WorldWideScience

Sample records for antiestrogen resistant human

  1. Functional ablation of pRb activates Cdk2 and causes antiestrogen resistance in human breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant Varma

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Estrogens are required for the proliferation of hormone dependent breast cancer cells, making estrogen receptor (ER positive tumors amenable to endocrine therapies such as antiestrogens. However, resistance to these agents remains a significant cause of treatment failure. We previously demonstrated that inactivation of the retinoblastoma protein (pRb family tumor suppressors causes antiestrogen resistance in MCF-7 cells, a widely studied model of estrogen responsive human breast cancers. In this study, we investigate the mechanism by which pRb inactivation leads to antiestrogen resistance. Cdk4 and cdk2 are two key cell cycle regulators that can phosphorylate and inactivate pRb, therefore we tested whether these kinases are required in cells lacking pRb function. pRb family members were inactivated in MCF-7 cells by expressing polyomavirus large tumor antigen (PyLT, and cdk activity was inhibited using the cdk inhibitors p16(INK4A and p21(Waf1/Cip1. Cdk4 activity was no longer required in cells lacking functional pRb, while cdk2 activity was required for proliferation in both the presence and absence of pRb function. Using inducible PyLT cell lines, we further demonstrated that pRb inactivation leads to increased cyclin A expression, cdk2 activation and proliferation in antiestrogen arrested cells. These results demonstrate that antiestrogens do not inhibit cdk2 activity or proliferation of MCF-7 cells in the absence of pRb family function, and suggest that antiestrogen resistant breast cancer cells resulting from pRb pathway inactivation would be susceptible to therapies that target cdk2.

  2. Molecular Mechanisms of Estrogen and Antiestrogen Resistance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clarke, Robert

    2003-01-01

    .... " In this application, the studies are focused on antiestrogen resistance. With respect to the career development aspects, several original studies and reviews relevant to this application have been published, others have been submitted for publication...

  3. Anti-estrogen Resistance in Human Breast Tumors Is Driven by JAG1-NOTCH4-Dependent Cancer Stem Cell Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno M. Simões

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancers (BCs typically express estrogen receptors (ERs but frequently exhibit de novo or acquired resistance to hormonal therapies. Here, we show that short-term treatment with the anti-estrogens tamoxifen or fulvestrant decrease cell proliferation but increase BC stem cell (BCSC activity through JAG1-NOTCH4 receptor activation both in patient-derived samples and xenograft (PDX tumors. In support of this mechanism, we demonstrate that high ALDH1 predicts resistance in women treated with tamoxifen and that a NOTCH4/HES/HEY gene signature predicts for a poor response/prognosis in 2 ER+ patient cohorts. Targeting of NOTCH4 reverses the increase in Notch and BCSC activity induced by anti-estrogens. Importantly, in PDX tumors with acquired tamoxifen resistance, NOTCH4 inhibition reduced BCSC activity. Thus, we establish that BCSC and NOTCH4 activities predict both de novo and acquired tamoxifen resistance and that combining endocrine therapy with targeting JAG1-NOTCH4 overcomes resistance in human breast cancers.

  4. Carboplatin treatment of antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mathilde S; Yde, Christina Westmose; Christensen, Ib J

    2012-01-01

    Antiestrogen resistance is a major clinical problem in current breast cancer treatment. Therefore, biomarkers and new treatment options for antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer are needed. In this study, we investigated whether antiestrogen‑resistant breast cancer cell lines have increased...... sensitivity to carboplatin, as it was previously shown with cisplatin, and whether low Bcl-2 expression levels have a potential value as marker for increased carboplatin sensitivity. Breast cancer cells resistant to the pure antiestrogen fulvestrant, and two out of four cell lines resistant...... to the antiestrogen tamoxifen, were more sensitive to carboplatin treatment compared to the parental MCF-7 cell line. This indicates that carboplatin may be an advantageous treatment in antiestrogen‑resistant breast cancer; however, a marker for increased sensitivity would be needed. Low Bcl-2 expression...

  5. Breast Cancer Stem Cells in Antiestrogen Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    that several flavonoid derivatives purified from the bark of the Paper Mulberry tree (Broussonetiapapyrifera) (L.) were able to down-regulate ER...Feng et al., 2008). Various types of flavonoids are the major constituents of this plant and some of which exhibited strong tyrosinase inhibitory...mechanisms of the flavonoids from B. papyrifera in human cancer have never been studied. Recently, we purified and identified two prenylflavone derivatives

  6. Breast cancer cells with acquired antiestrogen resistance are sensitized to cisplatin-induced cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, Christina Westmose; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E

    2007-01-01

    Antiestrogens are currently used for treating breast cancer patients who have estrogen receptor-positive tumors. However, patients with advanced disease will eventually develop resistance to the drugs. Therefore, compounds effective on antiestrogen-resistant tumors will be of great importance for...

  7. Aurora kinase B is important for antiestrogen resistant cell growth and a potential biomarker for tamoxifen resistant breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sarah L; Yde, Christina W; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Resistance to antiestrogen therapy is a major clinical challenge in the treatment of estrogen receptor α (ER)-positive breast cancer. The aim of the study was to explore the growth promoting pathways of antiestrogen resistant breast cancer cells to identify biomarkers and novel treatm...

  8. HIF2α contributes to antiestrogen resistance via positive bilateral crosstalk with EGFR in breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Muhammad Wasi; Persson, Camilla Ulrika; Reinbothe, Susann

    2016-01-01

    or inhibition of EGFR led to decreased HIF2α levels. This positive and bilateral HIF2-EGFR regulatory crosstalk promotes antiestrogen resistance and, where intrinsic hypoxic resistance exists, therapy itself may exacerbate the problem. Finally, inhibition of HIFs by FM19G11 restores antiestrogen sensitivity...

  9. A kinase inhibitor screen identifies Mcl-1 and Aurora kinase A as novel treatment targets in antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, S; Pedersen, A M; Thomsen, M B H

    2015-01-01

    Antiestrogen resistance is a major problem in breast cancer treatment. Therefore, the search for new therapeutic targets and biomarkers for antiestrogen resistance is crucial. In this study, we performed a kinase inhibitor screen on antiestrogen responsive MCF-7 cells and a panel of MCF-7-derived...

  10. In Utero Estrogen Exposure Increases Antiestrogen Resistance by Inducing EMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    currently unclear. Our recent preclinical study found that maternal exposure to excess estrogens during pregnancy increases the risk that AE resistance in...References: 1. Hilakivi-Clarke L, Clarke R, Onojafe I, Raygada M, Cho E, Lippman M. A maternal diet high in n-6-polyunsaturated fats alters mammary...the rate of obesity in this country (high fat diets resulting in elevated circulating estrogen levels), the prevelance of bisphenol A in our drinking

  11. An integrative analysis of cellular contexts, miRNAs and mRNAs reveals network clusters associated with antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Seungyoon

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major goal of the field of systems biology is to translate genome-wide profiling data (e.g., mRNAs, miRNAs into interpretable functional networks. However, employing a systems biology approach to better understand the complexities underlying drug resistance phenotypes in cancer continues to represent a significant challenge to the field. Previously, we derived two drug-resistant breast cancer sublines (tamoxifen- and fulvestrant-resistant cell lines from the MCF7 breast cancer cell line and performed genome-wide mRNA and microRNA profiling to identify differential molecular pathways underlying acquired resistance to these important antiestrogens. In the current study, to further define molecular characteristics of acquired antiestrogen resistance we constructed an “integrative network”. We combined joint miRNA-mRNA expression profiles, cancer contexts, miRNA-target mRNA relationships, and miRNA upstream regulators. In particular, to reduce the probability of false positive connections in the network, experimentally validated, rather than prediction-oriented, databases were utilized to obtain connectivity. Also, to improve biological interpretation, cancer contexts were incorporated into the network connectivity. Results Based on the integrative network, we extracted “substructures” (network clusters representing the drug resistant states (tamoxifen- or fulvestrant-resistance cells compared to drug sensitive state (parental MCF7 cells. We identified un-described network clusters that contribute to antiestrogen resistance consisting of miR-146a, -27a, -145, -21, -155, -15a, -125b, and let-7s, in addition to the previously described miR-221/222. Conclusions By integrating miRNA-related network, gene/miRNA expression and text-mining, the current study provides a computational-based systems biology approach for further investigating the molecular mechanism underlying antiestrogen resistance in breast cancer cells. In

  12. Elevated insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor signaling induces antiestrogen resistance through the MAPK/ERK and PI3K/Akt signaling routes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.; Moerkens, M.; Ramaiahgari, S.; Bont, de H.J.G.M.; Price, L.; Meerman, J.H.N.; Water, van de B.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) receptor (IGF-1R) is phosphorylated in all breast cancer subtypes. Past findings have shown that IGF-1R mediates antiestrogen resistance through cross-talk with estrogen receptor (ER) signaling and via its action upstream of the epidermal growth

  13. The Role of Interferon Regulatory Factor-1 (IRF1) in Overcoming Antiestrogen Resistance in the Treatment of Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.L.; Shajahan, A.N.; Clarke, R.

    2011-01-01

    Resistance to endocrine therapy is common among breast cancer patients with estrogen receptor alpha-positive (ER+) tumors and limits the success of this therapeutic strategy. While the mechanisms that regulate endocrine responsiveness and cell fate are not fully understood, interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF1) is strongly implicated as a key regulatory node in the underlying signaling network. IRF1 is a tumor suppressor that mediates cell fate by facilitating apoptosis and can do so with or without functional p53. Expression of IRF1 is down regulated in endocrine-resistant breast cancer cells, protecting these cells from IRF1-induced inhibition of proliferation and/or induction of cell death. Nonetheless, when IRF1 expression is induced following IFN treatment, antiestrogen sensitivity is restored by a process that includes the inhibition of pro survival BCL2 family members and caspase activation. These data suggest that a combination of endocrine therapy and compounds that effectively induce IRF1 expression may be useful for the treatment of many ER+ breast cancers. By understanding IRF1 signaling in the context of endocrine responsiveness, we may be able to develop novel therapeutic strategies and better predict how patients will respond to endocrine therapy

  14. Bazedoxifene exhibits antiestrogenic activity in animal models of tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer: implications for treatment of advanced disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardell, Suzanne E; Nelson, Erik R; Chao, Christina A; McDonnell, Donald P

    2013-05-01

    There is compelling evidence to suggest that drugs that function as pure estrogen receptor (ER-α) antagonists, or that downregulate the expression of ER-α, would have clinical use in the treatment of advanced tamoxifen- and aromatase-resistant breast cancer. Although such compounds are currently in development, we reasoned, based on our understanding of ER-α pharmacology, that there may already exist among the most recently developed selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERM) compounds that would have usage as breast cancer therapeutics. Thus, our objective was to identify among available SERMs those with unique pharmacologic activities and to evaluate their potential clinical use with predictive models of advanced breast cancer. A validated molecular profiling technology was used to classify clinically relevant SERMs based on their impact on ER-α conformation. The functional consequences of these observed mechanistic differences on (i) gene expression, (ii) receptor stability, and (iii) activity in cellular and animal models of advanced endocrine-resistant breast cancer were assessed. The high-affinity SERM bazedoxifene was shown to function as a pure ER-α antagonist in cellular models of breast cancer and effectively inhibited the growth of both tamoxifen-sensitive and -resistant breast tumor xenografts. Interestingly, bazedoxifene induced a unique conformational change in ER-α that resulted in its proteasomal degradation, although the latter activity was dispensable for its antagonist efficacy. Bazedoxifene was recently approved for use in the European Union for the treatment of osteoporosis and thus may represent a near-term therapeutic option for patients with advanced breast cancer. ©2013 AACR.

  15. Species-specific pharmacology of antiestrogens: role of metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, V.C.; Robinson, S.P.

    1987-01-01

    The nonsteroidal antiestrogen tamoxifen exhibits a paradoxial space species pharmacology. The drug is a full estrogen in the mouse, a partial estrogen/antiestrogen in humans and the rat, and an antiestrogen in the chick oviduct. Inasmuch as tamoxifen has antiestrogenic effects in vitro, differential metabolism of tamoxifen to estrogens might occur in the species in which it has antiestrogen pharmacology. Tamoxifen or its metabolite 4-hydroxytamoxifen could lose the alkylaminoethane side chain to form the estrogenic compound metabolite E of bisphenol. Sensitive metabolic studies with [ 3 H]tamoxifen in chicks, rats, and mice identified 4-hydroxytamoxifen as the major metabolite. Athymic mice with transplanted human breast tumors can be used to study the ability of tamoxifen to stimulate tissue or tumor growth. Estradiol caused the growth of transplanted breast cancer cells into solid tumors and a uterotrophic response. However, tamoxifen does not support tumor growth when administered alone, although it stimulates uterines growth. Since a similar profile of metabolites is sequestered in human mouse tissues, these studies strongly support the concept that the drug can selectively stimulate or inhibit events in the target tissues of different species without hometabolic intervention

  16. Functional screen for genes responsible for tamoxifen resistance in human breast cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Danielle; van Agthoven, Ton; Bosma, Peter T.; Nooter, Kees; Dorssers, Lambert C. J.

    2006-01-01

    Antiestrogens, such as tamoxifen, are widely used for endocrine treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. However, as breast cancer progresses, development of tamoxifen resistance is inevitable. The mechanisms underlying this resistance are not well understood. To identify genes

  17. Synthesis of a radioiodinated antiestrogen glucuronide compound (TAM-G)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazilet Zumrut Biber Muftuler; Perihan Unak; Cigdem Ichedef; Ilknur Demir

    2011-01-01

    Tamoxifen [TAM; ([Z]-2-[4-(1,2-diphenyl-1-di-butenyl)-phenoxy]-N,N-dimethylethanamine) has been used as an antiestrogen drug for treatment and prevention of human breast cancer. The aim of this study is conjugation of hydrophilic glucuronic acid to the starting substance TAM and labeling with 131 I using iodogen as oxidizing agent. The reactions are completed in three steps, including enzymatic reaction, with the following sub-steps; preparation of microsomal fraction from rat liver and subsequent purification of UDP-glucuronyl transferase (UDPGT), estimation of protein amount in microsomal samples and glucuronidation reaction. Synthesized glucuronide derivative (TAM-G) was purified using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Mass spectroscopy of cold standard showed that the labeling most probably occurs in ortho position to the aromatic ring containing the ether group of TAM-G as expected. Radiochemical yield of the 131 I labeled TAM-G ([ 131 I]TAM-G) is determined by using Thin Layer Radio Chromatography (TLRC). The radiopharmaceutical potential of [ 131 I]TAM-G is examined by biodistribution studies that is run on normal female Albino Wistar rats. According to biodistribution results 131 I labeled TAM-G may be proposed as a new antiestrogen glucuronide imaging agent for breast and uterus. Electronic supplementary material. The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10967-010-0932-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. (author)

  18. Influence resistance on human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Harits, M.; Bahtiar, Yusuf; Achdan, M. Syahdani; Sunarno, .

    2010-05-01

    Health is an important part of human life. Every person in this world want healthy body, in other words free of any disease. When seeing the pattern of human life today is high activity, always eat instant foods and lack of exercise makes a very bad human health from year to year. Therefore, there is need for the health revolution that can keep human health in order to remain in the condition is always healthy. Eat healthy foods four plus five perfect diligent exercise is the real solution to maintain health. In addition also advisable to always check each month to the doctor so that our health can be controlled. Most people underestimate it, especially the routine checks once a month to the doctor, therefore I created a simple research that aims to get people to mengonytrol health at any time without having to check into the doctor. By utilizing the resistance in the human body's health so we can be controlled. By using a simple tool to measure human resistance by using the concept of the bridge. Bridge circuit used to convert impedance variations into voltage variations. One advantage of this circuit is the voltage produced can vary around 0. This means strengthening can be used to raise the voltage level so as sensitivity to variations in impedance also increases. Another application is the impedance measurement accuracy. The bridge is the simplest and most widely used is the Wheatstone bridge circuit. This circuit is used for signal conditioning applications where a sensor can change the resistance value when the process variable is changed.

  19. Antiestrogenic constituents of the Thai medicinal plants Capparis flavicans and Vitex glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecha, Prathan; Umehara, Kaoru; Miyase, Toshio; Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2009-11-01

    Antiestrogenic compounds were investigated from Thai indigenous plants for galactogogues since estrogen is reported to suppress lactation in breastfeeding women. The aerial parts of the Thai medicinal plant Capparis flavicans, which has traditionally been used to promote lactation, gave the new compound capparoside A (1), along with 28 known compounds. The leaves of Vitex glabrata belong to the same genus as the chaste tree (Vitex agnus-castus), which is used traditionally to support lactation, and afforded the new compounds khainaoside A (14), khainaoside B (15), and khainaoside C (16), together with six known compounds. The isolates were tested for their biological activity using the estrogen-responsive human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and T47D. Syringaresinol (3) and principin (6), from C. flavicans, and khainaoside A (14) showed the most potent inhibitory effects on estrogen-enhanced cell proliferation among all compounds isolated. These results suggest that the lactation-promoting properties of C. flavicans might be related to the inhibitory effect on excess estrogen of women who experience insufficient breastfeeding and highlight the possibility of using V. glabrata leaves for their antiestrogenic properties.

  20. Silencing MED1 sensitizes breast cancer cells to pure anti-estrogen fulvestrant in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijiang Zhang

    Full Text Available Pure anti-estrogen fulvestrant has been shown to be a promising ER antagonist for locally advanced and metastatic breast cancer. Unfortunately, a significant proportion of patients developed resistance to this type of endocrine therapy but the molecular mechanisms governing cellular responsiveness to this agent remain poorly understood. Here, we've reported that knockdown of estrogen receptor coactivator MED1 sensitized fulvestrant resistance breast cancer cells to fulvestrant treatment. We found that MED1 knockdown further promoted cell cycle arrest induced by fulvestrant. Using an orthotopic xenograft mouse model, we found that knockdown of MED1 significantly reduced tumor growth in mice. Importantly, knockdown of MED1 further potentiated tumor growth inhibition by fulvestrant. Mechanistic studies indicated that combination of fulvestrant treatment and MED1 knockdown is able to cooperatively inhibit the expression of ER target genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments further supported a role for MED1 in regulating the recruitment of RNA polymerase II and transcriptional corepressor HDAC1 on endogenous ER target gene promoter in the presence of fulvestrant. These results demonstrate a role for MED1 in mediating resistance to the pure anti-estrogen fulvestrant both in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Resistant starch: promise for improving human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birt, Diane F; Boylston, Terri; Hendrich, Suzanne; Jane, Jay-Lin; Hollis, James; Li, Li; McClelland, John; Moore, Samuel; Phillips, Gregory J; Rowling, Matthew; Schalinske, Kevin; Scott, M Paul; Whitley, Elizabeth M

    2013-11-01

    Ongoing research to develop digestion-resistant starch for human health promotion integrates the disciplines of starch chemistry, agronomy, analytical chemistry, food science, nutrition, pathology, and microbiology. The objectives of this research include identifying components of starch structure that confer digestion resistance, developing novel plants and starches, and modifying foods to incorporate these starches. Furthermore, recent and ongoing studies address the impact of digestion-resistant starches on the prevention and control of chronic human diseases, including diabetes, colon cancer, and obesity. This review provides a transdisciplinary overview of this field, including a description of types of resistant starches; factors in plants that affect digestion resistance; methods for starch analysis; challenges in developing food products with resistant starches; mammalian intestinal and gut bacterial metabolism; potential effects on gut microbiota; and impacts and mechanisms for the prevention and control of colon cancer, diabetes, and obesity. Although this has been an active area of research and considerable progress has been made, many questions regarding how to best use digestion-resistant starches in human diets for disease prevention must be answered before the full potential of resistant starches can be realized.

  2. Intrinsic radiation resistance in human chondrosarcoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussavi-Harami, Farid; Mollano, Anthony; Martin, James A.; Ayoob, Andrew; Domann, Frederick E.; Gitelis, Steven; Buckwalter, Joseph A.

    2006-01-01

    Human chondrosarcomas rarely respond to radiation treatment, limiting the options for eradication of these tumors. The basis of radiation resistance in chondrosarcomas remains obscure. In normal cells radiation induces DNA damage that leads to growth arrest or death. However, cells that lack cell cycle control mechanisms needed for these responses show intrinsic radiation resistance. In previous work, we identified immortalized human chondrosarcoma cell lines that lacked p16 ink4a , one of the major tumor suppressor proteins that regulate the cell cycle. We hypothesized that the absence of p16 ink4a contributes to the intrinsic radiation resistance of chondrosarcomas and that restoring p16 ink4a expression would increase their radiation sensitivity. To test this we determined the effects of ectopic p16 ink4a expression on chondrosarcoma cell resistance to low-dose γ-irradiation (1-5 Gy). p16 ink4a expression significantly increased radiation sensitivity in clonogenic assays. Apoptosis did not increase significantly with radiation and was unaffected by p16 ink4a transduction of chondrosarcoma cells, indicating that mitotic catastrophe, rather than programmed cell death, was the predominant radiation effect. These results support the hypothesis that p16 ink4a plays a role in the radiation resistance of chondrosarcoma cell lines and suggests that restoring p16 expression will improve the radiation sensitivity of human chondrosarcomas

  3. Ovulation induction by antiestrogens in an Indian tropical vespertillionid bat, Scotophilus heathi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakrasi, Pranab Lal; Tiwari, Anjana

    2006-11-02

    The ovulation induction property of ICI 182,780 a pure antiestrogen and enclomiphene citrate (ENC) was carried out in Scotophilus heathi, an Indian tropical vespertillionid bat, during December to February i.e., preovulatory period. This bat ovulates two ova naturally and shows ovulatory asynchrony. The study showed that 100 ìg of ENC followed by 10 IU hCG resulted in significantly lower number of ovulation. Whereas, the pure antiestrogen ICI 182,780 at a dose of 100 ìg followed by 10 IU hCG resulted in ovulation induction (4.2 +/- 0.4), which is significantly different in comparison to other groups. This is possibly the first report of ovulation induction using this pure antiestrogen i.e., ICI 182,780 in any bat as well as in any animal model that exhibits temporary anovulation similar to polycystic ovary disease (PCOD). This antiestrogen may be useful to induce ovulation in PCOD patients.

  4. In Vivo Anti-estrogenic Effects of Menadione on Hepatic Estrogen-responsive Gene Expression in Male Medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    OpenAIRE

    Yamaguchi, Akemi; Kohra, Shinya; Ishibashi, Hiroshi; Arizono, Koji; Tominaga, Nobuaki

    2008-01-01

    Menadione, a synthetic vitamin K3, exhibits anti-estrogenic activity on in vitro assay. However, the in vivo anti-estrogenic effects of menadione have not been determined, while correlations between biological effects and structural changes are unclear. Thus, we investigated the in vivo anti-estrogenic activity of menadione under fluorescent light and dark conditions. Suppression of the hepatic estrogen response genes vitellogenin1 (VTG1), VTG2 and estrogen receptor-α (ER-α) was used as an in...

  5. Rapid determination of anti-estrogens by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in urine: Method validation and application to real samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gerace

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A fast screening protocol was developed for the simultaneous determination of nine anti-estrogenic agents (aminoglutethimide, anastrozole, clomiphene, drostanolone, formestane, letrozole, mesterolone, tamoxifen, testolactone plus five of their metabolites in human urine. After an enzymatic hydrolysis, these compounds can be extracted simultaneously from urine with a simple liquid–liquid extraction at alkaline conditions. The analytes were subsequently analyzed by fast-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (fast-GC/MS after derivatization. The use of a short column, high-flow carrier gas velocity and fast temperature ramping produced an efficient separation of all analytes in about 4 min, allowing a processing rate of 10 samples/h. The present analytical method was validated according to UNI EN ISO/IEC 17025 guidelines for qualitative methods. The range of investigated parameters included the limit of detection, selectivity, linearity, repeatability, robustness and extraction efficiency. High MS-sampling rate, using a benchtop quadrupole mass analyzer, resulted in accurate peak shape definition under both scan and selected ion monitoring modes, and high sensitivity in the latter mode. Therefore, the performances of the method are comparable to the ones obtainable from traditional GC/MS analysis. The method was successfully tested on real samples arising from clinical treatments of hospitalized patients and could profitably be used for clinical studies on anti-estrogenic drug administration. Keywords: Anti-estrogens, Fast-GC/MS, Urine screening, Validation, Breast cancer

  6. Human rights, State Violence and Political Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe Larsen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates Hannah Arendt’s and Giorgio Agamben’s critiques of human rights and argues that the two thinkers share a blind spot with regard to the radical potentials of human rights. The problem is that they do not break with two fixed imaginaries which still haunt liberal democracies: (1 the historical essentialist understanding of human rights and (2 nation-states and individuals as the principal loci for political rights, power, and action. Based on the work of Jacques Rancière, Costas Douzinas, and Étienne Balibar this article argues that human rights can be thought of as a constituent part of a radical political praxis and resistance movement. If human rights are thought of as a praxis of “right-ing” (Douzinas or a “dissensus” (Rancière, which both contest the current “distribution of the sensible,” a new “cosmopolitics of human rights” can be imagined where human rights are conceived as a borderline concept (Balibar.

  7. Radiosensitivity of drug-resistant human tumour xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattern, J.; Bak, M. Jr.; Volm, M.; Hoever, K.H.

    1989-01-01

    The radiosensitivity of three drug-resistant sublines of a human epidermoid lung carcinoma growing as xenografts in nude mice was investigated. Drug resistance to vincristine, actinomycin D and cisplatin was developed in vivo by repeated drug treatment. It was found that all three drug-resistant tumour lines were not cross-resistant to irradiation. (orig.) [de

  8. Heterologously expressed bacterial and human multidrug resistance proteins confer cadmium resistance to Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achard-Joris, M; van Saparoea, HBV; Driessen, AJM; Bourdineaud, JP; Bourdineaud, Jean-Paul

    2005-01-01

    The human MDR1 gene is induced by cadmium exposure although no resistance to this metal is observed in human cells overexpressing hMDR1. To access the role of MDR proteins in cadmium resistance, human MDR1, Lactococcus lactis lmrA, and Oenococcus oeni omrA were expressed in an Escherichia coli tolC

  9. Tamoxifen reduces P-gp-mediated multidrug resistance via inhibiting the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in ER-negative human gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zonglei; Zhou, Jin; Luan, Junwei; Sheng, Weihua; Shen, Xiaochun; Dong, Xiaoqiang

    2014-03-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR), mediated by overexpression of drug efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), is a major problem limiting successful chemotherapy of gastric cancer. Tamoxifen (TAM), a triphenylethylene nonsteroidal antiestrogen agent, shows broad-spectrum antitumor properties. Emerging studies demonstrated that TAM could significantly reduce the MDR in a variety of human cancers. Here we investigated the effects and possible underlying mechanisms of action of TAM on the reversion of MDR in ER-negative human gastric cancer cells. Our results demonstrated that in MDR phenotype SGC7901/CDDP gastric cancer cells TAM dramatically lowered the IC50 of CDDP, 5-FU and ADM, increased the intracellular Rhodamine123 accumulation and induced G0/G1 phase arrest, while G2/M phase decreased accordingly. Furthermore, at the molecular level, TAM substantially decreased the expression of P-gp, p-Akt and the Akt-regulated downstream effectors such as p-GSK-3β, p-BAD, Bcl-XL and cyclinD1 proteins without affecting the expression of t-Akt, t-GSK-3β, t-BAD proteins in SGC7901/CDDP cells. Thus, our findings demonstrate that TAM reverses P-gp-mediated gastric cancer cell MDR via inhibiting the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Determination and confirmation of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), anti-estrogens and aromatase inhibitors in bovine and porcine urine using UHPLC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Thijs; Essers, Martien L; Kaklamanos, George; Sterk, Saskia S; van Ginkel, Leendert A

    2017-04-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), anti-estrogens and aromatase inhibitors are prohibited in human sports doping. However, they also present a risk of being used illegally in animal husbandry for fattening purposes. A method was developed and validated using UHPLC-MS/MS for the determination and confirmation of SERMs, anti-estrogens and aromatase inhibiters in bovine and porcine urine. This method was used in a survey of more than 200 bovine and porcine urine samples from Dutch farms. In 18 out of 103 porcine urine samples (17%) and two out of 114 bovine samples (2%) formestane, an aromatase inhibitor, was detected. None of the other compounds was detected. From human doping control it is known that formestane can, in some cases, be of natural origin. Analyses of reference samples from untreated bovine and porcine animals demonstrated the presence of formestane in bovine animals, but not yet in porcine animals. Future research will focus on whether the detected formestane in porcine and bovine urine is from endogenous or exogenous origin, using GC-c-IRMS.

  11. Evaluation of the removal of antiestrogens and antiandrogens via ozone and granular activated carbon using bioassay and fluorescent spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dehua; Chen, Lujun; Wu, Yuchao; Liu, Rui

    2016-06-01

    Antiestrogens and antiandrogens are relatively rarely studied endocrine disrupting chemicals which can be found in un/treated wastewaters. Antiestrogens and antiandrogens in the wastewater treatment effluents could contribute to sexual disruption of organisms. In this study, to assess the removal of non-specific antiestrogens and antiandrogens by advanced treatment processes, ozonation and adsorption to granular activated carbon (GAC), the biological activities and excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy of wastewater were evaluated. As the applied ozone dose increased to 12 mg/L, the antiestrogenic activity dramatically decreased to 3.2 μg 4-hydroxytamoxifen equivalent (4HEQ)/L, with a removal efficiency of 84.8%, while the antiandrogenic activity was 23.1 μg flutamide equivalent (FEQ)/L, with a removal efficiency of 75.5%. The removal of antiestrogenic/antiandrogenic activity has high correlation with the removal of fulvic acid-like materials and humic acid-like organics, suggesting that they can be used as surrogates for antiestrogenic/antiandrogenic activity during ozonation. The adsorption kinetics of antiestrogenic activity and antiandrogenic activity were well described by pseudo-second-order kinetics models. The estimated equilibrium concentration of antiestrogenic activity is 7.9 μg 4HEQ/L with an effective removal efficiency of 70.5%, while the equilibrium concentration of antiandrogenic activity is 33.7 μg FEQ/L with a removal efficiency of 67.0%. Biological activity evaluation of wastewater effluents is an attractive way to assess the removal of endocrine disrupting chemicals by different treatment processes. Fluorescence spectroscopy can be used as a surrogate measure of bioassays during ozonation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Spiramycin resistance in human periodontitis microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rams, Thomas E; Dujardin, Sebastien; Sautter, Jacqueline D; Degener, John E; van Winkelhoff, Arie J

    Purpose: The occurrence of in vitro resistance to therapeutic concentrations of spiramycin, amoxicillin, and metronidazole was determined for putative periodontal pathogens isolated in the United States. Materials and methods: Subgingival plaque specimens from 37 consecutive adults with untreated

  13. Antibiotic Resistance in Human Chronic Periodontitis Microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rams, Thomas E.; Degener, John E.; van Winkelhoff, Arie J.

    Background: Patients with chronic periodontitis (CP) may yield multiple species of putative periodontal bacterial pathogens that vary in their antibiotic drug susceptibility. This study determines the occurrence of in vitro antibiotic resistance among selected subgingival periodontal pathogens in

  14. Cell cycle and anti-estrogen effects synergize to regulate cell proliferation and ER target gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Dalvai

    Full Text Available Antiestrogens are designed to antagonize hormone induced proliferation and ERalpha target gene expression in mammary tumor cells. Commonly used drugs such as OH-Tamoxifen and ICI 182780 (Fulvestrant block cell cycle progression in G0/G1. Inversely, the effect of cell cycle stage on ER regulated gene expression has not been tested directly. We show that in ERalpha-positive breast cancer cells (MCF-7 the estrogen receptor gene and downstream target genes are cell cycle regulated with expression levels varying as much as three-fold between phases of the cell cycle. Steroid free culture conditions commonly used to assess the effect of hormones or antiestrogens on gene expression also block MCF-7 cells in G1-phase when several ERalpha target genes are overexpressed. Thus, cell cycle effects have to be taken into account when analyzing the impact of hormonal treatments on gene transcription. We found that antiestrogens repress transcription of several ERalpha target genes specifically in S phase. This observation corroborates the more rapid and strong impact of antiestrogen treatments on cell proliferation in thymidine, hydroxyurea or aphidicolin arrested cells and correlates with an increase of apoptosis compared to similar treatments in lovastatin or nocodazol treated cells. Hence, cell cycle effects synergize with the action of antiestrogens. An interesting therapeutic perspective could be to enhance the action of anti-estrogens by associating hormone-therapy with specific cell cycle drugs.

  15. Combinatorial Synthesis for the Expedited Discovery of Novel Selective Antiestrogens for Breast Cancer Prevention and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-01

    From the Original Proposal Estrogens: H H OH COH CH0 HQ ~ HHo QH HHO ’ OH3 HAOH 3 H Estradiol Hexestrol Benzestrol Cyclofenil Y~e Pure Antiestrogens...overlapping s, fl-CH 2), 4.95 (2H, PS-ArCH 20), 5.16 emission wavelength of 364 nm were used, based on the (1H, cx/cx’-CH), 7.98 (4H, ArCH

  16. Transmission of antibiotic resistance from animals to humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijbers, P.M.C.

    2016-01-01

    Huijbers, P.M.C. (2016). Transmission of antibiotic resistance from animals to humans: Broilers as a reservoir of ESBL-producing bacteria. PhD thesis, Wageningen University, Wageningen, the Netherlands.

    Antibiotic resistance in animals becomes a public health issue when there is

  17. Rapid determination of anti-estrogens by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in urine: Method validation and application to real samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerace, E; Salomone, A; Abbadessa, G; Racca, S; Vincenti, M

    2012-02-01

    A fast screening protocol was developed for the simultaneous determination of nine anti-estrogenic agents (aminoglutethimide, anastrozole, clomiphene, drostanolone, formestane, letrozole, mesterolone, tamoxifen, testolactone) plus five of their metabolites in human urine. After an enzymatic hydrolysis, these compounds can be extracted simultaneously from urine with a simple liquid-liquid extraction at alkaline conditions. The analytes were subsequently analyzed by fast-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (fast-GC/MS) after derivatization. The use of a short column, high-flow carrier gas velocity and fast temperature ramping produced an efficient separation of all analytes in about 4 min, allowing a processing rate of 10 samples/h. The present analytical method was validated according to UNI EN ISO/IEC 17025 guidelines for qualitative methods. The range of investigated parameters included the limit of detection, selectivity, linearity, repeatability, robustness and extraction efficiency. High MS-sampling rate, using a benchtop quadrupole mass analyzer, resulted in accurate peak shape definition under both scan and selected ion monitoring modes, and high sensitivity in the latter mode. Therefore, the performances of the method are comparable to the ones obtainable from traditional GC/MS analysis. The method was successfully tested on real samples arising from clinical treatments of hospitalized patients and could profitably be used for clinical studies on anti-estrogenic drug administration.

  18. Increasing transmission of antibiotic resistance from animals to humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2011-01-01

    The importance of the animal reservoir for emergence of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria in humans is difficult to estimate. In this article we give our estimate of the importance and also highlight on which points we have become wiser during recent years. We conclude that it still is the human...... usage of antibiotics which contributes most to resistance observed in humans, but also that the contribution from animals is large and larger than estimated just a few years ago. This indicates the need to implement restriction on antimicrobial usage for both humans and animals....

  19. Increasing transmission of antibiotic resistance from animals to humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2011-01-01

    usage of antibiotics which contributes most to resistance observed in humans, but also that the contribution from animals is large and larger than estimated just a few years ago. This indicates the need to implement restriction on antimicrobial usage for both humans and animals.......The importance of the animal reservoir for emergence of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria in humans is difficult to estimate. In this article we give our estimate of the importance and also highlight on which points we have become wiser during recent years. We conclude that it still is the human...

  20. Resistance to antivirals in human cytomegalovirus: mechanisms and clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, J L

    1997-09-01

    Long term therapies needed for managing human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections in immunosupressed patients provided the background for the emergence of the resistance to antivirals active against HCMV. In addition, laboratory selected mutants have also been readily achieved. Both clinical and laboratory resistant strains share the same determinants of resistance. Ganciclovir resistance may be due to a few mutations in the HCMV UL97 gene and/or viral DNA pol gene, the former being responsible for about 70% of clinical resistant isolates. Among them, V464, V594, S595 and F595 are the most frequent mutations. Because of their less extensive clinical use, much less is known about resistance to foscarnet and cidofovir (formerly, HPMPC) but in both cases, it has been associated to mutations in the DNA pol. Ganciclovir resistant strains showing DNA pol mutations are cross-resistant to cidofovir and their corresponding IC50 are normally higher than those from strains harboring only mutations at the UL97 gene. To date, foscarnet resistance seems to be independent of both ganciclovir and cidofovir resistance.

  1. Mechanism of cisplatin resistance in human urothelial carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hui-Min; Wang, Tsing-Cheng

    2012-05-01

    An isogenic pair of cisplatin-susceptible (NTUB1) and -resistant (NTUB1/P) human urothelial carcinoma cell lines was used to elucidate the mechanism of cisplatin resistance. The significantly lower intracellular platinum (IP) concentration, which resulted from the decreased cisplatin uptake, was found in NTUB1/P cells. The enhancement of IP concentration did not increase the susceptibility of NTUB1/P cells to cisplatin treatment. The reduction of IP concentration as well was unable to enhance the cisplatin-resistance in susceptible NTUB1 cells. This indicated that reduction of IP concentration was not the account for the development of cisplatin resistance here. Instead, the over expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, anti-oxidative heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and cell cycle regulator p16INK4 seemed to be more important for the gaining of cisplatin in these human urothelial carcinoma cell. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Vancomycin-resistant enterococci - the nature of resistance and risk of transmission from animals to humans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanovská, Lýdia; Bardoň, Jan; Čermák, Pavel

    2016-06-01

    Enterococci are part of the normal intestinal flora of humans and animals. Under certain circumstances, they are capable of extraintestinal conversion to opportunistic pathogens. They cause endogenous as well as exogenous community and nosocomial infections. The gastrointestinal tract of mammals provides them with favorable conditions for acquisition and spread of resistance genes, for example to vancomycin (van), from other symbiotic bacteria. Thus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) become potential reservoirs and vectors of the van genes. Their occurrence in the population of the Czech Republic was first reported by Kolář et al. in 1997. Some variants of the vanA gene cluster carried on Tn1546 which encode resistance to vancomycin are identical in humans and in animals. It means that animals, especially cattle, poultry and pigs, could be an important reservoir of VRE for humans. Kolář and Bardoň detected VRE in animals in the Czech Republic for the first time in 2000. In Europe, the glycopeptide antibiotic avoparcin, used as a growth stimulator, is responsible for selection of VRE strains in animals. Strains of Enterococcus faecium from animals may offer genes of antimicrobial resistance to other enterococci or they can be directly dangerous to human. This is demonstrated by finding isolates of E. faecalis from human patients and from pigs having very similar profiles of resistance and virulence genes. The goal of the paper was to point out the similarity between isolates of human and animal strains of enterococci resistant to vancomycin, and the possibility of their bilateral transfer between humans and animals.

  3. Antibiotic Resistance Escherichia coli isolated from Faecal of Healthy Human

    OpenAIRE

    , S. Budiarti

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research was to examine antibiotic resistant of Escherechia coli as intestinal normal şora, isolated from healthy human. The samples were collected from faeces of new born children, children under 3 and 5years-old, and human adult. Bacteria were isolated at Eosin Methylen Blue solid media followed by biochemistry reaction for physiological E.coli identiŞcation. Antibiotic resistant test was carried out using Kirby-Bauer method. The result showed that 95 % bacterial strai...

  4. [Computational prediction of human immunodeficiency resistance to reverse transcriptase inhibitors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasova, O A; Filimonov, D A; Poroikov, V V

    2017-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and leads to over one million of deaths annually. Highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) is a gold standard in the HIV/AIDS therapy. Nucleoside and non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) are important component of HAART, but their effect depends on the HIV susceptibility/resistance. HIV resistance mainly occurs due to mutations leading to conformational changes in the three-dimensional structure of HIV RT. The aim of our work was to develop and test a computational method for prediction of HIV resistance associated with the mutations in HIV RT. Earlier we have developed a method for prediction of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) resistance; it is based on the usage of position-specific descriptors. These descriptors are generated using the particular amino acid residue and its position; the position of certain residue is determined in a multiple alignment. The training set consisted of more than 1900 sequences of HIV RT from the Stanford HIV Drug Resistance database; for these HIV RT variants experimental data on their resistance to ten inhibitors are presented. Balanced accuracy of prediction varies from 80% to 99% depending on the method of classification (support vector machine, Naive Bayes, random forest, convolutional neural networks) and the drug, resistance to which is obtained. Maximal balanced accuracy was obtained for prediction of resistance to zidovudine, stavudine, didanosine and efavirenz by the random forest classifier. Average accuracy of prediction is 89%.

  5. Insulin resistance in human subjects having impaired glucose regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.H.; Khan, F.A.; Ijaz, A.

    2007-01-01

    To determine insulin resistance in human subjects having impaired glucose regulation (IGR) by Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR). A total of 100 subjects with impaired glucose regulation were selected for evaluation of metabolic syndrome as per the criteria of National Cholesterol Education Program, Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP, ATP III), along with 47 healthy age and gender-matched controls. Physical examination to determine blood pressure and waist circumference was carried out and so was sampling for plasma glucose, serum triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol and insulin. Insulin resistance was calculated by the HOMA-IR. Finally, subjects with and without metabolic syndrome were compared with controls (n=47), using one-way ANOVA for studying insulin resistance between groups, with Tukey's post-hoc comparison. The frequency of finding metabolic syndrome in cases of IGR remained 47%. The insulin resistance demonstrated stepwise worsening from control population (mean=1.54, 95 % CI: 1.77 - 2.37) to subjects suffering from only IGR (mean=2.07, 95 % CI: 1.77- 2.37) to metabolic syndrome (mean=2.67, 95 %, CI: 2.34 - 3.00) (p < 0.001). Patients with impaired glucose regulation may have significant insulin resistance. It is, thus, recommended that a vigorous search be made to measure insulin resistance in all cases diagnosed to have impaired glucose regulation. (author)

  6. Antibodies and antiestrogens combined with boron for use in the neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, R.

    1987-01-01

    The ZR-75-1 cell line developed from a mammary carcinoma was chosen to characterise the binding of antiestrogen U23.469-M to the cell, which was subsequently compared to that of a derivative combined with boron. It was found that the original U23.469-M showed antiestrogenic activity, while this effect was largely abolished after the substance had been modified using b-decachloro-o-carborane. In this study, boron-conjugated antibodies were produced in order to find out whether those modified immunoglobulins would be suitable to bind sufficient quantities of boron to the tumour cells. It was calculated by experts on radiation biology that a minimum of 1000 boron atoms is required for a tumour-specific antibody to be therapeutically effective. When oxidated dextran of a molecular weight of 33 kD was used as a linking molecule, a reproducible method could be developed that permitted more than 1000 boron atoms to be bound per antibody. In one of the monoclonal antibodies tested here a combination with boron could, however, only be achieved at the expense of complete inactivation. A model was developed allowing to significantly increase the number modified antibodies attached to any one tumour cell. The cell binding experiments and radioimmunoassays then carried out were able to show that the number of antibodies bound to tumour cells can be increased to different degrees, depending on the monoclonal antibody used in each case. (orig./MG) [de

  7. Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Muenchen from Pigs and Humans and Potential Interserovar Transfer of Antimicrobial Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Gebreyes, Wondwossen A.; Thakur, Siddhartha

    2005-01-01

    Salmonella serovars are important reservoirs of antimicrobial resistance. Recently, we reported on multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains among pigs with resistance to ampicillin, kanamycin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline (resistance [R] type AKSSuT) and resistance to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline (R type AxACSSuT). In the present study, 67 isolates (39 from humans...

  8. Cross-resistance to radiation in human squamous cell carcinoma cells with induced cisplatin resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komori, Keiichi

    1998-01-01

    Accumulated evidence indicates that drug resistance is induced in tumor cells treated with a variety of anti-cancer drugs and that there is a possibility of cross-resistance to ionizing radiation associated with induced drug resistance. Most in vitro studies have shown inconsistent results on cross-resistance probably because of different cell lines used and protocols for drug induction. In this study, TE3 human squamous cell carcinoma cell line was treated with a 4-day cycle of cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II); CDDP) at a concentration yielding 10% cell survival. The treatment was repeated up to 3 cycles. After treatment, cells were tested for CDDP and X-ray sensitivity. One cycle of CDDP treatment induced CDDP resistance with a factor of 1.41 and 2 cycles of the treatment with a factor of 1.86. The resistance factor reached a plateau at 3 cycles of treatment. For analyzing the correlation of CDDP and X-ray resistance, 30 clones from both untreated and 3-cycle treated cells were isolated and analyzed for CDDP and X-ray sensitivity. The sensitivity was expressed as the concentration of drug or dose of X-ray required to reduce the cell survival to x% (Dx). The correlation coefficient of clones with 3-cycle treatment between CDDP and X-ray sensitivity increased gradually by increasing the end point of Dx from D 10 to D 90 , resulting in significant correlation at D 90 . The result suggested that there is a certain common repair-related mechanism affecting both CDDP and X-ray resistance in CDDP-treated cells. (author)

  9. Region specific patella tendon hypertrophy in humans following resistance training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, M.; Reitelseder, S; Pedersen, T.G.

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To examine if cross-sectional area (CSA) differs along the length of the human patellar tendon (PT), and if there is PT hypertrophy in response to resistance training. METHODS: Twelve healthy young men underwent baseline and post-training assessments. Maximal isometric knee extension strength...... (MVC) was determined unilaterally in both legs. PT CSA was measured at the proximal-, mid- and distal PT level and quadriceps muscle CSA was measured at mid-thigh level using magnetic resonance imaging. Mechanical properties of the patellar tendons were determined using ultrasonography. Subsequently....... CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this study is the first to report tendon hypertrophy following resistance training. Further, the data show that the human PT CSA varies along the length of the tendon....

  10. Methicillin resistant S. aureus in human and bovine mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Mark A; Zadoks, Ruth N

    2011-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a ubiquitous organism that causes a variety of diseases including mastitis in cattle and humans. High-level resistance of S. aureus to β-lactams conferred by a mecA gene encoding a modified penicillin binding protein (PBP2a) was first observed in the early 1960's. These methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) have been responsible for both hospital acquired infections (HA-MRSA) and, more recently, community acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA). A small number of human MRSA mastitis cases and outbreaks in maternity or neonatal units have been reported which are generally the result of CA-MRSA. The establishment of the sequence type 398 (ST398) in farm animals, primarily pigs, in the early 2000's has provided a reservoir of infection for humans and dairy cattle, particularly in continental Europe, described as livestock-associated MRSA (LA-MRSA). Prior to the emergence of ST398 there were sporadic reports of MRSA in bovine milk and cases of mastitis, often caused by strains from human associated lineages. Subsequently, there have been several reports describing bovine udder infections caused by ST-398 MRSA. Recently, another group of LA-MRSA strains was discovered in humans and dairy cattle in Europe. This group carries a divergent mecA gene and includes a number of S. aureus lineages (CC130, ST425, and CC1943) that were hitherto thought to be bovine-specific but are now also found as carriage or clinical isolates in humans. The emergence of MRSA in dairy cattle may be associated with contact with other host species, as in the case of ST398, or with the exchange of genetic material between S. aureus and coagulase negative Staphylococcus species, which are the most common species associated with bovine intramammary infections and commonly carry antimicrobial resistance determinants.

  11. Human Genetic Marker for Resistance to Radiation and Chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieberman, Howard B.

    2001-01-01

    TO characterize the human HRDAD9 gene and evaluate its potential as a biomarker to predict susceptibility to the deleterious health effects potentially caused by exposure to radiations or chemicals present at DOE hazardous waste cleanup sites. HRAD9 is a human gene that is highly conserved throughout evolution. Related genes have been isolated from yeasts and mice, underscoring its biological significance. Most of our previous work involved characterization of the yeast gene cognate, wherein it was determined that the corresponding protein plays a significant role in promoting resistance of cells to radiations and chemicals, and in particular, controlling cell growth in response to DNA damage

  12. Comparative Review of Antimicrobial Resistance in Humans and Nonhuman Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeffrey; Coble, Dondrae J; Salyards, Gregory W; Habing, Gregory G

    2018-04-02

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) presents serious threats to human and animal health. Although AMR of pathogens is often evaluated independently between humans and animals, comparative analysis of AMR between humans and animals is necessary for zoonotic pathogens. Major surveillance systems monitor AMR of zoonotic pathogens in humans and food animals, but comprehensive AMR data in veterinary medicine is not diligently monitored for most animal species with which humans commonly contact, including NHP. The objective of this review is to provide a complete report of the prevalences of AMR among zoonotic bacteria that present the greatest threats to NHP, occupational, and public health. High prevalences of AMR exist among Shigella, Campylobacter, and Yersinia, including resistance to antimicrobials important to public health, such as macrolides. Despite improvements in regulations, standards, policies, practices, and zoonotic awareness, occupational exposures to and illnesses due to zoonotic pathogens continue to be reported and, given the documented prevalences of AMR, constitute an occupational and public health risk. However, published literature is sparse, thus indicating the need for veterinarians to proactively monitor AMR in dangerous zoonotic bacteria, to enable veterinarians to make more informed decisions to maximize antimicrobial therapy and minimize occupational risk.

  13. Abrogating endocrine resistance by targeting ERα and PI3K in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, Emily M.; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Miller, Todd W.

    2012-01-01

    Antiestrogen therapies targeting estrogen receptor α (ER) signaling are a mainstay for patients with ER+ breast cancer. While many cancers exhibit resistance to antiestrogen therapies, a large body of clinical and experimental evidence indicates that hyperactivation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway promotes antiestrogen resistance. In addition, continued ligand-independent ER signaling in the setting of estrogen deprivation may contribute to resistance to endocrine therapy. PI3K activates several proteins which promote cell cycle progression and survival. In ER+ breast cancer cells, PI3K promotes ligand-dependent and -independent ER transcriptional activity. Models of antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer often remain sensitive to estrogen stimulation and PI3K inhibition, suggesting that clinical trials with combinations of drugs targeting both the PI3K and ER pathways are warranted. Herein, we review recent findings on the roles of PI3K and ER in antiestrogen resistance, and clinical trials testing drug combinations which target both pathways. We also discuss the need for clinical investigation of ER downregulators in combination with PI3K inhibitors.

  14. In-vitro effect of estrogen-antagonist on motility and penetration ability of human spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allag, I S; Rangari, K

    1997-08-01

    Antiestrogens affect spermatozoa through their action on Leydig and Sertoli cells. Direct effect of antiestrogens namely tamoxifen and centchroman in concentration of 1, 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 micrograms/ml in incubation medium was determined on motility and penetration ability of human spermatozoa. Motility (%) was invariably reduced after 15, 30 and 60 min. of incubation. Addition of 17 beta-estradiol to medium with antagonist caused inhibition of motility in dose related manner. The distance travelled by spermatozoa treated with tamoxifen or centchroman in media was reduced by 30% and addition of estradiol along with antiestrogen reduced it to 50% compared to that of untreated spermatozoa.

  15. The human multidrug resistance-associated protein MRP is a plasma membrane drug-efflux pump

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaman, G. J.; Flens, M. J.; van Leusden, M. R.; de Haas, M.; Mülder, H. S.; Lankelma, J.; Pinedo, H. M.; Scheper, R. J.; Baas, F.; Broxterman, H. J.

    1994-01-01

    The multidrug-resistance associated protein MRP is a 180- to 195-kDa membrane protein associated with resistance of human tumor cells to cytotoxic drugs. We have investigated how MRP confers drug resistance in SW-1573 human lung carcinoma cells by generating a subline stably transfected with an

  16. Sensitivity to ionizing radiation and chemotherapeutic agents in gemcitabine-resistant human tumor cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bree, Chris; Castro Kreder, Natasja; Loves, Willem J. P.; Franken, Nicolaas A. P.; Peters, Godefridus J.; Haveman, Jaap

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine cross-resistance to anti-tumor treatments in 2',2'difluorodeoxycytidine (dFdC, gemcitabine)-resistant human tumor cells. Methods and Materials: Human lung carcinoma cells SW-1573 (SWp) were made resistant to dFdC (SWg). Sensitivity to cisplatin (cDDP), paclitaxel,

  17. Adherence to anti-estrogen therapy in seniors with breast cancer: how well are we doing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabulsi, Nora; Riedel, Kristen; Winslade, Nancy; Gregoire, Jean-Pierre; Meterissian, Sarkis; Abrahamovicz, Michal; Tamblyn, Robyn; Mayo, Nancy; Meguerditchian, Ari

    2014-01-01

    A third of breast cancers (BC) occur in women ≥65 years (seniors). Anti-estrogen therapy (AET) significantly reduces BC recurrence and death. This study characterizes determinants of adherence to AET in seniors with BC. Provincial cancer registry and administrative claims data were accessed for all non-metastatic BC diagnosed in Quebec (1998-2005) to identify seniors treated for 5 years with AET. Multivariate linear regression was used to assess the association with patient, disease, and physician characteristics and the 5-year medication possession ratio (MPR) for each patient. 4,715 women were included (mean age: 72.9). Mean MPR was 83.5%, 79% of patients reached a 5-year MPR of ≥80%, and 34% discontinued AET at some point during treatment. The cumulative probability of discontinuation was 33.8% (mean time to discontinuation 2.3 years). The MPR decreased with increasing age and non-BC related hospitalizations, p seniors with BC remained a challenge and medication discontinuation rates were high. Advanced age, increasing number of hospitalizations, in situ disease, baseline use of antidepressants, Tamoxifen (versus aromatase inhibitors), early switches of AET type, and newly added medications significantly reduced the MPR. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Differential induction of progestin-binding sites in uterine cell types by estrogen and antiestrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ennis, B.W.; Stumpf, W.E.

    1988-01-01

    Effects of antiestrogen on progestin binding in uterine cell types were determined and compared to those of estrogen. Effects on uterine morphology were also studied. Immature rats were treated with four daily sc injections of 100 micrograms hydroxytamoxifen [TAM(OH)], 5 micrograms estradiol (E2), or oil. On day 5 the rats were injected iv with 1 microgram of the synthetic progestin [ 3 H]Org 2058, and 1 h later uteri were excised, weighed, and processed for thaw-mount autoradiography. Treatment with TAM(OH) or E2 resulted in uterine weight gain, which was greater in animals treated with E2. E2 treatment resulted in cellular hypertrophy in all tissue compartments, especially in the luminal epithelium and myometrium, but TAM(OH) treatment resulted in hypertrophy of only the luminal epithelium. Treatment with TAM(OH) or E2 changed the pattern and intensity of nuclear binding of [ 3 H]Org 2058 from that in oil-treated controls. E2 increased progestin binding in stroma and myometrium and decreased it in luminal epithelium. TAM(OH), similarly, decreased progestin binding in the luminal epithelium and increased it, albeit less than E2, in the myometrium, but left it unchanged in the stroma. The results indicate that E2 and TAM(OH) differentially effect progestin binding among the uterine tissue compartments

  19. Study on the effect of aromatase inhibitors and antiestrogens on the sex differentiation of broiler chicks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A Valizadeh

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available During the development of chick embryo, the genotype of the zygote determines the nature of the gonads, which thereafter creates the male or female phenotype. Differentiation of gonads during the period called “critical period for sexual differentiation “is accompanied with beginning of secretion of sexual hormones. Every change in the rate of steroidal hormones concentration during this critical period, affects on the structure of gonads. Therefore, injection of aromatase inhibitors (which blocks the synthesis of estrogen from testostron in 5th day of incubation into the eggs, causes the production of males with female genotype. These sex reversal females have bilateral testes with complete spermatogenesis, having normal physical appearance and behavior. In this study, 14-α-hydroxy 3,6,17, androstan-trion inhibitor (1mg/egg was injected into the eggs. Furthermore, the effect of three anti-estrogens (which blocks the estrogen receptor Tamoxifen, and Clomiphen Citrate and GAR79 were studied. Injection of aromatase inhibitors into the eggs during incubation period caused statistically significant (p

  20. Molecular conformation, receptor binding, and hormone action of natural and synthetic estrogens and antiestrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duax, W L; Griffin, J F; Weeks, C M; Korach, K S

    1985-01-01

    The X-ray crystallographic structural determinations of synthetic estrogens and antiestrogens provide reliable information on the global minimum energy conformation of these molecules or a local minimum energy conformation that is within 1 or 2 kcal/mole of the global minimum. In favorable cases, state-of-the-art molecular mechanics calculations provide quantitative agreement with X-ray results and information on the relative energy of other local minimum energy conformations not observed crystallographically. Because the conformation of diethylstilbestrol (DES) observed in solvated crystals has an overall conformation and dipole moment more similar to estradiol it is the form more likely to bind to the receptor and produce hormone activity. Either phenol ring of DES can successfully mimic the estradiol A-ring in binding to the receptor. Indenestrol A (INDA) and indenestrol B (INDB) have nearly identical fully extended planar conformations. Either the alpha or gamma rings of these compounds may mimic the A ring of estradiol and compete for the estrogen receptor. Although there are eight distinct ways in which molecules of a racemic mixture of INDA or INDB can bind to the receptor, not all of them may be able to elicit a hormonal response. This may account for the reduced biological activity of the compounds despite their successful competition for receptor binding. The minimum energy conformations of Z-pseudodiethylstilbestrol (ZPD) and E-pseudodiethylstilbestrol (EPD) are bent in a fashion similar to that of indanestrol (INDC). These molecules have good binding affinity suggesting that the receptor does not require a flat molecule. Therefore these conformations would appear to be compatible with receptor binding, but only the Z isomer has an energetically allowed extended conformation that accounts for its observed biological activity relative to DES. PMID:3905370

  1. Role of free radicals in an adriamycin-resistant human small cell lung cancer cell line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, C.; Mulder, N H; Timmer-Bosscha, H; Zijlstra, J G; de Vries, E G

    1987-01-01

    In two Adriamycin (Adr) resistant sublines (GLC4-Adr1 and GLC4-Adr2) of a human small cell lung carcinoma cell line, GLC4, cross-resistance for radiation was found. GLC4-Adr1 has an acquired Adr resistance factor of 44 after culturing without Adr for 20 days and GLC4-Adr2, the same subline cultured

  2. The human gut microbiota as a reservoir for antimicrobial resistance genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bülow, E.

    2015-01-01

    In the last decades, the emergence and spread of resistant opportunistic pathogens is compromising the effectiveness of antimicrobial therapies. Understanding the emergence and global spread of drug-resistant microorganisms is thus crucial to combat antimicrobial resistance. The human gut harbors a

  3. Effect of the antiestrogen ethamoxytriphetol (MER-25) on placental low density lipoprotein uptake and degradation in baboons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henson, M.C.; Babischkin, J.S.; Pepe, G.J.; Albrecht, E.D.

    1988-01-01

    The present study determined if the decline in placental progesterone (P4) production that results from administration of the antiestrogen ethamoxytriphetol (MER-25) to pregnant baboons results from a change in placental low density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake and/or degradation. Pregnant baboons (Papio anubis) were untreated (n = 10) or received MER-25 (25 mg/kg BW, orally; n = 10) daily on days 140-170 of gestation (term, 184 days). Placentas were removed by cesarean section on day 170 of gestation, and villous tissue was dispersed with 0.1% collagenase at 37 C for 40 min. Placental cells (10(6)) were incubated in medium 199 (pH 7.2) for 12 h at 37 C with increasing amounts (5-100 micrograms) of [125I]LDL, with or without a 100-fold excess of unlabeled baboon LDL. Mean (+/- SE) peripheral serum P4 concentrations on days 140-170 of gestation were 51% lower (P less than 0.01) in MER-25-treated (5.7 +/- 0.3 ng/ml) than in untreated (11.6 +/- 0.5 ng/ml) baboons. The uptake of LDL was 56% lower (P less than 0.01) in placental cells from antiestrogen-treated (6.3 +/- 1.6 ng/micrograms cell protein) than in those from untreated (14.4 +/- 1.9 ng/micrograms cell protein) baboons. The dissociation constants for placental LDL uptake, as assessed by Scatchard analysis, however, were similar in untreated (0.80 microgram/ml) and MER-25-treated (0.76 microgram/ml) animals. The amount of [125I]LDL concomitantly degraded by cells from baboons that received MER-25 was 54% of that degraded by cells from untreated controls. The relative decline in LDL degradation by cells of antiestrogen-treated baboons was proportionate to the decline in overall LDL uptake. The results indicate, therefore, that antiestrogen treatment decreased the amount of placental LDL uptake, but did not change the affinity for the lipoprotein

  4. Effect of the antiestrogen ethamoxytriphetol (MER-25) on placental low density lipoprotein uptake and degradation in baboons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henson, M.C.; Babischkin, J.S.; Pepe, G.J.; Albrecht, E.D.

    1988-05-01

    The present study determined if the decline in placental progesterone (P4) production that results from administration of the antiestrogen ethamoxytriphetol (MER-25) to pregnant baboons results from a change in placental low density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake and/or degradation. Pregnant baboons (Papio anubis) were untreated (n = 10) or received MER-25 (25 mg/kg BW, orally; n = 10) daily on days 140-170 of gestation (term, 184 days). Placentas were removed by cesarean section on day 170 of gestation, and villous tissue was dispersed with 0.1% collagenase at 37 C for 40 min. Placental cells (10(6)) were incubated in medium 199 (pH 7.2) for 12 h at 37 C with increasing amounts (5-100 micrograms) of (125I)LDL, with or without a 100-fold excess of unlabeled baboon LDL. Mean (+/- SE) peripheral serum P4 concentrations on days 140-170 of gestation were 51% lower (P less than 0.01) in MER-25-treated (5.7 +/- 0.3 ng/ml) than in untreated (11.6 +/- 0.5 ng/ml) baboons. The uptake of LDL was 56% lower (P less than 0.01) in placental cells from antiestrogen-treated (6.3 +/- 1.6 ng/micrograms cell protein) than in those from untreated (14.4 +/- 1.9 ng/micrograms cell protein) baboons. The dissociation constants for placental LDL uptake, as assessed by Scatchard analysis, however, were similar in untreated (0.80 microgram/ml) and MER-25-treated (0.76 microgram/ml) animals. The amount of (125I)LDL concomitantly degraded by cells from baboons that received MER-25 was 54% of that degraded by cells from untreated controls. The relative decline in LDL degradation by cells of antiestrogen-treated baboons was proportionate to the decline in overall LDL uptake. The results indicate, therefore, that antiestrogen treatment decreased the amount of placental LDL uptake, but did not change the affinity for the lipoprotein.

  5. Antimicrobial-Resistant Enterococci in Animals and Meat: A Human Health Hazard?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerum, A.M.; Lester, C.H.; Heuer, Ole Eske

    2010-01-01

    clones predominate in certain animal species. This may suggest that antimicrobial-resistant E. faecium from animals could be regarded less hazardous to humans; however, due to their excellent ability to acquire and transfer resistance genes, E. faecium of animal origin may act as donors of antimicrobial...... resistance genes for other more virulent enterococci. For E. faecalis, the situation appears different, as similar clones of, for example, vancomycin-and gentamicin-resistant E. faecalis have been obtained from animals and from human patients. Continuous surveillance of antimicrobial resistance...... of avoparcin, gentamicin, and virginiamycin for growth promotion and therapy in food animals has lead to the emergence of vancomycin-and gentamicin-resistant enterococci and quinupristin/dalfopristin-resistant E. faecium in animals and meat. This implies a potential risk for transfer of resistance genes...

  6. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signaling Regulates Myogenic Responsiveness in Human Resistance Arteries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonya Hui

    Full Text Available We recently identified sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P signaling and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR as prominent regulators of myogenic responsiveness in rodent resistance arteries. However, since rodent models frequently exhibit limitations with respect to human applicability, translation is necessary to validate the relevance of this signaling network for clinical application. We therefore investigated the significance of these regulatory elements in human mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries. Mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries were isolated from patient tissue specimens collected during colonic or cardiac bypass surgery. Pressure myography assessments confirmed endothelial integrity, as well as stable phenylephrine and myogenic responses. Both human mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries (i express critical S1P signaling elements, (ii constrict in response to S1P and (iii lose myogenic responsiveness following S1P receptor antagonism (JTE013. However, while human mesenteric arteries express CFTR, human skeletal muscle resistance arteries do not express detectable levels of CFTR protein. Consequently, modulating CFTR activity enhances myogenic responsiveness only in human mesenteric resistance arteries. We conclude that human mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries are a reliable and consistent model for translational studies. We demonstrate that the core elements of an S1P-dependent signaling network translate to human mesenteric resistance arteries. Clear species and vascular bed variations are evident, reinforcing the critical need for further translational study.

  7. The human microbiome as a reservoir of antimicrobial resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John ePenders

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The gut microbiota is amongst the most densely populated microbial ecosystem on earth. While the microbiome exerts numerous health beneficial functions, the high density of microorganisms within this ecosystem also facilitates horizontal transfer of antimicrobial resistance (AMR genes to potential pathogenic bacteria. Over the past decades antibiotic susceptibility testing of specific indicator bacteria from the microbiome, such as Escherichia coli, has been the method of choice in most studies. These studies have greatly enlarged our understanding on the prevalence and distribution of AMR and associated risk factors.Recent studies using (functional metagenomics, however, highlighted the unappreciated diversity of AMR genes in the human microbiome and identified genes that had not been described previously. Next to metagenomics, more targeted approaches such as PCR for detection and quantification of AMR genes within a population are promising, in particular for large-scale epidemiological screening. Here we present an overview of the indigenous microbiota as a reservoir of AMR genes, the current knowledge on this resistome and the recent and upcoming advances in the molecular diagnostic approaches to unravel this reservoir.

  8. Antimicrobial drug resistance of Salmonella isolates from meat and humans, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Marianne Nielsine; Andersen, Jens Strodl; Aabo, Søren

    2007-01-01

    We compared 8,144 Salmonella isolates collected from meat imported to or produced in Denmark, as well as from Danish patients. Isolates from imported meat showed a higher rate of antimicrobial drug resistance, including multidrug resistance, than did isolates from domestic meat. Isolates from...... humans showed resistance rates lower than those found in imported meat but higher than in domestic meat. These findings indicate that programs for controlling resistant Salmonella spp. are a global issue...

  9. Antimicrobial drug resistance of Salmonella isolates from meat and humans, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Marianne; Andersen, Jens Strodl; Aabo, Søren

    2007-01-01

    We compared 8,144 Salmonella isolates collected from meat imported to or produced in Denmark, as well as from Danish patients. Isolates from imported meat showed a higher rate of antimicrobial drug resistance, including multidrug resistance, than did isolates from domestic meat. Isolates from...... humans showed resistance rates lower than those found in imported meat but higher than in domestic meat. These findings indicate that programs for controlling resistant Salmonella spp. are a global issue....

  10. Estrogen and pure antiestrogen fulvestrant (ICI 182 780) augment cell–matrigel adhesion of MCF-7 breast cancer cells through a novel G protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPR30)-to-calpain signaling axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yan; Li, Zheng; He, Yan; Shang, Dandan; Pan, Jigang; Wang, Hongmei; Chen, Huamei; Zhu, Zhuxia [Department of Physiology/Cancer Research Group, Guiyang Medical University School of Basic Medicine, 9 Beijing Road, Guiyang 550004, Guizhou (China); Wan, Lei [Department of Pharmacology, Guiyang Medical University School of Basic Medicine, 9 Beijing Road, Guiyang 550004, Guizhou (China); Wang, Xudong, E-mail: xdwang@gmc.edu.cn [Department of Physiology/Cancer Research Group, Guiyang Medical University School of Basic Medicine, 9 Beijing Road, Guiyang 550004, Guizhou (China)

    2014-03-01

    Fulvestrant (ICI 182 780, ICI) has been used in treating patients with hormone-sensitive breast cancer, yet initial or acquired resistance to endocrine therapies frequently arises and, in particular, cancer recurs as metastasis. We demonstrate here that both 17-beta-estradiol (E2) and ICI enhance cell adhesion to matrigel in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, with increased autolysis of calpain 1 (large subunit) and proteolysis of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), indicating calpain activation. Additionally, either E2 or ICI induced down-regulation of estrogen receptor α without affecting G protein coupled estrogen receptor 30 (GPR30) expression. Interestingly, GPR30 agonist G1 triggered calpain 1 autolysis but not calpain 2, whereas ER agonist diethylstilbestrol caused no apparent calpain autolysis. Furthermore, the actions of E2 and ICI on calpain and cell adhesion were tremendously suppressed by G15, or knockdown of GPR30. E2 and ICI also induced phosphorylation of extracellular regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), and suppression of ERK1/2 phosphorylation by U0126 profoundly impeded calpain activation triggered by estrogenic and antiestrogenic stimulations indicating implication of ERK1/2 in the GPR30-mediated action. Lastly, the E2- or ICI-induced cell adhesion was dramatically impaired by calpain-specific inhibitors, ALLN or calpeptin, suggesting requirement of calpain in the GPR30-associated action. These data show that enhanced cell adhesion by E2 and ICI occurs via a novel GPR30-ERK1/2-calpain pathway. Our results indicate that targeting the GPR30 signaling may be a potential strategy to reduce metastasis and improve the efficacy of antiestrogens in treatment of advanced breast cancer. - Highlights: • Estrogen and ICI augment adhesion to matrigel with calpain activation in MCF-7 cells. • GPR30 mediates cell–matrigel adhesion and calpain activation via ERK1/2. • Calpain is required in the cell–matrigel adhesion induced by E2 and ICI.

  11. Estrogen and pure antiestrogen fulvestrant (ICI 182 780) augment cell–matrigel adhesion of MCF-7 breast cancer cells through a novel G protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPR30)-to-calpain signaling axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yan; Li, Zheng; He, Yan; Shang, Dandan; Pan, Jigang; Wang, Hongmei; Chen, Huamei; Zhu, Zhuxia; Wan, Lei; Wang, Xudong

    2014-01-01

    Fulvestrant (ICI 182 780, ICI) has been used in treating patients with hormone-sensitive breast cancer, yet initial or acquired resistance to endocrine therapies frequently arises and, in particular, cancer recurs as metastasis. We demonstrate here that both 17-beta-estradiol (E2) and ICI enhance cell adhesion to matrigel in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, with increased autolysis of calpain 1 (large subunit) and proteolysis of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), indicating calpain activation. Additionally, either E2 or ICI induced down-regulation of estrogen receptor α without affecting G protein coupled estrogen receptor 30 (GPR30) expression. Interestingly, GPR30 agonist G1 triggered calpain 1 autolysis but not calpain 2, whereas ER agonist diethylstilbestrol caused no apparent calpain autolysis. Furthermore, the actions of E2 and ICI on calpain and cell adhesion were tremendously suppressed by G15, or knockdown of GPR30. E2 and ICI also induced phosphorylation of extracellular regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), and suppression of ERK1/2 phosphorylation by U0126 profoundly impeded calpain activation triggered by estrogenic and antiestrogenic stimulations indicating implication of ERK1/2 in the GPR30-mediated action. Lastly, the E2- or ICI-induced cell adhesion was dramatically impaired by calpain-specific inhibitors, ALLN or calpeptin, suggesting requirement of calpain in the GPR30-associated action. These data show that enhanced cell adhesion by E2 and ICI occurs via a novel GPR30-ERK1/2-calpain pathway. Our results indicate that targeting the GPR30 signaling may be a potential strategy to reduce metastasis and improve the efficacy of antiestrogens in treatment of advanced breast cancer. - Highlights: • Estrogen and ICI augment adhesion to matrigel with calpain activation in MCF-7 cells. • GPR30 mediates cell–matrigel adhesion and calpain activation via ERK1/2. • Calpain is required in the cell–matrigel adhesion induced by E2 and ICI

  12. Genetic makeup of amantadine-resistant and oseltamivir-resistant human influenza A/H1N1 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaraket, Hassan; Saito, Reiko; Suzuki, Yasushi; Baranovich, Tatiana; Dapat, Clyde; Caperig-Dapat, Isolde; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2010-04-01

    The emergence and widespread occurrence of antiviral drug-resistant seasonal human influenza A viruses, especially oseltamivir-resistant A/H1N1 virus, are major concerns. To understand the genetic background of antiviral drug-resistant A/H1N1 viruses, we performed full genome sequencing of prepandemic A/H1N1 strains. Seasonal influenza A/H1N1 viruses, including antiviral-susceptible viruses, amantadine-resistant viruses, and oseltamivir-resistant viruses, obtained from several areas in Japan during the 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 influenza seasons were analyzed. Sequencing of the full genomes of these viruses was performed, and the phylogenetic relationships among the sequences of each individual genome segment were inferred. Reference genome sequences from the Influenza Virus Resource database were included to determine the closest ancestor for each segment. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the oseltamivir-resistant strain evolved from a reassortant oseltamivir-susceptible strain (clade 2B) which circulated in the 2007-2008 season by acquiring the H275Y resistance-conferring mutation in the NA gene. The oseltamivir-resistant lineage (corresponding to the Northern European resistant lineage) represented 100% of the H1N1 isolates from the 2008-2009 season and further acquired at least one mutation in each of the polymerase basic protein 2 (PB2), polymerase basic protein 1 (PB1), hemagglutinin (HA), and neuraminidase (NA) genes. Therefore, a reassortment event involving two distinct oseltamivir-susceptible lineages, followed by the H275Y substitution in the NA gene and other mutations elsewhere in the genome, contributed to the emergence of the oseltamivir-resistant lineage. In contrast, amantadine-resistant viruses from the 2007-2008 season distinctly clustered in clade 2C and were characterized by extensive amino acid substitutions across their genomes, suggesting that a fitness gap among its genetic components might have driven these mutations to maintain it in the

  13. Human health hazard from antimicrobial-resistant enterococci in animals and food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuer, Ole Eske; Hammerum, Anette Marie; Collignon, P.

    2006-01-01

    The use of antimicrobial agents in the modern farm industry has created a reservoir of resistant bacteria in food animals. Foods of animal origin are often contaminated with enterococci that are likely to contribute resistance genes, virulence factors, or other properties to enterococci IN humans....... The potential hazard to human health from antimicrobial-resistant enterococci in animals is questioned by some scientists because of evidence of host specificity of enterococci. Similarly, the occurrences of specific nosocomial clones of enterococci in hospitals have lead to the misconception that antimicrobial-resistant...... to change the current view that antimicrobial-resistant enterococci from animals pose a threat to human health. On the contrary, antimicrobial resistance genes appear to spread freely between enterococci from different reservoirs, irrespective of their apparent host association....

  14. Antibiotic resistance - the interplay between antibiotic use in animals and human beings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singer, R.S.; Finch, R.; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    2003-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria were first identified in the 1940s, but while new antibiotics were being discovered at a steady rate, the consequences of this phenomenon were slow to be appreciated. Today, the excessive use of antibiotics compounded by the paucity of new agents on the market has...... meant the problem of antibiotic resistance is fast escalating into a global health crisis. There is no doubt that misuse of these drugs in human beings has contributed to the increasing rates of resistance, but recently the use of antibiotics in food animals and its consequent effect on resistance....... There is a growing concern over the transmission of resistant bacteria via the food chain. Many questions will be difficult to resolve, such as how do you distinguish the fraction of resistance in human beings that originated from animals? If we wait to see evidence that a significant amount of antibiotic resistance...

  15. Incidence of high-level evernimicin resistance in Enterococcus faecium among food animals and humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; McNicholas, P. M.

    2002-01-01

    Six high-level evernimicin-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolates were identified among 304 avilarnycin-resistant E. faecium isolates from animals and 404 stool samples from humans with diarrhea. All four animal isolates, and one of the human isolates, were able to transfer resistance...... to a susceptible E. faecium strain. The resulting transconjugants all tested positive for the presence of emtA, a gene encoding a methyltransferase previously linked with high-level evernimicin resistance. The four transconjugants derived from animal isolates all carried the same plasmid, while a differently sized...... plasmid was found in the isolate from humans. This study demonstrated a low incidence of high-level evernimicin resistance mediated by the emtA gene in different E. faecium isolates of animal and human origin....

  16. Glucocorticoid receptor antagonism reverts docetaxel resistance in human prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, Jan; Kroon, Jan; Puhr, M.; Buijs, J.T.; van der Horst, G.; Hemmer, D.M.; Marijt, K.A.; Hwang, M.S.; Masood, M.; Grimm, S.; Storm, Gerrit; Metselaar, Josbert Maarten; Meijer, O.C.; Culig, Z.; van der Pluijm, M.

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to docetaxel is a major clinical problem in advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Although glucocorticoids (GCs) are frequently used in combination with docetaxel, it is unclear to what extent GCs and their receptor, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), contribute to the chemotherapy resistance.

  17. Glucocorticoid receptor antagonism reverts docetaxel resistance in human prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, Jan; Puhr, Martin; Buijs, Jeroen T.; Van Der Horst, Geertje; Lemhemmer, Daniël; Marijt, Koen A.; Hwang, Ming S.; Masood, Motasim; Grimm, Stefan; Storm, Gert; Metselaar, Josbert M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/244207690; Meijer, Onno C.; Culig, Zoran; Van Der Pluijm, Gabri

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to docetaxel is a major clinical problem in advanced prostate cancer (PCA). Although glucocorticoids (GCs) are frequently used in combination with docetaxel, it is unclear to what extent GCs and their receptor, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), contribute to the chemotherapy resistance.

  18. Recombinant Human Erythropoietin for Treating Treatment-Resistant Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiak, Kamilla W; Vinberg, Maj; Christensen, Ellen M

    2014-01-01

    improves mood and memory in treatment-resistant depression. Forty treatment-resistant depressed unipolar patients with Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-17 (HDRS-17) score ≥ 17 were randomized to eight weekly EPO (Eprex; 40,000 IU) or saline infusions in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel...

  19. Insulin resistance alters islet morphology in nondiabetic humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mezza, Teresa; Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Sorice, Gian Pio

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by poor glucose uptake in metabolic tissues and manifests when insulin secretion fails to cope with worsening insulin resistance. In addition to its effects on skeletal muscle, liver, and adipose tissue metabolism, it is evident that insulin resistance also affects...... pancreatic β-cells. To directly examine the alterations that occur in islet morphology as part of an adaptive mechanism to insulin resistance, we evaluated pancreas samples obtained during pancreatoduodenectomy from nondiabetic subjects who were insulin-resistant or insulin-sensitive. We also compared...... insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, and incretin levels between the two groups. We report an increased islet size and an elevated number of β- and α-cells that resulted in an altered β-cell-to-α-cell area in the insulin- resistant group. Our data in this series of studies suggest that neogenesis from...

  20. Pregnant ewes exposed to multiple endocrine disrupting pollutants through sewage sludge-fertilized pasture show an anti-estrogenic effect in their trabecular bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, P. Monica, E-mail: Monica.Lind@medsci.uu.se [Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University, Ullerakersvaegen 40, 751 85 Uppsala (Sweden); Oberg, Denise [Department of Environmental Toxicology, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Larsson, Sune [Department of Orthopaedics, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Kyle, Carol E. [Macaulay Land Use Research Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH (United Kingdom); Orberg, Jan [Department of Environmental Toxicology, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Rhind, Stewart M. [Macaulay Land Use Research Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-01

    Pregnant ewes were maintained on pastures fertilized, twice yearly, with either sewage sludge (2.25 tonnes dry matter/ha; Treated; T) or inorganic fertilizer containing equivalent amounts of nitrogen (Control; C), to determine effects on maternal and fetal bone structures, density and mechanical properties of exposure to environmental concentrations of multiple endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) and heavy metal pollutants. The ewes were maintained on the respective pastures from the age of about 8 months until they were 4-6 years of age and they were slaughtered at 110 d gestation. Metaphyseal parts of adult ewe femurs exhibited a significantly reduced mean, total cross sectional area (CSA, - 4%; p < 0.05), lower trabecular bone mineral content (BMC, mg/mm; - 18%; p < 0.05), trabecular bone mineral density (BMD, mg/cm{sup 3}, - 8.0%; p < 0.05) and trabecular CSA, mm{sup 2}, - 11.1%; p < 0.05) in T compared with C animals. Femurs of T ewes were stronger than those of C ewes but this may reflect greater body weights. At the mid-diaphyseal part of the fetal bones, there was a reduction in endosteal circumference (- 6.7%, p < 0.05) and marrow cavity area (- 13.8%, p < 0.05) in the female T fetuses compared with female C fetuses. In the male fetuses the mid-diaphyseal part total bone mineral content was higher (+ 3.0%, p < 0.05) in T than in C animals. No treatment difference in biomechanical bending was detected in the fetuses. It is concluded that ewes grazing pasture fertilized with sewage sludge exhibited an anti-estrogenic effect on their trabecular bone in the form of reduced mineral content and density, despite increased body weight. It is suggested that human exposure to low levels of multiple EDCs may have implications for bone structure and human health.

  1. Pregnant ewes exposed to multiple endocrine disrupting pollutants through sewage sludge-fertilized pasture show an anti-estrogenic effect in their trabecular bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lind, P. Monica; Oberg, Denise; Larsson, Sune; Kyle, Carol E.; Orberg, Jan; Rhind, Stewart M.

    2010-01-01

    Pregnant ewes were maintained on pastures fertilized, twice yearly, with either sewage sludge (2.25 tonnes dry matter/ha; Treated; T) or inorganic fertilizer containing equivalent amounts of nitrogen (Control; C), to determine effects on maternal and fetal bone structures, density and mechanical properties of exposure to environmental concentrations of multiple endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) and heavy metal pollutants. The ewes were maintained on the respective pastures from the age of about 8 months until they were 4-6 years of age and they were slaughtered at 110 d gestation. Metaphyseal parts of adult ewe femurs exhibited a significantly reduced mean, total cross sectional area (CSA, - 4%; p 3 , - 8.0%; p 2 , - 11.1%; p < 0.05) in T compared with C animals. Femurs of T ewes were stronger than those of C ewes but this may reflect greater body weights. At the mid-diaphyseal part of the fetal bones, there was a reduction in endosteal circumference (- 6.7%, p < 0.05) and marrow cavity area (- 13.8%, p < 0.05) in the female T fetuses compared with female C fetuses. In the male fetuses the mid-diaphyseal part total bone mineral content was higher (+ 3.0%, p < 0.05) in T than in C animals. No treatment difference in biomechanical bending was detected in the fetuses. It is concluded that ewes grazing pasture fertilized with sewage sludge exhibited an anti-estrogenic effect on their trabecular bone in the form of reduced mineral content and density, despite increased body weight. It is suggested that human exposure to low levels of multiple EDCs may have implications for bone structure and human health.

  2. Bimodal effect on pancreatic β-cells of secretory products from normal or insulin-resistant human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzakri, Karim; Plomgaard, Peter; Berney, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance with a relative deficiency in insulin secretion. This study explored the potential communication between insulin-resistant human skeletal muscle and primary (human and rat) β-cells.......Type 2 diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance with a relative deficiency in insulin secretion. This study explored the potential communication between insulin-resistant human skeletal muscle and primary (human and rat) β-cells....

  3. Contrasting ability of steroidal (ICI 182 780) and non-steroidal (EM-800) antiestrogens to inhibit reproductive organ growth in male and female mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotanová, Jana; Köhlerová, Eva; Škarda, Josef

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 74, - (2005), s. 533-541 ISSN 0001-7213 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS5045302 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : antiestrogen * growth * mammary gland Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 0.353, year: 2005

  4. Antibiotic resistance - the interplay between antibiotic use in animals and human beings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singer, R.S.; Finch, R.; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    2003-01-01

    meant the problem of antibiotic resistance is fast escalating into a global health crisis. There is no doubt that misuse of these drugs in human beings has contributed to the increasing rates of resistance, but recently the use of antibiotics in food animals and its consequent effect on resistance...... levels in people has also come under scrutiny. Antimicrobials are used therapeutically and prophylactically in animals. More controversially, antimicrobials are also used as growth promoters to improve the ability of the animal to convert feed into body mass. Some argue that the impact of use....... There is a growing concern over the transmission of resistant bacteria via the food chain. Many questions will be difficult to resolve, such as how do you distinguish the fraction of resistance in human beings that originated from animals? If we wait to see evidence that a significant amount of antibiotic resistance...

  5. Human health risk assessment (HHRA) for environmental development and transfer of antibiotic resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashbolt, Nicholas J.; Amézquita, Alejandro; Backhaus, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    to enable human health risk assessments (HHRA) that focus on the role of the environment in the failure of antibiotic treatment caused by antibiotic-resistant pathogens. Methods: The authors participated in a workshop held 4-8 March 2012 in Québec, Canada, to define the scope and objectives...... of an environmental assessment of antibiotic-resistance risks to human health. We focused on key elements of environmental-resistance-development "hot spots," exposure assessment (unrelated to food), and dose response to characterize risks that may improve antibiotic-resistance management options. Discussion: Various...... novel aspects to traditional risk assessments were identified to enable an assessment of environmental antibiotic resistance. These include a) accounting for an added selective pressure on the environmental resistome that, over time, allows for development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB); b...

  6. Human Health Hazards from Antimicrobial-Resistant Escherichia coli of Animal Origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerum, A. M.; Heuer, Ole Eske

    2009-01-01

    of antimicrobial agents in food animals may add to the burden of antimicrobial resistance in humans. Bacteria from the animal reservoir that carry resistance to antimicrobial agents that are regarded as highly or critically important in human therapy (e.g., aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, and third- and fourth......Because of the intensive use of antimicrobial agents in food animal production, meat is frequently contaminated with antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli. Humans can be colonized with E. coli of animal origin, and because of resistance to commonly used antimicrobial agents, these bacteria may...... cause infections for which limited therapeutic options are available. This may lead to treatment failure and can have serious consequences for the patient. Furthermore, E. coli of animal origin may act as a donor of antimicrobial resistance genes for other pathogenic E. coli. Thus, the intensive use...

  7. HUMAN RESISTANCE TO THE USE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN CONSTRUCTION COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Andi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of implementing information technology (IT often fails to bring the intended result because the human dimension is not given adequate consideration. Yet despite some evidence of failure, little has been written on the nature of human performance, compared to abundant resources about technical and procedural aspects, as it applies to the ideals of the IT philosophy. To combat people’s deficiencies, this paper focuses mainly on the question why people resist IT. It explores sources of human resistance to the use of IT. A survey is the conducted to personnel working for construction companies to examine the resistance sources. The result reveals personal money, habit, and threat to information security as most dominant sources for such resistance, instead of fear of employment instability as many previous researches have discussed. The paper discusses the resistances and suggests possible solutions to deal with them.

  8. spa typing and antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus from healthy humans, pigs and dogs in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katakweba, Abdul Sekemani; Muhairwa, Amandus Pachificus; Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen; Guardabassi, Luca; Mtambo, Madundo M A; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2016-02-28

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen causing infections in humans and animals. Here we report for the first time the prevalence of nasal carriage, spa typing and antimicrobial resistance of S. aureus in a Tanzanian livestock community. Nasal swabs were taken from 100 humans, 100 pigs and 100 dogs in Morogoro Municipal. Each swab was enriched in Mueller Hinton broth with 6.5% NaCl and subcultured on chromogenic agar for S. aureus detection. Presumptive S. aureus colonies were confirmed to the species level by nuc PCR and analysed by spa typing. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined by disc diffusion method. S. aureus was isolated from 22% of humans, 4% of pigs and 11% of dogs. A total of 21 spa types were identified: 13, 7 and 1 in human, dogs, and pigs, respectively. Three spa types (t314, t223 and t084) were shared between humans and dogs. A novel spa type (t10779) was identified in an isolate recovered from a colonized human. Antimicrobials tested revealed resistance to ampicillin in all isolates, moderate resistances to other antimicrobials with tetracycline resistance being the most frequent. S. aureus carrier frequencies in dogs and humans were within the expected range and low in pigs. The S. aureus spa types circulating in the community were generally not shared by different hosts and majority of types belonged to known clones. Besides ampicillin resistance, moderate levels of antimicrobial resistance were observed irrespective of the host species from which the strains were isolated.

  9. Functional characterization of the antibiotic resistance reservoir in the human microflora

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Morten; Church, George M; Dantas, Gautam

    2010-01-01

    The increasing levels of multi-drug resistance in human pathogenic bacteria are compromising our ability to treat infectious disease. Since antibiotic resistance determinants are readily exchanged between bacteria through lateral gene transfer, there is an increasing interest in investigating res...

  10. DNA from radiation resistant human tumor cells transfers resistance to NIH/3T3 cells with varying degrees of penetrance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasid, U.; Dritschilo, A.; Weichselbaum, R.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that clinical radiation resistance may correlate with in vitro radiation survival parameters. Specifically, they isolated several cell lines from radioresistant head and neck carcinomas with D/sub 0/ values greater than 2 Gy. The authors co-transfected DNA from cell line SQ2OB (D/sub 0/ = 2.4 Gy) with the rhoSVNeO plasmid into NIH/3T3 cells (D/sub 0/ = 1.7 Gy). Antibiotic G418 resistant, transformed clones were isolated and confirmed by Southern blotting to contain human alu, as well as rhoSVNeO sequences. Screening for radiation resistance with 8Gy (Cs-137) revealed that 3 of 4 tested hybrid clones show a radiation survival intermediate between NIH/3T3 and SQ2OB. This suggests that radiation resistance is a dominant, transfectable phenotype of mammalian cells and can be expressed in more sensitive cells. Karyotyping of resistant hybrid clones shows the presence of double minute chromosomes. Secondary transfection results and experiments to clone the genetic factors responsible for radiation resistance are in progress and results will be reported

  11. Antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar typhimurium from humans and production animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seyfarth, Anne Mette; Wegener, Henrik Caspar; FrimodtMoller, N.

    1997-01-01

    : Poultry strains were usually resistant only to ampicillin, white pig and cattle isolates were most often resistant to sulphonamide, tetracycline and streptomycin. Typing of the strains showed that some animal strains and human strains were indistinguishable. In conclusion, while antimicrobial resistance......We have studied the frequency of antimicrobial resistance and epidemiological relatedness among 473 isolates of Salmonella enterica subsp, enterica serovar typhimurium (S. typhimurium) from human and veterinary sources. The human strains were clinical isolates from patients with diarrhoea sent...... to the State Serum Institute during August 1993 (228 isolates). The animal strains were isolated from clinical or subclinical infections in cattle (48 isolates), pigs (99 isolates) or poultry (98 isolates), all from 1993. All strains were tested against 22 different antimicrobial agents used in both human...

  12. Hidden contributions of the enamel rods on the fracture resistance of human teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Yahyazadehfar, M.; Bajaj, Devendra; Arola, Dwayne D.

    2012-01-01

    The enamel of human teeth is generally regarded as a brittle material with low fracture toughness. Consequently, the contributions of this tissue in resisting tooth fracture and the importance of its complex microstructure have been largely overlooked. In this study an experimental evaluation of the crack growth resistance of human enamel was conducted to characterize the role of rod (i.e. prism) orientation and degree of decussation on the fracture behavior of this tissue. Incremental crack ...

  13. Molecular biological studies on the human radioresistance and drug resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Min; Hong, Weon Seon

    1992-04-01

    We irradiated the MKN45 and PC14 cell lines with 500 rads and also established the adriamycin-resistant and cis-platinum resistant cell line. The genomic DNA and total RNA were extracted and subjected to the Southern and Northern analysis using various probes including heat shock protein 70, MDR1, fos, TGFb etc. The mRNA transcript was increased 1 hour after the irradiation and sustained during the 48 hours and returned to the level of pre-irradiation. No significant change was observed with the drug resistant cell lines at the level of gene dosage. We suggest that the marked increase of the hsp70 transcript is very important finding and is believed to be a good candidate for the modulation of the cellular response to irradiation and the radioresistance. (Author)

  14. Does human activity impact the natural antibiotic resistance background? Abundance of antibiotic resistance genes in 21 Swiss lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czekalski, Nadine; Sigdel, Radhika; Birtel, Julia; Matthews, Blake; Bürgmann, Helmut

    2015-08-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are emerging environmental contaminants, known to be continuously discharged into the aquatic environment via human and animal waste. Freshwater aquatic environments represent potential reservoirs for ARG and potentially allow sewage-derived ARG to persist and spread in the environment. This may create increased opportunities for an eventual contact with, and gene transfer to, human and animal pathogens via the food chain or drinking water. However, assessment of this risk requires a better understanding of the level and variability of the natural resistance background and the extent of the human impact. We have analyzed water samples from 21 Swiss lakes, taken at sampling points that were not under the direct influence of local contamination sources and analyzed the relative abundance of ARG using quantitative real-time PCR. Copy numbers of genes mediating resistance to three different broad-spectrum antibiotic classes (sulfonamides: sul1, sul2, tetracyclines: tet(B), tet(M), tet(W) and fluoroquinolones: qnrA) were normalized to copy numbers of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. We used multiple linear regression to assess if ARG abundance is related to human activities in the catchment, microbial community composition and the eutrophication status of the lakes. Sul genes were detected in all sampled lakes, whereas only four lakes contained quantifiable numbers of tet genes, and qnrA remained below detection in all lakes. Our data indicate higher abundance of sul1 in lakes with increasing number and capacity of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in the catchment. sul2 abundance was rather related to long water residence times and eutrophication status. Our study demonstrates the potential of freshwater lakes to preserve antibiotic resistance genes, and provides a reference for ARG abundance from lake systems with low human impact as a baseline for assessing ARG contamination in lake water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  15. Mechanisms of quinolone resistance and implications for human and animal health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velhner Maja

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Quinolone antibiotics have been widely used in human and veterinary medicine. This has caused the development of resistance and difficulties in the treatment of complicated bacterial infections in humans. The resistance to quinolones develops due to chromosome mutations and it can also be transferred by plasmids. The target enzyme for quinolones in Gram-negative bacteria is Gyrasa A, while the target enzyme in Grampositive bacteria is mostly topoisomerase IV. Gyrase A consists of two subunits encoded by genes gyrA and gyrB. The function of the enzyme is to introduce negative super coiling in DNA and therefore is essential for the replication of bacteria. Quinolone resistance develops if point mutations at 83 and/or 87 codon are introduced on gyrA. Establishing a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC to this group of antimicrobials will reveal possible mutations. Recently it was discovered that quinolone resistance is transmittable by plasmid termed PMQR (plasmid mediated quinolone resistance. The target gene marked qnr encodes a pentapeptide repeat family protein. Pentapeptide repeats form sheets, involved in protein-protein interactions. Qnr protein binds to GyrA protecting the enzyme from the inhibitory effect of ciprofloxacin. The distribution of qnr related resistance is higher in humans than in animals. In poultry, however, this type of resistance is present more than in other animals. Plasmid mediated resistance contributes to the faster spread of quinolone resistance. Proper food handling will significantly contribute to decreasing the risk from infection to which people are exposed. In medical and veterinary laboratories antimicrobial resistance monitoring in clinical and environmental isolates is advised. Since correlation between antibiotics application and antimicrobial resistance is often suggested, antimicrobial use must be under strict control of the authorities both in human and in veterinary medicine. .

  16. Antibiotic resistance in human peri-implantitis microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rams, Thomas E.; Degener, John E.; van Winkelhoff, Arie J.

    ObjectivesBecause antimicrobial therapy is often employed in the treatment of infectious dental implant complications, this study determined the occurrence of in vitro antibiotic resistance among putative peri-implantitis bacterial pathogens. MethodsSubmucosal biofilm specimens were cultured from

  17. Mechanism of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense resistance to human serum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uzureau, Pierrick; Uzureau, Sophie; Lecordier, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    GP), which prevents APOL1 toxicity and induces stiffening of membranes upon interaction with lipids. Two additional features contribute to resistance to TLFs: reduction of sensitivity to APOL1 requiring cysteine protease activity, and TbHpHbR inactivation due to a L210S substitution. According...

  18. Acquisition of anoikis resistance in human osteosarcoma cells does not alter sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Díaz-Montero, C Marcela; McIntyre, Bradley W

    2005-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced cell death can involve the induction of apoptosis. Thus, aberrant function of the pathways involved might result in chemoresistance. Since cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix acts as a survival factor that homeostatically maintains normal tissue architecture, it was tested whether acquisition of resistance to deadhesion-induced apoptosis (anoikis) in human osteosarcoma would result in resistance to chemotherapy. Osteosarcoma cell lines (SAOS-2 and TE-85) obtained from ATCC and were maintained in complete Eagle's MEM medium. Suspension culture was established by placing cells in tissue culture wells coated with poly-HEMA. Cell cytotoxicity was determined using a live/dead cytotoxicity assay. Cell cycle/apoptosis analyses were performed using propidium iodide (PI) staining with subsequent FACS analysis. Apoptosis was also assayed by Annexin-FITC/PI staining. Etoposide, adriamycin, vinblastine, cisplatin and paclitaxel were able to induce apoptosis in human osteosarcoma cells SAOS-2 regardless of their anoikis resistance phenotype or the culture conditions (adhered vs. suspended). Moreover, suspended anoikis resistant TE-85 cells (TE-85ar) retained their sensitivity to chemotherapy as well. Acquisition of anoikis resistance in human osteosarcoma cells does not result in a generalized resistance to all apoptotic stimuli, including chemotherapy. Moreover, our results suggest that the pathways regulating anoikis resistance and chemotherapy resistance might involve the action of different mediators

  19. Acquisition of anoikis resistance in human osteosarcoma cells does not alter sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McIntyre Bradley W

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemotherapy-induced cell death can involve the induction of apoptosis. Thus, aberrant function of the pathways involved might result in chemoresistance. Since cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix acts as a survival factor that homeostatically maintains normal tissue architecture, it was tested whether acquisition of resistance to deadhesion-induced apoptosis (anoikis in human osteosarcoma would result in resistance to chemotherapy. Methods Osteosarcoma cell lines (SAOS-2 and TE-85 obtained from ATCC and were maintained in complete Eagle's MEM medium. Suspension culture was established by placing cells in tissue culture wells coated with poly-HEMA. Cell cytotoxicity was determined using a live/dead cytotoxicity assay. Cell cycle/apoptosis analyses were performed using propidium iodide (PI staining with subsequent FACS analysis. Apoptosis was also assayed by Annexin-FITC/PI staining. Results Etoposide, adriamycin, vinblastine, cisplatin and paclitaxel were able to induce apoptosis in human osteosarcoma cells SAOS-2 regardless of their anoikis resistance phenotype or the culture conditions (adhered vs. suspended. Moreover, suspended anoikis resistant TE-85 cells (TE-85ar retained their sensitivity to chemotherapy as well. Conclusion Acquisition of anoikis resistance in human osteosarcoma cells does not result in a generalized resistance to all apoptotic stimuli, including chemotherapy. Moreover, our results suggest that the pathways regulating anoikis resistance and chemotherapy resistance might involve the action of different mediators.

  20. Comparing the Genetic Diversity and Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles of Campylobacter jejuni Recovered from Cattle and Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonhee Cha

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni, a leading cause of gastroenteritis in humans, is a foodborne pathogen that can reside in chickens, pigs, and cattle. Because resistance to fluoroquinolones and macrolides, which are commonly used to treat human infections, has emerged in C. jejuni, it is imperative to continously monitor resistance patterns and examine the genetic variation in strains from human infections and animal reservoirs. Our previous study of C. jejuni from human campylobacteriosis cases showed a significantly higher rate of tetracycline resistance compared to national trends, and identified multilocus sequence type (ST-982 and a history of cattle contact to be associated with tetracycline resistance. To further investigate these associations, we conducted a cross-sectional study to determine the frequency of antimicrobial resistance and examine the genetic diversity of C. jejuni recovered from 214 cattle at three Michigan herds. Overall, the prevalence of C. jejuni was 69.2% (range: 58.6–83.8% for the three farms, and 83.7% (n = 113 of isolates were resistant to one or more antimicrobials. Resistance to only tetracycline predominated among the cattle isolates (n = 89; 65.9% with most resistant strains belonging to ST-459 (96.5% or ST-982 (86.4%. Among the 22 STs identified, STs 459 and 982 were more prevalent in one feedlot, which reported the use of chlortetracycline in feed upon arrival of a new herd. PCR-based fingerprinting demonstrated that the ST-982 isolates from cattle and humans had identical banding patterns, suggesting the possibility of interspecies transmission. Resistance to macrolides (1.5% and ciprofloxacin (16.3% was also observed; 14 of the 22 ciprofloxacin resistant isolates represented ST-1244. Together, these findings demonstrate a high prevalence of antimicrobial resistant C. jejuni in cattle and identify associations with specific genotypes. Continuous monitoring and identification of risk factors for resistance emergence

  1. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 from Human Patients, Upper Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz-Gercek, Sigrid; Mittermayer, Helmut

    2009-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal type ST398 is usually associated with animals. We examined 1,098 confirmed MRSA samples from human patients and found that 21 were MRSA ST398. Most (16) patients were farmers. Increasing prevalence from 1.3% (2006) to 2.5% (2008) shows emergence of MRSA ST398 in humans in Austria. PMID:19402964

  2. Livestock Origin for a Human Pandemic Clone of Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spoor, Laura E.; McAdam, Paul R.; Weinert, Lucy A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The importance of livestock as a source of bacterial pathogens with the potential for epidemic spread in human populations is unclear. In recent years, there has been a global increase in community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infections of healthy...... with the independent acquisition of mobile genetic elements encoding antimicrobial resistance and human-specific mediators of immune evasion, consistent with an important role for these genetic events in the capacity to survive and transmit among human populations. In conclusion, we provide evidence that livestock...... at the human-livestock interface. IMPORTANCE Animals are the major source of new pathogens affecting humans. However, the potential for pathogenic bacteria that originally were found in animals to switch hosts and become widely established in human populations is not clear. Here, we report the discovery...

  3. Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles and Diversity in Salmonella from Humans and Cattle, 2004-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afema, J A; Mather, A E; Sischo, W M

    2015-11-01

    Analysis of long-term anti-microbial resistance (AMR) data is useful to understand source and transmission dynamics of AMR. We analysed 5124 human clinical isolates from Washington State Department of Health, 391 cattle clinical isolates from the Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory and 1864 non-clinical isolates from foodborne disease research on dairies in the Pacific Northwest. Isolates were assigned profiles based on phenotypic resistance to 11 anti-microbials belonging to eight classes. Salmonella Typhimurium (ST), Salmonella Newport (SN) and Salmonella Montevideo (SM) were the most common serovars in both humans and cattle. Multinomial logistic regression showed ST and SN from cattle had greater probability of resistance to multiple classes of anti-microbials than ST and SN from humans (P resistant ST and SN for people, occurrence of profiles unique to cattle and not observed in temporally related human isolates indicates these profiles are circulating in cattle only. We used various measures to assess AMR diversity, conditional on the weighting of rare versus abundant profiles. AMR profile richness was greater in the common serovars from humans, although both source data sets were dominated by relatively few profiles. The greater profile richness in human Salmonella may be due to greater diversity of sources entering the human population compared to cattle or due to continuous evolution in the human environment. Also, AMR diversity was greater in clinical compared to non-clinical cattle Salmonella, and this could be due to anti-microbial selection pressure in diseased cattle that received treatment. The use of bootstrapping techniques showed that although there were shared profiles between humans and cattle, the expected and observed number of profiles was different, suggesting Salmonella and associated resistance from humans and cattle may not be wholly derived from a common population. © 2014 The Authors. Zoonoses and Public Health Published by

  4. CRISPR Typing and Antibiotic Resistance Correlates with Polyphyletic Distribution in Human Isolates of Salmonella Kentucky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosik, Dorothy; Tewari, Deepanker; Dettinger, Lisa; M'ikanatha, Nkuchia M; Shariat, Nikki W

    2018-02-01

    Although infrequently associated with reported salmonellosis in humans, Salmonella enterica, subsp. enterica serovar Kentucky (ser. Kentucky) is the most common nonclinical, nonhuman serovar reported in the United States. The goal of this study was to use Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-multi-virulence-locus sequence typing (MVLST) to subtype a collection of human clinical isolates of ser. Kentucky submitted to the Pennsylvania Department of Health and to determine the extent of antibiotic resistance in these strains. This analysis highlighted the polyphyletic nature of ser. Kentucky, and separated our isolates into two groups, Group I and Group II, which were equally represented in our collection. Furthermore, antimicrobial susceptibility testing on all isolates using a National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) panel of antibiotics demonstrated that resistance profiles could be divided into two groups. Group I isolates were resistant to cephems and penicillins, whereas Group II isolates were resistant to quinolones, gentamicin, and sulfisoxazole. Collectively, 50% of isolates were resistant to three or more classes of antibiotics and 30% were resistant to five or more classes. The correlation of antibiotic resistance with the two different lineages may reflect adaptation within two distinct reservoirs of ser. Kentucky, with differential exposure to antimicrobials.

  5. [Establishment of human multidrug-resistant lung carcinoma cell line (D6/MVP)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Sheng-lin; Feng, Jian-guo; Gu, Lin-hui; Ling, Yu-tian

    2003-03-01

    To establish human multidrug-resistant lung carcinoma cell line (D6/MVP) with its characteristics studied. Intermittent administration of high-dose MMC, VDS and DDP (MVP) was used to induce human lung carcinoma cell line (D6) to a multidrug-resistant variety (D6/MVP). MTT assay was used to study the multidrug resistance of D6/MVP to multianticarcinogen. Flow cytometry was used to study the cell cycle distribution and the expression of P-gp, multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) and GSH/GST. 1. D6/MVP was resistant to many anti-tumor agents, with the IC(50) 13.3 times higher and the drug resistance 2 - 6 times higher than D6, 2. The multiplication time of D6/MVP was prolonged and the cell number of S-phase decreased while that of G1- and G(2)-phase increased and 3. The expression of P-gp and MRP was enhanced significantly (96.2% vs 51.7%), but the expression of GSH/GST kept stable. D6/MVP is a multidrug-resistant cell line possessing the basic characteristics of drug-resistance.

  6. Identification of the Mechanisms Underlying Antiestrogen Resistance: Breast Cancer Research Partnership between FIU-UM Braman Family Breast Cancer Institute

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roy, Deodutta

    2008-01-01

    This research proposal has two primary objectives which are to (1) increase FIU investigators' research expertise and competitive ability to succeed as independent breast cancer researchers; and (2...

  7. Genetic diversity and antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli from human and animal sources uncovers multiple resistances from human sources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mark Ibekwe

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli are widely used as indicators of fecal contamination, and in some cases to identify host sources of fecal contamination in surface water. Prevalence, genetic diversity and antimicrobial susceptibility were determined for 600 generic E. coli isolates obtained from surface water and sediment from creeks and channels along the middle Santa Ana River (MSAR watershed of southern California, USA, after a 12 month study. Evaluation of E. coli populations along the creeks and channels showed that E. coli were more prevalent in sediment compared to surface water. E. coli populations were not significantly different (P = 0.05 between urban runoff sources and agricultural sources, however, E. coli genotypes determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE were less diverse in the agricultural sources than in urban runoff sources. PFGE also showed that E. coli populations in surface water were more diverse than in the sediment, suggesting isolates in sediment may be dominated by clonal populations.Twenty four percent (144 isolates of the 600 isolates exhibited resistance to more than one antimicrobial agent. Most multiple resistances were associated with inputs from urban runoff and involved the antimicrobials rifampicin, tetracycline, and erythromycin. The occurrence of a greater number of E. coli with multiple antibiotic resistances from urban runoff sources than agricultural sources in this watershed provides useful evidence in planning strategies for water quality management and public health protection.

  8. Emergence of Antimicrobial-Resistant Escherichia coli of Animal Origin Spreading in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skurnik, David; Clermont, Olivier; Guillard, Thomas; Launay, Adrien; Danilchanka, Olga; Pons, Stéphanie; Diancourt, Laure; Lebreton, François; Kadlec, Kristina; Roux, Damien; Jiang, Deming; Dion, Sara; Aschard, Hugues; Denamur, Maurice; Cywes-Bentley, Colette; Schwarz, Stefan; Tenaillon, Olivier; Andremont, Antoine; Picard, Bertrand; Mekalanos, John; Brisse, Sylvain; Denamur, Erick

    2016-04-01

    In the context of the great concern about the impact of human activities on the environment, we studied 403 commensal Escherichia coli/Escherichia clade strains isolated from several animal and human populations that have variable contacts to one another. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) showed a decrease of diversity 1) in strains isolated from animals that had an increasing contact with humans and 2) in all strains that had increased antimicrobial resistance. A specific B1 phylogroup clonal complex (CC87, Institut Pasteur schema nomenclature) of animal origin was identified and characterized as being responsible for the increased antimicrobial resistance prevalence observed in strains from the environments with a high human-mediated antimicrobial pressure. CC87 strains have a high capacity of acquiring and disseminating resistance genes with specific metabolic and genetic determinants as demonstrated by high-throughput sequencing and phenotyping. They are good mouse gut colonizers but are not virulent. Our data confirm the predominant role of human activities in the emergence of antimicrobial resistance in the environmental bacterial strains and unveil a particular E. coli clonal complex of animal origin capable of spreading antimicrobial resistance to other members of microbial communities. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Emergence of Antimicrobial-Resistant Escherichia coli of Animal Origin Spreading in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skurnik, David; Clermont, Olivier; Guillard, Thomas; Launay, Adrien; Danilchanka, Olga; Pons, Stéphanie; Diancourt, Laure; Lebreton, François; Kadlec, Kristina; Roux, Damien; Jiang, Deming; Dion, Sara; Aschard, Hugues; Denamur, Maurice; Cywes-Bentley, Colette; Schwarz, Stefan; Tenaillon, Olivier; Andremont, Antoine; Picard, Bertrand; Mekalanos, John; Brisse, Sylvain; Denamur, Erick

    2016-01-01

    In the context of the great concern about the impact of human activities on the environment, we studied 403 commensal Escherichia coli/Escherichia clade strains isolated from several animal and human populations that have variable contacts to one another. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) showed a decrease of diversity 1) in strains isolated from animals that had an increasing contact with humans and 2) in all strains that had increased antimicrobial resistance. A specific B1 phylogroup clonal complex (CC87, Institut Pasteur schema nomenclature) of animal origin was identified and characterized as being responsible for the increased antimicrobial resistance prevalence observed in strains from the environments with a high human-mediated antimicrobial pressure. CC87 strains have a high capacity of acquiring and disseminating resistance genes with specific metabolic and genetic determinants as demonstrated by high-throughput sequencing and phenotyping. They are good mouse gut colonizers but are not virulent. Our data confirm the predominant role of human activities in the emergence of antimicrobial resistance in the environmental bacterial strains and unveil a particular E. coli clonal complex of animal origin capable of spreading antimicrobial resistance to other members of microbial communities. PMID:26613786

  10. Cfr-mediated linezolid-resistance among methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci from infections of humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanqing Cui

    Full Text Available Four methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MRCoNS, one Staphylococcus haemolyticus and three Staphylococcus cohnii, from infections of humans collected via the Ministry of Health National Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance Net (Mohnarin program in China were identified as linezolid-resistant. These four isolates were negative for the 23S rRNA mutations, but positive for the gene cfr. Mutations in the gene for the ribosomal protein L3, which resulted in the amino acid exchanges Gly152Asp and Tyr158Phe, were identified in S. haemolyticus 09D279 and S. cohnii NDM113, respectively. In each isolate, the cfr gene was located on a plasmid of ca. 35.4 kb, as shown by S1 nuclease pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and Southern blotting experiments. This plasmid was indistinguishable from the previously described plasmid pSS-02 by its size, restriction pattern, and a sequenced 14-kb cfr-carrying segment. Plasmid pSS-02 was originally identified in staphylococci isolated from pigs. This is the first time that a cfr-carrying plasmid has been detected in MRCoNS obtained from intensive care patients in China. Based on the similarities to the cfr-carrying plasmid pSS-02 from porcine coagulase-negative staphylococci, a transmission of this cfr-carrying plasmid between staphylococci from pigs and humans appears to be likely.

  11. Cfr-mediated linezolid-resistance among methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci from infections of humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lanqing; Wang, Yang; Li, Yun; He, Tao; Schwarz, Stefan; Ding, Yujing; Shen, Jianzhong; Lv, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Four methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MRCoNS), one Staphylococcus haemolyticus and three Staphylococcus cohnii, from infections of humans collected via the Ministry of Health National Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance Net (Mohnarin) program in China were identified as linezolid-resistant. These four isolates were negative for the 23S rRNA mutations, but positive for the gene cfr. Mutations in the gene for the ribosomal protein L3, which resulted in the amino acid exchanges Gly152Asp and Tyr158Phe, were identified in S. haemolyticus 09D279 and S. cohnii NDM113, respectively. In each isolate, the cfr gene was located on a plasmid of ca. 35.4 kb, as shown by S1 nuclease pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and Southern blotting experiments. This plasmid was indistinguishable from the previously described plasmid pSS-02 by its size, restriction pattern, and a sequenced 14-kb cfr-carrying segment. Plasmid pSS-02 was originally identified in staphylococci isolated from pigs. This is the first time that a cfr-carrying plasmid has been detected in MRCoNS obtained from intensive care patients in China. Based on the similarities to the cfr-carrying plasmid pSS-02 from porcine coagulase-negative staphylococci, a transmission of this cfr-carrying plasmid between staphylococci from pigs and humans appears to be likely.

  12. Hypoxia-induced resistance to doxorubicin and methotrexate in human melanoma cell lines in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, K; Rofstad, E K

    1994-07-15

    Rodent cell lines can develop resistance to doxorubicin and methotrexate during hypoxic stress. This has so far not been observed in human tumor cell lines. The purpose of our communication is to show that doxorubicin and methotrexate resistance can also develop in human melanoma cells during exposure to hypoxia. Four cell lines (BEX-c, COX-c, SAX-c, WIX-c) have been studied. Cells were exposed to hypoxia (O2 concentration WIX-c. BEX-c and SAX-c were sensitive to methotrexate without hypoxia pre-treatment, whereas COX-c and WIX-c were resistant initially. Hypoxia-induced drug resistance was present immediately after reoxygenation and tended to decrease with time but remained statistically significant even 42 hr after reoxygenation.

  13. Overexpression of protein kinase A - RIalpha reduces lipofection efficiency of cisplatin-resistant human tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, K K; Rosenblatt, J

    2001-04-10

    Cisplatin-resistant variant A2780CP/vector cells were 4.0-5.3-fold more transfectable and 7.6-fold more resistant to cisplatin than their parent cisplatin-sensitive human ovarian carcinoma A2780/vector cells. Overexpression of cAMP-dependent protein kinase Type I regulatory alpha subunit (PKA-RIalpha) gene in A2780CP cells significantly reduced (maximum 47.0%) the transfection activity, with a slight reduction (maximum 27.3%) of cisplatin resistance, of A2780CP cells. However, RIalpha-overexpressing A2780CP (A2780CP/RIalpha) cells were still 2.5-to 3.0-fold more transfectable and 5.5-fold more resistant to cisplatin than A2780 cells. This results suggest that gene transfer efficiency is associated with cisplatin resistance, in part, through the PKA-mediated cAMP signal transduction pathway.

  14. Sensitivity to ionizing radiation and chemotherapeutic agents in gemcitabine-resistant human tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bree, Chris van; Kreder, Natasja Castro; Loves, Willem J.P.; Franken, Nicolaas A.P.; Peters, Godefridus J.; Haveman, Jaap

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine cross-resistance to anti-tumor treatments in 2',2'difluorodeoxycytidine (dFdC, gemcitabine)-resistant human tumor cells. Methods and Materials: Human lung carcinoma cells SW-1573 (SWp) were made resistant to dFdC (SWg). Sensitivity to cisplatin (cDDP), paclitaxel, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), methotrexate (MTX), cytarabine (ara-C), and dFdC was measured by a proliferation assay. Radiosensitivity and radioenhancement by dFdC of this cell panel and the human ovarian carcinoma cell line A2780 and its dFdC-resistant variant AG6000 were determined by clonogenic assay. Bivariate flowcytometry was performed to study cell cycle changes. Results: In the SWg, a complete deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) deficiency was found on mRNA and protein level. This was accompanied by a 10-fold decrease in dCK activity which resulted in the >1000-fold resistance to dFdC. Sensitivity to other anti-tumor drugs was not altered, except for ara-C (>100-fold resistance). Radiosensitivity was not altered in the dFdC-resistant cell lines SWg and AG6000. High concentrations (50-100 μM dFdC) induced radioenhancement in the dFdC-resistant cell lines similar to the radioenhancement obtained at lower concentrations (10 nM dFdC) in the parental lines. An early S-phase arrest was found in all cell lines after dFdC treatment where radioenhancement was achieved. Conclusions: In the dFdC-resistant lung tumor cell line SWg, the deficiency in dCK is related to the resistance to dFdC and ara-C. No cross-resistance was observed to other anti-tumor drugs used for the treatment in lung cancer. Sensitivity to ionizing radiation was not altered in two different dFdC-resistant cell lines. Resistance to dFdC does not eliminate the ability of dFdC to sensitize cells to radiation

  15. The path of least resistance: paying for antibiotics in non-human uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Aidan; Ahmed, Ziana

    2014-11-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a critical threat to human and animal health. Despite the importance of antibiotics, regulators continue to allow antibiotics to be used in low-value applications--subtherapeutic dosing in animals, and spraying tobacco plants for blue mold, for example--where the benefits are unlikely to outweigh the costs in terms of increased resistance. We explore the application of a user fee in non-human uses of antibiotics. Such a fee would efficiently deter low value uses while also providing funding to support the development of the urgently needed new antibiotics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of antibiotic resistant enterococci isolated from untreated waters for human consumption in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Ana S; Freitas, Ana R; Abreu, Cristina; Machado, Elisabete; Peixe, Luísa; Sousa, João C; Novais, Carla

    2011-01-31

    Untreated drinking water is frequently overlooked as a source of antibiotic resistance in developed countries. To gain further insight on this topic, we isolated the indicator bacteria Enterococcus spp. from water samples collected in wells, fountains and natural springs supplying different communities across Portugal, and characterized their antibiotic resistance profile with both phenotypic and genetic approaches. We found various rates of resistance to seven antibiotic families. Over 50% of the isolates were resistant to at least ciprofloxacin, tetracyclines or quinupristin-dalfopristin and 57% were multidrug resistant to ≥3 antibiotics from different families. Multiple enterococcal species (E. faecalis, E. faecium, E. hirae, E. casseliflavus and other Enterococcus spp) from different water samples harbored genes encoding resistance to tetracyclines, erythromycin or gentamicin [tet(M)-46%, tet(L)-14%, tet(S)-5%, erm(B)-22%, aac(6´)-Ie-aph(2″)-12%] and putative virulence factors [gel-28%, asa1-16%]. The present study positions untreated drinking water within the spectrum of ecological niches that may be reservoirs of or vehicles for antibiotic resistant enterococci/genes. These findings are worthy of attention as spread of antibiotic resistant enterococci to humans and animals through water ingestion cannot be dismissed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiation response of drug-resistant variants of a human breast cancer cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, S.; Greene, D.; Batist, G.

    1989-01-01

    The radiation response of drug-resistant variants of the human tumor breast cancer cell line MCF-7 has been investigated. Two sublines, one resistant to adriamycin (ADRR) and the other to melphalan (MLNR), have been selected by exposure to stepwise increasing concentrations of the respective drugs. ADRR cells are 200-fold resistant to adriamycin and cross-resistant to a number of other drugs and are characterized by the presence of elevated levels of selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase. MLNR cells are fourfold resistant to melphalan and cross-resistant to some other drugs. The only mechanism of drug resistance established for MLNR cells to date is an enhancement of DNA excision repair processes. While the spectrum of drug resistance and the underlying mechanisms differ for the two sublines, their response to radiation is qualitatively similar. Radiation survival curves for ADRR and MLNR cells differ from that for wild-type cells in a complex manner with, for the linear-quadratic model, a decrease in the size of alpha and an increase in the size of beta. There is a concomitant decrease in the size of the alpha/beta ratio which is greater for ADRR cells than for MLNR cells. Analysis of results using the multitarget model gave values of D0 of 1.48, 1.43, and 1.67 Gy for MCF-7 cells are not a consequence of cell kinetic differences between these sublines. Results of split-dose experiments indicated that for both drug-resistant sublines the extent of sublethal damage repair reflected the width of the shoulder on the single-dose survival curve. For MCF-7 cells in the stationary phase of growth, the drug-resistant sublines did not show cross-resistance to radiation; however, delayed subculture following irradiation of stationary-phase cultures increased survival to a greater extent for ADRR and MLNR cells than for wild-type cells

  18. Resistance to Carbapenems in Non-Typhoidal Salmonella enterica Serovars from Humans, Animals and Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Javier; Guerra, Beatriz; Rodicio, M Rosario

    2018-04-08

    Non-typhoidal serovars of Salmonella enterica (NTS) are a leading cause of food-borne disease in animals and humans worldwide. Like other zoonotic bacteria, NTS have the potential to act as reservoirs and vehicles for the transmission of antimicrobial drug resistance in different settings. Of particular concern is the resistance to critical "last resort" antimicrobials, such as carbapenems. In contrast to other Enterobacteriaceae (e.g., Klebsiella pneumoniae , Escherichia coli , and Enterobacter , which are major nosocomial pathogens affecting debilitated and immunocompromised patients), carbapenem resistance is still very rare in NTS. Nevertheless, it has already been detected in isolates recovered from humans, companion animals, livestock, wild animals, and food. Five carbapenemases with major clinical importance-namely KPC ( Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase) (class A), IMP (imipenemase), NDM (New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase), VIM (Verona integron-encoded metallo-β-lactamase) (class B), and OXA-48 (oxacillinase, class D)-have been reported in NTS. Carbapenem resistance due to the production of extended spectrum- or AmpC β-lactamases combined with porin loss has also been detected in NTS. Horizontal gene transfer of carbapenemase-encoding genes (which are frequently located on self-transferable plasmids), together with co- and cross-selective adaptations, could have been involved in the development of carbapenem resistance by NTS. Once acquired by a zoonotic bacterium, resistance can be transmitted from humans to animals and from animals to humans through the food chain. Continuous surveillance of resistance to these "last resort" antibiotics is required to establish possible links between reservoirs and to limit the bidirectional transfer of the encoding genes between S. enterica and other commensal or pathogenic bacteria.

  19. Resistance to Carbapenems in Non-Typhoidal Salmonella enterica Serovars from Humans, Animals and Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Fernández

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-typhoidal serovars of Salmonella enterica (NTS are a leading cause of food-borne disease in animals and humans worldwide. Like other zoonotic bacteria, NTS have the potential to act as reservoirs and vehicles for the transmission of antimicrobial drug resistance in different settings. Of particular concern is the resistance to critical “last resort” antimicrobials, such as carbapenems. In contrast to other Enterobacteriaceae (e.g., Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and Enterobacter, which are major nosocomial pathogens affecting debilitated and immunocompromised patients, carbapenem resistance is still very rare in NTS. Nevertheless, it has already been detected in isolates recovered from humans, companion animals, livestock, wild animals, and food. Five carbapenemases with major clinical importance—namely KPC (Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (class A, IMP (imipenemase, NDM (New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase, VIM (Verona integron-encoded metallo-β-lactamase (class B, and OXA-48 (oxacillinase, class D—have been reported in NTS. Carbapenem resistance due to the production of extended spectrum- or AmpC β-lactamases combined with porin loss has also been detected in NTS. Horizontal gene transfer of carbapenemase-encoding genes (which are frequently located on self-transferable plasmids, together with co- and cross-selective adaptations, could have been involved in the development of carbapenem resistance by NTS. Once acquired by a zoonotic bacterium, resistance can be transmitted from humans to animals and from animals to humans through the food chain. Continuous surveillance of resistance to these “last resort” antibiotics is required to establish possible links between reservoirs and to limit the bidirectional transfer of the encoding genes between S. enterica and other commensal or pathogenic bacteria.

  20. Overexpression of c-Jun contributes to sorafenib resistance in human hepatoma cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Haga

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in treatment strategies, it is still difficult to cure patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Sorafenib is the only approved multiple kinase inhibitor for systemic chemotherapy in patients with advanced HCC. The majority of advanced HCC patients are resistant to sorafenib. The mechanisms of sorafenib resistance are still unknown.The expression of molecules involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathway in human hepatoma cell lines was examined in the presence or absence of sorafenib. Apoptosis of human hepatoma cells treated with sorafenib was investigated, and the expression of Jun proto-oncogene (c-Jun was measured.The expression and phosphorylation of c-Jun were enhanced in human hepatoma cell lines after treatment with sorafenib. Inhibiting c-Jun enhanced sorafenib-induced apoptosis. The overexpression of c-Jun impaired sorafenib-induced apoptosis. The expression of osteopontin, one of the established AP-1 target genes, was enhanced after treatment with sorafenib in human hepatoma cell lines.The protein c-Jun plays a role in sorafenib resistance in human hepatoma cell lines. The modulation and phosphorylation of c-Jun could be a new therapeutic option for enhancing responsiveness to sorafenib. Modulating c-Jun may be useful for certain HCC patients with sorafenib resistance.

  1. Genetic diversity and antimicrobial resistance of Yersinia enterocolitica isolated from pigs and humans in Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoslavskij, Aleksandr; Kudirkienė, Eglė; Marcinkutė, Audronė; Bajoriūnienė, Almina; Korkeala, Hannu; Malakauskas, Mindaugas

    2013-06-01

    Yersiniosis is one of the three leading foodborne zoonoses in Lithuania, and the incidence of 12.86 per 100,000 population was the highest among EU member states in 2010. Contaminated pig carcasses and subsequently undercooked pig meat are considered to be the primary transmission vehicle of enteropathogenic Y. enterocolitica to consumers. With the aim of evaluating pigs as a possible source of human yersiniosis in Lithuania, this study investigated the genetic diversity of Y. enterocolitica isolated from pigs and human cases of yersiniosis. In addition, the antimicrobial resistance of selected isolates from both sources was compared. In total, 83 Y. enterocolitica strains were characterised using pulsed field gel electrophoresis. Overall, 68% of Y. enterocolitica 4/O:3 pulsotypes found in human clinical samples were identical to 81% of pulsotypes found in the pig production chain. Yersinia enterocolitica pulsotype II was confirmed as the dominant pulsotype in the pig production chain and was identical to nine of 19 Y. enterocolitica strains found in humans. All tested Y. enterocolitica 4/O:3 strains were resistant to ampicillin and erythromycin and sensitive to ciprofloxacin. Of the strains studied, 5% were resistant to tetracycline and streptomycin. This study showed that pigs may be the main source of human yersiniosis in Lithuania. In addition, Y. enterocolitica 4/O:3 strains isolated from the pig production chain and from yersiniosis patients shared similar resistance to different antimicrobials. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Noninvasive optical imaging of resistance training adaptations in human muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Robert V.; Cotter, Joshua; Ganesan, Goutham; Le, Lisa; Agustin, Janelle P.; Duarte, Bridgette; Cutler, Kyle; O'Sullivan, Thomas; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2017-12-01

    A quantitative and dynamic analysis of skeletal muscle structure and function can guide training protocols and optimize interventions for rehabilitation and disease. While technologies exist to measure body composition, techniques are still needed for quantitative, long-term functional imaging of muscle at the bedside. We evaluate whether diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging (DOSI) can be used for long-term assessment of resistance training (RT). DOSI measures of tissue composition were obtained from 12 adults before and after 5 weeks of training and compared to lean mass fraction (LMF) from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Significant correlations were detected between DXA LMF and DOSI-measured oxy-hemo/myoglobin, deoxy-hemo/myoglobin, total-hemo/myoglobin, water, and lipid. RT-induced increases of ˜6% in oxy-hemo/myoglobin (3.4±1.0 μM, p=0.00314) and total-hemo/myoglobin (4.9±1.1 μM, p=0.00024) from the medial gastrocnemius were detected with DOSI and accompanied by ˜2% increases in lean soft tissue mass (36.4±12.4 g, p=0.01641) and ˜60% increases in 1 rep-max strength (41.5±6.2 kg, p = 1.9E-05). DOSI measures of vascular and/or muscle changes combined with correlations between DOSI and DXA suggest that quantitative diffuse optical methods can be used to evaluate body composition, provide feedback on long-term interventions, and generate new insight into training-induced muscle adaptations.

  3. Contemporary status of insecticide resistance in the major Aedes vectors of arboviruses infecting humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyes, Catherine L; Vontas, John; Martins, Ademir J; Ng, Lee Ching; Koou, Sin Ying; Dusfour, Isabelle; Raghavendra, Kamaraju; Pinto, João; Corbel, Vincent; David, Jean-Philippe; Weetman, David

    2017-07-01

    Both Aedes aegytpi and Ae. albopictus are major vectors of 5 important arboviruses (namely chikungunya virus, dengue virus, Rift Valley fever virus, yellow fever virus, and Zika virus), making these mosquitoes an important factor in the worldwide burden of infectious disease. Vector control using insecticides coupled with larval source reduction is critical to control the transmission of these viruses to humans but is threatened by the emergence of insecticide resistance. Here, we review the available evidence for the geographical distribution of insecticide resistance in these 2 major vectors worldwide and map the data collated for the 4 main classes of neurotoxic insecticide (carbamates, organochlorines, organophosphates, and pyrethroids). Emerging resistance to all 4 of these insecticide classes has been detected in the Americas, Africa, and Asia. Target-site mutations and increased insecticide detoxification have both been linked to resistance in Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus but more work is required to further elucidate metabolic mechanisms and develop robust diagnostic assays. Geographical distributions are provided for the mechanisms that have been shown to be important to date. Estimating insecticide resistance in unsampled locations is hampered by a lack of standardisation in the diagnostic tools used and by a lack of data in a number of regions for both resistance phenotypes and genotypes. The need for increased sampling using standard methods is critical to tackle the issue of emerging insecticide resistance threatening human health. Specifically, diagnostic doses and well-characterised susceptible strains are needed for the full range of insecticides used to control Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus to standardise measurement of the resistant phenotype, and calibrated diagnostic assays are needed for the major mechanisms of resistance.

  4. Complexity of Complement Resistance Factors Expressed by Acinetobacter baumannii Needed for Survival in Human Serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Larrayoz, Amaro F; Elhosseiny, Noha M; Chevrette, Marc G; Fu, Yang; Giunta, Peter; Spallanzani, Raúl G; Ravi, Keerthikka; Pier, Gerald B; Lory, Stephen; Maira-Litrán, Tomás

    2017-10-15

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a bacterial pathogen with increasing impact in healthcare settings, due in part to this organism's resistance to many antimicrobial agents, with pneumonia and bacteremia as the most common manifestations of disease. A significant proportion of clinically relevant A. baumannii strains are resistant to killing by normal human serum (NHS), an observation supported in this study by showing that 12 out of 15 genetically diverse strains of A. baumannii are resistant to NHS killing. To expand our understanding of the genetic basis of A. baumannii serum resistance, a transposon (Tn) sequencing (Tn-seq) approach was used to identify genes contributing to this trait. An ordered Tn library in strain AB5075 with insertions in every nonessential gene was subjected to selection in NHS. We identified 50 genes essential for the survival of A. baumannii in NHS, including already known serum resistance factors, and many novel genes not previously associated with serum resistance. This latter group included the maintenance of lipid asymmetry genetic pathway as a key determinant in protecting A. baumannii from the bactericidal activity of NHS via the alternative complement pathway. Follow-up studies validated the role of eight additional genes identified by Tn-seq in A. baumannii resistance to killing by NHS but not by normal mouse serum, highlighting the human species specificity of A. baumannii serum resistance. The identification of a large number of genes essential for serum resistance in A. baumannii indicates the degree of complexity needed for this phenotype, which might reflect a general pattern that pathogens rely on to cause serious infections. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  5. Contemporary status of insecticide resistance in the major Aedes vectors of arboviruses infecting humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vontas, John; Martins, Ademir J.; Ng, Lee Ching; Koou, Sin Ying; Dusfour, Isabelle; Raghavendra, Kamaraju; Pinto, João; Corbel, Vincent; David, Jean-Philippe; Weetman, David

    2017-01-01

    Both Aedes aegytpi and Ae. albopictus are major vectors of 5 important arboviruses (namely chikungunya virus, dengue virus, Rift Valley fever virus, yellow fever virus, and Zika virus), making these mosquitoes an important factor in the worldwide burden of infectious disease. Vector control using insecticides coupled with larval source reduction is critical to control the transmission of these viruses to humans but is threatened by the emergence of insecticide resistance. Here, we review the available evidence for the geographical distribution of insecticide resistance in these 2 major vectors worldwide and map the data collated for the 4 main classes of neurotoxic insecticide (carbamates, organochlorines, organophosphates, and pyrethroids). Emerging resistance to all 4 of these insecticide classes has been detected in the Americas, Africa, and Asia. Target-site mutations and increased insecticide detoxification have both been linked to resistance in Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus but more work is required to further elucidate metabolic mechanisms and develop robust diagnostic assays. Geographical distributions are provided for the mechanisms that have been shown to be important to date. Estimating insecticide resistance in unsampled locations is hampered by a lack of standardisation in the diagnostic tools used and by a lack of data in a number of regions for both resistance phenotypes and genotypes. The need for increased sampling using standard methods is critical to tackle the issue of emerging insecticide resistance threatening human health. Specifically, diagnostic doses and well-characterised susceptible strains are needed for the full range of insecticides used to control Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus to standardise measurement of the resistant phenotype, and calibrated diagnostic assays are needed for the major mechanisms of resistance. PMID:28727779

  6. Contemporary status of insecticide resistance in the major Aedes vectors of arboviruses infecting humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine L Moyes

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Both Aedes aegytpi and Ae. albopictus are major vectors of 5 important arboviruses (namely chikungunya virus, dengue virus, Rift Valley fever virus, yellow fever virus, and Zika virus, making these mosquitoes an important factor in the worldwide burden of infectious disease. Vector control using insecticides coupled with larval source reduction is critical to control the transmission of these viruses to humans but is threatened by the emergence of insecticide resistance. Here, we review the available evidence for the geographical distribution of insecticide resistance in these 2 major vectors worldwide and map the data collated for the 4 main classes of neurotoxic insecticide (carbamates, organochlorines, organophosphates, and pyrethroids. Emerging resistance to all 4 of these insecticide classes has been detected in the Americas, Africa, and Asia. Target-site mutations and increased insecticide detoxification have both been linked to resistance in Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus but more work is required to further elucidate metabolic mechanisms and develop robust diagnostic assays. Geographical distributions are provided for the mechanisms that have been shown to be important to date. Estimating insecticide resistance in unsampled locations is hampered by a lack of standardisation in the diagnostic tools used and by a lack of data in a number of regions for both resistance phenotypes and genotypes. The need for increased sampling using standard methods is critical to tackle the issue of emerging insecticide resistance threatening human health. Specifically, diagnostic doses and well-characterised susceptible strains are needed for the full range of insecticides used to control Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus to standardise measurement of the resistant phenotype, and calibrated diagnostic assays are needed for the major mechanisms of resistance.

  7. Human health risks associated with antimicrobial-resistant enterococci and Staphylococcus aureus on poultry meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortolaia, V.; Gongora, Carmen Espinosa; Guardabassi, L.

    2016-01-01

    health risks associated with the occurrence of these opportunistic human pathogens on poultry meat with particular focus on the risk of food-borne transmission of antimicrobial resistance. In the absence of conclusive evidence of transmission, this risk was inferred using data from scientific articles......-resistant S. aureus of livestock origin has been reported on poultry meat. In theory handling or ingestion of contaminated meat is a potential risk factor for colonization by methicillin-resistant S. aureus. However, this risk is presently regarded as negligible by public health authorities. Clinical......Enterococci and staphylococci are frequent contaminants on poultry meat. Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium and Staphylococcus aureus are also well-known aetiological agents of a wide variety of infections resulting in major healthcare costs. This review provides an overview of the human...

  8. Fracture processes and mechanisms of crack growth resistance in human enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Devendra; Park, Saejin; Quinn, George D.; Arola, Dwayne

    2010-07-01

    Human enamel has a complex micro-structure that varies with distance from the tooth’s outer surface. But contributions from the microstructure to the fracture toughness and the mechanisms of crack growth resistance have not been explored in detail. In this investigation the apparent fracture toughness of human enamel and the mechanisms of crack growth resistance were evaluated using the indentation fracture approach and an incremental crack growth technique. Indentation cracks were introduced on polished surfaces of enamel at selected distances from the occlusal surface. In addition, an incremental crack growth approach using compact tension specimens was used to quantify the crack growth resistance as a Junction of distance from the occlusal surface. There were significant differences in the apparent toughness estimated using the two approaches, which was attributed to the active crack length and corresponding scale of the toughening mechanisms.

  9. Insulin resistance and the mitochondrial link. Lessons from cultured human myotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, Michael

    2007-01-01

    In order to better understand the impact of reduced mitochondrial function for the development of insulin resistance and cellular metabolism, human myotubes were established from lean, obese, and T2D subjects and exposed to mitochondrial inhibitors, either affecting the electron transport chain...... lipid uptake. The metabolic phenotype during respiratory uncoupling resembled the above picture, except for an increase in glucose and palmitate oxidation. Antimycin A and oligomycin treatment induced insulin resistance at the level of glucose and palmitate uptake in all three study groups while......, at the level of glycogen synthesis, insulin resistance was only seen in lean myotubes. Primary insulin resistance in diabetic myotubes was significantly worsened at the level of glucose and lipid uptake. The present study is the first convincing data linking functional mitochondrial impairment per se...

  10. The lipid content of cisplatin- and doxorubicin-resistant MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todor, I N; Lukyanova, N Yu; Chekhun, V F

    2012-07-01

    To perform the comparative study both of qualitative and quantitative content of lipids in parental and drug resistant breast cancer cells. Parental (MCF-7/S) and resistant to cisplatin (MCF-7/CP) and doxorubicin (MCF-7/Dox) human breast cancer cells were used in the study. Cholesterol, total lipids and phospholipids content were determined by means of thin-layer chromatography. It was found that cholesterol as well as cholesterol ethers content are significantly higher but diacylglycerols, triacyl-glycerols content are significantly lower in resistant cell strains than in parental (sensitive) cells. Moreover the analysis of individual phospholipids showed the increase of sphingomyelin, phosphatidylserine, cardiolipin, phosphatidic acid and the decrease of phosphatidy-lethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine in MCF-7/CP and MCF-7/Dox cells. Obtained results allow to suggest that the lipid profile changes can mediate the modulation of membrane fluidity in drug resistant MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

  11. Evidence for Human Adaptation and Foodborne Transmission of Livestock-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper; Stegger, Marc; Andersen, Paal S.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the evolution and epidemiology of a novel live-stock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain, which colonizes and infects urban-dwelling Danes even without a Danish animal reservoir. Genetic evidence suggests both poultry and human adaptation, with poultry meat...

  12. Antimicrobial drug resistance at the human-animal interface in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, V.T.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis investigates the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) among non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) and E. coli strains isolated from backyard farm chickens and humans in Vietnam. We found that this prevalence was to some extent related to antimicrobial usage. In particular,

  13. Significance of MDR1 and multiple drug resistance in refractory human epileptic brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dini Gabriele

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The multiple drug resistance protein (MDR1/P-glycoprotein is overexpressed in glia and blood-brain barrier (BBB endothelium in drug refractory human epileptic tissue. Since various antiepileptic drugs (AEDs can act as substrates for MDR1, the enhanced expression/function of this protein may increase their active extrusion from the brain, resulting in decreased responsiveness to AEDs. Methods Human drug resistant epileptic brain tissues were collected after surgical resection. Astrocyte cell cultures were established from these tissues, and commercially available normal human astrocytes were used as controls. Uptake of fluorescent doxorubicin and radioactive-labeled Phenytoin was measured in the two cell populations, and the effect of MDR1 blockers was evaluated. Frozen human epileptic brain tissue slices were double immunostained to locate MDR1 in neurons and glia. Other slices were exposed to toxic concentrations of Phenytoin to study cell viability in the presence or absence of a specific MDR1 blocker. Results MDR1 was overexpressed in blood vessels, astrocytes and neurons in human epileptic drug-resistant brain. In addition, MDR1-mediated cellular drug extrusion was increased in human 'epileptic' astrocytes compared to 'normal' ones. Concomitantly, cell viability in the presence of cytotoxic compounds was increased. Conclusions Overexpression of MDR1 in different cell types in drug-resistant epileptic human brain leads to functional alterations, not all of which are linked to drug pharmacokinetics. In particular, the modulation of glioneuronal MDR1 function in epileptic brain in the presence of toxic concentrations of xenobiotics may constitute a novel cytoprotective mechanism.

  14. Prevalence of Antibiotic Resistance Genes among Human Gut-Derived Bifidobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duranti, Sabrina; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Mancabelli, Leonardo; Turroni, Francesca; Milani, Christian; Mangifesta, Marta; Ferrario, Chiara; Anzalone, Rosaria; Viappiani, Alice; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2017-02-01

    The microbiota of the human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) may regularly be exposed to antibiotics, which are used to prevent and treat infectious diseases caused by bacteria and fungi. Bacterial communities of the gut retain a reservoir of antibiotic resistance (AR) genes, and antibiotic therapy thus positively selects for those microorganisms that harbor such genetic features, causing microbiota modulation. During the first months following birth, bifidobacteria represent some of the most dominant components of the human gut microbiota, although little is known about their AR gene complement (or resistome). In the current study, we assessed the resistome of the Bifidobacterium genus based on phenotypic and genotypic data of members that represent all currently recognized bifidobacterial (sub)species. Moreover, a comparison between the bifidobacterial resistome and gut metagenome data sets from adults and infants shows that the bifidobacterial community present at the first week following birth possesses a reduced AR arsenal compared to that present in the infant bifidobacterial population in subsequent weeks of the first year of life. Our findings reinforce the concept that the early infant gut microbiota is more susceptible to disturbances by antibiotic treatment than the gut microbiota developed at a later life stage. The spread of resistance to antibiotics among bacterial communities has represented a major concern since their discovery in the last century. The risk of genetic transfer of resistance genes between microorganisms has been extensively investigated due to its relevance to human health. In contrast, there is only limited information available on antibiotic resistance among human gut commensal microorganisms such as bifidobacteria, which are widely exploited by the food industry as health-promoting microorganisms or probiotic ingredients. In the current study, we explored the occurrence of antibiotic resistance genes in the genomes of bifidobacteria

  15. Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) for Environmental Development and Transfer of Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amézquita, Alejandro; Backhaus, Thomas; Borriello, Peter; Brandt, Kristian K.; Collignon, Peter; Coors, Anja; Finley, Rita; Gaze, William H.; Heberer, Thomas; Lawrence, John R.; Larsson, D.G. Joakim; McEwen, Scott A.; Ryan, James J.; Schönfeld, Jens; Silley, Peter; Snape, Jason R.; Van den Eede, Christel; Topp, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Background: Only recently has the environment been clearly implicated in the risk of antibiotic resistance to clinical outcome, but to date there have been few documented approaches to formally assess these risks. Objective: We examined possible approaches and sought to identify research needs to enable human health risk assessments (HHRA) that focus on the role of the environment in the failure of antibiotic treatment caused by antibiotic-resistant pathogens. Methods: The authors participated in a workshop held 4–8 March 2012 in Québec, Canada, to define the scope and objectives of an environmental assessment of antibiotic-resistance risks to human health. We focused on key elements of environmental-resistance-development “hot spots,” exposure assessment (unrelated to food), and dose response to characterize risks that may improve antibiotic-resistance management options. Discussion: Various novel aspects to traditional risk assessments were identified to enable an assessment of environmental antibiotic resistance. These include a) accounting for an added selective pressure on the environmental resistome that, over time, allows for development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB); b) identifying and describing rates of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in the relevant environmental “hot spot” compartments; and c) modifying traditional dose–response approaches to address doses of ARB for various health outcomes and pathways. Conclusions: We propose that environmental aspects of antibiotic-resistance development be included in the processes of any HHRA addressing ARB. Because of limited available data, a multicriteria decision analysis approach would be a useful way to undertake an HHRA of environmental antibiotic resistance that informs risk managers. Citation: Ashbolt NJ, Amézquita A, Backhaus T, Borriello P, Brandt KK, Collignon P, Coors A, Finley R, Gaze WH, Heberer T, Lawrence JR, Larsson DG, McEwen SA, Ryan JJ, Schönfeld J, Silley P, Snape JR

  16. Antibiotic resistance of staphylococci from humans, food and different animal species according to data of the Hungarian resistance monitoring system in 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszanyitzky, Eva J; Jánosi, Sz; Egyed, Zsuzsanna; Agost, Gizella; Semjén, G

    2003-01-01

    Based on data of the Hungarian resistance monitoring system the antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus strains of human and animal origin was studied. No methicillin-resistant staphylococci harbouring mecA gene were isolated from animals in 2001. Penicillin resistance, mediated by penicillinase production, was the most frequent among Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from humans (96%), from bovine mastitis (55%), from foods (45%) and from dogs. In staphylococci isolated from animals low resistance percentages to aminoglycosides (0-2%), fluoroquinolones (0.5-3%) and sulphonamides (0.5-4%) were found but in strains isolated humans these figures were higher (1-14%, 5-18% and 3-31%, respectively). The most frequent antibiotic resistance profiles of strains isolated from animals and food were penicillin/tetracycline, penicillin/lincomycin and penicillin/lincomycin/tetracycline. Penicillin/tetracycline resistance was exhibited by strains from mastitis (3), samples from the meat industry (31), poultry flocks (1), poultry industry (1), noodle (1) and horses (2). Penicillin/lincomycin resistance was found in 10 Staphylococcus strains from mastitis, 1 from the dairy industry, 1 from the meat industry and 6 from dogs. Isolates from mastitis (2), from the dairy industry (2), from pigs (1), from the meat industry (1) and from poultry (1) harboured penicillin/lincomycin/tetracycline resistance pattern. Multiresistant strains were usually isolated only from one and sometimes from two animal species; therefore, the spread of defined resistant strains (clones) among different animal species could not be demonstrated. These results also suggest that the transfer of antibiotic resistance of S. aureus from animals to humans probably occurs less frequently than is generally assumed.

  17. Review of insecticide resistance and behavioral avoidance of vectors of human diseases in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Physiological resistance and behavioral responses of mosquito vectors to insecticides are critical aspects of the chemical-based disease control equation. The complex interaction between lethal, sub-lethal and excitation/repellent ('excito-repellent’) properties of chemicals is typically overlooked in vector management and control programs. The development of “physiological” resistance, metabolic and/or target site modifications, to insecticides has been well documented in many insect groups and disease vectors around the world. In Thailand, resistance in many mosquito populations has developed to all three classes of insecticidal active ingredients currently used for vector control with a majority being synthetic-derived pyrethroids. Evidence of low-grade insecticide resistance requires immediate countermeasures to mitigate further intensification and spread of the genetic mechanisms responsible for resistance. This can take the form of rotation of a different class of chemical, addition of a synergist, mixtures of chemicals or concurrent mosaic application of different classes of chemicals. From the gathered evidence, the distribution and degree of physiological resistance has been restricted in specific areas of Thailand in spite of long-term use of chemicals to control insect pests and disease vectors throughout the country. Most surprisingly, there have been no reported cases of pyrethroid resistance in anopheline populations in the country from 2000 to 2011. The precise reasons for this are unclear but we assume that behavioral avoidance to insecticides may play a significant role in reducing the selection pressure and thus occurrence and spread of insecticide resistance. The review herein provides information regarding the status of physiological resistance and behavioral avoidance of the primary mosquito vectors of human diseases to insecticides in Thailand from 2000 to 2011. PMID:24294938

  18. spa typing and antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus from healthy humans, pigs and dogs in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katakweba, Abdul S.; Muhairwa, Amandus P.; Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    . aureus carrier frequencies in dogs and humans were within the expected range and low in pigs. The S. aureus spa types circulating in the community were generally not shared by different hosts and majority of types belonged to known clones. Besides ampicillin resistance, moderate levels of antimicrobial......Introduction: Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen causing infections in humans and animals. Here we report for the first time the prevalence of nasal carriage, spa typing and antimicrobial resistance of S. aureus in a Tanzanian livestock community. Methodology: Nasal swabs were taken...... from 100 humans, 100 pigs and 100 dogs in Morogoro Municipal. Each swab was enriched in Mueller Hinton broth with 6.5% NaCl and subcultured on chromogenic agar for S. aureus detection. Presumptive S. aureus colonies were confirmed to the species level by nuc PCR and analysed by spa typing...

  19. Streptococcus suis, an emerging drug-resistant animal and human pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio ePalmieri

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus suis, a major porcine pathogen, has been receiving growing attention not only for its role in severe and increasingly reported infections in humans, but also for its involvement in drug resistance. Recent studies and the analysis of sequenced genomes have been providing important insights into the S. suis resistome, and have resulted in the identification of resistance determinants for tetracyclines, macrolides, aminoglycosides, chloramphenicol, antifolate drugs, streptothricin, and cadmium salts. Resistance gene-carrying genetic elements described so far include integrative and conjugative elements, transposons, genomic islands, phages, and chimeric elements. Some of these elements are similar to those reported in major streptococcal pathogens such as Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Streptococcus agalactiae and share the same chromosomal insertion sites. The available information strongly suggests that S. suis is an important antibiotic resistance reservoir that can contribute to the spread of resistance genes to the above-mentioned streptococci. S. suis is thus a paradigmatic example of possible intersections between animal and human resistomes.

  20. Inhibition of human anthracycline reductases by emodin — A possible remedy for anthracycline resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hintzpeter, Jan, E-mail: hintzpeter@toxi.uni-kiel.de [Institute of Toxicology and Pharmacology for Natural Scientists, University Medical School Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Brunswiker Str. 10, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Seliger, Jan Moritz [Institute of Toxicology and Pharmacology for Natural Scientists, University Medical School Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Brunswiker Str. 10, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Hofman, Jakub [Department of Biochemical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Kralove, Charles University in Prague, Heyrovskeho 1203, 50005 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Martin, Hans-Joerg [Institute of Toxicology and Pharmacology for Natural Scientists, University Medical School Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Brunswiker Str. 10, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Wsol, Vladimir [Department of Biochemical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Kralove, Charles University in Prague, Heyrovskeho 1203, 50005 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Maser, Edmund [Institute of Toxicology and Pharmacology for Natural Scientists, University Medical School Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Brunswiker Str. 10, 24105 Kiel (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    The clinical application of anthracyclines, like daunorubicin and doxorubicin, is limited by two factors: dose-related cardiotoxicity and drug resistance. Both have been linked to reductive metabolism of the parent drug to their metabolites daunorubicinol and doxorubicinol, respectively. These metabolites show significantly less anti-neoplastic properties as their parent drugs and accumulate in cardiac tissue leading to chronic cardiotoxicity. Therefore, we aimed to identify novel and potent natural inhibitors for anthracycline reductases, which enhance the anticancer effect of anthracyclines by preventing the development of anthracycline resistance. Human enzymes responsible for the reductive metabolism of daunorubicin were tested for their sensitivity towards anthrachinones, in particular emodin and anthraflavic acid. Intense inhibition kinetic data for the most effective daunorubicin reductases, including IC{sub 50}- and K{sub i}-values, the mode of inhibition, as well as molecular docking, were compiled. Subsequently, a cytotoxicity profile and the ability of emodin to reverse daunorubicin resistance were determined using multiresistant A549 lung cancer and HepG2 liver cancer cells. Emodin potently inhibited the four main human daunorubicin reductases in vitro. Further, we could demonstrate that emodin is able to synergistically sensitize human cancer cells towards daunorubicin at clinically relevant concentrations. Therefore, emodin may yield the potential to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of anthracyclines by preventing anthracycline resistance via inhibition of the anthracycline reductases. In symphony with its known pharmacological properties, emodin might be a compound of particular interest in the management of anthracycline chemotherapy efficacy and their adverse effects. - Highlights: • Natural and synthetic compounds were identified as inhibitors for human daunorubicin reductases. • Emodin is a potent inhibitor for human daunorubicin

  1. Inhibition of human anthracycline reductases by emodin — A possible remedy for anthracycline resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hintzpeter, Jan; Seliger, Jan Moritz; Hofman, Jakub; Martin, Hans-Joerg; Wsol, Vladimir; Maser, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    The clinical application of anthracyclines, like daunorubicin and doxorubicin, is limited by two factors: dose-related cardiotoxicity and drug resistance. Both have been linked to reductive metabolism of the parent drug to their metabolites daunorubicinol and doxorubicinol, respectively. These metabolites show significantly less anti-neoplastic properties as their parent drugs and accumulate in cardiac tissue leading to chronic cardiotoxicity. Therefore, we aimed to identify novel and potent natural inhibitors for anthracycline reductases, which enhance the anticancer effect of anthracyclines by preventing the development of anthracycline resistance. Human enzymes responsible for the reductive metabolism of daunorubicin were tested for their sensitivity towards anthrachinones, in particular emodin and anthraflavic acid. Intense inhibition kinetic data for the most effective daunorubicin reductases, including IC 50 - and K i -values, the mode of inhibition, as well as molecular docking, were compiled. Subsequently, a cytotoxicity profile and the ability of emodin to reverse daunorubicin resistance were determined using multiresistant A549 lung cancer and HepG2 liver cancer cells. Emodin potently inhibited the four main human daunorubicin reductases in vitro. Further, we could demonstrate that emodin is able to synergistically sensitize human cancer cells towards daunorubicin at clinically relevant concentrations. Therefore, emodin may yield the potential to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of anthracyclines by preventing anthracycline resistance via inhibition of the anthracycline reductases. In symphony with its known pharmacological properties, emodin might be a compound of particular interest in the management of anthracycline chemotherapy efficacy and their adverse effects. - Highlights: • Natural and synthetic compounds were identified as inhibitors for human daunorubicin reductases. • Emodin is a potent inhibitor for human daunorubicin reductases.

  2. MRP- and BCL-2-mediated drug resistance in human SCLC: effects of apoptotic sphingolipids in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadadian, M; Leroux, M E; Auzenne, E; Ghosh, S C; Farquhar, D; Evans, R; Spohn, W; Zou, Y; Klostergaard, J

    2009-10-01

    Multidrug-resistance-associated protein (MRP) and BCL-2 contribute to drug resistance expressed in SCLC. To establish whether MRP-mediated drug resistance affects sphingolipid (SL)-induced apoptosis in SCLC, we first examined the human SCLC cell line, UMCC-1, and its MRP over-expressing, drug-resistant subline, UMCC-1/VP. Despite significantly decreased sensitivity to doxorubicin (Dox) and to the etoposide, VP-16, the drug-selected line was essentially equally as sensitive to treatment with exogenous ceramide (Cer), sphingosine (Sp) or dimethyl-sphingosine (DMSP) as the parental line. Next, we observed that high BCL-2-expressing human H69 SCLC cells, that were approximately 160-fold more sensitive to Dox than their combined BCL-2 and MRP-over-expressing (H69AR) counterparts, were only approximately 5-fold more resistant to DMSP. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of either UMCC cell line treated with DMSP-Coumarin revealed comparable extents and kinetics of SL uptake, further ruling out MRP-mediated effects on drug uptake. DMSP potentiated the cytotoxic activity of VP-16 and Taxol, but not Dox, in drug-resistant UMCC-1/VP cells. However, this sensitization did not appear to involve DMSP-mediated effects on the function of MRP in drug export; nor did DMSP strongly shift the balance of pro-apoptotic Sps and anti-apoptotic Sp-1-Ps in these cells. We conclude that SL-induced apoptosis markedly overcomes or bypasses MRP-mediated drug resistance relevant to SCLC and may suggest a novel therapeutic approach to chemotherapy for these tumors.

  3. Methods for quantifying adipose tissue insulin resistance in overweight/obese humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter Horst, K W; van Galen, K A; Gilijamse, P W; Hartstra, A V; de Groot, P F; van der Valk, F M; Ackermans, M T; Nieuwdorp, M; Romijn, J A; Serlie, M J

    2017-08-01

    Insulin resistance of adipose tissue is an important feature of obesity-related metabolic disease. However, assessment of lipolysis in humans requires labor-intensive and expensive methods, and there is limited validation of simplified measurement methods. We aimed to validate simplified methods for the quantification of adipose tissue insulin resistance against the assessment of insulin sensitivity of lipolysis suppression during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies. We assessed the insulin-mediated suppression of lipolysis by tracer-dilution of [1,1,2,3,3- 2 H 5 ]glycerol during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies in 125 overweight or obese adults (85 men, 40 women; age 50±11 years; body mass index 38±7 kg m -2 ). Seven indices of adipose tissue insulin resistance were validated against the reference measurement method. Low-dose insulin infusion resulted in suppression of the glycerol rate of appearance ranging from 4% (most resistant) to 85% (most sensitive), indicating a good range of adipose tissue insulin sensitivity in the study population. The reference method correlated with (1) insulin-mediated suppression of plasma glycerol concentrations (r=0.960, PInsulin Resistance (Adipo-IR) index (fasting plasma insulin-NEFA product; r=-0.526, Pinsulin-glycerol product (r=-0.467, PInsulin Resistance Index (fasting plasma insulin-basal lipolysis product; r=0.460, PInsulin Sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI)-NEFA index (r=0.621, Pinsulin resistance (area under the curve ⩾0.801, Pinsulin sensitivity (that is, the antilipolytic action of insulin) can be reliably quantified in overweight and obese humans by simplified index methods. The sensitivity and specificity of the Adipo-IR index and the fasting plasma insulin-glycerol product, combined with their simplicity and acceptable agreement, suggest that these may be most useful in clinical practice.

  4. A human model of dietary saturated fatty acid induced insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koska, Juraj; Ozias, Marlies K; Deer, James; Kurtz, Julie; Salbe, Arline D; Harman, S Mitchell; Reaven, Peter D

    2016-11-01

    Increased consumption of high-fat diets is associated with the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Current models to study the mechanisms of high-fat diet-induced IR in humans are limited by their long duration or low efficacy. In the present study we developed and characterized an acute dietary model of saturated fatty acid-enriched diet induced insulin resistance. High caloric diets enriched with saturated fatty acids (SFA) or carbohydrates (CARB) were evaluated in subjects with normal and impaired glucose tolerance (NGT or IGT). Both diets were compared to a standard eucaloric American Heart Association (AHA) control diet in a series of crossover studies. Whole body insulin resistance was estimated as steady state plasma glucose (SSPG) concentrations during the last 30min of a 3-h insulin suppression test. SSPG was increased after a 24-h SFA diet (by 83±74% vs. control, n=38) in the entire cohort, which was comprised of participants with NGT (92±82%, n=22) or IGT (65±55%, n=16) (all pinsulin resistance in both NGT and IGT subjects. Insulin resistance persisted overnight after the last SFA meal and was attenuated by one day of a healthy diet. This model offers opportunities for identifying early mechanisms and potential treatments of dietary saturated fat induced insulin resistance. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Induction of diphtheria toxin-resistant mutants in human cells by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocchi, P.; Ferreri, A.M.; Capucci, A.; Prodi, G.

    1981-01-01

    Stable spontaneous mutants resistant to the protein synthesis inhibitor diphtheria toxin (DT) have been selected in human cell line EUE at a very low frequency (less than 8 x 10(-6)). U.v.-induced mutation has been quantitatively measured: treatment of cells with u.v. light increased the frequencies of diphtheria toxin resistant (DTr) mutants up to 1000-fold. The maximum recovery of DTr mutants was observed after a short expression period, for all u.v. doses tested, and was followed by a decrease in mutation frequency on subsequent passages

  6. Induction of diphtheria toxin-resistant mutants in human cells by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocchi, P.; Ferreri, A.M.; Capucci, A.; Prodi, G.

    1981-01-01

    Stable spontaneous mutants resistant to the protein synthesis inhibitor diphtheria toxin (DT) have been selected in human cell line EUE at a very low frequency ( -6 ). U.v.-induced mutation has been quantitatively measured: treatment of cells with u.v. light increased the frequencies of diphtheria toxin resistant (DTsup(r)) mutants up to 1000-fold. The maximum recovery of DTsup(r) mutants was observed after a short expression period, for all u.v. doses tested, and was followed by a decrease in mutation frequency on subsequent passages. (author)

  7. Human recreational exposure to antibiotic resistant bacteria in coastal bathing waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Anne F C; Zhang, Lihong; Balfour, Andrew J; Garside, Ruth; Gaze, William H

    2015-09-01

    Infections caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) are associated with poor health outcomes and are recognised globally as a serious health problem. Much research has been conducted on the transmission of ARB to humans. Yet the role the natural environment plays in the spread of ARB and antibiotic resistance genes is not well understood. Antibiotic resistant bacteria have been detected in natural aquatic environments, and ingestion of seawater during water sports is one route by which many people could be directly exposed. The aim was to estimate the prevalence of resistance to one clinically important class of antibiotics (third-generation cephalosporins (3GCs)) amongst Escherichia coli in coastal surface waters in England and Wales. Prevalence data was used to quantify ingestion of 3GC-resistant E. coli (3GCREC) by people participating in water sports in designated coastal bathing waters. A further aim was to use this value to derive a population-level estimate of exposure to these bacteria during recreational use of coastal waters in 2012. The prevalence of 3GC-resistance amongst E. coli isolated from coastal surface waters was estimated using culture-based methods. This was combined with the density of E. coli reported in designated coastal bathing waters along with estimations of the volumes of water ingested during various water sports reported in the literature to calculate the mean number of 3GCREC ingested during different water sports. 0.12% of E. coli isolated from surface waters were resistant to 3GCs. This value was used to estimate that in England and Wales over 6.3 million water sport sessions occurred in 2012 that resulted in the ingestion of at least one 3GCREC. Despite the low prevalence of resistance to 3GCs amongst E. coli in surface waters, there is an identifiable human exposure risk for water users, which varies with the type of water sport undertaken. The relative importance of this exposure is likely to be greater in areas where a

  8. Metagenomic profiles of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) between human impacted estuary and deep ocean sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baowei; Yang, Ying; Liang, Ximei; Yu, Ke; Zhang, Tong; Li, Xiangdong

    2013-11-19

    Knowledge of the origins and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) is essential for understanding modern resistomes in the environment. The mechanisms of the dissemination of ARGs can be revealed through comparative studies on the metagenomic profiling of ARGs between relatively pristine and human-impacted environments. The deep ocean bed of the South China Sea (SCS) is considered to be largely devoid of anthropogenic impacts, while the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) in south China has been highly impacted by intensive human activities. Commonly used antibiotics (sulfamethazine, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, tetracycline, and erythromycin) have been detected through chemical analysis in the PRE sediments, but not in the SCS sediments. In the relatively pristine SCS sediments, the most prevalent and abundant ARGs are those related to resistance to macrolides and polypeptides, with efflux pumps as the predominant mechanism. In the contaminated PRE sediments, the typical ARG profiles suggest a prevailing resistance to antibiotics commonly used in human health and animal farming (including sulfonamides, fluoroquinolones, and aminoglycosides), and higher diversity in both genotype and resistance mechanism than those in the SCS. In particular, antibiotic inactivation significantly contributed to the resistance to aminoglycosides, β-lactams, and macrolides observed in the PRE sediments. There was a significant correlation in the levels of abundance of ARGs and those of mobile genetic elements (including integrons and plasmids), which serve as carriers in the dissemination of ARGs in the aquatic environment. The metagenomic results from the current study support the view that ARGs naturally originate in pristine environments, while human activities accelerate the dissemination of ARGs so that microbes would be able to tolerate selective environmental stress in response to anthropogenic impacts.

  9. Food and human gut as reservoirs of transferable antibiotic resistance encoding genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc eRolain

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The increase and spread of antibiotic resistance (AR over the past decade in human pathogens has become a worldwide health concern. Recent genomic and metagenomic studies in humans, animals, in food and in the environment have led to the discovery of a huge reservoir of AR genes called the resistome that could be mobilized and transferred from these sources to human pathogens. AR is a natural phenomenon developed by bacteria to protect antibiotic-producing bacteria from their own products and also to increase their survival in highly competitive microbial environments. Although antibiotics are used extensively in humans and animals, there is also considerable usage of antibiotics in agriculture, especially in animal feeds and aquaculture. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the sources of AR and the use of antibiotics in these reservoirs as selectors for emergence of AR bacteria in humans via the food chain.

  10. Teaching Human Rights from Below: Towards Solidarity, Resistance and Social Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Canlas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we discuss our approaches, pedagogies, and practices for a weekly human rights club that serves immigrant and refugee youth.  The research team is involved in a research collaboration with a public high school in a large urban area on the West Coast.  In this article, we discuss some of our curricular and pedagogical strategies and students’ responses to lesson plans and activities that aimed to build solidarity, resistance to dominant and assimilative narratives, and action towards social justice.  Our approach focuses on intersecting a transforamtive human rights perspective with the praxes of critical pedagogies and social justice.  This article discusses a radical approach to teaching Human Rights along three key themes: student-centered human rights pedagogy, cultural wealth and HRE, and students’ articulation of human rights language into action.

  11. RAD18 mediates resistance to ionizing radiation in human glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Chen; Wang, Hongwei; Cheng, Hongbin; Li, Jianhua; Wang, Zhi; Yue, Wu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • RAD18 is an important mediator of the IR-induced resistance in glioma cell lines. • RAD18 overexpression confers resistance to IR-mediated apoptosis. • The elevated expression of RAD18 is associated with recurrent GBM who underwent IR therapy. - Abstract: Radioresistance remains a major challenge in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). RAD18 a central regulator of translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), has been shown to play an important role in regulating genomic stability and DNA damage response. In the present study, we investigate the relationship between RAD18 and resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) and examined the expression levels of RAD18 in primary and recurrent GBM specimens. Our results showed that RAD18 is an important mediator of the IR-induced resistance in GBM. The expression level of RAD18 in glioma cells correlates with their resistance to IR. Ectopic expression of RAD18 in RAD18-low A172 glioma cells confers significant resistance to IR treatment. Conversely, depletion of endogenous RAD18 in RAD18-high glioma cells sensitized these cells to IR treatment. Moreover, RAD18 overexpression confers resistance to IR-mediated apoptosis in RAD18-low A172 glioma cells, whereas cells deficient in RAD18 exhibit increased apoptosis induced by IR. Furthermore, knockdown of RAD18 in RAD18-high glioma cells disrupts HR-mediated repair, resulting in increased accumulation of DSB. In addition, clinical data indicated that RAD18 was significantly higher in recurrent GBM samples that were exposed to IR compared with the corresponding primary GBM samples. Collectively, our findings reveal that RAD18 may serve as a key mediator of the IR response and may function as a potential target for circumventing IR resistance in human GBM

  12. Modulation of P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance in K562 leukemic cells by indole-3-carbinol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, Annu; Seth, Kavita; Kalra, Neetu; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2005-01-01

    Resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs is one of the major problems in the treatment of cancer. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) encoded by the mdr gene is a highly conserved protein, acts as a multidrug transporter, and has a major role in multiple drug resistance (MDR). Targeting of P-gp by naturally occurring compounds is an effective strategy to overcome MDR. Indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a glucosinolates present in cruciferous vegetables, is a promising chemopreventive agent as it is reported to possess antimutagenic, antitumorigenic, and antiestrogenic properties in experimental studies. In the present investigation, the potential of I3C to modulate P-gp expression was evaluated in vinblastine (VBL)-resistant K562 human leukemic cells. The resistant K562 cells (K562/R10) were found to be cross-resistant to vincristine (VCR), doxorubicin (DXR), and other antineoplastic agents. I3C at a nontoxic dose (10 x 10 -3 M) enhanced the cytotoxic effects of VBL time dependently in VBL-resistant human leukemia (K562/R10) cells but had no effect on parent-sensitive cells (K562/S). The Western blot analysis of K 562/R 10 cells showed that I3C downregulates the induced levels of P-gp in resistant cells near to normal levels. The quantitation of immunocytochemically stained K562/R10 cells showed 24%, 48%, and 80% decrease in the levels of P-gp by I3C for 24, 48, and 72 h of incubation. The above features thus indicate that I3C could be used as a novel modulator of P-gp-mediated multidrug resistance in vitro and may be effective as a dietary adjuvant in the treatment of MDR cancers

  13. Comparison of antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and resistance genes in Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium from humans in the community, broilers and pigs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Agersø, Yvonne; Gerner-Smidt, P.

    2000-01-01

    . faecium isolates of human and animal origin, examined. tet(K) was not observed, whereas tet(L) was detected in 17% of tetracycline resistant E. faecalis isolates and in 16% of the E. faecium isolates. tet(O) was not detected in any of the isolates from pigs, but was observed in 38% of E. faecalis isolates...... from broilers, in two E. faecalis isolates from humans and in three E. faecium isolates from broilers. tet(S) was not detected among isolates from animals, but was observed in 31% of E. faecalis and one E. faecium isolate from humans. This study showed a frequent occurrence of antimicrobial resistance...

  14. Barriers to Infection of Human Cells by Feline Leukemia Virus: Insights into Resistance to Zoonosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Anne; Kilbey, Anna; Naseer, Asif; Levy, Laura S; Ahmad, Shamim; Watts, Ciorsdaidh; Mackay, Nancy; Cameron, Ewan; Wilson, Sam; Neil, James C

    2017-03-01

    The human genome displays a rich fossil record of past gammaretrovirus infections, yet no current epidemic is evident, despite environmental exposure to viruses that infect human cells in vitro Feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) rank high on this list, but neither domestic nor workplace exposure has been associated with detectable serological responses. Nonspecific inactivation of gammaretroviruses by serum factors appears insufficient to explain these observations. To investigate further, we explored the susceptibilities of primary and established human cell lines to FeLV-B, the most likely zoonotic variant. Fully permissive infection was common in cancer-derived cell lines but was also a feature of nontransformed keratinocytes and lung fibroblasts. Cells of hematopoietic origin were generally less permissive and formed discrete groups on the basis of high or low intracellular protein expression and virion release. Potent repression was observed in primary human blood mononuclear cells and a subset of leukemia cell lines. However, the early steps of reverse transcription and integration appear to be unimpaired in nonpermissive cells. FeLV-B was subject to G→A hypermutation with a predominant APOBEC3G signature in partially permissive cells but was not mutated in permissive cells or in nonpermissive cells that block secondary viral spread. Distinct cellular barriers that protect primary human blood cells are likely to be important in protection against zoonotic infection with FeLV. IMPORTANCE Domestic exposure to gammaretroviruses such as feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) occurs worldwide, but the basis of human resistance to infection remains incompletely understood. The potential threat is evident from the human genome sequence, which reveals many past epidemics of gammaretrovirus infection, and from recent cross-species jumps of gammaretroviruses from rodents to primates and marsupials. This study examined resistance to infection at the cellular level with the most

  15. Hidden contributions of the enamel rods on the fracture resistance of human teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahyazadehfar, M; Bajaj, Devendra; Arola, Dwayne D

    2013-01-01

    The enamel of human teeth is generally regarded as a brittle material with low fracture toughness. Consequently, the contributions of this tissue in resisting tooth fracture and the importance of its complex microstructure have been largely overlooked. In this study an experimental evaluation of the crack growth resistance of human enamel was conducted to characterize the role of rod (i.e. prism) orientation and degree of decussation on the fracture behavior of this tissue. Incremental crack growth was achieved in-plane, with the rods in directions longitudinal or transverse to their axes. Results showed that the fracture resistance of enamel is both inhomogeneous and spatially anisotropic. Cracks extending transverse to the rods in the outer enamel undergo a lower rise in toughness with extension, and achieve significantly lower fracture resistance than in the longitudinal direction. Though cracks initiating at the surface of teeth may begin extension towards the dentin-enamel junction, they are deflected by the decussated rods and continue growth about the tooth's periphery, transverse to the rods in the outer enamel. This process facilitates dissipation of fracture energy and averts cracks from extending towards the dentin and vital pulp. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantitative analysis of MDR1 (multidrug resistance) gene expression in human tumors by polymerase chain reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noonan, K.E.; Beck, C.; Holzmayer, T.A.; Chin, J.E.; Roninson, I.B.; Wunder, J.S.; Andrulis, I.L.; Gazdar, A.F.; Willman, C.L.; Griffith, B.; Von Hoff, D.D.

    1990-01-01

    The resistance of tumor cells ot chemotheraprutic drugs is a major obstacle to successful cancer chemotherapy. In human cells, expression of the MDR1 gene, encoding a transmembrane efflux pump (P-glycoprotein), leads to decreased intracellular accumulation and resistance to a variety of lipophilic drugs (multidrug resistance; MDR). The levels of MDR in cell lines selected in bitro have been shown to correlate with the steady-state levels of MDR1 mRNA and P-glycoprotein. In cells with a severalfold increase in cellular drug resistance, MDR1 expression levels are close to the limits of detection by conventional assays. MDR1 expression has been frequently observed in human tumors after chemotherapy and in some but not all types of clinically refactory tumors untreated with chemotherapeutic drugs. The authors have devised a highly sensitive, specific, and quantitative protocol for measuring the levels of MDR1 mRNA in clincal samples, based on the polymerase chain reaction. They have used this assay to measure MDR1 gene expression in MDR cell lines and >300 normal tissues, tumor-derived cell lines, and clinical specimens of untreated tumors of the types in which MDR1 expression was rarely observed by standard assays. Low levels of MDR1 expression were found by polymerase chain reaction in most solid tumors and leukemias tested. The frequency of samples without detectable MDR1 expression varied among different types of tumors; MDR1-negative samples were ost common among tumor types known to be relatively responsive to chemotherapy

  17. Review of Antibiotic Resistance in the Indian Ocean Commission: A Human and Animal Health Issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Noellie; Belmonte, Olivier; Collard, Jean-Marc; Halifa, Mohamed; Issack, Mohammad Iqbal; Mindjae, Saindou; Palmyre, Philippe; Ibrahim, Abdul Aziz; Rasamoelina, Harena; Flachet, Loïc; Filleul, Laurent; Cardinale, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a major threat to human, animal health, and environment worldwide. For human, transmission occurred through a variety of routes both in health-care settings and community. In animals, AMR was reported in livestock, pets, and wildlife; transmission of AMR can be zoonotic with the probably most important route being foodborne transmission. The Indian Ocean Commission (IOC), composed of Comoros, Madagascar, Mauritius, Reunion (France), and Seychelles recognized the surveillance of AMR in both animal and human as a main public health priority for the region. Mayotte, French overseas territory, located in Comoros archipelago, was also included in this review. This review summarized our best epidemiological knowledge regarding AMR in Indian Ocean. We documented the prevalence, and phenotypic and genotypic profiles of prone to resistance Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria both in animals and humans. Our review clearly pointed out extended-spectrum β-lactamase and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae as main human and animal health issue in IOC. However, publications on AMR are scarce, particularly in Comoros, Mayotte, and Seychelles. Thus, research and surveillance priorities were recommended (i) estimating the volume of antimicrobial drugs used in livestock and human medicine in the different territories [mainly third generation cephalosporin (3GC)]; (ii) developing a "One Health" surveillance approach with epidemiological indicators as zoonotic foodborne pathogen (i.e., couple Escherichia coli resistance to 3GC/carbapenems); (iii) screening travelers with a history of hospitalization and consumption of antibiotic drug returning from at risk areas (e.g., mcr-1 transmission with China or hajj pilgrims) allowing an early warning detection of the emergence for quick control measures implementation in IOC.

  18. Involvement of HIF-1α activation in the doxorubicin resistance of human osteosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncuzzi, Laura; Pancotti, Fabia; Baldini, Nicola

    2014-07-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone cancer in children and adolescents. Despite aggressive treatment regimens, survival outcomes remain unsatisfactory, particularly in patients with metastatic and/or recurrent disease. Unfortunately, treatment failure is commonly due to the development of chemoresistance, for which the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF‑1α) and its signalling pathways as mediators of drug-resistance in human osteosarcoma. Toward this aim, we established two osteosarcoma cell lines selected for resistance to doxorubicin, a drug of choice in the treatment of this tumour. Our results showed that the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype was also mediated by HIF-1α, the most important regulator of cell adaptation to hypoxia. Our data showed that this transcription factor promoted the outward transport of intracellular doxorubicin by activating the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression in osteosarcoma cells maintained in normoxic conditions. In addition, it hindered doxorubicin-induced apoptosis by regulating the expression of c-Myc and p21. Finally, we observed that the doxorubicin-resistant cells maintained for 2 months of continuous culture in a drug-free medium, lost their drug-resistance and this effect was associated with the absence of HIF-1α expression. The emerging role of HIF-1α in osteosarcoma biology indicates its use as a valuable therapeutic target.

  19. Management of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in human immunodeficiency virus patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, K. F.

    2018-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a chronic infectious disease mainly caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis(MTB). 10.4 million new TB cases will appear in 2015 worldwide. There were an estimated 1.4 million TB deaths in 2015, and an additional 0.4 million deaths resulting from TB disease among people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Multidrug- resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR and XDR-TB) are major public health concerns worldwide. 480.000 new cases of MDR-TB will appear in 2015 and an additional 100,000 people with rifampicin-resistant TB (RR-TB) who were also newly eligible for MDR-TB treatment. Their association with HIV infection has contributed to the slowing down of TB incidence decline over the last two decades, therefore representing one important barrier to reach TB elimination. Patients infected with MDR-TB require more expensive treatment regimens than drug-susceptible TB, with poor treatment.Patients with multidrug- resistant tuberculosis do not receive rifampin; drug interactions risk is markedly reduced. However, overlapping toxicities may limit options for co-treatment of HIV and multidrug- resistant tuberculosis.

  20. Antimicrobial resistance and population structure of Staphylococcus epidermidis recovered from animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argudín, M Angeles; Vanderhaeghen, Wannes; Vandendriessche, Stien; Vandecandelaere, Ilse; André, François-Xavier; Denis, Olivier; Coenye, Tom; Butaye, Patrick

    2015-07-09

    While Staphylococcus epidermidis, as part of the commensal flora, is a well-known human opportunistic pathogen, only little is known about the genetic relatedness of S. epidermidis carriage isolates from animal and human origin. This study aimed to compare S. epidermidis recovered from livestock, livestock-farmers and humans associated with the hospital environment. A total of 193 S. epidermidis isolates from three populations [animals (n=33), farmers (n=86) and hospital-associated (n=74)] were characterized by broth microdilution antimicrobial susceptibility testing, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The overall S. epidermidis nasal colonization rate was low in animals (1-9%) but high among farmers (75%). High levels of multi-resistance were found in all populations. Tetracycline resistance was high in animal and farmer isolates; resistance to erythromycin, clindamycin and trimethoprim was high in animal and hospital-associated isolates. Methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis - MRSE isolates were found in all collections, with 22 (67%) MRSE in animals, 44 (51%) MRSE in farmers and 42 (57%) MRSE associated with the hospital-setting. Known SCCmec types and variants were detected in 79% of MRSE; the rest were non-typeable cassettes. In total 79 PFGE-types were found, of which 22 were shared between livestock, farmers and the hospital settings. Clonal complex 2 was predominant in all three populations and most STs corresponded to types previously observed in community and nosocomial S. epidermidis populations. S. epidermidis isolates from livestock, farmers and hospital-setting showed a high level of diversity, but some clones can be found in humans as well as in animals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Investigating the role of musical genre in human perception of music stretching resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Chaokun

    2017-01-01

    To stretch a music piece to a given length is a common demand in people's daily lives, e.g., in audio-video synchronization and animation production. However, it is not always guaranteed that the stretched music piece is acceptable for general audience since music stretching suffers from people's perceptual artefacts. Over-stretching a music piece will make it uncomfortable for human psychoacoustic hearing. The research on music stretching resistance attempts to estimate the maximum stretchab...

  2. Human Intestinal Cells Modulate Conjugational Transfer of Multidrug Resistance Plasmids between Clinical Escherichia coli Isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel; Sommer, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial conjugation in the human gut microbiota is believed to play a major role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and virulence plasmids. However, the modulation of bacterial conjugation by the human host remains poorly understood and there is a need for controlled systems...... to study this process. We established an in vitro co-culture system to study the interaction between human intestinal cells and bacteria. We show that the conjugation efficiency of a plasmid encoding an extended spectrum beta-lactamase is reduced when clinical isolates of Escherichia coli are co...... of the intestinal cells exposed to bacteria leading to a two-fold reduction in conjugation efficiency. These results show that human gut epithelial cells can modulate bacterial conjugation and may have relevance to gene exchange in the gut....

  3. Celastrol Protects against Antimycin A-Induced Insulin Resistance in Human Skeletal Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Hafizi Abu Bakar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation are widely accepted as key hallmarks of obesity-induced skeletal muscle insulin resistance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the functional roles of an anti-inflammatory compound, celastrol, in mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance induced by antimycin A (AMA in human skeletal muscle cells. We found that celastrol treatment improved insulin-stimulated glucose uptake activity of AMA-treated cells, apparently via PI3K/Akt pathways, with significant enhancement of mitochondrial activities. Furthermore, celastrol prevented increased levels of cellular oxidative damage where the production of several pro-inflammatory cytokines in cultures cells was greatly reduced. Celastrol significantly increased protein phosphorylation of insulin signaling cascades with amplified expression of AMPK protein and attenuated NF-κB and PKC θ activation in human skeletal muscle treated with AMA. The improvement of insulin signaling pathways by celastrol was also accompanied by augmented GLUT4 protein expression. Taken together, these results suggest that celastrol may be advocated for use as a potential therapeutic molecule to protect against mitochondrial dysfunction-induced insulin resistance in human skeletal muscle cells.

  4. Triclosan Lacks (Anti-Estrogenic Effects in Zebrafish Cells but Modulates Estrogen Response in Zebrafish Embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Serra

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Triclosan (TCS, an antimicrobial agent widely found in the aquatic environment, is suspected to act as an endocrine disrupting compound, however mechanistic information is lacking in regards to aquatic species. This study assessed the ability of TCS to interfere with estrogen receptor (ER transcriptional activity, in zebrafish-specific in vitro and in vivo reporter gene assays. We report that TCS exhibits a lack of either agonistic or antagonistic effects on a panel of ER-expressing zebrafish (ZELH-zfERα and -zfERβ and human (MELN cell lines. At the organism level, TCS at concentrations of up to 0.3 µM had no effect on ER-regulated brain aromatase gene expression in transgenic cyp19a1b-GFP zebrafish embryos. At a concentration of 1 µM, TCS interfered with the E2 response in an ambivalent manner by potentializing a low E2 response (0.625 nM, but decreasing a high E2 response (10 nM. Altogether, our study suggests that while modulation of ER-regulated genes by TCS may occur in zebrafish, it does so irrespective of a direct binding and activation of zfERs.

  5. Estrogenic and anti-estrogenic activity of off-the-shelf hair and skin care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Sharon L; Yang, Chun Z; Bittner, George D; Witt, Kristine L; Tice, Raymond R; Baird, Donna D

    2015-05-01

    Use of personal care products is widespread in the United States but tends to be greater among African Americans than whites. Of special concern is the possible hazard of absorption of chemicals with estrogenic activity (EA) or anti-EA (AEA) in these products. Such exposure may have adverse health effects, especially when it occurs during developmental windows (e.g., prepubertally) when estrogen levels are low. We assessed the ethanol extracts of eight commonly used hair and skin products popular among African Americans for EA and AEA using a cell proliferation assay with the estrogen sensitive MCF-7:WS8 cell line derived from a human breast cancer. Four of the eight personal care products tested (Oil Hair Lotion, Extra-dry Skin Lotion, Intensive Skin Lotion, Petroleum Jelly) demonstrated detectable EA, whereas three (Placenta Hair Conditioner, Tea-Tree Hair Conditioner, Cocoa Butter Skin Cream) exhibited AEA. Our data indicate that hair and skin care products can have EA or AEA, and suggest that laboratory studies are warranted to investigate the in vivo activity of such products under chronic exposure conditions as well as epidemiologic studies to investigate potential adverse health effects that might be associated with use of such products.

  6. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance; interactions between human, animal and environmental ecologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent ePOIREL

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to quinolones and fluoroquinolones is being increasingly reported among human but also veterinary isolates during the last two to three decades, very likely as a consequence of the large clinical usage of those antibiotics. Even if the principle mechanisms of resistance to quinolones are chromosome-encoded, due to modifications of molecular targets (DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, decreased outer-membrane permeability (porin defect and overexpression of naturally-occurring efflux, the emergence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR has been reported since 1998. Although these PMQR determinants confer low-level resistance to quinolones and/or fluoroquinolones, they are a favorable background for selection of additional chromosome-encoded quinolone resistance mechanisms. Different transferable mechanisms have been identified, corresponding to the production of Qnr proteins, of the aminoglycoside acetyltransferase AAC(6’-Ib-cr, or of the QepA-type or OqxAB-type efflux pumps. Qnr proteins protect target enzymes (DNA gyrase and type IV topoisomerase from quinolone inhibition (mostly nalidixic acid. The AAC(6’-Ib-cr determinant acetylates several fluoroquinolones, such as norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin. Finally, the QepA and OqxAB efflux pumps extrude fluoroquinolones from the bacterial cell. A series of studies have identified the environment to be a reservoir of PMQR genes, with farm animals and aquatic habitats being significantly involved. In addition, the origin of the qnr genes has been identified, corresponding to the waterborne species Shewanella sp. Altogether, the recent observations suggest that the aquatic environment might constitute the original source of PMQR genes, that would secondly spread among animal or human isolates.

  7. Resistance of human spermatozoa to cryoinjury in repeated cycles of thaw-refreezing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney Verza Jr.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the resistance of human spermatozoa to cryoinjury in repeated cycles of thaw-refreezing by using the fast liquid nitrogen vapor method. Material and Methods: Semen specimens were obtained from sixteen normal and oligozoospermic individuals who required disposal at the sperm bank. Five of them had testicular cancer. Specimens were thawed and an aliquot was removed for analysis. The remaining specimens were refrozen without removing the cryomedia. Repeated freeze-thaw cycles were performed until no motile sperm were observed. Sperm motility, number of motile spermatozoa and viability were determined after thawing. Resistance to cryoinjury was compared between groups and also after each refreezing cycle within groups. Results: Motile spermatozoa were recovered after five and two refreeze-thawing cycles in normozoospermic and oligozoospermic specimens, respectively. There were no significant differences in the recovery of motile spermatozoa between thaws within each group of normal and oligozoospermic specimens, but percentage motility and total number of motile spermatozoa were significantly lower in the oligozoospermic one. Specimens from men with cancer were exposed to six refreeze-thawing cycles. Although recovery of motile spermatozoa was significantly impaired after each thawing, there were no significant differences in the recovery of motile sperm between thaws in cancer and non-cancer groups. Conclusions: Human spermatozoa resist repeated cryopreservation using the fast liquid nitrogen vapor method. Normozoospermic specimens withstand refreezing for an average two cycles longer than oligozoospermic ones. Specimens from cancer patients seem to resist repeated cryoinjury similarly to non-cancer counterparts. Resistance to repeated cryoinjury was related to the initial semen quality.

  8. A bacterial antibiotic-resistance gene that complements the human multidrug-resistance P-glycoprotein gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, HW; Callaghan, R; Soceneantu, L; Sardini, A; Konings, WN; Higgins, CF

    1998-01-01

    Bacteria have developed many fascinating antibiotic-resistance mechanisms(1,2). A protein in Lactococcus lactis, LmrA, mediates antibiotic resistance by extruding amphiphilic compounds from the inner leaflet of the cytoplasmic membrane(3,4). Unlike other known bacterial multidrug-resistance

  9. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus associated with animals and its relevance to human health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa ePantosti

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a typical human pathogen. Some animal S. aureus lineages have derived from human strains following profound genetic adaptation determining a change in host specificity. Due to the close relationship of animals with the environmental microbioma and resistoma, animal staphylococcal strains also represent a source of resistance determinants. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA emerged fifty years ago as a nosocomial pathogen but in the last decade it has also become a frequent cause of infections in the community. The recent finding that MRSA frequently colonizes animals, especially livestock, has been a reason for concern, as it has revealed an expanded reservoir of MRSA. While MRSA strains recovered from companion animals are generally similar to human nosocomial MRSA, MRSA strains recovered from food animals appear to be specific animal-adapted clones. Since 2005, MRSA belonging to ST398 was recognized as a colonizer of pigs and human subjects professionally exposed to pig farming. The pig MRSA was also found to colonize other species of farmed animals, including horses, cattle and poultry and was therefore designated livestock-associated (LA-MRSA. LA-MRSA ST398 can cause infections in humans in contact with animals, and can infect hospitalized people, although at the moment this occurrence is relatively rare. Other animal-adapted MRSA clones have been detected in livestock, such as ST1 and ST9. Recently, ST130 MRSA isolated from bovine mastitis has been found to carry a novel mecA gene that eludes detection by conventional PCR tests. Similar ST130 strains have been isolated from human infections in UK, Denmark and Germany at low frequency. It is plausible that the increased attention to animal MRSA will reveal other strains with peculiar characteristics that can pose a risk to human health.

  10. Role of the Environment in the Transmission of Antimicrobial Resistance to Humans: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huijbers, Patricia M C; Blaak, Hetty; de Jong, Mart C M; Graat, Elisabeth A M; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M J E; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria

    2015-10-20

    To establish a possible role for the natural environment in the transmission of clinically relevant AMR bacteria to humans, a literature review was conducted to systematically collect and categorize evidence for human exposure to extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus spp. in the environment. In total, 239 datasets adhered to inclusion criteria. AMR bacteria were detected at exposure-relevant sites (35/38), including recreational areas, drinking water, ambient air, and shellfish, and in fresh produce (8/16). More datasets were available for environmental compartments (139/157), including wildlife, water, soil, and air/dust. Quantitative data from exposure-relevant sites (6/35) and environmental compartments (11/139) were scarce. AMR bacteria were detected in the contamination sources (66/66) wastewater and manure, and molecular data supporting their transmission from wastewater to the environment (1/66) were found. The abundance of AMR bacteria at exposure-relevant sites suggests risk for human exposure. Of publications pertaining to both environmental and human isolates, however, only one compared isolates from samples that had a clear spatial and temporal relationship, and no direct evidence was found for transmission to humans through the environment. To what extent the environment, compared to the clinical and veterinary domains, contributes to human exposure needs to be quantified. AMR bacteria in the environment, including sites relevant for human exposure, originate from contamination sources. Intervention strategies targeted at these sources could therefore limit emission of AMR bacteria to the environment.

  11. Radiation response of human lung cancer cells with inherent and acquired resistance to cisplatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twentyman, P.R.; Wright, K.A.; Rhodes, T.

    1991-01-01

    We have derived sublines of three human lung cancer cell lines with acquired resistance to cisplatin. The cisplatin resistant sublines of NCI-H69 (small cell), COR-L23 (large cell), and MOR (adenocarcinoma) show 5.3 fold, 3.1 fold, and 3.8 fold resistance, respectively, determined in a 6-day MTT assay. Although the parent lines show a wide range of glutathione content per cell, the sublines each show similar values to their corresponding parent line. Radiation response curves have been obtained using a soft agar clonogenic assay. Values obtained for the parent lines (95% CL in parentheses) were: NCI-H69: Do = 0.99 Gy (0.87-1.16), n = 2.9 (1.6-5.2), GSH = 14 ng/10(4) cells; COR-L23: Do = 1.23 Gy (1.05-1.49), n = 1.3 (0.7-2.2), GSH = 47 ng/10(4) cells; MOR: Do = 1.66 Gy (1.48-1.88), n = 3.0 (1.9-4.8), GSH = 86 ng/10(4) cells. The cisplatin resistant variants of NCI-H69 and COR-L23 showed 31% and 63% increases, respectively, in Do compared to their parent lines, whereas no change in radiation response was seen in MOR. In this panel of lines, therefore, although there is a correlation between glutathione content and radiosensitivity of the parent cell lines, acquired resistance to cisplatin is not accompanied by increased glutathione content. However, two of the three cisplatin resistant lines do show a significantly reduced radiosensitivity

  12. A third component of the human cytomegalovirus terminase complex is involved in letermovir resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Sunwen

    2017-12-01

    Letermovir is a human cytomegalovirus (CMV) terminase inhibitor that was clinically effective in a Phase III prevention trial. In vitro studies have shown that viral mutations conferring letermovir resistance map primarily to the UL56 component of the terminase complex and uncommonly to UL89. After serial culture of a baseline CMV laboratory strain under letermovir, mutation was observed in a third terminase component in 2 experiments, both resulting in amino acid substitution P91S in gene UL51 and adding to a pre-existing UL56 mutation. Recombinant phenotyping indicated that P91S alone conferred 2.1-fold increased letermovir resistance (EC50) over baseline, and when combined with UL56 mutation S229F or R369M, multiplied the level of resistance conferred by those mutations by 3.5-7.7-fold. Similarly a combination of UL56 mutations S229F, L254F and L257I selected in the same experiment conferred 54-fold increased letermovir EC50 over baseline, but 290-fold when combined with UL51 P91S. The P91S mutant was not perceptibly growth impaired. Although pUL51 is essential for normal function of the terminase complex, its biological significance is not well understood. Letermovir resistance mutations mapping to 3 separate genes, and their multiplier effect on the level of resistance, suggest that the terminase components interactively contribute to the structure of a letermovir antiviral target. The diagnostic importance of the UL51 P91S mutation arises from its potential to augment the letermovir resistance of some UL56 mutations at low fitness cost. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Novel Antibiotic Resistance Determinants from Agricultural Soil Exposed to Antibiotics Widely Used in Human Medicine and Animal Farming

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Calvin Ho-Fung; van Engelen, Kalene; Gordon, Stephen; Renaud, Justin; Topp, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance has emerged globally as one of the biggest threats to human and animal health. Although the excessive use of antibiotics is recognized as accelerating the selection for resistance, there is a growing body of evidence suggesting that natural environments are “hot spots” for the development of both ancient and contemporary resistance mechanisms. Given that pharmaceuticals can be entrained onto agricultural land through anthropogenic activities, this could be a potential dr...

  14. Danshen extract circumvents drug resistance and represses cell growth in human oral cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Yu; Hsieh, Cheng-Chih; Lin, Chih-Kung; Lin, Chun-Shu; Peng, Bo; Lin, Gu-Jiun; Sytwu, Huey-Kang; Chang, Wen-Liang; Chen, Yuan-Wu

    2017-12-29

    Danshen is a common traditional Chinese medicine used to treat neoplastic and chronic inflammatory diseases in China. However, the effects of Danshen on human oral cancer cells remain relatively unknown. This study investigated the antiproliferative effects of a Danshen extract on human oral cancer SAS, SCC25, OEC-M1, and KB drug-resistant cell lines and elucidated the possible underlying mechanism. We investigated the anticancer potential of the Danshen extract in human oral cancer cell lines and an in vivo oral cancer xenograft mouse model. The expression of apoptosis-related molecules was evaluated through Western blotting, and the concentration of in vivo apoptotic markers was measured using immunohistochemical staining. The antitumor effects of 5-fluorouracil and the Danshen extract were compared. Cell proliferation assays revealed that the Danshen extract strongly inhibited oral cancer cell proliferation. Cell morphology studies revealed that the Danshen extract inhibited the growth of SAS, SCC25, and OEC-M1 cells by inducing apoptosis. The Flow cytometric analysis indicated that the Danshen extract induced cell cycle G0/G1 arrest. Immunoblotting analysis for the expression of active caspase-3 and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein indicated that Danshen extract-induced apoptosis in human oral cancer SAS cells was mediated through the caspase pathway. Moreover, the Danshen extract significantly inhibited growth in the SAS xenograft mouse model. Furthermore, the Danshen extract circumvented drug resistance in KB drug-resistant oral cancer cells. The study results suggest that the Danshen extract could be a potential anticancer agent in oral cancer treatment.

  15. Detection and characterisation of multi-drug resistance protein 1 (MRP-1) in human mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roundhill, E A; Burchill, S A

    2012-03-13

    Overexpression of plasma membrane multi-drug resistance protein 1 (MRP-1) can lead to multidrug resistance. In this study, we describe for the first time the expression of mitochondrial MRP-1 in untreated human normal and cancer cells and tissues. MRP-1 expression and subcellular localisation in normal and cancer cells and tissues was examined by differential centrifugation and western blotting, and immunofluorescence microscopy. Viable mitochondria were isolated and MRP-1 efflux activity measured using the calcein-AM functional assay. MRP-1 expression was increased using retroviral infection and specific overexpression confirmed by RNA array. Cell viability was determined by trypan blue exclusion and annexin V-propidium iodide labelling of cells. MRP-1 was detected in the mitochondria of cancer and normal cells and tissues. The efflux activity of mitochondrial MRP-1 was more efficient (55-64%) than that of plasma membrane MRP-1 (11-22%; PMRP-1 expression resulted in a preferential increase in mitochondrial MRP-1, suggesting selective targeting to this organelle. Treatment with a non-lethal concentration of doxorubicin (0.85 nM, 8 h) increased mitochondrial and plasma membrane MRP-1, increasing resistance to MRP-1 substrates. For the first time, we have identified MRP-1 with efflux activity in human mitochondria. Mitochondrial MRP-1 may be an exciting new therapeutic target where historically MRP-1 inhibitor strategies have limited clinical success.

  16. Brain Insulin Resistance at the Crossroads of Metabolic and Cognitive Disorders in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullmann, Stephanie; Heni, Martin; Hallschmid, Manfred; Fritsche, Andreas; Preissl, Hubert; Häring, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-10-01

    Ever since the brain was identified as an insulin-sensitive organ, evidence has rapidly accumulated that insulin action in the brain produces multiple behavioral and metabolic effects, influencing eating behavior, peripheral metabolism, and cognition. Disturbances in brain insulin action can be observed in obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D), as well as in aging and dementia. Decreases in insulin sensitivity of central nervous pathways, i.e., brain insulin resistance, may therefore constitute a joint pathological feature of metabolic and cognitive dysfunctions. Modern neuroimaging methods have provided new means of probing brain insulin action, revealing the influence of insulin on both global and regional brain function. In this review, we highlight recent findings on brain insulin action in humans and its impact on metabolism and cognition. Furthermore, we elaborate on the most prominent factors associated with brain insulin resistance, i.e., obesity, T2D, genes, maternal metabolism, normal aging, inflammation, and dementia, and on their roles regarding causes and consequences of brain insulin resistance. We also describe the beneficial effects of enhanced brain insulin signaling on human eating behavior and cognition and discuss potential applications in the treatment of metabolic and cognitive disorders. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  17. SP-LL-37, human antimicrobial peptide, enhances disease resistance in transgenic rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, In Hye; Jung, Yu-Jin; Cho, Yong Gu; Nou, Ill Sup; Huq, Md Amdadul; Nogoy, Franz Marielle; Kang, Kwon-Kyoo

    2017-01-01

    Human LL-37 is a multifunctional antimicrobial peptide of cathelicidin family. It has been shown in recent studies that it can serve as a host's defense against influenza A virus. We now demonstrate in this study how signal peptide LL-37 (SP-LL-37) can be used in rice resistance against bacterial leaf blight and blast. We synthesized LL-37 peptide and subcloned in a recombinant pPZP vector with pGD1 as promoter. SP-LL-37 was introduced into rice plants by Agrobacterium mediated transformation. Stable expression of SP-LL-37 in transgenic rice plants was confirmed by RT-PCR and ELISA analyses. Subcellular localization of SP-LL-37-GFP fusion protein showed evidently in intercellular space. Our data on testing for resistance to bacterial leaf blight and blast revealed that the transgenic lines are highly resistant compared to its wildtype. Our results suggest that LL-37 can be further explored to improve wide-spectrum resistance to biotic stress in rice.

  18. Effect of fractionated radiation on multidrug resistance in human ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Dejuan; Liu Xiaodong; Liang Bing; Jia Lili; Ma Shumei

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of different subtypes of fractionated doses on multidrug resistance in ovarian cancer cells. Methods: The human ovarian cancer cell lines SKOV3 and its drug-resistant subtype SKVCR were divided into four groups i.e., sham-irradiated, single dose (10 Gy), fractionated dose (2 Gy × 5) and multi-fractionated dose (1 Gy × 2 × 5). Cell sensitivity to vincristine (VCR), etoposide (VP-16), pirarubicin (THP) and cisplatin (DDP) was measured by MTT assay. Western blot was applied to detect the expression of P-gp after irradiation. Results: The doubling time of SKVCR was about 1.8-fold of that of SKOV3 cells. P-gp was expressed in SKVCR but not in SKOV3. IC 50 values of SKVCR were higher than those of SKOV3. To SKOV3 cells, single dose irradiation decreased cell sensitivity to THP and DDP and fractionated irradiation decreased cell sensitivity to VCR, THP and VP-16. Multi-fractionated irradiation decreased cell sensitivity to VP-16. In SKVCR cells, all these irradiation treatments increased cell sensitivity to VCR and VP-16 but not to DDP. In addition, single and fractionated irradiation decreased P-gp expression in SKVCR cells. Conclusions: Single, fractionated and multi-fractionated radiation induced chemotherapy resistance in SKOV3 cells, while reversed drug resistance to VCR and VP-16 in SKVCR cells. (authors)

  19. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cisplatin-resistant Cell Strain A549/CDDP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sien SHI

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Chemotherapy plays an important role in the comprehensive therapy of lung cancer. However, the drug-resistance often causes the failure of the chemotherapy. The aim of this study is to identify differently expressed protein before and after cisplatin resistance of human lung adenocarcinoma cell A549 by proteomic analysis. Methods Cisplatin-resistant cell strain A549/CDDP was established by combining gradually increasing concentration of cisplatin with large dosage impact. Comparative proteomic analysis of A549 and A549/CDDP were carried out by means of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The differentially expressed proteins were detected and identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Results Eighty-two differentially expressed proteins were screened by analysis the electrophoretic maps of A549 and A549/CDDP. Six differential proteins were analyzed by peptide mass fingerprinting. Glucose regulating protein 75, ribosomal protein S4, mitochondrial ATP synthase F1 complex beta subunit and immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region were identified. All four differentially expressed proteins were over-expressed in A549/CDDP, whereas low-expressed or no-expressed in A549. Conclusion These differentially expressed proteins give some clues to elucidate the mechanism of lung cancer cell resistant of cisplatin, providing the basis of searching for potential target of chemotherapy of lung cancer.

  20. Genetic characterization and plasmid replicon typing of ß-lactam resistant Escherichia coli from humans and companion animals in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limited therapeutic options due to antimicrobial resistance (AR) is a major threat to human and animal health worldwide. There is a paucity of information on ß-lactam resistant Esherichia coli isolated from companion animals in developing countries; therefore their zoonotic impact is unknown. This s...

  1. Effect of Antimicrobial Use in Agricultural Animals on Drug-resistant Foodborne Campylobacteriosis in Humans: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrackin, M A; Helke, Kristi L; Galloway, Ashley M; Poole, Ann Z; Salgado, Cassandra D; Marriott, Bernadette P

    2016-10-02

    Controversy continues concerning antimicrobial use in food animals and its relationship to drug-resistant infections in humans. We systematically reviewed published literature for evidence of a relationship between antimicrobial use in agricultural animals and drug-resistant foodborne campylobacteriosis in humans. Based on publications from the United States (U.S.), Canada and Denmark from 2010 to July 2014, 195 articles were retained for abstract review, 50 met study criteria for full article review with 36 retained for which data are presented. Two publications reported increase in macrolide resistance of Campylobacter coli isolated from feces of swine receiving macrolides in feed, and one of these described similar findings for tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones. A study in growing turkeys demonstrated increased macrolide resistance associated with therapeutic dosing with Tylan® in drinking water. One publication linked tetracycline-resistant C. jejuni clone SA in raw cow's milk to a foodborne outbreak in humans. No studies that identified farm antimicrobial use also traced antimicrobial-resistant Campylobacter from farm to fork. Recent literature confirms that on farm antibiotic selection pressure can increase colonization of animals with drug-resistant Campylobacter spp. but is inadequately detailed to establish a causal relationship between use of antimicrobials in agricultural animals and prevalence of drug-resistant foodborne campylobacteriosis in humans.

  2. ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE AMONG ENTERIC BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM HUMAN AND ANIMAL WASTES AND IMPACTED SURFACE WATERS: COMPARISON WITH NARMS FINDINGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human infection with bacteria exhibiting mono or multiple antimicrobial resistance (MAR) has been a growing problem in the US, and studies have implicated livestock as a source of MAR bacteria primarily through foodborne transmission routes. However, waterborne transmission of...

  3. Genotypic and Phenotypic Markers of Livestock-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus CC9 in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Xiaohua; Wang, Xiaolin; Fan, Yanping; Peng, Yang; Li, Ling; Li, Shunming; Huang, Jingya; Yao, Zhenjiang; Chen, Sidong

    2016-01-01

    Use of antimicrobials in industrial food animal production is associated with the presence of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among animals and humans. The livestock-associated (LA) methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 9 (CC9) is associated with animals and related workers in Asia. This study aimed to explore the genotypic and phenotypic markers of LA-MRSA CC9 in humans. We conducted a cross-sectional study of livestock workers and controls in Guangdong, China. The ...

  4. Prevalence and characterization of plasmids carrying sulfonamide resistance genes among Escherichia coli from pigs, pig carcasses and human

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Shuyu; Dalsgaard, Anders; Hammerum, Anette M; Porsbo, Lone J; Jensen, Lars B

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Sulfonamide resistance is very common in Escherichia coli. The aim of this study was to characterize plasmids carrying sulfonamide resistance genes (sul1, sul2 and sul3) in E. coli isolated from pigs and humans with a specific objective to assess the genetic diversity of plasmids involved in the mobility of sul genes. Methods A total of 501 E. coli isolates from pig feces, pig carcasses and human stools were tested for their susceptibility to selected antimicrobial. Multip...

  5. Induction of cytosine arabinoside-resistant human myeloid leukemia cell death through autophagy regulation by hydroxychloroquine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yundeok; Eom, Ju-In; Jeung, Hoi-Kyung; Jang, Ji Eun; Kim, Jin Seok; Cheong, June-Won; Kim, Young Sam; Min, Yoo Hong

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the effects of the autophagy inhibitor hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) on cell death of cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C)-resistant human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. Ara-C-sensitive (U937, AML-2) and Ara-C-resistant (U937/AR, AML-2/AR) human AML cell lines were used to evaluate HCQ-regulated cytotoxicity, autophagy, and apoptosis as well as effects on cell death-related signaling pathways. We found that HCQ-induced dose- and time-dependent cell death in Ara-C-resistant cells compared to Ara-C-sensitive cell lines. The extent of cell death and features of HCQ-induced autophagic markers including increase in microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) I conversion to LC3-II, beclin-1, ATG5, as well as green fluorescent protein-LC3 positive puncta and autophagosome were remarkably greater in U937/AR cells. Also, p62/SQSTM1 was increased in response to HCQ. p62/SQSTM1 protein interacts with both LC3-II and ubiquitin protein and is degraded in autophagosomes. Therefore, a reduction of p62/SQSTM1 indicates increased autophagic degradation, whereas an increase of p62/SQSTM1 by HCQ indicates inhibited autophagic degradation. Knock down of p62/SQSTM1 using siRNA were prevented the HCQ-induced LC3-II protein level as well as significantly reduced the HCQ-induced cell death in U937/AR cells. Also, apoptotic cell death and caspase activation in U937/AR cells were increased by HCQ, provided evidence that HCQ-induced autophagy blockade. Taken together, our data show that HCQ-induced apoptotic cell death in Ara-C-resistant AML cells through autophagy regulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Enhanced expression of transferrin receptor confers UV-resistance in human and monkey cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zheng; Nomura, Jun; Suzuki, Toshikazu; Suzuki, Nobuo

    2005-01-01

    One of the most intriguing biological subjects is cell-surface molecules that regulate the susceptibility of human cells to cell-killing effects after irradiation with far-ultraviolet light (UV, principally 254 nm wavelength). Human RSa cells have unusual sensitivity to UV-induced cell-killing. We searched for molecules on the cell-surface of RSa cells that were present in different amounts as compared to a variant of these cells, UV r -1 cells, which have increased resistance to UV cell-killing. Among the 21 molecules examined, the amount of transferrin receptor (TfR) protein was found to be 2-fold higher in UV r -1 cells compared with in RSa cells. The amounts of this protein were also higher in the UV-resistant hematopoietic cell lines, CEM6 and Daudi, as compared to the UV-sensitive cell lines, Molt4 and 697. Culturing of UV r -1 cells in a medium containing anti-transferrin antibodies resulted in sensitization of the cells to UV cell-killing as demonstrated by colony formation assay. Similar results were observed by treatment of the cells with TfR siRNA. In contrast, overexpression of TfR protein led to a resistance to UV cell-killing in RSa cells and monkey COS7 cells as demonstrated by both colony formation and apoptosis assay. In TfR-overexpressing cells, reduction of p53 and Bax protein was observed after UV-irradiation. Thus, TfR expression appears to be involved in the regulation of UV-resistance, possibly via modulation of the amount of p53 and Bax protein. (author)

  7. Circulating ApoJ is closely associated with insulin resistance in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Ji A; Kang, Min-Cheol; Ciaraldi, Theodore P; Kim, Sang Soo; Park, Kyong Soo; Choe, Charles; Hwang, Won Min; Lim, Dong Mee; Farr, Olivia; Mantzoros, Christos; Henry, Robert R; Kim, Young-Bum

    2018-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes. ApolipoproteinJ (ApoJ) has been implicated in altered pathophysiologic states including cardiovascular and Alzheimer's disease. However, the function of ApoJ in regulation of glucose homeostasis remains unclear. This study sought to determine whether serum ApoJ levels are associated with insulin resistance in human subjects and if they change after interventions that improve insulin sensitivity. Serum ApoJ levels and insulin resistance status were assessed in nondiabetic (ND) and type 2 diabetic (T2D) subjects. The impacts of rosiglitazone or metformin therapy on serum ApoJ levels and glucose disposal rate (GDR) during a hyperinsulinemic/euglycemic clamp were evaluated in a separate cohort of T2D subjects. Total ApoJ protein or that associated with the HDL and LDL fractions was measured by immunoblotting or ELISA. Fasting serum ApoJ levels were greatly elevated in T2D subjects (ND vs T2D; 100±8.3 vs. 150.6±8.5AU, Pinsulin, HOMA-IR, and BMI. ApoJ levels were significantly and independently associated with HOMA-IR, even after adjustment for age, sex, and BMI. Rosiglitazone treatment in T2D subjects resulted in a reduction in serum ApoJ levels (before vs. after treatment; 100±13.9 vs. 77±15.2AU, P=0.015), whereas metformin had no effect on ApoJ levels. The change in ApoJ levels during treatment was inversely associated with the change in GDR. Interestingly, ApoJ content in the LDL fraction was inversely associated with HOMA-IR. Serum ApoJ levels are closely correlated with the magnitude of insulin resistance regardless of obesity, and decrease along with improvement of insulin resistance in response only to rosiglitazone in type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Novel Imidazopyridine Derivatives Possess Anti-Tumor Effect on Human Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A Ingersoll

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is the second leading cause of cancer-related death afflicting United States males. Most treatments to-date for metastatic PCa include androgen-deprivation therapy and second-generation anti-androgens such as abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide. However, a majority of patients eventually develop resistance to these therapies and relapse into the lethal, castration-resistant form of PCa to which no adequate treatment option remains. Hence, there is an immediate need to develop effective therapeutic agents toward this patient population. Imidazopyridines have recently been shown to possess Akt kinase inhibitory activity; thus in this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of novel imidazopyridine derivatives HIMP, M-MeI, OMP, and EtOP on different human castration-resistant PCa cells. Among these compounds, HIMP and M-MeI were found to possess selective dose- and time-dependent growth inhibition: they reduced castration-resistant PCa cell proliferation and spared benign prostate epithelial cells. Using LNCaP C-81 cells as the model system, these compounds also reduced colony formation as well as cell adhesion and migration, and M-MeI was the most potent in all studies. Further investigation revealed that while HIMP primarily inhibits PCa cell growth via suppression of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, M-MeI can inhibit both PI3K/Akt and androgen receptor pathways and arrest cell growth in the G2 phase. Thus, our results indicate the novel compound M-MeI to be a promising candidate for castration-resistant PCa therapy, and future studies investigating the mechanism of imidazopyridine inhibition may aid to the development of effective anti-PCa agents.

  9. Novel Imidazopyridine Derivatives Possess Anti-Tumor Effect on Human Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Matthew A; Lyons, Anastesia S; Muniyan, Sakthivel; D'Cunha, Napoleon; Robinson, Tashika; Hoelting, Kyle; Dwyer, Jennifer G; Bu, Xiu R; Batra, Surinder K; Lin, Ming-Fong

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death afflicting United States males. Most treatments to-date for metastatic PCa include androgen-deprivation therapy and second-generation anti-androgens such as abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide. However, a majority of patients eventually develop resistance to these therapies and relapse into the lethal, castration-resistant form of PCa to which no adequate treatment option remains. Hence, there is an immediate need to develop effective therapeutic agents toward this patient population. Imidazopyridines have recently been shown to possess Akt kinase inhibitory activity; thus in this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of novel imidazopyridine derivatives HIMP, M-MeI, OMP, and EtOP on different human castration-resistant PCa cells. Among these compounds, HIMP and M-MeI were found to possess selective dose- and time-dependent growth inhibition: they reduced castration-resistant PCa cell proliferation and spared benign prostate epithelial cells. Using LNCaP C-81 cells as the model system, these compounds also reduced colony formation as well as cell adhesion and migration, and M-MeI was the most potent in all studies. Further investigation revealed that while HIMP primarily inhibits PCa cell growth via suppression of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, M-MeI can inhibit both PI3K/Akt and androgen receptor pathways and arrest cell growth in the G2 phase. Thus, our results indicate the novel compound M-MeI to be a promising candidate for castration-resistant PCa therapy, and future studies investigating the mechanism of imidazopyridine inhibition may aid to the development of effective anti-PCa agents.

  10. Prior acetaminophen consumption impacts the early adaptive cellular response of human skeletal muscle to resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Lugos, Andrew C; Patel, Shivam H; Ormsby, Jordan C; Curtis, Donald P; Fry, Christopher S; Carroll, Chad C; Dickinson, Jared M

    2018-04-01

    Resistance exercise (RE) is a powerful stimulus for skeletal muscle adaptation. Previous data demonstrate that cyclooxygenase (COX)-inhibiting drugs alter the cellular mechanisms regulating the adaptive response of skeletal muscle. The purpose of this study was to determine whether prior consumption of the COX inhibitor acetaminophen (APAP) alters the immediate adaptive cellular response in human skeletal muscle after RE. In a double-blinded, randomized, crossover design, healthy young men ( n = 8, 25 ± 1 yr) performed two trials of unilateral knee extension RE (8 sets, 10 reps, 65% max strength). Subjects ingested either APAP (1,000 mg/6 h) or placebo (PLA) for 24 h before RE (final dose consumed immediately after RE). Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were collected at rest and 1 h and 3 h after exercise. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 signaling was assessed through immunoblot and immunohistochemistry, and mRNA expression of myogenic genes was examined via RT-qPCR. At 1 h p-rpS6 Ser240/244 was increased in both groups but to a greater extent in PLA. At 3 h p-S6K1 Thr389 was elevated only in PLA. Furthermore, localization of mTOR to the lysosome (LAMP2) in myosin heavy chain (MHC) II fibers increased 3 h after exercise only in PLA. mTOR-LAMP2 colocalization in MHC I fibers was greater in PLA vs. APAP 1 h after exercise. Myostatin mRNA expression was reduced 1 h after exercise only in PLA. MYF6 mRNA expression was increased 1 h and 3 h after exercise only in APAP. APAP consumption appears to alter the early adaptive cellular response of skeletal muscle to RE. These findings further highlight the mechanisms through which COX-inhibiting drugs impact the adaptive response of skeletal muscle to exercise. NEW & NOTEWORTHY The extent to which the cellular reaction to acetaminophen impacts the mechanisms regulating the adaptive response of human skeletal muscle to resistance exercise is not well understood. Consumption of acetaminophen before

  11. Antibiotics and heavy metals resistance patterns of Enterococcus faecalis and faecium bacteria isolated from the human and the livestock sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaser Sharifi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Enterococci have emerged as a major cause of nosocomial infections and within this group, Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium cause the majority of human and livestock enterococcal infections. In this article, we tried to determine antibiotics and metals resistance patterns of E. faecalis and E. faecium strains. Methods: One hundred sixty different strains of E. faecalis and E. faecium were collected from livestock sewage and the human fecal waste during 15 months. Then bacterial antibiotics sensitivity tests were carried out using the Agar disc diffusion method. Results: Generally, 100% of E. faecalis strains separated from human and livestock sources (i.e. sheep showed penicillin (P/ kanamycin (K/ nitrofurantoin (N/ loracarbef (L/ Ciprofloxacin (Cc/ ampicillin (AN/ nalidixic acid (NA/ sulfamethoxazole (S antibiotics resistance patterns. In addition, 55% of isolated E. faecium showed P/S/AN/NA antibiotics resistance patterns. Each strain showed a resistance to at least two aminoglycoside antibiotics. However, E. faecalis strains from human and the livestock sources showed 94% and 100% of resistance to nitrofurantoin, respectively. The effects of different metal concentrations was evaluated in both strains. The agar dilution method was applied in this stage. Hg at 0.05 mmol/L of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC showed toxicity to both the human and livestock Enterococcus strains. Cadmium at 1 mmol/L and 0.5 mmol/L concentrations had the most toxicity to E. faecalis and E. faecium strains, respectively. Obviously, toxicity to bacteria is less than other metals. As a result, Zn/Ni/Cu/Co resistance pattern is suggested for both strains. Finally, antibiotics and heavy metals resistance patterns were monitored simultaneously. Conclusion: Almost all E. faecalis strains isolated from humans and livestock showed antibiotics and heavy metals resistance patterns of P/K/L/Cc/S/AN/NA/Zn/Cu/Co simultaneously. Moreover, 55% of E

  12. Human exposure assessment to antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli through drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flaherty, E; Borrego, C M; Balcázar, J L; Cummins, E

    2018-03-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) are a potential threat to human health through drinking water with strong evidence of ARB presence in post treated tap water around the world. This study examines potential human exposure to antibiotic-resistant (AR) Escherichia coli (E. coli) through drinking water, the effect of different drinking water treatments on AR E. coli and the concentration of AR E. coli required in the source water for the EU Drinking Water Directive (DWD) (Council Directive 98/83/EC, 0CFU/100ml of E. coli in drinking water) to be exceeded. A number of scenarios were evaluated to examine different water treatment combinations and to reflect site specific conditions at a study site in Europe. A literature search was carried out to collate data on the effect of environmental conditions on AR E. coli, the effect of different water treatments on AR E. coli and typical human consumption levels of tap water. A human exposure assessment model was developed with probability distributions used to characterise uncertainty and variability in the input data. Overall results show the mean adult human exposure to AR E. coli from tap water consumption ranged between 3.44×10 -7 and 2.95×10 -1 cfu/day for the scenarios tested and varied depending on the water treatments used. The level of AR E. coli required in the source water pre-treatment to exceed the DWD varied between 1 and 5logcfu/ml, depending on the water treatments used. This can be used to set possible monitoring criteria in pre-treated water for potential ARB exposure in drinking water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Prevalence and characterization of plasmids carrying sulfonamide resistance genes among Escherichia coli from pigs, pig carcasses and human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shuyu, Wu; Dalsgaard, A.; Hammerum, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    isolates. Fifty-seven sulfonamide-resistant E. coli were selected based on presence of sul resistance genes and subjected to conjugation and/or transformation experiments. S1 nuclease digestion followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to visualize and determine the size of plasmids. Plasmids...... and humans) were 65%, 45% and 12% for sul2, sul1, and sul3, respectively. Transfer of resistance through conjugation was observed in 42/57 isolates. Resistances to streptomycin, ampicillin and trimethoprim were co-transferred in most strains. Class 1 integrons were present in 80% of sul1-carrying plasmids...

  14. Assessing Collagen and Elastin Pressure-Dependent Microarchitectures in Live, Human Resistance Arteries by Label-Free Fluorescence Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Thorsted, Bjarne; Brewer, Jonathan R.

    2017-01-01

    The pathogenic contribution of resistance artery remodeling is documented in essential hypertension, diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. Investigations and development of microstructurally motivated mathematical models for understanding the mechanical properties of human resistance arteries...... in health and disease have the potential to aid understanding how disease and medical treatments affect the human microcirculation. To develop these mathematical models, it is essential to decipher the relationship between the mechanical and microarchitectural properties of the microvascular wall....... In this work, we describe an ex vivo method for passive mechanical testing and simultaneous label-free three-dimensional imaging of the microarchitecture of elastin and collagen in the arterial wall of isolated human resistance arteries. The imaging protocol can be applied to resistance arteries of any species...

  15. Resistance of human and mouse myeloid leukemia cells to UV radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poljak-Blazi, M.; Osmak, M.; Hadzija, M.

    1989-01-01

    Sensitivity of mouse bone marrow and myeloid leukemia cells and sensitivity of human myeloid leukemia cells to UV light was tested. Criteria were the in vivo colony-forming ability of UV exposed cells and the inhibition of DNA synthesis during post-irradiation incubation for 24 h in vitro. Mouse bone marrow cells irradiated with a small dose of UV light (5 J/m 2 ) and injected into x-irradiated animals did not form hemopoietic colonies on recipient's spleens, and recipients died. However, mouse leukemia cells, after irradiation with higher doses of UV light, retained the ability to form colonies on the spleens, and all recipient mice died with typical symptoms of leukemia. In vitro, mouse bone marrow cells exhibited high sensitivity to UV light compared to mouse myeloid leukemia cells. Human leukemia cells were also resistant to UV light, but more sensitive than mouse leukemia cells. (author)

  16. Structure-activity relationships of diverse xanthones against multidrug resistant human tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiwen; Ma, Chenyao; Ma, Yun; Li, Xiang; Chen, Yong; Chen, Jianwei

    2017-02-01

    Thirteen xanthones were isolated naturally from the stem of Securidaca inappendiculata Hassk, and structure-activity relationships (SARs) of these compounds were comparatively predicted for their cytotoxic activity against three human multidrug resistant (MDR) cell lines MCF-7/ADR, SMMC-7721/Taxol, and A549/Taxol cells. The results showed that the selected xanthones exhibited different potent cytotoxic activity against the growth of different human tumor cell lines, and most of the xanthones exhibited selective cytotoxicity against SMMC-7721/Taxol cells. Furthermore, some tested xanthones showed stronger cytotoxicity than Cisplatin, which has been used in clinical application extensively. The SARs analysis revealed that the cytotoxic activities of diverse xanthones were affected mostly by the number and position of methoxyl and hydroxyl groups. Xanthones with more free hydroxyl and methoxyl groups increased the cytotoxic activity significantly, especially for those with the presence of C-3 hydroxyl and C-4 methoxyl groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of resistance to low pH and bile salts of human Lactobacillus spp. isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuochi, Virginia; Petronio, Giulio Petronio; Lissandrello, Edmondo; Furneri, Pio Maria

    2015-09-01

    There are nearly 100 trillion bacteria in the intestine that together form the intestinal microbiota. They are 'good' bacteria because they help to maintain a physiological balance and are called probiotics. Probiotics must have some important characteristics: be safe for humans, be resistant to the low pH in the stomach, as well as bile salts and pancreatic juice. Indeed, their survival is the most important factor, so that they can arrive alive in the intestine and are able to form colonies, at least temporarily. The aim of our study was the evaluation of resistance of Lactobacillus isolates from fecal and oral swabs compared to that found in a commercial product. Seven strains were randomly chosen: L. jensenii, L. gasseri, L. salivarius, L. fermentum, L. rhamnosus, L. crispatus, and L. delbrueckii. We observed a large variability in the results: L. gasseri and L. fermentum were the most resistance to low pH, while only L. gasseri showed the best survival rate to bile salts. Interestingly, the commercial product did not show tolerance to both low pH and bile salts. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. The role of organic proteins on the crack growth resistance of human enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahyazadehfar, Mobin; Arola, Dwayne

    2015-06-01

    With only 1% protein by weight, tooth enamel is the most highly mineralized tissue in mammals. The focus of this study was to evaluate contributions of the proteins on the fracture resistance of this unique structural material. Sections of enamel were obtained from the cusps of human molars and the crack growth resistance was quantified using a conventional fracture mechanics approach with complementary finite element analysis. In selected specimens the proteins were extracted using a potassium hydroxide treatment. Removal of the proteins resulted in approximately 40% decrease in the fracture toughness with respect to the fully proteinized control. The loss of organic content was most detrimental to the extrinsic toughening mechanisms, causing over 80% reduction in their contribution to the total energy to fracture. This degradation occurred by embrittlement of the unbroken bridging ligaments and consequent reduction in the crack closure stress. Although the organic content of tooth enamel is very small, it is essential to crack growth toughening by facilitating the formation of unbroken ligaments and in fortifying their potency. Replicating functions of the organic content will be critical to the successful development of bio-inspired materials that are designed for fracture resistance. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Resistance of multicellular aggregates to pharmorubicin observed in human hepatocarcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Jianmin

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the multicellular resistance of human hepatocarcinoma cells BEL-7402 to pharmorubicin. Cells (1 x 10(4 and 200 microcarrier Cytodex-3 beads were seeded onto a 24-well plate and cultured in RPMI 1640 medium. After the formation of multicellular aggregates, morphology and cell viability were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry, respectively. The IC50 was determined by flow cytometry and MTT assay after the cells cultured in aggregates and monolayers were treated with pharmorubicin. The culture products exhibited structural characteristics somewhat similar to those of trabecular hepatocarcinoma in vivo. Among the microcarriers, cells were organized into several layers. Intercellular spaces were 0.5-2.0 µm wide and filled with many microvilli. The percent of viable cells was 87%. The cells cultured as multicellular aggregates were resistant to pharmorubicin with IC50 4.5-fold and 7.7-fold that of monolayer culture as determined by flow cytometry and MTT assay, respectively. This three-dimensional culture model may be used to investigate the mechanisms of multicellular drug resistance of hepatocarcinoma and to screen new anticancer drugs.

  20. In vivo emergence of vicriviroc resistance in a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype C-infected subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsibris, Athe M N; Sagar, Manish; Gulick, Roy M; Su, Zhaohui; Hughes, Michael; Greaves, Wayne; Subramanian, Mani; Flexner, Charles; Giguel, Françoise; Leopold, Kay E; Coakley, Eoin; Kuritzkes, Daniel R

    2008-08-01

    Little is known about the in vivo development of resistance to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) CCR5 antagonists. We studied 29 subjects with virologic failure from a phase IIb study of the CCR5 antagonist vicriviroc (VCV) and identified one individual with HIV-1 subtype C who developed VCV resistance. Studies with chimeric envelopes demonstrated that changes within the V3 loop were sufficient to confer VCV resistance. Resistant virus showed VCV-enhanced replication, cross-resistance to another CCR5 antagonist, TAK779, and increased sensitivity to aminooxypentane-RANTES and the CCR5 monoclonal antibody HGS004. Pretreatment V3 loop sequences reemerged following VCV discontinuation, implying that VCV resistance has associated fitness costs.

  1. Diphtheria toxin resistance in human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts in the in vivo somatic cell mutation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomkins, D.J.; Wei, L.; Laurie, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    It has been shown that circulating peripheral blood lymphocytes can be used for the enumeration of 6-thioguanine-resistant cells that presumably arise by mutation in vivo. This somatic cell mutation test has been studied in lymphocytes from human populations exposed to known mutagens and/or carcinogens. The sensitivity of the test could be further enhanced by including other gene markers, since there is evidence for locus-specific differences in response to mutagens. Resistance to diphtheria toxin (Dip/sup r/) seemed like a potential marker to incorporate into the test because the mutation acts codominantly, can readily be selected in human diploid fibroblasts and Chinese hamster cells with no evidence for cell density or cross-feeding effects, and can be assayed for in nondividing cells by measuring protein synthesis inhibition. Blood samples were collected from seven individuals, and fresh, cryopreserved, or Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphocytes were tested for continued DNA synthesis ( 3 H-thymidine, autoradiography) or protein synthesis ( 35 S-methionine, scintillation counting). Both fresh and cryopreserved lymphocytes, stimulated to divide with phytohemagglutinin (PHA), continued to synthesize DNA in the presence of high doses of diphtheria toxin (DT). Similarly, both dividing (PHA-stimulated) and nondividing fresh lymphocytes carried on significant levels of protein synthesis even 68 hr after exposure to 100 flocculating units (LF)/ml DT. The results suggest that human T and B lymphocytes may not be as sensitive to DT protein synthesis inhibition as human fibroblast and Chinese hamster cells. For this reason, Dip/sup r/ may not be a suitable marker for the somatic cell mutation test

  2. On the importance of aging to the crack growth resistance of human enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahyazadehfar, Mobin; Zhang, Dongsheng; Arola, Dwayne

    2016-03-01

    With improvements in oral health and an overall increase in quality of life, the percentage of fully or largely dentate seniors is increasing. Understanding the effects of aging on the mechanical properties of teeth is essential to the maintenance of lifelong oral health. In this investigation the effects of aging on the fracture toughness of human enamel were evaluated from incremental crack growth experiments performed on tissue of donor teeth representing "young" (17 ⩽ age ⩽ 25) and "old" (age ⩾ 55) age groups. Results showed that the old enamel exhibited significantly lower resistance to fracture than that of the young tissue in two orthogonal directions of crack growth. For crack growth transverse to the enamel rods, the fracture toughness of the old enamel (0.37 ± 0.15 MPa m(0.5)) was nearly 70% lower than that of tissue from the young teeth (1.23 ± 0.20 MPa m(0.5)). Based on results from a mechanistic analysis of crack growth, the reduction in fracture resistance is attributed to a decrease in the degree of extrinsic toughening. The practice of restorative dentistry should account for these changes in tooth tissues in the treatment of senior patients. The mechanical behavior of enamel has been studied for over 3 decades. Due to the limited volume of tissue available for evaluation, past work has been largely based on indentation methods. In this investigation we have evaluated the resistance to fracture of human enamel using a conventional fracture mechanics approach and incremental crack growth. We compared the fracture resistance of cuspal enamel obtained from the teeth of representative "young" and "old" donor groups. Our results show that there is a substantial reduction in the resistance to fracture with age, that it is anisotropic, and that the degradation is more severe than that which occurs to dentin. As such, we feel this work is a significant contribution to the field. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  3. Loss of Nuclear Localized and Tyrosine Phosphorylated Stat5 in Breast Cancer Predicts Poor Clinical Outcome and Increased Risk of Antiestrogen Therapy Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Amy R.; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K.; Liu, Chengbao; Stringer, Ginger A.; Klimowicz, Alexander C.; Pequignot, Edward; Freydin, Boris; Tran, Thai H.; Yang, Ning; Rosenberg, Anne L.; Hooke, Jeffrey A.; Kovatich, Albert J.; Nevalainen, Marja T.; Shriver, Craig D.; Hyslop, Terry; Sauter, Guido; Rimm, David L.; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Rui, Hallgeir

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate nuclear localized and tyrosine phosphorylated Stat5 (Nuc-pYStat5) as a marker of prognosis in node-negative breast cancer and as a predictor of response to antiestrogen therapy. Patients and Methods Levels of Nuc-pYStat5 were analyzed in five archival cohorts of breast cancer by traditional diaminobenzidine-chromogen immunostaining and pathologist scoring of whole tissue sections or by immunofluorescence and automated quantitative analysis (AQUA) of tissue microarrays. Results Nuc-pYStat5 was an independent prognostic marker as measured by cancer-specific survival (CSS) in patients with node-negative breast cancer who did not receive systemic adjuvant therapy, when adjusted for common pathology parameters in multivariate analyses both by standard chromogen detection with pathologist scoring of whole tissue sections (cohort I; n = 233) and quantitative immunofluorescence of a tissue microarray (cohort II; n = 291). Two distinct monoclonal antibodies gave concordant results. A progression array (cohort III; n = 180) revealed frequent loss of Nuc-pYStat5 in invasive carcinoma compared to normal breast epithelia or ductal carcinoma in situ, and general loss of Nuc-pYStat5 in lymph node metastases. In cohort IV (n = 221), loss of Nuc-pYStat5 was associated with increased risk of antiestrogen therapy failure as measured by univariate CSS and time to recurrence (TTR). More sensitive AQUA quantification of Nuc-pYStat5 in antiestrogen-treated patients (cohort V; n = 97) identified by multivariate analysis patients with low Nuc-pYStat5 at elevated risk for therapy failure (CSS hazard ratio [HR], 21.55; 95% CI, 5.61 to 82.77; P < .001; TTR HR, 7.30; 95% CI, 2.34 to 22.78; P = .001). Conclusion Nuc-pYStat5 is an independent prognostic marker in node-negative breast cancer. If confirmed in prospective studies, Nuc-pYStat5 may become a useful predictive marker of response to adjuvant hormone therapy. PMID:21576635

  4. Resistance of human erythrocytes containing elevated levels of vitamin E to radiation-induced hemolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    Human erythrocytes were isolated from the blood of healthy donors and then incubated in the presence of suspensions of alpha-tocopherol for 30 min at 37 degrees C. Unabsorbed tocopherol was removed by centrifugation using several washes of isotonic phosphate-buffered saline. Washed erythrocytes were resuspended to 0.05%. Hct and exposed to hemolyzing doses of 60 Co gamma radiation, and hemolysis was monitored continuously by light scattering at 700 nm in a recording spectrophotometer. The extent of hemolysis with time was sigmoid and data analysis was carried out on the time taken for 50% hemolysis to occur (t50%). The vitamin E content of erythrocytes was significantly elevated by the incubation procedure and resulted in the cells exhibiting a significantly increased resistance to hemolysis as reflected by the extended t50% values. Oral supplementation of 500 IU of vitamin E per day to eight normal human subjects for a period of 16 days also resulted in their washed erythrocytes exhibiting a significant increase in resistance to radiation-induced hemolysis. When comparing vitamin E incubated cells with control cells, both the dose-reducing factor (DRF) and the time for 50% hemolysis quotient (Qt50%) were observed to increase with increasing radiation dose

  5. Multidrug Resistance Protein-4 Influences Aspirin Toxicity in Human Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Massimi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of efflux transporters, in human cells, is a mechanism of resistance to drug and also to chemotherapy. We found that multidrug resistance protein-4 (MRP4 overexpression has a role in reducing aspirin action in patients after bypass surgery and, very recently, we found that aspirin enhances platelet MRP4 levels through peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPARα. In the present paper, we verified whether exposure of human embryonic kidney-293 cells (Hek-293 to aspirin modifies MRP4 gene expression and its correlation with drug elimination and cell toxicity. We first investigated the effect of high-dose aspirin in Hek-293 and we showed that aspirin is able to increase cell toxicity dose-dependently. Furthermore, aspirin effects, induced at low dose, already enhance MRP4 gene expression. Based on these findings, we compared cell viability in Hek-293, after high-dose aspirin treatment, in MRP4 overexpressing cells, either after aspirin pretreatment or in MRP4 transfected cells; in both cases, a decrease of selective aspirin cell growth inhibition was observed, in comparison with the control cultures. Altogether, these data suggest that exposing cells to low nontoxic aspirin dosages can induce gene expression alterations that may lead to the efflux transporter protein overexpression, thus increasing cellular detoxification of aspirin.

  6. Increased bioactive lipids content in human subcutaneous and epicardial fat tissue correlates with insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błachnio-Zabielska, Agnieszka U; Baranowski, Marcin; Hirnle, Tomasz; Zabielski, Piotr; Lewczuk, Anna; Dmitruk, Iwona; Górski, Jan

    2012-12-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for metabolic diseases. Intramuscular lipid accumulation of ceramides, diacylglycerols, and long chain acyl-CoA is responsible for the induction of insulin resistance. These lipids are probably implicated in obesity-associated insulin resistance not only in skeletal muscle but also in fat tissue. Only few data are available about ceramide content in human subcutaneous adipose tissue. However, there are no data on DAG and LCACoA content in adipose tissue. The aim of our study was to measure the lipids content in human SAT and epicardial adipose tissue we sought to determine the bioactive lipids content by LC/MS/MS in fat tissue from lean non-diabetic, obese non-diabetic, and obese diabetic subjects and test whether the lipids correlate with HOMA-IR. We found, that total content of measured lipids was markedly higher in OND and OD subjects in both types of fat tissue (for all p lipids content is greater in subcutaneous and epicardial fat tissue and the particular lipids content positively correlates with HOMA-IR.

  7. Published sequences do not support transfer of oseltamivir resistance mutations from avian to human influenza A virus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norberg, Peter; Lindh, Magnus; Olofsson, Sigvard

    2015-03-28

    Tamiflu (oseltamivir phosphate ester, OE) is a widely used antiviral active against influenza A virus. Its active metabolite, oseltamivir carboxylate (OC), is chemically stable and secreted into wastewater treatment plants. OC contamination of natural habitats of waterfowl might induce OC resistance in influenza viruses persistently infecting waterfowl, and lead to transfer of OC-resistance from avian to human influenza. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether such has occurred. A genomics approach including phylogenetic analysis and probability calculations for homologous recombination was applied on altogether 19,755 neuraminidase (N1 and N2) genes from virus sampled in humans and birds, with and without resistance mutations. No evidence for transfer of OE resistance mutations from avian to human N genes was obtained, and events suggesting recombination between human and avian influenza virus variants could not be traced in the sequence material studied. The results indicate that resistance in influenza viruses infecting humans is due to the selection pressure posed by the global OE administration in humans rather than transfer from avian influenza A virus strains carrying mutations induced by environmental exposure to OC.

  8. Modulation of human multidrug-resistance MDR-1 gene by natural curcuminoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buddhasukh Duang

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multidrug resistance (MDR is a phenomenon that is often associated with decreased intracellular drug accumulation in patient's tumor cells resulting from enhanced drug efflux. It is related to the overexpression of a membrane protein, P-glycoprotein (Pgp-170, thereby reducing drug cytotoxicity. A variety of studies have tried to find MDR modulators which increase drug accumulation in cancer cells. Methods In this study, natural curcuminoids, pure curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin, isolated from turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn, were compared for their potential ability to modulate the human MDR-1 gene expression in multidrug resistant human cervical carcinoma cell line, KB-V1 by Western blot analysis and RT-PCR. Results Western blot analysis and RT-PCR showed that all the three curcuminoids inhibited MDR-1 gene expression, and bisdemethoxycurcumin produced maximum effect. In additional studies we found that commercial grade curcuminoid (approximately 77% curcumin, 17% demethoxycurcumin and 3% bisdemthoxycurcumin decreased MDR-1 gene expression in a dose dependent manner and had about the same potent inhibitory effect on MDR-1 gene expression as our natural curcuminoid mixtures. Conclusion These results indicate that bisdemethoxycurcumin is the most active of the curcuminoids present in turmeric for modulation of MDR-1 gene. Treatment of drug resistant KB-V1 cells with curcumin increased their sensitivity to vinblastine, which was consistent with a decreased MDR-1 gene product, a P-glycoprotein, on the cell plasma membrane. Although many drugs that prevent the P-glycoprotein function have been reported, this report describes the inhibition of MDR-1 expression by a phytochemical. The modulation of MDR-1 expression may be an attractive target for new chemosensitizing agents.

  9. Antibacterial activities of Rhazya stricta leaf extracts against multidrug-resistant human pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raziuddin Khan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial resistance to antibiotics, first a major concern in the 1960s, has re-emerged worldwide over the last 20 years. The World Health Organization (WHO and other health organizations have, therefore, declared ‘war’ against human microbial pathogens, particularly hospital-acquired infections, and have made drug discovery a top priority for these diseases. Because these bacteria are refractory to conventional chemotherapy, medicinal and herbal plants used in various countries should be assessed for their therapeutic potential; these valuable bio-resources are a reservoir of complex bioactive molecules. Earlier studies from our laboratory on Rhazya stricta, a native herbal shrub of Asia, have shown that this plant has a number of therapeutic properties. In this study, we evaluated the antimicrobial activities of various concentrations of five solvent extracts (aqueous alkaloid, aqueous non-alkaloid, organic alkaloid, organic non-alkaloid and whole aqueous extracts derived from R. stricta leaves against several multidrug-resistant, human-pathogenic bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-positive Escherichia coli. In vitro, molecular and electron microscopy analyses conclusively demonstrated the antimicrobial effects of these extracts against a panel of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The organic alkaloid extract was the most effective against E. coli and MRSA, resulting in cell membrane disruption visible with transmission electron microscopy. In the near future, we intend to further focus and delineate the molecular mechanism-of-action for specific alkaloids of R. stricta, particularly against MRSA.

  10. Modulation of human multidrug-resistance MDR-1 gene by natural curcuminoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limtrakul, Pornngarm; Anuchapreeda, Songyot; Buddhasukh, Duang

    2004-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a phenomenon that is often associated with decreased intracellular drug accumulation in patient's tumor cells resulting from enhanced drug efflux. It is related to the overexpression of a membrane protein, P-glycoprotein (Pgp-170), thereby reducing drug cytotoxicity. A variety of studies have tried to find MDR modulators which increase drug accumulation in cancer cells. In this study, natural curcuminoids, pure curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin, isolated from turmeric (Curcuma longa Linn), were compared for their potential ability to modulate the human MDR-1 gene expression in multidrug resistant human cervical carcinoma cell line, KB-V1 by Western blot analysis and RT-PCR. Western blot analysis and RT-PCR showed that all the three curcuminoids inhibited MDR-1 gene expression, and bisdemethoxycurcumin produced maximum effect. In additional studies we found that commercial grade curcuminoid (approximately 77% curcumin, 17% demethoxycurcumin and 3% bisdemthoxycurcumin) decreased MDR-1 gene expression in a dose dependent manner and had about the same potent inhibitory effect on MDR-1 gene expression as our natural curcuminoid mixtures. These results indicate that bisdemethoxycurcumin is the most active of the curcuminoids present in turmeric for modulation of MDR-1 gene. Treatment of drug resistant KB-V1 cells with curcumin increased their sensitivity to vinblastine, which was consistent with a decreased MDR-1 gene product, a P-glycoprotein, on the cell plasma membrane. Although many drugs that prevent the P-glycoprotein function have been reported, this report describes the inhibition of MDR-1 expression by a phytochemical. The modulation of MDR-1 expression may be an attractive target for new chemosensitizing agents

  11. Alkanna tinctoria leaves extracts: a prospective remedy against multidrug resistant human pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Usman Ali; Rahman, Hazir; Qasim, Muhammad; Hussain, Anwar; Azizllah, Azizullah; Murad, Waheed; Khan, Zakir; Anees, Muhammad; Adnan, Muhammad

    2015-04-23

    Plants are rich source of chemical compounds that are used to accomplish biological activity. Indigenously crude extracts of plants are widely used as herbal medicine for the treatment of infections by people of different ethnic groups. The present investigation was carried out to evaluate the biological potential of Alkanna tinctoria leaves extract from district Charsadda, Pakistan against multidrug resistant human pathogenic bacteria including Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Anti-multi-drug resistant bacterial activity of aqueous, chloroform, ethanol and hexane extracts of Alkanna tinctoria leaves were evaluated by well diffusion method. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of different extracts were determined. Moreover qualitative phytochemicals screening of the studied extracts was performed. All four selected bacteria including A. baumannii, E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were categorized as multi-drug resistant (MDR) as they were found to be resistant to 13, 10, 19 and 22 antibiotics belonging to different groups respectively. All the four extract showed potential activity against S. aureus as compare to positive control antibiotic (Imipenem). Similarly among the four extracts of Alkanna tinctoria leaves, aqueous extract showed best activity against A. baumannii (10±03 mm), P. aeruginosa (12±0.5 mm), and S. aureus (14±0.5 mm) as compare to Imipenem. The MICs and MBCs results also showed quantitative concentration of plant extracts to inhibit or kill MDR bacteria. When phytochemicals analysis was performed it was observed that aqueous and ethanol extracts showed phytochemicals with large number as well as volume, especially Alkaloides, Flavonoides and Charbohydrates. The undertaken study demonstrated that all the four extracts of Alkanna tinctoria leaves exhibited considerable antibacterial activity against MDR isolates. Finding from the

  12. Bypassing multidrug resistance in human breast cancer cells with lipid/polymer particle assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li B

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bo Li1, Hui Xu2, Zhen Li1, Mingfei Yao1, Meng Xie1, Haijun Shen1, Song Shen1, Xinshi Wang1, Yi Jin11College of Pharmaceutical sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 2No. 202 Hospital of People's Liberation Army, Shenyang, ChinaBackground: Multidrug resistance (MDR mediated by the overexpression of adenosine triphosphate (ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters, such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp, remains one of the major obstacles to effective cancer chemotherapy. In this study, lipid/particle assemblies named LipoParticles (LNPs, consisting of a dimethyldidodecylammonium bromide (DMAB-modified poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticle core surrounded by a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC shell, were specially designed for anticancer drugs to bypass MDR in human breast cancer cells that overexpress P-gp.Methods: Doxorubicin (DOX, a chemotherapy drug that is a P-gp substrate, was conjugated to PLGA and encapsulated in the self-assembled LNP structure. Physiochemical properties of the DOX-loaded LNPs were characterized in vitro. Cellular uptake, intracellular accumulation, and cytotoxicity were compared in parental Michigan Cancer Foundation (MCF-7 cells and P-gp-overexpressing, resistant MCF-7/adriamycin (MCF-7/ADR cells.Results: This study found that the DOX formulated in LNPs showed a significantly increased accumulation in the nuclei of drug-resistant cells relative to the free drug, indicating that LNPs could alter intracellular traffic and bypass drug efflux. The cytotoxicity of DOX loaded-LNPs had a 30-fold lower half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 value than free DOX in MCF-7/ADR, measured by the colorimetric cell viability (MTT assay, correlated with the strong nuclear retention of the drug.Conclusion: The results show that this core-shell lipid/particle structure could be a promising strategy to bypass MDR.Keywords: chemotherapy, drug delivery, polymeric nanoparticles, multidrug resistance

  13. Comparison of the multi-drug resistant human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line Bel-7402/ADM model established by three methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Xingguo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare the biological characteristics of three types of human hepatocellular carcinoma multi-drug resistant cell sub-lines Bel-7402/ADM models established by three methods. Methods Established human hepatocellular carcinoma adriamycin (ADM multi-drug resistant cell sub-lines models Bel-7402/ADMV, Bel-7402/ADML and Bel-7402/ADMS by three methods of in vitro concentration gradient increased induction, nude mice liver-implanted induction and subcutaneous-implanted induction respectively. Phase contrast microscopy was used to observe the cells and the MTT (methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium method was used to detect drug resistance of the three different sub-lines of cells. Results The three groups of drug resistant cells, Bel-7402/ADMV, Bel-7402/ADML and Bel-7402/ADMS generated cross-resistance to ADM and CDDP (cis-Diaminedichloroplatinum, but showed a significant difference in resistance to Bel-7402 IC50 value (P V, 46 h (Bel-7402/ADML, and 45 h (Bel-7402/ADMS. The excretion rates of ADM were significantly increased compared with the parent cell (34.14% line and were 81.06% (Bel-7402/ADMV, 66.56% (Bel-7402/ADML and 61.56% (Bel-7402/ADMS. Expression of P-gp and MRP in the three groups of resistant cells was significantly enhanced (P P > 0.05. Conclusions Stable resistance was involved in the resistant cell line model established by the above three methods. Liver implantation was a good simulation of human hepatocellular and proved to be an ideal model with characteristics similar to human hepatocellular biology and the pharmacokinetics of anticancer drugs.

  14. NOVEL ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE DETERMINANTS FROM AGRICULTURAL SOIL EXPOSED TO ANTIBIOTICS WIDELY USED IN HUMAN MEDICINE AND ANIMAL FARMING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Calvin Ho-Fung; van Engelen, Kalene; Gordon, Stephen; Renaud, Justin; Topp, Edward

    2017-06-16

    Antibiotic resistance has emerged globally as one of the biggest threats to human and animal health. Although the excessive use of antibiotics is recognized for accelerating the selection for resistance, there is a growing body of evidence suggesting that natural environments are "hotspots" for the development of both ancient and contemporary resistance mechanisms. Given that pharmaceuticals can be entrained onto agricultural land through anthropogenic activities, this could be a potential driver for the emergence and dissemination of resistance in soil bacteria. Using functional metagenomics, we interrogated the "resistome" of bacterial communities found in a collection of Canadian agricultural soil, some of which had been receiving antibiotics widely used in human medicine (macrolides) or food animal production (sulfamethazine, chlortetracycline and tylosin) for up to 16 years. Of the 34 new antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) recovered, the majority were predicted to encode for (multi)drug efflux systems, while a few share little to no homology with established resistance determinants. We characterized several novel gene products, including putative enzymes that can confer high-level resistance against aminoglycosides, sulfonamides, and broad range of beta-lactams, with respect to their resistance mechanisms and clinical significance. By coupling high-resolution proteomics analysis with functional metagenomics, we discovered an unusual peptide, PPP AZI 4 , encoded within an alternative open-reading frame not predicted by bioinformatics tools. Expression of the proline-rich PPP AZI 4 can promote resistance against different macrolides but not other ribosomal-targeting antibiotics, implicating a new macrolide-specific resistance mechanism that could be fundamentally linked to the evolutionary design of this peptide. IMPORTANCE Antibiotic resistance is a clinical phenomenon with an evolutionary link to the microbial pangenome. Genes and protogenes encoding for

  15. Occurrence of Multidrug Resistant Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Bacteria on Iceberg Lettuce Retailed for Human Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Bhutani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance in bacteria is a global problem exacerbated by the dissemination of resistant bacteria via uncooked food, such as green leafy vegetables. New strains of bacteria are emerging on a daily basis with novel expanded antibiotic resistance profiles. In this pilot study, we examined the occurrence of antibiotic resistant bacteria against five classes of antibiotics on iceberg lettuce retailed in local convenience stores in Rochester, Michigan. In this study, 138 morphologically distinct bacterial colonies from 9 iceberg lettuce samples were randomly picked and tested for antibiotic resistance. Among these isolates, the vast majority (86% demonstrated resistance to cefotaxime, and among the resistant bacteria, the majority showed multiple drug resistance, particularly against cefotaxime, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline. Three bacterial isolates (2.17% out of 138 were extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL producers. Two ESBL producers (T1 and T5 were identified as Klebsiella pneumoniae, an opportunistic pathogen with transferable sulfhydryl variable- (SHV- and TEM-type ESBLs, respectively. The DNA sequence analysis of the blaSHV detected in K. pneumoniae isolate T1 revealed 99% relatedness to blaSHV genes found in clinical isolates. This implies that iceberg lettuce is a potential reservoir of newly emerging and evolving antibiotic resistant bacteria and its consumption poses serious threat to human health.

  16. Dual effect of insulin resistance and cadmium on human granulosa cells - In vitro study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belani, Muskaan, E-mail: muskaanbelani@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara 390 002, Gujarat, India. (India); Shah, Preeti, E-mail: preeti.shah@novaivifertility.com [Nova IVI Fertility, Behind Xavier' s Ladies Hostel, 108, Swastik Society Rd., Navrangpura, Ahmedabad 390009, Gujarat, India. (India); Banker, Manish, E-mail: manish.banker@novaivifertility.com [Nova IVI Fertility, Behind Xavier' s Ladies Hostel, 108, Swastik Society Rd., Navrangpura, Ahmedabad 390009, Gujarat, India. (India); Gupta, Sarita, E-mail: saritagupta9@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara 390 002, Gujarat, India. (India)

    2016-12-15

    Combined exposure of cadmium (Cd) and insulin resistance (IR) might be responsible for subfertility. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Cd in vitro in IR human granulosa cells. Isolated human granulosa cells from control and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) follicular fluid samples were confirmed for IR by decrease in protein expression of insulin receptor-β. Control and IR human granulosa cells were then incubated with or without 32 μM Cd. The combined effect of IR with 32 μM Cd in granulosa cells demonstrated significant decrease in expression of StAR, CYP11A1, CYP19A1, 17β-HSD, 3β-HSD, FSH-R and LH-R. Decrease was also observed in progesterone and estradiol concentrations as compared to control. Additionally, increase in protein expression of cleaved PARP-F2, active caspase-3 and a positive staining for Annexin V and PI indicated apoptosis as the mode of increased cell death ultimately leading to decreased steroidogenesis, as observed through the combined exposure. Taken together the results suggest decrease in steroidogenesis ultimately leading to abnormal development of the follicle thus compromising fertility at the level of preconception. - Highlights: • Protein expression of INSR-β in granulosa cells to differentiate PCOS-IR and NIR • Cd and IR together decrease steroidogenesis in human granulosa cells in vitro. • Cd and IR increase human granulosa cell death by increase in apoptosis. • Environment and life style are set to hamper pregnancies at preconception level.

  17. Dual effect of insulin resistance and cadmium on human granulosa cells - In vitro study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belani, Muskaan; Shah, Preeti; Banker, Manish; Gupta, Sarita

    2016-01-01

    Combined exposure of cadmium (Cd) and insulin resistance (IR) might be responsible for subfertility. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Cd in vitro in IR human granulosa cells. Isolated human granulosa cells from control and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) follicular fluid samples were confirmed for IR by decrease in protein expression of insulin receptor-β. Control and IR human granulosa cells were then incubated with or without 32 μM Cd. The combined effect of IR with 32 μM Cd in granulosa cells demonstrated significant decrease in expression of StAR, CYP11A1, CYP19A1, 17β-HSD, 3β-HSD, FSH-R and LH-R. Decrease was also observed in progesterone and estradiol concentrations as compared to control. Additionally, increase in protein expression of cleaved PARP-F2, active caspase-3 and a positive staining for Annexin V and PI indicated apoptosis as the mode of increased cell death ultimately leading to decreased steroidogenesis, as observed through the combined exposure. Taken together the results suggest decrease in steroidogenesis ultimately leading to abnormal development of the follicle thus compromising fertility at the level of preconception. - Highlights: • Protein expression of INSR-β in granulosa cells to differentiate PCOS-IR and NIR • Cd and IR together decrease steroidogenesis in human granulosa cells in vitro. • Cd and IR increase human granulosa cell death by increase in apoptosis. • Environment and life style are set to hamper pregnancies at preconception level.

  18. MHC Class II and CD9 in Human Eosinophils Localize to Detergent-Resistant Membrane Microdomains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akuthota, Praveen; Melo, Rossana C. N.; Spencer, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Eosinophils function in murine allergic airways inflammation as professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs). In murine professional APC cell types, optimal functioning of MHC Class II depends on its lateral association in plasma membranes and colocalization with the tetraspanin CD9 into detergent-resistant membrane microdomains (DRMs). With human eosinophils, we evaluated the localization of MHC Class II (HLA-DR) to DRMs and the functional significance of such localization. In granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor–stimulated human eosinophils, antibody cross-linked HLA-DR colocalized by immunofluorescence microscopy focally on plasma membranes with CD9 and the DRM marker ganglioside GM1. In addition, HLA-DR coimmunoprecipitates with CD9 after chemical cross-linking of CD9. HLA-DR and CD9 were localized by Western blotting in eosinophil DRM subcellular fractions. DRM disruption with the cholesterol-depleting agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin decreased eosinophil surface expression of HLA-DR and CD9. We show that CD9 is abundant on the surface of eosinophils, presenting the first electron microscopy data of the ultrastructural immunolocalization of CD9 in human eosinophils. Disruption of HLA-DR–containing DRMs decreased the ability of superantigen-loaded human eosinophils to stimulate CD4+ T-cell activation (CD69 expression), proliferation, and cytokine production. Our results, which demonstrate that eosinophil MHC Class II localizes to DRMs in association with CD9 in a functionally significant manner, represent a novel insight into the organization of the antigen presentation complex of human eosinophils. PMID:21885678

  19. MHC Class II and CD9 in human eosinophils localize to detergent-resistant membrane microdomains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akuthota, Praveen; Melo, Rossana C N; Spencer, Lisa A; Weller, Peter F

    2012-02-01

    Eosinophils function in murine allergic airways inflammation as professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs). In murine professional APC cell types, optimal functioning of MHC Class II depends on its lateral association in plasma membranes and colocalization with the tetraspanin CD9 into detergent-resistant membrane microdomains (DRMs). With human eosinophils, we evaluated the localization of MHC Class II (HLA-DR) to DRMs and the functional significance of such localization. In granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-stimulated human eosinophils, antibody cross-linked HLA-DR colocalized by immunofluorescence microscopy focally on plasma membranes with CD9 and the DRM marker ganglioside GM1. In addition, HLA-DR coimmunoprecipitates with CD9 after chemical cross-linking of CD9. HLA-DR and CD9 were localized by Western blotting in eosinophil DRM subcellular fractions. DRM disruption with the cholesterol-depleting agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin decreased eosinophil surface expression of HLA-DR and CD9. We show that CD9 is abundant on the surface of eosinophils, presenting the first electron microscopy data of the ultrastructural immunolocalization of CD9 in human eosinophils. Disruption of HLA-DR-containing DRMs decreased the ability of superantigen-loaded human eosinophils to stimulate CD4(+) T-cell activation (CD69 expression), proliferation, and cytokine production. Our results, which demonstrate that eosinophil MHC Class II localizes to DRMs in association with CD9 in a functionally significant manner, represent a novel insight into the organization of the antigen presentation complex of human eosinophils.

  20. Response of sensitive human ataxia and resistant T-1 cell lines to accelerated heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, C.A.; Blakely, E.A.; Chang, P.Y.; Lommel, L.; Roots, R.

    1983-07-01

    The radiation dose responses of fibroblast from a patient with Ataxia telangiectasis (AT-2SF) and an established line of human T-1 cells were studied. Nearly monoenergetic accelerated neon and argon ions were used at the Berkeley Bevalac with various residual range values. The LET of the particles varied from 30 keV/μm to over 1000 keV/μm. All Ataxia survival curves were exponential functions of the dose. Their radiosensitivity reached peak values at 100 to 200 keV/μm. Human T-1 cells have effective sublethal damage repair as has been evidenced by split dose experiments, and they are much more resistant to low LET than to high LET radiation. The repair-misrepair model has been used to interpret these results. We have obtained mathematical expressions that describe the cross sections and inactivation coefficients for both human cell lines as a function of the LET and the type of particle used. The results suggest either that high-LET particles induce a greater number of radiolesions per track or that heavy-ions at high LET induce lesions that kill cells more effectively and that are different from those produced at low LET. We assume that the lesions induced in T-1 and Ataxia cells are qualitatively similar and that each cell line attempts to repair these lesions. The result in most irradiated Ataxia cells, however, is either lethal misrepair or incomplete repair leading to cell death. 63 references, 10 figures, 1 table

  1. Raf oncogene is associated with a radiation-resistant human laryngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasid, U.; Pfeifer, A.; Weichselbaum, R.R.; Dritschilo, A.; Mark, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    In order to identify the genetic factors associated with the radiation-resistant human laryngeal carcinoma cell line (SQ-20B), tumor cell DNA was transfected into NIH/3T3 cells. A high incidence (six out of six) of raf sequences was found in transfected NIH/3T3 clones and the tumorigenic potential of SQ-20B DNA could be linked to genomic fragments that represent most of the kinase domain of human c-raf-1. An apparently unaltered 3.5-kilobase pair (kb) human c-raf transcript was identified in SQ-20B cells but was not observed in the transfected NIH/3T3 cell clones. Two new transcripts (4.2 kb and 2.6 kb) were found in tumorigenic clones; the large transcript was missing in a very poorly tumorigenic clone. Cytogenetic analysis indicated that the normal autosomes of chromosome 3 were absent in SQ-20B karyotypes and had formed apparently stable marker chromosomes. Unlike the recipient NIH/3T3 cell line, 30% of the transformed clone-1 metaphases had minute and double-minute chromosomes representative of amplified DNA sequences. The frequency of the c-raf-1 identification by NIH/3T3 transfection of SQ-20B DNA suggests the presence of some genetic abnormality within this locus

  2. The Efficacy of Dandelion Root Extract in Inducing Apoptosis in Drug-Resistant Human Melanoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Chatterjee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Notoriously chemoresistant melanoma has become the most prevalent form of cancer for the 25–29 North American age demographic. Standard treatment after early detection involves surgical excision (recurrence is possible, and metastatic melanoma is refractory to immuno-, radio-, and most harmful chemotherapies. Various natural compounds have shown efficacy in killing different cancers, albeit not always specifically. In this study, we show that dandelion root extract (DRE specifically and effectively induces apoptosis in human melanoma cells without inducing toxicity in noncancerous cells. Characteristic apoptotic morphology of nuclear condensation and phosphatidylserine flipping to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane of A375 human melanoma cells was observed within 48 hours. DRE-induced apoptosis activates caspase-8 in A375 cells early on, demonstrating employment of an extrinsic apoptotic pathway to kill A375 cells. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS generated from DRE-treated isolated mitochondria indicates that natural compounds in DRE can also directly target mitochondria. Interestingly, the relatively resistant G361 human melanoma cell line responded to DRE when combined with the metabolism interfering antitype II diabetic drug metformin. Therefore, treatment with this common, yet potent extract of natural compounds has proven novel in specifically inducing apoptosis in chemoresistant melanoma, without toxicity to healthy cells.

  3. Human genetic marker for resistance to radiations and chemicals. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieberman, H.B.

    1998-01-01

    'The broad objective of the project is to understand the molecular basis for the response of cells to radiations and chemicals, with the pragmatic goal of being able to identify human subpopulations that are exceptionally sensitive to DNA damaging agents. The project focuses on HRAD9, a human orthologue of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene rad9. S. pombe rad9::ura4+ mutant cells are highly sensitive to ionizing radiation, UV and many chemicals, such as the DNA synthesis inhibitor hydroxyurea. They also lack the ability to delay cycling transiently in S phase or in G2 following a block in DNA replication or after incurring DNA damage, respectively -i.e., they lack checkpoint controls. The attempt by mutant cells to progress through mitosis in the absence of fully intact DNA accounts at least in part for their sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. Cells bearing rad9::ura4+ also aberrantly regulate UVDE, an enzyme that participates in a secondary DNA excision repair pathway. The key role played by S. pombe rad9 in promoting resistance to chemicals and radiations suggests that the evolutionarily conserved human cognate also has important functions in mammals. The first set of aims in this proposal centers on characterizing the structure and expression of HRAD9, to assess structure/function relationships and potentially link protein activity to a specific tissue. The next set of aims focuses on determining the role of HRAD9 in radio/chemoresponsiveness and cancer.'

  4. Quantitative Measurement of Dissection Resistance in Intimal and Medial Layers of Human Coronary Arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Johnson, John A.; Spinale, Francis G.; Sutton, Michael A.; Lessner, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    The left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery is the most frequently involved vessel in coronary artery dissection, a cause of acute coronary syndrome or sudden cardiac death. The biomechanical mechanisms underlying arterial dissection are not well understood. This study investigated the dissection properties of LAD specimens harvested from explanted hearts at the time of cardiac transplantation, from patients with primary dilated cardiomyopathy (n=12). Using a previously validated approach uniquely modified for these human LAD specimens, we quantified the local energy release rate, G, within different arterial layers during experimental dissection events (tissue tearing). Results show that the mean values of G during arterial dissection within the intima and within the media in human LADs are 20.7±16.5 J/m2 and 10.3±5.0 J/m2, respectively. The difference in dissection resistance between tearing events occurring within the intima and within the media is statistically significant. Our data fall in the same order of magnitude as most previous measurements of adhesive strength in other human arteries, with the differences in measured values of G within the layers most likely due to histologically observed differences in the structure and composition of arterial layers. PMID:24729631

  5. Effects of Running Shoes with Abrasion Resistant Rubber Sole on the Exercise Capacity of the Human Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available With the development of industrialization, rubber has been gradually used in the manufacture of sports equipment for its favourable properties. This study involved the addition of C5 petroleum resin into brominated isobutylene-isoprene rubber (BIIR and butadiene rubber (BR while manufacturing the sole of running shoes. The effects of running shoes with abrasion resistant rubber sole on the exercise capacity of the human body were investigated by analysing the skid resistance and abrasion resistance of the running shoes, and conducting biomechanical study on naked feet and feet wearing the shoes. The results demonstrated that the rubber sole had favourable slip resistance property and mechanical properties such as stretching, abrasion resistance, and hardness. Compared to naked feet, the peak pressure intensity of the whole step of feet wearing the newly developed shoes, was significantly lower than that of feet wearing ordinary shoes. In the future, rubber can bring more comfortable experience because of its favourable properties.

  6. Human isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium from Taiwan displayed significantly higher levels of antimicrobial resistance than those from Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torpdahl, Mia; Lauderdale, Tsai-Ling; Liang, Shiu-Yun; Li, Ishien; Wei, Sung-Hsi; Chiou, Chien-Shun

    2013-02-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a major zoonotic pathogen with a high prevalence of antimicrobial resistance. This pathogen can disseminate across borders and spread far distances via the food trade and international travel. In this study, we compared the genotypes and antimicrobial resistance of 378 S. Typhimurium isolates collected in Taiwan and Denmark between 2009 and 2010. Genotyping revealed that many S. Typhimurium strains were concurrently circulating in Taiwan, Denmark and other countries in 2009 and 2010. When compared to the isolates collected from Denmark, the isolates from Taiwan displayed a significantly higher level of resistance to 11 of the 12 tested antimicrobials. Seven genetic clusters (A-G) were designated for the isolates. A high percentage of the isolates in genetic clusters C, F and G were multidrug-resistant. Of the isolates in cluster C, 79.2% were ASSuT-resistant, characterized by resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline. In cluster F, 84.1% of the isolates were ACSSuT-resistant (resistant to ASSuT and chloramphenicol). Cluster G was unique to Taiwan and characterized in most isolates by the absence of three VNTRs (ST20, ST30 and STTR6) as well as a variety of multidrug resistance profiles. This cluster exhibited very high to extremely high levels of resistance to several first-line drugs, and among the seven clusters, it displayed the highest levels of resistance to cefotaxime and ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin and gentamicin. The high prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in S. Typhimurium from Taiwan highlights the necessity to strictly regulate the use of antimicrobials in the agriculture and human health care sectors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. An association of genotypes and antimicrobial resistance patterns among Salmonella isolates from pigs and humans in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Chih Kuo

    Full Text Available We collected 110 Salmonella enterica isolates from sick pigs and determined their serotypes, genotypes using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE, and antimicrobial susceptibility to 12 antimicrobials and compared the data with a collection of 18,280 isolates obtained from humans. The pig isolates fell into 12 common serovars for human salmonellosis in Taiwan; S. Typhimurium, S. Choleraesuis, S. Derby, S. Livingstone, and S. Schwarzengrund were the 5 most common serovars and accounted for a total of 84% of the collection. Of the 110 isolates, 106 (96% were multidrug resistant (MDR and 48 (44% had PFGE patterns found in human isolates. S. Typhimurium, S. Choleraesuis, and S. Schwarzengrund were among the most highly resistant serovars. The majority of the 3 serovars were resistant to 8-11 of the tested antimicrobials. The isolates from pigs and humans sharing a common PFGE pattern displayed identical or very similar resistance patterns and Salmonella strains that caused severe infection in pigs were also capable of causing infections in humans. The results indicate that pigs are one of the major reservoirs to human salmonellosis in Taiwan. Almost all of the pig isolates were MDR, which highlights the necessity of strictly regulating the use of antimicrobials in the agriculture sector in Taiwan.

  8. An association of genotypes and antimicrobial resistance patterns among Salmonella isolates from pigs and humans in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Hung-Chih; Lauderdale, Tsai-Ling; Lo, Dan-Yuan; Chen, Chiou-Lin; Chen, Pei-Chen; Liang, Shiu-Yun; Kuo, Jung-Che; Liao, Ying-Shu; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Tsao, Chi-Sen; Chiou, Chien-Shun

    2014-01-01

    We collected 110 Salmonella enterica isolates from sick pigs and determined their serotypes, genotypes using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and antimicrobial susceptibility to 12 antimicrobials and compared the data with a collection of 18,280 isolates obtained from humans. The pig isolates fell into 12 common serovars for human salmonellosis in Taiwan; S. Typhimurium, S. Choleraesuis, S. Derby, S. Livingstone, and S. Schwarzengrund were the 5 most common serovars and accounted for a total of 84% of the collection. Of the 110 isolates, 106 (96%) were multidrug resistant (MDR) and 48 (44%) had PFGE patterns found in human isolates. S. Typhimurium, S. Choleraesuis, and S. Schwarzengrund were among the most highly resistant serovars. The majority of the 3 serovars were resistant to 8-11 of the tested antimicrobials. The isolates from pigs and humans sharing a common PFGE pattern displayed identical or very similar resistance patterns and Salmonella strains that caused severe infection in pigs were also capable of causing infections in humans. The results indicate that pigs are one of the major reservoirs to human salmonellosis in Taiwan. Almost all of the pig isolates were MDR, which highlights the necessity of strictly regulating the use of antimicrobials in the agriculture sector in Taiwan.

  9. Interdependence of Gemcitabine Treatment, Transporter Expression, and Resistance in Human Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Hagmann

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Gemcitabine is widely used as first-line chemotherapeutic drug in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Our previous experimental chemotherapy studies have shown that treatment of human pancreatic carcinoma cells with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU alters the cellular transporter expression profile and that modulation of the expression of multidrug resistance protein 5 (MRP5; ABCC5 influences the chemoresistance of these tumor cells. Here, we studied the influence of acute and chronic gemcitabine treatment on the expression of relevant uptake and export transporters in pancreatic carcinoma cells by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, quantitative RT-PCR, and immunoblot analyses. The specific role of MRP5 in cellular gemcitabine sensitivity was studied by cytotoxicity assays using MRP5-overexpressing and MRP5-silenced cells. Exposure to gemcitabine (12 nM for 3 days did not alter the messenger RNA (mRNA expression of MRP1, MRP3, MRP5, and equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1, whereas high dosages of the drug (20 µM for 1 hour elicited up-regulation of these transporters in most cell lines studied. In cells with acquired gemcitabine resistance (up to 160 nM gemcitabine, the mRNA or protein expression of the gemcitabine transporters MRP5 and ENT1 was upregulated in several cell lines. Combined treatment with 5-FU and gemcitabine caused a 5- to 40-fold increase in MRP5 and ENT1 expressions. Cytotoxicity assays using either MRP5-overexpressing (HEK and PANC-1 or MRP5-silenced (PANC1/shMRP5 cells indicated that MRP5 contributes to gemcitabine resistance. Thus, our novel data not only on drug-induced alterations of transporter expression relevant for gemcitabine uptake and export but also on the link between gemcitabine sensitivity and MRP5 expression may lead to improved strategies of future chemotherapy regimens using gemcitabine in pancreatic carcinoma patients.

  10. WNT5A-JNK regulation of vascular insulin resistance in human obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farb, Melissa G; Karki, Shakun; Park, Song-Young; Saggese, Samantha M; Carmine, Brian; Hess, Donald T; Apovian, Caroline; Fetterman, Jessica L; Bretón-Romero, Rosa; Hamburg, Naomi M; Fuster, José J; Zuriaga, María A; Walsh, Kenneth; Gokce, Noyan

    2016-12-01

    Obesity is associated with the development of vascular insulin resistance; however, pathophysiological mechanisms are poorly understood. We sought to investigate the role of WNT5A-JNK in the regulation of insulin-mediated vasodilator responses in human adipose tissue arterioles prone to endothelial dysfunction. In 43 severely obese (BMI 44±11 kg/m 2 ) and five metabolically normal non-obese (BMI 26±2 kg/m 2 ) subjects, we isolated arterioles from subcutaneous and visceral fat during planned surgeries. Using videomicroscopy, we examined insulin-mediated, endothelium-dependent vasodilator responses and characterized adipose tissue gene and protein expression using real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses. Immunofluorescence was used to quantify endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation. Insulin-mediated vasodilation was markedly impaired in visceral compared to subcutaneous vessels from obese subjects (p<0.001), but preserved in non-obese individuals. Visceral adiposity was associated with increased JNK activation and elevated expression of WNT5A and its non-canonical receptors, which correlated negatively with insulin signaling. Pharmacological JNK antagonism with SP600125 markedly improved insulin-mediated vasodilation by sixfold (p<0.001), while endothelial cells exposed to recombinant WNT5A developed insulin resistance and impaired eNOS phosphorylation (p<0.05). We observed profound vascular insulin resistance in the visceral adipose tissue arterioles of obese subjects that was associated with up-regulated WNT5A-JNK signaling and impaired endothelial eNOS activation. Pharmacological JNK antagonism markedly improved vascular endothelial function, and may represent a potential therapeutic target in obesity-related vascular disease. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Intravitreal Ampicillin Sodium for Antibiotic-Resistant Endophthalmitis: Streptococcus uberis First Human Intraocular Infection Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Velez-Montoya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe the clinical characteristics, diagnosis, and treatment with intravitreal ampicillin sodium of a postoperative endophthalmitis case due to Streptococcus uberis; an environmental pathogen commonly seen in mastitis cases of lactating cows. Methods. Case Report. A 52-year-old, Hispanic diabetic patient who suddenly developed severe pain and severe loss of vision, following vitrectomy. Results. The patient was diagnosed with postoperative endophthalmitis secondary to a highly resistant strain of Streptococcus uberis that did not respond to intravitreal antibiotics. He was treated with an air-fluid interchange, anterior chamber washout, intravitreal ampicillin sodium (5 mg/0.1 mL, and silicon oil tamponade (5000 ck. The eye was anatomically stabilized, though there was no functional recovery. Conclusion. Streptococcus uberis is an uncommon pathogen to the human eye, which has unique features that help the strain in developing resistance to antibiotics. While treatment with intravitreal ampicillin is feasible, there are still concerns about its possible toxicity.

  12. Autoradiographic detection of diphtheria toxin resistant mutants in human diploid fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.S.; Singh, B.

    1985-01-01

    An autoradiographic procedure for the detection of diphtheria toxin (DT) resistant (Dip/sub R/) mutants in human diploid fibroblast (HDF) cells has been developed. The assay is based on the observation that when HDFs from confluent cultures are seeded in medium containing 0.01 flocculating units/ml or higher concentration of DT, protein synthesis in sensitive cells is severely inhibited by 4-6 hr. If at this or later time, a radiolabeled protein precursor (eg, 3 H-leucine) is added to the culture, it is almost exclusively incorporated into the resistant cells, which are then readily identified by autoradiography. These studies provide strong evidence that the labeled cells identified by autoradiography are bona fide Dip/sub R/ mutants. The detection of Dip/sub R/ cells by autoradiography is apparently not affected by the presence of the sensitive cells in the mixtures. The spontaneous frequency of Dip/sub R/ cells in HDFs has been found to be in the range of 1-5 x 10 -6 , and this increases in a dose dependent manner upon treatment with the mutagen ethyl methanesulfonate. These results indicate that the autoradiographic assay could be used for quantitative mutagenesis. Since the autoradiographic assay does not depend on cell division, it may prove useful in estimating the incidence of pre-existing mutations in cell populations that either do not divide or have very limited growth potential (eg, lymphocytes, muscle cells, neurons, senescent fibroblasts, etc.)

  13. A zinc-resistant human epithelial cell line is impaired in cadmium and manganese import

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousselet, Estelle; Richaud, Pierre; Douki, Thierry; Chantegrel, Jocelyne Garcia; Favier, Alain; Bouron, Alexandre; Moulis, Jean-Marc

    2008-01-01

    A human epithelial cell line (HZR) growing with high zinc concentrations has been analyzed for its ability to sustain high cadmium concentrations. Exposure to up to 200 μM of cadmium acetate for 24 h hardly impacted viability, whereas most of parental HeLa cells were killed by less than 10 μM of cadmium. Upon challenge by 35 fold higher cadmium concentrations than HeLa cells, HZR cells did not display increased DNA damage, increased protein oxidation, or changed intracellular cadmium localization. Rather, the main cause of resistance against cadmium was by avoiding cadmium entry into cells, which differs from that against zinc as the latter accumulates inside cells. The zinc-resistant phenotype of these cells was shown to also impair extracellular manganese uptake. Manganese and cadmium competed for entry into HeLa cells. Probing formerly identified cadmium or manganese transport systems in different animal cells did not evidence any significant change between HeLa and HZR cells. These results reveal zinc adaptation influences manganese and cadmium cellular traffic and they highlight previously unknown connections among homeostasis of divalent metals

  14. Resveratrol ameliorates the chemical and microbial induction of inflammation and insulin resistance in human placenta, adipose tissue and skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Ha T; Liong, Stella; Lim, Ratana; Barker, Gillian; Lappas, Martha

    2017-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), which complicates up to 20% of all pregnancies, is associated with low-grade maternal inflammation and peripheral insulin resistance. Sterile inflammation and infection are key mediators of this inflammation and peripheral insulin resistance. Resveratrol, a stilbene-type phytophenol, has been implicated to exert beneficial properties including potent anti-inflammatory and antidiabetic effects in non-pregnant humans and experimental animal models of GDM. However, studies showing the effects of resveratrol on inflammation and insulin resistance associated with GDM in human tissues have been limited. In this study, human placenta, adipose (omental and subcutaneous) tissue and skeletal muscle were stimulated with pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β, the bacterial product lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the synthetic viral dsRNA analogue polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) to induce a GDM-like model. Treatment with resveratrol significantly reduced the expression and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-1α, IL-1β and pro-inflammatory chemokines IL-8 and MCP-1 in human placenta and omental and subcutaneous adipose tissue. Resveratrol also significantly restored the defects in the insulin signalling pathway and glucose uptake induced by TNF-α, LPS and poly(I:C). Collectively, these findings suggest that resveratrol reduces inflammation and insulin resistance induced by chemical and microbial products. Resveratrol may be a useful preventative therapeutic for pregnancies complicated by inflammation and insulin resistance, like GDM.

  15. Molecular characterization and antimicrobial resistance of faecal and urinary Escherichia coli isolated from dogs and humans in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Tramuta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available During this study, 109 faecal Escherichia coli samples isolated from 61 dogs and 48 humans were characterised according to phylogenetic group, extraintestinal virulence factors and antibiotic resistance. The isolates from dogs were predominantly distributed within phylogroup B1 (36%, while the majority of human strains belonged to phylogroup B2 (54%. The prevalence of cnf1, hlyA, papC and sfa virulence genes was significantly associated with the group B2. Canine isolates showed multidrug resistance (MDR more frequently than human strains. Since group B2 contains most of the strains that cause extraintestinal infections, all 46 B2 faecal strains were confronted against an addition population of 57 urinary E. coli strains belonging to the same phylogroup. The comparison shows that there was no significant difference in the occurrence of virulence factors or in the distribution of antibiotic resistance between faecal and urinary E. coli isolates fromd dogs. At the same time, a highly significant association was detected between multiple resistence and the source of the strains and between MDR and E. coli isolated from urine in human. This study highlighted similar features of E. coli isolated across sources and hosts. The data suggest a high prevalence of antibiotic resistance in faecal strains, which may represent a serious health risk since these strains can function as a reservoir for uropathogenic E. coli.

  16. Resistance to asbestos-induced apoptosis with continuous exposure to crocidolite on a human T cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Megumi [Department of Biofunctional Chemistry, Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, 1-1-1 Tsushima-Naka, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Yamamoto, Shoko [Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Chen, Ying [Division of Pneumoconiosis, School of Public Health, China Medical University, 92 North 2nd, Heping District, Shenyang 110001 (China); Kumagai-Takei, Naoko [Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Hayashi, Hiroaki [Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Department of Dermatology, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Lee, Suni; Hatayama, Tamayo; Miyahara, Naomi; Katoh, Minako [Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Hiratsuka, Juni-ichi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Nishimura, Yasumitsu [Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan); Otsuki, Takemi, E-mail: takemi@med.kawasaki-m.ac.jp [Department of Hygiene, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, Kurashiki 701-0192 (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    We have been investigating the immunological effects of asbestos. The establishment of a low-dose and continuously exposed human T cell line, HTLV-1 immortalized MT-2, to chrysotile (CB) revealed reduction of CXCR3 chemokine receptor and production of IFN-{gamma} that caused a decline of tumor immunity. These effects were coupled with upregulation of IL-10, TGF-{beta}, and BCL-2 in asbestos-exposed patients. To observe the immunological effects of crocidolite (CR) on human T cells, a trial to establish a low-dose and continuously exposed model was conducted and compared with a previously reported CB-exposed model (MT-2CB). Transient exposure of MT-2 original cells to CB or CR induced a similar level of apoptosis and growth inhibition. The establishment of a continuously exposed subline to CR (MT-2CR) revealed resistance against CR-induced apoptosis and upregulation of the BCL-2/BAX ratio similar to that recorded for MT-2CB. Both sublines showed reduced production of IFN-{gamma}, TNF-{alpha}, and IL-6 with increased IL-10. cDNA microarray with network/pathway analyses focusing on transcription factors revealed that many similar factors related to cell proliferation were involved following continuous exposure to asbestos in both MT-2CB and MT-2CR. These results indicate that both CB and CR fibers affect human T cells with similar degrees even though the carcinogenic activity of these substances differs due to their chemical and physical forms. Trials to identify early detection markers for asbestos exposure or the occurrence of asbestos-inducing malignancies using these findings may lead to the development of clinical tools for asbestos-related diseases and chemoprevention that modifies the reduced tumor immunity. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of effects of chrysotile and crocidolite on human T cell was done. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both fibers caused apoptosis of T cells by transient exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T cells

  17. Human inflammatory and resolving lipid mediator responses to resistance exercise and ibuprofen treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markworth, James F.; Vella, Luke; Lingard, Benjamin S.; Tull, Dedreia L.; Rupasinghe, Thusitha W.; Sinclair, Andrew J.; Maddipati, Krishna Rao

    2013-01-01

    Classical proinflammatory eicosanoids, and more recently discovered lipid mediators with anti-inflammatory and proresolving bioactivity, exert a complex role in the initiation, control, and resolution of inflammation. Using a targeted lipidomics approach, we investigated circulating lipid mediator responses to resistance exercise and treatment with the NSAID ibuprofen. Human subjects undertook a single bout of unaccustomed resistance exercise (80% of one repetition maximum) following oral ingestion of ibuprofen (400 mg) or placebo control. Venous blood was collected during early recovery (0–3 h and 24 h postexercise), and serum lipid mediator composition was analyzed by LC-MS-based targeted lipidomics. Postexercise recovery was characterized by elevated levels of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and 2-derived prostanoids (TXB2, PGE2, PGD2, PGF2α, and PGI2), lipooxygenase (5-LOX, 12-LOX, and 15-LOX)-derived hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), and leukotrienes (e.g., LTB4), and epoxygenase (CYP)-derived epoxy/dihydroxy eicosatrienoic acids (EpETrEs/DiHETrEs). Additionally, we detected elevated levels of bioactive lipid mediators with anti-inflammatory and proresolving properties, including arachidonic acid-derived lipoxins (LXA4 and LXB4), and the EPA (E-series) and DHA (D-series)-derived resolvins (RvD1 and RvE1), and protectins (PD1 isomer 10S, 17S-diHDoHE). Ibuprofen treatment blocked exercise-induced increases in COX-1 and COX-2-derived prostanoids but also resulted in off-target reductions in leukotriene biosynthesis, and a diminished proresolving lipid mediator response. CYP pathway product metabolism was also altered by ibuprofen treatment, as indicated by elevated postexercise serum 5,6-DiHETrE and 8,9-DiHETrE only in those receiving ibuprofen. These findings characterize the blood inflammatory lipid mediator response to unaccustomed resistance exercise in humans and show that acute proinflammatory signals are mechanistically linked to the induction of a

  18. Branched-Chain Amino Acid Ingestion Stimulates Muscle Myofibrillar Protein Synthesis following Resistance Exercise in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah R. Jackman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The ingestion of intact protein or essential amino acids (EAA stimulates mechanistic target of rapamycin complex-1 (mTORC1 signaling and muscle protein synthesis (MPS following resistance exercise. The purpose of this study was to investigate the response of myofibrillar-MPS to ingestion of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs only (i.e., without concurrent ingestion of other EAA, intact protein, or other macronutrients following resistance exercise in humans. Ten young (20.1 ± 1.3 years, resistance-trained men completed two trials, ingesting either 5.6 g BCAA or a placebo (PLA drink immediately after resistance exercise. Myofibrillar-MPS was measured during exercise recovery with a primed, constant infusion of L-[ring13C6] phenylalanine and collection of muscle biopsies pre and 4 h-post drink ingestion. Blood samples were collected at time-points before and after drink ingestion. Western blotting was used to measure the phosphorylation status of mTORC1 signaling proteins in biopsies collected pre, 1-, and 4 h-post drink. The percentage increase from baseline in plasma leucine (300 ± 96%, isoleucine (300 ± 88%, and valine (144 ± 59% concentrations peaked 0.5 h-post drink in BCAA. A greater phosphorylation status of S6K1Thr389 (P = 0.017 and PRAS40 (P = 0.037 was observed in BCAA than PLA at 1 h-post drink ingestion. Myofibrillar-MPS was 22% higher (P = 0.012 in BCAA (0.110 ± 0.009%/h than PLA (0.090 ± 0.006%/h. Phenylalanine Ra was ~6% lower in BCAA (18.00 ± 4.31 μmol·kgBM−1 than PLA (21.75 ± 4.89 μmol·kgBM−1; P = 0.028 after drink ingestion. We conclude that ingesting BCAAs alone increases the post-exercise stimulation of myofibrillar-MPS and phosphorylation status mTORC1 signaling.

  19. MicroRNA-21 induces 5-fluorouracil resistance in human pancreatic cancer cells by regulating PTEN and PDCD4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Xueju; Wang, Weibin; Wang, Lanlan; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xian; Chen, Mingtai; Wang, Fang; Yu, Jia; Ma, Yanni; Sun, Guotao

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer patients are often resistant to chemotherapy treatment, which results in poor prognosis. The objective of this study was to delineate the mechanism by which miR-21 induces drug resistance to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in human pancreatic cancer cells (PATU8988 and PANC-1). We report that PATU8988 cells resistant to 5-FU express high levels of miR-21 in comparison to sensitive primary PATU8988 cells. Suppression of miR-21 expression in 5-Fu-resistant PATU8988 cells can alleviate its 5-FU resistance. Meanwhile, lentiviral vector-mediated overexpression of miR-21 not only conferred resistance to 5-FU but also promoted proliferation, migration, and invasion of PATU8988 and PANC-1 cells. The proresistance effects of miR-21 were attributed to the attenuated expression of tumor suppressor genes, including PTEN and PDCD4. Overexpression of PTEN and PDCD4 antagonized miR-21-induced resistance to 5-FU and migration activity. Our work demonstrates that miR-21 can confer drug resistance to 5-FU in pancreatic cancer cells by regulating the expression of tumor suppressor genes, as the target genes of miR-21, PTEN and PDCD4 can rescue 5-FU sensitivity and the phenotypic characteristics disrupted by miR-21

  20. Antibiotic Resistance in an Indian Rural Community: A ‘One-Health’ Observational Study on Commensal Coliform from Humans, Animals, and Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Manju Raj; Chandran, Salesh; Shah, Harshada; Diwan, Vishal; Tamhankar, Ashok J.; Stålsby Lundborg, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are an escalating grim menace to global public health. Our aim is to phenotype and genotype antibiotic-resistant commensal Escherichia coli (E. coli) from humans, animals, and water from the same community with a ‘one-health’ approach. The samples were collected from a village belonging to demographic surveillance site of Ruxmaniben Deepchand (R.D.) Gardi Medical College Ujjain, Central India. Commensal coliforms from stool samples from children aged 1–3 years and their environment (animals, drinking water from children's households, common source- and waste-water) were studied for antibiotic susceptibility and plasmid-encoded resistance genes. E. coli isolates from human (n = 127), animal (n = 21), waste- (n = 12), source- (n = 10), and household drinking water (n = 122) carried 70%, 29%, 41%, 30%, and 30% multi-drug resistance, respectively. Extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producers were 57% in human and 23% in environmental isolates. Co-resistance was frequent in penicillin, cephalosporin, and quinolone. Antibiotic-resistance genes blaCTX-M-9 and qnrS were most frequent. Group D-type isolates with resistance genes were mainly from humans and wastewater. Colistin resistance, or the mcr-1 gene, was not detected. The frequency of resistance, co-resistance, and resistant genes are high and similar in coliforms from humans and their environment. This emphasizes the need to mitigate antibiotic resistance with a ‘one-health’ approach. PMID:28383517

  1. Cysteamine-mediated clearance of antibiotic-resistant pathogens in human cystic fibrosis macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra L Shrestha

    Full Text Available Members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex are virulent, multi-drug resistant pathogens that survive and replicate intracellularly in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. We have discovered that B. cenocepacia cannot be cleared from CF macrophages due to defective autophagy, causing continued systemic inflammation and infection. Defective autophagy in CF is mediated through constitutive reactive oxygen species (ROS activation of transglutaminase-2 (TG2, which causes the sequestration (accumulation of essential autophagy initiating proteins. Cysteamine is a TG2 inhibitor and proteostasis regulator with the potential to restore autophagy. Therefore, we sought to examine the impact of cysteamine on CF macrophage autophagy and bacterial killing. Human peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs and alveolar macrophages were isolated from CF and non-CF donors. Macrophages were infected with clinical isolates of relevant CF pathogens. Cysteamine caused direct bacterial growth killing of live B. cenocepacia, B. multivorans, P. aeruginosa and MRSA in the absence of cells. Additionally, B. cenocepacia, B. multivorans, and P. aeruginosa invasion were significantly decreased in CF MDMs treated with cysteamine. Finally, cysteamine decreased TG2, p62, and beclin-1 accumulation in CF, leading to increased Burkholderia uptake into autophagosomes, increased macrophage CFTR expression, and decreased ROS and IL-1β production. Cysteamine has direct anti-bacterial growth killing and improves human CF macrophage autophagy resulting in increased macrophage-mediated bacterial clearance, decreased inflammation, and reduced constitutive ROS production. Thus, cysteamine may be an effective adjunct to antibiotic regimens in CF.

  2. Protease activation involved in resistance of human cells to x-ray cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hong-Chang; Takahashi, Shuji; Karata, Kiyonobu; Kita, Kazuko; Suzuki, Nobuo

    2003-01-01

    Little is known of proteases that play roles in the early steps of X-ray irradiation response. In the present study, we first searched for proteases whose activity is induced in human RSa-R cells after X-ray irradiation. The activity was identified as fibrinolytic, using 125 I-labeled fibrin as a substrate. Protease samples were prepared by lysation of cells with a buffer containing MEGA-8. RSa-R cells showed an increased level of protease activity 10 min after X-ray (up to 3 Gy) irradiation. We next examined whether this protease inducibility is causally related with the X-ray susceptibility of cells. Leupeptin, a serine-cysteine protease inhibitor, inhibited the protease activity in samples obtained from X-ray-irradiated RSa-R cells. Treatment of RSa-R cells with the inhibitor before and after X-ray irradiation resulted in an increased susceptibility of the cells to X-ray cell killing. However, the treatment of cells with other inhibitors tested did not modulate the X-ray susceptibility. These results suggest that leupeptin-sensitive proteases are involved in the resistance of human cells to X-ray cell killing. (author)

  3. Resistance to change and resurgence in humans engaging in a computer task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Toshikazu; Cançado, Carlos R X; Podlesnik, Christopher A

    2016-04-01

    The relation between persistence, as measured by resistance to change, and resurgence has been examined with nonhuman animals but not systematically with humans. The present study examined persistence and resurgence with undergraduate students engaging in a computer task for points exchangeable for money. In Phase 1, a target response was maintained on a multiple variable-interval (VI) 15-s (Rich) VI 60-s (Lean) schedule of reinforcement. In Phase 2, the target response was extinguished while an alternative response was reinforced at equal rates in both schedule components. In Phase 3, the target and the alternative responses were extinguished. In an additional test of persistence (Phase 4), target responding was reestablished as in Phase 1 and then disrupted by access to videos in both schedule components. In Phases 2 and 4, target responding was more persistent in the Rich than in the Lean component. Also, resurgence generally was greater in the Rich than in the Lean component in Phase 3. The present findings with humans extend the generality of those obtained with nonhuman animals showing that higher reinforcement rates produce both greater persistence and resurgence, and suggest that common processes underlie response persistence and relapse. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Double Standards in Global Health: Medicine, Human Rights Law and Multidrug-Resistant TB Treatment Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Thomas; Admay, Catherine; Shakow, Aaron; Keshavjee, Salmaan

    2016-06-01

    The human rights arguments that underpinned the fight against HIV over the last three decades were poised, but ultimately failed, to provide a similar foundation for success against multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) and other diseases of the poor. With more than 1.5 million deaths since 2000 attributed to strains of MDR-TB, and with half a million new, and mostly untreated, MDR-TB cases in the world each year, the stakes could not be higher. The World Health Organization (WHO), whose mandate is to champion the attainment by all peoples of the highest possible level of health, recommended unsound medical treatment for MDR-TB patients in resource-poor settings from 1993-2002. Citing cost considerations, WHO did not recommend the available standard of care that had been successfully used to contain and defeat MDR-TB in rich countries. By acting as a strategic gatekeeper in its technical advisory role to donor agencies and countries, it also facilitated the global implementation of a double standard for TB care in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), upending important legal and scientific priorities. This raises serious questions about whether the organization violated international human rights standards and those established in its own constitution. While calling for additional analysis and discussion on this topic, the authors propose that policymakers should reject double standards of this kind and instead embrace the challenge of implementing the highest standard of care on a global level.

  5. Characterization of Hospital-Associated Lineages of Ampicillin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium from Clinical Cases in Dogs and Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy-Love eTremblay

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Ampicillin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (ARE has rapidly emerged worldwide and is one of the most important nosocomial pathogens. However, very few reports are available on ARE isolates from canine clinical cases. The objective of this study was to characterize ARE strains of canine clinical origin from a veterinary teaching hospital in Canada and to compare them with human strains. Ten ARE strains from dogs and humans were characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST, pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE, antibiotic susceptibility and biofilm activities, presence of rep-families, CRISPR-cas and putative virulence genes. All ARE strains (n = 10 were resistant to ciprofloxacin and lincomycin. Resistances to tetracycline (n = 6, macrolides (n = 6, and to high concentrations of gentamicin, kanamycin and streptomycin (n = 5 were also observed. Canine ARE isolates were found to be susceptible to vancomycin whereas resistance to this antibiotic was observed in human strains. Ampicillin resistance was linked to PBP5 showing mutations at 25 amino acid positions. Fluoroquinolone resistance was attributable to ParC, GyrA, and GyrB mutations. Data demonstrated that all canine ARE were acm (collagen binding protein-positive and that most harbored the efaAfm gene, encoding for a cell wall adhesin. Biofilm formation was observed in two human strains but not in canine strains. Two to five rep-families were observed per strain but no CRISPR sequences were found. A total of six STs (1, 18, 65, 202, 205, and 803 were found with one belonging to a new ST (ST803. These STs were identical or closely related to human hospital-associated lineages. This report describes for the first time the characterization of canine ARE hospital-associated strains in Canada and also supports the importance of prudent antibiotic use in veterinary medicine to avoid zoonotic spread of canine ARE.

  6. Human Coronaviruses: Insights into Environmental Resistance and Its Influence on the Development of New Antiseptic Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Chloé; Varbanov, Mihayl; Duval, Raphaël E.

    2012-01-01

    The Coronaviridae family, an enveloped RNA virus family, and, more particularly, human coronaviruses (HCoV), were historically known to be responsible for a large portion of common colds and other upper respiratory tract infections. HCoV are now known to be involved in more serious respiratory diseases, i.e. bronchitis, bronchiolitis or pneumonia, especially in young children and neonates, elderly people and immunosuppressed patients. They have also been involved in nosocomial viral infections. In 2002–2003, the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), due to a newly discovered coronavirus, the SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV); led to a new awareness of the medical importance of the Coronaviridae family. This pathogen, responsible for an emerging disease in humans, with high risk of fatal outcome; underline the pressing need for new approaches to the management of the infection, and primarily to its prevention. Another interesting feature of coronaviruses is their potential environmental resistance, despite the accepted fragility of enveloped viruses. Indeed, several studies have described the ability of HCoVs (i.e. HCoV 229E, HCoV OC43 (also known as betacoronavirus 1), NL63, HKU1 or SARS-CoV) to survive in different environmental conditions (e.g. temperature and humidity), on different supports found in hospital settings such as aluminum, sterile sponges or latex surgical gloves or in biological fluids. Finally, taking into account the persisting lack of specific antiviral treatments (there is, in fact, no specific treatment available to fight coronaviruses infections), the Coronaviridae specificities (i.e. pathogenicity, potential environmental resistance) make them a challenging model for the development of efficient means of prevention, as an adapted antisepsis-disinfection, to prevent the environmental spread of such infective agents. This review will summarize current knowledge on the capacity of human coronaviruses to survive in the

  7. Effects of Thermal Resistance on One-Dimensional Thermal Analysis of the Epidermal Flexible Electronic Devices Integrated with Human Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, He; Cui, Yun

    2017-12-01

    Nowadays, flexible electronic devices are increasingly used in direct contact with human skin to monitor the real-time health of human body. Based on the Fourier heat conduction equation and Pennes bio-heat transfer equation, this paper deduces the analytical solutions of one - dimensional heat transfer for flexible electronic devices integrated with human skin under the condition of a constant power. The influence of contact thermal resistance between devices and skin is considered as well. The corresponding finite element model is established to verify the correctness of analytical solutions. The results show that the finite element analysis agrees well with the analytical solution. With bigger thermal resistance, temperature increase of skin surface will decrease. This result can provide guidance for the design of flexible electronic devices to reduce the negative impact that exceeding temperature leave on human skin.

  8. Six1 overexpression at early stages of HPV16-mediated transformation of human keratinocytes promotes differentiation resistance and EMT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Hanwen; Pirisi, Lucia; Creek, Kim E.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory discovered that SIX1 mRNA expression increased during in vitro progression of HPV16-immortalized human keratinocytes (HKc/HPV16) toward a differentiation-resistant (HKc/DR) phenotype. In this study, we explored the role of Six1 at early stages of HPV16-mediated transformation by overexpressing Six1 in HKc/HPV16. We found that Six1 overexpression in HKc/HPV16 increased cell proliferation and promoted cell migration and invasion by inducing epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). Moreover, the overexpression of Six1 in HKc/HPV16 resulted in resistance to serum and calcium-induced differentiation, which is the hallmark of the HKc/DR phenotype. Activation of MAPK in HKc/HPV16 overexpressing Six1 is linked to resistance to calcium-induced differentiation. In conclusion, this study determined that Six1 overexpression resulted in differentiation resistance and promoted EMT at early stages of HPV16-mediated transformation of human keratinocytes. - Highlights: • Six1 expression increases during HPV16-mediated transformation. • Six1 overexpression causes differentiation resistance in HPV16-immortalized cells. • Six1 overexpression in HPV16-immortalized keratinocytes activates MAPK. • Activation of MAPK promotes EMT and differentiation resistance. • Six1 overexpression reduces Smad-dependent TGF-β signaling

  9. Proteomic analysis of docetaxel resistance in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells using the two-dimensional gel electrophoresis method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xingchen; Gong, Fengming M; Ren, Min; Ai, Ping; Wu, ShaoYong; Tang, Jie; Hu, XiaoLin

    2016-09-01

    Docetaxel-based chemotherapy has been recommended for advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, treatment failure often occurs because of acquired drug resistance. In this study, a docetaxel-resistant NPC cell line CNE-2R was established with increasing doses of docetaxel for more than 6 months. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and ESI-Q-TOF-MS were used to compare the differential expression of docetaxel-resistance-associated proteins between human NPC CNE-2 cells and docetaxel-resistant CNE-2R cells. As a result, 24 differentially expressed proteins were identified, including 11 proteins with increased expression and 13 proteins with decreased expression. These proteins function in diverse biological processes such as metabolism, signal transduction, calcium ion binding, immune response, proteolysis, and so on. Among these, α-enolase (ENO1), significantly upregulated in CNE-2R, was selected for detailed analysis. Inhibition of ENO1 by shRNA restored CNE-2R cells' sensitivity to docetaxel. Moreover, overexpression of ENO1 could facilitate the development of acquired resistance of docetaxel in CNE-2 cells. Western blot and reverse-transcription PCR data of clinical samples confirmed that α-enolase was upregulated in docetaxel-resistant human NPC tissues. Finding such proteins might improve interpretation of the molecular mechanisms leading to the acquisition of docetaxel chemoresistance.

  10. Sensitization of multidrug-resistant human cancer cells to Hsp90 inhibitors by down-regulation of SIRT1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hak-Bong; Lee, Su-Hoon; Um, Jee-Hyun; Oh, Won Keun; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kang, Chi-Dug; Kim, Sun-Hee

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of Hsp90 inhibitors as anticancer agents was limited in multidrug-resistant (MDR) human cancer cells due to induction of heat shock proteins (Hsps) such as Hsp70/Hsp27 and P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated efflux. In the present study, we showed that resistance to Hsp90 inhibitors of MDR human cancer cells could be overcome with SIRT1 inhibition. SIRT1 knock-down or SIRT1 inhibitors (amurensin G and EX527) effectively suppressed the resistance to Hsp90 inhibitors (17-AAG and AUY922) in several MDR variants of human lymphoblastic leukemia and human breast cancer cell lines. SIRT1 inhibition down-regulated the expression of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) and subsequently Hsps and facilitated Hsp90 multichaperone complex disruption via hyperacetylation of Hsp90/Hsp70. These findings were followed by acceleration of ubiquitin ligase CHIP-mediated mutant p53 (mut p53) degradation and subsequent down-regulation of P-gp in 17-AAG-treated MDR cancer cells expressing P-gp and mut p53 after inhibition of SIRT1. Therefore, combined treatment with Hsp90 inhibitor and SIRT1 inhibitor could be a more effective therapeutic approach for Hsp90 inhibitor-resistant MDR cells via down-regulation of HSF1/Hsps, mut p53 and P-gp. PMID:26416354

  11. The breast cancer resistance protein transporter ABCG2 is expressed in the human kidney proximal tubule apical membrane.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huls, M.; Brown, C.D.; Windass, A.S.; Sayer, R.; Heuvel, J.J.M.W. van den; Heemskerk, S.; Russel, F.G.M.; Masereeuw, R.

    2008-01-01

    The Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP/ABCG2) is a transporter restricting absorption and enhancing excretion of many compounds including anticancer drugs. This transporter is highly expressed in many tissues; however, in human kidney, only the mRNA was found in contrast to the mouse kidney,

  12. Hepatic Diacylglycerol-Associated Protein Kinase Cε Translocation Links Hepatic Steatosis to Hepatic Insulin Resistance in Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Horst, Kasper W.; Gilijamse, Pim W.; Versteeg, Ruth I.; Ackermans, Mariette T.; Nederveen, Aart J.; la Fleur, Susanne E.; Romijn, Johannes A.; Nieuwdorp, Max; Zhang, Dongyan; Samuel, Varman T.; Vatner, Daniel F.; Petersen, Kitt F.; Shulman, Gerald I.; Serlie, Mireille J.

    2017-01-01

    Hepatic lipid accumulation has been implicated in the development of insulin resistance, but translational evidence in humans is limited. We investigated the relationship between liver fat and tissue-specific insulin sensitivity in 133 obese subjects. Although the presence of hepatic steatosis in

  13. Pasteurization Procedures for Donor Human Milk Affect Body Growth, Intestinal Structure, and Resistance against Bacterial Infections in Preterm Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yanqi; Duc Ninh Nguyen; de Waard, Marita

    2017-01-01

    Background: Holder pasteurization (HP) destroys multiple bioactive factors in donor human milk (DM), and UV-C irradiation (UVC) is potentially a gentler method for pasteurizing DM for preterm infants. Objective: We investigated whether UVC-treated DM improves gut maturation and resistance toward...

  14. Proteomic analysis of human tooth pulp proteomes – Comparison of caries-resistant and caries-susceptible

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jágr, Michal; Eckhardt, Adam; Pataridis, Statis; Foltán, R.; Myšák, J.; Mikšík, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 145, Aug 11 (2016), s. 127-136 ISSN 1874-3919 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT14324 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : human tooth pulp * DIGE * proteome * caries * resistance Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 3.914, year: 2016

  15. Review on Usage of Vancomycin in Livestock and Humans: Maintaining Its Efficacy, Prevention of Resistance and Alternative Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panditharathnalage Nishantha Kumara Wijesekara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vancomycin is one of the “last-line” classes of antibiotics used in the treatment of life-threatening infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria. Even though vancomycin was discovered in the 1950s, it was widely used after the 1980s for the treatment of infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococci, as the prevalence of these strains were increased. However, it is currently evident that vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci have developed for various reasons, including the use of avaparcin—an analog of vancomycin—as a feed additive in livestock. Therefore, prophylactic and empiric use of antibiotics and their analogues need to be minimized. Herein we discuss the rational use of vancomycin in treating humans, horses, farm animals, and pet animals such as dogs, cats, and rabbits. In present day context, more attention should be paid to the prevention of the emergence of resistance to antibiotics in order to maintain their efficacy. In order to prevent emergence of resistance, proper guidance for the responsible use of antimicrobials is indispensable. Therefore, almost all stakeholders who use antibiotics should have an in-depth understanding of the antibiotic that they use. As such, it is imperative to be aware of the important aspects of vancomycin. In the present review, efforts have been made to discuss the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, indications, emergence of resistance, control of resistance, adverse effects, and alternative therapy for vancomycin.

  16. Spectrum of lipid and lipoprotein indices in human subjects with insulin resistance syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.H.; Khan, F.A.; Mohammad, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    Insulin resistance syndrome or metabolic syndrome is one of the major metabolic threats our recently urbanized society is going to face in near future. The management of this syndrome requires a very effective biochemical marker for screening. The objective of this cross sectional study were to compare various lipid and lipoprotein indices in human subjects with insulin resistance syndrome This study was carried out between April 2004 to January 2006 at the department of chemical pathology and endocrinology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi. A total of forty-seven subjects with metabolic syndrome were selected as per the criteria of National Cholesterol Education Program, Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP, ATP III) from a target population diagnosed to have impaired glucose regulation at AFIP. Forty-seven age and sex-matched healthy controls were also included in the study. Insulin resistance was calculated by the method of HOMA-IR, using the formula of Mathew's et al. The various lipid and lipoproteins, their ratios and log-transformed versions were evaluated for differences between subjects with metabolic syndrome and controls. Finally the diagnostic performances of these candidate lipid markers were evaluated. Results between subjects with metabolic syndrome and controls were found to be significant for serum triglyceride (p<0.05), HDL-C (p<0.05), triglyceride/HDLC (p<0.01), Log triglyceride/HDL-C (p<0.01), total cholesterol/HDL-C (p<0.01), LDL-C/HDL-C (p<0.01). However there was weak correlation between these lipid based markers and HOMA-IR ((serum triglyceride: r= 0.225), (HDL-C: r= -0.235), (triglyceride/HDL-C: r= 0.333), (total cholesterol/HDL-C: r= 0.239)). The AUCs for the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome remained highest for HOMA-IR (0.727 (95%CI: 0.642-0.812)), followed by triglyceride/HDL-C (0.669 (95%CI: 0.572-0.766)) and LDLC/ HDL-C (0.639 (95%CI: 0.537-0.742)). The differences for lipids and lipoproteins between subjects with metabolic

  17. An investigation on the crack growth resistance of human tooth enamel: Anisotropy, microstructure and toughening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahyazadehfar, Mobin

    The enamel of human teeth is generally regarded as a brittle material with low fracture toughness. Consequently, the contributions of this tissue in resisting tooth fracture and the importance of its complex microstructure have been largely overlooked. The primary objective of this dissertation is to characterize the role of enamel's microstructure and degree of decussation on the fracture behavior of human enamel. The importance of the protein content and aging on the fracture toughness of enamel were also explored. Incremental crack growth in sections of human enamel was achieved using a special inset Compact Tension (CT) specimen configuration. Crack extension was achieved in two orthogonal directions, i.e. longitudinal and transverse to the prism axes. Fracture surfaces and the path of crack growth path were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to understand the fundamental mechanisms of crack growth extension. Furthermore, a hybrid approach was adopted to quantify the contribution of toughening mechanisms to the overall toughness. Results of this investigations showed that human enamel exhibits rising R-curve for both directions of crack extension. Cracks extending transverse to the rods in the outer enamel achieved lower rise in toughness with crack extension, and significantly lower toughness (1.23 +/- 0.20 MPa·m 0.5) than in the inner enamel (1.96 +/- 0.28 MPa· 0.5) and in the longitudinal direction (2.01 +/- 0.21 MPa· 0.5). The crack growth resistance exhibited both anisotropy and inhomogeneity, which arise from the complex hierarchical microstructure and the decussated prism structure. Decussation causes deflection of cracks extending from the enamel surface inwards, and facilitates a continuation of transverse crack extension within the outer enamel. This process dissipates fracture energy and averts cracks from extending toward the dentin and vital pulp. This study is the first to investigate the importance of proteins and the effect of

  18. Human-Finger Electronics Based on Opposing Humidity-Resistance Responses in Carbon Nanofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Tai, Yanlong

    2017-01-09

    Carbon nanomaterials have excellent humidity sensing properties. Here, it is demonstrated that multiwalled carbon-nanotube (MWCNT)- and reduced-graphene-oxide (rGO)-based conductive films have opposite humidity/electrical resistance responses: MWCNTs increase their electrical resistance (positive response) and rGOs decrease their electrical resistance (negative response). The authors propose a new phenomenology that describes a

  19. Association between antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli isolates from food animals and blood stream isolates from humans in Europe: an ecological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Antonio R; Collignon, Peter; Aarestrup, Frank M; McEwen, Scott A; Hendriksen, Rene S; Hald, Tine; Wegener, Henrik C

    2011-12-01

    In addition to medical antimicrobial usage, the use of antimicrobials in food animals contributes to the occurrence of resistance among some bacterial species isolated from infections in humans. Recently, several studies have indicated that a large proportion of Escherichia coli causing infections in humans, especially those resistant to antimicrobials, have an animal origin. We analyzed the correlation between the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in E. coli isolates from blood stream infections in humans and in E. coli isolates from poultry, pigs, and cattle between 2005 and 2008 for 11 countries, using available surveillance data. We also assessed the correlation between human antimicrobial usage and the occurrence of resistance in E. coli isolates from blood stream infections. Strong and significant correlations between prevalences of resistance to ampicillin (r=0.94), aminoglycosides (r=0.72), third-generation cephalosporins (r=0.76), and fluoroquinolones (r=0.68) were observed for human and poultry E. coli isolates. Similar significant correlations were observed for ampicillin (r=0.91), aminoglycosides (r=0.73), and fluoroquinolone resistance (r=0.74) in pig and human isolates. In cattle isolates, only ampicillin resistance (r=0.72) was significantly correlated to human isolates. When usage of antimicrobials in humans was analyzed with antimicrobial resistance among human isolates, only correlations between fluoroquinolones (r=0.90) and third-generation cephalosporins (r=0.75) were significant. Resistance in E. coli isolates from food animals (especially poultry and pigs) was highly correlated with resistance in isolates from humans. This supports the hypothesis that a large proportion of resistant E. coli isolates causing blood stream infections in people may be derived from food sources.

  20. Comparative analysis of antibiotic resistance and phylogenetic group patterns in human and porcine urinary tract infectious Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Nielsen, E.M.; Krag, L.

    2009-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common infectious diseases in humans and domestic animals such as pigs. The most frequent infectious agent in such infections is Escherichia coli. Virulence characteristics of E. coli UTI strains range from highly virulent pyelonephritis strains...... to relatively benign asymptomatic bacteriuria strains. Here we analyse a spectrum of porcine and human UTI E. coli strains with respect to their antibiotic resistance patterns and their phylogenetic groups, determined by multiplex PCR. The clonal profiles of the strains differed profoundly; whereas human...

  1. IGF-1 receptor targeted nanoparticles for image-guided therapy of stroma-rich and drug resistant human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongyu; Qian, Weiping; Uckun, Fatih M; Zhou, Zhiyang; Wang, Liya; Wang, Andrew; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2016-04-17

    Low drug delivery efficiency and drug resistance from highly heterogeneous cancer cells and tumor microenvironment represent major challenges in clinical oncology. Growth factor receptor, IGF-1R, is overexpressed in both human tumor cells and tumor associated stromal cells. The level of IGF-1R expression is further up-regulated in drug resistant tumor cells. We have developed IGF-1R targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) carrying multiple anticancer drugs into human tumors. This IGF-1R targeted theranostic nanoparticle delivery system has an iron core for non-invasive MR imaging, amphiphilic polymer coating to ensure the biocompatibility as well as for drug loading and conjugation of recombinant human IGF-1 as targeting molecules. Chemotherapy drugs, Doxorubicin (Dox), was encapsulated into the polymer coating and/or conjugated to the IONP surface by coupling with the carboxyl groups. The ability of IGF1R targeted theranostic nanoparticles to penetrate tumor stromal barrier and enhance tumor cell killing has been demonstrated in human pancreatic cancer patient tissue derived xenograft (PDX) models. Repeated systemic administrations of those IGF-1R targeted theranostic IONP carrying Dox led to breaking the tumor stromal barrier and improved therapeutic effect. Near infrared (NIR) optical and MR imaging enabled noninvasive monitoring of nanoparticle-drug delivery and therapeutic responses. Our results demonstrated that IGF-1R targeted nanoparticles carrying multiple drugs are promising combination therapy approaches for image-guided therapy of stroma-rich and drug resistant human cancer, such as pancreatic cancer.

  2. IGF-1 receptor targeted nanoparticles for image-guided therapy of stroma-rich and drug resistant human cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongyu; Qian, Weiping; Uckun, Fatih M.; Zhou, Zhiyang; Wang, Liya; Wang, Andrew; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2016-05-01

    Low drug delivery efficiency and drug resistance from highly heterogeneous cancer cells and tumor microenvironment represent major challenges in clinical oncology. Growth factor receptor, IGF-1R, is overexpressed in both human tumor cells and tumor associated stromal cells. The level of IGF-1R expression is further up-regulated in drug resistant tumor cells. We have developed IGF-1R targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) carrying multiple anticancer drugs into human tumors. This IGF-1R targeted theranostic nanoparticle delivery system has an iron core for non-invasive MR imaging, amphiphilic polymer coating to ensure the biocompatibility as well as for drug loading and conjugation of recombinant human IGF-1 as targeting molecules. Chemotherapy drugs, Doxorubicin (Dox), was encapsulated into the polymer coating and/or conjugated to the IONP surface by coupling with the carboxyl groups. The ability of IGF1R targeted theranostic nanoparticles to penetrate tumor stromal barrier and enhance tumor cell killing has been demonstrated in human pancreatic cancer patient tissue derived xenograft (PDX) models. Repeated systemic administrations of those IGF-1R targeted theranostic IONP carrying Dox led to breaking the tumor stromal barrier and improved therapeutic effect. Near infrared (NIR) optical and MR imaging enabled noninvasive monitoring of nanoparticle-drug delivery and therapeutic responses. Our results demonstrated that IGF-1R targeted nanoparticles carrying multiple drugs are promising combination therapy approaches for image-guided therapy of stroma-rich and drug resistant human cancer, such as pancreatic cancer.

  3. Impact of antibiotic use in adult dairy cows on antimicrobial resistance of veterinary and human pathogens: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Stephen P; Murinda, Shelton E; Jayarao, Bhushan M

    2011-03-01

    Antibiotics have saved millions of human lives, and their use has contributed significantly to improving human and animal health and well-being. Use of antibiotics in food-producing animals has resulted in healthier, more productive animals; lower disease incidence and reduced morbidity and mortality in humans and animals; and production of abundant quantities of nutritious, high-quality, and low-cost food for human consumption. In spite of these benefits, there is considerable concern from public health, food safety, and regulatory perspectives about the use of antimicrobials in food-producing animals. Over the last two decades, development of antimicrobial resistance resulting from agricultural use of antibiotics that could impact treatment of diseases affecting the human population that require antibiotic intervention has become a significant global public health concern. In the present review, we focus on antibiotic use in lactating and nonlactating cows in U.S. dairy herds, and address four key questions: (1) Are science-based data available to demonstrate antimicrobial resistance in veterinary pathogens that cause disease in dairy cows associated with use of antibiotics in adult dairy cows? (2) Are science-based data available to demonstrate that antimicrobial resistance in veterinary pathogens that cause disease in adult dairy cows impacts pathogens that cause disease in humans? (3) Does antimicrobial resistance impact the outcome of therapy? (4) Are antibiotics used prudently in the dairy industry? On the basis of this review, we conclude that scientific evidence does not support widespread, emerging resistance among pathogens isolated from dairy cows to antibacterial drugs even though many of these antibiotics have been used in the dairy industry for treatment and prevention of disease for several decades. However, it is clear that use of antibiotics in adult dairy cows and other food-producing animals does contribute to increased antimicrobial resistance

  4. Refractory sporotrichosis due to Sporothrix brasiliensis in humans appears to be unrelated to in vivo resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; Oliveira, Manoel Marques Evangelista; Freitas, Dayvison Francis Saraiva; Valle, Antônio Carlos Francesconi do; Gutierrez-Galhardo, Maria Clara; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2017-07-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subacute to chronic infection caused by members of the Sporothrix schenckii complex. Itraconazole is the first choice antifungal drug for treating this infection, with terbinafine and potassium iodide as alternatives and amphotericin B used in cases of severe infections. Correlation of antifungal susceptibility data with the clinical outcome of the patients is scarce. The aim of this study was to correlate clinical and mycological data in patients with refractory sporotrichosis. In this work, antifungal susceptibilities, determined according to the reference M38-A2 CLSI protocol, of 25 Sporothrix strains, isolated from seven human cases of sporotrichosis with adversities in the treatment, are presented. Tested drugs included itraconazole, ketoconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole, terbinafine, and amphotericin B. Fungi were identified using the T3B PCR fingerprinting. This method identified all strains as Sporothrix brasiliensis and also demonstrated a high degree of similarity between the strains. In general, voriconazole was ineffective against all strains, and elevated minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were observed for amphotericin B. High itraconazole and terbinafine MICs were not observed in S. brasiliensis isolates from patients of this study. Moreover, a significant increase in itraconazole and terbinafine MIC values from strains isolated from the same patient in different periods was not observed. The results suggest that the antifungal susceptibility to terbinafine and itraconazole determined by the reference method does not play an important role in therapeutic failure of sporotrichosis and that acquisition of resistance during prolonged antifungal treatment is not likely to occur in S. brasiliensis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Effect of magnesium supplementation on insulin resistance in humans: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Jennifer Beatriz Silva; Severo, Juliana Soares; de Alencar, Geórgia Rosa Reis; de Oliveira, Ana Raquel Soares; Cruz, Kyria Jayanne Clímaco; Marreiro, Dilina do Nascimento; Freitas, Betânia de Jesus E Silva de Almendra; de Carvalho, Cecília Maria Resende; Martins, Maria do Carmo de Carvalho E; Frota, Karoline de Macedo Gonçalves

    2017-06-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that minerals play a role in glucose metabolism disorders in humans. Magnesium, in particular, is an extensively studied mineral that has been shown to function in the management of hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance (IR) action. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of magnesium supplementation on IR in humans via systematic review of the available clinical trials. This review was conducted in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) recommendations. A survey was conducted to select clinical trials related to the effects of this mineral in insulin sensitivity using the following databases: PubMed, SciVerse Scopus, ScienceDirect, and SciVerse Cochrane. After the selection process, 12 articles were identified as eligible, representing different clinical conditions and being free of restriction with regard to sex, age, ethnicity, and differential dosing/shape of magnesium. The results of eight clinical trials showed that supplementation with magnesium influences serum fasting glucose concentrations, and five trials determined an effect on fasting insulin levels. The results of seven studies demonstrated that mineral supplementation reduced homeostasis model assessment for IR values. The data of this systematic review provide evidence as to the benefits of magnesium supplementation in reducing IR in patients with hypomagnesemia presenting IR. However, new intervention studies are needed to elucidate the role of the nutrient in protection against this metabolic disorder, as well as the standardization of the type, dose, and time of magnesium supplementation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. PPARγ1 phosphorylation enhances proliferation and drug resistance in human fibrosarcoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Xiaojuan; Shu, Yuxin; Niu, Zhiyuan; Zheng, Wei; Wu, Haochen [State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, Nanjing University, Nanjing (China); Lu, Yan, E-mail: luyan@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, Nanjing University, Nanjing (China); Shen, Pingping, E-mail: ppshen@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, Nanjing University, Nanjing (China); Model Animal Research Center (MARC), Nanjing University, Nanjing (China)

    2014-03-10

    Post-translational regulation plays a critical role in the control of cell growth and proliferation. The phosphorylation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is the most important post-translational modification. The function of PPARγ phosphorylation has been studied extensively in the past. However, the relationship between phosphorylated PPARγ1 and tumors remains unclear. Here we investigated the role of PPARγ1 phosphorylation in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cell line. Using the nonphosphorylation (Ser84 to alanine, S84A) and phosphorylation (Ser84 to aspartic acid, S84D) mutant of PPARγ1, the results suggested that phosphorylation attenuated PPARγ1 transcriptional activity. Meanwhile, we demonstrated that phosphorylated PPARγ1 promoted HT1080 cell proliferation and this effect was dependent on the regulation of cell cycle arrest. The mRNA levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CKI) p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1} descended in PPARγ1{sup S84D} stable HT1080 cell, whereas the expression of p18{sup INK4C} was not changed. Moreover, compared to the PPARγ1{sup S84A}, PPARγ1{sup S84D} up-regulated the expression levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin A. Finally, PPARγ1 phosphorylation reduced sensitivity to agonist rosiglitazone and increased resistance to anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in HT1080 cell. Our findings establish PPARγ1 phosphorylation as a critical event in human fibrosarcoma growth. These findings raise the possibility that chemical compounds that prevent the phosphorylation of PPARγ1 could act as anticancer drugs. - Highlights: • Phosphorylation attenuates PPARγ1 transcriptional activity. • Phosphorylated PPARγ1 promotes HT1080 cells proliferation. • PPARγ1 phosphorylation regulates cell cycle by mediating expression of cell cycle regulators. • PPARγ1 phosphorylation reduces sensitivity to agonist and anticancer drug. • Our findings establish PPARγ1 phosphorylation as a critical event in HT1080

  7. Presentation of an immunodominant immediate-early CD8+ T cell epitope resists human cytomegalovirus immunoevasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Ameres

    Full Text Available Control of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV depends on CD8+ T cell responses that are shaped by an individual's repertoire of MHC molecules. MHC class I presentation is modulated by a set of HCMV-encoded proteins. Here we show that HCMV immunoevasins differentially impair T cell recognition of epitopes from the same viral antigen, immediate-early 1 (IE-1, that are presented by different MHC class I allotypes. In the presence of immunoevasins, HLA-A- and HLA-B-restricted T cell clones were ineffective, but HLA-C*0702-restricted T cell clones recognized and killed infected cells. Resistance of HLA-C*0702 to viral immunoevasins US2 and US11 was mediated by the alpha3 domain and C-terminal region of the HLA heavy chain. In healthy donors, HLA-C*0702-restricted T cells dominated the T cell response to IE-1. The same HLA-C allotype specifically protected infected cells from attack by NK cells that expressed a corresponding HLA-C-specific KIR. Thus, allotype-specific viral immunoevasion allows HCMV to escape control by NK cells and HLA-A- and HLA-B-restricted T cells, while the virus becomes selectively vulnerable to an immunodominant population of HLA-C-restricted T cells. Our work identifies a T cell population that may be of particular efficiency in HCMV-specific immunotherapy.

  8. MicroRNA-223 Expression Is Upregulated in Insulin Resistant Human Adipose Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung-Yueh Chuang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are short noncoding RNAs involved in posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression and influence many cellular functions including glucose and lipid metabolism. We previously reported that adipose tissue (AT from women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS or controls with insulin resistance (IR revealed a differentially expressed microRNA (miRNA profile, including upregulated miR-93 in PCOS patients and in non-PCOS women with IR. Overexpressed miR-93 directly inhibited glucose transporter isoform 4 (GLUT4 expression, thereby influencing glucose metabolism. We have now studied the role of miR-223, which is also abnormally expressed in the AT of IR subjects. Our data indicates that miR-223 is significantly overexpressed in the AT of IR women, regardless of whether they had PCOS or not. miR-223 expression in AT was positively correlated with HOMA-IR. Unlike what is reported in cardiomyocytes, overexpression of miR-223 in human differentiated adipocytes was associated with a reduction in GLUT4 protein content and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. In addition, our data suggests miR-223 regulates GLUT4 expression by direct binding to its 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR. In conclusion, in AT miR-223 is an IR-related miRNA that may serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of IR-related disorders.

  9. Distribution of phylogroups and co-resistance to antimicrobial agents in ampicillin resistant Escherichia coli isolated from healthy humans and from patients with bacteraemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, A.; Hammerum, A. M.; Porsbo, Lone Jannok

    inhibitory concentration to antimicrobial agents and examined by PCR to determine their phylogroups. The phylotyping grouped the faecal samples into A (13%), B1 (10%), B2 (42%), D (19%), NT (16%) while the blood isolates grouped into A (16%), B1 (0%), B2 (48%), D (32%) and NT (3%). The frequency...... of resistance in faecal and blood isolates (F/B) was: tetracycline (48%/48%), gentamicin (0%/10%), ciprofloxacin (3%,13%), sulfonamide (68%/77%) and trimethoprim (39%/39%). Conclusion: B2 was the most prevalent phylogroup found both in faecal isolates collected from healthy humans and in blood isolates from...

  10. Antimicrobial resistance genes in marine bacteria and human uropathogenic Escherichia coli from a region of intensive aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomova, Alexandra; Ivanova, Larisa; Buschmann, Alejandro H; Rioseco, Maria Luisa; Kalsi, Rajinder K; Godfrey, Henry P; Cabello, Felipe C

    2015-10-01

    Antimicrobials are heavily used in Chilean salmon aquaculture. We previously found significant differences in antimicrobial-resistant bacteria between sediments from an aquaculture and a non-aquaculture site. We now show that levels of antimicrobial resistance genes (ARG) are significantly higher in antimicrobial-selected marine bacteria than in unselected bacteria from these sites. While ARG in tetracycline- and florfenicol-selected bacteria from aquaculture and non-aquaculture sites were equally frequent, there were significantly more plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes per bacterium and significantly higher numbers of qnrB genes in quinolone-selected bacteria from the aquaculture site. Quinolone-resistant urinary Escherichia coli from patients in the Chilean aquacultural region were significantly enriched for qnrB (including a novel qnrB gene), qnrS, qnrA and aac(6')-1b, compared with isolates from New York City. Sequences of qnrA1, qnrB1 and qnrS1 in quinolone-resistant Chilean E. coli and Chilean marine bacteria were identical, suggesting horizontal gene transfer between antimicrobial-resistant marine bacteria and human pathogens. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Prevalence and characterization of plasmids carrying sulfonamide resistance genes among Escherichia coli from pigs, pig carcasses and human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuyu; Dalsgaard, Anders; Hammerum, Anette M; Porsbo, Lone J; Jensen, Lars B

    2010-07-30

    Sulfonamide resistance is very common in Escherichia coli. The aim of this study was to characterize plasmids carrying sulfonamide resistance genes (sul1, sul2 and sul3) in E. coli isolated from pigs and humans with a specific objective to assess the genetic diversity of plasmids involved in the mobility of sul genes. A total of 501 E. coli isolates from pig feces, pig carcasses and human stools were tested for their susceptibility to selected antimicrobial. Multiplex PCR was conducted to detect the presence of three sul genes among the sulfonamide-resistant E. coli isolates. Fifty-seven sulfonamide-resistant E. coli were selected based on presence of sul resistance genes and subjected to conjugation and/or transformation experiments. S1 nuclease digestion followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to visualize and determine the size of plasmids. Plasmids carrying sul genes were characterized by PCR-based replicon typing to allow a comparison of the types of sul genes, the reservoir and plasmid present. A total of 109/501 isolates exhibited sulfonamide resistance. The relative prevalences of sul genes from the three reservoirs (pigs, pig carcasses and humans) were 65%, 45% and 12% for sul2, sul1, and sul3, respectively. Transfer of resistance through conjugation was observed in 42/57 isolates. Resistances to streptomycin, ampicillin and trimethoprim were co-transferred in most strains. Class 1 integrons were present in 80% of sul1-carrying plasmids and 100% of sul3-carrying plasmids, but only in 5% of sul2-carrying plasmids. The sul plasmids ranged from 33 to 160-kb in size and belonged to nine different incompatibility (Inc) groups: FII, FIB, I1, FIA, B/O, FIC, N, HI1 and X1. IncFII was the dominant type in sul2-carrying plasmids (52%), while IncI1 was the most common type in sul1 and sul3-carrying plasmids (33% and 45%, respectively). Multireplicons were found associated with all three sul genes. Sul genes were distributed widely in E. coli isolated

  12. Prevalence and characterization of plasmids carrying sulfonamide resistance genes among Escherichia coli from pigs, pig carcasses and human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammerum Anette M

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sulfonamide resistance is very common in Escherichia coli. The aim of this study was to characterize plasmids carrying sulfonamide resistance genes (sul1, sul2 and sul3 in E. coli isolated from pigs and humans with a specific objective to assess the genetic diversity of plasmids involved in the mobility of sul genes. Methods A total of 501 E. coli isolates from pig feces, pig carcasses and human stools were tested for their susceptibility to selected antimicrobial. Multiplex PCR was conducted to detect the presence of three sul genes among the sulfonamide-resistant E. coli isolates. Fifty-seven sulfonamide-resistant E. coli were selected based on presence of sul resistance genes and subjected to conjugation and/or transformation experiments. S1 nuclease digestion followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to visualize and determine the size of plasmids. Plasmids carrying sul genes were characterized by PCR-based replicon typing to allow a comparison of the types of sul genes, the reservoir and plasmid present. Results A total of 109/501 isolates exhibited sulfonamide resistance. The relative prevalences of sul genes from the three reservoirs (pigs, pig carcasses and humans were 65%, 45% and 12% for sul2, sul1, and sul3, respectively. Transfer of resistance through conjugation was observed in 42/57 isolates. Resistances to streptomycin, ampicillin and trimethoprim were co-transferred in most strains. Class 1 integrons were present in 80% of sul1-carrying plasmids and 100% of sul3-carrying plasmids, but only in 5% of sul2-carrying plasmids. The sul plasmids ranged from 33 to 160-kb in size and belonged to nine different incompatibility (Inc groups: FII, FIB, I1, FIA, B/O, FIC, N, HI1 and X1. IncFII was the dominant type in sul2-carrying plasmids (52%, while IncI1 was the most common type in sul1 and sul3-carrying plasmids (33% and 45%, respectively. Multireplicons were found associated with all three sul genes

  13. Disruption of Mitochondria-Associated Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane (MAM) Integrity Contributes to Muscle Insulin Resistance in Mice and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, Emily; Chanon, Stéphanie; Robert, Maud; Bendridi, Nadia; Bidaux, Gabriel; Chauvin, Marie-Agnès; Ji-Cao, Jingwei; Durand, Christine; Gauvrit-Ramette, Daphné; Vidal, Hubert; Lefai, Etienne; Rieusset, Jennifer

    2018-04-01

    Modifications of the interactions between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria, defined as mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs), were recently shown to be involved in the control of hepatic insulin action and glucose homeostasis, but with conflicting results. Whereas skeletal muscle is the primary site of insulin-mediated glucose uptake and the main target for alterations in insulin-resistant states, the relevance of MAM integrity in muscle insulin resistance is unknown. Deciphering the importance of MAMs on muscle insulin signaling could help to clarify this controversy. Here, we show in skeletal muscle of different mice models of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) a marked disruption of ER-mitochondria interactions as an early event preceding mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance. Furthermore, in human myotubes, palmitate-induced insulin resistance is associated with a reduction of structural and functional ER-mitochondria interactions. Importantly, experimental increase of ER-mitochondria contacts in human myotubes prevents palmitate-induced alterations of insulin signaling and action, whereas disruption of MAM integrity alters the action of the hormone. Lastly, we found an association between altered insulin signaling and ER-mitochondria interactions in human myotubes from obese subjects with or without T2D compared with healthy lean subjects. Collectively, our data reveal a new role of MAM integrity in insulin action of skeletal muscle and highlight MAM disruption as an essential subcellular alteration associated with muscle insulin resistance in mice and humans. Therefore, reduced ER-mitochondria coupling could be a common alteration of several insulin-sensitive tissues playing a key role in altered glucose homeostasis in the context of obesity and T2D. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  14. Human Management of a Wild Plant Modulates the Evolutionary Dynamics of a Gene Determining Recessive Resistance to Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulicard, Nils; Pacios, Luis Fernández; Gallois, Jean-Luc; Piñero, Daniel; García-Arenal, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    This work analyses the genetic variation and evolutionary patterns of recessive resistance loci involved in matching-allele (MA) host-pathogen interactions, focusing on the pvr2 resistance gene to potyviruses of the wild pepper Capsicum annuum glabriusculum (chiltepin). Chiltepin grows in a variety of wild habitats in Mexico, and its cultivation in home gardens started about 25 years ago. Potyvirus infection of Capsicum plants requires the physical interaction of the viral VPg with the pvr2 product, the translation initiation factor eIF4E1. Mutations impairing this interaction result in resistance, according to the MA model. The diversity of pvr2/eIF4E1 in wild and cultivated chiltepin populations from six biogeographical provinces in Mexico was analysed in 109 full-length coding sequences from 97 plants. Eleven alleles were found, and their interaction with potyvirus VPg in yeast-two-hybrid assays, plus infection assays of plants, identified six resistance alleles. Mapping resistance mutations on a pvr2/eIF4E1 model structure showed that most were around the cap-binding pocket and strongly altered its surface electrostatic potential, suggesting resistance-associated costs due to functional constraints. The pvr2/eIF4E1 phylogeny established that susceptibility was ancestral and resistance was derived. The spatial structure of pvr2/eIF4E1 diversity differed from that of neutral markers, but no evidence of selection for resistance was found in wild populations. In contrast, the resistance alleles were much more frequent, and positive selection stronger, in cultivated chiltepin populations, where diversification of pvr2/eIF4E1 was higher. This analysis of the genetic variation of a recessive resistance gene involved in MA host-pathogen interactions in populations of a wild plant show that evolutionary patterns differ according to the plant habitat, wild or cultivated. It also demonstrates that human management of the plant population has profound effects on the

  15. Human Management of a Wild Plant Modulates the Evolutionary Dynamics of a Gene Determining Recessive Resistance to Virus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Poulicard

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This work analyses the genetic variation and evolutionary patterns of recessive resistance loci involved in matching-allele (MA host-pathogen interactions, focusing on the pvr2 resistance gene to potyviruses of the wild pepper Capsicum annuum glabriusculum (chiltepin. Chiltepin grows in a variety of wild habitats in Mexico, and its cultivation in home gardens started about 25 years ago. Potyvirus infection of Capsicum plants requires the physical interaction of the viral VPg with the pvr2 product, the translation initiation factor eIF4E1. Mutations impairing this interaction result in resistance, according to the MA model. The diversity of pvr2/eIF4E1 in wild and cultivated chiltepin populations from six biogeographical provinces in Mexico was analysed in 109 full-length coding sequences from 97 plants. Eleven alleles were found, and their interaction with potyvirus VPg in yeast-two-hybrid assays, plus infection assays of plants, identified six resistance alleles. Mapping resistance mutations on a pvr2/eIF4E1 model structure showed that most were around the cap-binding pocket and strongly altered its surface electrostatic potential, suggesting resistance-associated costs due to functional constraints. The pvr2/eIF4E1 phylogeny established that susceptibility was ancestral and resistance was derived. The spatial structure of pvr2/eIF4E1 diversity differed from that of neutral markers, but no evidence of selection for resistance was found in wild populations. In contrast, the resistance alleles were much more frequent, and positive selection stronger, in cultivated chiltepin populations, where diversification of pvr2/eIF4E1 was higher. This analysis of the genetic variation of a recessive resistance gene involved in MA host-pathogen interactions in populations of a wild plant show that evolutionary patterns differ according to the plant habitat, wild or cultivated. It also demonstrates that human management of the plant population has profound

  16. Current trends of human infections and antibiotic resistance of the genus Shewanella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousfi, K; Bekal, S; Usongo, V; Touati, A

    2017-08-01

    Shewanella spp. are commonly known as environmental bacteria and are most frequently isolated from aquatic areas. Currently, diseases syndromes and multidrug resistance have increasingly been reported in the genus Shewanella. Some species are associated with various infections, such as skin and soft tissue infections, as well as bacteremia. Generally, these bacteria are opportunistic and mostly affect people with an impaired immune system. This genus is also a probable vehicle and progenitor of antibiotic resistance genes. In fact, several resistance genes and mobile genetic elements have been identified in some resistant species isolated from environmental or clinical settings. These genes confer resistance to different antibiotic classes, including those used in therapies such as β-lactams and quinolones, and are generally located on the chromosome. Recently, a multidrug-resistant (MDR) plasmid harboring several drug resistance genes associated with transposons and integrons has been identified in Shewanella xiamenensis. These antibiotic resistance genes can circulate in the environment and contribute to the emergence of antibiotic resistance. This review describes different aspects of Shewanella, focusing on the infections caused by this genus, as well as their role in the propagation of antibiotic resistance via mobile genetic elements.

  17. Impact of Dietary Resistant Starch on the Human Gut Microbiome, Metaproteome, and Metabolome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Tanja V; Lucio, Marianna; Lee, Lang Ho; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C; Brislawn, Colin J; Bernhardt, Jörg; Lamendella, Regina; McDermott, Jason E; Bergeron, Nathalie; Heinzmann, Silke S; Morton, James T; González, Antonio; Ackermann, Gail; Knight, Rob; Riedel, Katharina; Krauss, Ronald M; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Jansson, Janet K

    2017-10-17

    Diet can influence the composition of the human microbiome, and yet relatively few dietary ingredients have been systematically investigated with respect to their impact on the functional potential of the microbiome. Dietary resistant starch (RS) has been shown to have health benefits, but we lack a mechanistic understanding of the metabolic processes that occur in the gut during digestion of RS. Here, we collected samples during a dietary crossover study with diets containing large or small amounts of RS. We determined the impact of RS on the gut microbiome and metabolic pathways in the gut, using a combination of "omics" approaches, including 16S rRNA gene sequencing, metaproteomics, and metabolomics. This multiomics approach captured changes in the abundance of specific bacterial species, proteins, and metabolites after a diet high in resistant starch (HRS), providing key insights into the influence of dietary interventions on the gut microbiome. The combined data showed that a high-RS diet caused an increase in the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes , including increases in relative abundances of some specific members of the Firmicutes and concurrent increases in enzymatic pathways and metabolites involved in lipid metabolism in the gut. IMPORTANCE This work was undertaken to obtain a mechanistic understanding of the complex interplay between diet and the microorganisms residing in the intestine. Although it is known that gut microbes play a key role in digestion of the food that we consume, the specific contributions of different microorganisms are not well understood. In addition, the metabolic pathways and resultant products of metabolism during digestion are highly complex. To address these knowledge gaps, we used a combination of molecular approaches to determine the identities of the microorganisms in the gut during digestion of dietary starch as well as the metabolic pathways that they carry out. Together, these data provide a more complete picture of

  18. Impact of Dietary Resistant Starch on the Human Gut Microbiome, Metaproteome, and Metabolome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, Tanja V.; Lucio, Marianna; Lee, Lang Ho; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; Brislawn, Colin J.; Bernhardt, Jörg; Lamendella, Regina; McDermott, Jason E.; Bergeron, Nathalie; Heinzmann, Silke S.; Morton, James T.; González, Antonio; Ackermann, Gail; Knight, Rob; Riedel, Katharina; Krauss, Ronald M.; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Jansson, Janet K.; Moran, Mary Ann

    2017-10-17

    ABSTRACT

    Diet can influence the composition of the human microbiome, and yet relatively few dietary ingredients have been systematically investigated with respect to their impact on the functional potential of the microbiome. Dietary resistant starch (RS) has been shown to have health benefits, but we lack a mechanistic understanding of the metabolic processes that occur in the gut during digestion of RS. Here, we collected samples during a dietary crossover study with diets containing large or small amounts of RS. We determined the impact of RS on the gut microbiome and metabolic pathways in the gut, using a combination of “omics” approaches, including 16S rRNA gene sequencing, metaproteomics, and metabolomics. This multiomics approach captured changes in the abundance of specific bacterial species, proteins, and metabolites after a diet high in resistant starch (HRS), providing key insights into the influence of dietary interventions on the gut microbiome. The combined data showed that a high-RS diet caused an increase in the ratio ofFirmicutestoBacteroidetes, including increases in relative abundances of some specific members of theFirmicutesand concurrent increases in enzymatic pathways and metabolites involved in lipid metabolism in the gut.

    IMPORTANCEThis work was undertaken to obtain a mechanistic understanding of the complex interplay between diet and the microorganisms residing in the intestine. Although it is known that gut microbes play a key role in digestion of the food that we consume, the specific contributions of different microorganisms are not well understood. In addition, the metabolic pathways and resultant products of metabolism during digestion are highly complex. To address these knowledge gaps, we used a combination of molecular approaches to determine the identities of the microorganisms in the gut during digestion of dietary starch as well as the

  19. Expression and localization of p-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance protein 4, and breast cancer resistance protein in the female lower genital tract of human and pigtailed macaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tian; Hu, Minlu; Pearlman, Andrew; Patton, Dorothy; Rohan, Lisa

    2014-11-01

    Antiretroviral drug absorption and disposition in cervicovaginal tissue is important for the effectiveness of vaginally or orally administered drug products in preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) of HIV-1 sexual transmission to women. Therefore, it is imperative to understand critical determinants of cervicovaginal tissue pharmacokinetics. This study aimed to examine the mRNA expression and protein localization of three efflux transporters, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (MRP4), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), in the lower genital tract of premenopausal women and pigtailed macaques. Along the human lower genital tract, the three transporters were moderately to highly expressed compared to colorectal tissue and liver, as revealed by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In a given genital tract segment, the transporter with the highest expression level was either BCRP or P-gp, while MRP4 was always expressed at the lowest level among the three transporters tested. The immunohistochemical staining showed that P-gp and MRP4 were localized in multiple cell types including epithelial cells and vascular endothelial cells. BCRP was predominantly localized in the vascular endothelial cells. Differences in transporter mRNA level and localization were observed among endocervix, ectocervix, and vagina. Compared to human tissues, the macaque cervicovaginal tissues displayed comparable expression and localization patterns of the three transporters, although subtle differences were observed between the two species. The role of these cervicovaginal transporters in drug absorption and disposition warrants further studies. The resemblance between human and pigtailed macaque in transporter expression and localization suggests the utility of the macaque model in the studies of human cervicovaginal transporters.

  20. Human, animal and environmental contributors to antibiotic resistance in low-resource settings: integrating behavioural, epidemiological and One Health approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousham, Emily K; Unicomb, Leanne; Islam, Mohammad Aminul

    2018-04-11

    Antibiotic resistance (ABR) is recognized as a One Health challenge because of the rapid emergence and dissemination of resistant bacteria and genes among humans, animals and the environment on a global scale. However, there is a paucity of research assessing ABR contemporaneously in humans, animals and the environment in low-resource settings. This critical review seeks to identify the extent of One Health research on ABR in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Existing research has highlighted hotspots for environmental contamination; food-animal production systems that are likely to harbour reservoirs or promote transmission of ABR as well as high and increasing human rates of colonization with ABR commensal bacteria such as Escherichia coli However, very few studies have integrated all three components of the One Health spectrum to understand the dynamics of transmission and the prevalence of community-acquired resistance in humans and animals. Microbiological, epidemiological and social science research is needed at community and population levels across the One Health spectrum in order to fill the large gaps in knowledge of ABR in low-resource settings. © 2018 The Author(s).

  1. Antimicrobial use in aquaculture re-examined: its relevance to antimicrobial resistance and to animal and human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, Felipe C; Godfrey, Henry P; Tomova, Alexandra; Ivanova, Larisa; Dölz, Humberto; Millanao, Ana; Buschmann, Alejandro H

    2013-07-01

    The worldwide growth of aquaculture has been accompanied by a rapid increase in therapeutic and prophylactic usage of antimicrobials including those important in human therapeutics. Approximately 80% of antimicrobials used in aquaculture enter the environment with their activity intact where they select for bacteria whose resistance arises from mutations or more importantly, from mobile genetic elements containing multiple resistance determinants transmissible to other bacteria. Such selection alters biodiversity in aquatic environments and the normal flora of fish and shellfish. The commonality of the mobilome (the total of all mobile genetic elements in a genome) between aquatic and terrestrial bacteria together with the presence of residual antimicrobials, biofilms, and high concentrations of bacteriophages where the aquatic environment may also be contaminated with pathogens of human and animal origin can stimulate exchange of genetic information between aquatic and terrestrial bacteria. Several recently found genetic elements and resistance determinants for quinolones, tetracyclines, and β-lactamases are shared between aquatic bacteria, fish pathogens, and human pathogens, and appear to have originated in aquatic bacteria. Excessive use of antimicrobials in aquaculture can thus potentially negatively impact animal and human health as well as the aquatic environment and should be better assessed and regulated. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Characterization of ultraviolet light-induced diphtheria toxin-resistant mutations in normal and Xeroderma pigmentosum human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glover, T.W.

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative mutagenesis studies in human cells have been severely limited by the lack of reliable genetic markers. Experiments were therefore performed to develop and characterize a better quantitative mutation assay for human cells. The uv-induction of diphtheria toxin resistant (DT/sup r/) mutations in normal and excision repair defective xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) fibroblasts has been quantitatively characterized. A concentration of diphtheria toxin to use in the selection of resistant mutants was determined whereby DT/sup r/ cells are cross-resistant to Pseudomonas aeurginosa exotoxin A, indicating mutants have altered elongation factor-2 (EF-2) which is not susceptible to ADP-ribosylation by either toxin. Results of this study indicate that XP fibroblasts have higher uv-induced mutation frequencies per unit uv-dose but similar frequencies per unit survival compared to normal cells as measured using a new genetic marker for quantitative mutagenesis. Furthermore, these results support a prediction of the mutation theory of cancer, namely, that cells from individuals with certain human syndromes that predispose the individual to cancer will have higher induced mutation frequencies than cells from non-susceptible individuals. This newly characterized genetic marker should be useful in quantitative mutagenesis studies in human cells

  3. Oseltamivir (Tamiflu® in the environment, resistance development in influenza A viruses of dabbling ducks and the risk of transmission of an oseltamivir-resistant virus to humans – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef D. Järhult

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The antiviral drug oseltamivir (Tamiflu® is a cornerstone in influenza pandemic preparedness plans worldwide. However, resistance to the drug is a growing concern. The active metabolite oseltamivir carboxylate (OC is not degraded in surface water or sewage treatment plants and has been detected in river water during seasonal influenza outbreaks. The natural influenza reservoir, dabbling ducks, can thus be exposed to OC in aquatic environments. Environmental-like levels of OC induce resistance development in influenza A/H1N1 virus in mallards. There is a risk of resistance accumulation in influenza viruses circulating among wild birds when oseltamivir is used extensively. By reassortment or direct transmission, oseltamivir resistance can be transmitted to humans potentially causing a resistant pandemic or human-adapted highly-pathogenic avian influenza virus. There is a need for more research on resistance development in the natural influenza reservoir and for a prudent use of antivirals.

  4. Identification of genes associated with cisplatin resistance in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Ping; Zhang Zhiyuan; Zhou Xiaojian; Qiu Weiliu; Chen Fangan; Chen Wantao

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Cisplatin is widely used for chemotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. However, details of the molecular mechanism responsible for cisplatin resistance are still unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the expression of genes related to cisplatin resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. Methods A cisplatin-resistant cell line, Tca/cisplatin, was established from a cisplatin-sensitive cell line, Tca8113, which was derived from moderately-differe...

  5. Type-I Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptor (IGF1R)-Estrogen Receptor (ER) Crosstalk Contributes to Antiestrogen Therapy Resistance in Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    vitro have downregulated J GF1R making antibodies directed agai nst th is receptor ineffective. Inhlbition of IH may be necessary to manage ...monoclonal antibody to insulin-like growth factor receptor 1. J Clin Oncol 2009;27:580Q-7. 31. Drury s. Detre s. Leary A, Salter J, Reis-Filho J

  6. The attribution of human infections with antimicrobial resistant Salmonella bacteria in Denmark to sources of animal origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tine; Lo Fo Wong, Danilo M. A.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2007-01-01

    Based on the Danish Salmonella surveillance in 2000-2001, we developed a mathematical model for quantifying the contribution of each major animal-food sources to human salmonellosis caused by antimicrobial resistant bacteria. Domestic food products accounted for 53.1% of all cases, mainly caused......, but infections with multidrug- and quinolone-resistant isolates were more commonly caused by imported food products and travelling, emphasizing the need for a global perspective on food safety and antimicrobial usage....... by table eggs (37.6%). A large proportion (19%) of cases were travel related, while 18% could not be associated with any source. Imported food products accounted for 9.5% of all cases; the most important source being imported chicken. Multidrug and quinolone resistance was rarely found in cases acquired...

  7. Human Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells in Adaptations to Exercise; Effects of Resistance Exercise Contraction Mode and Protein Supplementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farup, Jean

    2014-01-01

    the effect of contraction mode specific resistance training and protein supplementation on whole muscle and tendon hypertrophy. Quadriceps muscle and patellar tendon cross-sectional area (CSA) was quantified using magnetic resonance imaging pre and post 12 weeks of eccentric (Ecc) or concentric (Conc...... concentric resistance training and ingestion of protein influence myocellular adaptations, with special emphasis on muscle stem cell adaptations, during both acute and prolonged resistance exercise in human skeletal muscle. Paper I. Whey protein supplementation accelerates satellite cell proliferation during...... recovery from eccentric exercise In paper I, we evaluated the effect of a single bout of unaccustomed eccentric exercise on fiber type specific SC content by immunohistochemistry. Subjects received either hydrolysed whey protein (Whey) or iso-caloric carbohydrate (Placebo) in the days post eccentric...

  8. Whole genome sequencing of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolated from humans and poultry in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagambèga, Assèta; Lienemann, Taru; Frye, Jonathan G; Barro, Nicolas; Haukka, Kaisa

    2018-01-01

    for all the isolates . The poultry and human isolates were genetically similar showing a potential food safety risk for consumers. Our finding of multidrug-resistant S. Typhimurium ST313 in poultry feces calls for further studies to clarify the potential reservoirs of this emerging pathogen.

  9. Identification of microRNAs and mRNAs associated with multidrug resistance of human laryngeal cancer Hep-2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Wanzhong; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xin [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, The First Clinical Hospital, Norman Bethune College of Medicine, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Song, Wenzhi [Department of Stomatology, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Cui, Xiangyan; Yu, Hong; Zhu, Wei [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, The First Clinical Hospital, Norman Bethune College of Medicine, Jilin University, Changchun (China)

    2013-06-12

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) poses a serious impediment to the success of chemotherapy for laryngeal cancer. To identify microRNAs and mRNAs associated with MDR of human laryngeal cancer Hep-2 cells, we developed a multidrug-resistant human laryngeal cancer subline, designated Hep-2/v, by exposing Hep-2 cells to stepwise increasing concentrations of vincristine (0.02-0.96'µM). Microarray assays were performed to compare the microRNA and mRNA expression profiles of Hep-2 and Hep-2/v cells. Compared to Hep-2 cells, Hep-2/v cells were more resistant to chemotherapy drugs (∼45-fold more resistant to vincristine, 5.1-fold more resistant to cisplatin, and 5.6-fold more resistant to 5-fluorouracil) and had a longer doubling time (42.33±1.76 vs 28.75±1.12'h, P<0.05), higher percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase (80.98±0.52 vs 69.14±0.89, P<0.05), increased efflux of rhodamine 123 (95.97±0.56 vs 12.40±0.44%, P<0.01), and up-regulated MDR1 expression. A total of 7 microRNAs and 605 mRNAs were differentially expressed between the two cell types. Of the differentially expressed mRNAs identified, regulator of G-protein signaling 10, high-temperature requirement protein A1, and nuclear protein 1 were found to be the putative targets of the differentially expressed microRNAs identified. These findings may open a new avenue for clarifying the mechanisms responsible for MDR in laryngeal cancer.

  10. Identification of microRNAs and mRNAs associated with multidrug resistance of human laryngeal cancer Hep-2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Wanzhong; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xin; Song, Wenzhi; Cui, Xiangyan; Yu, Hong; Zhu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) poses a serious impediment to the success of chemotherapy for laryngeal cancer. To identify microRNAs and mRNAs associated with MDR of human laryngeal cancer Hep-2 cells, we developed a multidrug-resistant human laryngeal cancer subline, designated Hep-2/v, by exposing Hep-2 cells to stepwise increasing concentrations of vincristine (0.02-0.96'µM). Microarray assays were performed to compare the microRNA and mRNA expression profiles of Hep-2 and Hep-2/v cells. Compared to Hep-2 cells, Hep-2/v cells were more resistant to chemotherapy drugs (∼45-fold more resistant to vincristine, 5.1-fold more resistant to cisplatin, and 5.6-fold more resistant to 5-fluorouracil) and had a longer doubling time (42.33±1.76 vs 28.75±1.12'h, P<0.05), higher percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase (80.98±0.52 vs 69.14±0.89, P<0.05), increased efflux of rhodamine 123 (95.97±0.56 vs 12.40±0.44%, P<0.01), and up-regulated MDR1 expression. A total of 7 microRNAs and 605 mRNAs were differentially expressed between the two cell types. Of the differentially expressed mRNAs identified, regulator of G-protein signaling 10, high-temperature requirement protein A1, and nuclear protein 1 were found to be the putative targets of the differentially expressed microRNAs identified. These findings may open a new avenue for clarifying the mechanisms responsible for MDR in laryngeal cancer

  11. Integrating human and environmental health in antibiotic risk assessment: A critical analysis of protection goals, species sensitivity and antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Page, Gareth; Gunnarsson, Lina; Snape, Jason; Tyler, Charles R

    2017-12-01

    Antibiotics are vital in the treatment of bacterial infectious diseases but when released into the environment they may impact non-target organisms that perform vital ecosystem services and enhance antimicrobial resistance development with significant consequences for human health. We evaluate whether the current environmental risk assessment regulatory guidance is protective of antibiotic impacts on the environment, protective of antimicrobial resistance, and propose science-based protection goals for antibiotic manufacturing discharges. A review and meta-analysis was conducted of aquatic ecotoxicity data for antibiotics and for minimum selective concentration data derived from clinically relevant bacteria. Relative species sensitivity was investigated applying general linear models, and predicted no effect concentrations were generated for toxicity to aquatic organisms and compared with predicted no effect concentrations for resistance development. Prokaryotes were most sensitive to antibiotics but the range of sensitivities spanned up to several orders of magnitude. We show reliance on one species of (cyano)bacteria and the 'activated sludge respiration inhibition test' is not sufficient to set protection levels for the environment. Individually, neither traditional aquatic predicted no effect concentrations nor predicted no effect concentrations suggested to safeguard for antimicrobial resistance, protect against environmental or human health effects (via antimicrobial resistance development). Including data from clinically relevant bacteria and also more species of environmentally relevant bacteria in the regulatory framework would help in defining safe discharge concentrations for antibiotics for patient use and manufacturing that would protect environmental and human health. It would also support ending unnecessary testing on metazoan species. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of Serial Thawing-Refreezing on Human Spermatozoa Resistance Using Cryovials and Straws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Ghasemian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We designed this study to detect the cryoinjury rate on human sperm after serialfreezing and thawing, taking into consideration the effects of using cryovials and straws.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, semen specimens obtained from 15 subjectswere divided into normozoospermic and oligozoospermic groups. Each of the normozoospermicand oligozoo spermic semen specimens were additionally divided into two groups: i. washed andii. unwashed. Specimens were repeatedly freeze-thawed by using cryovials and straws with thefast liquid nitrogen vapor method, until no motile sperm remained. Sperm motility, recovery, andmorphology rate were then determined after thawing, and compared between the groups whiletaking into consideration the effects of using cryovials and straws.Results: Motile spermatozoa were observed in all normozoospermic samples up to thaw 6 with bothcryovials and straws while in oligozoospermic specimens up to thaw 4 (straw and thaw 3 (cryovialin the freeze-thawing cycle. Normozoospermic sample analysis showed no significant difference inmorphology rate. There was a significant increase in motility and recovery percentages for washedsamples, which was observed with straws in compared to the unwashed groups. Oligozoospermicsample analysis indicated a significant increase in motility, recovery (p<0.01, and morphology(p<0.001 rates in washed specimens compared to unwashed specimens using straws. Theimportance of washing sperm was obvious for oligozoospermic specimens.Conclusion: Normozoospermic sperm resisted freezing longer than oligozoospermic sperm. Use ofstraws and cryovials made significant differences in motility, recovery, and morphology of sperm ineach thaw. This difference was slightly higher for oligozoospermic specimens. Results indicated thatthe percentage of motility was higher for washed normozoospermic specimens in each thaw whenstraws were used, whereas the percentage of motility, recovery, and

  13. Association Between Antimicrobial Resistance in Escherichia coli Isolates from Food Animals and Blood Stream Isolates from Humans in Europe: An Ecological Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vieira, Antonio; Collignon, Peter; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2011-01-01

    Background: In addition to medical antimicrobial usage, the use of antimicrobials in food animals contributes to the occurrence of resistance among some bacterial species isolated from infections in humans. Recently, several studies have indicated that a large proportion of Escherichia coli causing...... infections in humans, especially those resistant to antimicrobials, have an animal origin.Methods: We analyzed the correlation between the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in E. coli isolates from blood stream infections in humans and in E. coli isolates from poultry, pigs, and cattle between 2005...... and 2008 for 11 countries, using available surveillance data. We also assessed the correlation between human antimicrobial usage and the occurrence of resistance in E. coli isolates from blood stream infections.Results: Strong and significant correlations between prevalences of resistance to ampicillin (r...

  14. The antiapoptotic gene survivin is highly expressed in human chondrosarcoma and promotes drug resistance in chondrosarcoma cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Chondrosarcoma is virtually resistant to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Survivin, the smallest member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family, is a critical factor for tumor progression and resistance to conventional therapeutic approaches in a wide range of malignancies. However, the role of survivin in chondrosarcoma has not been well studied. We examined the importance of survivin gene expression in chondrosarcoma and analysed its influences on proliferation, apoptosis and resistance to chemotherapy in vitro. Methods Resected chondrosarcoma specimens from which paraffin-embedded tissues could be extracted were available from 12 patients. In vitro experiments were performed in human chondrosarcoma cell lines SW1353 and Hs819.T. Immunohistochemistry, immunoblot, quantitative PCR, RNA interference, gene-overexpression and analyses of cell proliferation and apoptosis were performed. Results Expression of survivin protein was detected in all chondrosarcoma specimens analyzed, while undetectable in adult human cartilage. RNA interference targeting survivin resulted in a G2/M-arrest of the cell cycle and led to increased rates of apoptosis in chondrosarcoma cells in vitro. Overexpression of survivin resulted in pronounced resistance to doxorubicin treatment. Conclusions These findings indicate that survivin plays a role in the pathogenesis and pronounced chemoresistance of high grade chondrosarcoma. Survivin antagonizing therapeutic strategies may lead to new treatment options in unresectable and metastasized chondrosarcoma. PMID:21457573

  15. The antiapoptotic gene survivin is highly expressed in human chondrosarcoma and promotes drug resistance in chondrosarcoma cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechler, Philipp; Renkawitz, Tobias; Campean, Valentina; Balakrishnan, Sanjeevi; Tingart, Markus; Grifka, Joachim; Schaumburger, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is virtually resistant to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Survivin, the smallest member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family, is a critical factor for tumor progression and resistance to conventional therapeutic approaches in a wide range of malignancies. However, the role of survivin in chondrosarcoma has not been well studied. We examined the importance of survivin gene expression in chondrosarcoma and analysed its influences on proliferation, apoptosis and resistance to chemotherapy in vitro. Resected chondrosarcoma specimens from which paraffin-embedded tissues could be extracted were available from 12 patients. In vitro experiments were performed in human chondrosarcoma cell lines SW1353 and Hs819.T. Immunohistochemistry, immunoblot, quantitative PCR, RNA interference, gene-overexpression and analyses of cell proliferation and apoptosis were performed. Expression of survivin protein was detected in all chondrosarcoma specimens analyzed, while undetectable in adult human cartilage. RNA interference targeting survivin resulted in a G 2 /M-arrest of the cell cycle and led to increased rates of apoptosis in chondrosarcoma cells in vitro. Overexpression of survivin resulted in pronounced resistance to doxorubicin treatment. These findings indicate that survivin plays a role in the pathogenesis and pronounced chemoresistance of high grade chondrosarcoma. Survivin antagonizing therapeutic strategies may lead to new treatment options in unresectable and metastasized chondrosarcoma

  16. The antiapoptotic gene survivin is highly expressed in human chondrosarcoma and promotes drug resistance in chondrosarcoma cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grifka Joachim

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chondrosarcoma is virtually resistant to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Survivin, the smallest member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family, is a critical factor for tumor progression and resistance to conventional therapeutic approaches in a wide range of malignancies. However, the role of survivin in chondrosarcoma has not been well studied. We examined the importance of survivin gene expression in chondrosarcoma and analysed its influences on proliferation, apoptosis and resistance to chemotherapy in vitro. Methods Resected chondrosarcoma specimens from which paraffin-embedded tissues could be extracted were available from 12 patients. In vitro experiments were performed in human chondrosarcoma cell lines SW1353 and Hs819.T. Immunohistochemistry, immunoblot, quantitative PCR, RNA interference, gene-overexpression and analyses of cell proliferation and apoptosis were performed. Results Expression of survivin protein was detected in all chondrosarcoma specimens analyzed, while undetectable in adult human cartilage. RNA interference targeting survivin resulted in a G2/M-arrest of the cell cycle and led to increased rates of apoptosis in chondrosarcoma cells in vitro. Overexpression of survivin resulted in pronounced resistance to doxorubicin treatment. Conclusions These findings indicate that survivin plays a role in the pathogenesis and pronounced chemoresistance of high grade chondrosarcoma. Survivin antagonizing therapeutic strategies may lead to new treatment options in unresectable and metastasized chondrosarcoma.

  17. Assessing Collagen and Elastin Pressure-dependent Microarchitectures in Live, Human Resistance Arteries by Label-free Fluorescence Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Thorsted, Bjarne; Brewer, Jonathan R

    2018-01-01

    The pathogenic contribution of resistance artery remodeling is documented in essential hypertension, diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. Investigations and development of microstructurally motivated mathematical models for understanding the mechanical properties of human resistance arteries...... in health and disease have the potential to aid understanding how disease and medical treatments affect the human microcirculation. To develop these mathematical models, it is essential to decipher the relationship between the mechanical and microarchitectural properties of the microvascular wall...... of interest. Image analyses are described for quantifying i) pressure-induced changes in internal elastic lamina branching angles and adventitial collagen straightness using Fiji and ii) collagen and elastin volume densities determined using Ilastik software. Preferably all mechanical and imaging measurements...

  18. Growth hormone-induced insulin resistance in human subjects involves reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nellemann, B.; Vendelbo, M.H.; Nielsen, Thomas Svava

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance induced by growth hormone (GH) is linked to promotion of lipolysis by unknown mechanisms. We hypothesized that suppression of the activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase in the active form (PDHa) underlies GH-induced insulin resistance similar to what is observed during fasting....

  19. Resistance to maribavir is associated with the exclusion of pUL27 from nucleoli during human cytomegalovirus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakki, Morgan; Drummond, Coyne; Houser, Benjamin; Marousek, Gail; Chou, Sunwen

    2011-01-01

    Select mutations in the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) gene UL27 confer low-grade resistance to the HCMV UL97 kinase inhibitor maribavir (MBV). It has been reported that the 608-amino acid UL27 gene product (pUL27) normally localizes to cell nuclei and nucleoli, whereas its truncation at codon 415, as found in a MBV-resistant mutant, results in cytoplasmic localization. We now show that in the context of full-length pUL27, diverse single amino acid substitutions associated with MBV resistance result in loss of its nucleolar localization when visualized after transient transfection, whereas substitutions representing normal interstrain polymorphism had no such effect. The same differences in localization were observed during a complete infection cycle with recombinant HCMV strains over-expressing full-length fluorescent pUL27 variants. Nested UL27 C-terminal truncation expression plasmids showed that amino acids 596–599 were required for the nucleolar localization of pUL27. These results indicate that the loss of a nucleolar function of pUL27 may contribute to MBV resistance, and that the nucleolar localization of pUL27 during HCMV infection depends not only on a carboxy-terminal domain but also on a property of pUL27 that is affected by MBV-resistant mutations, such as an interaction with component(s) of the nucleolus. PMID:21906628

  20. Cytotoxic and Apoptotic Effect of Structurally Similar Flavonoids on Parental and Drug-Resistant Cells of a Human Cervical Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenija Durgo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids are phytochemicals characterized by a wide range of biological activities, including antioxidant activity, the ability to modulate enzyme or cell receptor activity patterns, and to interfere with essential biochemical pathways. Using HeLa cells of a human cervical carcinoma, and their drug-resistant HeLa CK subline, the effects of three structurally related flavonoids (quercetin, fisetin and luteolin have been examined, in terms of their: (i cytotoxicity, (ii influence on intracellular glutathione (GSH level, (iii influence on glutathione S-transferase (GST activity, and (iv influence on the expression of apoptosis-related genes (PARP, Bcl-2, survivin. Fisetin was more toxic to resistant HeLa CK cell line than to parental cell line, causing decreased expression of survivin in the same cell line. Concentrations of 5 μM of the examined flavonoids caused PARP degradation in parental cell line, leading HeLa cell line into apoptotic cell death. The same event was not determined in the resistant cell line. Fisetin and luteolin induce glutathione and GST in the resistant cell line, pointing to complex cellular effects which could be responsible for higher sensitivity of the resistant cell line in comparison with the parental cell line. Prooxidative nature of the investigated flavonoids was not detected, so free radical formation is not responsible for the induction of GSH, GST and proapoptotic enzymes.

  1. Relaxing Responses to Hydrogen Peroxide and Nitric Oxide in Human Pericardial Resistance Arteries Stimulated with Endothelin-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leurgans, Thomas M; Bloksgaard, Maria; Irmukhamedov, Akhmadjon

    2018-01-01

    In human pericardial resistance arteries, effects of the endothelium-dependent vasodilator bradykinin are mediated by NO during contraction induced by K(+) or the TxA2 analogue U46619 and by H2 O2 during contraction by endothelin-1 (ET-1), respectively. We tested the hypotheses that ET-1 reduces...... also acts as an endothelium-dependent vasodilator. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  2. Exosome release and low pH belong to a framework of resistance of human melanoma cells to cisplatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Federici

    Full Text Available Intrinsic resistance to cytotoxic drugs has been a main issue in cancer therapy for decades. Microenvironmental acidity is a simple while highly efficient mechanism of chemoresistance, exploited through impairment of drug delivery. The latter is achieved by extracellular protonation and/or sequestration into acidic vesicles. This study investigates the importance of extracellular acidosis and nanovesicle (exosome release in the resistance of human tumour cell to cisplatin (CisPt; in parallel to proton pump inhibitors (PPI ability of interfering with these tumour cell features. The results showed that CisPt uptake by human tumour cells was markedly impaired by low pH conditions. Moreover, exosomes purified from supernatants of these cell cultures contained various amounts of CisPt, which correlated to the pH conditions of the culture medium. HPLC-Q-ICP-MS analysis revealed that exosome purified from tumour cell culture supernatants contained CisPt in its native form. PPI pre-treatment increased cellular uptake of CisPt, as compared to untreated cells, in an acidic-depend manner. Furthermore, it induced a clear inhibition of exosome release by tumour cells. Human tumours obtained from xenografts pretreated with PPI contained more CisPt as compared to tumours from xenografts treated with CisPt alone. Further analysis showed that in vivo PPI treatment induced a clear reduction in the plasmatic levels of tumour-derived exosomes which also contained lower level of CisPt. Altogether, these findings point to the identification of a double mechanism that human malignant melanoma use in resisting to a dreadful cellular poison such as cisplatin. This framework of resistance includes both low pH-dependent extracellular sequestration and an exosome-mediated elimination. Both mechanisms are markedly impaired by proton pump inhibition, leading to an increased CisPt-dependent cytotoxicity.

  3. Exosome release and low pH belong to a framework of resistance of human melanoma cells to cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Cristina; Petrucci, Francesco; Caimi, Stefano; Cesolini, Albino; Logozzi, Mariantonia; Borghi, Martina; D'Ilio, Sonia; Lugini, Luana; Violante, Nicola; Azzarito, Tommaso; Majorani, Costanza; Brambilla, Daria; Fais, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Intrinsic resistance to cytotoxic drugs has been a main issue in cancer therapy for decades. Microenvironmental acidity is a simple while highly efficient mechanism of chemoresistance, exploited through impairment of drug delivery. The latter is achieved by extracellular protonation and/or sequestration into acidic vesicles. This study investigates the importance of extracellular acidosis and nanovesicle (exosome) release in the resistance of human tumour cell to cisplatin (CisPt); in parallel to proton pump inhibitors (PPI) ability of interfering with these tumour cell features. The results showed that CisPt uptake by human tumour cells was markedly impaired by low pH conditions. Moreover, exosomes purified from supernatants of these cell cultures contained various amounts of CisPt, which correlated to the pH conditions of the culture medium. HPLC-Q-ICP-MS analysis revealed that exosome purified from tumour cell culture supernatants contained CisPt in its native form. PPI pre-treatment increased cellular uptake of CisPt, as compared to untreated cells, in an acidic-depend manner. Furthermore, it induced a clear inhibition of exosome release by tumour cells. Human tumours obtained from xenografts pretreated with PPI contained more CisPt as compared to tumours from xenografts treated with CisPt alone. Further analysis showed that in vivo PPI treatment induced a clear reduction in the plasmatic levels of tumour-derived exosomes which also contained lower level of CisPt. Altogether, these findings point to the identification of a double mechanism that human malignant melanoma use in resisting to a dreadful cellular poison such as cisplatin. This framework of resistance includes both low pH-dependent extracellular sequestration and an exosome-mediated elimination. Both mechanisms are markedly impaired by proton pump inhibition, leading to an increased CisPt-dependent cytotoxicity.

  4. Engineering human T cells for resistance to methotrexate and mycophenolate mofetil as an in vivo cell selection strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Jonnalagadda

    Full Text Available Gene transfer and drug selection systems that enforce ongoing transgene expression in vitro and in vivo which are compatible with human pharmaceutical drugs are currently underdeveloped. Here, we report on the utility of incorporating human enzyme muteins that confer resistance to the lymphotoxic/immunosuppressive drugs methotrexate (MTX and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF in a multicistronic lentiviral vector for in vivo T lymphocyte selection. We found that co-expression of human dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR(FS; L22F, F31S and inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase II (IMPDH2(IY; T333I, S351Y conferred T cell resistance to the cytocidal and anti-proliferative effects of these drugs at concentrations that can be achieved clinically (up to 0.1 µM MTX and 1.0 µM MPA. Furthermore, using a immunodeficient mouse model that supports the engraftment of central memory derived human T cells, in vivo selection studies demonstrate that huEGFRt(+DHFR(FS+IMPDH2(IY+ T cells could be enriched following adoptive transfer either by systemic administration of MTX alone (4.4 -fold, MMF alone (2.9-fold, or combined MTX and MMF (4.9-fold. These findings demonstrate the utility of both DHFR(FS/MTX and IMPDH2(IY/MMF for in vivo selection of lentivirally transduced human T cells. Vectors incorporating these muteins in combination with other therapeutic transgenes may facilitate the selective engraftment of therapeutically active cells in recipients.

  5. Engineering human T cells for resistance to methotrexate and mycophenolate mofetil as an in vivo cell selection strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonnalagadda, Mahesh; Brown, Christine E; Chang, Wen-Chung; Ostberg, Julie R; Forman, Stephen J; Jensen, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    Gene transfer and drug selection systems that enforce ongoing transgene expression in vitro and in vivo which are compatible with human pharmaceutical drugs are currently underdeveloped. Here, we report on the utility of incorporating human enzyme muteins that confer resistance to the lymphotoxic/immunosuppressive drugs methotrexate (MTX) and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in a multicistronic lentiviral vector for in vivo T lymphocyte selection. We found that co-expression of human dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR(FS); L22F, F31S) and inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase II (IMPDH2(IY); T333I, S351Y) conferred T cell resistance to the cytocidal and anti-proliferative effects of these drugs at concentrations that can be achieved clinically (up to 0.1 µM MTX and 1.0 µM MPA). Furthermore, using a immunodeficient mouse model that supports the engraftment of central memory derived human T cells, in vivo selection studies demonstrate that huEGFRt(+)DHFR(FS+)IMPDH2(IY+) T cells could be enriched following adoptive transfer either by systemic administration of MTX alone (4.4 -fold), MMF alone (2.9-fold), or combined MTX and MMF (4.9-fold). These findings demonstrate the utility of both DHFR(FS)/MTX and IMPDH2(IY)/MMF for in vivo selection of lentivirally transduced human T cells. Vectors incorporating these muteins in combination with other therapeutic transgenes may facilitate the selective engraftment of therapeutically active cells in recipients.

  6. Engineering HIV-resistant human CD4+ T cells with CXCR4-specific zinc-finger nucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig B Wilen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 entry requires the cell surface expression of CD4 and either the CCR5 or CXCR4 coreceptors on host cells. Individuals homozygous for the ccr5Δ32 polymorphism do not express CCR5 and are protected from infection by CCR5-tropic (R5 virus strains. As an approach to inactivating CCR5, we introduced CCR5-specific zinc-finger nucleases into human CD4+ T cells prior to adoptive transfer, but the need to protect cells from virus strains that use CXCR4 (X4 in place of or in addition to CCR5 (R5X4 remains. Here we describe engineering a pair of zinc finger nucleases that, when introduced into human T cells, efficiently disrupt cxcr4 by cleavage and error-prone non-homologous DNA end-joining. The resulting cells proliferated normally and were resistant to infection by X4-tropic HIV-1 strains. CXCR4 could also be inactivated in ccr5Δ32 CD4+ T cells, and we show that such cells were resistant to all strains of HIV-1 tested. Loss of CXCR4 also provided protection from X4 HIV-1 in a humanized mouse model, though this protection was lost over time due to the emergence of R5-tropic viral mutants. These data suggest that CXCR4-specific ZFNs may prove useful in establishing resistance to CXCR4-tropic HIV for autologous transplant in HIV-infected individuals.

  7. The influence of acute resistance exercise on cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 activity and protein levels in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Chad C; O'Connor, Devin T; Steinmeyer, Robert; Del Mundo, Jonathon D; McMullan, David R; Whitt, Jamie A; Ramos, Jahir E; Gonzales, Rayna J

    2013-07-01

    This study evaluated the activity and content of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and -2 in response to acute resistance exercise (RE) in human skeletal muscle. Previous work suggests that COX-1, but not COX-2, is the primary COX isoform elevated with resistance exercise in human skeletal muscle. COX activity, however, has not been assessed after resistance exercise in humans. It was hypothesized that RE would increase COX-1 but not COX-2 activity. Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis of nine young men (25 ± 1 yr) at baseline (preexercise), 4, and 24 h after a single bout of knee extensor RE (three sets of 10 repetitions at 70% of maximum). Tissue lysate was assayed for COX-1 and COX-2 activity. COX-1 and COX-2 protein levels were measured via Western blot analysis. COX-1 activity increased at 4 h (P 0.05) with acute RE. In contrast, COX-2 protein levels were nearly 3-fold greater (P > 0.05) at 4 h and 5-fold greater (P = 0.06) at 24 h, compared with preexercise. In conclusion, COX-1 activity increases transiently with exercise independent of COX-1 protein levels. In contrast, both COX-2 activity and protein levels were elevated with exercise, and this elevation persisted to at least 24 h after RE.

  8. Resistance monitoring of human pathogenic bacteria in Germany, SWOT analysis and examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Wolfgang

    2006-06-01

    Determination of antibiotic resistance has two main goals in clinical-microbiological diagnosis. One aspect is preservation of antibacterial chemotherapy. Furthermore, trends in resistance development should be monitored and should serve as an early warning-system for occurrence and spread of new and clinically important antibiotic resistances. Plenty of data on antibiotic resistance is gathered on a routine basis in medical-microbiological diagnosis and often it is stored in electronic databases that could be interlinked. The main reason that the available data is not being used for resistance monitoring in Germany is the widely used methodology of the agar diffusion test. It is the cheapest and by far the most inaccurate method of determining resistance. The test results are not always comparable with tests for all substance groups from national standards (also limited international comparability). Trend analysis of the resistance situation in Germany can therefore only be determined through individual studies. These studies are discussed according to a SWOT analysis (SWOT = Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats).

  9. Genotypic and Phenotypic Markers of Livestock-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus CC9 in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiaohua; Wang, Xiaolin; Fan, Yanping; Peng, Yang; Li, Ling; Li, Shunming; Huang, Jingya; Yao, Zhenjiang; Chen, Sidong

    2016-07-01

    Use of antimicrobials in industrial food animal production is associated with the presence of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among animals and humans. The livestock-associated (LA) methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 9 (CC9) is associated with animals and related workers in Asia. This study aimed to explore the genotypic and phenotypic markers of LA-MRSA CC9 in humans. We conducted a cross-sectional study of livestock workers and controls in Guangdong, China. The study participants responded to a questionnaire and provided a nasal swab for S. aureus analysis. The resulting isolates were assessed for antibiotic susceptibility, multilocus sequence type, and immune evasion cluster (IEC) genes. Livestock workers had significantly higher rates of S. aureus CC9 (odds ratio [OR] = 30.98; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.06 to 236.39) and tetracycline-resistant S. aureus (OR = 3.26; 95% CI, 2.12 to 5.00) carriage than controls. All 19 S. aureus CC9 isolates from livestock workers were MRSA isolates and also exhibited the characteristics of resistance to several classes of antibiotics and absence of the IEC genes. Notably, the interaction analyses indicated phenotype-phenotype (OR = 525.7; 95% CI, 60.0 to 4,602.1) and gene-environment (OR = 232.3; 95% CI, 28.7 to 1,876.7) interactions associated with increased risk for livestock-associated S. aureus CC9 carriage. These findings suggest that livestock-associated S. aureus and MRSA (CC9, IEC negative, and tetracycline resistant) in humans are associated with occupational livestock contact, raising questions about the potential for occupational exposure to opportunistic S. aureus This study adds to existing knowledge by giving insight into the genotypic and phenotypic markers of LA-MRSA. Our findings suggest that livestock-associated S. aureus and MRSA (CC9, IEC negative, and tetracycline resistant) in humans are associated with occupational livestock contact. Future studies should direct more

  10. Circumvention of acquired resistance to doxorubicin in K562 human leukemia cells by oxatomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, M; Fujita, R; Furusawa, S; Takayanagi, M; Sasaki, K; Satoh, S

    2001-10-01

    We studied the effect of oxatomide, an antiallergic drug, on the resistance of K562 cells to doxorubicin. Oxatomide synergistically potentiated the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin in doxorubicin-resistant K562 cells (K562/DXR) at a concentration of 1-10 microM, but had hardly any synergistic effect on the parental cell line (K562) at the same concentration. Oxatomide inhibit P-glycoprotein pump-efflux activity and the binding of [3H]-azidopine to the cell-surface protein P-glycoprotein, in a dose-related manner. These results indicate that oxatomide reverses the multidrug-resistance phenotype through direct interaction with P-glycoprotein.

  11. The effects of antibiotic usage in food animals on the development of antimicrobial resistance of importance for humans in Campylobacter and Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    1999-01-01

    Modern food animal production depends on use of large amounts of antibiotics for disease control. This provides favourable conditions for the spread and persistence of antimicrobial-resistant zoonotic bacteria such as Campylobacter and E. coli O157. The occurrence of antimicrobial resistance...... to antimicrobials used in human therapy is increasing in human pathogenic Campylobacter and E. coli from animals. There is an urgent need to implement strategies for prudent use of antibiotics in food animal production to prevent further increases in the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in food-borne human...

  12. Genetic Structure and Antimicrobial Resistance of Escherichia coli and Cryptic Clades in Birds with Diverse Human Associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyton, Michaela D J; Pi, Hongfei; Vangchhia, Belinda; Abraham, Sam; Trott, Darren J; Johnson, James R; Gordon, David M

    2015-08-01

    The manner and extent to which birds associate with humans may influence the genetic attributes and antimicrobial resistance of their commensal Escherichia communities through strain transmission and altered selection pressures. In this study, we determined whether the distribution of the different Escherichia coli phylogenetic groups and cryptic clades, the occurrence of 49 virulence associated genes, and/or the prevalence of resistance to 12 antimicrobials differed between four groups of birds from Australia with contrasting types of human association. We found that birds sampled in suburban and wilderness areas had similar Escherichia communities. The Escherichia communities of backyard domestic poultry were phylogenetically distinct from the Escherichia communities sourced from all other birds, with a large proportion (46%) of poultry strains belonging to phylogenetic group A and a significant minority (17%) belonging to the cryptic clades. Wild birds sampled from veterinary and wildlife rehabilitation centers (in-care birds) carried Escherichia isolates that possessed particular virulence-associated genes more often than Escherichia isolates from birds sampled in suburban and wilderness areas. The Escherichia isolates from both the backyard poultry and in-care birds were more likely to be multidrug resistant than the Escherichia isolates from wild birds. We also detected a multidrug-resistant E. coli strain circulating in a wildlife rehabilitation center, reinforcing the importance of adequate hygiene practices when handling and caring for wildlife. We suggest that the relatively high frequency of antimicrobial resistance in the in-care birds and backyard poultry is due primarily to the use of antimicrobials in these animals, and we recommend that the treatment protocols used for these birds be reviewed. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced resistance to doxorubicin is reversed by paeonol treatment in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulu Fan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress is generally activated in solid tumors and results in tumor cell anti-apoptosis and drug resistance. Paeonol (Pae, 2-hydroxy-4-methoxyacetophenone, is a natural product extracted from the root of Paeonia Suffruticosa Andrew. Although Pae displays anti-neoplastic activity and increases the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs in various cell lines and in animal models, studies related to the effect of Pae on ER stress-induced resistance to chemotherapeutic agents in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC are poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we investigated the effect of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress response during resistance of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells to doxorubicin. Treatment with the ER stress-inducer tunicamycin (TM before the addition of doxorubicin reduced the rate of apoptosis induced by doxorubicin. Interestingly, co-pretreatment with tunicamycin and Pae significantly increased apoptosis induced by doxorubicin. Furthermore, induction of ER stress resulted in increasing expression of COX-2 concomitant with inactivation of Akt and up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic transcription factor CHOP (GADD153 in HepG2 cells. These cellular changes in gene expression and Akt activation may be an important resistance mechanism against doxorubicin in hepatocellular carcinoma cells undergoing ER stress. However, co-pretreatment with tunicamycin and Pae decreased the expression of COX-2 and levels of activation of Akt as well as increasing the levels of CHOP in HCC cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that Pae reverses ER stress-induced resistance to doxorubicin in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells by targeting COX-2 mediated inactivation of PI3K/AKT/CHOP.

  14. Differentially expressed proteins in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells sensitive and resistant to paclitaxel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavlíková, N.; Bartoňová, I.; Balušíková, K.; Kopperová, D.; Halada, Petr; Kovář, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 333, č. 1 (2015), s. 1-10 ISSN 0014-4827 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Breast cancer * Taxane resistance * 2-D electrophoresis Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.378, year: 2015

  15. Human-Finger Electronics Based on Opposing Humidity-Resistance Responses in Carbon Nanofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Tai, Yanlong; Lubineau, Gilles

    2017-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials have excellent humidity sensing properties. Here, it is demonstrated that multiwalled carbon-nanotube (MWCNT)- and reduced-graphene-oxide (rGO)-based conductive films have opposite humidity/electrical resistance responses

  16. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Protease and the Emergence of Drug Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Nina Rødtness

    in multi-drug-resistant PRs. Computational analysis of a vast number of inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 PR variants can broaden the knowledge of how and why the mutations arise, which would be a great advantage in the design on resistance-evading inhibitors. Here we present a diverse system to select...... in the virus life cycle has made it a major target for drug development and active site competitive inhibitors have been successful in the battle against HIV. Unfortunately, the massive drug pressure along with high-level replication and lack of proofreading by the viral reverse transcriptase have resulted...... for catalytically active HIV-1 PR in the presence of inhibitor. The system is based on the protein AraC, which regulates transcription of the araA, araB and araD genes necessary for arabinose catabolism in Escherichia coli, and its effectiveness was demonstrated by the isolation of both known and unknown inhibitor-resistant...

  17. Emergence and spread of a human-transmissible multidrug-resistant nontuberculous mycobacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryant, Josephine M; Grogono, Dorothy M; Rodriguez-Rincon, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Lung infections with Mycobacterium abscessus, a species of multidrug-resistant nontuberculous mycobacteria, are emerging as an important global threat to individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF), in whom M. abscessus accelerates inflammatory lung damage, leading to increased morbidity and mortality....

  18. The role of miRNA regulation in cancer progression and drug resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Tejal

    RNAs in the context of cancer biology, drug resistance and disease progression. The first project described in Chapter 6 addresses the problem of tamoxifen resistance, an anti-estrogen drug that is generally highly effective in the treatment of ER-positive breast cancers. The underlying molecular mechanisms...... to the disease transformation. In summary, this thesis focuses on regulatory role of miRNAs in drug resistance and disease progression. The findings provide hints toward various biologically and perhaps therapeutically relevant gene regulatory events. This thesis demonstrates the right choice of data analysis...... for the acquired resistance to tamoxifen are not very well understood. Therefore, with the aid of miRNA and gene expression profiles for MCF7/S0.5 (tamoxifen sensitive) and three MCF7/S0.5 derived tamoxifen resistant cell lines, we obtained several miRNA-mediated regulatory events in the tamoxifen resistant cell...

  19. Increased p38-MAPK is responsible for chemotherapy resistance in human gastric cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Xianling; Zhang, Baihe; Wu, Mengchao; Wei, Lixin; Ma, Nannan; Wang, Jin; Song, Jianrui; Bu, Xinxin; Cheng, Yue; Sun, Kai; Xiong, Haiyan; Jiang, Guocheng

    2008-01-01

    Chemoresistance is one of the main obstacles to successful cancer therapy and is frequently associated with Multidrug resistance (MDR). Many different mechanisms have been suggested to explain the development of an MDR phenotype in cancer cells. One of the most studied mechanisms is the overexpression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), which is a product of the MDR1 gene. Tumor cells often acquire the drug-resistance phenotype due to upregulation of the MDR1 gene. Overexpression of MDR1 gene has often been reported in primary gastric adenocarcinoma. This study investigated the role of p38-MAPK signal pathway in vincristine-resistant SGC7901/VCR cells. P-gp and MDR1 RNA were detected by Western blot analysis and RT-PCR amplification. Mitgen-activated protein kinases and function of P-gp were demonstrated by Western blot and FACS Aria cytometer analysis. Ap-1 activity and cell apoptosis were detected by Dual-Luciferase Reporter Assay and annexin V-PI dual staining. The vincristine-resistant SGC7901/VCR cells with increased expression of the multidrug-resistance 1 (MDR1) gene were resistant to P-gp-related drug and P-gp-unrelated drugs. Constitutive increases of phosphorylated p38-MAPK and AP-1 activities were also found in the drug-resistant cells. Inhibition of p38-MAPK by SB202190 reduced activator protein-1 (AP-1) activity and MDR1 expression levels and increased the sensitivity of SGC7901/VCR cells to chemotherapy. Activation of the p38-MAPK pathway might be responsible for the modulation of P-glycoprotein-mediated and P-glycoprotein-unmediated multidrug resistance in the SGC7901/VCR cell line

  20. Novel and Reversible Mechanisms of Smoking-Induced Insulin Resistance in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Bergman, Bryan C.; Perreault, Leigh; Hunerdosse, Devon; Kerege, Anna; Playdon, Mary; Samek, Ali M.; Eckel, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    Smoking is the most common cause of preventable morbidity and mortality in the United States, in part because it is an independent risk factor for the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. However, mechanisms responsible for smoking-induced insulin resistance are unclear. In this study, we found smokers were less insulin sensitive compared with controls, which increased after either 1 or 2 weeks of smoking cessation. Improvements in insulin sensitivity after smoking cessation...

  1. Profiling of circulating microRNAs after a bout of acute resistance exercise in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuji Sawada

    Full Text Available Recent studies have revealed a new aspect of physiological regulation in which microRNAs (miRNAs play fundamental roles in diverse biological and pathological processes. Furthermore, it was recently discovered that miRNAs are stably secreted into blood and that circulating miRNAs may play important roles in cell-cell communication. Here, we examined whether the circulating miRNA profile is affected by acute resistance exercise. Twelve males performed a resistance exercise session (bench press and leg press, consisting of five sets of 10 repetitions at 70% of maximum strength, with a 1 min rest between sets. Blood samples were taken before exercise, and at 0 and 60 min, 1 day, and 3 days after exercise. The circulating miRNA profile was determined by microarray analysis. Quantitative real-time PCR confirmed that the miR-149* level increased three days after resistance exercise. In contrast, the miR-146a and miR-221 levels decreased three days after resistance exercise. Our findings suggest that circulating miRNA levels change in response to acute resistance exercise, and miRNAs may play important roles in resistance-exercise-induced adaptation.

  2. Dioxin exerts anti-estrogenic actions in a novel dioxin-responsive telomerase-immortalized epithelial cell line of the porcine oviduct (TERT-OPEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine; Pocar, Paola; Kauffold, Johannes; Klonisch, Thomas

    2006-04-01

    Oviduct epithelial cells are important for the nourishment and survival of ovulated oocytes and early embryos, and they respond to the steroid hormones estrogen and progesterone. Endocrine-disrupting polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAH) are environmental toxins that act in part through the ligand-activated transcription factor arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR; dioxin receptor), and exposure to PHAH has been shown to decrease fertility. To investigate effects of PHAHs on the oviduct epithelium as a potential target tissue of dioxin-type endocrine disruptors, we have established a novel telomerase-immortalized oviduct porcine epithelial cell line (TERT-OPEC). TERT-OPEC exhibited active telomerase and the immunoreactive epithelial marker cytokeratin but lacked the stromal marker vimentin. TERT-OPEC contained functional estrogen receptor (ER)-alpha and AhR, as determined by the detection of ER-alpha- and AhR-specific target molecules. Treatment of TERT-OPEC with the AhR ligand 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) resulted in a significant increase in the production of the cytochrome P-450 microsomal enzyme CYP1A1. Activated AhR caused a downregulation of ER nuclear protein fraction and significantly decreased ER-signaling in TERT-OPEC as determined by ERE-luciferase transient transfection assays. In summary, the TCDD-induced and AhR-mediated anti-estrogenic responses by TERT-OPEC suggest that PHAH affect the predominantly estrogen-dependent differentiation of the oviduct epithelium within the fallopian tube. This action then alters the local endocrine milieu, potentially resulting in a largely unexplored cause of impaired embryonic development and female infertility.

  3. Sequence-Based Characterization of Tn5801-Like Genomic Islands in Tetracycline-Resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and Other Gram-positive Bacteria from Humans and Animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Vries, Lisbeth Elvira; Hasman, Henrik; Jurado Rabadán, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in pathogens is often associated with mobile genetic elements, such as genomic islands (GI) including integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs). These can transfer resistance genes within and between bacteria from humans and/or animals. The aim of this study was to investi......Antibiotic resistance in pathogens is often associated with mobile genetic elements, such as genomic islands (GI) including integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs). These can transfer resistance genes within and between bacteria from humans and/or animals. The aim of this study......-like GIs appear to be relatively common in tetracycline-resistant S. pseudintermedius in Denmark. Almost identical Tn5801-like GIs were identified in different Gram-positive species of pet and human origin, suggesting that horizontal transfer of these elements has occurred between S. pseudintermedius...

  4. Identification of genes associated with cisplatin resistance in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Zhou, Xiaojian; Qiu, Weiliu; Chen, Fangan; Chen, Wantao

    2006-01-01

    Cisplatin is widely used for chemotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. However, details of the molecular mechanism responsible for cisplatin resistance are still unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the expression of genes related to cisplatin resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. A cisplatin-resistant cell line, Tca/cisplatin, was established from a cisplatin-sensitive cell line, Tca8113, which was derived from moderately-differentiated tongue squamous cell carcinoma. Global gene expression in this resistant cell line and its sensitive parent cell line was analyzed using Affymetrix HG-U95Av2 microarrays. Candidate genes involved in DNA repair, the MAP pathway and cell cycle regulation were chosen to validate the microarray analysis results. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis following cisplatin exposure were also investigated. Cisplatin resistance in Tca/cisplatin cells was stable for two years in cisplatin-free culture medium. The IC50 for cisplatin in Tca/cisplatin was 6.5-fold higher than that in Tca8113. Microarray analysis identified 38 genes that were up-regulated and 25 that were down-regulated in this cell line. Some were novel candidates, while others are involved in well-characterized mechanisms that could be relevant to cisplatin resistance, such as RECQL for DNA repair and MAP2K6 in the MAP pathway; all the genes were further validated by Real-time PCR. The cell cycle-regulated genes CCND1 and CCND3 were involved in cisplatin resistance; 24-hour exposure to 10 μM cisplatin induced a marked S phase block in Tca/cisplatin cells but not in Tca8113 cells. The Tca8113 cell line and its stable drug-resistant variant Tca/cisplatin provided a useful model for identifying candidate genes responsible for the mechanism of cisplatin resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma. Our data provide a useful basis for screening candidate targets for early diagnosis and further intervention in cisplatin resistance

  5. Identification of genes associated with cisplatin resistance in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Ping

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cisplatin is widely used for chemotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. However, details of the molecular mechanism responsible for cisplatin resistance are still unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the expression of genes related to cisplatin resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. Methods A cisplatin-resistant cell line, Tca/cisplatin, was established from a cisplatin-sensitive cell line, Tca8113, which was derived from moderately-differentiated tongue squamous cell carcinoma. Global gene expression in this resistant cell line and its sensitive parent cell line was analyzed using Affymetrix HG-U95Av2 microarrays. Candidate genes involved in DNA repair, the MAP pathway and cell cycle regulation were chosen to validate the microarray analysis results. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis following cisplatin exposure were also investigated. Results Cisplatin resistance in Tca/cisplatin cells was stable for two years in cisplatin-free culture medium. The IC50 for cisplatin in Tca/cisplatin was 6.5-fold higher than that in Tca8113. Microarray analysis identified 38 genes that were up-regulated and 25 that were down-regulated in this cell line. Some were novel candidates, while others are involved in well-characterized mechanisms that could be relevant to cisplatin resistance, such as RECQL for DNA repair and MAP2K6 in the MAP pathway; all the genes were further validated by Real-time PCR. The cell cycle-regulated genes CCND1 and CCND3 were involved in cisplatin resistance; 24-hour exposure to 10 μM cisplatin induced a marked S phase block in Tca/cisplatin cells but not in Tca8113 cells. Conclusion The Tca8113 cell line and its stable drug-resistant variant Tca/cisplatin provided a useful model for identifying candidate genes responsible for the mechanism of cisplatin resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma. Our data provide a useful basis for screening candidate targets for early diagnosis

  6. C-Cbl reverses HER2-mediated tamoxifen resistance in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Xu, Ling; Che, Xiaofang; Li, Haizhou; Zhang, Ye; Song, Na; Wen, Ti; Hou, Kezuo; Yang, Yi; Zhou, Lu; Xin, Xing; Xu, Lu; Zeng, Xue; Shi, Sha; Liu, Yunpeng; Qu, Xiujuan; Teng, Yuee

    2018-05-02

    Tamoxifen is a frontline therapy for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer in premenopausal women. However, many patients develop resistance to tamoxifen, and the mechanism underlying tamoxifen resistance is not well understood. Here we examined whether ER-c-Src-HER2 complex formation is involved in tamoxifen resistance. MTT and colony formation assays were used to measure cell viability and proliferation. Western blot was used to detect protein expression and protein complex formations were detected by immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence. SiRNA was used to examine the function of HER2 in of BT474 cells. An in vivo xenograft animal model was established to examine the role of c-Cbl in tumor growth. MTT and colony formation assay showed that BT474 cells are resistant to tamoxifen and T47D cells are sensitive to tamoxifen. Immunoprecipitation experiments revealed ER-c-Src-HER2 complex formation in BT474 cells but not in T47D cells. However, ER-c-Src-HER2 complex formation was detected after overexpressing HER2 in T47D cells and these cells were more resistant to tamoxifen. HER2 knockdown by siRNA in BT474 cells reduced ER-c-Src-HER2 complex formation and reversed tamoxifen resistance. ER-c-Src-HER2 complex formation was also disrupted and tamoxifen resistance was reversed in BT474 cells by the c-Src inhibitor PP2 and HER2 antibody trastuzumab. Nystatin, a lipid raft inhibitor, reduced ER-c-Src-HER2 complex formation and partially reversed tamoxifen resistance. ER-c-Src-HER2 complex formation was disrupted by overexpression of c-Cbl but not by the c-Cbl ubiquitin ligase mutant. In addition, c-Cbl could reverse tamoxifen resistance in BT474 cells, but the ubiquitin ligase mutant had no effect. The effect of c-Cbl was validated in BT474 tumor-bearing nude mice in vivo. Immunofluorescence also revealed ER-c-Src-HER2 complex formation was reduced in tumor tissues of nude mice with c-Cbl overexpression. Our results suggested that c-Cbl can reverse tamoxifen

  7. Prevalence, antimicrobial resistance and risk factors for thermophilic Campylobacter infections in symptomatic and asymptomatic humans in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Komba, E. V. G.; Mdegela, R. H.; Msoffe, P. L. M.

    2015-01-01

    testing employed the disc diffusion method. A small proportion of the test isolates was also subjected to agar dilution method. Risk factors for human illness were determined in an unmatched case-control study. Thermophilic Campylobacter were isolated from 11.4% of the screened individuals (n = 1195...... dilution methods indicated a good correlation, and the tests were in agreement to each other (κ ≥ 0.75). Human illness was found to be associated with young age and consumption of chicken meat and pre-prepared salad. Our data indicate the presence of antibiotic-resistant thermophilic Campylobacter...... in humans in the study area. There is a need for routine investigation of the presence of the organisms in gastroenteritis aetiology, including determination of their antibiotic susceptibilities....

  8. Evidence for altered transport of insulin across the blood-brain barrier in insulin-resistant humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heni, Martin; Schöpfer, Patricia; Peter, Andreas; Sartorius, Tina; Fritsche, Andreas; Synofzik, Matthis; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Maetzler, Walter; Hennige, Anita M

    2014-08-01

    Eating behavior, body weight regulation, peripheral glucose metabolism, and cognitive function depend on adequate insulin action in the brain, and recent studies in humans suggested that impaired insulin action in the brain emerges upon fat intake, obesity, and genetic variants. As insulin enters into the brain in a receptor-mediated fashion, we hypothesized that whole-body insulin sensitivity might affect the transport of insulin into the brain and contribute to the aversive effect of insulin resistance in the central nervous system. In this study, we aimed to determine the ratio of insulin in the cerebrospinal fluid and serum to whole-body insulin sensitivity. Healthy human subjects participated in an oral glucose tolerance test to determine whole-body insulin sensitivity and underwent lumbar puncture. Blood and CSF concentrations of insulin were significantly correlated. The CSF/serum ratio for insulin was significantly associated with whole body insulin sensitivity with reduced insulin transported into the CSF in insulin-resistant subjects. Together, our data suggest that transport of insulin into the CSF relates to peripheral insulin sensitivity and impairs insulin action in the brain. This underlines the need for sensitizing measures in insulin-resistant subjects.

  9. The significance of crack-resistance curves to the mixed-mode fracture toughness of human cortical bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Launey, Maximilien E.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2010-03-25

    The majority of fracture mechanics studies on the toughness of bone have been performed under tensile loading. However, it has recently been shown that the toughness of human cortical bone in the transverse (breaking) orientation is actually much lower in shear (mode II) than in tension (mode I); a fact that is physiologically relevant as in vivo bone is invariably loaded multiaxially. Since bone is a material that derives its fracture resistance primarily during crack growth through extrinsic toughening mechanisms, such as crack deflection and bridging, evaluation of its toughness is best achieved through measurements of the crack-resistance or R-curve, which describes the fracture toughness as a function of crack extension. Accordingly, in this study, we attempt to measure for the first time the R-curve fracture toughness of human cortical bone under physiologically relevant mixed-mode loading conditions. We show that the resulting mixed-mode (mode I + II) toughness depends strongly on the crack trajectory and is the result of the competition between the paths of maximum mechanical driving force and 'weakest' microstructural resistance.

  10. Doxorubicin-induced mitophagy contributes to drug resistance in cancer stem cells from HCT8 human colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chen; Luo, Lan; Guo, Chang-Ying; Goto, Shinji; Urata, Yoshishige; Shao, Jiang-Hua; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2017-03-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are known to be drug resistant. Mitophagy selectively degrades unnecessary or damaged mitochondria by autophagy during cellular stress. To investigate the potential role of mitophagy in drug resistance in CSCs, we purified CD133 + /CD44 + CSCs from HCT8 human colorectal cancer cells and then exposed to doxorubicin (DXR). Compared with parental cells, CSCs were more resistant to DXR treatment. Although DXR treatment enhanced autophagy levels in both cell types, the inhibition of autophagy by ATG7 silencing significantly increased the toxicity of DXR only in parental cells, not in CSCs. Interestingly, the level of mitochondrial superoxide was detected to be significantly lower in CSCs than in parental cells after DXR treatment. Furthermore, the mitophagy level and expression of BNIP3L, a mitophagy regulator, were significantly higher in CSCs than in parental cells after DXR treatment. Silencing BNIP3L significantly halted mitophagy and enhanced the sensitivity to DXR in CSCs. Our data suggested that mitophagy, but not non-selective autophagy, likely contributes to drug resistance in CSCs isolated from HCT8 cells. Further studies in other cancer cell lines will be needed to confirm our findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Technetium-99m sestamibi uptake in human breast carcinoma cell lines displaying glutathione-associated drug-resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabasakal, L.; Oezker, K.; Hayward, M.; Akansel, G.; Griffith, O.; Isitman, A.T.; Hellman, R.; Collier, D.

    1996-01-01

    An in vitro study was designed to evaluate the uptake of sestamibi (MIBI) in P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and glutathione-associated (GSH) multidrug-resistant (MDR) cell lines. MIBI uptake was studied in various human breast carcinoma cell lines, i.e. in wild-type (MCF7/wt) cells, in adriamycin-resistant (MCF7/adr) cells which express Pgp and in melphalan-resistant (MCF7/mph) cells with increased levels of GSH. The effects of buthiomine sulphoximine (BSO) and verapamil on MIBI uptake were also studied in the MCF7/mph and MCF7/adr cells respectively. The cells were incubated for 1 h with a dose of 0.1 MBq thallium-201 and technetium-99m MIBI. Both BIBI and 201 Tl uptakes were higher for MCF7/mph cells than for the other cells studied. The mean MIBI uptake in MCF7/adr cells was significantly lower than that in MCF7/wt cells (1.9%±0.5% vs 3.1%.0.6%; P 0.1). This study suggests that the uptake of MIBI is not diminished by glutathione-associated drug resistance and that MIBI uptake in a tumour sample does not necessarly indicate that a cancer is sensitive to drugs. (orig.)

  12. FOXP3 renders activated human regulatory T cells resistant to restimulation-induced cell death by suppressing SAP expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Gil; Voss, Kelsey; Yan, Toria F; Kim, Yong Chan; Kortum, Robert L; Scott, David W; Snow, Andrew L

    2018-05-01

    Restimulation-induced cell death (RICD) is an apoptotic program that regulates effector T cell expansion, triggered by repeated stimulation through the T cell receptor (TCR) in the presence of interleukin-2 (IL-2). Although CD4 + regulatory T cells (Tregs) consume IL-2 and experience frequent TCR stimulation, they are highly resistant to RICD. Resistance in Tregs is dependent on the forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) transcription factor, although the mechanism remains unclear. T cells from patients with X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP-1), that lack the adaptor molecule SLAM-associated protein (SAP), are also resistant to RICD. Here we demonstrate that normal Tregs express very low levels of SAP compared to conventional T cells. FOXP3 reduces SAP expression by directly binding to and repressing the SH2D1A (SAP) promoter. Indeed, ectopic SAP expression restores RICD sensitivity in human FOXP3 + Tregs. Our findings illuminate the mechanism behind FOXP3-mediated RICD resistance in Tregs, providing new insight into their long-term persistence. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from food production animals to humans: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broens, E.M.; Cleef, van B.A.G.L.; Graat, E.A.M.; Kluytmans, J.A.J.W.

    2008-01-01

    International surveillance of antimicrobial use in food animal production shows that methicillinresistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), traditionally a human pathogen associated with hospitals, has emerged in the community and animals. Since 1961, MRSA has been causing human infections in hospitals

  14. HYPERTHERMIC POTENTIATION OF CISPLATIN TOXICITY IN A HUMAN SMALL-CELL LUNG-CARCINOMA CELL-LINE AND A CISPLATIN-RESISTANT SUBLINE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HETTINGA, JVE; LEMSTRA, W; MEIJER, C; MULDER, NH; KONINGS, AWT; DEVRIES, EGE; KAMPINGA, HH

    1994-01-01

    A human small cell lung carcinoma cell line (GLC4) and its subline with in vitro acquired cisplatin (cDDP) resistance (GLC4-cDDP) were used to study the applicability of hyperthermia to interfere with acquired cDDP resistance. GLC4 and GLC4-cDDP did not differ in heat sensitivity (clonogenic

  15. Integron, Plasmid and Host Strain Characteristics of Escherichia coli from Humans and Food Included in the Norwegian Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunde, Marianne; Simonsen, Gunnar Skov; Slettemeås, Jannice Schau; Böckerman, Inger; Norström, Madelaine

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli (n=331) isolates from humans with bloodstream infections were investigated for the presence of class 1 and class 2 integrons. The integron cassettes arrays were characterized and the findings were compared with data from similar investigations on resistant E. coli from meat and meat products (n=241) produced during the same time period. All isolates were obtained from the Norwegian monitoring programs for antimicrobial resistance in human pathogens and in the veterinary sector. Methods used included PCR, sequencing, conjugation experiments, plasmid replicon typing and subtyping, pulsed-field-gel-electrophoresis and serotyping. Integrons of class 1 and 2 occurred significantly more frequently among human isolates; 45.4% (95% CI: 39.9-50.9) than among isolates from meat; 18% (95% CI: 13.2 -23.3), (pfood source and from a human clinical sample highlights the possible role of meat as a source of resistance elements for pathogenic bacteria.

  16. Andrographolide reversed 5-FU resistance in human colorectal cancer by elevating BAX expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weicheng; Guo, Wenjie; Li, Lele; Fu, Zan; Liu, Wen; Gao, Jian; Shu, Yongqian; Xu, Qiang; Sun, Yang; Gu, Yanhong

    2016-12-01

    5-FU is the first line therapy for colorectal cancer, however, treatment effect is often hampered by the development of drug resistance or toxicity at high doses. Andrographolide is a natural diterpenoid from Andrographis paniculata which has anti-bacterial, anti-antiviral and anti-inflammation activities. In the current study, we test the hypothesis that Andrographolide reverses 5-FU resistance in colorectal cancer and examine the underlying mechanism. In vitro and vivo studies indicated that Andrographolide treatment significantly re-sensitizes HCT116/5-FUR cells (HCT116 cells which are 5-FU resistant) to cytotoxicity of 5-FU. Mechanism analysis showed that Andrographolide/5-FU co-treatment elevated apoptosis level of HCT116/5-FUR cells with highly increased level of BAX. By using biotin-Andrographolide pull down and cellular thermal shift assay, we found out that Andrographolide can directly target to BAX. Andrographolide-BAX interaction prevented BAX degradation, enhancing mitochondria-mediated apoptosis thus reversed 5-FU resistance while BAX silence diminished this effect. Further, by analyzing patient samples who received 5-FU involved chemotherapy, we found that expression level of BAX is correlated with PFS. Our results here provide a novel combination treatment strategy, especially for patients with 5-FU-resistant tumors expressing low level of BAX. Meanwhile, we also proposed that BAX expression may be a predicted and prognosis marker of 5-FU involved chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Exosomes derived from human mesenchymal stem cells confer drug resistance in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Runbi; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Xu; Xue, Jianguo; Yuan, Xiao; Yan, Yongmin; Wang, Mei; Zhu, Wei; Qian, Hui; Xu, Wenrong

    2015-08-03

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play an important role in chemoresistance. Exosomes have been reported to modify cellular phenotype and function by mediating cell-cell communication. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether exosomes derived from MSCs (MSC-exosomes) are involved in mediating the resistance to chemotherapy in gastric cancer and to explore the underlying molecular mechanism. We found that MSC-exosomes significantly induced the resistance of gastric cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil both in vivo and ex vivo. MSC-exosomes antagonized 5-fluorouracil-induced apoptosis and enhanced the expression of multi-drug resistance associated proteins, including MDR, MRP and LRP. Mechanistically, MSC-exosomes triggered the activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaM-Ks) and Raf/MEK/ERK kinase cascade in gastric cancer cells. Blocking the CaM-Ks/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway inhibited the promoting role of MSC-exosomes in chemoresistance. Collectively, MSC-exosomes could induce drug resistance in gastric cancer cells by activating CaM-Ks/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway. Our findings suggest that MSC-exosomes have profound effects on modifying gastric cancer cells in the development of drug resistance. Targeting the interaction between MSC-exosomes and cancer cells may help improve the efficacy of chemotherapy in gastric cancer.

  18. Glucocorticoids promote a glioma stem cell-like phenotype and resistance to chemotherapy in human glioblastoma primary cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostopoulou, Ourania N; Mohammad, Abdul-Aleem; Bartek, Jiri

    2018-01-01

    Glioma stem cells (GSCs) are glioblastoma (GBM) cells that are resistant to therapy and can give rise to recurrent tumors. The identification of patient-related factors that support GSCs is thus necessary to design effective therapies for GBM patients. Glucocorticoids (GCs) are used to treat GBM......-associated edema. However, glucocorticoids participate in the physiological response to psychosocial stress, which has been linked to poor cancer prognosis. This raises concern that glucocorticoids affect the tumor and GSCs. Here, we treated primary human GBM cells with dexamethasone and evaluated GC......-driven changes in cell morphology, proliferation, migration, gene expression, secretory activity and growth as neurospheres. Dexamethasone treatment of GBM cells appeared to promote the development of a GSC-like phenotype and conferred resistance to physiological stress and chemotherapy. We also analyzed...

  19. Effect of acute resistance exercise and sex on human patellar tendon structural and regulatory mRNA expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sullivan, B.E.; Carroll, C.C.; Jemiolo, B.

    2009-01-01

    Sullivan BE, Carroll CC, Jemiolo B, Trappe SW, Magnusson SP, Dossing S, Kjaer M, Trappe TA. Effect of acute resistance exercise and sex on human patellar tendon structural and regulatory mRNA expression. J Appl Physiol 106: 468-475, 2009. First published November 20, 2008; doi: 10.1152/japplphysiol.......91341.2008.-Tendon is mainly composed of collagen and an aqueous matrix of proteoglycans that are regulated by enzymes called matrix metalloproteinases ( MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Although it is known that resistance exercise (RE) and sex influence tendon metabolism...... and mechanical properties, it is uncertain what structural and regulatory components contribute to these responses. We measured the mRNA expression of tendon's main fibrillar collagens (type I and type III) and the main proteoglycans (decorin, biglycan, fibromodulin, and versican) and the regulatory enzymes MMP...

  20. Induction and adaptation of chaperone-assisted selective autophagy CASA in response to resistance exercise in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbricht, Anna; Gehlert, Sebastian; Leciejewski, Barbara; Schiffer, Thorsten; Bloch, Wilhelm; Höhfeld, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Chaperone-assisted selective autophagy (CASA) is a tension-induced degradation pathway essential for muscle maintenance. Impairment of CASA causes childhood muscle dystrophy and cardiomyopathy. However, the importance of CASA for muscle function in healthy individuals has remained elusive so far. Here we describe the impact of strength training on CASA in a group of healthy and moderately trained men. We show that strenuous resistance exercise causes an acute induction of CASA in affected muscles to degrade mechanically damaged cytoskeleton proteins. Moreover, repeated resistance exercise during 4 wk of training led to an increased expression of CASA components. In human skeletal muscle, CASA apparently acts as a central adaptation mechanism that responds to acute physical exercise and to repeated mechanical stimulation.

  1. A cross sectional study of animal and human colonization with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA in an Aboriginal community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Daley

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infections are common among humans in Aboriginal communities in Canada, for unknown reasons. Methods Cross sectional study of humans and dogs in an Aboriginal community of approximately 1200 persons. Our objectives were to measure community-based prevalence of nasal MRSA colonization among humans, use multivariable logistic regression to analyze risk factors for MRSA colonization, and perform molecular typing of Staphylococci isolated to investigate interspecies transmission. Results 461 humans were approached for consent and 442 provided complete data. 109/442 (24.7 %, 95 % C.I. = 20.7–28.7 % of humans were colonized with MRSA. 169/442 (38.2 % of humans had received antibiotics in the last 12 months. Only number of rooms in the house (OR 0.86, p = 0.023 and recreational dog use (OR 7.7, p = 0.002 were significant risk factors for MRSA colonization. 95/109 (87.1 % of MRSA strains from humans were of the same spa type (CMRSA10/USA300. 8/157 (5.1 %, 95 % C.I. = 1.7–8.5 % of dogs were colonized with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus, and no dogs were colonized with MRSA. Conclusions Human MRSA colonization in this community is very common, and a single clone is predominant, suggesting local transmission. Antibiotic use is also very common. Crowding may partially explain high colonization, but most considered risk factors including animal exposure were not predictive. Very few dogs carried human Staphylococcal strains.

  2. Epidermal growth factor receptor signalling in human breast cancer cells operates parallel to estrogen receptor α signalling and results in tamoxifen insensitive proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moerkens, Marja; Zhang, Yinghui; Wester, Lynn; Water, Bob van de; Meerman, John HN

    2014-01-01

    Tamoxifen resistance is a major problem in the treatment of estrogen receptor (ER) α -positive breast cancer patients. Although the mechanisms behind tamoxifen resistance are still not completely understood, clinical data suggests that increased expression of receptor tyrosine kinases is involved. Here, we studied the estrogen and anti-estrogen sensitivity of human breast cancer MCF7 cells that have a moderate, retroviral-mediated, ectopic expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (MCF7-EGFR). Proliferation of MCF7-EGFR and parental cells was induced by 17β-estradiol (E2), epidermal growth factor (EGF) or a combination of these. Inhibition of proliferation under these conditions was investigated with 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen (TAM) or fulvestrant at 10 -12 to 10 -6 M. Cells were lysed at different time points to determine the phosphorylation status of EGFR, MAPK 1/3 , AKT and the expression of ERα. Knockdown of target genes was established using smartpool siRNAs. Transcriptomics analysis was done 6 hr after stimulation with growth factors using Affymetrix HG-U133 PM array plates. While proliferation of parental MCF7 cells could only be induced by E2, proliferation of MCF7-EGFR cells could be induced by either E2 or EGF. Treatment with TAM or fulvestrant did significantly inhibit proliferation of MCF7-EGFR cells stimulated with E2 alone. EGF treatment of E2/TAM treated cells led to a marked cell proliferation thereby overruling the anti-estrogen-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation. Under these conditions, TAM however did still inhibit ERα- mediated transcription. While siRNA-mediated knock-down of EGFR inhibited the EGF- driven proliferation under TAM/E2/EGF condition, knock down of ERα did not. The TAM resistant cell proliferation mediated by the conditional EGFR-signaling may be dependent on the PI3K/Akt pathway but not the MEK/MAPK pathway, since a MEK inhibitor (U0126), did not block the proliferation. Transcriptomic analysis under the various E2/TAM

  3. Effects of biochar on reducing the abundance of oxytetracycline, antibiotic resistance genes, and human pathogenic bacteria in soil and lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Manli; Li, Haichao; Gu, Jie; Tuo, Xiaxia; Sun, Wei; Qian, Xun; Wang, Xiaojuan

    2017-05-01

    Antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in soil can affect human health via the food chain. Biochar is a soil amendment but its impacts on ARGs and the microbial communities associated with soil and vegetables are unclear. Therefore, we established three lettuce pot culture experiments, i.e., O300: 300 mg/kg oxytetracycline (OTC), BO300: 300 mg/kg OTC + 2% biochar, and a control without OTC or biochar. We found that under BO300, the relative abundances of ARGs were reduced by 51.8%, 43.4%, and 44.1% in lettuce leaves, roots, and soil, respectively, compared with O300. intI1 was highly abundant in soil and lettuce, and it co-occurred with some ARGs (tetW, ermF, and sul1). Redundancy analysis and network analysis indicated that the bacterial community succession was the main mechanism that affected the variations in ARGs and intI1. The reduction of Firmicutes due to the biochar treatment of soil and lettuce was the main factor responsible for the removal of tetracycline resistance genes in leaves. Biochar application led to the disappearance of human pathogenic bacteria (HPB), which was significantly correlated with the abundances of ermF and ermX. In summary, biochar is an effective farmland amendment for reducing the abundances of antibiotics, ARGs, and HPB in order to ensure the safety of vegetables and protect human health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dynamic proteome profiling of individual proteins in human skeletal muscle after a high-fat diet and resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camera, Donny M; Burniston, Jatin G; Pogson, Mark A; Smiles, William J; Hawley, John A

    2017-12-01

    It is generally accepted that muscle adaptation to resistance exercise (REX) training is underpinned by contraction-induced, increased rates of protein synthesis and dietary protein availability. By using dynamic proteome profiling (DPP), we investigated the contribution of both synthesis and breakdown to changes in abundance on a protein-by-protein basis in human skeletal muscle. Age-matched, overweight males consumed 9 d of a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet during which time they either undertook 3 sessions of REX or performed no exercise. Precursor enrichment and the rate of incorporation of deuterium oxide into newly synthesized muscle proteins were determined by mass spectrometry. Ninety proteins were included in the DPP, with 28 proteins exhibiting significant responses to REX. The most common pattern of response was an increase in turnover, followed by an increase in abundance with no detectable increase in protein synthesis. Here, we provide novel evidence that demonstrates that the contribution of synthesis and breakdown to changes in protein abundance induced by REX differ on a protein-by-protein basis. We also highlight the importance of the degradation of individual muscle proteins after exercise in human skeletal muscle.-Camera, D. M., Burniston, J. G., Pogson, M. A., Smiles, W. J., Hawley, J. A. Dynamic proteome profiling of individual proteins in human skeletal muscle after a high-fat diet and resistance exercise. © FASEB.

  5. Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1 overexpression in human breast cancer stem cells and resistance to olaparib.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine Gilabert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs have been recognized as playing a major role in various aspects of breast cancer biology. To identify specific biomarkers of BCSCs, we have performed comparative proteomics of BCSC-enriched and mature cancer cell populations from the human breast cancer cell line (BCL, BrCA-MZ-01. METHODS: ALDEFLUOR assay was used to sort BCSC-enriched (ALDH+ and mature cancer (ALDH- cell populations. Total proteins were extracted from both fractions and subjected to 2-Dimensional Difference In-Gel Electrophoresis (2-D DIGE. Differentially-expressed spots were excised and proteins were gel-extracted, digested and identified using MALDI-TOF MS. RESULTS: 2-D DIGE identified poly(ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1 as overexpressed in ALDH+ cells from BrCA-MZ-01. This observation was confirmed by western blot and extended to four additional human BCLs. ALDH+ cells from BRCA1-mutated HCC1937, which had the highest level of PARP1 overexpression, displayed resistance to olaparib, a specific PARP1 inhibitor. CONCLUSION: An unbiased proteomic approach identified PARP1 as upregulated in ALDH+, BCSC-enriched cells from various human BCLs, which may contribute to clinical resistance to PARP inhibitors.

  6. Identification of Emerging Human Mastitis Pathogens by MALDI-TOF and Assessment of Their Antibiotic Resistance Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Marín

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Lactational mastitis constitutes one of the main causes of undesired weaning, depriving the mother–infant pair from the benefits of breastfeeding; therefore, this condition should be considered a relevant public health issue. The role of specific microorganisms remains unclear since human milk cultures and antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST are not routinely performed, despite the fact that this would be key to ensure an early and effective diagnosis and treatment. The objective of this study was to describe the culturable microbial diversity in 647 milk samples from breastfeeding women with clinical symptoms of mastitis by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF VITEK MS technology and to analyze the antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of a collection of isolates from these samples by the VITEK 2 AST system. Staphylococcus epidermidis was the most common species isolated from mastitis samples (87.6%, while Staphylococcus aureus was detected in 22.1%. Streptococci constituted the second (68.6% most prevalent bacterial group, with Streptococcus mitis/oralis, Streptococcus salivarius, and Streptococcus parasanguinis detected with frequencies of 40.8, 36.8, and 14.4%, respectively. The antibiotic susceptibility profiles of 642 staphylococcal isolates indicated a remarkable resistance to benzylpenicillin (88.3% and erythromycin (67.3% with differences between species. A high percentage of Staphylococcus isolates were resistant to at least one antibiotic (Staphylococcus hominis, 100%; S. epidermidis, 98.2%; S. aureus, 92.9%; Staphylococcus lugdunensis, 90.5% and the percentage of multidrug-resistance (MDR isolates was noticeable (S. hominis, 81%; S. epidermidis, 64.4%; S. aureus, 11.5%; S. lugdunensis, 10.5%. In relation to streptococcal isolates (n = 524, AST revealed high or moderate percentages of resistance to erythromycin (68.7%, benzylpenicillin (63.7%, ampicillin (51.5%, and tetracycline

  7. Performance of an in-house human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genotyping system for assessment of drug resistance in Cuba.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoan Alemán

    Full Text Available As commercial human immunodeficiency virus type 1 drug resistance assays are expensive, they are not commonly used in resource-limited settings. Hence, a more affordable in-house procedure was set up taking into account the specific epidemiological and economic circumstances of Cuba. The performance characteristics of the in-house assay were evaluated using clinical samples with various subtypes and resistance patterns. The lower limit of amplification was determined on dilutions series of 20 clinical isolates and ranged from 84 to 529 RNA copies/mL. For the assessment of trueness, 14 clinical samples were analyzed and the ViroSeq HIV-1 Genotyping System v2.0 was used as the reference standard. The mean nucleotide sequence identity between the two assays was 98.7% ± 1.0. Additionally, 99.0% of the amino acids at drug resistance positions were identical. The sensitivity and specificity in detecting drug resistance mutations was respectively 94.1% and 99.5%. Only few discordances in drug resistance interpretation patterns were observed. The repeatability and reproducibility were evaluated using 10 clinical samples with 3 replicates per sample. The in-house test was very precise as nucleotide sequence identity among paired nucleotide sequences ranged from 98.7% to 99.9%. The acceptance criteria were met by the in-house test for all performance characteristics, demonstrating a high degree of accuracy. Subsequently, the applicability in routine clinical practice was evaluated on 380 plasma samples. The amplification success rate was 91% and good quality consensus sequences encoding the entire protease and the first 335 codons in reverse transcriptase could be obtained for 99% of the successful amplicons. The reagent cost per sample using the in-house procedure was around € 80 per genotyping attempt. Overall, the in-house assay provided good results, was feasible with equipment and reagents available in Cuba and was half as expensive as commercial

  8. Sensitization of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand-resistant malignant melanomas by quercetin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Katherine A; Manouchehri, Jasmine M; Kalafatis, Michael

    2018-03-28

    Malignant melanoma is the most commonly diagnosed skin cancer associated with a high rate of metastasis. Low-stage melanoma is easily treated, but metastatic malignant melanoma is an extremely treatment-resistant malignancy with low survival rates. The application of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (rhTRAIL) for the treatment of metastatic malignant melanoma holds considerable promise because of its selective proapoptotic activity towards cancer cells and not nontransformed cells. Unfortunately, the clinical utilization of rhTRAIL has been terminated due to the resistance of many cancer cells to undergo apoptosis in response to rhTRAIL. However, rhTRAIL-resistance can be abrogated through the cotreatment with compounds derived from 'Mother Nature' such as quercetin that can modulate cellular components responsible for rhTRAIL-resistance. Here, we show that rhTRAIL-resistant malignant melanomas are sensitized by quercetin. Quercetin action is manifested by the upregulation of rhTRAIL-binding receptors DR4 and DR5 on the surface of cancer cells and by increased rate of the proteasome-mediated degradation of the antiapoptotic protein FLIP. Our data provide for a new efficient and nontoxic treatment of malignant melanoma.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/.

  9. Antimicrobial Resistance status and prevalence rates of Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL producers isolated from a mixed human population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth A. Afunwa

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Owing to the increasing epidemiological and therapeutic challenges associated with infections due to ESBL producers, ESBL prevalence rate among some bacteria isolates from healthy and non-healthy human population in a metropolitan Nigerian setting was evaluated.A total of one hundred and forty-five (145 bacteria strains were isolated from a total of four hundred and sixty (460 samples collected from urine, wound, throat and anal swabs of 220 healthy volunteers in the community and from 240 patients in 2 secondary and 2 tertiary hospitals (altogether, 4 in Enugu metropolis. The presumptive confirmatory test used for ESBL detection was the Double Disc Synergy Test (DDST method. Conjugation and plasmid curing studies were also done for resistance factor determination.Of the 145 isolates, 20 were ESBL producers with 35% of these ESBL producers being of community origin and 65% from hospitals. This translates to 4.8% and 9% incidences (comparably higher than established prevalence of 4.4% and 7.5 respectively for community and hospital infections respectively. The ESBL isolates showed high resistance to tetracycline, gentamicin, pefloxacin, ceftriaxone, cefuroxime, ciprofloxacin and Augmentin® (Amoxicilin and clavulanic acid combination. Conjugation studies for Resistance plasmid transfer showed non-transference of resistance determinants between the ESBL transconjugants and recipient strains. Correspondingly, the plasmid curing studies revealed that the acridine orange could not effect a cure on the isolates as they still retained high resistance to the antibiotics after the treatment.This study confirms the growing incidences/pool of ESBL strains in Nigeria and call for widespread and continuous monitoring towards an effective management of the potential therapeutic hurdle posed by this trend.

  10. Performance of an in-house human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genotyping system for assessment of drug resistance in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemán, Yoan; Vinken, Lore; Kourí, Vivian; Pérez, Lissette; Álvarez, Alina; Abrahantes, Yeissel; Fonseca, Carlos; Pérez, Jorge; Correa, Consuelo; Soto, Yudira; Schrooten, Yoeri; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Laethem, Kristel

    2015-01-01

    As commercial human immunodeficiency virus type 1 drug resistance assays are expensive, they are not commonly used in resource-limited settings. Hence, a more affordable in-house procedure was set up taking into account the specific epidemiological and economic circumstances of Cuba. The performance characteristics of the in-house assay were evaluated using clinical samples with various subtypes and resistance patterns. The lower limit of amplification was determined on dilutions series of 20 clinical isolates and ranged from 84 to 529 RNA copies/mL. For the assessment of trueness, 14 clinical samples were analyzed and the ViroSeq HIV-1 Genotyping System v2.0 was used as the reference standard. The mean nucleotide sequence identity between the two assays was 98.7% ± 1.0. Additionally, 99.0% of the amino acids at drug resistance positions were identical. The sensitivity and specificity in detecting drug resistance mutations was respectively 94.1% and 99.5%. Only few discordances in drug resistance interpretation patterns were observed. The repeatability and reproducibility were evaluated using 10 clinical samples with 3 replicates per sample. The in-house test was very precise as nucleotide sequence identity among paired nucleotide sequences ranged from 98.7% to 99.9%. The acceptance criteria were met by the in-house test for all performance characteristics, demonstrating a high degree of accuracy. Subsequently, the applicability in routine clinical practice was evaluated on 380 plasma samples. The amplification success rate was 91% and good quality consensus sequences encoding the entire protease and the first 335 codons in reverse transcriptase could be obtained for 99% of the successful amplicons. The reagent cost per sample using the in-house procedure was around € 80 per genotyping attempt. Overall, the in-house assay provided good results, was feasible with equipment and reagents available in Cuba and was half as expensive as commercial assays.

  11. Notch1 is a 5-fluorouracil resistant and poor survival marker in human esophagus squamous cell carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Liu

    Full Text Available Notch signaling involves the processes that govern cell proliferation, cell fate decision, cell differentiation and stem cell maintenance. Due to its fundamental role in stem cells, it has been speculated during the recent years that Notch family may have critical functions in cancer stem cells or cancer cells with a stem cell phenotype, therefore playing an important role in the process of oncogenesis. In this study, expression of Notch family in KYSE70, KYSE140 and KYSE450 squamous esophageal cancer cell lines and virus transformed squamous esophageal epithelial cell line Het-1A was examined by quantitative RT-PCR. Compared to the Het-1A cells, higher levels of Nocth1 and Notch3 expression in the cancer cell lines were identified. Due to the finding that NOTCH3 mainly mediates squamous cell differentiation, NOTCH1 expression was further studied in these cell lines. By Western blot analyses, the KYSE70 cell line which derived from a poorly differentiated tumor highly expressed Notch1, and the Notch1 expression in this cell line was hypoxia inducible, while the KYSE450 cell line which derived from a well differentiated tumor was always negative for Notch1, even in hypoxia. Additional studies demonstrated that the KYSE70 cell line was more 5-FU resistant than the KYSE450 cell line and such 5-FU resistance is correlated to Notch1 expression verified by Notch1 knockdown experiments. In clinical samples, Notch1 protein expression was detected in the basal cells of human esophagus epithelia, and its expression in squamous cell carcinomas was significantly associated with higher pathological grade and shorter overall survival. We conclude that Notch1 expression is associated with cell aggressiveness and 5-FU drug resistance in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines in vitro and is significantly associated with a poor survival in human esophageal squamous cell carcinomas.

  12. Third-Generation Cephalosporin-Resistant Non-Typhoidal Salmonella Isolated from Human Feces in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Satomi; Koori, Yoshio; Ohsaki, Yusuke; Osaka, Shunsuke; Oana, Kozue; Nagano, Yukiko; Arakawa, Yoshichika; Nagano, Noriyuki

    2017-05-24

    β-lactamase genes were detected and characterized from 10 non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) clinical isolates resistant to third-generation cephalosporins collected between 2012 and 2014 in Japan. Five strains showed cefotaxime minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≥ 64 μg/ml and positive clavulanic acid inhibition results. The bla CTX-M-2 was detected in 3 strains (serotypes Stanley and Muenchen), whereas bla TEM-52 (serotype Manhattan) and bla SHV-12 (serotype Infantis) were each found in 1 strain. bla CMY-2 was detected in the remaining 5 strains (serotypes Infantis, Rissen, Newport, and Saintpaul) with cefotaxime MICs of 4-32 μg/ml and positive cloxacillin- and 3-aminophenylboronic acid- based inhibition tests. ISEcp1 was located upstream of the bla CMY-2 in 4 strains and of the bla CTX-M-2 in 1 strain. Incompatibility (Inc)A/C, IncP, and IncI1 plasmids were present in the strains harboring bla CMY-2 , which were detected predominantly in this study. Acquisition of resistance to third-generation cephalosporins by invasive NTS may limit therapeutic options for severe systemic infections and causing serious public health problems. Though such resistant clinical isolates are still rare in Salmonella species in Japan, our findings reveal the presence of cephem-resistant NTS in food handlers, thus emphasizing the necessity of more systematic nationwide investigations.

  13. The human microbiota: novel targets for hospital-acquired infections and antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Melinda M; Johnson, J Kristie; Harris, Anthony D

    2016-05-01

    Hospital-acquired infections are increasing in frequency due to multidrug resistant organisms (MDROs), and the spread of MDROs has eroded our ability to treat infections. Health care professionals cannot rely solely on traditional infection control measures and antimicrobial stewardship to prevent MDRO transmission. We review research on the microbiota as a target for infection control interventions. We performed a literature review of key research findings related to the microbiota as a target for infection control interventions. These data are summarized and used to outline challenges, opportunities, and unanswered questions in the field. The healthy microbiota provides protective functions including colonization resistance, which refers to the microbiota's ability to prevent colonization and/or expansion of pathogens. Antibiotic use and other exposures in hospitalized patients are associated with disruptions of the microbiota that may reduce colonization resistance and select for antibiotic resistance. Novel methods to exploit protective mechanisms provided by an intact microbiota may provide the key to preventing the spread of MDROs in the health care setting. Research on the microbiota as a target for infection control has been limited. Epidemiologic studies will facilitate progress toward the goal of manipulating the microbiota for control of MDROs in the health care setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Study of human immunodeficiency virus transmission chains in Andalusia: analysis from baseline antiretroviral resistance sequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Parra, Santiago; Chueca-Porcuna, Natalia; Álvarez-Estevez, Marta; Pasquau, Juan; Omar, Mohamed; Collado, Antonio; Vinuesa, David; Lozano, Ana Belen; García-García, Federico

    2015-11-01

    Protease and reverse transcriptase HIV-1 sequences provide useful information for patient clinical management, as well as information on resistance to antiretrovirals. The aim of this study is to evaluate transmission events, transmitted drug resistance, and to georeference subtypes among newly diagnosed patients referred to our center. A study was conducted on 693 patients diagnosed between 2005 and 2012 in Southern Spain. Protease and reverse transcriptase sequences were obtained for resistance to cART analysis with Trugene(®) HIV Genotyping Kit (Siemens, NAD). MEGA 5.2, Neighbor-Joining, ArcGIS and REGA were used for subsequent analysis. The results showed 298 patients clustered into 77 different transmission events. Most of the clusters were formed by pairs (n=49), of men having sex with men (n=26), Spanish (n=37), and below 45 years of age (73.5%). Urban areas from Granada, and the coastal areas of Almeria and Granada showed the greatest subtype heterogeneity. Five clusters were formed by more than 10 patients, and 15 clusters had transmitted drug resistance. The study data demonstrate how the phylogenetic characterization of transmission clusters is a powerful tool to monitor the spread of HIV, and may contribute to design correct preventive measures to minimize it. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  15. Timing of postexercise protein intake is important for muscle hypertrophy with resistance training in elderly humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esmarck, B.; Andersen, J.L.; Olsen, S.

    2001-01-01

    1. Age-associated loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength can partly be counteracted by resistance training, causing a net synthesis of muscular proteins. Protein synthesis is influenced synergistically by postexercise amino acid supplementation, but the importance of the timing of protein intake...

  16. Human ClC-6 is a late endosomal glycoprotein that associates with detergent-resistant lipid domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Ignoul

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mammalian CLC protein family comprises nine members (ClC-1 to -7 and ClC-Ka, -Kb that function either as plasma membrane chloride channels or as intracellular chloride/proton antiporters, and that sustain a broad spectrum of cellular processes, such as membrane excitability, transepithelial transport, endocytosis and lysosomal degradation. In this study we focus on human ClC-6, which is structurally most related to the late endosomal/lysomal ClC-7. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a polyclonal affinity-purified antibody directed against a unique epitope in the ClC-6 COOH-terminal tail, we show that human ClC-6, when transfected in COS-1 cells, is N-glycosylated in a region that is evolutionary poorly conserved between mammalian CLC proteins and that is located between the predicted helices K and M. Three asparagine residues (N410, N422 and N432 have been defined by mutagenesis as acceptor sites for N-glycosylation, but only two of the three sites seem to be simultaneously N-glycosylated. In a differentiated human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y, endogenous ClC-6 colocalizes with LAMP-1, a late endosomal/lysosomal marker, but not with early/recycling endosomal markers such as EEA-1 and transferrin receptor. In contrast, when transiently expressed in COS-1 or HeLa cells, human ClC-6 mainly overlaps with markers for early/recycling endosomes (transferrin receptor, EEA-1, Rab5, Rab4 and not with late endosomal/lysosomal markers (LAMP-1, Rab7. Analogously, overexpression of human ClC-6 in SH-SY5Y cells also leads to an early/recycling endosomal localization of the exogenously expressed ClC-6 protein. Finally, in transiently transfected COS-1 cells, ClC-6 copurifies with detergent-resistant membrane fractions, suggesting its partitioning in lipid rafts. Mutating a juxtamembrane string of basic amino acids (amino acids 71-75: KKGRR disturbs the association with detergent-resistant membrane fractions and also affects the segregation of ClC-6

  17. Transfer of human genes conferring resistance to methylating mutagens, but not to UV irradiation and cross-linking agents, into Chinese hamster ovary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaina, B.; Van Zeeland, A.A.; Backendorf, C.; Thielmann, H.W.; Van de Putte, P.

    1987-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary cells were transfected by human DNA ligated to the bacterial gpt (xanthine-guanine-phosphoribosyltransferase) gene which was used either in its native form or after partial inactivation with methylnitrosourea. The gpt+ transfectants were screened for resistance to high doses of N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Using this approach, we showed that Chinese hamster ovary cells can acquire N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine resistance upon transfection with DNA from diploid human fibroblasts, that this resistance is transferable by secondary transfection and is specific for methylating mutagens, and that it is not caused by increased removal of O6-methylguanine, 3-methyladenine, and 7-methylguanine from DNA

  18. PTEN overexpression improves cisplatin-resistance of human ovarian cancer cells through upregulating KRT10 expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Huijuan; Wang, Ke; Liu, Wenxin; Hao, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Overexpression of PTEN enhanced the sensitivity of C13K cells to cisplatin. • KRT10 is a downstream molecule of PTEN involved in the resistance-reversing effect. • Overexpression of KRT10 enhanced the chemosensitivity of C13K cells to cisplatin. - Abstract: Multi-drug resistance (MDR) is a common cause of the failure of chemotherapy in ovarian cancer. PTEN, a tumor suppressor gene, has been demonstrated to be able to reverse cisplatin-resistance in ovarian cancer cell line C13K. However, the downstream molecules of PTEN involved in the resistance-reversing effect have not been completely clarified. Therefore, we screened the downstream molecules of PTEN and studied their interactions in C13K ovarian cancer cells using a 3D culture model. Firstly, we constructed an ovarian cancer cell line stably expressing PTEN, C13K/PTEN. MTT assay showed that overexpression of PTEN enhanced the sensitivity of C13K cells to cisplatin, but not to paclitaxel. Then we examined the differently expressed proteins that interacted with PTEN in C13K/PTEN cells with or without cisplatin treatment by co-immunoprecipitation. KRT10 was identified as a differently expressed protein in cisplatin-treated C13K/PTEN cells. Further study confirmed that cisplatin could induce upregulation of KRT10 mRNA and protein in C13K/PTEN cells and there was a directly interaction between KRT10 and PTEN. Forced expression of KRT10 in C13K cells also enhanced cisplatin-induced proliferation inhibition and apoptosis of C13K cells. In addition, KRT10 siRNA blocked cisplatin-induced proliferation inhibition of C13K/PTEN cells. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that KRT10 is a downstream molecule of PTEN which improves cisplatin-resistance of ovarian cancer and forced KRT10 overexpression may also act as a therapeutic method for overcoming MDR in ovarian cancer

  19. Imaging and modeling of acute pressure-induced changes of collagen and elastin microarchitectures in pig and human resistance arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Leurgans, Thomas M; Spronck, Bart; Heusinkveld, Maarten H G; Thorsted, Bjarne; Rosenstand, Kristoffer; Nissen, Inger; Hansen, Ulla M; Brewer, Jonathan R; Bagatolli, Luis A; Rasmussen, Lars M; Irmukhamedov, Akhmadjon; Reesink, Koen D; De Mey, Jo G R

    2017-07-01

    The impact of disease-related changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) on the mechanical properties of human resistance arteries largely remains to be established. Resistance arteries from both pig and human parietal pericardium (PRA) display a different ECM microarchitecture compared with frequently used rodent mesenteric arteries. We hypothesized that the biaxial mechanics of PRA mirror pressure-induced changes in the ECM microarchitecture. This was tested using isolated pig PRA as a model system, integrating vital imaging, pressure myography, and mathematical modeling. Collagenase and elastase digestions were applied to evaluate the load-bearing roles of collagen and elastin, respectively. The incremental elastic modulus linearly related to the straightness of adventitial collagen fibers circumferentially and longitudinally (both R 2 ≥ 0.99), whereas there was a nonlinear relationship to the internal elastic lamina elastin fiber branching angles. Mathematical modeling suggested a collagen recruitment strain (means ± SE) of 1.1 ± 0.2 circumferentially and 0.20 ± 0.01 longitudinally, corresponding to a pressure of ~40 mmHg, a finding supported by the vital imaging. The integrated method was tested on human PRA to confirm its validity. These showed limited circumferential distensibility and elongation and a collagen recruitment strain of 0.8 ± 0.1 circumferentially and 0.06 ± 0.02 longitudinally, reached at a distending pressure below 20 mmHg. This was confirmed by vital imaging showing negligible microarchitectural changes of elastin and collagen upon pressurization. In conclusion, we show here, for the first time in resistance arteries, a quantitative relationship between pressure-induced changes in the extracellular matrix and the arterial wall mechanics. The strength of the integrated methods invites for future detailed studies of microvascular pathologies. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This is the first study to quantitatively relate pressure

  20. High pressure inactivation of human norovirus-like particles: evidence that the capsid of human norovirus is highly pressure resistant

    Science.gov (United States)

    High pressure processing (HPP) is a promising non-thermal technology to inactivate foodborne viruses. However, the effectiveness of HPP on inactivating human norovirus (HuNoV), the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis, is unknown because it cannot be propagated in cell culture. Therefore, developi...

  1. Thermal analysis of epidermal electronic devices integrated with human skin considering the effects of interfacial thermal resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuhang; Zhang, Jianpeng; Xing, Yufeng; Song, Jizhou

    2018-05-01

    Epidermal electronic devices (EEDs) have similar mechanical properties as those of human skin such that they can be integrated with human skin for potential applications in monitoring of human vital signs for diagnostic, therapeutic or surgical functions. Thermal management is critical for EEDs in these applications since excessive heating may cause discomfort. Comprehensive analytical studies, finite element analysis and experiments are carried out to study the effects of interfacial thermal resistance between EEDs and human skin on thermal properties of the EED/skin system in this paper. The coupling between the Fourier heat transfer in EEDs and the bio-heat transfer in human skin is accounted in the analytical model based on the transfer matrix method to give accurate predictions on temperatures, which agree well with finite element analysis and experimental measurements. It is shown that the maximum temperature increase of the EED for the case of imperfect bonding between EED and skin is much higher than that of perfect bonding. These results may help the design of EEDs in bi-integrated applications and suggest a valuable route to evaluate the bonding condition between EEDs and biological tissues.

  2. Niclosamide inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition and tumor growth in lapatinib-resistant human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junjun; Chen, Xiaosong; Ward, Toby; Mao, Yan; Bockhorn, Jessica; Liu, Xiaofei; Wang, Gen; Pegram, Mark; Shen, Kunwei

    2016-02-01

    Acquired resistance to lapatinib, a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 kinase inhibitor, remains a clinical problem for women with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive advanced breast cancer, as metastasis is commonly observed in these patients. Niclosamide, an anti-helminthic agent, has recently been shown to exhibit cytotoxicity to tumor cells with stem-like characteristics. This study was designed to identify the mechanisms underlying lapatinib resistance and to determine whether niclosamide inhibits lapatinib resistance by reversing epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Here, two human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer cell lines, SKBR3 and BT474, were exposed to increasing concentrations of lapatinib to establish lapatinib-resistant cultures. Lapatinib-resistant SKBR3 and BT474 cells exhibited up-regulation of the phenotypic epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers Snail, vimentin and α-smooth muscle actin, accompanied by activation of nuclear factor-кB and Src and a concomitant increase in stem cell marker expression (CD44(high)/CD24(low)), compared to naive lapatinib-sensitive SKBR3 and BT474 cells, respectively. Interestingly, niclosamide reversed epithelial-mesenchymal transition, induced apoptosis and inhibited cell growth by perturbing aberrant signaling pathway activation in lapatinib-resistant human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive cells. The ability of niclosamide to alleviate stem-like phenotype development and invasion was confirmed. Collectively, our results demonstrate that lapatinib resistance correlates with epithelial-mesenchymal transition and that niclosamide inhibits lapatinib-resistant cell viability and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. These findings suggest a role of niclosamide or derivatives optimized for more favorable bioavailability not only in reversing lapatinib resistance but also in reducing metastatic potential during the treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor

  3. Potential therapeutic effects of branched-chain amino acids supplementation on resistance exercise-based muscle damage in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Luz Claudia R

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA supplementation has been considered an interesting nutritional strategy to improve skeletal muscle protein turnover in several conditions. In this context, there is evidence that resistance exercise (RE-derived biochemical markers of muscle soreness (creatine kinase (CK, aldolase, myoglobin, soreness, and functional strength may be modulated by BCAA supplementation in order to favor of muscle adaptation. However, few studies have investigated such effects in well-controlled conditions in humans. Therefore, the aim of this short report is to describe the potential therapeutic effects of BCAA supplementation on RE-based muscle damage in humans. The main point is that BCAA supplementation may decrease some biochemical markers related with muscle soreness but this does not necessarily reflect on muscle functionality.

  4. Risk assessment of antimicrobial usage in Danish pig production on the human exposure to antimicrobial resistant bacteria from pork

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Struve, Tina

    to antimicrobials are influenced by the use of antimicrobial agents, and the prudence of antimicrobial use have been emphasized since the Swann report in 1969 recommended that antibiotics used in human medicine should not be used as growth promoters in food-producing animals. In 2007, the World Health Organisation...... the human exposure to cephalosporin resistance from pork purchased in retail shops was assessed using different scenarios for the amount of antimicrobial used in the primary production. Also, farm-related factors affecting the antimicrobial usage were investigated as a part of this thesis. The thesis...... producing E. coli through the purchase of pork chops Objective 3: Identification of management factors in the Danish finishing pig production important for antimicrobial usage In Objective 1, the occurrence (presence/non-presence) of ESC producing E. coli in samples from healthy pigs at slaughter...

  5. Identification of protein expression alterations in gefitinib-resistant human lung adenocarcinoma: PCNT and mPR play key roles in the development of gefitinib-associated resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chi-Chen [Institute of Biomedical Science, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Science, and Rong Hsing Research Center for Translational Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research and Education, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Division of Chest Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jing-Ting [Department of Medical Science and Institute of Bioinformatics and Structural Biology, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Lin, Meng-Wei [Department of Medical Science and Institute of Bioinformatics and Structural Biology, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Department of Applied Science, National Hsinchu University of Education, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Chan, Chia-Hao [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hsinchu Mackay Memorial Hospital, Hsinchu 30071, Taiwan (China); Wen, Yueh-Feng [Department of Medical Science and Institute of Bioinformatics and Structural Biology, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital Hsinchu Branch, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Wu, Shin-Bei [Department of Applied Science, National Hsinchu University of Education, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Chung, Ting-Wen [Department of Medical Science and Institute of Bioinformatics and Structural Biology, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Lyu, Kevin W. [Lutheran Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Global Scholars Program, St. George' s University/Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Chou, Hsiu-Chuan, E-mail: chouhc@mail.nhcue.edu.tw [Department of Applied Science, National Hsinchu University of Education, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); and others

    2015-11-01

    Gefitinib is the first-line chemotherapeutic drug for treating non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), which comprises nearly 85% of all lung cancer cases worldwide. However, most patients eventually develop drug resistance after 12–18 months of treatment. Hence, investigating the drug resistance mechanism and resistance-associated biomarkers is necessary. Two lung adenocarcinoma cell lines, PC9 and gefitinib-resistant PC9/Gef, were established for examining resistance mechanisms and identifying potential therapeutic targets. Two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry were used for examining global protein expression changes between PC9 and PC9/Gef. The results revealed that 164 identified proteins were associated with the formation of gefitinib resistance in PC9 cells. Additional studies using RNA interference showed that progesterone receptor membrane component 1 and pericentrin proteins have major roles in gefitinib resistance. In conclusion, the proteomic approach enabled identifying of numerous proteins involved in gefitinib resistance. The results provide useful diagnostic markers and therapeutic candidates for treating gefitinib-resistant NSCLC. - Highlights: • 164 proteins associated with gefitinib resistance were identified through proteomic analysis. • In this study, a lung adenocarcinoma and its gefitinib resistant partner were established. • mPR and PCNT proteins have evidenced to play important roles in gefitinib resistance.

  6. Identification of protein expression alterations in gefitinib-resistant human lung adenocarcinoma: PCNT and mPR play key roles in the development of gefitinib-associated resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chi-Chen; Chen, Jing-Ting; Lin, Meng-Wei; Chan, Chia-Hao; Wen, Yueh-Feng; Wu, Shin-Bei; Chung, Ting-Wen; Lyu, Kevin W.; Chou, Hsiu-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Gefitinib is the first-line chemotherapeutic drug for treating non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), which comprises nearly 85% of all lung cancer cases worldwide. However, most patients eventually develop drug resistance after 12–18 months of treatment. Hence, investigating the drug resistance mechanism and resistance-associated biomarkers is necessary. Two lung adenocarcinoma cell lines, PC9 and gefitinib-resistant PC9/Gef, were established for examining resistance mechanisms and identifying potential therapeutic targets. Two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry were used for examining global protein expression changes between PC9 and PC9/Gef. The results revealed that 164 identified proteins were associated with the formation of gefitinib resistance in PC9 cells. Additional studies using RNA interference showed that progesterone receptor membrane component 1 and pericentrin proteins have major roles in gefitinib resistance. In conclusion, the proteomic approach enabled identifying of numerous proteins involved in gefitinib resistance. The results provide useful diagnostic markers and therapeutic candidates for treating gefitinib-resistant NSCLC. - Highlights: • 164 proteins associated with gefitinib resistance were identified through proteomic analysis. • In this study, a lung adenocarcinoma and its gefitinib resistant partner were established. • mPR and PCNT proteins have evidenced to play important roles in gefitinib resistance.

  7. Of monkeys and men: immunomic profiling of sera from humans and non-human primates resistant to schistosomiasis reveals novel potential vaccine candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark ePearson

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Schistosoma haematobium affects more than 100 million people throughout Africa and is the causative agent of urogenital schistosomiasis. The parasite is strongly associated with urothelial cancer in infected individuals and as such is designated a group I carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Using a protein microarray containing schistosome proteins, we sought to identify antigens that were the targets of protective IgG1 immune responses in S. haematobium-exposed individuals that acquire drug-induced resistance (DIR to schistosomiasis after praziquantel treatment. Numerous antigens with known vaccine potential were identified, including calpain (Smp80, tetraspanins, glutathione-S-transferases and glucose transporters (SGTP1, as well as previously uncharacterized proteins. Reactive IgG1 responses were not elevated in exposed individuals who did not acquire DIR. To complement our human subjects study, we screened for antigen targets of rhesus macaques rendered resistant to Schistosoma japonicum by experimental infection followed by self-cure, and discovered a number of new and known vaccine targets, including major targets recognised by our human subjects. This study has further validated the immunomics-based approach to schistosomiasis vaccine antigen discovery and identified numerous novel potential vaccine antigens.

  8. Of monkeys and men: immunomic profiling of sera from humans and non-human primates resistant to schistosomiasis reveals novel potential vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Mark S; Becker, Luke; Driguez, Patrick; Young, Neil D; Gaze, Soraya; Mendes, Tiago; Li, Xiao-Hong; Doolan, Denise L; Midzi, Nicholas; Mduluza, Takafira; McManus, Donald P; Wilson, R Alan; Bethony, Jeffrey M; Nausch, Norman; Mutapi, Francisca; Felgner, Philip L; Loukas, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Schistosoma haematobium affects more than 100 million people throughout Africa and is the causative agent of urogenital schistosomiasis. The parasite is strongly associated with urothelial cancer in infected individuals and as such is designated a group I carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Using a protein microarray containing schistosome proteins, we sought to identify antigens that were the targets of protective IgG1 immune responses in S. haematobium-exposed individuals that acquire drug-induced resistance (DIR) to schistosomiasis after praziquantel treatment. Numerous antigens with known vaccine potential were identified, including calpain (Smp80), tetraspanins, glutathione-S-transferases, and glucose transporters (SGTP1), as well as previously uncharacterized proteins. Reactive IgG1 responses were not elevated in exposed individuals who did not acquire DIR. To complement our human subjects study, we screened for antigen targets of rhesus macaques rendered resistant to S. japonicum by experimental infection followed by self-cure, and discovered a number of new and known vaccine targets, including major targets recognized by our human subjects. This study has further validated the immunomics-based approach to schistosomiasis vaccine antigen discovery and identified numerous novel potential vaccine antigens.

  9. Effects of Vitamin K3 and K5 on Daunorubicin-resistant Human T Lymphoblastoid Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaoka, Eri; Tanaka, Sachiko; Onda, Kenji; Sugiyama, Kentaro; Hirano, Toshihiko

    2015-11-01

    Anticancer efficacy of vitamin K derivatives on multidrug-resistant cancer cells has been scarcely investigated. The effects of vitamins K3 and K5 on proliferation of human leukemia MOLT-4 cells and on daunorubicin-resistant MOLT-4/DNR cells were estimated by a WST assay. Apoptotic cells were detected by Annexin V and propidium iodide staining, followed by flow cytometry. Vitamins K3 and K5 significantly inhibited proliferation of leukemic cells at 10 and 100 μM (pVitamin K3 induced cell apoptosis at 10 and 100 μM in both MOLT-4 and MOLT-4/DNR cells (pVitamin K5 also increased apoptotic cells, while rather inducing necrotic cell death. Vitamins K3 and K5 suppress MOLT-4 and MOLT-4/DNR cell-proliferation partially through induction of apoptosis, and these vitamin derivatives can overcome drug resistance due to P-glycoprotein expression. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  10. Resistance of plateau-phase human normal and xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts to the cytotoxic effect of ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, G.L.; Little, J.B.

    1979-01-01

    Clonogenic survival response to 254-nm ultraviolet light was measured in 2 strains of repair-proficient normal human fibroblasts and 4 strains of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) fibroblasts belonging to complementation groups A, C, D and variant. In all strains except XPA, cells irradiated in plateau phase and subcultured immediately were much more resistant to the lethal effect of UV than cells irradiated in the exponential phase of growth. Typically, 10-20% of plateau-phase cells were extremely resistant. When the cultures were held in plateau phase for 24 h after irradiation and before subculture, there was a further enhancement of survival. By use of a UV-specific endonuclease assay, no difference was found in the number of DNA lesions induced in exponentially growing and plateau cultures by the same dose of UV light. Thus plateau-phase cells appear to be more efficient in their DNA-repair capability than cells in exponential growth. XP group A cells were uniquely found to be deficient in the processes which lead to plateau-phase resistance. Since plateau-phase repair was not lacking in XP groups C, D and variant, it may be related to a DNA-repair process different from that which is responsible for the overall UV sensitivity of these cells. (orig.)

  11. Transferability of a tetracycline resistance gene from probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri to bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract of humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egervärn, Maria; Lindmark, Hans; Olsson, Johan; Roos, Stefan

    2010-02-01

    The potential of Lactobacillus reuteri as a donor of antibiotic resistance genes in the human gut was investigated by studying the transferability of the tetracycline resistance gene tet(W) to faecal enterococci, bifidobacteria and lactobacilli. In a double-blind clinical study, seven subjects consumed L. reuteri ATCC 55730 harbouring a plasmid-encoded tet(W) gene (tet(W)-reuteri) and an equal number of subjects consumed L. reuteri DSM 17938 derived from the ATCC 55730 strain by the removal of two plasmids, one of which contained the tet(W) gene. Faecal samples were collected before, during and after ingestion of 5 x 10(8) CFU of L. reuteri per day for 14 days. Both L. reuteri strains were detectable at similar levels in faeces after 14 days of intake but neither was detected after a two-week wash-out period. After enrichment and isolation of tetracycline resistant enterococci, bifidobacteria and lactobacilli from each faecal sample, DNA was extracted and analysed for presence of tet(W)-reuteri using a real-time PCR allelic discrimination method developed in this study. No tet(W)-reuteri signal was produced from any of the DNA samples and thus gene transfer to enterococci, bifidobacteria and lactobacilli during intestinal passage of the probiotic strain was non-detectable under the conditions tested, although transfer at low frequencies or to the remaining faecal bacterial population cannot be excluded.

  12. Estrogenic and anti-estrogenic influences in cultured brown trout hepatocytes: Focus on the expression of some estrogen and peroxisomal related genes and linked phenotypic anchors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madureira, Tânia Vieira; Malhão, Fernanda; Pinheiro, Ivone; Lopes, Célia; Ferreira, Nádia; Urbatzka, Ralph; Castro, L Filipe C; Rocha, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    Estrogens, estrogenic mimics and anti-estrogenic compounds are known to target estrogen receptors (ER) that can modulate other nuclear receptor signaling pathways, such as those controlled by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), and alter organelle (inc. peroxisome) morphodynamics. By using primary isolated brown trout (Salmo trutta f. fario) hepatocytes after 72 and 96h of exposure we evaluated some effects in selected molecular targets and in peroxisomal morphological features caused by: (1) an ER agonist (ethinylestradiol-EE2) at 1, 10 and 50μM; (2) an ER antagonist (ICI 182,780) at 10 and 50μM; and (3) mixtures of both (Mix I-10μM EE2 and 50μM ICI; Mix II-1μM EE2 and 10μM ICI and Mix III-1μM EE2 and 50μM ICI). The mRNA levels of the estrogenic targets (ERα, ERβ-1 and vitellogenin A-VtgA) and the peroxisome structure/function related genes (catalase, urate oxidase-Uox, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 4-17β-HSD4, peroxin 11α-Pex11α and PPARα) were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Stereology combined with catalase immunofluorescence revealed a significant reduction in peroxisome volume densities at 50μM of EE2 exposure. Concomitantly, at the same concentration, electron microscopy showed smaller peroxisome profiles, exacerbated proliferation of rough endoplasmic reticulum, and a generalized cytoplasmic vacuolization of hepatocytes. Catalase and Uox mRNA levels decreased in all estrogenic stimuli conditions. VtgA and ERα mRNA increased after all EE2 treatments, while ERβ-1 had an inverse pattern. The EE2 action was reversed by ICI 182,780 in a concentration-dependent manner, for VtgA, ERα and Uox. Overall, our data show the great value of primary brown trout hepatocytes to study the effects of estrogenic/anti-estrogenic inputs in peroxisome kinetics and in ER and PPARα signaling, backing the still open hypothesis of crosstalk interactions between these pathways and calling for more mechanistic

  13. Selection and Characterization of Drug-Resistant Variants of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (AIDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-10-01

    on Antiviral Reserach, Santa Fe, New Mexico , 1995. Page 18 APPENDIX Page 19 p - FACTFILE Mutations in HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase and Protease...including herpes simplex viruses, varicella -zoster Resistance of clinical HIV-1 isolates to foscarnet has not virus, cytomegalovirus (CMV), hepatitis B...This effect of the Tyr-208 substitution was not ob- reported previously for herpes simplex viruses, varicella -zoster served in MT-2 cells, however. virus

  14. Curcumin Chemosensitizes 5-Fluorouracil Resistant MMR-Deficient Human Colon Cancer Cells in High Density Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Shakibaei, Mehdi; Buhrmann, Constanze; Kraehe, Patricia; Shayan, Parviz; Lueders, Cora; Goel, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a clinical challenge, as more than 15% of patients are resistant to 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapeutic regimens, and tumor recurrence rates can be as high as 50-60%. Cancer stem cells (CSC) are capable of surviving conventional chemotherapies that permits regeneration of original tumors. Therefore, we investigated the effectiveness of 5-FU and plant polyphenol (curcumin) in context of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) status and CSC ac...

  15. Frequency of resistance to methicillin and other antimicrobial agents among Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from pigs and their human handlers in Trinidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Gordon

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has emerged recently worldwide in production animals, particularly pigs and veal calves, which act as reservoirs for MRSA strains for human infection. The study determined the prevalence of MRSA and other resistant strains of S. aureus isolated from the anterior nares of pigs and human handlers on pig farms in Trinidad. Methods: Isolation of S. aureus was done by concurrently inoculating Baird-Parker agar (BPA and Chromagar MRSA (CHROM with swab samples and isolates were identified using standard methods. Suspect MRSA isolates from Chromagar and BPA were subjected to confirmatory test using Oxoid PBP2 latex agglutination test. The disc diffusion method was used to determine resistance to antimicrobial agents. Results: The frequency of isolation of MRSA was 2.1% (15 of 723 for pigs but 0.0% (0 of 72 for humans. Generally, for isolates of S. aureus from humans there was a high frequency of resistance compared with those from pigs, which had moderate resistance to the following antimicrobials: penicillin G (54.5%, 51.5%, ampicillin (59.1%, 49.5%, and streptomycin (59.1%, 37.1%, respectively. There was moderate resistance to tetracycline (36.4%, 41.2% and gentamycin (27.2%, 23.7% for human and pig S. aureus isolates, respectively, and low resistance to sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (4.5%, 6.2% and norfloxacin (9.1%, 12.4%, respectively. The frequency of resistance to oxacillin by the disc method was 36.4 and 34.0% from S. aureus isolates from humans and pigs, respectively. Out of a total of 78 isolates of S. aureus from both human and pig sources that were resistant to oxacillin by the disc diffusion method, only 15 (19.2% were confirmed as MRSA by the PBP'2 latex test kit. Conclusions: The detection of MRSA strains in pigs, albeit at a low frequency, coupled with a high frequency of resistance to commonly used antimicrobial agents in pig and humans could have zoonotic and therapeutic

  16. Incidence, adherence, and antibiotic resistance of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species causing human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, C A; Stempsey, W

    1984-09-01

    Fifty-two isolates of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species recovered from the blood or intravenous catheters of patients with clinically significant disease were compared to 60 similar isolates from patients who were presumably colonized. All isolates were identified and evaluated for ability to adhere to smooth surfaces, and resistance to anti-staphylococcal penicillins. S. epidermidis, S. hominis, and S. haemolyticus were the most frequently occurring species, representing 65%, 15%, and 10%, respectively, of disease isolates and 57%, 25%, and 8% of colonizers. The seven other species recovered accounted for only 10% of the total in both groups. Differences in isolation rates of each species within the two groups were not significant and were reflective of their reported incidence in the normal flora. All species of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (except S. capitis and S. cohnii, which were isolated in very small numbers) were capable of adhering to smooth surfaces. S. hominis disease isolates were all capable of adherence, and the difference between the disease isolates and colonizers was statistically significant (p less than 0.02). This was not true for any other species that was analyzed nor for all isolates considered as a whole. Resistance to anti-staphylococcal penicillins was documented for all coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species, and was more frequent in S. epidermidis disease isolates than colonizers (p less than 0.05). No correlation was found between resistance to antistaphylococcal penicillins and ability to adhere.

  17. Molecular characterization of irinotecan (SN-38) resistant human breast cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jandu, Haatisha; Aluzaite, Kristina; Fogh, Louise

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies in taxane and/or anthracycline refractory metastatic breast cancer (mBC) patients have shown approximately 30 % response rates to irinotecan. Hence, a significant number of patients will experience irinotecan-induced side effects without obtaining any benefit. The aim of this ......Background: Studies in taxane and/or anthracycline refractory metastatic breast cancer (mBC) patients have shown approximately 30 % response rates to irinotecan. Hence, a significant number of patients will experience irinotecan-induced side effects without obtaining any benefit. The aim...... or an initial high dose of SN-38 (the active metabolite of irinotecan), respectively. The resistant cell lines were analyzed for cross-resistance to other anti-cancer drugs, global gene expression, growth rates, TOP1 and TOP2A gene copy numbers and protein expression, and inhibition of the breast cancer...... of the BCRP in breast cancer patients scheduled for irinotecan treatment. Moreover, LMP400 should be tested in a clinical setting in breast cancer patients with resistance to irinotecan....

  18. Neutralization resistance of hepatitis C virus can be overcome by recombinant human monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jannie L; Carlsen, Thomas H R; Prentoe, Jannick

    2013-01-01

    Immunotherapy and vaccine development for hepatitis C virus (HCV) will depend on broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). However, studies in infectious strain JFH1-based culture systems expressing patient-derived Core-NS2 proteins have suggested neutralization resistance for specific HCV...... demonstrated that the novel genotype 2 viruses as well as prototype strains J6/JFH1(2a) and J8/JFH1(2b), all with authentic envelope proteins, were resistant to neutralization by genotype 2a, 2b, 2c, 2j, 2i, and 2q patient sera. However, these patient sera had high titers of HCV-specific NAbs, because...... they efficiently reduced the infectivity of J6(2a) and J8(2b) with deleted hypervariable region 1. The genotype 2a, 2b, and 2c viruses, found resistant to polyclonal patient sera neutralization, were efficiently neutralized by two lead HMAbs (AR4A and HC84.26). Conclusion: Using novel 2a, 2b, and 2c cell...

  19. Characterization of vancomycin-resistant and vancomycin-susceptible Enterococcus faecium isolates from humans, chickens and pigs by RiboPrinting and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerum, Anette Marie; Fussing, Vivian; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2000-01-01

    Forty-eight vancomycin-resistant and 35 vancomycin-sensitive Danish Enterococcus faecium isolates obtained from pigs, chickens and humans, as well as the human vanA reference isolate BM4147, were characterized by EcoRI RiboPrinting and Smal pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. RiboPrinting of the 84...

  20. Adaptive response in human blood lymphocytes exposed to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields: resistance to ionizing radiation-induced damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sannino, Anna; Zeni, Olga; Romeo, Stefania; Massa, Rita; Gialanella, Giancarlo; Grossi, Gianfranco; Manti, Lorenzo; Vijayalaxmi; Scarfì, Maria Rosaria

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this preliminary investigation was to assess whether human peripheral blood lymphocytes which have been pre-exposed to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields exhibit an adaptive response (AR) by resisting the induction of genetic damage from subsequent exposure to ionizing radiation. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from four healthy donors were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin for 24 h and then exposed for 20 h to 1950 MHz radiofrequency fields (RF, adaptive dose, AD) at an average specific absorption rate of 0.3 W/kg. At 48 h, the cells were subjected to a challenge dose (CD) of 1.0 or 1.5 Gy X-irradiation (XR, challenge dose, CD). After a 72 h total culture period, cells were collected to examine the incidence of micronuclei (MN). There was a significant decrease in the number of MN in lymphocytes exposed to RF + XR (AD + CD) as compared with those subjected to XR alone (CD). These observations thus suggested a RF-induced AR and induction of resistance to subsequent damage from XR. There was variability between the donors in RF-induced AR. The data reported in our earlier investigations also indicated a similar induction of AR in human blood lymphocytes that had been pre-exposed to RF (AD) and subsequently treated with a chemical mutagen, mitomycin C (CD). Since XR and mitomycin-C induce different kinds of lesions in cellular DNA, further studies are required to understand the mechanism(s) involved in the RF-induced adaptive response.

  1. Role of 14-3-3σ in poor prognosis and in radiation and drug resistance of human pancreatic cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhaomin; Dong, Zizheng; Myer, David; Yip-Schneider, Michele; Liu, Jianguo; Cui, Ping; Schmidt, C Max; Zhang, Jian-Ting

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of death in the US. Unlike other solid tumors such as testicular cancer which are now curable, more than 90% of pancreatic cancer patients die due to lack of response to therapy. Recently, the level of 14-3-3σ mRNA was found to be increased in pancreatic cancers and this increased expression may contribute to the failure in treatment of pancreatic cancers. In the present study, we tested this hypothesis. Western blot analysis was used to determine 14-3-3σ protein level in fresh frozen tissues and was correlated to clinical outcome. A stable cell line expressing 14-3-3σ was established and the effect of 14-3-3σ over-expression on cellular response to radiation and anticancer drugs were tested using SRB assay and clonogenic assays. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis analyses were performed using propidium iodide staining and PARP cleavage assays. We found that 14-3-3σ protein level was increased significantly in about 71% (17 of 24) of human pancreatic cancer tissues and that the 14-3-3σ protein level in cancers correlated with lymph node metastasis and poor prognosis. Furthermore, we demonstrated that over-expression of 14-3-3σ in a pancreatic cancer cell line caused resistance to γ-irradiation as well as anticancer drugs by causing resistance to treatment-induced apoptosis and G2/M arrest. The increased level of 14-3-3σ protein likely contributes to the poor clinical outcome of human pancreatic cancers by causing resistance to radiation and anticancer drugs. Thus, 14-3-3σ may serve as a prognosis marker predicting survival of pancreatic cancer patients and guide the clinical treatment of these patients

  2. Insusceptibility to disinfectants in bacteria from animals, food and humans – is there a link to antimicrobial resistance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin eSchwaiger

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Enterococcus faecalis (n = 834 and Enterococcus faecium (n = 135 from blood and feces of hospitalized humans, from feces of outpatients and livestock and from food were screened for their susceptibility to a quaternary ammonium compound (didecyldimethyl-ammoniumchloride, DDAC and to 28 antibiotics by micro-/macrodilution. The maximum DDAC-MIC in our field study was 3.5 mg/l, but after adaptation in the laboratory, MIC values of 21.9 mg/l were observed. Strains for which DDAC had MICs > 1.4 mg/l (non-wildtype, in total: 46 of 969 isolates / 4. 7 % were most often found in milk and dairy products (14.6 %, while their prevalence in livestock was generally low (0-4 %. Of human isolates, 2.9 to 6.8 % had a non-wildtype phenotype. An association between reduced susceptibility to DDAC, high-level-aminoglycoside resistance and aminopenicillin resistance was seen in E. faecium (p In addition, bacteria (n = 42 of different genera were isolated from formic acid based boot bath disinfectant (20 ml of 55 % formic acid /l. The MICs of this disinfectant exceeded the wildtype MICs up to 20fold (staphylococci, but were still one to three orders of magnitude below the used concentration of the disinfectant (i. e. 1.1 % formic acid. In conclusion, the bacterial susceptibility to disinfectants still seems to be high. Thus, the proper use of disinfectants in livestock surroundings along with a good hygiene praxis should still be highly encouraged. Hints to a link between antibiotic resistance and reduced susceptibility for disinfectants – as seen for E. faecium - should be substantiated in further studies and might be an additional reason to confine the use of antibiotics.

  3. Roles of circulating WNT-signaling proteins and WNT-inhibitors in human adiposity, insulin resistance, insulin secretion, and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almario, R U; Karakas, S E

    2015-02-01

    Wingless-type MMTV integration site family member (WNT) signaling and WNT-inhibitors have been implicated in regulation of adipogenesis, insulin resistance, pancreatic function, and inflammation. Our goal was to determine serum proteins involved in WNT signaling (WNT5 and WISP2) and WNT inhibition (SFRP4 and SFRP5) as they relate to obesity, serum adipokines, insulin resistance, insulin secretion, and inflammation in humans. Study population comprised 57 insulin resistant women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and 27 reference women. In a cross-sectional study, blood samples were obtained at fasting, during oral, and frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance tests. Serum WNT5, WISP2, and SFRP4 concentrations did not differ between PCOS vs. reference women. Serum WNT5 correlated inversely with weight both in PCOS and reference women, and correlated directly with insulin response during oral glucose tolerance test in PCOS women. Serum WISP2 correlated directly with fatty acid binding protein 4. Serum SFRP5 did not differ between obese (n=32) vs. nonobese (n=25) PCOS women, but reference women had lower SFRP5 (pPCOS groups). Serum SFRP5 correlated inversely with IL-1β, TNF-α, cholesterol, and apoprotein B. These findings demonstrated that WNT5 correlated inversely with adiposity and directly with insulin response, and the WNT-inhibitor SFRP5 may be anti-inflammatory. Better understanding of the role of WNT signaling in obesity, insulin resistance, insulin secretion, lipoprotein metabolism, and inflammation is important for prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Integrative analysis of miRNA and gene expression reveals regulatory networks in tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Tejal; Elias, Daniel; Stenvang, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Tamoxifen is an effective anti-estrogen treatment for patients with estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer, however, tamoxifen resistance is frequently observed. To elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of tamoxifen resistance, we performed a systematic analysis of mi......+ breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant tamoxifen mono-therapy. Our results provide new insight into the molecular mechanisms of tamoxifen resistance and may form the basis for future medical intervention for the large number of women with tamoxifen-resistant ER+ breast cancer.......RNA-mediated gene regulation in three clinically-relevant tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cell lines (TamRs) compared to their parental tamoxifen-sensitive cell line. Alterations in the expression of 131 miRNAs in tamoxifen-resistant vs. parental cell lines were identified, 22 of which were common to all Tam...

  5. The Influences of Arm Resist Motion on a CAR Crash Test Using Hybrid III Dummy with Human-Like Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongchul; Youm, Youngil; Bae, Hanil; Choi, Hyeonki

    Safety of the occupant during the crash is very essential design element. Many researches have been investigated in reducing the fatal injury of occupant. They are focusing on the development of a dummy in order to obtain the real human-like motion. However, they have not considered the arm resist motion during the car accident. In this study, we would like to suggest the importance of the reactive force of the arm in a car crash. The influences of reactive force acting on the human upper extremity were investigated using the impedance experimental method with lumped mass model of hand system and a Hybrid III dummy with human-like arm. Impedance parameters (e.g. inertia, spring constant and damping coefficient) of the elbow joint in maximum activation level were measured by free oscillation test using single axis robot. The results showed that without seat belt, the reactive force of human arm reduced the head, chest, and femur injury, and the flexion moment of the neck is higher than that of the conventional dummy.

  6. The human tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP): involvement of the hemin responsive elements (HRE) in transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleckenstein, E C; Dirks, W G; Drexler, H G

    2000-02-01

    The biochemical properties and protein structure of the tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), an iron-containing lysosomal glycoprotein in cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system, are well known. In contrast, little is known about the physiology and genic structure of this unique enzyme. In some diseases, like hairy cell leukemia, Gaucher's disease and osteoclastoma, cytochemically detected TRAP expression is used as a disease-associated marker. In order to begin to elucidate the regulation of this gene we generated different deletion constructs of the TRAP 5'-flanking region, placed them upstream of the luciferase reporter gene and assayed them for their ability to direct luciferase expression in human 293 cells. Treatment of these cells with the iron-modulating reagents transferrin and hemin causes opposite effects on the TRAP promoter activity. Two regulatory GAGGC tandem repeat sequences (the hemin responsive elements, HRE) within the 5'-flanking region of the human TRAP gene were identified. Studies with specific HRE-deletion constructs of the human TRAP 5'-flanking region upstream of the luciferase reporter gene document the functionality of these HRE-sequences which are apparently responsible for mediating transcriptional inhibition upon exposure to hemin. In addition to the previously published functional characterization of the murine TRAP HRE motifs, these results provide the first description of a new iron/hemin-responsive transcriptional regulation in the human TRAP gene.

  7. The multidrug resistance 1 gene Abcb1 in brain and placenta: comparative analysis in human and guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Jane J; Petropoulos, Sophie; Suderman, Matthew; Iqbal, Majid; Moisiadis, Vasilis; Turecki, Gustavo; Matthews, Stephen G; Szyf, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    The Multidrug Resistance 1 (MDR1; alternatively ABCB1) gene product P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an ATP binding cassette transporter, extrudes multiple endogenous and exogenous substrates from the cell, playing an important role in normal physiology and xenobiotic distribution and bioavailability. To date, the predominant animal models used to investigate the role of P-gp have been the mouse and rat, which have two distinct genes, Abcb1a and Abcb1b. In contrast, the human has a single gene, ABCB1, for which only a single isoform has been validated. We and others have previously shown important differences between Abcb1a and Abcb1b, limiting the extrapolation from rodent findings to the human. Since the guinea pig has a relatively long gestation, hemomonochorial placentation and neuroanatomically mature offspring, it is more similar to the human, and may provide a more comparable model for investigating the regulation of P-gp in the brain and placenta, however, to date, the Abcb1 gene in the guinea pig remains to be characterized. The placenta and fetal brain are barrier sites that express P-gp and that play a critical role of protection of the fetus and the fetal brain from maternally administered drugs and other xenobiotics. Using RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and quantitative PCR (QPCR) to sequence the expressed isoforms of guinea pig Abcb1, we demonstrate that like the human, the guinea pig genome contains one gene for Abcb1 but that it is expressed as at least three different isoforms via alternative splicing and alternate exon usage. Further, we demonstrate that these isoforms are more closely related to human than to rat or mouse isoforms. This striking, overall similarity and evolutionary relatedness between guinea pig Abcb1 and human ABCB1 indicate that the guinea pig represents a relevant animal model for investigating the function and regulation of P-gp in the placenta and brain.

  8. Application of microarray and functional-based screening methods for the detection of antimicrobial resistance genes in the microbiomes of healthy humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roderick M Card

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to screen for the presence of antimicrobial resistance genes within the saliva and faecal microbiomes of healthy adult human volunteers from five European countries. Two non-culture based approaches were employed to obviate potential bias associated with difficult to culture members of the microbiota. In a gene target-based approach, a microarray was employed to screen for the presence of over 70 clinically important resistance genes in the saliva and faecal microbiomes. A total of 14 different resistance genes were detected encoding resistances to six antibiotic classes (aminoglycosides, β-lactams, macrolides, sulphonamides, tetracyclines and trimethoprim. The most commonly detected genes were erm(B, blaTEM, and sul2. In a functional-based approach, DNA prepared from pooled saliva samples was cloned into Escherichia coli and screened for expression of resistance to ampicillin or sulphonamide, two of the most common resistances found by array. The functional ampicillin resistance screen recovered genes encoding components of a predicted AcrRAB efflux pump. In the functional sulphonamide resistance screen, folP genes were recovered encoding mutant dihydropteroate synthase, the target of sulphonamide action. The genes recovered from the functional screens were from the chromosomes of commensal species that are opportunistically pathogenic and capable of exchanging DNA with related pathogenic species. Genes identified by microarray were not recovered in the activity-based screen, indicating that these two methods can be complementary in facilitating the identification of a range of resistance mechanisms present within the human microbiome. It also provides further evidence of the diverse reservoir of resistance mechanisms present in bacterial populations in the human gut and saliva. In future the methods described in this study can be used to monitor changes in the resistome in response to antibiotic therapy.

  9. Interleukin-6 induces impairment in human subcutaneous adipogenesis in obesity-associated insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuraikhy, Shamma; Kafienah, Wael; Bashah, Moataz; Diboun, Ilhame; Jaganjac, Morana; Al-Khelaifi, Fatima; Abdesselem, Houari; Mazloum, Nayef A; Alsayrafi, Mohammed; Mohamed-Ali, Vidya; Elrayess, Mohamed A

    2016-11-01

    A subset of obese individuals remains insulin sensitive by mechanisms as yet unclear. The hypothesis that maintenance of normal subcutaneous (SC) adipogenesis accounts, at least partially, for this protective phenotype and whether it can be abrogated by chronic exposure to IL-6 was investigated. Adipose tissue biopsies were collected from insulin-sensitive (IS) and insulin-resistant (IR) individuals undergoing weight-reduction surgery. Adipocyte size, pre-adipocyte proportion of stromal vascular fraction (SVF)-derived cells, adipogenic capacity and gene expression profiles of isolated pre-adipocytes were determined, along with local in vitro IL-6 secretion. Adipogenic capacity was further assessed in response to exogenous IL-6 application. Despite being equally obese, IR individuals had significantly lower plasma leptin and adiponectin levels and higher IL-6 levels compared with age-matched IS counterparts. Elevated systemic IL-6 in IR individuals was associated with hyperplasia of adipose tissue-derived SVF cells, despite higher frequency of hypertrophied adipocytes. SC pre-adipocytes from these tissues exhibited lower adipogenic capacity accompanied by downregulation of PPARγ (also known as PPARG) and CEBPα (also known as CEBPA) and upregulation of GATA3 expression. Impaired adipogenesis in IR individuals was further associated with increased adipose secretion of IL-6. Treatment of IS-derived SC pre-adipocytes with IL-6 reduced their adipogenic capacity to levels of the IR group. Obesity-associated insulin resistance is marked by impaired SC adipogenesis, mediated, at least in a subset of individuals, by elevated local levels of IL-6. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying reduced adipogenic capacity in IR individuals could help target appropriate therapeutic strategies aimed at those at greatest risk of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  10. Kaempferol increases apoptosis in human acute promyelocytic leukemia cells and inhibits multidrug resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradzadeh, Maliheh; Tabarraei, Alijan; Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza; Ghorbani, Ahmad; Mohamadkhani, Ashraf; Erfanian, Saiedeh; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2018-02-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is one of the most life-threatening hematological malignancies. Defects in the cell growth and apoptotic pathways are responsible for both disease pathogenesis and treatment resistance. Therefore, pro-apoptotic agents are potential candidates for APL treatment. Kaempferol is a flavonoid with antioxidant and anti-tumor properties. This study was designed to investigate the cytotoxic, pro-apoptotic, and differentiation-inducing effects of kaempferol on HL-60 and NB4 leukemia cells. Resazurin assay was used to determine cell viability following treatment with kaempferol (12.5-100 μM) and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA; 10 μM; used as a positive control). Apoptosis and differentiation were also detected using propidium iodide and NBT staining techniques, respectively. Furthermore, the expression levels of genes involved in apoptosis (PI3 K, AKT, BCL2, BAX, p53, p21, PTEN, CASP3, CASP8, and CASP9), differentiation (PML-RAR and HDAC1), and multi-drug resistance (ABCB1 and ABCC1) were determined using quantitative real-time PCR. The protein expressions of Bax/Bcl2 and casp3 were confirmed using Western blot. The results showed that kaempferol decreased cell viability and increased subG1 population in the tested leukemic cells. This effect was associated with decreased expression of Akt, BCL2, ABCB1, and ABCC1 genes, while the expression of CASP3 and BAX/BCL-2 ratio were significantly increased at both gene and protein levels. Kaempferol promoted apoptosis and inhibited multidrug resistance in a concentration-dependent manner, without any differential effect on leukemic cells. In conclusion, this study suggested that kaempferol may be utilized as an appropriate alternative for ATRA in APL patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Curcumin chemosensitizes 5-fluorouracil resistant MMR-deficient human colon cancer cells in high density cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Shakibaei

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC remains a clinical challenge, as more than 15% of patients are resistant to 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU-based chemotherapeutic regimens, and tumor recurrence rates can be as high as 50-60%. Cancer stem cells (CSC are capable of surviving conventional chemotherapies that permits regeneration of original tumors. Therefore, we investigated the effectiveness of 5-FU and plant polyphenol (curcumin in context of DNA mismatch repair (MMR status and CSC activity in 3D cultures of CRC cells. METHODS: High density 3D cultures of CRC cell lines HCT116, HCT116+ch3 (complemented with chromosome 3 and their corresponding isogenic 5-FU-chemo-resistant derivative clones (HCT116R, HCT116+ch3R were treated with 5-FU either without or with curcumin in time- and dose-dependent assays. RESULTS: Pre-treatment with curcumin significantly enhanced the effect of 5-FU on HCT116R and HCR116+ch3R cells, in contrast to 5-FU alone as evidenced by increased disintegration of colonospheres, enhanced apoptosis and by inhibiting their growth. Curcumin and/or 5-FU strongly affected MMR-deficient CRC cells in high density cultures, however MMR-proficient CRC cells were more sensitive. These effects of curcumin in enhancing chemosensitivity to 5-FU were further supported by its ability to effectively suppress CSC pools as evidenced by decreased number of CSC marker positive cells, highlighting the suitability of this 3D culture model for evaluating CSC marker expression in a close to vivo setting. CONCLUSION: Our results illustrate novel and previously unrecognized effects of curcumin in enhancing chemosensitization to 5-FU-based chemotherapy on DNA MMR-deficient and their chemo-resistant counterparts by targeting the CSC sub-population. (246 words in abstract.

  12. Curcumin chemosensitizes 5-fluorouracil resistant MMR-deficient human colon cancer cells in high density cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakibaei, Mehdi; Buhrmann, Constanze; Kraehe, Patricia; Shayan, Parviz; Lueders, Cora; Goel, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a clinical challenge, as more than 15% of patients are resistant to 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapeutic regimens, and tumor recurrence rates can be as high as 50-60%. Cancer stem cells (CSC) are capable of surviving conventional chemotherapies that permits regeneration of original tumors. Therefore, we investigated the effectiveness of 5-FU and plant polyphenol (curcumin) in context of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) status and CSC activity in 3D cultures of CRC cells. High density 3D cultures of CRC cell lines HCT116, HCT116+ch3 (complemented with chromosome 3) and their corresponding isogenic 5-FU-chemo-resistant derivative clones (HCT116R, HCT116+ch3R) were treated with 5-FU either without or with curcumin in time- and dose-dependent assays. Pre-treatment with curcumin significantly enhanced the effect of 5-FU on HCT116R and HCR116+ch3R cells, in contrast to 5-FU alone as evidenced by increased disintegration of colonospheres, enhanced apoptosis and by inhibiting their growth. Curcumin and/or 5-FU strongly affected MMR-deficient CRC cells in high density cultures, however MMR-proficient CRC cells were more sensitive. These effects of curcumin in enhancing chemosensitivity to 5-FU were further supported by its ability to effectively suppress CSC pools as evidenced by decreased number of CSC marker positive cells, highlighting the suitability of this 3D culture model for evaluating CSC marker expression in a close to vivo setting. Our results illustrate novel and previously unrecognized effects of curcumin in enhancing chemosensitization to 5-FU-based chemotherapy on DNA MMR-deficient and their chemo-resistant counterparts by targeting the CSC sub-population. (246 words in abstract).

  13. The Reversal Effect and Its Mechanisms of Tetramethylpyrazine on Multidrug Resistance in Human Bladder Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Wang

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy is an important strategy for the treatment of bladder cancer. However, the main problem limiting the success of chemotherapy is the development of multidrug resistance (MDR. To improve the management of bladder cancer, it is an urgent matter to search for strategies to reverse MDR. We chose three kinds of herbal medicines including ginsenoside Rh2, (--Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG and Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP to detect their effects on bladder cancer. Reversal effects of these three herbal medicines for drug resistance in adriamycin (ADM-resistant Pumc-91 cells (Pumc-91/ADM were assessed by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8 cell proliferation assay system. The mechanisms of reversal effect for TMP were explored in Pumc-91/ADM and T24/DDP cells. After Pumc-91/ADM and T24/DDP cells were treated with TMP, cell cycle distribution analysis was performed by flow cytometry. The expression of MRP1, GST, BCL-2, LRP and TOPO-II was evaluated using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, immunefluorescence assay and western blot. It was observed that TMP was capable of enhancing the cytotoxicity of anticancer agents on Pumc-91/ADM cells in response to ADM, however Rh2 and EGCG were unable to. The reversal effect of TMP was also demonstrated in T24/DDP cells. Moreover, the treatment with TMP in Pumc-91/ADM and T24/DDP cells led to an increased of G1 phase accompanied with a concomitant decrease of cell numbers in S phase. Compared to the control group, an obvious decrease of MRP1, GST, BCL-2 and an increase of TOPO-II were shown in TMP groups with a dose-dependency in mRNA and protein levels. However, there was no difference on LRP expression between TMP groups and the control group. TMP could effectively reverse MDR of Pumc-91/ADM and T24/DDP cells and its mechanisms might be correlated with the alteration of MRP1, GST, BCL-2 and TOPO-II. TMP might be a potential candidate for reversing drug resistance in bladder cancer

  14. Resistance to organophosphorus agent toxicity in transgenic mice expressing the G117H mutant of human butyrylcholinesterase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yuxia; Ticu Boeck, Andreea; Duysen, Ellen G.; Van Keuren, Margaret; Saunders, Thomas L.; Lockridge, Oksana

    2004-01-01

    Organophosphorus toxicants (OP) include chemical nerve agents and pesticides. The goal of this work was to find out whether an animal could be made resistant to OP toxicity by genetic engineering. The human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) mutant G117H was chosen for study because it has the unusual ability to hydrolyze OP as well as acetylcholine, and it is resistant to inhibition by OP. Human G117H BChE, under the control of the ROSA26 promoter, was expressed in all tissues of transgenic mice. A stable transgenic mouse line expressed 0.5 μg/ml of human G117H BChE in plasma as well as 2 μg/ml of wild-type mouse BChE. Intestine, kidneys, stomach, lungs, heart, spleen, liver, brain, and muscle expressed 0.6-0.15 μg/g of G117H BChE. Transgenic mice were normal in behavior and fertility. The LD50 dose of echothiophate for wild-type mice was 0.1 mg/kg sc. This dose caused severe cholinergic signs of toxicity and lethality in wild-type mice, but caused no deaths and only mild toxicity in transgenic animals. The mechanism of protection was investigated by measuring acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and BChE activity. It was found that AChE and endogenous BChE were inhibited to the same extent in echothiophate-treated wild type and transgenic mice. This led to the hypothesis that protection against echothiophate toxicity was not explained by hydrolysis of echothiophate. In conclusion, the transgenic G117H BChE mouse demonstrates the factors required to achieve protection from OP toxicity in a vertebrate animal

  15. In vitro phagocytosis of methicillin resistant and methicillin sensitive staphylococcus aureus by human polymorphonuclear leucocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javed, N.; Tahir, R.; Abbas, A.

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a gram positive bacterium that causes a number of diseases such as abscesses, infective endocarditis, septic arthritis, etc. It is acquiring resistance against many antibiotics like methicillin; therefore its control is becoming increasingly difficult. Peripheral blood phagocytes particularly polymorphonuclear leucocytes play an important role in the protective mechanisms against these organisms. Phagocytes interact with bacteria and phagocytose these microorganisms to kill them. Phenotypically different isolates of Staphylococcus aureus including methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) were collected from various hospitals of Lahore, Pakistan. Fresh polymorphonuclaer leucocytes were obtained from healthy individuals by centrifugation using Ficol-Hypaque gradient combined with dextran sedimentation. Microbiological method was used for the determination of phagocytic index of phenotypic variants of Staphylococcus aureus. A significant difference was observed between the phagocytic index of both bacterial groups. MSSA group showed the Mean+-SD of 79.46%+-3.9 while MRSA group showed 72.35%+-2.5. Significant difference in phagocytic index indicates that it can be one of the mechanisms of MRSA to evade host immune system as compare to MSSA. (author)

  16. Characteristics of Quinolone Resistance in Escherichia coli Isolates from Humans, Animals, and the Environment in the Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röderova, Magdalena; Halova, Dana; Papousek, Ivo; Dolejska, Monika; Masarikova, Martina; Hanulik, Vojtech; Pudova, Vendula; Broz, Petr; Htoutou-Sedlakova, Miroslava; Sauer, Pavel; Bardon, Jan; Cizek, Alois; Kolar, Milan; Literak, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a common commensal bacterial species of humans and animals that may become a troublesome pathogen causing serious diseases. The aim of this study was to characterize the quinolone resistance phenotypes and genotypes in E. coli isolates of different origin from one area of the Czech Republic. E. coli isolates were obtained from hospitalized patients and outpatients, chicken farms, retailed turkeys, rooks wintering in the area, and wastewaters. Susceptibility of the isolates grown on the MacConkey agar with ciprofloxacin (0.05 mg/L) to 23 antimicrobial agents was determined. The presence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) and ESBL genes was tested by PCR and sequencing. Specific mutations in gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE were also examined. Multilocus sequence typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis were performed to assess the clonal relationship. In total, 1050 E. coli isolates were obtained, including 303 isolates from humans, 156 from chickens, 105 from turkeys, 114 from the rooks, and 372 from wastewater samples. PMQR genes were detected in 262 (25%) isolates. The highest occurrence was observed in isolates from retailed turkey (49% of the isolates were positive) and inpatients (32%). The qnrS1 gene was the most common PMQR determinant identified in 146 (56%) followed by aac(6′)-Ib-cr in 77 (29%), qnrB19 in 41 (16%), and qnrB1 in 9 (3%) isolates. All isolates with high level of ciprofloxacin resistance (>32 mg/L) carried double or triple mutations in gyrA combined with single or double mutations in parC. The most frequently identified substitutions were Ser(83)Leu; Asp(87)Asn in GyrA, together with Ser(80)Ile, or Glu(84)Val in ParC. Majority of these isolates showed resistance to beta-lactams and multiresistance phenotype was found in 95% isolates. Forty-eight different sequence types among 144 isolates analyzed were found, including five major clones ST131 (26), ST355 (19), ST48 (13), ST95 (10), and ST10 (5). No isolates

  17. Proliferation of human mammary cancer cells exposed to 27-hydroxycholesterol

    OpenAIRE

    CRUZ, PAMELA; TORRES, CRISTIAN; RAMÍREZ, MARÍA EUGENIA; EPUÑÁN, MARÍA JOSÉ; VALLADARES, LUIS EMILIO; SIERRALTA, WALTER DANIEL

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the possible mechanisms by which certain estradiol receptor (ER)-positive mammary tumor cells remain resistant to treatment with anti-estrogens or inhibitors of local estradiol (E2) production. To this end, we compared the proliferative effects on mammary cancer cells of the novel selective ER modulator 27-hydroxycholesterol (27OHC) to those of E2, and evaluated their inhibition by ICI 182,780 (ICI). Analysis of the effects on the cell cycle of 27O...

  18. EFSA (European Food Safety Authority) and ECDC (European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control), 2015. EU Summary Report on antimicrobial resistance in zoonotic and indicator bacteria from humans, animals and food in 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Helle Bisgaard

    The antimicrobial resistance data on zoonotic and indicator bacteria in 2013, submitted by 28 EU MSs, were jointly analysed by EFSA and ECDC. Resistance in zoonotic Salmonella and Campylobacter species from humans, animals and food, and resistance in indicator Escherichia coli and enterococci...... from broilers and/or pigs in several MSs. Multi-resistance and co-resistance to critically important antimicrobials in both human and animal isolates were uncommon. A minority of isolates from animals belonging to a few Salmonella serovars (notably Kentucky and Infantis) had a high level of resistance......,as well as data on meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, in animals and food were addressed. ‘Microbiological’ resistance was assessed using epidemiological cut-off (ECOFF) values in animal and food isolates and, where possible, in human isolates. For human isolates interpreted based on clinical...

  19. DR_SEQAN: a PC/Windows-based software to evaluate drug resistance using human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menéndez-Arias Luis

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genotypic assays based on DNA sequencing of part or the whole reverse transcriptase (RT- and protease (PR-coding regions of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 genome have become part of the routine clinical management of HIV-infected individuals. However, the results are difficult to interpret due to complex interactions between mutations found in viral genes. Results DR_SEQAN is a tool to analyze RT and PR sequences. The program output includes a list containing all of the amino acid changes found in the query sequence in comparison with the sequence of a wild-type HIV-1 strain. Translation of codons containing nucleotide mixtures can result in potential ambiguities or heterogeneities in the amino acid sequence. The program identifies all possible combinations of 2 or 3 amino acids that derive from translation of triplets containing nucleotide mixtures. In addition, when ambiguities affect codons relevant for drug resistance, DR_SEQAN allows the user to select the appropriate mutation to be considered by the program's drug resistance interpretation algorithm. Resistance is predicted using a rule-based algorithm, whose efficiency and accuracy has been tested with a large set of drug susceptibility data. Drug resistance predictions given by DR_SEQAN were consistent with phenotypic data and coherent with predictions provided by other publicly available algorithms. In addition, the program output provides two tables showing published drug susceptibility data and references for mutations and combinations of mutations found in the analyzed sequence. These data are retrieved from an integrated relational database, implemented in Microsoft Access, which includes two sets of non-redundant core tables (one for combinations of mutations in the PR and the other for combinations in the RT. Conclusion DR_SEQAN is an easy to use off-line application that provides expert advice on HIV genotypic resistance interpretation. It is

  20. High mobility group A1 enhances tumorigenicity of human cholangiocarcinoma and confers resistance to therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintavalle, Cristina; Burmeister, Katharina; Piscuoglio, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    High mobility group A1 (HMGA1) protein has been described to play an important role in numerous types of human carcinoma. By the modulation of several target genes HMGA1 promotes proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition of tumor cells. However, its role in cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) has...

  1. Brain, nutrition and metabolism : Studies in lean, obese and insulin resistant humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteeg, R.I.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis describes studies on the effects of obesity, weight loss and meal timing on the human brain and glucose metabolism. We investigated effects of meal timing during a hypocaloric diet and weight loss on brain serotonin transporters (SERT) and dopamine transporters (DAT), neuronal activity

  2. Antimicrobial peptide exposure selects for Staphylococcus aureus resistance to human defence peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kubicek-Sutherland, Jessica Z.; Lofton, Hava; Vestergaard, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Background: The clinical development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) is currently under evaluation to combat the rapid increase in MDR bacterial pathogens. However, many AMPs closely resemble components of the human innate immune system and the ramifications of prolonged bacterial exposure to AM...

  3. Human health risk assessment (HHRA) for environmental development and transfer of antibiotic resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: Here we present possible approaches and identify research needs to enable human health risk assessments that focus on the role the environment plays in antibiotic treatment failure of patients. Methods: The authors participated in a workshop sub-committee to define t...

  4. Potential for pet animals to harbor methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) when residing with human MRSA patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Daniel O.; Lautenbach, Ebbing; Zaoutis, Theoklis; Leckerman, Kateri; Edelstein, Paul H.; Rankin, Shelley C.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) may be persistent in people, and is horizontally transmissible. The scientific literature suggests that domestic pets may also participate in cross-transmission of MRSA within households. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of and risk factors for MRSA carriage by pets residing in households with an MRSA-infected person. From 66 households in which an MRSA infected patient resided, we screened 47 dogs and 52 cats using a swab protocol. Isolates from pets and humans were genotyped using two techniques, and compared for concordance. Human participants completed a 22-question survey of demographic and epidemiologic data relevant to staphylococcal transmission. Eleven of 99 pets (11.5%) representing 9 (13.6%) of households were MRSA-positive, but in only 6 of these households were the human and animal-source strains genetically concordant. Human infection by strain USA 100 was significantly associated with pet carriage [OR = 11.4 (95% C.I. 1.7, 76.9); p=0.013]. Yet, for each day of delay in sampling the pet after the person’s MRSA diagnosis, the odds of isolating any type of MRSA from the pet decreased by 13.9% [(95% C.I. 2.6%, 23.8%); p=0.017)]. It may be concluded that pets can harbor pandemic strains of MRSA while residing in a household with an infected person. However, the source of MRSA to the pet cannot always be attributed to the human patient. Moreover, the rapid attrition of the odds of obtaining a positive culture from pets over time suggests that MRSA carriage may be fleeting. PMID:22233337

  5. Identification of the Interaction between P-Glycoprotein and Anxa2 in Multidrug-resistant Human Breast Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hai-chang; Zhang, Fei; Wu, Bing; Han, Jing-hua; Ji, Wei; Zhou, Yan; Niu, Rui-fang

    2012-01-01

    To explore the interaction of Anxa2 with P-Glycoprotein (P-gp) in the migration and invasion of the multidrug-resistant (MDR) human breast cancer cell line MCF-7/ADR. A pair of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting P-gp was transfected into MCF-7/ADR cells, and monoclonal cell strains were screened. The expression of P-gp was detected by Western blot. Transwell chambers were used to observe the cell migration capacity and invasion ability. The interaction between P-gp and Anxa2 was examined by immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy analyses. P-gp expression was significantly knocked down, and there were notable decreasing trends in the migration and invasion capability of MDR breast cancer cells (P<0.05). There was a close interaction between Anxa2 and P-gp. MCF-7/ADR is an MDR human breast cancer cell line with high migration and invasion abilities. The knockdown of P-gp notably impaired the migration and invasion abilities of the tumor cells. The interaction of Anxa2 with P-pg may play an important role in the enhanced invasiveness of MDR human breast cancer cells

  6. Multidrug resistance and retroviral transduction potential in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, M D; Gram, G J; Jensen, P B

    1999-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a major problem in the successful treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). New treatment strategies are needed, such as gene therapy specifically targeting the MDR cells in the tumor. Retroviral LacZ gene-containing vectors that were either pseudotyped...... for the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV-1) receptor or had specificity for the amphotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV-A) receptor were used for transduction of five SCLC cell lines differing by a range of MDR mechanisms. Transduction efficiencies in these cell lines were compared by calculating the percentage...... of blue colonies after X-Gal staining of the cells grown in soft agar. All examined SCLC cell lines were transducible with either vector. Transduction efficiencies varied from 5.7% to 33.5% independent of the presence of MDR. These results indicate that MDR does not severely impair transduction of SCLC...

  7. Human mesenchymal stem cells are resistant to cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of cisplatin in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Corrêa Bellagamba

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are known for their important properties involving multilineage differentiation potential., trophic factor secretion and localization along various organs and tissues. On the dark side, MSCs play a distinguished role in tumor microenvironments by differentiating into tumor-associated fibroblasts or supporting tumor growth via distinct mechanisms. Cisplatin (CIS is a drug widely applied in the treatment of a large number of cancers and is known for its cytotoxic and genotoxic effects, both in vitro and in vivo. Here we assessed the effects of CIS on MSCs and the ovarian cancer cell line OVCAR-3, by MTT and comet assays. Our results demonstrated the resistance of MSCs to cell death and DNA damage induction by CIS, which was not observed when OVCAR-3 cells were exposed to this drug.

  8. Potential epigenetic biomarkers of obesity-related insulin resistance in human whole-blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Samantha E; Coletta, Richard L; Kim, Joon Young; Garcia, Luis A; Campbell, Latoya E; Benjamin, Tonya R; Roust, Lori R; De Filippis, Elena A; Mandarino, Lawrence J; Coletta, Dawn K

    2017-04-03

    Obesity can increase the risk of complex metabolic diseases, including insulin resistance. Moreover, obesity can be caused by environmental and genetic factors. However, the epigenetic mechanisms of obesity are not well defined. Therefore, the identification of novel epigenetic biomarkers of obesity allows for a more complete understanding of the disease and its underlying insulin resistance. The aim of our study was to identify DNA methylation changes in whole-blood that were strongly associated with obesity and insulin resistance. Whole-blood was obtained from lean (n = 10; BMI = 23.6 ± 0.7 kg/m 2 ) and obese (n = 10; BMI = 34.4 ± 1.3 kg/m 2 ) participants in combination with euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps to assess insulin sensitivity. We performed reduced representation bisulfite sequencing on genomic DNA isolated from the blood. We identified 49 differentially methylated cytosines (DMCs; q obese compared with lean participants. We identified 2 sites (Chr.21:46,957,981 and Chr.21:46,957,915) in the 5' untranslated region of solute carrier family 19 member 1 (SLC19A1) with decreased methylation in obese participants (lean 0.73 ± 0.11 vs. obese 0.09 ± 0.05; lean 0.68 ± 0.10 vs. obese 0.09 ± 0.05, respectively). These 2 DMCs identified by obesity were also significantly predicted by insulin sensitivity (r = 0.68, P = 0.003; r = 0.66; P = 0.004). In addition, we performed a differentially methylated region (DMR) analysis and demonstrated a decrease in methylation of Chr.21:46,957,915-46,958,001 in SLC19A1 of -34.9% (70.4% lean vs. 35.5% obese). The decrease in whole-blood SLC19A1 methylation in our obese participants was similar to the change observed in skeletal muscle (Chr.21:46,957,981, lean 0.70 ± 0.09 vs. obese 0.31 ± 0.11 and Chr.21:46,957,915, lean 0.72 ± 0.11 vs. obese 0.31 ± 0.13). Pyrosequencing analysis further demonstrated a decrease in methylation at Chr.21:46,957,915 in both whole-blood (lean 0.71 ± 0.10 vs. obese 0.18 ± 0

  9. Myogenic response of human skeletal muscle to 12 weeks of resistance training at light loading intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackey, Abigail; Holm, L; Reitelseder, S

    2011-01-01

    There is strong evidence for enhanced numbers of satellite cells with heavy resistance training. The satellite cell response to very light muscle loading is, however, unknown. We, therefore, designed a 12-week training protocol where volunteers trained one leg with a high load (H) and the other leg...... with a light load (L). Twelve young healthy men [mean age 25 ± 3 standard deviation (SD) years] volunteered for the study. Muscle biopsies were collected from the m. vastus lateralis of both legs before and after the training period and satellite cells were visualized by CD56 immunohistochemistry....... A significant main effect of time was observed (P12 ± 0.03 to 0.15 ± 0.05, mean ± SD). The finding that 12 weeks of training skeletal muscle even with very light loads can induce an increase in the number of satellite...

  10. Comparative Genotypes, Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec (SCCmec) Genes and Antimicrobial Resistance amongst Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus Isolates from Infections in Humans and Companion Animals

    OpenAIRE

    McManus, Brenda A.; Coleman, David C.; Deasy, Emily C.; Brennan, Gráinne I.; O’ Connell, Brian; Monecke, Stefan; Ehricht, Ralf; Leggett, Bernadette; Leonard, Nola; Shore, Anna C.

    2015-01-01

    This study compares the characteristics of Staphylococcus epidermidis (SE) and Staphylococcus haemolyticus (SH) isolates from epidemiologically unrelated infections in humans (Hu) (28 SE-Hu; 8 SH-Hu) and companion animals (CpA) (12 SE-CpA; 13 SH-CpA). All isolates underwent antimicrobial susceptibility testing, multilocus sequence typing and DNA microarray profiling to detect antimicrobial resistance and SCCmec-associated genes. All methicillin-resistant (MR) isolates (33/40 SE, 20/21 SH) und...

  11. Prediction of response to antiretroviral therapy by human experts and by the EuResist data-driven expert system (the EVE study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazzi, M; Kaiser, R; Sönnerborg, A; Struck, D; Altmann, A; Prosperi, M; Rosen-Zvi, M; Petroczi, A; Peres, Y; Schülter, E; Boucher, C A; Brun-Vezinet, F; Harrigan, P R; Morris, L; Obermeier, M; Perno, C-F; Phanuphak, P; Pillay, D; Shafer, R W; Vandamme, A-M; van Laethem, K; Wensing, A M J; Lengauer, T; Incardona, F

    2011-04-01

    The EuResist expert system is a novel data-driven online system for computing the probability of 8-week success for any given pair of HIV-1 genotype and combination antiretroviral therapy regimen plus optional patient information. The objective of this study was to compare the EuResist system vs. human experts (EVE) for the ability to predict response to treatment. The EuResist system was compared with 10 HIV-1 drug resistance experts for the ability to predict 8-week response to 25 treatment cases derived from the EuResist database validation data set. All current and past patient data were made available to simulate clinical practice. The experts were asked to provide a qualitative and quantitative estimate of the probability of treatment success. There were 15 treatment successes and 10 treatment failures. In the classification task, the number of mislabelled cases was six for EuResist and 6-13 for the human experts [mean±standard deviation (SD) 9.1±1.9]. The accuracy of EuResist was higher than the average for the experts (0.76 vs. 0.64, respectively). The quantitative estimates computed by EuResist were significantly correlated (Pearson r=0.695, Pexperts. However, the agreement among experts was only moderate (for the classification task, inter-rater κ=0.355; for the quantitative estimation, mean±SD coefficient of variation=55.9±22.4%). With this limited data set, the EuResist engine performed comparably to or better than human experts. The system warrants further investigation as a treatment-decision support tool in clinical practice. © 2010 British HIV Association.

  12. A low dose lipid infusion is sufficient to induce insulin resistance and a pro-inflammatory response in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hanyu; Lum, Helen; Alvarez, Andrea; Garduno-Garcia, Jose de Jesus; Daniel, Benjamin J; Musi, Nicolas

    2018-01-01

    The root cause behind the low-grade inflammatory state seen in insulin resistant (obesity and type 2 diabetes) states is unclear. Insulin resistant subjects have elevations in plasma free fatty acids (FFA), which are ligands for the pro-inflammatory toll-like receptor (TLR)4 pathway. We tested the hypothesis that an experimental elevation in plasma FFA (within physiological levels) in lean individuals would upregulate TLR4 and activate downstream pathways (e.g., MAPK) in circulating monocytes. Twelve lean, normal glucose-tolerant subjects received a low dose (30 ml/h) 48 h lipid or saline infusion on two different occasions. Monocyte TLR4 protein level, MAPK phosphorylation, and expression of genes in the TLR pathway were determined before and after each infusion. The lipid infusion significantly increased monocyte TLR4 protein and phosphorylation of JNK and p38 MAPK. Lipid-mediated increases in TLR4 and p38 phosphorylation directly correlated with reduced peripheral insulin sensitivity (M value). Lipid increased levels of multiple genes linked to inflammation, including several TLRs, CD180, MAP3K7, and CXCL10. Monocytes exposed in vivo to lipid infusion exhibited enhanced in vitro basal and LPS-stimulated IL-1β secretion. In lean subjects, a small increase in plasma FFA (as seen in insulin resistant subjects) is sufficient to upregulate TLR4 and stimulate inflammatory pathways (MAPK) in monocytes. Moreover, lipids prime monocytes to endotoxin. We provide proof-of-concept data in humans indicating that the low-grade inflammatory state characteristic of obesity and type 2 diabetes could be caused (at least partially) by pro-inflammatory monocytes activated by excess lipids present in these individuals.

  13. Pleuromutilins: use in food-producing animals in the European Union, development of resistance and impact on human and animal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijkeren, Engeline; Greko, Christina; Pringle, Märit; Baptiste, Keith Edward; Catry, Boudewijn; Jukes, Helen; Moreno, Miguel A; Pomba, M Constança Matias Ferreira; Pyörälä, Satu; Rantala, Merja; Ružauskas, Modestas; Sanders, Pascal; Teale, Christopher; Threlfall, E John; Torren-Edo, Jordi; Törneke, Karolina

    2014-08-01

    Pleuromutilins (tiamulin and valnemulin) are antimicrobial agents that are used mainly in veterinary medicine, especially for swine and to a lesser extent for poultry and rabbits. In pigs, tiamulin and valnemulin are used to treat swine dysentery, spirochaete-associated diarrhoea, porcine proliferative enteropathy, enzootic pneumonia and other infections where Mycoplasma is involved. There are concerns about the reported increases in the MICs of tiamulin and valnemulin for porcine Brachyspira hyodysenteriae isolates from different European countries, as only a limited number of antimicrobials are available for the treatment of swine dysentery where resistance to these antimicrobials is already common and widespread. The loss of pleuromutilins as effective tools to treat swine dysentery because of further increases in resistance or as a consequence of restrictions would present a considerable threat to pig health, welfare and productivity. In humans, only one product containing pleuromutilins (retapamulin) is authorized currently for topical use; however, products for oral and intravenous administration to humans with serious multidrug-resistant skin infections and respiratory infections, including those caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), are being developed. The objective of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on the usage of pleuromutilins, resistance development and the potential impact of this resistance on animal and human health. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. A leukocyte antigen, Leu-13, is involved in induction of resistance of human cells to x-ray cell killing by interferon-α

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Kazuko; Zhai, Ling; Sugaya, Shigeru; Suzuki, Nobuo

    2003-01-01

    We previously reported on human interferon (HuIFN)-induced resistance of human cells to X-ray and UV cell killing. In this study, we searched for the genes whose expression is responsible for the resistance, using a PCR-based mRNA differential display method and Northern blotting analysis. RSa cells were used for this analysis, because they show increased resistance to X-ray- and UV-caused cell killing by HuIFN-α treatment prior to irradiation. Messenger RNA expression levels for Leu-13, a leukocyte antigen, were markedly up-regulated in RSa cells after HuIFN-α treatment. Furthermore, pretreatment of RSa cells with antisense oligonucleotides for Leu-13 mRNA resulted in the suppression of the HuIFN-α-induced resistance of the cells to X-ray cell killing, but did not modulate HuIFN-α-induced resistance to UV cell killing. These results suggest that Leu-13 is involved in HuIFN-α-induced resistance of human cells to X-ray cell killing, but not to UV cell killing. (author)

  15. Salinomycin overcomes ABC transporter-mediated multidrug and apoptosis resistance in human leukemia stem cell-like KG-1a cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Dominik; Daniel, Volker; Sadeghi, Mahmoud; Opelz, Gerhard; Naujokat, Cord

    2010-01-01

    Leukemia stem cells are known to exhibit multidrug resistance by expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters which constitute transmembrane proteins capable of exporting a wide variety of chemotherapeutic drugs from the cytosol. We show here that human promyeloblastic leukemia KG-1a cells exposed to the histone deacetylase inhibitor phenylbutyrate resemble many characteristics of leukemia stem cells, including expression of functional ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein, BCRP and MRP8. Consequently, KG-1a cells display resistance to the induction of apoptosis by various chemotherapeutic drugs. Resistance to apoptosis induction by chemotherapeutic drugs can be reversed by cyclosporine A, which effectively inhibits the activity of P-glycoprotein and BCRP, thus demonstrating ABC transporter-mediated drug resistance in KG-1a cells. However, KG-1a are highly sensitive to apoptosis induction by salinomycin, a polyether ionophore antibiotic that has recently been shown to kill human breast cancer stem cell-like cells and to induce apoptosis in human cancer cells displaying multiple mechanisms of drug and apoptosis resistance. Whereas KG-1a cells can be adapted to proliferate in the presence of apoptosis-inducing concentrations of bortezomib and doxorubicin, salinomycin does not permit long-term adaptation of the cells to apoptosis-inducing concentrations. Thus, salinomycin should be regarded as a novel and effective agent for the elimination of leukemia stem cells and other tumor cells exhibiting ABC transporter-mediated multidrug resistance.

  16. Emergence of a Clonal Lineage of Multidrug-Resistant ESBL-Producing Salmonella Infantis Transmitted from Broilers and Broiler Meat to Humans in Italy between 2011 and 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Alessia; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Feltrin, Fabiola

    2015-01-01

    We report the spread of a clone of multidrug-resistant (MDR), ESBL-producing (blaCTX-M-1) Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Infantis, in the Italian broiler chicken industry and along the food-chain. This was first detected in Italy in 2011 and led to human infection in Italy in 2013....... This megaplasmid carried the ESBL gene blaCTX-M-1, and additional genes [tet(A), sul1, dfrA1 and dfrA14] mediating cefotaxime, tetracycline, sulfonamide, and trimethoprim resistance. It also contained genes conferring enhanced colonization capability, virulence (fimbriae, yersiniabactin), resistance and fitness...

  17. Epidemiology and ecology of enterococci, with special reference to antibiotic resistant strains, in animals, humans and the environment - Example of an ongoing project within the European research programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, I.; Iversen, A.; Burman, L. G.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of the present study are to generate knowledge of the ecology and epidemiology of enterococci in the food chain by studying the following: (1) the population structure (in measures of abundance, number of vancomycin resistant strains, antibiotic resistance patterns, diversity...... of enterococci and (4) the diversity of the drug resistance genes in enterococci, So far, 1578 samples have been collected from different countries within the EU (Sweden, Denmark, UK and Spain), and from different habitats (pig farms, carcasses in slaughter houses, soil, manure, water, sewage, and humans). Total...

  18. Detection of sul1, sul2 and sul3 in sulphonamide resistant Escherichia coli isolates obtained from healthy humans, pork and pigs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerum, Anette Marie; Sandvag, Dorthe; Andersen, Sigrid R.

    2006-01-01

    The occurrence of sulphonamide resistance was investigated in 998 Escherichia coli isolates, obtained from pig faeces collected at slaughter, Danish pork collected at retail outlets and from faeces from healthy persons in Denmark. In total 18% (n = 35), 20% (n = 38) and 26% (n = 161) of the E. coli...... isolates obtained from humans, pork and pigs, respectively, were resistant to sulphonamide. All sulphonamide resistant E. coli isolates were investigated for the presence of sul1, sul2, sul3 and intl1 genes by PCR. The sul1 gene was detected in 40% (n = 14), 29% (n = 11) and 55% (n = 88...

  19. Mechanisms associated with the expression of cisplatin resistance in a human ovarian tumor cell line following exposure to fractionated x-irradiation in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dempke, W.C.M.; Shellard, S.A.; Hosking, L.K.; Hill, B.T.

    1992-01-01

    Interactions between cisplatin (CDDP) and irradiation are of potential significance for the combined modality treatment of cancer. To identify parameters associated with CDDP resistance, the human ovarian carcinoma cell line SK-OV-3/P was pre-exposed to fractionated X-irradiation in vitro. The resultant subline (SK-OV-3/DXR-10) proved 2-fold resistant to CDDP, but not to acute X-irradiation. Consistent with unaltered dihydrofolate reductase and thymidylate synthase activities, SK-OV-3/DXR-10 cells were neither cross-resistant to methotrexate nor to 5-fluorouracil. Verapamil significantly enhanced CDDP-induced cytotoxicity in the resistant DXR-10 subline, but not in the parental cells. Resistance in the SK-OV-3/DXR-10 cells was associated with significantly decreased cisplatin uptake. After an 18 h post-treatment incubation the parental cell line appeared proficient in the removal of the intrastrand adduct Pt-AG, but deficient in removing the major adduct Pt-GG and the difunctional Pt-(GMP) 2 lesion, whilst the DXR-10 resistant subline appeared proficient in removal of all four Pt-DNA adducts. DNA polymerases α and β activities, however, were comparable in both cell lines. These data implicate both enhanced repair and increased tolerance of DNA damage as mechanisms of resistance to CDDP resulting from in vitro exposure of a human ovarian carcinoma cell line to fractionated X-irradiation. (author)

  20. A truncating mutation of HDAC2 in human cancers confers resistance to histone deacetylase inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ropero, S; Fraga, MF; Ballestar, E

    2006-01-01

    Disruption of histone acetylation patterns is a common feature of cancer cells, but very little is known about its genetic basis. We have identified truncating mutations in one of the primary human histone deacetylases, HDAC2, in sporadic carcinomas with microsatellite instability and in tumors a...... deacetylase inhibitors. As such drugs may serve as therapeutic agents for cancer, our findings support the use of HDAC2 mutational status in future pharmacogenetic treatment of these individuals....

  1. Composition and adaptation of human myotendinous junction and neighboring muscle fibers to heavy resistance training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jens R.; Mackey, A L; Knudsen, A B

    2017-01-01

    The myotendinous junction (MTJ) is a common site of strain injury and yet understanding of its composition and ability to adapt to loading is poor. The main aims of this study were to determine the profile of selected collagens and macrophage density in human MTJ and adjoining muscle fibers...... 4 weeks of training may reflect a training-induced protection against strain injuries in this region....

  2. On the Importance of Aging to the Crack Growth Resistance of Human Enamel

    OpenAIRE

    Yahyazadehfar, Mobin; Zhang, Dongsheng; Arola, Dwayne

    2015-01-01

    With improvements in oral health and an overall increase in quality of life, the percentage of fully or largely dentate seniors is increasing. Understanding the effects of aging on the mechanical properties of teeth is essential to the maintenance of lifelong oral health. In this investigation the effects of aging on the fracture toughness of human enamel were evaluated from incremental crack growth experiments performed on tissue of donor teeth representing ?young? (17? age ? 25) and ?old? (...

  3. miR-297 modulates multidrug resistance in human colorectal carcinoma by down-regulating MRP-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ke; Liang, Xin; Shen, Ke; Cui, Daling; Zheng, Yuanhong; Xu, Jianhua; Fan, Zhongze; Qiu, Yanyan; Li, Qi; Ni, Lei; Liu, Jianwen

    2012-09-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is a frequent cause of cancer-related death in men and women. miRNAs (microRNAs) are endogenous small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression negatively at the post-transcriptional level. In the present study we investigated the possible role of microRNAs in the development of MDR (multidrug resistance) in colorectal carcinoma cells. We analysed miRNA expression levels between MDR colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT116/L-OHP cells and their parent cell line HCT116 using a miRNA microarray. miR-297 showed lower expression in HCT116/L-OHP cells compared with its parental cells. MRP-2 (MDR-associated protein 2) is an important MDR protein in platinum-drug-resistance cells and is a predicted target of miR-297. Additionally miR-297 was down-regulated in a panel of human colorectal carcinoma tissues and negatively correlated with expression levels of MRP-2. Furthermore, we found that ectopic expression of miR-297 in MDR colorectal carcinoma cells reduced MRP-2 protein level and sensitized these cells to anti-cancer drugs in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our findings suggest that miR-297 could play a role in the development of MDR in colorectal carcinoma cells, at least in part by modulation of MRP-2.

  4. The multifaceted resources and microevolution of the successful human and animal pathogen methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Marie Sá Figueiredo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is one of the most important bacterial pathogens based on its incidence and the severity of its associated infections. In addition, severe MRSA infections can occur in hospitalised patients or healthy individuals from the community. Studies have shown the infiltration of MRSA isolates of community origin into hospitals and variants of hospital-associated MRSA have caused infections in the community. These rapid epidemiological changes represent a challenge for the molecular characterisation of such bacteria as a hospital or community-acquired pathogen. To efficiently control the spread of MRSA, it is important to promptly detect the mecA gene, which is the determinant of methicillin resistance, using a polymerase chain reaction-based test or other rapidly and accurate methods that detect the mecA product penicillin-binding protein (PBP2a or PBP2’. The recent emergence of MRSA isolates that harbour a mecA allotype, i.e., the mecC gene, infecting animals and humans has raised an additional and significant issue regarding MRSA laboratory detection. Antimicrobial drugs for MRSA therapy are becoming depleted and vancomycin is still the main choice in many cases. In this review, we present an overview of MRSA infections in community and healthcare settings with focus on recent changes in the global epidemiology, with special reference to the MRSA picture in Brazil.

  5. Effects of atmospheric pressure cold plasma on human hepatocarcinoma cell and its 5-fluorouracil resistant cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, H.; Gan, L.; Yang, X., E-mail: luxinpei@hotmail.com, E-mail: yangxl@mail.hust.edu.cn [College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Lu, R. [School Hospital of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Xian, Y.; Lu, X., E-mail: luxinpei@hotmail.com, E-mail: yangxl@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Atmospheric pressure cold plasma showed selective killing efficiency on cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, which makes plasma a potential option for cancer therapy. However, the plasma effects on chemotherapeutic drugs-resistant cells are rarely to be found. In this paper, the effects of plasma on human hepatocellular carcinoma Bel7402 cells and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) resistant Bel7402/5FU cells were intensively investigated. The results showed that plasma induced superior toxicity to Bel7402 cells compared with Bel7402/5FU cells. Incubation with plasma-treated medium for 20 s induced more than 85% death rate in Bel7402 cells, while the same death ratio was achieved when Bel7402/5FU cells were treated for as long as 300 s. The hydrogen peroxide in the medium played a leading role in the cytotoxicity effects. Further studies implicated that when the treatment time was shorter than 60 s, the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptosis occurred through the intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation in Bel7402 cells. Molecular analysis showed an increase in the transcription factor activity for AP-1, NF-kB, and p53 in Bel7402 cells. No obvious damage could be detected in plasma-treated Bel7402/5FU cells due to the strong intracellular reactive oxygen stress scavenger system.

  6. The multifaceted resources and microevolution of the successful human and animal pathogen methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Agnes Marie Sá; Ferreira, Fabienne Antunes

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most important bacterial pathogens based on its incidence and the severity of its associated infections. In addition, severe MRSA infections can occur in hospitalised patients or healthy individuals from the community. Studies have shown the infiltration of MRSA isolates of community origin into hospitals and variants of hospital-associated MRSA have caused infections in the community. These rapid epidemiological changes represent a challenge for the molecular characterisation of such bacteria as a hospital or community-acquired pathogen. To efficiently control the spread of MRSA, it is important to promptly detect the mecA gene, which is the determinant of methicillin resistance, using a polymerase chain reaction-based test or other rapidly and accurate methods that detect the mecA product penicillin-binding protein (PBP)2a or PBP2’. The recent emergence of MRSA isolates that harbour a mecA allotype, i.e., the mecC gene, infecting animals and humans has raised an additional and significant issue regarding MRSA laboratory detection. Antimicrobial drugs for MRSA therapy are becoming depleted and vancomycin is still the main choice in many cases. In this review, we present an overview of MRSA infections in community and healthcare settings with focus on recent changes in the global epidemiology, with special reference to the MRSA picture in Brazil. PMID:24789555

  7. Effects of atmospheric pressure cold plasma on human hepatocarcinoma cell and its 5-fluorouracil resistant cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H.; Lu, R.; Xian, Y.; Gan, L.; Lu, X.; Yang, X.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure cold plasma showed selective killing efficiency on cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, which makes plasma a potential option for cancer therapy. However, the plasma effects on chemotherapeutic drugs-resistant cells are rarely to be found. In this paper, the effects of plasma on human hepatocellular carcinoma Bel7402 cells and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) resistant Bel7402/5FU cells were intensively investigated. The results showed that plasma induced superior toxicity to Bel7402 cells compared with Bel7402/5FU cells. Incubation with plasma-treated medium for 20 s induced more than 85% death rate in Bel7402 cells, while the same death ratio was achieved when Bel7402/5FU cells were treated for as long as 300 s. The hydrogen peroxide in the medium played a leading role in the cytotoxicity effects. Further studies implicated that when the treatment time was shorter than 60 s, the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptosis occurred through the intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation in Bel7402 cells. Molecular analysis showed an increase in the transcription factor activity for AP-1, NF-кB, and p53 in Bel7402 cells. No obvious damage could be detected in plasma-treated Bel7402/5FU cells due to the strong intracellular reactive oxygen stress scavenger system.

  8. The Critical Role of Supply Chains in Preventing Human Immunodeficiency Virus Drug Resistance in Low- and Middle-Income Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minior, Thomas; Douglas, Meaghan; Edgil, Dianna; Srivastava, Meena; Crowley, John; Firth, Jacqueline; Lapidos-Salaiz, Ilana; Williams, Jason; Lee, Lana

    2017-12-01

    The functioning of the supply chain may be a driving factor behind the development of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance (HIVDR) in many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Additionally, the effectiveness of supply chains will likely impact the scale-up of both viral-load monitoring and HIVDR testing. This article describes the complexities of global supply chains relevant for LMICs and presents early data on stock-outs and drug substitutions in several countries supported by the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief. Supply chain systems will need to be strengthened to minimize interruptions as new antiretroviral therapy regimens are introduced and to facilitate adoption of new laboratory technologies. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  9. Antibiotic exposure and bacterial resistance in human and veterinary medicine: a problem-based learning topic for Master's students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eveillard, Matthieu; Pouliquen, Hervé; Ruvoen, Nathalie; Couvreur, Sébastien; Krempf, Michel; Magras, Catherine; Lepelletier, Didier

    2017-03-01

    This report describes a problem-based learning activity concerning antibiotic exposure and bacterial resistance in human and veterinary medicine. In addition, learning outcomes and satisfaction of students were recorded by the supervisors of the activity. The students all participated actively in the group work and considered that the small size of the group facilitated interpersonal communication. They believed that working in an interdisciplinary group helped them learn better than if they were following specific courses. They also reported that their mid-term meeting with one of the supervisors was a catalyst for the initiation of a real work group. Concerning the evaluation of the activity itself, the supervisors considered that the group provided a relevant analysis of the issue. These characteristics should encourage teachers to test this method of learning certain aspects of microbiology and infectious diseases with their students. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Expression of P-gp, MRP, LRP, GST-π and TopoIIα and intrinsic resistance in human lung cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiarui; Zhang, Jinhui; Zhang, Lichuan; Zhao, Long; Fan, Sufang; Yang, Zhonghai; Gao, Fei; Kong, Ying; Xiao, Gary Guishan; Wang, Qi

    2011-11-01

    This study aimed to determine the relationship between the endogenous levels of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP), lung resistance-related protein (LRP), glutathione-s-transferase-π (GST‑π) and topoisomerase IIα (TopoIIα) and intrinsic drug resistance in four human lung cancer cell lines, SK-MES-1, SPCA-1, NCI-H-460 and NCI-H-446, of different histological types. The expression of P-gp, MRP, LRP, GST-π and TopoIIα was measured by immunofluorescence, Western blotting and RT-PCR. Drug resistance to cisplatin, doxorubicin and VP-16 was determined using MTT assays. The correlation between expression of the resistance-related proteins and their roles in the resistance to drugs in these cancer cell lines was analyzed. We found that the endogenous levels of P-gp, MRP, LRP, GST-π and TopoIIα in the four cell lines varied. The level of GST-π in the SK-MES-1 cells was the highest, whereas the level of P-gp in the SPCA-1 cells was the lowest. The chemoresistance to cisplatin, doxorubicin and VP-16 in the four cell lines was different. The SPCA-1 cell line was most resistance to cisplatin; SK-MES-1 was most resistance to VP-16; whereas SK-MES-1 was most sensitive to doxorubicin. There was a positive correlation between GST-π expression and resistance to cisplatin, between TopoIIα expression and resistance to VP-16; and a negative correlation was noted between TopoIIα expression and resistance to doxorubicin. In summary, the endogenous expression of P-gp, MRP, LRP, GST-π and TopoIIα was different in the four human lung cancer cell lines of different histological types, and this variance may be associated with the variation in chemosensitivity to cisplatin, doxorubicin and VP-16. Among the related proteins, GST-π may be useful for the prediction of the intrinsic resistance to cisplatin, whereas TopoIIα may be useful to predict resistance to doxorubicin and VP-16 in human lung cancer cell lines.

  11. Research on DNA methylation of human osteosarcoma cell MGMT and its relationship with cell resistance to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun; Cui, Qiu; Jiang, WeiHao; Liu, Cheng; Li, DingFeng; Zeng, Yanjun

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene methylation status and its protein expression, as well as the effects of demethylating agent 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-CdR) on MGMT gene expression and its resistance to alkylating agents, and to elucidate MGMT expression mechanism and significance in osteosarcoma. The human osteosarcoma cell lines Saos-2 and MG-63 were collected and treated with 5-Aza-CdR for 6 days. The cells not treated with 5-Aza-CdR were set as a negative control. The genomic DNA was extracted from the Saos-2 and MG-63 cells using methylation-specific PCR to detect the promoter CpG island methylation status of the MGMT gene. Cell sensitivity to alkylating agents before and after drug administration was detected by the MTT method. The variation in MGMT gene mRNA and protein was detected by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blotting. The MGMT promoter gene of normal Saos-2 cells was methylated, with reduced MGMT mRNA and protein expression; the MGMT mRNA and protein expression of Saos-2 cells treated with 5-Aza-CdR was obviously enhanced, and its sensitivity to alkylating agents was reversed. Meanwhile, with promoter CpG island unmethylation of the MGMT gene, MGMT protein was expressed in the normal MG-63 cells and the MG-63 cells treated with 5-Aza-CdR, and both showed resistance to alkylating agents. The methylation status of the MGMT gene promoter in human osteosarcoma cells reflected the cells' ability to induce MGMT protein expression and can be used as a molecular marker to project the sensitivity of cancer tissues to alkylating agent drugs.

  12. Insulin resistance is associated with MCP1-mediated macrophage accumulation in skeletal muscle in mice and humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Patsouris

    Full Text Available Inflammation is now recognized as a major factor contributing to type 2 diabetes (T2D. However, while the mechanisms and consequences associated with white adipose tissue inflammation are well described, very little is known concerning the situation in skeletal muscle. The aim of this study was to investigate, in vitro and in vivo, how skeletal muscle inflammation develops and how in turn it modulates local and systemic insulin sensitivity in different mice models of T2D and in humans, focusing on the role of the chemokine MCP1. Here, we found that skeletal muscle inflammation and macrophage markers are increased and associated with insulin resistance in mice models and humans. In addition, we demonstrated that intra-muscular TNFα expression is exclusively restricted to the population of intramuscular leukocytes and that the chemokine MCP1 was associated with skeletal muscle inflammatory markers in these models. Furthermore, we demonstrated that exposure of C2C12 myotubes to palmitate elevated the production of the chemokine MCP1 and that the muscle-specific overexpression of MCP1 in transgenic mice induced the local recruitment of macrophages and altered local insulin sensitivity. Overall our study demonstrates that skeletal muscle inflammation is clearly increased in the context of T2D in each one of the models we investigated, which is likely consecutive to the lipotoxic environment generated by peripheral insulin resistance, further increasing MCP1 expression in muscle. Consequently, our results suggest that MCP1-mediated skeletal muscle macrophages recruitment plays a role in the etiology of T2D.

  13. Correlation of HIF-2α, ABCG2 and OCT-4 with chemotherapy resistance in human gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-mei ZHANG

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the correlation of HIF-2α, ABCG2 and OCT-4 with chemotherapy resistant gastric cancer in humans. Methods Fifty-two patients who were confirmed to have advanced gastric cancer with the aid of electronic endoscopy and pathology in the Department of Gastroenterology, Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical College, were enrolled in the study. According to the effect of FOL-FOX4 chemotherapy that these patients had experienced, they were divided into three groups: CR+PR (complete remission+partial remission group, SD (stable disease group and PD (progressive disease group. The expression levels of HIF-2α, ABCG2, and OCT-4 mRNA and protein were assessed in different groups by using RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. Results Two patients achieved CR , 19 achieved PR , 25 showed SD, and 6 showed PD. In other words, CR+PR were seen in 21 patients (40.4%, SD in 25(48.1%, PD in 6(11.5%. In CR+PR group, the expression levels of HIF-2α, ABCG2 and OCT4 mRNA and protein were low, but the above mentioned expressions were significantly increased in SD group and PD group. The expression levels of HIF-2α, ABCG2 and Oct-4 mRNA and protein were highest in the PD group, lower in the SD group, and lowest in the CR + PR groups (all P<0.05. Conclusions The expression of the markers HIF-2α, ABCG2 and OCT4 in human tumor tissues is related to the effect of chemotherapy for gastric cancer. A high expression of tumor markers is perhaps the main reason for low efficacy of chemotherapy due to drug resistance. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.10.09

  14. Estrogenic and anti-estrogenic influences in cultured brown trout hepatocytes: Focus on the expression of some estrogen and peroxisomal related genes and linked phenotypic anchors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madureira, Tânia Vieira; Malhão, Fernanda; Pinheiro, Ivone; Lopes, Célia; Ferreira, Nádia; Urbatzka, Ralph; Castro, L. Filipe C.; Rocha, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Evidence of crosstalk between estrogens and peroxisomal pathways in brown trout. • VtgA and ERα mRNA levels increased after 1, 10 and 50 μM of ethinylestradiol (EE2). • ERβ-1, catalase and urate oxidase mRNA levels decreased after estrogenic stimuli. • Estrogenic effects in VtgA, ERα and Uox mRNA levels were reverted by ICI 182,780. • Immunofluorescence/electron microscopy shows smaller peroxisomes after 50 μM of EE2. - Abstract: Estrogens, estrogenic mimics and anti-estrogenic compounds are known to target estrogen receptors (ER) that can modulate other nuclear receptor signaling pathways, such as those controlled by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), and alter organelle (inc. peroxisome) morphodynamics. By using primary isolated brown trout (Salmo trutta f. fario) hepatocytes after 72 and 96 h of exposure we evaluated some effects in selected molecular targets and in peroxisomal morphological features caused by: (1) an ER agonist (ethinylestradiol—EE2) at 1, 10 and 50 μM; (2) an ER antagonist (ICI 182,780) at 10 and 50 μM; and (3) mixtures of both (Mix I—10 μM EE2 and 50 μM ICI; Mix II—1 μM EE2 and 10 μM ICI and Mix III—1 μM EE2 and 50 μM ICI). The mRNA levels of the estrogenic targets (ERα, ERβ-1 and vitellogenin A—VtgA) and the peroxisome structure/function related genes (catalase, urate oxidase—Uox, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 4—17β-HSD4, peroxin 11α—Pex11α and PPARα) were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Stereology combined with catalase immunofluorescence revealed a significant reduction in peroxisome volume densities at 50 μM of EE2 exposure. Concomitantly, at the same concentration, electron microscopy showed smaller peroxisome profiles, exacerbated proliferation of rough endoplasmic reticulum, and a generalized cytoplasmic vacuolization of hepatocytes. Catalase and Uox mRNA levels decreased in all estrogenic stimuli conditions. VtgA and ERα m

  15. Estrogenic and anti-estrogenic influences in cultured brown trout hepatocytes: Focus on the expression of some estrogen and peroxisomal related genes and linked phenotypic anchors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madureira, Tânia Vieira, E-mail: tvmadureira@icbas.up.pt [Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR/CIMAR), U.Porto—University of Porto, Rua dos Bragas 289, P 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); Institute of Biomedical Sciences Abel Salazar, U.Porto (ICBAS)—University of Porto, Laboratory of Histology and Embryology, Department of Microscopy, Rua Jorge Viterbo Ferreira 228, P 4050-313 Porto (Portugal); Malhão, Fernanda; Pinheiro, Ivone; Lopes, Célia; Ferreira, Nádia [Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR/CIMAR), U.Porto—University of Porto, Rua dos Bragas 289, P 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); Institute of Biomedical Sciences Abel Salazar, U.Porto (ICBAS)—University of Porto, Laboratory of Histology and Embryology, Department of Microscopy, Rua Jorge Viterbo Ferreira 228, P 4050-313 Porto (Portugal); Urbatzka, Ralph [Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR/CIMAR), U.Porto—University of Porto, Rua dos Bragas 289, P 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); Castro, L. Filipe C. [Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR/CIMAR), U.Porto—University of Porto, Rua dos Bragas 289, P 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); Faculty of Sciences (FCUP), U.Porto—University of Porto, Department of Biology, Rua do Campo Alegre, P 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Rocha, Eduardo [Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR/CIMAR), U.Porto—University of Porto, Rua dos Bragas 289, P 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); Institute of Biomedical Sciences Abel Salazar, U.Porto (ICBAS)—University of Porto, Laboratory of Histology and Embryology, Department of Microscopy, Rua Jorge Viterbo Ferreira 228, P 4050-313 Porto (Portugal)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Evidence of crosstalk between estrogens and peroxisomal pathways in brown trout. • VtgA and ERα mRNA levels increased after 1, 10 and 50 μM of ethinylestradiol (EE2). • ERβ-1, catalase and urate oxidase mRNA levels decreased after estrogenic stimuli. • Estrogenic effects in VtgA, ERα and Uox mRNA levels were reverted by ICI 182,780. • Immunofluorescence/electron microscopy shows smaller peroxisomes after 50 μM of EE2. - Abstract: Estrogens, estrogenic mimics and anti-estrogenic compounds are known to target estrogen receptors (ER) that can modulate other nuclear receptor signaling pathways, such as those controlled by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), and alter organelle (inc. peroxisome) morphodynamics. By using primary isolated brown trout (Salmo trutta f. fario) hepatocytes after 72 and 96 h of exposure we evaluated some effects in selected molecular targets and in peroxisomal morphological features caused by: (1) an ER agonist (ethinylestradiol—EE2) at 1, 10 and 50 μM; (2) an ER antagonist (ICI 182,780) at 10 and 50 μM; and (3) mixtures of both (Mix I—10 μM EE2 and 50 μM ICI; Mix II—1 μM EE2 and 10 μM ICI and Mix III—1 μM EE2 and 50 μM ICI). The mRNA levels of the estrogenic targets (ERα, ERβ-1 and vitellogenin A—VtgA) and the peroxisome structure/function related genes (catalase, urate oxidase—Uox, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 4—17β-HSD4, peroxin 11α—Pex11α and PPARα) were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Stereology combined with catalase immunofluorescence revealed a significant reduction in peroxisome volume densities at 50 μM of EE2 exposure. Concomitantly, at the same concentration, electron microscopy showed smaller peroxisome profiles, exacerbated proliferation of rough endoplasmic reticulum, and a generalized cytoplasmic vacuolization of hepatocytes. Catalase and Uox mRNA levels decreased in all estrogenic stimuli conditions. VtgA and ERα m

  16. Bat lung epithelial cells show greater host species-specific innate resistance than MDCK cells to human and avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Tessa; Eckerle, Isabella; Chang, Kin-Chow

    2018-04-10

    With the recent discovery of novel H17N10 and H18N11 influenza viral RNA in bats and report on high frequency of avian H9 seroconversion in a species of free ranging bats, an important issue to address is the extent bats are susceptible to conventional avian and human influenza A viruses. To this end, three bat species (Eidolon helvum, Carollia perspicillata and Tadarida brasiliensis) of lung epithelial cells were separately infected with two avian and two human influenza viruses to determine their relative host innate immune resistance to infection. All three species of bat cells were more resistant than positive control Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells to all four influenza viruses. TB1-Lu cells lacked sialic acid α2,6-Gal receptors and were most resistant among the three bat species. Interestingly, avian viruses were relatively more replication permissive in all three bat species of cells than with the use of human viruses which suggest that bats could potentially play a role in the ecology of avian influenza viruses. Chemical inhibition of the JAK-STAT pathway in bat cells had no effect on virus production suggesting that type I interferon signalling is not a major factor in resisting influenza virus infection. Although all three species of bat cells are relatively more resistant to influenza virus infection than control MDCK cells, they are more permissive to avian than human viruses which suggest that bats could have a contributory role in the ecology of avian influenza viruses.

  17. Hypomorphism in human NSMCE2 linked to primordial dwarfism and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Felicity; Colnaghi, Rita; Rocha, Nuno; Seth, Asha; Harris, Julie; Carpenter, Gillian; Bottomley, William E; Wheeler, Eleanor; Wong, Stephen; Saudek, Vladimir; Savage, David; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Carel, Jean-Claude; Barroso, Inês; O'Driscoll, Mark; Semple, Robert

    2014-09-01

    Structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) complexes are essential for maintaining chromatin structure and regulating gene expression. Two the three known SMC complexes, cohesin and condensin, are important for sister chromatid cohesion and condensation, respectively; however, the function of the third complex, SMC5-6, which includes the E3 SUMO-ligase NSMCE2 (also widely known as MMS21) is less clear. Here, we characterized 2 patients with primordial dwarfism, extreme insulin resistance, and gonadal failure and identified compound heterozygous frameshift mutations in NSMCE2. Both mutations reduced NSMCE2 expression in patient cells. Primary cells from one patient showed increased micronucleus and nucleoplasmic bridge formation, delayed recovery of DNA synthesis, and reduced formation of foci containing Bloom syndrome helicase (BLM) after hydroxyurea-induced replication fork stalling. These nuclear abnormalities in patient dermal fibroblast were restored by expression of WT NSMCE2, but not a mutant form lacking SUMO-ligase activity. Furthermore, in zebrafish, knockdown of the NSMCE2 ortholog produced dwarfism, which was ameliorated by reexpression of WT, but not SUMO-ligase-deficient NSMCE. Collectively, these findings support a role for NSMCE2 in recovery from DNA damage and raise the possibility that loss of its function produces dwarfism through reduced tolerance of replicative stress.

  18. Viral phenotype, antiretroviral resistance and clinical evolution in human immunodeficiency virus-infected children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellado, M J; Cilleruelo, M J; Ortiz, M; Villota, J; García, M; Perez-Jurado, M L; Barreiro, G; Martín-Fontelos, P; Bernal, A

    1997-11-01

    The syncytium-inducing (SI) viral phenotype and the emergence of viral strains resistant to zidovudine have been described in persons infected with HIV, and in some cases they have been associated with poor prognosis. HIV isolates obtained from 37 HIV-infected children were analyzed to determine whether the SI viral phenotype and the mutation on the 215 position of the reverse transcriptase (M215) could be used as markers of disease progression. We performed peripheral blood coculture mononuclear cells, and we analyzed the induction of syncytia using the MT-2 cell line. The emergence of mutations on the 215 position was determined by PCR. We found a statistically significant association (P < 0.05) between SI viral phenotype and (1) recurrent serious bacterial infections, (2) absolute CD4+ cell counts <2 SD, (3) progression to AIDS and (4) death. Sixty percent of the children treated with zidovudine developed 215 mutant viral strains without statistically significant association with clinical or immunologic findings. The SI viral phenotype was statistically associated with the presence of the 215 mutation (P < 0.05). SI viral phenotype is a marker associated with a poor clinical and immunologic progression of the disease and it may facilitate the emergence of mutant strains in children treated with zidovudine.

  19. Antiproliferative activity of novel imidazopyridine derivatives on castration-resistant human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniyan, Sakthivel; Chou, Yu-Wei; Ingersoll, Matthew A; Devine, Alexus; Morris, Marisha; Odero-Marah, Valerie A; Khan, Shafiq A; Chaney, William G; Bu, Xiu R; Lin, Ming-Fong

    2014-10-10

    Metastatic prostate cancer (mPCa) relapses after a short period of androgen deprivation therapy and becomes the castration-resistant prostate cancer (CR PCa); to which the treatment is limited. Hence, it is imperative to identify novel therapeutic agents towards this patient population. In the present study, antiproliferative activities of novel imidazopyridines were compared. Among three derivatives, PHE, AMD and AMN, examined, AMD showed the highest inhibitory activity on LNCaP C-81 cell proliferation, following dose- and time-dependent manner. Additionally, AMD exhibited significant antiproliferative effect against a panel of PCa cells, but not normal prostate epithelial cells. Further, when compared to AMD, its derivative DME showed higher inhibitory activities on PCa cell proliferation, clonogenic potential and in vitro tumorigenicity. The inhibitory activity was apparently in part due to the induction of apoptosis. Mechanistic studies indicate that AMD and DME treatments inhibited both AR and PI3K/Akt signaling. The results suggest that better understanding of inhibitory mechanisms of AMD and DME could help design novel therapeutic agents for improving the treatment of CR PCa. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George K. Siberry

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infection incidence has increased in healthy US children. Our objective was to evaluate MRSA incidence and correlates in HIV-infected youth. Methods. The CDC-sponsored LEGACY study is a US multicenter chart abstraction study of HIV-infected youth. We identified MRSA infections among participants with ≥1 visit during 2006. We used bivariate and multivariable analyses to compare sociodemographic and HIV clinical factors between MRSA cases and noncases. Results. Fourteen MRSA infections (1 invasive, 12 soft tissue, 1 indeterminate occurred among 1,813 subjects (11.1 infections/1,000 patient-years (PY, 95% CI: 11.06–11.14. Most (86% isolates were clindamycin susceptible. Compared with noncases, MRSA cases were more likely older (17 versus 14 years, black (100% versus 69%, behaviorally HIV infected (43% versus 17%, and in Maryland (43% versus 7% and had viral loads (VL >1000 copies/mL (86% versus 51% and lower mean CD4% (18% versus 27% (all P1000 copies/mL (aOR = 5.9, and black race (aOR undefined. Conclusions. MRSA occurred at a rate of 11.1 infections/1,000 PY in HIV-infected youth but invasive disease was uncommon. Geographic location, black race, and increased VL, but not immunosuppression, were independently associated with MRSA risk.

  1. [The effect and mechanism of vinorelbine on cisplatin resistance of human lung cancer cell line A549/DDP].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Chunsheng; Gao, Sen; Li, Huiqiang; Gao, Weizhen

    2014-02-01

    Drug resistance is a major obstacle on lung cancer treatment and Vinorelbine is an effective drug to inhibition of tumor proliferation and metastasis. In this study, we investigated the effect and mechanism of Vinorelbine on reversing the cisplatin resistance of human lung cancer A549/DDP cell line. With 1 μmol/L and 5 μmol/L Vinorelbine treatment, MTS assay was employed to determine the effect of the cisplatin sensitivity of tumor cells, flow cytometry to determine the apoptosis rate and change of Rh-123 content; Western blot to determine the expression of MDR1, Bcl-2, surviving, PTEN, caspase-3/8 and phosphorylation level of Akt (p-Akt); Real-time PCR was to determine the mRNA expression of MDR1, Bcl-2, survivin and PTEN. Finally the transcriptional activities of NF-κB, Twist and Snail were determined by reporter gene system. With 1 μmol/L and 5 μmol/L Vinorelbine treatment, the sensitivity of cancer cells to cisplatin was increased by 1.91- and 2.54- folds respectively, flow cytometry showed that the content of Rh-123 was elevated 1.93- and 2.95- folds and apoptosis rate was increased 2.25- and 3.82- folds, Western blot showed that the expression of multidrug resistance related proteins MDR, Bcl-2 and survivin were downregulated, caspase-3/8 and PTEN was upregulated, phosphorylation of Akt was downregulated as well, real-time assay showed that the mRNA expression of MDR1 was downregulated 43.5% and 25.8%, Bcl-2 was downregulated 57.3% and 34.1%, survivin was downregulated 37.6% and 12.4%, PTEN was upregulated 183.4% and 154.2%, the transcriptional activities of NF-κB was downregulated 53.2% and 34.5%, Twist was downregulated 61.4% and 33.5%, and Snail was downregulated 57.8% and 18.7%. Vinorelbine treatment led to increase of cisplatin sensitivity of A549/DDP cells and the mechanisms included the regulation of PTEN/AKT/NF-κB signal pathway to decreased drug resistance gene expression and increased pro-apoptosis gene expression.

  2. The Use of a Combined Bioinformatics Approach to Locate Antibiotic Resistance Genes on Plasmids From Whole Genome Sequences of Salmonella enterica Serovars From Humans in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egle Kudirkiene

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, we identified plasmids carrying antimicrobial resistance genes in draft whole genome sequences of 16 selected Salmonella enterica isolates representing six different serovars from humans in Ghana. The plasmids and the location of resistance genes in the genomes were predicted using a combination of PlasmidFinder, ResFinder, plasmidSPAdes and BLAST genomic analysis tools. Subsequently, S1-PFGE was employed for analysis of plasmid profiles. Whole genome sequencing confirmed the presence of antimicrobial resistance genes in Salmonella isolates showing multidrug resistance phenotypically. ESBL, either blaTEM52−B or blaCTX−M15 were present in two cephalosporin resistant isolates of S. Virchow and S. Poona, respectively. The systematic genome analysis revealed the presence of different plasmids in different serovars, with or without insertion of antimicrobial resistance genes. In S. Enteritidis, resistance genes were carried predominantly on plasmids of IncN type, in S. Typhimurium on plasmids of IncFII(S/IncFIB(S/IncQ1 type. In S. Virchow and in S. Poona, resistance genes were detected on plasmids of IncX1 and TrfA/IncHI2/IncHI2A type, respectively. The latter two plasmids were described for the first time in these serovars. The combination of genomic analytical tools allowed nearly full mapping of the resistance plasmids in all Salmonella strains analyzed. The results suggest that the improved analytical approach used in the current study may be used to identify plasmids that are specifically associated with resistance phenotypes in whole genome sequences. Such knowledge would allow the development of rapid multidrug resistance tracking tools in Salmonella populations using WGS.

  3. Characterization of DNA topoisomerase I in three SN-38 resistant human colon cancer cell lines reveals a new pair of resistance-associated mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Frank; Agama, Keli; Roy, Amit

    2016-01-01

    gene copy gain and a loss of chromosome 20, respectively. One resistant cell line harbored a pair of yet unreported TOP1 mutations (R364K and G717R) in close proximity to the drug binding site. Mutant TOP1 was expressed at a markedly higher level than wild-type TOP1. None or very small reductions were...... mechanisms for Top1-targeting chemotherapeutic drugs. Importantly, two yet unreported TOP1 mutations were identified, and it was underlined that cross-resistance to the new indenoisoquinoline drugs depends on the specific underlying molecular mechanism of resistance to SN-38....

  4. Intense resistance exercise induces early and transient increases in ryanodine receptor 1 phosphorylation in human skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Gehlert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While ryanodine receptor 1 (RyR1 critically contributes to skeletal muscle contraction abilities by mediating Ca²⁺ion oscillation between sarcoplasmatic and myofibrillar compartments, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK senses contraction-induced energetic stress by phosphorylation at Thr¹⁷². Phosphorylation of RyR1 at serine²⁸⁴³ (pRyR1Ser²⁸⁴³ results in leaky RyR1 channels and impaired Ca²⁺homeostasis. Because acute resistance exercise exerts decreased contraction performance in skeletal muscle, preceded by high rates of Ca²⁺-oscillation and energetic stress, intense myofiber contractions may induce increased RyR1 and AMPK phosphorylation. However, no data are available regarding the time-course and magnitude of early RyR1 and AMPK phosphorylation in human myofibers in response to acute resistance exercise. PURPOSE: Determine the effects and early time-course of resistance exercise on pRyR1Ser²⁸⁴³ and pAMPKThr¹⁷² in type I and II myofibers. METHODS: 7 male subjects (age 23±2 years, height: 185±7 cm, weight: 82±5 kg performed 3 sets of 8 repetitions of maximum eccentric knee extensions. Muscle biopsies were taken at rest, 15, 30 and 60 min post exercise. pRyR1Ser²⁸⁴³ and pAMPKThr¹⁷² levels were determined by western blot and semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry techniques. RESULTS: While total RyR1 and total AMPK levels remained unchanged, RyR1 was significantly more abundant in type II than type I myofibers. pRyR1Ser²⁸⁴³ increased 15 min and peaked 30 min (p<0.01 post exercise in both myofiber types. Type I fibers showed relatively higher increases in pRyR1Ser²⁸⁴³ levels than type II myofibers and remained elevated up to 60 min post resistance exercise (p<0.05. pAMPKThr¹⁷² also increased 15 to 30 min post exercise (p<0.01 in type I and II myofibers and in whole skeletal muscle. CONCLUSION: Resistance exercise induces acutely increased pRyR1Ser²⁸⁴³ and

  5. Small-molecule synthetic compound norcantharidin reverses multi-drug resistance by regulating Sonic hedgehog signaling in human breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jen Chen

    Full Text Available Multi-drug resistance (MDR, an unfavorable factor compromising treatment efficacy of anticancer drugs, involves upregulated ATP binding cassette (ABC transporters and activated Sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling. By preparing human breast cancer MCF-7 cells resistant to doxorubicin (DOX, we examined the effect and mechanism of norcantharidin (NCTD, a small-molecule synthetic compound, on reversing multidrug resistance. The DOX-prepared MCF-7R cells also possessed resistance to vinorelbine, characteristic of MDR. At suboptimal concentration, NCTD significantly inhibited the viability of DOX-sensitive (MCF-7S and DOX-resistant (MCF-7R cells and reversed the resistance to DOX and vinorelbine. NCTD increased the intracellular accumulation of DOX in MCF-7R cells and suppressed the upregulated the mdr-1 mRNA, P-gp and BCRP protein expression, but not the MRP-1. The role of P-gp was strengthened by partial reversal of the DOX and vinorelbine resistance by cyclosporine A. NCTD treatment suppressed the upregulation of Shh expression and nuclear translocation of Gli-1, a hallmark of Shh signaling activation in the resistant clone. Furthermore, the Shh ligand upregulated the expression of P-gp and attenuated the growth inhibitory effect of NCTD. The knockdown of mdr-1 mRNA had not altered the expression of Shh and Smoothened in both MCF-7S and MCF-7R cells. This indicates that the role of Shh signaling in MDR might be upstream to mdr-1/P-gp, and similar effect was shown in breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and BT-474 cells. This study demonstrated that NCTD may overcome multidrug resistance through inhibiting Shh signaling and expression of its downstream mdr-1/P-gp expression in human breast cancer cells.

  6. Biorelevant media resistant co-culture model mimicking permeability of human intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, Delphine; Pellequer, Yann; Tempesta, Camille; Lorscheidt, Stefan; Kettel, Bernadette; Tamaddon, Lana; Jannin, Vincent; Demarne, Frédéric; Lamprecht, Alf; Béduneau, Arnaud

    2015-03-15

    Cell culture models are currently used to predict absorption pattern of new compounds and formulations in the human gastro-intestinal tract (GIT). One major drawback is the lack of relevant apical incubation fluids allowing mimicking luminal conditions in the GIT. Here, we suggest a culture model compatible with biorelevant media, namely Fasted State Simulated Intestinal Fluid (FaSSIF) and Fed State Simulated Intestinal Fluid (FeSSIF). Co-culture was set up from Caco-2 and mucus-secreting HT29-MTX cells using an original seeding procedure. Viability and cytotoxicity assays were performed following incubation of FeSSIF and FaSSIF with co-culture. Influence of biorelevant fluids on paracellular permeability or transporter proteins were also evaluated. Results were compared with Caco-2 and HT29-MTX monocultures. While Caco-2 viability was strongly affected with FeSSIF, no toxic effect was detected for the co-cultures in terms of viability and lactate dehydrogenase release. The addition of FeSSIF to the basolateral compartment of the co-culture induced cytotoxic effects which suggested the apical mucus barrier being cell protective. In contrast to FeSSIF, FaSSIF induced a slight increase of the paracellular transport and both tested media inhibited partially the P-gp-mediated efflux in the co-culture. Additionally, the absorptive transport of propranolol hydrochloride, a lipophilic β-blocker, was strongly affected by biorelevant fluids. This study demonstrated the compatibility of the Caco-2/HT29-MTX model with some of the current biorelevant media. Combining biorelevant intestinal fluids with features such as mucus secretion, adjustable paracellular and P-gp mediated transports, is a step forward to more realistic in-vitro models of the human intestine. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Systemic blockade of TNF-α does not improve insulin resistance in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz-Amaro, I; Arce-Franco, M; Muñiz, J; López-Fernández, J; Hernández-Hernández, V; Franco, A; Quevedo, J; Martínez-Martín, J; Díaz-González, F

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether long-term modulation of inflammatory activity by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors has some influence on insulin resistance (IR). 16 active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients without CV risk factors treated with anti-TNF-α agents were included in this study. RA activity by disease activity score 28, IR by HOMA2-IR, body composition by impedance analysis, physical activity by accelerometry, abdominal fat distribution by magnetic resonance imaging, and serum level of key adipokines by ELISA were measured at baseline and during a 1-year follow-up period. Patient body mass index increased significantly (26.94 ± 3.88 vs. 28.06 ± 4.57 kg/m2, p=0.02) after 1 year of treatment. Body composition, in terms of fat and fat-free mass, remained unchanged except for a significant elevation in body cell mass (25.50 ± 4.60 vs. 26.60 ± 3.17 kg, p=0.02). Basal levels of IR in the RA patients included in this study were significantly higher than healthy controls (1.6 ± 0.8 vs. 1.11 ± 0.56, p=0.011) but did not change during the follow-up. Nor did basal concentrations of adiponectin, visfatin, leptin, ghrelin, resistin, and apelin in response to anti-TNF-α treatment; only retinol-binding protein 4, showed a significant increase (51.7 ± 32.7 vs. 64.9 ± 28.4 μg/ml, p=0.03) at the end of the study. IR, adiposity distribution, and serum levels of most adipokines are not significantly affected by long-term inhibition of TNF-α in RA patients. Our data suggest that although systemic blockade of TNF-α exerts an anticachectic effect in RA patients, it does not seem to play a major role in IR. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Knockdown of HOXA10 reverses the multidrug resistance of human chronic mylogenous leukemia K562/ADM cells by downregulating P-gp and MRP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ying-Jie; Jia, Xiu-Hong; Wang, Jian-Yong; Li, You-Jie; Wang, Hong; Xie, Shu-Yang

    2016-05-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) of leukemia cells is a major obstacle in chemotherapeutic treatment. The high expression and constitutive activation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance protein-1 (MRP-1) have been reported to play a vital role in enhancing cell resistance to anticancer drugs in many tumors. The present study aimed to investigate the reversal of MDR by silencing homeobox A10 (HOXA10) in adriamycin (ADR)-resistant human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) K562/ADM cells by modulating the expression of P-gp and MRP-1. K562/ADM cells were stably transfected with HOXA10-targeted short hairpin RNA (shRNA). The results of reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blot analysis showed that the mRNA and protein expression of HOXA10 was markedly suppressed following transfection with a shRNA-containing vector. The sensitivity of the K562/ADM cells to ADR was enhanced by the silencing of HOXA10, due to the increased intracellular accumulation of ADR. The accumulation of ADR induced by the silencing of HOXA10 may be due to the downregulation of P-gp and MRP-1. Western blot analysis revealed that downregulating HOXA10 inhibited the protein expression of P-gp and MRP-1. Taken together, these results suggest that knockdown of HOXA10 combats resistance and that HOXA10 is a potential target for resistant human CML.

  9. TIMP1 overexpression mediates resistance of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells to fulvestrant and down-regulates progesterone receptor expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Christina; Vinther, Lena; Belling, Kirstine C.

    2013-01-01

    is associated with endocrine sensitivity. We established a panel of 11 MCF-7 subclones with a wide range of TIMP1 mRNA and protein expression levels. Cells with high expression of TIMP1 versus low TIMP1 displayed significantly reduced sensitivity to the antiestrogen fulvestrant (ICI 182,780, Faslodex®), while......, the effects of fulvestrant, 4-hydroxytamoxifen, or estrogen on estrogen receptor expression were not associated with TIMP1 levels. Gene expression analyses revealed associations between expression of TIMP1 and genes involved in metabolic pathways, epidermal growth factor receptor 1/cancer signaling pathways......, and cell cycle. Gene and protein expression analyses showed no general defects in estrogen receptor signaling except from lack of progesterone receptor expression and estrogen inducibility in clones with high TIMP1. The present study suggests a relation between high expression level of TIMP1 and loss...

  10. Spiritual activities as a resistance resource for women with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowell, R; Moneyham, L; Hennessy, M; Guillory, J; Demi, A; Seals, B

    2000-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the role that spiritual activities play in the adaptational outcomes of women with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. To examine the role of spiritual activities as a resource that may reduce the negative effects of disease-related stressors on the adaptational outcomes in HIV-infected women. A theoretically based causal model was tested to examine the role of spiritual activities as a moderator of the impact of HIV-related stressors (functional impairment, work impairment, and HIV-related symptoms) on two stress-related adaptational outcomes (emotional distress and quality of life), using a clinic-based sample of 184 HIV-positive women. Findings indicated that as spiritual activities increased, emotional distress decreased even when adjustments were made for HIV-related stressors. A positive relationship between spiritual activities and quality of life was found, which approached significance. Findings showed that HIV-related stressors have a significant negative effect on both emotional distress and quality of life. The findings support the hypothesis that spiritual activities are an important psychological resource accounting for individual variability in adjustment to the stressors associated with HIV disease.

  11. Role of cyclophilin B in tumorigenesis and cisplatin resistance in hepatocellular carcinoma in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeonghwan; Jang, Miran; Lim, Sangbin; Won, Hyeran; Yoon, Kyung-Sik; Park, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Hyo Jong; Kim, Byung-Ho; Park, Won-Sang; Ha, Joohun; Kim, Sung-Soo

    2011-11-01

    Cyclophilin B (CypB) performs diverse roles in living cells, but its role in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is largely unclear. To reveal its role in HCC, we investigated the induction of CypB under hypoxia and its functions in tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrated that hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) induces CypB under hypoxia. Interestingly, CypB protected tumor cells, even p53-defective HCC cells, against hypoxia- and cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, it regulated the effects of HIF-1α, including those in angiogenesis and glucose metabolism, via a positive feedback loop with HIF-1α. The tumorigenic and chemoresistant effects of CypB were confirmed in vivo using a xenograft model. Finally, we showed that CypB is overexpressed in 78% and 91% of the human HCC and colon cancer tissues, respectively, and its overexpression in these cancers reduced patient survival. These results indicate that CypB induced by hypoxia stimulates the survival of HCC via a positive feedback loop with HIF-1α, indicating that CypB is a novel candidate target for developing chemotherapeutic agents against HCC and colon cancer. Copyright © 2011 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  12. The Association of CXC Receptor 4 Mediated Signaling Pathway with Oxaliplatin-Resistant Human Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Shih Huang

    Full Text Available The stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1/CXC receptor 4 (CXCR4 axis plays an important role in tumor angiogenesis and invasiveness in colorectal cancer (CRC progression. In addition, metastatic CRC remains one of the most difficult human malignancies to treat because of its chemoresistant behavior. However, the mechanism by which correlation occurs between CXCR4 and the clinical response of CRC to chemotherapy remains unknown. We generated chemoresistant cells with increasing doses of oxaliplatin (OXA and 5-Fluorouracil (5FU to develop resistance at a clinical dose. We found that the putative markers did not change in the parental cells, but HCT-116/OxR and HCT-116/5-FUR were more aggressive and had higher tumor growth (demonstrated by wound healing, chemotaxis assay, and a nude mice xenograft model with the use of oxaliplatin. Apoptosis induced by oxaliplatin treatment was significantly decreased in HCT-116/OxR compared to the parental cells. Moreover, HCT-116/OxR cells displayed increased levels of p-gp, p-Akt p-ERK, p-IKBβ, CXCR4, and Bcl-2, but they also significantly inhibited the apoptotic pathways when compared to the parental strain. We evaluated the molecular mechanism governing the signaling pathway associated with anti-apoptosis activity and the aggressive status of chemoresistant cells. Experiments involving specific inhibitors demonstrated that the activation of the pathways associated with CXCR4, ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt is critical to the functioning of the HCT-116/OxR and HCT-116/5-FUR characteristics of chemosensitivity. These findings elucidate the mechanism of CXCR4/PI3K/Akt downstream signaling and provide strategies to inhibit CXCR4 mediated signaling pathway in order to overcome CRC's resistance to chemotherapy.

  13. Inhibition of breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2 in human myeloid dendritic cells induces potent tolerogenic functions during LPS stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-O Jin

    Full Text Available Breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2, a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporters has been identified as a major determinant of multidrug resistance (MDR in cancer cells, but ABC transporter inhibition has limited therapeutic value in vivo. In this research, we demonstrated that inhibition of efflux transporters ABCG2 induced the generation of tolerogenic DCs from human peripheral blood myeloid DCs (mDCs. ABCG2 expression was present in mDCs and was further increased by LPS stimulation. Treatment of CD1c+ mDCs with an ABCG2 inhibitor, Ko143, during LPS stimulation caused increased production of IL-10 and decreased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and decreased expression of CD83 and CD86. Moreover, inhibition of ABCG2 in monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs abrogated the up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in these cells in response to LPS. Furthermore, CD1c+ mDCs stimulated with LPS plus Ko143 inhibited the proliferation of allogeneic and superantigen-specific syngenic CD4+ T cells and promoted expansion of CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T (Treg cells in an IL-10-dependent fashion. These tolerogenic effects of ABCG2 inhibition could be abolished by ERK inhibition. Thus, we demonstrated that inhibition of ABCG2 in LPS-stimulated mDCs can potently induce tolerogenic potentials in these cells, providing crucial new information that could lead to development of better strategies to combat MDR cancer.

  14. A novel BHLHE41 variant is associated with short sleep and resistance to sleep deprivation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Renata; Kavakli, Ibrahim Halil; Goel, Namni; Cardinale, Christopher J; Dinges, David F; Kuna, Samuel T; Maislin, Greg; Van Dongen, Hans P A; Tufik, Sergio; Hogenesch, John B; Hakonarson, Hakon; Pack, Allan I

    2014-08-01

    Earlier work described a mutation in DEC2 also known as BHLHE41 (basic helix-loophelix family member e41) as causal in a family of short sleepers, who needed just 6 h sleep per night. We evaluated whether there were other variants of this gene in two well-phenotyped cohorts. Sequencing of the BHLHE41 gene, electroencephalographic data, and delta power analysis and functional studies using cell-based luciferase. We identified new variants of the BHLHE41 gene in two cohorts who had either acute sleep deprivation (n = 200) or chronic partial sleep deprivation (n = 217). One variant, Y362H, at another location in the same exon occurred in one twin in a dizygotic twin pair and was associated with reduced sleep duration, less recovery sleep following sleep deprivation, and fewer performance lapses during sleep deprivation than the homozygous twin. Both twins had almost identical amounts of non rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. This variant reduced the ability of BHLHE41 to suppress CLOCK/BMAL1 and NPAS2/BMAL1 transactivation in vitro. Another variant in the same exome had no effect on sleep or response to sleep deprivation and no effect on CLOCK/BMAL1 transactivation. Random mutagenesis identified a number of other variants of BHLHE41 that affect its function. There are a number of mutations of BHLHE41. Mutations reduce total sleep while maintaining NREM sleep and provide resistance to the effects of sleep loss. Mutations that affect sleep also modify the normal inhibition of BHLHE41 of CLOCK/BMAL1 transactivation. Thus, clock mechanisms are likely involved in setting sleep length and the magnitude of sleep homeostasis. Pellegrino R, Kavakli IH, Goel N, Cardinale CJ, Dinges DF, Kuna ST, Maislin G, Van Dongen HP, Tufik S, Hogenesch JB, Hakonarson H, Pack AI. A novel BHLHE41 variant is associated with short sleep and resistance to sleep deprivation in humans. SLEEP 2014;37(8):1327-1336.

  15. Establishment of New Transmissible and Drug-Sensitive Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Wild Types due to Transmission of Nucleoside Analogue-Resistant Virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronde, Anthony de; Dooren, Maaike van; Hoek, Lian van der; Bouwhuis, Denise; Rooij, Esther de; Gemen, Bob van; Boer, R.J. de; Goudsmit, Jaap

    2000-01-01

    Sequence analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from 74 persons with acute infections identified eight strains with mutations in the reverse transcriptase (RT) gene at positions 41, 67, 68, 70, 215, and 219 associated with resistance to the nucleoside analogue zidovudine (AZT).

  16. Establishment of new transmissible and drug-sensitive human immunodeficiency virus type 1 wild types due to transmission of nucleoside analogue-resistant virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ronde, A.; van Dooren, M.; van der Hoek, L.; Bouwhuis, D.; de Rooij, E.; van Gemen, B.; de Boer, R.; Goudsmit, J.

    2001-01-01

    Sequence analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from 74 persons with acute infections identified eight strains with mutations in the reverse transcriptase (RT) gene at positions 41, 67, 68, 70, 215, and 219 associated with resistance to the nucleoside analogue zidovudine (AZT).

  17. Positive selection pressure introduces secondary mutations at Gag cleavage sites in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 harboring major protease resistance mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banke, S.; Lillemark, M.R.; Gerstoft, J.

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitors (PIs) specifically target the HIV-1 protease enzyme. Mutations in the enzyme can result in PI resistance (termed PI mutations); however, mutations in the HIV-1 gag region, the substrate for the protease enzyme, might also lead to PI ...

  18. Discovery of a 1,2-bis(3-indolyl)ethane that selectively inhibits the pyruvate kinase of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus over human isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoraghi, Roya; Campbell, Sara; Kim, Catrina; Dullaghan, Edie M; Blair, Lachlan M; Gillard, Rachel M; Reiner, Neil E; Sperry, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pyruvate kinase (MRSA PK) has recently been identified as a target for development of novel antibacterial agents. Testing a series of 1,2-bis(3-indolyl)ethanes against MRSA PK has led to the discovery of a potent inhibitor that is selective over human isoforms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Oridonin effectively reverses the drug resistance of cisplatin involving induction of cell apoptosis and inhibition of MMP expression in human acute myeloid leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is the first generation platinum-based chemotherapy agent. However, the extensive application of cisplatin inevitably causes drug resistance, which is a major obstacle to cancer chemotherapy. Oridonin is a diterpenoid isolated from Rabdosia rubescens with potent anticancer activity. The aim of our study is to investigate the role of oridonin to reverse the cisplatin-resistance in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells. The effect of oridonin on human AML cell proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay, cell migration and invasion were evaluated by transwell migration and invasion assays in cisplatin-resistant human AML cells. Furthermore, cell apoptosis was examined by flow cytometry. The inhibitive effect of oridonin in vivo was determined using xenografted nude mice. In addition, the expressions of MMP2 and MMP9 were detected by Western blot. There was a synergistic antitumor effect between cisplatin and oridonin on cisplatin-resistant human AML cells in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the combination of cisplatin and oridonin synergistically induced cell apoptosis. Furthermore, the combination treatment not only inhibited AML cell migration and invasion, but more significantly, decreased the expressions of MMP2 and MMP9 proteins. Our results suggest that the synergistic effect between both agents is likely to be driven by the inhibition of MMP expression and the resulting increased apoptosis.