into myosin-binding subunit coiled-coil structure reveals binding interface with protein kinase G-Iα leucine zipper in vascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Alok K; Birrane, Gabriel; Anklin, Clemens; Rigby, Alan C; Alper, Seth L

    2017-04-28

    Nitrovasodilators relax vascular smooth-muscle cells in part by modulating the interaction of the C-terminal coiled-coil domain (CC) and/or the leucine zipper (LZ) domain of the myosin light-chain phosphatase component, myosin-binding subunit (MBS), with the N-terminal LZ domain of protein kinase G (PKG)-Iα. Despite the importance of vasodilation in cardiovascular homeostasis and therapy, our structural understanding of the MBS CC interaction with LZ PKG-1α has remained limited. Here, we report the 3D NMR solution structure of homodimeric CC MBS in which amino acids 932-967 form a coiled-coil of two monomeric α-helices in parallel orientation. We found that the structure is stabilized by non-covalent interactions, with dominant contributions from hydrophobic residues at a and d heptad positions. Using NMR chemical-shift perturbation (CSP) analysis, we identified a subset of hydrophobic and charged residues of CC MBS (localized within and adjacent to the C-terminal region) contributing to the dimer-dimer interaction interface between homodimeric CC MBS and homodimeric LZ PKG-Iα. 15 N backbone relaxation NMR revealed the dynamic features of the CC MBS interface residues identified by NMR CSP. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement- and CSP-NMR-guided HADDOCK modeling of the dimer-dimer interface of the heterotetrameric complex exhibits the involvement of non-covalent intermolecular interactions that are localized within and adjacent to the C-terminal regions of each homodimer. These results deepen our understanding of the binding restraints of this CC MBS·LZ PKG-Iα low-affinity heterotetrameric complex and allow reevaluation of the role(s) of myosin light-chain phosphatase partner polypeptides in regulation of vascular smooth-muscle cell contractility. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Magic angle spinning and oriented sample solid-state NMR structural restraints combine for influenza a M2 protein functional insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Thach V; Sharma, Mukesh; Hung, Ivan; Gor'kov, Peter L; Brey, William W; Cross, Timothy A

    2012-06-06

    As a small tetrameric helical membrane protein, the M2 proton channel structure is highly sensitive to its environment. As a result, structural data from a lipid bilayer environment have proven to be essential for describing the conductance mechanism. While oriented sample solid-state NMR has provided a high-resolution backbone structure in lipid bilayers, quaternary packing of the helices and many of the side-chain conformations have been poorly restrained. Furthermore, the quaternary structural stability has remained a mystery. Here, the isotropic chemical shift data and interhelical cross peaks from magic angle spinning solid-state NMR of a liposomal preparation strongly support the quaternary structure of the transmembrane helical bundle as a dimer-of-dimers structure. The data also explain how the tetrameric stability is enhanced once two charges are absorbed by the His37 tetrad prior to activation of this proton channel. The combination of these two solid-state NMR techniques appears to be a powerful approach for characterizing helical membrane protein structure.

  7. Protein oligomers studied by solid-state NMR – the case of the full-length nucleoid-associated protein histone-like nucleoid structuring protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renault, M.A.M.; García, J.; Cordeiro, T.N.; Baldus, M.; Pons, M.

    2013-01-01

    Members of the histone-like nucleoid structuring protein (H-NS) family play roles both as architectural proteins and as modulators of gene expression in Gram-negative bacteria. The H-NS protein participates in modulatory processes that respond to environmental changes in osmolarity, pH, or

  8. Hydrogen bond strength in membrane proteins probed by time-resolved1H-detected solid-state NMR and MD simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros-Silva, João; Jekhmane, Shehrazade; Baldus, Marc; Weingarth, Markus

    2017-10-01

    1 H-detected solid-state NMR in combination with 1 H/ 2 D exchange steps allows for the direct identification of very strong hydrogen bonds in membrane proteins. On the example of the membrane-embedded potassium channel KcsA, we quantify the longevity of such very strong hydrogen bonds by combining time-resolved 1 H-detected solid-state NMR experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, we show that the carboxyl-side chain of the highly conserved residue Glu51 is involved in ultra-strong hydrogen bonds, which are fully-water-exposed and yet stable for weeks. The astonishing stability of these hydrogen bonds is important for the structural integrity of potassium channels, which we further corroborate by computational studies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Inhibition of Condensation Frosting by Arrays of Hygroscopic Antifreeze Drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoda; Damle, Viraj G; Uppal, Aastha; Linder, Rubin; Chandrashekar, Sriram; Mohan, Ajay R; Rykaczewski, Konrad

    2015-12-29

    The formation of frost and ice can have negative impacts on travel and a variety of industrial processes and is typically addressed by dispensing antifreeze substances such as salts and glycols. Despite the popularity of this anti-icing approach, some of the intricate underlying physical mechanisms are just being unraveled. For example, recent studies have shown that in addition to suppressing ice formation within its own volume, an individual salt saturated water microdroplet forms a region of inhibited condensation and condensation frosting (RIC) in its surrounding area. This occurs because salt saturated water, like most antifreeze substances, is hygroscopic and has water vapor pressure at its surface lower than water saturation pressure at the substrate. Here, we demonstrate that for macroscopic drops of propylene glycol and salt saturated water, the absolute RIC size can remain essentially unchanged for several hours. Utilizing this observation, we demonstrate that frost formation can be completely inhibited in-between microscopic and macroscopic arrays of propylene glycol and salt saturated water drops with spacing (S) smaller than twice the radius of the RIC (δ). Furthermore, by characterizing condensation frosting dynamics around various hygroscopic drop arrays, we demonstrate that they can delay complete frosting over of the samples 1.6 to 10 times longer than films of the liquids with equivalent volume. The significant delay in onset of ice nucleation achieved by dispensing propylene glycol in drops rather than in films is likely due to uniform dilution of the drops driven by thermocapillary flow. This transport mode is absent in the films, leading to faster dilution, and with that facilitated homogeneous nucleation, near the liquid-air interface.

  10. In situ structural characterization of a recombinant protein in native Escherichia coli membranes with solid-state magic-angle-spinning NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Riqiang; Wang, Xingsheng; Li, Conggang; Santiago-Miranda, Adriana N; Pielak, Gary J; Tian, Fang

    2011-08-17

    The feasibility of using solid-state magic-angle-spinning NMR spectroscopy for in situ structural characterization of the LR11 (sorLA) transmembrane domain (TM) in native Escherichia coli membranes is presented. LR11 interacts with the human amyloid precursor protein (APP), a central player in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. The background signals from E. coli lipids and membrane proteins had only minor effects on the LR11 TM resonances. Approximately 50% of the LR11 TM residues were assigned by using (13)C PARIS data. These assignments allowed comparisons of the secondary structure of the LR11 TM in native membrane environments and commonly used membrane mimics (e.g., micelles). In situ spectroscopy bypasses several obstacles in the preparation of membrane proteins for structural analysis and offers the opportunity to investigate how membrane heterogeneity, bilayer asymmetry, chemical gradients, and macromolecular crowding affect the protein structure.

  11. A general assignment method for oriented sample (OS) solid-state NMR of proteins based on the correlation of resonances through heteronuclear dipolar couplings in samples aligned parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, George J; Son, Woo Sung; Opella, Stanley J

    2011-04-01

    A general method for assigning oriented sample (OS) solid-state NMR spectra of proteins is demonstrated. In principle, this method requires only a single sample of a uniformly ¹⁵N-labeled membrane protein in magnetically aligned bilayers, and a previously assigned isotropic chemical shift spectrum obtained either from solution NMR on micelle or isotropic bicelle samples or from magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR on unoriented proteoliposomes. The sequential isotropic resonance assignments are transferred to the OS solid-state NMR spectra of aligned samples by correlating signals from the same residue observed in protein-containing bilayers aligned with their normals parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. The underlying principle is that the resonances from the same residue have heteronuclear dipolar couplings that differ by exactly a factor of two between parallel and perpendicular alignments. The method is demonstrated on the membrane-bound form of Pf1 coat protein in phospholipid bilayers, whose assignments have been previously made using an earlier generation of methods that relied on the preparation of many selectively labeled (by residue type) samples. The new method provides the correct resonance assignments using only a single uniformly ¹⁵N-labeled sample, two solid-state NMR spectra, and a previously assigned isotropic spectrum. Significantly, this approach is equally applicable to residues in alpha helices, beta sheets, loops, and any other elements of tertiary structure. Moreover, the strategy bridges between OS solid-state NMR of aligned samples and solution NMR or MAS solid-state NMR of unoriented samples. In combination with the development of complementary experimental methods, it provides a step towards unifying these apparently different NMR approaches. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Structural features of the binding site for ribosomal protein S8 in Escherichia coli 16S rRNA defined using NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalurachchi, K; Uma, K; Zimmermann, R A; Nikonowicz, E P

    1997-03-18

    Ribosomal protein S8 of Escherichia coli plays a key role in 30S ribosomal subunit assembly through its interaction with 16S rRNA. S8 also participates in the translational regulation of ribosomal protein expression through its interaction with spc operon mRNA. The binding site for protein S8 within the 16S rRNA encompasses nucleotides G588 to G604 and C634 to C651 and is composed of two base paired helical regions that flank a phylogenetically conserved core element containing nine residues. We have investigated the structure of the rRNA binding site for S8 both in the free state and in the presence of protein using NMR spectroscopy. The integrity of the two helical segments has been verified, and the presence of G597 x C643 and A596 x U644 base pairs within the conserved core, predicted from comparative analysis, have been confirmed. In addition, we have identified a base triple within the core that is composed of residues A595 x (A596 x U644). The NMR data suggest that S8-RNA interaction is accomplished without significant changes in the RNA. Nonetheless, S8 binding promotes formation of the U598 x A640 base pair and appears to stabilize the G597 x C643 and A596 x U644 base pairs.

  13. Structural NMR assignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procter, J.B.; Torda, A.E.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: General automated NMR assignment approaches are aimed at full heteronuclear assignment, which is needed for structure determination. Usually, full assignment requires at least as much spectral information as is used for structure generation. For large proteins, obtaining sufficient spectral information may require a number of sample preparations and many spectra, resulting in a significant overhead for the use of NMR in biochemical investigation. For a protein of biochemical interest one may already have an x-ray crystal structure, but spectral assignment is still needed to use NMR as a structural probe for ligand binding studies. In this situation it may be possible to use much less spectral information to make an assignment based purely on the correspondence of structural data to the measurements contained in a few simple spectra. We introduce a framework to accomplish this 'structural assignment', and give some observations on the practical requirements for a structural assignment to succeed

  14. FT-IR Spectra of Antifreeze Glycoproteins in Heavy Water and D2O Ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetkova, N. M.; Crowe, J. H.; Feeney, R. H.; Fink, W. H.; Yeh, Yin

    2000-03-01

    This work presents FT-IR studies on the antifreeze glycoprotein (AFGP)/heavy water (D2O) mixtures during freezing and melting. AFGP in the blood serum of polar fish are known to prevent ice crystal growth by a non-colligative mechanism. There are 8 known fractions of AFGP (1 8) that range in molecular mass from 33.7 to 2.6 kD respectively, each composed of alanine-alanine-threonine repeats, with a disaccharide attached to the threonine residue. The smallest peptide (AFGP-8) is structurally different from fractions 1-5 in that it contains proline substituting for alanine in certain positions. Substantial linewidth change of the D20 bending mode (ca. 1210 cm-1) was measured with solutions containing fractions 2-5 during both freezing and thawing cycles, suggesting significant coupling between protein and water molecules. At the same time, the Amide I band between 1620 and 1675 cm-1 shows that 310 helix and random coils are the main conformations of fractions 2-5 and fraction 8 in the presence of ice. In liquid state, b-sheet dominates the secondary structure of AFGP 8, whereas b-sheet and random coil are the main conformations of AFGP 2-5. These results are discussed in terms of the ability of AFGP 2-5 to affect the surface states of ice.

  15. Weak Intermolecular Hydrogen Bonds with Fluorine: Detection and Implications for Enzymatic/Chemical Reactions, Chemical Properties, and Ligand/Protein Fluorine NMR Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalvit, Claudio; Vulpetti, Anna

    2016-05-23

    It is known that strong hydrogen-bonding interactions play an important role in many chemical and biological systems. However, weak or very weak hydrogen bonds, which are often difficult to detect and characterize, may also be relevant in many recognition and reaction processes. Fluorine serving as a hydrogen-bond acceptor has been the subject of many controversial discussions and there are different opinions about it. It now appears that there is compelling experimental evidence for the involvement of fluorine in weak intramolecular or intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Using established NMR methods, we have previously characterized and measured the strengths of intermolecular hydrogen-bond complexes involving the fluorine moieties CH2 F, CHF2 , and CF3 , and have compared them with the well-known hydrogen-bond complex formed between acetophenone and the strong hydrogen-bond donor p-fluorophenol. We now report evidence for the formation of hydrogen bonds involving fluorine with significantly weaker donors, namely 5-fluoroindole and water. A simple NMR method is proposed for the simultaneous measurement of the strengths of hydrogen bonds between an acceptor and a donor or water. Important implications of these results for enzymatic/chemical reactions involving fluorine, for chemical and physical properties, and for ligand/protein (19) F NMR screening are analyzed through experiments and theoretical simulations. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Solution NMR Structure of Hypothetical Protein CV_2116 Encoded by a Viral Prophage Element in Chromobacterium violaceum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhuang Yang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available CV_2116 is a small hypothetical protein of 82 amino acids from the Gram-negative coccobacillus Chromobacterium violaceum. A PSI-BLAST search using the CV_2116 sequence as a query identified only one hit (E = 2e−07 corresponding to a hypothetical protein OR16_04617 from Cupriavidus basilensis OR16, which failed to provide insight into the function of CV_2116. The CV_2116 gene was cloned into the p15TvLic expression plasmid, transformed into E. coli, and 13C- and 15N-labeled NMR samples of CV_2116 were overexpressed in E. coli and purified for structure determination using NMR spectroscopy. The resulting high-quality solution NMR structure of CV_2116 revealed a novel α + β fold containing two anti-parallel β -sheets in the N-terminal two-thirds of the protein and one α-helix in the C-terminal third of the protein. CV_2116 does not belong to any known protein sequence family and a Dali search indicated that no similar structures exist in the protein data bank. Although no function of CV_2116 could be derived from either sequence or structural similarity searches, the neighboring genes of CV_2116 encode various proteins annotated as similar to bacteriophage tail assembly proteins. Interestingly, C. violaceum exhibits an extensive network of bacteriophage tail-like structures that likely result from lateral gene transfer by incorporation of viral DNA into its genome (prophages due to bacteriophage infection. Indeed, C. violaceum has been shown to contain four prophage elements and CV_2116 resides in the fourth of these elements. Analysis of the putative operon in which CV_2116 resides indicates that CV_2116 might be a component of the bacteriophage tail-like assembly that occurs in C. violaceum.

  17. EZ-ASSIGN, a program for exhaustive NMR chemical shift assignments of large proteins from complete or incomplete triple-resonance data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuiderweg, Erik R. P.; Bagai, Ireena; Rossi, Paolo; Bertelsen, Eric B.

    2013-01-01

    For several of the proteins in the BioMagResBank larger than 200 residues, 60 % or fewer of the backbone resonances were assigned. But how reliable are those assignments? In contrast to complete assignments, where it is possible to check whether every triple-resonance Generalized Spin System (GSS) is assigned once and only once, with incomplete data one should compare all possible assignments and pick the best one. But that is not feasible: For example, for 200 residues and an incomplete set of 100 GSS, there are 1.6 × 10 260 possible assignments. In “EZ-ASSIGN”, the protein sequence is divided in smaller unique fragments. Combined with intelligent search approaches, an exhaustive comparison of all possible assignments is now feasible using a laptop computer. The program was tested with experimental data of a 388-residue domain of the Hsp70 chaperone protein DnaK and for a 351-residue domain of a type III secretion ATPase. EZ-ASSIGN reproduced the hand assignments. It did slightly better than the computer program PINE (Bahrami et al. in PLoS Comput Biol 5(3):e1000307, 2009) and significantly outperformed SAGA (Crippen et al. in J Biomol NMR 46:281–298, 2010), AUTOASSIGN (Zimmerman et al. in J Mol Biol 269:592–610, 1997), and IBIS (Hyberts and Wagner in J Biomol NMR 26:335–344, 2003). Next, EZ-ASSIGN was used to investigate how well NMR data of decreasing completeness can be assigned. We found that the program could confidently assign fragments in very incomplete data. Here, EZ-ASSIGN dramatically outperformed all the other assignment programs tested

  18. BioMagResBank database with sets of experimental NMR constraints corresponding to the structures of over 1400 biomolecules deposited in the Protein Data Bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doreleijers, Jurgen F.; Mading, Steve; Maziuk, Dimitri; Sojourner, Kassandra; Yin Lei; Zhu Jun; Markley, John L.; Ulrich, Eldon L.

    2003-01-01

    Experimental constraints associated with NMR structures are available from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) in the form of 'Magnetic Resonance' (MR) files. These files contain multiple types of data concatenated without boundary markers and are difficult to use for further research. Reported here are the results of a project initiated to annotate, archive, and disseminate these data to the research community from a searchable resource in a uniform format. The MR files from a set of 1410 NMR structures were analyzed and their original constituent data blocks annotated as to data type using a semi-automated protocol. A new software program called Wattos was then used to parse and archive the data in a relational database. From the total number of MR file blocks annotated as constraints, it proved possible to parse 84% (3337/3975). The constraint lists that were parsed correspond to three data types (2511 distance, 788 dihedral angle, and 38 residual dipolar couplings lists) from the three most popular software packages used in NMR structure determination: XPLOR/CNS (2520 lists), DISCOVER (412 lists), and DYANA/DIANA (405 lists). These constraints were then mapped to a developmental version of the BioMagResBank (BMRB) data model. A total of 31 data types originating from 16 programs have been classified, with the NOE distance constraint being the most commonly observed. The results serve as a model for the development of standards for NMR constraint deposition in computer-readable form. The constraints are updated regularly and are available from the BMRB web site (http://www.bmrb.wisc.edu)

  19. {sup 13}CHD{sub 2}–CEST NMR spectroscopy provides an avenue for studies of conformational exchange in high molecular weight proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rennella, Enrico; Huang, Rui; Velyvis, Algirdas; Kay, Lewis E., E-mail: kay@pound.med.utoronto.ca [The University of Toronto, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry (Canada)

    2015-10-15

    An NMR experiment for quantifying slow (millisecond) time-scale exchange processes involving the interconversion between visible ground state and invisible, conformationally excited state conformers is presented. The approach exploits chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and makes use of {sup 13}CHD{sub 2} methyl group probes that can be readily incorporated into otherwise highly deuterated proteins. The methodology is validated with an application to a G48A Fyn SH3 domain that exchanges between a folded conformation and a sparsely populated and transiently formed unfolded ensemble. Experiments on a number of different protein systems, including a 360 kDa half-proteasome, establish that the sensitivity of this {sup 13}CHD{sub 2}{sup 13}C–CEST technique can be upwards of a factor of 5 times higher than for a previously published {sup 13}CH{sub 3}{sup 13}C–CEST approach (Bouvignies and Kay in J Biomol NMR 53:303–310, 2012), suggesting that the methodology will be powerful for studies of conformational exchange in high molecular weight proteins.

  20. relaxGUI: a new software for fast and simple NMR relaxation data analysis and calculation of ps-ns and μs motion of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieri, Michael; D’Auvergne, Edward J.; Gooley, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Investigation of protein dynamics on the ps-ns and μs-ms timeframes provides detailed insight into the mechanisms of enzymes and the binding properties of proteins. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is an excellent tool for studying protein dynamics at atomic resolution. Analysis of relaxation data using model-free analysis can be a tedious and time consuming process, which requires good knowledge of scripting procedures. The software relaxGUI was developed for fast and simple model-free analysis and is fully integrated into the software package relax. It is written in Python and uses wxPython to build the graphical user interface (GUI) for maximum performance and multi-platform use. This software allows the analysis of NMR relaxation data with ease and the generation of publication quality graphs as well as color coded images of molecular structures. The interface is designed for simple data analysis and management. The software was tested and validated against the command line version of relax.

  1. The “long tail” of the protein tumbling correlation function: observation by {sup 1}H NMR relaxometry in a wide frequency and concentration range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, Matthias [Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Institut für Physik (Germany); Hofmann, Marius [Universität Bayreuth, Lehrstuhl Experimentalphysik II, Universitätsstr. 30 (Germany); Link, Susanne; Ott, Maria; Balbach, Jochen [Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Institut für Physik (Germany); Rössler, Ernst [Universität Bayreuth, Lehrstuhl Experimentalphysik II, Universitätsstr. 30 (Germany); Saalwächter, Kay, E-mail: kay.saalwaechter@physik.uni-halle.de; Krushelnitsky, Alexey, E-mail: krushelnitsky@physik.uni-halle.de [Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Institut für Physik (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Inter-protein interactions in solution affect the auto-correlation function of Brownian tumbling not only in terms of a simple increase of the correlation time, they also lead to the appearance of a weak slow component (“long tail”) of the correlation function due to a slowly changing local anisotropy of the microenvironment. The conventional protocol of correlation time estimation from the relaxation rate ratio R{sub 1}/R{sub 2} assumes a single-component tumbling correlation function, and thus can provide incorrect results as soon as the “long tail” is of relevance. This effect, however, has been underestimated in many instances. In this work we present a detailed systematic study of the tumbling correlation function of two proteins, lysozyme and bovine serum albumin, at different concentrations and temperatures using proton field-cycling relaxometry combined with R{sub 1ρ} and R{sub 2} measurements. Unlike high-field NMR relaxation methods, these techniques enable a detailed study of dynamics on a time scale longer than the normal protein tumbling correlation time and, thus, a reliable estimate of the parameters of the “long tail”. In this work we analyze the concentration dependence of the intensity and correlation time of the slow component and perform simulations of high-field {sup 15}N NMR relaxation data demonstrating the importance of taking the “long tail” in the analysis into account.

  2. Development of Two-Dimensional NMR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    The development of Fourier transform NMR in the mid. 1960's, did parallel processing of the collection of NMR data, increased the signal/noise ratio by two orders of magnitude and made it possible to record the proton NMR spectra of small proteins which contain hundreds of resonances. The assignment of these ...

  3. A chemical approach for site-specific identification of NMR signals from protein side-chain NH₃⁺ groups forming intermolecular ion pairs in protein-nucleic acid complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kurtis M; Nguyen, Dan; Esadze, Alexandre; Zandrashvili, Levani; Gorenstein, David G; Iwahara, Junji

    2015-05-01

    Protein-nucleic acid interactions involve intermolecular ion pairs of protein side-chain and DNA or RNA phosphate groups. Using three protein-DNA complexes, we demonstrate that site-specific oxygen-to-sulfur substitution in phosphate groups allows for identification of NMR signals from the protein side-chain NH3 (+) groups forming the intermolecular ion pairs. A characteristic change in their (1)H and (15)N resonances upon this modification (i.e., substitution of phosphate to phosphorodithioate) can represent a signature of an intermolecular ion pair. Hydrogen-bond scalar coupling between protein side-chain (15)N and DNA phosphorodithiaote (31)P nuclei provides direct confirmation of the intermolecular ion pair. The same approach is likely applicable to protein-RNA complexes as well.

  4. Absolute nutrient concentration measurements in cell culture media: (1)H q-NMR spectra and data to compare the efficiency of pH-controlled protein precipitation versus CPMG or post-processing filtering approaches.

    OpenAIRE

    Goldoni, L; Beringhelli, T; Rocchia, W; Realini, N; Piomelli, D

    2016-01-01

    The NMR spectra and data reported in this article refer to the research article titled "A simple and accurate protocol for absolute polar metabolite quantification in cell cultures using q-NMR" [1]. We provide the (1)H q-NMR spectra of cell culture media (DMEM) after removal of serum proteins, which show the different efficiency of various precipitating solvents, the solvent/DMEM ratios, and pH of the solution. We compare the data of the absolute nutrient concentrations, measured by PULCON ex...

  5. NMR data-driven structure determination using NMR-I-TASSER in the CASD-NMR experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Richard; Wang, Yan; Xue, Zhidong; Zhang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    NMR-I-TASSER, an adaption of the I-TASSER algorithm combining NMR data for protein structure determination, recently joined the second round of the CASD-NMR experiment. Unlike many molecular dynamics-based methods, NMR-I-TASSER takes a molecular replacement-like approach to the problem by first threading the target through the PDB to identify structural templates which are then used for iterative NOE assignments and fragment structure assembly refinements. The employment of multiple templates...

  6. Effects of environmental hypercapnia on animal physiology: a 13C NMR study of protein synthesis rates in the marine invertebrate Sipunculus nudus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenbuch, M; Bock, C; Leibfritz, D; Pörtner, H O

    2006-08-01

    Global climate change is associated with a progressive rise in ocean CO(2) concentrations (hypercapnia) and, consequently, a drop in seawater pH. However, a comprehensive picture of the physiological mechanisms affected by chronic CO(2) stress in marine biota is still lacking. Here we present an analysis of protein biosynthesis rates in isolated muscle of the marine invertebrate Sipunculus nudus, a sediment dwelling worm living at various water depths. We followed the incorporation of (13)C-labelled phenylalanine into muscular protein via high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. Protein synthesis decreased by about 60% at a medium pH of 6.70 and a consequently lowered intracellular pH (pHi). The decrease in protein synthesis rates is much stronger than the concomitant suppression of protein degradation (60% versus 10-15%) possibly posing a threat to the cellular homeostasis of structural as well as functional proteins. Considering the progressive rise in ocean CO(2) concentrations, permanent disturbances of cellular protein turnover might seriously affect growth and reproductive performance in many marine organisms with as yet unexplored impacts on species density and composition in marine ecosystems.

  7. [15N]NMR Determination of Asparagine and Glutamine Nitrogen Utilization for Synthesis of Storage Protein in Developing Cotyledons of Soybean in Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skokut, Thomas A.; Varner, Joseph E.; Schaefer, Jacob; Stejskal, Edward O.; McKay, Robert A.

    1982-01-01

    Solid-state [15N]NMR was used to measure the use of the amide and amino nitrogens of glutamine and asparagine for synthesis of storage protein in cotyledons of soybean (Glycine max L. cv. Elf) in culture. No major discrimination in the incorporation of the amide or amino nitrogens of glutamine into protein is apparent, but the same nitrogens of asparagine are used with a degree of specificity. During the first seven days in culture with asparagine as the sole nitrogen source, the amino nitrogen donates approximately twice as much nitrogen to protein as does the amide nitrogen. The use of the amide nitrogen increases with longer periods of culture. The reduced use of the amide nitrogen was confirmed by its early appearance as ammonium in the culture medium. The amide nitrogen of asparagine was found at all times to be an essential precursor for protein because of its appearance in protein in residues whose nitrogens were not supplied by the amino nitrogen. In addition, methionine sulfoximine inhibited growth completely on asparagine, indicating that some ammonium assimilation is essential for storage protein synthesis. These results indicate that in a developing cotyledon, a transaminase reaction is of major importance in the utilization of asparagine for synthesis of storage protein and that, at least in the early stages of cotyledon development, reduced activities of ammonium-assimilating enzymes in the cotyledon tissue or in other tissues of the seed or pod may be a limiting factor in the use of asparagine-amide nitrogen. PMID:16662198

  8. Screening protein-ligand interactions using {sup 1}H NMR techniques for detecting the ligand; Mapeamento das interacoes proteina-ligante atraves de tecnicas de RMN de {sup 1}H utilizando deteccao do ligante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, Isis Martins; Marsaioli, Anita Jocelyne [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Organica]. E-mail: anita@iqm.unicamp.br

    2007-07-01

    NMR is a valuable screening tool for the binding of ligands to proteins providing structural information on both protein and ligands and is thus largely applied to drug-discovery. Among the recent NMR techniques to probe weak binding protein-ligand complexes we have critically evaluated the advantages and disadvantages of STD (Saturation Transfer Difference), WaterLOGSY (Water Ligand Observation with Gradient Spectroscopy), NOE pumping and DOSY-NOESY (Diffusion-Ordered NOESY) using a mixture of BSA (bovine serum albumin) plus salicylic acid, caffeine, citric acid, adipic acid and D-glucose. (author)

  9. Object-oriented approach to drug design enabled by NMR SOLVE: first real-time structural tool for characterizing protein-ligand interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sem, D S; Yu, L; Coutts, S M; Jack, R

    2001-01-01

    As a result of genomics efforts, the number of protein drug targets is expected to increase by an order of magnitude. Functional genomics efforts are identifying these targets, while structural genomics efforts are determining structures for many of them. However, there is a significant gap in going from structural information for a protein target to a high affinity (K(d) object-oriented. There is a growing realization that the most efficient drug design strategies for attacking the mass of targets coming from genomics efforts will be systems-based approaches that attack groups of related proteins in parallel. We propose that the most effective drug design strategy will be one that parallels the object-oriented manner by which nature designed the gene families themselves. IOPE (Integrated Object-Oriented PharmacoEngineering) is such an approach. It is a three-step technology to build focused combinatorial libraries of potential inhibitors for major families and sub-families of enzymes, using cogent NMR data derived from representatives of these protein families. The NMR SOLVE (Structurally Oriented Library Valency Engineering) data used to design these libraries are gathered in days, and data can be obtained for large proteins (> 170 kDa). Furthermore, the process is fully object-oriented in that once a given bi-ligand is identified for a target, potency is retained if different cofactor mimics are swapped. This gives the drug design process maximum flexibility, allowing for the more facile transition from in vitro potency to in vivo efficacy. Copyright 2002 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

  10. Dante-Z sequence as selective impulsion in high field mono and multidimensional NMR. Application to the study of proteins, peptides and their interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roumestand, C.; Toma, F.

    1992-01-01

    DANTE-Z is a simple and efficient way for NMR spectral selection. We present here different applications of DANTE-Z in high-resolution NMR of peptides and proteins. We have been using proton selective excitation by DANTE-Z to perform 1D-correlated (homo- or heteronuclear) experiments corresponding to one line of either 2D or 3D experiments. Following the same scheme, we could also edit planes of 3D experiments by concatenating 1D-correlated experiments with conventional 2D experiments. In the heteronuclear case (i.e. 1 H, 31 P), we could also edit planes of a 4D experiment by the simultaneous selection of 1 H and the X nucleus. Owing to the favourable excitation profile of DANTE-Z, we used it successfully for topological excitations (spectral width from 150 Hz up to 1500 Hz) in 'semi-soft'-2D experiments and 'soft'-2D experiment. These applications are illustrated by the results obtained at 600 MHz on a protein and a phosphonamide peptide

  11. Simultaneous acquisition of 2D and 3D solid-state NMR experiments for sequential assignment of oriented membrane protein samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopinath, T.; Mote, Kaustubh R.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method called DAISY (Dual Acquisition orIented ssNMR spectroScopY) for the simultaneous acquisition of 2D and 3D oriented solid-state NMR experiments for membrane proteins reconstituted in mechanically or magnetically aligned lipid bilayers. DAISY utilizes dual acquisition of sine and cosine dipolar or chemical shift coherences and long living 15 N longitudinal polarization to obtain two multi-dimensional spectra, simultaneously. In these new experiments, the first acquisition gives the polarization inversion spin exchange at the magic angle (PISEMA) or heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) spectra, the second acquisition gives PISEMA-mixing or HETCOR-mixing spectra, where the mixing element enables inter-residue correlations through 15 N– 15 N homonuclear polarization transfer. The analysis of the two 2D spectra (first and second acquisitions) enables one to distinguish 15 N– 15 N inter-residue correlations for sequential assignment of membrane proteins. DAISY can be implemented in 3D experiments that include the polarization inversion spin exchange at magic angle via I spin coherence (PISEMAI) sequence, as we show for the simultaneous acquisition of 3D PISEMAI–HETCOR and 3D PISEMAI–HETCOR-mixing experiments

  12. An economical method for production of (2H, (13CH3-threonine for solution NMR studies of large protein complexes: application to the 670 kDa proteasome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Algirdas Velyvis

    Full Text Available NMR studies of very high molecular weight protein complexes have been greatly facilitated through the development of labeling strategies whereby (13CH(3 methyl groups are introduced into highly deuterated proteins. Robust and cost-effective labeling methods are well established for all methyl containing amino acids with the exception of Thr. Here we describe an inexpensive biosynthetic strategy for the production of L-[α-(2H; β-(2H;γ-(13C]-Thr that can then be directly added during protein expression to produce highly deuterated proteins with Thr methyl group probes of structure and dynamics. These reporters are particularly valuable, because unlike other methyl containing amino acids, Thr residues are localized predominantly to the surfaces of proteins, have unique hydrogen bonding capabilities, have a higher propensity to be found at protein nucleic acid interfaces and can play important roles in signaling pathways through phosphorylation. The utility of the labeling methodology is demonstrated with an application to the 670 kDa proteasome core particle, where high quality Thr (13C,(1H correlation spectra are obtained that could not be generated from samples prepared with commercially available U-[(13C,(1H]-Thr.

  13. Multidimensional oriented solid-state NMR experiments enable the sequential assignment of uniformly 15N labeled integral membrane proteins in magnetically aligned lipid bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mote, Kaustubh R.; Gopinath, T.; Traaseth, Nathaniel J.; Kitchen, Jason; Gor’kov, Peter L.; Brey, William W.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2011-01-01

    Oriented solid-state NMR is the most direct methodology to obtain the orientation of membrane proteins with respect to the lipid bilayer. The method consists of measuring 1 H- 15 N dipolar couplings (DC) and 15 N anisotropic chemical shifts (CSA) for membrane proteins that are uniformly aligned with respect to the membrane bilayer. A significant advantage of this approach is that tilt and azimuthal (rotational) angles of the protein domains can be directly derived from analytical expression of DC and CSA values, or, alternatively, obtained by refining protein structures using these values as harmonic restraints in simulated annealing calculations. The Achilles’ heel of this approach is the lack of suitable experiments for sequential assignment of the amide resonances. In this Article, we present a new pulse sequence that integrates proton driven spin diffusion (PDSD) with sensitivity-enhanced PISEMA in a 3D experiment ([ 1 H, 15 N]-SE-PISEMA-PDSD). The incorporation of 2D 15 N/ 15 N spin diffusion experiments into this new 3D experiment leads to the complete and unambiguous assignment of the 15 N resonances. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated for the membrane protein sarcolipin reconstituted in magnetically aligned lipid bicelles. Taken with low electric field probe technology, this approach will propel the determination of sequential assignment as well as structure and topology of larger integral membrane proteins in aligned lipid bilayers.

  14. Multidimensional oriented solid-state NMR experiments enable the sequential assignment of uniformly {sup 15}N labeled integral membrane proteins in magnetically aligned lipid bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mote, Kaustubh R. [University of Minnesota, Department of Chemistry (United States); Gopinath, T. [University of Minnesota, Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics (United States); Traaseth, Nathaniel J. [New York University, Chemistry Department (United States); Kitchen, Jason; Gor' kov, Peter L.; Brey, William W. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (United States); Veglia, Gianluigi, E-mail: vegli001@umn.edu [University of Minnesota, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Oriented solid-state NMR is the most direct methodology to obtain the orientation of membrane proteins with respect to the lipid bilayer. The method consists of measuring {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N dipolar couplings (DC) and {sup 15}N anisotropic chemical shifts (CSA) for membrane proteins that are uniformly aligned with respect to the membrane bilayer. A significant advantage of this approach is that tilt and azimuthal (rotational) angles of the protein domains can be directly derived from analytical expression of DC and CSA values, or, alternatively, obtained by refining protein structures using these values as harmonic restraints in simulated annealing calculations. The Achilles' heel of this approach is the lack of suitable experiments for sequential assignment of the amide resonances. In this Article, we present a new pulse sequence that integrates proton driven spin diffusion (PDSD) with sensitivity-enhanced PISEMA in a 3D experiment ([{sup 1}H,{sup 15}N]-SE-PISEMA-PDSD). The incorporation of 2D {sup 15}N/{sup 15}N spin diffusion experiments into this new 3D experiment leads to the complete and unambiguous assignment of the {sup 15}N resonances. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated for the membrane protein sarcolipin reconstituted in magnetically aligned lipid bicelles. Taken with low electric field probe technology, this approach will propel the determination of sequential assignment as well as structure and topology of larger integral membrane proteins in aligned lipid bilayers.

  15. Multidimensional oriented solid-state NMR experiments enable the sequential assignment of uniformly 15N labeled integral membrane proteins in magnetically aligned lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mote, Kaustubh R; Gopinath, T; Traaseth, Nathaniel J; Kitchen, Jason; Gor'kov, Peter L; Brey, William W; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2011-11-01

    Oriented solid-state NMR is the most direct methodology to obtain the orientation of membrane proteins with respect to the lipid bilayer. The method consists of measuring (1)H-(15)N dipolar couplings (DC) and (15)N anisotropic chemical shifts (CSA) for membrane proteins that are uniformly aligned with respect to the membrane bilayer. A significant advantage of this approach is that tilt and azimuthal (rotational) angles of the protein domains can be directly derived from analytical expression of DC and CSA values, or, alternatively, obtained by refining protein structures using these values as harmonic restraints in simulated annealing calculations. The Achilles' heel of this approach is the lack of suitable experiments for sequential assignment of the amide resonances. In this Article, we present a new pulse sequence that integrates proton driven spin diffusion (PDSD) with sensitivity-enhanced PISEMA in a 3D experiment ([(1)H,(15)N]-SE-PISEMA-PDSD). The incorporation of 2D (15)N/(15)N spin diffusion experiments into this new 3D experiment leads to the complete and unambiguous assignment of the (15)N resonances. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated for the membrane protein sarcolipin reconstituted in magnetically aligned lipid bicelles. Taken with low electric field probe technology, this approach will propel the determination of sequential assignment as well as structure and topology of larger integral membrane proteins in aligned lipid bilayers. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

  16. Antifreeze polymeric additives for fuels; Aditivos polimericos anticongelantes para combustiveis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muniz, Aline S.; Carvalho, Agne Roani de; Sakae, George Hideki; Oliveira, Angelo R.S.; Cesar-Oliveira, Maria Aparecida F. [Universidade Federal do Parana - UFPR - Departamento de Quimica - LABPOL-Laboratorio de Polimeros Sinteticos, Centro Politecnico, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)], e-mails: mafco@ufpr.br, alinemuniz@ufpr.br

    2011-07-01

    Owing to the current interest in the reduction of environmental pollution, several researchers are seeking renewable sources of energy which can at least partially replace combustibles derived from petroleum. Diesel oil is the combustible that most seriously pollutes the environment and is thus the biodiesel that is being considered as a fuel which can be replaced by a renewable combustible; this can possibly be used in diesel engines without any modifications. However, certain problems have to be overcome with regard to the temperature at which the biodiesel should be stored and used, since there is a tendency for biodiesel to solidify at low temperatures. This suggests that there is a need for the use of anti-freeze additives. This work behind the main focus additives with only 25 ppm, were able to reduce the pour point of fuel, achieving significant results, for example, the additive M14A18 lowered the pour point (PP) of B20 to -20 degree C, showing that the use of increasing amounts of biodiesel to diesel can aggregate. The main focus of work behind the development of additives that with only 25 ppm, were able to reduce the pour point of fuel, producing significant results such as those obtained with the use of additive M14A18 which lowered the pour point of the B20 to -20 degree C, showing the possibility of using increasing amounts of biodiesel added to diesel. (author)

  17. 15N- and [13C]NMR Determination of Utilization of Glycine for Synthesis of Storage Protein in the Presence of Glutamine in Developing Cotyledons of Soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skokut, Thomas A.; Varner, Joseph E.; Schaefer, Jacob; Stejskal, Edward O.; McKay, Robert A.

    1982-01-01

    Solid-state 15N- and [13C] NMR have been used to measure quantitatively the utilization of glycine in the presence of glutamine for the synthesis of storage protein in immature cotyledons of soybean (Glycine max L. cv. Elf) in culture. The presence of an equal molar amount of glycine in the medium causes a decrease in the use of glutamine-amide nitrogen. Glycine nitrogen is incorporated extensively into peptide bonds (in amounts greater than what would be expected if it appeared solely in glycine residues), but is used sparingly for synthesis of histidine ring residues, guanidino nitrogen residues of arginine, and lysine residues. The modest use of glycine carbon in protein synthesis does not parallel the use of glycine nitrogen. PMID:16662199

  18. FISH GLYCOPEPTIDE AND PEPTIDE ANTIFREEZES : THEIR INTERACTION WITH ICE AND WATER

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, P.; Devries, A.

    1987-01-01

    Glycopeptide and peptide antifreeze agents are present in the body fluids of polar fishes and allow them to avoid freezing in ice-laden seawater. These antifreezes lower the freezing point 200 times more than predicted by colligative relations, but have little effect on the melting point of ice. They bind to ice and appear to inhibit growth by increasing the curvature of growth steps on the ice crystal surface. Such a growth would result in a substantial increase in the roughness of the surfa...

  19. Simultaneous acquisition of three NMR spectra in a single ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    reduce the acquisition time of high-dimensional NMR spectra for metabolomics.8 The different fast NMR methods and their combinations developed during the past decade for proteins and nucleic acids such as single-scan NMR spectroscopy (ultrafast NMR),9–13. HADMARD encoding,14 reduced dimensional (RD). 1091 ...

  20. NMR Studies of Peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veitch, Nigel Charles

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Peroxidases are a haem-containing group of enzymes with a wide diversity of function within biological systems. While a common characteristic is the ability to catalyse the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water, it is the accompanying processes of hormone synthesis and degradation which have generated such a high level of interest. However, information at the molecular level is limited to a single well-resolved crystal structure, that of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase. This thesis presents a strategy for the investigation of peroxidase structure and function based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a technique which has the ability to address aspects of both protein structure and protein dynamics in solution. The application of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques has been developed in the context of plant peroxidases, notably the isoenzyme HRP-C derived from the horseradish root. Characterisation of the proton NMR spectra of HRP -C in resting and ligated states provided new information enabling the structure of the binding site for aromatic donor molecules, such as indole-3-propionic, ferulic and benzhydroxamic acids, to be resolved. In order to overcome difficulties encountered with a protein of the complexity of peroxidase, additional information was obtained from chemical shift parameters and the use of peroxidase variants produced by site-directed mutagenesis. A comparative study using NMR spectroscopy was undertaken for wild-type recombinant HRP-C expressed in Escherichia coli, and two protein variants with substitutions made to residues located on the distal side of the haem pocket, Phe41 to Val and Arg38 to Lys. NMR analyses of a plant peroxidase from barley grains and the fungal peroxidase from Coprinus cinereus were also successful using methods conceived with HRP-C. Examination of three specifically constructed recombinant protein variants of C. cinereus

  1. Structural biology of the sequestration and transport of heavy metal toxins: NMR structure determination of proteins containing the -Cys-X-Y-Cys-metal binding motifs. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opella, S.J.

    1998-01-01

    'The overall goal of the research is to apply the methods of structural biology, which have been previously used primarily in biomedical applications, to bioremediation. The authors are doing this by using NMR spectroscopy to determine the structures of proteins involved in the bacterial mercury detoxification system. The research is based on the premise that the proteins encoded in the genes of the bacterial detoxification system are an untapped source of reagents and, more fundamentally, chemical strategies that can be used to remove heavy metal toxins from the environment. The initial goals are to determine the structures of the proteins of the bacterial mercury detoxification systems responsible for the sequestration and transport of the Hg(II) ions in to the cell where reduction to Hg(O) occurs. These proteins are meP, which is water soluble and can be investigated with multidimensional solution NMR methods, and merT, the transport protein in the membrane that requires solid-state NMR methods. As of June 1998, this report summarizes work after about one and half years of the three-year award. The authors have made significant accomplishments in three aspects of the NMR studies of the proteins of the bacterial mercury detoxification system.'

  2. Interpretation of Seemingly Contradictory Data: Low NMR S2Order Parameters Observed in Helices and High NMR S2Order Parameters in Disordered Loops of the Protein hGH at Low pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lorna J; Athill, Roya; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F; Hansen, Niels

    2017-07-18

    At low pH, human growth hormone (hGH) adopts a partially folded state, in which the native helices are maintained, but the long loop regions and side-chain packing become disordered. Some of the S 2 order parameters for backbone N-H vectors derived from NMR relaxation measurements on hGH at low pH initially seem contradictory. Three isolated residues (15, 20, and 171) in helices A and D exhibit low order parameter values (<0.5) indicating flexibility, whereas residue 143 in the centre of a long flexible loop region has a high order parameter (0.82). Using S 2 order parameter restraining MD simulations, this paradox has been resolved. Low S 2 values in helices are due to the presence of a mixture of 3 10 -helical and α-helical hydrogen bonds. High S 2 values in relatively disordered parts of a protein may be due to fluctuating networks of hydrogen bonds between the backbone and the side chains, which restrict the motion of N-H bond vectors. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Magic angle spinning NMR reveals sequence-dependent structural plasticity, dynamics, and the spacer peptide 1 conformation in HIV-1 capsid protein assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yun; Hou, Guangjin; Suiter, Christopher L; Ahn, Jinwoo; Byeon, In-Ja L; Lipton, Andrew S; Burton, Sarah; Hung, Ivan; Gor'kov, Peter L; Gan, Zhehong; Brey, William; Rice, David; Gronenborn, Angela M; Polenova, Tatyana

    2013-11-27

    A key stage in HIV-1 maturation toward an infectious virion requires sequential proteolytic cleavage of the Gag polyprotein leading to the formation of a conical capsid core that encloses the viral RNA genome and a small complement of proteins. The final step of this process involves severing the SP1 peptide from the CA-SP1 maturation intermediate, which triggers the condensation of the CA protein into the capsid shell. The details of the overall mechanism, including the conformation of the SP1 peptide in CA-SP1, are still under intense debate. In this report, we examine tubular assemblies of CA and the CA-SP1 maturation intermediate using magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. At magnetic fields of 19.9 T and above, outstanding quality 2D and 3D MAS NMR spectra were obtained for tubular CA and CA-SP1 assemblies, permitting resonance assignments for subsequent detailed structural characterization. Dipolar- and scalar-based correlation experiments unequivocally indicate that SP1 peptide is in a random coil conformation and mobile in the assembled CA-SP1. Analysis of two CA protein sequence variants reveals that, unexpectedly, the conformations of the SP1 tail, the functionally important CypA loop, and the loop preceding helix 8 are modulated by residue variations at distal sites. These findings provide support for the role of SP1 as a trigger of the disassembly of the immature CA capsid for its subsequent de novo reassembly into mature cores and establish the importance of sequence-dependent conformational plasticity in CA assembly.

  4. 1H NMR of High-Potential Iron-Sulfur Protein from the Purple Non-Sulfur Bacterium Rhodoferax fermentans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciurli, Stefano; Cremonini, Mauro Andrea; Kofod, Pauli

    1996-01-01

    residues bound to the [4Fe-4S]3+/2+ cluster have been performed using one-dimensional NOE and exchange spectroscopy experiments. 1H-NMR hyperfine shifts and relaxation rates of cluster-bound Cys β-CH2 protons indicate that in the [4Fe-4S]3+ cluster one iron ion can be formally described as Fe(III), while...... electron density corresponding to one electron is unevenly delocalized onto the remaining three iron ions. This delocalization is effected by means of two different electronic distributions interconverting rapidly on the NMR time scale. The mechanism of paramagnetic proton relaxation, studied by analyzing...... longitudinal relaxation rates of Cys β-CH2 protons in HiPIPs from six different sources as a function of the Fe-S-Cβ-Cα dihedral angle, indicate that the major contribution is due to a dipolar metal-centered mechanism, with a non-negligeable contribution from a ligand-centered dipolar mechanism which involves...

  5. Native-unlike Long-lived Intermediates along the Folding Pathway of the Amyloidogenic Protein β2-Microglobulin Revealed by Real-time Two-dimensional NMR*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazza, Alessandra; Rennella, Enrico; Schanda, Paul; Mimmi, Maria Chiara; Cutuil, Thomas; Raimondi, Sara; Giorgetti, Sofia; Fogolari, Federico; Viglino, Paolo; Frydman, Lucio; Gal, Maayan; Bellotti, Vittorio; Brutscher, Bernhard; Esposito, Gennaro

    2010-01-01

    β2-microglobulin (β2m), the light chain of class I major histocompatibility complex, is responsible for the dialysis-related amyloidosis and, in patients undergoing long term dialysis, the full-length and chemically unmodified β2m converts into amyloid fibrils. The protein, belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily, in common to other members of this family, experiences during its folding a long-lived intermediate associated to the trans-to-cis isomerization of Pro-32 that has been addressed as the precursor of the amyloid fibril formation. In this respect, previous studies on the W60G β2m mutant, showing that the lack of Trp-60 prevents fibril formation in mild aggregating condition, prompted us to reinvestigate the refolding kinetics of wild type and W60G β2m at atomic resolution by real-time NMR. The analysis, conducted at ambient temperature by the band selective flip angle short transient real-time two-dimensional NMR techniques and probing the β2m states every 15 s, revealed a more complex folding energy landscape than previously reported for wild type β2m, involving more than a single intermediate species, and shedding new light into the fibrillogenic pathway. Moreover, a significant difference in the kinetic scheme previously characterized by optical spectroscopic methods was discovered for the W60G β2m mutant. PMID:20028983

  6. Deterioration of western redcedar (Thuja plicata Donn ex D. Don) seeds: protein oxidation and in vivo NMR monitoring of storage oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terskikh, Victor V; Zeng, Ying; Feurtado, J Allan; Giblin, Michael; Abrams, Suzanne R; Kermode, Allison R

    2008-01-01

    Deterioration of conifer seeds during prolonged storage has a negative impact on reforestation and gene conservation efforts. Western redcedar (Thuja plicata Donn ex D. Don) is a species of tremendous value to the forest industry. The seeds of this species are particularly prone to viability losses during long-term storage. Reliable tools to assess losses in seed viability during storage and their underlying causes, as well as the development of methods to prevent storage-related deterioration of seeds are needed by the forest industry. In this work, various imaging methods and biochemical analyses were applied to study deterioration of western redcedar seeds. Seedlots that exhibited poor germination performance, i.e. those that had experienced the greatest losses of viability during prolonged storage, exhibited greater abundance of oxidized proteins, detected by protein oxidation assays, and more pronounced changes in their in vivo (13)C NMR spectra, most likely due to storage oil oxidation. The proportion of oxidized proteins also increased when seeds were subjected to accelerated ageing treatments. Detection of oxidized oils and proteins may constitute a reliable and useful tool for the forest industry.

  7. Proton-detected MAS NMR experiments based on dipolar transfers for backbone assignment of highly deuterated proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevelkov, Veniamin; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2014-05-01

    Proton-detected solid-state NMR was applied to a highly deuterated insoluble, non-crystalline biological assembly, the Salmonella typhimurium type iii secretion system (T3SS) needle. Spectra of very high resolution and sensitivity were obtained at a low protonation level of 10-20% at exchangeable amide positions. We developed efficient experimental protocols for resonance assignment tailored for this system and the employed experimental conditions. Using exclusively dipolar-based interspin magnetization transfers, we recorded two sets of 3D spectra allowing for an almost complete backbone resonance assignment of the needle subunit PrgI. The additional information provided by the well-resolved proton dimension revealed the presence of two sets of resonances in the N-terminal helix of PrgI, while in previous studies employing 13C detection only a single set of resonances was observed.

  8. Specific 13C labeling of leucine, valine and isoleucine methyl groups for unambiguous detection of long-range restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasshuber, Hannes Klaus; Demers, Jean-Philippe; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Here we present an isotopic labeling strategy to easily obtain unambiguous long-range distance restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies. The method is based on the inclusion of two biosynthetic precursors in the bacterial growth medium, α-ketoisovalerate and α-ketobutyrate, leading to the production of leucine, valine and isoleucine residues that are exclusively 13C labeled on methyl groups. The resulting spectral simplification facilitates the collection of distance restraints, the verification of carbon chemical shift assignments and the measurement of methyl group dynamics. This approach is demonstrated on the type-three secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri, where 49 methyl-methyl and methyl-nitrogen distance restraints including 10 unambiguous long-range distance restraints could be collected. By combining this labeling scheme with ultra-fast MAS and proton detection, the assignment of methyl proton chemical shifts was achieved.

  9. Estimating side-chain order in methyl-protonated, perdeuterated proteins via multiple-quantum relaxation violated coherence transfer NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Hechao; Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Tugarinov, Vitali

    2012-01-01

    Relaxation violated coherence transfer NMR spectroscopy (Tugarinov et al. in J Am Chem Soc 129:1743–1750, 2007) is an established experimental tool for quantitative estimation of the amplitudes of side-chain motions in methyl-protonated, highly deuterated proteins. Relaxation violated coherence transfer experiments monitor the build-up of methyl proton multiple-quantum coherences that can be created in magnetically equivalent spin-systems as long as their transverse magnetization components relax with substantially different rates. The rate of this build-up is a reporter of the methyl-bearing side-chain mobility. Although the build-up of multiple-quantum 1 H coherences is monitored in these experiments, the decay of the methyl signal during relaxation delays occurs when methyl proton magnetization is in a single-quantum state. We describe a relaxation violated coherence transfer approach where the relaxation of multiple-quantum 1 H– 13 C methyl coherences during the relaxation delay period is quantified. The NMR experiment and the associated fitting procedure that models the time-dependence of the signal build-up, are applicable to the characterization of side-chain order in [ 13 CH 3 ]-methyl-labeled, highly deuterated protein systems up to ∼100 kDa in molecular weight. The feasibility of extracting reliable measures of side-chain order is experimentally verified on methyl-protonated, perdeuterated samples of an 8.5-kDa ubiquitin at 10°C and an 82-kDa Malate Synthase G at 37°C.

  10. NMR structure and localization of a large fragment of the SARS-CoV fusion protein: Implications in viral cell fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Mukesh; Chatterjee, Deepak; Bhuvaneswari, Kannaian; Pillay, Shubhadra; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2018-02-01

    The lethal Coronaviruses (CoVs), Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-associated Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and most recently Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus, (MERS-CoV) are serious human health hazard. A successful viral infection requires fusion between virus and host cells carried out by the surface spike glycoprotein or S protein of CoV. Current models propose that the S2 subunit of S protein assembled into a hexameric helical bundle exposing hydrophobic fusogenic peptides or fusion peptides (FPs) for membrane insertion. The N-terminus of S2 subunit of SARS-CoV reported to be active in cell fusion whereby FPs have been identified. Atomic-resolution structure of FPs derived either in model membranes or in membrane mimic environment would glean insights toward viral cell fusion mechanism. Here, we have solved 3D structure, dynamics and micelle localization of a 64-residue long fusion peptide or LFP in DPC detergent micelles by NMR methods. Micelle bound structure of LFP is elucidated by the presence of discretely folded helical and intervening loops. The C-terminus region, residues F42-Y62, displays a long hydrophobic helix, whereas the N-terminus is defined by a short amphipathic helix, residues R4-Q12. The intervening residues of LFP assume stretches of loops and helical turns. The N-terminal helix is sustained by close aromatic and aliphatic sidechain packing interactions at the non-polar face. 15 N{ 1 H}NOE studies indicated dynamical motion, at ps-ns timescale, of the helices of LFP in DPC micelles. PRE NMR showed that insertion of several regions of LFP into DPC micelle core. Together, the current study provides insights toward fusion mechanism of SARS-CoV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Oscillations and accelerations of ice crystal growth rates in microgravity in presence of antifreeze glycoprotein impurity in supercooled water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Yoshinori; Nagashima, Ken; Nakatsubo, Shun-Ichi; Yoshizaki, Izumi; Tamaru, Haruka; Shimaoka, Taro; Sone, Takehiko; Yokoyama, Etsuro; Zepeda, Salvador; Terasawa, Takanori; Asakawa, Harutoshi; Murata, Ken-Ichiro; Sazaki, Gen

    2017-03-01

    The free growth of ice crystals in supercooled bulk water containing an impurity of glycoprotein, a bio-macromolecule that functions as ‘antifreeze’ in living organisms in a subzero environment, was observed under microgravity conditions on the International Space Station. We observed the acceleration and oscillation of the normal growth rates as a result of the interfacial adsorption of these protein molecules, which is a newly discovered impurity effect for crystal growth. As the convection caused by gravity may mitigate or modify this effect, secure observations of this effect were first made possible by continuous measurements of normal growth rates under long-term microgravity condition realized only in the spacecraft. Our findings will lead to a better understanding of a novel kinetic process for growth oscillation in relation to growth promotion due to the adsorption of protein molecules and will shed light on the role that crystal growth kinetics has in the onset of the mysterious antifreeze effect in living organisms, namely, how this protein may prevent fish freezing.

  12. Effects of short-time preheating on ice growth in antifreeze polypeptides solutions in a narrow space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, T.; Nishi, N.; Waku, T.; Tanaka, N.; Hagiwara, Y.

    2018-03-01

    We conducted experiments on the unidirectional freezing of solutions of winter flounder antifreeze protein or of a polypeptide which was based on twelve amino-acid residues of this protein. The temperature in the solutions and ice was measured with a small thermocouple. The interface temperature was defined as the temperature at the tip of the serrated or pectinate interface. The interface temperature of these solutions was lower than that of pure water. To vary this supercooling activity of these solutes, we preheated the solutions and cooled them before conducting identical experiments. It was found that short-time preheating caused further decreases in the interface temperature and interface velocities. Furthermore, the inclined interfaces and the narrow liquid regions inside the ice area became wider. To investigate the reasons for these changes, we measured aggregates of the solutes in the solutions. These aggregates were found to become larger as a result of preheating. Thus, it can be concluded that these large aggregates attenuated the ice growth by their interaction with ice. Finally, we carried out similar measurements by using pH-adjusted solutions of the protein to produce aggregates without preheating, and obtained similar supercooling enhancement by the aggregates. Thus, the effects of thermal denaturation on the supercooling were not significant in the preheating.

  13. Binding ability of a HHP-tagged protein towards Ni{sup 2+} studied by paramagnetic NMR relaxation: The possibility of obtaining long-range structure information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Malene Ringkjo bing [University of Copenhagen, H.C. Orsted Institute, Department of Chemistry (Denmark); Lauritzen, Conni; Dahl, Soren Weis; Pedersen, John [Unizyme Laboratories A/S (Denmark); Led, Jens J. [University of Copenhagen, H.C. Orsted Institute, Department of Chemistry (Denmark)

    2004-06-15

    The binding ability of a protein with a metal binding tag towards Ni{sup 2+} was investigated by longitudinal paramagnetic NMR relaxation, and the possibility of obtaining long-range structure information from the paramagnetic relaxation was explored. A protein with a well-defined solution structure (Escherichia coli thioredoxin) was used as the model system, and the peptide His-His-Pro (HHP) fused to the N-terminus of the protein was used as the metal binding tag. It was found that the tag forms a stable dimer complex with the paramagnetic Ni{sup 2+} ion, where each metal ion binds two HHP-tagged protein molecules. However, it was also found that additional sites in the protein compete with the HHP-tag for the binding of the metal ion. These binding sites were identified as the side chain carboxylate groups of the aspartic and glutamic acid residues. Yet, the carboxylate groups bind the Ni{sup 2+} ions considerably weaker than the HHP-tag, and only protons spatially close to the carboxylate sites are affected by the Ni{sup 2+} ions bound to these groups. As for the protons that are unaffected by the carboxylate-bound Nisupb2+bsup> ions, it was found that the long-range distances derived from the paramagnetic relaxation enhancements are in good agreement with the solution structure of thioredoxin. Specifically, the obtained long-range paramagnetic distance constraints revealed that the dimer complex is asymmetric with different orientations of the two protein molecules relative to the Ni{sup 2+} ion. Abbreviations: NOE - nuclear Overhauser enhancement; E. coli - Escherichia coli; Trx - thioredoxin; IMAC - immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography; HT-DPPI - Polyhistidine-tagged dipeptidyl peptidase I; IPTG - isopropyl-1-thio-galactopyranoside; IR - inversion recovery; RMSD - root mean square deviation.

  14. Protein structural studies by paramagnetic solid-state NMR spectroscopy aided by a compact cyclen-type Cu(II) binding tag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, Ishita; Gao, Min; Arachchige, Rajith J.; Nadaud, Philippe S. [The Ohio State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Cunningham, Timothy F.; Saxena, Sunil [University of Pittsburgh, Department of Chemistry (United States); Schwieters, Charles D. [National Institutes of Health, Center for Information Technology (United States); Jaroniec, Christopher P., E-mail: jaroniec@chemistry.ohio-state.edu [The Ohio State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs) are a rich source of structural information in protein solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Here we demonstrate that PRE measurements in natively diamagnetic proteins are facilitated by a thiol-reactive compact, cyclen-based, high-affinity Cu{sup 2+} binding tag, 1-[2-(pyridin-2-yldisulfanyl)ethyl]-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (TETAC), that overcomes the key shortcomings associated with the use of larger, more flexible metal-binding tags. Using the TETAC–Cu{sup 2+} K28C mutant of B1 immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G as a model, we find that amino acid residues located within ∼10 Å of the Cu{sup 2+} center experience considerable transverse PREs leading to severely attenuated resonances in 2D {sup 15}N–{sup 13}C correlation spectra. For more distant residues, electron–nucleus distances are accessible via quantitative measurements of longitudinal PREs, and we demonstrate such measurements for {sup 15}N–Cu{sup 2+} distances up to ∼20 Å.

  15. Solution NMR Structure of the Iron-Sulfur Cluster Assembly Protein U (IscU) with Zinc Bound at the Active Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramelot, Theresa A.; Cort, John R.; Goldsmith-Fischman, Sharon; Kornhaber, Greg J.; Xiao, Rong; Shastry, Ritu; Acton, Thomas; Honig, Barry; Montelione, Gaetano; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2004-11-19

    IscU is a highly conserved protein that serves as the scaffold for IscS-mediated assembly of iron-sulfur ([Fe-S]) clusters. We report the NMR solution structure of monomeric Haemophilus influenzae IscU with zinc bound at the [Fe-S] cluster assembly site. The compact core of the globular structure has an {alpha}-{beta} sandwich architecture with a three-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet and four {alpha}-helices. A nascent helix is located N-terminal to the core structure. The zinc is ligated by three cysteines and one histidine that are located in and near conformationally dynamic loops at one end of the IscU structure. Removal of the zinc metal by chelation results in widespread loss of structure in the apo form. The zinc-bound IscU may be a good model for iron-loaded IscU and may demonstrate structural features found in the iron-sulfur cluster bound form. Structural and functional similarities, genomic context in operons containing other homologous genes, and distributions of conserved surface residues support the hypothesis that IscU protein domains are homologous (i.e. derived from a common ancestor) with the SufE/YgdK family of iron sulfur cluster assembly proteins.

  16. 15N and 31P solid-state NMR study of transmembrane domain alignment of M2 protein of influenza A virus in hydrated cylindrical lipid bilayers confined to anodic aluminum oxide nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Hu, Jun; Gor'kov, Peter L.; Brey, William W.; Cross, Timothy A.; Ruuge, Andres; Smirnov, Alex I.

    2005-04-01

    This communication reports the first example of a high resolution solid-state 15N 2D PISEMA NMR spectrum of a transmembrane peptide aligned using hydrated cylindrical lipid bilayers formed inside nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) substrates. The transmembrane domain SSDPLVVA(A- 15N)SIIGILHLILWILDRL of M2 protein from influenza A virus was reconstituted in hydrated 1,2-dimyristoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine bilayers that were macroscopically aligned by a conventional micro slide glass support or by the AAO nanoporous substrate. 15N and 31P NMR spectra demonstrate that both the phospholipids and the protein transmembrane domain are uniformly aligned in the nanopores. Importantly, nanoporous AAO substrates may offer several advantages for membrane protein alignment in solid-state NMR studies compared to conventional methods. Specifically, higher thermal conductivity of aluminum oxide is expected to suppress thermal gradients associated with inhomogeneous radio frequency heating. Another important advantage of the nanoporous AAO substrate is its excellent accessibility to the bilayer surface for exposure to solute molecules. Such high accessibility achieved through the substrate nanochannel network could facilitate a wide range of structure-function studies of membrane proteins by solid-state NMR.

  17. Frontiers of NMR in Molecular Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-08-25

    NMR spectroscopy is expanding the horizons of structural biology by determining the structures and describing the dynamics of blobular proteins in aqueous solution, as well as other classes of proteins including membrane proteins and the polypeptides that form the aggregates diagnostic of prion and amyloid diseases. Significant results are also emerging on DNA and RNA oligomers and their complexes with proteins. This meeting focused attention on key structural questions emanating from molecular biology and how NMR spectroscopy can be used to answer them.

  18. Toward an integrated model of protein-DNA recognition as inferred from NMR studies on the Lac repressor system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalodimos, Ch.; Boelens, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070151407; Kaptein, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074334603

    2004-01-01

    Sequence-specific protein-DNA interactions are responsible for the regulation of key biological functions such as replication of the genome, initiation of transcription, and repair of damaged DNA. All of these regulatory pathways are built on the foundation that proteins are able to bind selectively

  19. NMR in structural genomics to increase structural coverage of the protein universe: Delivered by Prof. Kurt Wüthrich on 7 July 2013 at the 38th FEBS Congress in St. Petersburg, Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Pedro; Dutta, Samit K; Proudfoot, Andrew; Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Susac, Lukas; Martin, Bryan; Geralt, Michael; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Godzik, Adam; Elsliger, Marc; Wilson, Ian A; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2016-11-01

    For more than a decade, the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG; www.jcsg.org) worked toward increased three-dimensional structure coverage of the protein universe. This coordinated quest was one of the main goals of the four high-throughput (HT) structure determination centers of the Protein Structure Initiative (PSI; www.nigms.nih.gov/Research/specificareas/PSI). To achieve the goals of the PSI, the JCSG made use of the complementarity of structure determination by X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to increase and diversify the range of targets entering the HT structure determination pipeline. The overall strategy, for both techniques, was to determine atomic resolution structures for representatives of large protein families, as defined by the Pfam database, which had no structural coverage and could make significant contributions to biological and biomedical research. Furthermore, the experimental structures could be leveraged by homology modeling to further expand the structural coverage of the protein universe and increase biological insights. Here, we describe what could be achieved by this structural genomics approach, using as an illustration the contributions from 20 NMR structure determinations out of a total of 98 JCSG NMR structures, which were selected because they are the first three-dimensional structure representations of the respective Pfam protein families. The information from this small sample is representative for the overall results from crystal and NMR structure determination in the JCSG. There are five new folds, which were classified as domains of unknown functions (DUF), three of the proteins could be functionally annotated based on three-dimensional structure similarity with previously characterized proteins, and 12 proteins showed only limited similarity with previous deposits in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and were classified as DUFs. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  20. NMR structure of the first PHD finger of autoimmune regulator protein (AIRE1). Insights into autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottomley, Matthew James; Stier, Gunter; Pennacchini, Danilo; Legube, Gaelle; Simon, Bernd; Akhtar, Asifa; Sattler, Michael; Musco, Giovanna

    2005-03-25

    Mutations in the autoimmune regulator protein AIRE1 cause a monogenic autosomal recessively inherited disease: autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED). AIRE1 is a multidomain protein that harbors two plant homeodomain (PHD)-type zinc fingers. The first PHD finger of AIRE1 is a mutational hot spot, to which several pathological point mutations have been mapped. Using heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy, we determined the solution structure of the first PHD finger of AIRE1 (AIRE1-PHD1), and characterized the peptide backbone mobility of the domain. We performed a conformational analysis of pathological AIRE1-PHD1 mutants that allowed us to rationalize the structural impact of APECED-causing mutations and to identify an interaction site with putative protein ligands of the AIRE1-PHD1 domain. The structure unequivocally exhibits the canonical PHD finger fold, with a highly conserved tryptophan buried inside the structure. The PHD finger is stabilized by two zinc ions coordinated in an interleaved (cross-brace) scheme. This zinc coordination resembles RING finger domains, which can function as E3 ligases in the ubiquitination pathway. Based on this fold similarity, it has been suggested that PHD fingers might also function as E3 ligases, although this hypothesis is controversial. At variance to a previous report, we could not find any evidence that AIRE1-PHD1 has an intrinsic E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, nor detect any direct interaction between AIRE1-PHD1 and its putative cognate E2. Consistently, we show that the AIRE1-PHD1 structure is clearly distinct from the RING finger fold. Our results point to a function of the AIRE1-PHD1 domain in protein-protein interactions, which is impaired in some APECED mutations.

  1. Structure and dynamics of the membrane-bound form of the filamentous bacteriophage coat proteins by NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogusky, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of the Pf1 and fd bacteriophage coat proteins in detergent micelles are characterized in solution by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The coat proteins are found to exist within the bacterial inner cell membrane during viral infection and assembly. The coat proteins serve as a model system to investigate integral membrane proteins as well as the viral infection and assembly processes. The coat protein is insoluble in aqueous or organic solvents and can only be effectively solubilized in the presence of detergents that form micelles or phospholipids that form vesicles. The effective molecular weight of the detergent-micelle complex is ca. 30K daltons. Sequential assignment strategies were ineffective due to short T/sub 2s/ and severe resonance degeneracy. The backbone resonance assignments were completed by the combination of several homo- and heteronuclear correlation techniques with biosynthetic 15 N labelling. 2D NOE experiments were used to locate and characterize the secondary structure of the membrane bound form of the proteins showing them to be largely helical with the hydrophobic core existing in a very stable helix

  2. Proton detection for signal enhancement in solid-state NMR experiments on mobile species in membrane proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Meaghan E.; Ritz, Emily [University of Guelph, Department of Physics (Canada); Ahmed, Mumdooh A. M. [Suez University, The Department of Physics, Faculty of Science (Egypt); Bamm, Vladimir V.; Harauz, George [University of Guelph, Biophysics Interdepartmental Group (Canada); Brown, Leonid S.; Ladizhansky, Vladimir, E-mail: vladizha@uoguelph.ca [University of Guelph, Department of Physics (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    Direct proton detection is becoming an increasingly popular method for enhancing sensitivity in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Generally, these experiments require extensive deuteration of the protein, fast magic angle spinning (MAS), or a combination of both. Here, we implement direct proton detection to selectively observe the mobile entities in fully-protonated membrane proteins at moderate MAS frequencies. We demonstrate this method on two proteins that exhibit different motional regimes. Myelin basic protein is an intrinsically-disordered, peripherally membrane-associated protein that is highly flexible, whereas Anabaena sensory rhodopsin is composed of seven rigid transmembrane α-helices connected by mobile loop regions. In both cases, we observe narrow proton linewidths and, on average, a 10× increase in sensitivity in 2D insensitive nuclear enhancement of polarization transfer-based HSQC experiments when proton detection is compared to carbon detection. We further show that our proton-detected experiments can be easily extended to three dimensions and used to build complete amino acid systems, including sidechain protons, and obtain inter-residue correlations. Additionally, we detect signals which do not correspond to amino acids, but rather to lipids and/or carbohydrates which interact strongly with membrane proteins.

  3. Structural changes of a light-activated G protein-coupled receptor determined by solid-state NMR: Channeling light energy into the visual pigment rhodopsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, Evan Daniel

    Absorption of light by the visual pigment rhodopsin triggers an 11- cis to all-trans isomerization of the retinal chromophore within the interior of this G protein-coupled receptor. Two-dimensional solid-state NMR of rhodopsin and the active metarhodopsin II intermediate is used to determine the trajectory of the retinal and the effects of retinal isomerization on the structure of the protein. Structural constraints obtained in this study indicate that helices H5, H6 and H7 undergo changes in orientation relative to the H1--H4 core of the receptor upon retinal isomerization. The position of the retinal beta-ionone ring in metarhodopsin II was found to translate toward and interact with H5. Changes observed in the H4--H5 interface are consistent with a small counter clockwise rotation of H5, as observed from the extracellular side of the protein. Retinal isomerization also alters the structure and position of H6. The position of Trp265 relative to H3 and the retinal in metarhodopsin II indicates that the extracellular end of H6 moves inward and rotates upon activation. Together with previous EPR measurements of the relative positions of the intracellular ends of H3 and H6 in metarhodopsin II, the NMR constraints define how Trp265 serves as a lever for the motion of H6. Retinal translation also leads to an inward motion of the extracellular end of H7, suggesting that H6 and H7 move in concert upon receptor activation. A function of the highly conserved NPxxY sequence on the intracellular end of H7 is proposed. Based on the observations described above and indications that helices H1 through H4 form a stable core that serves as a platform for the motion of H5, H6 and H7, a model for the structure of the active state of rhodopsin is presented. Aspects of this model are put into the context of the proposed activation mechanisms of other members of the GPCR superfamily.

  4. Determination of glucose exchange rates and permeability of erythrocyte membrane in preeclampsia and subsequent oxidative stress-related protein damage using dynamic-{sup 19}F-NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickinson, Elizabeth, E-mail: elizabeth.dickinson@york.ac.uk [University of York, Department of Chemistry (United Kingdom); Arnold, John R. P. [Selby College (United Kingdom); Fisher, Julie [University of Leeds, School of Chemistry (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-15

    The cause of the pregnancy condition preeclampsia (PE) is thought to be endothelial dysfunction caused by oxidative stress. As abnormal glucose tolerance has also been associated with PE, we use a fluorinated-mimic of this metabolite to establish whether any oxidative damage to lipids and proteins in the erythrocyte membrane has increased cell membrane permeability. Data were acquired using {sup 19}F Dynamic-NMR (DNMR) to measure exchange of 3-fluoro-3-deoxyglucose (3-FDG) across the membrane of erythrocytes from 10 pregnant women (5 healthy control women, and 5 from women suffering from PE). Magnetisation transfer was measured using the 1D selective inversion and 2D EXSY pulse sequences, over a range of time delays. Integrated intensities from these experiments were used in matrix diagonalisation to estimate the values of the rate constants of exchange and membrane permeability. No significant differences were observed for the rate of exchange of 3-FDG and membrane permeability between healthy pregnant women and those suffering from PE, leading us to conclude that no oxidative damage had occurred at this carrier-protein site in the membrane.

  5. ¹H, ¹³C and ¹⁵N NMR assignments of the Escherichia coli Orf135 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Kumiko; Yoneyama, Momoko; Murata-Kamiya, Naoko; Harashima, Hideyoshi; Kojima, Chojiro; Ito, Yutaka; Kamiya, Hiroyuki; Mishima, Masaki

    2012-04-01

    Escherichia coli Orf135 protein is thought to be an enzyme that efficiently hydrolyzes oxidatively damaged nucleotides such as 2-hydroxy-dATP, 8-hydroxy-dGTP and 5-hydroxy-CTP, in addition to 5-methyl-dCTP, dCTP and CTP, thus preventing mutations in cells caused by unfavorable base pairing. Nucleotide pool sanitization by Orf135 is important since organisms are continually subjected to potential damage by reactive oxygen species produced during respiration. It is known that the frequency of spontaneous and H(2)O(2)-induced mutations is two to threefold higher in the orf135(-) strain compared with the wild-type. Orf135 is a member of the Nudix family of proteins which hydrolyze nucleoside diphosphate derivatives. Nudix hydrolases are characterized by the presence of a conserved motif, although they recognize various substrates and possess a variety of substrate binding pockets. We are interested in delineating the mechanism by which Orf135 recognizes oxidatively damaged nucleotides. To this end, we are investigating the tertiary structure of Orf135 and its interaction with substrate using NMR. Herein, we report on the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments of Orf135, which should contribute towards a structural understanding of Orf135 and its interaction with substrate.

  6. Unique opportunities for NMR methods in structural genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelione, Gaetano T; Arrowsmith, Cheryl; Girvin, Mark E; Kennedy, Michael A; Markley, John L; Powers, Robert; Prestegard, James H; Szyperski, Thomas

    2009-04-01

    This Perspective, arising from a workshop held in July 2008 in Buffalo NY, provides an overview of the role NMR has played in the United States Protein Structure Initiative (PSI), and a vision of how NMR will contribute to the forthcoming PSI-Biology program. NMR has contributed in key ways to structure production by the PSI, and new methods have been developed which are impacting the broader protein NMR community.

  7. Analysis of local molecular motions of aromatic sidechains in proteins by 2D and 3D fast MAS NMR spectroscopy and quantum mechanical calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paluch, P.; Pawlak, T.; Jeziorna, A.; Trébosc, J.; Hou, G.; Vega, A. J.; Amoureux, J. P.; Dračínský, Martin; Polenova, T.; Potrzebowski, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 43 (2015), s. 28789-28801 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-11223S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : solid-state NMR * angle spinning NMR * NMR Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.449, year: 2015 http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlepdf/2015/cp/c5cp04475h

  8. Backbone 1H, 13C, and 15N NMR assignments for the Cyanothece 51142 protein cce_0567: a protein associated with nitrogen fixation in the DUF683 family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchko, Garry W; Sofia, Heidi J

    2008-06-01

    Cyanothece 51142 contains a 78-residue protein, cce_0567, that falls into the DUF683 family of proteins associated with nitrogen fixation. Here we report the assignment of most of the main chain and 13C(beta) side chain resonances of the approximately 40 kDa homo-tetramer.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of natural and modified antifreeze glycopeptides: glycosylated foldamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Lilly; Plattner, Carolin; Budke, Carsten; Majer, Zsuzsanna; DeVries, Arthur L; Berkemeier, Thomas; Koop, Thomas; Sewald, Norbert

    2011-08-01

    In Arctic and Antarctic marine regions, where the temperature declines below the colligative freezing point of physiological fluids, efficient biological antifreeze agents are crucial for the survival of polar fish. One group of such agents is classified as antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGP) that usually consist of a varying number (n = 4-55) of [AAT]( n )-repeating units. The threonine side chain of each unit is glycosidically linked to β-D: -galactosyl-(1 → 3)-α-N-acetyl-D: -galactosamine. These biopolymers can be considered as biological antifreeze foldamers. A preparative route for stepwise synthesis of AFGP allows for efficient synthesis. The diglycosylated threonine building block was introduced into the peptide using microwave-enhanced solid phase synthesis. By this versatile solid phase approach, glycosylated peptides of varying sequences and lengths could be obtained. Conformational studies of the synthetic AFGP analogs were performed by circular dichroism experiments (CD). Furthermore, the foldamers were analysed microphysically according to their inhibiting effect on ice recrystallization and influence on the crystal habit.

  10. NMR in structure-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Marta G; Ab, Eiso; Theisgen, Stephan; Siegal, Gregg

    2017-11-08

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful technique that can provide valuable structural information for drug discovery endeavors. Here, we discuss the strengths (and limitations) of NMR applications to structure-based drug discovery, highlighting the different levels of resolution and throughput obtainable. Additionally, the emerging field of paramagnetic NMR in drug discovery and recent developments in approaches to speed up and automate protein-observed NMR data collection and analysis are discussed. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  11. Cross-Correlated Relaxation of Dipolar Coupling and Chemical-Shift Anisotropy in Magic-Angle Spinning R1ρ NMR Measurements: Application to Protein Backbone Dynamics Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurauskas, Vilius; Weber, Emmanuelle; Hessel, Audrey; Ayala, Isabel; Marion, Dominique; Schanda, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Transverse relaxation rate measurements in MAS solid-state NMR provide information about molecular motions occurring on nanoseconds-to-milliseconds (ns-ms) time scales. The measurement of heteronuclear (13C, 15N) relaxation rate constants in the presence of a spin-lock radio-frequency field (R1ρ relaxation) provides access to such motions, and an increasing number of studies involving R1ρ relaxation in proteins has been reported. However, two factors that influence the observed relaxation rate constants have so far been neglected, namely (i) the role of CSA/dipolar cross-correlated relaxation (CCR), and (ii) the impact of fast proton spin flips (i.e. proton spin diffusion and relaxation). We show that CSA/D CCR in R1ρ experiments is measurable, and that this cross-correlated relaxation rate constant depends on ns-ms motions, and can thus itself provide insight into dynamics. We find that proton spin-diffusion attenuates this cross-correlated relaxation, due to its decoupling effect on the doublet components. For measurements of dynamics, the use of R1ρ rate constants has practical advantages over the use of CCR rates, and the present manuscript reveals factors that have so far been disregarded and which are important for accurate measurements and interpretation. PMID:27500976

  12. Application of high resolution NMR, ESR, and gamma-ray scintillation spectroscopy to the study of ligand binding in proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lancione, G.V.

    1982-01-01

    Electron spin resonance spectroscopy has been employed to study the nature of the ligand binding site of alpha-1-antitrypsin. Spectra of spin-labeled alpha-1-antitrypsin were recorded at pH's ranging from 2.4 to 12.5. This data demonstrates the tight binding of the spin-label to the protease, and the sensitivity of the bound spin-label to informational changes in the protease inhibitor. A molecular dipstick approach has also been applied to this system and has yielded information on the geometry of the cleft accommodating the spin-label. 160 Terbium(III) exchange experiments have been performed on the acetylcholine receptor protein isolated from Torpedo californica, employing a specially designed flow dialysis apparatus constructed in the laboratory. The apparatus is designed to allow continuous monitoring of 160 Tb(III) gamma-ray emission from the protein compartment of the flow dialysis cell. Nicotinic ligand-induced displacement of 160 Tb(III) from the nicotinic binding site of the receptor was monitored as a funtion of (1) the concentration of nicotinic ligand in the washout buffer, and (2) the nature of the nicotinic ligand in the buffer. Measured 160 Tb(III) exchange half-lives indicate (1) a direct relationship between 160 Tb(III) displacement and nicotinic ligand concentration in the wash-out buffer, and (2) an enhanced 160 Tb(III) displacement for nicotinic agents possessing quaternary ammonium functions

  13. Quantifying millisecond time-scale exchange in proteins by CPMG relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy of side-chain carbonyl groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Alexandar L.; Kay, Lewis E., E-mail: kay@pound.med.utoronto.ca [University of Toronto, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry (Canada)

    2011-08-15

    A new pulse sequence is presented for the measurement of relaxation dispersion profiles quantifying millisecond time-scale exchange dynamics of side-chain carbonyl groups in uniformly {sup 13}C labeled proteins. The methodology has been tested using the 87-residue colicin E7 immunity protein, Im7, which is known to fold via a partially structured low populated intermediate that interconverts with the folded, ground state on the millisecond time-scale. Comparison of exchange parameters extracted for this folding 'reaction' using the present methodology with those obtained from more 'traditional' {sup 15}N and backbone carbonyl probes establishes the utility of the approach. The extracted excited state side-chain carbonyl chemical shifts indicate that the Asx/Glx side-chains are predominantly unstructured in the Im7 folding intermediate. However, several crucial salt-bridges that exist in the native structure appear to be already formed in the excited state, either in part or in full. This information, in concert with that obtained from existing backbone and side-chain methyl relaxation dispersion experiments, will ultimately facilitate a detailed description of the structure of the Im7 folding intermediate.

  14. Current NMR Techniques for Structure-Based Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiki, Toshihiko; Furuita, Kyoko; Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Kojima, Chojiro

    2018-01-12

    A variety of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) applications have been developed for structure-based drug discovery (SBDD). NMR provides many advantages over other methods, such as the ability to directly observe chemical compounds and target biomolecules, and to be used for ligand-based and protein-based approaches. NMR can also provide important information about the interactions in a protein-ligand complex, such as structure, dynamics, and affinity, even when the interaction is too weak to be detected by ELISA or fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based high-throughput screening (HTS) or to be crystalized. In this study, we reviewed current NMR techniques. We focused on recent progress in NMR measurement and sample preparation techniques that have expanded the potential of NMR-based SBDD, such as fluorine NMR ( 19 F-NMR) screening, structure modeling of weak complexes, and site-specific isotope labeling of challenging targets.

  15. Bayesian Peak Picking for NMR Spectra

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Yichen

    2014-02-01

    Protein structure determination is a very important topic in structural genomics, which helps people to understand varieties of biological functions such as protein-protein interactions, protein–DNA interactions and so on. Nowadays, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has often been used to determine the three-dimensional structures of protein in vivo. This study aims to automate the peak picking step, the most important and tricky step in NMR structure determination. We propose to model the NMR spectrum by a mixture of bivariate Gaussian densities and use the stochastic approximation Monte Carlo algorithm as the computational tool to solve the problem. Under the Bayesian framework, the peak picking problem is casted as a variable selection problem. The proposed method can automatically distinguish true peaks from false ones without preprocessing the data. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first effort in the literature that tackles the peak picking problem for NMR spectrum data using Bayesian method.

  16. Bayesian Peak Picking for NMR Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichen Cheng

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein structure determination is a very important topic in structural genomics, which helps people to understand varieties of biological functions such as protein-protein interactions, protein–DNA interactions and so on. Nowadays, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR has often been used to determine the three-dimensional structures of protein in vivo. This study aims to automate the peak picking step, the most important and tricky step in NMR structure determination. We propose to model the NMR spectrum by a mixture of bivariate Gaussian densities and use the stochastic approximation Monte Carlo algorithm as the computational tool to solve the problem. Under the Bayesian framework, the peak picking problem is casted as a variable selection problem. The proposed method can automatically distinguish true peaks from false ones without preprocessing the data. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first effort in the literature that tackles the peak picking problem for NMR spectrum data using Bayesian method.

  17. Resolving the paradox for protein aggregation diseases: NMR structure and dynamics of the membrane-embedded P56S-MSP causing ALS imply a common mechanism for aggregation-prone proteins to attack membranes [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3zl

    OpenAIRE

    Haina Qin; Liangzhong Lim; Yuanyuan Wei; Garvita Gupta; Jianxing Song

    2014-01-01

    Paradoxically, aggregation of specific proteins is characteristic of many human diseases and aging, yet aggregates have increasingly been found to be unnecessary for initiating pathogenesis. Here we determined the NMR topology and dynamics of a helical mutant in a membrane environment transformed from the 125-residue cytosolic all-β MSP domain of vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein B (VAPB) by the ALS-causing P56S mutation. Despite its low hydrophobicity, the P56S major spe...

  18. Integration of NMR And SAXS with Atomistic Simulations for Characterizing the Structure and Dynamics of Multi-Domain Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debiec, Karl Thomas

    In the seven decades since the first atomic-level structures of biomolecules were determined, the development and application of novel research methods has led to an advanced understanding of biological functions at the molecular level. In addition to experimental methods, key advances have been spurred by computer simulations, which provide an in silico representation of accumulated prior knowledge of biomolecular structure and dynamics. These models can be used both (i) as a complement to experimental results, filling in the gaps where experimental information is not accessible, and (ii) as complete representations, directing future research. Critically, the validity of either application depends on the accuracy of the models used. In this work, I aspired to combine computational and experimental methods to characterize the structure and dynamics of the flexibly linked two-domain protein MoCVNH3. In Chapter 1 I describe my motivation, and the suspected simulation artifacts observed in our preliminary simulations, which led me to investigate how accurately simulation models represent salt bridge interactions. Chapter 2 details my comparison of current models ("force fields"), for which significant variation but consistent overstabilization of salt bridges was discovered. This work motivated the development of a new force field, AMBER ff15ipq, which corrects, to some degree, the overstabilization and introduces extensive improvements, described in Chapter 3. Finally, in Chapter 4, I applied this new force field in simulations of MoCVNH3, for which I collected extensive experimental data leading to the determination of a structural ensemble. I validated the simulations against the experimental data set, and identified further directions for improvement. Overall, the work presented here demonstrates the power of integrating experimental and computational methods.

  19. NMR Analysis of Amide Hydrogen Exchange Rates in a Pentapeptide-Repeat Protein from A. thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shenyuan; Ni, Shuisong; Kennedy, Michael A

    2017-05-23

    At2g44920 from Arabidopsis thaliana is a pentapeptide-repeat protein (PRP) composed of 25 repeats capped by N- and C-terminal α-helices. PRP structures are dominated by four-sided right-handed β-helices typically consisting of mixtures of type II and type IV β-turns. PRPs adopt repeated five-residue (Rfr) folds with an Rfr consensus sequence (STAV)(D/N)(L/F)(S/T/R)(X). Unlike other PRPs, At2g44920 consists exclusively of type II β-turns. At2g44920 is predicted to be located in the thylakoid lumen although its biochemical function remains unknown. Given its unusual structure, we investigated the biophysical properties of At2g44920 as a representative of the β-helix family to determine if it had exceptional global stability, backbone dynamics, or amide hydrogen exchange rates. Circular dichroism measurements yielded a melting point of 62.8°C, indicating unexceptional global thermal stability. Nuclear spin relaxation measurements indicated that the Rfr-fold core was rigid with order parameters ranging from 0.7 to 0.9. At2g44920 exhibited a striking range of amide hydrogen exchange rates spanning 10 orders of magnitude, with lifetimes ranging from minutes to several months. A weak correlation was found among hydrogen exchange rates, hydrogen bonding energies, and amino acid solvent-accessible areas. Analysis of contributions from fast (approximately picosecond to nanosecond) backbone dynamics to amide hydrogen exchange rates revealed that the average order parameter of amides undergoing fast exchange was significantly smaller compared to those undergoing slow exchange. Importantly, the activation energies for amide hydrogen exchange were found to be generally higher for the slowest exchanging amides in the central Rfr coil and decreased toward the terminal coils. This could be explained by assuming that the concerted motions of two preceding or following coils required for hydrogen bond disruption and amide hydrogen exchange have a higher activation energy

  20. STUDY ON PROPERTIES OF SKID RESISTANCE ON FREEZING PAVEMENTS AND QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION METHOD OF ANTIFREEZING EFFECTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shunsuke; Takeichi, Kiyoshi; Masuyama, Yukiei; Takahashi, Naoto

    Snow and ice control in winter roads trends to be controlled by the skid friction coefficients in North America and North European countries at present, but the measurements are not necessarily easy. We studied on a simplified measurement method based on the relationship between skid friction coefficients and the bare pavement ratio (BPR) in the laboratory tests and field tests. The factors of BPR, surface textures and antifreezing materials which affect the skid friction coefficient are reviewed by a multiple linear regression analysis and a spectrum analysis, considering different freezing surfaces. These studies indicate that conclusions induced by laboratory tests could be applied to roads in service.

  1. GFT projection NMR based resonance assignment of membrane proteins: application to subunit c of E. coli F{sub 1}F{sub 0} ATP synthase in LPPG micelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Qi [State University of New York at Buffalo, Department of Chemistry (United States); Atreya, Hanudatta S. [NMR Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science (India); Kamen, Douglas E.; Girvin, Mark E. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Biochemistry Department (United States); Szyperski, Thomas [State University of New York at Buffalo, Department of Chemistry (United States)], E-mail: szypersk@chem.buffalo.edu

    2008-03-15

    G-matrix FT projection NMR spectroscopy was employed for resonance assignment of the 79-residue subunit c of the Escherichia coli F{sub 1}F{sub 0} ATP synthase embedded in micelles formed by lyso palmitoyl phosphatidyl glycerol (LPPG). Five GFT NMR experiments, that is, (3,2)D HNNCO, L-(4,3)D HNNC{sup {alpha}}{sup {beta}}C{sup {alpha}}, L-(4,3)D HNN(CO)C{sup {alpha}}{sup {beta}}C{sup {alpha}}, (4,2)D HACA(CO)NHN and (4,3)D HCCH, were acquired along with simultaneous 3D {sup 15}N, {sup 13}C{sup aliphatic}, {sup 13}C{sup aromatic}-resolved [{sup 1}H,{sup 1}H]-NOESY with a total measurement time of {approx}43 h. Data analysis resulted in sequence specific assignments for all routinely measured backbone and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} shifts, and for 97% of the side chain shifts. Moreover, the use of two G{sup 2}FT NMR experiments, that is, (5,3)D HN{l_brace}N,CO{r_brace}{l_brace}C{sup {alpha}}{sup {beta}}C{sup {alpha}}{r_brace} and (5,3)D {l_brace}C{sup {alpha}}{sup {beta}}C{sup {alpha}}{r_brace}{l_brace}CON{r_brace}HN, was explored to break the very high chemical shift degeneracy typically encountered for membrane proteins. It is shown that the 4D and 5D spectral information obtained rapidly from GFT and G{sup 2}FT NMR experiments enables one to efficiently obtain (nearly) complete resonance assignments of membrane proteins.

  2. Structural analysis of alanine tripeptide with antiparallel and parallel beta-sheet structures in relation to the analysis of mixed beta-sheet structures in Samia cynthia ricini silk protein fiber using solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Tetsuo; Okonogi, Michi; Nakazawa, Yasumoto; Yamauchi, Kazuo

    2006-05-10

    The structural analysis of natural protein fibers with mixed parallel and antiparallel beta-sheet structures by solid-state NMR is reported. To obtain NMR parameters that can characterize these beta-sheet structures, (13)C solid-state NMR experiments were performed on two alanine tripeptide samples: one with 100% parallel beta-sheet structure and the other with 100% antiparallel beta-sheet structure. All (13)C resonances of the tripeptides could be assigned by a comparison of the methyl (13)C resonances of Ala(3) with different [3-(13)C]Ala labeling schemes and also by a series of RFDR (radio frequency driven recoupling) spectra observed by changing mixing times. Two (13)C resonances observed for each Ala residue could be assigned to two nonequivalent molecules per unit cell. Differences in the (13)C chemical shifts and (13)C spin-lattice relaxation times (T(1)) were observed between the two beta-sheet structures. Especially, about 3 times longer T(1) values were obtained for parallel beta-sheet structure as compared to those of antiparallel beta-sheet structure, which could be explicable by the difference in the hydrogen-bond networks of both structures. This very large difference in T(1) becomes a good measure to differentiate between parallel or antiparallel beta-sheet structures. These differences in the NMR parameters found for the tripeptides may be applied to assign the parallel and antiparallel beta-sheet (13)C resonances in the asymmetric and broad methyl spectra of [3-(13)C]Ala silk protein fiber of a wild silkworm, Samia cynthia ricini.

  3. Carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy of biological systems

    CERN Document Server

    Beckmann, Nicolau

    1995-01-01

    This book is intended to provide an in-depth understanding of 13C NMR as a tool in biological research. 13C NMR has provided unique information concerning complex biological systems, from proteins and nucleic acids to animals and humans. The subjects addressed include multidimensional heteronuclear techniques for structural studies of molecules in the liquid and solid states, the investigation of interactions in model membranes, the elucidation of metabolic pathwaysin vitro and in vivo on animals, and noninvasive metabolic studies performed on humans. The book is a unique mix of NMR methods and biological applications which makes it a convenient reference for those interested in research in this interdisciplinary area of physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine.Key Features* An interdisciplinary text with emphasis on both 13C NMR methodology and the relevant biological and biomedical issues* State-of-the-art 13C NMR techniques are described; Whenever possible, their advantages over other approaches are empha...

  4. Selective 'unlabeling' of amino acids in fractionally 13C labeled proteins: An approach for stereospecific NMR assignments of CH3 groups in Val and Leu residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atreya, H.S.; Chary, K.V.R. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Department of Chemical Sciences (India)

    2001-03-15

    A novel methodology for stereospecific NMR assignments of methyl (CH{sub 3}) groups of Val and Leu residues in fractionally {sup 13}C-labeled proteins is presented. The approach is based on selective 'unlabeling' of specific amino acids in proteins while fractionally {sup 13}C-labeling the rest. A 2D [{sup 13}C-{sup 1}H] HSQC spectrum recorded on such a sample is devoid of peaks belonging to the 'unlabeled' amino acid residues. Such spectral simplification aids in unambiguous stereospecific assignment of diastereotopic CH{sub 3} groups in Val and Leu residues in large proteins. This methodology has been demonstrated on a 15 kDa calcium binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica (Eh-CaBP)

  5. Recommendations of the wwPDB NMR Validation Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelione, Gaetano T.; Nilges, Michael; Bax, Ad; Güntert, Peter; Herrmann, Torsten; Richardson, Jane S.; Schwieters, Charles; Vranken, Wim F.; Vuister, Geerten W.; Wishart, David S.; Berman, Helen M.; Kleywegt, Gerard J.; Markley, John L.

    2013-01-01

    As methods for analysis of biomolecular structure and dynamics using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) continue to advance, the resulting 3D structures, chemical shifts, and other NMR data are broadly impacting biology, chemistry, and medicine. Structure model assessment is a critical area of NMR methods development, and is an essential component of the process of making these structures accessible and useful to the wider scientific community. For these reasons, the Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) has convened an NMR Validation Task Force (NMR-VTF) to work with the wwPDB partners in developing metrics and policies for biomolecular NMR data harvesting, structure representation, and structure quality assessment. This paper summarizes the recommendations of the NMR-VTF, and lays the groundwork for future work in developing standards and metrics for biomolecular NMR structure quality assessment. PMID:24010715

  6. NMR of lignins

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Ralph; Larry L. Landucci

    2010-01-01

    This chapter will consider the basic aspects and findings of several forms of NMR spectroscopy, including separate discussions of proton, carbon, heteronuclear, and multidimensional NMR. Enhanced focus will be on 13C NMR, because of its qualitative and quantitative importance, followed by NMR’s contributions to our understanding of lignin...

  7. A community resource of experimental data for NMR / X-ray crystal structure pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, John K; Tejero, Roberto; Murthy, Sarath B K; Acton, Thomas B; Aramini, James M; Baran, Michael C; Benach, Jordi; Cort, John R; Eletsky, Alexander; Forouhar, Farhad; Guan, Rongjin; Kuzin, Alexandre P; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Liu, Gaohua; Mani, Rajeswari; Mao, Binchen; Mills, Jeffrey L; Montelione, Alexander F; Pederson, Kari; Powers, Robert; Ramelot, Theresa; Rossi, Paolo; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Snyder, David; Swapna, G V T; Vorobiev, Sergey M; Wu, Yibing; Xiao, Rong; Yang, Yunhuang; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Hunt, John F; Kennedy, Michael A; Prestegard, James H; Szyperski, Thomas; Tong, Liang; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an online NMR / X-ray Structure Pair Data Repository. The NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI) has provided many valuable reagents, 3D structures, and technologies for structural biology. The Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium was one of several PSI centers. NESG used both X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy for protein structure determination. A key goal of the PSI was to provide experimental structures for at least one representative of each of hundreds of targeted protein domain families. In some cases, structures for identical (or nearly identical) constructs were determined by both NMR and X-ray crystallography. NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction data for 41 of these "NMR / X-ray" structure pairs determined using conventional triple-resonance NMR methods with extensive sidechain resonance assignments have been organized in an online NMR / X-ray Structure Pair Data Repository. In addition, several NMR data sets for perdeuterated, methyl-protonated protein samples are included in this repository. As an example of the utility of this repository, these data were used to revisit questions about the precision and accuracy of protein NMR structures first outlined by Levy and coworkers several years ago (Andrec et al., Proteins 2007;69:449-465). These results demonstrate that the agreement between NMR and X-ray crystal structures is improved using modern methods of protein NMR spectroscopy. The NMR / X-ray Structure Pair Data Repository will provide a valuable resource for new computational NMR methods development. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  8. The inverted chevron plot measured by NMR relaxation reveals a native-like unfolding intermediate in acyl-CoA binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Kaare; Poulsen, F. M.; Akke, M.

    2006-01-01

    under conditions favoring folding, for which the folding rate constant (k f) dominates the relaxation in stopped-flow kinetic measurements. Conversely, k f was determined under conditions favoring unfolding, for which k u dominates stopped-flow data. The rates determined by NMR therefore complement...

  9. A chemical approach for site-specific identification of NMR signals from protein side-chain NH3+ groups forming intermolecular ion pairs in protein–nucleic acid complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Kurtis M.; Nguyen, Dan; Esadze, Alexandre; Zandrashvili, Levani; Gorenstein, David G.; Iwahara, Junji

    2015-01-01

    Protein–nucleic acid interactions involve intermolecular ion pairs of protein side-chain and DNA or RNA phosphate groups. Using three protein–DNA complexes, we demonstrate that site-specific oxygen-to-sulfur substitution in phosphate groups allows for identification of NMR signals from the protein side-chain NH 3 + groups forming the intermolecular ion pairs. A characteristic change in their 1 H and 15 N resonances upon this modification (i.e., substitution of phosphate to phosphorodithioate) can represent a signature of an intermolecular ion pair. Hydrogen-bond scalar coupling between protein side-chain 15 N and DNA phosphorodithiaote 31 P nuclei provides direct confirmation of the intermolecular ion pair. The same approach is likely applicable to protein–RNA complexes as well

  10. A chemical approach for site-specific identification of NMR signals from protein side-chain NH{sub 3}{sup +} groups forming intermolecular ion pairs in protein–nucleic acid complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Kurtis M. [University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Department of NanoMedicine and Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Molecular Medicine (United States); Nguyen, Dan; Esadze, Alexandre; Zandrashvili, Levani [University of Texas Medical Branch, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics (United States); Gorenstein, David G. [University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Department of NanoMedicine and Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Molecular Medicine (United States); Iwahara, Junji, E-mail: juiwahar@utmb.edu, E-mail: j.iwahara@utmb.edu [University of Texas Medical Branch, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Protein–nucleic acid interactions involve intermolecular ion pairs of protein side-chain and DNA or RNA phosphate groups. Using three protein–DNA complexes, we demonstrate that site-specific oxygen-to-sulfur substitution in phosphate groups allows for identification of NMR signals from the protein side-chain NH{sub 3}{sup +} groups forming the intermolecular ion pairs. A characteristic change in their {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N resonances upon this modification (i.e., substitution of phosphate to phosphorodithioate) can represent a signature of an intermolecular ion pair. Hydrogen-bond scalar coupling between protein side-chain {sup 15}N and DNA phosphorodithiaote {sup 31}P nuclei provides direct confirmation of the intermolecular ion pair. The same approach is likely applicable to protein–RNA complexes as well.

  11. An introduction to biological NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marion, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for biologists interested in the structure, dynamics, and interactions of biological macromolecules. This review aims at presenting in an accessible manner the requirements and limitations of this technique. As an introduction, the history of NMR will highlight how the method evolved from physics to chemistry and finally to biology over several decades. We then introduce the NMR spectral parameters used in structural biology, namely the chemical shift, the J-coupling, nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings. Resonance assignment, the required step for any further NMR study, bears a resemblance to jigsaw puzzle strategy. The NMR spectral parameters are then converted into angle and distances and used as input using restrained molecular dynamics to compute a bundle of structures. When interpreting a NMR-derived structure, the biologist has to judge its quality on the basis of the statistics provided. When the 3D structure is a priori known by other means, the molecular interaction with a partner can be mapped by NMR: information on the binding interface as well as on kinetic and thermodynamic constants can be gathered. NMR is suitable to monitor, over a wide range of frequencies, protein fluctuations that play a crucial role in their biological function. In the last section of this review, intrinsically disordered proteins, which have escaped the attention of classical structural biology, are discussed in the perspective of NMR, one of the rare available techniques able to describe structural ensembles. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 16 MCP). (authors)

  12. Prediction of peak overlap in NMR spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hefke, Frederik; Schmucki, Roland; Güntert, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Peak overlap is one of the major factors complicating the analysis of biomolecular NMR spectra. We present a general method for predicting the extent of peak overlap in multidimensional NMR spectra and its validation using both, experimental data sets and Monte Carlo simulation. The method is based on knowledge of the magnetization transfer pathways of the NMR experiments and chemical shift statistics from the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank. Assuming a normal distribution with characteristic mean value and standard deviation for the chemical shift of each observable atom, an analytic expression was derived for the expected overlap probability of the cross peaks. The analytical approach was verified to agree with the average peak overlap in a large number of individual peak lists simulated using the same chemical shift statistics. The method was applied to eight proteins, including an intrinsically disordered one, for which the prediction results could be compared with the actual overlap based on the experimentally measured chemical shifts. The extent of overlap predicted using only statistical chemical shift information was in good agreement with the overlap that was observed when the measured shifts were used in the virtual spectrum, except for the intrinsically disordered protein. Since the spectral complexity of a protein NMR spectrum is a crucial factor for protein structure determination, analytical overlap prediction can be used to identify potentially difficult proteins before conducting NMR experiments. Overlap predictions can be tailored to particular classes of proteins by preparing statistics from corresponding protein databases. The method is also suitable for optimizing recording parameters and labeling schemes for NMR experiments and improving the reliability of automated spectra analysis and protein structure determination.

  13. Numerical prediction of micro-channel LD heat sink operated with antifreeze based on CFD method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Liu, Yang; Wang, Chao; Wang, Wentao; Wang, Gang; Tang, Xiaojun

    2014-12-01

    To theoretically study the feasibility of antifreeze coolants applied as cooling fluids for high power LD heat sink, detailed Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of liquid cooled micro-channels heat sinks is presented. The performance operated with antifreeze coolant (ethylene glycol aqueous solution) compared with pure water are numerical calculated for the heat sinks with the same micro-channels structures. The maximum thermal resistance, total pressure loss (flow resistance), thermal resistance vs. flow-rate, and pressure loss vs. flow-rate etc. characteristics are numerical calculated. The results indicate that the type and temperature of coolants plays an important role on the performance of heat sinks. The whole thermal resistance and pressure loss of heat sinks increase significantly with antifreeze coolants compared with pure water mainly due to its relatively lower thermal conductivity and higher fluid viscosity. The thermal resistance and pressure loss are functions of the flow rate and operation temperature. Increasing of the coolant flow rate can reduce the thermal resistance of heat sinks; meanwhile increase the pressure loss significantly. The thermal resistance tends to a limit with increasing flow rate, while the pressure loss tends to increase exponentially with increasing flow rate. Low operation temperature chiefly increases the pressure loss rather than thermal resistance due to the remarkable increasing of fluid viscosity. The actual working point of the cooling circulation system can be determined on the basis of the pressure drop vs. flow rate curve for the micro-channel heat sink and that for the circulation system. In the same system, if the type or/and temperature of the coolant is changed, the working point is accordingly influenced, that is, working flow rate and pressure is changed simultaneously, due to which the heat sink performance is influenced. According to the numerical simulation results, if ethylene glycol aqueous

  14. NMR-spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundin, A.G.; Fedin, Eh.I.

    1986-01-01

    Physical foundations are given and the most important areas of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) application in physics, chemistry, biology are described. A detailed review of the investigations conducted and the NMR applications in different science and technology fields is presented. The method basic experimental variants, including such new ones as high resolution in a solid body; rare isotope resonance; two-dimensional and multi-quantum fourier-spectroscopy; large molecule NMR; NMR tomography and NMR intrascopy etc. are considered. The instruments are briefly described. NMR is characterized as one of the most important investigation methods of the material composition, its molecular and crystal structure, visualization of the living organism and nonmetallic object inner structure

  15. NMR study of non-structural proteins-part III:1H,13C,15N backbone and side-chain resonance assignment of macro domain from Chikungunya virus (CHIKV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykouras, Michail V; Tsika, Aikaterini C; Lichière, Julie; Papageorgiou, Nicolas; Coutard, Bruno; Bentrop, Detlef; Spyroulias, Georgios A

    2018-04-01

    Macro domains are conserved protein domains found in eukaryotic organisms, bacteria, and archaea as well as in certain viruses. They consist of 130-190 amino acids and can bind ADP-ribose. Although the exact role of these domains is not fully understood, the conserved binding affinity for ADP-ribose indicates that this ligand is important for the function of the domain. Such a macro domain is also present in the non-structural protein 3 (nsP3) of Chikungunya Alphavirus (CHIKV) and consists of 160 amino acids. In this study we describe the high yield expression of the macro domain from CHIKV and its preliminary structural analysis via solution NMR spectroscopy. The macro domain seems to be folded in solution and an almost complete backbone assignment was achieved. In addition, the α/β/α sandwich topology with 4 α-helices and 6 β-strands was predicted by TALOS+.

  16. Nanomaterials for efficiently lowering the freezing point of anti-freeze coolants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Haiping; Zheng, Yingsong; Roy, Walter

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, we report, for the first time, the effect of the lowered freezing point in a 50% water/50% anti-freeze coolant (PAC) or 50% water/50% ethylene glycol (EG) solution by the addition of carbon nanotubes and other particles. The experimental results indicated that the nano materials are much more efficient (hundreds fold) in lowering the freezing point than the regular ionic materials (e.g., NaCl). The possible explanation for this interesting phenomenon is the colligative property of fluid and relative small size of nano material. It is quite certain that the carbon nanotubes and metal oxide nano particles could be a wonderful candidate for the nano coolant application because they could not only increase the thermal conductivity, but also efficiently lower the freezing point of traditional coolants.

  17. Inhibition of ice recrystallization and cryoprotective activity of wheat proteins in liver and pancreatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow-Shi-Yée, Mélanie; Briard, Jennie G; Grondin, Mélanie; Averill-Bates, Diana A; Ben, Robert N; Ouellet, François

    2016-05-01

    Efficient cryopreservation of cells at ultralow temperatures requires the use of substances that help maintain viability and metabolic functions post-thaw. We are developing new technology where plant proteins are used to substitute the commonly-used, but relatively toxic chemical dimethyl sulfoxide. Recombinant forms of four structurally diverse wheat proteins, TaIRI-2 (ice recrystallization inhibition), TaBAS1 (2-Cys peroxiredoxin), WCS120 (dehydrin), and TaENO (enolase) can efficiently cryopreserve hepatocytes and insulin-secreting INS832/13 cells. This study shows that TaIRI-2 and TaENO are internalized during the freeze-thaw process, while TaBAS1 and WCS120 remain at the extracellular level. Possible antifreeze activity of the four proteins was assessed. The "splat cooling" method for quantifying ice recrystallization inhibition activity (a property that characterizes antifreeze proteins) revealed that TaIRI-2 and TaENO are more potent than TaBAS1 and WCS120. Because of their ability to inhibit ice recrystallization, the wheat recombinant proteins TaIRI-2 and TaENO are promising candidates and could prove useful to improve cryopreservation protocols for hepatocytes and insulin-secreting cells, and possibly other cell types. TaENO does not have typical ice-binding domains, and the TargetFreeze tool did not predict an antifreeze capacity, suggesting the existence of nontypical antifreeze domains. The fact that TaBAS1 is an efficient cryoprotectant but does not show antifreeze activity indicates a different mechanism of action. The cryoprotective properties conferred by WCS120 depend on biochemical properties that remain to be determined. Overall, our results show that the proteins' efficiencies vary between cell types, and confirm that a combination of different protection mechanisms is needed to successfully cryopreserve mammalian cells. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  18. NMR data-driven structure determination using NMR-I-TASSER in the CASD-NMR experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Richard; Wang, Yan; Xue, Zhidong; Zhang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    NMR-I-TASSER, an adaption of the I-TASSER algorithm combining NMR data for protein structure determination, recently joined the second round of the CASD-NMR experiment. Unlike many molecular dynamics-based methods, NMR-I-TASSER takes a molecular replacement-like approach to the problem by first threading the target through the PDB to identify structural templates which are then used for iterative NOE assignments and fragment structure assembly refinements. The employment of multiple templates allows NMR-I-TASSER to sample different topologies while convergence to a single structure is not required. Retroactive and blind tests of the CASD-NMR targets from Rounds 1 and 2 demonstrate that even without using NOE peak lists I-TASSER can generate correct structure topology with 15 of 20 targets having a TM-score above 0.5. With the addition of NOE-based distance restraints, NMR-I-TASSER significantly improved the I-TASSER models with all models having the TM-score above 0.5. The average RMSD was reduced from 5.29 to 2.14 Å in Round 1 and 3.18 to 1.71 Å in Round 2. There is no obvious difference in the modeling results with using raw and refined peak lists, indicating robustness of the pipeline to the NOE assignment errors. Overall, despite the low-resolution modeling the current NMR-I-TASSER pipeline provides a coarse-grained structure folding approach complementary to traditional molecular dynamics simulations, which can produce fast near-native frameworks for atomic-level structural refinement

  19. NMR data-driven structure determination using NMR-I-TASSER in the CASD-NMR experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Richard; Wang, Yan; Xue, Zhidong; Zhang, Yang

    2015-08-01

    NMR-I-TASSER, an adaption of the I-TASSER algorithm combining NMR data for protein structure determination, recently joined the second round of the CASD-NMR experiment. Unlike many molecular dynamics-based methods, NMR-I-TASSER takes a molecular replacement-like approach to the problem by first threading the target through the PDB to identify structural templates which are then used for iterative NOE assignments and fragment structure assembly refinements. The employment of multiple templates allows NMR-I-TASSER to sample different topologies while convergence to a single structure is not required. Retroactive and blind tests of the CASD-NMR targets from Rounds 1 and 2 demonstrate that even without using NOE peak lists I-TASSER can generate correct structure topology with 15 of 20 targets having a TM-score above 0.5. With the addition of NOE-based distance restraints, NMR-I-TASSER significantly improved the I-TASSER models with all models having the TM-score above 0.5. The average RMSD was reduced from 5.29 to 2.14 Å in Round 1 and 3.18 to 1.71 Å in Round 2. There is no obvious difference in the modeling results with using raw and refined peak lists, indicating robustness of the pipeline to the NOE assignment errors. Overall, despite the low-resolution modeling the current NMR-I-TASSER pipeline provides a coarse-grained structure folding approach complementary to traditional molecular dynamics simulations, which can produce fast near-native frameworks for atomic-level structural refinement.

  20. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of human immunodeficiency virus gp41 protein that includes the fusion peptide: NMR detection of recombinant Fgp41 in inclusion bodies in whole bacterial cells and structural characterization of purified and membrane-associated Fgp41.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Erica P; Curtis-Fisk, Jaime; Young, Kaitlin M; Weliky, David P

    2011-11-22

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection of a host cell begins with fusion of the HIV and host cell membranes and is mediated by the gp41 protein, a single-pass integral membrane protein of HIV. The 175 N-terminal residues make up the ectodomain that lies outside the virus. This work describes the production and characterization of an ectodomain construct containing the 154 N-terminal gp41 residues, including the fusion peptide (FP) that binds to target cell membranes. The Fgp41 sequence was derived from one of the African clade A strains of HIV-1 that have been less studied than European/North American clade B strains. Fgp41 expression at a level of ~100 mg/L of culture was evidenced by an approach that included amino acid type (13)CO and (15)N labeling of recombinant protein and solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy of lyophilized whole cells. The approach did not require any protein solubilization or purification and may be a general approach for detection of recombinant protein. The purified Fgp41 yield was ~5 mg/L of culture. SSNMR spectra of membrane-associated Fgp41 showed high helicity for the residues C-terminal of the FP. This was consistent with a "six-helix bundle" (SHB) structure that is the final gp41 state during membrane fusion. This observation and negligible Fgp41-induced vesicle fusion supported a function for SHB gp41 of membrane stabilization and fusion arrest. SSNMR spectra of residues in the membrane-associated FP provided evidence of a mixture of molecular populations with either helical or β-sheet FP conformation. These and earlier SSNMR data strongly support the existence of these populations in the SHB state of membrane-associated gp41. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  1. Detecting seasonal variation of antifreeze protein distribution in Rhagium mordax using immunofluorescence and high resolution microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch, Johannes Lørup; Ramløv, Hans

    2017-01-01

    with UV reflected light microscopy. An automated software analysis method was developed in order to discard autofluorescence, and quantify fluorescence from bound antibodies. The results show that R. mordax cuticle and gut exhibit a higher degree of fluorophore-bound fluorescence during summer, than...

  2. Detection of the sulfhydryl groups in proteins with slow hydrogen exchange rates and determination of their proton/deuteron fractionation factors using the deuterium-induced effects on the 13C(beta) NMR signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Jee, JunGoo; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2010-05-05

    A method for identifying cysteine (Cys) residues with sulfhydryl (SH) groups exhibiting slow hydrogen exchange rates has been developed for proteins in aqueous media. The method utilizes the isotope shifts of the C(beta) chemical shifts induced by the deuteration of the SH groups. The 18.2 kDa E. coli peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase b (EPPIb), which was selectively labeled with [3-(13)C;3,3-(2)H(2)]Cys, showed much narrower line widths for the (13)C(beta) NMR signals, as compared to those of the proteins labeled with either [3-(13)C]Cys or (3R)-[3-(13)C;3-(2)H]Cys. The (13)C(beta) signals of the two Cys residues of EPPIb, i.e. Cys-31 and Cys-121, labeled with [3-(13)C;3,3-(2)H(2)]Cys, split into four signals in H(2)O/D(2)O (1:1) at 40 degrees C and pH 7.5, indicating that the exchange rates of the side-chain SH's and the backbone amides are too slow to average the chemical shift differences of the (13)C(beta) signals, due to the two- and three-bond isotope shifts. By virtue of the well-separated signals, the proton/deuteron fractional factors for both the SH and amide groups of the two Cys residues in EPPIb could be directly determined, as approximately 0.4-0.5 for [SD]/[SH] and 0.9-1.0 for [ND]/[NH], by the relative intensities of the NMR signals for the isotopomers. The proton NOE's of the two slowly exchanging SH's were clearly identified in the NOESY spectra and were useful for the determining the local structure of EPPIb around the Cys residues.

  3. Accurate measurements of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C distances in uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled proteins using multi-dimensional four-oscillating field solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straasø, Lasse Arnt; Nielsen, Jakob Toudahl; Bjerring, Morten; Nielsen, Niels Chr., E-mail: ncn@inano.au.dk [Center for Insoluble Protein Structures (inSPIN), Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO) and Department of Chemistry, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Khaneja, Navin [Division of Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2014-09-21

    Application of sets of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C internuclear distance restraints constitutes a typical key element in determining the structure of peptides and proteins by magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Accurate measurements of the structurally highly important {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C distances in uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled peptides and proteins, however, pose a big challenge due to the problem of dipolar truncation. Here, we present novel two-dimensional (2D) solid-state NMR experiments capable of extracting distances between carbonyl ({sup 13}C′) and aliphatic ({sup 13}C{sub aliphatic}) spins with high accuracy. The method is based on an improved version of the four-oscillating field (FOLD) technique [L. A. Straasø, M. Bjerring, N. Khaneja, and N. C. Nielsen, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 225103 (2009)] which circumvents the problem of dipolar truncation, thereby offering a base for accurate extraction of internuclear distances in many-spin systems. The ability to extract reliable accurate distances is demonstrated using one- and two-dimensional variants of the FOLD experiment on uniformly {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeled-L-isoleucine. In a more challenging biological application, FOLD 2D experiments are used to determine a large number of {sup 13}C′-{sup 13}C{sub aliphatic} distances in amyloid fibrils formed by the SNNFGAILSS fibrillating core of the human islet amyloid polypeptide with uniform {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeling on the FGAIL fragment.

  4. Nano-Mole Scale Side-Chain Signal Assignment by 1H-Detected Protein Solid-State NMR by Ultra-Fast Magic-Angle Spinning and Stereo-Array Isotope Labeling

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Songlin

    2015-04-09

    We present a general approach in 1H-detected 13C solid-state NMR (SSNMR) for side-chain signal assignments of 10-50 nmol quantities of proteins using a combination of a high magnetic field, ultra-fast magic-angle spinning (MAS) at ~80 kHz, and stereo-array-isotope-labeled (SAIL) proteins [Kainosho M. et al., Nature 440, 52–57, 2006]. First, we demonstrate that 1H indirect detection improves the sensitivity and resolution of 13C SSNMR of SAIL proteins for side-chain assignments in the ultra-fast MAS condition. 1H-detected SSNMR was performed for micro-crystalline ubiquitin (~55 nmol or ~0.5mg) that was SAIL-labeled at seven isoleucine (Ile) residues. Sensitivity was dramatically improved by 1H-detected 2D 1H/13C SSNMR by factors of 5.4-9.7 and 2.1-5.0, respectively, over 13C-detected 2D 1H/13C SSNMR and 1D 13C CPMAS, demonstrating that 2D 1H-detected SSNMR offers not only additional resolution but also sensitivity advantage over 1D 13C detection for the first time. High 1H resolution for the SAIL-labeled side-chain residues offered reasonable resolution even in the 2D data. A 1H-detected 3D 13C/13C/1H experiment on SAIL-ubiquitin provided nearly complete 1H and 13C assignments for seven Ile residues only within ~2.5 h. The results demonstrate the feasibility of side-chain signal assignment in this approach for as little as 10 nmol of a protein sample within ~3 days. The approach is likely applicable to a variety of proteins of biological interest without any requirements of highly efficient protein expression systems.

  5. Functional studies using NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCready, V.R.; Leach, M.O.; Sutton; Ell, P.

    1986-01-01

    The object of this book is to discuss and evaluate an area of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance which to date has been less emphasized than it might be, namely the use of NMR for functional studies. The book commences with a discussion of the areas in which the NMR techniques might be needed due to deficiencies in other techniques. The physics of NMR especially relating to functional measurement are then explained. Technical factors in producing functional images are discussed and the use of paramagnetic substances for carrying out flow studies are detailed. Particular attention is paid to specific studies in the various organs. The book ends with a survey of imaging in each organ and the relation of NMR images to other techniques such as ultrasound, nuclear medicine and X-rays

  6. Functional studies using NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCready, V.R.; Leach, M.; Ell, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    This volume is based on a series of lectures delivered at a one-day teaching symposium on functional and metabolic aspects of NMR measurements held at the Middlesex Hospital Medical School on 1st September 1985 as a part of the European Nuclear Medicine Society Congress. Currently the major emphasis in medical NMR in vivo is on its potential to image and display abnormalities in conventional radiological images, providing increased contrast between normal and abnormal tissue, improved definition of vasculature, and possibly an increased potential for differential diagnosis. Although these areas are undeniably of major importance, it is probable that NMR will continue to complement conventional measurement methods. The major potential benefits to be derived from in vivo NMR measurements are likely to arise from its use as an instrument for functional and metabolic studies in both clinical research and in the everyday management of patients. It is to this area that this volume is directed

  7. Combined 1H-Detected Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy and Electron Cryotomography to Study Membrane Proteins across Resolutions in Native Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baker, Lindsay A; Sinnige, Tessa; Schellenberger, Pascale; de Keyzer, Jeanine; Siebert, C Alistair; Driessen, Arnold J M; Baldus, Marc; Grünewald, Kay

    2018-01-01

    Membrane proteins remain challenging targets for structural biology, despite much effort, as their native environment is heterogeneous and complex. Most methods rely on detergents to extract membrane proteins from their native environment, but this removal can significantly alter the structure and

  8. NMR-based modelling and binding studies of a ternary complex between chicken liver bile acid binding protein and bile acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomasell, S.; Ragona, L.; Zetta, L.; Assfalg, M.; Ferranti, P.; Longhi, R.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.; Molinari, H.

    2007-01-01

    Chicken liver bile acid binding protein (cL-BABP) is involved in bile acid transport in the liver cytosol. A detailed study of the mechanism of binding and selectivity of bile acids binding proteins towards the physiological pool of bile salts is a key issue for the complete understanding of the

  9. UC Merced NMR Instrumentation Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-18

    UC Merced NMR Instrumentation Acquisition For the UC Merced NMR Instrumentation Acquisition proposal, a new 400 MHz and an upgraded 500 MHz NMR...valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. University of California - Merced 5200 North Lake Road Merced , CA 95343...UC Merced NMR Instrumentation Acquisition Report Title For the UC Merced NMR Instrumentation Acquisition proposal, a new 400 MHz and an upgraded 500

  10. Extension of the geometry algorithm for the calculation of the spatial structure of protein-peptide molecules from NMR spectroscopic results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiorov, V.N.; Arsen'ev, A.S.; Bystrov, V.F.

    1986-01-01

    A special supplement to the program of the distance geometry algorithm has been developed which, in the construction of the spatial structure of polypeptides, permits the taking into account of experimental NMR characteristics that are unambiguously connected with distance limitations - the spin-spin coupling constants of the H-NC/sup α/-H and H-C/sup α/C/sup β/-H protons and the rates of deuterium exchange of the amide NH groups of the main chain. In addition, the results of an analysis of spin-spin coupling constants are brought in for the empirical calculation of the intensities of the cross-peaks of the nuclear Overhauser effect in order to increase their informativeness for the distance geometry algorithm. A calculation performed by the extended program in the determination of the helical conformation of the Ala 13 -Cys 20 fragment of insectotoxin I 5 A of Buthus eupeus has shown the correctness of the proposed procedure for evaluating the distance limitations introduced

  11. Ancient climate change, antifreeze, and the evolutionary diversification of Antarctic fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Near, Thomas J; Dornburg, Alex; Kuhn, Kristen L; Eastman, Joseph T; Pennington, Jillian N; Patarnello, Tomaso; Zane, Lorenzo; Fernández, Daniel A; Jones, Christopher D

    2012-02-28

    The Southern Ocean around Antarctica is among the most rapidly warming regions on Earth, but has experienced episodic climate change during the past 40 million years. It remains unclear how ancient periods of climate change have shaped Antarctic biodiversity. The origin of antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs) in Antarctic notothenioid fishes has become a classic example of how the evolution of a key innovation in response to climate change can drive adaptive radiation. By using a time-calibrated molecular phylogeny of notothenioids and reconstructed paleoclimate, we demonstrate that the origin of AFGP occurred between 42 and 22 Ma, which includes a period of global cooling approximately 35 Ma. However, the most species-rich lineages diversified and evolved significant ecological differences at least 10 million years after the origin of AFGPs, during a second cooling event in the Late Miocene (11.6-5.3 Ma). This pattern indicates that AFGP was not the sole trigger of the notothenioid adaptive radiation. Instead, the bulk of the species richness and ecological diversity originated during the Late Miocene and into the Early Pliocene, a time coincident with the origin of polar conditions and increased ice activity in the Southern Ocean. Our results challenge the current understanding of the evolution of Antarctic notothenioids suggesting that the ecological opportunity that underlies this adaptive radiation is not linked to a single trait, but rather to a combination of freeze avoidance offered by AFGPs and subsequent exploitation of new habitats and open niches created by increased glacial and ice sheet activity.

  12. Robust high-yield methodologies for (2)H and (2)H/(15)N/(13)C labeling of proteins for structural investigations using neutron scattering and NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Anthony P; Wilde, Karyn L; Rekas, Agata; Lake, Vanessa; Holden, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a method that has proven highly reliable for the deuteration and triple labeling ((2)H/(15)N/(13)C) of a broad range of proteins by recombinant expression in Escherichia coli BL21. Typical biomass yields are 40-80g/L wet weight, yielding 50-500mg/L purified protein. This method uses a simple, relatively inexpensive defined medium, and routinely results in a high-yield expression without need for optimization. The key elements are very tight control of expression, careful starter culture adaptation steps, media composition, and strict maintenance of aerobic conditions ensuring exponential growth. Temperature is reduced as required to prevent biological oxygen demand exceeding maximum aeration capacity. Glycerol is the sole carbon source. We have not encountered an upper limit for the size of proteins that can be expressed, achieving excellent expression for proteins from 11 to 154kDa and the quantity produced at 1L scale ensures that no small-angle neutron scattering, nuclear magnetic resonance, or neutron crystallography experiment is limited by the amount of deuterated material. Where difficulties remain, these tend to be cases of altered protein solubility due to high protein concentration and a D2O-based environment. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Teaching NMR Using Online Textbooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P. Hornak

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy has almost become an essential analytical tool for the chemist. High-resolution one- and multi-dimensional NMR, timedomain NMR, and NMR microscopy are but a few of the NMR techniques at a chemist's disposal to determine chemical structure and dynamics. Consequently, even small chemistry departments are finding it necessary to provide students with NMR training and experience in at least some of these techniques. The hands-on experience is readily provided with access to state-of-the-art commercial spectrometers. Instruction in the principles of NMR is more difficult to achieve as most instructors try to teach NMR using single organic or analytical chemistry book chapters with static figures. This paper describes an online textbook on NMR spectroscopy called The Basics of NMR (http://www.cis.rit.edu/htbooks/nmr/ suitable for use in teaching the principles of NMR spectroscopy. The book utilizes hypertext and animations to present the principles of NMR spectroscopy. The book can be used as a textbook associated with a lecture or as a stand-alone teaching tool. Conference participants are encouraged to review the textbook and evaluate its suitability for us in teaching NMR spectroscopy to undergraduate chemistry majors.

  14. Dynamics in photosynthetic transient complexes studied by paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scanu, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    This PhD thesis focuses on fundamental aspects of protein-protein interactions. A multidisciplinary methodology for the detection and visualization of transient, lowly-populated encounter protein complexes is described. The new methodology combined paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy with computational

  15. Microprocessorized NMR measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rijllart, A.

    1984-01-01

    An MC68000 CAMAC microprocessor system for fast and accurate NMR signal measurement will be presented. A stand-alone CAMAC microprocessor system (MC68000 STAC) with a special purpose interface sweeps a digital frequency synthesizer and digitizes the NMR signal with a 16-bit ADC of 17 μs conversion time. It averages the NMR signal data over many sweeps and then transfers it through CAMAC to a computer for calculation of the signal parameters. The computer has full software control over the timing and sweep settings of this signal averager, and thus allows optimization of noise suppression. Several of these processor systems can be installed in the same crate for parallel processing, and the flexibility of the STAC also allows easy adaptation to other applications such as transient recording or phase-sensitive detection. (orig.)

  16. H-1, C-13, and N-15 NMR assignments of the hypothetical Nudix protein DR0079 from the extremely radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchko, Garry W.; Ni, Shuisong; Holbrook, Stephen R.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2003-02-05

    Letter to the Editor. Biological context Deinococcus radiodurans is a bacterium that is extremely resistant to the lethal and mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation, ultraviolet radiation, and other physical and chemical DNA-damaging agents (Battista, 1997). It has been suggested that this resistance is due to unusually efficient DNA repair mechanisms (Minton, 1994). Analysis of the complete genome sequence of D. radiodurans reveals a full suite of genes with potential DNA repair activities (White et al, 1999), essentially all of which have functional homologues in other procaryotes. These hypothetical DNA repair genes display a high amount of redundancy and include 21 genes that have sequence homology with the Nudix family of polyphosphate pyrophosphohydrolases (Bessman et al., 1996). Nudix proteins are identified by the consensus sequence GX5EX7REUXEEXGU (where U= I, L, or V and X= any amino acid) that forms part of the catalytic site for diphosphate hydrolysis (Bessman et al., 1996). Consequently, a nucleoside diphosphate linkage is a feature common in Nudix substrates that include NADH, nucleotide sugars, dinucleotide polyphosphates, and (deoxy)ribonucleoside triphosphates (NTPs). The general biochemical function of the Nudix family of proteins is believed to be sanitizing the cell (Bessman et al., 1996). For example, MutT preferably hydrolyzes the promutagenic NTP 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanosine triphosphate to nucleotide monophosphate and inorganic phosphate. Despite the identification of over 450 putative Nudix proteins in genomes on the basis of the Nudix consensus sequence (Gabelli et al., 2001), few Nudix protein structures have been determined (Holbrook et al., 2002). To better understand the relevance, function, and mechanism of the Nudix family of proteins, and to better understand the roles played by the hypothetical D. radiodurans Nudix proteins in radiation-resistance, we have crystallized the hypothetical D.

  17. Synergic Investigation Of The Self-Assembly Structure And Mechanism Of Retroviral Capsid Proteins By Solid State NMR, Transmission Electron Microscopy And Multiscale simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-29

    manifestation of structural rearrangements, are likely a consequence of the localized large change of torsion angles of the loops between helices, interdomain...structures of native HIV-1 capsid protein reveal conformational variability, Science, 349 (2015) 99-103. [32] T.R. Gamble , S.H. Yoo, F.F. Vajdos, U.K

  18. Structural Studies of Biological Solids Using NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2011-03-01

    High-resolution structure and dynamics of biological molecules are important in understanding their function. While studies have been successful in solving the structures of water-soluble biomolecules, it has been proven difficult to determine the structures of membrane proteins and fibril systems. Recent studies have shown that solid-state NMR is a promising technique and could be highly valuable in studying such non-crystalline and non-soluble biosystems. I will present strategies to study the structures of such challenging systems and also about the applications of solid-state NMR to study the modes of membrane-peptide interactions for a better assessment of the prospects of antimicrobial peptides as substitutes to antibiotics in the control of human disease. Our studies on the mechanism of membrane disruption by LL-37 (a human antimicrobial peptide), analogs of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide magainin2 extracted from the skin of the African frog Xenopus Laevis, and pardaxin will be presented. Solid-state NMR experiments were used to determine the secondary structure, dynamics and topology of these peptides in lipid bilayers. Similarities and difference in the cell-lysing mechanism, and their dependence on the membrane composition, of these peptides will be discussed. Atomic-level resolution NMR structures of amyloidogenic proteins revealing the misfolding pathway and early intermediates that play key roles in amyloid toxicity will also be presented.

  19. Long-range effects of tag sequence on marginally stabilized structure in HIV-1 p24 capsid protein monitored using NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Honoka; Kaneko, Chie; Hirahara, Miyuki; Watanabe, Satoru; Tochio, Naoya; Kigawa, Takanori; Nishimura, Chiaki

    2014-09-01

    N-terminal domain of HIV-1 p24 capsid protein is a globular fold composed of seven helices and two β-strands with a flexible structure including the α4-5 loop and both N- and C-terminal ends. However, the protein shows a high tendency (48%) for an intrinsically disordered structure based on the PONDR VL-XT prediction from the primary sequence. To assess the possibility of marginally stabilized structure under physiological conditions, the N-terminal domain of p24 was destabilized by the addition of an artificial flexible tag to either N- or C-terminal ends, and it was analyzed using T1, T2, hetero-nuclear NOE, and amide-proton exchange experiments. When the C-terminal tag (12 residues) was attached, the regions of the α3-4 loop and helix 6 as well as the α4-5 loop attained the flexible structures. Furthermore, in the protein containing the N-terminal tag (27 residues), helix 4 in addition to the above-mentioned area including α3-4 and α4-5 loops as well as helix 6 exhibited highly disordered structures. Thus, the long-range effects of the existence of tag sequence was observed in the stepwise manner of the appearance of disordered structures (step 1: α4-5 loop, step 2: α3-4 loop and helix 6, and step 3: helix 4). Furthermore, the disordered regions in tagged proteins were consistent with the PONDR VL-XT disordered prediction. The dynamic structure located in the middle part (α3-4 loop to helix 6) of the protein shown in this study may be related to the assembly of the viral particle. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Relaxation-compensated difference spin diffusion NMR for detecting 13C–13C long-range correlations in proteins and polysaccharides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Tuo; Williams, Jonathan K.; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Hong, Mei

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of long-range distances remains a challenge in solid-state NMR structure determination of biological macromolecules. In 2D and 3D correlation spectra of uniformly 13 C-labeled biomolecules, inter-residue, inter-segmental, and intermolecular 13 C– 13 C cross peaks that provide important long-range distance constraints for three-dimensional structures often overlap with short-range cross peaks that only reflect the covalent structure of the molecule. It is therefore desirable to develop new approaches to obtain spectra containing only long-range cross peaks. Here we show that a relaxation-compensated modification of the commonly used 2D 1 H-driven spin diffusion (PDSD) experiment allows the clean detection of such long-range cross peaks. By adding a z-filter to keep the total z-period of the experiment constant, we compensate for 13 C T 1 relaxation. As a result, the difference spectrum between a long- and a scaled short-mixing time spectrum show only long-range correlation signals. We show that one- and two-bond cross peaks equalize within a few tens of milliseconds. Within ∼200 ms, the intensity equilibrates within an amino acid residue and a monosaccharide to a value that reflects the number of spins in the local network. With T 1 relaxation compensation, at longer mixing times, inter-residue and inter-segmental cross peaks increase in intensity whereas intra-segmental cross-peak intensities remain unchanged relative to each other and can all be subtracted out. Without relaxation compensation, the difference 2D spectra exhibit both negative and positive intensities due to heterogeneous T 1 relaxation in most biomolecules, which can cause peak cancellation. We demonstrate this relaxation-compensated difference PDSD approach on amino acids, monosaccharides, a crystalline model peptide, a membrane-bound peptide and a plant cell wall sample. The resulting difference spectra yield clean multi-bond, inter-residue and intermolecular correlation peaks

  1. Optimized fast mixing device for real-time NMR applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Rémi; Favier, Adrien; Schanda, Paul; Brutscher, Bernhard

    2017-08-01

    We present an improved fast mixing device based on the rapid mixing of two solutions inside the NMR probe, as originally proposed by Hore and coworkers (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 125 (2003) 12484-12492). Such a device is important for off-equilibrium studies of molecular kinetics by multidimensional real-time NMR spectrsocopy. The novelty of this device is that it allows removing the injector from the NMR detection volume after mixing, and thus provides good magnetic field homogeneity independently of the initial sample volume placed in the NMR probe. The apparatus is simple to build, inexpensive, and can be used without any hardware modification on any type of liquid-state NMR spectrometer. We demonstrate the performance of our fast mixing device in terms of improved magnetic field homogeneity, and show an application to the study of protein folding and the structural characterization of transiently populated folding intermediates.

  2. Comparing pharmacophore models derived from crystallography and NMR ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanakota, Phani; Carlson, Heather A.

    2017-11-01

    NMR and X-ray crystallography are the two most widely used methods for determining protein structures. Our previous study examining NMR versus X-Ray sources of protein conformations showed improved performance with NMR structures when used in our Multiple Protein Structures (MPS) method for receptor-based pharmacophores (Damm, Carlson, J Am Chem Soc 129:8225-8235, 2007). However, that work was based on a single test case, HIV-1 protease, because of the rich data available for that system. New data for more systems are available now, which calls for further examination of the effect of different sources of protein conformations. The MPS technique was applied to Growth factor receptor bound protein 2 (Grb2), Src SH2 homology domain (Src-SH2), FK506-binding protein 1A (FKBP12), and Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ). Pharmacophore models from both crystal and NMR ensembles were able to discriminate between high-affinity, low-affinity, and decoy molecules. As we found in our original study, NMR models showed optimal performance when all elements were used. The crystal models had more pharmacophore elements compared to their NMR counterparts. The crystal-based models exhibited optimum performance only when pharmacophore elements were dropped. This supports our assertion that the higher flexibility in NMR ensembles helps focus the models on the most essential interactions with the protein. Our studies suggest that the "extra" pharmacophore elements seen at the periphery in X-ray models arise as a result of decreased protein flexibility and make very little contribution to model performance.

  3. International symposium on NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication consists of 32 papers and presentations from the field of NMR spectroscopy applications submitted to the International Symposium on NMR Spectroscopy held at Smolenice between 29 Sep and 3 Oct, 1980. (B.S.)

  4. The solubilisation of boar sperm membranes by different detergents - a microscopic, MALDI-TOF MS, 31P NMR and PAGE study on membrane lysis, extraction efficiency, lipid and protein composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Karin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detergents are often used to isolate proteins, lipids as well as "detergent-resistant membrane domains" (DRMs from cells. Different detergents affect different membrane structures according to their physico-chemical properties. However, the effects of different detergents on membrane lysis of boar spermatozoa and the lipid composition of DRMs prepared from the affected sperm membranes have not been investigated so far. Results Spermatozoa were treated with the selected detergents Pluronic F-127, sodium cholate, CHAPS, Tween 20, Triton X-100 and Brij 96V. Different patterns of membrane disintegration were observed by light and electron microscopy. In accordance with microscopic data, different amounts of lipids and proteins were released from the cells by the different detergents. The biochemical methods to assay the phosphorus and cholesterol contents as well as 31P NMR to determine the phospholipids were not influenced by the presence of detergents since comparable amounts of lipids were detected in the organic extracts from whole cell suspensions after exposure to each detergent. However, matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry applied to identify phospholipids was essentially disturbed by the presence of detergents which exerted particular suppression effects on signal intensities. After separation of the membrane fractions released by detergents on a sucrose gradient only Triton X-100 and sodium cholate produced sharp turbid DRM bands. Only membrane solubilisation by Triton X-100 leads to an enrichment of cholesterol, sphingomyelin, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylethanolamine in a visible DRM band accompanied by a selective accumulation of proteins. Conclusion The boar sperm membranes are solubilised to a different extent by the used detergents. Particularly, the very unique DRMs isolated after Triton X-100 exposure are interesting candidates for further studies regarding the

  5. NMR studies of Borrelia burgdorferi OspA, a 28 kDa protein containing a single-layer {beta}-sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Thuy-Nga; Koide, Shohei

    1998-05-15

    The crystal structure of outer surface protein A (OspA) from Borrelia burgdorferi contains a single-layer {beta}-sheet connecting the N- and C-terminal globular domains. The central {beta}-sheet consists largely of polar amino acids and it is solvent-exposed on both faces, which so far appears to be unique among known protein structures. We have accomplished nearly complete backbone H, C and N and C{sup ;}/H{sup {beta}} assignments of OspA (28 kDa) using standard triple resonance techniques without perdeuteration. This was made possible by recording spectra at a high temperature (45 {sup o}C ). The chemical shift index and {sup 15}N T{sub 1}/T{sub 2} ratios show that both the secondary structure and the global conformation of OspA in solution are similar to the crystal structure, suggesting that the unique central {beta}-sheet is fairly rigid.

  6. Proton NMR measurements of bacteriophage T4 lysozyme aided by 15N isotopic labeling: structural and dynamic studies of larger proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntosh, L.P.; Griffey, R.H.; Muchmore, D.C.; Nielson, C.P.; Redfield, A.G.; Dahlquist, F.W.

    1987-01-01

    A strategy for resolution and assignment of single proton resonances in proteins of molecular mass up to at least 40 kDa is presented. This approach is based on 15 N (or 13 C) labeling of selected residues in a protein. The resonances from protons directly bonded to labeled atoms are detected in a two-dimensional 1H- 15 N (or 13 C) spectrum. The nuclear Overhauser effects from isotopically tagged protons are selectively observed in one-dimensional isotope-directed measurements. Using this approach, we have observed approximately 160 resonances from 15 N-bonded protons in the backbone and sidechains of uniformly 15 N-labeled T4 lysozyme (molecular mass = 18.7 kDa). Partial proton-deuterium exchange can be used to simplify the 1H- 15 N spectrum of this protein. These resonances are identified by amino acid class using selective incorporation of 15 N-labeled amino acids and are assigned to specific residues by mutational substitution, multiple 15 N and 13 C labeling, and isotope-directed nuclear Overhauser effect measurements. For example, using a phenyl[ 15 N]alanine-labeled lysozyme variant containing two consecutive phenylalanine residues in an alpha-helical region, we observe an isotope-directed nuclear Overhauser effect from the amide proton of Phe-66 to that of Phe-67

  7. Autonomous driving in NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The automatic analysis of NMR data has been a much-desired endeavour for the last six decades, as it is the case with any other analytical technique. This need for automation has only grown as advances in hardware; pulse sequences and automation have opened new research areas to NMR and increased the throughput of data. Full automatic analysis is a worthy, albeit hard, challenge, but in a world of artificial intelligence, instant communication and big data, it seems that this particular fight is happening with only one technique at a time (let this be NMR, MS, IR, UV or any other), when the reality of most laboratories is that there are several types of analytical instrumentation present. Data aggregation, verification and elucidation by using complementary techniques (e.g. MS and NMR) is a desirable outcome to pursue, although a time-consuming one if performed manually; hence, the use of automation to perform the heavy lifting for users is required to make the approach attractive for scientists. Many of the decisions and workflows that could be implemented under automation will depend on the two-way communication with databases that understand analytical data, because it is desirable not only to query these databases but also to grow them in as much of an automatic manner as possible. How these databases are designed, set up and the data inside classified will determine what workflows can be implemented. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. NMR, water and plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    As, van H.

    1982-01-01

    This Thesis describes the application of a non-destructive pulsed proton NMR method mainly to measure water transport in the xylem vessels of plant stems and in some model systems. The results are equally well applicable to liquid flow in other biological objects than plants, e.g. flow of blood and

  9. Single-sided NMR

    CERN Document Server

    Casanova, Federico; Blümich, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Single-Sided NMR describes the design of the first functioning single-sided tomograph, the related measurement methods, and a number of applications. One of the key advantages to this method is the speed at which the images are obtained.

  10. Characterization of type IV antifreeze gene in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and influence of cold and hot weather on its expression and some immune-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, Asmma Y; El Nahas, Abeer F; Mahmoud, Shawky; Barakat, Mohamed E; Hassan, Asmaa M

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this work is to study the effect of the thermal stress of ambient temperature during winter and summer on the expression of type IV antifreeze gene (ANF IV) in different tissues of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) as well as some immune-related genes. At first, genomic ANF IV gene was characterized from one fish; 124 amino acids were identified with 92.7% similarity with that on the gene bank. Expression of ANF IV and immune-related genes were done twice, once at the end of December (winter sample, temperature 14 °C) and the other at August (summer sample, temperature 36 °C). Assessment of ANF IV gene expression in different organs of fish was done; splenic mRNA was used for assessment of immune-related gene transcripts (CXCl2 chemokine, cc-chemokine, INF-3A, and MHC IIβ). Winter expression analysis of AFP IV in O. niloticus revealed significant upregulation of mRNA transcript levels in the intestine, gills, skin, spleen, liver, and brain with 324.03-, 170.06-, 107.63-, 97.61-, 94.35-, and 27.85-folds, respectively. Furthermore, upregulation in the gene was observed in some organs during summer: in the liver, gills, skin, intestine, and brain with lower levels compared with winter. The level of expression of immune-related genes in winter is significantly higher than summer in all assessed genes. Cc-chemokine gene expression was the most affected in both winter and summer. Variable expression profile of ANF IV in different organs and in different seasons together with its amino acid similarity of N-terminal and C-terminal with apolipoprotein (lipid binder) and form of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) suggests a different role for this protein which may be related to lipid metabolism.

  11. NMR for chemists and biologists

    CERN Document Server

    Carbajo, Rodrigo J

    2013-01-01

    This book offers a concise introduction to the field of nuclear magnetic resonance or NMR. It presents the basic foundations of NMR in a non-mathematical way and provides an overview of both recent and important biological applications of NMR.

  12. Ice growth in supercooled solutions of a biological "antifreeze", AFGP 1-5: an explanation in terms of adsorption rate for the concentration dependence of the freezing point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, C A; DeVries, A L

    2009-07-21

    It is widely accepted, and we agree, that the lowering of the temperature at which ice can grow in a water solution of one of the biological antifreezes is a result of adsorption of the antifreeze molecules at the ice surface. However, how this can produce a well-defined "freezing point" that varies with the solution concentration has remained problematical. The results of a series of measurements of ice growing in supercooled solutions of an effective antifreeze are reported and interpreted in terms of this fundamental problem. It seemed that the solution of the problem would have to rely upon adsorption rate, because that appeared to be the only way for the concentration in solution to be so important. The crystal growth results are most unusual, and appear to confirm this. The growth rates over a wide range of antifreeze concentration in solution (about 0.05 to 9 mg ml(-1)) are zero from the thermodynamic freezing point down to the "non-equilibrium" freezing point, where there is a very sudden increase to a plateau value that then remains about constant as the supercooling is increased by about 2 degrees C. The plateau values of growth rate are faster than those from pure water at the lower-supercooling ends of the plateaus, but slower at higher supercooling, until the growth rate starts rising toward that from pure water. These plateau values of growth rate increase markedly with increasing concentration of the antifreeze in solution. Along with these changes there are complex changes in the growth orientations, from c-axis spicules in the plateaus to those more characteristic of growth from pure water at greater supercooling. We conclude that the non-equilibrium freezing point is determined by the adsorption rate. It is the warmest temperature at which the ice growth rate on the basal plane (where the antifreeze does not adsorb) is fast enough to prevent the area of basal face on a growing ice crystal from becoming too small to grow, which is determined in

  13. Thermal hysteresis proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, J

    2001-02-01

    Extreme environments present a wealth of biochemical adaptations. Thermal hysteresis proteins (THPs) have been found in vertebrates, invertebrates, plants, bacteria and fungi and are able to depress the freezing point of water (in the presence of ice crystals) in a non-colligative manner by binding to the surface of nascent ice crystals. The THPs comprise a disparate group of proteins with a variety of tertiary structures and often no common sequence similarities or structural motifs. Different THPs bind to different faces of the ice crystal, and no single mechanism has been proposed to account for THP ice binding affinity and specificity. Experimentally THPs have been used in the cryopreservation of tissues and cells and to induce cold tolerance in freeze susceptible organisms. THPs represent a remarkable example of parallel and convergent evolution with different proteins being adapted for an anti-freeze role.

  14. Effects of anti-freeze concentration in the engine coolant on the cavitation temperature of a water pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David Huang, K.; Tzeng, S.-C.; Ma Weiping

    2004-01-01

    Improvements in engine-manufacturing technology have gradually increased the thermal efficiencies of engines as well as the burning temperature and pressure of fuels within the cylinders. Accordingly, greater heat dissipation are required. However, the volume of the radiators is constrained by the configuration of the engines, leading to excessive internal resistance in the engine-cooling system. Therefore, water pumps in engines are prone to cavitation, and air bubbles are likely to permeate into the anti-freeze, thereby severely reducing the performance, reliability and service life of the engines. Ethylene glycol (EG) is added to the radiator of some vehicles in cold areas to reduce the solidification point of the coolant and prevent freezing. This study probes the effects of the percentage of anti-freeze added to the cooling water in a water pump in an engine on the water-supply capability and cavitation temperature, whether air or burnt gas is present in the system. The results of this study have revealed that engines have a higher tolerance to air bubbles at lower rates of rotation. At a given fixed rotational speed, the tolerable cavitation temperature of an engine's water pump will fall slowly as the amount of air bubbles increases

  15. The structure of mouse cytomegalovirus m04 protein obtained from sparse NMR data reveals a conserved fold of the m02-m06 viral immune modulator family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgourakis, Nikolaos G; Natarajan, Kannan; Ying, Jinfa; Vogeli, Beat; Boyd, Lisa F; Margulies, David H; Bax, Ad

    2014-09-02

    Immunoevasins are key proteins used by viruses to subvert host immune responses. Determining their high-resolution structures is key to understanding virus-host interactions toward the design of vaccines and other antiviral therapies. Mouse cytomegalovirus encodes a unique set of immunoevasins, the m02-m06 family, that modulates major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) antigen presentation to CD8+ T cells and natural killer cells. Notwithstanding the large number of genetic and functional studies, the structural biology of immunoevasins remains incompletely understood, largely because of crystallization bottlenecks. Here we implement a technology using sparse nuclear magnetic resonance data and integrative Rosetta modeling to determine the structure of the m04/gp34 immunoevasin extracellular domain. The structure reveals a β fold that is representative of the m02-m06 family of viral proteins, several of which are known to bind MHC-I molecules and interfere with antigen presentation, suggesting its role as a diversified immune regulation module. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. NMR imaging of the cardiovascular system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canby, R.C.; Evanochko, W.T.; Pohost, G.M.

    1986-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging permits high-resolution tomographic and three-dimensional images of the human body to be obtained without exposure to ionizing radiation. Such imaging not only yields anatomic resolution comparable to X-ray examinations but also provides a potential means to discriminate between healthy tissue and diseased tissue. This potential is based on certain NMR properties known as relaxation times, which determine, in part, the signal intensity in an image. These properties are related to such factors as the sizes and concentrations of proteins and mobile lipids and the compartmentalization of the protons of water. Although NMR imaging (also called magnetic resonance imaging, MRI) is becoming widely available for clinical use, application to the cardiovascular system, though promising, remains primarily a research tool. Gated proton NMR imaging can generate cardiac images with excellent morphologic detail and contrast; however, its ultimate importance as a cardiovascular diagnostic modality will depend on the development of several unique applications. These applications are discussed in this paper

  17. NMR, water and plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As, H. van.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis describes the application of a non-destructive pulsed proton NMR method mainly to measure water transport in the xylem vessels of plant stems and in some model systems. The results are equally well applicable to liquid flow in other biological objects than plants, e.g. flow of blood and other body fluids in human and animals. The method is based on a pulse sequence of equidistant π pulses in combination with a linear magnetic field gradient. (Auth.)

  18. NMR studies on DNA binding specificity of the lac repressor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopke Salinas, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    The thesis describes NMR structures of two protein-DNA complexes. The first structure shows how the protein, the DNA binding domain of lac repressor, recognizes its natural DNA binding site, by adaptation and read out of the nucleotide sequence. The second one shows how the DNA binding specificity

  19. NMR spectroscopic study and DFT calculations of GIAO NMR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1H, proton coupled and decoupled 13C, DEPT, HETCOR NMR spectra, the magnitude of one bond 1JCH coupling constants and 13C NMR spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of 1,9-diaminononane (danon, C9H22N2) have been reported for the first time. 1H, 13C NMR chemical shifts and 1JCH coupling constants of danon ...

  20. NMR imaging of the spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, J.S. (Case Western Reserve Univ. School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH); Kaufman, B.; El Yousef, S.J.; Benson, J.E.; Bonstelle, C.T.; Alfidi, R.J.; Haaga, J.R.; Yeung, H.; Huss, R.G.

    1983-12-01

    The usefulness of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images in the evaluation of spinal disorders below the craniocervical junction was studied. Six normal subjects and 41 patients with various spinal abnormalities were examined. NMR proved capable of demonstrating important normal and pathologic anatomic structures; it was useful in the evaluation of syringohydromyelia and cystic spinal cord tumors, and the bright signal intensity of lipoma was quite impressive. In the evaluation of herniated disk, NMR images offered a new perspective by visualizing abnormal degradation of the signal intensity of the nucleus pulposus itself. NMR images were least valuable in the evaluation of spondylosis and spinal stenosis. Although NMR imaging of the spine is still in a very early developmental stage, the absence of both ionizing radiation and risks associated with contrast material makes it especially attractive as a new diagnostic method. This limited experience with currently available equipment suggests that, with technical refinement, the efficacy of NMR of the spine will increase.

  1. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy of the HIV gp41 membrane fusion protein supports intermolecular antiparallel β sheet fusion peptide structure in the final six-helix bundle state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackett, Kelly; Nethercott, Matthew J; Zheng, Zhaoxiong; Weliky, David P

    2014-03-06

    The HIV gp41 protein catalyzes fusion between viral and target cell membranes. Although the ~20-residue N-terminal fusion peptide (FP) region is critical for fusion, the structure of this region is not well characterized in large gp41 constructs that model the gp41 state at different times during fusion. This paper describes solid-state NMR (SSNMR) studies of FP structure in a membrane-associated construct (FP-Hairpin), which likely models the final fusion state thought to be thermostable trimers with six-helix bundle structure in the region C-terminal of the FP. The SSNMR data show that there are populations of FP-Hairpin with either α helical or β sheet FP conformation. For the β sheet population, measurements of intermolecular (13)C-(13)C proximities in the FP are consistent with a significant fraction of intermolecular antiparallel β sheet FP structure with adjacent strand crossing near L7 and F8. There appears to be negligible in-register parallel structure. These findings support assembly of membrane-associated gp41 trimers through interleaving of N-terminal FPs from different trimers. Similar SSNMR data are obtained for FP-Hairpin and a construct containing the 70 N-terminal residues of gp41 (N70), which is a model for part of the putative pre-hairpin intermediate state of gp41. FP assembly may therefore occur at an early fusion stage. On a more fundamental level, similar SSNMR data are obtained for FP-Hairpin and a construct containing the 34 N-terminal gp41 residues (FP34) and support the hypothesis that the FP is an autonomous folding domain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular Characterization, Structural Modeling, and Evaluation of Antimicrobial Activity of Basrai Thaumatin-Like Protein against Fungal Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasmin, Nusrat; Saleem, Mahjabeen; Naz, Mamoona; Gul, Roquyya; Rehman, Hafiz Muzzammel

    2017-01-01

    A thaumatin-like protein gene from Basrai banana was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli . Amplified gene product was cloned into pTZ57R/T vector and subcloned into expression vector pET22b(+) and resulting pET22b-basrai TLP construct was introduced into E. coli BL21. Maximum protein expression was obtained at 0.7 mM IPTG concentration after 6 hours at 37°C. Western blot analysis showed the presence of approximately 20 kDa protein in induced cells. Basrai antifungal TLP was tried as pharmacological agent against fungal disease. Independently Basrai antifungal protein and amphotericin B exhibited their antifungal activity against A. fumigatus ; however combined effect of both agents maximized activity against the pathogen. Docking studies were performed to evaluate the antimicrobial potential of TLP against A. fumigatus by probing binding pattern of antifungal protein with plasma membrane ergosterol of targeted fungal strain. Ice crystallization primarily damages frozen food items; however addition of antifreeze proteins limits the growth of ice crystal in frozen foods. The potential of Basrai TLP protein, as an antifreezing agent, in controlling the ice crystal formation in frozen yogurt was also studied. The scope of this study ranges from cost effective production of pharmaceutics to antifreezing and food preserving agent as well as other real life applications.

  3. Molecular Characterization, Structural Modeling, and Evaluation of Antimicrobial Activity of Basrai Thaumatin-Like Protein against Fungal Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nusrat Yasmin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A thaumatin-like protein gene from Basrai banana was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Amplified gene product was cloned into pTZ57R/T vector and subcloned into expression vector pET22b(+ and resulting pET22b-basrai TLP construct was introduced into E. coli BL21. Maximum protein expression was obtained at 0.7 mM IPTG concentration after 6 hours at 37°C. Western blot analysis showed the presence of approximately 20 kDa protein in induced cells. Basrai antifungal TLP was tried as pharmacological agent against fungal disease. Independently Basrai antifungal protein and amphotericin B exhibited their antifungal activity against A. fumigatus; however combined effect of both agents maximized activity against the pathogen. Docking studies were performed to evaluate the antimicrobial potential of TLP against A. fumigatus by probing binding pattern of antifungal protein with plasma membrane ergosterol of targeted fungal strain. Ice crystallization primarily damages frozen food items; however addition of antifreeze proteins limits the growth of ice crystal in frozen foods. The potential of Basrai TLP protein, as an antifreezing agent, in controlling the ice crystal formation in frozen yogurt was also studied. The scope of this study ranges from cost effective production of pharmaceutics to antifreezing and food preserving agent as well as other real life applications.

  4. Applications of saturation transfer difference NMR in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhunia, Anirban; Bhattacharjya, Surajit; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu

    2012-05-01

    The method of saturation transfer difference (STD) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is an indispensable NMR tool in drug discovery. It identifies binding epitope(s) at the atomic resolution of small molecule ligands (e.g. organic drugs, peptides and oligosaccharides), while interacting with their receptors, such as proteins and/or nucleic acids. The method is widely used to screen active drug molecules, simultaneously ranking them in a qualitative way. STD NMR is highly successful for a variety of high molecular weight systems, such as whole viruses, platelets, intact cells, lipopolysaccharide micelles, membrane proteins, recombinant proteins and dispersion pigments. Modifications of STD pulse programs using (13)C and (15)N nuclei are now used to overcome the signal overlapping that occurs with more complex structures. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Processing DOSY NMR Data by Chemometric Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huo, R.

    2006-01-01

    DOSY NMR can be used as a non-invasive separation method for complex mixtures. It is more and more attractive for industrial laboratories, for the main advantage DOSY NMR over routine separation methods such as LC-NMR is easy and economical implementation. With NMR instruments, DOSY NMR data can be

  6. Isolation and characterisation of sericin antifreeze peptides and molecular dynamics modelling of their ice-binding interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinhong; Rong, Yuzhi; Wang, Zhengwu; Zhou, Yanfu; Wang, Shaoyun; Zhao, Bo

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to isolate and characterise a novel sericin antifreeze peptide and investigate its ice-binding molecular mechanism. The thermal hysteresis activity of ice-binding sericin peptides (I-SP) was measured and their activity reached as high as 0.94 °C. A P4 fraction, with high hypothermia protective activity and inhibition activity of ice recrystallisation, was obtained from I-SP, and a purified sericin peptide, named SM-AFP, with the sequence of TTSPTNVSTT and a molecular weight of 1009.50 Da was then isolated from the P4 fraction. Treatment of Lactobacillus delbrueckii Subsp. bulgaricus LB340 LYO with 100 μg/ml synthetic SM-AFP led to 1.4-fold increased survival (p Sericin peptides could be developed into beneficial cryoprotectants and used in frozen food processing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. nmr spectroscopic study and dft calculations of giao nmr shieldings

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    NMR is a sensitive and versatile probe of molecular-scale structure and dynamics in solids and liquids. It has been widely used in chemistry, materials and geochemistry [21-23] and it enables one to get faster and easier structural information. The standard 1D and 2D hetero and homonuclear NMR experiments are enough ...

  8. Resolving the paradox for protein aggregation diseases: NMR structure and dynamics of the membrane-embedded P56S-MSP causing ALS imply a common mechanism for aggregation-prone proteins to attack membranes [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3zl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haina Qin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Paradoxically, aggregation of specific proteins is characteristic of many human diseases and aging, yet aggregates have increasingly been found to be unnecessary for initiating pathogenesis. Here we determined the NMR topology and dynamics of a helical mutant in a membrane environment transformed from the 125-residue cytosolic all-β MSP domain of vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein B (VAPB by the ALS-causing P56S mutation. Despite its low hydrophobicity, the P56S major sperm protein (MSP domain becomes largely embedded in the membrane environment with high backbone rigidity. Furthermore it is composed of five helices with amphiphilicity comparable to those of the partly-soluble membrane toxin mellitin and α-synuclein causing Parkinson's disease. Consequently, the mechanism underlying this chameleon transformation becomes clear: by disrupting the specific tertiary interaction network stabilizing the native all-β MSP fold to release previously-locked amphiphilic segments, the P56S mutation acts to convert the classic MSP fold into a membrane-active protein that is fundamentally indistinguishable from mellitin and α-synuclein which are disordered in aqueous solution but spontaneously partition into membrane interfaces driven by hydrogen-bond energetics gained from forming α-helix in the membrane environments. As segments with high amphiphilicity exist in all proteins, our study successfully resolves the paradox by deciphering that the proteins with a higher tendency to aggregate have a stronger potential to partition into membranes through the same mechanism as α-synuclein to initially attack membranes to trigger pathogenesis without needing aggregates. This might represent the common first step for various kinds of aggregated proteins to trigger familiar, sporadic and aging diseases. Therefore the homeostasis of aggregated proteins in vivo is the central factor responsible for a variety of human diseases including aging

  9. THz Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanni, Emilio A; Barnes, Alexander B; Griffin, Robert G; Temkin, Richard J

    2011-08-29

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) increases the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy by using high frequency microwaves to transfer the polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. The enhancement in NMR sensitivity can amount to a factor of well above 100, enabling faster data acquisition and greatly improved NMR measurements. With the increasing magnetic fields (up to 23 T) used in NMR research, the required frequency for DNP falls into the THz band (140-600 GHz). Gyrotrons have been developed to meet the demanding specifications for DNP NMR, including power levels of tens of watts; frequency stability of a few megahertz; and power stability of 1% over runs that last for several days to weeks. Continuous gyrotron frequency tuning of over 1 GHz has also been demonstrated. The complete DNP NMR system must include a low loss transmission line; an optimized antenna; and a holder for efficient coupling of the THz radiation to the sample. This paper describes the DNP NMR process and illustrates the THz systems needed for this demanding spectroscopic application. THz DNP NMR is a rapidly developing, exciting area of THz science and technology.

  10. NMR imaging studies of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Z.R.; Zhang, P.Z.; Ding, G.L.; Li, L.Y.; Ye, C.H. [University of Science and Technology, Beijing (China). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-06-01

    The permeation transportation and swelling behavior of solvents into coal are investigated by NMR imaging using pyridine-d{sub 5} and acetone-d{sub 6}. Images of coal swollen with deuterated solvents illuminate proton distributions of mobile phases within the coal macromolecular networks. More information about the chemical and physical structure of coal can be obtained using NMR imaging techniques.

  11. NMR imaging of osteoarticular pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frocrain, L.; Duvauferrier, R.; Gagey, N. and others

    1987-01-01

    NMR imaging is assuming an increasingly important role in the diagnosis of osteo-articular disorders. Semiological descriptions of the mean pathological disorders of the locomotor system are presented. Some investigation strategies are proposed to compare NMR imaging with other imaging techniques in various pathological states.

  12. NMR in pulsed magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, Edy

    2011-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments in pulsed magnetic fields up to 30.4 T focused on 1H and 93Nb nuclei are reported. Here we discuss the advantage and limitation of pulsed field NMR and why this technique is able to become a promising research tool. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Quantum Information Processing by NMR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. NMR; quantum information processing; quantum computing; qubits; pseudopure states; quantum; pseudopure states; quantum gates; quantum simulations; decoherence. ... T S Mahesh1. Department of Physics and NMR Research Center, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Pune 411 008, India ...

  14. Resistive NMR of intracranial hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Grossman, R.I.; Levine, R.S.; Lynch, R.; Goldberg, H.I.; Samuel, L.; Edelstein, W.; Bottomley, P.; Redington, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    Comparison between computed tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in 17 patients with intracranial hematomas indicate a distinct role for NMR in evaluating the stable patient with hematoma. NMR is useful for delineating the extent of the hematoma, the relationship of the hematoma to brain anatomy, and the presence of hematoma at a time when the hematoma is isodense on CT.

  15. Structural Biology: Practical NMR Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Teng, Quincy

    2005-01-01

    This textbook begins with an overview of NMR development and applications in biological systems. It describes recent developments in instrument hardware and methodology. Chapters highlight the scope and limitation of NMR methods. While detailed math and quantum mechanics dealing with NMR theory have been addressed in several well-known NMR volumes, chapter two of this volume illustrates the fundamental principles and concepts of NMR spectroscopy in a more descriptive manner. Topics such as instrument setup, data acquisition, and data processing using a variety of offline software are discussed. Chapters further discuss several routine stategies for preparing samples, especially for macromolecules and complexes. The target market for such a volume includes researchers in the field of biochemistry, chemistry, structural biology and biophysics.

  16. Ligand screening by saturation-transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, V V

    2005-04-26

    NMR based methods to screen for high-affinity ligands have become an indispensable tool for designing rationalized drugs, as these offer a combination of good experimental design of the screening process and data interpretation methods, which together provide unprecedented information on the complex nature of protein-ligand interactions. These methods rely on measuring direct changes in the spectral parameters, that are often simpler than the complex experimental procedures used to study structure and dynamics of proteins. The goal of this review article is to provide the basic details of NMR based ligand-screening methods, with particular focus on the saturation transfer difference (STD) experiment. In addition, we provide an overview of other NMR experimental methods and a practical guide on how to go about designing and implementing them.

  17. Multinuclear NMR studies of hemoproteins and their model compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.C.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in both solution and solid state has been used to study the active site structure of various hemoproteins, and the nature of the iron-oxygen bond in oxyhemoglobin. The first iron-57 NMR spectra of a metalloprotein, carbonmonoxymyoglobin, has been obtained, yielding the isotropic chemical shift, the anisotropy of the chemical shielding tensor and the rotational correlation time of the protein. The oxygen-17 NMR signals from CO ligands bound to oxygen-transport hemoproteins are much narrower than expected, and the lineshape is non-Lorentzian. The results indicate that the unusual linewidths and lineshapes originate from the multiexponential nature of quadrupolar relaxation outside of the extreme narrowing limit, permitting determinations of the oxygen-17 nuclear quadrupole coupling constants and the rotational correlation time of the proteins

  18. Annual reports on NMR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Graham A; McCarthy, M J

    1995-01-01

    Over recent years, no other technique has grown to such importance as that of NMR spectroscopy. It is used in all branches of science where precise structural determination is required and where the nature of interactions and reactions in solution is being studied. Annual Reports on NMR Spectroscopy has established itself as a means for the specialist and non-specialist alike to become familiar with new applications of the technique in all branches of chemistry, including biochemistry, and pharmaceutics. This volume focuses on theoretical aspects of NMR nuclear shielding and on applications of

  19. Functional Analysis of the Nitrogen Metabolite Repression Regulator Gene nmrA in Aspergillus flavus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyun Han

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In Aspergillus nidulans, the nitrogen metabolite repression regulator NmrA plays a major role in regulating the activity of the GATA transcription factor AreA during nitrogen metabolism. However, the function of nmrA in Aspergillus flavus has notbeen previously studied. Here, we report the identification and functional analysis of nmrA in A. flavus. Our work showed that the amino acid sequences of NmrA are highly conserved among Aspergillus species and that A. flavus NmrA protein contains a canonical Rossmann fold motif. Deletion of nmrA slowed the growth of A. flavus but significantly increased conidiation and sclerotia production. Moreover, seed infection experiments indicated that nmrA is required for the invasive virulence of A. flavus. In addition, the ΔnmrA mutant showed increased sensitivity to rapamycin and methyl methanesulfonate, suggesting that nmrA could be responsive to target of rapamycin signaling and DNA damage. Furthermore, quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis suggested that nmrA might interact with other nitrogen regulatory and catabolic genes. Our study provides a better understanding of nitrogen metabolite repression and the nitrogen metabolism network in fungi.

  20. Structural, vibrational, NMR, quantum chemical, DNA binding and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Structural, vibrational, NMR, quantum chemical, DNA binding and protein docking studies of two flexible imine oximes. YUNUS KAYAa,b. aDepartment of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Uludag University, 16059 Bursa, Turkey. bDepartment of Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Architecture, and Engineering, ...

  1. NMR Studies of Polymer Nanocomposites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greenbaum, Steve

    2001-01-01

    .... The primary tool is pulsed field gradient NMR. A static field gradient method was developed which makes possible variable pressure diffusion measurement, and the application to the important fuel cell membrane NAFION constitute the first results...

  2. β-NMR sample optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Zakoucka, Eva

    2013-01-01

    During my summer student programme I was working on sample optimization for a new β-NMR project at the ISOLDE facility. The β-NMR technique is well-established in solid-state physics and just recently it is being introduced for applications in biochemistry and life sciences. The β-NMR collaboration will be applying for beam time to the INTC committee in September for three nuclei: Cu, Zn and Mg. Sample optimization for Mg was already performed last year during the summer student programme. Therefore sample optimization for Cu and Zn had to be completed as well for the project proposal. My part in the project was to perform thorough literature research on techniques studying Cu and Zn complexes in native conditions, search for relevant binding candidates for Cu and Zn applicable for ß-NMR and eventually evaluate selected binding candidates using UV-VIS spectrometry.

  3. Interpretations of NMR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, J.Z.; McFarland, W.D.; Chen, S.S.; Sadhu, V.K.

    1986-01-01

    Two color display schemes are generally considered in medical images: pseudo-color and color composite. Psuedo-color technique maps the intensity means of a single monochrome image into a three dimensional color space, the gray level is thus replaced by the assigned color. Such a psuedo-color assignment is somewhat arbitrary but may be advantageous if the monochrome image is composed of simple intensity patterns. A good example of psuedo-color application is in nuclear medicine: The change of gray levels can be simply determined and the isocounts from two regions with different surroundings can be readily recognized. However, the use of psuedo-color in CT or MR imaging is controversial because it does not give additional information and may exaggerate insignificant gray scale differences. The color composite technique maps three parametric image data into a three dimensional color space, and thus three monochrome images are merged to form a single color image. The color composite technique increases the number of ways information can be displayed and provides both quantitative and qualitative data about the object or event represented. This paper describes the application of color composite in NMR images

  4. Aqueous geochemistry in icy world interiors: Equilibrium fluid, rock, and gas compositions, and fate of antifreezes and radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveu, Marc; Desch, Steven J.; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.

    2017-09-01

    The geophysical evolution of many icy moons and dwarf planets seems to have provided opportunities for interaction between liquid water and rock (silicate and organic solids). Here, we explore two ways by which water-rock interaction can feed back on geophysical evolution: the production or consumption of antifreeze compounds, which affect the persistence and abundance of cold liquid; and the potential leaching into the fluid of lithophile radionuclides, affecting the distribution of a long-term heat source. We compile, validate, and use a numerical model, implemented with the PHREEQC code, of the interaction of chondritic rock with pure water and with C, N, S-bearing cometary fluid, thought to be the materials initially accreted by icy worlds, and describe the resulting equilibrium fluid and rock assemblages at temperatures, pressures, and water-to-rock ratios of 0-200 ° C, 1-1000 bar, and 0.1-10 by mass, respectively. Our findings suggest that water-rock interaction can strongly alter the nature and amount of antifreezes, resulting in solutions rich in reduced nitrogen and carbon, and sometimes dissolved H2, with additional sodium, calcium, chlorine, and/or oxidized carbon. Such fluids can remain partially liquid down to 176 K if NH3 is present. The prominence of Cl in solution seems to hinge on its primordial supply in ices, which is unconstrained by the meteoritical record. Equilibrium assemblages, rich in serpentine and saponite clays, retain thorium and uranium radionuclides unless U-Cl or U-HCO3 complexing, which was not modeled, significantly enhances U solubility. However, the radionuclide 40 K can be leached at high water:rock ratio and/or low temperature at which K is exchanged with ammonium in minerals. We recommend the inclusion of these effects in future models of the geophysical evolution of ocean-bearing icy worlds. Our simulation products match observations of chloride salts on Europa and Enceladus; CI chondrites mineralogies; the observation of

  5. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping 129 Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the 131 Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen

  6. Vivaldi: Visualization and validation of biomacromolecular NMR structures from the PDB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickx, Pieter M S; Gutmanas, Aleksandras; Kleywegt, Gerard J

    2013-01-01

    We describe Vivaldi (VIsualization and VALidation DIsplay; http://pdbe.org/vivaldi), a web-based service for the analysis, visualization, and validation of NMR structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Vivaldi provides access to model coordinates and several types of experimental NMR data using interactive visualization tools, augmented with structural annotations and model-validation information. The service presents information about the modeled NMR ensemble, validation of experimental chemical shifts, residual dipolar couplings, distance and dihedral angle constraints, as well as validation scores based on empirical knowledge and databases. Vivaldi was designed for both expert NMR spectroscopists and casual non-expert users who wish to obtain a better grasp of the information content and quality of NMR structures in the public archive. © Proteins 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23180575

  7. NMR imaging in theory and in practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.G.; Inamdar, R.; Bushell, M.-C.

    1988-01-01

    This review, completed in 1988, covers basic theory, NMR imaging (selective excitation, image acquisition and reconstruction, spatial localisation of NMR parameters, factors affecting accuracy of NMR parameters, image quality considerations), and NMR imaging in clinical practice. The authors conclude that current NMR technology enables one to image the human body with a clarity matching x-ray CT, in terms of contrast differentiation in soft tissues being superior. (U.K.)

  8. Relationship of amino acid composition and molecular weight of antifreeze glycopeptides to non-colligative freezing point depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrag, J D; O'Grady, S M; DeVries, A L

    1982-08-06

    Many polar fishes synthesize a group of eight glycopeptides that exhibit a non-colligative lowering of the freezing point of water. These glycopeptides range in molecular weight between 2600 and 33 700. The largest glycopeptides [1-5] lower the freezing point more than the small ones on a weight basis and contain only two amino acids, alanine and threonine, with the disaccharide galactose-N-acetyl-galactosamine attached to threonine. The small glycopeptides, 6, 7, and 8, also lower the freezing point and contain proline, which periodically substitutes for alanine. Glycopeptides with similar antifreeze properties isolated from the saffron cod and the Atlantic tomcod contain an additional amino acid, arginine, which substitutes for threonine in glycopeptide 6. In this study we address the question of whether differences in amino acid composition or molecular weight between large and small glycopeptides are responsible for the reduced freezing point depressing capability of the low molecular weight glycopeptides. The results indicate that the degree of amino acid substitutions that occur in glycopeptides 6-8 do not have a significant effect on the unusual freezing point lowering and that the observed decrease in freezing point depression with smaller glycopeptides can be accounted for on the basis of molecular weight.