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Sample records for antifreeze protein nmr

  1. Protein-water dynamics in antifreeze protein III activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yao; Bäumer, Alexander; Meister, Konrad; Bischak, Connor G.; DeVries, Arthur L.; Leitner, David M.; Havenith, Martina

    2016-03-01

    We combine Terahertz absorption spectroscopy (THz) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism for the antifreeze activity of one class of antifreeze protein, antifreeze protein type III (AFP-III) with a focus on the collective water hydrogen bond dynamics near the protein. After summarizing our previous work on AFPs, we present a new investigation of the effects of cosolutes on protein antifreeze activity by adding sodium citrate to the protein solution of AFP-III. Our results reveal that for AFP-III, unlike some other AFPs, the addition of the osmolyte sodium citrate does not affect the hydrogen bond dynamics at the protein surface significantly, as indicated by concentration dependent THz measurements. The present data, in combination with our previous THz measurements and molecular simulations, confirm that while long-range solvent perturbation is a necessary condition for the antifreeze activity of AFP-III, the local binding affinity determines the size of the hysteresis.

  2. Plant Antifreeze Proteins and Their Expression Regulatory Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Yuan-zhen; Lin Shan-zhi; Zhang Zhi-yi; Zhang Wei; Liu Wen-feng

    2005-01-01

    Low temperature is one of the major limiting environmental factors which constitutes the growth, development,productivity and distribution of plants. Over the past several years, the proteins and genes associated with freezing resistance of plants have been widely studied. The recent progress of domestic and foreign research on plant antifreeze proteins and the identification and characterization of plant antifreeze protein genes, especially on expression regulatory mechanism of plant antifreeze proteins are reviewed in this paper. Finally, some unsolved problems and the trend of research in physiological functions and gene expression regulatory mechanism of plant antifreeze proteins are discussed.

  3. Coarse grained simulation reveals antifreeze properties of hyperactive antifreeze protein from Antarctic bacterium Colwellia sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung; Van, Thanh Dac; Le, Ly

    2015-10-01

    The novel hyperactive antifreeze protein (AFP) of Antarctic sea ice bacterium Colwellia sp. provides a target for studying the protection of psychrophilic microgoranisms against freezing environment. Interestingly, the Colwellia sp. hyperactive antifreeze protein (ColAFP) was crystallized without the structural dynamic characteristics. Here, the result indicated, through coarse grained simulation of ColAFP under various subfreezing temperature, that ColAFP remains active at temperature of equal and greater than 275 K (∼2 °C). Extensive simulation analyses also revealed the adaptive mechanism of ColAFP in subfreezing environment. Our result provides a structural dynamic understanding of the ColAFP.

  4. Antifreeze activity enhancement by site directed mutagenesis on an antifreeze protein from the beetle Rhagium mordax

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Dennis Steven; Kristiansen, Erlend; von Solms, Nicolas;

    2014-01-01

    The ice binding motifs of insect antifreeze proteins (AFPs) mainly consist of repetitive TxT motifs aligned on a flat face of the protein. However, these motifs often contain non-threonines that disrupt the TxT pattern. We substituted two such disruptive amino acids located in the ice binding face...... of an AFP from Rhagium mordax with threonine. Furthermore, a mutant with an extra ice facing TxT motif was constructed. These mutants showed enhanced antifreeze activity compared to the wild type at low concentrations. However, extrapolating the data indicates that the wild type will become the most...

  5. Antifreeze proteins enable plants to survive in freezing conditions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ravi Gupta; Renu Deswal

    2014-12-01

    Overwintering plants secrete antifreeze proteins (AFPs) to provide freezing tolerance. These proteins bind to and inhibit the growth of ice crystals that are formed in the apoplast during subzero temperatures. Antifreeze activity has been detected in more than 60 plants and AFPs have been purified from 15 of these, including gymnosperms, dicots and monocots. Biochemical characterization of plant antifreeze activity, as determined by the high ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) activities and low thermal hysteresis (TH) of AFPs, showed that their main function is inhibition of ice crystal growth rather than the lowering of freezing temperatures. However, recent studies showed that antifreeze activity with higher TH also exists in plants. Calcium and hormones like ethylene and jasmonic acid have been shown to regulate plant antifreeze activity. Recent studies have shown that plant AFPs bind to both prism planes and basal planes of ice crystals by means of two flat ice binding sites. Plant AFPs have been postulated to evolve from the OsLRR-PSR gene nearly 36 million years ago. In this review, we present the current scenario of plant AFP research in order to understand the possible potential of plant AFPs in generation of freezing-tolerant crops.

  6. Expression of a Carrot Antifreeze Protein Gene in Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Xinyu; Shen Xin; Lu Cunfu

    2003-01-01

    The recombinant expression vectorpET43. lb-AFP, which contains full encoding region of a carrot 36 kD antifreeze protein (AFP) gene was constructed. The recombinant was transformed into expression host carrying T7 RNA polymerase gene (DE3 lysogen) and induced by 1 mmol. L-1 IPTG (isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside) to express 110 kD polypeptide of AFP fusion protein.The analysis of product solubility revealed that pET43. 1b-AFP was predominately soluble, and the expressed amount reached the maximum after the IPTG treatment for 3 h.

  7. Dynamical mechanism of antifreeze proteins to prevent ice growth

    CERN Document Server

    Kutschan, B; Thoms, S

    2014-01-01

    The fascinating ability of algae, insects and fishes to survive at temperatures below normal freezing is realized by antifreeze proteins (AFPs). Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are surface-active molecules and interact with the diffusive water/ice interface preventing a complete solidification. A new dynamical mechanism is proposed how these proteins inhibit the freezing of water. We apply a Ginzburg-Landau type approach to describe the phase separation in the two-component system (ice, AFP). The free energy density involves two fields: one for the ice phase with low AFP concentration, and one for the liquid water with high AFP concentration. The time evolution of the ice reveals microstructures as a result of phase separation in the presence of AFPs. We observe a faster clustering of pre-ice structure connected with a locking of grain size by the action of AFP which is an essentially dynamical process. The adsorption of additional water molecules are inhibited and the further growth of ice grains are stopped. The...

  8. Computational simulations on the fish-type-Ⅱ antifreeze protein-ice-solvent system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Kai; WANG Yan; TAN Hongwei; CHEN Guangju; TONG Zhenhe

    2007-01-01

    Based on the computational simulation with the vacuum environment for the fish-type-Ⅱ antifreeze proteinice-solvent (water)system,the multi-complex system of the antifreeze protein-ice-water has been constructed and calculated.We have studied the interaction of such proteinice system with water solvent through the dynamics simulation with 350 ps.By employing the Molecular Dynamics simulation and semi-empirical method calculation,we have further investigated the interface properties of the antifreeze protein and ice crystal combined system.Consequently,a water solvent affects significantly the properties of this combined system.

  9. Effects of polyhydroxy compounds on beetle antifreeze protein activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amornwittawat, Natapol; Wang, Sen; Banatlao, Joseph; Chung, Melody; Velasco, Efrain; Duman, John G.; Wen, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) noncolligatively depress the nonequilibrium freezing point of a solution and produce a difference between the melting and freezing points termed thermal hysteresis (TH). Some low-molecular-mass solutes can affect the TH values. The TH enhancement effects of selected polyhydroxy compounds including polyols and carbohydrates on an AFP from the beetle Dendroides canadensis were systematically investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The number of hydroxyl groups dominates the molar enhancement effectiveness of polyhydroxy compounds having one to five hydroxyl groups. However, the above rule does not apply for polyhydroxy compounds having more than five hydroxyl groups. The most efficient polyhydroxy enhancer identified is trehalose. In a combination of enhancers the strongest enhancer plays the major role in determining the TH enhancement. Mechanistic insights into identification of highly efficient AFP enhancers are discussed. PMID:19038370

  10. Towards a green hydrate inhibitor: imaging antifreeze proteins on clathrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimond Gordienko

    Full Text Available The formation of hydrate plugs in oil and gas pipelines is a serious industrial problem and recently there has been an increased interest in the use of alternative hydrate inhibitors as substitutes for thermodynamic inhibitors like methanol. We show here that antifreeze proteins (AFPs possess the ability to modify structure II (sII tetrahydrofuran (THF hydrate crystal morphologies by adhering to the hydrate surface and inhibiting growth in a similar fashion to the kinetic inhibitor poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP. The effects of AFPs on the formation and growth rate of high-pressure sII gas mix hydrate demonstrated that AFPs are superior hydrate inhibitors compared to PVP. These results indicate that AFPs may be suitable for the study of new inhibitor systems and represent an important step towards the development of biologically-based hydrate inhibitors.

  11. Comparison of backbone dynamics of the type III antifreeze protein and antifreeze-like domain of human sialic acid synthase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are found in a variety of cold-adapted (psychrophilic) organisms to promote survival at subzero temperatures by binding to ice crystals and decreasing the freezing temperature of body fluids. The type III AFPs are small globular proteins that consist of one α-helix, three 310-helices, and two β-strands. Sialic acids play important roles in a variety of biological functions, such as development, recognition, and cell adhesion and are synthesized by conserved enzymatic pathways that include sialic acid synthase (SAS). SAS consists of an N-terminal catalytic domain and a C-terminal antifreeze-like (AFL) domain, which is similar to the type III AFPs. Despite having very similar structures, AFL and the type III AFPs exhibit very different temperature-dependent stability and activity. In this study, we have performed backbone dynamics analyses of a type III AFP (HPLC12 isoform) and the AFL domain of human SAS (hAFL) at various temperatures. We also characterized the structural/dynamic properties of the ice-binding surfaces by analyzing the temperature gradient of the amide proton chemical shift and its correlation with chemical shift deviation from random coil. The dynamic properties of the two proteins were very different from each other. While HPLC12 was mostly rigid with a few residues exhibiting slow motions, hAFL showed fast internal motions at low temperature. Our results provide insight into the molecular basis of thermostability and structural flexibility in homologous psychrophilic HPLC12 and mesophilic hAFL proteins

  12. Comparison of backbone dynamics of the type III antifreeze protein and antifreeze-like domain of human sialic acid synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong-Geun [Gyeongsang National University, Department of Chemistry and Research Institute of Natural Science (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chin-Ju [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Division of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Department of Chemistry (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee-Eun; Seo, Yeo-Jin; Lee, Ae-Ree; Choi, Seo-Ree; Lee, Shim Sung; Lee, Joon-Hwa, E-mail: joonhwa@gnu.ac.kr [Gyeongsang National University, Department of Chemistry and Research Institute of Natural Science (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are found in a variety of cold-adapted (psychrophilic) organisms to promote survival at subzero temperatures by binding to ice crystals and decreasing the freezing temperature of body fluids. The type III AFPs are small globular proteins that consist of one α-helix, three 3{sub 10}-helices, and two β-strands. Sialic acids play important roles in a variety of biological functions, such as development, recognition, and cell adhesion and are synthesized by conserved enzymatic pathways that include sialic acid synthase (SAS). SAS consists of an N-terminal catalytic domain and a C-terminal antifreeze-like (AFL) domain, which is similar to the type III AFPs. Despite having very similar structures, AFL and the type III AFPs exhibit very different temperature-dependent stability and activity. In this study, we have performed backbone dynamics analyses of a type III AFP (HPLC12 isoform) and the AFL domain of human SAS (hAFL) at various temperatures. We also characterized the structural/dynamic properties of the ice-binding surfaces by analyzing the temperature gradient of the amide proton chemical shift and its correlation with chemical shift deviation from random coil. The dynamic properties of the two proteins were very different from each other. While HPLC12 was mostly rigid with a few residues exhibiting slow motions, hAFL showed fast internal motions at low temperature. Our results provide insight into the molecular basis of thermostability and structural flexibility in homologous psychrophilic HPLC12 and mesophilic hAFL proteins.

  13. A study of the growth rates and growth habits of ice crystals in a solution of antifreeze (glyco) proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qianzhong; Luo, Liaofu

    1996-12-01

    The mechanism of the antifreeze glycoprotein/antifreeze protein interaction on the surface of ice is analyzed. The theory of ice crystal growth in an AF(G)P solution is presented. A quantitative calculation of the growth rates for gain growth has been obtained. The anisotropic growth habits and growth rates of ice crystals in an AF(G)P solution are explained.

  14. Research Progress on Insect Antifreeze Proteins%昆虫抗冻蛋白研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万军; 朱兴友; 张洋

    2012-01-01

    近年来昆虫抗冻蛋白(AFPs)的研究取得了较快的发展。本文综述了昆虫抗冻蛋白的发现过程、结构特点、表达规律、抗冻机制及相关的昆虫基因工程简况。%In recent years, the research of insect antifreeze proteins has developed rapidly. The discovery process, structural characteristics, expression laws and antifreeze mechanism of insect antifreeze proteins, as well as the related insect gene engineering research were reviewed in this paper.

  15. Interaction of Tenebrio Molitor Antifreeze Protein with Ice Crystal: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramya, L; Ramakrishnan, Vigneshwar

    2016-07-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFP) observed in cold-adapting organisms bind to ice crystals and prevent further ice growth. However, the molecular mechanism of AFP-ice binding and AFP-inhibited ice growth remains unclear. Here we report the interaction of the insect antifreeze protein (Tenebrio molitor, TmAFP) with ice crystal by molecular dynamics simulation studies. Two sets of simulations were carried out at 263 K by placing the protein near the primary prism plane (PP) and basal plane (BL) of the ice crystal. To delineate the effect of temperatures, both the PP and BL simulations were carried out at 253 K as well. The analyses revealed that the protein interacts strongly with the ice crystal in BL simulation than in PP simulation both at 263 K and 253 K. Further, it was observed that the interactions are primarily mediated through the interface waters. We also observed that as the temperature decreases, the interaction between the protein and the ice increases which can be attributed to the decreased flexibility and the increased structuring of the protein at low temperature. In essence, our study has shed light on the interaction mechanism between the TmAFP antifreeze protein and the ice crystal. PMID:27492241

  16. Inhibition of Gas Hydrate Nucleation and Growth: Efficacy of an Antifreeze Protein from the Longhorn BeetleRhagium mordax

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perfeldt, Christine Malmos; Chua, Pei Cheng; Daraboina, Nagu;

    2014-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are characterized by their ability to protect organisms from subfreezing temperatures by preventing tiny ice crystals in solution from growing as the solution is cooled below its freezing temperature. This inhibition of ice growth is called antifreeze activity, and in...... particular, certain insect AFPs show very high antifreeze activity. Recent studies have shown AFPs to be promising candidates as green and environmentally benign inhibitors for gas hydrate formation. Here we show that an insect antifreeze protein from the longhorn beetle, Rhagium mordax (RmAFP1), the most...... potent protein yet found for freezing inhibition, can inhibit methane hydrates as effectively as the synthetic polymeric inhibitor polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). In high pressure rocking cell experiments, onset hydrate nucleation temperatures and growth profiles showed repeatable results. RmAFP1 clearly...

  17. The response of watercress (nasturtium officinale) to vacuum impregnation: Effect of an antifreeze protein type I

    OpenAIRE

    Rui M.S. Cruz; Vieira, Margarida C.; Silva, Cristina L. M.

    2009-01-01

    The setting up of methodologies that reduce the size of ice crystals and reduce or inhibit the recrystallisation phenomena could have an extraordinary significance in the final quality of frozen products and consequently bring out new market opportunities. In this work, the effect of an antifreeze protein type I (AFP-I), by vacuum impregnation (VI), on frozen watercress was studied. The VI pressure, samples’ weight, Hunter Lab colour, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and a wilting test ...

  18. Antifreeze proteins govern the precipitation of trehalose in a freezing-avoiding insect at low temperature

    OpenAIRE

    WEN, Xin; Wang, Sen; Duman, John G.; Arifin, Josh Fnu; Juwita, Vonny; Goddard, William A.; Rios, Alejandra; Liu, Fan; Kim, Soo-Kyung; Abrol, Ravinder; DeVries, Arthur L.; Henling, Lawrence M.

    2016-01-01

    The remarkable adaptive strategies of insects to extreme environments are linked to the biochemical compounds in their body fluids. Trehalose, a versatile sugar molecule, can accumulate to high levels in freeze-tolerant and freeze-avoiding insects, functioning as a cryoprotectant and a supercooling agent. Antifreeze proteins (AFPs), known to protect organisms from freezing by lowering the freezing temperature and deferring the growth of ice, are present at high levels in some freeze-avoiding ...

  19. Why Does Insect Antifreeze Protein from Tenebrio molitor Produce Pyramidal Ice Crystallites?

    OpenAIRE

    Strom, Christina S.; Liu, Xiang Yang; Jia, Zongchao

    2005-01-01

    The antifreeze protein (AFP) reduces the growth rates of the ice crystal facets. In that process the ice morphology undergoes a modification. An AFP-induced surface pinning mechanism, through matching of periodic bond chains in two dimensions, enables two-dimensional regular ice-binding surfaces (IBSs) of the insect AFPs to engage a certain class of ice surfaces, called primary surfaces. They are kinetically stable surfaces with unambiguous and predetermined orientations. In this work, the or...

  20. Structural characteristics of a novel antifreeze protein from the longhorn beetle Rhagium inquisitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, E; Ramløv, Hans; Højrup, Peter;

    2011-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are characterized by their capacity to inhibit the growth of ice and are produced by a variety of polar fish, terrestrial arthropods and other organisms inhabiting cold environments. This capacity reflects their role as stabilizers of supercooled body fluids. The longhorn...... beetle Rhagium inquisitor is known to express AFPs in its body fluids. In this work we report on the primary structure and structural characteristics of a 12.8 kDa AFP from this beetle (RiAFP). It has a high capacity to evoke antifreeze activity as compared to other known insect AFPs and it is...... structurally unique in several aspects. In contrast to the high content of disulfide bond-formation observed in other coleopteran AFPs, RiAFP contains only a single such bond. Six internal repeat segments of a thirteen residue repeat pattern is irregularly spaced apart throughout its sequence. The central part...

  1. Unusual dynamic properties of water near the ice-binding plane of hyperactive antifreeze protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamical properties of solvation water of hyperactive antifreeze protein from Choristoneura fumiferana (CfAFP) are analyzed and discussed in context of its antifreeze activity. The protein comprises of three well-defined planes and one of them binds to the surface of ice. The dynamical properties of solvation water around each of these planes were analyzed separately; the results are compared with the dynamical properties of solvation water of ice around its two crystallographic planes: basal and prism. Three main conclusions are inferred from our investigations. The first one is that the solvation shell of CfAFP does not seem to be particularly far-ranged, at least not beyond what is usually observed for proteins that do not interact with ice. Therefore, it does not appear to us that the antifreeze activity is enhanced by a long-ranged retardation of water mobility. Also the correlation between the collective mobility of water and the collective mobility of protein atoms highly resembles the one measured for the protein that does not interact with ice. Our second conclusion is that the dynamical properties of solvation water of CfAFP are non-uniform. The dynamics of solvation water of ice-binding plane is, in some respects, different from the dynamics of solvation water of the two remaining planes. The feature that distinguishes the dynamics of solvation water of the three planes is the activation energy of diffusion process. The third conclusion is that—from the three analyzed solvation shells of CfAFP—the dynamical properties of solvation water of the ice-binding plane resemble the most the properties of solvation water of ice; note, however, that these properties still clearly differ from the dynamic properties of solvation water of ice

  2. Unusual dynamic properties of water near the ice-binding plane of hyperactive antifreeze protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuffel, Anna; Czapiewski, Dariusz; Zielkiewicz, Jan, E-mail: jaz@chem.pg.gda.pl [Department of Chemistry, Gdansk University of Technology, Narutowicza 11/12, 80–233 Gdansk (Poland)

    2015-10-07

    The dynamical properties of solvation water of hyperactive antifreeze protein from Choristoneura fumiferana (CfAFP) are analyzed and discussed in context of its antifreeze activity. The protein comprises of three well-defined planes and one of them binds to the surface of ice. The dynamical properties of solvation water around each of these planes were analyzed separately; the results are compared with the dynamical properties of solvation water of ice around its two crystallographic planes: basal and prism. Three main conclusions are inferred from our investigations. The first one is that the solvation shell of CfAFP does not seem to be particularly far-ranged, at least not beyond what is usually observed for proteins that do not interact with ice. Therefore, it does not appear to us that the antifreeze activity is enhanced by a long-ranged retardation of water mobility. Also the correlation between the collective mobility of water and the collective mobility of protein atoms highly resembles the one measured for the protein that does not interact with ice. Our second conclusion is that the dynamical properties of solvation water of CfAFP are non-uniform. The dynamics of solvation water of ice-binding plane is, in some respects, different from the dynamics of solvation water of the two remaining planes. The feature that distinguishes the dynamics of solvation water of the three planes is the activation energy of diffusion process. The third conclusion is that—from the three analyzed solvation shells of CfAFP—the dynamical properties of solvation water of the ice-binding plane resemble the most the properties of solvation water of ice; note, however, that these properties still clearly differ from the dynamic properties of solvation water of ice.

  3. NMR of unfolded proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amarnath Chtterjee; Ashutosh Kumar; Jeetender Chugh; Sudha Srivastava; Neel S Bhavesh; Ramakrishna V Hosur

    2005-01-01

    In the post-genomic era, as more and more genome sequences are becoming known and hectic efforts are underway to decode the information content in them, it is becoming increasingly evident that flexibility in proteins plays a crucial role in many of the biological functions. Many proteins have intrinsic disorder either wholly or in specific regions. It appears that this disorder may be important for regulatory functions of the proteins, on the one hand, and may help in directing the folding process to reach the compact native state, on the other. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has over the last two decades emerged as the sole, most powerful technique to help characterize these disordered protein systems. In this review, we first discuss the significance of disorder in proteins and then describe the recent developments in NMR methods for their characterization. A brief description of the results obtained on several disordered proteins is presented at the end.

  4. Revealing Surface Waters on an Antifreeze Protein by Fusion Protein Crystallography Combined with Molecular Dynamic Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tianjun; Gauthier, Sherry Y; Campbell, Robert L; Davies, Peter L

    2015-10-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) adsorb to ice through an extensive, flat, relatively hydrophobic surface. It has been suggested that this ice-binding site (IBS) organizes surface waters into an ice-like clathrate arrangement that matches and fuses to the quasi-liquid layer on the ice surface. On cooling, these waters join the ice lattice and freeze the AFP to its ligand. Evidence for the generality of this binding mechanism is limited because AFPs tend to crystallize with their IBS as a preferred protein-protein contact surface, which displaces some bound waters. Type III AFP is a 7 kDa globular protein with an IBS made up two adjacent surfaces. In the crystal structure of the most active isoform (QAE1), the part of the IBS that docks to the primary prism plane of ice is partially exposed to solvent and has clathrate waters present that match this plane of ice. The adjacent IBS, which matches the pyramidal plane of ice, is involved in protein-protein crystal contacts with few surface waters. Here we have changed the protein-protein contacts in the ice-binding region by crystallizing a fusion of QAE1 to maltose-binding protein. In this 1.9 Å structure, the IBS that fits the pyramidal plane of ice is exposed to solvent. By combining crystallography data with MD simulations, the surface waters on both sides of the IBS were revealed and match well with the target ice planes. The waters on the pyramidal plane IBS were loosely constrained, which might explain why other isoforms of type III AFP that lack the prism plane IBS are less active than QAE1. The AFP fusion crystallization method can potentially be used to force the exposure to solvent of the IBS on other AFPs to reveal the locations of key surface waters. PMID:26371748

  5. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of Rhagium inquisitor antifreeze protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel hyperactive antifreeze protein from R. inquisitor (RiAFP) has been overexpressed, purified and crystallized. A complete native X-ray diffraction data set was recorded to 1.3 Å resolution. Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a specialized evolutionary adaptation of a variety of bacteria, fish, arthropods and other organisms to inhibit ice-crystal growth for survival in harsh subzero environments. The recently reported novel hyperactive AFP from Rhagium inquisitor (RiAFP) is the second distinct type of AFP in beetles and its structure could reveal important molecular insights into the evolution of AFPs. For this purpose, RiAFP was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized at 293 K using a combination of 23% PEG 3350 and 0.2 M ammonium sulfate as a precipitant. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.3 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystals belonged to the trigonal space group P3121 (or P3221), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 46.46, c = 193.21 Å

  6. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of modified antifreeze protein gene in strawberry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srisulak Dheeranupattana

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The optimum condition for shoot regeneration from leaf explants of strawberry cultivar Tiogar was investigated. It was found that the best regeneration condition was MS medium containing N6-Benzyladenine (BA and 2,4-Dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D at concentrations of 1 mg.l-1 and 0.2 mg.l-1, respectively. Antibiotics sensitivity test found that shoot regeneration from leaf explant was inhibited more than 90% at the concentration of kanamycin (Km as low as 5 mg.l-1. The modified gene encoding antifreeze protein isoform HPLC 6 was successfully constructed using codons which were optimally expressed in the strawberry plant. The antifreeze protein genes, naturally in plasmid pSW1 and modified in plasmid BB, were transformed to strawberry leaf explants by Agrobacterium tumefaciens LBA 4404. The strawberry plants, transformed with both AFP genes, were able to root in MS media containing 50 mg.l-1 Km, while no roots grew from nontransformed plant in this condition. Polymerase chain reaction indicated that the transgenes were integrated in the genome of transformants.

  7. An Effective Antifreeze Protein Predictor with Ensemble Classifiers and Comprehensive Sequence Descriptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runtao Yang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Antifreeze proteins (AFPs play a pivotal role in the antifreeze effect of overwintering organisms. They have a wide range of applications in numerous fields, such as improving the production of crops and the quality of frozen foods. Accurate identification of AFPs may provide important clues to decipher the underlying mechanisms of AFPs in ice-binding and to facilitate the selection of the most appropriate AFPs for several applications. Based on an ensemble learning technique, this study proposes an AFP identification system called AFP-Ensemble. In this system, random forest classifiers are trained by different training subsets and then aggregated into a consensus classifier by majority voting. The resulting predictor yields a sensitivity of 0.892, a specificity of 0.940, an accuracy of 0.938 and a balanced accuracy of 0.916 on an independent dataset, which are far better than the results obtained by previous methods. These results reveal that AFP-Ensemble is an effective and promising predictor for large-scale determination of AFPs. The detailed feature analysis in this study may give useful insights into the molecular mechanisms of AFP-ice interactions and provide guidance for the related experimental validation. A web server has been designed to implement the proposed method.

  8. A unique capsular polysaccharide structure from the psychrophilic marine bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H that mimics antifreeze (glyco)proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carillo, Sara; Casillo, Angela; Pieretti, Giuseppina; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; Sannino, Filomena; Bayer-Giraldi, Maddalena; Cosconati, Sandro; Novellino, Ettore; Ewert, Marcela; Deming, Jody W; Lanzetta, Rosa; Marino, Gennaro; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Randazzo, Antonio; Tutino, Maria L; Corsaro, M Michela

    2015-01-14

    The low temperatures of polar regions and high-altitude environments, especially icy habitats, present challenges for many microorganisms. Their ability to live under subfreezing conditions implies the production of compounds conferring cryotolerance. Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H, a γ-proteobacterium isolated from subzero Arctic marine sediments, provides a model for the study of life in cold environments. We report here the identification and detailed molecular primary and secondary structures of capsular polysaccharide from C. psychrerythraea 34H cells. The polymer was isolated in the water layer when cells were extracted by phenol/water and characterized by one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy together with chemical analysis. Molecular mechanics and dynamics calculations were also performed. The polysaccharide consists of a tetrasaccharidic repeating unit containing two amino sugars and two uronic acids bearing threonine as substituent. The structural features of this unique polysaccharide resemble those present in antifreeze proteins and glycoproteins. These results suggest a possible correlation between the capsule structure and the ability of C. psychrerythraea to colonize subfreezing marine environments. PMID:25525681

  9. Re-evaluation of a bacterial antifreeze protein as an adhesin with ice-binding activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuaiqi Guo

    Full Text Available A novel role for antifreeze proteins (AFPs may reside in an exceptionally large 1.5-MDa adhesin isolated from an Antarctic Gram-negative bacterium, Marinomonas primoryensis. MpAFP was purified from bacterial lysates by ice adsorption and gel electrophoresis. We have previously reported that two highly repetitive sequences, region II (RII and region IV (RIV, divide MpAFP into five distinct regions, all of which require mM Ca(2+ levels for correct folding. Also, the antifreeze activity is confined to the 322-residue RIV, which forms a Ca(2+-bound beta-helix containing thirteen Repeats-In-Toxin (RTX-like repeats. RII accounts for approximately 90% of the mass of MpAFP and is made up of ∼120 tandem 104-residue repeats. Because these repeats are identical in DNA sequence, their number was estimated here by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Structural homology analysis by the Protein Homology/analogY Recognition Engine (Phyre2 server indicates that the 104-residue RII repeat adopts an immunoglobulin beta-sandwich fold that is typical of many secreted adhesion proteins. Additional RTX-like repeats in RV may serve as a non-cleavable signal sequence for the type I secretion pathway. Immunodetection shows both repeated regions are uniformly distributed over the cell surface. We suggest that the development of an AFP-like domain within this adhesin attached to the bacterial outer surface serves to transiently bind the host bacteria to ice. This association would keep the bacteria within the upper reaches of the water column where oxygen and nutrients are potentially more abundant. This novel envirotactic role would give AFPs a third function, after freeze avoidance and freeze tolerance: that of transiently binding an organism to ice.

  10. The mysteries of memory effect and its elimination with antifreeze proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, V.; Gordienko, R.; Kuiper, M.; Huva, E.; Wu, Z. [Queen' s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Biology; Zeng, H.; Ripmeester, J. [Queen' s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Biology]|[National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Steacie Inst. for Molecular Sciences

    2008-07-01

    With the decline in easily accessible and conventional hydrocarbon supplies, exploration will focus on hydrocarbons in deep offshore waters, in permafrost or in crystalline water as gas hydrates. Crystallization of water or water-encaged gas molecules takes place when nuclei reach a critical size, but the crystal growth may be inhibited by certain antifreeze proteins (AFPs). In this study, the authors hypothesized that the crystal lattice of gas hydrates may act as an alternative for substrate antifreeze proteins (AFPs). AFP-mediated inhibition of ice and clathrate hydrate crystallization was examined. Since the AFPs had a notable ability to eliminate the memory effect (ME) or the faster reformation of clathrate hydrates after melting, the authors were prompted to examine heterogeneous nucleation. Silica, served as a model nucleator hydrophilic surface. Quartz crystal microbalance-dissipation (QCM-D) experiments showed that an active AFP was tightly adsorbed to the silica surface. However, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and polyvinylcaprolactam (PVCap), 2 commercial hydrate kinetic inhibitors that do not eliminate ME, were not as tightly adsorbed. A mutant AFP inhibited tetrahydrofuran clathrate hydrate growth, but not ME. QCM-D analysis showed that adsorption of the mutant AFP was more similar to PVCap than the active AFP. It was concluded that although there is no evidence for memory in ice reformation, the crystallization of ice and hydrates, and the elimination of the more rapid recrystallization of hydrates, can be mediated by the same proteins. The properties of adsorbed layers can be effectively monitored by QCM-D. These study results provided useful information about the inhibition mechanism of heterogeneous nucleation of clathrate hydrate. The technique facilitates the screening of potential low dose hydrate inhibitors and residues in AFPs that are involved in silica adsorption. 24 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  11. Ice nucleation in emulsified aqueous solutions of antifreeze protein type III and poly(vinyl alcohol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Takaaki; Koyama, Toshie; Goto, Fumitoshi; Seto, Takafumi

    2011-06-23

    Antifreeze protein (AFP) III and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) are known as anti-ice nucleating agents (anti-INAs), which inhibit heterogeneous ice nucleation. However, the effectiveness of these anti-INAs in inhibiting ice nucleation in water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions, in which homogeneous ice nucleation can be experimentally simulated, is unclear. In this study, the ice nucleation temperature in emulsified solutions of AFP III, PVA, and other nonanti-INA polymers was measured, and then the nucleation rate was analyzed based on classical nucleation theory. Results showed that ice nucleation was surface-initiated and, except for PVA solutions, probably caused heterogeneously by the emulsifier, SPAN 65, at the droplet surfaces. In this nucleation mode, AFP III had no significant effect on the ice nucleation rate. In contrast, PVA exhibited ice-nucleating activity only at the droplet surfaces, suggesting that the nucleation is due to the interaction between PVA and SPAN 65. PMID:21619040

  12. Evolution of Type II Antifreeze Protein Genes in Teleost Fish: A Complex Scenario Involving Lateral Gene Transfers and Episodic Directional Selection

    OpenAIRE

    Ulf Sorhannus

    2012-01-01

    I examined hypotheses about lateral transfer of type II antifreeze protein (AFP) genes among “distantly” related teleost fish. The effects of episodic directional selection on amino acid evolution were also investigated. The strict consensus results showed that the type II AFP and type II antifreeze-like protein genes were transferred from Osmerus mordax to Clupea harengus, from the ancestral lineage of the Brachyopsis rostratus—Hemitripterus americanus clade to the ancestor of the Hypomesus ...

  13. Antifreeze proteins govern the precipitation of trehalose in a freezing-avoiding insect at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xin; Wang, Sen; Duman, John G; Arifin, Josh Fnu; Juwita, Vonny; Goddard, William A; Rios, Alejandra; Liu, Fan; Kim, Soo-Kyung; Abrol, Ravinder; DeVries, Arthur L; Henling, Lawrence M

    2016-06-14

    The remarkable adaptive strategies of insects to extreme environments are linked to the biochemical compounds in their body fluids. Trehalose, a versatile sugar molecule, can accumulate to high levels in freeze-tolerant and freeze-avoiding insects, functioning as a cryoprotectant and a supercooling agent. Antifreeze proteins (AFPs), known to protect organisms from freezing by lowering the freezing temperature and deferring the growth of ice, are present at high levels in some freeze-avoiding insects in winter, and yet, paradoxically are found in some freeze-tolerant insects. Here, we report a previously unidentified role for AFPs in effectively inhibiting trehalose precipitation in the hemolymph (or blood) of overwintering beetle larvae. We determine the trehalose level (29.6 ± 0.6 mg/mL) in the larval hemolymph of a beetle, Dendroides canadensis, and demonstrate that the hemolymph AFPs are crucial for inhibiting trehalose crystallization, whereas the presence of trehalose also enhances the antifreeze activity of AFPs. To dissect the molecular mechanism, we examine the molecular recognition between AFP and trehalose crystal interfaces using molecular dynamics simulations. The theory corroborates the experiments and shows preferential strong binding of the AFP to the fast growing surfaces of the sugar crystal. This newly uncovered role for AFPs may help explain the long-speculated role of AFPs in freeze-tolerant species. We propose that the presence of high levels of molecules important for survival but prone to precipitation in poikilotherms (their body temperature can vary considerably) needs a companion mechanism to prevent the precipitation and here present, to our knowledge, the first example. Such a combination of trehalose and AFPs also provides a novel approach for cold protection and for trehalose crystallization inhibition in industrial applications. PMID:27226297

  14. Expression of a Carrot 36 kD Antifreeze Protein Gene Improves Cold Stress Tolerance in Transgenic Tobacco

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) enable organisms to survive under cold conditions, and have great potential in improving cold tolerance of cold-sensitive plants. In order to determine whether expression of the carrot 36 kD antifreeze protein gene confers improved cold-resistant properties to plant tissues, we tried to obtain transgenic tobacco plants which expressed the antifreeze protein. Cold, salt, and drought induced promoter Prd29A was cloned using PCR from Arabidopsis. Two plant expression vectors based on pBI121 were constructed with CaMV35S:AFP and Prd29A:AFP. Tobacco plantlets were transformed by Agrobacterium-medicated transformation. PCR and Southern blotting demonstrated that the carrot 36 kD afp gene was successfully integrated into the genomes of transformed plantlets. The expression of the afp gene in transgenic plants led to improved tolerance to cold stress.However, the use of the strong constitutive 35S cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) promoter to drive expression of afp also resulted in growth retardation under normal growing conditions. In contrast, the expression of afp driven by the stress-inducible Prd29A promoter from Arabidopsis gave rise to minimal effects on plant growth while providing an increased tolerance to cold stress condition (2℃). The results demonstrated the prospect of using Prd29A-AFP transgenic plants in cold-stressed conditions that will in turn benefit agriculture.

  15. Structural Basis for the Inhibition of Gas Hydrates by α-Helical Antifreeze Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tianjun; Davies, Peter L; Walker, Virginia K

    2015-10-20

    Kinetic hydrate inhibitors (KHIs) are used commercially to inhibit gas hydrate formation and growth in pipelines. However, improvement of these polymers has been constrained by the lack of verified molecular models. Since antifreeze proteins (AFPs) act as KHIs, we have used their solved x-ray crystallographic structures in molecular modeling to explore gas hydrate inhibition. The internal clathrate water network of the fish AFP Maxi, which extends to the protein's outer surface, is remarkably similar to the {100} planes of structure type II (sII) gas hydrate. The crystal structure of this water web has facilitated the construction of in silico models for Maxi and type I AFP binding to sII hydrates. Here, we have substantiated our models with experimental evidence of Maxi binding to the tetrahydrofuran sII model hydrate. Both in silico and experimental evidence support the absorbance-inhibition mechanism proposed for KHI binding to gas hydrates. Based on the Maxi crystal structure we suggest that the inhibitor adsorbs to the gas hydrate lattice through the same anchored clathrate water mechanism used to bind ice. These results will facilitate the rational design of a next generation of effective green KHIs for the petroleum industry to ensure safe and efficient hydrocarbon flow. PMID:26488661

  16. Dendrimer-Linked Antifreeze Proteins Have Superior Activity and Thermal Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Corey A; Drori, Ran; Zalis, Shiran; Braslavsky, Ido; Davies, Peter L

    2015-09-16

    By binding to ice, antifreeze proteins (AFPs) depress the freezing point of a solution and inhibit ice recrystallization if freezing does occur. Previous work showed that the activity of an AFP was incrementally increased by fusing it to another protein. Even larger increases in activity were achieved by doubling the number of ice-binding sites by dimerization. Here, we have combined the two strategies by linking multiple outward-facing AFPs to a dendrimer to significantly increase both the size of the molecule and the number of ice-binding sites. Using a heterobifunctional cross-linker, we attached between 6 and 11 type III AFPs to a second-generation polyamidoamine (G2-PAMAM) dendrimer with 16 reactive termini. This heterogeneous sample of dendrimer-linked type III constructs showed a greater than 4-fold increase in freezing point depression over that of monomeric type III AFP. This multimerized AFP was particularly effective at ice recrystallization inhibition activity, likely because it can simultaneously bind multiple ice surfaces. Additionally, attachment to the dendrimer has afforded the AFP superior recovery from heat denaturation. Linking AFPs together via polymers can generate novel reagents for controlling ice growth and recrystallization. PMID:26267368

  17. Fundamentals of Protein NMR Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Rule, Gordon S

    2006-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has proven to be a powerful technique to study the structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules. Fundamentals of Protein NMR Spectroscopy is a comprehensive textbook that guides the reader from a basic understanding of the phenomenological properties of magnetic resonance to the application and interpretation of modern multi-dimensional NMR experiments on 15N/13C-labeled proteins. Beginning with elementary quantum mechanics, a set of practical rules is presented and used to describe many commonly employed multi-dimensional, multi-nuclear NMR pulse sequences. A modular analysis of NMR pulse sequence building blocks also provides a basis for understanding and developing novel pulse programs. This text not only covers topics from chemical shift assignment to protein structure refinement, as well as the analysis of protein dynamics and chemical kinetics, but also provides a practical guide to many aspects of modern spectrometer hardware, sample preparation, experimental set-up, and data pr...

  18. Structure and evolutionary origin of Ca(2+-dependent herring type II antifreeze protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    Full Text Available In order to survive under extremely cold environments, many organisms produce antifreeze proteins (AFPs. AFPs inhibit the growth of ice crystals and protect organisms from freezing damage. Fish AFPs can be classified into five distinct types based on their structures. Here we report the structure of herring AFP (hAFP, a Ca(2+-dependent fish type II AFP. It exhibits a fold similar to the C-type (Ca(2+-dependent lectins with unique ice-binding features. The 1.7 A crystal structure of hAFP with bound Ca(2+ and site-directed mutagenesis reveal an ice-binding site consisting of Thr96, Thr98 and Ca(2+-coordinating residues Asp94 and Glu99, which initiate hAFP adsorption onto the [10-10] prism plane of the ice lattice. The hAFP-ice interaction is further strengthened by the bound Ca(2+ through the coordination with a water molecule of the ice lattice. This Ca(2+-coordinated ice-binding mechanism is distinct from previously proposed mechanisms for other AFPs. However, phylogenetic analysis suggests that all type II AFPs evolved from the common ancestor and developed different ice-binding modes. We clarify the evolutionary relationship of type II AFPs to sugar-binding lectins.

  19. In silico characterization of antifreeze proteins using computational tools and servers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Sivakumar; S Balaji; Gangaradhakrishnan

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, seventeen different fish Antifreeze Proteins (AFPs) retrieved from Swiss-Prot database are analysed and characterized using In silico tools. Primary structure analysis shows that most of the AFPs are hydrophobic in nature due to the high content of non-polar residues. The presence of 11 cysteines in the rainbow smelt fish and sea raven fish AFPs infer that these proteins may form disulphide (SS) bonds, which are regarded as a positive factor for stability. The aliphatic index computed by Ex-Pasy’s ProtParam infers that AFPs may be stable for a wide range of temperature. Secondary structure analysis shows that most of the fish AFPs have predominant α-helical structures and rest of the AFPs have mixed secondary structure. The very high coil structural content of rainbow smelt fish and sea raven fish AFPs are due to the rich content of more flexible glycine and hydrophobic proline amino acids. Proline has a special property of creating kinks in polypetide chains and disrupting ordered secondary structure. SOSUI server predicts one transmembrane region in winter flounder fish and atlantic cod and two transmembrane regions in yellowtail flounder fish AFP. The predicted transmembrane regions were visualized and analysed using helical wheel plots generated by EMBOSS pepwheel tool. The presence of disulphide (SS) bonds in the AFPs Q01758 and P05140 are predicted by CYS_REC tool and also identified from the three-dimensional structure using Rasmol tool. The disulphide bonds identified from the three-dimensional structure using the Rasmol tool might be correct as the evaluation parameters are within the acceptable limits for the modelled 3D structures.

  20. Expression, purification and activity determination of the beetle tenebrio molitor antifreeze protein afp84c in escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summary: A cDNA encoding antifreeze protein (AFP84c) was cloned by RT-PCR from the larva of the yellow mealworm Tenebrio molitor. The coding fragment of 252 bp encodes a protein of 84 amino acid residues and was fused to the expression vectors pMAL-c2X and pMAL-p2X. The expression plasmids pMAL-c2X-afp84c and pMAL-p2X-afp84c were constructed and transformed into Escherischia coli strains TBI, respectively. Strategy of optimization of induction conditions were used for expression of the highly disulfide-bonded beta-helix-contained protein with the activity of antifreeze in pMALTM expression system. The target fusion protein was released from the cytoplasm and periplasm by sonication and cold osmotic shock procedure respectively. Recombinant AFP84c was purified by amylose affinity column. The purified target protein displayed a single band in SDS-PAGE. Expressed AFP84c exhibits to increase low temperature resistance of bacteria. (author)

  1. Modeling the Influence of Antifreeze Proteins on Three-Dimensional Ice Crystal Melt Shapes using a Geometric Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jun Jie; Dolev, Maya Bar; Celik, Yeliz; Wettlaufer, J S; Braslavsky, Ido

    2012-01-01

    The melting of pure axisymmetric ice crystals has been described previously by us within the framework of so-called geometric crystal growth. Nonequilibrium ice crystal shapes evolving in the presence of hyperactive antifreeze proteins (hypAFPs) are experimentally observed to assume ellipsoidal geometries ("lemon" or "rice" shapes). To analyze such shapes we harness the underlying symmetry of hexagonal ice Ih and extend two-dimensional geometric models to three-dimensions to reproduce the experimental dissolution process. The geometrical model developed will be useful as a quantitative test of the mechanisms of interaction between hypAFPs and ice.

  2. Low thermodynamic but high kinetic stability of an antifreeze protein from Rhagium mordax

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Dennis Steven; Johnsen, Johannes Lørup; Kristiansen, Erlend;

    2014-01-01

    The equilibrium heat stability and the kinetic heat tolerance of a recombinant antifreeze protein (AFP) from the beetle Rhagium mordax (RmAFP1) are studied through differential scanning calorimetry and circular dichroism spectroscopy. In contrast to other insect AFPs studied with this respect, the...... RmAFP1 has only one disulfide bridge. The melting temperature, Tm, of the protein is determined to be 28.5°C (pH 7.4), which is much lower than most of those reported for AFPs or globular proteins in general. Despite its low melting temperature, both biophysical and activity measurements show that...... the protein almost completely refolds into the native state after repeated exposure of 70°C. RmAFP1 thus appears to be kinetically stable even far above its melting temperature. Thermodynamically, the insect AFPs seem to be dividable in three groups, relating to their content of disulfide bridges and...

  3. De novo DESIGN AND SYNTHESIS OF AN ICE-BINDING, DENDRIMERIC, POLYPEPTIDE BASED ON INSECT ANTIFREEZE PROTEINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Vera Bravo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A new strategy is presented for the designand synthesis of peptides that exhibitice-binding and antifreeze activity. Apennant-type dendrimer polypeptidescaffold combining an α-helical backbonewith four short β-strand branches wassynthesized in solid phase using Fmocchemistry in a divergent approach. The51-residue dendrimer was characterizedby reverse phase high performance liquidchromatography, mass spectrometry andcircular dichroism. Each β-strand branchcontained three overlapping TXT aminoacid repeats, an ice-binding motif foundin the ice-binding face of the sprucebudworm (Choristoneura fumiferanaand beetle (Tenebrio molitor antifreezeproteins. Ice crystals in the presence ofthe polypeptide monomer displayed flat,hexagonal plate morphology, similar tothat produced by weakly active antifreezeproteins. An oxidized dimeric form of thedendrimer polypeptide also produced flathexagonal ice crystals and was capableof inhibiting ice crystal growth upontemperature reduction, a phenomenontermed thermal hysteresis, a definingproperty of antifreeze proteins. Linkageof the pennant-type dendrimer to a trifunctionalcascade-type polypeptideproduced a trimeric macromolecule thatgave flat hexagonal ice crystals withhigher thermal hysteresis activity thanthe dimer or monomer and an ice crystal burst pattern similar to that producedby samples containing insect antifreezeproteins. This macromolecule was alsocapable of inhibiting ice recrystallization.

  4. Gold Nanoparticle Aggregation as a Probe of Antifreeze (Glyco) Protein-Inspired Ice Recrystallization Inhibition and Identification of New IRI Active Macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Daniel E.; Congdon, Thomas; Rodger, Alison; Gibson, Matthew I.

    2015-10-01

    Antifreeze (glyco)proteins are found in polar fish species and act to slow the rate of growth of ice crystals; a property known as ice recrystallization inhibition. The ability to slow ice growth is of huge technological importance especially in the cryopreservation of donor cells and tissue, but native antifreeze proteins are often not suitable, nor easily available. Therefore, the search for new materials that mimic this function is important, but currently limited by the low-throughout assays associated with the antifreeze properties. Here 30 nm gold nanoparticles are demonstrated to be useful colorimetric probes for ice recrystallization inhibition, giving a visible optical response and is compatible with 96 well plates for high-throughout studies. This method is faster, requires less infrastructure, and has easier interpretation than the currently used ‘splat’ methods. Using this method, a series of serum proteins were identified to have weak, but specific ice recrystallization inhibition activity, which was removed upon denaturation. It is hoped that high-throughput tools such as this will accelerate the discovery of new antifreeze mimics.

  5. Effects of three different types of antifreeze proteins on mouse ovarian tissue cryopreservation and transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewang Lee

    Full Text Available Ovarian tissue (OT cryopreservation is effective in preserving fertility in cancer patients who have concerns about fertility loss due to cancer treatment. However, the damage incurred at different steps during the cryopreservation procedure may cause follicular depletion; hence, preventing chilling injury would help maintain ovarian function.This study was designed to investigate the beneficial effects of different antifreeze proteins (AFPs on mouse ovarian tissue cryopreservation and transplantation.Ovaries were obtained from 5-week-old B6D2F1 mice, and each ovary was cryopreserved using two-step vitrification and four-step warming procedures. In Experiment I, ovaries were randomly allocated into fresh, vitrification control, and nine experimental groups according to the AFP type (FfIBP, LeIBP, type III and concentration (0.1, 1, 10 mg/mL used. After vitrification and warming, 5,790 ovarian follicles were evaluated using histology and TUNEL assays, and immunofluorescence for τH2AX and Rad51 was used to detect DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs and repair (DDR, respectively. In Experiment II, 20 mice were randomly divided into two groups: one where the vitrification and warming media were supplemented with 10 mg/mL LeIBP, and the other where media alone were used (control. Ovaries were then autotransplanted under both kidney capsules 7 days after vitrification together with the addition of 10 mg/mL LeIBP in the vitrification-warming media. After transplantation, the ovarian follicles, the percentage of apoptotic follicles, the extent of the CD31-positive area, and the serum FSH levels of the transplanted groups were compared.In Experiment I, the percentage of total grade 1 follicles was significantly higher in the 10 mg/mL LeIBP group than in the vitrification control, while all AFP-treated groups had significantly improved grade 1 primordial follicle numbers compared with those of the vitrification control. The number of apoptotic (TUNEL

  6. Research Progress in Antifreeze Proteins and Application in Food Industry%抗冻蛋白的研究进展及其在食品工业中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪少芸; 赵珺; 吴金鸿; 陈琳

    2011-01-01

    抗冻蛋白是一类具有热滞效应、冰晶形态效应和重结晶抑制效应的蛋白质,因其特殊的结构和功能,抗冻蛋白引起了研究人员的极大兴趣.探讨了近年来抗冻蛋白的研究进展,介绍了目前已知的抗冻蛋白的来源、特性、测定方法、基因结构及在食品工业中的应用.抗冻蛋白对冷冻食品有显著的品质改良功能,是未来冷冻食品工业中极具潜力的抗冻添加剂.%Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are the thermal hysteresis proteins that have the ability to modify the growth and inhibit the recrystallization of the ice. Antifreeze proteins aroused great interests of many researchers due to its special structure and functions. In this article, the recent advance in antifreeze protein was reviewed, and the types, properties, measurements, gene structures of antifreeze protein, and its applications in food industry were introduced. The application trials indicated that antifreeze protein could significantly improve the qualities of frozen foods, which suggested the potential food additives of antifreeze protein in future frozen food industry.

  7. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses on the supercooling ability and mining of antifreeze proteins of the Chinese white wax scale insect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shu-Hui; Yang, Pu; Sun, Tao; Qi, Qian; Wang, Xue-Qing; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Feng, Ying; Liu, Bo-Wen

    2016-06-01

    The Chinese white wax scale insect, Ericerus pela, can survive at extremely low temperatures, and some overwintering individuals exhibit supercooling at temperatures below -30°C. To investigate the deep supercooling ability of E. pela, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses were performed to delineate the major gene and protein families responsible for the deep supercooling ability of overwintering females. Gene Ontology (GO) classification and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis indicated that genes involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase, calcium, and PI3K-Akt signaling pathways and pathways associated with the biosynthesis of soluble sugars, sugar alcohols and free amino acids were dominant. Proteins responsible for low-temperature stress, such as cold acclimation proteins, glycerol biosynthesis-related enzymes and heat shock proteins (HSPs) were identified. However, no antifreeze proteins (AFPs) were identified through sequence similarity search methods. A random forest approach identified 388 putative AFPs in the proteome. The AFP gene ep-afp was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the expressed protein exhibited a thermal hysteresis activity of 0.97°C, suggesting its potential role in the deep supercooling ability of E. pela. PMID:26799455

  8. Quality assessment of protein NMR structures

    OpenAIRE

    Rosato A.; Montelione G.T.; Tejero R.

    2013-01-01

    Biomolecular NMR structures are now routinely used in biology, chemistry, and bioinformatics. Methods and metrics for assessing the accuracy and precision of protein NMR structures are beginning to be standardized across the biological NMR community. These include both knowledge-based assessment metrics, parameterized from the database of protein structures, and model versus data assessment metrics. On line servers are available that provide comprehensive protein structure quality assessment ...

  9. Molecular and quantum mechanical studies on the monomer recognition of a highly-regular β-helical antifreeze protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Zuoyin; JIA; Zongchao; LIU; Ruozhuang; CHEN; Guangj

    2004-01-01

    The possible interaction models for an antifreeze protein from Tenebrio molitar (TmAFP) have been systematically studied using the methods of molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry. It is hoped that these approaches would provide insights into the nature of interaction between protein monomers through sampling a number of interaction possibilities and evaluating their interaction energies between two monomers in the course of recognition. The results derived from the molecular mechanics indicate that monomer's β-sheets would be involved in interaction area and the side chains on two β-faces can match each other at the two-dimensional level. The results from molecular mechanics and ONIOM methods show that the strongest interaction energy could be gained through the formation of H-bonds when the two β-sheets are involved in the interaction model. Furthermore, the calculation of DFT and analysis of van der Waals bond charge density confirm further that recognition between the two TCTs mainly depends on inter-molecular hydroxyls. Therefore, our results demonstrate that during the course of interaction the most favorable association of TmAFPs is via their β-sheets.

  10. Crystal structure and mutational analysis of Ca2+-independent type II antifreeze protein from longsnout poacher, Brachyopsis rostratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimiya, Yoshiyuki; Kondo, Hidemasa; Takamichi, Manabu; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Mamoru; Miura, Ai; Tsuda, Sakae

    2008-10-10

    We recently found that longsnout poacher (Brachyosis rostratus) produces a Ca(2+)-independent type II antifreeze protein (lpAFP) and succeeded in expressing recombinant lpAFP using Phichia pastoris. Here, we report, for the first time, the X-ray crystal structure of lpAFP at 1.34 A resolution. The lpAFP structure displayed a relatively planar surface, which encompasses two loop regions (Cys86-Lys89 and Asn91-Cys97) and a short beta-strand (Trp109-Leu112) with three unstructured segments (Gly57-Ile58, Ala103-Ala104, and Pro113-His118). Electrostatic calculation of the protein surface showed that the relatively planar surface was divided roughly into a hydrophobic area (composed of the three unstructured segments lacking secondary structure) and a hydrophilic area (composed of the loops and beta-strand). Site-directed mutation of Ile58 with Phe at the center of the hydrophobic area decreased activity significantly, whereas mutation of Leu112 with Phe at an intermediate area between the hydrophobic and hydrophilic areas retained complete activity. In the hydrophilic area, a peptide-swap mutant in the loops retained 60% activity despite simultaneous mutations of eight residues. We conclude that the epicenter of the ice-binding site of lpAFP is the hydrophobic region, which is centered by Ile58, in the relatively planar surface. We built an ice-binding model for lpAFP on the basis of a lattice match of ice and constrained water oxygen atoms surrounding the hydrophobic area in the lpAFP structure. The model in which lpAFP has been docked to a secondary prism (2-1-10) plane, which is different from the one determined for Ca(2+)-independent type II AFP from sea raven (11-21), appears to explain the results of the mutagenesis analysis. PMID:18674542

  11. NMR of Membrane Proteins: Beyond Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, Sundaresan; Overduin, Michael; Bonev, Boyan B

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are essential for the flow of signals, nutrients and energy between cells and between compartments of the cell. Their mechanisms can only be fully understood once the precise structures, dynamics and interactions involved are defined at atomic resolution. Through advances in solution and solid state NMR spectroscopy, this information is now available, as demonstrated by recent studies of stable peripheral and transmembrane proteins. Here we highlight recent cases of G-protein coupled receptors, outer membrane proteins, such as VDAC, phosphoinositide sensors, such as the FAPP-1 pleckstrin homology domain, and enzymes including the metalloproteinase MMP-12. The studies highlighted have resulted in the determination of the 3D structures, dynamical properties and interaction surfaces for membrane-associated proteins using advanced isotope labelling strategies, solubilisation systems and NMR experiments designed for very high field magnets. Solid state NMR offers further insights into the structure and multimeric assembly of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, as well as into interactions with ligands and targets. Remaining challenges for wider application of NMR to membrane structural biology include the need for overexpression and purification systems for the production of isotope-labelled proteins with fragile folds, and the availability of only a few expensive perdeuterated detergents.Step changes that may transform the field include polymers, such as styrene maleic acid, which obviate the need for detergent altogether, and allow direct high yield purification from cells or membranes. Broader demand for NMR may be facilitated by MODA software, which instantly predicts membrane interactive residues that can subsequently be validated by NMR. In addition, recent developments in dynamic nuclear polarization NMR instrumentation offer a remarkable sensitivity enhancement from low molarity samples and cell surfaces. These advances illustrate the current

  12. Saccharide antifreeze compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Kent; Duman, John G; Serianni, Anthony S

    2013-12-10

    The invention provides an antifreeze glycolipid compounds and composition comprising a polysaccharide moiety of Formula I; ##STR00001## wherein D-Manp represents a D-mannopyranose moiety, D-Xylp represents a D-xylopyranose moiety, and n is about 5 to about 70; and one or more lipid moieties covalently linked to the polysaccharide moiety of Formula I or electrostatically associated with the polysaccaride moiety for Formula I. The antifreeze glycolipid compounds and compositions can be used for a variety of industrial, agricultural, medical, and cosmetic applications where recrystallization-inhibition, cyroprotection, or cryopreservation is desired. The antifreeze glycolipid compounds or compositions can be used as, for example, as cryoprotectants for tissue preservation and transplantation, improving the texture of processed frozen food and frozen meats, frostbit protection, crop protection, and green alternatives for land vehicle antifreeze and aircraft de-icing.

  13. Transient protein-protein interactions visualized by solution NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhu; Gong, Zhou; Dong, Xu; Tang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Proteins interact with each other to establish their identities in cell. The affinities for the interactions span more than ten orders of magnitude, and KD values in μM-mM regimen are considered transient and are important in cell signaling. Solution NMR including diamagnetic and paramagnetic techniques has enabled atomic-resolution depictions of transient protein-protein interactions. Diamagnetic NMR allows characterization of protein complexes with KD values up to several mM, whereas ultraweak and fleeting complexes can be modeled with the use of paramagnetic NMR especially paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE). When tackling ever-larger protein complexes, PRE can be particularly useful in providing long-range intermolecular distance restraints. As NMR measurements are averaged over the ensemble of complex structures, structural information for dynamic protein-protein interactions besides the stereospecific one can often be extracted. Herein the protein interaction dynamics are exemplified by encounter complexes, alternative binding modes, and coupled binding/folding of intrinsically disordered proteins. Further integration of NMR with other biophysical techniques should allow better visualization of transient protein-protein interactions. In particular, single-molecule data may facilitate the interpretation of ensemble-averaged NMR data. Though same structures of proteins and protein complexes were found in cell as in diluted solution, we anticipate that the dynamics of transient protein protein-protein interactions be different, which awaits awaits exploration by NMR. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Physiological Enzymology and Protein Functions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Physiological Enzymology and Protein Functions. PMID:25896389

  14. The Quiet Renaissance of Protein NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Paul J.; Chen, Jiang; Cho, Min-Kyu; Kim, Ji-Hun; Lu, Zhenwei; Mathew, Sijo; Peng, Dungeng; Song, Yuanli; Van Horn, Wade D.; Zhuang, Tiandi; Sönnichsen, Frank D.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    From roughly 1985 through the start of the new millennium, the cutting edge of solution protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was to a significant extent driven by the aspiration to determine structures. Here we survey recent advances in protein NMR that herald a renaissance in which a number of its most important applications reflect the broad problem-solving capability displayed by this method during its classical era during the 1970s and early 80s. “Without receivers fitted and kept in order, the air may tingle and thrill with the message, but it will not reach my spirit and consciousness.” Mary Slessor, Calabar, circa 1910 PMID:23368985

  15. Identification of antifreeze proteins and their functional residues by support vector machine and genetic algorithms based on n-peptide compositions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Sheng Yu

    Full Text Available For the first time, multiple sets of n-peptide compositions from antifreeze protein (AFP sequences of various cold-adapted fish and insects were analyzed using support vector machine and genetic algorithms. The identification of AFPs is difficult because they exist as evolutionarily divergent types, and because their sequences and structures are present in limited numbers in currently available databases. Our results reveal that it is feasible to identify the shared sequential features among the various structural types of AFPs. Moreover, we were able to identify residues involved in ice binding without requiring knowledge of the three-dimensional structures of these AFPs. This approach should be useful for genomic and proteomic studies involving cold-adapted organisms.

  16. Purification, crystal structure determination and functional characterization of type III antifreeze proteins from the European eelpout Zoarces viviparus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkens, Casper; Poulsen, Jens-Christian Navarro; Ramløv, Hans;

    2014-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are essential components of many organisms adaptation to cold temperatures. Fish type III AFPs are divided into two groups, SP isoforms being much less active than QAE1 isoforms. Two type III AFPs from Zoarces viviparus, a QAE1 (ZvAFP13) and an SP (ZvAFP6) isoform, are...... here characterized and their crystal structures determined. We conclude that the higher activity of the QAE1 isoforms cannot be attributed to single residues, but rather a combination of structural effects. Furthermore both ZvAFP6 and ZvAFP13 crystal structures have water molecules around T18...... equivalent to the tetrahedral-like waters previously identified in a neutron crystal structure. Interestingly, ZvAFP6 forms dimers in the crystal, with a significant dimer interface. The presence of ZvAFP6 dimers was confirmed in solution by native electrophoresis and gel filtration. To our knowledge this is...

  17. Identification and Evaluation of Cryoprotective Peptides from Chicken Collagen: Ice-Growth Inhibition Activity Compared to That of Type I Antifreeze Proteins in Sucrose Model Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lihui; Betti, Mirko

    2016-06-29

    The ability of chicken collagen peptides to inhibit the growth of ice crystals was evaluated and compared to that of fish antifreeze proteins (AFPs). This ice inhibition activity was assessed using a polarized microscope by measuring ice crystal dimensions in a sucrose model system with and without collagen peptides after seven thermal cycles. The system was stabilized at -25 °C and cycled between -16 and -12 °C. Five candidate peptides with ice inhibition activity were identified using liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry and were then synthesized. Their ice inhibition capacity was compared to that of type I AFPs in a 23% sucrose model system. Specific collagen peptides with certain amino acid sequences reduced the extent of ice growth by approximately 70% at a relatively low concentration (1 mg/mL). These results suggest that specific collagen peptides may act in a noncolligative manner, inhibiting ice crystal growth like type I AFPs, but less efficiently. PMID:27293017

  18. TROSY NMR with partially deuterated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eletsky, A; Kienhöfer, A; Pervushin, K

    2001-06-01

    TROSY-type optimization of liquid-state NMR experiments is based on the preservation of unique coherence transfer pathways with distinct transverse relaxation properties. The broadband decoupling of the 1H spins interchanges the TROSY and anti-TROSY magnetization transfer pathways and thus is not used in TROSY-type triple resonance experiments or is replaced with narrowband selective decoupling. To achieve the full advantage of TROSY, the uniform deuteration of proteins is usually required. Here we propose a new and general method for 1H broadband decoupling in TROSY NMR, which does not compromise the relaxation optimization in the 15N-1H moieties, but uniformly and efficiently refocuses the 1JCH scalar coupling evolution in the 13C-1H moieties. Combined with the conventional 2H decoupling, this method enables obtaining high sensitivity TROSY-type triple resonance spectra with partially deuterated or fully protonated 13C,15N labeled proteins. PMID:11495249

  19. NMR screening for rapid protein characterization in structural proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Justine M

    2008-01-01

    In the age of structural proteomics when protein structures are targeted on a genome-wide scale, the identification of proteins that are amenable to analysis using x-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy is the key to high throughput structure determination. NMR screening is a beneficial part of a structural proteomics pipeline because of its ability to provide detailed biophysical information about the protein targets under investigation at an early stage of the structure determination process. This chapter describes efficient methods for the production of uniformly (15)N-labeled proteins for NMR screening using both conventional IPTG induction and autoinduction approaches in E. coli. Details of sample preparation for NMR and the acquisition of 1D (1)H NMR and 2D (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra to assess the structural characteristics and suitability of proteins for further structural studies are also provided. PMID:18542882

  20. Solution structures, dynamics, and ice growth inhibitory activity of peptide fragments derived from an antarctic yeast protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Hussinien H Shah

    Full Text Available Exotic functions of antifreeze proteins (AFP and antifreeze glycopeptides (AFGP have recently been attracted with much interest to develop them as commercial products. AFPs and AFGPs inhibit ice crystal growth by lowering the water freezing point without changing the water melting point. Our group isolated the Antarctic yeast Glaciozyma antarctica that expresses antifreeze protein to assist it in its survival mechanism at sub-zero temperatures. The protein is unique and novel, indicated by its low sequence homology compared to those of other AFPs. We explore the structure-function relationship of G. antarctica AFP using various approaches ranging from protein structure prediction, peptide design and antifreeze activity assays, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR studies and molecular dynamics simulation. The predicted secondary structure of G. antarctica AFP shows several α-helices, assumed to be responsible for its antifreeze activity. We designed several peptide fragments derived from the amino acid sequences of α-helical regions of the parent AFP and they also showed substantial antifreeze activities, below that of the original AFP. The relationship between peptide structure and activity was explored by NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation. NMR results show that the antifreeze activity of the peptides correlates with their helicity and geometrical straightforwardness. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation also suggests that the activity of the designed peptides can be explained in terms of the structural rigidity/flexibility, i.e., the most active peptide demonstrates higher structural stability, lower flexibility than that of the other peptides with lower activities, and of lower rigidity. This report represents the first detailed report of downsizing a yeast AFP into its peptide fragments with measurable antifreeze activities.

  1. Monitoring prion protein stability by NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, Olivier; Graether, Steffen P; Sykes, Brian D

    2009-01-01

    Prion diseases, or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE), are a group of fatal neurological diseases that affect both humans and animals. At the end of the 20th century, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), better known as mad cow disease, was shown to be transmissible to humans. This resulted in considerable concern for public health and a number of questions for scientists. The first question answered was the possible source of the disease, which appears to be the prion protein (PrP). There are two major forms of this protein: the native, noninfectious form (PrP(C)), and the misfolded infectious form (PrP(Sc)). PrP(C) is mainly alpha-helical in structure, whereas PrP(Sc) aggregates into an assembly of beta-sheets, forming amyloid fibrils. Since the first solution structure of the noninfectious form of the mouse prion protein, about 30 structures of the globular portion of PrP(C) have been characterized from different organisms. However, only a few minor differences are observed when comparing one PrP(C) structure to another. The key to understanding prion formation may then be not in the structure of PrP(C), but in the mechanism underlying PrP(C) unfolding and then conversion into a misfolded fibril state. To identify the possible region(s) of PrP(C) responsible for initiating the conversion into the amyloid fibril formation, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was applied to characterize the stability and structure of PrP(C) and intermediate states during the conversion from PrP(C) to PrP(Sc). Subsequently urea was used to induce unfolding, and data analysis revealed region-specific structural stabilities that may bring insights into the mechanisms underlying conversion of protein into an infectious prion. PMID:19697241

  2. Evaluation of propanediol, ethylene glycol, sucrose and antifreeze proteins on the survival of slow-cooled mouse pronuclear and 4-cell embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, J M; Ward, C; Trounson, A O

    1995-02-01

    Mouse pronuclear and 4-cell embryos were cryopreserved by slow cooling to -33 degrees C in 1.5 M 1,2-propanediol or 1.5 M ethylene glycol, with or without 0.1 M sucrose. Straws were thawed by immersion into a 37 degrees C water bath, immediately after their removal from liquid nitrogen (protocol 1), or after being held in air for 15 (protocol 2) or 30 s (protocol 3). Others were held in air until the ice melted (protocol 4). Embryos which formed blastocysts that hatched and attached to the Petri dish in vitro (plated) were considered viable. The thawing protocol did not significantly influence the viability of embryos frozen in propanediol with 0.1 M sucrose (52-72% of pronuclear and 69-97% of 4-cell embryos plated). In the other solutions tested, propanediol without sucrose and ethylene glycol with/without sucrose, only protocol 2 resulted in uniformly high development of both pronuclear (45-65% plating) and 4-cell embryos (70-97% plating). Thawing protocol 4 significantly reduced development, in particular for embryos frozen in ethylene glycol (0% 1-cell; 0-25% 4-cell plating). The difference between thawing protocols 2 and 4 was reduced by continuing slow cooling of ethylene glycol solutions to lower temperatures (-41 degrees C). Adding antifreeze proteins type I or III did not improve survival or development. Thus, although mouse pronuclear and 4-cell embryos can be frozen-thawed in either ethylene glycol or propanediol without significant loss of viability, an appropriate thawing protocol is essential for embryos frozen in ethylene glycol or propanediol-sucrose. PMID:7769070

  3. Heteronuclear Multidimensional Protein NMR in a Teaching Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Nathan T.

    2016-01-01

    Heteronuclear multidimensional NMR techniques are commonly used to study protein structure, function, and dynamics, yet they are rarely taught at the undergraduate level. Here, we describe a senior undergraduate laboratory where students collect, process, and analyze heteronuclear multidimensional NMR experiments using an unstudied Ig domain (Ig2…

  4. NMR-based screening of membrane protein ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanamala, Naveena; Dutta, Arpana; Beck, Barbara; van Vliet, Bart; van Fleet, Bart; Hay, Kelly; Yazbak, Ahmad; Ishima, Rieko; Doemling, Alexander; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2010-03-01

    Membrane proteins pose problems for the application of NMR-based ligand-screening methods because of the need to maintain the proteins in a membrane mimetic environment such as detergent micelles: they add to the molecular weight of the protein, increase the viscosity of the solution, interact with ligands non-specifically, overlap with protein signals, modulate protein dynamics and conformational exchange and compromise sensitivity by adding highly intense background signals. In this article, we discuss the special considerations arising from these problems when conducting NMR-based ligand-binding studies with membrane proteins. While the use of (13)C and (15)N isotopes is becoming increasingly feasible, (19)F and (1)H NMR-based approaches are currently the most widely explored. By using suitable NMR parameter selection schemes independent of or exploiting the presence of detergent, (1)H-based approaches require least effort in sample preparation because of the high sensitivity and natural abundance of (1)H in both, ligand and protein. On the other hand, the (19)F nucleus provides an ideal NMR probe because of its similarly high sensitivity to that of (1)H and the lack of natural (19)F background in biologic systems. Despite its potential, the use of NMR spectroscopy is highly underdeveloped in the area of drug discovery for membrane proteins. PMID:20331645

  5. Solution NMR studies of polytopic α-helical membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nietlispach, Daniel; Gautier, Antoine

    2011-08-01

    NMR spectroscopy has established itself as one of the main techniques for the structural study of integral membrane proteins. Remarkably, over the last few years, substantial progress has been achieved in the structure determination of increasingly complex polytopical α-helical membrane proteins, with their size approaching ∼100kDa. Such advances are the result of significant improvements in NMR methodology, sample preparation and powerful selective isotope labelling schemes. We review the requirements facilitating such work based on the more recent solution NMR studies of α-helical proteins. While the majority of such studies still use detergent-solubilized proteins, alternative more native-like lipid-based media are emerging. Recent interaction, dynamics and conformational studies are discussed that cast a promising light on the future role of NMR in this important and exciting area. PMID:21775128

  6. Recent progress in protein structure analysis by NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, many NMR methodologies have been developed to improve the molecular weight limit of protein structure analysis. Sophisticated selective stable-isotope labeling techniques such as the SAIL method solved the issue of signal reduction due to increased correlation time and that of spectral overlapping. Residual dipolar coupling and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement enabled to obtain long-range distance restraints for structure determination. NMR analysis of intrinsically disordered protein revealed novel molecular recognition mode of protein called coupling folding and binding. NMR method also revealed intermediates in macromolecular binding processes. New data acquisition techniques such the projection spectroscopy and the non-linear sampling, which introduced signal processing techniques, were developed to reduce the data acquisition time and/or increase sensitivity. In this chapter, recent progress in protein structure analysis by NMR spectroscopy is summarized. (author)

  7. NMR and protein folding: equilibrium and stopped-flow studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Frieden, C.; Hoeltzli, S D; Ropson, I. J.

    1993-01-01

    NMR studies are now unraveling the structure of intermediates of protein folding using hydrogen-deuterium exchange methodologies. These studies provide information about the time dependence of formation of secondary structure. They require the ability to assign specific resonances in the NMR spectra to specific amide protons of a protein followed by experiments involving competition between folding and exchange reactions. Another approach is to use 19F-substituted amino acids to follow change...

  8. 白菜型冬油菜质外体抗冻蛋白研究%Study on apoplast anti-freeze proteins in winter turnip rape (Brassica rape L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨刚; 刘林波; 杨建胜; 方园; 张娟; 史鹏辉; 孙万仓; 刘自刚; 曾秀存; 武军艳; 方彦; 李学才; 陈奇

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to lay the basis for studying cold resistance of winter rapeseed. The anti-freeze activities of apoplast proteins were determined in the ‘Longyou 6’ winter rape leaves and roots under cold vernalization. The apoplast proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and high expression proteins identified in MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry under field and pot experiments. The results showed that apoplast protein content of ‘Longyou 6’ leaves increased significantly (P < 0.05) after cold acclimation in an artificial climate chamber, reaching 92.31 µg•g-1(FW) on the fifth day, which represented an increase of 246.12% over CK. Apoplast protein content after 10-15 days of cold acclimation dropped compared with that after 5 days, but was still significantly higher than that of CK (P < 0.05). Apoplast protein content continued to increase with increasing cold acclimation time from 20 to 25 days (P < 0.05). Apoplast protein content decreased significantly with after 10 days of de-acclimation. In the process of cold acclimation, apoplast protein content of ‘Longyou 6’ leaves significantly accumulated. However, it decreased significantly after de-acclimation. Obviously, apoplast proteins of‘Longyou 6’ winter rape belonged to low temperature induced proteins. Anti-freeze activity detection analysis suggested that apoplast proteins had re-crystallization inhibition activity. Mass spectrometry identification revealed a variety of proteins with unclear functions along with β-1-3-glucanase consistent anti-freeze proteins reported in winter rye. The class glucanase detected by mass spectrometry was found to have weaker ice crystal forms due to modification effect with reclamation and anti-freeze activity test. The test suggested that this class glucanase was a low activity anti-freeze protein. Many anti-freeze proteins were synthesized and secreted by winter rape in apoplast of leaves and roots under low temperature stress. The proteins

  9. 抗冻蛋白应用前景及基因工程表达研究进展%Researches Advances in Application of Antifreeze Protein and Its Gene Engineering Expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡文萍; 马纪

    2012-01-01

    抗冻蛋白(antifreeze protein,AFP)又称为热滞蛋白,是一类抑制冰晶生长的蛋白,它具有三个基本特征:热滞效应(thermal hysteresis activity,THA)、冰晶形态效应和重结晶抑制效应(frecrystallization inhibition,RI),抗冻蛋白是一类广泛存在于鱼类、植物、真菌、昆虫中的蛋白,不同生物的AFPs的化学结构、理化性质、空间构型各不相同,并且同类生物之间的AFPs同源性也不高,不存在相似性序列或结构模式,说明它们可能是在不同的有机体中独立进化而来,没有共同的演化规律.随着研究的深入,抗冻蛋白可广泛应用于医学农学食品工业等领域,起到冷冻保护剂,食品添加剂的作用,前人已经对抗冻蛋白的结构、生化性质和抗冻机制进行了阐述,研究主要对抗冻蛋白应用方面及基因工程的表达作了系统综述,为抗冻蛋白的深入研究奠定基础.%Antifreeze protein (AFP) , also known as thermal hysteresis protein, It is a class of proteinThat inhibiting the growth of ice crystals. It has three basic characteristics; thermal hysteresis effect (THA), the effect of ice crystals form, recrystallization inhibitory effect (RI), To date, AFPs have been widely found in a variety of organisms, such as fish, insects, plants, bacteria and fungi, isolated from a number of fish, plants , bacteria, fungi and arthropods . Different biological AFPs chemical structure, physical and chemical properties, spatial configuration of each are not identical, and similar biological between AFPs homology is not high, there is no similar sequence or structural patterns, indicating that they may be in different organisms evolved independently, there is no common evolution law. Along with the development of research, Antifreeze protein can be widely used in agriculture, medicine food sciences and industry, It played a role in the cryoprotectant and food additives. The biochemical characteristics, as well as antifreeze

  10. NMR-based screening of membrane protein ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yanamala, Naveena; Dutta, Arpana; Beck, Barbara; Van Fleet, Bart; Hay, Kelly; Yazbak, Ahmad; Ishima, Rieko; Doemling, Alexander; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2010-01-01

    Membrane proteins pose problems for the application of NMR-based ligand-screening methods because of the need to maintain the proteins in a membrane mimetic environment such as detergent micelles: they add to the molecular weight of the protein, increase the viscosity of the solution, interact with

  11. Extracting protein dynamics information from overlapped NMR signals using relaxation dispersion difference NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein dynamics plays important roles in many biological events, such as ligand binding and enzyme reactions. NMR is mostly used for investigating such protein dynamics in a site-specific manner. Recently, NMR has been actively applied to large proteins and intrinsically disordered proteins, which are attractive research targets. However, signal overlap, which is often observed for such proteins, hampers accurate analysis of NMR data. In this study, we have developed a new methodology called relaxation dispersion difference that can extract conformational exchange parameters from overlapped NMR signals measured using relaxation dispersion spectroscopy. In relaxation dispersion measurements, the signal intensities of fluctuating residues vary according to the Carr-Purcell-Meiboon-Gill pulsing interval, whereas those of non-fluctuating residues are constant. Therefore, subtraction of each relaxation dispersion spectrum from that with the highest signal intensities, measured at the shortest pulsing interval, leaves only the signals of the fluctuating residues. This is the principle of the relaxation dispersion difference method. This new method enabled us to extract exchange parameters from overlapped signals of heme oxygenase-1, which is a relatively large protein. The results indicate that the structural flexibility of a kink in the heme-binding site is important for efficient heme binding. Relaxation dispersion difference requires neither selectively labeled samples nor modification of pulse programs; thus it will have wide applications in protein dynamics analysis

  12. Extracting protein dynamics information from overlapped NMR signals using relaxation dispersion difference NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konuma, Tsuyoshi [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Department of Structural and Chemical Biology (United States); Harada, Erisa [Suntory Foundation for Life Sciences, Bioorganic Research Institute (Japan); Sugase, Kenji, E-mail: sugase@sunbor.or.jp, E-mail: sugase@moleng.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kyoto University, Department of Molecular Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Protein dynamics plays important roles in many biological events, such as ligand binding and enzyme reactions. NMR is mostly used for investigating such protein dynamics in a site-specific manner. Recently, NMR has been actively applied to large proteins and intrinsically disordered proteins, which are attractive research targets. However, signal overlap, which is often observed for such proteins, hampers accurate analysis of NMR data. In this study, we have developed a new methodology called relaxation dispersion difference that can extract conformational exchange parameters from overlapped NMR signals measured using relaxation dispersion spectroscopy. In relaxation dispersion measurements, the signal intensities of fluctuating residues vary according to the Carr-Purcell-Meiboon-Gill pulsing interval, whereas those of non-fluctuating residues are constant. Therefore, subtraction of each relaxation dispersion spectrum from that with the highest signal intensities, measured at the shortest pulsing interval, leaves only the signals of the fluctuating residues. This is the principle of the relaxation dispersion difference method. This new method enabled us to extract exchange parameters from overlapped signals of heme oxygenase-1, which is a relatively large protein. The results indicate that the structural flexibility of a kink in the heme-binding site is important for efficient heme binding. Relaxation dispersion difference requires neither selectively labeled samples nor modification of pulse programs; thus it will have wide applications in protein dynamics analysis.

  13. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy of protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shangjin; Han, Yun; Paramasivam, Sivakumar; Yan, Si; Siglin, Amanda E; Williams, John C; Byeon, In-Ja L; Ahn, Jinwoo; Gronenborn, Angela M; Polenova, Tatyana

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are vital for many biological processes. These interactions often result in the formation of protein assemblies that are large in size, insoluble, and difficult to crystallize, and therefore are challenging to study by structure biology techniques, such as single crystal X-ray diffraction and solution NMR spectroscopy. Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy is emerging as a promising technique for studies of such protein assemblies because it is not limited by molecular size, solubility, or lack of long-range order. In the past several years, we have applied magic angle spinning SSNMR-based methods to study several protein complexes. In this chapter, we discuss the general SSNMR methodologies employed for structural and dynamics analyses of protein complexes with specific examples from our work on thioredoxin reassemblies, HIV-1 capsid protein assemblies, and microtubule-associated protein assemblies. We present protocols for sample preparation and characterization, pulse sequences, SSNMR spectra collection, and data analysis. PMID:22167681

  14. Antifreeze life cycle assessment (LCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesić Jelena

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Antifreeze based on ethylene glycol is a commonly used commercial product The classification of ethylene glycol as a toxic material increased the disposal costs for used antifreeze and life cycle assessment became a necessity. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA considers the identification and quantification of raw materials and energy inputs and waste outputs during the whole life cycle of the analyzed product. The objectives of LCA are the evaluation of impacts on the environment and improvements of processes in order to reduce and/or eliminate waste. LCA is conducted through a mathematical model derived from mass and energy balances of all the processes included in the life cycle. In all energy processes the part of energy that can be transformed into some other kind of energy is called exergy. The concept of exergy considers the quality of different types of energy and the quality of different materials. It is also a connection between energy and mass transformations. The whole life cycle can be described by the value of the total loss of exergy. The physical meaning of this value is the loss of material and energy that can be used. The results of LCA are very useful for the analyzed products and processes and for the determined conditions under which the analysis was conducted. The results of this study indicate that recycling is the most satisfactory solution for the treatment of used antifreeze regarding material and energy consumption but the re-use of antifreeze should not be neglected as a solution.

  15. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C.; Markley, John L.

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-13C, U-15N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D 1H-15N and 1H-13C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of 1H, 13C, and 15N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use.

  16. GFT projection NMR spectroscopy for proteins in the solid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recording of four-dimensional (4D) spectra for proteins in the solid state has opened new avenues to obtain virtually complete resonance assignments and three-dimensional (3D) structures of proteins. As in solution state NMR, the sampling of three indirect dimensions leads per se to long minimal measurement time. Furthermore, artifact suppression in solid state NMR relies primarily on radio-frequency pulse phase cycling. For an n-step phase cycle, the minimal measurement times of both 3D and 4D spectra are increased n times. To tackle the associated 'sampling problem' and to avoid sampling limited data acquisition, solid state G-Matrix Fourier Transform (SS GFT) projection NMR is introduced to rapidly acquire 3D and 4D spectral information. Specifically, (4,3)D (HA)CANCOCX and (3,2)D (HACA)NCOCX were implemented and recorded for the 6 kDa protein GB1 within about 10% of the time required for acquiring the conventional congeners with the same maximal evolution times and spectral widths in the indirect dimensions. Spectral analysis was complemented by comparative analysis of expected spectral congestion in conventional and GFT NMR experiments, demonstrating that high spectral resolution of the GFT NMR experiments enables one to efficiently obtain nearly complete resonance assignments even for large proteins.

  17. Mapping protein conformational energy landscapes using NMR and molecular simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides detailed understanding of the nature and extent of protein dynamics on physiologically important timescales. We present recent advances in the combination of NMR with state-of-the art molecular simulation that are providing unique new insight into the motions on timescales from nanoseconds to milliseconds. In particular, we focus on methods based on residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) that allow for detailed mapping of the protein conformational energy landscape. A novel combination of RDCs with accelerated molecular dynamics allows for the development of ensemble representations of the underlying Boltzmann ensemble. (authors)

  18. NMR spectroscopy of proteins encapsulated in a positively charged surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Brian G; Liu, Weixia; Peterson, Ronald W; Valentine, Kathleen G; Wand, A Joshua

    2005-07-01

    Traditionally, large proteins, aggregation-prone proteins, and membrane proteins have been difficult to examine by modern multinuclear and multidimensional solution NMR spectroscopy. A major limitation presented by these protein systems is that their slow molecular reorientation compromises many aspects of the more powerful solution NMR methods. Several approaches have emerged to deal with the various spectroscopic difficulties arising from slow molecular reorientation. One of these takes the approach of actively seeking to increase the effective rate of molecular reorientation by encapsulating the protein of interest within the protective shell of a reverse micelle and dissolving the resulting particle in a low viscosity fluid. Since the encapsulation is largely driven by electrostatic interactions, the preparation of samples of acidic proteins suitable for NMR spectroscopy has been problematic owing to the paucity of suitable cationic surfactants. Here, it is shown that the cationic surfactant CTAB may be used to prepare samples of encapsulated anionic proteins dissolved in low viscosity solvents. In a more subtle application, it is further shown that this surfactant can be employed to encapsulate a highly basic protein, which is completely denatured upon encapsulation using an anionic surfactant. PMID:15949753

  19. Application of Solution NMR Spectroscopy to Study Protein Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Göbl

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in spectroscopic methods allow the identification of minute fluctuations in a protein structure. These dynamic properties have been identified as keys to some biological processes. The consequences of this structural flexibility can be far‑reaching and they add a new dimension to the structure-function relationship of biomolecules. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR spectroscopy allows the study of structure as well as dynamics of biomolecules in a very broad range of timescales at atomic level. A number of new NMR methods have been developed recently to allow the measurements of time scales and spatial fluctuations, which in turn provide the thermodynamics associated with the biological processes. Since NMR parameters reflect ensemble measurements, structural ensemble approaches in analyzing NMR data have also been developed. These new methods in some instances can even highlight previously hidden conformational features of the biomolecules. In this review we describe several solution NMR methods to study protein dynamics and discuss their impact on important biological processes.

  20. Graphical interpretation of Boolean operators for protein NMR assignments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdegem, Dries; Dijkstra, Klaas; Hanoulle, Xavier; Lippens, Guy

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a graphics based algorithm for semi-automated protein NMR assignments. Using the basic sequential triple resonance assignment strategy, the method is inspired by the Boolean operators as it applies "AND"-, "OR"- and "NOT"-like operations on planes pulled out of the classical three-

  1. Conformational propensities of intrinsically disordered proteins from NMR chemical shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The realization that a protein can be fully functional even in the absence of a stable three-dimensional structure has motivated a large number of studies describing the conformational behaviour of these proteins at atomic resolution. Here, we review recent advances in the determination of local structural propensities of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) from experimental NMR chemical shifts. A mapping of the local structure in IDPs is of paramount importance in order to understand the molecular details of complex formation, in particular, for IDPs that fold upon binding or undergo structural transitions to pathological forms of the same protein. We discuss experimental strategies for the spectral assignment of IDPs, chemical shift prediction algorithms and the generation of representative structural ensembles of IDPs on the basis of chemical shifts. Additionally, we highlight the inherent degeneracies associated with the determination of IDP sub-state populations from NMR chemical shifts alone. (authors)

  2. Efficient cellular solid-state NMR of membrane proteins by targeted protein labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy (ssNMR) has made significant progress towards the study of membrane proteins in their native cellular membranes. However, reduced spectroscopic sensitivity and high background signal levels can complicate these experiments. Here, we describe a method for ssNMR to specifically label a single protein by repressing endogenous protein expression with rifampicin. Our results demonstrate that treatment of E. coli with rifampicin during induction of recombinant membrane protein expression reduces background signals for different expression levels and improves sensitivity in cellular membrane samples. Further, the method reduces the amount of time and resources needed to produce membrane protein samples, enabling new strategies for studying challenging membrane proteins by ssNMR

  3. Efficient cellular solid-state NMR of membrane proteins by targeted protein labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Lindsay A. [University of Oxford, Oxford Particle Imaging Centre, The Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Division of Structural Biology, Nuffield Department of Medicine (United Kingdom); Daniëls, Mark; Cruijsen, Elwin A. W. van der; Folkers, Gert E.; Baldus, Marc, E-mail: m.baldus@uu.nl [Utrecht University, NMR Spectroscopy, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Bijvoet Center for Biomolecular Research (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy (ssNMR) has made significant progress towards the study of membrane proteins in their native cellular membranes. However, reduced spectroscopic sensitivity and high background signal levels can complicate these experiments. Here, we describe a method for ssNMR to specifically label a single protein by repressing endogenous protein expression with rifampicin. Our results demonstrate that treatment of E. coli with rifampicin during induction of recombinant membrane protein expression reduces background signals for different expression levels and improves sensitivity in cellular membrane samples. Further, the method reduces the amount of time and resources needed to produce membrane protein samples, enabling new strategies for studying challenging membrane proteins by ssNMR.

  4. Graphical interpretation of Boolean operators for protein NMR assignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdegem, Dries; Dijkstra, Klaas; Hanoulle, Xavier; Lippens, Guy

    2008-09-01

    We have developed a graphics based algorithm for semi-automated protein NMR assignments. Using the basic sequential triple resonance assignment strategy, the method is inspired by the Boolean operators as it applies "AND"-, "OR"- and "NOT"-like operations on planes pulled out of the classical three-dimensional spectra to obtain its functionality. The method's strength lies in the continuous graphical presentation of the spectra, allowing both a semi-automatic peaklist construction and sequential assignment. We demonstrate here its general use for the case of a folded protein with a well-dispersed spectrum, but equally for a natively unfolded protein where spectral resolution is minimal. PMID:18762868

  5. Peakr: simulating solid-state NMR spectra of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When analyzing solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of proteins, assignment of resonances to nuclei and derivation of restraints for 3D structure calculations are challenging and time-consuming processes. Simulated spectra that have been calculated based on, for example, chemical shift predictions and structural models can be of considerable help. Existing solutions are typically limited in the type of experiment they can consider and difficult to adapt to different settings. Here, we present Peakr, a software to simulate solid-state NMR spectra of proteins. It can generate simulated spectra based on numerous common types of internuclear correlations relevant for assignment and structure elucidation, can compare simulated and experimental spectra and produces lists and visualizations useful for analyzing measured spectra. Compared with other solutions, it is fast, versatile and user friendly. (authors)

  6. Analysis of the interface variability in NMR structure ensembles of protein-protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvanese, Luisa; D'Auria, Gabriella; Vangone, Anna; Falcigno, Lucia; Oliva, Romina

    2016-06-01

    NMR structures consist in ensembles of conformers, all satisfying the experimental restraints, which exhibit a certain degree of structural variability. We analyzed here the interface in NMR ensembles of protein-protein heterodimeric complexes and found it to span a wide range of different conservations. The different exhibited conservations do not simply correlate with the size of the systems/interfaces, and are most probably the result of an interplay between different factors, including the quality of experimental data and the intrinsic complex flexibility. In any case, this information is not to be missed when NMR structures of protein-protein complexes are analyzed; especially considering that, as we also show here, the first NMR conformer is usually not the one which best reflects the overall interface. To quantify the interface conservation and to analyze it, we used an approach originally conceived for the analysis and ranking of ensembles of docking models, which has now been extended to directly deal with NMR ensembles. We propose this approach, based on the conservation of the inter-residue contacts at the interface, both for the analysis of the interface in whole ensembles of NMR complexes and for the possible selection of a single conformer as the best representative of the overall interface. In order to make the analyses automatic and fast, we made the protocol available as a web tool at: https://www.molnac.unisa.it/BioTools/consrank/consrank-nmr.html. PMID:26968364

  7. Structure and collective dynamics of hydrated anti-freeze protein type III from 180 K to 298 K by X-ray diffraction and inelastic X-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Koji; Baron, Alfred Q R; Uchiyama, Hiroshi; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Toshio

    2016-04-01

    We investigated hydrated antifreeze protein type III (AFP III) powder with a hydration level h (=mass of water/mass of protein) of 0.4 in the temperature range between 180 K and 298 K using X-ray diffraction and inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS). The X-ray diffraction data showed smooth, largely monotonic changes between 180 K and 298 K without freezing water. Meanwhile, the collective dynamics observed by IXS showed a strong change in the sound velocity at 180 K, after being largely temperature independent at higher temperatures (298-220 K). We interpret this change in terms of the dynamic transition previously discussed using other probes including THz IR absorption spectroscopy and incoherent elastic and quasi-elastic neutron scattering. This finding suggests that the dynamic transition of hydrated proteins is observable on the subpicosecond time scale as well as nano- and pico-second scales, both in collective dynamics from IXS and single particle dynamics from neutron scattering. Moreover, it is most likely that the dynamic transition of hydrated AFP III is not directly correlated with its hydration structure. PMID:27059578

  8. Structure and collective dynamics of hydrated anti-freeze protein type III from 180 K to 298 K by X-ray diffraction and inelastic X-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Koji; Baron, Alfred Q. R.; Uchiyama, Hiroshi; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Toshio

    2016-04-01

    We investigated hydrated antifreeze protein type III (AFP III) powder with a hydration level h (=mass of water/mass of protein) of 0.4 in the temperature range between 180 K and 298 K using X-ray diffraction and inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS). The X-ray diffraction data showed smooth, largely monotonic changes between 180 K and 298 K without freezing water. Meanwhile, the collective dynamics observed by IXS showed a strong change in the sound velocity at 180 K, after being largely temperature independent at higher temperatures (298-220 K). We interpret this change in terms of the dynamic transition previously discussed using other probes including THz IR absorption spectroscopy and incoherent elastic and quasi-elastic neutron scattering. This finding suggests that the dynamic transition of hydrated proteins is observable on the subpicosecond time scale as well as nano- and pico-second scales, both in collective dynamics from IXS and single particle dynamics from neutron scattering. Moreover, it is most likely that the dynamic transition of hydrated AFP III is not directly correlated with its hydration structure.

  9. Cell-free protein production for NMR studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2012-01-01

    The cell-free expression system using an Escherichia coli extract is a practical method for producing isotope-labeled proteins. The advantage of the cell-free system over cellular expression is that any isotope-labeled amino acid can be incorporated into the target protein with minimal scrambling, thus providing opportunities for advanced isotope labeling of proteins. We have modified the standard protocol for E. coli cell-free expression to cope with two problems specific to NMR sample preparation. First, endogenous amino acids present in the E. coli S30 extract lead to dilution of the added isotope. To minimize the content of the remaining amino acids, a gel filtration step is included in the preparation of the E. coli extract. Second, proteins produced by the cell-free system are not necessarily homogeneous due to incomplete processing of the N-terminal formyl-methionine residue, which complicates NMR spectra. Therefore, the protein of interest is engineered to contain a cleavable N-terminal histidine-tag, which generates a homogeneous protein after the digestion of the tag. Here, we describe the protocol for modified E. coli cell-free expression. PMID:22167669

  10. 13C-NMR studies of membrane lipid-protein interactions upon protein heat denaturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinach chloroplast membranes were studied by natural abundance carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (13C-NMR) spectroscopy in their normal state and after heat denaturation of membrane proteins. The membrane proteins were denaturated by raising the temperature of the sample to 67degC for 5 minutes. Line-broadening of 13C-NMR resonances arising from the 1st (carbonyl), 7th, 9th and 12th carbon atom of fatty-acyl chains at these locations, obviously caused by changes in interactions between membrane lipids and proteins upon heat denaturation of membrane proteins. (author). 7 refs.; 1 fig

  11. Preparation and application of antifreeze proteins extracted from winter wheat bran%冬小麦抗冻蛋白制备及其在汤圆中的应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏露; 张超; 王立; 张晖

    2009-01-01

    研究了冬小麦麸皮抗冻蛋白的制备方法及其在速冻汤圆中的应用.研究确定冬小麦麸皮抗冻蛋白的提取工艺为:pH8.0,提取时间3h,液料比5:1,该条件下小麦麸皮水溶性蛋白质提取率达到38%,其中含抗冻蛋白1.6%.抗冻蛋白粗品在汤圆中的应用实验结果显示,2.5%的蛋白添加量对汤圆的品质有明显的改善效果.%The preparation and application of antifreeze proteins (AFPs) were studied.The extraction process of AFPs from winter wheat bran was optimized as following, water/material ratio 5:1, pH 8.0, extraction time 3h.The extraction rate of soluble protein from winter wheat bran was 38%, and the AFPs content in the extraction (crude AFPs) was 1.6%.The application experiment of AFP in rice dumpling showed that the quality of rice dumpling would be improved by adding with 2.5% crude AFPs.

  12. Structure and Dynamic Properties of Membrane Proteins using NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rösner, Heike; Kragelund, Birthe

    2012-01-01

    conformational changes. Their structural and functional decoding is challenging and has imposed demanding experimental development. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the techniques providing the capacity to make a significant difference in the deciphering of the membrane protein......Integral membrane proteins are one of the most challenging groups of macromolecules despite their apparent conformational simplicity. They manage and drive transport, circulate information, and participate in cellular movements via interactions with other proteins and through intricate...... structure-function paradigm. The method has evolved dramatically during the last decade resulting in a plethora of new experiments leading to a significant increase in the scientific repertoire for studying membrane proteins. Besides solving the three-dimensional structures using state-of-the-art approaches...

  13. Lysine methylation strategies for characterizing protein conformations by NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the presence of formaldehyde and a mild reducing agent, reductive methylation is known to achieve near complete dimethylation of protein amino groups under non-denaturing conditions, in aqueous media. Amino methylation of proteins is employed in mass spectrometric, crystallographic, and NMR studies. Where biosynthetic labeling is prohibitive, amino 13C-methylation provides an attractive option for monitoring folding, kinetics, protein–protein and protein-DNA interactions by NMR. Here, we demonstrate two improvements over traditional 13C-reductive methylation schemes: (1) By judicious choice of stoichiometry and pH, ε-aminos can be preferentially monomethylated. Monomethyl tags are less perturbing and generally exhibit improved resolution over dimethyllysines, and (2) By use of deuterated reducing agents and 13C-formaldehyde, amino groups can be labeled with 13CH2D tags. Use of deutero-13C-formaldehyde affords either 13CHD2, or 13CD3 probes depending on choice of reducing agent. Making use of 13C–2H scalar couplings, we demonstrate a filtering scheme that eliminates natural abundance 13C signal.

  14. Cloning and sequencing of antifreeze protein gene inDaucus carota var \\%sativus\\% Hoffm Deutschl%胡萝卜var sativus Hoffm Deutschl抗冻蛋白基因的克隆及测序

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹明安; 崔鸿文; 樊代明; 郭立

    2001-01-01

    Antifreeze protein gene (afp) in three native carrot cultivars(Daucus carota var \\%sativus\\% Hoffm Deutschl),Wuzhong carrot in Ningxia,H uaxian carrot in Shaanxi and Hanzhong carrot in Shaanxi,was cloned by PCR (polym erase chain reaction).Wuzhong carrots afp was sequenced and its sequence w as compared with that of Daucus carota var \\%autumn\\% King from British.Ther e were 35 different bases between two varieties in 1004 sequenced nucleotides,among which there were 20 nonsense mutations and 15 sense mutations.Based on sense mutations homology was 98.5%.%以宁夏吴忠胡萝卜、陕西华县胡萝卜、陕西汉中胡萝卜3个地方品种为材料,用PCR方法克隆了中国胡萝卜var\\%sativus\\%HoffmDeutschl的抗冻蛋白基因\\%afp\\%,测定了宁夏吴忠胡萝卜\\%afp\\%的核苷酸序列,和英国胡萝卜var\\%autumn\\%King\\%afp\\%序列对比,在所测1004个核苷酸中,有35个碱基不同,其中无义突变20个,有义突变15个。按有义突变计,同源性为\\{98.5%\\}

  15. Probabilistic validation of protein NMR chemical shift assignments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data validation plays an important role in ensuring the reliability and reproducibility of studies. NMR investigations of the functional properties, dynamics, chemical kinetics, and structures of proteins depend critically on the correctness of chemical shift assignments. We present a novel probabilistic method named ARECA for validating chemical shift assignments that relies on the nuclear Overhauser effect data. ARECA has been evaluated through its application to 26 case studies and has been shown to be complementary to, and usually more reliable than, approaches based on chemical shift databases. ARECA is available online at http://areca.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ http://areca.nmrfam.wisc.edu/

  16. Probabilistic validation of protein NMR chemical shift assignments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dashti, Hesam [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Graduate Program in Biophysics, Biochemistry Department (United States); Tonelli, Marco; Lee, Woonghee; Westler, William M.; Cornilescu, Gabriel [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Biochemistry Department, National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison (United States); Ulrich, Eldon L. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, BioMagResBank, Biochemistry Department (United States); Markley, John L., E-mail: markley@nmrfam.wisc.edu, E-mail: jmarkley@wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Biochemistry Department, National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Data validation plays an important role in ensuring the reliability and reproducibility of studies. NMR investigations of the functional properties, dynamics, chemical kinetics, and structures of proteins depend critically on the correctness of chemical shift assignments. We present a novel probabilistic method named ARECA for validating chemical shift assignments that relies on the nuclear Overhauser effect data. ARECA has been evaluated through its application to 26 case studies and has been shown to be complementary to, and usually more reliable than, approaches based on chemical shift databases. ARECA is available online at http://areca.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ http://areca.nmrfam.wisc.edu/.

  17. Fast mapping of global protein folding states by multivariate NMR: a GPS for proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmendal, Anders; Underhaug, Jarl; Otzen, Daniel E; Nielsen, Niels Christian

    2010-01-01

    To obtain insight into the functions of proteins and their specific roles, it is important to establish efficient procedures for exploring the states that encapsulate their conformational space. Global Protein folding State mapping by multivariate NMR (GPS NMR) is a powerful high-throughput method...... in, protein-folding state maps. The method is fast, sensitive, and robust, and it works without isotope-labelling. The unique capabilities of GPS NMR to identify different folding states and to compare different unfolding processes are demonstrated by mapping of the equilibrium folding space of...... bovine alpha-lactalbumin in the presence of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS, and compare these with other surfactants, acid, denaturants and heat....

  18. Protein NMR Structure Refinement based on Bayesian Inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeya, Teppei; Ikeda, Shiro; Kigawa, Takanori; Ito, Yutaka; Güntert, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a tool to investigate threedimensional (3D) structures and dynamics of biomacromolecules at atomic resolution in solution or more natural environments such as living cells. Since NMR data are principally only spectra with peak signals, it is required to properly deduce structural information from the sparse experimental data with their imperfections and uncertainty, and to visualize 3D conformations by NMR structure calculation. In order to efficiently analyse the data, Rieping et al. proposed a new structure calculation method based on Bayes’ theorem. We implemented a similar approach into the program CYANA with some modifications. It allows us to handle automatic NOE cross peak assignments in unambiguous and ambiguous usages, and to create a prior distribution based on a physical force field with the generalized Born implicit water model. The sampling scheme for obtaining the posterior is performed by a hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm combined with Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) by the Gibbs sampler, and molecular dynamics simulation (MD) for obtaining a canonical ensemble of conformations. Since it is not trivial to search the entire function space particularly for exploring the conformational prior due to the extraordinarily large conformation space of proteins, the replica exchange method is performed, in which several MCMC calculations with different temperatures run in parallel as replicas. It is shown with simulated data or randomly deleted experimental peaks that the new structure calculation method can provide accurate structures even with less peaks, especially compared with the conventional method. In particular, it dramatically improves in-cell structures of the proteins GB1 and TTHA1718 using exclusively information obtained in living Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells.

  19. Effects of NMR spectral resolution on protein structure calculation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhas Tikole

    Full Text Available Adequate digital resolution and signal sensitivity are two critical factors for protein structure determinations by solution NMR spectroscopy. The prime objective for obtaining high digital resolution is to resolve peak overlap, especially in NOESY spectra with thousands of signals where the signal analysis needs to be performed on a large scale. Achieving maximum digital resolution is usually limited by the practically available measurement time. We developed a method utilizing non-uniform sampling for balancing digital resolution and signal sensitivity, and performed a large-scale analysis of the effect of the digital resolution on the accuracy of the resulting protein structures. Structure calculations were performed as a function of digital resolution for about 400 proteins with molecular sizes ranging between 5 and 33 kDa. The structural accuracy was assessed by atomic coordinate RMSD values from the reference structures of the proteins. In addition, we monitored also the number of assigned NOESY cross peaks, the average signal sensitivity, and the chemical shift spectral overlap. We show that high resolution is equally important for proteins of every molecular size. The chemical shift spectral overlap depends strongly on the corresponding spectral digital resolution. Thus, knowing the extent of overlap can be a predictor of the resulting structural accuracy. Our results show that for every molecular size a minimal digital resolution, corresponding to the natural linewidth, needs to be achieved for obtaining the highest accuracy possible for the given protein size using state-of-the-art automated NOESY assignment and structure calculation methods.

  20. NMR Structure of the Myristylated Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Matrix Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lola A. Brown

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2 is mediated by Gag’s N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV, a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S. These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly.

  1. NMR assignment of the arenaviral protein Z from Lassa fever virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpon, Laurent; Osborne, Michael J; Borden, Katherine L B

    2008-06-01

    The arenavirus protein Z from Lassa fever virus was recently found to inhibit mRNA translation through direct interaction with eIF4E. Here, we report the NMR assignment of this RING-containing protein that was determined by triple resonance NMR techniques. PMID:18958179

  2. NMR assignment of the arenaviral protein Z from Lassa fever virus

    OpenAIRE

    Volpon, Laurent; Osborne, Michael J.; Borden, Katherine L. B.

    2008-01-01

    The arenavirus protein Z from Lassa fever virus was recently found to inhibit mRNA translation through direct interaction with eIF4E. Here, we report the NMR assignment of this RING-containing protein that was determined by triple resonance NMR techniques.

  3. NMR assignment of the arenaviral protein Z from Lassa fever virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Michael J.; Borden, Katherine L.B.

    2008-01-01

    The arenavirus protein Z from Lassa fever virus was recently found to inhibit mRNA translation through direct interaction with eIF4E. Here, we report the NMR assignment of this RING-containing protein that was determined by triple resonance NMR techniques. PMID:18958179

  4. High-Resolution NMR of Encapsulated Proteins Dissolved in Low-Viscosity Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wand, A. Joshua; Ehrhardt, Mark R.; Flynn, Peter F.

    1998-12-01

    The majority of known proteins are too large to be comprehensively examined by solution NMR methods, primarily because they tumble too slowly in solution. Here we introduce an approach to making the NMR relaxation properties of large proteins amenable to modern solution NMR techniques. The encapsulation of a protein in a reverse micelle dissolved in a low-viscosity fluid allows it to tumble as fast as a much smaller protein. The approach is demonstrated and validated with the protein ubiquitin encapsulated in reverse micelles prepared in a variety of alkane solvents.

  5. Structure prediction of protein complexes by an NMR-based protein docking algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein docking algorithms can be used to study the driving forces and reaction mechanisms of docking processes. They are also able to speed up the lengthy process of experimental structure elucidation of protein complexes by proposing potential structures. In this paper, we are discussing a variant of the protein-protein docking problem, where the input consists of the tertiary structures of proteins A and B plus an unassigned one-dimensional 1H-NMR spectrum of the complex AB. We present a new scoring function for evaluating and ranking potential complex structures produced by a docking algorithm. The scoring function computes a 'theoretical' 1H-NMR spectrum for each tentative complex structure and subtracts the calculated spectrum from the experimental one. The absolute areas of the difference spectra are then used to rank the potential complex structures. In contrast to formerly published approaches (e.g. [Morelli et al. (2000) Biochemistry, 39, 2530-2537]) we do not use distance constraints (intermolecular NOE constraints). We have tested the approach with four protein complexes whose three-dimensional structures are stored in the PDB data bank [Bernstein et al. (1977)] and whose 1H-NMR shift assignments are available from the BMRB database. The best result was obtained for an example, where all standard scoring functions failed completely. Here, our new scoring function achieved an almost perfect separation between good approximations of the true complex structure and false positives

  6. Utilization of lysine {sup 13}C-methylation NMR for protein-protein interaction studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattori, Yoshikazu; Furuita, Kyoko [Osaka University, Institute for Protein Research (Japan); Ohki, Izuru, E-mail: i-ooki@bs.naist.jp [Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), Graduate School of Biological Sciences (Japan); Ikegami, Takahisa [Osaka University, Institute for Protein Research (Japan); Fukada, Harumi [Osaka Prefecture University, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences (Japan); Shirakawa, Masahiro [Kyoto University, Graduate School of Engineering (Japan); Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Kojima, Chojiro, E-mail: kojima@protein.osaka-u.ac.jp [Osaka University, Institute for Protein Research (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Chemical modification is an easy way for stable isotope labeling of non-labeled proteins. The reductive {sup 13}C-methylation of the amino group of the lysine side-chain by {sup 13}C-formaldehyde is a post-modification and is applicable to most proteins since this chemical modification specifically and quickly proceeds under mild conditions such as 4 Degree-Sign C, pH 6.8, overnight. {sup 13}C-methylation has been used for NMR to study the interactions between the methylated proteins and various molecules, such as small ligands, nucleic acids and peptides. Here we applied lysine {sup 13}C-methylation NMR to monitor protein-protein interactions. The affinity and the intermolecular interaction sites of methylated ubiquitin with three ubiquitin-interacting proteins were successfully determined using chemical-shift perturbation experiments via the {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C HSQC spectra of the {sup 13}C-methylated-lysine methyl groups. The lysine {sup 13}C-methylation NMR results also emphasized the importance of the usage of side-chain signals to monitor the intermolecular interaction sites, and was applicable to studying samples with concentrations in the low sub-micromolar range.

  7. PDBStat: a universal restraint converter and restraint analysis software package for protein NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The heterogeneous array of software tools used in the process of protein NMR structure determination presents organizational challenges in the structure determination and validation processes, and creates a learning curve that limits the broader use of protein NMR in biology. These challenges, including accurate use of data in different data formats required by software carrying out similar tasks, continue to confound the efforts of novices and experts alike. These important issues need to be addressed robustly in order to standardize protein NMR structure determination and validation. PDBStat is a C/C++ computer program originally developed as a universal coordinate and protein NMR restraint converter. Its primary function is to provide a user-friendly tool for interconverting between protein coordinate and protein NMR restraint data formats. It also provides an integrated set of computational methods for protein NMR restraint analysis and structure quality assessment, relabeling of prochiral atoms with correct IUPAC names, as well as multiple methods for analysis of the consistency of atomic positions indicated by their convergence across a protein NMR ensemble. In this paper we provide a detailed description of the PDBStat software, and highlight some of its valuable computational capabilities. As an example, we demonstrate the use of the PDBStat restraint converter for restrained CS-Rosetta structure generation calculations, and compare the resulting protein NMR structure models with those generated from the same NMR restraint data using more traditional structure determination methods. These results demonstrate the value of a universal restraint converter in allowing the use of multiple structure generation methods with the same restraint data for consensus analysis of protein NMR structures and the underlying restraint data

  8. A tracked approach for automated NMR assignments in proteins (TATAPRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel automated approach for the sequence specific NMR assignments of 1HN, 13Cα, 13Cβ, 13C'/1Hα and 15N spins in proteins, using triple resonance experimental data, is presented. The algorithm, TATAPRO (Tracked AuTomated Assignments in Proteins) utilizes the protein primary sequence and peak lists from a set of triple resonance spectra which correlate 1HN and 15N chemical shifts with those of 13Cα, 13Cβ and 13C'/1Hα. The information derived from such correlations is used to create a 'masterlist' consisting of all possible sets of 1HNi, 15Ni, 13Cαi, 13Cβi, 13C'i/1Hαi, 13Cαi-1, 13Cβi-1 and 13C'i-1/ 1Hαi-1 chemical shifts. On the basis of an extensive statistical analysis of 13Cα and 13Cβ chemical shift data of proteins derived from the BioMagResBank (BMRB), it is shown that the 20 amino acid residues can be grouped into eight distinct categories, each of which is assigned a unique two-digit code. Such a code is used to tag individual sets of chemical shifts in the masterlist and also to translate the protein primary sequence into an array called ppsarray. The program then uses the masterlist to search for neighbouring partners of a given amino acid residue along the polypeptide chain and sequentially assigns a maximum possible stretch of residues on either side. While doing so, each assigned residue is tracked in an array called assigarray, with the two-digit code assigned earlier. The assigarray is then mapped onto the ppsarray for sequence specific resonance assignment. The program has been tested using experimental data on a calcium binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica (Eh-CaBP, 15 kDa) having substantial internal sequence homology and using published data on four other proteins in the molecular weight range of 18-42 kDa. In all the cases, nearly complete sequence specific resonance assignments (> 95%) are obtained. Furthermore, the reliability of the program has been tested by deleting sets of chemical shifts randomly from the masterlist

  9. Determination of the Electron Self-Exchange Rates of Blue Copper Proteins by Super-WEFT NMR Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Lixin; Philipp, Else Astrid; Led, Jens J.

    Anabaena variabilis plastocyanin, blue copper proteins, electron self-exchange rates, electron transfer, super-WEFT NMR......Anabaena variabilis plastocyanin, blue copper proteins, electron self-exchange rates, electron transfer, super-WEFT NMR...

  10. Selectively Labeling the Heterologous Protein in Escherichia coli for NMR Studies: A Strategy to Speed Up NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, F. C. L.; Amorim, G. C.; Moreau, V. H.; Sousa, V. O.; Creazola, A. T.; Américo, T. A.; Pais, A. P. N.; Leite, A.; Netto, L. E. S.; Giordano, R. J.; Valente, A. P.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is an important tool for high-resolution structural studies of proteins. It demands high protein concentration and high purity; however, the expression of proteins at high levels often leads to protein aggregation and the protein purification step can correspond to a high percentage of the overall time in the structural determination process. In the present article we show that the step of sample optimization can be simplified by selective labeling the heterologous protein expressed in Escherichia coli by the use of rifampicin. Yeast thioredoxin and a coix transcription factor Opaque 2 leucine zipper (LZ) were used to show the effectiveness of the protocol. The 1H/15N heteronuclear correlation two-dimensional NMR spectrum (HMQC) of the selective 15N-labeled thioredoxin without any purification is remarkably similar to the spectrum of the purified protein. The method has high yields and a good 1H/15N HMQC spectrum can be obtained with 50 ml of M9 growth medium. Opaque 2 LZ, a difficult protein due to the lower expression level and high hydrophobicity, was also probed. The 15N-edited spectrum of Opaque 2 LZ showed only the resonances of the protein of heterologous expression (Opaque 2 LZ) while the 1H spectrum shows several other resonances from other proteins of the cell lysate. The demand for a fast methodology for structural determination is increasing with the advent of genome/proteome projects. Selective labeling the heterologous protein can speed up NMR structural studies as well as NMR-based drug screening. This methodology is especially effective for difficult proteins such as hydrophobic transcription factors, membrane proteins, and others.

  11. Solid-state NMR studies of globular and membrane proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Luca, Sorin

    2003-01-01

    Spektroskopie erlaubt die Eigenschaften und Struktur der Materie durch Einsatz elektromagnetischer Strahlung auf molekularer Ebene zu untersuchen. Die Kernspinresonanz (NMR) ist ein spezielles Gebiet der Spektroskopie, die die magnetischen Eigenschaften der Atomkerne auswertet. Ein kurzer Überblick über die historischen Weiterentwicklungen im Bereich der NMR ergibt sich aus einer Betrachtung der Nobelpreise, die bisher im Zusammenhang der NMR vergeben wurden: 1952 empfingen Felix Bloch und Ed...

  12. Micro-scale NMR Screening of New Detergents for Membrane Protein Structural Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qinghai; Horst, Reto; Geralt, Michael; Ma, Xingquan; Hong, Wen-Xu; Finn, M.G.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2008-01-01

    The rate limiting step in biophysical characterization of membrane proteins is often the availability of suitable amounts of protein material. It was therefore of interest to demonstrate that micro-coil nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technology can be used to screen microscale quantities of membrane proteins for proper folding in samples destined for structural studies. Micoscale NMR was then used to screen a series of newly designed zwitterionic phosphocholine detergents for their ability ...

  13. NMR structure of an acyl-carrier protein from Borrelia burgdorferi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high-resolution NMR structure of the acyl-carrier protein from the pathogen B. burgdorferi determined to a r.m.s. deviation of 0.4 Å over the protein backbone is reported. The NMR structure was determined using multidimensional NMR spectroscopy and consists of four α-helices and two 310-helices. Structural comparison reveals that this protein is highly similar to the acyl-carrier protein from A. aeolicus. Nearly complete resonance assignment and the high-resolution NMR structure of the acyl-carrier protein from Borrelia burgdorferi, a target of the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID) structure-determination pipeline, are reported. This protein was chosen as a potential target for drug-discovery efforts because of its involvement in fatty-acid biosynthesis, an essential metabolic pathway, in bacteria. It was possible to assign >98% of backbone resonances and >92% of side-chain resonances using multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. The NMR structure was determined to a backbone r.m.s.d. of 0.4 Å and contained four α-helices and two 310-helices. A structure-homology search revealed that this protein is highly similar to the acyl-carrier protein from Aquifex aeolicus

  14. A tracked approach for automated NMR assignments in proteins (TATAPRO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atreya, H.S.; Sahu, S.C.; Chary, K.V.R.; Govil, Girjesh [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Department of Chemical Sciences (India)

    2000-06-15

    A novel automated approach for the sequence specific NMR assignments of {sup 1}H{sup N}, {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}, {sup 13}C{sup {beta}}, {sup 13}C'/{sup 1}H{sup {alpha}} and {sup 15}N spins in proteins, using triple resonance experimental data, is presented. The algorithm, TATAPRO (Tracked AuTomated Assignments in Proteins) utilizes the protein primary sequence and peak lists from a set of triple resonance spectra which correlate {sup 1}H{sup N} and {sup 15}N chemical shifts with those of {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}, {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} and {sup 13}C'/{sup 1}H{sup {alpha}}. The information derived from such correlations is used to create a 'master{sub l}ist' consisting of all possible sets of {sup 1}H{sup N}{sub i}, {sup 15}N{sub i}, {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}{sub i}, {sup 13}C{sup {beta}}{sub i}, {sup 13}C'{sub i}/{sup 1}H{sup {alpha}}{sub i}, {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}{sub i-1}, {sup 13}C{sup {beta}}{sub i-1} and {sup 13}C'{sub i-1}/ {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}}{sub i-1} chemical shifts. On the basis of an extensive statistical analysis of {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shift data of proteins derived from the BioMagResBank (BMRB), it is shown that the 20 amino acid residues can be grouped into eight distinct categories, each of which is assigned a unique two-digit code. Such a code is used to tag individual sets of chemical shifts in the master{sub l}ist and also to translate the protein primary sequence into an array called pps{sub a}rray. The program then uses the master{sub l}ist to search for neighbouring partners of a given amino acid residue along the polypeptide chain and sequentially assigns a maximum possible stretch of residues on either side. While doing so, each assigned residue is tracked in an array called assig{sub a}rray, with the two-digit code assigned earlier. The assig{sub a}rray is then mapped onto the pps{sub a}rray for sequence specific resonance assignment. The program has been tested using

  15. SPINS: Standardized ProteIn NMR Storage. A data dictionary and object-oriented relational database for archiving protein NMR spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern protein NMR spectroscopy laboratories have a rapidly growing need for an easily queried local archival system of raw experimental NMR datasets. SPINS (Standardized ProteIn Nmr Storage) is an object-oriented relational database that provides facilities for high-volume NMR data archival, organization of analyses, and dissemination of results to the public domain by automatic preparation of the header files required for submission of data to the BioMagResBank (BMRB). The current version of SPINS coordinates the process from data collection to BMRB deposition of raw NMR data by standardizing and integrating the storage and retrieval of these data in a local laboratory file system. Additional facilities include a data mining query tool, graphical database administration tools, and a NMRStar v2.1.1 file generator. SPINS also includes a user-friendly internet-based graphical user interface, which is optionally integrated with Varian VNMR NMR data collection software. This paper provides an overview of the data model underlying the SPINS database system, a description of its implementation in Oracle, and an outline of future plans for the SPINS project

  16. Characterization of glycoprotein antifreeze biosynthesis in isolated hepatocytes from Pagothenia borchgrevinki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incorporation of 14C-leucine and 3H-alanine into TCA-precipitable protein. TCA-soluble protein, and antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGP) was measured in isolated hepatocytes from Pagothenia borchgrevinki Boulenger following acclimation to -1.5 degrees C and +4 degrees C. the rate of 3H-alanine incorporation into AFGP followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a Vmax of 4.8 nM X mg protein-1 X h-1 at -1.5 degrees C and 7.5 nM X mg protein-1 X h-1 at +4 degrees C. Km values were 27.9 microM and 41.7 microM at -1.5 degrees C and +4 degrees C, respectively. Incorporation of 14C-leucine into TCA-precipitable protein also showed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a Vmax of 20 nM X mg protein-1 X hr-1 at 1.5 degrees C and 32.3 nM X mg protein-1 X hr-1 at +4 degrees C. Km values were 83.3 microM at -1.5 degrees C and 125 microM at +4 degrees C. AFGP synthesis was monitored over a 120-h period by radioimmunoassay in cultures of hepatocytes from cold acclimated fish (-1.5 degrees C) incubated at both -1.5 degrees C and +4 degrees C. The estimated Q10 for AFGP from these data is 3.23. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of antifreeze glycoproteins produced by isolated hepatocytes showed that all four antifreeze fractions normally present in the serum of P. borchgrevinki are also synthesized by isolated hepatocytes. The two major conclusions from these experiments were that 1) P. brochgrevinki, unlike many northern fishes, does not show thermal acclimation, and 2) environmental factors responsible for modification of peptide antifreeze synthesis in northern fishes do not elicit changes in AFGP synthesis in P. borchgrevinki

  17. NMR studies of a new family of DNA binding proteins: the THAP proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, Virginie; Campagne, Sébastien; Durand, Jade; Muller, Isabelle; Milon, Alain

    2013-05-01

    The THAP (THanatos-Associated Protein) domain is an evolutionary conserved C2CH zinc-coordinating domain shared with a large family of cellular factors (THAP proteins). Many members of the THAP family act as transcription factors that control cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, angiogenesis, apoptosis and epigenetic gene silencing. They recognize specific DNA sequences in the promoters of target genes and subsequently recruit effector proteins. Recent structural and functional studies have allowed getting better insight into the nuclear and cellular functions of some THAP members and the molecular mechanisms by which they recognize DNA. The present article reviews recent advances in the knowledge of the THAP domains structures and their interaction with DNA, with a particular focus on NMR. It provides the solution structure of the THAP domain of THAP11, a recently characterized human THAP protein with important functions in transcription and cell growth in colon cancer. PMID:23306615

  18. NMR studies of a new family of DNA binding proteins: the THAP proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gervais, Virginie, E-mail: virginie.gervais@ipbs.fr [IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), CNRS (France); Campagne, Sebastien [ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Durand, Jade; Muller, Isabelle; Milon, Alain, E-mail: alain.milon@ipbs.fr [IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale), CNRS (France)

    2013-05-15

    The THAP (THanatos-Associated Protein) domain is an evolutionary conserved C2CH zinc-coordinating domain shared with a large family of cellular factors (THAP proteins). Many members of the THAP family act as transcription factors that control cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, angiogenesis, apoptosis and epigenetic gene silencing. They recognize specific DNA sequences in the promoters of target genes and subsequently recruit effector proteins. Recent structural and functional studies have allowed getting better insight into the nuclear and cellular functions of some THAP members and the molecular mechanisms by which they recognize DNA. The present article reviews recent advances in the knowledge of the THAP domains structures and their interaction with DNA, with a particular focus on NMR. It provides the solution structure of the THAP domain of THAP11, a recently characterized human THAP protein with important functions in transcription and cell growth in colon cancer.

  19. NMR contributions to structural dynamics studies of intrinsically disordered proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Konrat, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are characterized by substantial conformational plasticity. Given their inherent structural flexibility X-ray crystallography is not applicable to study these proteins. In contrast, NMR spectroscopy offers unique opportunities for structural and dynamic studies of IDPs. The past two decades have witnessed significant development of NMR spectroscopy that couples advances in spin physics and chemistry with a broad range of applications. This article will...

  20. Determination of protein-ligand binding affinity by NMR: observations from serum albumin model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Lee; Rutherford, Samantha; Fletcher, Dan

    2005-06-01

    The usefulness of bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein for testing NMR methods for the study of protein-ligand interactions is discussed. Isothermal titration calorimetry established the binding affinity and stoichiometry of the specific binding site for L-tryptophan, D-tryptophan, naproxen, ibuprofen, salicylic acid and warfarin. The binding affinities of the same ligands determined by NMR methods are universally weaker (larger KD). This is because the NMR methods are susceptible to interference from additional non-specific binding. The L-tryptophan-BSA and naproxen-BSA systems were the best behaved model systems. PMID:15816062

  1. Magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Lindsay A; Folkers, Gert E; Sinnige, Tessa; Houben, Klaartje; Kaplan, Mohammed; van der Cruijsen, Elwin A W; Baldus, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy (ssNMR) provides increasing possibilities to examine membrane proteins in different molecular settings, ranging from synthetic bilayers to whole cells. This flexibility often enables ssNMR experiments to be directly correlated with membrane protein function. In this contribution, we discuss experimental aspects of such studies starting with protein expression and labeling, leading to membrane protein isolation or to membrane proteins in a cellular environment. We show that optimized procedures can depend on aspects such as the achieved levels of expression, the stability of the protein during purification or proper refolding. Dealing with native membrane samples, such as isolated cellular membranes, can alleviate or entirely remove such biochemical challenges. Subsequently, we outline ssNMR experiments that involve the use of magic-angle-spinning and can be used to study membrane protein structure and their functional aspects. We pay specific attention to spectroscopic issues such as sensitivity and spectral resolution. The latter aspect can be controlled using a combination of tailored preparation procedures with solid-state NMR experiments that simplify the spectral analysis using specific filtering and correlation methods. Such approaches have already provided access to obtain structural views of membrane proteins and study their function in lipid bilayers. Ongoing developments in sample preparation and NMR methodology, in particular in using hyperpolarization or proton-detection schemes, offer additional opportunities to study membrane proteins close to their cellular function. These considerations suggest a further increase in the potential of using solid-state NMR in the context of prokaryotic or eukaryotic membrane protein systems in the near future. PMID:25950971

  2. Testing antifreeze protein from the longhorn beetle Rhagium mordax as a kinetic gas hydrate inhibitor using a high-pressure micro differential scanning calorimeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daraboina, Nagu; Perfeldt, Christine Malmos; von Solms, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    protein from Rhagium mordax (RmAFP) and biodegradable synthetic kinetic inhibitor Luvicap Bio. A systematic capillary dispersion method was used, and this method enhanced the ability to detect the effect of various inhibitors on hydrate formation with small quantities. The presence of RmAFP and Luvicap...... Bio influence (inhibit) the hydrate formation phenomena significantly. Luvicap Bio (relative strength compared to buffer: 13.3 degrees C) is stronger than RmAFP (9.8 degrees C) as a nucleation inhibitor. However, the presence RmAFP not only delays hydrate nucleation but also reduces the amount of...... hydrate formed (20%-30%) after nucleation significantly. Unlike RmAFP, Luvicap Bio promoted the amount of hydrate formed after nucleation. The superior hydrate growth inhibition capability and predictable hydrate melting behavior compared to complex, heterogeneous hydrate melting with Luvicap Bio shows...

  3. Characterization of proteins by in-cell NMR spectroscopy in cultured mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Letizia; Luchinat, Enrico; Banci, Lucia

    2016-06-01

    In-cell NMR spectroscopy is a unique tool for characterizing biological macromolecules in their physiological environment at atomic resolution. Recent progress in NMR instruments and sample preparation methods allows functional processes, such as metal uptake, disulfide-bond formation and protein folding, to be analyzed by NMR in living, cultured human cells. This protocol describes the necessary steps to overexpress one or more proteins of interest inside human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK293T) cells, and it explains how to set up in-cell NMR experiments. The cDNA is transiently transfected as a complex with a cationic polymer (DNA:PEI (polyethylenimine)), and protein expression is carried on for 2-3 d, after which the NMR sample is prepared. (1)H and (1)H-(15)N correlation NMR experiments (for example, using band-selective optimized flip-angle short-transient heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (SOFAST-HMQC)) can be carried out in <2 h, ensuring cell viability. Uniform (15)N labeling and amino-acid-specific (e.g., cysteine, methionine) labeling schemes are possible. The entire procedure takes 4 d from cell culture seeding to NMR data collection. PMID:27196722

  4. An open source cryostage and software analysis method for detection of antifreeze activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, J L; Ramløv, H

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to provide the reader with a simple setup that can detect antifreeze proteins (AFP) by inhibition of ice recrystallisation in very small sample sizes. This includes an open source cryostage, a method for preparing and loading samples as well as a software analysis method. The entire setup was tested using hyperactive AFP from the cerambycid beetle, Rhagium mordax. Samples containing AFP were compared to buffer samples, and the results are visualised as crystal radius evolution over time and in absolute change over 30 min. Statistical analysis showed that samples containing AFP could reliably be told apart from controls after only two minutes of recrystallisation. The goal of providing a fast, cheap and easy method for detecting antifreeze proteins in solution was met, and further development of the system can be followed at https://github.com/pechano/cryostage. PMID:27041219

  5. Methyl labeling and TROSY NMR spectroscopy of proteins expressed in the eukaryote Pichia pastoris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    13C Methyl TROSY NMR spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful method for studying the dynamics of large systems such as macromolecular assemblies and membrane proteins. Specific 13C labeling of aliphatic methyl groups and perdeuteration has been limited primarily to proteins expressed in E. coli, preventing studies of many eukaryotic proteins of physiological and biomedical significance. We demonstrate the feasibility of efficient 13C isoleucine δ1-methyl labeling in a deuterated background in an established eukaryotic expression host, Pichia pastoris, and show that this method can be used to label the eukaryotic protein actin, which cannot be expressed in bacteria. This approach will enable NMR studies of previously intractable targets

  6. Uniform and selective deuteration in two-dimensional NMR of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the practicality of isotopic labeling, particularly deuteration, that has received considerable impetus from advances in molecular biology, which have allowed ready production of NMR quantities of labeled proteins. Protein expression in Escherichia coli allows use of the considerable metabolic genetics known for the organism in shaping the biosynthetic process to meet the labeling demands of the NMR experiments. In addition to deuteration's common use in spectral assignment problems, it also offers considerable potential for enhancing the quality of the nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) distance and dihedral angle constraints used for solution structural analysis of proteins. Recent reviews emphasize the sample preparation and spectral benefits of protein deuteration

  7. Application of stable isotopes to the NMR conformational study of peptides and membrane proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analysis of the lipid-peptide complexes generally necessitates isotopic enrichment, specifically or not, of the lipidic or peptidic partner. The isotope labelling depends on the membrane model and the associated NMR techniques: high resolution 1H NMR of peptides or proteins in the presence of per-deuterated phospholipidic micells, high resolution (micells) or ''solid'' type 2H NMR of the lipid partner, ''solid'' type NMR (15N, 13C) of the peptide partner in a bi-layer. Application examples are given: utilization of stable isotopes for NMR study of lipopeptide structure and dynamic, of folding-up and functional linking at the annexines membrane interface, and of phospholipid conformation and dynamics in the lipids-ions-peptides interactions. 3 figs

  8. Patrones electroforéticos de proteínas y actividad anticongelante en el apoplasto de la hoja de la especie andina tropical Senecio niveoaureus PROTEIN ELECTROPHORETIC PATTERNS AND ANTIFREEZING ACTIVITY IN THE LEAF APOPLAST OF THE TROPICAL ANDEAN SPECIES Senecio niveoaureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F ÁLVAREZFLÓREZ

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Las plantas de alta montaña tienen diferentes adaptaciones para sobrevivir a cambios drásticos de temperatura, especialmente a condiciones de congelamiento. En plantas de invierno, la supervivencia a temperaturas bajas está relacionada con la capacidad de las células para producir proteínas específicas de bajo peso molecular (proteínas anticongelantes y exportarlas al apoplasto. Para establecer si plantas tropicales de alta montaña sobreviven las temperaturas bajas a través del mismo mecanismo, se colectaron hojas de plantas de Senecio niveoaureus durante 24 horas y a dos alturas 3.300 y 3.600 msnm en el Páramo de Palacio, Chingaza, Colombia. Se observaron proteínas apoplásticas de pesos moleculares entre 3512 kDa. Los patrones electroforéticos fueron diferentes dependiendo de la altura y la hora de muestreo, sin embargo, se observaron variaciones en el patrón de bandeo que no pueden ser atribuidas ni a la temperatura ni al gradiente altitudinal únicamente. Se detectó actividad anticongelante en el apoplasto de hojas de S. niveoaureus, siendo este el primer reporte en especies tropicales de alta montaña.Tropical high mountain plants have different adaptations to survive extreme daily temperature fluctuations and specially freezing night conditions. In winter plant species, survival to low temperatures is related to the ability of the cell to produce specific low molecular weight proteins (antifreezing proteins and to export them to the apoplast. In order to see if high mountain tropical plants survive to low temperatures through the same mechanism we collected, during a 24 hourperiod, leaves from Senecio niveoaureus growing at 3,300 and 3,600 m.o.s.l, in the Páramo de Palacio, Chingaza, Colombia. Leaf apoplast proteins had MW between 3512 kDa. Electrophoretic patterns were different depending on the altitude and the time of sampling. However the observed variations could not be linked to changes in temperature or to the

  9. Structures of larger proteins in solution: Three- and four-dimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronenborn, A.M.; Clore, G.M. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Complete understanding of a protein`s function and mechanism of action can only be achieved with a knowledge of its three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution. At present, there are two methods available for determining such structures. The first method, which has been established for many years, is x-ray diffraction of protein single crystals. The second method has blossomed only in the last 5 years and is based on the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to proteins in solution. This review paper describes three- and four-dimensional NMR methods applied to protein structure determination and was adapted from Clore and Gronenborn. The review focuses on the underlying principals and practice of multidimensional NMR and the structural information obtained.

  10. Improving the chemical shift dispersion of multidimensional NMR spectra of intrinsically disordered proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bermel, Wolfgang [Bruker BioSpin GmbH (Germany); Bruix, Marta [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Instituto de Quimica Fisica ' ' Rocasolano' ' (Spain); Felli, Isabella C., E-mail: felli@cerm.unifi.it [University of Florence, Department of Chemistry ' Ugo Shiff' (Italy); Kumar, M.V. Vasantha [University of Florence, Magnetic Resonance Center (Italy); Pierattelli, Roberta, E-mail: pierattelli@cerm.unifi.it [University of Florence, Department of Chemistry ' Ugo Shiff' (Italy); Serrano, Soraya [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Instituto de Quimica Fisica ' ' Rocasolano' ' (Spain)

    2013-03-15

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) have recently attracted the attention of the scientific community challenging the well accepted structure-function paradigm. In the characterization of the dynamic features of proteins nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) is a strategic tool of investigation. However the peculiar properties of IDPs, with the lack of a unique 3D structure and their high flexibility, have a strong impact on NMR observables (low chemical shift dispersion, efficient solvent exchange broadening) and thus on the quality of NMR spectra. Key aspects to be considered in the design of new NMR experiments optimized for the study of IDPs are discussed. A new experiment, based on direct detection of {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}, is proposed.

  11. Solution NMR study of the transmembrane domain of single-span membrane proteins: opportunities and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayen, Shovanlal; Li, Qingxin; Kang, Congbao

    2012-09-01

    Membrane proteins play important roles in signal transduction across the cell membrane. Structural information for the membrane proteins is still limited due to many technical challenges. Membrane proteins containing a single α- helical transmembrane (TM) domain are very important in several pathways. Solution NMR spectroscopy is an important tool for the study of the structure of the TM domain of these types of proteins due to their small size. In this review, we summarize the importance of some single-span membrane proteins in signal transduction and the importance of understanding the structure of the TM domain. We discussed the current progress in the structural study of these types of proteins using solution NMR spectroscopy. We summarize the structures solved during last several years. The structures of the regulatory domain of the ion channels such as KCNE1, integrin and viral proteins such as the M2 channel are described. The binding interface of single TM-TM domains is discussed based on NMR structural studies. Strategies including sample preparation, detergent screening, and structural determination of single-span membrane protein are summarized. We also discuss the potential application of NMR spectroscopy to drug discovery of proteins with a single-span TM domain. PMID:23004360

  12. Expression of deuterium-isotope-labelled protein in the yeast Pichia pastoris for NMR studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuterium isotope labelling is important for NMR studies of large proteins and complexes. Many eukaryotic proteins are difficult to express in bacteria, but can be efficiently produced in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. In order to facilitate NMR studies of the malaria parasite merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP1) complex and its interactions with antibodies, we have investigated production of the MSP1-19 protein in P. pastoris grown in deuterated media. The resulting deuteration patterns were analyzed by NMR and mass spectrometry. We have compared growth characteristics and levels of heterologous protein expression in cells adapted to growth in deuterated media (95% D2O), compared with expression in non-adapted cells. We have also compared the relative deuteration levels and the distribution pattern of residual protiation in protein from cells grown either in 95% D2O medium with protiated methanol as carbon source, or in 95% D2O medium containing deuterated methanol. A high level of uniform Cα deuteration was demonstrated, and the consequent reduction of backbone amide signal linewidths in [1H/15N]-correlation experiments was measured. Residual protiation at different positions in various amino acid residues, including the distribution of methyl isotopomers, was also investigated. The deuteration procedures examined here should facilitate economical expression of 2H/13C/15N-labelled protein samples for NMR studies of the structure and interactions of large proteins and protein complexes

  13. Expression of deuterium-isotope-labelled protein in the yeast Pichia pastoris for NMR studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, W.D.; Kragt, A.; Feeney, J. [National Institute for Medical Research, Division of Molecular Structure (United Kingdom)

    2000-08-15

    Deuterium isotope labelling is important for NMR studies of large proteins and complexes. Many eukaryotic proteins are difficult to express in bacteria, but can be efficiently produced in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. In order to facilitate NMR studies of the malaria parasite merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP1) complex and its interactions with antibodies, we have investigated production of the MSP1-19 protein in P. pastoris grown in deuterated media. The resulting deuteration patterns were analyzed by NMR and mass spectrometry. We have compared growth characteristics and levels of heterologous protein expression in cells adapted to growth in deuterated media (95% D{sub 2}O), compared with expression in non-adapted cells. We have also compared the relative deuteration levels and the distribution pattern of residual protiation in protein from cells grown either in 95% D{sub 2}O medium with protiated methanol as carbon source, or in 95% D{sub 2}O medium containing deuterated methanol. A high level of uniform C{sub {alpha}} deuteration was demonstrated, and the consequent reduction of backbone amide signal linewidths in [{sup 1}H/{sup 15}N]-correlation experiments was measured. Residual protiation at different positions in various amino acid residues, including the distribution of methyl isotopomers, was also investigated. The deuteration procedures examined here should facilitate economical expression of {sup 2}H/{sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labelled protein samples for NMR studies of the structure and interactions of large proteins and protein complexes.

  14. Mapping of unfolding states of integral helical membrane proteins by GPS-NMR and scattering techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calcutta, Antonello; Jessen, Christian M; Behrens, Manja Annette;

    2012-01-01

    induced by unfolding of an integral membrane protein, namely TFE-induced unfolding of KcsA solubilized by the n-dodecyl ß-d-maltoside (DDM) surfactant is investigated by the recently introduced GPS-NMR (Global Protein folding State mapping by multivariate NMR) (Malmendal et al., PlosONE 5, e10262 (2010...... addressing detergent properties and protein conformations at the same time. The mapping of the states reveals that KcsA undergoes a series of rearrangements which include expansion of the tetramer in several steps followed by dissociation into monomers at 29% TFE. Supplementary studies of DDM and TFE in the...

  15. The second round of Critical Assessment of Automated Structure Determination of Proteins by NMR: CASD-NMR-2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosato, Antonio [University of Florence, Department of Chemistry and Magnetic Resonance Center (Italy); Vranken, Wim [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Structural Biology Brussels (Belgium); Fogh, Rasmus H.; Ragan, Timothy J. [University of Leicester, Department of Biochemistry, School of Biological Sciences (United Kingdom); Tejero, Roberto [Universidad de Valencia, Departamento de Química Física (Spain); Pederson, Kari; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Prestegard, James H. [University of Georgia, Complex Carbohydrate Research Center and Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (United States); Yee, Adelinda; Wu, Bin; Lemak, Alexander; Houliston, Scott; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H. [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Biophysics, Cancer Genomics and Proteomics, Ontario Cancer Institute, Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (Canada); Kennedy, Michael [Miami University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (United States); Acton, Thomas B.; Xiao, Rong; Liu, Gaohua; Montelione, Gaetano T., E-mail: guy@cabm.rutgers.edu [The State University of New Jersey, Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers (United States); Vuister, Geerten W., E-mail: gv29@le.ac.uk [University of Leicester, Department of Biochemistry, School of Biological Sciences (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    The second round of the community-wide initiative Critical Assessment of automated Structure Determination of Proteins by NMR (CASD-NMR-2013) comprised ten blind target datasets, consisting of unprocessed spectral data, assigned chemical shift lists and unassigned NOESY peak and RDC lists, that were made available in both curated (i.e. manually refined) or un-curated (i.e. automatically generated) form. Ten structure calculation programs, using fully automated protocols only, generated a total of 164 three-dimensional structures (entries) for the ten targets, sometimes using both curated and un-curated lists to generate multiple entries for a single target. The accuracy of the entries could be established by comparing them to the corresponding manually solved structure of each target, which was not available at the time the data were provided. Across the entire data set, 71 % of all entries submitted achieved an accuracy relative to the reference NMR structure better than 1.5 Å. Methods based on NOESY peak lists achieved even better results with up to 100 % of the entries within the 1.5 Å threshold for some programs. However, some methods did not converge for some targets using un-curated NOESY peak lists. Over 90 % of the entries achieved an accuracy better than the more relaxed threshold of 2.5 Å that was used in the previous CASD-NMR-2010 round. Comparisons between entries generated with un-curated versus curated peaks show only marginal improvements for the latter in those cases where both calculations converged.

  16. The second round of Critical Assessment of Automated Structure Determination of Proteins by NMR: CASD-NMR-2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The second round of the community-wide initiative Critical Assessment of automated Structure Determination of Proteins by NMR (CASD-NMR-2013) comprised ten blind target datasets, consisting of unprocessed spectral data, assigned chemical shift lists and unassigned NOESY peak and RDC lists, that were made available in both curated (i.e. manually refined) or un-curated (i.e. automatically generated) form. Ten structure calculation programs, using fully automated protocols only, generated a total of 164 three-dimensional structures (entries) for the ten targets, sometimes using both curated and un-curated lists to generate multiple entries for a single target. The accuracy of the entries could be established by comparing them to the corresponding manually solved structure of each target, which was not available at the time the data were provided. Across the entire data set, 71 % of all entries submitted achieved an accuracy relative to the reference NMR structure better than 1.5 Å. Methods based on NOESY peak lists achieved even better results with up to 100 % of the entries within the 1.5 Å threshold for some programs. However, some methods did not converge for some targets using un-curated NOESY peak lists. Over 90 % of the entries achieved an accuracy better than the more relaxed threshold of 2.5 Å that was used in the previous CASD-NMR-2010 round. Comparisons between entries generated with un-curated versus curated peaks show only marginal improvements for the latter in those cases where both calculations converged

  17. Structural rearrangements of membrane proteins probed by water-edited solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ader, C.; Schneider, R.; Seidel, K.; Etzkorn, M.; Becker, S.; Baldus, M.

    2009-01-01

    We show that water-edited solid-state NMR spectroscopy allows for probing global protein conformation and residue-specific solvent accessibility in a lipid bilayer environment. The transfer dynamics can be well described by a general time constant, irrespective of protein topology and lipid environm

  18. CASD-NMR 2: robust and accurate unsupervised analysis of raw NOESY spectra and protein structure determination with UNIO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerry, Paul; Duong, Viet Dung; Herrmann, Torsten, E-mail: torsten.herrmann@ens-lyon.fr [Université de Lyon (UMR 5280 CNRS, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1), Institut des Sciences Analytiques, Centre de RMN à très Hauts Champs (France)

    2015-08-15

    UNIO is a comprehensive software suite for protein NMR structure determination that enables full automation of all NMR data analysis steps involved—including signal identification in NMR spectra, sequence-specific backbone and side-chain resonance assignment, NOE assignment and structure calculation. Within the framework of the second round of the community-wide stringent blind NMR structure determination challenge (CASD-NMR 2), we participated in two categories of CASD-NMR 2, namely using either raw NMR spectra or unrefined NOE peak lists as input. A total of 15 resulting NMR structure bundles were submitted for 9 out of 10 blind protein targets. All submitted UNIO structures accurately coincided with the corresponding blind targets as documented by an average backbone root mean-square deviation to the reference proteins of only 1.2 Å. Also, the precision of the UNIO structure bundles was virtually identical to the ensemble of reference structures. By assessing the quality of all UNIO structures submitted to the two categories, we find throughout that only the UNIO–ATNOS/CANDID approach using raw NMR spectra consistently yielded structure bundles of high quality for direct deposition in the Protein Data Bank. In conclusion, the results obtained in CASD-NMR 2 are another vital proof for robust, accurate and unsupervised NMR data analysis by UNIO for real-world applications.

  19. CASD-NMR 2: robust and accurate unsupervised analysis of raw NOESY spectra and protein structure determination with UNIO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UNIO is a comprehensive software suite for protein NMR structure determination that enables full automation of all NMR data analysis steps involved—including signal identification in NMR spectra, sequence-specific backbone and side-chain resonance assignment, NOE assignment and structure calculation. Within the framework of the second round of the community-wide stringent blind NMR structure determination challenge (CASD-NMR 2), we participated in two categories of CASD-NMR 2, namely using either raw NMR spectra or unrefined NOE peak lists as input. A total of 15 resulting NMR structure bundles were submitted for 9 out of 10 blind protein targets. All submitted UNIO structures accurately coincided with the corresponding blind targets as documented by an average backbone root mean-square deviation to the reference proteins of only 1.2 Å. Also, the precision of the UNIO structure bundles was virtually identical to the ensemble of reference structures. By assessing the quality of all UNIO structures submitted to the two categories, we find throughout that only the UNIO–ATNOS/CANDID approach using raw NMR spectra consistently yielded structure bundles of high quality for direct deposition in the Protein Data Bank. In conclusion, the results obtained in CASD-NMR 2 are another vital proof for robust, accurate and unsupervised NMR data analysis by UNIO for real-world applications

  20. Detection of protein-ligand interactions by NMR using reductive methylation of lysine residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that reductive methylation of proteins can be used for highly sensitive NMR identification of conformational changes induced by metal- and small molecule binding, as well as protein-protein interactions. Reductive methylation of proteins introduces two 13C-methyl groups on each lysine in the protein of interest. This method works well even when the lysines are not actively involved in the interaction, due to changes in the microenvironments of lysine residues. Most lysine residues are located on the protein exterior, and the exposed 13C-methyl groups may exhibit rapid localized motions. These motions could be faster than the tumbling rate of the molecule as a whole. Thus, this technique has great potential in the study of large molecular weight systems which are currently beyond the scope of conventional NMR methods

  1. Saturation transfer difference NMR studies of protein-ligand interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Szczepina, Monica Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    The mycolyl–arabinogalactan–peptidoglycan complex coats the surface of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It is a structure composed of galactofuranosyl (Galf) residues attached via alternating β-(1→6) and β-(1→5) linkages synthesized by bifunctional galactofuranosyltransferases, GlfT1 and GlfT2. We have used Saturation Transfer Difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy to examine the active site architecture of GlfT2 using trisaccharide acceptor substrates, β-D-Galf-(1→6)-β-D-Galf-(1→5)-β-D-Galf-O(CH2)7CH...

  2. Synthesis of fluorinated maltose derivatives for monitoring protein interaction by 19F NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Braitsch

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel reporter system, which is applicable to the 19F NMR investigation of protein interactions, is presented. This approach uses 2-F-labeled maltose as a spy ligand to indirectly probe protein–ligand or protein–protein interactions of proteins fused or tagged to the maltose-binding protein (MBP. The key feature is the simultaneous NMR observation of both 19F NMR signals of gluco/manno-type-2-F-maltose-isomers; one isomer (α-gluco-type binds to MBP and senses the protein interaction, and the nonbinding isomers (β-gluco- and/or α/β-manno-type are utilized as internal references. Moreover, this reporter system was used for relative affinity studies of fluorinated and nonfluorinated carbohydrates to the maltose-binding protein, which were found to be in perfect agreement with published X-ray data. The results of the NMR competition experiments together with the established correlation between 19F chemical shift data and molecular interaction patterns, suggest valuable applications for studies of protein–ligand interaction interfaces.

  3. Solution NMR of membrane proteins in bilayer mimics: Small is beautiful, but sometimes bigger is better

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poget, Sébastien F.; Girvin, Mark E.

    2007-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made recently on solution NMR studies of multi-transmembrane helix membrane protein systems of increasing size. Careful correlation of structure with function has validated the physiological relevance of these studies in detergent micelles. However, larger micelle and bicelle systems are sometimes required to stabilize the active forms of dynamic membrane proteins, such as the bacterial small multidrug resistance transporters. Even in these systems with aggregate molecular weights well over 100 kDa, solution NMR structural studies are feasible – but challenging. PMID:17961504

  4. Simultaneous NMR assignment of backbone and side chain amides in large proteins with IS-TROSY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new strategy for the simultaneous NMR assignment of both backbone and side chain amides in large proteins with isotopomer-selective transverse-relaxation-optimized spectroscopy (IS-TROSY) is reported. The method considers aspects of both the NMR sample preparation and the experimental design. First, the protein is dissolved in a buffer with 50%H2O/50%D2O in order to promote the population of semideuterated NHD isotopomers in side chain amides of Asn/Gln residues. Second, a 13C'-coupled 2D 15N-1H IS-TROSY spectrum provides a stereospecific distinction between the geminal protons in the E and Z configurations of the carboxyamide group. Third, a suite of IS-TROSY-based triple-resonance NMR experiments, e.g. 3D IS-TROSY-HNCA and 3D IS-TROSY-HNCACB, are designed to correlate aliphatic carbon atoms with backbone amides and, for Asn/Gln residues, at the same time with side chain amides. The NMR assignment procedure is similar to that for small proteins using conventional 3D HNCA/3D HNCACB spectra, in which, however, signals from NH2 groups are often very weak or even missing due to the use of broad-band proton decoupling schemes and NOE data have to be used as a remedy. For large proteins, the use of conventional TROSY experiments makes resonances of side chain amides not observable at all. The application of IS-TROSY experiments to the 35-kDa yeast cytosine deaminase has established a complete resonance assignment for the backbone and stereospecific assignment for side chain amides, which otherwise could not be achieved with existing NMR experiments. Thus, the development of IS-TROSY-based method provides new opportunities for the NMR study of important structural and biological roles of carboxyamides and side chain moieties of arginine and lysine residues in large proteins as well as amino moieties in nucleic acids

  5. Median Modified Wiener Filter for nonlinear adaptive spatial denoising of protein NMR multidimensional spectra

    KAUST Repository

    Cannistraci, Carlo Vittorio

    2015-01-26

    Denoising multidimensional NMR-spectra is a fundamental step in NMR protein structure determination. The state-of-the-art method uses wavelet-denoising, which may suffer when applied to non-stationary signals affected by Gaussian-white-noise mixed with strong impulsive artifacts, like those in multi-dimensional NMR-spectra. Regrettably, Wavelet\\'s performance depends on a combinatorial search of wavelet shapes and parameters; and multi-dimensional extension of wavelet-denoising is highly non-trivial, which hampers its application to multidimensional NMR-spectra. Here, we endorse a diverse philosophy of denoising NMR-spectra: less is more! We consider spatial filters that have only one parameter to tune: the window-size. We propose, for the first time, the 3D extension of the median-modified-Wiener-filter (MMWF), an adaptive variant of the median-filter, and also its novel variation named MMWF*. We test the proposed filters and the Wiener-filter, an adaptive variant of the mean-filter, on a benchmark set that contains 16 two-dimensional and three-dimensional NMR-spectra extracted from eight proteins. Our results demonstrate that the adaptive spatial filters significantly outperform their non-adaptive versions. The performance of the new MMWF* on 2D/3D-spectra is even better than wavelet-denoising. Noticeably, MMWF* produces stable high performance almost invariant for diverse window-size settings: this signifies a consistent advantage in the implementation of automatic pipelines for protein NMR-spectra analysis.

  6. Probing structure and dynamics of protein assemblies by magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Si; Suiter, Christopher L; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2013-09-17

    In living organisms, biological molecules often organize into multicomponent complexes. Such assemblies consist of various proteins and carry out essential functions, ranging from cell division, transport, and energy transduction to catalysis, signaling, and viral infectivity. To understand the biological functions of these assemblies, in both healthy and disease states, researchers need to study their three-dimensional architecture and molecular dynamics. To date, the large size, the lack of inherent long-range order, and insolubility have made atomic resolution studies of many protein assemblies challenging or impractical using traditional structural biology methods such as X-ray diffraction and solution NMR spectroscopy. In the past 10 years, we have focused our work on the development and application of magic angle spinning solid-state NMR (MAS NMR) methods to characterize large protein assemblies at atomic-level resolution. In this Account, we discuss the rapid progress in the field of MAS NMR spectroscopy, citing work from our laboratory and others on methodological developments that have facilitated the in-depth analysis of biologically important protein assemblies. We emphasize techniques that yield enhanced sensitivity and resolution, such as fast MAS (spinning frequencies of 40 kHz and above) and nonuniform sampling protocols for data acquisition and processing. We also discuss the experiments for gaining distance restraints and for recoupling anisotropic tensorial interactions under fast MAS conditions. We give an overview of sample preparation approaches when working with protein assemblies. Following the overview of contemporary MAS NMR methods, we present case studies into the structure and dynamics of two classes of biological systems under investigation in our laboratory. We will first turn our attention to cytoskeletal microtubule motor proteins including mammalian dynactin and dynein light chain 8. We will then discuss protein assemblies from the

  7. REDOR NMR of stable-isotope-labeled protein binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, J. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Rotational-echo, double resonance (REDOR) NMR, a new analytical spectroscopic technique for solids spinning at the magic angle, has been developed over the last 5 years. REDOR provides a direct measure of heteronuclear dipolar coupling between isolated pairs of labeled nuclei. In a solid with a {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N labeled pair, for example, the {sup 13}C rotational echoes that form each rotor period following a{sup 1}H-{sup 13}C cross-polarization transfer can be prevented from reaching full intensity by insertion of a {sup 15}N {pi} pulse each half rotor period. The REDOR difference (the difference between a {sup 13}C NMR spectrum obtained under these conditions and one obtained with no {sup 15}N {pi} pulses) has a strong dependence on the {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N dipolar coupling, and hence, the {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N internuclear distance. REDOR is described as double-resonance even though three radio frequencies (typically {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N) are used because the protons are removed from the important evolution part of the experiment by resonant decoupling. The dephasing of magnetization in REDOR arises from a local dipolar {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N field gradient and involves no polarization transfer. REDOR has no dependence on {sup 13}C or {sup 15}N chemical-shift tensors and does not require resolution of a {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N coupling in the chemical-shift dimension.

  8. Yeast-expressed human membrane protein aquaporin-1 yields excellent resolution of solid-state MAS NMR spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emami, Sanaz; Fan Ying; Munro, Rachel; Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Brown, Leonid S., E-mail: lebrown@uoguelph.ca [University of Guelph, Departments of Physics, and Biophysics Interdepartmental Group (Canada)

    2013-02-15

    One of the biggest challenges in solid-state NMR studies of membrane proteins is to obtain a homogeneous natively folded sample giving high spectral resolution sufficient for structural studies. Eukaryotic membrane proteins are especially difficult and expensive targets in this respect. Methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris is a reliable producer of eukaryotic membrane proteins for crystallography and a promising economical source of isotopically labeled proteins for NMR. We show that eukaryotic membrane protein human aquaporin 1 can be doubly ({sup 13}C/{sup 15}N) isotopically labeled in this system and functionally reconstituted into phospholipids, giving excellent resolution of solid-state magic angle spinning NMR spectra.

  9. Yeast-expressed human membrane protein aquaporin-1 yields excellent resolution of solid-state MAS NMR spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the biggest challenges in solid-state NMR studies of membrane proteins is to obtain a homogeneous natively folded sample giving high spectral resolution sufficient for structural studies. Eukaryotic membrane proteins are especially difficult and expensive targets in this respect. Methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris is a reliable producer of eukaryotic membrane proteins for crystallography and a promising economical source of isotopically labeled proteins for NMR. We show that eukaryotic membrane protein human aquaporin 1 can be doubly (13C/15N) isotopically labeled in this system and functionally reconstituted into phospholipids, giving excellent resolution of solid-state magic angle spinning NMR spectra.

  10. CoNSEnsX: an ensemble view of protein structures and NMR-derived experimental data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perczel András

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In conjunction with the recognition of the functional role of internal dynamics of proteins at various timescales, there is an emerging use of dynamic structural ensembles instead of individual conformers. These ensembles are usually substantially more diverse than conventional NMR ensembles and eliminate the expectation that a single conformer should fulfill all NMR parameters originating from 1016 - 1017 molecules in the sample tube. Thus, the accuracy of dynamic conformational ensembles should be evaluated differently to that of single conformers. Results We constructed the web application CoNSEnsX (Consistency of NMR-derived Structural Ensembles with eXperimental data allowing fast, simple and convenient assessment of the correspondence of the ensemble as a whole with diverse independent NMR parameters available. We have chosen different ensembles of three proteins, human ubiquitin, a small protease inhibitor and a disordered subunit of cGMP phosphodiesterase 5/6 for detailed evaluation and demonstration of the capabilities of the CoNSEnsX approach. Conclusions Our results present a new conceptual method for the evaluation of dynamic conformational ensembles resulting from NMR structure determination. The designed CoNSEnsX approach gives a complete evaluation of these ensembles and is freely available as a web service at http://consensx.chem.elte.hu.

  11. NMR assignment of the amylase-binding protein A from Streptococcus parasanguinis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing; Zhu, Fan; Wu, Hui; Matthews, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    Streptococcus parasanguinis is a primary colonizer of tooth surfaces in the oral cavity. Amylase-binding protein A (AbpA) from S. parasanguinis is responsible for the recruitment of salivary amylase to bacterial surface, which plays an important role in the development of oral biofilms. Here, we describe the essentially complete NMR assignments for AbpA. PMID:25016927

  12. A Method for Systematic Assessment of Intrinsically Disordered Protein Regions by NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natsuko Goda

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs that lack stable conformations and are highly flexible have attracted the attention of biologists. Therefore, the development of a systematic method to identify polypeptide regions that are unstructured in solution is important. We have designed an “indirect/reflected” detection system for evaluating the physicochemical properties of IDPs using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR. This approach employs a “chimeric membrane protein”-based method using the thermostable membrane protein PH0471. This protein contains two domains, a transmembrane helical region and a C-terminal OB (oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding-fold domain (named NfeDC domain, connected by a flexible linker. NMR signals of the OB-fold domain of detergent-solubilized PH0471 are observed because of the flexibility of the linker region. In this study, the linker region was substituted with target IDPs. Fifty-three candidates were selected using the prediction tool POODLE and 35 expression vectors were constructed. Subsequently, we obtained 15N-labeled chimeric PH0471 proteins with 25 IDPs as linkers. The NMR spectra allowed us to classify IDPs into three categories: flexible, moderately flexible, and inflexible. The inflexible IDPs contain membrane-associating or aggregation-prone sequences. This is the first attempt to use an indirect/reflected NMR method to evaluate IDPs and can verify the predictions derived from our computational tools.

  13. A combined rheology and time domain NMR approach for determining water distributions in protein blends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, Birgit L.; Kort, de Daan W.; Grabowska, Katarzyna J.; Tian, Bei; As, Van Henk; Goot, van der Atze Jan

    2016-01-01

    We present a combined time domain NMR and rheology approach to quantify the water distribution in a phase separated protein blend. The approach forms the basis for a new tool to assess the microstructural properties of phase separated biopolymer blends, making it highly relevant for many food and

  14. The J-UNIO protocol for automated protein structure determination by NMR in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The J-UNIO (JCSG protocol using the software UNIO) procedure for automated protein structure determination by NMR in solution is introduced. In the present implementation, J-UNIO makes use of APSY-NMR spectroscopy, 3D heteronuclear-resolved [1H,1H]-NOESY experiments, and the software UNIO. Applications with proteins from the JCSG target list with sizes up to 150 residues showed that the procedure is highly robust and efficient. In all instances the correct polypeptide fold was obtained in the first round of automated data analysis and structure calculation. After interactive validation of the data obtained from the automated routine, the quality of the final structures was comparable to results from interactive structure determination. Special advantages are that the NMR data have been recorded with 6–10 days of instrument time per protein, that there is only a single step of chemical shift adjustments to relate the backbone signals in the APSY-NMR spectra with the corresponding backbone signals in the NOESY spectra, and that the NOE-based amino acid side chain chemical shift assignments are automatically focused on those residues that are heavily weighted in the structure calculation. The individual working steps of J-UNIO are illustrated with the structure determination of the protein YP926445.1 from Shewanella amazonensis, and the results obtained with 17 JCSG targets are critically evaluated.

  15. MODERN NMR TECHNIQUES FOR THE STUDY OF LARGE PROTEINS IN SOLUTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ A number of important methodological developments in high resolution NMR spectroscopy have led to significant increases in the size limitations that previously impeded solution structural studies of macromolecules. Specifically, isotope labeling and TROSY triple resonance spectroscopy has resulted in substantial sensitivity and resolution gain for applications to large molecular weight proteins.

  16. Refinement of the protein backbone angle {psi} in NMR structure calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprangers, R.; Bottomley, M.J.; Linge, J.P.; Schultz, J.; Nilges, M.; Sattler, M. [European Molecular Biology Laboratory (Germany)

    2000-01-15

    Cross-correlated relaxation rates involving the C{sup {alpha}}-H{sup {alpha}} dipolar interaction and the carbonyl (C') chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) have been measured using two complementary 3D experiments. We show that the protein backbone angle {psi} can be directly refined against such cross-correlated relaxation rates ({gamma}{sup H{alpha}}{sup C{alpha}}{sup ,C'}) and the three-bond H/D isotope effect on the C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts ({sup 3}{delta}C{sup {alpha}}{sub (ND)}). By simultaneously using both experimental parameters as restraints during NMR structure calculations, a unique value for the backbone angle {psi} is defined. We have applied the new refinement method to the {alpha}-Spectrin SH3 domain (a {beta}-sheet protein) and to the Sgs1p HRDC domain (an {alpha}-helical protein) and show that the quality of the NMR structures is substantially improved, judging from the atomic coordinate precision and the Ramachandran map. In addition, the {psi}-refined NMR structures of the SH3 domain deviate less from the 1.8 A crystal structure, suggesting an improved accuracy. The proposed refinement method can be used to significantly improve the quality of NMR structures and will be applicable to larger proteins.

  17. Using NMR chemical shifts to calculate the propensity for structural order and disorder in proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamiola, Kamil; Mulder, Frans A. A.

    2012-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy offers the unique possibility to relate the structural propensities of disordered proteins and loop segments of folded peptides to biological function and aggregation behaviour. Backbone chemical shifts are ideally suited for this task, provided that appropriate reference data are a

  18. A novel strategy for NMR resonance assignment and protein structure determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quality of protein structures determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is contingent on the number and quality of experimentally-derived resonance assignments, distance and angular restraints. Two key features of protein NMR data have posed challenges for the routine and automated structure determination of small to medium sized proteins; (1) spectral resolution – especially of crowded nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) spectra, and (2) the reliance on a continuous network of weak scalar couplings as part of most common assignment protocols. In order to facilitate NMR structure determination, we developed a semi-automated strategy that utilizes non-uniform sampling (NUS) and multidimensional decomposition (MDD) for optimal data collection and processing of selected, high resolution multidimensional NMR experiments, combined it with an ABACUS protocol for sequential and side chain resonance assignments, and streamlined this procedure to execute structure and refinement calculations in CYANA and CNS, respectively. Two graphical user interfaces (GUIs) were developed to facilitate efficient analysis and compilation of the data and to guide automated structure determination. This integrated method was implemented and refined on over 30 high quality structures of proteins ranging from 5.5 to 16.5 kDa in size.

  19. Methyl labeling and TROSY NMR spectroscopy of proteins expressed in the eukaryote Pichia pastoris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Lindsay; Zahm, Jacob A.; Ali, Rustam [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Biophysics (United States); Kukula, Maciej; Bian, Liangqiao [University of Texas at Arlington, Shimadzu Center for Advanced Analytical Chemistry (United States); Patrie, Steven M. [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Pathology (United States); Gardner, Kevin H. [CUNY Advanced Science Research Center, Structural Biology Initiative (United States); Rosen, Michael K.; Rosenbaum, Daniel M., E-mail: dan.rosenbaum@utsouthwestern.edu [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Biophysics (United States)

    2015-07-15

    {sup 13}C Methyl TROSY NMR spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful method for studying the dynamics of large systems such as macromolecular assemblies and membrane proteins. Specific {sup 13}C labeling of aliphatic methyl groups and perdeuteration has been limited primarily to proteins expressed in E. coli, preventing studies of many eukaryotic proteins of physiological and biomedical significance. We demonstrate the feasibility of efficient {sup 13}C isoleucine δ1-methyl labeling in a deuterated background in an established eukaryotic expression host, Pichia pastoris, and show that this method can be used to label the eukaryotic protein actin, which cannot be expressed in bacteria. This approach will enable NMR studies of previously intractable targets.

  20. Stable isotope labeling of protein by Kluyveromyces lactis for NMR study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiki, Toshihiko [Japan Biological Informatics Consortium (JBiC) (Japan); Shimada, Ichio, E-mail: shimada@iw-nmr.f.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Takahashi, Hideo [Biomedicinal Information Research Center (BIRC), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) (Japan)], E-mail: hid.takahashi@aist.go.jp

    2008-11-15

    Stable isotope labeling for proteins of interest is an important technique in structural analyses of proteins by NMR spectroscopy. Escherichia coli is one of the most useful protein expression systems for stable isotope labeling because of its high-level protein expression and low costs for isotope-labeling. However, for the expression of proteins with numerous disulfide-bonds and/or post-translational modifications, E. coli systems are not necessarily appropriate. Instead, eukaryotic cells, such as yeast Pichia pastoris, have great potential for successful production of these proteins. The hemiascomycete yeast Kluyveromyces lactis is superior to the methylotrophic yeast P. pastoris in some respects: simple and rapid transformation, good reproducibility of protein expression induction and easy scale-up of culture. In the present study, we established a protein expression system using K. lactis, which enabled the preparation of labeled proteins using glucose and ammonium chloride as a stable isotope source.

  1. Stable isotope labeling of protein by Kluyveromyces lactis for NMR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stable isotope labeling for proteins of interest is an important technique in structural analyses of proteins by NMR spectroscopy. Escherichia coli is one of the most useful protein expression systems for stable isotope labeling because of its high-level protein expression and low costs for isotope-labeling. However, for the expression of proteins with numerous disulfide-bonds and/or post-translational modifications, E. coli systems are not necessarily appropriate. Instead, eukaryotic cells, such as yeast Pichia pastoris, have great potential for successful production of these proteins. The hemiascomycete yeast Kluyveromyces lactis is superior to the methylotrophic yeast P. pastoris in some respects: simple and rapid transformation, good reproducibility of protein expression induction and easy scale-up of culture. In the present study, we established a protein expression system using K. lactis, which enabled the preparation of labeled proteins using glucose and ammonium chloride as a stable isotope source

  2. NMR structure of an acyl-carrier protein from Borrelia burgdorferi

    OpenAIRE

    Barnwal, Ravi P.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Varani, G

    2011-01-01

    Nearly complete resonance assignment and the high-resolution NMR structure of the acyl-carrier protein from Borrelia burgdorferi, a target of the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID) structure-determination pipeline, are reported. This protein was chosen as a potential target for drug-discovery efforts because of its involvement in fatty-acid biosynthesis, an essential metabolic pathway, in bacteria. It was possible to assign >98% of backbone resonances and >92% ...

  3. Prion protein NMR structure and species barrier for prion diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Billeter, Martin; Riek, Roland; Wider, Gerhard; Hornemann, Simone; Glockshuber, Rudi; Wüthrich, Kurt

    1997-01-01

    The structural basis of species specificity of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, such as bovine spongiform encephalopathy or “mad cow disease” and Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease in humans, has been investigated using the refined NMR structure of the C-terminal domain of the mouse prion protein with residues 121–231. A database search for mammalian prion proteins yielded 23 different sequences for the fragment 124–226, which display a high degree of sequence identity and show relevant amin...

  4. NMR insights into a megadalton-size protein self-assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Chugh, Jeetender; Sharma, Shilpy; Hosur, Ramakrishna V.

    2008-01-01

    Protein self-association is critical to many biological functions. However, atomic-level structural characterization of these assemblies has remained elusive. In this report we present insights into the mechanistic details of the process of self-association of the 136-residue GTPase effector domain (GED) of the endocytic protein dynamin into a megadalton-sized soluble mass. Our approach is based on NMR monitoring of regulated folding and association through Gdn-HCl titration. The results sugg...

  5. Probing Membrane Protein Structure Using Water Polarization Transfer Solid-State NMR

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Jonathan K.; Hong, Mei

    2014-01-01

    Water plays an essential role in the structure and function of proteins, lipid membranes and other biological macromolecules. Solid-state NMR heteronuclear-detected 1H polarization transfer from water to biomolecules is a versatile approach for studying water-protein, water-membrane, and water-carbohydrate interactions in biology. We review radiofrequency pulse sequences for measuring water polarization transfer to biomolecules, the mechanisms of polarization transfer, and the application of ...

  6. A robust algorithm for optimizing protein structures with NMR chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berjanskii, Mark; Arndt, David; Liang, Yongjie; Wishart, David S., E-mail: david.wishart@ualberta.ca [University of Alberta, Department of Computing Science (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Over the past decade, a number of methods have been developed to determine the approximate structure of proteins using minimal NMR experimental information such as chemical shifts alone, sparse NOEs alone or a combination of comparative modeling data and chemical shifts. However, there have been relatively few methods that allow these approximate models to be substantively refined or improved using the available NMR chemical shift data. Here, we present a novel method, called Chemical Shift driven Genetic Algorithm for biased Molecular Dynamics (CS-GAMDy), for the robust optimization of protein structures using experimental NMR chemical shifts. The method incorporates knowledge-based scoring functions and structural information derived from NMR chemical shifts via a unique combination of multi-objective MD biasing, a genetic algorithm, and the widely used XPLOR molecular modelling language. Using this approach, we demonstrate that CS-GAMDy is able to refine and/or fold models that are as much as 10 Å (RMSD) away from the correct structure using only NMR chemical shift data. CS-GAMDy is also able to refine of a wide range of approximate or mildly erroneous protein structures to more closely match the known/correct structure and the known/correct chemical shifts. We believe CS-GAMDy will allow protein models generated by sparse restraint or chemical-shift-only methods to achieve sufficiently high quality to be considered fully refined and “PDB worthy”. The CS-GAMDy algorithm is explained in detail and its performance is compared over a range of refinement scenarios with several commonly used protein structure refinement protocols. The program has been designed to be easily installed and easily used and is available at http://www.gamdy.ca http://www.gamdy.ca.

  7. A robust algorithm for optimizing protein structures with NMR chemical shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past decade, a number of methods have been developed to determine the approximate structure of proteins using minimal NMR experimental information such as chemical shifts alone, sparse NOEs alone or a combination of comparative modeling data and chemical shifts. However, there have been relatively few methods that allow these approximate models to be substantively refined or improved using the available NMR chemical shift data. Here, we present a novel method, called Chemical Shift driven Genetic Algorithm for biased Molecular Dynamics (CS-GAMDy), for the robust optimization of protein structures using experimental NMR chemical shifts. The method incorporates knowledge-based scoring functions and structural information derived from NMR chemical shifts via a unique combination of multi-objective MD biasing, a genetic algorithm, and the widely used XPLOR molecular modelling language. Using this approach, we demonstrate that CS-GAMDy is able to refine and/or fold models that are as much as 10 Å (RMSD) away from the correct structure using only NMR chemical shift data. CS-GAMDy is also able to refine of a wide range of approximate or mildly erroneous protein structures to more closely match the known/correct structure and the known/correct chemical shifts. We believe CS-GAMDy will allow protein models generated by sparse restraint or chemical-shift-only methods to achieve sufficiently high quality to be considered fully refined and “PDB worthy”. The CS-GAMDy algorithm is explained in detail and its performance is compared over a range of refinement scenarios with several commonly used protein structure refinement protocols. The program has been designed to be easily installed and easily used and is available at http://www.gamdy.ca http://www.gamdy.ca

  8. Ligands turning around in the midst of protein conformers: the origin of ligand-protein mating. A NMR view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertinhez, T A; Spisni, A

    2011-01-01

    Protein-ligand binding is a puzzling process. Many theories have been devised since the pioneering key-and-lock hypothesis based on the idea that both the protein and the ligand have a rigid single conformation. Indeed, molecular motion is the essence of the universe. Consequently, not only proteins are characterized by an extraordinary conformational freedom, but ligands too can fluctuate in a rather vast conformational space. In this scenario, the quest to understand how do they match is fascinating. Recognizing that the inherent dynamics of molecules is the key factor controlling the success of the binding and, subsequently, their chemical/biological function, here we present a view of this process from the NMR stand point. A description of the most relevant NMR parameters that can provide insights, at atomic level, on the mechanisms of protein-ligand binding is provided in the final section. PMID:20939791

  9. Solid-state NMR of the Yersinia pestis outer membrane protein Ail in lipid bilayer nanodiscs sedimented by ultracentrifugation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Yi; Fujimoto, L. Miya; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M., E-mail: fmarassi@sbmri.org [Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Solid-state NMR studies of sedimented soluble proteins has been developed recently as an attractive approach for overcoming the size limitations of solution NMR spectroscopy while bypassing the need for sample crystallization or precipitation (Bertini et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108(26):10396–10399, 2011). Inspired by the potential benefits of this method, we have investigated the ability to sediment lipid bilayer nanodiscs reconstituted with a membrane protein. In this study, we show that nanodiscs containing the outer membrane protein Ail from Yersinia pestis can be sedimented for solid-state NMR structural studies, without the need for precipitation or lyophilization. Optimized preparations of Ail in phospholipid nanodiscs support both the structure and the fibronectin binding activity of the protein. The same sample can be used for solution NMR, solid-state NMR and activity assays, facilitating structure–activity correlation experiments across a wide range of timescales.

  10. Solid-state NMR of the Yersinia pestis outer membrane protein Ail in lipid bilayer nanodiscs sedimented by ultracentrifugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid-state NMR studies of sedimented soluble proteins has been developed recently as an attractive approach for overcoming the size limitations of solution NMR spectroscopy while bypassing the need for sample crystallization or precipitation (Bertini et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108(26):10396–10399, 2011). Inspired by the potential benefits of this method, we have investigated the ability to sediment lipid bilayer nanodiscs reconstituted with a membrane protein. In this study, we show that nanodiscs containing the outer membrane protein Ail from Yersinia pestis can be sedimented for solid-state NMR structural studies, without the need for precipitation or lyophilization. Optimized preparations of Ail in phospholipid nanodiscs support both the structure and the fibronectin binding activity of the protein. The same sample can be used for solution NMR, solid-state NMR and activity assays, facilitating structure–activity correlation experiments across a wide range of timescales

  11. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low-viscosity fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nucci, Nathaniel V; Valentine, Kathleen G; Wand, A Joshua

    2014-04-01

    High-resolution multi-dimensional solution NMR is unique as a biophysical and biochemical tool in its ability to examine both the structure and dynamics of macromolecules at atomic resolution. Conventional solution NMR approaches, however, are largely limited to examinations of relatively small (viscosity fluids has been developed as a means through which the 'slow tumbling problem' can be overcome. This approach has been successfully applied to diverse proteins and nucleic acids ranging up to 100kDa, considerably widening the range of biological macromolecules to which conventional solution NMR methodologies may be applied. Recent advances in methodology have significantly broadened the utility of this approach in structural biology and molecular biophysics. PMID:24656086

  12. NMR structure of hypothetical protein MG354 from Mycoplasmagenitalium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Shi, Jianxia; Yokotoa, Hisao; Kim, Rosalind; Wemmer, David E.

    2005-04-12

    Mycoplasma genitalium (Mg) and M. pneumoniae (Mp) are human pathogens with two of the smallest genomes sequenced to date ({approx} 480 and 680 genes, respectively). The Berkeley Structural Genomics Center is determining representative structures for gene products in these organisms, helping to understand the set of protein folds needed to sustain this minimal organism. The protein coded by gene MG354 (gi3844938) from M. genitalium has a relatively unique sequence, related only to MPN530 from M. pneumoniae (68% identity, coverage 99%) and MGA{_}0870 from the avian pathogen M. gallisepticum (23% identity, coverage 94%), has no homologue with a determined structure, and no functional annotations.

  13. An evaluation of detergents for NMR structural studies of membrane proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural information on membrane proteins lags far behind that on soluble proteins, in large part due to difficulties producing homogeneous, stable, structurally relevant samples in a membrane-like environment. In this study 25 membrane mimetics were screened using 2D 1H-15N heteronuclear single quantum correlation NMR experiments to establish sample homogeneity and predict fitness for structure determination. A single detergent, 1-palmitoyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-RAC-(1-glycerol)] (LPPG), yielded high quality NMR spectra with sample lifetimes greater than one month for the five proteins tested - R. sphaeroides LH1 α and β subunits, E. coli and B. pseudofirmus OF4 ATP synthase c subunits, and S. aureus small multidrug resistance transporter - with 1, 2, or 4 membrane spanning α-helices, respectively. Site-specific spin labeling established interhelical distances in the drug transporter and genetically fused dimers of c subunits in LPPG consistent with in vivo distances. Optical spectroscopy showed that LH1 β subunits form native-like complexes with bacteriochlorphyll a in LPPG. All the protein/micelle complexes were estimated to exceed 100 kDaltons by translational diffusion measurements. However, analysis of 15N transverse, longitudinal and 15N{1H} nuclear Overhauser effect relaxation measurements yielded overall rotational correlation times of 8 to 12 nsec, similar to a 15-20 kDalton protein tumbling isotropically in solution, and consistent with the high quality NMR data observed

  14. APSY-NMR for protein backbone assignment in high-throughput structural biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Samit Kumar; Serrano, Pedro; Proudfoot, Andrew; Geralt, Michael [The Scripps Research Institute, Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology (United States); Pedrini, Bill [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), SwissFEL Project (Switzerland); Herrmann, Torsten [Université de Lyon, Institut des Sciences Analytiques, Centre de RMN à Très Hauts Champs, UMR 5280 CNRS, ENS Lyon, UCB Lyon 1 (France); Wüthrich, Kurt, E-mail: wuthrich@scripps.edu [The Scripps Research Institute, Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology (United States)

    2015-01-15

    A standard set of three APSY-NMR experiments has been used in daily practice to obtain polypeptide backbone NMR assignments in globular proteins with sizes up to about 150 residues, which had been identified as targets for structure determination by the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG) under the auspices of the Protein Structure Initiative (PSI). In a representative sample of 30 proteins, initial fully automated data analysis with the software UNIO-MATCH-2014 yielded complete or partial assignments for over 90 % of the residues. For most proteins the APSY data acquisition was completed in less than 30 h. The results of the automated procedure provided a basis for efficient interactive validation and extension to near-completion of the assignments by reference to the same 3D heteronuclear-resolved [{sup 1}H,{sup 1}H]-NOESY spectra that were subsequently used for the collection of conformational constraints. High-quality structures were obtained for all 30 proteins, using the J-UNIO protocol, which includes extensive automation of NMR structure determination.

  15. Peptides and proteins in a confined environment: NMR spectra at natural isotopic abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Annalisa; Salvadori, Severo; Temussi, Piero Andrea

    2007-05-01

    Confinement of proteins and peptides in a small inert space mimics the natural environment of the cell, allowing structural studies in conditions that stabilize folded conformations. We have previously shown that confinement in polyacrylamide gels (PAGs) is sufficient to induce a change in the viscosity of the aqueous solution without changing the composition and temperature of the solvent. The main limitation of a PAG to run NMR experiments in a confined environment is the need for labelling the peptides. Here we report the use of the agarose gel to run the NMR spectra of proteins and peptides. We show that agarose gels are completely transparent in NMR experiments, relieving the need for labelling. Although it is necessary to expose biomolecules to fairly high temperatures during sample preparation, we believe that this is not generally an obstacle to the study of peptides, and found that the method is also compatible with temperature-resistant proteins. The mesh of agarose gels is too wide for direct effects of confinement on the stability of proteins but confinement can be easily exploited to interact the proteins with other reagents, including crowding macromolecules that can eventually lead to fold stabilization. The use of these gels is ideally suited for low-temperature studies; we show that a very flexible peptide at subzero temperatures is stabilized into a well-folded conformation. PMID:17436341

  16. APSY-NMR for protein backbone assignment in high-throughput structural biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A standard set of three APSY-NMR experiments has been used in daily practice to obtain polypeptide backbone NMR assignments in globular proteins with sizes up to about 150 residues, which had been identified as targets for structure determination by the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG) under the auspices of the Protein Structure Initiative (PSI). In a representative sample of 30 proteins, initial fully automated data analysis with the software UNIO-MATCH-2014 yielded complete or partial assignments for over 90 % of the residues. For most proteins the APSY data acquisition was completed in less than 30 h. The results of the automated procedure provided a basis for efficient interactive validation and extension to near-completion of the assignments by reference to the same 3D heteronuclear-resolved [1H,1H]-NOESY spectra that were subsequently used for the collection of conformational constraints. High-quality structures were obtained for all 30 proteins, using the J-UNIO protocol, which includes extensive automation of NMR structure determination

  17. Utilization of lysine 13C-methylation NMR for protein–protein interaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical modification is an easy way for stable isotope labeling of non-labeled proteins. The reductive 13C-methylation of the amino group of the lysine side-chain by 13C-formaldehyde is a post-modification and is applicable to most proteins since this chemical modification specifically and quickly proceeds under mild conditions such as 4 °C, pH 6.8, overnight. 13C-methylation has been used for NMR to study the interactions between the methylated proteins and various molecules, such as small ligands, nucleic acids and peptides. Here we applied lysine 13C-methylation NMR to monitor protein–protein interactions. The affinity and the intermolecular interaction sites of methylated ubiquitin with three ubiquitin-interacting proteins were successfully determined using chemical-shift perturbation experiments via the 1H–13C HSQC spectra of the 13C-methylated-lysine methyl groups. The lysine 13C-methylation NMR results also emphasized the importance of the usage of side-chain signals to monitor the intermolecular interaction sites, and was applicable to studying samples with concentrations in the low sub-micromolar range.

  18. NMR Methods for the Study of Instrinsically Disordered Proteins Structure, Dynamics, and Interactions: General Overview and Practical Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutscher, Bernhard; Felli, Isabella C; Gil-Caballero, Sergio; Hošek, Tomáš; Kümmerle, Rainer; Piai, Alessandro; Pierattelli, Roberta; Sólyom, Zsófia

    2015-01-01

    Thanks to recent improvements in NMR instrumentation, pulse sequence design, and sample preparation, a panoply of new NMR tools has become available for atomic resolution characterization of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) that are optimized for the particular chemical and spectroscopic properties of these molecules. A wide range of NMR observables can now be measured on increasingly complex IDPs that report on their structural and dynamic properties in isolation, as part of a larger complex, or even inside an entire living cell. Herein we present basic NMR concepts, as well as optimised tools available for the study of IDPs in solution. In particular, the following sections are discussed hereafter: a short introduction to NMR spectroscopy and instrumentation (Sect. 3.1), the effect of order and disorder on NMR observables (Sect. 3.2), particular challenges and bottlenecks for NMR studies of IDPs (Sect. 3.3), 2D HN and CON NMR experiments: the fingerprint of an IDP (Sect. 3.4), tools for overcoming major bottlenecks of IDP NMR studies (Sect. 3.5), 13C detected experiments (Sect. 3.6), from 2D to 3D: from simple snapshots to site-resolved characterization of IDPs (Sect. 3.7), sequential NMR assignment: 3D experiments (Sect. 3.8), high-dimensional NMR experiments (nD, with n>3) (Sect. 3.9) and conclusions and perspectives (Sect. 3.10). PMID:26387100

  19. NMR approaches for structural analysis of multidomain proteins and complexes in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göbl, Christoph; Madl, Tobias; Simon, Bernd; Sattler, Michael

    2014-07-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a key method for studying the structure and dynamics of (large) multidomain proteins and complexes in solution. It plays a unique role in integrated structural biology approaches as especially information about conformational dynamics can be readily obtained at residue resolution. Here, we review NMR techniques for such studies focusing on state-of-the-art tools and practical aspects. An efficient approach for determining the quaternary structure of multidomain complexes starts from the structures of individual domains or subunits. The arrangement of the domains/subunits within the complex is then defined based on NMR measurements that provide information about the domain interfaces combined with (long-range) distance and orientational restraints. Aspects discussed include sample preparation, specific isotope labeling and spin labeling; determination of binding interfaces and domain/subunit arrangements from chemical shift perturbations (CSP), nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs), isotope editing/filtering, cross-saturation, and differential line broadening; and based on paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PRE) using covalent and soluble spin labels. Finally, the utility of complementary methods such as small-angle X-ray or neutron scattering (SAXS, SANS), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) or fluorescence spectroscopy techniques is discussed. The applications of NMR techniques are illustrated with studies of challenging (high molecular weight) protein complexes. PMID:24924266

  20. Interaction of the replication terminator protein of Bacillus subtilis with DNA probed by NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Termination of DNA replication in Bacillus subtilis involves the polar arrest of replication forks by a specific complex formed between the dimeric 29 kDa replication terminator protein (RTP) and DNA terminator sites. We have used NMR spectroscopy to probe the changes in 1H-15N correlation spectra of a 15N-labelled RTP.C110S mutant upon the addition of a 21 base pair symmetrical DNA binding site. Assignment of the 1H-15N correlations was achieved using a suite of triple resonance NMR experiments with 15N,13C,70% 2H enriched protein recorded at 800 MHz and using TROSY pulse sequences. Perturbations to 1H-15N spectra revealed that the N-termini, α3-helices and several loops are affected by the binding interaction. An analysis of this data in light of the crystallographically determined apo- and DNA-bound forms of RTP.C110S revealed that the NMR spectral perturbations correlate more closely to protein structural changes upon complex formation rather than to interactions at the protein-DNA interface

  1. Segmental isotope labeling of proteins for NMR structural study using a protein S tag for higher expression and solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A common obstacle to NMR studies of proteins is sample preparation. In many cases, proteins targeted for NMR studies are poorly expressed and/or expressed in insoluble forms. Here, we describe a novel approach to overcome these problems. In the protein S tag-intein (PSTI) technology, two tandem 92-residue N-terminal domains of protein S (PrS2) from Myxococcus xanthus is fused at the N-terminal end of a protein to enhance its expression and solubility. Using intein technology, the isotope-labeled PrS2-tag is replaced with non-isotope labeled PrS2-tag, silencing the NMR signals from PrS2-tag in isotope-filtered 1H-detected NMR experiments. This method was applied to the E. coli ribosome binding factor A (RbfA), which aggregates and precipitates in the absence of a solubilization tag unless the C-terminal 25-residue segment is deleted (RbfAΔ25). Using the PrS2-tag, full-length well-behaved RbfA samples could be successfully prepared for NMR studies. PrS2 (non-labeled)-tagged RbfA (isotope-labeled) was produced with the use of the intein approach. The well-resolved TROSY-HSQC spectrum of full-length PrS2-tagged RbfA superimposes with the TROSY-HSQC spectrum of RbfAΔ25, indicating that PrS2-tag does not affect the structure of the protein to which it is fused. Using a smaller PrS-tag, consisting of a single N-terminal domain of protein S, triple resonance experiments were performed, and most of the backbone 1H, 15N and 13C resonance assignments for full-length E. coli RbfA were determined. Analysis of these chemical shift data with the Chemical Shift Index and heteronuclear 1H–15N NOE measurements reveal the dynamic nature of the C-terminal segment of the full-length RbfA protein, which could not be inferred using the truncated RbfAΔ25 construct. CS-Rosetta calculations also demonstrate that the core structure of full-length RbfA is similar to that of the RbfAΔ25 construct.

  2. Segmental isotope labeling of proteins for NMR structural study using a protein S tag for higher expression and solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Swapna, G V T; Wu, Kuen-Phon; Afinogenova, Yuliya; Conover, Kenith; Mao, Binchen; Montelione, Gaetano T; Inouye, Masayori

    2012-04-01

    A common obstacle to NMR studies of proteins is sample preparation. In many cases, proteins targeted for NMR studies are poorly expressed and/or expressed in insoluble forms. Here, we describe a novel approach to overcome these problems. In the protein S tag-intein (PSTI) technology, two tandem 92-residue N-terminal domains of protein S (PrS(2)) from Myxococcus xanthus is fused at the N-terminal end of a protein to enhance its expression and solubility. Using intein technology, the isotope-labeled PrS(2)-tag is replaced with non-isotope labeled PrS(2)-tag, silencing the NMR signals from PrS(2)-tag in isotope-filtered (1)H-detected NMR experiments. This method was applied to the E. coli ribosome binding factor A (RbfA), which aggregates and precipitates in the absence of a solubilization tag unless the C-terminal 25-residue segment is deleted (RbfAΔ25). Using the PrS(2)-tag, full-length well-behaved RbfA samples could be successfully prepared for NMR studies. PrS(2) (non-labeled)-tagged RbfA (isotope-labeled) was produced with the use of the intein approach. The well-resolved TROSY-HSQC spectrum of full-length PrS(2)-tagged RbfA superimposes with the TROSY-HSQC spectrum of RbfAΔ25, indicating that PrS(2)-tag does not affect the structure of the protein to which it is fused. Using a smaller PrS-tag, consisting of a single N-terminal domain of protein S, triple resonance experiments were performed, and most of the backbone (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonance assignments for full-length E. coli RbfA were determined. Analysis of these chemical shift data with the Chemical Shift Index and heteronuclear (1)H-(15)N NOE measurements reveal the dynamic nature of the C-terminal segment of the full-length RbfA protein, which could not be inferred using the truncated RbfAΔ25 construct. CS-Rosetta calculations also demonstrate that the core structure of full-length RbfA is similar to that of the RbfAΔ25 construct. PMID:22389115

  3. Solid-state NMR studies of proteins immobilized on inorganic surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, Wendy J.

    2015-09-01

    Solid state NMR is the primary tool for studying the quantitative, site-specific structure, orientation, and dynamics of biomineralization proteins under biologically relevant conditions. Two calcium phosphate proteins, statherin and leucine rich amelogenin protein (LRAP), have been studied in depth and have different features, challenging our ability to extract design principles. More recent studies of the significantly larger full-length amelogenin represent a challenging but necessary step to ultimately investigate the full diversity of biomineralization proteins. Interactions of amino acids and silaffin peptide with silica are also being studied, along with qualitative studies of proteins interacting with calcium carbonate. Dipolar recoupling techniques have formed the core of the quantitative studies, yet, the need for isolated spin pairs makes this approach costly and time intensive. The use of multi-dimensional techniques is advancing, methodology which, despite its challenges with these difficult-to-study proteins, will continue to drive future advancements in this area..

  4. Automated solid-state NMR resonance assignment of protein microcrystals and amyloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid-state NMR is an emerging structure determination technique for crystalline and non-crystalline protein assemblies, e.g., amyloids. Resonance assignment constitutes the first and often very time-consuming step to a structure. We present ssFLYA, a generally applicable algorithm for automatic assignment of protein solid-state NMR spectra. Application to microcrystals of ubiquitin and the Ure2 prion C-terminal domain, as well as amyloids of HET-s(218–289) and α-synuclein yielded 88–97 % correctness for the backbone and side-chain assignments that are classified as self-consistent by the algorithm, and 77–90 % correctness if also assignments classified as tentative by the algorithm are included

  5. Exact NMR simulation of protein-size spin systems using tensor train formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Savostyanov, D V; Werner, J M; Kuprov, Ilya

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new method, based on alternating optimization, for compact representation of spin Hamiltonian, and solution of linear systems in the tensor train format. We demonstrate its utility by simulating, without significant approximations, a 15N NMR spectrum of ubiquitin --- protein containing several hundred interacting nuclear spins. Existing simulation algorithms for the spin system and the NMR experiment in question either require significant approximations or scale exponentially with the system size. We compare the proposed method to the Spinach package that uses heuristic restricted state space (RSS) techniques to achieve polynomial complexity scaling. When the spin system topology is close to a linear chain (e.g. for backbone of a protein), the tensor train representation of a Hamiltonian is more compact and can be computed faster than the sparse representation using the RSS.

  6. A solution NMR view of protein dynamics in the biological membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chill, Jordan H; Naider, Fred

    2011-10-01

    Structure determination of membrane-associated proteins (MPs) represents a frontier of structural biology that is characterized by unique challenges in sample preparation and data acquisition. No less important is our ability to study the dynamics of MPs, since MP flexibility and characteristic motions often make sizeable contributions to their function. This review focuses on solution state NMR methods to characterize dynamics of MPs in the membrane environment. NMR approaches to study molecular motions on a wide range of time-scales and their application to membrane proteins are described. Studies of polytopic and bitopic MPs demonstrating the power of such methods to characterize the dynamic behavior of MPs and their interaction with the membrane-mimicking surroundings are presented. Attempts are made to place the dynamic conclusions into a biological context. The importance and limitations of such investigations guarantee that further developments in this field will be actively pursued. PMID:21807499

  7. Automated solid-state NMR resonance assignment of protein microcrystals and amyloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Elena [Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance, Institute of Biophysical Chemistry (Germany); Gath, Julia [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Habenstein, Birgit [UMR 5086 CNRS/Universite de Lyon 1, Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Proteines (France); Ravotti, Francesco; Szekely, Kathrin; Huber, Matthias [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Buchner, Lena [Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance, Institute of Biophysical Chemistry (Germany); Boeckmann, Anja, E-mail: a.bockmann@ibcp.fr [UMR 5086 CNRS/Universite de Lyon 1, Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Proteines (France); Meier, Beat H., E-mail: beme@ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Guentert, Peter, E-mail: guentert@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance, Institute of Biophysical Chemistry (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Solid-state NMR is an emerging structure determination technique for crystalline and non-crystalline protein assemblies, e.g., amyloids. Resonance assignment constitutes the first and often very time-consuming step to a structure. We present ssFLYA, a generally applicable algorithm for automatic assignment of protein solid-state NMR spectra. Application to microcrystals of ubiquitin and the Ure2 prion C-terminal domain, as well as amyloids of HET-s(218-289) and {alpha}-synuclein yielded 88-97 % correctness for the backbone and side-chain assignments that are classified as self-consistent by the algorithm, and 77-90 % correctness if also assignments classified as tentative by the algorithm are included.

  8. Rapid Determination of Protein Solubility and Stability Conditions for NMR Studies Using Incomplete Factorial Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sample preparation constitutes a crucial and limiting step in structural studies of proteins by NMR. The determination of the solubility and stability (SAS) conditions of biomolecules at millimolar concentrations stays today empirical and hence time- and material-consuming. Only few studies have been recently done in this field and they have highlighted the interest of using crystallogenesis tools to optimise sample conditions. In this study, we have adapted a method based on incomplete factorial design and making use of crystallisation plates to quantify the influence of physico-chemical parameters such as buffer pH and salts on protein SAS. A description of the experimental set up and an evaluation of the method are given by case studies on two functional domains from the bacterial regulatory protein LicT as well as two other proteins. Using this method, we could rapidly determine optimised conditions for extracting soluble proteins from bacterial cells and for preparing purified protein samples sufficiently concentrated and stable for NMR characterisation. The drastic reduction in the time and number of experiments required for searching protein SAS conditions makes this method particularly well-adapted for a systematic investigation on a large range of physico-chemical parameters

  9. Magic Angle Spinning NMR Structure Determination of Proteins from Pseudocontact Shifts

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jianping

    2013-06-05

    Magic angle spinning solid-state NMR is a unique technique to study atomic-resolution structure of biomacromolecules which resist crystallization or are too large to study by solution NMR techniques. However, difficulties in obtaining sufficient number of long-range distance restraints using dipolar coupling based spectra hamper the process of structure determination of proteins in solid-state NMR. In this study it is shown that high-resolution structure of proteins in solid phase can be determined without the use of traditional dipolar-dipolar coupling based distance restraints by combining the measurements of pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) with Rosetta calculations. The PCSs were generated by chelating exogenous paramagnetic metal ions to a tag 4-mercaptomethyl-dipicolinic acid, which is covalently attached to different residue sites in a 56-residue immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G (GB1). The long-range structural restraints with metal-nucleus distance of up to ∼20 Å are quantitatively extracted from experimentally observed PCSs, and these are in good agreement with the distances back-calculated using an X-ray structure model. Moreover, we demonstrate that using several paramagnetic ions with varied paramagnetic susceptibilities as well as the introduction of paramagnetic labels at different sites can dramatically increase the number of long-range restraints and cover different regions of the protein. The structure generated from solid-state NMR PCSs restraints combined with Rosetta calculations has 0.7 Å root-mean-square deviation relative to X-ray structure. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  10. Cooling overall spin temperature: Protein NMR experiments optimized for longitudinal relaxation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, Michaël; Campbell, Iain D.

    2006-02-01

    In experiments performed on protonated proteins at high fields, 80% of the NMR spectrometer time is spent waiting for the 1H atoms to recover their polarization after recording the free induction decay. Selective excitation of a fraction of the protons in a large molecule has previously been shown to lead to faster longitudinal relaxation for the selected protons [K. Pervushin, B. Vögeli, A. Eletsky, Longitudinal 1H relaxation optimization in TROSY NMR spectroscopy, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 124 (2002) 12898-12902; P. Schanda, B. Brutscher, Very fast two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy for real-time investigation of dynamic events in proteins on the time scale of seconds, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127 (2005) 8014-8015; H.S. Attreya, T. Szyperski, G-matrix Fourier transform NMR spectroscopy for complete protein resonance assignment, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101 (2004) 9642-9647]. The pool of non-selected protons acts as a "thermal bath" and spin-diffusion processes ("flip-flop" transitions) channel the excess energy from the excited pool to the non-selected protons in regions of the molecule where other relaxation processes can dissipate the excess energy. We present here a sensitivity enhanced HSQC sequence (COST-HSQC), based on one selective E-BURP pulse, which can be used on protonated 15N enriched proteins (with or without 13C isotopic enrichment). This experiment is compared to a gradient sensitivity enhanced HSQC with a water flip-back pulse (the water flip-back pulse quenches the spin diffusion between 1H N and 1H α spins). This experiment is shown to have significant advantages in some circumstances. Some observed limitations, namely sample overheating with short recovery delays and complex longitudinal relaxation behaviour are discussed and analysed.

  11. Micro-scale NMR Experiments for Monitoring the Optimization of Membrane Protein Solutions for Structural Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Horst, Reto; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Reconstitution of integral membrane proteins (IMP) in aqueous solutions of detergent micelles has been extensively used in structural biology, using either X-ray crystallography or NMR in solution. Further progress could be achieved by establishing a rational basis for the selection of detergent and buffer conditions, since the stringent bottleneck that slows down the structural biology of IMPs is the preparation of diffracting crystals or concentrated solutions of stable isotope labeled IMPs...

  12. Fast Two-Dimensional NMR Spectroscopy of High Molecular Weight Protein Assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An optimized NMR experiment that combines the advantages of methyl-TROSY and SOFAST-HMQC has been developed. It allows the recording of high quality methyl 1H-13C correlation spectra of protein assemblies of several hundreds of kDa in a few seconds. The SOFAST-methyl-TROSY-based experiment offers completely new opportunities for the study of structural and dynamic changes occurring in molecular nano-machines while they perform their biological function in vitro. (authors)

  13. Cryogenic temperature effects and resolution upon slow cooling of protein preparations in solid state NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linden, Arne H.; Franks, W. Trent; Akbey, Uemit; Lange, Sascha; Rossum, Barth-Jan van; Oschkinat, Hartmut, E-mail: oschkinat@fmp-berlin.de [Forschungsinstitut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    X-ray crystallography using synchrotron radiation and the technique of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) require samples to be kept at temperatures below 100 K. Protein dynamics are poorly understood below the freezing point of water and down to liquid nitrogen temperatures. Therefore, we investigate the {alpha}-spectrin SH3 domain by magic angle spinning (MAS) solid state NMR (ssNMR) at various temperatures while cooling slowly. Cooling down to 95 K, the NMR-signals of SH3 first broaden and at lower temperatures they separate into several peaks. The coalescence temperature differs depending on the individual residue. The broadening is shown to be inhomogeneous by hole-burning experiments. The coalescence behavior of 26 resolved signals (of 62) was compared to water proximity and crystal structure Debye-Waller factors (B-factors). Close proximity to the solvent and large B-factors (i.e. mobility) lead, generally, to a higher coalescence temperature. We interpret a high coalescence temperature as indicative of a large number of magnetically inequivalent populations at cryogenic temperature.

  14. Constructing a folding model for protein S6 guided by native fluctuations deduced from NMR structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammert, Heiko; Noel, Jeffrey K; Haglund, Ellinor; Schug, Alexander; Onuchic, José N

    2015-12-28

    The diversity in a set of protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures provides an estimate of native state fluctuations that can be used to refine and enrich structure-based protein models (SBMs). Dynamics are an essential part of a protein's functional native state. The dynamics in the native state are controlled by the same funneled energy landscape that guides the entire folding process. SBMs apply the principle of minimal frustration, drawn from energy landscape theory, to construct a funneled folding landscape for a given protein using only information from the native structure. On an energy landscape smoothed by evolution towards minimal frustration, geometrical constraints, imposed by the native structure, control the folding mechanism and shape the native dynamics revealed by the model. Native-state fluctuations can alternatively be estimated directly from the diversity in the set of NMR structures for a protein. Based on this information, we identify a highly flexible loop in the ribosomal protein S6 and modify the contact map in a SBM to accommodate the inferred dynamics. By taking into account the probable native state dynamics, the experimental transition state is recovered in the model, and the correct order of folding events is restored. Our study highlights how the shared energy landscape connects folding and function by showing that a better description of the native basin improves the prediction of the folding mechanism. PMID:26723626

  15. Constructing a folding model for protein S6 guided by native fluctuations deduced from NMR structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammert, Heiko; Noel, Jeffrey K.; Haglund, Ellinor; Schug, Alexander; Onuchic, José N.

    2015-12-01

    The diversity in a set of protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures provides an estimate of native state fluctuations that can be used to refine and enrich structure-based protein models (SBMs). Dynamics are an essential part of a protein's functional native state. The dynamics in the native state are controlled by the same funneled energy landscape that guides the entire folding process. SBMs apply the principle of minimal frustration, drawn from energy landscape theory, to construct a funneled folding landscape for a given protein using only information from the native structure. On an energy landscape smoothed by evolution towards minimal frustration, geometrical constraints, imposed by the native structure, control the folding mechanism and shape the native dynamics revealed by the model. Native-state fluctuations can alternatively be estimated directly from the diversity in the set of NMR structures for a protein. Based on this information, we identify a highly flexible loop in the ribosomal protein S6 and modify the contact map in a SBM to accommodate the inferred dynamics. By taking into account the probable native state dynamics, the experimental transition state is recovered in the model, and the correct order of folding events is restored. Our study highlights how the shared energy landscape connects folding and function by showing that a better description of the native basin improves the prediction of the folding mechanism.

  16. NMR spectroscopic and analytical ultracentrifuge analysis of membrane protein detergent complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choe Senyon

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural studies of integral membrane proteins (IMPs are hampered by inherent difficulties in their heterologous expression and in the purification of solubilized protein-detergent complexes (PDCs. The choice and concentrations of detergents used in an IMP preparation play a critical role in protein homogeneity and are thus important for successful crystallization. Results Seeking an effective and standardized means applicable to genomic approaches for the characterization of PDCs, we chose 1D-NMR spectroscopic analysis to monitor the detergent content throughout their purification: protein extraction, detergent exchange, and sample concentration. We demonstrate that a single NMR measurement combined with a SDS-PAGE of a detergent extracted sample provides a useful gauge of the detergent's extraction potential for a given protein. Furthermore, careful monitoring of the detergent content during the process of IMP production allows for a high level of reproducibility. We also show that in many cases a simple sedimentation velocity measurement provides sufficient data to estimate both the oligomeric state and the detergent-to-protein ratio in PDCs, as well as to evaluate the homogeneity of the samples prior to crystallization screening. Conclusion The techniques presented here facilitate the screening and selection of the extraction detergent, as well as help to maintain reproducibility in the detergent exchange and PDC concentration procedures. Such reproducibility is particularly important for the optimization of initial crystallization conditions, for which multiple purifications are routinely required.

  17. Preparation, characterization, and NMR spectroscopy of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low viscosity fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Encapsulating a protein in a reverse micelle and dissolving it in a low-viscosity solvent can lower the rotational correlation time of a protein and thereby provides a novel strategy for studying proteins in a variety of contexts. The preparation of the sample is a key element in this approach and is guided by a number of competing parameters. Here we examine the applicability of several strategies for the preparation and characterization of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low viscosity fluids that are suitable for high performance NMR spectroscopy. Ubiquitin is used as a model system to explore various issues such as the homogeneity of the encapsulation, characterization of the hydrodynamic performance of reverse micelles containing protein molecules, and the effective pH of the water environment of the reverse micelle

  18. CASA: An Efficient Automated Assignment of Protein Mainchain NMR Data Using an Ordered Tree Search Algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapid analysis of protein structure, interaction, and dynamics requires fast and automated assignments of 3D protein backbone triple-resonance NMR spectra. We introduce a new depth-first ordered tree search method of automated assignment, CASA, which uses hand-edited peak-pick lists of a flexible number of triple resonance experiments. The computer program was tested on 13 artificially simulated peak lists for proteins up to 723 residues, as well as on the experimental data for four proteins. Under reasonable tolerances, it generated assignments that correspond to the ones reported in the literature within a few minutes of CPU time. The program was also tested on the proteins analyzed by other methods, with both simulated and experimental peaklists, and it could generate good assignments in all relevant cases. The robustness was further tested under various situations

  19. Hydration-optimized oriented phospholipid bilayer samples for solid-state NMR structural studies of membrane proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Marassi, Francesca M.; Crowell, Kevin J.

    2003-01-01

    The preparation of oriented, hydration-optimized lipid bilayer samples, for NMR structure determination of membrane proteins, is described. The samples consist of planar phospholipid bilayers, containing membrane proteins, that are oriented on single pairs of glass slides, and are placed in the coil of the NMR probe with the bilayer plane perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field. Lipid bilayers provide a medium that closely resembles the biological membrane, and sample orientation...

  20. Constructing a folding model for protein S6 guided by native fluctuations deduced from NMR structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diversity in a set of protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures provides an estimate of native state fluctuations that can be used to refine and enrich structure-based protein models (SBMs). Dynamics are an essential part of a protein’s functional native state. The dynamics in the native state are controlled by the same funneled energy landscape that guides the entire folding process. SBMs apply the principle of minimal frustration, drawn from energy landscape theory, to construct a funneled folding landscape for a given protein using only information from the native structure. On an energy landscape smoothed by evolution towards minimal frustration, geometrical constraints, imposed by the native structure, control the folding mechanism and shape the native dynamics revealed by the model. Native-state fluctuations can alternatively be estimated directly from the diversity in the set of NMR structures for a protein. Based on this information, we identify a highly flexible loop in the ribosomal protein S6 and modify the contact map in a SBM to accommodate the inferred dynamics. By taking into account the probable native state dynamics, the experimental transition state is recovered in the model, and the correct order of folding events is restored. Our study highlights how the shared energy landscape connects folding and function by showing that a better description of the native basin improves the prediction of the folding mechanism

  1. Constructing a folding model for protein S6 guided by native fluctuations deduced from NMR structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lammert, Heiko; Noel, Jeffrey K.; Haglund, Ellinor; Onuchic, José N., E-mail: jonuchic@rice.edu [Center for Theoretical Biological Physics and Department of Physics, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Schug, Alexander [Steinbuch Centre for Computing, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-12-28

    The diversity in a set of protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures provides an estimate of native state fluctuations that can be used to refine and enrich structure-based protein models (SBMs). Dynamics are an essential part of a protein’s functional native state. The dynamics in the native state are controlled by the same funneled energy landscape that guides the entire folding process. SBMs apply the principle of minimal frustration, drawn from energy landscape theory, to construct a funneled folding landscape for a given protein using only information from the native structure. On an energy landscape smoothed by evolution towards minimal frustration, geometrical constraints, imposed by the native structure, control the folding mechanism and shape the native dynamics revealed by the model. Native-state fluctuations can alternatively be estimated directly from the diversity in the set of NMR structures for a protein. Based on this information, we identify a highly flexible loop in the ribosomal protein S6 and modify the contact map in a SBM to accommodate the inferred dynamics. By taking into account the probable native state dynamics, the experimental transition state is recovered in the model, and the correct order of folding events is restored. Our study highlights how the shared energy landscape connects folding and function by showing that a better description of the native basin improves the prediction of the folding mechanism.

  2. NMR structure of the N-terminal domain of the replication initiator protein DnaA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wemmer, David E.; Lowery, Thomas J.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Chandonia, John-Marc; Kim, Rosalind; Yokota, Hisao; Wemmer, David E.

    2007-08-07

    DnaA is an essential component in the initiation of bacterial chromosomal replication. DnaA binds to a series of 9 base pair repeats leading to oligomerization, recruitment of the DnaBC helicase, and the assembly of the replication fork machinery. The structure of the N-terminal domain (residues 1-100) of DnaA from Mycoplasma genitalium was determined by NMR spectroscopy. The backbone r.m.s.d. for the first 86 residues was 0.6 +/- 0.2 Angstrom based on 742 NOE, 50 hydrogen bond, 46 backbone angle, and 88 residual dipolar coupling restraints. Ultracentrifugation studies revealed that the domain is monomeric in solution. Features on the protein surface include a hydrophobic cleft flanked by several negative residues on one side, and positive residues on the other. A negatively charged ridge is present on the opposite face of the protein. These surfaces may be important sites of interaction with other proteins involved in the replication process. Together, the structure and NMR assignments should facilitate the design of new experiments to probe the protein-protein interactions essential for the initiation of DNA replication.

  3. Optimizing nanodiscs and bicelles for solution NMR studies of two β-barrel membrane proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucharska, Iga [University of Virginia, Center for Membrane Biology and Department of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics (United States); Edrington, Thomas C. [Monsanto Company (United States); Liang, Binyong; Tamm, Lukas K., E-mail: Lkt2e@virginia.edu [University of Virginia, Center for Membrane Biology and Department of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Solution NMR spectroscopy has become a robust method to determine structures and explore the dynamics of integral membrane proteins. The vast majority of previous studies on membrane proteins by solution NMR have been conducted in lipid micelles. Contrary to the lipids that form a lipid bilayer in biological membranes, micellar lipids typically contain only a single hydrocarbon chain or two chains that are too short to form a bilayer. Therefore, there is a need to explore alternative more bilayer-like media to mimic the natural environment of membrane proteins. Lipid bicelles and lipid nanodiscs have emerged as two alternative membrane mimetics that are compatible with solution NMR spectroscopy. Here, we have conducted a comprehensive comparison of the physical and spectroscopic behavior of two outer membrane proteins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, OprG and OprH, in lipid micelles, bicelles, and nanodiscs of five different sizes. Bicelles stabilized with a fraction of negatively charged lipids yielded spectra of almost comparable quality as in the best micellar solutions and the secondary structures were found to be almost indistinguishable in the two environments. Of the five nanodiscs tested, nanodiscs assembled from MSP1D1ΔH5 performed the best with both proteins in terms of sample stability and spectral resolution. Even in these optimal nanodiscs some broad signals from the membrane embedded barrel were severely overlapped with sharp signals from the flexible loops making their assignments difficult. A mutant OprH that had two of the flexible loops truncated yielded very promising spectra for further structural and dynamical analysis in MSP1D1ΔH5 nanodiscs.

  4. Optimizing nanodiscs and bicelles for solution NMR studies of two β-barrel membrane proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solution NMR spectroscopy has become a robust method to determine structures and explore the dynamics of integral membrane proteins. The vast majority of previous studies on membrane proteins by solution NMR have been conducted in lipid micelles. Contrary to the lipids that form a lipid bilayer in biological membranes, micellar lipids typically contain only a single hydrocarbon chain or two chains that are too short to form a bilayer. Therefore, there is a need to explore alternative more bilayer-like media to mimic the natural environment of membrane proteins. Lipid bicelles and lipid nanodiscs have emerged as two alternative membrane mimetics that are compatible with solution NMR spectroscopy. Here, we have conducted a comprehensive comparison of the physical and spectroscopic behavior of two outer membrane proteins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, OprG and OprH, in lipid micelles, bicelles, and nanodiscs of five different sizes. Bicelles stabilized with a fraction of negatively charged lipids yielded spectra of almost comparable quality as in the best micellar solutions and the secondary structures were found to be almost indistinguishable in the two environments. Of the five nanodiscs tested, nanodiscs assembled from MSP1D1ΔH5 performed the best with both proteins in terms of sample stability and spectral resolution. Even in these optimal nanodiscs some broad signals from the membrane embedded barrel were severely overlapped with sharp signals from the flexible loops making their assignments difficult. A mutant OprH that had two of the flexible loops truncated yielded very promising spectra for further structural and dynamical analysis in MSP1D1ΔH5 nanodiscs

  5. NMR Solution Structure and Biophysical Characterization of Vibrio harveyi Acyl Carrier Protein A75H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, David I.; Chu, Byron C. H.; Lau, Cheryl K. Y.; Hunter, Howard N.; Byers, David M.; Vogel, Hans J.

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial acyl carrier protein (ACP) is a highly anionic, 9 kDa protein that functions as a cofactor protein in fatty acid biosynthesis. Escherichia coli ACP is folded at neutral pH and in the absence of divalent cations, while Vibrio harveyi ACP, which is very similar at 86% sequence identity, is unfolded under the same conditions. V. harveyi ACP adopts a folded conformation upon the addition of divalent cations such as Ca2+ and Mg2+ and a mutant, A75H, was previously identified that restores the folded conformation at pH 7 in the absence of divalent cations. In this study we sought to understand the unique folding behavior of V. harveyi ACP using NMR spectroscopy and biophysical methods. The NMR solution structure of V. harveyi ACP A75H displays the canonical ACP structure with four helices surrounding a hydrophobic core, with a narrow pocket closed off from the solvent to house the acyl chain. His-75, which is charged at neutral pH, participates in a stacking interaction with Tyr-71 in the far C-terminal end of helix IV. pH titrations and the electrostatic profile of ACP suggest that V. harveyi ACP is destabilized by anionic charge repulsion around helix II that can be partially neutralized by His-75 and is further reduced by divalent cation binding. This is supported by differential scanning calorimetry data which indicate that calcium binding further increases the melting temperature of V. harveyi ACP A75H by ∼20 °C. Divalent cation binding does not alter ACP dynamics on the ps-ns timescale as determined by 15N NMR relaxation experiments, however, it clearly stabilizes the protein fold as observed by hydrogen-deuterium exchange studies. Finally, we demonstrate that the E. coli ACP H75A mutant is similarly unfolded as wild-type V. harveyi ACP, further stressing the importance of this particular residue for proper protein folding. PMID:20659901

  6. NMR-guided molecular docking of a protein-peptide complex based on ant colony optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, Oliver; Möller, Heiko M; Exner, Thomas E

    2010-07-01

    Standard docking approaches used for the prediction of protein-ligand complexes in the drug development process have problems identifying the correct binding mode of large flexible ligands. Herein we show how additional experimental data from NMR experiments can be used to predict the binding mode of a mucin 1 (MUC-1) pentapeptide recognized by the breast-cancer-selective monoclonal antibody SM3. Distance constraints derived from trNOE and saturation transfer difference NMR experiments are combined with the docking approach PLANTS. The resulting complex structures show excellent agreement with the NMR data and with a published X-ray crystal structure. The method was then further tested on two complexes in order to demonstrate its more general applicability: T-antigen disaccharide bound to Maclura pomifera agglutinin, and the inhibitor SBi279 bound to S100B protein. Our new approach has the advantages of being fully automatic, rapid, and unbiased; moreover, it is based on relatively easily obtainable experimental data and can greatly increase the reliability of the generated structures. PMID:20486157

  7. Automating unambiguous NOE data usage in NVR for NMR protein structure-based assignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmedov, Murodzhon; Çatay, Bülent; Apaydın, Mehmet Serkan

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy is an important technique that allows determining protein structure in solution. An important problem in protein structure determination using NMR spectroscopy is the mapping of peaks to corresponding amino acids, also known as the assignment problem. Structure-Based Assignment (SBA) is an approach to solve this problem using a template structure that is homologous to the target. Our previously developed approach Nuclear Vector Replacement-Binary Integer Programming (NVR-BIP) computed the optimal solution for small proteins, but was unable to solve the assignments of large proteins. NVR-Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) extended the applicability of the NVR approach for such proteins. One of the input data utilized in these approaches is the Nuclear Overhauser Effect (NOE) data. NOE is an interaction observed between two protons if the protons are located close in space. These protons could be amide protons, protons attached to the alpha-carbon atom in the backbone of the protein, or side chain protons. NVR only uses backbone protons. In this paper, we reformulate the NVR-BIP model to distinguish the type of proton in NOE data and use the corresponding proton coordinates in the extended formulation. In addition, the threshold value over interproton distances is set in a standard manner for all proteins by extracting the NOE upper bound distance information from the data. We also convert NOE intensities into distance thresholds. Our new approach thus handles the NOE data correctly and without manually determined parameters. We accordingly adapt NVR-ACO solution methodology to these changes. Computational results show that our approaches obtain optimal solutions for small proteins. For the large proteins our ant colony optimization-based approach obtains promising results. PMID:26260854

  8. NMR investigation of the interaction of the inhibitor protein Im9 with its partner DNase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boetzel, R; Czisch, M; Kaptein, R; Hemmings, A M; James, R; Kleanthous, C; Moore, G R

    2000-09-01

    The bacterial toxin colicin E9 is secreted by producing Escherichia coli cells with its 9.5 kDa inhibitor protein Im9 bound tightly to its 14.5 kDa C-terminal DNase domain. Double- and triple-resonance NMR spectra of the 24 kDa complex of uniformly 13C and 15N labeled Im9 bound to the unlabeled DNase domain have provided sufficient constraints for the solution structure of the bound Im9 to be determined. For the final ensemble of 20 structures, pairwise RMSDs for residues 3-84 were 0.76 +/- 0.14 A for the backbone atoms and 1.36 +/- 0.15 A for the heavy atoms. Representative solution structures of the free and bound Im9 are highly similar, with backbone and heavy atom RMSDs of 1.63 and 2.44 A, respectively, for residues 4-83, suggesting that binding does not cause a major conformational change in Im9. The NMR studies have also allowed the DNase contact surface on Im9 to be investigated through changes in backbone chemical shifts and NOEs between the two proteins determined from comparisons of 1H-1H-13C NOESY-HSQC spectra with and without 13C decoupling. The NMR-defined interface agrees well with that determined in a recent X-ray structure analysis with the major difference being that a surface loop of Im9, which is at the interface, has a different conformation in the solution and crystal structures. Tyr54, a key residue on the interface, is shown to exhibit NMR characteristics indicative of slow rotational flipping. A mechanistic description of the influence binding of Im9 has on the dynamic behavior of E9 DNase, which is known to exist in two slowly interchanging conformers in solution, is proposed. PMID:11045617

  9. A tabu search approach for the NMR protein structure-based assignment problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavuşlar, Gizem; Çatay, Bülent; Apaydın, Mehmet Serkan

    2012-01-01

    Spectroscopy is an experimental technique which exploits the magnetic properties of specific nuclei and enables the study of proteins in solution. The key bottleneck of NMR studies is to map the NMR peaks to corresponding nuclei, also known as the assignment problem. Structure-Based Assignment (SBA) is an approach to solve this computationally challenging problem by using prior information about the protein obtained from a homologous structure. NVR-BIP used the Nuclear Vector Replacement (NVR) framework to model SBA as a binary integer programming problem. In this paper, we prove that this problem is NP-hard and propose a tabu search (TS) algorithm (NVR-TS) equipped with a guided perturbation mechanism to efficiently solve it. NVR-TS uses a quadratic penalty relaxation of NVR-BIP where the violations in the Nuclear Overhauser Effect constraints are penalized in the objective function. Experimental results indicate that our algorithm finds the optimal solution on NVRBIP’s data set which consists of seven proteins with 25 templates (31 to 126 residues). Furthermore, it achieves relatively high assignment accuracies on two additional large proteins, MBP and EIN (348 and 243 residues, respectively), which NVR-BIP failed to solve. The executable and the input files are available for download at http://people.sabanciuniv.edu/catay/NVR-TS/NVR-TS.html. PMID:23221084

  10. Heat management strategies for solid-state NMR of functional proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Daniel J.; Harris, Michael J.; Thompson, Lynmarie K.

    2012-09-01

    Modern solid-state NMR methods can acquire high-resolution protein spectra for structure determination. However, these methods use rapid sample spinning and intense decoupling fields that can heat and denature the protein being studied. Here we present a strategy to avoid destroying valuable samples. We advocate first creating a sacrificial sample, which contains unlabeled protein (or no protein) in buffer conditions similar to the intended sample. This sample is then doped with the chemical shift thermometer Sm2Sn2O7. We introduce a pulse scheme called TCUP (for Temperature Calibration Under Pulseload) that can characterize the heating of this sacrificial sample rapidly, under a variety of experimental conditions, and with high temporal resolution. Sample heating is discussed with respect to different instrumental variables such as spinning speed, decoupling strength and duration, and cooling gas flow rate. The effects of different sample preparation variables are also discussed, including ionic strength, the inclusion of cryoprotectants, and the physical state of the sample (i.e. liquid, solid, or slurry). Lastly, we discuss probe detuning as a measure of sample thawing that does not require retuning the probe or using chemical shift thermometer compounds. Use of detuning tests and chemical shift thermometers with representative sample conditions makes it possible to maximize the efficiency of the NMR experiment while retaining a functional sample.

  11. Mechanisms of allosteric gene regulation by NMR quantification of microsecond-millisecond protein dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleckner, Ian R; Gollnick, Paul; Foster, Mark P

    2012-01-13

    The trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) is a paradigmatic allosteric protein that regulates the tryptophan biosynthetic genes associated with the trp operon in bacilli. The ring-shaped 11-mer TRAP is activated for recognition of a specific trp-mRNA target by binding up to 11 tryptophan molecules. To characterize the mechanisms of tryptophan-induced TRAP activation, we have performed methyl relaxation dispersion (MRD) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments that probe the time-dependent structure of TRAP in the microsecond-to-millisecond "chemical exchange" time window. We find significant side chain flexibility localized to the RNA and tryptophan binding sites of the apo protein and that these dynamics are dramatically reduced upon ligand binding. Analysis of the MRD NMR data provides insights into the structural nature of transiently populated conformations sampled in solution by apo TRAP. The MRD data are inconsistent with global two-state exchange, indicating that conformational sampling in apo TRAP is asynchronous. These findings imply a temporally heterogeneous population of structures that are incompatible with RNA binding and substantiate the study of TRAP as a paradigm for probing and understanding essential dynamics in allosteric, regulatory proteins. PMID:22115774

  12. Structural, vibrational, NMR, quantum chemical, DNA binding and protein docking studies of two flexible imine oximes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    YUNUS KAYA

    2016-09-01

    Two flexible imine oxime molecules, namely, 3-(pyridin-2-ylmethylimino)-butan-2-one oxime (HL¹) and 3-(pyridin-2-ylmethylimino)-pentan-2-one oxime (HL²) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR and NMR techniques. The conformational behavior was investigated using the density functional theory (DFT) with the B3LYP method combined with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. As a result of the conformational studies, three stable molecules and the most stable conformer were determined for the both imine oximes. The spectroscopic properties such as vibrational and NMR were calculated for the most stable conformer of the HL¹ and HL². The calculation results were applied to simulate infrared spectra of the title compounds, which show good agreement with observed spectra. In addition, the stable three molecules of the both imine oximes have been used to carry out DNA binding and protein docking studies with DNA and protein structures (downloaded from Protein Data Bank) using Discovery Studio 3.5 to find the most preferred binding mode of the ligands inside the DNA and protein cavity.

  13. Optimization of NMR spectroscopy of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low viscosity fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nucci, Nathaniel V.; Marques, Bryan S.; Bedard, Sabrina; Dogan, Jakob; Gledhill, John M.; Moorman, Veronica R. [University of Pennsylvania, Graduate Group in Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics and Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, 905 Stellar-Chance Laboratories (United States); Peterson, Ronald W. [LLC, Daedalus Innovations (United States); Valentine, Kathleen G.; Wand, Alison L.; Wand, A. Joshua, E-mail: wand@mail.med.upenn.edu [University of Pennsylvania, Graduate Group in Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics and Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, 905 Stellar-Chance Laboratories (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Comprehensive application of solution NMR spectroscopy to studies of macromolecules remains fundamentally limited by the molecular rotational correlation time. For proteins, molecules larger than 30 kDa require complex experimental methods, such as TROSY in conjunction with isotopic labeling schemes that are often expensive and generally reduce the potential information available. We have developed the reverse micelle encapsulation strategy as an alternative approach. Encapsulation of proteins within the protective nano-scale water pool of a reverse micelle dissolved in ultra-low viscosity nonpolar solvents overcomes the slow tumbling problem presented by large proteins. Here, we characterize the contributions from the various components of the protein-containing reverse micelle system to the rotational correlation time of the encapsulated protein. Importantly, we demonstrate that the protein encapsulated in the reverse micelle maintains a hydration shell comparable in size to that seen in bulk solution. Using moderate pressures, encapsulation in ultra-low viscosity propane or ethane can be used to magnify this advantage. We show that encapsulation in liquid ethane can be used to reduce the tumbling time of the 43 kDa maltose binding protein from {approx}23 to {approx}10 ns. These conditions enable, for example, acquisition of TOCSY-type data resolved on the adjacent amide NH for the 43 kDa encapsulated maltose binding protein dissolved in liquid ethane, which is typically impossible for proteins of such size without use of extensive deuteration or the TROSY effect.

  14. Optimization of NMR spectroscopy of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low viscosity fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comprehensive application of solution NMR spectroscopy to studies of macromolecules remains fundamentally limited by the molecular rotational correlation time. For proteins, molecules larger than 30 kDa require complex experimental methods, such as TROSY in conjunction with isotopic labeling schemes that are often expensive and generally reduce the potential information available. We have developed the reverse micelle encapsulation strategy as an alternative approach. Encapsulation of proteins within the protective nano-scale water pool of a reverse micelle dissolved in ultra-low viscosity nonpolar solvents overcomes the slow tumbling problem presented by large proteins. Here, we characterize the contributions from the various components of the protein-containing reverse micelle system to the rotational correlation time of the encapsulated protein. Importantly, we demonstrate that the protein encapsulated in the reverse micelle maintains a hydration shell comparable in size to that seen in bulk solution. Using moderate pressures, encapsulation in ultra-low viscosity propane or ethane can be used to magnify this advantage. We show that encapsulation in liquid ethane can be used to reduce the tumbling time of the 43 kDa maltose binding protein from ∼23 to ∼10 ns. These conditions enable, for example, acquisition of TOCSY-type data resolved on the adjacent amide NH for the 43 kDa encapsulated maltose binding protein dissolved in liquid ethane, which is typically impossible for proteins of such size without use of extensive deuteration or the TROSY effect.

  15. Differences in lysine pKa values may be used to improve NMR signal dispersion in reductively methylated proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reductive methylation of lysine residues in proteins offers a way to introduce 13C methyl groups into otherwise unlabeled molecules. The 13C methyl groups on lysines possess favorable relaxation properties that allow highly sensitive NMR signal detection. One of the major limitations in the use of reductive methylation in NMR is the signal overlap of 13C methyl groups in NMR spectra. Here we show that the uniform influence of the solvent on chemical shifts of exposed lysine methyl groups could be overcome by adjusting the pH of the buffering solution closer to the pKa of lysine side chains. Under these conditions, due to variable pKa values of individual lysine side chains in the protein of interest different levels of lysine protonation are observed. These differences are reflected in the chemical shift differences of methyl groups in reductively methylated lysines. We show that this approach is successful in four different proteins including Ca2+-bound Calmodulin, Lysozyme, Ca2+-bound Troponin C, and Glutathione S-Transferase. In all cases significant improvement in NMR spectral resolution of methyl signals in reductively methylated proteins was obtained. The increased spectral resolution helps with more precise characterization of protein structural rearrangements caused by ligand binding as shown by studying binding of Calmodulin antagonist trifluoperazine to Calmodulin. Thus, this approach may be used to increase resolution in NMR spectra of 13C methyl groups on lysine residues in reductively methylated proteins that enhances the accuracy of protein structural assessment

  16. NMR of proteins (4Fe-4S): structural properties and intramolecular electron transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NMR started to be applied to Fe-S proteins in the seventies. Its use has recently been enlarged as the problems arising from the paramagnetic polymetallic clusters ware overcome. Applications to [4Fe-4S] are presented herein. The information derived thereof deepens the understanding of the redox properties of these proteins which play a central role in the metabolism of bacterial cells. The secondary structure elements and the overall folding of Chromatium vinosum ferredoxin (Cv Fd) in solution have been established by NMR. The unique features of this sequence have been shown to fold as an α helix at the C-terminus and as a loop between two cysteines ligand of one cluster: these two parts localize in close proximity from one another. The interaction between nuclear and electronic spins is a source of additional structural information for (4Fe-AS] proteins. The conformation of the cysteine-ligands, as revealed by the Fe-(Sγ-Cβ-Hβ)Cys dihedral angles, is related to the chemical shifts of the signals associated with the protons of these residues. The longitudinal relaxation times of the protons depend on their distance to the cluster. A quantitative relationship has been established and used to show that the solution structure of the high-potential ferredoxin from Cv differs significantly from the crystal structure around Phe-48. Both parameters (chemical shifts and longitudinal relaxation times) give also insight into the electronic and magnetic properties of the [4Fe-4S] clusters. The rate of intramolecular electron transfer between the two [4FE-4S] clusters of ferredoxins has been measured by NMR. It is far slower in the case of Cv Fd than for shorter ferredoxins. The difference may be associated with changes in the magnetic and/or electronic properties of one cluster. The strong paramagnetism of the [4Fe-4S] clusters, which originally limited the applicability of NMR to proteins containing these cofactors, has been proven instrumental in affording new

  17. On choosing a detergent for solution NMR studies of membrane proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Translational diffusion coefficients and catalytic activities were measured for the integral membrane protein diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK) in a variety of types of detergent micelles. Despite the structural diversity of the detergents examined, the translational diffusion coefficients observed for DAGK spanned a fairly limited range of values: 2.7 to 4.7 (x 10-7cm2/s). No general correlation was observed between the diffusion coefficients for the detergent-DAGK aggregates and the sizes of the corresponding protein-free micelles. These results indicate that the effective molecular weights of the DAGK-detergent aggregates were determined more by the structural properties of the protein than by the properties of the detergents. The catalytic activity of DAGK in detergents having medium-length alkyl chains such as dodecylphosphocholine or decylmaltoside was usually observed to be substantially higher than in short-chain detergents such as octylphosphocholine or octylglucoside. Taken together, the diffusion and activity results indicate that medium-chain detergents are generally preferred for use in NMR studies of complex membrane proteins because they are no worse than short-chained detergents in terms of increasing the effective molecular weight of the protein of interest while they are considerably better at maintaining native-like protein conformation. Among the 10 detergents examined, only sodium dodecylsulfate was observed to be unable to support DAGK activity under any conditions examined, suggesting that this well-known protein denaturant should be used with care in studies of complex membrane proteins

  18. Revisiting the NMR structure of the ultrafast downhill folding protein gpW from bacteriophage λ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Sborgi

    Full Text Available GpW is a 68-residue protein from bacteriophage λ that participates in virus head morphogenesis. Previous NMR studies revealed a novel α+β fold for this protein. Recent experiments have shown that gpW folds in microseconds by crossing a marginal free energy barrier (i.e., downhill folding. These features make gpW a highly desirable target for further experimental and computational folding studies. As a step in that direction, we have re-determined the high-resolution structure of gpW by multidimensional NMR on a construct that eliminates the purification tags and unstructured C-terminal tail present in the prior study. In contrast to the previous work, we have obtained a full manual assignment and calculated the structure using only unambiguous distance restraints. This new structure confirms the α+β topology, but reveals important differences in tertiary packing. Namely, the two α-helices are rotated along their main axis to form a leucine zipper. The β-hairpin is orthogonal to the helical interface rather than parallel, displaying most tertiary contacts through strand 1. There also are differences in secondary structure: longer and less curved helices and a hairpin that now shows the typical right-hand twist. Molecular dynamics simulations starting from both gpW structures, and calculations with CS-Rosetta, all converge to our gpW structure. This confirms that the original structure has strange tertiary packing and strained secondary structure. A comparison of NMR datasets suggests that the problems were mainly caused by incomplete chemical shift assignments, mistakes in NOE assignment and the inclusion of ambiguous distance restraints during the automated procedure used in the original study. The new gpW corrects these problems, providing the appropriate structural reference for future work. Furthermore, our results are a cautionary tale against the inclusion of ambiguous experimental information in the determination of protein

  19. Efficient DNP NMR of membrane proteins: sample preparation protocols, sensitivity, and radical location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Shu Y; Lee, Myungwoon; Wang, Tuo; Sergeyev, Ivan V; Hong, Mei

    2016-03-01

    Although dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has dramatically enhanced solid-state NMR spectral sensitivities of many synthetic materials and some biological macromolecules, recent studies of membrane-protein DNP using exogenously doped paramagnetic radicals as polarizing agents have reported varied and sometimes surprisingly limited enhancement factors. This motivated us to carry out a systematic evaluation of sample preparation protocols for optimizing the sensitivity of DNP NMR spectra of membrane-bound peptides and proteins at cryogenic temperatures of ~110 K. We show that mixing the radical with the membrane by direct titration instead of centrifugation gives a significant boost to DNP enhancement. We quantify the relative sensitivity enhancement between AMUPol and TOTAPOL, two commonly used radicals, and between deuterated and protonated lipid membranes. AMUPol shows ~fourfold higher sensitivity enhancement than TOTAPOL, while deuterated lipid membrane does not give net higher sensitivity for the membrane peptides than protonated membrane. Overall, a ~100 fold enhancement between the microwave-on and microwave-off spectra can be achieved on lipid-rich membranes containing conformationally disordered peptides, and absolute sensitivity gains of 105-160 can be obtained between low-temperature DNP spectra and high-temperature non-DNP spectra. We also measured the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement of lipid signals by TOTAPOL and AMUPol, to determine the depths of these two radicals in the lipid bilayer. Our data indicate a bimodal distribution of both radicals, a surface-bound fraction and a membrane-bound fraction where the nitroxides lie at ~10 Å from the membrane surface. TOTAPOL appears to have a higher membrane-embedded fraction than AMUPol. These results should be useful for membrane-protein solid-state NMR studies under DNP conditions and provide insights into how biradicals interact with phospholipid membranes. PMID:26873390

  20. Application of data mining tools for classification of protein structural class from residue based averaged NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arun V; Ali, Rehana F M; Cao, Yu; Krishnan, V V

    2015-10-01

    The number of protein sequences deriving from genome sequencing projects is outpacing our knowledge about the function of these proteins. With the gap between experimentally characterized and uncharacterized proteins continuing to widen, it is necessary to develop new computational methods and tools for protein structural information that is directly related to function. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides powerful means to determine three-dimensional structures of proteins in the solution state. However, translation of the NMR spectral parameters to even low-resolution structural information such as protein class requires multiple time consuming steps. In this paper, we present an unorthodox method to predict the protein structural class directly by using the residue's averaged chemical shifts (ACS) based on machine learning algorithms. Experimental chemical shift information from 1491 proteins obtained from Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank (BMRB) and their respective protein structural classes derived from structural classification of proteins (SCOP) were used to construct a data set with 119 attributes and 5 different classes. Twenty four different classification schemes were evaluated using several performance measures. Overall the residue based ACS values can predict the protein structural classes with 80% accuracy measured by Matthew correlation coefficient. Specifically protein classes defined by mixed αβ or small proteins are classified with >90% correlation. Our results indicate that this NMR-based method can be utilized as a low-resolution tool for protein structural class identification without any prior chemical shift assignments. PMID:25758094

  1. NMR investigation of the interaction of the inhibitor protein Im9 with its partner DNase.

    OpenAIRE

    Boetzel, R.; Czisch, M.; Kaptein, R; Hemmings, A. M.; James, R.; Kleanthous, C; Moore, G. R.

    2000-01-01

    The bacterial toxin colicin E9 is secreted by producing Escherichia coli cells with its 9.5 kDa inhibitor protein Im9 bound tightly to its 14.5 kDa C-terminal DNase domain. Double- and triple-resonance NMR spectra of the 24 kDa complex of uniformly 13C and 15N labeled Im9 bound to the unlabeled DNase domain have provided sufficient constraints for the solution structure of the bound Im9 to be determined. For the final ensemble of 20 structures, pairwise RMSDs for residues 3-84 were 0.76 +/- 0...

  2. Lipid bilayer-bound conformation of an integral membrane beta barrel protein by multidimensional MAS NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eddy, Matthew T. [The Scripps Research Institute, Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology (United States); Su, Yongchao; Silvers, Robert; Andreas, Loren; Clark, Lindsay [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry (United States); Wagner, Gerhard [Harvard Medical School, Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology (United States); Pintacuda, Guido; Emsley, Lyndon [Université de Lyon, Centre de RMN à Très Hauts Champs, Institut des Sciences Analytiques (CNRS, ENS Lyon, UCB Lyon 1) (France); Griffin, Robert G., E-mail: rgg@mit.edu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2015-04-15

    The human voltage dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC) is a 32 kDa β-barrel integral membrane protein that controls the transport of ions across the outer mitochondrial membrane. Despite the determination of VDAC solution and diffraction structures, a structural basis for the mechanism of its function is not yet fully understood. Biophysical studies suggest VDAC requires a lipid bilayer to achieve full function, motivating the need for atomic resolution structural information of VDAC in a membrane environment. Here we report an essential step toward that goal: extensive assignments of backbone and side chain resonances for VDAC in DMPC lipid bilayers via magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR). VDAC reconstituted into DMPC lipid bilayers spontaneously forms two-dimensional lipid crystals, showing remarkable spectral resolution (0.5–0.3 ppm for {sup 13}C line widths and <0.5 ppm {sup 15}N line widths at 750 MHz). In addition to the benefits of working in a lipid bilayer, several distinct advantages are observed with the lipid crystalline preparation. First, the strong signals and sharp line widths facilitated extensive NMR resonance assignments for an integral membrane β-barrel protein in lipid bilayers by MAS NMR. Second, a large number of residues in loop regions were readily observed and assigned, which can be challenging in detergent-solubilized membrane proteins where loop regions are often not detected due to line broadening from conformational exchange. Third, complete backbone and side chain chemical shift assignments could be obtained for the first 25 residues, which comprise the functionally important N-terminus. The reported assignments allow us to compare predicted torsion angles for VDAC prepared in DMPC 2D lipid crystals, DMPC liposomes, and LDAO-solubilized samples to address the possible effects of the membrane mimetic environment on the conformation of the protein. Concluding, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the

  3. Lipid bilayer-bound conformation of an integral membrane beta barrel protein by multidimensional MAS NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human voltage dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC) is a 32 kDa β-barrel integral membrane protein that controls the transport of ions across the outer mitochondrial membrane. Despite the determination of VDAC solution and diffraction structures, a structural basis for the mechanism of its function is not yet fully understood. Biophysical studies suggest VDAC requires a lipid bilayer to achieve full function, motivating the need for atomic resolution structural information of VDAC in a membrane environment. Here we report an essential step toward that goal: extensive assignments of backbone and side chain resonances for VDAC in DMPC lipid bilayers via magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR). VDAC reconstituted into DMPC lipid bilayers spontaneously forms two-dimensional lipid crystals, showing remarkable spectral resolution (0.5–0.3 ppm for 13C line widths and <0.5 ppm 15N line widths at 750 MHz). In addition to the benefits of working in a lipid bilayer, several distinct advantages are observed with the lipid crystalline preparation. First, the strong signals and sharp line widths facilitated extensive NMR resonance assignments for an integral membrane β-barrel protein in lipid bilayers by MAS NMR. Second, a large number of residues in loop regions were readily observed and assigned, which can be challenging in detergent-solubilized membrane proteins where loop regions are often not detected due to line broadening from conformational exchange. Third, complete backbone and side chain chemical shift assignments could be obtained for the first 25 residues, which comprise the functionally important N-terminus. The reported assignments allow us to compare predicted torsion angles for VDAC prepared in DMPC 2D lipid crystals, DMPC liposomes, and LDAO-solubilized samples to address the possible effects of the membrane mimetic environment on the conformation of the protein. Concluding, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the reported

  4. Correlation between local structural dynamics of proteins inferred from NMR ensembles and evolutionary dynamics of homologues of known structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Swapnil; de Brevern, Alexandre G; Offmann, Bernard; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2014-01-01

    Conformational changes in proteins are extremely important for their biochemical functions. Correlation between inherent conformational variations in a protein and conformational differences in its homologues of known structure is still unclear. In this study, we have used a structural alphabet called Protein Blocks (PBs). PBs are used to perform abstraction of protein 3-D structures into a 1-D strings of 16 alphabets (a-p) based on dihedral angles of overlapping pentapeptides. We have analyzed the variations in local conformations in terms of PBs represented in the ensembles of 801 protein structures determined using NMR spectroscopy. In the analysis of concatenated data over all the residues in all the NMR ensembles, we observe that the overall nature of inherent local structural variations in NMR ensembles is similar to the nature of local structural differences in homologous proteins with a high correlation coefficient of .94. High correlation at the alignment positions corresponding to helical and β-sheet regions is only expected. However, the correlation coefficient by considering only the loop regions is also quite high (.91). Surprisingly, segregated position-wise analysis shows that this high correlation does not hold true to loop regions at the structurally equivalent positions in NMR ensembles and their homologues of known structure. This suggests that the general nature of local structural changes is unique; however most of the local structural variations in loop regions of NMR ensembles do not correlate to their local structural differences at structurally equivalent positions in homologues. PMID:23730714

  5. Prediction of Antifreeze Critical Strength of Infant Age Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jun; LIU Runqing

    2008-01-01

    The rule of infant age concrete strength development under low temperature and complex affecting factors is researched. An efficient and reliable mathematical forecast model is set up to predict the infant age concrete antifreeze critical strength under low temperature at construction site. On the basis of the revision of concrete equivalent coefficient under complex influencing factors, least-squares curve-fitting method is applied to approximate the concrete strength under standard curing and the forecast formula of concrete compressive strength could be obtained under natural temperature condition by various effects. When the amounts of donble-doped are 10% fly ashes and 4% silica fumes as cement replacement, the antifreeze critical strength changes form 3.5-4.1MPa under different low temperature curing. The equivalent coefficient correction formula of concrete under low temperature affected by various factors could be obtained. The obtainede quivalent coefficient is suitable for calculating the strength which is between 10% to 40% of standard strength and the curing temperature from 5-20 ℃. The forecast value of concrete antifreeze critical strength under low temperature could be achieved by combining the concrete antifreeze critical strength value with the compressive strength forecast of infant age concrete under low temperature. Then the theory for construction quality control under low temperature is provided.

  6. Insights into Equilibrium Dynamics of Proteins from Comparison of NMR and X-Ray Data with Computational Predictions

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Lee-Wei; Eyal, Eran; Chennubhotla, Chakra; Jee, JunGoo; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Bahar, Ivet

    2007-01-01

    For a representative set of 64 nonhomologous proteins, each containing a structure solved by NMR and X-ray crystallography, we analyzed the variations in atomic coordinates between NMR models, the temperature (B) factors measured by X-ray crystallography, and the fluctuation dynamics predicted by the Gaussian network model (GNM). The NMR and X-ray data exhibited a correlation of 0.49. The GNM results, on the other hand, yielded a correlation of 0.59 with X-ray data and a distinctively better ...

  7. Solution NMR refinement of a metal ion bound protein using metal ion inclusive restrained molecular dynamics methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravorty, Dhruva K.; Wang Bing [University of Florida, Department of Chemistry and the Quantum Theory Project (United States); Lee, Chul Won [Chonnam National University, Department of Chemistry (Korea, Republic of); Guerra, Alfredo J.; Giedroc, David P., E-mail: giedroc@indiana.edu [Indiana University, Department of Chemistry (United States); Merz, Kenneth M., E-mail: kmerz1@gmail.com [University of Florida, Department of Chemistry and the Quantum Theory Project (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Correctly calculating the structure of metal coordination sites in a protein during the process of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure determination and refinement continues to be a challenging task. In this study, we present an accurate and convenient means by which to include metal ions in the NMR structure determination process using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations constrained by NMR-derived data to obtain a realistic and physically viable description of the metal binding site(s). This method provides the framework to accurately portray the metal ions and its binding residues in a pseudo-bond or dummy-cation like approach, and is validated by quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) MD calculations constrained by NMR-derived data. To illustrate this approach, we refine the zinc coordination complex structure of the zinc sensing transcriptional repressor protein Staphylococcus aureus CzrA, generating over 130 ns of MD and QM/MM MD NMR-data compliant sampling. In addition to refining the first coordination shell structure of the Zn(II) ion, this protocol benefits from being performed in a periodically replicated solvation environment including long-range electrostatics. We determine that unrestrained (not based on NMR data) MD simulations correlated to the NMR data in a time-averaged ensemble. The accurate solution structure ensemble of the metal-bound protein accurately describes the role of conformational sampling in allosteric regulation of DNA binding by zinc and serves to validate our previous unrestrained MD simulations of CzrA. This methodology has potentially broad applicability in the structure determination of metal ion bound proteins, protein folding and metal template protein-design studies.

  8. RAPID TEST METHOD FOR EVALUATION OF ANTIFREEZE ADDITIVE EFFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Gushchin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Usage of chemical additives while executing concrete works at negative temperatures is considered as a convenient and economical method. Range of the used antifreeze additives is rather wide. A great number of new additives are advertised but their characteristics have not been practically studied. Evaluation of the antifreeze additive efficiency is unfortunately rather long process and it does not provide comprehensive data on concrete structure formation processes. Due to this development of rapid and comprehensive methodology for construction companies is urgently required.Freezing processes of antifreeze additive aqueous solutions and hardening of cement paste with them have been investigated in the paper. The paper proposes a methodology for determination of freezing point for aqueous solutions of chemical additives of various applications. Identity of  freezing point for a chemical additive aqueous solution and cement paste with an equal concentration of the additive in the paste pore fluid has been determined while taking  calcium nitrate and sodium formate additives as an example. The paper demonstrates the possibility to evaluate efficiency of antifreeze additive action on the basis of kinetics in temperature changes of the cement paste with additives by its consecutive freezing and defrosting.  A methodology for operational evaluation in the field of chemical additive application for concreting items at negative temperatures has been offered in the paper.  The methodology does not require  deficient and expensive test-equipment. It can be applied at ordinary construction companies and it is comprehensible for personnel of low-qualification.  The paper shows the possibility to develop an original methodology for designing concrete structure which is based on operating efficiency determinations  for single and integrated antifreeze additives.

  9. Novel strategies to overcome expression problems encountered with toxic proteins: application to the production of Lac repressor proteins for NMR studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanuka, Julija; van den Bulke, Heidi; Kaptein, Robert; Boelens, Rolf; Folkers, Gert E

    2009-10-01

    NMR studies of structural aspects of allosteric regulation by the Lac repressor requires overexpression and isotope labeling of the protein. The size of the repressor makes it a challenging target, putting constraints on both expression conditions and sample preparation methods to overcome problems associated with studies of larger proteins by NMR. We optimized protocols for the production of deuterated functionally active thermostable dimeric Lac repressor and its core domain mutants. The Lac repressor core domain has never been obtained as a recombinant protein, possibly due to the observed toxicity to the host cells. We overcame the core domain induced toxicity by co-expression of this domain with the full length Lac repressor, combined with a stringent control of culture conditions. Significant overexpression was only obtained if during all stages of pre-culturing the bacteria were kept in their exponential growth phase at low density. The sensitivity of NMR measurements is dramatically affected by buffer conditions; we therefore used a thermofluor buffer optimization screen to determine the optimal buffer conditions. The combined thermofluor and NMR screening method yielded thermostable fully functional Lac repressor domain samples suitable for high-resolution NMR studies. The optimized procedures to adapt Escherichia coli to growth in D2O, to overcome toxicity, and to optimize protein sample conditions provides a broad range of universally applicable techniques for production of larger proteins for NMR spectroscopy. PMID:19460439

  10. Dynamics of protein-protein interactions studied by paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somireddy Venkata, Bharat Kumar Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play an important role in all cellular processes such as signal transduction, electron transfer, gene regulation, transcription, and translation. Understanding these protein-protein interactions at the molecular level, is an important aim in structural biology. The prote

  11. Antifreeze and cryoprotective activities of ice-binding collagen peptides from pig skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hui; Zhao, Ying; Zhu, Yu Bing; Xu, Fei; Yu, Jing Song; Yuan, Min

    2016-03-01

    A novel "hyperactive" ice-binding peptide from porcine collagen was prepared by alkaline protease hydrolysis and a series of column chromatography separations, and then its antifreeze and cryoprotective properties were reported. Using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), the thermal hysteresis (TH) of ice-binding collagen peptides was closely related to their concentration and crystal fraction. Collagen hydrolysates with maximal TH were obtained by hydrolysis at pH 8.0, DH 15.0%, and 5% alkaline protease at 55°C. After purification by column chromatography, the AP-3 ice-binding collagen peptide (GLLGPLGPRGLL) with 1162.8Da molecular weights exhibited the highest TH (5.28°C), which can be classified as "hyperactive". Recrystallisation and melt-resistance of ice cream were improved by AP-3 ice-binding collagen peptide at 0.2% (w/v) in a similar manner to natural antifreeze proteins. Moreover, the addition of AP-3 collagen peptides in ice cream greatly elevated the glass transition temperature (Tg) to -17.64°C. PMID:26471678

  12. The AUDANA algorithm for automated protein 3D structure determination from NMR NOE data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woonghee; Petit, Chad M; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Stark, Jaime L; Markley, John L

    2016-06-01

    We introduce AUDANA (Automated Database-Assisted NOE Assignment), an algorithm for determining three-dimensional structures of proteins from NMR data that automates the assignment of 3D-NOE spectra, generates distance constraints, and conducts iterative high temperature molecular dynamics and simulated annealing. The protein sequence, chemical shift assignments, and NOE spectra are the only required inputs. Distance constraints generated automatically from ambiguously assigned NOE peaks are validated during the structure calculation against information from an enlarged version of the freely available PACSY database that incorporates information on protein structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). This approach yields robust sets of distance constraints and 3D structures. We evaluated the performance of AUDANA with input data for 14 proteins ranging in size from 6 to 25 kDa that had 27-98 % sequence identity to proteins in the database. In all cases, the automatically calculated 3D structures passed stringent validation tests. Structures were determined with and without database support. In 9/14 cases, database support improved the agreement with manually determined structures in the PDB and in 11/14 cases, database support lowered the r.m.s.d. of the family of 20 structural models. PMID:27169728

  13. Mapping the population of protein conformational energy sub-states from NMR dipolar couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a general method that exploits experimental RDCs (Residual dipolar couplings) to map the free-energy landscape occupied by folded proteins in solution, determining populations of accessible conformational sub-states contributing to the dynamic equilibrium. The method initially exploits multi-level AMD simulation, flooding the conformational space available to the protein as completely as possible to sample different sub-states, which are combined to provide an extensive pool of conformers, comprising both high-and low-energy conformations. Boltzmann-weighted ensembles are then assembled by comparison with experimental NMR data. Ensemble selection is achieved using model-free interpretation of RDCs combined with a specifically designed genetic algorithm. The approach is termed SUPERNOVA (sub-state populations on potential-energy surfaces using restraints from NMR spectroscopy and conformational over-sampling). The accuracy of SUPERNOVA, and its robustness against bias in the pools of structures from which the ensembles are selected, were tested using a synthetic dataset simulated from a hypothetical system

  14. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancements in structure determination of proteins by NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solution NMR spectroscopy is a versatile tool to study a variety of a biomolecular parameters such as its structural assembly, its dynamics and its interaction with other molecules. We used the methodological expansion of paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs) to gain additional insights into spatial proximities and surface accessibility of a variety of proteins.The structure of Fst, a toxic, hydrophobic peptide was solved within a membrane mimicking environment. Using PREs, it was possible to show a transmembrane binding mode.Further, the structure of Cla h 8 was solved which is a eukaryotic homologue to prokaryotic cold shock proteins. We were using PREs to determine the high resolution structure and its mode of binding to DNA.Additionally, we solved the structure of Phl p 5a, a major grass pollen allergen. The determination of PREs displayed the dynamic behavior of different parts of the molecule. (author)

  15. Protein backbone and sidechain torsion angles predicted from NMR chemical shifts using artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new program, TALOS-N, is introduced for predicting protein backbone torsion angles from NMR chemical shifts. The program relies far more extensively on the use of trained artificial neural networks than its predecessor, TALOS+. Validation on an independent set of proteins indicates that backbone torsion angles can be predicted for a larger, ≥90 % fraction of the residues, with an error rate smaller than ca 3.5 %, using an acceptance criterion that is nearly two-fold tighter than that used previously, and a root mean square difference between predicted and crystallographically observed (φ, ψ) torsion angles of ca 12º. TALOS-N also reports sidechain χ1 rotameric states for about 50 % of the residues, and a consistency with reference structures of 89 %. The program includes a neural network trained to identify secondary structure from residue sequence and chemical shifts

  16. Protein backbone and sidechain torsion angles predicted from NMR chemical shifts using artificial neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Yang; Bax, Ad, E-mail: bax@nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States)

    2013-07-15

    A new program, TALOS-N, is introduced for predicting protein backbone torsion angles from NMR chemical shifts. The program relies far more extensively on the use of trained artificial neural networks than its predecessor, TALOS+. Validation on an independent set of proteins indicates that backbone torsion angles can be predicted for a larger, {>=}90 % fraction of the residues, with an error rate smaller than ca 3.5 %, using an acceptance criterion that is nearly two-fold tighter than that used previously, and a root mean square difference between predicted and crystallographically observed ({phi}, {psi}) torsion angles of ca 12 Masculine-Ordinal-Indicator . TALOS-N also reports sidechain {chi}{sup 1} rotameric states for about 50 % of the residues, and a consistency with reference structures of 89 %. The program includes a neural network trained to identify secondary structure from residue sequence and chemical shifts.

  17. Observation of intermediate states of the human prion protein by high pressure NMR spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahn Ralph

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prions as causative agents of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs in humans and animals are composed of the infectious isomer, PrPSc, of the cellular prion protein, PrPC. The conversion and thus the propensity of PrPC to adopt alternative folds leads to the species-specific propagation of the disease. High pressure is a powerful tool to study the physico-chemical properties of proteins as well as the dynamics and structure of folding intermediates. Results Conformational intermediates of the human prion protein huPrPC were characterized by a combination of hydrostatic pressure (up to 200 MPa with two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. All pressure effects showed to be reversible and there is virtually no difference in the overall pressure response between the folded core of the N-terminal truncated huPrPC(121–230 and the full-length huPrPC(23–230. The only significant differences in the pressure response of full-length and truncated PrP suggest that E168, H187, T192, E207, E211 and Y226 are involved in a transient interaction with the unfolded N-terminus. High-pressure NMR spectroscopy indicates that the folded core of the human prion protein occurs in two structural states N1and N2 in solution associated with rather small differences in free enthalpies (3.0 kJ/mol. At atmospheric pressure approximately 29% of the protein are already in the pressure favored conformation N2. There is a second process representing two possible folding intermediates I1 and I2 with corresponding average free enthalpies of 10.8 and 18.6 kJ/mol. They could represent preaggregation states of the protein that coexist at ambient pressure with a very small population of approximately 1.2% and less than 0.1%. Further the pressure response of the N-terminus indicates that four different regions are in a fast equilibrium with non-random structural states whose populations are shifted by pressure. Conclusion We identified pressure stabilized

  18. NMR spectroscopy reveals unexpected structural variation at the protein-protein interface in MHC class I molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beerbaum, Monika; Ballaschk, Martin; Erdmann, Natalja [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) (Germany); Schnick, Christina [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Institut fuer Immungenetik, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Diehl, Anne [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) (Germany); Uchanska-Ziegler, Barbara; Ziegler, Andreas [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Institut fuer Immungenetik, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Schmieder, Peter, E-mail: schmieder@fmp-berlin.de [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    {beta}{sub 2}-Microglobulin ({beta}{sub 2}m) is a small, monomorphic protein non-covalently bound to the heavy chain (HC) in polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Given the high evolutionary conservation of structural features of {beta}{sub 2}m in various MHC molecules as shown by X-ray crystallography, {beta}{sub 2}m is often considered as a mere scaffolding protein. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we investigate here whether {beta}{sub 2}m residues at the interface to the HC exhibit changes depending on HC polymorphisms and the peptides bound to the complex in solution. First we show that human {beta}{sub 2}m can effectively be produced in deuterated form using high-cell-density-fermentation and we employ the NMR resonance assignments obtained for triple-labeled {beta}{sub 2}m bound to the HLA-B*27:09 HC to examine the {beta}{sub 2}m-HC interface. We then proceed to compare the resonances of {beta}{sub 2}m in two minimally distinct subtypes, HLA-B*27:09 and HLA-B*27:05, that are differentially associated with the spondyloarthropathy Ankylosing Spondylitis. Each of these subtypes is complexed with four distinct peptides for which structural information is already available. We find that only the resonances at the {beta}{sub 2}m-HC interface show a variation of their chemical shifts between the different complexes. This indicates the existence of an unexpected plasticity that enables {beta}{sub 2}m to accommodate changes that depend on HC polymorphism as well as on the bound peptide through subtle structural variations of the protein-protein interface.

  19. Effect of Anti-freezing Admixtures on Alkali-silica Reaction in Mortars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Junzhe; LI Yushun; LV Lihua

    2005-01-01

    The influence of anti-freezing admixture on the alkali aggregate reaction in mortar was analyzed with accelerated methods. It is confirmed that the addition of sodium salt ingredients of anti-freezing admixture accelerates the alkali silica reaction to some extent, whereas calcium salt ingredient of anti-freezing admixture reduces the expansion of alkali silica reaction caused by high alkali cement. It is found that the addition of the fly ash considerably suppresses the expansion of alkali silica reaction induced by the anti-freezing admixtures.

  20. Development of an integrated system for high-pressure NMR spectroscopy on proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High hydrostatic pressure can induce multiple effects on proteins including denaturation, depolymerization, and changes of side chain protonation state. Pressure induced structural changes can be investigated with high pressure NMR spectroscopy, because different conformers in the energy-landscape of proteins are accessible via their different specific volume. Therefore static pressure in the range from 4-200 MPa has been applied to proteins and peptides. In addition the application of pressure jumps with a microprocessor controlled on-line pressure system has been performed in order to analyze possible structural intermediates which are not accessible by the utilization of static pressure. Quartz, sapphire or ceramic cells are used to handle the proteins in aqueous solutions during the experiment. The best results can be obtained with ceramic cells because they can withstand high pressures and can be easily handled. A completely new autoclave for these ceramic cells has been constructed, including an improved method for pressure transmission, an integrated safety jacket and a fast closing emergency valve.

  1. Zero in on Key Open Problems in Automated NMR Protein Structure Determination

    KAUST Repository

    Abbas, Ahmed

    2015-11-12

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is one of the main approaches for protein struc- ture determination. The biggest advantage of this approach is that it can determine the three-dimensional structure of the protein in the solution phase. Thus, the natural dynamics of the protein can be studied. However, NMR protein structure determina- tion is an expertise intensive and time-consuming process. If the structure determi- nation process can be accelerated or even automated by computational methods, that will significantly advance the structural biology field. Our goal in this dissertation is to propose highly efficient and error tolerant methods that can work well on real and noisy data sets of NMR. Our first contribution in this dissertation is the development of a novel peak pick- ing method (WaVPeak). First, WaVPeak denoises the NMR spectra using wavelet smoothing. A brute force method is then used to identify all the candidate peaks. Af- ter that, the volume of each candidate peak is estimated. Finally, the peaks are sorted according to their volumes. WaVPeak is tested on the same benchmark data set that was used to test the state-of-the-art method, PICKY. WaVPeak shows significantly better performance than PICKY in terms of recall and precision. Our second contribution is to propose an automatic method to select peaks pro- duced by peak picking methods. This automatic method is used to overcome the limitations of fixed number-based methods. Our method is based on the Benjamini- Hochberg (B-H) algorithm. The method is used with both WaVPeak and PICKY to automatically select the number of peaks to return from out of hundreds of candidate peaks. The volume (in WaVPeak) and the intensity (in PICKY) are converted into p-values. Peaks that have p-values below some certain threshold are selected. Ex- perimental results show that the new method is better than the fixed number-based method in terms of recall. To improve precision, we tried to eliminate false peaks using

  2. Resolution-by-proxy: a simple measure for assessing and comparing the overall quality of NMR protein structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berjanskii, Mark; Zhou Jianjun; Liang Yongjie; Lin Guohui; Wishart, David S., E-mail: david.wishart@ualberta.ca [University of Alberta, Department of Computing Science (Canada)

    2012-07-15

    In protein X-ray crystallography, resolution is often used as a good indicator of structural quality. Diffraction resolution of protein crystals correlates well with the number of X-ray observables that are used in structure generation and, therefore, with protein coordinate errors. In protein NMR, there is no parameter identical to X-ray resolution. Instead, resolution is often used as a synonym of NMR model quality. Resolution of NMR structures is often deduced from ensemble precision, torsion angle normality and number of distance restraints per residue. The lack of common techniques to assess the resolution of X-ray and NMR structures complicates the comparison of structures solved by these two methods. This problem is sometimes approached by calculating 'equivalent resolution' from structure quality metrics. However, existing protocols do not offer a comprehensive assessment of protein structure as they calculate equivalent resolution from a relatively small number (<5) of protein parameters. Here, we report a development of a protocol that calculates equivalent resolution from 25 measurable protein features. This new method offers better performance (correlation coefficient of 0.92, mean absolute error of 0.28 A) than existing predictors of equivalent resolution. Because the method uses coordinate data as a proxy for X-ray diffraction data, we call this measure 'Resolution-by-Proxy' or ResProx. We demonstrate that ResProx can be used to identify under-restrained, poorly refined or inaccurate NMR structures, and can discover structural defects that the other equivalent resolution methods cannot detect. The ResProx web server is available at http://www.resprox.cahttp://www.resprox.ca.

  3. Resolution-by-proxy: a simple measure for assessing and comparing the overall quality of NMR protein structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In protein X-ray crystallography, resolution is often used as a good indicator of structural quality. Diffraction resolution of protein crystals correlates well with the number of X-ray observables that are used in structure generation and, therefore, with protein coordinate errors. In protein NMR, there is no parameter identical to X-ray resolution. Instead, resolution is often used as a synonym of NMR model quality. Resolution of NMR structures is often deduced from ensemble precision, torsion angle normality and number of distance restraints per residue. The lack of common techniques to assess the resolution of X-ray and NMR structures complicates the comparison of structures solved by these two methods. This problem is sometimes approached by calculating “equivalent resolution” from structure quality metrics. However, existing protocols do not offer a comprehensive assessment of protein structure as they calculate equivalent resolution from a relatively small number (<5) of protein parameters. Here, we report a development of a protocol that calculates equivalent resolution from 25 measurable protein features. This new method offers better performance (correlation coefficient of 0.92, mean absolute error of 0.28 Å) than existing predictors of equivalent resolution. Because the method uses coordinate data as a proxy for X-ray diffraction data, we call this measure “Resolution-by-Proxy” or ResProx. We demonstrate that ResProx can be used to identify under-restrained, poorly refined or inaccurate NMR structures, and can discover structural defects that the other equivalent resolution methods cannot detect. The ResProx web server is available at http://www.resprox.cahttp://www.resprox.ca.

  4. Solid-state NMR approaches to internal dynamics of proteins: from picoseconds to microseconds and seconds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krushelnitsky, Alexey; Reichert, Detlef; Saalwächter, Kay

    2013-09-17

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has matured to the point that it is possible to determine the structure of proteins in immobilized states, such as within microcrystals or embedded in membranes. Currently, researchers continue to develop and apply NMR techniques that can deliver site-resolved dynamic information toward the goal of understanding protein function at the atomic scale. As a widely-used, natural approach, researchers have mostly measured longitudinal (T1) relaxation times, which, like in solution-state NMR, are sensitive to picosecond and nanosecond motions, and motionally averaged dipolar couplings, which provide an integral amplitude of all motions with a correlation time of up to a few microseconds. While overall Brownian tumbling in solution mostly precludes access to slower internal dynamics, dedicated solid-state NMR approaches are now emerging as powerful new options. In this Account, we give an overview of the classes of solid-state NMR experiments that have expanded the accessible range correlation times from microseconds to many milliseconds. The measurement of relaxation times in the rotating frame, T1ρ, now allows researchers to access the microsecond range. Using our recent theoretical work, researchers can now quantitatively analyze this data to distinguish relaxation due to chemical-shift anisotropy (CSA) from that due to dipole-dipole couplings. Off-resonance irradiation allows researchers to extend the frequency range of such experiments. We have built multidimensional analogues of T2-type or line shape experiments using variants of the dipolar-chemical shift correlation (DIPSHIFT) experiment that are particularly suited to extract intermediate time scale motions in the millisecond range. In addition, we have continuously improved variants of exchange experiments, mostly relying on the recoupling of anisotropic interactions to address ultraslow motions in the ms to s ranges. The NH dipolar coupling offers a

  5. Use of Residual Dipolar Couplings in Structural Analysis of Protein-Ligand Complexes by Solution NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Nitin U.

    Investigation of structure-function relationships in protein complexes, specifically protein-ligand interactions, carry great significance in elucidating the structural and mechanistic bases of molecular recognition events and their role in regulating cell processes. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the leading structural and analytical techniques in in-depth studies of protein-ligand interactions. Recent advances in NMR methodology such as transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy (TROSY) and residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) measured in liquid crystalline alignment medium, offer a viable alternative to traditional nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE)-based approaches for structure determination of large protein complexes. RDCs provide a way to constrain the relative orientation of two molecules in complex with each other by aligning their independently determined order tensors. The potential for utilization of RDCs can be extended to proteins with multiple ligands or even multimeric protein-ligand complexes, where symmetry properties of the protein can be taken advantage of. Availability of effective RDC data collection and analysis protocols can certainly aid this process by their incorporation into structure calculation protocols using intramolecular and intermolecular orientational restraints. This chapter discusses in detail some of these protocols including methods for sample preparation in liquid crystalline media, NMR experiments for RDC data collection, as well as software tools for RDC data analysis and protein-ligand complex structure determination.

  6. Sensitivity enhancement using paramagnetic relaxation in MAS solid-state NMR of perdeuterated proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linser, Rasmus; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Diehl, Anne; Reif, Bernd

    2007-12-01

    Previously, Ishii et al., could show that chelated paramagnetic ions can be employed to significantly decrease the recycle delay of a MAS solid-state NMR experiment [N.P. Wickramasinghe, M. Kotecha, A. Samoson, J. Past, Y. Ishii, Sensitivity enhancement in C-13 solid-state NMR of protein microcrystals by use of paramagnetic metal ions for optimizing H-1 T-1 relaxation, J. Magn. Reson. 184 (2007) 350-356]. Application of the method is limited to very robust samples, for which sample stability is not compromised by RF induced heating. In addition, probe integrity might be perturbed in standard MAS PRE experiments due to the use of very short duty cycles. We show that these deleterious effects can be avoided if perdeuterated proteins are employed that have been re-crystallized from D 2O:H 2O = 9:1 containing buffer solutions. The experiments are demonstrated using the SH3 domain of chicken α-spectrin as a model system. The labeling scheme allows to record proton detected 1H, 15N correlation spectra with very high resolution in the absence of heteronuclear dipolar decoupling. Cu-edta as a doping reagent yields a reduction of the recycle delay by up to a factor of 15. In particular, we find that the 1H T1 for the bulk H N magnetization is reduced from 4.4 s to 0.3 s if the Cu-edta concentration is increased from 0 mM to 250 mM. Possible perturbations like chemical shift changes or line broadening due to the paramagnetic chelate complex are minimal. No degradation of our samples was observed in the course of the experiments.

  7. Structure of the Bacterial Cytoskeleton Protein Bactofilin by NMR Chemical Shifts and Sequence Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Maher M; Wang, Yong; Boomsma, Wouter; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten

    2016-06-01

    Bactofilins constitute a recently discovered class of bacterial proteins that form cytoskeletal filaments. They share a highly conserved domain (DUF583) of which the structure remains unknown, in part due to the large size and noncrystalline nature of the filaments. Here, we describe the atomic structure of a bactofilin domain from Caulobacter crescentus. To determine the structure, we developed an approach that combines a biophysical model for proteins with recently obtained solid-state NMR spectroscopy data and amino acid contacts predicted from a detailed analysis of the evolutionary history of bactofilins. Our structure reveals a triangular β-helical (solenoid) conformation with conserved residues forming the tightly packed core and polar residues lining the surface. The repetitive structure explains the presence of internal repeats as well as strongly conserved positions, and is reminiscent of other fibrillar proteins. Our work provides a structural basis for future studies of bactofilin biology and for designing molecules that target them, as well as a starting point for determining the organization of the entire bactofilin filament. Finally, our approach presents new avenues for determining structures that are difficult to obtain by traditional means. PMID:27276252

  8. Elucidation of intermediate (mobile) and slow (solidlike) protein motions in bovine lens homogenates by carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The motional dynamics of lens cytoplasmic proteins present in calf lens homogenates were investigated by two 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques sensitive to molecular motion to further define the organizational differences between the cortex and nucleus. For the study of intermediate (mobile) protein rotational reorientation motion time scales [rotational correlation time (τ0) range of 1-500 ns], the authors employed 13C off-resonance rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation, whereas for the study of slow (solidlike) motions (τ0 ≥ 10 μs) they used the solid-state NMR techniques of dipolar decoupling and cross-polarization. The frequency dependence of the peptide bond carbonyl off-resonance rotating frame spectral intensity ratio of the lens proteins present in native calf nuclear homogenate at 35 degree C indicates the presence of a polydisperse mobile protein fraction with a τ0,eff (mean) value of 57 ns. Lowering the temperature to 1 degree C, a temperature which produces the cold cataract, results in an overall decrease in τ0,eff to 43 ns, suggesting a selective removal of βH-, LM-, and possibly γs-crystallins from the mobile lens protein population. The presence of solidlike or motionally restricted protein species was established by dipolar decoupling and cross-polarization. Comparison of proton dipolar-decoupled and nondecoupled 13C NMR spectra of native cortical homogenate at 20 degree C indicates the absence of significant contributions from slowly tumbling, motionally restricted species. These studies establish the presence of both mobile and solidlike protein phases in calf lens nuclear homogenate, whereas for the native cortical homogenate, within the detection limits of NMR, the protein phase is mobile, except at low temperature where a small fraction of solidlike protein phase is present

  9. High-resolution membrane protein structure by joint calculations with solid-state NMR and X-ray experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray diffraction and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) are the staple methods for revealing atomic structures of proteins. Since crystals of biomolecular assemblies and membrane proteins often diffract weakly and such large systems encroach upon the molecular tumbling limit of solution NMR, new methods are essential to extend structures of such systems to high resolution. Here we present a method that incorporates solid-state NMR restraints alongside of X-ray reflections to the conventional model building and refinement steps of structure calculations. Using the 3.7 Å crystal structure of the integral membrane protein complex DsbB-DsbA as a test case yielded a significantly improved backbone precision of 0.92 Å in the transmembrane region, a 58% enhancement from using X-ray reflections alone. Furthermore, addition of solid-state NMR restraints greatly improved the overall quality of the structure by promoting 22% of DsbB transmembrane residues into the most favored regions of Ramachandran space in comparison to the crystal structure. This method is widely applicable to any protein system where X-ray data are available, and is particularly useful for the study of weakly diffracting crystals.

  10. (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR assignments of a calcium-binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Deepshikha; Bhattacharya, Alok; Chary, Kandala V R

    2016-04-01

    We report almost complete sequence specific (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR assignments of a 150-residue long calmodulin-like calcium-binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica (EhCaBP6), as a prelude to its structural and functional characterization. PMID:26377206

  11. Recommendations for the presentation of NMR structures of proteins and nucleic acids - IUPAC-IUBMB-IUPAB Inter-Union Task Group on the Standardization of Data Bases of Protein and Nucleic Acid Structures Determined by NMR Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recommendations presented here are designed to support easier communication of NMR data and NMR structures of proteins and nucleic acids through unified nomenclature and reporting standards. Much of this document pertains to the reporting of data in journal articles; however, in the interest of the future development of structural biology, it is desirable that the bulk of the reported information be stored in computer-accessible form and be freely accessible to the scientific community in standardized formats for data exchange. These recommendations stem from an IUPAC-IUBMB-IUPAB inter-union venture with the direct involvement of ICSU and CODATA. The Task Group has reviewed previous formal recommendations and has extended them in the light of more recent developments in the field of biomolecular NMR spectroscopy. Drafts of the recommendations presented here have been examined critically by more than 50 specialists in the field and have gone through two rounds of extensive modification to incorporate suggestions and criticisms

  12. General order parameter based correlation analysis of protein backbone motions between experimental NMR relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Internal backbone dynamic motions are essential for different protein functions and occur on a wide range of time scales, from femtoseconds to seconds. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin relaxation measurements are valuable tools to gain access to fast (nanosecond) internal motions. However, there exist few reports on correlation analysis between MD and NMR relaxation data. Here, backbone relaxation measurements of 15N-labeled SH3 (Src homology 3) domain proteins in aqueous buffer were used to generate general order parameters (S2) using a model-free approach. Simultaneously, 80 ns MD simulations of SH3 domain proteins in a defined hydrated box at neutral pH were conducted and the general order parameters (S2) were derived from the MD trajectory. Correlation analysis using the Gromos force field indicated that S2 values from NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations were significantly different. MD simulations were performed on models with different charge states for three histidine residues, and with different water models, which were SPC (simple point charge) water model and SPC/E (extended simple point charge) water model. S2 parameters from MD simulations with charges for all three histidines and with the SPC/E water model correlated well with S2 calculated from the experimental NMR relaxation measurements, in a site-specific manner. - Highlights: • Correlation analysis between NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations. • General order parameter (S2) as common reference between the two methods. • Different protein dynamics with different Histidine charge states in neutral pH. • Different protein dynamics with different water models

  13. General order parameter based correlation analysis of protein backbone motions between experimental NMR relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qing; Shi, Chaowei [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); Yu, Lu [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Zhang, Longhua [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); Xiong, Ying, E-mail: yxiong73@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); Tian, Changlin, E-mail: cltian@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

    2015-02-13

    Internal backbone dynamic motions are essential for different protein functions and occur on a wide range of time scales, from femtoseconds to seconds. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin relaxation measurements are valuable tools to gain access to fast (nanosecond) internal motions. However, there exist few reports on correlation analysis between MD and NMR relaxation data. Here, backbone relaxation measurements of {sup 15}N-labeled SH3 (Src homology 3) domain proteins in aqueous buffer were used to generate general order parameters (S{sup 2}) using a model-free approach. Simultaneously, 80 ns MD simulations of SH3 domain proteins in a defined hydrated box at neutral pH were conducted and the general order parameters (S{sup 2}) were derived from the MD trajectory. Correlation analysis using the Gromos force field indicated that S{sup 2} values from NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations were significantly different. MD simulations were performed on models with different charge states for three histidine residues, and with different water models, which were SPC (simple point charge) water model and SPC/E (extended simple point charge) water model. S{sup 2} parameters from MD simulations with charges for all three histidines and with the SPC/E water model correlated well with S{sup 2} calculated from the experimental NMR relaxation measurements, in a site-specific manner. - Highlights: • Correlation analysis between NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations. • General order parameter (S{sup 2}) as common reference between the two methods. • Different protein dynamics with different Histidine charge states in neutral pH. • Different protein dynamics with different water models.

  14. Protein dynamics in the solid state from 2H NMR line shape analysis: a consistent perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirovitch, Eva; Liang, Zhichun; Freed, Jack H

    2015-02-19

    Deuterium line shape analysis of CD3 groups has emerged as a particularly useful tool for studying microsecond-millisecond protein motions in the solid state. The models devised so far consist of several independently conceived simple jump-type motions. They are comprised of physical quantities encoded in their simplest form; improvements are only possible by adding yet another simple motion, thereby changing the model. The various treatments developed are case-specific; hence comparison among the different systems is not possible. Here we develop a new methodology for (2)H NMR line shape analysis free of these limitations. It is based on the microscopic-order-macroscopic-disorder (MOMD) approach. In MOMD motions are described by diffusion tensors, spatial restrictions by potentials/ordering tensors, and geometric features by relative tensor orientations. Jump-type motions are recovered in the limit of large orientational potentials. Model improvement is accomplished by monitoring the magnitude, symmetry, and orientation of the various tensors. The generality of MOMD makes possible comparison among different scenarios. CD3 line shapes from the Chicken Villin Headpiece Subdomain and the Streptomyces Subtilisin Inhibitor are used as experimental examples. All of these spectra are reproduced by using rhombic local potentials constrained for simplicity to be given by the L = 2 spherical harmonics, and by axial diffusion tensors. Potential strength and rhombicity are found to be ca. 2-3 k(B)T. The diffusion tensor is tilted at 120° from the C-CD3 axis. The perpendicular (parallel) correlation times for local motion are 0.1-1.0 ms (3.3-30 μs). Activation energies in the 1.1-8.0 kcal/mol range are estimated. Future prospects include extension to the (2)H relaxation limit, application to the (15)N and (13)C NMR nuclei, and accounting for collective motions and anisotropic media. PMID:25594631

  15. Pulsed field gradient NMR study of poly(ethylene glycol) diffusion in whey protein solutions and gels

    OpenAIRE

    Colsenet, R.; Söderman, O.; Mariette, F.

    2006-01-01

    PEG self-diffusion coefficients of poly(ethylene glycol)s (PEGs) (1080, 8500, and 82 250 g/mol) were measured by PFG-NMR spectroscopy in whey protein solutions and gels in relation to whey protein concentration effects (from 6.49 to 40.45 g/100 g) and whey protein heat denaturation effects (30 min at 70 °C). A strong dependency of diffusion on probe size was observed in both whey protein solutions and gels: as PEG size increased, diffusion was reduced. This effect was more pronounced for h...

  16. Functional manipulation of a calcium-binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica guided by paramagnetic NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Ashok K; Patel, Sunita; Somlata; Shukla, Manish; Saraswathi, Deepa; Bhattacharya, Alok; Chary, Kandala V R

    2013-08-01

    EhCaBP1, one of the calcium-binding proteins from Entamoeba histolytica, is a two-domain EF-hand protein. The two domains of EhCaBP1 are structurally and functionally different from each other. However, both domains are required for structural stability and a full range of functional diversity. Analysis of sequence and structure of EhCaBP1 and other CaBPs indicates that the C-terminal domain of EhCaBP1 possesses a unique structure compared with other family members. This had been attributed to the absence of a Phe-Phe interaction between highly conserved Phe residues at the -4 position in EF-hand III (F[-4]; Tyr(81)) and at the 13th position in EF-hand IV (F[+13]; Phe(129)) of the C-terminal domain. Against this backdrop, we mutated the Tyr residue at the -4th position of EF III to the Phe residue (Y81F), to bring in the Phe-Phe interaction and understand the nature of structural and functional changes in the protein by NMR spectroscopy, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and biological assays, such as imaging and actin binding. The Y81F mutation in EhCaBP1 resulted in a more compact structure for the C-terminal domain of the mutant as in the case of calmodulin and troponin C. The compact structure is favored by the presence of a π-π interaction between Phe(81) and Phe(129) along with several hydrophobic interactions of Phe(81), which are not seen in the wild-type protein. Furthermore, the biological assays reveal preferential membrane localization of the mutant, loss of its colocalization with actin in the phagocytic cups, whereas retaining its ability to bind G- and F-actin. PMID:23782698

  17. Probing Early Misfolding Events in Prion Protein Mutants by NMR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Ilc

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The post-translational conversion of the ubiquitously expressed cellular form of the prion protein, PrPC, into its misfolded and pathogenic isoform, known as prion or PrPSc, plays a key role in prion diseases. These maladies are denoted transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs and affect both humans and animals. A prerequisite for understanding TSEs is unraveling the molecular mechanism leading to the conversion process whereby most α-helical motifs are replaced by β-sheet secondary structures. Importantly, most point mutations linked to inherited prion diseases are clustered in the C-terminal domain region of PrPC and cause spontaneous conversion to PrPSc. Structural studies with PrP variants promise new clues regarding the proposed conversion mechanism and may help identify “hot spots” in PrPC involved in the pathogenic conversion. These investigations may also shed light on the early structural rearrangements occurring in some PrPC epitopes thought to be involved in modulating prion susceptibility. Here we present a detailed overview of our solution-state NMR studies on human prion protein carrying different pathological point mutations and the implications that such findings may have for the future of prion research.

  18. Mechanism of phosphoryl transfer and protein-protein interaction in the PTS system-an NMR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HPr and Enzyme IIAGlc are two of the components of the bacterial PTS (phosphoenolpyruvate: sugar phosphotranferase system) and are involved in the phosphorylation and concomitant translocation of sugars across the membrane. These PTS protein complexes also regulate sugar transport. HPr, phosphorylated at a histidine N1 site by Enzyme I and phosphoenol pyruvate, transfers the phosphoryl group to a histidine N3 position in Enzyme IIAGlc. HPrs from Gram-positive bacteria undergo regulatory phosphorylation at Ser46, whereby phosphorylation of the histidine residue is inhibited. Conversely, histidine phosphorylation inhibits phosphorylation at Ser46. HPrs from Gram-negative bacteria possess a serine residue at position 46, but do not undergo regulatory phosphorylation. HPr forms an open-faced sandwich structure with a four-strand S-sheet and 2 to 3 helices lying on top of the sheet. The active-site histidine and Ser46 occur in conformationally flexible regions. P-His-HPr from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilus has been investigated by both homonuclear and heteronuclear two-dimensional and three-dimensional NMR experiments using an in-situ enzymatic regeneration system to maintain a constant level of P-His-HPr. The results show that localized conformational changes occur in the vicinity of the active-site histidine and also near Ser46. HPr-Enzyme IIAGlc complexes from both Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli were also studied by a variety of 15N-edited two-dimensional NMR experiments, which were performed on uniformly 15N-labeled HPr complexed to unlabeled Enzyme IIAGlc. The complex is in fast exchange with a molecular weight of about 27 kDa. The focus of our work is to assess the changes undergone by HPr (the smaller of the two components), and so all the experiments were performed with excess Enzyme IIA present in the system

  19. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of encapsulated proteins dissolved in low-viscosity fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nucci, Nathaniel V.; Valentine, Kathleen G.; Wand, A. Joshua

    2014-04-01

    High-resolution multi-dimensional solution NMR is unique as a biophysical and biochemical tool in its ability to examine both the structure and dynamics of macromolecules at atomic resolution. Conventional solution NMR approaches, however, are largely limited to examinations of relatively small (NMR methodologies may be applied. Recent advances in methodology have significantly broadened the utility of this approach in structural biology and molecular biophysics.

  20. Uncoupling protein 3 expression and intramyocellular lipid accumulation by NMR following local burn trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qunhao; Cao, Haihui; Astrakas, Loukas G; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Mindrinos, Michael N; Schulz, John; Tompkins, Ronald G; Rahme, Laurence G; Tzika, A Aria

    2006-12-01

    Burn trauma is a clinical condition accompanied by muscle wasting that severely impedes rehabilitation in burn survivors. Mitochondrial uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) is uniformly expressed in myoskeletal mitochondria and its expression has been found to increase in other clinical syndromes that, like burn trauma, are associated with muscle wasting (e.g., starvation, fasting, cancer, sepsis). The aim of this study was to explore the effects of burn trauma on UCP3 expression, intramyocellular lipids, and plasma-free fatty acids. Mice were studied at 6 h, 1 d and 3 d after nonlethal hindlimb burn trauma. Intramyocellular lipids in hindlimb skeletal muscle samples collected from burned and normal mice were measured using 1H NMR spectroscopy on a Bruker 14.1 Tesla spectrometer at 4 degrees C. UCP3 mRNA and protein levels were also measured in these samples. Plasma-free fatty acids were measured in burned and normal mice. Local burn trauma was found to result in: 1) upregulation of UCP3 mRNA and protein expression in hindlimb myoskeletal mitochondria by 6 h postburn; 2) increased intramyocellular lipids; and 3) increased plasma-free fatty acids. Our findings show that the increase in UCP3 after burn trauma may be linked to burn-induced alterations in lipid metabolism. Such a link could reveal novel insights into how processes related to energy metabolism are controlled in burn and suggest that induction of UCP3 by burn in skeletal muscle is protective by either activating cellular redox signaling and/or mitochondrial uncoupling. PMID:17089030

  1. NMR assignments, secondary structure, and global fold of calerythrin, an EF-hand calcium-binding protein from Saccharopolyspora erythraea.

    OpenAIRE

    Aitio, H.; Annila, A; Heikkinen, S.; Thulin, E.; Drakenberg, T; Kilpeläinen, I.

    1999-01-01

    Calerythrin is a 20 kDa calcium-binding protein isolated from gram-positive bacterium Saccharopolyspora erythraea. Based on amino acid sequence homology, it has been suggested that calerythrin belongs to the family of invertebrate sarcoplasmic EF-hand calcium-binding proteins (SCPs), and therefore it is expected to function as a calcium buffer. NMR spectroscopy was used to obtain structural information on the protein in solution. Backbone and side chain 1H, 13C, and 15N assignments were obtai...

  2. Nitrogen detected TROSY at high field yields high resolution and sensitivity for protein NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detection of 15N in multidimensional NMR experiments of proteins has sparsely been utilized because of the low gyromagnetic ratio (γ) of nitrogen and the presumed low sensitivity of such experiments. Here we show that selecting the TROSY components of proton-attached 15N nuclei (TROSY 15NH) yields high quality spectra in high field magnets (>600 MHz) by taking advantage of the slow 15N transverse relaxation and compensating for the inherently low 15N sensitivity. The 15N TROSY transverse relaxation rates increase modestly with molecular weight but the TROSY gain in peak heights depends strongly on the magnetic field strength. Theoretical simulations predict that the narrowest line width for the TROSY 15NH component can be obtained at 900 MHz, but sensitivity reaches its maximum around 1.2 GHz. Based on these considerations, a 15N-detected 2D 1H–15N TROSY-HSQC (15N-detected TROSY-HSQC) experiment was developed and high-quality 2D spectra were recorded at 800 MHz in 2 h for 1 mM maltose-binding protein at 278 K (τc ∼ 40 ns). Unlike for 1H detected TROSY, deuteration is not mandatory to benefit 15N detected TROSY due to reduced dipolar broadening, which facilitates studies of proteins that cannot be deuterated, especially in cases where production requires eukaryotic expression systems. The option of recording 15N TROSY of proteins expressed in H2O media also alleviates the problem of incomplete amide proton back exchange, which often hampers the detection of amide groups in the core of large molecular weight proteins that are expressed in D2O culture media and cannot be refolded for amide back exchange. These results illustrate the potential of 15NH-detected TROSY experiments as a means to exploit the high resolution offered by high field magnets near and above 1 GHz

  3. Molecular dynamics studies on the NMR and X-ray structures of rabbit prion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiapu; Zhang, Yuanli

    2014-02-01

    Prion diseases, traditionally referred to as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), are invariably fatal and highly infectious neurodegenerative diseases that affect a wide variety of mammalian species, manifesting as scrapie in sheep and goats, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or mad-cow disease) in cattle, chronic wasting disease in deer and elk, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob diseases, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome, fatal familial insomnia, and kulu in humans, etc. These neurodegenerative diseases are caused by the conversion from a soluble normal cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into insoluble abnormally folded infectious prions (PrP(Sc)), and the conversion of PrP(C) to PrP(Sc) is believed to involve conformational change from a predominantly α-helical protein to one rich in β-sheet structure. Such a conformational change may be amenable to study by molecular dynamics (MD) techniques. For rabbits, classical studies show that they have a low susceptibility to be infected by PrP(Sc), but recently it was reported that rabbit prions can be generated through saPMCA (serial automated Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification) in vitro and the rabbit prion is infectious and transmissible. In this paper, we first do a detailed survey on the research advances of rabbit prion protein (RaPrP) and then we perform MD simulations on the NMR and X-ray molecular structures of rabbit prion protein wild-type and mutants. The survey shows to us that rabbits were not challenged directly in vivo with other known prion strains and the saPMCA result did not pass the test of the known BSE strain of cattle. Thus, we might still look rabbits as a prion resistant species. MD results indicate that the three α-helices of the wild-type are stable under the neutral pH environment (but under low pH environment the three α-helices have been unfolded into β-sheets), and the three α-helices of the mutants (I214V and S173N) are unfolded into rich β-sheet structures under

  4. Nitrogen detected TROSY at high field yields high resolution and sensitivity for protein NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Koh [National Institute for Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Molecular Profiling Research Center for Drug Discovery (Japan); Arthanari, Haribabu [Harvard Medical School, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology (United States); Shimada, Ichio, E-mail: shimada@iw-nmr.f.u-tokyo.ac.jp [National Institute for Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Molecular Profiling Research Center for Drug Discovery (Japan); Wagner, Gerhard, E-mail: gerhard-wagner@hms.harvard.edu [Harvard Medical School, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Detection of {sup 15}N in multidimensional NMR experiments of proteins has sparsely been utilized because of the low gyromagnetic ratio (γ) of nitrogen and the presumed low sensitivity of such experiments. Here we show that selecting the TROSY components of proton-attached {sup 15}N nuclei (TROSY {sup 15}N{sub H}) yields high quality spectra in high field magnets (>600 MHz) by taking advantage of the slow {sup 15}N transverse relaxation and compensating for the inherently low {sup 15}N sensitivity. The {sup 15}N TROSY transverse relaxation rates increase modestly with molecular weight but the TROSY gain in peak heights depends strongly on the magnetic field strength. Theoretical simulations predict that the narrowest line width for the TROSY {sup 15}N{sub H} component can be obtained at 900 MHz, but sensitivity reaches its maximum around 1.2 GHz. Based on these considerations, a {sup 15}N-detected 2D {sup 1}H–{sup 15}N TROSY-HSQC ({sup 15}N-detected TROSY-HSQC) experiment was developed and high-quality 2D spectra were recorded at 800 MHz in 2 h for 1 mM maltose-binding protein at 278 K (τ{sub c} ∼ 40 ns). Unlike for {sup 1}H detected TROSY, deuteration is not mandatory to benefit {sup 15}N detected TROSY due to reduced dipolar broadening, which facilitates studies of proteins that cannot be deuterated, especially in cases where production requires eukaryotic expression systems. The option of recording {sup 15}N TROSY of proteins expressed in H{sub 2}O media also alleviates the problem of incomplete amide proton back exchange, which often hampers the detection of amide groups in the core of large molecular weight proteins that are expressed in D{sub 2}O culture media and cannot be refolded for amide back exchange. These results illustrate the potential of {sup 15}N{sub H}-detected TROSY experiments as a means to exploit the high resolution offered by high field magnets near and above 1 GHz.

  5. Correlated dynamics between protein HN and HC bonds observed by NMR cross relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vögeli, Beat; Yao, Lishan

    2009-03-18

    Although collective dynamics of atom groups steer many biologically relevant processes in biomacromolecules, most atomic resolution motional studies focus on isolated bonds. In this study, a new method is introduced to assess correlated dynamics between bond vectors by cross relaxation nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Dipole-dipole cross correlated relaxation rates between intra- and inter-residual H(N)-N and H(alpha)-C(alpha) in the 56 residue protein GB3 are measured with high accuracy. It is demonstrated that the assumption of anisotropic molecular tumbling is necessary to evaluate rates accurately and predictions from the static structure using effective bond lengths of 1.041 and 1.117 A for H(N)-N and H(alpha)-C(alpha) are within 3% of both experimental intra- and inter-residual rates. Deviations are matched to models of different degrees of motional correlation. These models are based on previously determined orientations and motional amplitudes from residual dipolar couplings with high accuracy and precision. Clear evidence of correlated motion in the loops comprising residues 10-14, 20-22, and 47-50 and anticorrelated motion in the alpha helix comprising 23-38 is presented. Somewhat weaker correlation is observed in the beta strands 2-4, which have previously been shown to exhibit slow correlated motional modes. PMID:19235934

  6. Residual methyl protonation in perdeuterated proteins for multi-dimensional correlation experiments in MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Vipin; Reif, Bernd

    2008-09-01

    NMR studies involving perdeuterated proteins focus in general on exchangeable amide protons. However, non-exchangeable sites contain as well a small amount of protons as the employed precursors for protein biosynthesis are not completely proton depleted. The degree of methyl group protonation is in the order of 9% for CD 2H using >97% deuterium enriched glucose. We show in this manuscript that this small amount of residual protonation is sufficient to perform 2D and 3D MAS solid-state NMR experiments. In particular, we suggest a HCCH-TOBSY type experiment which we successfully employ to assign the methyl resonances in aliphatic side chains in a perdeuterated sample of the SH3 domain of chicken α-spectrin.

  7. Solid state NMR chemical shift assignment and conformational analysis of a cellulose binding protein facilitated by optimized glycerol enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanir, Hadar; Goldbourt, Amir

    2014-07-01

    Magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR has been applied to study CBM3b-Cbh9A (CBM3b), a cellulose binding module protein belonging to family 3b. It is a 146-residue protein having a unique nine-stranded β-sandwich fold, in which 35% of the structure is in a β-sheet conformation and the remainder of the protein is composed of loops and unstructured regions. Yet, the protein can be crystalized and it forms elongated needles. Close to complete chemical shift assignment of the protein was obtained by combining two- and three-dimensional experiments using a fully labeled sample and a glycerol-labeled sample. The use of an optimized protocol for glycerol-based sparse labeling reduces sample preparation costs and facilitates the assignment of the large number of aromatic signals in this protein. Conformational analysis shows good correlation between the NMR-predicted secondary structure and the reported X-ray crystal structure, in particular in the structured regions. Residues which show high B-factor values are situated mainly in unstructured regions, and are missing in our spectra indicating conformational flexibility rather than heterogeneity. Interestingly, long-range contacts, which could be clearly detected for tyrosine residues, could not be observed for aromatic phenylalanine residues pointing into the hydrophobic core, suggesting possible high ring mobility. These studies will allow us to further investigate the cellulose-bound form of CBM proteins. PMID:24824437

  8. Directly probing the antifreeze glycoprotein kinetics at the ice/solution interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepeda, Salvador; Yokoyama, Etsuro; Furukawa, Yoshinor

    2009-03-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFP) and glycoproteins (AFGP) help fish, plants, insects and bacteria survive sub-freezing environments. It is well known that these proteins function via some surface interaction, but the exact mechanism has eluded scientists. Aside from mutagenesis experiments directed towards examining the functional importance of specific residues, conclusions about the mechanism have been drawn from indirect studies or more precisely from studies that describe the proteins effects on the ice interface. Our work is aimed at directly studying the protein kinetics at the ice/solution interface. Fluorescent microscopy is used to determine interaction planes, surface concentrations as well as adsorption characteristics and the segregation constants, while fourier transform infra-red attenuated total reßectance (FTIR-ATR) is used to determine the protein structure vs. temperature in the liquid and solid states as well as the ice interface characteristics. All data show that AFGP do not function by the characteristic Gibbs-Thomson mechanism. While the surface coverage is similar for the AFPIII, segregation (amount in ice/amount in solution) is non-zero.

  9. Automation of NMR measurements and data evaluation for systematically screening interactions of small molecules with target proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this technical note we describe the setup and application of automated sample preparation and usage of flow-through NMR equipment for the characterization of ligand binding on proteins. In addition, we focus on the perspectives of automated analysis of 2D HSQC spectra to identify changes in patterns indicative for ligand binding or changes of sample conditions. In this context we discuss a combination of statistical and non-statistical data analysis

  10. Mechanism of phosphoryl transfer and protein-protein interaction in the PTS system-an NMR study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopal, P.; Klevit, R.E. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    HPr and Enzyme IIA{sup Glc} are two of the components of the bacterial PTS (phosphoenolpyruvate: sugar phosphotranferase system) and are involved in the phosphorylation and concomitant translocation of sugars across the membrane. These PTS protein complexes also regulate sugar transport. HPr, phosphorylated at a histidine N1 site by Enzyme I and phosphoenol pyruvate, transfers the phosphoryl group to a histidine N3 position in Enzyme IIA{sup Glc}. HPrs from Gram-positive bacteria undergo regulatory phosphorylation at Ser{sup 46}, whereby phosphorylation of the histidine residue is inhibited. Conversely, histidine phosphorylation inhibits phosphorylation at Ser{sup 46}. HPrs from Gram-negative bacteria possess a serine residue at position 46, but do not undergo regulatory phosphorylation. HPr forms an open-faced sandwich structure with a four-strand S-sheet and 2 to 3 helices lying on top of the sheet. The active-site histidine and Ser{sup 46} occur in conformationally flexible regions. P-His-HPr from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilus has been investigated by both homonuclear and heteronuclear two-dimensional and three-dimensional NMR experiments using an in-situ enzymatic regeneration system to maintain a constant level of P-His-HPr. The results show that localized conformational changes occur in the vicinity of the active-site histidine and also near Ser{sup 46}. HPr-Enzyme IIA{sup Glc} complexes from both Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli were also studied by a variety of {sup 15}N-edited two-dimensional NMR experiments, which were performed on uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled HPr complexed to unlabeled Enzyme IIA{sup Glc}. The complex is in fast exchange with a molecular weight of about 27 kDa. The focus of our work is to assess the changes undergone by HPr (the smaller of the two components), and so all the experiments were performed with excess Enzyme IIA present in the system.

  11. Encoded loop-lanthanide-binding tags for long-range distance measurements in proteins by NMR and EPR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We recently engineered encodable lanthanide binding tags (LBTs) into proteins and demonstrated their applicability in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography and luminescence studies. Here, we engineered two-loop-LBTs into the model protein interleukin-1β (IL1β) and measured 1H, 15N-pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) by NMR spectroscopy. We determined the Δχ-tensors associated with each Tm3+-loaded loop-LBT and show that the experimental PCSs yield structural information at the interface between the two metal ion centers at atomic resolution. Such information is very valuable for the determination of the sites of interfaces in protein–protein-complexes. Combining the experimental PCSs of the two-loop-LBT construct IL1β-S2R2 and the respective single-loop-LBT constructs IL1β-S2, IL1β-R2 we additionally determined the distance between the metal ion centers. Further, we explore the use of two-loop LBTs loaded with Gd3+ as a novel tool for distance determination by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy and show the NMR-derived distances to be remarkably consistent with distances derived from Pulsed Electron–Electron Dipolar Resonance

  12. Discovery of a potent inhibitor of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL from NMR and parallel synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petros, Andrew M; Dinges, Jurgen; Augeri, David J; Baumeister, Steven A; Betebenner, David A; Bures, Mark G; Elmore, Steven W; Hajduk, Philip J; Joseph, Mary K; Landis, Shelley K; Nettesheim, David G; Rosenberg, Saul H; Shen, Wang; Thomas, Sheela; Wang, Xilu; Zanze, Irini; Zhang, Haichao; Fesik, Stephen W

    2006-01-26

    The antiapoptotic proteins Bcl-x(L) and Bcl-2 play key roles in the maintenance of normal cellular homeostasis. However, their overexpression can lead to oncogenic transformation and is responsible for drug resistance in certain types of cancer. This makes Bcl-x(L) and Bcl-2 attractive targets for the development of potential anticancer agents. Here we describe the structure-based discovery of a potent Bcl-x(L) inhibitor directed at a hydrophobic groove on the surface of the protein. This groove represents the binding site for BH3 peptides from proapoptotic Bcl-2 family members such as Bak and Bad. Application of NMR-based screening yielded an initial biaryl acid with an affinity (K(d)) of approximately 300 microM for the protein. Following the classical "SAR by NMR" approach, a second-site ligand was identified that bound proximal to the first-site ligand in the hydrophobic groove. From NMR-based structural studies and parallel synthesis, a potent ligand was obtained, which binds to Bcl-x(L) with an inhibition constant (K(i)) of 36 +/- 2 nM. PMID:16420051

  13. Vanishing amplitude of backbone dynamics causes a true protein dynamical transition: H2 NMR studies on perdeuterated C-phycocyanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämpf, Kerstin; Kremmling, Beke; Vogel, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Using a combination of H2 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, we study internal rotational dynamics of the perdeuterated protein C-phycocyanin (CPC) in dry and hydrated states over broad temperature and dynamic ranges with high angular resolution. Separating H2 NMR signals from methyl deuterons, we show that basically all backbone deuterons exhibit highly restricted motion occurring on time scales faster than microseconds. The amplitude of this motion increases when a hydration shell exists, while it decreases upon cooling and vanishes near 175 K. We conclude that the vanishing of the highly restricted motion marks a dynamical transition, which is independent of the time window and of a fundamental importance. This conclusion is supported by results from experimental and computational studies of the proteins myoglobin and elastin. In particular, we argue based on findings in molecular dynamics simulations that the behavior of the highly restricted motion of proteins at the dynamical transition resembles that of a characteristic secondary relaxation of liquids at the glass transition, namely the nearly constant loss. Furthermore, H2 NMR studies on perdeuterated CPC reveal that, in addition to highly restricted motion, small fractions of backbone segments exhibit weakly restricted dynamics when temperature and hydration are sufficiently high.

  14. Encoded loop-lanthanide-binding tags for long-range distance measurements in proteins by NMR and EPR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthelmes, Dominic [Goethe University Frankfurt, Institute of Organic Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (Germany); Gränz, Markus [Goethe University Frankfurt, Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (Germany); Barthelmes, Katja [Technical University Munich, Department of Chemistry, Munich Center for Integrated Protein Science and Chair Biomolecular NMR (Germany); Allen, Karen N. [Boston University, Department of Chemistry (United States); Imperiali, Barbara [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Departments of Chemistry and Biology (United States); Prisner, Thomas, E-mail: prisner@prisner.de [Goethe University Frankfurt, Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (Germany); Schwalbe, Harald, E-mail: Schwalbe@nmr.uni-frankfurt.de [Goethe University Frankfurt, Institute of Organic Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    We recently engineered encodable lanthanide binding tags (LBTs) into proteins and demonstrated their applicability in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography and luminescence studies. Here, we engineered two-loop-LBTs into the model protein interleukin-1β (IL1β) and measured {sup 1}H, {sup 15}N-pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) by NMR spectroscopy. We determined the Δχ-tensors associated with each Tm{sup 3+}-loaded loop-LBT and show that the experimental PCSs yield structural information at the interface between the two metal ion centers at atomic resolution. Such information is very valuable for the determination of the sites of interfaces in protein–protein-complexes. Combining the experimental PCSs of the two-loop-LBT construct IL1β-S2R2 and the respective single-loop-LBT constructs IL1β-S2, IL1β-R2 we additionally determined the distance between the metal ion centers. Further, we explore the use of two-loop LBTs loaded with Gd{sup 3+} as a novel tool for distance determination by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy and show the NMR-derived distances to be remarkably consistent with distances derived from Pulsed Electron–Electron Dipolar Resonance.

  15. Solution NMR Experiment for Measurement of (15)N-(1)H Residual Dipolar Couplings in Large Proteins and Supramolecular Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eletsky, Alexander; Pulavarti, Surya V S R K; Beaumont, Victor; Gollnick, Paul; Szyperski, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    NMR residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) are exquisite probes of protein structure and dynamics. A new solution NMR experiment named 2D SE2 J-TROSY is presented to measure N-H RDCs for proteins and supramolecular complexes in excess of 200 kDa. This enables validation and refinement of their X-ray crystal and solution NMR structures and the characterization of structural and dynamic changes occurring upon complex formation. Accurate N-H RDCs were measured at 750 MHz (1)H resonance frequency for 11-mer 93 kDa (2)H,(15)N-labeled Trp RNA-binding attenuator protein tumbling with a correlation time τc of 120 ns. This is about twice as long as that for the most slowly tumbling system, for which N-H RDCs could be measured, so far, and corresponds to molecular weights of ∼200 kDa at 25 °C. Furthermore, due to the robustness of SE2 J-TROSY with respect to residual (1)H density from exchangeable protons, increased sensitivity at (1)H resonance frequencies around 1 GHz promises to enable N-H RDC measurement for even larger systems. PMID:26293598

  16. Cell-free Protein Synthesis in an Autoinduction System for NMR Studies of Protein-Protein Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell-free protein synthesis systems provide facile access to proteins in a nascent state that enables formation of soluble, native protein-protein complexes even if one of the protein components is prone to self-aggregation and precipitation. Combined with selective isotope-labeling, this allows the rapid analysis of protein-protein interactions with few 15N-HSQC spectra. The concept is demonstrated with binary and ternary complexes between the χ, ψ and γ subunits of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III: nascent, selectively 15N-labeled ψ produced in the presence of χ resulted in a soluble, correctly folded χ-ψ complex, whereas ψ alone precipitated irrespective of whether γ was present or not. The 15N-HSQC spectra showed that the N-terminal segment of ψ is mobile in the χ-ψ complex, yet important for its binding to γ. The sample preparation was greatly enhanced by an autoinduction strategy, where the T7 RNA polymerase needed for transcription of a gene in a T7-promoter vector was produced in situ

  17. Site-specific tagging proteins with a rigid, small and stable transition metal chelator, 8-hydroxyquinoline, for paramagnetic NMR analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design of a paramagnetic metal binding motif in a protein is a valuable way for understanding the function, dynamics and interactions of a protein by paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy. Several strategies have been proposed to site-specifically tag proteins with paramagnetic lanthanide ions. Here we report a simple approach of engineering a transition metal binding motif via site-specific labelling of a protein with 2-vinyl-8-hydroxyquinoline (2V-8HQ). The protein-2V-8HQ adduct forms a stable complex with transition metal ions, Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II). The paramagnetic effects generated by these transition metal ions were evaluated by NMR spectroscopy. We show that 2V-8HQ is a rigid and stable transition metal binding tag. The coordination of the metal ion can be assisted by protein sidechains. More importantly, tunable paramagnetic tensors are simply obtained in an α-helix that possesses solvent exposed residues in positions i and i + 3, where i is the residue to be mutated to cysteine, i + 3 is Gln or Glu or i − 4 is His. The coordination of a sidechain carboxylate/amide or imidazole to cobalt(II) results in different structural geometries, leading to different paramagnetic tensors as shown by experimental data

  18. Site-specific tagging proteins with a rigid, small and stable transition metal chelator, 8-hydroxyquinoline, for paramagnetic NMR analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yin; Huang, Feng; Huber, Thomas; Su, Xun-Cheng

    2016-02-01

    Design of a paramagnetic metal binding motif in a protein is a valuable way for understanding the function, dynamics and interactions of a protein by paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy. Several strategies have been proposed to site-specifically tag proteins with paramagnetic lanthanide ions. Here we report a simple approach of engineering a transition metal binding motif via site-specific labelling of a protein with 2-vinyl-8-hydroxyquinoline (2V-8HQ). The protein-2V-8HQ adduct forms a stable complex with transition metal ions, Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II). The paramagnetic effects generated by these transition metal ions were evaluated by NMR spectroscopy. We show that 2V-8HQ is a rigid and stable transition metal binding tag. The coordination of the metal ion can be assisted by protein sidechains. More importantly, tunable paramagnetic tensors are simply obtained in an α-helix that possesses solvent exposed residues in positions i and i + 3, where i is the residue to be mutated to cysteine, i + 3 is Gln or Glu or i - 4 is His. The coordination of a sidechain carboxylate/amide or imidazole to cobalt(II) results in different structural geometries, leading to different paramagnetic tensors as shown by experimental data. PMID:26732873

  19. Site-specific tagging proteins with a rigid, small and stable transition metal chelator, 8-hydroxyquinoline, for paramagnetic NMR analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yin; Huang, Feng [Nankai University, State Key Laboratory of Elemento-Organic Chemistry, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin) (China); Huber, Thomas [Australian National University, Research School of Chemistry (Australia); Su, Xun-Cheng, E-mail: xunchengsu@nankai.edu.cn [Nankai University, State Key Laboratory of Elemento-Organic Chemistry, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin) (China)

    2016-02-15

    Design of a paramagnetic metal binding motif in a protein is a valuable way for understanding the function, dynamics and interactions of a protein by paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy. Several strategies have been proposed to site-specifically tag proteins with paramagnetic lanthanide ions. Here we report a simple approach of engineering a transition metal binding motif via site-specific labelling of a protein with 2-vinyl-8-hydroxyquinoline (2V-8HQ). The protein-2V-8HQ adduct forms a stable complex with transition metal ions, Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II). The paramagnetic effects generated by these transition metal ions were evaluated by NMR spectroscopy. We show that 2V-8HQ is a rigid and stable transition metal binding tag. The coordination of the metal ion can be assisted by protein sidechains. More importantly, tunable paramagnetic tensors are simply obtained in an α-helix that possesses solvent exposed residues in positions i and i + 3, where i is the residue to be mutated to cysteine, i + 3 is Gln or Glu or i − 4 is His. The coordination of a sidechain carboxylate/amide or imidazole to cobalt(II) results in different structural geometries, leading to different paramagnetic tensors as shown by experimental data.

  20. Micro-coil NMR to monitor optimization of the reconstitution conditions for the integral membrane protein OmpW in detergent micelles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optimization of aqueous solutions of the integral membrane protein (IMP) OmpW for NMR structure determination has been monitored with micro-coil NMR, which enables the acquisition of NMR spectra using only micrograms of protein and detergent. The detergent 30-Fos (2-undecylphosphocholine) was found to yield the best 2D [15N, 1H]-TROSY correlation NMR spectra of [2H, 15N]-labeled OmpW. For the OmpW structure determination we then optimized the 30-Fos concentration, the sample temperature and long-time stability, and the deuteration level of the protein. Some emerging guidelines for reconstitution of β-barrel integral membrane proteins in structural biology are discussed.

  1. 1H-detected solid-state NMR of proteins entrapped in bioinspired silica: a new tool for biomaterials characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravera, Enrico; Cerofolini, Linda; Martelli, Tommaso; Louka, Alexandra; Fragai, Marco; Luchinat, Claudio

    2016-06-01

    Proton-detection in solid-state NMR, enabled by high magnetic fields (>18 T) and fast magic angle spinning (>50 kHz), allows for the acquisition of traditional 1H-15N experiments on systems that are too big to be observed in solution. Among those, proteins entrapped in a bioinspired silica matrix are an attractive target that is receiving a large share of attention. We demonstrate that 1H-detected SSNMR provides a novel approach to the rapid assessment of structural integrity in proteins entrapped in bioinspired silica.

  2. Unraveling a phosphorylation event in a folded protein by NMR spectroscopy: phosphorylation of the Pin1 WW domain by PKA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smet-Nocca, Caroline, E-mail: caroline.smet@univ-lille1.fr; Launay, Helene; Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel; Lippens, Guy; Landrieu, Isabelle, E-mail: isabelle.landrieu@univ-lille1.fr [Universite de Lille-Nord de France, Institut Federatif de Recherches 147, CNRS UMR 8576 (France)

    2013-04-15

    The Pin1 protein plays a critical role in the functional regulation of the hyperphosphorylated neuronal Tau protein in Alzheimer's disease and is by itself regulated by phosphorylation. We have used Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to both identify the PKA phosphorylation site in the Pin1 WW domain and investigate the functional consequences of this phosphorylation. Detection and identification of phosphorylation on serine/threonine residues in a globular protein, while mostly occurring in solvent-exposed flexible loops, does not lead to chemical shift changes as obvious as in disordered proteins and hence does not necessarily shift the resonances outside the spectrum of the folded protein. Other complications were encountered to characterize the extent of the phosphorylation, as part of the {sup 1}H,{sup 15}N amide resonances around the phosphorylation site are specifically broadened in the unphosphorylated state. Despite these obstacles, NMR spectroscopy was an efficient tool to confirm phosphorylation on S16 of the WW domain and to quantify the level of phosphorylation. Based on this analytical characterization, we show that WW phosphorylation on S16 abolishes its binding capacity to a phosphorylated Tau peptide. A reduced conformational heterogeneity and flexibility of the phospho-binding loop upon S16 phosphorylation could account for part of the decreased affinity for its phosphorylated partner. Additionally, a structural model of the phospho-WW obtained by molecular dynamics simulation and energy minimization suggests that the phosphate moiety of phospho-S16 could compete with the phospho-substrate.

  3. Unraveling a phosphorylation event in a folded protein by NMR spectroscopy: phosphorylation of the Pin1 WW domain by PKA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pin1 protein plays a critical role in the functional regulation of the hyperphosphorylated neuronal Tau protein in Alzheimer’s disease and is by itself regulated by phosphorylation. We have used Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to both identify the PKA phosphorylation site in the Pin1 WW domain and investigate the functional consequences of this phosphorylation. Detection and identification of phosphorylation on serine/threonine residues in a globular protein, while mostly occurring in solvent-exposed flexible loops, does not lead to chemical shift changes as obvious as in disordered proteins and hence does not necessarily shift the resonances outside the spectrum of the folded protein. Other complications were encountered to characterize the extent of the phosphorylation, as part of the 1H,15N amide resonances around the phosphorylation site are specifically broadened in the unphosphorylated state. Despite these obstacles, NMR spectroscopy was an efficient tool to confirm phosphorylation on S16 of the WW domain and to quantify the level of phosphorylation. Based on this analytical characterization, we show that WW phosphorylation on S16 abolishes its binding capacity to a phosphorylated Tau peptide. A reduced conformational heterogeneity and flexibility of the phospho-binding loop upon S16 phosphorylation could account for part of the decreased affinity for its phosphorylated partner. Additionally, a structural model of the phospho-WW obtained by molecular dynamics simulation and energy minimization suggests that the phosphate moiety of phospho-S16 could compete with the phospho-substrate.

  4. Interaction of the replication terminator protein (RTP) with DNA probed by NMR spectroscopy and x-ray crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The arrest of replication forks during the termination of DNA replication in Bacillus subtilis is dependent upon the binding of the 30 kDa replication terminator protein (RTP) to its cognate Ter binding site. Two adjacently bound dimers of RTP form a termination complex that can prevent the progression of a replication fork approaching from one direction, but not the other. The crystal structure of free RTP has previously been solved, but the precise orientation with which it binds to Ter sites remains unknown. This information is important for understanding the molecular mechanism of replication fork arrest. We have used NMR spectroscopy to observe 1H-15N correlations arising from 15N-labelled RTP mutant, and to track their perturbations upon the addition of DNA. This showed that 60% of the amino acid residues are affected by the DNA interaction, and also that the complex is symmetrical. Assignment of the 1H-15N correlations was achieved using a suite of triple resonance NMR experiments with 15N,13C,2H enriched protein recorded at 800 MHz and using TROSY pulse sequences. This revealed that α3-helices are involved in the binding interaction, and that the 'wings' of RTP may not be contributing to binding. Crystals of the complex have been grown from the NMR sample, and data collected to 3.1 Angstroms is anticipated to provide further molecular detail

  5. Protein dynamics at Eph receptor-ligand interfaces as revealed by crystallography, NMR and MD simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of dynamics in protein functions including signal transduction is just starting to be deciphered. Eph receptors with 16 members divided into A- and B- subclasses are respectively activated by 9 A- and B-ephrin ligands. EphA4 is the only receptor capable of binding to all 9 ephrins and small molecules with overlapped interfaces. We first determined the structures of the EphA4 ligand binding domain (LBD) in two crystals of P1 space group. Noticeably, 8 EphA4 molecules were found in one asymmetric unit and consequently from two crystals we obtained 16 structures, which show significant conformational variations over the functionally critical A-C, D-E, G-H and J-K loops. The 16 new structures, together with previous 9 ones, can be categorized into two groups: closed and open forms which resemble the uncomplexed and complexed structures of the EphA4 LBD respectively. To assess whether the conformational diversity over the loops primarily results from the intrinsic dynamics, we initiated 30-ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for both closed and open forms. The results indicate that the loops do have much higher intrinsic dynamics, which is further unravelled by NMR H/D exchange experiments. During simulations, the open form has the RMS deviations slightly larger than those of the closed one, suggesting the open form may be less stable in the absence of external contacts. Furthermore, no obvious exchange between two forms is observed within 30 ns, implying that they are dynamically separated. Our study provides the first experimental and computational result revealing that the intrinsic dynamics are most likely underlying the conformational diversity observed for the EphA4 LBD loops mediating the binding affinity and specificity. Interestingly, the open conformation of the EphA4 LBD is slightly unstable in the absence of it natural ligand ephrins, implying that the conformational transition from the closed to open has to be driven by the high

  6. Towards fully automated structure-based NMR resonance assignment of 15N-labeled proteins from automatically picked peaks

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Richard

    2011-03-01

    In NMR resonance assignment, an indispensable step in NMR protein studies, manually processed peaks from both N-labeled and C-labeled spectra are typically used as inputs. However, the use of homologous structures can allow one to use only N-labeled NMR data and avoid the added expense of using C-labeled data. We propose a novel integer programming framework for structure-based backbone resonance assignment using N-labeled data. The core consists of a pair of integer programming models: one for spin system forming and amino acid typing, and the other for backbone resonance assignment. The goal is to perform the assignment directly from spectra without any manual intervention via automatically picked peaks, which are much noisier than manually picked peaks, so methods must be error-tolerant. In the case of semi-automated/manually processed peak data, we compare our system with the Xiong-Pandurangan-Bailey- Kellogg\\'s contact replacement (CR) method, which is the most error-tolerant method for structure-based resonance assignment. Our system, on average, reduces the error rate of the CR method by five folds on their data set. In addition, by using an iterative algorithm, our system has the added capability of using the NOESY data to correct assignment errors due to errors in predicting the amino acid and secondary structure type of each spin system. On a publicly available data set for human ubiquitin, where the typing accuracy is 83%, we achieve 91% accuracy, compared to the 59% accuracy obtained without correcting for such errors. In the case of automatically picked peaks, using assignment information from yeast ubiquitin, we achieve a fully automatic assignment with 97% accuracy. To our knowledge, this is the first system that can achieve fully automatic structure-based assignment directly from spectra. This has implications in NMR protein mutant studies, where the assignment step is repeated for each mutant. © Copyright 2011, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  7. MERA: a webserver for evaluating backbone torsion angle distributions in dynamic and disordered proteins from NMR data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantsyzov, Alexey B. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Fundamental Medicine (Russian Federation); Shen, Yang; Lee, Jung Ho [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States); Hummer, Gerhard [Max Planck Institute of Biophysics (Germany); Bax, Ad, E-mail: bax@nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States)

    2015-09-15

    MERA (Maximum Entropy Ramachandran map Analysis from NMR data) is a new webserver that generates residue-by-residue Ramachandran map distributions for disordered proteins or disordered regions in proteins on the basis of experimental NMR parameters. As input data, the program currently utilizes up to 12 different parameters. These include three different types of short-range NOEs, three types of backbone chemical shifts ({sup 15}N, {sup 13}C{sup α}, and {sup 13}C′), six types of J couplings ({sup 3}J{sub HNHα}, {sup 3}J{sub C′C′}, {sup 3}J{sub C′Hα}, {sup 1}J{sub HαCα}, {sup 2}J{sub CαN} and {sup 1}J{sub CαN}), as well as the {sup 15}N-relaxation derived J(0) spectral density. The Ramachandran map distributions are reported in terms of populations of their 15° × 15° voxels, and an adjustable maximum entropy weight factor is available to ensure that the obtained distributions will not deviate more from a newly derived coil library distribution than required to account for the experimental data. MERA output includes the agreement between each input parameter and its distribution-derived value. As an application, we demonstrate performance of the program for several residues in the intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein, as well as for several static and dynamic residues in the folded protein GB3.

  8. Integrated analysis of the conformation of a protein-linked spin label by crystallography, EPR and NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-range structural information derived from paramagnetic relaxation enhancement observed in the presence of a paramagnetic nitroxide radical is highly useful for structural characterization of globular, modular and intrinsically disordered proteins, as well as protein–protein and protein-DNA complexes. Here we characterized the conformation of a spin-label attached to the homodimeric protein CylR2 using a combination of X-ray crystallography, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and NMR spectroscopy. Close agreement was found between the conformation of the spin label observed in the crystal structure with interspin distances measured by EPR and signal broadening in NMR spectra, suggesting that the conformation seen in the crystal structure is also preferred in solution. In contrast, conformations of the spin label observed in crystal structures of T4 lysozyme are not in agreement with the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement observed for spin-labeled CylR2 in solution. Our data demonstrate that accurate positioning of the paramagnetic center is essential for high-resolution structure determination.

  9. MERA: a webserver for evaluating backbone torsion angle distributions in dynamic and disordered proteins from NMR data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MERA (Maximum Entropy Ramachandran map Analysis from NMR data) is a new webserver that generates residue-by-residue Ramachandran map distributions for disordered proteins or disordered regions in proteins on the basis of experimental NMR parameters. As input data, the program currently utilizes up to 12 different parameters. These include three different types of short-range NOEs, three types of backbone chemical shifts (15N, 13Cα, and 13C′), six types of J couplings (3JHNHα, 3JC′C′, 3JC′Hα, 1JHαCα, 2JCαN and 1JCαN), as well as the 15N-relaxation derived J(0) spectral density. The Ramachandran map distributions are reported in terms of populations of their 15° × 15° voxels, and an adjustable maximum entropy weight factor is available to ensure that the obtained distributions will not deviate more from a newly derived coil library distribution than required to account for the experimental data. MERA output includes the agreement between each input parameter and its distribution-derived value. As an application, we demonstrate performance of the program for several residues in the intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein, as well as for several static and dynamic residues in the folded protein GB3

  10. Development of Solid State NMR Methods for the Structural Characterization of Membrane Proteins: Applications to Understand Multiple Sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosman, M; Tran, A T; Ulloa, J; Maxwell, R S

    2003-03-04

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a relapsing-remitting disorder of the central nervous system that results in the loss of the myelin sheaths insulating nerve fibers (axons). Strong evidence suggests that MS is an autoimmune disease mediated by T-cell and antibody responses against myelin antigens. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is a 26 kD to 28 kD an integral membrane protein of the central nervous system implicated as a target for autoaggressive antibodies in MS. To date, the conformation of MOG in association with the myelin membrane is unknown and the exact nature of the interactions between this protein and disease-inducing immune responses have not been determined. Since membrane associated proteins are typically characterized by decreased correlation times, solution state NMR methodologies are often impracticable. Membrane proteins are also often difficult to crystallize for X-ray diffraction studies, Consequently, there is an urgent need to develop new structure characterization tools for this important class of biomolecules. The research described here overviews the initial stages of our effort to develop an integrated, NMR based approach to structural studies of MOG over the many structural domains it is postulated to posses. The structural knowledge gained about this important MS antigen in its native environment will contribute significantly to our understanding of its function in vivo. This project will also aid in the development of therapeutics to inhibit the antigedantibody interaction and thus prevent demyelination in MS patients.

  11. Antifreeze Polysaccharide Coating Study for De-icing Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Katsuaki; Sakaue, Hirotaka; Ando, Azuma; Matsuda, Yoshiyuki; Kawahara, Hidehisa

    2015-11-01

    Anti-icing or deicing of an aircraft is necessary for a safe flight operation. Mechanical processes, such as heating and deicer boot, are widely used. Deicing fluids, such as propyrene glycol and ethylene glycol, are used to coat the aircraft. However, these should be coated every time before the take-off, since the fluids come off from the aircraft while cruising. We study an antifreeze polysaccharide (AFPS) coating as a deicer for an aircraft. It is designed to coat on the aircraft without removal. Since an AFPS coating removes ice by reducing the interfacial energy, it would be an alternative way to prevent ice on the aircraft. We provide a temperature-controlled room, which can control its temperature under icing conditions (-8 and -4 °C). Ice adhesion tests are performed for AFPS coating and compared with a fundamental specimen without the coating.

  12. NMR structure of the N-terminal domain of capsid protein from the Mason-Pfizer monkey virus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macek, Pavel; Chmelík, Josef; Křížová, Ivana; Kadeřávek, P.; Padrta, P.; Žídek, L.; Wildová, Marcela; Hadravová, Romana; Chaloupková, R.; Pichová, Iva; Ruml, T.; Rumlová, Michaela; Sklenář, V.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 392, č. 1 (2009), s. 100-114. ISSN 0022-2836 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC545; GA MŠk 1M0508; GA ČR GA204/09/1388; GA ČR GESCO/06/E001 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; MŠk(CZ) LC06030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : M-PMV * betaretroviruses * capsid protein * NMR structure * internal dynamics Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.871, year: 2009

  13. Nano-mole scale sequential signal assignment by 1 H-detected protein solid-state NMR

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Songlin

    2015-01-01

    We present a 3D 1H-detected solid-state NMR (SSNMR) approach for main-chain signal assignments of 10-100 nmol of fully protonated proteins using ultra-fast magic-angle spinning (MAS) at ∼80 kHz by a novel spectral-editing method, which permits drastic spectral simplification. The approach offers ∼110 fold time saving over a traditional 3D 13C-detected SSNMR approach. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015.

  14. Complete assignment of lysine resonances in 1H NMR spectra of proteins as probes of surface structure and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A strategy is presented for complete identification of 1H spin systems of lysine residues using sophisticated 2D NMR experiments. Relayed and remote connectivities within each spin system are determined for spin subsystems based at the backbone amide and Cε proton resonances. When complete spin system identification is combined with sequence-specific assignment, protein surface structure and dynamics can be probed in a site-specific manner. The interaction between the five lysine residues of French bean plastocyanin and a model redox partner Cr(CN)63- has been examined using this approach. 12 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 table

  15. In vivo NMR field-cycling relaxation spectroscopy reveals 14N1H relaxation sinks in the backbones of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this preliminary note, the authors report an in vivo study of Hirudo medicinalis, using field-cycling relaxation spectroscopy, showing clear 14N1H quadrupole dips, proving that the amide 14N1H groups of proteins can act as relaxation sinks in a frequency range relevant for NMR tomography. Also, as a byproduct of this work it is noted that during these experiments, leeches were exposed to field variation rates of about 50 Ts-1 in several thousand field-cycles up and down, without any obvious damage. (U.K.)

  16. Backbone dynamics of a model membrane protein: assignment of the carbonyl carbon 13C NMR resonances in detergent-solubilized M13 coat protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major coat protein of the filamentous bacteriophage M13 is a 50-residue amphiphilic polypeptide which is inserted, as an integral membrane-spanning protein, in the inner membrane of the Escherichia coli host during infection. 13C was incorporated biosynthetically into a total of 23 of the peptide carbonyls using labeled amino acids (alanine, glycine, lysine, phenylalanine, and proline). The structure and dynamics of carbonyl-labeled M13 coat protein were monitored by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Assignment of many resonances was achieved by using protease digestion, pH titration, or labeling of the peptide bond with both 13C and 15N. The carbonyl region of the natural-abundance 13C NMR spectrum of M13 coat protein in sodium dodecyl sulfate solution shows approximately eight backbone carbonyl resonances with line widths much narrower than the rest. Three of these more mobile residues correspond to assigned peaks (glycine-3, lysine-48, and alanine-49) in the individual amino acid spectra, and another almost certainly arises from glutamic acid-2. A ninth residue, alanine-1, also gives rise to a very narrow carbonyl resonance if the pH is well above or below the pK/sub a/ of the terminal amino group. These data suggest that only about four residues at either end of the protein experience large-amplitude spatial fluctuations; the rest of the molecule is essentially rigid on the time scale of the overall rotational tumbling of the protein-detergent complex. The relative exposure of different regions of detergent-bound protein was monitored by limited digestion with proteinase K. Comparable spectra and digestion patterns were obtained when the protein was solubilized in sodium deoxycholate, suggesting that the coat protein binds both amphiphiles in a similar fashion

  17. Improved Methods for Characterization of Protein Dynamics by NMR spectroscopy and Studies of the EphB2 Kinase Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Ahlner, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are essential for all known forms of life and in many lethal diseases protein failure is the cause of the disease. To understand proteins and the processes they are involved in, it is valuable to know their structures as well as their dynamics and interactions. The structures may not be directly inspected because proteins are too small to be visible in a light microscope, which is why indirect methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy have to be utilized. This met...

  18. Determination of structural topology of a membrane protein in lipid bilayers using polarization optimized experiments (POE) for static and MAS solid state NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mote, Kaustubh R. [University of Minnesota, Department of Chemistry (United States); Gopinath, T. [University of Minnesota, Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics (United States); Veglia, Gianluigi, E-mail: vegli001@umn.edu [University of Minnesota, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2013-10-15

    The low sensitivity inherent to both the static and magic angle spinning techniques of solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy has thus far limited the routine application of multidimensional experiments to determine the structure of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers. Here, we demonstrate the advantage of using a recently developed class of experiments, polarization optimized experiments, for both static and MAS spectroscopy to achieve higher sensitivity and substantial time-savings for 2D and 3D experiments. We used sarcolipin, a single pass membrane protein, reconstituted in oriented bicelles (for oriented ssNMR) and multilamellar vesicles (for MAS ssNMR) as a benchmark. The restraints derived by these experiments are then combined into a hybrid energy function to allow simultaneous determination of structure and topology. The resulting structural ensemble converged to a helical conformation with a backbone RMSD {approx}0.44 A, a tilt angle of 24 Degree-Sign {+-} 1 Degree-Sign , and an azimuthal angle of 55 Degree-Sign {+-} 6 Degree-Sign . This work represents a crucial first step toward obtaining high-resolution structures of large membrane proteins using combined multidimensional oriented solid-state NMR and magic angle spinning solid-state NMR.

  19. Determination of structural topology of a membrane protein in lipid bilayers using polarization optimized experiments (POE) for static and MAS solid state NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low sensitivity inherent to both the static and magic angle spinning techniques of solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy has thus far limited the routine application of multidimensional experiments to determine the structure of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers. Here, we demonstrate the advantage of using a recently developed class of experiments, polarization optimized experiments, for both static and MAS spectroscopy to achieve higher sensitivity and substantial time-savings for 2D and 3D experiments. We used sarcolipin, a single pass membrane protein, reconstituted in oriented bicelles (for oriented ssNMR) and multilamellar vesicles (for MAS ssNMR) as a benchmark. The restraints derived by these experiments are then combined into a hybrid energy function to allow simultaneous determination of structure and topology. The resulting structural ensemble converged to a helical conformation with a backbone RMSD ∼0.44 Å, a tilt angle of 24° ± 1°, and an azimuthal angle of 55° ± 6°. This work represents a crucial first step toward obtaining high-resolution structures of large membrane proteins using combined multidimensional oriented solid-state NMR and magic angle spinning solid-state NMR

  20. Combining NMR and small angle X-ray and neutron scattering in the structural analysis of a ternary protein-RNA complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many processes in the regulation of gene expression and signaling involve the formation of protein complexes involving multi-domain proteins. Individual domains that mediate protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions are typically connected by flexible linkers, which contribute to conformational dynamics and enable the formation of complexes with distinct binding partners. Solution techniques are therefore required for structural analysis and to characterize potential conformational dynamics. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) provides such information but often only sparse data are obtained with increasing molecular weight of the complexes. It is therefore beneficial to combine NMR data with additional structural restraints from complementary solution techniques. Small angle X-ray/neutron scattering (SAXS/SANS) data can be efficiently combined with NMR-derived information, either for validation or by providing additional restraints for structural analysis. Here, we show that the combination of SAXS and SANS data can help to refine structural models obtained from data-driven docking using HADDOCK based on sparse NMR data. The approach is demonstrated with the ternary protein-protein-RNA complex involving two RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of Sex-lethal, the N-terminal cold shock domain of Upstream-to-N-Ras, and msl-2 mRNA. Based on chemical shift perturbations we have mapped protein-protein and protein-RNA interfaces and complemented this NMR-derived information with SAXS data, as well as SANS measurements on subunit-selectively deuterated samples of the ternary complex. Our results show that, while the use of SAXS data is beneficial, the additional combination with contrast variation in SANS data resolves remaining ambiguities and improves the docking based on chemical shift perturbations of the ternary protein-RNA complex.

  1. Combining NMR and small angle X-ray and neutron scattering in the structural analysis of a ternary protein-RNA complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennig, Janosch; Wang, Iren; Sonntag, Miriam [Institute of Structural Biology, Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen (Germany); Gabel, Frank [Extremophiles and Large Molecular Assemblies Group (ELMA), Institut de Biologie Structurale (IBS) CEA-CNRS-UJF (France); Sattler, Michael, E-mail: sattler@helmholtz-muenchen.de [Institute of Structural Biology, Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    Many processes in the regulation of gene expression and signaling involve the formation of protein complexes involving multi-domain proteins. Individual domains that mediate protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions are typically connected by flexible linkers, which contribute to conformational dynamics and enable the formation of complexes with distinct binding partners. Solution techniques are therefore required for structural analysis and to characterize potential conformational dynamics. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) provides such information but often only sparse data are obtained with increasing molecular weight of the complexes. It is therefore beneficial to combine NMR data with additional structural restraints from complementary solution techniques. Small angle X-ray/neutron scattering (SAXS/SANS) data can be efficiently combined with NMR-derived information, either for validation or by providing additional restraints for structural analysis. Here, we show that the combination of SAXS and SANS data can help to refine structural models obtained from data-driven docking using HADDOCK based on sparse NMR data. The approach is demonstrated with the ternary protein-protein-RNA complex involving two RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of Sex-lethal, the N-terminal cold shock domain of Upstream-to-N-Ras, and msl-2 mRNA. Based on chemical shift perturbations we have mapped protein-protein and protein-RNA interfaces and complemented this NMR-derived information with SAXS data, as well as SANS measurements on subunit-selectively deuterated samples of the ternary complex. Our results show that, while the use of SAXS data is beneficial, the additional combination with contrast variation in SANS data resolves remaining ambiguities and improves the docking based on chemical shift perturbations of the ternary protein-RNA complex.

  2. The role of water in protein's behavior: The two dynamical crossovers studied by NMR and FTIR techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Mallamace

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The role the solvent plays in determining the biological activity of proteins is of primary importance. Water is the solvent of life and proteins need at least a water monolayer covering their surface in order to become biologically active. We study how the properties of water and the effect of its coupling with the hydrophilic moieties of proteins govern the regime of protein activity. In particular we follow, by means of Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, the thermal evolution of the amide vibrational modes of hydrated lysozyme in the temperature interval 180K < T < 350K. In such a way we are able to observe the thermal limit of biological activity characterizing hydrated lysozyme. Finally we focus on the region of lysozyme thermal denaturation by following the evolution of the proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR spectra for 298K < T < 366K with the High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning probe. Our data suggest that the hydrogen bond coupling between hydration water and protein hydrophilic groups is crucial in triggering the main mechanisms that define the enzymatic activity of proteins.

  3. Proton-detected scalar coupling based assignment strategies in MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy applied to perdeuterated proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linser, Rasmus; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd

    2008-07-01

    Assignment of proteins in MAS (magic angle spinning) solid-state NMR relies so far on correlations among heteronuclei. This strategy is based on well dispersed resonances in the 15N dimension. In many complex cases like membrane proteins or amyloid fibrils, an additional frequency dimension is desirable in order to spread the amide resonances. We show here that proton detected HNCO, HNCA, and HNCACB type experiments can successfully be implemented in the solid-state. Coherences are sufficiently long lived to allow pulse schemes of a duration greater than 70 ms before incrementation of the first indirect dimension. The achieved resolution is comparable to the resolution obtained in solution-state NMR experiments. We demonstrate the experiments using a triply labeled sample of the SH3 domain of chicken α-spectrin, which was re-crystallized in H 2O/D 2O using a ratio of 1/9. We employ paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) using EDTA chelated Cu II to enable rapid data acquisition.

  4. NMR of proteins (4Fe-4S): structural properties and intramolecular electron transfer; RMN de proteines (4Fe-4S): proprietes structurales et transfert electronique intramoleculaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, J.G.

    1996-10-17

    NMR started to be applied to Fe-S proteins in the seventies. Its use has recently been enlarged as the problems arising from the paramagnetic polymetallic clusters ware overcome. Applications to [4Fe-4S] are presented herein. The information derived thereof deepens the understanding of the redox properties of these proteins which play a central role in the metabolism of bacterial cells. The secondary structure elements and the overall folding of Chromatium vinosum ferredoxin (Cv Fd) in solution have been established by NMR. The unique features of this sequence have been shown to fold as an {alpha} helix at the C-terminus and as a loop between two cysteines ligand of one cluster: these two parts localize in close proximity from one another. The interaction between nuclear and electronic spins is a source of additional structural information for (4Fe-AS] proteins. The conformation of the cysteine-ligands, as revealed by the Fe-(S{sub {gamma}}-C{sub {beta}}-H{sub {beta}})Cys dihedral angles, is related to the chemical shifts of the signals associated with the protons of these residues. The longitudinal relaxation times of the protons depend on their distance to the cluster. A quantitative relationship has been established and used to show that the solution structure of the high-potential ferredoxin from Cv differs significantly from the crystal structure around Phe-48. Both parameters (chemical shifts and longitudinal relaxation times) give also insight into the electronic and magnetic properties of the [4Fe-4S] clusters. The rate of intramolecular electron transfer between the two [4FE-4S] clusters of ferredoxins has been measured by NMR. It is far slower in the case of Cv Fd than for shorter ferredoxins. The difference may be associated with changes in the magnetic and/or electronic properties of one cluster. The strong paramagnetism of the [4Fe-4S] clusters, which originally limited the applicability of NMR to proteins containing these cofactors, has been proven

  5. Reduced Dimensionality (4,3)D-hnCOCANH Experiment: An Efficient Backbone Assignment tool for NMR studies of Proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    Sequence specific resonance assignment and secondary structure determination of proteins form the basis for variety of structural and functional proteomics studies by NMR. In this context, an efficient standalone method for rapid assignment of backbone (1H, 15N, 13Ca and 13C') resonances and secondary structure determination of proteins has been presented here. Compared to currently available strategies used for the purpose, the method employs only a single reduced dimensionality (RD) experiment -(4,3)D-hnCOCANH and exploits the linear combinations of backbone (13Ca and 13C') chemical shifts to achieve a dispersion relatively better compared to those of individual chemical shifts (see the text) for efficient and rapid data analysis. Further, the experiment leads to the spectrum with direct distinction of self (intra-residue) and sequential (inter-residue) carbon correlation peaks; these appear opposite in signs and therefore can easily be discriminated without using an additional complementary experiment. On ...

  6. Selective {sup 2}H and {sup 13}C labeling in NMR analysis of solution protein structure and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeMaster, D.M. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Preparation of samples bearing combined isotope enrichment patterns has played a central role in the recent advances in NMR analysis of proteins in solution. In particular, uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N enrichment has made it possible to apply heteronuclear multidimensional correlation experiments for the mainchain assignments of proteins larger than 30 KDa. In contrast, selective labeling approaches can offer advantages in terms of the directedness of the information provided, such as chirality and residue type assignments, as well as through enhancements in resolution and sensitivity that result from editing the spectral complexity, the relaxation pathways and the scalar coupling networks. In addition, the combination of selective {sup 13}C and {sup 2}H enrichment can greatly facilitate the determination of heteronuclear relaxation behavior.

  7. Determination of muscle protein synthesis rates in fish using (2)H2O and (2)H NMR analysis of alanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Cátia; Viegas, Filipa; Rito, João; Jones, John; Viegas, Ivan

    2016-09-15

    Following administration of deuterated water ((2)H2O), the fractional synthetic rate (FSR) of a given endogenous protein can be estimated by (2)H-enrichment quantification of its alanine residues. Currently, this is measured by mass spectrometry following a derivatization procedure. Muscle FSR was measured by (1)H/(2)H NMR analysis of alanine from seabass kept for 6 days in 5% (2)H-enriched saltwater, following acid hydrolysis and amino acid isolation by cation-exchange chromatography of muscle tissue. The analysis is simple and robust, and provides precise measurements of excess alanine (2)H-enrichment in the 0.1-0.4% range from 50 mmol of alanine recovered from muscle protein. PMID:27418547

  8. "Rules of Engagement" of Protein-Glycoconjugate Interactions: A Molecular View Achievable by using NMR Spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Roberta; Perez, Serge; Arda, Ana; Imberty, Anne; Jimenez-Barbero, Jesus; Silipo, Alba; Molinaro, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the dynamics of protein-ligand interactions, which lie at the heart of host-pathogen recognition, represents a crucial step to clarify the molecular determinants implicated in binding events, as well as to optimize the design of new molecules with therapeutic aims. Over the last decade, advances in complementary biophysical and spectroscopic methods permitted us to deeply dissect the fine structural details of biologically relevant molecular recognition processes with high resolution. This Review focuses on the development and use of modern nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to dissect binding events. These spectroscopic methods, complementing X-ray crystallography and molecular modeling methodologies, will be taken into account as indispensable tools to provide a complete picture of protein-glycoconjugate binding mechanisms related to biomedicine applications against infectious diseases. PMID:27547635

  9. Uniform isotope labeling of a eukaryotic seven-transmembrane helical protein in yeast enables high-resolution solid-state NMR studies in the lipid environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan Ying; Shi Lichi; Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Brown, Leonid S., E-mail: leonid@physics.uoguelph.ca [University of Guelph, Department of Physics (Canada)

    2011-02-15

    Overexpression of isotope-labeled multi-spanning eukaryotic membrane proteins for structural NMR studies is often challenging. On the one hand, difficulties with achieving proper folding, membrane insertion, and native-like post-translational modifications frequently disqualify bacterial expression systems. On the other hand, eukaryotic cell cultures can be prohibitively expensive. One of the viable alternatives, successfully used for producing proteins for solution NMR studies, is yeast expression systems, particularly Pichia pastoris. We report on successful implementation and optimization of isotope labeling protocols, previously used for soluble secreted proteins, to produce homogeneous samples of a eukaryotic seven-transmembrane helical protein, rhodopsin from Leptosphaeria maculans. Even in shake-flask cultures, yields exceeded 5 mg of purified uniformly {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeled protein per liter of culture. The protein was stable (at least several weeks at 5 Degree-Sign C) and functionally active upon reconstitution into lipid membranes at high protein-to-lipid ratio required for solid-state NMR. The samples gave high-resolution {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N solid-state magic angle spinning NMR spectra, amenable to a detailed structural analysis. We believe that similar protocols can be adopted for challenging mammalian targets, which often resist characterization by other structural methods.

  10. Uniform isotope labeling of a eukaryotic seven-transmembrane helical protein in yeast enables high-resolution solid-state NMR studies in the lipid environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overexpression of isotope-labeled multi-spanning eukaryotic membrane proteins for structural NMR studies is often challenging. On the one hand, difficulties with achieving proper folding, membrane insertion, and native-like post-translational modifications frequently disqualify bacterial expression systems. On the other hand, eukaryotic cell cultures can be prohibitively expensive. One of the viable alternatives, successfully used for producing proteins for solution NMR studies, is yeast expression systems, particularly Pichia pastoris. We report on successful implementation and optimization of isotope labeling protocols, previously used for soluble secreted proteins, to produce homogeneous samples of a eukaryotic seven-transmembrane helical protein, rhodopsin from Leptosphaeria maculans. Even in shake-flask cultures, yields exceeded 5 mg of purified uniformly 13C,15N-labeled protein per liter of culture. The protein was stable (at least several weeks at 5°C) and functionally active upon reconstitution into lipid membranes at high protein-to-lipid ratio required for solid-state NMR. The samples gave high-resolution 13C and 15N solid-state magic angle spinning NMR spectra, amenable to a detailed structural analysis. We believe that similar protocols can be adopted for challenging mammalian targets, which often resist characterization by other structural methods.

  11. Specific labeling and assignment strategies of valine methyl groups for NMR studies of high molecular weight proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The specific protonation of valine and leucine methyl groups in proteins is typically achieved by overexpressing proteins in M9/D2O medium supplemented with either labeled α-ketoisovalerate for the labeling of the four prochiral methyl groups or with 2-acetolactate for the stereospecific labeling of the valine and leucine side chains. However, when these labeling schemes are applied to large protein assemblies, significant overlap between the correlations of the valine and leucine methyl groups occurs, hampering the analysis of 2D methyl-TROSY spectra. Analysis of the leucine and valine biosynthesis pathways revealed that the incorporation of labeled precursors in the leucine pathway can be inhibited by the addition of exogenous l-leucine-d10. We exploited this property to label stereospecifically the pro-R and pro-S methyl groups of valine with minimal scrambling to the leucine residues. This new labeling protocol was applied to the 468 kDa homododecameric peptidase TET2 to decrease the complexity of its NMR spectra. All of the pro-S valine methyl resonances of TET2 were assigned by combining mutagenesis with this innovative labeling approach. The assignments were transferred to the pro-R groups using an optimally labeled sample and a set of triple resonance experiments. This improved labeling scheme enables us to overcome the main limitation of overcrowding in the NMR spectra of prochiral methyl groups, which is a prerequisite for the site-specific measurement of the structural and dynamic parameters or for the study of interactions in very large protein assemblies

  12. Specific labeling and assignment strategies of valine methyl groups for NMR studies of high molecular weight proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mas, Guillaume; Crublet, Elodie [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Institut de Biologie Structurale (IBS) (France); Hamelin, Olivier [CNRS (France); Gans, Pierre; Boisbouvier, Jérôme, E-mail: jerome.boisbouvier@ibs.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Institut de Biologie Structurale (IBS) (France)

    2013-09-28

    The specific protonation of valine and leucine methyl groups in proteins is typically achieved by overexpressing proteins in M9/D{sub 2}O medium supplemented with either labeled α-ketoisovalerate for the labeling of the four prochiral methyl groups or with 2-acetolactate for the stereospecific labeling of the valine and leucine side chains. However, when these labeling schemes are applied to large protein assemblies, significant overlap between the correlations of the valine and leucine methyl groups occurs, hampering the analysis of 2D methyl-TROSY spectra. Analysis of the leucine and valine biosynthesis pathways revealed that the incorporation of labeled precursors in the leucine pathway can be inhibited by the addition of exogenous l-leucine-d{sub 10}. We exploited this property to label stereospecifically the pro-R and pro-S methyl groups of valine with minimal scrambling to the leucine residues. This new labeling protocol was applied to the 468 kDa homododecameric peptidase TET2 to decrease the complexity of its NMR spectra. All of the pro-S valine methyl resonances of TET2 were assigned by combining mutagenesis with this innovative labeling approach. The assignments were transferred to the pro-R groups using an optimally labeled sample and a set of triple resonance experiments. This improved labeling scheme enables us to overcome the main limitation of overcrowding in the NMR spectra of prochiral methyl groups, which is a prerequisite for the site-specific measurement of the structural and dynamic parameters or for the study of interactions in very large protein assemblies.

  13. Deciphering Protein Dynamics from NMR Data Using Explicit Structure Sampling and Selection

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yiwen; Campbell, Sharon L.; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2007-01-01

    Perhaps one of the most prominent realizations of recent years is the critical role that protein dynamics plays in many facets of cellular function. While characterization of protein dynamics is fundamental to our understanding of protein function, the ability to explicitly detect an ensemble of protein conformations from dynamics data is a paramount challenge in structural biology. Here, we report a new computational method, Sample and Select, for determining the ensemble of protein conforma...

  14. Auto-FACE: an NMR based binding site mapping program for fast chemical exchange protein-ligand systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janarthanan Krishnamoorthy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR spectroscopy offers a variety of experiments to study protein-ligand interactions at atomic resolution. Among these experiments, 15N Heteronuclear Single Quantum Correlation (HSQCexperiment is simple, less time consuming and highly informative in mapping the binding site of the ligand. The interpretation of 15N HSQC becomes ambiguous when the chemical shift perturbations are caused by non-specific interactions like allosteric changes and local structural rearrangement. Under such cases, detailed chemical exchange analysis based on chemical shift perturbation will assist in locating the binding site accurately. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have automated the mapping of binding sites for fast chemical exchange systems using information obtained from 15N HSQC spectra of protein serially titrated with ligand of increasing concentrations. The automated program Auto-FACE (Auto-FAst Chemical Exchange analyzer determines the parameters, e.g. rate of change of perturbation, binding equilibrium constant and magnitude of chemical shift perturbation to map the binding site residues.Interestingly, the rate of change of perturbation at lower ligand concentration is highly sensitive in differentiating the binding site residues from the non-binding site residues. To validate this program, the interaction between the protein hBcl(XL and the ligand BH3I-1 was studied. Residues in the hydrophobic BH3 binding groove of hBcl(XL were easily identified to be crucial for interaction with BH3I-1 from other residues that also exhibited perturbation. The geometrically averaged equilibrium constant (3.0 x 10(4 calculated for the residues present at the identified binding site is consistent with the values obtained by other techniques like isothermal calorimetry and fluorescence polarization assays (12.8 x 10(4. Adjacent to the primary site, an additional binding site was identified which had an affinity of 3.8 times weaker

  15. Re-evaluation of the model-free analysis of fast internal motion in proteins using NMR relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Kendra King; Sharp, Kim A; Warischalk, Nicholas; Wand, A Joshua

    2008-09-25

    NMR spin relaxation retains a central role in the characterization of the fast internal motion of proteins and their complexes. Knowledge of the distribution and amplitude of the motion of amino acid side chains is critical for the interpretation of the dynamical proxy for the residual conformational entropy of proteins, which can potentially significantly contribute to the entropy of protein function. A popular treatment of NMR relaxation phenomena in macromolecules dissolved in liquids is the so-called model-free approach of Lipari and Szabo. The robustness of the mode-free approach has recently been strongly criticized and the remarkable range and structural context of the internal motion of proteins, characterized by such NMR relaxation techniques, attributed to artifacts arising from the model-free treatment, particularly with respect to the symmetry of the underlying motion. We develop an objective quantification of both spatial and temporal asymmetry of motion and re-examine the foundation of the model-free treatment. Concerns regarding the robustness of the model-free approach to asymmetric motion appear to be generally unwarranted. The generalized order parameter is robustly recovered. The sensitivity of the model-free treatment to asymmetric motion is restricted to the effective correlation time, which is by definition a normalized quantity and not a true time constant and therefore of much less interest in this context. With renewed confidence in the model-free approach, we then examine the microscopic distribution of side chain motion in the complex between calcium-saturated calmodulin and the calmodulin-binding domain of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Deuterium relaxation is used to characterize the motion of methyl groups in the complex. A remarkable range of Lipari-Szabo model-free generalized order parameters are seen with little correlation with basic structural parameters such as the depth of burial. These results are contrasted with the

  16. Nonlinear excitations match correlated motions unveiled by NMR in proteins: a new perspective on allosteric cross-talk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we propose a novel theoretical framework for interpreting long-range dynamical correlations unveiled in proteins through NMR measurements. The theoretical rationale relies on the hypothesis that correlated motions in proteins may be reconstructed as large-scale, collective modes sustained by long-lived nonlinear vibrations known as discrete breathers (DB) localized at key, hot-spot sites. DBs are spatially localized modes, whose nonlinear nature hinders resonant coupling with the normal modes, thus conferring them long lifetimes as compared to normal modes. DBs have been predicted to exist in proteins, localized at few hot-spot residues typically within the stiffest portions of the structure. We compute DB modes analytically in the framework of the nonlinear network model, showing that the displacement patterns of many DBs localized at key sites match to a remarkable extent the experimentally uncovered correlation blueprint. The computed dispersion relations prove that it is physically possible for some of these DBs to be excited out of thermal fluctuations at room temperature. Based on our calculations, we speculate that transient energy redistribution among the vibrational modes in a protein might favor the emergence of DB-like bursts of long-lived energy at hot-spot sites with lifetimes in the ns range, able to sustain critical, function-encoding correlated motions. More generally, our calculations provide a novel quantitative tool to predict fold-spanning dynamical pathways of correlated residues that may be central to allosteric cross-talk in proteins. (paper)

  17. NMR structure and dynamics of Q4D059, a kinetoplastid-specific and conserved protein from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Castilla, Aracelys; Pons, Tirso; Pires, José R

    2015-04-01

    Q4D059 (UniProt accession number), is an 86-residue protein from Trypanosoma cruzi, conserved in the related kinetoplastid parasites Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania major. These pathogens are the causal agents of the neglected diseases: Chagas, sleeping sickness and leishmaniases respectively and had recently their genomes sequenced. Q4D059 shows low sequence similarity with mammal proteins and because of its essentiality demonstrated in T. brucei, it is a potential target for anti-parasitic drugs. The 11 hypothetical proteins homologous to Q4D059 are all uncharacterized proteins of unknown function. Here, the solution structure of Q4D059 was solved by NMR and its backbone dynamics was characterized by (15)N relaxation parameters. The structure is composed by a parallel/anti-parallel three-stranded β-sheet packed against four helical regions. The structure is well defined by ca. 9 NOEs per residue and a backbone rmsd of 0.50±0.05 Å for the representative ensemble of 20 lowest-energy structures. The structure is overall rigid except for N-terminal residues A(9) to D(11) at the beginning of β1, K(38), V(39) at the end of helix H3 with rapid motion in the ps-ns timescale and G(25) (helix H2), I(68) (β2) and V(78) (loop 3) undergoing internal motion in the μs-ms timescale. Limited structural similarities were found in protein structures deposited in the PDB, therefore functional inferences based on protein structure information are not clear. Q4D059 adopts a α/β fold that is slightly similar to the ATPase sub-domain IIB of the heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) and to the N-terminal domain of the ribosomal protein L11. PMID:25748338

  18. A comparison of chemical shift sensitivity of trifluoromethyl tags: optimizing resolution in {sup 19}F NMR studies of proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Libin; Larda, Sacha Thierry; Frank Li, Yi Feng [University of Toronto, UTM, Department of Chemistry (Canada); Manglik, Aashish [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology (United States); Prosser, R. Scott, E-mail: scott.prosser@utoronto.ca [University of Toronto, UTM, Department of Chemistry (Canada)

    2015-05-15

    The elucidation of distinct protein conformers or states by fluorine ({sup 19}F) NMR requires fluorinated moieties whose chemical shifts are most sensitive to subtle changes in the local dielectric and magnetic shielding environment. In this study we evaluate the effective chemical shift dispersion of a number of thiol-reactive trifluoromethyl probes [i.e. 2-bromo-N-(4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)acetamide (BTFMA), N-(4-bromo-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)acetamide (3-BTFMA), 3-bromo-1,1,1-trifluoropropan-2-ol (BTFP), 1-bromo-3,3,4,4,4-pentafluorobutan-2-one (BPFB), 3-bromo-1,1,1-trifluoropropan-2-one (BTFA), and 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl-1-thiol (TFET)] under conditions of varying polarity. In considering the sensitivity of the {sup 19}F NMR chemical shift to the local environment, a series of methanol/water mixtures were prepared, ranging from relatively non-polar (MeOH:H{sub 2}O = 4) to polar (MeOH:H{sub 2}O = 0.25). {sup 19}F NMR spectra of the tripeptide, glutathione ((2S)-2-amino-4-{[(1R)-1-[(carboxymethyl)carbamoyl] -2-sulfanylethyl]carbamoyl}butanoic acid), conjugated to each of the above trifluoromethyl probes, revealed that the BTFMA tag exhibited a significantly greater range of chemical shift as a function of solvent polarity than did either BTFA or TFET. DFT calculations using the B3LYP hybrid functional and the 6-31G(d,p) basis set, confirmed the observed trend in chemical shift dispersion with solvent polarity.

  19. Solution NMR structure of CsgE: Structural insights into a chaperone and regulator protein important for functional amyloid formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Qin; Krezel, Andrzej M; Cusumano, Zachary T; Pinkner, Jerome S; Klein, Roger; Hultgren, Scott J; Frieden, Carl

    2016-06-28

    Curli, consisting primarily of major structural subunit CsgA, are functional amyloids produced on the surface of Escherichia coli, as well as many other enteric bacteria, and are involved in cell colonization and biofilm formation. CsgE is a periplasmic accessory protein that plays a crucial role in curli biogenesis. CsgE binds to both CsgA and the nonameric pore protein CsgG. The CsgG-CsgE complex is the curli secretion channel and is essential for the formation of the curli fibril in vivo. To better understand the role of CsgE in curli formation, we have determined the solution NMR structure of a double mutant of CsgE (W48A/F79A) that appears to be similar to the wild-type (WT) protein in overall structure and function but does not form mixed oligomers at NMR concentrations similar to the WT. The well-converged structure of this mutant has a core scaffold composed of a layer of two α-helices and a layer of three-stranded antiparallel β-sheet with flexible N and C termini. The structure of CsgE fits well into the cryoelectron microscopy density map of the CsgG-CsgE complex. We highlight a striking feature of the electrostatic potential surface in CsgE structure and present an assembly model of the CsgG-CsgE complex. We suggest a structural mechanism of the interaction between CsgE and CsgA. Understanding curli formation can provide the information necessary to develop treatments and therapeutic agents for biofilm-related infections and may benefit the prevention and treatment of amyloid diseases. CsgE could establish a paradigm for the regulation of amyloidogenesis because of its unique role in curli formation. PMID:27298344

  20. On the ability of molecular dynamics force fields to recapitulate NMR derived protein side chain order parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Evan S; Wand, A Joshua; Sharp, Kim A

    2016-06-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have become a central tool for investigating various biophysical questions with atomistic detail. While many different proxies are used to qualify MD force fields, most are based on largely structural parameters such as the root mean square deviation from experimental coordinates or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts and residual dipolar couplings. NMR derived Lipari-Szabo squared generalized order parameter (O(2) ) values of amide NH bond vectors of the polypeptide chain were also often employed for refinement and validation. However, with a few exceptions, side chain methyl symmetry axis order parameters have not been incorporated into experimental reference sets. Using a test set of five diverse proteins, the performance of several force fields implemented in the NAMDD simulation package was examined. It was found that simulations employing explicit water implemented using the TIP3 model generally performed significantly better than those using implicit water in reproducing experimental methyl symmetry axis O(2) values. Overall the CHARMM27 force field performs nominally better than two implementations of the Amber force field. It appeared that recent quantum mechanics modifications to side chain torsional angles of leucine and isoleucine in the Amber force field have significantly hindered proper motional modeling for these residues. There remained significant room for improvement as even the best correlations of experimental and simulated methyl group Lipari-Szabo generalized order parameters fall below an R(2) of 0.8. PMID:26990788

  1. Transient interactions studied by NMR : iron sulfur proteins and their interaction partners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Xingfu

    2009-01-01

    The interactions between proteins are of central importance for virtually every process in a living cell. It has long been a mystery how two proteins associate to form a complex in a complicated cellular context. Recently, it was found that an intermediate state called encounter state, of a protein

  2. Antifreeze polymeric additives for fuels; Aditivos polimericos anticongelantes para combustiveis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muniz, Aline S.; Carvalho, Agne Roani de; Sakae, George Hideki; Oliveira, Angelo R.S.; Cesar-Oliveira, Maria Aparecida F. [Universidade Federal do Parana - UFPR - Departamento de Quimica - LABPOL-Laboratorio de Polimeros Sinteticos, Centro Politecnico, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)], e-mails: mafco@ufpr.br, alinemuniz@ufpr.br

    2011-07-01

    Owing to the current interest in the reduction of environmental pollution, several researchers are seeking renewable sources of energy which can at least partially replace combustibles derived from petroleum. Diesel oil is the combustible that most seriously pollutes the environment and is thus the biodiesel that is being considered as a fuel which can be replaced by a renewable combustible; this can possibly be used in diesel engines without any modifications. However, certain problems have to be overcome with regard to the temperature at which the biodiesel should be stored and used, since there is a tendency for biodiesel to solidify at low temperatures. This suggests that there is a need for the use of anti-freeze additives. This work behind the main focus additives with only 25 ppm, were able to reduce the pour point of fuel, achieving significant results, for example, the additive M14A18 lowered the pour point (PP) of B20 to -20 degree C, showing that the use of increasing amounts of biodiesel to diesel can aggregate. The main focus of work behind the development of additives that with only 25 ppm, were able to reduce the pour point of fuel, producing significant results such as those obtained with the use of additive M14A18 which lowered the pour point of the B20 to -20 degree C, showing the possibility of using increasing amounts of biodiesel added to diesel. (author)

  3. Synthesis of Cyclic Antifreeze Glycopeptide and Glycopeptoids and Their Ice Recrystallization Inhibition Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Mija; Murugan, Ravichandran N.; Bang, Jeong Kyu; Kim, Hak Jun [Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Song Yub [Chousn Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eunjung; Lee, Jun Hyuck [Korea Polar Research Institute, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Until now, few groups reported the antifreeze activity of cyclic glycopeptides; however, the tedious synthetic procedure is not amenable to study the intensive structure activity relationship. A series of N-linked cyclic glycopeptoids and glycopeptide have been prepared to evaluate antifreeze activity as a function of peptide backbone cyclization and methyl stereochemical effect on the rigid Thr position. This study has combined the cyclization protocol with solid phase peptide synthesis and obtained significant quantities of homogeneous cyclic glycopeptide and glycopeptoids. Analysis of antifreeze activity revealed that our cyclic peptide demonstrated RI activity while cyclic glycopeptoids showed no RI activity. These results suggest that the subtle changes in conformation and Thr orientation dramatically influence RI activity of N-linked glycopeptoids.

  4. Advanced solid-state NMR techniques for characterization of membrane protein structure and dynamics: Application to Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Meaghan E.; Brown, Leonid S.; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    Studies of the structure, dynamics, and function of membrane proteins (MPs) have long been considered one of the main applications of solid-state NMR (SSNMR). Advances in instrumentation, and the plethora of new SSNMR methodologies developed over the past decade have resulted in a number of high-resolution structures and structural models of both bitopic and polytopic α-helical MPs. The necessity to retain lipids in the sample, the high proportion of one type of secondary structure, differential dynamics, and the possibility of local disorder in the loop regions all create challenges for structure determination. In this Perspective article we describe our recent efforts directed at determining the structure and functional dynamics of Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin, a heptahelical transmembrane (7TM) protein. We review some of the established and emerging methods which can be utilized for SSNMR-based structure determination, with a particular focus on those used for ASR, a bacterial protein which shares its 7TM architecture with G-protein coupled receptors.

  5. NMR studies of the structural dynamics and intermolecular interactions of colicin E9 and its inhibitor protein

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, E S

    2001-01-01

    reveal the anisotropic character of the molecule. The thesis concludes with a general discussion in chapter six that considers the current model for the uptake of colicin E9 into a bacterium in the light of the NMR data. The subject of this work is the structural dynamics of colicin E9, a plasmid-encoded toxin produced by Escherichia coli, and its immunity protein lm9. Colicin proteins, their mode of action and their structures are introduced in chapter one. Chapter two describes the relaxation properties of protein backbone NH groups, their measurement and how they can give information about the dynamics of a protein. Experimental work is reported in chapters three, four and five. Chapter three deals with lm9, showing that the relaxation times of its backbone NH groups are determined primarily by the overall rotational diffusion of the molecule. This chapter includes a critical evaluation of model-free analysis of the lm9 relaxation data. Chapter four examines the DNase domain of colicin E9 showing it to hav...

  6. Advanced solid-state NMR techniques for characterization of membrane protein structure and dynamics: application to Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Meaghan E; Brown, Leonid S; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    Studies of the structure, dynamics, and function of membrane proteins (MPs) have long been considered one of the main applications of solid-state NMR (SSNMR). Advances in instrumentation, and the plethora of new SSNMR methodologies developed over the past decade have resulted in a number of high-resolution structures and structural models of both bitopic and polytopic α-helical MPs. The necessity to retain lipids in the sample, the high proportion of one type of secondary structure, differential dynamics, and the possibility of local disorder in the loop regions all create challenges for structure determination. In this Perspective article we describe our recent efforts directed at determining the structure and functional dynamics of Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin, a heptahelical transmembrane (7TM) protein. We review some of the established and emerging methods which can be utilized for SSNMR-based structure determination, with a particular focus on those used for ASR, a bacterial protein which shares its 7TM architecture with G-protein coupled receptors. PMID:25637099

  7. Production of Membrane Proteins for NMR Studies Using the Condensed Single Protein Production (cSPP) System

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Lili; Tang, Yuefeng; Vaiphei, S. Thangminlal; Shimazu, Tsutomu; Kim, Sung-Gun; Mani, Rajeswari; Fakhoury, Elias; White, Eileen; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Inouye, Masayori

    2009-01-01

    In the Single Protein Production (SPP) method, all E. coli cellular mRNAs are eliminated by the induction of MazF, an ACA-specific mRNA interferase. When an mRNA for a membrane protein, engineered to have no ACA sequences without altering its amino acid sequence, is induced in the MazF-induced cells, E. coli is converted into a bioreactor producing only the targeted membrane protein. Here we demonstrate that three prokaryotic inner membrane proteins, two prokaryotic outer membrane proteins, a...

  8. NMR Structure of the hypothetical protein encoded by the YjbJ gene from Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; Liao, Jack; Wu, Bin; Yee, Adelinda; Cort, John R.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Edwards, Aled M.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2002-06-01

    Here we describe the solution structure of YjbJ (gil418541) as part of a structural proteomics project on the feasibility of the high-throughput generation of samples from Escherichia coli for structural studies. YjbJ is a hypothetical protein from Escherichia coli protein of unknown function. It is conserved, showing significant sequence identity to four predicted prokaryotic proteins, also of unknown function (Figure 1A). These include gil16762921 from Salmonella enterica (S. typhi), gil17938413 from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, gil16265654 from Sinorizhobium meliloti, and gil15599932 from Pseudomona aeruginosa. The structure of YjbJ reveals a new variation of a common motif (four-helix bundle) that could not be predicted from the protein sequence. Although the biochemical function is unknown, the existence of patterns of conserved residues on the protein surface suggest that the fold and function of all these proteins could be similar.

  9. NMR spectroscopic and analytical ultracentrifuge analysis of membrane protein detergent complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Choe Senyon; Riek Roland; Johnson Casey; Kefala Georgia; Maslennikov Innokentiy; Kwiatkowski Witek

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Structural studies of integral membrane proteins (IMPs) are hampered by inherent difficulties in their heterologous expression and in the purification of solubilized protein-detergent complexes (PDCs). The choice and concentrations of detergents used in an IMP preparation play a critical role in protein homogeneity and are thus important for successful crystallization. Results Seeking an effective and standardized means applicable to genomic approaches for the characteriza...

  10. Molecular dynamics studies on the NMR structures of rabbit prion protein wild-type and mutants: surface electrostatic charge distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jiapu

    2014-01-01

    Prion is a misfolded protein found in mammals that causes infectious diseases of the nervous system in humans and animals. Prion diseases are invariably fatal and highly infectious neurodegenerative diseases that affect a wide variety of mammalian species such as sheep and goats, cattle, deer, elk and humans etc. Recent studies have shown that rabbits have a low susceptibility to be infected by prion diseases with respect to other animals including humans. The present study employs molecular dynamics (MD) means to unravel the mechanism of rabbit prion proteins (RaPrPC) based on the recently available rabbit NMR structures (of the wild-type and its two mutants of two surface residues). The electrostatic charge distributions on the protein surface are the focus when analysing the MD trajectories. It is found that we can conclude that surface electrostatic charge distributions indeed contribute to the structural stability of wild-type RaPrPC; this may be useful for the medicinal treatment of prion diseases.

  11. Strategy for complete NMR assignment of disordered proteins with highly repetitive sequences based on resolution-enhanced 5D experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A strategy for complete backbone and side-chain resonance assignment of disordered proteins with highly repetitive sequence is presented. The protocol is based on three resolution-enhanced NMR experiments: 5D HN(CA)CONH provides sequential connectivity, 5D HabCabCONH is utilized to identify amino acid types, and 5D HC(CC-TOCSY)CONH is used to assign the side-chain resonances. The improved resolution was achieved by a combination of high dimensionality and long evolution times, allowed by non-uniform sampling in the indirect dimensions. Random distribution of the data points and Sparse Multidimensional Fourier Transform processing were used. Successful application of the assignment procedure to a particularly difficult protein, δ subunit of RNA polymerase from Bacillus subtilis, is shown to prove the efficiency of the strategy. The studied protein contains a disordered C-terminal region of 81 amino acids with a highly repetitive sequence. While the conventional assignment methods completely failed due to a very small differences in chemical shifts, the presented strategy provided a complete backbone and side-chain assignment.

  12. Secondary structural analysis of proteins based on 13C chemical shift assignments in unresolved solid-state NMR spectra enhanced by fragmented structure database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magic-angle-spinning solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy is useful for structural analysis of non-crystalline proteins. However, the signal assignments and structural analysis are often hampered by the signal overlaps primarily due to minor structural heterogeneities, especially for uniformly-13C,15N labeled samples. To overcome this problem, we present a method for assigning 13C chemical shifts and secondary structures from unresolved two-dimensional 13C–13C MAS NMR spectra by spectral fitting, named reconstruction of spectra using protein local structures (RESPLS). The spectral fitting was conducted using databases of protein fragmented structures related to 13Cα, 13Cβ, and 13C′ chemical shifts and cross-peak intensities. The experimental 13C–13C inter- and intra-residue correlation spectra of uniformly isotope-labeled ubiquitin in the lyophilized state had a few broad peaks. The fitting analysis for these spectra provided sequence-specific Cα, Cβ, and C′ chemical shifts with an accuracy of about 1.5 ppm, which enabled the assignment of the secondary structures with an accuracy of 79 %. The structural heterogeneity of the lyophilized ubiquitin is revealed from the results. Test of RESPLS analysis for simulated spectra of five different types of proteins indicated that the method allowed the secondary structure determination with accuracy of about 80 % for the 50–200 residue proteins. These results demonstrate that the RESPLS approach expands the applicability of the NMR to non-crystalline proteins exhibiting unresolved 13C NMR spectra, such as lyophilized proteins, amyloids, membrane proteins and proteins in living cells.

  13. BioMagResBank (BMRB) as a partner in the Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB): new policies affecting biomolecular NMR depositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the role of the BioMagResBank (BMRB) within the Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) and recent policies affecting the deposition of biomolecular NMR data. All PDB depositions of structures based on NMR data must now be accompanied by experimental restraints. A scheme has been devised that allows depositors to specify a representative structure and to define residues within that structure found experimentally to be largely unstructured. The BMRB now accepts coordinate sets representing three-dimensional structural models based on experimental NMR data of molecules of biological interest that fall outside the guidelines of the Protein Data Bank (i.e., the molecule is a peptide with 23 or fewer residues, a polynucleotide with 3 or fewer residues, a polysaccharide with 3 or fewer sugar residues, or a natural product), provided that the coordinates are accompanied by representation of the covalent structure of the molecule (atom connectivity), assigned NMR chemical shifts, and the structural restraints used in generating model. The BMRB now contains an archive of NMR data for metabolites and other small molecules found in biological systems

  14. An Introduction to Drug Discovery by Probing Protein-Substrate Interactions Using Saturation Transfer Difference-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (STD-NMR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guegan, Jean-Paul; Daniellou, Richard

    2012-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for characterizing and identifying molecules and nowadays is even used to characterize complex systems in biology. In the experiment presented here, students learned how to apply this modern technique to probe interactions between small molecules and proteins. With the use of simple organic synthesis, students…

  15. 13C-Labeled Heparan Sulfate Analogue as a Tool To Study Protein/Heparan Sulfate Interactions by NMR Spectroscopy: Application to the CXCL12α Chemokine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heparan sulfate (HS), a polysaccharide of the glycosaminoglycan family characterized by a unique level of complexity, has emerged as a key regulator of many fundamental biological processes. Although it has become clear that this class of molecules exert their functions by interacting with proteins, the exact modes of interaction still remain largely unknown. Here we report the engineering of a 13C-labeled HS-like oligosaccharide with a defined oligo-saccharidic sequence that was used to investigate the structural determinants involved in protein/HS recognition by multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Using the chemokine CXCL12α as a model system, we obtained experimental NMR data on both the oligosaccharide and the chemokine that was used to obtain a structural model of a protein/HS complex. This new approach provides a foundation for further investigations of protein/HS interactions and should find wide application. (authors)

  16. Characterization of protein detergent complexes by NMR, light scattering, and analytical ultracentrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslennikov, Innokentiy; Krupa, Martin; Dickson, Christopher; Esquivies, Luis; Blain, Katherine; Kefala, Georgia; Choe, Senyon; Kwiatkowski, Witek

    2009-03-01

    Bottlenecks in expression, solubilization, purification and crystallization hamper the structural study of integral membrane proteins (IMPs). Successful crystallization is critically dependent on the purity, stability and oligomeric homogeneity of an IMP sample. These characteristics are in turn strongly influenced by the type and concentration of the detergents used in IMP preparation. By utilizing the techniques and analytical tools we earlier developed for the characterization of protein-detergent complexes (PDCs) [21], we demonstrate that for successful protein extraction from E. coli membrane fractions, the solubilizing detergent associates preferentially to IMPs rather than to membrane lipids. Notably, this result is contrary to the generally accepted mechanism of detergent-mediated IMP solubilization. We find that for one particular member of the family of proteins studied (E. coli receptor kinases, which is purified in mixed multimeric states and oligomerizes through its transmembrane region), the protein oligomeric composition is largely unaffected by a 10-fold increase in protein concentration, by alteration of micelle properties through addition of other detergents to the PDC sample, or by a 20-fold variation in the detergent concentration used for solubilization of the IMP from the membrane. We observed that the conditions used for expression of the IMP, which impact protein density in the membrane, has the greatest influence on the IMP oligomeric structure. Finally, we argue that for concentrating PDCs smaller than 30 kDa, stirred concentration cells are less prone to over-concentration of detergent and are therefore more effective than centrifugal ultrafiltration devices. PMID:19214777

  17. 113Cd NMR studies of a 1:1 Cd adduct with an 18-residue finger peptide from HIV-1 nucleic acid binding protein, p7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Zn2+ and Cd2+ adducts with the 18-residue peptide comprising the amino acid sequence of the first finger (residues 13 through 30) of retroviral nucleic acid binding proteins p7 from HIV-1 (the causative agent of AIDS) have been prepared. 1H NMR data indicate that the metal adducts are 1:1 compounds that are stable in aqueous solutions for at least a month. The 113Cd NMR spectral results for the adduct are presented and analyzed. 26 references, 3 figures

  18. Assigning large proteins in the solid state: a MAS NMR resonance assignment strategy using selectively and extensively 13C-labelled proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, solid-state magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MAS NMR) has been growing into an important technique to study the structure of membrane proteins, amyloid fibrils and other protein preparations which do not form crystals or are insoluble. Currently, a key bottleneck is the assignment process due to the absence of the resolving power of proton chemical shifts. Particularly for large proteins (approximately >150 residues) it is difficult to obtain a full set of resonance assignments. In order to address this problem, we present an assignment method based upon samples prepared using [1,3-13C]- and [2-13C]-glycerol as the sole carbon source in the bacterial growth medium (so-called selectively and extensively labelled protein). Such samples give rise to higher quality spectra than uniformly [13C]-labelled protein samples, and have previously been used to obtain long-range restraints for use in structure calculations. Our method exploits the characteristic cross-peak patterns observed for the different amino acid types in 13C-13C correlation and 3D NCACX and NCOCX spectra. An in-depth analysis of the patterns and how they can be used to aid assignment is presented, using spectra of the chicken α-spectrin SH3 domain (62 residues), αB-crystallin (175 residues) and outer membrane protein G (OmpG, 281 residues) as examples. Using this procedure, over 90% of the Cα, Cβ, C' and N resonances in the core domain of αB-crystallin and around 73% in the flanking domains could be assigned (excluding 24 residues at the extreme termini of the protein)

  19. Assigning large proteins in the solid state: a MAS NMR resonance assignment strategy using selectively and extensively {sup 13}C-labelled proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higman, Victoria A. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (Germany); Flinders, Jeremy [Genentech, Inc., Structural Biology Department (United States); Hiller, Matthias; Jehle, Stefan; Markovic, Stefan; Fiedler, Sebastian; Rossum, Barth-Jan van; Oschkinat, Hartmut [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (Germany)], E-mail: oschkinat@fmp-berlin.de

    2009-08-15

    In recent years, solid-state magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MAS NMR) has been growing into an important technique to study the structure of membrane proteins, amyloid fibrils and other protein preparations which do not form crystals or are insoluble. Currently, a key bottleneck is the assignment process due to the absence of the resolving power of proton chemical shifts. Particularly for large proteins (approximately >150 residues) it is difficult to obtain a full set of resonance assignments. In order to address this problem, we present an assignment method based upon samples prepared using [1,3-{sup 13}C]- and [2-{sup 13}C]-glycerol as the sole carbon source in the bacterial growth medium (so-called selectively and extensively labelled protein). Such samples give rise to higher quality spectra than uniformly [{sup 13}C]-labelled protein samples, and have previously been used to obtain long-range restraints for use in structure calculations. Our method exploits the characteristic cross-peak patterns observed for the different amino acid types in {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C correlation and 3D NCACX and NCOCX spectra. An in-depth analysis of the patterns and how they can be used to aid assignment is presented, using spectra of the chicken {alpha}-spectrin SH3 domain (62 residues), {alpha}B-crystallin (175 residues) and outer membrane protein G (OmpG, 281 residues) as examples. Using this procedure, over 90% of the C{alpha}, C{beta}, C' and N resonances in the core domain of {alpha}B-crystallin and around 73% in the flanking domains could be assigned (excluding 24 residues at the extreme termini of the protein)

  20. Effect of Antifreeze Peptide Pretreatment on Ice Crystal Size, Drip Loss, Texture, and Volatile Compounds of Frozen Carrots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Charles H Z; Hamid, Nazimah; Liu, Tingting; Sarojini, Vijayalekshmi

    2016-06-01

    Ice crystal formation is of primary concern to the frozen food industry. In this study, the effects of antifreeze peptides (AFPs) on ice crystal formation were assessed in carrot during freezing and thawing. Three synthetic analogues based on naturally occurring antifreeze peptides were used in this study. The AFPs exhibited modification of ice crystal morphology, confirming their antifreeze activity in vitro. The ability of the synthetic AFPs to minimize drip loss and preserve color, structure, texture, and volatiles of frozen carrot was evaluated using the techniques of SEM, GC-MS, and texture analysis. The results prove the potential of these AFPs to preserve the above characteristics in frozen carrot samples. PMID:27138051

  1. Conformational dynamics of a seven transmembrane helical protein Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin probed by solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Daryl B; Wang, Shenlin; Ward, Meaghan E; Struppe, Jochem; Brown, Leonid S; Lewandowski, Józef R; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2014-02-19

    The ability to detect and characterize molecular motions represents one of the unique strengths of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In this study, we report solid-state NMR site-specific measurements of the dipolar order parameters and (15)N rotating frame spin-lattice (R1ρ) relaxation rates in a seven transmembrane helical protein Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin reconstituted in lipids. The magnitudes of the observed order parameters indicate that both the well-defined transmembrane regions and the less structured intramembrane loops undergo restricted submicrosecond time scale motions. In contrast, the R1ρ rates, which were measured under fast magic angle spinning conditions, vary by an order of magnitude between the TM and exposed regions and suggest the presence of intermediate time scale motions. Using a simple model, which assumes a single exponential autocorrelation function, we estimated the time scales of dominant stochastic motions to be on the order of low tens of nanoseconds for most residues within the TM helices and tens to hundreds of nanoseconds for the extracellular B-C and F-G loops. These relatively slow time scales could be attributed to collective anisotropic motions. We used the 3D Gaussian axial fluctuations model to estimate amplitudes, directions, and time scales of overall motions for helices and the extracellular B-C and F-G loops. Within this model, the TM helices A,B,C,D,E,F undergo rigid body motions on a time scale of tens of nanoseconds, while the time scale for the seventh helix G approaches 100 ns. Similar time scales of roughly 100-200 ns are estimated for the B-C and F-G loops. PMID:24467417

  2. Resonance assignment of the NMR spectra of disordered proteins using a multi-objective non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multi-objective genetic algorithm is introduced to predict the assignment of protein solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectra with partial resonance overlap and missing peaks due to broad linewidths, molecular motion, and low sensitivity. This non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II (NSGA-II) aims to identify all possible assignments that are consistent with the spectra and to compare the relative merit of these assignments. Our approach is modeled after the recently introduced Monte-Carlo simulated-annealing (MC/SA) protocol, with the key difference that NSGA-II simultaneously optimizes multiple assignment objectives instead of searching for possible assignments based on a single composite score. The multiple objectives include maximizing the number of consistently assigned peaks between multiple spectra (“good connections”), maximizing the number of used peaks, minimizing the number of inconsistently assigned peaks between spectra (“bad connections”), and minimizing the number of assigned peaks that have no matching peaks in the other spectra (“edges”). Using six SSNMR protein chemical shift datasets with varying levels of imperfection that was introduced by peak deletion, random chemical shift changes, and manual peak picking of spectra with moderately broad linewidths, we show that the NSGA-II algorithm produces a large number of valid and good assignments rapidly. For high-quality chemical shift peak lists, NSGA-II and MC/SA perform similarly well. However, when the peak lists contain many missing peaks that are uncorrelated between different spectra and have chemical shift deviations between spectra, the modified NSGA-II produces a larger number of valid solutions than MC/SA, and is more effective at distinguishing good from mediocre assignments by avoiding the hazard of suboptimal weighting factors for the various objectives. These two advantages, namely diversity and better evaluation, lead to a higher probability of predicting the correct

  3. Smelt was the likely beneficiary of an antifreeze gene laterally transferred between fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Laurie A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type II antifreeze protein (AFP from the rainbow smelt, Osmerus mordax, is a calcium-dependent C-type lectin homolog, similar to the AFPs from herring and sea raven. While C-type lectins are ubiquitous, type II AFPs are only found in a few species in three widely separated branches of teleost fishes. Furthermore, several other non-homologous AFPs are found in intervening species. We have previously postulated that this sporadic distribution has resulted from lateral gene transfer. The alternative hypothesis, that the AFP evolved from a lectin present in a shared ancestor and that this gene was lost in most species, is not favored because both the exon and intron sequences are highly conserved. Results Here we have sequenced and annotated a 160 kb smelt BAC clone containing a centrally-located AFP gene along with 14 other genes. Quantitative PCR indicates that there is but a single copy of this gene within the smelt genome, which is atypical for fish AFP genes. The corresponding syntenic region has been identified and searched in a number of other species and found to be devoid of lectin or AFP sequences. Unlike the introns of the AFP gene, the intronic sequences of the flanking genes are not conserved between species. As well, the rate and pattern of mutation in the AFP gene are radically different from those seen in other smelt and herring genes. Conclusions These results provide stand-alone support for an example of lateral gene transfer between vertebrate species. They should further inform the debate about genetically modified organisms by showing that gene transfer between ‘higher’ eukaryotes can occur naturally. Analysis of the syntenic regions from several fishes strongly suggests that the smelt acquired the AFP gene from the herring.

  4. Protein residue linking in a single spectrum for magic-angle spinning NMR assignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we introduce a new pulse sequence for resonance assignment that halves the number of data sets required for sequential linking by directly correlating sequential amide resonances in a single diagonal-free spectrum. The method is demonstrated with both microcrystalline and sedimented deuterated proteins spinning at 60 and 111 kHz, and a fully protonated microcrystalline protein spinning at 111 kHz, with as little as 0.5 mg protein sample. We find that amide signals have a low chance of ambiguous linkage, which is further improved by linking in both forward and backward directions. The spectra obtained are amenable to automated resonance assignment using general-purpose software such as UNIO-MATCH

  5. A rigid lanthanide binding tag to aid NMR studies of a 70 kDa homodimeric coat protein of human norovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallagaray, Alvaro; Domínguez, Gema; Peters, Thomas; Pérez-Castells, Javier

    2016-01-11

    Attachment of human noroviruses to histo blood group antigens is thought to be essential for infection of host cells. Molecular details of the attachment process can be studied in vitro using a variety of NMR experiments. The use of protein NMR based experiments requires assignments of backbone NMR signals. Using uniformly (2)H,(15)N-labeled protruding domains (P-dimers) of a prevalent epidemic human norovirus strain (GII.4 Saga) we have studied the potential of α-l-fucose covalently linked to a rigid lanthanide binding tag to aid backbone assignments using the paramagnetic properties of lanthanide ions. The synthesis of tagged α-l-fucose is reported. Notably, the metal chelating unit connects to the carbohydrate via a triazole linker constructed using click chemistry. PMID:26553572

  6. Multiple Acquisition of Magic Angle Spinning Solid-State NMR Experiments Using One Receiver: Application to Microcrystalline and Membrane Protein Preparations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, T.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2015-01-01

    Solid-State NMR spectroscopy of proteins is a notoriously low-throughput technique. Relatively low-sensitivity and poor resolution of protein samples require long acquisition times for multidimensional NMR experiments. To speed up data acquisition, we developed a family of experiments called Polarization Optimized Experiments (POE), in which we utilized the orphan spin operators that are discarded in classical multidimensional NMR experiments, recovering them to allow simultaneous acquisition of multiple 2D and 3D experiments, all while using conventional probes with spectrometers equipped with one receiver. POEs allow the concatenation of multiple 2D or 3D pulse sequences into a single experiment, thus potentially combining all of the aforementioned advances, boosting the capability of ssNMR spectrometers at least two-fold without the addition of any hardware. In this Perspective, we describe the first generation of POEs, such as dual acquisition MAS (or DUMAS) methods, and then illustrate the evolution of these experiments into MEIOSIS, a method that enables the simultaneous acquisition of multiple 2D and 3D spectra. Using these new pulse schemes for the solid-state NMR investigation of biopolymers makes it possible to obtain sequential resonance assignments, as well as distance restraints, in about half the experimental time. While designed for acquisition of heteronuclei, these new experiments can be easily implemented for proton detection and coupled with other recent advancements, such as dynamic polarization, to improve signal to noise. Finally, we illustrate the application of these methods to microcrystalline protein preparations as well as single and multi-span membrane proteins reconstituted in lipid membranes. PMID:25797011

  7. Direct prediction of NMR residual dipolar couplings from the primary sequence of unfolded proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report we demonstrate that RDCs for a given residue are essentially determined by the identity of the amino acid in question and its two neighbors, and sequence dependent corrections defining local alignment and the polymeric nature of the protein. Combining these effects, we propose a simplified, automatic, and highly accurate method for directly predicting RDCs from the primary sequence of unfolded proteins. Analysis of local and long-range effects, corresponding to the conformational sampling of the region of interest and the chain-like nature of the unfolded protein, respectively, reveals that theoretical RDCs can be determined by consideration of these factors alone. Using insights gained from these studies, we find that RDC prediction can in general be de-convoluted to four components: the sampling of the amino acid of interest, nearest-neighbor-dependent effects, sequence-dependent scaling factors to correct the local alignment tensor, and a length-dependent baseline to incorporate the polymeric nature of the unfolded protein. We demonstrate that a database of combinations of triplets of amino acids, combined with corrections for the presence of the triplet in a chain of known composition, defines to a very good approximation expected random coil values of RDCs in unfolded states. This obviates the need to calculate explicit and extensive ensembles of atomic resolution structures, resulting in a significant improvement in the efficiency of calculating RDCs from unfolded sequences

  8. Characterization of pH titration shifts for all the nonlabile proton resonances in a protein by two-dimensional NMR: The case of mouse epidermal growth factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pH titration shifts for all the nonlabile proton resonances in a 53-residue protein (mouse epidermal growth factor) were measured in the p2H range 1.5-9 with two-dimensional (2D) 1H NMR. The 2D NMR pH titration experiment made it possible to determine the pK values for all the ionizable group which were titrated in the pH range 1.5-9 in the protein. The pK values of the nine ionizable groups (α-amino group, four Asp, two Glu, one His, and α-carboxyl group) were found to be near their normal values. The 2D titration experiment also provided a detailed description of the pH-dependent behavior of the proton chemical shifts and enabled us to characterize the pH-dependent changes of protein conformation. Analysis of the pH-dependent shifts of ca. 200 proton resonances offered evidence of conformational changes in slightly basic pH solution: The deprotonation of the N-terminal α-amino group induced a widespread conformational change over the β-sheet structure in the protein, while the effects of deprotonation of the His22 imidazole group were relatively localized. The authors found that the 2D NMR pH titration experiment is a powerful tool for investigating the structural and dynamic properties of proteins

  9. Solution NMR structure of the N-terminal domain of the human DEK protein

    OpenAIRE

    Devany, Matthew; Kappes, Ferdinand; Chen, Kuan-Ming; Markovitz, David M; Matsuo, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    The human DEK protein has a long-standing association with carcinogenesis since the DEK gene was originally identified in the t(6:9) chromosomal translocation in a subtype of patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Recent studies have partly unveiled DEK's cellular functions including apoptosis inhibition in primary cells as well as cancer cells, determination of 3′ splice site of transcribed RNA, and suppression of transcription initiation by polymerase II. It has been previously sho...

  10. Protein Dynamics in the Solid-State from 2H NMR Lineshape Analysis: a Consistent Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Meirovitch, Eva; Liang, Zhichun; Freed, Jack H.

    2015-01-01

    Deuterium lineshape analysis of CD3 groups has emerged as a particularly useful tool for studying μs - ms protein motions in the solid-state. The models devised so far consist of several independently conceived simple jump-type motions. They are comprised of physical quantities encoded in their simplest form; improvements are only possible by adding yet another simple motion, thereby changing the model. The various treatments developed are case-specific; hence comparison amongst the different...

  11. Measuring 1HN temperature coefficients in invisible protein states by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method based on the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill relaxation dispersion experiment is presented for measuring the temperature coefficients of amide proton chemical shifts of low populated ‘invisible’ protein states that exchange with a ‘visible’ ground state on the millisecond time-scale. The utility of the approach is demonstrated with an application to an I58D mutant of the Pfl6 Cro protein that undergoes exchange between the native, folded state and a cold denatured, unfolded conformational ensemble that is populated at a level of 6% at 2.5°C. A wide distribution of amide temperature coefficients is measured for the unfolded state. The distribution is centered about –5.6 ppb/K, consistent with an absence of intra-molecular hydrogen bonds, on average. However, the large range of values (standard deviation of 2.1 ppb/K) strongly supports the notion that the unfolded state of the protein is not a true random coil polypeptide chain.

  12. Protein 2D NMR analysis utilizing selective 2H and 13C enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E. coli thioredoxin has been prepared with specific residue types substituted with fully enriched 2H or 13C labeled amino acids. In 1H COSY and NOESY experiments cross peaks result from pairs of protons interacting via through-bond or through-space coupling respectively. A cross peak is eliminated if either nucleus is substituted with deuterium. Direct residue type assignments of cross peaks have been obtained by comparing data from protein samples with one residue type deuterated and data from a non-enriched sample. Selective deuteration is particularly useful for the interresidue connectivity assignments obtained by NOESY experiments which normally depend on residue type assignment information obtained from independent COSY data. Difficulties in 1H COSY type intraresidue connectivity assignments are the main reason that successful analyses generally have been limited to proteins less than 10 kilodaltons. The authors have collected 13C homonuclear COSY data which compared to the 1H experiment benefit from larger spin couplings as well as from the spectral simplification obtained by enrichment. Resolved cross peaks for the 13C-13C J1 couplings are readily observed with 30 mg of labeled protein. 1H-13C heteronuclear COSY experiments then provide an independent method of intraresidue proton spin connectivity assignments

  13. J-UNIO protocol used for NMR structure determination of the 206-residue protein NP-346487.1 from Streptococcus pneumoniae TIGR4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NMR structure of the 206-residue protein NP-346487.1 was determined with the J-UNIO protocol, which includes extensive automation of the structure determination. With input from three APSY-NMR experiments, UNIO-MATCH automatically yielded 77 % of the backbone assignments, which were interactively validated and extended to 97 %. With an input of the near-complete backbone assignments and three 3D heteronuclear-resolved [1H,1H]-NOESY spectra, automated side chain assignment with UNIO-ATNOS/ASCAN resulted in 77 % of the expected assignments, which was extended interactively to about 90 %. Automated NOE assignment and structure calculation with UNIO-ATNOS/CANDID in combination with CYANA was used for the structure determination of this two-domain protein. The individual domains in the NMR structure coincide closely with the crystal structure, and the NMR studies further imply that the two domains undergo restricted hinge motions relative to each other in solution. NP-346487.1 is so far the largest polypeptide chain to which the J-UNIO structure determination protocol has successfully been applied

  14. J-UNIO protocol used for NMR structure determination of the 206-residue protein NP-346487.1 from Streptococcus pneumoniae TIGR4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaudzems, Kristaps [Latvian Institute of Organic Synthesis (Latvia); Pedrini, Bill [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), SwissFEL Project (Switzerland); Geralt, Michael; Serrano, Pedro; Wüthrich, Kurt, E-mail: wuthrich@scripps.edu [The Scripps Research Institute, Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The NMR structure of the 206-residue protein NP-346487.1 was determined with the J-UNIO protocol, which includes extensive automation of the structure determination. With input from three APSY-NMR experiments, UNIO-MATCH automatically yielded 77 % of the backbone assignments, which were interactively validated and extended to 97 %. With an input of the near-complete backbone assignments and three 3D heteronuclear-resolved [{sup 1}H,{sup 1}H]-NOESY spectra, automated side chain assignment with UNIO-ATNOS/ASCAN resulted in 77 % of the expected assignments, which was extended interactively to about 90 %. Automated NOE assignment and structure calculation with UNIO-ATNOS/CANDID in combination with CYANA was used for the structure determination of this two-domain protein. The individual domains in the NMR structure coincide closely with the crystal structure, and the NMR studies further imply that the two domains undergo restricted hinge motions relative to each other in solution. NP-346487.1 is so far the largest polypeptide chain to which the J-UNIO structure determination protocol has successfully been applied.

  15. BioMagResBank databases DOCR and FRED containing converted and filtered sets of experimental NMR restraints and coordinates from over 500 protein PDB structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present two new databases of NMR-derived distance and dihedral angle restraints: the Database Of Converted Restraints (DOCR) and the Filtered Restraints Database (FRED). These databases currently correspond to 545 proteins with NMR structures deposited in the Protein Databank (PDB). The criteria for inclusion were that these should be unique, monomeric proteins with author-provided experimental NMR data and coordinates available from the PDB capable of being parsed and prepared in a consistent manner. The Wattos program was used to parse the files, and the CcpNmr FormatConverter program was used to prepare them semi-automatically. New modules, including a new implementation of Aqua in the BioMagResBank (BMRB) software Wattos were used to analyze the sets of distance restraints (DRs) for inconsistencies, redundancies, NOE completeness, classification and violations with respect to the original coordinates. Restraints that could not be associated with a known nomenclature were flagged. The coordinates of hydrogen atoms were recalculated from the positions of heavy atoms to allow for a full restraint analysis. The DOCR database contains restraint and coordinate data that is made consistent with each other and with IUPAC conventions. The FRED database is based on the DOCR data but is filtered for use by test calculation protocols and longitudinal analyses and validations. These two databases are available from websites of the BMRB and the Macromolecular Structure Database (MSD) in various formats: NMR-STAR, CCPN XML, and in formats suitable for direct use in the software packages CNS and CYANA

  16. NMR studies on the mechanism of structural destabilization of the globular proteins and DNA by aliphatic alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept that the mechanism of structural destabilization of the biologically active macromolecules by typical denaturing agents should find a reflection in the NMR spectra of the denaturants themselves has been followed by proton NMR for some aliphatic alcohols in the system containing the serum albumin of DNA. (author)

  17. 1H NMR Cryoporometry Study of the Melting Behavior of Water in White Cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguszyńska, Joanna; Tritt-Goc, Jadwiga

    2004-09-01

    The pore size of white cement samples is studied by the melting behaviour of water confined in it, using 1H NMR cryopormetry. The influence of the preparing method and antifreeze admixture on the pore size and distribution in cement samples is investigated at 283 K. The addition of an antifreeze admixture [containing 1% Sika Rapid 2 by weight of the dry cement] influences the porosity. In wet prepared samples we observed a significant increase in the quantity of mesopores between 0.8 and 5 nm and a smaller increase of mesopores between 5 and 10 nm, when compared to cement without admixture. The compressive strength is related to the porosity of the cement. Therefore the cement with Sika Rapid 2, wet prepared at 278 K shows a higher strength than all other measured samples.

  18. Quantification of protein backbone hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates by solid state NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez del Amo, Juan-Miguel; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd, E-mail: reif@tum.d [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    We present the quantification of backbone amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates (HDX) for immobilized proteins. The experiments make use of the deuterium isotope effect on the amide nitrogen chemical shift, as well as on proton dilution by deuteration. We find that backbone amides in the microcrystalline {alpha}-spectrin SH3 domain exchange rather slowly with the solvent (with exchange rates negligible within the individual {sup 15}N-T{sub 1} timescales). We observed chemical exchange for 6 residues with HDX exchange rates in the range from 0.2 to 5 s{sup -1}. Backbone amide {sup 15}N longitudinal relaxation times that we determined previously are not significantly affected for most residues, yielding no systematic artifacts upon quantification of backbone dynamics (Chevelkov et al. 2008b). Significant exchange was observed for the backbone amides of R21, S36 and K60, as well as for the sidechain amides of N38, N35 and for W41{epsilon}. These residues could not be fit in our previous motional analysis, demonstrating that amide proton chemical exchange needs to be considered in the analysis of protein dynamics in the solid-state, in case D{sub 2}O is employed as a solvent for sample preparation. Due to the intrinsically long {sup 15}N relaxation times in the solid-state, the approach proposed here can expand the range of accessible HDX rates in the intermediate regime that is not accessible so far with exchange quench and MEXICO type experiments.

  19. Quantitative analysis of backbone motion in proteins using MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevelkov, Veniamin; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd [Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) (Germany)], E-mail: reif@fmp-berlin.de

    2009-09-15

    We present a comprehensive analysis of protein dynamics for a micro-crystallin protein in the solid-state. Experimental data include {sup 15}N T{sub 1} relaxation times measured at two different magnetic fields as well as {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N dipole, {sup 15}N CSA cross correlated relaxation rates which are sensitive to the spectral density function J(0) and are thus a measure of T{sub 2} in the solid-state. In addition, global order parameters are included from a {sup 1}H,{sup 15}N dipolar recoupling experiment. The data are analyzed within the framework of the extended model-free Clore-Lipari-Szabo theory. We find slow motional correlation times in the range of 5 and 150 ns. Assuming a wobbling in a cone motion, the amplitude of motion of the respective amide moiety is on the order of 10 deg. for the half-opening angle of the cone in most of the cases. The experiments are demonstrated using a perdeuterated sample of the chicken {alpha}-spectrin SH3 domain.

  20. Backbone and Ile-δ1, Leu, Val Methyl 1H, 13C and 15N NMR chemical shift assignments for human interferon-stimulated gene 15 protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Cuifeng; Aramini, James M.; Ma, LiChung; Cort, John R.; Swapna, G.V.T.; Krug, R. M.; Montelione, Gaetano

    2011-10-01

    Human interferon-stimulated gene 15 protein (ISG15), also called ubiquitin cross-reactive protein (UCRP), is the first identified ubiquitin-like protein containing two ubiquitin-like domains fused in tandem. The active form of ISG15 is conjugated to target proteins via the C-terminal glycine residue through an isopeptide bond in a manner similar to ubiquitin. The biological role of ISG15 is strongly associated with the modulation of cell immune function, and there is mounting evidence suggesting that many viral pathogens evade the host innate immune response by interfering with ISG15 conjugation to both host and viral proteins in a variety of ways. Here we report nearly complete backbone 1HN, 15N, 13CO, and 13Ca, as well as side chain 13Cb, methyl (Ile-d1, Leu, Val), amide (Asn, Gln), and indole NH (Trp) NMR resonance assignments for the 157-residue human ISG15 protein. These resonance assignments provide the basis for future structural and functional solution NMR studies of the biologically important human ISG15 protein.

  1. REDOR solid-state NMR as a probe of the membrane locations of membrane-associated peptides and proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Lihui; Liang, Shuang; Sackett, Kelly; Xie, Li; Ghosh, Ujjayini; Weliky, David P.

    2015-04-01

    Rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) solid-state NMR is applied to probe the membrane locations of specific residues of membrane proteins. Couplings are measured between protein 13CO nuclei and membrane lipid or cholesterol 2H and 31P nuclei. Specific 13CO labeling is used to enable unambiguous assignment and 2H labeling covers a small region of the lipid or cholesterol molecule. The 13CO-31P and 13CO-2H REDOR respectively probe proximity to the membrane headgroup region and proximity to specific insertion depths within the membrane hydrocarbon core. One strength of the REDOR approach is use of chemically-native proteins and membrane components. The conventional REDOR pulse sequence with 100 kHz 2H π pulses is robust with respect to the 2H quadrupolar anisotropy. The 2H T1's are comparable to the longer dephasing times (τ's) and this leads to exponential rather than sigmoidal REDOR buildups. The 13CO-2H buildups are well-fitted to A × (1 - e-γτ) where A and γ are fitting parameters that are correlated as the fraction of molecules (A) with effective 13CO-2H coupling d = 3γ/2. The REDOR approach is applied to probe the membrane locations of the "fusion peptide" regions of the HIV gp41 and influenza virus hemagglutinin proteins which both catalyze joining of the viral and host cell membranes during initial infection of the cell. The HIV fusion peptide forms an intermolecular antiparallel β sheet and the REDOR data support major deeply-inserted and minor shallowly-inserted molecular populations. A significant fraction of the influenza fusion peptide molecules form a tight hairpin with antiparallel N- and C-α helices and the REDOR data support a single peptide population with a deeply-inserted N-helix. The shared feature of deep insertion of the β and α fusion peptide structures may be relevant for fusion catalysis via the resultant local perturbation of the membrane bilayer. Future applications of the REDOR approach may include samples that contain cell

  2. PMP1 18-38, a yeast plasma membrane protein fragment, binds phosphatidylserine from bilayer mixtures with phosphatidylcholine: a (2)H-NMR study.

    OpenAIRE

    M. Roux; Beswick, V; Coïc, Y M; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Sanson, A.; Neumann, J M

    2000-01-01

    PMP1 is a 38-residue plasma membrane protein of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that regulates the activity of the H(+)-ATPase. The cytoplasmic domain conformation results in a specific interfacial distribution of five basic side chains, thought to strongly interact with anionic phospholipids. We have used the PMP1 18-38 fragment to carry out a deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance ((2)H-NMR) study for investigating the interactions between the PMP1 cytoplasmic domain and phosphatidylserine...

  3. Selectively dispersed isotope labeling for protein structure determination by magic angle spinning NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eddy, Matthew T. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry (United States); Belenky, Marina [Brandeis University, Department of Chemistry (United States); Sivertsen, Astrid C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory (United States); Griffin, Robert G. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry (United States); Herzfeld, Judith, E-mail: herzfeld@brandeis.edu [Brandeis University, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2013-10-15

    The power of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy derives from its site-specific access to chemical, structural and dynamic information. However, the corresponding multiplicity of interactions can be difficult to tease apart. Complimentary approaches involve spectral editing on the one hand and selective isotope substitution on the other. Here we present a new 'redox' approach to the latter: acetate is chosen as the sole carbon source for the extreme oxidation numbers of its two carbons. Consistent with conventional anabolic pathways for the amino acids, [1-{sup 13}C] acetate does not label {alpha} carbons, labels other aliphatic carbons and the aromatic carbons very selectively, and labels the carboxyl carbons heavily. The benefits of this labeling scheme are exemplified by magic angle spinning spectra of microcrystalline immunoglobulin binding protein G (GB1): the elimination of most J-couplings and one- and two-bond dipolar couplings provides narrow signals and long-range, intra- and inter-residue, recoupling essential for distance constraints. Inverse redox labeling, from [2-{sup 13}C] acetate, is also expected to be useful: although it retains one-bond couplings in the sidechains, the removal of CA-CO coupling in the backbone should improve the resolution of NCACX spectra.

  4. Backbone conformational flexibility of the lipid modified membrane anchor of the human N-Ras protein investigated by solid-state NMR and molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Alexander; Reuther, Guido; Roark, Matthew B; Tan, Kui-Thong; Waldmann, Herbert; Feller, Scott E; Huster, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    The lipid modified human N-Ras protein, implicated in human cancer development, is of particular interest due to its membrane anchor that determines the activity and subcellular location of the protein. Previous solid-state NMR investigations indicated that this membrane anchor is highly dynamic, which may be indicative of backbone conformational flexibility. This article aims to address if a dynamic exchange between three structural models exist that had been determined previously. We applied a combination of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods and replica exchange molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using a Ras peptide that represents the terminal seven amino acids of the human N-Ras protein. Analysis of correlations between the conformations of individual amino acids revealed that Cys 181 and Met 182 undergo collective conformational exchange. Two major structures constituting about 60% of all conformations could be identified. The two conformations found in the simulation are in rapid exchange, which gives rise to low backbone order parameters and nuclear spin relaxation as measured by experimental NMR methods. These parameters were also determined from two 300 ns conventional MD simulations, providing very good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:19819220

  5. Structure determination of uniformly 13C, 15N labeled protein using qualitative distance restraints from MAS solid-state 13C-NMR observed paramagnetic relaxation enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful method for structure determination of insoluble biomolecules. However, structure determination by MAS solid-state NMR remains challenging because it is difficult to obtain a sufficient amount of distance restraints owing to spectral complexity. Collection of distance restraints from paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) is a promising approach to alleviate this barrier. However, the precision of distance restraints provided by PRE is limited in solid-state NMR because of incomplete averaged interactions and intermolecular PREs. In this report, the backbone structure of the B1 domain of streptococcal protein G (GB1) has been successfully determined by combining the CS-Rosetta protocol and qualitative PRE restraints. The derived structure has a Cα RMSD of 1.49 Å relative to the X-ray structure. It is noteworthy that our protocol can determine the correct structure from only three cysteine-EDTA-Mn2+ mutants because this number of PRE sites is insufficient when using a conventional structure calculation method based on restrained molecular dynamics and simulated annealing. This study shows that qualitative PRE restraints can be employed effectively for protein structure determination from a limited conformational sampling space using a protein fragment library

  6. 复合防冻剂的防冻机理及施工要求%On the Antifreeze Mechanism and the Construction Requirements of Antifreeze Compound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王超

    2011-01-01

    Concrete is the most widely used material in construction,.The durability of concrete which is strongly influenced by its frost resistance has raised great attention.Therefore,improving and developing concrete of good frost resistance has very significant economic and social benefits.Using concrete with antifreeze compound can achieve convenient construction,can conserve energy,can save concrete cost and improve the quality of concrete constructed in winter.It can not only reduce the liquid freezing point of concrete,but can promote freezing and save water as well.Therefore,understanding the antifreeze mechanism and the construction requirements of antifreeze compound can achieve better technical economic benefit.%在建筑工程中,混凝土是使用最广泛的一种材料,混凝土的耐久性受到人们的普遍关注,其中冻害性是影响混凝土耐久性的一个最重要的因素。改善并开发抗冻性能良好的混凝土具有非常重大的经济效益与社会效益。而采用掺复合防冻剂混凝土具有施工简便、节能、节约混凝土冬施费用,提高混凝土冬施质量等优点,它不仅能够降低混凝土中液相冰点,同时还具有促凝、早强和减水作用。

  7. An improved method for suppressing protein background in PFG NMR experiments to determine ligand diffusion coefficients in the presence of receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Bridget A; Morris, Kevin F; Larive, Cynthia K

    2006-08-01

    In NMR diffusion experiments to study ligand-protein binding equilibria, the spectral background due to broad protein resonances can contribute significantly to the measured ligand signal intensity resulting in erroneous binding affinities. One method to suppress the protein spectral background involves coupling a CPMG pulse train before or after the BPPSTE pulse sequence to allow for differential T(2) relaxation of the broad protein resonances. Here, we present an improved method, the Gradient Phase Encoded Spin-lock (GraPES) experiment that integrates the relaxation filter into the diffusion period. Compared with sequential CPMG-BPPSTE pulse sequences, GraPES offers effective suppression of the protein background with improved signal-to-noise ratios and shorter experiment times. PMID:16698296

  8. Heteronuclear two-and three-dimensional NMR studies on the R1-R2-R3 domain of Drosophila melanogaster c-myb protein: spin system identifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advantages of heteronuclear two- and three-dimensional NMR experiments in obtaining better dispersion of peaks in spectra of large protein molecules have been described. The basic experimental techniques have been qualitatively presented and their application to a protein of 160 amino acid residues has been described. Several residue-type specific signals have been identified. The analysis of three-dimensional 13C resolved 1H-1H TOCSY (total correlated spectroscopy) spectra for spin system identifications has been described in some detail. (author). 42 refs., 9 figs

  9. Observation on the modifying activity of the protein from Elytrzgia repens rhizome for ice crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In winter, spring and summer, the rhizome of wild Elytrzgia repens of Heilongjiang Province was selected to extract the soluble which whole protein and the apoplastic protein, and analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The result indicated that there were two specific polypeptides in two types protein from winter; their relative molecular weight were identified as 52 ku and 26 ku by analyzing software; the apoplastic protein from winter had the ability of modifing the growth of ice crystal which appeared hexagonal in shape observed with the phase-contrast photomicroscope. So the apoplastic protein from winter has the antifreeze characters and the 52 ku protein is more likely the antifreeze protein.

  10. Optimum levels of exchangeable protons in perdeuterated proteins for proton detection in MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbey, Umit; Lange, Sascha; Trent Franks, W.; Linser, Rasmus; Rehbein, Kristina; Diehl, Anne; Rossum, Barth-Jan van; Reif, Bernd; Oschkinat, Hartmut, E-mail: oschkinat@fmp-berlin.d [Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    We present a systematic study of the effect of the level of exchangeable protons on the observed amide proton linewidth obtained in perdeuterated proteins. Decreasing the amount of D{sub 2}O employed in the crystallization buffer from 90 to 0%, we observe a fourfold increase in linewidth for both {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N resonances. At the same time, we find a gradual increase in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N correlations in dipolar coupling based experiments for H{sub 2}O concentrations of up to 40%. Beyond 40%, a significant reduction in SNR is observed. Scalar-coupling based {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N correlation experiments yield a nearly constant SNR for samples prepared with {<=}30% H{sub 2}O. Samples in which more H{sub 2}O is employed for crystallization show a significantly reduced NMR intensity. Calculation of the SNR by taking into account the reduction in {sup 1}H T{sub 1} in samples containing more protons (SNR per unit time), yields a maximum SNR for samples crystallized using 30 and 40% H{sub 2}O for scalar and dipolar coupling based experiments, respectively. A sensitivity gain of 3.8 is obtained by increasing the H{sub 2}O concentration from 10 to 40% in the CP based experiment, whereas the linewidth only becomes 1.5 times broader. In general, we find that CP is more favorable compared to INEPT based transfer when the number of possible {sup 1}H,{sup 1}H interactions increases. At low levels of deuteration ({>=}60% H{sub 2}O in the crystallization buffer), resonances from rigid residues are broadened beyond detection. All experiments are carried out at MAS frequency of 24 kHz employing perdeuterated samples of the chicken {alpha}-spectrin SH3 domain.

  11. Biodegradability and groundwater pollutant potential of organic anti-freeze liquids used in borehole heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klotzbuecher, Thimo; Kappler, Andreas; Straub, Kristina L.; Haderlein, Stefan B. [Center for Applied Geosciences, Institute for Geosciences, Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Sigwartstrasse 10, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    Ground source heat pump systems are increasingly being used to exploit the energy content of shallow geothermal resources for space heating and cooling. In this study we evaluate the potential for groundwater contamination of the different organic anti-freeze compounds (ethylene glycol, propylene glycol and betaine) used in these pumps, based on a literature review of their biodegradability and the results of our own laboratory experiments on aquifer material. Ethylene and propylene glycol were found to be readily biodegradable under both oxic and anoxic conditions, without formation of toxic or persistent intermediates. Long-term groundwater contamination by the glycols is therefore not expected. Betaine is also expected to be readily biodegradable in oxic and anoxic groundwater. The potential formation of trimethylamine, an intermediate of anaerobic betaine degradation, is, however, regarded as critical due to its unpleasant odor even at very low concentrations. Additionally, betaine has the potential to complex metal ions and thus may mobilize toxic metals in groundwater. We therefore recommend that betaine not be used in borehole heat exchanger fluids. In addition to organic anti-freeze compounds such as glycols, borehole heat exchanger fluids also contain additives such as corrosion inhibitors or biocides. We demonstrate that potentially toxic additives in these fluids inhibit biodegradation of the organic anti-freeze compounds. In order to ensure environmental compatibility of borehole heat exchanger fluids, further research should be conducted on the impact of additives on subsurface microbiological activity and on groundwater quality. (author)

  12. Comparative 2D NMR studies of human insulin and des-pentapeptide insulin: Sequential resonance assignment and implications for protein dynamics and receptor recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Qingxin (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Weiss, M.A. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States) Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States))

    1991-06-04

    The solution structure and dynamics of human insulin are ivestigated by 2D {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy in reference to a previously analyzed analogue, des-pentapeptide (B26-B30) insulin. This spectroscopic comparison is of interest since (i) the structure of the C-terminal region of the B-chain has not been determined in the monomeric state and (ii) the role of this region in binding to the insulin receptor has been the subject of long-standing speculation. The present NMR studies are conducted in the presence of an organic cosolvent (20% acetic acid), under which conditions both proteins are monomeric and stably folded. Complete sequential assignment of human insulin is obtained and leads to the following conclusions. (1) The secondary structure of the insulin monomer (three {alpha}-helices and B-chain {beta}-turn) is similar to that observed in the 2-Zn crustal state. (2) The folding of DPI is essentially the same as the corresponding portion of intact insulin, in accord with the similarities between their respective crystal structues. (3) residues B24-B28 adopt an extended configuration in the monomer and pack against the hydrophobic core as in crystallographic dimers; residues B29 and B30 are largely disordered. (4) The insulin fold is shown to provide a model for collective motions in a protein with implications for the mechanism of protein-protein recognition. To their knowledge, this paper describes the first detailed analysis of a protein NMR spectrum under conditions of extensive conformational broadening.

  13. Comparative 2D NMR studies of human insulin and des-pentapeptide insulin: Sequential resonance assignment and implications for protein dynamics and receptor recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solution structure and dynamics of human insulin are ivestigated by 2D 1H NMR spectroscopy in reference to a previously analyzed analogue, des-pentapeptide (B26-B30) insulin. This spectroscopic comparison is of interest since (i) the structure of the C-terminal region of the B-chain has not been determined in the monomeric state and (ii) the role of this region in binding to the insulin receptor has been the subject of long-standing speculation. The present NMR studies are conducted in the presence of an organic cosolvent (20% acetic acid), under which conditions both proteins are monomeric and stably folded. Complete sequential assignment of human insulin is obtained and leads to the following conclusions. (1) The secondary structure of the insulin monomer (three α-helices and B-chain β-turn) is similar to that observed in the 2-Zn crustal state. (2) The folding of DPI is essentially the same as the corresponding portion of intact insulin, in accord with the similarities between their respective crystal structues. (3) residues B24-B28 adopt an extended configuration in the monomer and pack against the hydrophobic core as in crystallographic dimers; residues B29 and B30 are largely disordered. (4) The insulin fold is shown to provide a model for collective motions in a protein with implications for the mechanism of protein-protein recognition. To their knowledge, this paper describes the first detailed analysis of a protein NMR spectrum under conditions of extensive conformational broadening

  14. Magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR of a 144 kDa membrane protein complex: E. coli cytochrome bo3 oxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent progress in magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) has enabled multidimensional studies of large, macroscopically unoriented membrane proteins with associated lipids, without the requirement of solubility that limits other structural techniques. Here we present initial sample preparation and SSNMR studies of a 144 kDa integral membrane protein, E. coli cytochrome bo3 oxidase. The optimized protocol for expression and purification yields ∼5 mg of the enzymatically active, uniformly 13C,15N-enriched membrane protein complex from each liter of growth medium. The preparation retains endogenous lipids and yields spectra of high sensitivity and resolution, consistent with a folded, homogenous protein. Line widths of isolated signals are less than 0.5 ppm, with a large number of individual resonances resolved in the 2D and 3D spectra. The 13C chemical shifts, assigned by amino acid type, are consistent with the secondary structure previously observed by diffraction methods. Although the structure is predominantly helical, the percentage of non-helical signals varies among residue types; these percentages agree well between the NMR and diffraction data. Samples show minimal evidence of degradation after several weeks of NMR data acquisition. Use of a triple resonance scroll resonator probe further improves sample stability and enables higher power decoupling, higher duty cycles and more advanced 3D experiments to be performed. These initial results in cytochrome bo3 oxidase demonstrate that multidimensional MAS SSNMR techniques have sufficient sensitivity and resolution to interrogate selected parts of a very large uniformly 13C,15N-labeled membrane protein

  15. Magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR of a 144 kDa membrane protein complex: E. coli cytochrome bo3 oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frericks, Heather L; Zhou, Donghua H; Yap, Lai Lai; Gennis, Robert B; Rienstra, Chad M

    2006-09-01

    Recent progress in magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) has enabled multidimensional studies of large, macroscopically unoriented membrane proteins with associated lipids, without the requirement of solubility that limits other structural techniques. Here we present initial sample preparation and SSNMR studies of a 144 kDa integral membrane protein, E. coli cytochrome bo(3) oxidase. The optimized protocol for expression and purification yields approximately 5 mg of the enzymatically active, uniformly (13)C,(15)N-enriched membrane protein complex from each liter of growth medium. The preparation retains endogenous lipids and yields spectra of high sensitivity and resolution, consistent with a folded, homogenous protein. Line widths of isolated signals are less than 0.5 ppm, with a large number of individual resonances resolved in the 2D and 3D spectra. The (13)C chemical shifts, assigned by amino acid type, are consistent with the secondary structure previously observed by diffraction methods. Although the structure is predominantly helical, the percentage of non-helical signals varies among residue types; these percentages agree well between the NMR and diffraction data. Samples show minimal evidence of degradation after several weeks of NMR data acquisition. Use of a triple resonance scroll resonator probe further improves sample stability and enables higher power decoupling, higher duty cycles and more advanced 3D experiments to be performed. These initial results in cytochrome bo(3) oxidase demonstrate that multidimensional MAS SSNMR techniques have sufficient sensitivity and resolution to interrogate selected parts of a very large uniformly (13)C,(15)N-labeled membrane protein. PMID:16964530

  16. HYPER: A hierarchical algorithm for automatic determination of protein dihedral-angle constraints and stereospecific CβH2 resonance assignments from NMR data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new computer program, HYPER, has been developed for automated analysis of protein dihedral angle values and CβH2 stereospecific assignments from NMR data. HYPER uses a hierarchical grid-search algorithm to determine allowed values of φ, Ψ, and χ1 dihedral angles and CβH2 stereospecific assignments based on a set of NMR-derived distance and/or scalar-coupling constraints. Dihedral-angle constraints are valuable for restricting conformational space and improving convergence in three-dimensional structure calculations. HYPER computes the set of φ, Ψ, and χ1dihedral angles and CβH2 stereospecific assignments that are consistent with up to nine intraresidue and sequential distance bounds, two pairs of relative distance bounds, thirteen homo- and heteronuclear scalar coupling bounds, and two pairs of relative scalar coupling constant bounds. The program is designed to be very flexible, and provides for simple user modification of Karplus equations and standard polypeptide geometries, allowing it to accommodate recent and future improved calibrations of Karplus curves. The C code has been optimized to execute rapidly (0.3-1.5 CPU-sec residue-1 using a 5 deg. grid) on Silicon Graphics R8000, R10000 and Intel Pentium CPUs, making it useful for interactive evaluation of inconsistent experimental constraints. The HYPER program has been tested for internal consistency and reliability using both simulated and real protein NMR data sets

  17. Selective 'unlabeling' of amino acids in fractionally 13C labeled proteins: An approach for stereospecific NMR assignments of CH3 groups in Val and Leu residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel methodology for stereospecific NMR assignments of methyl (CH3) groups of Val and Leu residues in fractionally 13C-labeled proteins is presented. The approach is based on selective 'unlabeling' of specific amino acids in proteins while fractionally 13C-labeling the rest. A 2D [13C-1H] HSQC spectrum recorded on such a sample is devoid of peaks belonging to the 'unlabeled' amino acid residues. Such spectral simplification aids in unambiguous stereospecific assignment of diastereotopic CH3 groups in Val and Leu residues in large proteins. This methodology has been demonstrated on a 15 kDa calcium binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica (Eh-CaBP)

  18. Utilization of paramagnetic relaxation enhancements for high-resolution NMR structure determination of a soluble loop-rich protein with sparse NOE distance restraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NMR structure determination of soluble proteins depends in large part on distance restraints derived from NOE. In this study, we examined the impact of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE)-derived distance restraints on protein structure determination. A high-resolution structure of the loop-rich soluble protein Sin1 could not be determined by conventional NOE-based procedures due to an insufficient number of NOE restraints. By using the 867 PRE-derived distance restraints obtained from the NOE-based structure determination procedure, a high-resolution structure of Sin1 could be successfully determined. The convergence and accuracy of the determined structure were improved by increasing the number of PRE-derived distance restraints. This study demonstrates that PRE-derived distance restraints are useful in the determination of a high-resolution structure of a soluble protein when the number of NOE constraints is insufficient

  19. Absolute nutrient concentration measurements in cell culture media: (1)H q-NMR spectra and data to compare the efficiency of pH-controlled protein precipitation versus CPMG or post-processing filtering approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldoni, Luca; Beringhelli, Tiziana; Rocchia, Walter; Realini, Natalia; Piomelli, Daniele

    2016-09-01

    The NMR spectra and data reported in this article refer to the research article titled "A simple and accurate protocol for absolute polar metabolite quantification in cell cultures using q-NMR" [1]. We provide the (1)H q-NMR spectra of cell culture media (DMEM) after removal of serum proteins, which show the different efficiency of various precipitating solvents, the solvent/DMEM ratios, and pH of the solution. We compare the data of the absolute nutrient concentrations, measured by PULCON external standard method, before and after precipitation of serum proteins and those obtained using CPMG (Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill) sequence or applying post-processing filtering algorithms to remove, from the (1)H q-NMR spectra, the proteins signal contribution. For each of these approaches, the percent error in the absolute value of every measurement for all the nutrients is also plotted as accuracy assessment. PMID:27331118

  20. Two- and three-dimensional sup 1 H NMR studies of a wheat phospholipid transfer protein: Sequential resonance assignments and secondary structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simorre, J.P.; Caille, A. (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Orleans (France)); Marion, D. (Laboratoire de Resonance Magnetique en Biologie et Medecine, Grenoble (France)); Marion, D. (INRA, Nantes (France)); Ptak, M. (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Orleans (France) Univ. d' Orleans (France))

    1991-12-10

    Two- and three-dimensional {sup 1}H NMR experiments have been used to sequentially assign nearly all proton resonances of the 90 residues of wheat phospholipid transfer protein. Only a few side-chain protons were not identified because of degeneracy or overlapping. The identification of spin systems and the sequential assignment were made at the same time by combining the data of the two- and three-dimensional experiments. The classical two-dimensional COSY, HOHAHA, and NOESY experiments benefit from both good resolution and high sensitivity, allowing the detection of long-range dipolar connectivities. The three-dimensional HOHAHA-NOESY experiment offers the advantage of a faster and unambiguous assignment. As a matter of fact, homonuclear three-dimensional NMR spectroscopy prove to be a very efficient method for resonance assignments of protein {sup 1}H NMR spectra which cannot be unraveled by 2D methods. An assignment strategy which overcomes most of the ambiguities has been proposed, in which each individual assignment toward the C-terminal end is supported by another in the opposite direction originating from a completely different part of the spectrum. Location of secondary structures of the phospholipid transfer protein was determined by using the method of analysis introduced here and was confirmed by {sup 3}J{sub {alpha}NH} coupling and NH exchange rates. Except for the C-terminal part, the polypeptide chain appears to be organized mainly as helical fragments connected by disulfide bridges. Further modeling will display the overall folding of the protein and should provide a better understanding of its interactions with lipids.

  1. Reduced dimensionality (3,2)D NMR experiments and their automated analysis: implications to high-throughput structural studies on proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Jithender G; Kumar, Dinesh; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2015-02-01

    Protein NMR spectroscopy has expanded dramatically over the last decade into a powerful tool for the study of their structure, dynamics, and interactions. The primary requirement for all such investigations is sequence-specific resonance assignment. The demand now is to obtain this information as rapidly as possible and in all types of protein systems, stable/unstable, soluble/insoluble, small/big, structured/unstructured, and so on. In this context, we introduce here two reduced dimensionality experiments – (3,2)D-hNCOcanH and (3,2)D-hNcoCAnH – which enhance the previously described 2D NMR-based assignment methods quite significantly. Both the experiments can be recorded in just about 2-3 h each and hence would be of immense value for high-throughput structural proteomics and drug discovery research. The applicability of the method has been demonstrated using alpha-helical bovine apo calbindin-D9k P43M mutant (75 aa) protein. Automated assignment of this data using AUTOBA has been presented, which enhances the utility of these experiments. The backbone resonance assignments so derived are utilized to estimate secondary structures and the backbone fold using Web-based algorithms. Taken together, we believe that the method and the protocol proposed here can be used for routine high-throughput structural studies of proteins. PMID:25178811

  2. The dynamics of the G protein-coupled neuropeptide Y2 receptor in monounsaturated membranes investigated by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In contrast to the static snapshots provided by protein crystallography, G protein-coupled receptors constitute a group of proteins with highly dynamic properties, which are required in the receptors’ function as signaling molecule. Here, the human neuropeptide Y2 receptor was reconstituted into a model membrane composed of monounsaturated phospholipids and solid-state NMR was used to characterize its dynamics. Qualitative static 15N NMR spectra and quantitative determination of 1H–13C order parameters through measurement of the 1H–13C dipolar couplings of the CH, CH2 and CH3 groups revealed axially symmetric motions of the whole molecule in the membrane and molecular fluctuations of varying amplitude from all molecular segments. The molecular order parameters (Sbackbone = 0.59–0.67, SCH2 = 0.41–0.51 and SCH3 = 0.22) obtained in directly polarized 13C NMR experiments demonstrate that the Y2 receptor is highly mobile in the native-like membrane. Interestingly, according to these results the receptor was found to be slightly more rigid in the membranes formed by the monounsaturated phospholipids than by saturated phospholipids as investigated previously. This could be caused by an increased chain length of the monounsaturated lipids, which may result in a higher helical content of the receptor. Furthermore, the incorporation of cholesterol, phosphatidylethanolamine, or negatively charged phosphatidylserine into the membrane did not have a significant influence on the molecular mobility of the Y2 receptor

  3. The dynamics of the G protein-coupled neuropeptide Y2 receptor in monounsaturated membranes investigated by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Lars; Kahr, Julian; Schmidt, Peter; Krug, Ulrike; Scheidt, Holger A.; Huster, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.huster@medizin.uni-leipzig.de [University of Leipzig, Institute of Medical Physics and Biophysics (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    In contrast to the static snapshots provided by protein crystallography, G protein-coupled receptors constitute a group of proteins with highly dynamic properties, which are required in the receptors’ function as signaling molecule. Here, the human neuropeptide Y2 receptor was reconstituted into a model membrane composed of monounsaturated phospholipids and solid-state NMR was used to characterize its dynamics. Qualitative static {sup 15}N NMR spectra and quantitative determination of {sup 1}H–{sup 13}C order parameters through measurement of the {sup 1}H–{sup 13}C dipolar couplings of the CH, CH{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} groups revealed axially symmetric motions of the whole molecule in the membrane and molecular fluctuations of varying amplitude from all molecular segments. The molecular order parameters (S{sub backbone} = 0.59–0.67, S{sub CH2} = 0.41–0.51 and S{sub CH3} = 0.22) obtained in directly polarized {sup 13}C NMR experiments demonstrate that the Y2 receptor is highly mobile in the native-like membrane. Interestingly, according to these results the receptor was found to be slightly more rigid in the membranes formed by the monounsaturated phospholipids than by saturated phospholipids as investigated previously. This could be caused by an increased chain length of the monounsaturated lipids, which may result in a higher helical content of the receptor. Furthermore, the incorporation of cholesterol, phosphatidylethanolamine, or negatively charged phosphatidylserine into the membrane did not have a significant influence on the molecular mobility of the Y2 receptor.

  4. EZ-ASSIGN, a program for exhaustive NMR chemical shift assignments of large proteins from complete or incomplete triple-resonance data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For several of the proteins in the BioMagResBank larger than 200 residues, 60 % or fewer of the backbone resonances were assigned. But how reliable are those assignments? In contrast to complete assignments, where it is possible to check whether every triple-resonance Generalized Spin System (GSS) is assigned once and only once, with incomplete data one should compare all possible assignments and pick the best one. But that is not feasible: For example, for 200 residues and an incomplete set of 100 GSS, there are 1.6 × 10260 possible assignments. In “EZ-ASSIGN”, the protein sequence is divided in smaller unique fragments. Combined with intelligent search approaches, an exhaustive comparison of all possible assignments is now feasible using a laptop computer. The program was tested with experimental data of a 388-residue domain of the Hsp70 chaperone protein DnaK and for a 351-residue domain of a type III secretion ATPase. EZ-ASSIGN reproduced the hand assignments. It did slightly better than the computer program PINE (Bahrami et al. in PLoS Comput Biol 5(3):e1000307, 2009) and significantly outperformed SAGA (Crippen et al. in J Biomol NMR 46:281–298, 2010), AUTOASSIGN (Zimmerman et al. in J Mol Biol 269:592–610, 1997), and IBIS (Hyberts and Wagner in J Biomol NMR 26:335–344, 2003). Next, EZ-ASSIGN was used to investigate how well NMR data of decreasing completeness can be assigned. We found that the program could confidently assign fragments in very incomplete data. Here, EZ-ASSIGN dramatically outperformed all the other assignment programs tested

  5. PFG-NMR self-diffusion in casein dispersions: effect of probe size and protein aggregate size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salami, S.; Rondeau, C.; Duynhoven, van J.P.M.; Mariette, F.

    2013-01-01

    The self-diffusion coefficients of different molecular weight PEGs (Polyethylene glycol) and casein particles were measured, using a pulsed-gradient nuclear magnetic resonance technique (PFG-NMR), in native phosphocaseinate (NPC) and sodium caseinate (SC) dispersions where caseins are not structured

  6. The “long tail” of the protein tumbling correlation function: observation by 1H NMR relaxometry in a wide frequency and concentration range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inter-protein interactions in solution affect the auto-correlation function of Brownian tumbling not only in terms of a simple increase of the correlation time, they also lead to the appearance of a weak slow component (“long tail”) of the correlation function due to a slowly changing local anisotropy of the microenvironment. The conventional protocol of correlation time estimation from the relaxation rate ratio R1/R2 assumes a single-component tumbling correlation function, and thus can provide incorrect results as soon as the “long tail” is of relevance. This effect, however, has been underestimated in many instances. In this work we present a detailed systematic study of the tumbling correlation function of two proteins, lysozyme and bovine serum albumin, at different concentrations and temperatures using proton field-cycling relaxometry combined with R1ρ and R2 measurements. Unlike high-field NMR relaxation methods, these techniques enable a detailed study of dynamics on a time scale longer than the normal protein tumbling correlation time and, thus, a reliable estimate of the parameters of the “long tail”. In this work we analyze the concentration dependence of the intensity and correlation time of the slow component and perform simulations of high-field 15N NMR relaxation data demonstrating the importance of taking the “long tail” in the analysis into account

  7. relaxGUI: a new software for fast and simple NMR relaxation data analysis and calculation of ps-ns and μs motion of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigation of protein dynamics on the ps-ns and μs-ms timeframes provides detailed insight into the mechanisms of enzymes and the binding properties of proteins. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is an excellent tool for studying protein dynamics at atomic resolution. Analysis of relaxation data using model-free analysis can be a tedious and time consuming process, which requires good knowledge of scripting procedures. The software relaxGUI was developed for fast and simple model-free analysis and is fully integrated into the software package relax. It is written in Python and uses wxPython to build the graphical user interface (GUI) for maximum performance and multi-platform use. This software allows the analysis of NMR relaxation data with ease and the generation of publication quality graphs as well as color coded images of molecular structures. The interface is designed for simple data analysis and management. The software was tested and validated against the command line version of relax.

  8. {sup 13}CHD{sub 2}–CEST NMR spectroscopy provides an avenue for studies of conformational exchange in high molecular weight proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rennella, Enrico; Huang, Rui; Velyvis, Algirdas; Kay, Lewis E., E-mail: kay@pound.med.utoronto.ca [The University of Toronto, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry (Canada)

    2015-10-15

    An NMR experiment for quantifying slow (millisecond) time-scale exchange processes involving the interconversion between visible ground state and invisible, conformationally excited state conformers is presented. The approach exploits chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and makes use of {sup 13}CHD{sub 2} methyl group probes that can be readily incorporated into otherwise highly deuterated proteins. The methodology is validated with an application to a G48A Fyn SH3 domain that exchanges between a folded conformation and a sparsely populated and transiently formed unfolded ensemble. Experiments on a number of different protein systems, including a 360 kDa half-proteasome, establish that the sensitivity of this {sup 13}CHD{sub 2}{sup 13}C–CEST technique can be upwards of a factor of 5 times higher than for a previously published {sup 13}CH{sub 3}{sup 13}C–CEST approach (Bouvignies and Kay in J Biomol NMR 53:303–310, 2012), suggesting that the methodology will be powerful for studies of conformational exchange in high molecular weight proteins.

  9. The “long tail” of the protein tumbling correlation function: observation by {sup 1}H NMR relaxometry in a wide frequency and concentration range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, Matthias [Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Institut für Physik (Germany); Hofmann, Marius [Universität Bayreuth, Lehrstuhl Experimentalphysik II, Universitätsstr. 30 (Germany); Link, Susanne; Ott, Maria; Balbach, Jochen [Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Institut für Physik (Germany); Rössler, Ernst [Universität Bayreuth, Lehrstuhl Experimentalphysik II, Universitätsstr. 30 (Germany); Saalwächter, Kay, E-mail: kay.saalwaechter@physik.uni-halle.de; Krushelnitsky, Alexey, E-mail: krushelnitsky@physik.uni-halle.de [Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Institut für Physik (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Inter-protein interactions in solution affect the auto-correlation function of Brownian tumbling not only in terms of a simple increase of the correlation time, they also lead to the appearance of a weak slow component (“long tail”) of the correlation function due to a slowly changing local anisotropy of the microenvironment. The conventional protocol of correlation time estimation from the relaxation rate ratio R{sub 1}/R{sub 2} assumes a single-component tumbling correlation function, and thus can provide incorrect results as soon as the “long tail” is of relevance. This effect, however, has been underestimated in many instances. In this work we present a detailed systematic study of the tumbling correlation function of two proteins, lysozyme and bovine serum albumin, at different concentrations and temperatures using proton field-cycling relaxometry combined with R{sub 1ρ} and R{sub 2} measurements. Unlike high-field NMR relaxation methods, these techniques enable a detailed study of dynamics on a time scale longer than the normal protein tumbling correlation time and, thus, a reliable estimate of the parameters of the “long tail”. In this work we analyze the concentration dependence of the intensity and correlation time of the slow component and perform simulations of high-field {sup 15}N NMR relaxation data demonstrating the importance of taking the “long tail” in the analysis into account.

  10. Membrane-Bound Dynamic Structure of an Arginine-Rich Cell-Penetrating Peptide, the Protein Transduction Domain of HIV TAT, from Solid-State NMR

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Yongchao; Alan J Waring; Ruchala, Piotr; Hong, Mei

    2010-01-01

    The protein transduction domain of HIV-1 TAT, TAT(48-60), is an efficient cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) that diffuses across the lipid membranes of cells despite eight cationic Arg and Lys residues. To understand its mechanism of membrane translocation against the free energy barrier, we have conducted solid-state NMR experiments to determine the site-specific conformation, dynamics, and lipid interaction of the TAT peptide in anionic lipid bilayers. We found that TAT(48-60) is a highly dyna...

  11. BioMagResBank database with sets of experimental NMR constraints corresponding to the structures of over 1400 biomolecules deposited in the Protein Data Bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental constraints associated with NMR structures are available from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) in the form of 'Magnetic Resonance' (MR) files. These files contain multiple types of data concatenated without boundary markers and are difficult to use for further research. Reported here are the results of a project initiated to annotate, archive, and disseminate these data to the research community from a searchable resource in a uniform format. The MR files from a set of 1410 NMR structures were analyzed and their original constituent data blocks annotated as to data type using a semi-automated protocol. A new software program called Wattos was then used to parse and archive the data in a relational database. From the total number of MR file blocks annotated as constraints, it proved possible to parse 84% (3337/3975). The constraint lists that were parsed correspond to three data types (2511 distance, 788 dihedral angle, and 38 residual dipolar couplings lists) from the three most popular software packages used in NMR structure determination: XPLOR/CNS (2520 lists), DISCOVER (412 lists), and DYANA/DIANA (405 lists). These constraints were then mapped to a developmental version of the BioMagResBank (BMRB) data model. A total of 31 data types originating from 16 programs have been classified, with the NOE distance constraint being the most commonly observed. The results serve as a model for the development of standards for NMR constraint deposition in computer-readable form. The constraints are updated regularly and are available from the BMRB web site (http://www.bmrb.wisc.edu)

  12. Screening protein-ligand interactions using {sup 1}H NMR techniques for detecting the ligand; Mapeamento das interacoes proteina-ligante atraves de tecnicas de RMN de {sup 1}H utilizando deteccao do ligante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, Isis Martins; Marsaioli, Anita Jocelyne [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Organica]. E-mail: anita@iqm.unicamp.br

    2007-07-01

    NMR is a valuable screening tool for the binding of ligands to proteins providing structural information on both protein and ligands and is thus largely applied to drug-discovery. Among the recent NMR techniques to probe weak binding protein-ligand complexes we have critically evaluated the advantages and disadvantages of STD (Saturation Transfer Difference), WaterLOGSY (Water Ligand Observation with Gradient Spectroscopy), NOE pumping and DOSY-NOESY (Diffusion-Ordered NOESY) using a mixture of BSA (bovine serum albumin) plus salicylic acid, caffeine, citric acid, adipic acid and D-glucose. (author)

  13. PFG-NMR self-diffusion in casein dispersions: Effects of probe size and protein aggregate size

    OpenAIRE

    Salami, S; Rondeau Mouro, C.; Van Duyhoven, J.; Mariette, F.

    2013-01-01

    The self-diffusion coefficients of different molecular weight PEGs (Polyethylene glycol) and casein particles were measured, using a pulsed-gradient nuclear magnetic resonance technique (PFG-NMR), in native phosphocaseinate (NPC) and sodium caseinate (SC) dispersions where caseins are not structured into micelles. The dependence of the PEG self-diffusion coefficient on the PEG size, casein concentration, the size and the mobility of casein obstacle particles are reported. Wide differences in ...

  14. STUDY ON PROPERTIES OF SKID RESISTANCE ON FREEZING PAVEMENTS AND QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION METHOD OF ANTIFREEZING EFFECTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shunsuke; Takeichi, Kiyoshi; Masuyama, Yukiei; Takahashi, Naoto

    Snow and ice control in winter roads trends to be controlled by the skid friction coefficients in North America and North European countries at present, but the measurements are not necessarily easy. We studied on a simplified measurement method based on the relationship between skid friction coefficients and the bare pavement ratio (BPR) in the laboratory tests and field tests. The factors of BPR, surface textures and antifreezing materials which affect the skid friction coefficient are reviewed by a multiple linear regression analysis and a spectrum analysis, considering different freezing surfaces. These studies indicate that conclusions induced by laboratory tests could be applied to roads in service.

  15. An economical method for production of (2H, (13CH3-threonine for solution NMR studies of large protein complexes: application to the 670 kDa proteasome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Algirdas Velyvis

    Full Text Available NMR studies of very high molecular weight protein complexes have been greatly facilitated through the development of labeling strategies whereby (13CH(3 methyl groups are introduced into highly deuterated proteins. Robust and cost-effective labeling methods are well established for all methyl containing amino acids with the exception of Thr. Here we describe an inexpensive biosynthetic strategy for the production of L-[α-(2H; β-(2H;γ-(13C]-Thr that can then be directly added during protein expression to produce highly deuterated proteins with Thr methyl group probes of structure and dynamics. These reporters are particularly valuable, because unlike other methyl containing amino acids, Thr residues are localized predominantly to the surfaces of proteins, have unique hydrogen bonding capabilities, have a higher propensity to be found at protein nucleic acid interfaces and can play important roles in signaling pathways through phosphorylation. The utility of the labeling methodology is demonstrated with an application to the 670 kDa proteasome core particle, where high quality Thr (13C,(1H correlation spectra are obtained that could not be generated from samples prepared with commercially available U-[(13C,(1H]-Thr.

  16. Simultaneous acquisition of 2D and 3D solid-state NMR experiments for sequential assignment of oriented membrane protein samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopinath, T. [University of Minnesota, Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and Biophysics (United States); Mote, Kaustubh R. [University of Minnesota, Department of Chemistry (United States); Veglia, Gianluigi, E-mail: vegli001@umn.edu [University of Minnesota, Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and Biophysics (United States)

    2015-05-15

    We present a new method called DAISY (Dual Acquisition orIented ssNMR spectroScopY) for the simultaneous acquisition of 2D and 3D oriented solid-state NMR experiments for membrane proteins reconstituted in mechanically or magnetically aligned lipid bilayers. DAISY utilizes dual acquisition of sine and cosine dipolar or chemical shift coherences and long living {sup 15}N longitudinal polarization to obtain two multi-dimensional spectra, simultaneously. In these new experiments, the first acquisition gives the polarization inversion spin exchange at the magic angle (PISEMA) or heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) spectra, the second acquisition gives PISEMA-mixing or HETCOR-mixing spectra, where the mixing element enables inter-residue correlations through {sup 15}N–{sup 15}N homonuclear polarization transfer. The analysis of the two 2D spectra (first and second acquisitions) enables one to distinguish {sup 15}N–{sup 15}N inter-residue correlations for sequential assignment of membrane proteins. DAISY can be implemented in 3D experiments that include the polarization inversion spin exchange at magic angle via I spin coherence (PISEMAI) sequence, as we show for the simultaneous acquisition of 3D PISEMAI–HETCOR and 3D PISEMAI–HETCOR-mixing experiments.

  17. Simultaneous acquisition of 2D and 3D solid-state NMR experiments for sequential assignment of oriented membrane protein samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a new method called DAISY (Dual Acquisition orIented ssNMR spectroScopY) for the simultaneous acquisition of 2D and 3D oriented solid-state NMR experiments for membrane proteins reconstituted in mechanically or magnetically aligned lipid bilayers. DAISY utilizes dual acquisition of sine and cosine dipolar or chemical shift coherences and long living 15N longitudinal polarization to obtain two multi-dimensional spectra, simultaneously. In these new experiments, the first acquisition gives the polarization inversion spin exchange at the magic angle (PISEMA) or heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) spectra, the second acquisition gives PISEMA-mixing or HETCOR-mixing spectra, where the mixing element enables inter-residue correlations through 15N–15N homonuclear polarization transfer. The analysis of the two 2D spectra (first and second acquisitions) enables one to distinguish 15N–15N inter-residue correlations for sequential assignment of membrane proteins. DAISY can be implemented in 3D experiments that include the polarization inversion spin exchange at magic angle via I spin coherence (PISEMAI) sequence, as we show for the simultaneous acquisition of 3D PISEMAI–HETCOR and 3D PISEMAI–HETCOR-mixing experiments

  18. Dante-Z sequence as selective impulsion in high field mono and multidimensional NMR. Application to the study of proteins, peptides and their interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DANTE-Z is a simple and efficient way for NMR spectral selection. We present here different applications of DANTE-Z in high-resolution NMR of peptides and proteins. We have been using proton selective excitation by DANTE-Z to perform 1D-correlated (homo- or heteronuclear) experiments corresponding to one line of either 2D or 3D experiments. Following the same scheme, we could also edit planes of 3D experiments by concatenating 1D-correlated experiments with conventional 2D experiments. In the heteronuclear case (i.e. 1H, 31P), we could also edit planes of a 4D experiment by the simultaneous selection of 1H and the X nucleus. Owing to the favourable excitation profile of DANTE-Z, we used it successfully for topological excitations (spectral width from 150 Hz up to 1500 Hz) in 'semi-soft'-2D experiments and 'soft'-2D experiment. These applications are illustrated by the results obtained at 600 MHz on a protein and a phosphonamide peptide

  19. Accurate measurements of 13C-13C distances in uniformly 13C-labeled proteins using multi-dimensional four-oscillating field solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of sets of 13C-13C internuclear distance restraints constitutes a typical key element in determining the structure of peptides and proteins by magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Accurate measurements of the structurally highly important 13C-13C distances in uniformly 13C-labeled peptides and proteins, however, pose a big challenge due to the problem of dipolar truncation. Here, we present novel two-dimensional (2D) solid-state NMR experiments capable of extracting distances between carbonyl (13C′) and aliphatic (13Caliphatic) spins with high accuracy. The method is based on an improved version of the four-oscillating field (FOLD) technique [L. A. Straasø, M. Bjerring, N. Khaneja, and N. C. Nielsen, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 225103 (2009)] which circumvents the problem of dipolar truncation, thereby offering a base for accurate extraction of internuclear distances in many-spin systems. The ability to extract reliable accurate distances is demonstrated using one- and two-dimensional variants of the FOLD experiment on uniformly 13C,15N-labeled-L-isoleucine. In a more challenging biological application, FOLD 2D experiments are used to determine a large number of 13C′-13Caliphatic distances in amyloid fibrils formed by the SNNFGAILSS fibrillating core of the human islet amyloid polypeptide with uniform 13C,15N-labeling on the FGAIL fragment

  20. Magic Angle Spinning NMR Reveals Sequence-Dependent Structural Plasticity, Dynamics, and the Spacer Peptide 1 Conformation in HIV-1 Capsid Protein Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Yun; Hou, Guangjin; Suiter, Christopher L.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Lipton, Andrew S.; Burton, Sarah D.; Hung, Ivan; Gorkov, Peter L.; Gan, Zhehong; Brey, William W.; Rice, David M.; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Polenova, Tatyana E.

    2013-11-27

    Maturation of HIV-1 virus into an infectious virion requires cleavage of the Gag polyprotein into its constituent domains and formation of a conical capsid core that encloses viral RNA and a small complement of proteins for replication. The final step of this process is the cleavage of the SP1 peptide from the CA-SP1 maturation intermediate, which triggers the condensation of the CA protein into a conical capsid. The mechanism of this step, including the conformation of the SP1 peptide in CA-SP1, is under intense debate. In this report, we examine the tubular assemblies of CA and the CA-SP1 maturation intermediate using Magic Angle Spinning NMR spectroscopy. At the magnetic fields of 19.9 T and above, tubular CA and CA-SP1 assemblies yield outstanding-quality 2D and 3D MAS NMR spectra, which are amenable to resonance assignments and detailed structural characterization. Dipolar- and scalar-based correlation experiments unequivocally indicate that SP1 peptide is in a random coil conformation and mobile in the assembled CA-SP1. Analysis of two sequence variants reveals that remarkably, the conformation of SP1 tail, of the functionally important CypA loop, and of the loop preceding helix 8 are sequence dependent and modulated by the residue variations at distal sites. These findings challenge the role of SP1 as a conformational switch in the maturation process and establish sequence-dependent conformational plasticity in CA.

  1. Preparation of Food-based Antifreeze Peptides and Research on the Ice Crystal Inhibition%食品源抗冻多肽的制备及冰晶抑制作用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪晶; 汪少芸; 吴金鸿; 饶平凡

    2013-01-01

    Objective:Antifreeze protein is becoming a popular research point because it could inhibit ice crystal growth, reduce damage of cell membranes and maintain products' quality during food during storage and handling. Methods:This paper reports that gelatin peptides of a certain molecular size range with compact-packed structural domain derived from Papain hydrolysis of bovine gelatin are able to inhibit recrystallization of ice crystals in ice cream mix and show natural antifreeze activity. Results:The optimum conditions for producing antifreeze peptides were hydrolysis at pH 7.0 for 30 min at 37℃ and an Papain to gelatin ratio of 1 :10. The gelatin peptides were fractionated on size exclusion (Sephadex C-SO) and ion exchange (sulfopropyl-Sephadex C-2S) columns, and the molecular mass distribution of the antifreeze peptide fractions was determined by matrixassisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. The gelatin peptide fractions in the molecular mass range of 700~1 318 u strongly inhibited ice recrystallization in ice cream mix. Conclusion:The highly effective antifreeze peptide on ice crystal inhibition shows specific rules during cold-heat-stage cycles, the key approach is how to control hydrolysis conditions. It probably exists the surface hydropholic-complementary interaction between antifreeze peptide and ice molecules.%目的:因抗冻蛋白具有控制冰晶生长,减少细胞损伤及保持产品原有组织结构、质地和品质的特点和突出意义而成为研究的热点.方法:以食品源的食用明胶为原材料,通过控制木瓜蛋白酶的切割条件,将活性多肤切割为具有特定的肽链长度和结构组成,从而使抗冻活性得以高效实现.结果:酶切多肽抗冻活性的实现受酶/底物比、酶解时间、酶解温度等条件的影响.优化的酶解条件为:pH 7.0,酶/底物配比1:10;酶解时间30 min;酶解温度37℃.通过Sephadex G-50和Sephadex C-25色谱分离

  2. Structural biology of the sequestration and transport of heavy metal toxins: NMR structure determination of proteins containing the -Cys-X-Y-Cys-metal binding motifs. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'The overall goal of the research is to apply the methods of structural biology, which have been previously used primarily in biomedical applications, to bioremediation. The authors are doing this by using NMR spectroscopy to determine the structures of proteins involved in the bacterial mercury detoxification system. The research is based on the premise that the proteins encoded in the genes of the bacterial detoxification system are an untapped source of reagents and, more fundamentally, chemical strategies that can be used to remove heavy metal toxins from the environment. The initial goals are to determine the structures of the proteins of the bacterial mercury detoxification systems responsible for the sequestration and transport of the Hg(II) ions in to the cell where reduction to Hg(O) occurs. These proteins are meP, which is water soluble and can be investigated with multidimensional solution NMR methods, and merT, the transport protein in the membrane that requires solid-state NMR methods. As of June 1998, this report summarizes work after about one and half years of the three-year award. The authors have made significant accomplishments in three aspects of the NMR studies of the proteins of the bacterial mercury detoxification system.'

  3. Compact NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluemich, Bernhard; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Zia, Wasif [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie (ITMC)

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the most popular method for chemists to analyze molecular structures, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic tool for medical doctors that provides high-contrast images of biological tissue. In both applications, the sample (or patient) is positioned inside a large, superconducting magnet to magnetize the atomic nuclei. Interrogating radio-frequency pulses result in frequency spectra that provide the chemist with molecular information, the medical doctor with anatomic images, and materials scientist with NMR relaxation parameters. Recent advances in magnet technology have led to a variety of small permanent magnets to allow compact and low-cost instruments. The goal of this book is to provide an introduction to the practical use of compact NMR at a level nearly as basic as the operation of a smart phone.

  4. Compact NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the most popular method for chemists to analyze molecular structures, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic tool for medical doctors that provides high-contrast images of biological tissue. In both applications, the sample (or patient) is positioned inside a large, superconducting magnet to magnetize the atomic nuclei. Interrogating radio-frequency pulses result in frequency spectra that provide the chemist with molecular information, the medical doctor with anatomic images, and materials scientist with NMR relaxation parameters. Recent advances in magnet technology have led to a variety of small permanent magnets to allow compact and low-cost instruments. The goal of this book is to provide an introduction to the practical use of compact NMR at a level nearly as basic as the operation of a smart phone.

  5. Towards a structural understanding of the smallest known oncoprotein: investigation of the bovine papillomavirus E5 protein using solution-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gavin; Oates, Joanne; Patel, Dharmesh; van den Berg, Hugo A; Dixon, Ann M

    2011-06-01

    The homodimeric E5 protein from bovine papillomavirus activates the platelet-derived growth factor β receptor through transmembrane (TM) helix-helix interactions leading to uncontrolled cell growth. Detailed structural information for the E5 dimer is essential if we are to uncover its unique mechanism of action. In vivo mutagenesis has been used to identify residues in the TM domain critical for dimerization, and we previously reported that a truncated synthetic E5 peptide forms dimers via TM domain interactions. Here we extend this work with the first application of high-resolution solution-state NMR to the study of the E5 TM domain in SDS micelles. Using selectively 15N-labelled peptides, we first probe sample homogeneity revealing two predominate species, which we interpret to be monomer and dimer. The equilibrium between the two states is shown to be dependent on detergent concentration, revealed by intensity shifts between two sets of peaks in 15N-(1)H HSQC experiments, highlighting the importance of sample preparation when working with these types of proteins. This information is used to estimate a free energy of association (ΔGx°=-3.05 kcal mol(-1)) for the dimerization of E5 in SDS micelles. In addition, chemical shift changes have been observed that indicate a more pronounced change in chemical environment for those residues expected to be at the dimer interface in vivo versus those that are not. Thus we are able to demonstrate our in vitro dimer is comparable to that defined in vivo, validating the biological significance of our synthetic peptide and providing a solid foundation upon which to base further structural studies. Using detergent concentration to modulate oligomeric state and map interfacial residues by NMR could prove useful in the study of other homo-oligomeric transmembrane proteins. PMID:21073859

  6. Bacterial expression, purification, and model membrane reconstitution of the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the human APP binding protein LR11/SorLA for NMR studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingsheng; Gill, Richard L; Zhu, Qin; Tian, Fang

    2011-06-01

    LR11 (SorLA) is a recently identified neuronal protein that interacts with amyloid precursor protein (APP), a central player in the pathology of the Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is a neurodegenerative disease and the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. Current estimates suggest that as many as 5.3 million Americans are living with AD. Recent investigations have uncovered the pathophysiological relevance of APP intracellular trafficking in AD. LR11 is of particular importance due to its role in regulating APP transport and processing. LR11 is a type I transmembrane protein and belongs to a novel family of Vps10p receptors. Using a new expression vector, pMTTH (MBP-MCS1 (multiple cloning site)-Thrombin protease cleavage site-MCS2-TEV protease cleavage site-MCS3-His(6)), we successfully expressed, purified and reconstituted the LR11 transmembrane (TM) and cytoplasmic (CT) domains into bicelles and detergent micelles for NMR structural studies. This new construct allowed us to overcome several obstacles during sample preparation. MBP fused LR11TM and LR11TMCT proteins are preferably expressed at high levels in Escherichia coli membrane, making a refolding of the protein unnecessary. The C-terminal His-tag allows for easy separation of the target protein from the truncated products from the C-terminus, and provides a convenient route for screening detergents to produce high quality 2D (1)H-(15)N TROSY spectra. Thrombin protease cleavage is compatible with most of the commonly used detergents, including a direct cleavage at the E. coli membrane surface. This new MBP construct may provide an effective route for the preparation of small proteins with TM domains. PMID:21320603

  7. Preparation of uniformly labeled NMR samples in Escherichia coli under the tight control of the araBAD promoter: expression of an archaeal homolog of the RNase P Rpp29 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomershine, William P; Raj, M L Stephen; Gopalan, Venkat; Foster, Mark P

    2003-04-01

    We report the first use of the tightly regulated araBAD promoter for generating uniformly labeled samples for NMR. The araBAD promoter provides a distinct advantage over that of the most commonly used protein overexpression systems in bacteria (e.g., in pET vectors: T7lac), in that it provides much tighter control over basal expression. However, use of araBAD-regulated expression for preparation of uniformly labeled protein samples for NMR is complicated by the fact that glucose (the most commonly used carbon source in defined minimal media) indirectly represses transcription, and thus, cannot be used. After experimenting with alternative media, we found that uniformly labeled NMR samples can be prepared using the highly regulated arabinose-inducible promoter and that suitable yields can be obtained in defined minimal media containing glycerol, not glucose, as the carbon source. PMID:12699688

  8. Theoretical analysis of geometry and NMR isotope shift in hydrogen-bonding center of photoactive yellow protein by combination of multicomponent quantum mechanics and ONIOM scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multicomponent quantum mechanical (MC-QM) calculation has been extended with ONIOM (our own N-layered integrated molecular orbital + molecular mechanics) scheme [ONIOM(MC-QM:MM)] to take account of both the nuclear quantum effect and the surrounding environment effect. The authors have demonstrated the first implementation and application of ONIOM(MC-QM:MM) method for the analysis of the geometry and the isotope shift in hydrogen-bonding center of photoactive yellow protein. ONIOM(MC-QM:MM) calculation for a model with deprotonated Arg52 reproduced the elongation of O–H bond of Glu46 observed by neutron diffraction crystallography. Among the unique isotope shifts in different conditions, the model with protonated Arg52 with solvent effect reasonably provided the best agreement with the corresponding experimental values from liquid NMR measurement. Our results implied the availability of ONIOM(MC-QM:MM) to distinguish the local environment around hydrogen bonds in a biomolecule

  9. Specific 13C labeling of leucine, valine and isoleucine methyl groups for unambiguous detection of long-range restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasshuber, Hannes Klaus; Demers, Jean-Philippe; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Here we present an isotopic labeling strategy to easily obtain unambiguous long-range distance restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies. The method is based on the inclusion of two biosynthetic precursors in the bacterial growth medium, α-ketoisovalerate and α-ketobutyrate, leading to the production of leucine, valine and isoleucine residues that are exclusively 13C labeled on methyl groups. The resulting spectral simplification facilitates the collection of distance restraints, the verification of carbon chemical shift assignments and the measurement of methyl group dynamics. This approach is demonstrated on the type-three secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri, where 49 methyl-methyl and methyl-nitrogen distance restraints including 10 unambiguous long-range distance restraints could be collected. By combining this labeling scheme with ultra-fast MAS and proton detection, the assignment of methyl proton chemical shifts was achieved.

  10. 2D NMR studies of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work described in this thesis comprises two related subjects. The first part describes methods to derive high-resolution structures of proteins in solution using two-dimensional (2-D) NMR. The second part describes 2-D NMR studies on the interaction between proteins and DNA. (author). 261 refs.; 52 figs.; 23 tabs

  11. Backbone dynamics of a model membrane protein: measurement of individual amide hydrogen-exchange rates in detergent-solubilized M13 coat protein using 13C NMR hydrogen/deuterium isotope shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen-exchange rates have been measured for individual assigned amide protons in M13 coat protein, a 50-residue integral membrane protein, using a 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) equilibrium isotope shift technique. The locations of the more rapidly exchanging amides have been determined. In D2O solutions, a peptide carbonyl resonance undergoes a small upfield isotope shift (0.08-0.09 ppm) from its position in H2O solutions; in 1:1 H2O/D2O mixtures, the carbonyl line shape is determined by the exchange rate at the adjacent nitrogen atom. M13 coat protein was labeled biosynthetically with 13C at the peptide carbonyls of alanine, glycine, phenylalanine, proline, and lysine, and the exchange rates of 12 assigned amide protons in the hydrophilic regions were measured as a function of pH by using the isotope shift method. This equilibrium technique is sensitive to the more rapidly exchanging protons which are difficult to measure by classical exchange-out experiments. In proteins, structural factors, notably H bonding, can decrease the exchange rate of an amide proton by many orders of magnitude from that observed in the freely exposed amides of model peptides such as poly(DL-alanine). With corrections for sequence-related inductive effects, the retardation of amide exchange in sodium dodecyl sulfate solubilized coat protein has been calculated with respect to poly(DL-alanine). The most rapidly exchanging protons, which are retarded very little or not at all, are shown to occur at the N- and C-termini of the molecule. A model of the detergent-solubilized coat protein is constructed from these H-exchange data which is consistent with circular dichroism and other NMR results

  12. Comparison of cooperative and isolated site binding of T4 gene 32 protein to ssDNA by 1H NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuteriation of all aromatic protons of gene 32 protein (g32P) from phage T4, followed by selective introduction of specific protons, has allowed the precise identification of the number and magnitude of the chemical shift changes induced in the aromatic protons when g32P binds noncooperatively or cooperatively to nucleotides. Signals from five Tyr residues are shifted by binding of g32P to d(pA)8 or d(pA)40-60; however, the change from noncooperative, d(pA)8, to cooperative, d(pA)40-60, binding causes significant increases in the magnitudes of the shifts for only two of these Tyr signals. These two Tyr residues may interact directly with the nucleotide bases, while the shifts associated with the other three Tyr may be due to conformational changes in g32P upon ssDNA binding. Similar conclusions can be drawn for two of the six Phe residues whose protons undergo shifts upon nucleotide binding. Observation of selected proton signals allows for the first time detection by 1H NMR of changes in the proton signals from two Trp residues upon nucleotide binding. The side chains of two Tyr, one or two Phe, and one Trp are probably directly involved in nucleotide base-protein interactions. As assayed by the signals from the H2 and H8 protons of adenine, the bases of a bound nucleotide are undergoing a fast chemical exchange in the noncooperative mode of binding, but shift to slow exchange upon assuming the cooperative mode of ssDNA interaction. When bound to a polynucleotide, the A domain of g32P (residues 254-301) becomes more mobile, as reflected in sharpening of the 1H NMR signals from the A domain

  13. Protein catabolism and high lipid metabolism associated with long-distance exercise are revealed by plasma NMR metabolomics in endurance horses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Le Moyec

    Full Text Available During long distance endurance races, horses undergo high physiological and metabolic stresses. The adaptation processes involve the modulation of the energetic pathways in order to meet the energy demand. The aims were to evaluate the effects of long endurance exercise on the plasma metabolomic profiles and to investigate the relationships with the individual horse performances. The metabolomic profiles of the horses were analyzed using the non-dedicated methodology, NMR spectroscopy and statistical multivariate analysis. The advantage of this method is to investigate several metabolomic pathways at the same time in a single sample. The plasmas were obtained before exercise (BE and post exercise (PE from 69 horses competing in three endurance races at national level (130-160 km. Biochemical assays were also performed on the samples taken at PE. The proton NMR spectra were compared using the supervised orthogonal projection on latent structure method according to several factors. Among these factors, the race location was not significant whereas the effect of the race exercise (sample BE vs PE of same horse was highly discriminating. This result was confirmed by the projection of unpaired samples (only BE or PE sample of different horses. The metabolomic profiles proved that protein, energetic and lipid metabolisms as well as glycoproteins content are highly affected by the long endurance exercise. The BE samples from finisher horses could be discriminated according to the racing speed based on their metabolomic lipid content. The PE samples could be discriminated according to the horse ranking position at the end of the race with lactate as unique correlated metabolite. As a conclusion, the metabolomic profiles of plasmas taken before and after the race provided a better understanding of the high energy demand and protein catabolism pathway that could expose the horses to metabolic disorders.

  14. Two-dimensional NMR and photo-CIDNP studies of the insulin monomer: Assignment of aromatic resonances with application to protein folding, structure, and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aromatic 1H NMR resonances of the insulin monomer are assigned at 500 MHz by comparative studies of chemically modified and genetically altered variants, including a mutant insulin (PheB25 → Leu) associated with diabetes mellitus. The two histidines, three phenylalanines, and four tyrosines are observed to be in distinct local environments; their assignment provides sensitive markers for studies of tertiary structure, protein dynamics, and protein folding. The environments of the tyrosine residues have also been investigated by photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) and analyzed in relation to packing constrains in the crystal structures of insulin. Dimerization involving specific B-chain interactions is observed with increasing protein concentration and is shown to depend on temperature, pH, and solvent composition. The differences between proinsulin and mini-proinsulin suggest a structural mechanism for the observation that the fully reduced B29-A1 analogue folds more efficiently than proinsulin to form the correct pattern of disulfide bonds. These results are discussed in relation to molecular mechanics calculations of insulin based on the available crystal structures

  15. Two-dimensional NMR and photo-CIDNP studies of the insulin monomer: Assignment of aromatic resonances with application to protein folding, structure, and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, M.A.; Shoelson, S.E. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA) Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston (USA)); Nguyen, D.T.; O' Shea, E.; Karplus, M. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (USA)); Khait, I.; Neuringer, L.J. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (USA)); Inouye, K. (Shionogi and Co., Ltd., Osaka (Japan)); Frank, B.H.; Beckage, M. (Eli Lilly and Co., Indianapolis, IN (USA))

    1989-12-12

    The aromatic {sup 1}H NMR resonances of the insulin monomer are assigned at 500 MHz by comparative studies of chemically modified and genetically altered variants, including a mutant insulin (PheB25 {yields} Leu) associated with diabetes mellitus. The two histidines, three phenylalanines, and four tyrosines are observed to be in distinct local environments; their assignment provides sensitive markers for studies of tertiary structure, protein dynamics, and protein folding. The environments of the tyrosine residues have also been investigated by photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) and analyzed in relation to packing constrains in the crystal structures of insulin. Dimerization involving specific B-chain interactions is observed with increasing protein concentration and is shown to depend on temperature, pH, and solvent composition. The differences between proinsulin and mini-proinsulin suggest a structural mechanism for the observation that the fully reduced B29-A1 analogue folds more efficiently than proinsulin to form the correct pattern of disulfide bonds. These results are discussed in relation to molecular mechanics calculations of insulin based on the available crystal structures.

  16. Protein structural studies by paramagnetic solid-state NMR spectroscopy aided by a compact cyclen-type Cu(II) binding tag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs) are a rich source of structural information in protein solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Here we demonstrate that PRE measurements in natively diamagnetic proteins are facilitated by a thiol-reactive compact, cyclen-based, high-affinity Cu2+ binding tag, 1-[2-(pyridin-2-yldisulfanyl)ethyl]-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (TETAC), that overcomes the key shortcomings associated with the use of larger, more flexible metal-binding tags. Using the TETAC–Cu2+ K28C mutant of B1 immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G as a model, we find that amino acid residues located within ∼10 Å of the Cu2+ center experience considerable transverse PREs leading to severely attenuated resonances in 2D 15N–13C correlation spectra. For more distant residues, electron–nucleus distances are accessible via quantitative measurements of longitudinal PREs, and we demonstrate such measurements for 15N–Cu2+ distances up to ∼20 Å

  17. Amino-acid selective experiments on uniformly 13C and 15N labeled proteins by MAS NMR: Filtering of lysines and arginines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehle, Stefan; Rehbein, Kristina; Diehl, Anne; van Rossum, Barth-Jan

    2006-12-01

    Amino-acid selective magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiments can aid the assignment of ambiguous cross-peaks in crowded spectra of solid proteins. In particular for larger proteins, data analysis can be hindered by severe resonance overlap. In such cases, filtering techniques may provide a good alternative to site-specific spin-labeling to obtain unambiguous assignments that can serve as starting points in the assignment procedure. In this paper we present a simple pulse sequence that allows selective excitation of arginine and lysine residues. To achieve this, we make use of a combination of specific cross-polarization for selective excitation [M. Baldus, A.T. Petkova, J. Herzfeld, R.G. Griffin, Cross polarization in the tilted frame: assignment and spectral simplification in heteronuclear spin systems, Mol. Phys. 95 (1998) 1197-1207.] and spin diffusion for transfer along the amino-acid side-chain. The selectivity of the filter is demonstrated with the excitation of lysine and arginine side-chain resonances in a uniformly 13C and 15N labeled protein preparation of the α-spectrin SH3 domain. It is shown that the filter can be applied as a building block in a 13C- 13C lysine-only correlation experiment.

  18. Frontiers of NMR in Molecular Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-08-25

    NMR spectroscopy is expanding the horizons of structural biology by determining the structures and describing the dynamics of blobular proteins in aqueous solution, as well as other classes of proteins including membrane proteins and the polypeptides that form the aggregates diagnostic of prion and amyloid diseases. Significant results are also emerging on DNA and RNA oligomers and their complexes with proteins. This meeting focused attention on key structural questions emanating from molecular biology and how NMR spectroscopy can be used to answer them.

  19. The mitochondrial precursor protein apocytochrome c strongly influences the order of the headgroup and acyl chains of phosphatidylserine dispersions. A 2H and 31P NMR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuterium and phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance techniques were used to study the interaction of the mitochondrial precursor protein apocytochrome c with headgroup-deuterated (dioleoylphosphatidyl-L-[2-2H1]serine) and acyl chain deuterated (1,2-[11,11-2H2]dioleoylphosphatidylserine) dispersions. Binding of the protein to dioleoylphosphatidylserine liposomes results in phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectra typical of phospholipids undergoing fast axial rotation in extended liquid-crystalline bilayers with a reduced residual chemical shift anisotropy and an increased line width. 2H NMR spectra on headgroup-deuterated dioleoylphosphatidylserine dispersions showed a decrease in quadrupolar splitting and a broadening of the signal on interaction with apocytochrome c. Addition of increasing amounts of apocytochrome c to the acyl chain deuterated dioleoylphosphatidylserine dispersions results in the gradual appearance of a second component in the spectra with a 44% reduced quadrupolar splitting. Such large reduction of the quadrupolar splitting has never been observed for any protein studied yet. The induction of a new spectral component with a well-defined reduced quadrupolar splitting seems to be confined to the N-terminus since addition of a small hydrophilic amino-terminal peptide (residues 1-38) also induces a second component with a strongly reduced quadrupolar splitting. A chemically synthesized peptide corresponding to amino acid residues 2-17 of the presequence of the mitochondrial protein cytochrome oxidase subunit IV also has a large perturbing effect on the order of the acyl chains, indicating that the observed effects may be a property shared by many mitochondrial precursor proteins. Implications of these data for the import of apocytochrome c into mitochondria will be discussed

  20. Nanomaterials for efficiently lowering the freezing point of anti-freeze coolants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Haiping; Zheng, Yingsong; Roy, Walter

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, we report, for the first time, the effect of the lowered freezing point in a 50% water/50% anti-freeze coolant (PAC) or 50% water/50% ethylene glycol (EG) solution by the addition of carbon nanotubes and other particles. The experimental results indicated that the nano materials are much more efficient (hundreds fold) in lowering the freezing point than the regular ionic materials (e.g., NaCl). The possible explanation for this interesting phenomenon is the colligative property of fluid and relative small size of nano material. It is quite certain that the carbon nanotubes and metal oxide nano particles could be a wonderful candidate for the nano coolant application because they could not only increase the thermal conductivity, but also efficiently lower the freezing point of traditional coolants. PMID:18019146

  1. Rapid solid-state NMR of deuterated proteins by interleaved cross-polarization from 1H and 2H nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerring, Morten; Paaske, Berit; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Akbey, Ümit; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel sampling strategy, interleaving acquisition of multiple NMR spectra by exploiting initial polarization subsequently from 1H and 2H spins, taking advantage of their different T1 relaxation times. Different 1H- and 2H-polarization based spectra are in this way simultaneously recorded improving either information content or sensitivity by adding spectra. The so-called Relaxation-optimized Acquisition of Proton Interleaved with Deuterium (RAPID) 1H → 13C/ 2H → 13C CP/MAS multiple-acquisition method is demonstrated by 1D and 2D experiments using a uniformly 2H, 15N, 13C-labeled α-spectrin SH3 domain sample with all or 30% back-exchanged labile 2H to 1H. It is demonstrated how 1D 13C CP/MAS or 2D 13C- 13C correlation spectra initialized with polarization from either 1H or 2H may be recorded simultaneously with flexibility to be added or used individually for spectral editing. It is also shown how 2D 13C- 13C correlation spectra may be recorded interleaved with 2H- 13C correlation spectra to obtain 13C- 13C correlations along with information about dynamics from 2H sideband patterns.

  2. Proton detection for signal enhancement in solid-state NMR experiments on mobile species in membrane proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Meaghan E.; Ritz, Emily [University of Guelph, Department of Physics (Canada); Ahmed, Mumdooh A. M. [Suez University, The Department of Physics, Faculty of Science (Egypt); Bamm, Vladimir V.; Harauz, George [University of Guelph, Biophysics Interdepartmental Group (Canada); Brown, Leonid S.; Ladizhansky, Vladimir, E-mail: vladizha@uoguelph.ca [University of Guelph, Department of Physics (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    Direct proton detection is becoming an increasingly popular method for enhancing sensitivity in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Generally, these experiments require extensive deuteration of the protein, fast magic angle spinning (MAS), or a combination of both. Here, we implement direct proton detection to selectively observe the mobile entities in fully-protonated membrane proteins at moderate MAS frequencies. We demonstrate this method on two proteins that exhibit different motional regimes. Myelin basic protein is an intrinsically-disordered, peripherally membrane-associated protein that is highly flexible, whereas Anabaena sensory rhodopsin is composed of seven rigid transmembrane α-helices connected by mobile loop regions. In both cases, we observe narrow proton linewidths and, on average, a 10× increase in sensitivity in 2D insensitive nuclear enhancement of polarization transfer-based HSQC experiments when proton detection is compared to carbon detection. We further show that our proton-detected experiments can be easily extended to three dimensions and used to build complete amino acid systems, including sidechain protons, and obtain inter-residue correlations. Additionally, we detect signals which do not correspond to amino acids, but rather to lipids and/or carbohydrates which interact strongly with membrane proteins.

  3. Proton detection for signal enhancement in solid-state NMR experiments on mobile species in membrane proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct proton detection is becoming an increasingly popular method for enhancing sensitivity in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Generally, these experiments require extensive deuteration of the protein, fast magic angle spinning (MAS), or a combination of both. Here, we implement direct proton detection to selectively observe the mobile entities in fully-protonated membrane proteins at moderate MAS frequencies. We demonstrate this method on two proteins that exhibit different motional regimes. Myelin basic protein is an intrinsically-disordered, peripherally membrane-associated protein that is highly flexible, whereas Anabaena sensory rhodopsin is composed of seven rigid transmembrane α-helices connected by mobile loop regions. In both cases, we observe narrow proton linewidths and, on average, a 10× increase in sensitivity in 2D insensitive nuclear enhancement of polarization transfer-based HSQC experiments when proton detection is compared to carbon detection. We further show that our proton-detected experiments can be easily extended to three dimensions and used to build complete amino acid systems, including sidechain protons, and obtain inter-residue correlations. Additionally, we detect signals which do not correspond to amino acids, but rather to lipids and/or carbohydrates which interact strongly with membrane proteins

  4. Ligand-receptor Interactions by NMR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novak. P.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Today NMR spectroscopy is a method of choice for elucidation of interactions between biomolecules and the potential ligands. Knowledge on these interactions is an essential prerequisite for the rational drug design. The most important contribution of NMR to drug design a few years ago was the 3D structure determination of proteins. Besides delivering the 3D structures of the free proteins as a raw material for the modeling studies on ligand binding, NMR can directly yield valuable experimental data on the biologically important protein-ligand complexes. In addition to X-ray diffraction, NMR spectroscopy can provide information on the internal protein dynamics ordynamics of intermolecular interactions. Changes in NMR parameters allow us to detect ("SAR by NMR" and quantitatively determine binding affinities (titration, diffusion NMR experiments, etc. of potential ligands. Also, it is possible to determine the binding site and conformations of ligands, receptors and receptor-ligand complexes with the help of NMR methods such as tr-NOESY. Epitopes or functional groups responsible for binding of ligands to the receptor can be identified by employing STD or WaterLOGSY experiments. In this review are described some of the most frequent NMR methods for the characterization of the interactions between biomolecules and ligands, together with their advantages and disadvantages.

  5. Spectral editing of two-dimensional magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectra for protein resonance assignment and structure determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several techniques for spectral editing of 2D 13C–13C correlation NMR of proteins are introduced. They greatly reduce the spectral overlap for five common amino acid types, thus simplifying spectral assignment and conformational analysis. The carboxyl (COO) signals of glutamate and aspartate are selected by suppressing the overlapping amide N–CO peaks through 13C–15N dipolar dephasing. The sidechain methine (CH) signals of valine, lecuine, and isoleucine are separated from the overlapping methylene (CH2) signals of long-chain amino acids using a multiple-quantum dipolar transfer technique. Both the COO and CH selection methods take advantage of improved dipolar dephasing by asymmetric rotational-echo double resonance (REDOR), where every other π-pulse is shifted from the center of a rotor period tr by about 0.15 tr. This asymmetry produces a deeper minimum in the REDOR dephasing curve and enables complete suppression of the undesired signals of immobile segments. Residual signals of mobile sidechains are positively identified by dynamics editing using recoupled 13C–1H dipolar dephasing. In all three experiments, the signals of carbons within a three-bond distance from the selected carbons are detected in the second spectral dimension via 13C spin exchange. The efficiencies of these spectral editing techniques range from 60 % for the COO and dynamic selection experiments to 25 % for the CH selection experiment, and are demonstrated on well-characterized model proteins GB1 and ubiquitin.

  6. Assessment of the Effect of High or Low Protein Diet on the Human Urine Metabolome as Measured by NMR

    OpenAIRE

    Engelsen, Søren B; Arne Astrup; Rasmussen, Lone G.; Hanne Winning; Francesco Savorani; Henrik Toft; Larsen, Thomas M.; Dragsted, Lars O.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify urinary metabolite profiles that discriminate between high and low intake of dietary protein during a dietary intervention. Seventy-seven overweight, non-diabetic subjects followed an 8-week low-calorie diet (LCD) and were then randomly assigned to a high (HP) or low (LP) protein diet for 6 months. Twenty-four hours urine samples were collected at baseline (prior to the 8-week LCD) and after dietary intervention; at months 1, 3 and 6, respectively. ...

  7. Analysis of local molecular motions of aromatic sidechains in proteins by 2D and 3D fast MAS NMR spectroscopy and quantum mechanical calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paluch, P.; Pawlak, T.; Jeziorna, A.; Trébosc, J.; Hou, G.; Vega, A. J.; Amoureux, J. P.; Dračínský, Martin; Polenova, T.; Potrzebowski, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 43 (2015), s. 28789-28801. ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-11223S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : solid-state NMR * angle spinning NMR * NMR Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.493, year: 2014 http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlepdf/2015/cp/c5cp04475h

  8. Detailed NMR Analysis of the Heme-Protein Interactions in Component IV Glycera dibranchiata Monomeric Hemoglobin-CO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete 13C, 15N, and 1H resonance assignments have been obtained for the recombinant, ferrous CO-ligated form of component IV monomeric hemoglobin from Glycera dibranchiata. This 15642 Da myoglobin-like protein contains a large number of glycine and alanine residues (47) and a heme prosthetic group. Coupling constant information has allowed the determination of χ1 and χ2 torsion angles, backbone φ angles, as well as 43 of 81 possible assignments to Hβ2/β3 pairs. The 13Cα, 13Cβ, 13C', and 1Hα assignments yield a consensus chemical shift index (CSI) that, in combination with NOE information and backbone torsion angles, defines seven distinct helical regions for the protein's global architecture. Discrepancies between the CSI and NOE/3JHNHα-based secondary structure definitions have been attributed to heme ring current shifts on the basis of calculations from a model structure [Alam et al. (1994) J. Protein Chem., 13, 151-164]. The agreement can be improved by correcting the 1Hα chemical shifts for the ring current contributions. Because the holoprotein was assembled from isotopically enriched globin and natural isotope-abundance heme, data from 13C-filtered/13C-edited and 13C-filtered/13C-filtered 2D NOESY experiments could be used to determine complete heme proton assignments and to position the heme within the protein. The results confirm the unusual presence of Phe31(B10) and Leu58(E7) side chains near the heme ligand binding site which may alter the polarity and steric environment and thus the functional properties of this protein

  9. NMR and dynamics of biopolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several basic experimental analytical NMR techniques that are frequently used for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of dynamic and exchange processes, focusing on proteins systems, are described: chemical exchange (slow exchange, fast exchange, intermediate exchange), heteronuclear relaxation measurements (relaxation parameters, strategy of relaxation data analysis, experimental results and examples, motional model interpretation of relaxation data, homonuclear relaxation); slow large-scale exchange and hydrogen-deuterium exchange are also studied: mechanisms of hydrogen exchange in a native protein, methods for measuring amide exchange rates by NMR, interpretation of amide exchange rates. 9 fig., 3 tab., 56 ref

  10. NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book reviews the applications of NMR-spectroscopy in medicine and biology. The first chapter of about 40 pages summarizes the history of development and explains the chemical and physical fundamentals of this new and non-invasive method in an easily comprehensible manner. The other chapters summarize diagnostic results obtained with this method in organs and tissues, so that the reader will find a systematic overview of the available findings obtained in the various organ systems. It must be noted, however, that ongoing research work and new insight quite naturally will necessitate corrections to be done, as is the case here with some biochemical interpretations which would need adjustment to latest research results. NMR-spectroscopy is able to measure very fine energy differences on the molecular level, and thus offers insight into metabolic processes, with the advantage that there is no need of applying ionizing radiation in order to qualitatively or quantitatively analyse the metabolic processes in the various organ systems. (orig./DG) With 40 figs., 4 tabs

  11. CH3-specific NMR assignment of alanine, isoleucine, leucine and valine methyl groups in high molecular weight proteins using a single sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new strategy for the NMR assignment of aliphatic side-chains in large perdeuterated proteins is proposed. It involves an alternative isotopic labeling protocol, the use of an out-and-back 13C–13C TOCSY experiment ((H)C-TOCSY-C-TOCSY-(C)H) and an optimized non-uniform sampling protocol. It has long been known that the non-linearity of an aliphatic spin-system (for example Ile, Val, or Leu) substantially compromises the efficiency of the TOCSY transfers. To permit the use of this efficient pulse scheme, a series of optimized precursors were designed to yield linear 13C perdeuterated side-chains with a single protonated CH3 group in these three residues. These precursors were added to the culture medium for incorporation into expressed proteins. For Val and Leu residues, the topologically different spin-systems introduced for the pro-R and pro-S methyl groups enable stereospecific assignment. All CH3 can be simultaneously assigned on a single sample using a TOCSY experiment. It only requires the tuning of a mixing delay and is thus more versatile than the relayed COSY experiment. Enhanced resolution and sensi-tivity can be achieved by non-uniform sampling combined with the removal of the large JCC coupling by deconvolution prior to the processing by iterative soft thresholding. This strategy has been used on malate synthase G where a large percentage of the CH3 groups could be correlated directly up to the backbone Ca. It is anticipated that this robust combined strategy can be routinely applied to large proteins

  12. CH{sub 3}-specific NMR assignment of alanine, isoleucine, leucine and valine methyl groups in high molecular weight proteins using a single sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerfah, Rime [Université Grenoble Alpes, IBS (France); Hamelin, Olivier [University Grenoble Alpes, Chemistry and Biology of Metals Laboratory (France); Boisbouvier, Jérôme; Marion, Dominique, E-mail: Dominique.Marion@ibs.fr [Université Grenoble Alpes, IBS (France)

    2015-12-15

    A new strategy for the NMR assignment of aliphatic side-chains in large perdeuterated proteins is proposed. It involves an alternative isotopic labeling protocol, the use of an out-and-back {sup 13}C–{sup 13}C TOCSY experiment ((H)C-TOCSY-C-TOCSY-(C)H) and an optimized non-uniform sampling protocol. It has long been known that the non-linearity of an aliphatic spin-system (for example Ile, Val, or Leu) substantially compromises the efficiency of the TOCSY transfers. To permit the use of this efficient pulse scheme, a series of optimized precursors were designed to yield linear {sup 13}C perdeuterated side-chains with a single protonated CH{sub 3} group in these three residues. These precursors were added to the culture medium for incorporation into expressed proteins. For Val and Leu residues, the topologically different spin-systems introduced for the pro-R and pro-S methyl groups enable stereospecific assignment. All CH{sub 3} can be simultaneously assigned on a single sample using a TOCSY experiment. It only requires the tuning of a mixing delay and is thus more versatile than the relayed COSY experiment. Enhanced resolution and sensi-tivity can be achieved by non-uniform sampling combined with the removal of the large J{sub CC} coupling by deconvolution prior to the processing by iterative soft thresholding. This strategy has been used on malate synthase G where a large percentage of the CH{sub 3} groups could be correlated directly up to the backbone Ca. It is anticipated that this robust combined strategy can be routinely applied to large proteins.

  13. Sample preparation of membrane proteins suitable for solid-state MAS NMR and development of assignment strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Hiller, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Although the basic structure of biological membranes is provided by the lipid bilayer, most of the specific functions are carried out by membrane proteins (MPs) such as channels, ion-pumps and receptors. Additionally, it is known, that mutations in MPs are directly or indirectly involved in many diseases. Thus, structure determination of MPs is of major interest not only in structural biology but also in pharmacology, especially for drug development. Advances in structural biology of membrane...

  14. Spectral editing at ultra-fast magic-angle-spinning in solid-state NMR: facilitating protein sequential signal assignment by HIGHLIGHT approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study demonstrates a novel spectral editing technique for protein solid-state NMR (SSNMR) to simplify the spectrum drastically and to reduce the ambiguity for protein main-chain signal assignments in fast magic-angle-spinning (MAS) conditions at a wide frequency range of 40–80 kHz. The approach termed HIGHLIGHT (Wang et al., in Chem Comm 51:15055–15058, 2015) combines the reverse 13C, 15N-isotope labeling strategy and selective signal quenching using the frequency-selective REDOR pulse sequence under fast MAS. The scheme allows one to selectively observe the signals of “highlighted” labeled amino-acid residues that precede or follow unlabeled residues through selectively quenching 13CO or 15N signals for a pair of consecutively labeled residues by recoupling 13CO–15N dipolar couplings. Our numerical simulation results showed that the scheme yielded only ∼15 % loss of signals for the highlighted residues while quenching as much as ∼90 % of signals for non-highlighted residues. For lysine-reverse-labeled micro-crystalline GB1 protein, the 2D 15N/13Cα correlation and 2D 13Cα/13CO correlation SSNMR spectra by the HIGHLIGHT approach yielded signals only for six residues following and preceding the unlabeled lysine residues, respectively. The experimental dephasing curves agreed reasonably well with the corresponding simulation results for highlighted and quenched residues at spinning speeds of 40 and 60 kHz. The compatibility of the HIGHLIGHT approach with fast MAS allows for sensitivity enhancement by paramagnetic assisted data collection (PACC) and 1H detection. We also discuss how the HIGHLIGHT approach facilitates signal assignments using 13C-detected 3D SSNMR by demonstrating full sequential assignments of lysine-reverse-labeled micro-crystalline GB1 protein (∼300 nmol), for which data collection required only 11 h. The HIGHLIGHT approach offers valuable means of signal assignments especially for larger proteins through reducing the

  15. Spectral editing at ultra-fast magic-angle-spinning in solid-state NMR: facilitating protein sequential signal assignment by HIGHLIGHT approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Songlin; Matsuda, Isamu; Long, Fei; Ishii, Yoshitaka, E-mail: yishii@uic.edu [University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2016-02-15

    This study demonstrates a novel spectral editing technique for protein solid-state NMR (SSNMR) to simplify the spectrum drastically and to reduce the ambiguity for protein main-chain signal assignments in fast magic-angle-spinning (MAS) conditions at a wide frequency range of 40–80 kHz. The approach termed HIGHLIGHT (Wang et al., in Chem Comm 51:15055–15058, 2015) combines the reverse {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N-isotope labeling strategy and selective signal quenching using the frequency-selective REDOR pulse sequence under fast MAS. The scheme allows one to selectively observe the signals of “highlighted” labeled amino-acid residues that precede or follow unlabeled residues through selectively quenching {sup 13}CO or {sup 15}N signals for a pair of consecutively labeled residues by recoupling {sup 13}CO–{sup 15}N dipolar couplings. Our numerical simulation results showed that the scheme yielded only ∼15 % loss of signals for the highlighted residues while quenching as much as ∼90 % of signals for non-highlighted residues. For lysine-reverse-labeled micro-crystalline GB1 protein, the 2D {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C{sub α} correlation and 2D {sup 13}C{sub α}/{sup 13}CO correlation SSNMR spectra by the HIGHLIGHT approach yielded signals only for six residues following and preceding the unlabeled lysine residues, respectively. The experimental dephasing curves agreed reasonably well with the corresponding simulation results for highlighted and quenched residues at spinning speeds of 40 and 60 kHz. The compatibility of the HIGHLIGHT approach with fast MAS allows for sensitivity enhancement by paramagnetic assisted data collection (PACC) and {sup 1}H detection. We also discuss how the HIGHLIGHT approach facilitates signal assignments using {sup 13}C-detected 3D SSNMR by demonstrating full sequential assignments of lysine-reverse-labeled micro-crystalline GB1 protein (∼300 nmol), for which data collection required only 11 h. The HIGHLIGHT approach offers valuable

  16. NMR Spectroscopy and Its Value: A Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeraraghavan, Sudha

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is widely used by chemists. Furthermore, the use of NMR spectroscopy to solve structures of macromolecules or to examine protein-ligand interactions is popular. Yet, few students entering graduate education in biological sciences have been introduced to this method or its utility. Over the last six…

  17. The inverted chevron plot measured by NMR relaxation reveals a native-like unfolding intermediate in acyl-CoA binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Kaare; Poulsen, F. M.; Akke, M.

    2006-01-01

    those from stopped-flow kinetics and define an "inverted chevron" plot. The combination of NMR relaxation and stopped-flow kinetic measurements allowed determination of k f and k u in the range from 0.48 M GuHCl to 1.28 M GuHCl. Individually, the stopped-flow and NMR data fit two-state models...

  18. NMR experiments for resonance assignments of 13C, 15N doubly-labeled flexible polypeptides: Application to the human prion protein hPrP(23-230)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combination of three heteronuclear three-dimensional NMR experiments tailored for sequential resonance assignments in uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled flexible polypeptide chains is described. The 3D (H)N(CO-TOCSY)NH, 3D (H)CA(CO-TOCSY)NH and 3D (H)CBCA(CO-TOCSY)NH schemes make use of the favorable 15N chemical shift dispersion in unfolded polypeptides, exploit the slow transverse 15N relaxation rates of unfolded polypeptides in high resolution constant-time [1H, 15N]-correlation experiments, and use carbonyl carbon homonuclear isotropic mixing to transfer magnetization sequentially along the amino acid sequence. Practical applications are demonstrated with the 100-residue flexible tail of the recombinant human prion protein, making use of spectral resolution up to 0.6 Hz in the 15N dimension, simultaneous correlation with the two adjacent amino acid residues to overcome problems associated with spectral overlap, and the potential of the presently described experiments to establish nearest-neighbor correlations across proline residues in the amino acid sequence

  19. Conformational preferences of synthetic peptides derived from the immunodominant site of the circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium falciparum by sup 1 H NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyson, H.J.; Satterthwait, A.C.; Lerner, R.A.; Wright, P.E. (Research Institute of Scripps Clinic, La Jolla, CA (USA))

    1990-08-28

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance and ultraviolet circular dichroism spectroscopy have been used to probe the conformational ensemble of the tandemly repeated tetrapeptide unit of the circumsporozoite coat protein of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Peptides based on the Asn-Ala-Asn-Pro and Asn-Pro-Asn-Ala cadences and composed of one to three tetrapeptide units were synthesized and examined using one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The chemical shift of the amide protons, the temperature dependence of the amide proton chemical shift, and the patterns of NOE connectivities in the various peptides give evidence for the presence of a substantial population of folded conformers in several of the peptides in water solution at pH 5.0. Correlations between the behavior of the tandemly repeated units in different peptides have been used to infer the structure(s) of the folded conformers. The data are consistent with the presence of turnlike structures stabilized by hydrogen bonding of the backbone amid protons of the alanines and the asparagine residues preceding them. Specific differences in the strengths of NOEs between peptides of different lengths indicate that the folded structure is considerably stabilized by the presence of the asparagine residue following the alanine. Differences between peptides with different cadences of the tandemly repeating unit indicate that a repeating structural motif is formed by the Asn-Pro-Asn-Ala-(Asn) cadence.

  20. Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx)-induced abnormalities of nucleic acid metabolism revealed by 1H-NMR-based metabonomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan Yue; Zhang, Yuwei; Cheng, Liuliu; Ma, Jinhu; Xi, Yufeng; Yang, Liping; Su, Chao; Shao, Bin; Huang, Anliang; Xiang, Rong; Cheng, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) plays an important role in HBV-related hepatocarcinogenesis; however, mechanisms underlying HBx-mediated carcinogenesis remain unclear. In this study, an NMR-based metabolomics approach was applied to systematically investigate the effects of HBx on cell metabolism. EdU incorporation assay was conducted to examine the effects of HBx on DNA synthesis, an important feature of nucleic acid metabolism. The results revealed that HBx disrupted metabolism of glucose, lipids, and amino acids, especially nucleic acids. To understand the potential mechanism of HBx-induced abnormalities of nucleic acid metabolism, gene expression profiles of HepG2 cells expressing HBx were investigated. The results showed that 29 genes involved in DNA damage and DNA repair were differentially expressed in HBx-expressing HepG2 cells. HBx-induced DNA damage was further demonstrated by karyotyping, comet assay, Western blotting, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry analyses. Many studies have previously reported that DNA damage can induce abnormalities of nucleic acid metabolism. Thus, our results implied that HBx initially induces DNA damage, and then disrupts nucleic acid metabolism, which in turn blocks DNA repair and induces the occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). These findings further contribute to our understanding of the occurrence of HCC. PMID:27075403

  1. Spectral editing of two-dimensional magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectra for protein resonance assignment and structure determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt-Rohr, K.; Fritzsching, K. J.; Liao, S. Y.; Hong Mei, E-mail: mhong@iastate.edu [Iowa State University, Department of Chemistry and Ames Laboratory (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Several techniques for spectral editing of 2D {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C correlation NMR of proteins are introduced. They greatly reduce the spectral overlap for five common amino acid types, thus simplifying spectral assignment and conformational analysis. The carboxyl (COO) signals of glutamate and aspartate are selected by suppressing the overlapping amide N-CO peaks through {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N dipolar dephasing. The sidechain methine (CH) signals of valine, lecuine, and isoleucine are separated from the overlapping methylene (CH{sub 2}) signals of long-chain amino acids using a multiple-quantum dipolar transfer technique. Both the COO and CH selection methods take advantage of improved dipolar dephasing by asymmetric rotational-echo double resonance (REDOR), where every other {pi}-pulse is shifted from the center of a rotor period t{sub r} by about 0.15 t{sub r}. This asymmetry produces a deeper minimum in the REDOR dephasing curve and enables complete suppression of the undesired signals of immobile segments. Residual signals of mobile sidechains are positively identified by dynamics editing using recoupled {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H dipolar dephasing. In all three experiments, the signals of carbons within a three-bond distance from the selected carbons are detected in the second spectral dimension via {sup 13}C spin exchange. The efficiencies of these spectral editing techniques range from 60 % for the COO and dynamic selection experiments to 25 % for the CH selection experiment, and are demonstrated on well-characterized model proteins GB1 and ubiquitin.

  2. Interaction of a putative BH3 domain of clusterin with anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins as revealed by NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong-Hwa; Ha, Ji-Hyang [Medical Proteomics Research Center, KRIBB, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yul [Department of Bio and Brain Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Kwang-Hee [Medical Proteomics Research Center, KRIBB, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae-Yong [Department of Physiology, Institute of Health Science, School of Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, Gyeongnam 660-751 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Wan Sung [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Institute of Health Science, School of Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, Gyeongnam 660-751 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Ho Sup [Division of Structural and Computational Biology, School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637511 (Singapore); Park, Sung Goo; Park, Byoung Chul [Medical Proteomics Research Center, KRIBB, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Gwan-Su, E-mail: gsyi@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Bio and Brain Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Chi, Seung-Wook, E-mail: swchi@kribb.re.kr [Medical Proteomics Research Center, KRIBB, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} Identification of a conserved BH3 motif in C-terminal coiled coil region of nCLU. {yields} The nCLU BH3 domain binds to BH3 peptide-binding grooves in both Bcl-X{sub L} and Bcl-2. {yields} A conserved binding mechanism of nCLU BH3 and the other pro-apoptotic BH3 peptides with Bcl-X{sub L}. {yields} The absolutely conserved Leu323 and Asp328 of nCLU BH3 domain are critical for binding to Bcl-X{sub L.} {yields} Molecular understanding of the pro-apoptotic function of nCLU as a novel BH3-only protein. -- Abstract: Clusterin (CLU) is a multifunctional glycoprotein that is overexpressed in prostate and breast cancers. Although CLU is known to be involved in the regulation of apoptosis and cell survival, the precise molecular mechanism underlying the pro-apoptotic function of nuclear CLU (nCLU) remains unclear. In this study, we identified a conserved BH3 motif in C-terminal coiled coil (CC2) region of nCLU by sequence analysis and characterized the molecular interaction of the putative nCLU BH3 domain with anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The chemical shift perturbation data demonstrated that the nCLU BH3 domain binds to pro-apoptotic BH3 peptide-binding grooves in both Bcl-X{sub L} and Bcl-2. A structural model of the Bcl-X{sub L}/nCLU BH3 peptide complex reveals that the binding mode is remarkably similar to those of other Bcl-X{sub L}/BH3 peptide complexes. In addition, mutational analysis confirmed that Leu323 and Asp328 of nCLU BH3 domain, absolutely conserved in the BH3 motifs of BH3-only protein family, are critical for binding to Bcl-X{sub L}. Taken altogether, our results suggest a molecular basis for the pro-apoptotic function of nCLU by elucidating the residue specific interactions of the BH3 motif in nCLU with anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins.

  3. Interaction of a putative BH3 domain of clusterin with anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins as revealed by NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Identification of a conserved BH3 motif in C-terminal coiled coil region of nCLU. → The nCLU BH3 domain binds to BH3 peptide-binding grooves in both Bcl-XL and Bcl-2. → A conserved binding mechanism of nCLU BH3 and the other pro-apoptotic BH3 peptides with Bcl-XL. → The absolutely conserved Leu323 and Asp328 of nCLU BH3 domain are critical for binding to Bcl-XL. → Molecular understanding of the pro-apoptotic function of nCLU as a novel BH3-only protein. -- Abstract: Clusterin (CLU) is a multifunctional glycoprotein that is overexpressed in prostate and breast cancers. Although CLU is known to be involved in the regulation of apoptosis and cell survival, the precise molecular mechanism underlying the pro-apoptotic function of nuclear CLU (nCLU) remains unclear. In this study, we identified a conserved BH3 motif in C-terminal coiled coil (CC2) region of nCLU by sequence analysis and characterized the molecular interaction of the putative nCLU BH3 domain with anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The chemical shift perturbation data demonstrated that the nCLU BH3 domain binds to pro-apoptotic BH3 peptide-binding grooves in both Bcl-XL and Bcl-2. A structural model of the Bcl-XL/nCLU BH3 peptide complex reveals that the binding mode is remarkably similar to those of other Bcl-XL/BH3 peptide complexes. In addition, mutational analysis confirmed that Leu323 and Asp328 of nCLU BH3 domain, absolutely conserved in the BH3 motifs of BH3-only protein family, are critical for binding to Bcl-XL. Taken altogether, our results suggest a molecular basis for the pro-apoptotic function of nCLU by elucidating the residue specific interactions of the BH3 motif in nCLU with anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins.

  4. Mechanism of antifreeze proteins action, based on Hierarchic theory of water and new ''clusterphilic'' interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Kaivarainen, A

    2001-01-01

    A basically new Hierarchic theory, general for solids and liquids (Kaivarainen, 2001, 2000, 1995, 1992), has been briefly described and illustrated by computer simulations on examples of water and ice. Full description of theory and its numerous applications are presented in series of articles at the arXiv of Los-Alamos (see http://arXiv.org/abs/physics/0102086). New clusterphilic interactions, intermediate between hydrophilic and hydrphobic, are introduced. They can be subdivided into: intramolecular - when water cluster is localized in the ''open'' states of big interdomain or intersubunit cavities and intermolecular clusterphilic interactions. Intermolecular clusterphilic interactions can be induced by very different macromolecules. The latter displays themselves in bordering of water cluster by macromolecules and forming so-called ''clustrons''. Clusterphilic interactions can play an important role in self-organization of biosystems, especially multiglobular allosteric enzymes, microtubules and the actin ...

  5. Application of Natural Isotopic Abundance ¹H-¹³C- and ¹H-¹⁵N-Correlated Two-Dimensional NMR for Evaluation of the Structure of Protein Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbogast, Luke W; Brinson, Robert G; Marino, John P

    2016-01-01

    Methods for characterizing the higher-order structure of protein therapeutics are in great demand for establishing consistency in drug manufacturing, for detecting drug product variations resulting from modifications in the manufacturing process, and for comparing a biosimilar to an innovator reference product. In principle, solution NMR can provide a robust approach for characterization of the conformation(s) of protein therapeutics in formulation at atomic resolution. However, molecular weight limitations and the perceived need for stable isotope labeling have to date limited its practical applications in the biopharmaceutical industry. Advances in NMR magnet and console technologies, cryogenically cooled probes, and new rapid acquisition methodologies, particularly selective optimized flip-angle short transient pulse schemes and nonuniform sampling, have greatly ameliorated these limitations. Here, we describe experimental methods for the collection and analysis of 2D (1)H(N)-(15)N-amide- and (1)H-(13)C-methyl-correlated spectra applied to protein drug products at natural isotopic abundance, including representatives from the rapidly growing class of monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics. Practical aspects of experimental setup and data acquisition for both standard and rapid acquisition NMR techniques are described. Furthermore, strategies for the statistical comparison of 2D (1)H(N)-(15)N-amide- and (1)H-(13)C-methyl-correlated spectra are detailed. PMID:26791974

  6. Structure determination of uniformly {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeled protein using qualitative distance restraints from MAS solid-state {sup 13}C-NMR observed paramagnetic relaxation enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamaki, Hajime [Hokkaido University, Graduate School of Life Science (Japan); Egawa, Ayako [Osaka University, Institute for Protein Research (Japan); Kido, Kouki [Hokkaido University, Graduate School of Life Science (Japan); Kameda, Tomoshi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Biotechnology Research Institute for Drug Discovery (Japan); Kamiya, Masakatsu; Kikukawa, Takashi; Aizawa, Tomoyasu [Hokkaido University, Faculty of Advanced Life Science (Japan); Fujiwara, Toshimichi [Osaka University, Institute for Protein Research (Japan); Demura, Makoto, E-mail: demura@sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Hokkaido University, Faculty of Advanced Life Science (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    Magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful method for structure determination of insoluble biomolecules. However, structure determination by MAS solid-state NMR remains challenging because it is difficult to obtain a sufficient amount of distance restraints owing to spectral complexity. Collection of distance restraints from paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) is a promising approach to alleviate this barrier. However, the precision of distance restraints provided by PRE is limited in solid-state NMR because of incomplete averaged interactions and intermolecular PREs. In this report, the backbone structure of the B1 domain of streptococcal protein G (GB1) has been successfully determined by combining the CS-Rosetta protocol and qualitative PRE restraints. The derived structure has a Cα RMSD of 1.49 Å relative to the X-ray structure. It is noteworthy that our protocol can determine the correct structure from only three cysteine-EDTA-Mn{sup 2+} mutants because this number of PRE sites is insufficient when using a conventional structure calculation method based on restrained molecular dynamics and simulated annealing. This study shows that qualitative PRE restraints can be employed effectively for protein structure determination from a limited conformational sampling space using a protein fragment library.

  7. Bayesian Peak Picking for NMR Spectra

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Yichen

    2014-02-01

    Protein structure determination is a very important topic in structural genomics, which helps people to understand varieties of biological functions such as protein-protein interactions, protein–DNA interactions and so on. Nowadays, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has often been used to determine the three-dimensional structures of protein in vivo. This study aims to automate the peak picking step, the most important and tricky step in NMR structure determination. We propose to model the NMR spectrum by a mixture of bivariate Gaussian densities and use the stochastic approximation Monte Carlo algorithm as the computational tool to solve the problem. Under the Bayesian framework, the peak picking problem is casted as a variable selection problem. The proposed method can automatically distinguish true peaks from false ones without preprocessing the data. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first effort in the literature that tackles the peak picking problem for NMR spectrum data using Bayesian method.

  8. Effect of antifreeze glycoprotein 8 supplementation during vitrification on the developmental competence of bovine oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shuang; Yuan, Bao; Kwon, Jeong-Woo; Ahn, Mija; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Bang, Jeong Kyu; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2016-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of antifreeze glycoprotein 8 (AFGP8) supplementation during vitrification on the survival, fertilization, and embryonic development of bovine oocytes and the underlying molecular mechanism(s). Survival, fertilization, early embryonic development, apoptosis, DNA double-strand breaks, reactive oxygen species levels, meiotic cytoskeleton assembly, chromosome alignment, and energy status of mitochondria were measured in the present experiments. Compared with that in the nonsupplemented group; survival, monospermy, blastocyst formation rates, and blastomere counts were significantly higher in the AFGP8-supplemented animals. Oocytes of the latter group also presented fewer double-strand breaks and lower cathepsin B and caspase activities. Rates of normal spindle organization and chromosome alignment, actin filament impairment, and mitochondrial distribution were significantly higher in the AFGP8-supplemented group. In addition, intracellular reactive oxygen species levels significantly decreased in the AFGP8-supplemented groups, maintaining a higher ΔΨm than that in the nonsupplemented group. Taken together, these results indicated that supplementation with AFGP8 during vitrification has a protective effect on bovine oocytes against chilling injury. PMID:26948296

  9. Ancient climate change, antifreeze, and the evolutionary diversification of Antarctic fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Near, Thomas J; Dornburg, Alex; Kuhn, Kristen L; Eastman, Joseph T; Pennington, Jillian N; Patarnello, Tomaso; Zane, Lorenzo; Fernández, Daniel A; Jones, Christopher D

    2012-02-28

    The Southern Ocean around Antarctica is among the most rapidly warming regions on Earth, but has experienced episodic climate change during the past 40 million years. It remains unclear how ancient periods of climate change have shaped Antarctic biodiversity. The origin of antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs) in Antarctic notothenioid fishes has become a classic example of how the evolution of a key innovation in response to climate change can drive adaptive radiation. By using a time-calibrated molecular phylogeny of notothenioids and reconstructed paleoclimate, we demonstrate that the origin of AFGP occurred between 42 and 22 Ma, which includes a period of global cooling approximately 35 Ma. However, the most species-rich lineages diversified and evolved significant ecological differences at least 10 million years after the origin of AFGPs, during a second cooling event in the Late Miocene (11.6-5.3 Ma). This pattern indicates that AFGP was not the sole trigger of the notothenioid adaptive radiation. Instead, the bulk of the species richness and ecological diversity originated during the Late Miocene and into the Early Pliocene, a time coincident with the origin of polar conditions and increased ice activity in the Southern Ocean. Our results challenge the current understanding of the evolution of Antarctic notothenioids suggesting that the ecological opportunity that underlies this adaptive radiation is not linked to a single trait, but rather to a combination of freeze avoidance offered by AFGPs and subsequent exploitation of new habitats and open niches created by increased glacial and ice sheet activity. PMID:22331888

  10. RECENT PROGRESS IN BIOMOLECULAR NMR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ Structural genomics and proteomics were born from the understanding that functions of a protein are dictated by its 3D structure and dynamics. To understand protein functions on a genomic scale, we must know protein structures on a genomic scale. High resolution NMR can be used for this purpose. Traditional multidimensional NMR structure determination protocols become ineffective for structural genomics since to obtain a structure of a small protein of 15kD requires many months of painstaking spectral analysis and modeling. Recent advances in magnet and probe technology and in experimental methods have expanded the range of proteins amenable to structure determination and make the large scale structure determination possible. These advances are (1) effective expression systems for protein production, (2) introduction of cryoprobe, (3) structure determination with the use of the minimal amount of structural restraints obtained from the chemical shifts, residual dipolar couplings, NOEs, and computer modeling. In this talk,Iwill briefly outline these developments and related works done in our NMR lab.

  11. Structural proteomics by NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Joon; Lee, Woonghee; Lee, Weontae

    2008-08-01

    Structural proteomics is one of the powerful research areas in the postgenomic era, elucidating structure-function relationships of uncharacterized gene products based on the 3D protein structure. It proposes biochemical and cellular functions of unannotated proteins and thereby identifies potential drug design and protein engineering targets. Recently, a number of pioneering groups in structural proteomics research have achieved proof of structural proteomic theory by predicting the 3D structures of hypothetical proteins that successfully identified the biological functions of those proteins. The pioneering groups made use of a number of techniques, including NMR spectroscopy, which has been applied successfully to structural proteomics studies over the past 10 years. In addition, advances in hardware design, data acquisition methods, sample preparation and automation of data analysis have been developed and successfully applied to high-throughput structure determination techniques. These efforts ensure that NMR spectroscopy will become an important methodology for performing structural proteomics research on a genomic scale. NMR-based structural proteomics together with x-ray crystallography will provide a comprehensive structural database to predict the basic biological functions of hypothetical proteins identified by the genome projects. PMID:18761469

  12. First solid-state NMR analysis of uniformly ¹³C-enriched major light-harvesting complexes from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and identification of protein and cofactor spin clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Anjali; Morosinotto, Tomas; Reus, Michael; Holzwarth, Alfred R; Bassi, Roberto; de Groot, Huub J M

    2011-04-01

    The light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) is the main component of the antenna system of plants and green algae and plays a major role in the capture of sun light for photosynthesis. The LHCII complexes have also been proposed to play a key role in the optimization of photosynthetic efficiency through the process of state 1-state 2 transitions and are involved in down-regulation of photosynthesis under excess light by energy dissipation through non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). We present here the first solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR data of the major light-harvesting complex (LHCII) of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a eukaryotic green alga. We are able to identify nuclear spin clusters of the protein and of its associated chlorophyll pigments in ¹³C-¹³C dipolar homonuclear correlation spectra on a uniformly ¹³C-labeled sample. In particular, we were able to resolve several chlorophyll 13¹ carbon resonances that are sensitive to hydrogen bonding to the 13¹-keto carbonyl group. The data show that ¹³C NMR signals of the pigments and protein sites are well resolved, thus paving the way to study possible structural reorganization processes involved in light-harvesting regulation through MAS solid-state NMR. PMID:21276419

  13. Selective 'unlabeling' of amino acids in fractionally 13C labeled proteins: An approach for stereospecific NMR assignments of CH3 groups in Val and Leu residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atreya, H.S.; Chary, K.V.R. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Department of Chemical Sciences (India)

    2001-03-15

    A novel methodology for stereospecific NMR assignments of methyl (CH{sub 3}) groups of Val and Leu residues in fractionally {sup 13}C-labeled proteins is presented. The approach is based on selective 'unlabeling' of specific amino acids in proteins while fractionally {sup 13}C-labeling the rest. A 2D [{sup 13}C-{sup 1}H] HSQC spectrum recorded on such a sample is devoid of peaks belonging to the 'unlabeled' amino acid residues. Such spectral simplification aids in unambiguous stereospecific assignment of diastereotopic CH{sub 3} groups in Val and Leu residues in large proteins. This methodology has been demonstrated on a 15 kDa calcium binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica (Eh-CaBP)

  14. NMR studies of metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the authors present applications of NMR to the study of different aspects of metabolism. The authors begin with a brief outline of localization methods that are commonly used to obtain in vivo NMR spectra. The authors then describe in more detail metabolic information recently obtained by NMR of perfused organs, intact animals, and humans. Previous reviews have already covered the applications of NMR to the study of metabolism in microorganisms, isolated or cultivated cells, and tumors. NMR spectroscopy of the brain, and human in vivo NMR spectroscopy have also been reviewed

  15. Carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy of biological systems

    CERN Document Server

    Beckmann, Nicolau

    1995-01-01

    This book is intended to provide an in-depth understanding of 13C NMR as a tool in biological research. 13C NMR has provided unique information concerning complex biological systems, from proteins and nucleic acids to animals and humans. The subjects addressed include multidimensional heteronuclear techniques for structural studies of molecules in the liquid and solid states, the investigation of interactions in model membranes, the elucidation of metabolic pathwaysin vitro and in vivo on animals, and noninvasive metabolic studies performed on humans. The book is a unique mix of NMR methods and biological applications which makes it a convenient reference for those interested in research in this interdisciplinary area of physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine.Key Features* An interdisciplinary text with emphasis on both 13C NMR methodology and the relevant biological and biomedical issues* State-of-the-art 13C NMR techniques are described; Whenever possible, their advantages over other approaches are empha...

  16. Effects of anti-freeze concentration in the engine coolant on the cavitation temperature of a water pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improvements in engine-manufacturing technology have gradually increased the thermal efficiencies of engines as well as the burning temperature and pressure of fuels within the cylinders. Accordingly, greater heat dissipation are required. However, the volume of the radiators is constrained by the configuration of the engines, leading to excessive internal resistance in the engine-cooling system. Therefore, water pumps in engines are prone to cavitation, and air bubbles are likely to permeate into the anti-freeze, thereby severely reducing the performance, reliability and service life of the engines. Ethylene glycol (EG) is added to the radiator of some vehicles in cold areas to reduce the solidification point of the coolant and prevent freezing. This study probes the effects of the percentage of anti-freeze added to the cooling water in a water pump in an engine on the water-supply capability and cavitation temperature, whether air or burnt gas is present in the system. The results of this study have revealed that engines have a higher tolerance to air bubbles at lower rates of rotation. At a given fixed rotational speed, the tolerable cavitation temperature of an engine's water pump will fall slowly as the amount of air bubbles increases

  17. NMR analysis of biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel is usually analyzed by the various methods called for in standards such as ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is not one of these methods. However, NMR, with 1H-NMR commonly applied, can be useful in a variety of applications related to biodiesel. These include monit...

  18. Heteronuclear 2D NMR studies on an engineered insulin monomer: Assignments and characterization of the receptor-binding surface by selective 2H and 13C labeling with application to protein design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insulin provides an important model for the application of genetic engineering to rational protein design and has been well characterized in the crystal state. However, self-association of insulin in solution has precluded complementary 2D NMR study under physiological conditions. The authors demonstrate here that such limitations may be circumvented by the use of a monomeric analogue that contains three amino acid substitutions on the protein surface (HisB10 → Asp, ProB28 → Lys, and LysB29 → Pro); this analogue (designated DKP-insulin) retains native receptor-binding potency. Comparative 1H NMR studies of native human insulin and a series of three related analogues-(i) the singly substituted analogue [HisB10→Asp], (ii) the doubly substituted analogue [ProB28→Lys; LysB29→Pro], and (iii) DKP-insulin-demonstrate progressive reduction in concentration-dependent line-broadening in accord with the results of analytical ultracentrifugation. Extensive nonlocal interactions are observed in the NOESY spectrum of DKP-insulin, indicating that this analogue adopts a compact and stably folded structure as a monomer in overall accord with crystal models. Site-specific 2H and 13C isotopic labels are introduced by semisynthesis as probes for the structure and dynamics of the receptor-binding surface. These studies confirm and extend under physiological conditions the results of a previous 2D NMR analysis of native insulin in 20% acetic acid. Implications for the role of protein flexibility in receptor recognition are discussed with application to the design of novel insulin analogues

  19. A chemical approach for site-specific identification of NMR signals from protein side-chain NH{sub 3}{sup +} groups forming intermolecular ion pairs in protein–nucleic acid complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Kurtis M. [University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Department of NanoMedicine and Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Molecular Medicine (United States); Nguyen, Dan; Esadze, Alexandre; Zandrashvili, Levani [University of Texas Medical Branch, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics (United States); Gorenstein, David G. [University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Department of NanoMedicine and Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Molecular Medicine (United States); Iwahara, Junji, E-mail: juiwahar@utmb.edu, E-mail: j.iwahara@utmb.edu [University of Texas Medical Branch, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Protein–nucleic acid interactions involve intermolecular ion pairs of protein side-chain and DNA or RNA phosphate groups. Using three protein–DNA complexes, we demonstrate that site-specific oxygen-to-sulfur substitution in phosphate groups allows for identification of NMR signals from the protein side-chain NH{sub 3}{sup +} groups forming the intermolecular ion pairs. A characteristic change in their {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N resonances upon this modification (i.e., substitution of phosphate to phosphorodithioate) can represent a signature of an intermolecular ion pair. Hydrogen-bond scalar coupling between protein side-chain {sup 15}N and DNA phosphorodithiaote {sup 31}P nuclei provides direct confirmation of the intermolecular ion pair. The same approach is likely applicable to protein–RNA complexes as well.

  20. A chemical approach for site-specific identification of NMR signals from protein side-chain NH3+ groups forming intermolecular ion pairs in protein–nucleic acid complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein–nucleic acid interactions involve intermolecular ion pairs of protein side-chain and DNA or RNA phosphate groups. Using three protein–DNA complexes, we demonstrate that site-specific oxygen-to-sulfur substitution in phosphate groups allows for identification of NMR signals from the protein side-chain NH3+ groups forming the intermolecular ion pairs. A characteristic change in their 1H and 15N resonances upon this modification (i.e., substitution of phosphate to phosphorodithioate) can represent a signature of an intermolecular ion pair. Hydrogen-bond scalar coupling between protein side-chain 15N and DNA phosphorodithiaote 31P nuclei provides direct confirmation of the intermolecular ion pair. The same approach is likely applicable to protein–RNA complexes as well

  1. 15N NMR relaxation studies of calcium-loaded parvalbumin show tight dynamics compared to those of other EF-hand proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldellon, C; Alattia, J R; Strub, M P;

    1998-01-01

    Dynamics of the rat alpha-parvalbumin calcium-loaded form have been determined by measurement of 15N nuclear relaxation using proton-detected heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. The relaxation data were analyzed using spectral density functions and the Lipari-Szabo formalism. The major dynamic features...

  2. Dynamics of a truncated prion protein, PrP(113–231), from 15N NMR relaxation: Order parameters calculated and slow conformational fluctuations localized to a distinct region

    OpenAIRE

    O'Sullivan, Denis B D; Jones, Christopher E; Abdelraheim, Salama R; Brazier, Marcus W; Toms, Harold; Brown, David R; Viles, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Prion diseases are associated with the misfolding of the prion protein (PrPC) from a largely α-helical isoform to a β-sheet rich oligomer (PrPSc). Flexibility of the polypeptide could contribute to the ability of PrPC to undergo the conformational rearrangement during PrPC–PrPSc interactions, which then leads to the misfolded isoform. We have therefore examined the molecular motions of mouse PrPC, residues 113–231, in solution, using 15N NMR relaxation measurements. A truncated fragment has b...

  3. “Fuzzy oil drop” model applied to individual small proteins built of 70 amino acids

    OpenAIRE

    Prymula, Katarzyna; Sałapa, Kinga; Roterman, Irena

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The proteins composed of short polypeptides (about 70 amino acid residues) representing the following functional groups (according to PDB notation): growth hormones, serine protease inhibitors, antifreeze proteins, chaperones and proteins of unknown function, were selected for structural and functional analysis. Classification based on the distribution of hydrophobicity in terms of deficiency/excess as the measure of structural and functional specificity is presented. The ...

  4. An introduction to biological NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for biologists interested in the structure, dynamics, and interactions of biological macromolecules. This review aims at presenting in an accessible manner the requirements and limitations of this technique. As an introduction, the history of NMR will highlight how the method evolved from physics to chemistry and finally to biology over several decades. We then introduce the NMR spectral parameters used in structural biology, namely the chemical shift, the J-coupling, nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings. Resonance assignment, the required step for any further NMR study, bears a resemblance to jigsaw puzzle strategy. The NMR spectral parameters are then converted into angle and distances and used as input using restrained molecular dynamics to compute a bundle of structures. When interpreting a NMR-derived structure, the biologist has to judge its quality on the basis of the statistics provided. When the 3D structure is a priori known by other means, the molecular interaction with a partner can be mapped by NMR: information on the binding interface as well as on kinetic and thermodynamic constants can be gathered. NMR is suitable to monitor, over a wide range of frequencies, protein fluctuations that play a crucial role in their biological function. In the last section of this review, intrinsically disordered proteins, which have escaped the attention of classical structural biology, are discussed in the perspective of NMR, one of the rare available techniques able to describe structural ensembles. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 16 MCP). (authors)

  5. Protein catabolism and high lipid metabolism associated with long-distance exercise are revealed by plasma NMR metabolomics in endurance horses

    OpenAIRE

    Laurence Le Moyec; Céline Robert; Triba, Mohamed N.; Billat, Véronique L.; Xavier Mata; Laurent Schibler; Eric Barrey

    2014-01-01

    During long distance endurance races, horses undergo high physiological and metabolic stresses. The adaptation processes involve the modulation of the energetic pathways in order to meet the energy demand. The aims were to evaluate the effects of long endurance exercise on the plasma metabolomic profiles and to investigate the relationships with the individual horse performances. The metabolomic profiles of the horses were analyzed using the non-dedicated methodology, NMR spectroscopy and sta...

  6. Protein Catabolism and High Lipid Metabolism Associated with Long-Distance Exercise Are Revealed by Plasma NMR Metabolomics in Endurance Horses

    OpenAIRE

    Robert, Céline; Triba, Mohamed N.; Billat, Veronique L.; Mata, Xavier; Schibler, Laurent; Barrey, Eric

    2014-01-01

    During long distance endurance races, horses undergo high physiological and metabolic stresses. The adaptation processes involve the modulation of the energetic pathways in order to meet the energy demand. The aims were to evaluate the effects of long endurance exercise on the plasma metabolomic profiles and to investigate the relationships with the individual horse performances. The metabolomic profiles of the horses were analyzed using the non-dedicated methodology, NMR spectroscopy and sta...

  7. Isolation and characterisation of sericin antifreeze peptides and molecular dynamics modelling of their ice-binding interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinhong; Rong, Yuzhi; Wang, Zhengwu; Zhou, Yanfu; Wang, Shaoyun; Zhao, Bo

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to isolate and characterise a novel sericin antifreeze peptide and investigate its ice-binding molecular mechanism. The thermal hysteresis activity of ice-binding sericin peptides (I-SP) was measured and their activity reached as high as 0.94 °C. A P4 fraction, with high hypothermia protective activity and inhibition activity of ice recrystallisation, was obtained from I-SP, and a purified sericin peptide, named SM-AFP, with the sequence of TTSPTNVSTT and a molecular weight of 1009.50 Da was then isolated from the P4 fraction. Treatment of Lactobacillus delbrueckii Subsp. bulgaricus LB340 LYO with 100 μg/ml synthetic SM-AFP led to 1.4-fold increased survival (p Sericin peptides could be developed into beneficial cryoprotectants and used in frozen food processing. PMID:25529728

  8. NMR at 900 MHz

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ An important factor in the development of solutionstate NMR has always been th e ability to produce stable and homogeneous magnetic fields. As higher and higher field strengths are reached the pressure is growing on manufacturers to produce NMR systems with greatly improved spectral resolution and signal to noise ratio. The introduction of the Varian 900 MHz INOVA system in August 2000 featuring Oxford Instruments 21.1 T magnet represents the latest pioneering development in NMR technology.

  9. Solution NMR of proteins within polyacrylamide gels: Diffusional properties and residual alignment by mechanical stress or embedding of oriented purple membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diffusive properties of biomacromolecules within the aqueous phase of polyacrylamide gels are described. High quality NMR spectra can be obtained under such conditions. As compared to water, a fivefold reduction in the translational diffusion constant, but only a 1.6-fold decrease (1.4-fold increase) in amide-15N T2 (T1) are observed for human ubiquitin within a 10% acrylamide gel. Weak alignment of the solute macromolecules can be achieved within such gels by vertical or radial compression or by the embedding of magnetically oriented purple membrane fragments. The methods are applied to derive residual dipolar couplings for human HIV-1 Nef and ubiquitin

  10. Rhodopsin-lipid interactions studied by NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubias, Olivier; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The biophysical properties of the lipid matrix are known to influence function of integral membrane proteins. We report on a sample preparation method for reconstitution of membrane proteins which uses porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) filters with 200-nm-wide pores of high density. The substrate permits formation of tubular, single membranes that line the inner surface of pores. One square centimeter of filter with a thickness of 60μm yields on the order of 500cm(2) of solid-supported single bilayer surface, sufficient for NMR studies. The tubular bilayers are free of detergent, fully hydrated, and accessible for ligands from one side of the membrane. The use of AAO filters greatly improves reproducibility of the reconstitution process such that the influence of protein on lipid order parameters can be studied with high resolution. As an example, results for the G protein-coupled receptor of class A, bovine rhodopsin, are shown. By (2)H NMR order parameter measurements, it is detected that rhodopsin insertion elastically deforms membranes near the protein. Furthermore, by (1)H saturation-transfer NMR under conditions of magic angle spinning, we demonstrate detection of preferences in interactions of rhodopsin with particular lipid species. It is assumed that function of integral membrane proteins depends on both protein-induced elastic deformations of the lipid matrix and preferences for interaction of the protein with particular lipid species in the first layer of lipids surrounding the protein. PMID:23374188

  11. Use of 2D NMR, protein engineering, and molecular modeling to study the hapten-binding site of an antibody Fv fragment against 2-phenyloxazolone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional (2D) 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to study the hapten-binding site of a recombinant antibody Fv fragment expressed in Escherichia coli. Point mutations of residues in the CDR loops of the Fv fragment were designed in order to investigate their influence on hapten binding and to make site-specific assignments of aromatic NMR proton signals. Two tyrosines giving NOEs to the ligand 2-phenyloxazolone were identified, residue 33 in CDR1 of the heavy chain and residue 32 in CDR1 of the light chain. The benzyl portion of 2-phenyloxazolone is located between these two residues. The binding site is close to the surface of the Fv fragment. Comparison with a different anti-2-phenyloxazolone antibody, the crystal structure of which has recently been solved, shows that the general location of the hapten-binding site in both antibodies is similar. However, in the crystallographically solved antibody, the hapten is bound farther from the surface in a pocket created by a short CDR3 loop of the heavy chain. In the binding site identified in the Fv fragment studied in this report, this space is probably filled by the extra seven residues of the CDR3

  12. Dynamics of antibody domains studied by solution NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Bang K; Walsh, Joseph D; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Ishima, Rieko

    2009-01-01

    Information on local dynamics of antibodies is important to evaluate stability, to rationally design variants, and to clarify conformational disorders at the epitope binding sites. Such information may also be useful for improved understanding of antigen recognition. NMR can be used for characterization of local protein dynamics at the atomic level through relaxation measurements. Due to the complexity of the NMR spectra, an extensive use of this method is limited to small protein molecules, for example, antibody domains and some scFv. Here, we describe a protocol that was used to study the dynamics of an antibody domain in solution using NMR. We describe protein preparation for NMR studies, NMR sample optimization, signal assignments, and dynamics experiments. PMID:19252840

  13. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 32 refs., 56 figs

  14. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 55 figs

  15. Effect of phosphorylation on hydrogen-bonding interactions of the active site histidine of the phosphocarrier protein HPr of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system determined by 15N NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phosphocarrier protein HPr of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar transport system of Escherichia coli can exist in a phosphorylated and a nonphosphorylated form. During phosphorylation, the phosphoryl group is carried on a histidine residue, His15. The hydrogen-bonding state of this histidine was examined with 15N NMR. For this purpose we selectively enriched the histidine imidazole nitrogens with 15N by supplying an E. coli histidine auxotroph with the amino acid labeled either at the Nδ1 and Nε2 positions or at only the Nδ1 position. 15N NMR spectra of two synthesized model compound, phosphoimidazole and phosphomethylimidazole, were also recorded. The authors show that, prior to phosphorylation, the protonated His15 Nε2 is strongly hydrogen bonded, most probably to a carboxylate moiety. The H-bond should strengthen the nucleophilic character of the deprotonated Nδ1, resulting in a good acceptor for the phosphoryl group. The hydrogen bond to the His15 Nδ1 breaks upon phosphorylation of the residue. Implications of the H-bond structure for the mechanism of phosphorylation of HPr are discussed

  16. NMR data-driven structure determination using NMR-I-TASSER in the CASD-NMR experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NMR-I-TASSER, an adaption of the I-TASSER algorithm combining NMR data for protein structure determination, recently joined the second round of the CASD-NMR experiment. Unlike many molecular dynamics-based methods, NMR-I-TASSER takes a molecular replacement-like approach to the problem by first threading the target through the PDB to identify structural templates which are then used for iterative NOE assignments and fragment structure assembly refinements. The employment of multiple templates allows NMR-I-TASSER to sample different topologies while convergence to a single structure is not required. Retroactive and blind tests of the CASD-NMR targets from Rounds 1 and 2 demonstrate that even without using NOE peak lists I-TASSER can generate correct structure topology with 15 of 20 targets having a TM-score above 0.5. With the addition of NOE-based distance restraints, NMR-I-TASSER significantly improved the I-TASSER models with all models having the TM-score above 0.5. The average RMSD was reduced from 5.29 to 2.14 Å in Round 1 and 3.18 to 1.71 Å in Round 2. There is no obvious difference in the modeling results with using raw and refined peak lists, indicating robustness of the pipeline to the NOE assignment errors. Overall, despite the low-resolution modeling the current NMR-I-TASSER pipeline provides a coarse-grained structure folding approach complementary to traditional molecular dynamics simulations, which can produce fast near-native frameworks for atomic-level structural refinement

  17. NMR data-driven structure determination using NMR-I-TASSER in the CASD-NMR experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Richard [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, School of Software Engineering (China); Wang, Yan [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, School of Life Science and Technology (China); Xue, Zhidong, E-mail: zdxue@hust.edu.cn [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, School of Software Engineering (China); Zhang, Yang, E-mail: zhng@umich.edu [University of Michigan, Department of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics (United States)

    2015-08-15

    NMR-I-TASSER, an adaption of the I-TASSER algorithm combining NMR data for protein structure determination, recently joined the second round of the CASD-NMR experiment. Unlike many molecular dynamics-based methods, NMR-I-TASSER takes a molecular replacement-like approach to the problem by first threading the target through the PDB to identify structural templates which are then used for iterative NOE assignments and fragment structure assembly refinements. The employment of multiple templates allows NMR-I-TASSER to sample different topologies while convergence to a single structure is not required. Retroactive and blind tests of the CASD-NMR targets from Rounds 1 and 2 demonstrate that even without using NOE peak lists I-TASSER can generate correct structure topology with 15 of 20 targets having a TM-score above 0.5. With the addition of NOE-based distance restraints, NMR-I-TASSER significantly improved the I-TASSER models with all models having the TM-score above 0.5. The average RMSD was reduced from 5.29 to 2.14 Å in Round 1 and 3.18 to 1.71 Å in Round 2. There is no obvious difference in the modeling results with using raw and refined peak lists, indicating robustness of the pipeline to the NOE assignment errors. Overall, despite the low-resolution modeling the current NMR-I-TASSER pipeline provides a coarse-grained structure folding approach complementary to traditional molecular dynamics simulations, which can produce fast near-native frameworks for atomic-level structural refinement.

  18. Probing Microsecond Time Scale Dynamics in Proteins by Methyl H-1 Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill Relaxation Dispersion NMR Measurements. Application to Activation of the Signaling Protein NtrC(r)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, Renee; Villali, Janice; Kern, Dorothee; Mulder, Frans A. A.

    2010-01-01

    To study microsecond processes by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy, low power deposition and short pulses are crucial and encourage the development of experiments that employ H-1 Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse trains. Herein, a method is described for the comprehensive study of microse

  19. Assignment of methyl NMR resonances of a 52 kDa protein with residue-specific 4D correlation maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methyl groups have become key probes for structural and functional studies by nuclear magnetic resonance. However, their NMR signals cluster in a small spectral region and assigning their resonances can be a tedious process. Here, we present a method that facilitates assignment of methyl resonances from assigned amide groups. Calculating the covariance between sensitive methyl and amide 3D spectra, each providing correlations to Cα and Cβ separately, produces 4D correlation maps directly correlating methyl groups to amide groups. Optimal correlation maps are obtained by extracting residue-specific regions, applying derivative to the dimensions subject to covariance, and multiplying 4D maps stemming from different 3D spectra. The latter procedure rescues weak signals that may be missed in traditional assignment procedures. Using these covariance correlation maps, nearly all assigned isoleucine, leucine, and valine amide resonances of a 52 kDa nonribosomal peptide synthetase cyclization domain were paired with their corresponding methyl groups

  20. Assignment of methyl NMR resonances of a 52 kDa protein with residue-specific 4D correlation maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Subrata H.; Frueh, Dominique P., E-mail: dfrueh@jhmi.edu [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Methyl groups have become key probes for structural and functional studies by nuclear magnetic resonance. However, their NMR signals cluster in a small spectral region and assigning their resonances can be a tedious process. Here, we present a method that facilitates assignment of methyl resonances from assigned amide groups. Calculating the covariance between sensitive methyl and amide 3D spectra, each providing correlations to C{sup α} and C{sup β} separately, produces 4D correlation maps directly correlating methyl groups to amide groups. Optimal correlation maps are obtained by extracting residue-specific regions, applying derivative to the dimensions subject to covariance, and multiplying 4D maps stemming from different 3D spectra. The latter procedure rescues weak signals that may be missed in traditional assignment procedures. Using these covariance correlation maps, nearly all assigned isoleucine, leucine, and valine amide resonances of a 52 kDa nonribosomal peptide synthetase cyclization domain were paired with their corresponding methyl groups.

  1. Nano-Mole Scale Side-Chain Signal Assignment by 1H-Detected Protein Solid-State NMR by Ultra-Fast Magic-Angle Spinning and Stereo-Array Isotope Labeling

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Songlin

    2015-04-09

    We present a general approach in 1H-detected 13C solid-state NMR (SSNMR) for side-chain signal assignments of 10-50 nmol quantities of proteins using a combination of a high magnetic field, ultra-fast magic-angle spinning (MAS) at ~80 kHz, and stereo-array-isotope-labeled (SAIL) proteins [Kainosho M. et al., Nature 440, 52–57, 2006]. First, we demonstrate that 1H indirect detection improves the sensitivity and resolution of 13C SSNMR of SAIL proteins for side-chain assignments in the ultra-fast MAS condition. 1H-detected SSNMR was performed for micro-crystalline ubiquitin (~55 nmol or ~0.5mg) that was SAIL-labeled at seven isoleucine (Ile) residues. Sensitivity was dramatically improved by 1H-detected 2D 1H/13C SSNMR by factors of 5.4-9.7 and 2.1-5.0, respectively, over 13C-detected 2D 1H/13C SSNMR and 1D 13C CPMAS, demonstrating that 2D 1H-detected SSNMR offers not only additional resolution but also sensitivity advantage over 1D 13C detection for the first time. High 1H resolution for the SAIL-labeled side-chain residues offered reasonable resolution even in the 2D data. A 1H-detected 3D 13C/13C/1H experiment on SAIL-ubiquitin provided nearly complete 1H and 13C assignments for seven Ile residues only within ~2.5 h. The results demonstrate the feasibility of side-chain signal assignment in this approach for as little as 10 nmol of a protein sample within ~3 days. The approach is likely applicable to a variety of proteins of biological interest without any requirements of highly efficient protein expression systems.

  2. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, P.E. [Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  3. In-cell NMR in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongwichian, Rossukon; Selenko, Philipp

    2012-01-01

    For the purpose of studying IDPs inside cells of higher organisms, several eukaryotic in-cell NMR systems have been developed over the past years. In this chapter we will focus on high-resolution in-cell NMR applications in Xenopus laevis oocytes, the first eukaryotic cellular model system to be established. In contrast to prokaryotic in-cell NMR samples, eukaryotic in-cell NMR specimens are prepared by cytoplasmic delivery of an exogenously produced, isotope-labeled protein into the non-isotope-labeled environment of the respective "host" cell. In-cell NMR applications in Xenopus oocytes rely on intracellular sample deposition by direct microinjection into the oocyte cytoplasm. Here, we describe the preparation of oocyte in-cell NMR samples for IDP studies in this cellular model environment. PMID:22760310

  4. The mitochondrial precursor protein apocytochrome c strongly influences the order of the headgroup and acyl chains of phosphatidylserine dispersions. A sup 2 H and sup 31 P NMR study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordi, W.; de Kroon, A.I.P.M.; Killian, A.; de Kruijff, B. (State Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands))

    1990-03-06

    Deuterium and phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance techniques were used to study the interaction of the mitochondrial precursor protein apocytochrome c with headgroup-deuterated (dioleoylphosphatidyl-L-(2-{sup 2}H{sub 1})serine) and acyl chain deuterated (1,2-(11,11-{sup 2}H{sub 2})dioleoylphosphatidylserine) dispersions. Binding of the protein to dioleoylphosphatidylserine liposomes results in phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectra typical of phospholipids undergoing fast axial rotation in extended liquid-crystalline bilayers with a reduced residual chemical shift anisotropy and an increased line width. {sup 2}H NMR spectra on headgroup-deuterated dioleoylphosphatidylserine dispersions showed a decrease in quadrupolar splitting and a broadening of the signal on interaction with apocytochrome c. Addition of increasing amounts of apocytochrome c to the acyl chain deuterated dioleoylphosphatidylserine dispersions results in the gradual appearance of a second component in the spectra with a 44% reduced quadrupolar splitting. Such large reduction of the quadrupolar splitting has never been observed for any protein studied yet. The induction of a new spectral component with a well-defined reduced quadrupolar splitting seems to be confined to the N-terminus since addition of a small hydrophilic amino-terminal peptide (residues 1-38) also induces a second component with a strongly reduced quadrupolar splitting. A chemically synthesized peptide corresponding to amino acid residues 2-17 of the presequence of the mitochondrial protein cytochrome oxidase subunit IV also has a large perturbing effect on the order of the acyl chains, indicating that the observed effects may be a property shared by many mitochondrial precursor proteins. Implications of these data for the import of apocytochrome c into mitochondria will be discussed.

  5. Functional studies using NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume is based on a series of lectures delivered at a one-day teaching symposium on functional and metabolic aspects of NMR measurements held at the Middlesex Hospital Medical School on 1st September 1985 as a part of the European Nuclear Medicine Society Congress. Currently the major emphasis in medical NMR in vivo is on its potential to image and display abnormalities in conventional radiological images, providing increased contrast between normal and abnormal tissue, improved definition of vasculature, and possibly an increased potential for differential diagnosis. Although these areas are undeniably of major importance, it is probable that NMR will continue to complement conventional measurement methods. The major potential benefits to be derived from in vivo NMR measurements are likely to arise from its use as an instrument for functional and metabolic studies in both clinical research and in the everyday management of patients. It is to this area that this volume is directed

  6. Recrystallized S-layer protein of a probiotic Propionibacterium: structural and nanomechanical changes upon temperature or pH shifts probed by solid-state NMR and AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de sa Peixoto, Paulo; Roiland, Claire; Thomas, Daniel; Briard-Bion, Valérie; Le Guellec, Rozenn; Parayre, Sandrine; Deutsch, Stéphanie-Marie; Jan, Gwénaël; Guyomarc'h, Fanny

    2015-01-01

    Surface protein layers (S layers) are common constituents of the bacterial cell wall and originate from the assembly of strain-dependent surface layer proteins (Slps). These proteins are thought to play important roles in the bacteria's biology and to have very promising technological applications as biomaterials or as part of cell-host cross-talk in probiotic mechanism. The SlpA from Propionibacterium freudenreichii PFCIRM 118 strain was isolated and recrystallized to investigate organization and assembly of the protein using atomic force microscopy and solid-state (1)H and (13)C-nuclear magnetic resonance. SlpA was found to form hexagonal p1 monolayer lattices where the protein exhibited high proportions of disordered regions and of bound water. The lattice structure was maintained, but softened, upon mild heating or acidification, probably in relation with the increasing mobilities of the disordered protein regions. These results gave structural insights on the mobile protein regions exposed by S layer films, upon physiologically relevant changes of their environmental conditions. PMID:25479375

  7. Renal transplant NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preliminary results of NMR evaluation of renal transplants (Txs) are reported including correlation with nuclear medicine (NM) and ultrasound (US). Thirteen Txs (8 cadaver (Cd), 5 living related doner (LRD) in 13 patients (6M, 7F) ranging in age from 25-47 (x 35) were evaluated by NM (32), NMR (15) and US (5). Clinical diagnoses included: rejection (8), ATN (2), infarction (1), and normal (2). Of the 8 patients with rejection (5) Cd; 3 LRD) pathologic proof was obtained in 3. An experimental 0.12 T resistive magnet (GE) was used with a partial saturation technique with repetition time (TR) of 143 and 286 msec to provide T1 weighting. T2 weighted information was obtained with a spin echo technique with echo times (TE) of 20, 40, 60 and 80 msec. The NMR appearance of normal Txs consisted of a uniform signal intensity (Tx> pelvic musculature), well-defined internal architecture with good cortical medullary differentiation and normal appearing vessels. The NMR appearance of abnormal transplants consisted of a heterogeneous or overall decrease in signal intensity (kidney muscle) with poor cortical medullary differentiation with or without a halo of decreased signal intensity. Although NMR was able to differentiate normal from abnormal, it was unable to clearly discriminate between ATN and rejection. Advantages of NMR included the ability to demonstrate regional anatomy, vasculature, post operative fluid collections and hematomas, and associated avascular necrosis of the hips

  8. Dynamics of Antibody Domains Studied by Solution NMR

    OpenAIRE

    Vu, Bang K.; Walsh, Joseph D.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Ishima, Rieko

    2009-01-01

    Information on local dynamics of antibodies is important to evaluate stability, to rationally design variants, and to clarify conformational disorders at the epitope binding sites. Such information may also be useful for improved understanding of antigen recognition. NMR can be used for characterization of local protein dynamics at the atomic level through relaxation measurements. Due to the complexity of the NMR spectra, an extensive use of this method is limited to small protein molecules, ...

  9. Histidine 121 of staphylococcal nuclease. Correction of the Hδ21H NMR assignment and reinterpretation of the role this residue plays in conformation heterogeneity of the protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heteronuclear two-dimensional NMR studies of wild-type staphylococcal nuclease containing histidine residues uniformly labeled with carbon-13 (26% isotope) have led to full analysis of the aromatic parts of the histidine 1H and 13C spin systems. The 1Hδ2 and 13Cδ2 resonances of His121 were found to be split as the result of the Nal right-equilibrium Na2 conformational equilibrium described previously and attributed to cis-trans isomerism about the Lys116-Pro117 peptide bond (Nal, cis; Na2, trans). The relative intensities of the pair of 1Hε1 peaks from the same residue. A soluble-mutant enzyme (nuclease G79S + H124L), which exhibited a drastically altered [Na1] to [Na2] ratio, provided additional evidence that the pair of 1Hδ2 peaks and the pair of 1Hε1 peaks of His121 report on the same conformational equilibrium (Na1 right-equilibrium Na2). The unusual chemical shift of the 1Hδ2 of His121 is attributed to diamagnetic shielding by the aromatic ring of Tyr91 as verified by ring-current calculations based on two X-ray structures for wild-type staphylococcal nuclease

  10. Bacterial expression, purification, and model membrane reconstitution of the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the human APP binding protein LR11/SorLA for NMR studies

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xingsheng; Gill, Richard L; Zhu, Qin; Tian, Fang

    2011-01-01

    LR11 (SorLA) is a recently identified neuronal protein that interacts with amyloid precursor protein (APP), a central player in the pathology of the Alzheimer’s disease (AD). AD is a neurodegenerative disease and the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. Current estimates suggest that as many as 5.3 million Americans are living with AD. Recent investigations have uncovered the pathophysiological relevance of APP intracellular trafficking in AD. LR11 is of particular importance due to ...

  11. Evidence from NMR interaction studies challenges the hypothesis of direct lipid transfer from L-FABP to malaria sporozoite protein UIS3

    OpenAIRE

    Favretto, Filippo; Assfalg, Michael; Molinari, Henriette; D'Onofrio, Mariapina

    2012-01-01

    UIS3 is a malaria parasite protein essential for liver stage development of Plasmodium species, presumably localized to the membrane of the parasitophorous vacuole formed in infected cells. It has been recently proposed that the soluble domain of UIS3 interacts with the host liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), providing the parasite with a pathway for importing exogenous lipids required for its rapid growth. This finding may suggest novel strategies for arresting parasite development. ...

  12. Dynamics in photosynthetic transient complexes studied by paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scanu, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    This PhD thesis focuses on fundamental aspects of protein-protein interactions. A multidisciplinary methodology for the detection and visualization of transient, lowly-populated encounter protein complexes is described. The new methodology combined paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy with computational me

  13. Relaxation-compensated difference spin diffusion NMR for detecting 13C–13C long-range correlations in proteins and polysaccharides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of long-range distances remains a challenge in solid-state NMR structure determination of biological macromolecules. In 2D and 3D correlation spectra of uniformly 13C-labeled biomolecules, inter-residue, inter-segmental, and intermolecular 13C–13C cross peaks that provide important long-range distance constraints for three-dimensional structures often overlap with short-range cross peaks that only reflect the covalent structure of the molecule. It is therefore desirable to develop new approaches to obtain spectra containing only long-range cross peaks. Here we show that a relaxation-compensated modification of the commonly used 2D 1H-driven spin diffusion (PDSD) experiment allows the clean detection of such long-range cross peaks. By adding a z-filter to keep the total z-period of the experiment constant, we compensate for 13C T1 relaxation. As a result, the difference spectrum between a long- and a scaled short-mixing time spectrum show only long-range correlation signals. We show that one- and two-bond cross peaks equalize within a few tens of milliseconds. Within ∼200 ms, the intensity equilibrates within an amino acid residue and a monosaccharide to a value that reflects the number of spins in the local network. With T1 relaxation compensation, at longer mixing times, inter-residue and inter-segmental cross peaks increase in intensity whereas intra-segmental cross-peak intensities remain unchanged relative to each other and can all be subtracted out. Without relaxation compensation, the difference 2D spectra exhibit both negative and positive intensities due to heterogeneous T1 relaxation in most biomolecules, which can cause peak cancellation. We demonstrate this relaxation-compensated difference PDSD approach on amino acids, monosaccharides, a crystalline model peptide, a membrane-bound peptide and a plant cell wall sample. The resulting difference spectra yield clean multi-bond, inter-residue and intermolecular correlation peaks, which

  14. NMR Aerosolomics: Novel NMR Method for Organic Aerosol Analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horník, Štěpán; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Sýkora, Jan

    - : -, 2015, s. 162. ISBN N. [Small Molecule NMR Conference - SMASH 2015. Baveno (IT), 20.09.2015-23.09.2015] Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : aerosol * analysis * NMR Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  15. NMR studies of Borrelia burgdorferi OspA, a 28 kDa protein containing a single-layer {beta}-sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Thuy-Nga; Koide, Shohei

    1998-05-15

    The crystal structure of outer surface protein A (OspA) from Borrelia burgdorferi contains a single-layer {beta}-sheet connecting the N- and C-terminal globular domains. The central {beta}-sheet consists largely of polar amino acids and it is solvent-exposed on both faces, which so far appears to be unique among known protein structures. We have accomplished nearly complete backbone H, C and N and C{sup ;}/H{sup {beta}} assignments of OspA (28 kDa) using standard triple resonance techniques without perdeuteration. This was made possible by recording spectra at a high temperature (45 {sup o}C ). The chemical shift index and {sup 15}N T{sub 1}/T{sub 2} ratios show that both the secondary structure and the global conformation of OspA in solution are similar to the crystal structure, suggesting that the unique central {beta}-sheet is fairly rigid.

  16. Solid state NMR of proteins at high MAS frequencies: symmetry-based mixing and simultaneous acquisition of chemical shift correlation spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellstedt, Peter [Fritz Lipmann Institute, Biomolecular NMR spectroscopy, Leibniz Institute for Age Research (Germany); Herbst, Christian [Ubon Ratchathani University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science (Thailand); Haefner, Sabine; Leppert, Joerg; Goerlach, Matthias; Ramachandran, Ramadurai, E-mail: raman@fli-leibniz.de [Fritz Lipmann Institute, Biomolecular NMR spectroscopy, Leibniz Institute for Age Research (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    We have carried out chemical shift correlation experiments with symmetry-based mixing sequences at high MAS frequencies and examined different strategies to simultaneously acquire 3D correlation spectra that are commonly required in the structural studies of proteins. The potential of numerically optimised symmetry-based mixing sequences and the simultaneous recording of chemical shift correlation spectra such as: 3D NCAC and 3D NHH with dual receivers, 3D NC Prime C and 3D C Prime NCA with sequential {sup 13}C acquisitions, 3D NHH and 3D NC Prime H with sequential {sup 1}H acquisitions and 3D CANH and 3D C'NH with broadband {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N mixing are demonstrated using microcrystalline samples of the {beta}1 immunoglobulin binding domain of protein G (GB1) and the chicken {alpha}-spectrin SH3 domain.

  17. NMR imaging technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention provides a method that can be adapted to existing NMR tomographic scanners of producing spectra of any given point in the image of the specimen slice, the intensity distribution of a selected resonance within an area of the image of the specimen slice, or an entire NMR spectrum of the given area. The method comprises acquiring n projections of the specimen slice, where n is greater than 1. Each of the projections is then shifted by Δ f for the point (the frequency offset of the signal arising from the point, from the true chemical shift)

  18. Enhanced inactivation of avian influenza virus at −20°C by disinfectants supplemented with calcium chloride or other antifreeze agents