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Sample records for antidiarrheals

  1. Central Nervous System Depressant, Analgesic and Antidiarrheal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In CNS depressant test, diazepam (1 mg/kg) was used as reference drug while indomethacin (10 mg/kg) and loperamide(2 mg/kg) were used as standard drugs in analgesic and antidiarrheal tests, respectively. Results: In hole cross method, EALS showed the most effective depressant effect, viz, 1.17±0.17 for 200 mg/kg ...

  2. Study of antidiarrheal activity of Hydrocotyle javanica in mice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of the methanolic leaf extract of Hydrocotyle javanica (family Hydrocharitaceae) was investigated in mice to evaluate its antidiarrheal activity on magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) induced diarrhea and gastrointestinal motility. Hydrocotyle javanica, at doses of 50 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg, was tested for its effect on fecal ...

  3. Antidiarrheal Activity of Three Medicinal Plants in Swiss Albino Mice

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    MD. Ashrafuzzaman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different parts of Allamanda neriifolia (AN, Crinum latifolium (CL, and Bruguiera cylindrical (BC are used in folk medicine to treat diarrhea. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate and compare possible antidiarrheal activity of methanol extracts from barks, stems, and roots of AL, CL, and BC in Swiss albino mice. Methods: Antidiarrheal activities of extracts were evaluated at three doses (100mg/kg, 200 mg/kg and 400mg/kg and compared with Loperamide in a castor oil-induced diarrhea and charcoal meal test model in the Swiss albino mice. Results: The aqueous extract of CL and BC administered at doses of 100, 200 and 400mg/kg showed 0%, 24.5%, 62.26% and 5.66%, 37.11%, and 62.26% diarrhea inhibition, respectively (Table 2. This reduction in diarrheal episodes is significant, and maximum effect was observed at the dose of 400mg/kg similarly in the alcohol extracts of both CL and BC. AN administered at the dose of 100, 200 and 400mg/kg showed 55.97%, 74.84% and 74.84% diarrhea inhibition, respectively. Conclusion: The antidiarrheal effect of the AN extract, in contrast to CL and BC, against the castor oil-induced diarrhea model prove its efficacy in an extensive range of diarrheal conditions.

  4. Antidiarrheal Activity of 80% Methanolic Leaf Extract of Justicia schimperiana

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    Belay Mekonnen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Diarrhea is one of the leading causes of preventable death in developing countries and mainly affects children and infants. It has been reported that the leaf of Justicia schimperiana is used as an antidiarrheal agent in Libo Kemekem district, northwest Ethiopia. Method. The 80% methanolic leaf extract of J. schimperiana was evaluated for its activity against castor oil-induced diarrhea, enteropooling, and gastrointestinal motility in mice. Results. Significant reduction (p<0.001 in the total defecation and diarrheal drops was produced by all the test doses of the extract. Percentage inhibition of wet feces was 42.58, 65.07, and 74.96% at 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg doses of the extract, respectively. The extract also significantly inhibited castor oil-induced enteropooling at all test doses. The percent reduction in mean weight of intestinal contents was 66.96, 67.83, and 76.52% at 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg doses of the extract, respectively. The extract significantly reduced gastrointestinal movement of charcoal meal as well at 200 (p<0.01 and 400 mg/kg (p<0.001 doses. Conclusion. In conclusion, the methanolic leaf extract of J. schimperiana has an antidiarrheal activity and this supports the use of this plant in the treatment of diarrhea in the traditional settings.

  5. Toxicological, Antidiarrheal and Spasmolytic Activities of Solanum paniculatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementino-Neto, José; Pereira, Joedna C; Vasconcelos, Luiz H C; de Souza, Iara L L; Silva, Anne D S; Silva, Telma M G; Ramos, Natalia S M; Pessôa, Hilzeth L F; Silva, Tania M S; da Silva, Bagnólia A; de Cavalcante, Fabiana A

    2016-01-01

    Solanum paniculatum is popularly known as "jurubeba-verdadeira". In folk medicine, its roots, stems, and leaves are used as tonics, anti-inflammatories, carminatives, diuretics, and for gastrointestinal disorders. This species is listed in the Brazilian Pharmacopoeia and belongs to the "Relação Nacional de Plantas Medicinais de Interesse ao SUS". Based on folk medicine data of the Solanum genus, we decided to investigate whether the crude ethanol extract from S. paniculatum aerial parts presents toxicological, antidiarrheal, and spasmolytic activities. The crude ethanol extract from S. paniculatum aerial parts did not produce in vitro or in vivo toxicity and showed dose-dependent antidiarrheal activity, inhibiting equipotently both the defecation frequency (ED50 = 340.3 ± 35.1 mg/kg) and liquid stool formation (ED50 = 370.1 ± 19.4 mg/kg) in mice. Conversely, the crude ethanol extract from S. paniculatum aerial parts did not inhibit normal intestinal transit, even though it has shown a dose-dependent reduction of both the castor oil-induced intestinal transit (Emax = 36.9 ± 1.3 %, ED50 = 242.0 ± 8.6 mg/kg) and intestinal fluid content (Emax = 74.8 ± 2.4 %, ED50 = 328.9 ± 15.9 mg/kg). Additionally, the crude ethanol extract from S. paniculatum aerial parts was approximately 2-fold more potent in antagonizing the phasic contractions induced with histamine (IC50 = 63.7 ± 3.5 µg/mL) than carbachol 10(-6) M (IC50 = 129.3 ± 14.1 µg/mL). Therefore, we concluded that the crude ethanol extract from S. paniculatum aerial parts presents antidiarrheal activity in mice related to the inhibition of small intestinal motility and secretion as well as nonselective spasmolytic activity on the guinea pig ileum. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. [Antidiarrheal and anti-inflammatory effects of berberine].

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    Zhang, M F; Shen, Y Q

    1989-03-01

    Berberine sulfate (Ber) 40 and 80 mg/kg ig reduced the purging effects of castor oil or Cassia angustifolia leaf in mice, but did not affect the gastrointestinal transport function of Chinese ink in normal mice. Ber 60 mg/kg ig significantly inhibited the increased vascular permeability induced by ip 0.7% acetic acid in mice. Ber 20 and 50 mg/kg sc markedly inhibited the increased vascular permeability induced by histamine 100 micrograms/0.1 ml ic in rats. Ber 4 and 8 mg/kg sc produced obvious inhibition in the xylene-induced swelling of mouse ear. The anti-inflammatory effects were enhanced in a dose-dependent manner. It is suggested that the antidiarrheal effect of Ber is relative to its restriction against exudative inflammation to a certain extent.

  7. Maytenus erythroxylon Reissek (Celastraceae) ethanol extract presents antidiarrheal activity via antimotility and antisecretory mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Formiga, Rodrigo de Oliveira; Quirino, Zelma Glebya Maciel; Diniz, Margareth de F?tima Formiga Melo; Marinho, Alexsandro Fernandes; Tavares, Josean Fechine; Batista, Le?nia Maria

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the acute toxicity, phytochemical profile, antidiarrheal activity and mechanisms of action of Maytenus erythroxylon (M. erythroxylon) ethanol extract. METHODS A castor oil-induced diarrhea model was used to evaluate antidiarrheal activity. Intestinal transit and gastric emptying protocols were used to evaluate a possible antimotility effect. KATP channels, nitric oxide, presynaptic ?2-adrenergic and tissue adrenergic receptors were investigated to uncover antimotility mecha...

  8. Antispasmodic and Antidiarrheal Activities of Valeriana hardwickii Wall. Rhizome Are Putatively Mediated through Calcium Channel Blockade

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    Bashir, Samra; Memon, Raafia; Gilani, Anwar H.

    2011-01-01

    Valeriana hardwickii is indigenous to Pakistan, Burma and Ceylon, where it is traditionally being used as an antispasmodic and antidiarrheal, besides its culinary use as spice. The aim of this paper was to provide pharmacological validation to these medicinal uses. The crude aqueous-methanolic extract of Valeriana hardwickii rhizome (Vh.Cr) was studied on isolated rabbit jejunum and castor oil-induced diarrhea in mice for spasmolytic and antidiarrheal properties, respectively. Vh.Cr caused concentration-dependent (0.01–1 mg/mL) relaxation of spontaneous contractions in isolated rabbit jejunum and inhibited K+-induced contractions (0.01–0.3 mg/mL), similar to verapamil, suggestive of calcium channel blockade (CCB). The CCB effect was confirmed when pretreatment of the jejunum preparations with Vh.Cr produced a concentration-dependent (0.03–0.1 mg/mL) rightward shift in the Ca++ concentration-response curves, as caused by verapamil. Vh.Cr exhibited dose-dependent (100–300 mg/kg) protection against castor oil-induced diarrhea in mice. Loperamide, a standard antidiarrheal drug, similarly prevented the diarrhea. These data indicate the presence of CCB effect in the extract of Valeriana hardwickii rhizome, possibly mediating its antispasmodic and antidiarrheal activities and provide a scientific base for its traditional use in hyperactive gut disorders. PMID:21423691

  9. Anti-Diarrheal Activity and Toxicity of Learng Pid Samud Recipe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Learng Pid Samud (LPS) recipe is a traditional remedy in Thai folk medicine to ease the common diarrhea. The anti-diarrheal potential of LPS recipe was herein examined in vitro using a guinea-pig ileum model. The LPS exerted an inhibitory effect on acetylcholine-induced smooth muscle contraction in the guinea pig ...

  10. Anti-diarrheal, anti-secretory, anti-spasmodic and anti- ulcer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    suggest the validity of the acclaimed ethnomedicinal effects in hyperactive gut disorders. Keywords: Acacia modesta, Antidiarrheal, Antisecretory, ... evidence for the medicinal use of Acacia modesta in hyperactive gut disorders like ..... activities of Matricaria chamomilla are mediated predominantly through K+- channels ...

  11. Anti-Diarrheal Activity of the Aqueous Leaf Extract of Ageratum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The leaves of Ageratum conyzoides had been reportedly used in traditional medicine in the treatment of diarrhea. Thus its aqueous leaf extract was investigated for its possible anti-diarrheal property using castor oil induced diarrheal, charcoal meal intestinal transit and castor oil-induced enteropooling models in Wistar rats ...

  12. Antispasmodic and Antidiarrheal Activities of Valeriana hardwickii Wall. Rhizome Are Putatively Mediated through Calcium Channel Blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Samra; Memon, Raafia; Gilani, Anwar H

    2011-01-01

    Valeriana hardwickii is indigenous to Pakistan, Burma and Ceylon, where it is traditionally being used as an antispasmodic and antidiarrheal, besides its culinary use as spice. The aim of this paper was to provide pharmacological validation to these medicinal uses. The crude aqueous-methanolic extract of Valeriana hardwickii rhizome (Vh.Cr) was studied on isolated rabbit jejunum and castor oil-induced diarrhea in mice for spasmolytic and antidiarrheal properties, respectively. Vh.Cr caused concentration-dependent (0.01-1 mg/mL) relaxation of spontaneous contractions in isolated rabbit jejunum and inhibited K(+)-induced contractions (0.01-0.3 mg/mL), similar to verapamil, suggestive of calcium channel blockade (CCB). The CCB effect was confirmed when pretreatment of the jejunum preparations with Vh.Cr produced a concentration-dependent (0.03-0.1 mg/mL) rightward shift in the Ca(++) concentration-response curves, as caused by verapamil. Vh.Cr exhibited dose-dependent (100-300 mg/kg) protection against castor oil-induced diarrhea in mice. Loperamide, a standard antidiarrheal drug, similarly prevented the diarrhea. These data indicate the presence of CCB effect in the extract of Valeriana hardwickii rhizome, possibly mediating its antispasmodic and antidiarrheal activities and provide a scientific base for its traditional use in hyperactive gut disorders.

  13. Antispasmodic and Antidiarrheal Activities of Valeriana hardwickii Wall. Rhizome Are Putatively Mediated through Calcium Channel Blockade

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    Samra Bashir

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Valeriana hardwickii is indigenous to Pakistan, Burma and Ceylon, where it is traditionally being used as an antispasmodic and antidiarrheal, besides its culinary use as spice. The aim of this paper was to provide pharmacological validation to these medicinal uses. The crude aqueous-methanolic extract of Valeriana hardwickii rhizome (Vh.Cr was studied on isolated rabbit jejunum and castor oil-induced diarrhea in mice for spasmolytic and antidiarrheal properties, respectively. Vh.Cr caused concentration-dependent (0.01–1 mg/mL relaxation of spontaneous contractions in isolated rabbit jejunum and inhibited K+-induced contractions (0.01–0.3 mg/mL, similar to verapamil, suggestive of calcium channel blockade (CCB. The CCB effect was confirmed when pretreatment of the jejunum preparations with Vh.Cr produced a concentration-dependent (0.03–0.1 mg/mL rightward shift in the Ca++ concentration-response curves, as caused by verapamil. Vh.Cr exhibited dose-dependent (100–300 mg/kg protection against castor oil-induced diarrhea in mice. Loperamide, a standard antidiarrheal drug, similarly prevented the diarrhea. These data indicate the presence of CCB effect in the extract of Valeriana hardwickii rhizome, possibly mediating its antispasmodic and antidiarrheal activities and provide a scientific base for its traditional use in hyperactive gut disorders.

  14. Byrsonima fagifolia: an integrative study to validate the gastroprotective, healing, antidiarrheal, antimicrobial and mutagenic action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Zeila Pinheiro; dos Santos, Raquel de Cássia; Torres, Talita Uliana; Sannomiya, Miriam; Rodrigues, Clenilson Martins; dos Santos, Lourdes Campaner; Pellizzon, Cláudia Helena; Rocha, Lúcia Regina Machado; Vilegas, Wagner; Souza Brito, Alba Regina Monteiro; Cardoso, Cássia Regina Primila; Varanda, Eliana Aparecida; de Moraes, Helen Pimenta; Bauab, Taís Maria; Carli, Camila; Carlos, Iracilda Zeppone; Hiruma-Lima, Clélia Akiko

    2008-11-20

    Ethnopharmacological survey indicated leaves of Byrsonima fagifolia Nied. (Malpighiaceae) against gastrointestinal disorders. The methanolic extract from the leaves of Byrsonima fagifolia (denominated BF) was evaluated for toxic, mutagenic, gastroprotective, antidiarrheal, antibacterial and immunomodulatory activities. The preventive and healing action of BF against gastric ulcer was evaluated in experimental models in rodents. We evaluated immunomodulatory (by murine peritoneal macrophages), antidiarrheal (by induced diarrhea with castor oil and intestinal motility) and antibacterial action of BF against standard strain of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Helicobacter pylori. The safety of use of BF was also evaluated by mutagenic (Ames assay) and by analyses of toxicity parameters. Phytochemical BF profile indicated the presence of phenolic compounds with antioxidant and radical-scavenging properties. BF significantly inhibited gastric lesions induced by ethanol and HCl/ethanol and endogenous mucosal sulphydryl groups (SHs) participated efficaciously in BF gastroprotection. BF blocked development of inflammation process and also has antidiarrheal actions. This extract accelerated the healing of the gastric ulcerated mucosa by stimulating proliferative factors and by increasing production of gastric mucus with no toxic action. The substances responsible for the protective action are concentrated in the ethyl acetate fraction that demonstrated no mutagenic action in vitro. Byrsonima fagifolia presents gastroprotective, healing and antidiarrheal activities supporting previous claims that its traditional use by Brazilians can treat these gastrointestinal ailments.

  15. Screening of Baccaurea ramiflora (Lour.) extracts for cytotoxic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, neuropharmacological and antidiarrheal activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesa, Mst Luthfun; Karim, S M Sajedul; Api, Khairunasa; Sarker, Md Moklesur Rahman; Islam, Md Monirul; Kabir, Asma; Sarker, Mithun Kumar; Nahar, Kamrun; Asadujjaman, Mohammad; Munir, Mohammad Sirajum

    2018-01-30

    It has been observed that the various part of Baccaurea ramiflora plant is used in rheumatoid arthritis, cellulitis, abscesses, constipation and injuries. This plant also has anticholinergic, hypolipidemic, hypoglycemic, antiviral, antioxidant, diuretic and cytotoxic activities. The present studyaimed to assess the cytotoxic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, CNS depressant and antidiarrheal activities of methanol extract of Baccaurea ramiflora pulp and seeds in mice model. The cytotoxic activity was determined by brine shrimp lethality bioassay; anti-nociceptive activity was determined by acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin- induced licking and biting, and tail immersion methods. The anti-inflammatory, CNS depressant and anti-diarrheal activities were assessed by carrageenan-induced hind paw edema, the open field and hole cross tests, and castor oil-induced diarrheal methods, respectively. The data were analyzed by one way ANOVA (analysis of variance) followed by Dunnett's test. In brine shrimp lethality bioassay, the LC 50 values of the methanol extracts of Baccaurea ramiflora pulp and seed were 40 μg/mL and 10 μg/mL, respectively. Our investigation showed that Baccaurea ramiflora pulp and seed extracts (200 mg/kg) inhibited acetic acid induced pain 67.51 and 66.08%, respectively (p analgesic, anti-inflammatory, CNS depressant and antidiarrheal activities of methanol extract of Baccaurea ramiflora pulp and seeds (200 mg/kg).

  16. Antidiarrheal activity of wood creosote: inhibition of muscle contraction and enterotoxin-induced fluid secretion in rabbit small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, N; Shibata, T

    2001-01-01

    Wood creosote has long been used as an antidiarrheal agent, but its mechanism of action is not well understood. To elucidate the mechanism of its antidiarrheal activity, we have addressed questions whether it inhibits fluid secretion induced by Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) in rabbit jejunum in vivo, and whether it inhibits muscle contraction of isolated rabbit ileum ex vivo. Wood creosote (10-100 mg/l) instilled in a ligated loop of jejunum inhibited STa-induced fluid secretion (p creosote is attributable to its antisecretory and antimotility effects. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  17. Antidiarrheal activity of ethanolic extract of Manihot esculenta Crantz leaves in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahekar, Satish E; Kale, Ranjana S

    2015-01-01

    Use of Manihot esculenta Crantz (MEC) plant has been mentioned in literature of Food and Agriculture Organization of United Nations, Central Tuber Crops Research Institute and many others. It is also known commonly as tapioca, continues to be a crop of food security for the millions of people, especially in the developing countries of the globe including India. Medicinal uses of this plant including diarrhea have been mentioned in literature, but scientific evidence is lacking. The objective was to study antidiarrheal activity of ethanolic leaf extract of MEC in Wistar rats. Ethanolic extract of MEC leaves in the doses of 50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg were used in Wistar rats of either sex. Experimental models used were castor oil-induced intestinal fluid accumulation and charcoal passage test. Loperamide and atropine sulfate were the standard drugs used in these models respectively. MEC extracts decreased intestinal fluid volume in dose dependent manner no extract group was comparable with standard drug loperamide (5 mg/kg). MEC extracts also significantly inhibited gastrointestinal motility in dose dependent manner. MEC (100 mg/kg) and MEC (200 mg/kg) were comparable with standard drug atropine sulfate (5 mg/kg) in this aspect. <0.05 were considered to be significant. Ethanolic extract of MEC leaves exhibited significant antidiarrheal activity by decreasing intestinal fluid accumulation and the gastrointestinal motility in Wistar rats.

  18. Antidiarrheal and antioxidant activities of chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.) decoction extract in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebai, Hichem; Jabri, Mohamed-Amine; Souli, Abdelaziz; Rtibi, Kais; Selmi, Slimen; Tebourbi, Olfa; El-Benna, Jamel; Sakly, Mohsen

    2014-03-14

    Matricaria recutita L. (Chamomile) has been widely used in the Tunisian traditional medicine for the treatment of digestive system disorders. The present work aims to investigate the protective effects of chamomile decoction extract (CDE) against castor oil-induced diarrhea and oxidative stress in rats. The antidiarrheal activity was evaluated using castor oil-induced diarrhea method. In this respect, rats were divided into six groups: Control, Castor oil, Castor oil+Loperamide (LOP) and Castor oil+various doses of CDE. Animals were per orally (p.o.) pre-treated with CDE during 1h and intoxicated for 2 or 4h by acute oral administration of castor oil. Our results showed that CDE produced a significant dose-dependent protection against castor oil-induced diarrhea and intestinal fluid accumulation. On the other hand, we showed that diarrhea was accompagned by an oxidative stress status assessed by an increase of malondialdehyde (MDA) level and depletion of antioxidant enzyme activities as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Castor oil also increased gastric and intestinal mucosa hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and free iron levels. Importantly, we showed that chamomile pre-treatment abrogated all these biochemical alterations. These findings suggested that chamomile extract had a potent antidiarrheal and antioxidant properties in rats confirming their use in traditional medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Antidiarrheal Activity of 19-Deoxyicetexone Isolated from Salvia ballotiflora Benth in Mice and Rats

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    Ernesto Sánchez-Mendoza

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The antidiarrheal properties of 19-deoxyicetexone, a diterpenoid isolated from Salvia ballotiflora were evaluated on castor oil-, arachidonic acid (AA- and prostaglandin (PGE2-induced diarrhea in rodent models. The structure of 19-deoxyicetexone was determined by X-ray crystallography, mass spectrometry (EI-MS, as well as ultraviolet (UV-Vis, infrared (FT-IR and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopies. This compound significantly and dose-dependently reduced frequency of stooling in castor oil-induced diarrhea, and at dose of 25 mg/kg it also inhibited diarrhea induced with AA, while it had no effect on PGE2-induced diarrhea. This compound at doses of 25 mg/kg also diminished castor oil-induced enteropooling and intestinal motility, and inhibited the contraction of the rats’ ileum induced by carbachol chloride at a concentration of 100 µg/mL. 19-Deoxyicetexone did not present acute toxicity at doses of 625 mg/kg. Its antidiarrheal activity may be due to increased reabsorption of NaCl and water and inhibition of the release of prostaglandins, gastrointestinal motility and fluid accumulation in the intestinal tracts of rats. These findings suggest that 19-deoxyicetexone may be used in the treatment of diarrhea, although more studies must be carried out to confirm this.

  20. Antidiarrheal activity of cashew GUM, a complex heteropolysaccharide extracted from exudate of Anacardium occidentale L. in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Thiago S L; Costa, Douglas S; Sousa, Nayara A; Souza, Luan K M; de Araújo, Simone; Oliveira, Ana Patrícia; Sousa, Francisca Beatriz M; Silva, Durcilene A; Barbosa, André L R; Leite, José Roberto S A; Medeiros, Jand Venes R

    2015-11-04

    Anacardium occidentale L. (Anacardiaceae) is commonly known as the cashew tree. It is native to tropical America and extracts of the leaves, bark, roots, chestnut net and exudate have been traditionally used in northeast Brazil for the treatment of various diseases. The exudate of the cashew tree (cashew gum) has been exploited by locals since ancient times for multiple applications, including the treatment of diarrheal diseases. The primary aim of the present study is to evaluate the antidiarrheal activity of cashew gum (CG), a complex heteropolysaccharide from the exudate of the cashew tree, using various models. The antidiarrheal activity of cashew gum (CG) against acute diarrhea was investigated using the castor oil-induced diarrhea model. The effects of CG on gastrointestinal transit and castor oil- and PGE2- induced enteropooling were also examined in rodents. In addition, the effect of CG against secretory diarrhea was investigated using a model of fluid secretion in cholera toxin-treated intestinal closed loops in live mice. Cashew gum (30, 60, and 90 mg/kg, p.o.) showed a significant (Poccidentale L. has antidiarrheal activity in acute, inflammatory, and secretory diarrhea models, which could justify its traditional use in the treatment of diarrhea in northeast Brazil. The antidiarrheal activity might be explained by the capacity of CG to inhibit gastrointestinal motility and thereby reduce the accumulation of intestinal fluid and the secretion of water and chloride ions in the lumen of the intestine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Byrsonima intermedia A. Juss.: gastric and duodenal anti-ulcer, antimicrobial and antidiarrheal effects in experimental rodent models.

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    Santos, Raquel Cássia; Kushima, Hélio; Rodrigues, Clenilson Martins; Sannomiya, Miriam; Rocha, Lúcia Regina Machado; Bauab, Taís Maria; Tamashiro, Jorge; Vilegas, Wagner; Hiruma-Lima, Clélia Akiko

    2012-03-27

    An ethnopharmacological survey indicated that the leaves of Byrsonima intermedia A. Juss. (Malpighiaceae), a medicinal species commonly found in the Brazilian Cerrado, can be used against gastroduodenal disorders, such as gastric ulcers and diarrhea. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of a methanolic extract of Byrsonima intermedia (MBI) leaves on gastric and duodenal ulcers and to assess the antimicrobial and antidiarrheal effects of this extract. The anti-ulcerogenic effect of MBI was investigated with different ulcerogenic agents in rodents (mice and rats), including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), HCl/ethanol, pyloric ligature, absolute ethanol, cysteamine and ischemia-reperfusion. The gastroprotective effect of MBI was assessed by analysing the volume of gastric juice, pH, total acidity, mucus, NO, sulfhydryl compound, vanilloid receptor, glutathione (GSH) levels, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the gastric and duodenal mucosa. The gastric and duodenal healing effects of MBI were also evaluated during 7 or 14 days of treatment. The antidiarrheal action (measured by intestinal motility and diarrhea induced by castor oil) and anti-bacterial action of MBI against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Helicobacter pylori were also evaluated by microdilution methods. The phytochemical profile from MBI indicated the presence of phenolic acids, flavan-3-ols, oligomeric proanthocyanidins, and flavonoids. MBI (500mg/kg, p.o.) significantly inhibited totally gastric and duodenal lesions (69%) and healed gastric (49% on 14 days) and duodenal lesions (45% on 7 and 14 days). The MBI exert gastroprotective action by participation of endogenous sulfhydryl compounds, vanilloid receptors and increase in GSH level to effective gastric and duodenal protection. MBI also displayed curative (42%) and preventive (49%) antidiarrheal effects by involvement of opiate receptors and also antimicrobial effects in vitro. Byrsonima intermedia

  2. Antidiarrheal Evaluation of Aqueous and Ethanolic Stem Bark Extracts of Khaya senegalensis A. Juss (Meliaceae in Albino Rats

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    Ishaku L. Elisha, Micah S. Makoshi, Sunday Makama*, Christiana J. Dawurung, Nkechi V. Offiah§, Jurbe G. Gotep, Olusola O. Oladipo and David Shamaki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The stem bark of Khaya senegalensis A. Juss (Meliaceae is used traditionally in the treatment of malaria, intestinal worms, diarrhea, dysentery and venereal diseases. Despite the claim as an effective antidiarrheal remedy in both humans and animals, there is scarcity of documented scientific information of specific in vivo antidiarrheal test using extracts of this plant. The number of wet feces and the distance travelled by activated charcoal meal in rats orally given 300, 600 and 1200 mg/kg doses of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of the stem bark of K. senegalensis were evaluated in the castor oil induced diarrhea and gastrointestinal motility studies. The phytochemical constituents and acute toxicity test of the extracts were also tested using standard methods. Both extracts dose-dependently (P0.05 distance travelled by charcoal in the gastrointestinal motility test. The extracts were apparently safe at 2000 mg/kg body weight per os. Cardiac glycosides and flavonoids were present in both extracts, while tannins were present only in the ethanolic extract. The aqueous and ethanolic stem bark extracts of K. senegalensis inhibits diarrhea, at least in part, by a mechanism other than inhibition of gastrointestinal motility. The antidiarrheal activity of K. senegalensis may be attributed to the flavonoid and tannin constituents present in the extracts. The ability of K. senegalensis to significantly protect against castor oil induced diarrhea justifies its use in traditional management of human and animal diarrhea.

  3. Antibacterial and Antidiarrheal Activities of Plant Products against Enterotoxinogenic Escherichia coli

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    J. Daniel Dubreuil

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC produces two types of enterotoxins: heat-labile (LT and heat-stable (STa and STb. These molecules are involved in the induction of secretory diarrhea in animals including humans. This condition is currently treated using a fluid replacement therapy and antibiotics. This treatment is often not available to people in developing countries, and several die from the condition provoke by ETEC. Over the years, plants and plant extracts have been use as traditional medicine to treat various gastrointestinal ailments including diarrhea. Many of these plant products have been claimed to be active against diarrhea, however few have been extensively studied. The main objective of this review was to gather the scattered information on the antidiarrheal activities reported for various plant products on ETEC. This includes two major effects: (1 The inhibitory effect on bacterial growth or viability and (2 The interference with ETEC enterotoxins activity upon the intestinal epithelium. We will focus on plant products and extracts for which we have major indications of their biological activity against ETEC and their enterotoxins. Because Vibrio cholerae toxin (CT is structurally, antigenically and mechanistically related to LT, it will also be discussed in this review.

  4. Antidiarrheal and antispasmodic activities of Vincetoxicum stocksii are mediated through calcium channel blockade

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    Abdul Jabbar Shah

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to explore the mechanism underlying antidiarrheal and antispasmodic activities of Vincetoxicum stocksii. The crude extract of V. stocksii provided 12-24% protection from castor oil-induced diarrhea at the dose of 300-1,000 mg/kg, similar to loperamide. In isolated rabbit jejunum preparations, V. stocksii caused inhibition of the spontaneous and high K+ (80 mM-induced contractions, with respective EC50 values of 2.53 (1.65-3.90 and 0.95 mg/mL (0.63-1.42, similar to that caused by verapamil, suggesting the calcium channel blocking effect. Loperamide caused inhibition of sponta-neous and high K+-induced contraction, with respective EC50 values of 8.59 (6.33-10.11 and 9.12 µM (7.33-12.81. The calcium channel blocking activity was further confirmed when pretreatment of the tissues with V. stocksii (1-3 mg/mL caused a rightward displacement of the Ca++ concentrations response curves, similar to that produced by verapamil; constructed in Ca++ free medium. These data indicate that the crude extract of V. stocksii contains calcium channel blocking constituents that may possibly explain its medicinal use in hyperactive states of gut, such as, diarrhea and spasms.

  5. Antidiarrheal activity of extracts from Maytenus gonoclada and inhibition of Dengue virus by lupeol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FERNANDO C. SILVA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Diarrhea is an infectious disease caused by bacterial, virus, or protozoan, and dengue is caused by virus, included among the neglected diseases in several underdeveloped and developing countries, with an urgent demand for new drugs. Considering the antidiarrheal potential of species of Maytenus genus, a phytochemical investigation followed by antibacterial activity test with extracts of branches and heartwood and bark of roots from Maytenus gonoclada were conducted. Moreover, due the frequency of isolation of lupeol from Maytenus genus the antiviral activity against Dengue virus and cytotoxicity of lupeol and its complex with β-cyclodextrins were also tested. The results indicated the bioactivity of ethyl acetate extract from branches and ethanol extract from heartwood of roots of M. gonoclada against diarrheagenic bacteria. The lupeol showed potent activity against Dengue virus and low cytotoxicity in LLC-MK2 cells, but its complex with β-cyclodextrin was inactive. Considering the importance of novel and selective antiviral drug candidates the results seem to be promising.

  6. Evaluation of Anti-diarrheal Potential of Hydro-alcoholic Extracts of Leaves of Murraya koenigii in Experimental Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Anand; Das, Saibal; Mani, Vasudevan; Sengottuvelu, S; Vinoth Prabhu, V

    2016-01-01

    The indigenous medical system of India mentions the use of Murraya koenigii leaves for the treatment of different types of diarrheas over ages. To evaluate the anti-diarrheal activity of hydro-alcoholic extracts of leaves of Murraya koenigii and to check its effects on intestinal transits in experimental rat model. The hydro-alcoholic extract of Murraya koenigii leaves was obtained with Soxhlet extraction method. Animals were divided into four groups (n = 6) receiving daily for three consecutive days: vehicle, standard drug atropine (3mg/kg, i.p.), leaf extracts 200 & 400 mg/kg respectively in oral route. Effects of the drugs on normal defecation were noted and then castor oil induced diarrhea was used to measure the effects of leaf extract on stool frequency and consistency. Finally, charcoal meal test was used to evaluate the effect of the extract on intestinal transit. Statistical evaluation was done using SPSS version 17, one way ANOVA followed by Dunnett's t-test was done and P< 0.001 was considered as significant. Murraya koenigii leaf extracts in 200 and 400 mg/kg dose reduced stool frequency, increased stool consistency and increased small intestinal transit time. Hydro-alcoholic extract of Murraya koenigii leaves possesses significant anti-diarrheal activity due to its inhibitory effect on gastrointestinal motility, making it useful for a wide number of gastrointestinal diseases.

  7. Evaluation of the antidiarrheal activity of the leaf extracts of Myrtus communis Linn (Myrtaceae) in mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisay, Mekonnen; Engidawork, Ephrem; Shibeshi, Workineh

    2017-02-10

    Myrtus communis L. has a folkloric repute for the management of diarrhea and dysentery in different parts of the world. However, the safety and efficacy of the leaf extract have not been scientifically validated in animal model. This study was, therefore, aimed to investigate the antidiarrheal effect of 80% methanol extract (80ME) and solvent fractions of the leaves of Myrtus communis L. in mice. The antidiarrheal activity of the 80ME and solvent fractions was evaluated against castor oil induced diarrheal model, charcoal meal and enteropooling tests. For the 80%ME, the test groups received 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg of the extract. In case of fractions, the test groups received various doses of fractions (200, 300, 400 mg/kg and an additional dose of 800 mg/kg for the aqueous fraction (AF)), where as negative controls received the vehicle (10 ml/kg) and positive controls received loperamide (3 mg/kg). The 80ME at 200 mg/kg (p < 0.05) & 400 mg/kg (p < 0.01) as well as the chloroform fraction (CF) and methanol fraction (MF) at 400 mg/kg (p < 0.05) significantly delayed the onset of diarrhea. Besides, the 80ME (at all tested doses) and both of these fractions (at 300 & 400 mg/kg) significantly decreased the frequency and weight of fecal outputs. Results from the charcoal meal test revealed that the 80ME, at all doses, (p < 0.001) as well as the CF and MF at 300 mg/kg (p < 0.05) & 400 mg/kg (p < 0.001) produced a significant anti-motility effect. Similarly, in the entero-pooling test, the 80ME (at all tested doses) (p < 0.01) as well as the CF and MF (at 300 & 400 mg/kg, p < 0.05) produced a significant decline in the weight and volume of intestinal contents, whereas the AF revealed significant effect (p < 0.05) at dose of 800 mg/kg only. The study demonstrated that the 80ME and solvent fractions contain bioactive constituents that have antidiarrheal activity. Therefore, this study provides a scientific support for the

  8. Antidiarrheal and Antispasmodic Activities of Buddleja polystachya are Mediated Through Dual Inhibition of Ca(++) Influx and Phosphodiesterase Enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Najeeb-ur; Gilani, Anwarul-Hassan; Khan, Aslam; Nazneen, Maryam; El Gamal, Ali A; Fawzy, Ghada A; Al-Ati, Hanan Y; Abdel-kader, Maged S

    2015-08-01

    This study describes the antidiarrheal and antispasmodic activities of the hydro-alcoholic extract of Buddleja polystachya (Bp.Cr) with possible mode of action explored along with activity-directed fractionation. Bp.Cr and its aqueous (Bp.Aq) and organic fractions, petroleum ether (Bp.Pet), dichloromethane (Bp.DCM), ethylacetate (Bp.EtAc) and butanol (Bp.But), were tested using the in-vivo and in-vitro assays. The crude extract (100-300 mg/kg) showed 20 and 60% protection of castor oil-induced diarrhea in mice. In isolated rabbit jejunum, Bp.Cr like papaverine inhibited spontaneous and high K(+) (80 mM)-induced contractions equi-potently. In guinea-pig ileum, Bp.Cr showed a moderate spasmogenic effect. The activity-directed fractionation revealed that the spasmolytic activity was concentrated in the organic fractions and spasmogenic component in the aqueous fraction. Amongst the organic fractions, BP.DCM and Bp.Pet inhibited spontaneous and high K(+) -induced contractions equi-potently, while Bp.But, like verapamil was more potent against high K(+) . The crude extract and its organic fractions caused rightward shift in the Ca(++) -concentration response curves (CRCs), similar to verapamil, and all except Bp.But potentiated the isoprenaline-inhibitory CRCs to the left, similar to papaverine. The results of this study indicate that the crude extract of B. polystachya possesses antidiarrheal and antispasmodic activities, mediated possibly through dual inhibition of Ca(++) influx and phospodiesterase enzyme. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Campomanesia adamantium Peel Extract in Antidiarrheal Activity: The Ability of Inhibition of Heat-Stable Enterotoxin by Polyphenols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lescano, Caroline Honaiser; de Oliveira, Ivan Pires; Zaminelli, Tiago; Baldivia, Débora da Silva; da Silva, Luan Ramos; Napolitano, Mauro; Silvério, Camila Bitencourt Mendes; Lincopan, Nilton; Sanjinez-Argandoña, Eliana Janet

    2016-01-01

    Campomanesia adamantium (Myrtaceae) is a medicinal plant distributed in Brazilian Cerrado. Different parts of this plant are used in popular medicine for treatment of several diseases like fever, diarrhea, hypercholesterolemia and rheumatism. The aim of this work was to evaluate the inhibition of heat-stable enterotoxin type A (STa) by gallic acid present in the peel of C. adamantium fruit and assays to assess the antidiarrheal activity, anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic properties of peel extract using the T84 cell line model. The possible inhibition exerted by the gallic acid of the peel extract on the STa peptide was inferred by molecular dynamics simulations. The antidiarrheal effects were investigated measuring cGMP accumulation in cells after stimulation by STa toxin and antibacterial activity was assessed. The anti-inflammatory activity was assessed by inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2. MTT and LDH assays were used to evaluate any possible cytotoxic action while the CyQUANT test was used to investigate the effect on cell proliferation. A representation showing how the possible interactions between STa and the gallic acid of the extract might reduce the action of the enterotoxin is presented. C. adamantium peel extract significantly decreased the levels of cGMP in T84 cells. However, no effect on the species of microorganisms was observed. The extract also inhibited COX-1 (IC50 255.70 ± 0.04 ng/mL) and COX-2 (IC50 569.50 ± 0.11 ng/mL) enzymes. Cytotoxicity assay have shown significant changes in cells treated with the extract, which inhibited the cell proliferation until 72 hours of treatment. Direct interactions of phenolic compounds present in the extract with the STa toxin may limit its activity. Curative effect in the diarrhea treatment and its anti-inflammatory action is based on the pharmacological properties, mechanism of action of the C. adamantium peel extract, and no toxic effects of the peel extract presented on this work. PMID:27764241

  10. Antidiarrheal Thymol Derivatives from Ageratina glabrata. Structure and Absolute Configuration of 10-Benzoyloxy-8,9-epoxy-6-hydroxythymol Isobutyrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Bustos-Brito

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chemical investigation of the leaves from Ageratina glabrata yielded four new thymol derivatives, namely: 10-benzoyloxy-8,9-dehydro-6-hydroxythymol isobutyrate (4, 10-benzoyloxy-8,9-dehydrothymol (5, 10-benzoyloxythymol (6 and 10-benzoyloxy-6,8-dihydroxy-9-isobutyryl-oxythymol (7. In addition, (8S-10-benzoyloxy-8,9-epoxy-6-hydroxythymol isobutyrate (1, together with other two already known thymol derivatives identified as 10-benzoyloxy-8,9-epoxy-6-methoxythymol isobutyrate (2 and 10-benzoyloxy-8,9-epoxythymol isobutyrate (3 were also obtained. In this paper, we report the structures and complete assignments of the 1H and 13C-NMR data of compounds 1–7, and the absolute configuration for compound 1, unambiguously established by single crystal X-ray diffraction, and evaluation of the Flack parameter. The in vitro antiprotozoal assay showed that compound 1 and its derivative 1a were the most potent antiamoebic and antigiardial compounds. Both compounds showed selectivity and good antiamoebic activity comparable to emetine and metronidazole, respectively, two antiprotozoal drugs used as positive controls. In relation to anti-propulsive effect, compound 1 and 1a showed inhibitory activity, with activities comparable to quercetin and compound 9, two natural antipropulsive compounds used as positive controls. These data suggest that compound 1 may play an important role in antidiarrheal properties of Ageratina glabrata.

  11. Hymenaea stigonocarpa Mart. ex Hayne: a Brazilian medicinal plant with gastric and duodenal anti-ulcer and antidiarrheal effects in experimental rodent models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues Orsi, Patricia; Bonamin, Flávia; Aparecida Severi, Juliana; Cássia Santos, Raquel; Vilegas, Wagner; Hiruma-Lima, Clélia Akiko; Stasi, Luiz Claudio Di

    2012-08-30

    Hymenaea stigonocarpa Mart. ex Hayne (Fabaceae) is a medicinal species commonly found in the Brazilian savannah. The stem bark of this medicinal plant, popularly known as "jatobá-do-cerrado", is widely used in tea form to treat gastric pain, ulcers, diarrhoea and inflammation, whereas its fruits pulp is edible. The aim of this study was to investigate the antidiarrheal and anti-ulcer effects of a methanolic extract derived from the stem bark (MHs) and diet with fruit pulp of H. stigonocarpa. The antidiarrheal action of MHs was measured against the intestinal motility and diarrhoea induced by castor oil in mice. The preventive action of MHs (50, 100, 150 and 200mg/Kg, by oral route (p.o.)) against peptic ulcers was evaluated in experimental rodent models challenged with absolute ethanol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) (200mg/Kg, p.o.) and cysteamine (200mg/Kg, p.o.). The main anti-ulcer mechanisms of action of MHs were analysed as follows: evaluation of the gastric juice parameters, assessment of mucus adherence to the gastric wall, determination of the role of nitric oxide (NO) and sulfhydryl compounds (SH), glutathione (GSH) levels and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. The healing effects from MHs (200mg/Kg) and diet with fruit pulp (10%) against gastric and duodenal ulcers induced by acetic acid were also evaluated by treating rats over 7 or 14 consecutive days of treatment. The phytochemical profile of MHs and fruit pulp indicated the presence of phenolic compounds (mainly flavonoids and condensed tannins). MHs (200mg/Kg, p.o.) displayed an antidiarrheal effect and were able to protect gastric mucosa against absolute ethanol (68% protection) and also against the injurious effect of NSAIDs (86% protection) when compared to the group treated with vehicle. These results were accompanied by the prevention of GSH depletion and an inhibition of MPO activity when compared to animals treated with vehicle (P<0.05). MHs markedly

  12. Efecto antidiarreico de la tintura al 20 % de Mentha piperita Linn en ratas Antidiarrheal effect of Mentha piperita Linn tincture 20 % in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José de la Paz Naranjo

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Con el objetivo de evaluar la acción antidiarreica de una tintura al 20 % de Mentha piperita Linn (toronjil de menta, se realizó un estudio in vivo en modelo de diarreas en ratas inducidas con aceite de castor. Las dosis evaluadas fueron 200, 300 y 400 mg/kg. Se encontró que las dosis de 300 y 400 mg/kg alargaron el tiempo de aparición de la primera deposición líquida y disminuyeron su frecuencia, no así la dosis menor, que solamente redujo el número de deposiciones líquidas en el tiempo. Se halló conjuntamente un efecto dependiente de la dosis y una dosis efectiva media calculada (DE50 de 346,41 mg/kg. La dosis máxima de la tintura mostró tener acción antidiarreica en el modelo empleado. El nivel de significación se fijó en una p £ 0,05.To evaluate the antidiarrheal action a Mentha piperita Linn (toronjil de menta tincture 20 %, an in vivo study was carried out in a model of diarrheas in rats induced by beaver oil. The evaluated doses were 200, 300 and 400 mg/kg. It was found that the doses of 300 and 400 mg/kg prolonged the time of appearance of the first liquid defecation and reduced its frequency. It was not so with the smaller dose, which only reduced the number of liquid defecations in time. It was also found an effect depending on the dose and an effective mean calculated dose (ED50 of 346.41 mg/kg. The maximum dose of tincture proved to have an antidiarrheal action in the model used. The level of significance was fixed in a p £ 0.05.

  13. Not any type of rice performs equally to improve lactose-induced diarrhea characteristics in rats: is amylose an antidiarrheal factor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lia Felipoff

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of different types of rice in relation to their ability to accelerate diarrhea recovering was evaluated in a rat model of osmotic diarrhea (OD. Animals (90-100 g received protein free diet until reaching up to 20% weight loss, followed by lactose rich diet (LRD to induce osmotic diarrhea. Rats presenting osmotic diarrhea were divided into 4 groups, which received lactose rich diet for 4 days from 8 am to 8 pm, and one of three experimental products containing 6% rice flour differing in amylose content during the night: high (HA, intermediate (IA, and low (LA. A group fed stock diet containing equivalent amount of lactose was taken as control and allowed to recover spontaneously. Amylose and viscosity (cp at 25 °C, 10 rpm of final products were determined. Effectiveness was expressed as the ratio between percentages of normal vs. diarrheic stools during the treatment. Fecal characteristics in this rat model improved only as result of feeding high amylose content (HA type of rice. In this experimental model of osmotic diarrhea in young rats, the antidiarrheal effects of rice were strongly dependent on the type of diet used and appear to be related to its amylose content.

  14. Wood creosote, the principal active ingredient of seirogan, an herbal antidiarrheal medicine: a single-dose, dose-escalation safety and pharmacokinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuge, Tomoo; Shibata, Takashi; Willett, Michael S

    2003-11-01

    To assess the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of escalating single doses of wood creosote, an herbal antidiarrheal and antispasmodic agent. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Clinical research center. Forty (32 men, 8 women) healthy volunteers aged 19-42 years. By random assignment, 22 men and 8 women received escalating single doses of wood creosote (45, 90, 135, 180, and 225 mg) and 10 men received placebo (for each of the five dose levels, 6 subjects received active substance and 2 subjects received placebo). Vital signs, laboratory tests, and electrocardiograms were assessed; no dose-related or clinically significant changes were noted. Serial blood samples were obtained to determine the pharmacokinetics of four major active components of wood creosote: total (conjugated plus free) guaiacol, creosol, o-cresol, and 4-ethylguaiacol. The most common adverse events were mild headache and dizziness, with no dose-related trends being apparent. Area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity increased in a dose-proportional manner for total guaiacol, creosol, and o-cresol and was not assessed for total 4-ethylguaiacol owing to lack of data at the low dose level. No apparent differences by sex were noted for any of the four active components. All four components were rapidly eliminated. Single oral doses of wood creosote up to 225 mg were safe and well tolerated in healthy men and women. Also, the doses of wood creosote were rapidly absorbed, conjugated, and eliminated. Such a rapid onset and short duration of action would appear desirable in the treatment of acute nonspecific diarrhea.

  15. Racecadotril versus loperamide - Antidiarrheal research revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijghebaert, S.; Awouters, F.; Tytgat, G. N. J.

    2003-01-01

    Racecadotril is an enkephalinase inhibitor, presented as a purely antisecretory agent with advantages over the opiate-receptor agonist loperamide in the treatment of diarrhea. A critical review of the literature and the models used was performed. Although pretreatment with high doses of racecadotril

  16. Antidiarrheal Medicines: OTC Relief for Diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CorrectlyPain Relievers: Understanding Your OTC OptionsAntacids and Acid Reducers: OTC Relief for Heartburn and Acid RefluxOTC Cough ... Loss and Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics ...

  17. Anti-diarrheal constituents of Alpinia oxyphylla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junqing; Wang, Sheng; Li, Yonghui; Xu, Peng; Chen, Feng; Tan, Yinfeng; Duan, Jinao

    2013-09-01

    Isolation, screening and in vivo assays have been used for evaluating anti-diarrhea bioactive of Alpinia oxyphylla. Preliminary experimental results showed that 95% ethanol extract and 90% ethanol elution significantly extended the onset time of diarrhea and reduced the wet feces proportion, however 50% ethanol election had no effect on diarrhea. Chemical analysis results displayed that Nootkatone, Tectochrysin and yakuchinone A may be bioactive ingredients for curing diarrhea. Duodenum in vitro experiment showed that Tectochrysin 50, 100 μM reduces carbachol-induced contraction, while yakuchinone A and Nootkatone had no effect. Bioinformatic computational method as molecular docking has been complementary to experimentally work to explore the potential mechanism. The study of pathogenesis of diarrhea in humans and animal models suggested that Na(+)/H(+) exchanger3 (NHE3) and aquaporin4 (AQP4) are causative agents of diarrhea. The analysis was done on the basis of scoring and binding ability and the docking analysis showed that Tectochrysin has maximum potential against NHE3 (PDB ID: 2OCS) and AQP4 (PDB ID: 3GD8). Tectochrysin indicated minimum energy score and the highest number of interactions with active site residues. These results suggested that A. oxyphylla might exhibit its anti-diarrhea effect partially by affecting the proteins of NHE3 and AQP4 with its active ingredient Tectochrysin. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Not any type of rice performs equally to improve lactose-induced diarrhea characteristics in rats: is amylose an antidiarrheal factor? No tratamento das diarréias induzidas por lactose em ratos, nem todas as variedades de arroz agem da mesma forma: poderia ser a amilose um fator antidiarreico?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lia Felipoff

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of different types of rice in relation to their ability to accelerate diarrhea recovering was evaluated in a rat model of osmotic diarrhea (OD. Animals (90-100 g received protein free diet until reaching up to 20% weight loss, followed by lactose rich diet (LRD to induce osmotic diarrhea. Rats presenting osmotic diarrhea were divided into 4 groups, which received lactose rich diet for 4 days from 8 am to 8 pm, and one of three experimental products containing 6% rice flour differing in amylose content during the night: high (HA, intermediate (IA, and low (LA. A group fed stock diet containing equivalent amount of lactose was taken as control and allowed to recover spontaneously. Amylose and viscosity (cp at 25 °C, 10 rpm of final products were determined. Effectiveness was expressed as the ratio between percentages of normal vs. diarrheic stools during the treatment. Fecal characteristics in this rat model improved only as result of feeding high amylose content (HA type of rice. In this experimental model of osmotic diarrhea in young rats, the antidiarrheal effects of rice were strongly dependent on the type of diet used and appear to be related to its amylose content.Avaliou-se a eficiência de diferentes tipos de arroz quanto a sua habilidade de acelerar a recuperação de um episódio de diarreia em um modelo de indução de diarreia osmótica (DO em ratos. Animais (90-100 g receberam dieta isenta de proteína até perderem 20% do seu peso, seguida de uma dieta rica em lactose para indução de diarreia. Os ratos que apresentaram diarreia osmótica foram divididos em quatro grupos, os quais receberam uma dieta rica em lactose durante quatro dias das 8 às 20 hours e, durante a noite, receberam um dos produtos experimentais, com 6% de farinha de arroz e diferentes quantidades de amilose: alto (AA, intermediário (IA e baixo (BA teor de amilose. Um grupo alimentado com ração comercial foi escolhido como controle e para

  19. Phytochemical and anti-diarrheal studies of Bauhinia rufescens Lam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    phytochemical screening of the leaves, roots and stem bark showed the presence of saponins, tannins, cardiac glycosides, flavonoids, sterols and terpenes. The methanol extract of the leaves showed 100 percent protection at dose levels of 125 and 250mg/kg in castor oil-induced diarrheal study in mice. This activity was ...

  20. Antidiarrheal Mechanism And Ionic Profile Of Carpolobia Lutea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mechanism elucidated using yohimbine, isosorbide dinitrate, and diphenoxylate. The elemental and ionic profile of ESE was established using inductively coupled argon-plasma emission spectrometer and potentiometric titration respectively. The finger print of ESE was revealed by Jasco (Tokyo, Japan), HPLC and ...

  1. Potential antisecretory antidiarrheals. 1. Alpha 2-adrenergic aromatic aminoguanidine hydrazones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitzele, B S; Moormann, A E; Gullikson, G W; Albin, D; Bianchi, R G; Palicharla, P; Sanguinetti, E L; Walters, D E

    1988-01-01

    Guanabenz, a centrally acting antihypertensive agent, has been shown to have intestinal antisecretory properties. A series of aromatic aminoguanidine hydrazones was made in an effort to separate the antisecretory and cardiovascular activities. Benzaldehyde, naphthaldehyde, and tetralone derivatives were synthesized. The compounds were evaluated in the cholera toxin treated ligated jejunum of the rat and in the Ussing chamber using a rabbit ileum preparation. A number of compounds, including members of each structural class, were active upon subcutaneous administration in the rat. Active compounds were determined to be alpha 2-adrenergic agonists by yohimbine reversals of their Ussing chamber activities. The compound displaying the best separation of activities was the aminoguanidine hydrazone of 2,6-dimethyl-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (20).

  2. Antidiarrheal Activity of the Ethyl Acetate Extract of Morinda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: The ethyl acetate extract of Morinda morindoides (250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg body weight) was administered orally to three groups of rats (five animals per group) in order to evaluate the activity of the extract against castor oil-induced diarrhea model in rat. Two other groups received normal saline (5mg/kg) and ...

  3. Anti-diarrheal, anti-secretory, anti-spasmodic and antiulcer activities of

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In isolated tissue (rabbit jejunum), Am.Cr concentration-dependently (0.01 - 3.0 mg/mL) produced relaxation of K+ (80 mM)-induced and spontaneous contractions at ... anti-secretory, antispasmodic and anti-ulcer activities, probably mediated through dual mechanisms, including Ca2+ influx and PDE enzyme(s) inhibition.

  4. Anti-Diarrheal Activity Of The Leaf Extracts Of Daniellia oliveri Hutch ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Moraceae) used in diarrhea treatment in Hausa ethnomedicine of Northern Nigeria were investigated. The study was carried out on parfused isolated rabbit jejunum and castor oil-induced diarrhea in mice. The n-butanol extracts: NBD and NBF ...

  5. Anti-Diarrheal Activity of the Aqueous Leaf Extract of Ageratum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Earnest Erhirhie

    Caracterização farmacognóstica da droga e do extrato fluído de mentrasto, Ageratum conyzoides. L. Lecta 11(1):63–100. Oliver, B. (1960). Medicinal plants in Nigeria. 1st. Edition. Nigerian College of Arts and Science and Technology, Ibadan, pp. 17-41. Owolabi, J.O., Omogbai, E.K.I., and Oduru, E.E.. (2007). Antidiarrhoeal ...

  6. Antidiarrheal and antimicrobial profiles extracts of the leaves from Trichilia emetica Vahl. (Meliaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiessoun Konaté

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: The obtained results allow justifying the traditional uses of Trichilia emetica and possess good antidiarrhoeal and antimicrobial activities of EAF from Trichilia emetica. Results of the present study have clearly supported the utilization of Trichilia emetica in Burkina Faso traditional medicine.

  7. Anti-diarrheal effects of diosmectite in the treatment of acute diarrhea in children: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Christophe; Vernisse, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Acute diarrhea caused by an infectious organism is highly prevalent, particularly in developing countries, and is usually self-limiting. The condition is a major contributor to the global disease burden and is associated with a significant economic cost. The disease is common in children aged Diarrhea almost always occurs by one or more of four mechanisms: disruption of osmotic forces in the intestine; disruption of normal secretory processes; disruption of epithelial cells or the epithelial tight junctions; or motility disorders. Oral rehydration therapy (ORT) is central to the management of acute diarrhea, and is sufficient to prevent complications due to dehydration in most patients while the disease runs its course. However, ORT has no effect on the duration of the disease or frequency of bowel motions, and any agent that could meet these needs would therefore be a useful addition to ORT. Diosmectite is a natural aluminomagnesium silicate clay with a lamellar, non-fibrous crystalline structure that gives it strong adsorbent properties. Its mechanisms of action are not yet fully understood, but are probably multiple. Diosmectite reduces inflammation, modifies mucus rheologic properties, inhibits mucolysis, and adsorbs bacteria, bacterial enterotoxins, viruses and other potentially diarrheogenic substances. A number of studies have shown that diosmectite reduces the duration of diarrhea and decreases the frequency of bowel motions after 2 days of treatment in children with mild-to-moderate acute diarrhea. Two recent trials have indicated a reduction in stool output with diosmectite. Because of its very favorable safety profile, with no serious adverse effects, diosmectite is frequently used, mainly in European countries but also in Asia and Africa. Diosmectite should be used as an adjunct, not an alternative, to ORT and, when needed, to antibacterial therapy.

  8. Antidiarrheal Activity of Aqueous Extract of the Stem Bark of Sapium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AESE, in a concentration-dependent manner, reduced the tone and amplitude of spontaneous contractions of the ileal smooth muscle with EC50 of 33.29 and 45.43 μg/ml, respectively. None of the doses used in acute toxicity test induced any significant behavioral changes or mortality. Conclusion: These results suggest ...

  9. Study of antidiarrheal and hematology profile of laboratory rat fed with yogurt containing local probiotic and purple sweet potato extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tari, A. I. N.; Handayani, C. B.; Hartati, S.

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of local probiotic in yogurt with purple sweet potato extract supplementation on the hematological parameters of albino rats (Spraque dawley). The study was conducted using a Completely Randomized Design with 30 rats divided into 6 groups. In group K-, rats were fed with distilled water from day 1 to 21. In group YTP, Rats were fed with yogurt without probiotics from day 1 to 21. YDP group was rats were fed with probiotic yogurt from day 1 to 21. In group YTP+E, rats were fed with yogurt without probiotic from day 1 to 7, interspersed with exposure to enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) on day 8 to 14. In group YDP+E, rats were fed with probiotic yogurt from day 1 to 7, interspersed by EPEC on day 8 to 24. In group K +, rats were fed with water from day 1 to 7, then fed with EPEC on day 8 to 14, after which water was given back on day 15 to 21. The result showed that probiotic yogurt treatment with supplement of purple sweet potato extract had a significant effect (P<0,05) on feces water content, number of erythrocyte, leucocyte, and hemoglobin. The treatment of YDP had water content in feces 48.422% and the number of erythrocyte, leucocytes, and hemoglobin were 8.578 106/μl, 14.152 106/μl and 13.98 g/dL respectively.

  10. Not any type of rice performs equally to improve lactose-induced diarrhea characteristics in rats: is amylose an antidiarrheal factor?

    OpenAIRE

    Felipoff,Ana Lia; Zuleta,Angela; Sambucetti,Maria Elena; Rio,Maria Esther

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness of different types of rice in relation to their ability to accelerate diarrhea recovering was evaluated in a rat model of osmotic diarrhea (OD). Animals (90-100 g) received protein free diet until reaching up to 20% weight loss, followed by lactose rich diet (LRD) to induce osmotic diarrhea. Rats presenting osmotic diarrhea were divided into 4 groups, which received lactose rich diet for 4 days from 8 am to 8 pm, and one of three experimental products containing 6% rice flou...

  11. Lack of oncogenicity of wood creosote, the principal active ingredient of Seirogan, an herbal antidiarrheal medication, in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuge, T; Shibata, T; Willett, M S; Turck, P; Traul, K A

    2001-01-01

    Seirogan, an herbal medicine containing wood creosote (tablets, 10.0% w/w), has been developed and marketed for almost a century in various countries for the control of acute diarrhea and treatment of associated symptoms, such as abdominal cramping. Wood creosote (CAS no. 8021-39-4) is a mixture of simple phenolic compounds, including guaiacol and creosol and related compounds, and is chemically distinct from, and should not be confused with, coal tar creosote, a known carcinogen. In the current study, the oncogenic potential of wood creosote was assessed in a 96/103-week oral gavage study in Sprague-Dawley rats. Groups of 60 rats/sex received wood creosote at dose levels of 20, 50, or 200 mg/kg body weight [bw]/day. An additional group of rats received the vehicle, 0.5% carboxymethylcellulose in deionized, distilled water, at the same dose volume as the treatment groups (10 ml/kg) and served as the controls. Treatment-related decreases in survival, body weight, and food consumption, as well as increased incidences of clinical signs that included rales, decreased activity, and salivation, were noted at 200 mg/kg bw/day when compared with the control group. There was an increased incidence of reddened and edematous lungs in rats from the 200 mg/kg bw/day group that died during the study. The lung findings were suggestive of test article aspiration during dose administration or agonal aspiration preceding and possibly resulting in death, especially because these observations were not seen in animals that survived to scheduled sacrifice. Additionally, phenols are generally recognized as having corrosive properties. There were no changes in clinical pathology and no increases in neoplastic or non-neoplastic lesions, excluding the lung findings, related to treatment with wood creosote at any dose level. Although the results of this study indicate that the maximum tolerated dose of wood creosote was met or exceeded at 200 mg/kg bw/day, there was no evidence of oncogenicity at any dose level. The lack of any evidence of oncogenicity supports the safety profile of the active ingredient in Seirogan, wood creosote.

  12. Impairment of Swimming Motility by Antidiarrheic Lactobacillus acidophilus Strain LB Retards Internalization of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium within Human Enterocyte-Like Cells▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa; Amsellem, Raymonde; Servin, Alain L.

    2011-01-01

    We report that both culture and the cell-free culture supernatant (CFCS) of Lactobacillus acidophilus strain LB (Lactéol Boucard) have the ability (i) to delay the appearance of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain SL1344-induced mobilization of F-actin and, subsequently, (ii) to retard cell entry by S. Typhimurium SL1344. Time-lapse imaging and Western immunoblotting showed that S. Typhimurium SL1344 swimming motility, as represented by cell tracks of various types, was rapidly but temporarily blocked without affecting the expression of FliC flagellar propeller protein. We show that the product(s) secreted by L. acidophilus LB that supports the inhibitory activity is heat stable and of low molecular weight. The product(s) caused rapid depolarization of the S. Typhimurium SL1344 cytoplasmic membrane without affecting bacterial viability. We identified inhibition of swimming motility as a newly discovered mechanism by which the secreted product(s) of L. acidophilus strain LB retards the internalization of the diarrhea-associated pathogen S. enterica serovar Typhimurium within cultured human enterocyte-like cells. PMID:21825295

  13. Impairment of swimming motility by antidiarrheic Lactobacillus acidophilus strain LB retards internalization of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium within human enterocyte-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa; Amsellem, Raymonde; Servin, Alain L

    2011-10-01

    We report that both culture and the cell-free culture supernatant (CFCS) of Lactobacillus acidophilus strain LB (Lactéol Boucard) have the ability (i) to delay the appearance of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain SL1344-induced mobilization of F-actin and, subsequently, (ii) to retard cell entry by S. Typhimurium SL1344. Time-lapse imaging and Western immunoblotting showed that S. Typhimurium SL1344 swimming motility, as represented by cell tracks of various types, was rapidly but temporarily blocked without affecting the expression of FliC flagellar propeller protein. We show that the product(s) secreted by L. acidophilus LB that supports the inhibitory activity is heat stable and of low molecular weight. The product(s) caused rapid depolarization of the S. Typhimurium SL1344 cytoplasmic membrane without affecting bacterial viability. We identified inhibition of swimming motility as a newly discovered mechanism by which the secreted product(s) of L. acidophilus strain LB retards the internalization of the diarrhea-associated pathogen S. enterica serovar Typhimurium within cultured human enterocyte-like cells.

  14. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Agents Antidiarrheal Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Pharmacologic, or drug, therapy is best ... Agents Antidiarrheal Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS ... Antibiotics Psychological Treatments Understanding Stress Cognitive Behavioral ...

  15. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... July 2017 Print Jump to Topic Medications for IBS Laxatives Anticholinergic/Antispasmodic Agents Antidiarrheal Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics Pharmacologic, ...

  16. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... atropine (Lomotil) Read more about antidiarrheal agents. Anti-anxiety medications – can be helpful for some people with ... treatment of IBS symptoms is not linked to depression, but rather likely to effects on the brain ...

  17. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... atropine (Lomotil) Read more about antidiarrheal agents. Anti-anxiety medications – can be helpful for some people with ... who specializes in motility or stress-related gastrointestinal disorders. More complex medication regimens, and specialized motility and/ ...

  18. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... With IBS Relationships and IBS Pregnancy and IBS Travel and IBS IBS Patients' Experience and Unmet Needs IBS and ... Agents Antidiarrheal Agents Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications Probiotics ...

  19. Traditional uses, phytochemistry and biological activities of Cotula ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cotula cinerea contains a wide range of phytochemical compounds such as saponins, essential oils, tannins, flavonoids, steroids, and terpenoids. This paper reviews information pertaining its traditional uses, phytochemistry and biological activities such as antibacterial, antifungal, antioxidant, herbicidal, anti-diarrheal and ...

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    This study was designed to evaluate the anti-diarrheal property of Juniperus procera using albino mice. An aqueous extract of J. procera leaves was administered to albino mice at 150, 300, and 450 mg kg-1 (p.o). Wet feces, intestinal accumulation (enteropooling) and intestinal motility were rec- orded. The aqueous extract ...

  1. 21 CFR 330.5 - Drug categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... MISBRANDED General Provisions § 330.5 Drug categories. Monographs promulgated pursuant to the provisions of... designated categories: (a) Antacids. (b) Laxatives. (c) Antidiarrheal products. (d) Emetics. (e) Antiemetics. (f) Antiperspirants. (g) Sunburn prevention and treatment products. (h) Vitamin-mineral products. (i...

  2. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 107 ... Vol 1, No 4 (2012), Anti-diarrheal activity of leaf extract of Juniperus procera and its effect on intestinal motility in albino mice, Abstract PDF. G Tafesse, Y .... Vol 5, No 3 (2016), Comparison of various staining techniques in the diagnosis of Coccidian parasitosis in HIV infection, Abstract PDF. A.A. Joseph ...

  3. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anti-Diarrheal Activity and Toxicity of Learng Pid Samud Recipe Abstract PDF · Vol 10, No 1 (2013) - Articles Acute and Subchronic Toxicity of Chantaleela Recipe in Rats Abstract PDF · Vol 10, No 2 (2013) - Articles Acute and chronic toxicity studies of the water extract from dried fruits of terminalia bellerica (gaertn.) roxb. in ...

  4. M.S. CHID AM BAR AM^.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    effect on fecal output in magnesium sulfate induced diarrhea in albino mice and the ... diarrhea. There are several potent antidiarrheal drugs in the modem system of medicine [6] that, however, on prolonged use do have some adverse effects [7]. A phenomenal increase in the .... E. Lebenthal, Chronic Diarrhea in. Children ...

  5. Sireeratawong et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2012) 9(4 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJTCAM

    Technology, Chiang Mai Rajabhat University, Chiang Mai, 50300 Thailand. ... Learng Pid Samud (LPS) recipe is a household remedy in the National List of Essential Medicines of Thailand, for ... anti-diarrheal activity (Rajkumar et al., 2011; Chengaiah et al., 2010; Meena et al., 2010; Rabbani et al., 2010; Sawangjaroen.

  6. Pharmacological basis for medicinal use of Ziziphyus nummularia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Ziziphus nummularia crude extract (Zn.Cr) was investigated for antidiarrheal activity (50, 100 and 300 mg/kg) in terms of reduction diarrhea droppings as well as for antisecretory activity (300 and 1000 mg/kg) in castor-oil induced model in mice. The effect of the extract on potassium chloride (KCl, 80 mM)-induced ...

  7. Genetic diversity in Satureja species determined by sequence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ANITA NAMAYANDEH

    genus of aromatic plants of the family Lamiaceae, subfam- ily Nepetoidae, and tribe Mentheae, related to rosemary and thyme. It is widely distributed in the Mediterranean area,. Asia and North America (Cantino et al. ... ditional medicine as a carminative, stomachic, antidiarrheal, and diuretic agent. S. bachtiarica has a ...

  8. Maytenus erythroxylon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formiga, Rodrigo de Oliveira; Quirino, Zelma Glebya Maciel; Diniz, Margareth de Fátima Formiga Melo; Marinho, Alexsandro Fernandes; Tavares, Josean Fechine; Batista, Leônia Maria

    2017-06-28

    To investigate the acute toxicity, phytochemical profile, antidiarrheal activity and mechanisms of action of Maytenus erythroxylon ( M. erythroxylon ) ethanol extract. A castor oil-induced diarrhea model was used to evaluate antidiarrheal activity. Intestinal transit and gastric emptying protocols were used to evaluate a possible antimotility effect. K ATP channels, nitric oxide, presynaptic α2-adrenergic and tissue adrenergic receptors were investigated to uncover antimotility mechanisms of action and castor oil-induced enteropooling to elucidate antisecretory mechanisms. All tested doses of the extract (62.5, 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg) possessed antidiarrheal activity, with a significant decrease of the evacuation index. This activity is possibly related to a reduced gastric emptying (125, 250 and 500 mg/kg) and to a decreased percentage of intestinal transit for all tested doses. That last effect seems to be modulated by nitric oxide, K ATP channels and tissue adrenergic receptors. Besides, the extract also presented antisecretory effect due to a decrease of intestinal fluid accumulation. The antidiarrheal effect of M. erythroxylon found in this study involves antimotility and antisecretory mechanisms that may be attributed to the chemical compounds found in this species: saponins, flavonoids, tannins, triterpenes and steroids.

  9. Inhibitory Effects of Two Varieties of Tunisian Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) Extracts on Gastrointestinal Transit in Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souli, Abdelaziz; Sebai, Hichem; Rtibi, Kais; Chehimi, Latifa; Sakly, Mohsen; Amri, Mohamed; El-Benna, Jamel; Marzouki, Lamjed

    2015-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether total and methanol juice extracts of two Tunisian Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) varieties (Garsi and Gabsi) protect against diarrhea as well as their effects on gastrointestinal transit (GIT) in healthy rats. In this respect, male Wistar rats were used and divided into control- and pomegranate-treated groups. The antidiarrheal activity was evaluated using the castor oil-induced diarrhea method and the GIT was assessed using charcoal meal. Our results showed that total and methanol P. granatum juice extracts produced a significant dose-dependent protection against castor oil-induced diarrhea. Pomegranate extracts and juice also decreased the GIT significantly and dose dependently. Importantly, the Garsi variety appeared to be more effective than the Gabsi variety on these two parameters. These findings suggest that pomegranate extracts have a potent antidiarrheal property in rats confirming their efficiency in the Tunisian traditional medicine.

  10. Influence of environmental factors on the concentration of phenolic compounds in leaves of Lafoensia pacari

    OpenAIRE

    Sampaio, Bruno Leite; Bara, Maria Teresa F.; Ferri, Pedro Henrique; Santos, Suzana da Costa; Paula, José Realino de

    2011-01-01

    Lafoensia pacari A. St.-Hil., Lythraceae, a plant from the Cerrado known as pacari or dedaleiro, is widely used as an antipyretic, wound healing, anti-inflammatory, antidiarrheal and in the treatment of gastritis and cancer. Notable among the metabolite groups identified in leaves of L. pacari are the polyphenols, such as tannins and flavonoids, related to the pharmacological activities of pacari. Studies on the influence of environmental factors over production of major groups of secondary m...

  11. Dual effectiveness of Flaxseed in constipation and diarrhea: Possible mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanif Palla, Amber; Gilani, Anwarul-Hassan

    2015-07-01

    This study was planned to assess pharmacological basis for the medicinal use of Flaxseed in constipation and diarrhea. The oil and mucilage of Flaxseeds were studied for their laxative, and antidiarrheal activities in mice. The mechanisms of laxative and antidiarrheal activities were further studied using the isolated tissue preparations (rabbit jejunum and guinea-pig ileum) immersed in Tyrode׳s solution maintained at 37°C and aerated with carbogen gas. Isotonic responses were measured on spontaneously contracting isolated jejunum and guinea-pig ileum preparations. Oral administration of Flaxseed oil (30 and 70mg/kg, orally) and mucilage (1 and 2.5g/kg, orally) caused dose-dependent increase in wet feces in mice. The spasmogenic effect of Flaxseed oil was partially blocked by pyrilamine (peffect of Flaxseed mucilage on isolated guinea-pig ileum. When studied for its antidiarrheal effect, Flaxseed oil reduced the castor oil-induced diarrheal score by 49.35% and 84.41% and intestinal secretions by 19% and 33.62% at the oral doses of 100 and 300mg/kg respectively. In isolated rabbit jejunum preparations, Flaxseed oil produced a dose-dependent inhibition of both spontaneous and low K(+) (25mM) -induced contractions in rabbit jejunum. The inhibitory effect against low K(+) was most sensitive to tetra-ethylammonium chloride, a non-specific K(+) channel blocker, followed by glibenclamide, a partial ATP-dependent K(+) channels blocker and 4-Aminopyridine, a voltage gated K(+)-channel blocker. Our results indicate that Flaxseed oil and mucilage exhibit laxative activity, mediated primarily through cholinergic pathway with weak histaminergic effect component evident in Flaxseed oil, which also showed antidiarrheal activity, mediated possibly through K(+) channels activation. Thus this study rationalizes the medicinal use of Flaxseed in both the constipation and diarrhea with sound mechanistic basis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. 2591-IJBCS-Article-Rokhaya Sylla Gueye

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    minéralogiques d'une argile provenant de Mbodiène (Sénégal), l'attapulgite, comparativement avec un médicament antidiarrhéique, constitué d'attapulgite, ... refroidissement et de climatisation (Chen et al., 2013). Les argiles ont été également .... 2000 tours/mn, 15 mn). Une solution de. HNO3 1M a été ajoutée au culot ...

  13. Therapy of Acute Intestinal Infections in Children: Proven Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Khaliullina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on questions of etiotropic, pa diarrhea in children. The recommendations are given with the basic principles of evidence-based medicine including summary data from randomized clinical trials and metaanalyses. The new lines of the treatment are discussed suchas the possibility of application of antiemetic, antidiarrheal, antisecretory, probiotic drugs in pediatric practice.

  14. Therapy of Acute Intestinal Infections in Children: Proven Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Khaliullina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on questions of etiotropic, pathogenetic, and symptomatic treatment of acute infectious diarrhea in children. The recommendations are given with the basic principles of evidence-based medicine including summary data from randomized clinical trials and metaanalyses. The new lines of the treatment are discussed such as the possibility of application of antiemetic, antidiarrheal, antisecretory, probiotic drugs in pediatric practice.

  15. Zinc treatment ameliorates diarrhea and intestinal inflammation in undernourished rats

    OpenAIRE

    de Queiroz, Camila AA; Fonseca, Said Gonçalves C; Frota, Priscila B; Figueiredo, Ítalo L; Aragão, Karoline S; Magalhães, Carlos Emanuel C; de Carvalho, Cibele BM; Lima, Aldo Ângelo M; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A; Guerrant, Richard L; Moore, Sean R; Oriá, Reinaldo B

    2014-01-01

    Background WHO guidelines recommend zinc supplementation as a key adjunct therapy for childhood diarrhea in developing countries, however zinc’s anti-diarrheal effects remain only partially understood. Recently, it has been recognized that low-grade inflammation may influence stunting. In this study, we examined whether oral zinc supplementation could improve weight, intestinal inflammation, and diarrhea in undernourished weanling rats. Methods Rats were undernourished using a northeastern Br...

  16. Prevention of secretory diarrhea by ethanol extract of Bistortae rhizoma through inhibition of chloride channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR and Ca2+-activated Cl- channel (CaCC represents an attractive approach for the treatment of secretory diarrhea. The aim of the study is to investigate the molecular basis of the anti-diarrheal effect of traditional Chinese herbal anti-diarrheal medicine Bistortae rhizoma. Fluorescence quenching assay indicated that the 40% methanol /water fraction (D5 dose-dependently inhibited both CFTR and CaCC function in transfected Fischer rat thyroid (FRT cells. Ex vivo studies indicated that D5 inhibited both forskolin (FSK-activated CFTR current and CCh-induced CaCC current in rat colonic mucosa. In the mouse closed-loop model, intraluminal application of D5 (200 µg/mL significantly reduced cholera toxin-stimulated fluid secretion. In the intestinal motility model, D5 significantly delayed intestinal peristalsis in mice. Our research suggests that CFTR and CaCC-mediated intestinal epithelial Cl- secretion inhibiting and gastrointestinal motility delaying may account for the anti-diarrheal activity of B. rhizoma.

  17. Solanum paniculatum root extract reduces diarrhea in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonh A.B. Tenório

    Full Text Available Abstract Solanum paniculatum L., Solanaceae, locally known as "jurubeba", is widely used in Brazil for culinary purposes, and in folk medicine to treat of diverse disorder including gastric dysfunctions. In this study we investigated the antidiarrheal activity of S. paniculatum roots extract in rats at different concentrations (125, 250 and 500 mg/kg, p.o using different experimental models such as castor oil-induced diarrhea, enteropooling and gastrointestinal motility, determined by in vivo experimental models. The major compound of root extract was characterized as chlorogenic acid based in the IR, 1D and 2D NMR analysis. All the extract doses achieved antidiarrheal potency, as indicated by reduced weight of feces in castor oil-induced diarrhea, decreased intestinal motility and significantly inhibited castor oil-induced enteropooling compared to the vehicle group. The highest dose (500 mg/kg produced greater anti-motility effect and better reduction of enteropooling, similar to the reference drug Loperamide (5 mg/kg. Extract from S. paniculatum L. roots had antidiarrheal activity, as shown by the lower weight of the feces as well as decrease in the accumulation of intestinal fluid and slower transit, justifying the traditional use of plant for diarrhea.

  18. Hojas de Psidium guajava L Psidium guajava L. leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Rodríguez Amado

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: la especie Psidium guajava L., se utiliza tradicionalmente como antidiarreico. Los pacientes rechazan la tintura 20% en las diarreas por su sabor desagradable. Objetivo: evaluar el estado del arte en la utilidad de los extractos de las hojas de esta especie. Métodos: se realizó una extensa revisión en bases de datos internacionales. Se revisaron las bases HighWire, DOAJ, EBSCO, Scielo, Scopus, Chemical abstract, Medline, PudMed, Pharmaceutical Abstract entre los años 1753 y 2012. Resultados: se reporta la composición química y existen ensayos preclínicos y clínicos que confirman actividad antidiarreica. No se reportan efectos tóxicos. Existen pocas formas farmacéuticas para esta especie. Conclusiones: las hojas de guayaba son inocuas. Hay que realizar más estudios para garantizar la eficacia. Se deben preparar otras variantes terapéuticas para su uso como antidiarreico.Introduction: the s Psidium guajava L. species (guava, is used traditionally as antidiarrheal. The patients reject the 20 % tincture because of its unpleasant flavor. Objective: to evaluate the state of the art in the usefulness of the guava leaf extracts. Methods: an extensive review of the national and international databases such as HighWire, DOAJ, EBSCO, Scielo, Scopus, Chemical abstract, Medline, PudMed Pharmaceutical Abstract from 1753 to 2012. Results: the chemical composition of the guava leaves was reported. There are preclinical and clinical assays that confirm their antidiarrheal effect. No toxic effects were reported. The pharmaceutical forms of this species are limited. Conclusions: the leaves of this plant are innocuous. It is necessary to conduct more studies to guarantee the effectiveness of this species. Other therapeutic variants of this species should be prepared to use them as antidiarrheal agents.

  19. Psidium guajava: A review on its potential as an adjunct in treating periodontal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, K.; Divyashree, P.

    2014-01-01

    Plants for thousands of years have been used to enhance health and for medicinal purposes. Psidium guajava is one which has an enormous wealth of medicinal value. It for long has been known for its anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antioxidant, antidiarrheal, antimutagenic properties. Despite of its widespread biologic uses there is a dearth of information on its therapeutic effect in the treatment of periodontal disease. Hence, this review is an attempt to highlight the potential of P. guajava in the treatment of periodontal disease. Internet databases PubMed, Google Scholar were searched and the most relevant articles were considered for review. PMID:25125881

  20. Small Bowel Review - Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABR Thomson

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant advances have been made in the study of the small bowel. Part I of this two-part review of the small bowel examines carbohydrates, including brush border membrane hydrolysis and sugar transport; amino acids, dipeptides, proteins and food allergy, with a focus on glutamine, peptides and macromolecules, and nucleosides, nucleotides and polyamines; salt and water absorption, and diarrhea, including antidiarrheal therapy and oral rehydration treatment; lipids (digestion and absorption, fatty acid binding proteins, intracellular metabolism, lipoproteins and bile acids; and metals (eg, iron and vitamins.

  1. Don'T miss gastrointestinal disorders in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putukian, M

    1997-11-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms in physically active persons can be caused by gut ischemia, dehydration, the use of tobacco and alcohol, medications, and certain foods and fluids. Exercise may also unmask underlying medical problems, the more serious being inflammatory bowel disease, ulcers, and malignancy. Athletes often ignore or are reluctant to talk about symptoms, so physicians must ask specific questions. Diagnosis requires checking orthostatic blood pressure to detect dehydration and conducting a thorough physical examination. Laboratory tests may include a complete blood count, iron studies, thyroid and occult-blood tests, and stool cultures. Treatment may include simple dietary or exercise modifications or medications. Antidiarrheal medications, however, may cause troublesome central nervous system side effects.

  2. Treatment of adult short bowel syndrome patients with teduglutide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørholk, Lærke Marijke; Holst, Jens Juul; Jeppesen, Palle Bekker

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Parenteral support is lifesaving in short bowel syndrome patients with intestinal failure (SBS-IF), who are unable to compensate for their malabsorption by metabolic or pharmacologic adaptation. Mutually, the symptoms of SBS-IF and the inconveniences and complications in relation...... to parenteral support may cause impairment of the quality of life of SBS-IF patients. Conventional treatments include dietary manipulations, oral rehydration solutions, antidiarrheal and antisecretory treatments. However, the evidence base for these interventions is limited, and treatments improving structural...

  3. Pre-travel advice at a crossroad: Medical preparedness of travellers to South and Southeast-Asia - The Hamburg Airport Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolling, Thierry; Mühlenpfordt, Melina; Addo, Marylyn M; Cramer, Jakob P; Vinnemeier, Christof D

    Specific travel-related recommendations exist for the prevention or self-treatment of infectious diseases contracted by travellers to the tropics. In the current study, we assessed the medical preparedness per these recommendations, focusing on whether travellers carried antidiarrheal and antimalarial medication with them stratified by type of pre-travel advice. We surveyed travellers departing from Hamburg International Airport to South or Southeast Asia, using a questionnaire on demographic, medical and travel characteristics. 975 travellers were analysed - the majority (817, 83%) being tourists. A large proportion packed any antidiarrheal medication (612, 63%) - most frequently loperamide (440, 72%). Only 176 of 928 (19%) travellers to destinations with low-to medium risk for malaria packed a recommended antimalarial medication. The majority (162, 17%) of them carried antimalarials as stand-by emergency treatment (SBET). 468 (48%) travellers had a pre-travel medical consultation. This lead to higher odds of carrying SBET- with the highest odds associated with a consultation at a travel medicine specialist (OR 7.83 compared to no consultation). Attending a travel medicine specialist was associated with better adherence to current recommendations concerning the carriage of stand-by emergency treatment of malaria. However, the proportion of travellers seeking pre-travel health advice was overall low in our population. Promoting pre-travel consultations may, therefore, lead to higher adherence to the current recommendations in travel medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Analysis and modeling of heat-labile enterotoxins of Escherichia coli suggests a novel space with insights into receptor preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Raja, M; Ghosh, Asit Ranjan; Vino, S; Sajitha Lulu, S

    2015-01-01

    Features of heat-labile enterotoxins of Escherichia coli which make them fit to use as novel receptors for antidiarrheals are not completely explored. Data-set of 14 different serovars of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli producing heat-labile toxins were taken from NCBI Genbank database and used in the study. Sequence analysis showed mutations in different subunits and also at their interface residues. As these toxins lack crystallography structures, homology modeling using Modeller 9.11 led to the structural approximation for the E. coli producing heat-labile toxins. Interaction of modeled toxin subunits with proanthocyanidin, an antidiarrheal showed several strong hydrogen bonding interactions at the cost of minimized energy. The hits were subsequently characterized by molecular dynamics simulation studies to monitor their binding stabilities. This study looks into novel space where the ligand can choose the receptor preference not as a whole but as an individual subunit. Mutation at interface residues and interaction among subunits along with the binding of ligand to individual subunits would help to design a non-toxic labile toxin and also to improve the therapeutics.

  5. Wood creosote inhibits calcium mobilization in Guinea pig colonic smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morino, Hirofumi; Ataka, Koji; Ito, Masafumi; Kuge, Tomoo

    2004-07-01

    Wood creosote, a mixture of simple phenolic compounds, has long been used as an herbal antidiarrheal medicine. Previous studies have shown that wood creosote has antimotility activity on the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, although its mechanism of action is not completely understood. The in vitro efficacy of wood creosote on calcium mobilization in guinea pig colonic smooth muscle was evaluated using a digital video camera system mounted on an inverted fluorescence microscope. The effects of wood creosote on spontaneous periodic increases in the free cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)), acetylcholine (ACh)-enhanced periodic increases in [Ca(2+)](i), and tetrodotoxin- or nifedipine-resistant spontaneous periodic increases in [Ca(2+)](i) were evaluated. Wood creosote decreased the amplitude of spontaneous (IC(50)=21 microg/ml) and ACh-enhanced (IC(50)=40 microg/ml) periodic increases in [Ca(2+)](i) in guinea pig colonic smooth muscle. Wood creosote also decreased the amplitude of both tetrodotoxin- and nifedipine-resistant spontaneous periodic increases in [Ca(2+)](i). These results suggest that antimotility activity through inhibition of Ca(2+) mobilization in the GI tract is at least partially responsible for the antidiarrheal activity of wood creosote. Wood creosote may exert its antimotility effect, at least in part, on network regions of interstitial cells of Cajal, which act as pacemaker cells and mediators of neurotransmission in the GI tract.

  6. Antigiardial Activity of Podophyllotoxin-Type Lignans from Bursera fagaroides var. fagaroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Filiberto; Puebla-Pérez, Ana María; González-Pozos, Sirenia; Hernández-Hernández, José Manuel; Pérez-Rangel, Armando; Alvarez, Laura Patricia; Tapia-Pastrana, Gabriela; Castillo-Romero, Araceli

    2017-05-13

    Giardiasis, a diarrheal disease, is highly prevalent in developing countries. Several drugs are available for the treatment of this parasitosis; unfortunately, all of them have variable efficacies and adverse effects. Bursera fagaroides has been known for its anti-inflammatory and antidiarrheal properties in Mexican traditional medicine. We investigated the in vitro anti-giardial activities of four podophyllotoxin-type lignans from Bursera fagaroides var. fagaroides , namely, 5'-desmethoxy-β-peltatin-A-methylether (5-DES), acetylpodophyllotoxin (APOD), burseranin (BUR), and podophyllotoxin (POD). All lignans affected the Giardia adhesion and electron microscopy images revealed morphological alterations in the caudal region, ventral disk, membrane, and flagella, to different extents. Only 5-DES, APOD, and POD caused growth inhibition. Using the Caco-2 human cell line as a model of the intestinal epithelium, we demonstrated that APOD displayed direct antigiardial killing activity and low toxicity on Caco-2 cells. This finding makes it an attractive potential starting point for new antigiardial drugs.

  7. Medicinal uses, chemistry and pharmacology of Dillenia species (Dilleniaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabandar, Carla W; Jalil, Juriyati; Ahmat, Norizan; Aladdin, Nor-Ashila

    2017-02-01

    The genus Dillenia is comprised of about 100 species of evergreen and deciduous trees or shrubs of disjunct distribution in the seasonal tropics of Madagascar through South and South East Asia, Malaysia, North Australia, and Fiji. Species from this genus have been widely used in medicinal folklore to treat cancers, wounds, jaundice, fever, cough, diabetes mellitus, and diarrhea as well as hair tonics. The plants of the genus also produce edible fruits and are cultivated as ornamental plants. Flavonoids, triterpenoids, and miscellaneous compounds have been identified in the genus. Their extracts and pure compounds have been reported for their antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, cytotoxic, antidiabetes, antioxidant, antidiarrheal, and antiprotozoal activities. Mucilage from their fruits is used in drug formulations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Diagnosis and Management of AIDS-related Diarrhea

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    John F Johanson

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of illness associated with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS has been increasing since the initial description in 1981. While virtually all organ systems may be affected, the gastrointestinal tract appears to be a major target. Diarrhea is the most common symptom, affecting up to half of all AIDS patients during the course of their disease. Although diarrhea occurs frequently, its optimal management remains controversial. An extensive evaluation including stool studies and endoscopic biopsies of both the colon and small intestine has been widely recommended to identify all potential pathogenic organisms. An alternative approach is a more limited evaluation consisting of stool and blood cultures followed by symptomatic treatment with antidiarrheal agents if no specific organisms are identified. The clinical presentation of the most common opportunistic pathogens are reviewed, including several recently discovered organisms. Recommendations for treatment are followed by a brief discussion of management strategies used to care for patients with AIDS-related diarrhea.

  9. Scientific basis for the therapeutic use of Cymbopogon citratus, stapf (Lemon grass

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    Gagan Shah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cymbopogon citratus, Stapf (Lemon grass is a widely used herb in tropical countries, especially in Southeast Asia. The essential oil of the plant is used in aromatherapy. The compounds identified in Cymbopogon citratus are mainly terpenes, alcohols, ketones, aldehyde and esters. Some of the reported phytoconstituents are essential oils that contain Citral a, Citral b, Nerol Geraniol, Citronellal, Terpinolene, Geranyl acetate, Myrecene and Terpinol Methylheptenone. The plant also contains reported phytoconstituents such as flavonoids and phenolic compounds, which consist of luteolin, isoorientin 2′-O-rhamnoside, quercetin, kaempferol and apiginin. Studies indicate that Cymbopogon citratus possesses various pharmacological activities such as anti-amoebic, antibacterial, antidiarrheal, antifilarial, antifungal and anti-inflammatory properties. Various other effects like antimalarial, antimutagenicity, antimycobacterial, antioxidants, hypoglycemic and neurobehaviorial have also been studied. These results are very encouraging and indicate that this herb should be studied more extensively to confirm these results and reveal other potential therapeutic effects.

  10. Plant profile, phytochemistry and pharmacology of Avartani (Helicteres isora Linn.): A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nirmal; Singh, Anil Kumar

    2014-05-01

    Plants are used as medicine since ancient time, in organized (Ayurveda, Unani & Siddha) and unorganized (folk, native & tribal) form. In these systems, drugs are described either in Sanskrit or vernacular languages. Avartani (Helicteres isora Linn.) is a medicinal plant which is used in several diseases. It is commonly known as Marodphali, Marorphali, Enthani etc. due to screw like appearance of its fruit. Avartani is used as a folk medicine to treat snake bite, diarrhoea and constipation of new born baby. In the research, antioxidant, hypolipidaemic, antibacterial and antiplasmid activities, cardiac antioxidant, antiperoxidative potency, brain-antioxidation potency, anticancer activity, antinociceptive activity, hepatoprotective activity, anti-diarrheal activity and wormicidal activity in this plant were reviewed.

  11. Plant profile, phytochemistry and pharmacology of Avartani (Helicteres isora Linn.: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal Kumar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Plants are used as medicine since ancient time, in organized (Ayurveda, Unani & Siddha and unorganized (folk, native & tribal form. In these systems, drugs are described either in Sanskrit or vernacular languages. Avartani (Helicteres isora Linn. is a medicinal plant which is used in several diseases. It is commonly known as Marodphali, Marorphali, Enthani etc. due to screw like appearance of its fruit. Avartani is used as a folk medicine to treat snake bite, diarrhoea and constipation of new born baby. In the research, antioxidant, hypolipidaemic, antibacterial and antiplasmid activities, cardiac antioxidant, antiperoxidative potency, brain-antioxidation potency, anticancer activity, antinociceptive activity, hepatoprotective activity, anti-diarrheal activity and wormicidal activity in this plant were reviewed.

  12. Melastoma malabathricum (L. Smith Ethnomedicinal Uses, Chemical Constituents, and Pharmacological Properties: A Review

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    S. Mohd. Joffry

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Melastoma malabathricum L. (Melastomataceae is one of the 22 species found in the Southeast Asian region, including Malaysia. Considered as native to tropical and temperate Asia and the Pacific Islands, this commonly found small shrub has gained herbal status in the Malay folklore belief as well as the Indian, Chinese, and Indonesian folk medicines. Ethnopharmacologically, the leaves, shoots, barks, seeds, and roots of M. malabathricum have been used to treat diarrhoea, dysentery, hemorrhoids, cuts and wounds, toothache, and stomachache. Scientific findings also revealed the wide pharmacological actions of various parts of M. malabthricum, such as antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory, wound healing, antidiarrheal, cytotoxic, and antioxidant activities. Various types of phytochemical constituents have also been isolated and identifed from different parts of M. malabathricum. Thus, the aim of the present review is to present comprehensive information on ethnomedicinal uses, phytochemical constituents, and pharmacological activities of M. malabathricum.

  13. Levels of Tannins and Flavonoids in Medicinal Plants: Evaluating Bioprospecting Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Clarissa Fernanda de Queiroz; Cabral, Daniela Lyra Vasconcelos; Peixoto Sobrinho, Tadeu José da Silva; de Amorim, Elba Lúcia Cavalcanti; de Melo, Joabe Gomes; Araújo, Thiago Antônio de Sousa; de Albuquerque, Ulysses Paulino

    2012-01-01

    There are several species of plants used by traditional communities in the Brazilian semiarid. An approach used in the search for natural substances that possess therapeutic value is ethnobotany or ethnopharmacology. Active substances that have phenolic groups in their structure have great pharmacological potential. To establish a quantitative relationship between the species popularly considered to be antimicrobial, antidiabetic, and antidiarrheal, the contents of tannins and flavonoids were determined. The plant selection was based on an ethnobotanical survey conducted in a community located in the municipality of Altinho, northeastern Brazil. For determination of tannin content was utilized the technique of radial diffusion, and for flavonoids, an assay based on the complexation of aluminum chloride. The group of plants with antimicrobial indications showed a higher content of tannins compared to the control groups. The results evidence suggests a possible relationship between these compounds and the observed activity. PMID:21969842

  14. Suspensión oral antidiarreica de Psidium guajaba, L.

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    Yamilet Irene Gutiérrez Gaitén

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Se efectuó la estandarización de la droga cruda de Psidium guajaba, L., así como el diseño y elaboración de una suspensión oral antidiarreica a partir de dicho material vegetal previamente secado y tamizado. En la estandarización de la droga cruda, se encontró que todos los parámetros de calidad evaluados estaban dentro de los límites establecidos por la Norma Ramal de Salud Pública (NRSP 308,1992. A la formulación diseñada se le determinó su estabilidad física, química y microbiológica, con resultados satisfactorios durante los 270 d de evaluación. Finalmente se desarrolló un estudio preclínico preliminar de la suspensión teniendo en cuenta las pruebas farmacológicas en ratas, y se obtuvo como resultado que la formulación presentaba efecto antidiarreico a las dosis de 3, 6 y 9 mg/kg de peso, bajo condiciones experimentales en los animales evaluados.The standarization of a raw drug from Psidium guajaba L. As well as the design and production of an oral antidiarrheal suspension from this plant after drying and sieving were carried out. It was found that all the assesed quality parameters were within the limits set the Public Health Branch Standard 308 of 1992. The physical, chemical and microbiological stability of the designed formulation was determined, with satisfactory results during 270 days of testing. Finally, a preliminary pre-clinical study was conducted, taking the pharmacological tests in rats into consideration, which resulted in the formulation having an antidiarrheal effect with doses of 3,6 and 9 mg per kg of weight under experimental conditions.

  15. Inhibitory effects of kratom leaf extract (Mitragyna speciosa Korth.) on the rat gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittrakarn, Somsmorn; Sawangjaroen, Kitja; Prasettho, Supaporn; Janchawee, Benjamas; Keawpradub, Niwat

    2008-02-28

    Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa Korth.) is an indigenous plant of Thailand used traditionally in folk medicine although it is claimed to cause addiction. It is used to treat diarrhea, however, there is no scientific evidence to support the use. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of methanolic extract of kratom leaves on the rat gastrointestinal tract. Kratom extract at 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg (p.o.) caused a dose dependent protection against castor oil-induced diarrhea in rats and also inhibited intestinal transit. The antidiarrheal effect was not antagonized by naloxzone. The inhibition of intestinal transit by kratom extract was significantly different from the control when treated with a single dose for 1 day. For longer-term treatments of 15 and 30 days, kratom extract did not decrease the intestinal transit time indicating that adaptation had occurred. Kratom extract at a dose level of 200 and 400 mg/kg for 30 days and morphine at 3 mg/kg (i.p.) caused a decrease in the increment of body weight that was significantly different from the control and kratom extract at lower doses (50 and 100 mg/kg). However it had no effect on the level of plasma cholecystokinin. The results suggested that methanolic kratom extract exhibited its antidiarrheal effect on rat gastrointestinal tract. The effects may occur via pathways in addition to the action on opioid receptors. High does of kratom extract decreased the increment of body weight similar to the effect of morphine.

  16. In vitro effects of wood creosote on enterotoxin-induced secretion measured electrophysiologically in the rat jejunum and colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuge, T; Venkova, K; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, B

    2001-06-01

    Secretory diarrhea occurs when the balance between intestinal absorption and secretion is disturbed by excessive secretion caused by enterotoxins produced by the pathogen. Wood creosote has long been used as a traditional antidiarrheal remedy. The goal of our study was to extend our knowledge about the antisecretory action of wood creosote against Escherichia coli enterotoxin-induced secretion in the small intestine and colon. Experiments were performed in mucosal sheets of rat jejunum and colon which were stripped of the external muscle layers to eliminate interactions with smooth muscle activity and local blood flow. Mucosal sheets were placed in modified Ussing chambers and hypersecretory conditions were induced by heat-labile (LT) or heat-stable (STa) E. coli enterotoxins added cumulatively (0.01-10 microg/ml) to the mucosal bathing solution. Intestinal secretion was monitored electrophysiologically as transmucosal short circuit current (Isc). LT induced a concentration-dependent increase in Isc in the rat jejunum, with no effect in the colon. In contrast, STa induced a significant increase in colonic Isc, without causing any change in Isc across the jejunum. In separate experiments the effects of increasing concentrations of wood creosote (0.1-50 microg/ml), added to the mucosal or serosal bathing solution, were examined against the secretory responses induced by LT or STa. In the small intestine the antisecretory activity of wood creosote against LT-induced secretion was more potent following serosal application, whereas in the colon wood creosote inhibited STa-induced secretion with equal potency following either serosal or mucosal addition. In summary, our findings demonstrate that wood creosote possesses antidiarrheal activity suppressing E. coli enterotoxin-induced secretion in both the small intestine and colon.

  17. BACILLUS COAGULANS EFFICIENCY IN TREATING ANTIBIOTIC-ASSOCIATED DIARRHEA IN IMMUNODEFICIENCY MICE

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    Nosalskaya T.N.,

    2016-06-01

    ; 5 - pathology immunosuppression + reference drug. Results and discussion. Laktovit Forte (BC showed pronounced Antidiarrheal effect - the effect was 75%, and in immunodeficiency conditions only 50%. The antidiarrheal effect of the drug based on comparison lactobacilli was 60% in both groups. Similar trends were observed in level of intestinal motility. The Laktovit Forte decreased high intestinal motility during pathology at 61%; in immunosuppression conditions - only 54%. Comparing the drug produced a less pronounced effect, but similar in the groups with and without immunosuppression - respectively 44.5 and 45.9%. BC effects differently under immunosuppressant conditions and without; indicating the importance of immune component in the mechanism of its action in antibiotic-associated diarrhea. The drugs based on comparison bacteria have less pronounced effect, indicating that its probiotic effects and the absence of immune system direct stimulation. The Laktovit Forte is also more effective in preventing body weight loss in animal than comparison drug on the background of the development pathology. For all studies indicates Laktovit Forte was significantly more effective than the drug on the other lactobacillus. Conclusion. Bacillus coagulans from Laktovit Forte provided antidiarrheal effect not only due to the antagonistic probiotic action, but also due to direct stimulation of the immune system.

  18. Rice Bran and Probiotics Alter the Porcine Large Intestine and Serum Metabolomes for Protection against Human Rotavirus Diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nealon, Nora Jean; Yuan, Lijuan; Yang, Xingdong; Ryan, Elizabeth P

    2017-01-01

    Human rotavirus (HRV) is a leading cause of severe childhood diarrhea, and there is limited vaccine efficacy in the developing world. Neonatal gnotobiotic pigs consuming a prophylactic synbiotic combination of probiotics and rice bran (Pro+RB) did not exhibit HRV diarrhea after challenge. Multiple immune, gut barrier protective, and anti-diarrheal mechanisms contributed to the prophylactic efficacy of Pro+RB when compared to probiotics (Pro) alone. In order to understand the molecular signature associated with diarrheal protection by Pro+RB, a global non-targeted metabolomics approach was applied to investigate the large intestinal contents and serum of neonatal gnotobiotic pigs. The ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry platform revealed significantly different metabolites (293 in LIC and 84 in serum) in the pigs fed Pro+RB compared to Pro, and many of these metabolites were lipids and amino acid/peptides. Lipid metabolites included 2-oleoylglycerol (increased 293.40-fold in LIC of Pro+RB, p = 3.04E-10), which can modulate gastric emptying, andhyodeoxycholate (decreased 0.054-fold in the LIC of Pro+RB, p = 0.0040) that can increase colonic mucus production to improve intestinal barrier function. Amino acid metabolites included cysteine (decreased 0.40-fold in LIC, p = 0.033, and 0.62-fold in serum, p = 0.014 of Pro+RB), which has been found to reduce inflammation, lower oxidative stress and modulate mucosal immunity, and histamine (decreased 0.18-fold in LIC, p = 0.00030, of Pro+RB and 1.57-fold in serum, p = 0.043), which modulates local and systemic inflammatory responses as well as influences the enteric nervous system. Alterations to entire LIC and serum metabolic pathways further contributed to the anti-diarrheal and anti-viral activities of Pro+RB such as sphingolipid, mono/diacylglycerol, fatty acid, secondary bile acid, and polyamine metabolism. Sphingolipid and long chain fatty acid profiles influenced the ability of HRV to

  19. A randomized double blind placebo controlled multicenter study of mesalazine for the prevention of acute radiation enteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resbeut, Michel; Marteau, Philippe; Cowen, Didier; Richaud, Pierre; Bourdin, Sylvain; Dubois, Jean Bernard; Mere, Pascale; N'Guyen, Tan D.

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: Symptoms of acute radiation enteritis (ARE), dominated by diarrhea, occur in more than 70% of patients receiving pelvic irradiation. Eicosanoids and free radicals release have been implicated in the pathogenesis. Mesalazine (5-ASA) is a potent inhibitor of their synthesis in the mucosa and could therefore be of some interest in preventing ARE. Patients and methods: The study was performed in six radiotherapy units in France who agreed on standardized irradiation procedures. One hundred and fifty-three patients planned for external beam radiotherapy to the pelvis ≥45 Gy for prostate (n = 97) or uterus (n = 54) cancer were randomized on a double blind basis to receive prophylactic 5-ASA (4 g/day Pentasa[reg]) or placebo. Patients with concomitant chemotherapy were excluded. Prostate and uterus cancers were chosen since these centropelvic tumors require a similar radiotherapy protocol during the first step of treatment and involve a comparable volume of small intestine. The symptoms of ARE and their severity were assessed every week during irradiation, and 1 and 3 months after its end. All patients followed a low fiber and low lactose diet. End points were diarrhea, use of antidiarrheal agents, abdominal pain, and body weight. Efficacy was evaluated using intention to treat. Results: (means ± SD) Groups did not differ for age (mean 64 ± 9 years), sex, tumor site, or irradiation procedure. During irradiation, diarrhea occurred in 69% and 66% of the 5-ASA and placebo groups, respectively (χ 2 , P = 0.22). Curves of survival without diarrhea did not differ between groups (logrank P = 0.09). Severity of diarrhea did not differ between groups except at d15 where it was significantly more severe in the 5-ASA group (ANOVA P = 0.006). Duration of diarrhea did not differ (22 ± 15 days in both groups, P = 0.88). Abdominal pain was less frequently reported in the 5-ASA group at d28 (34% vs. 51%, P 0.048). Use of antidiarrheal agents and body weight

  20. Rice Bran and Probiotics Alter the Porcine Large Intestine and Serum Metabolomes for Protection against Human Rotavirus Diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth P. Ryan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Human rotavirus (HRV is a leading cause of severe childhood diarrhea, and there is limited vaccine efficacy in the developing world. Neonatal gnotobiotic pigs consuming a prophylactic synbiotic combination of probiotics and rice bran (Pro+RB did not exhibit HRV diarrhea after challenge. Multiple immune, gut barrier protective, and anti-diarrheal mechanisms contributed to the prophylactic efficacy of Pro+RB when compared to probiotics (Pro alone. In order to understand the molecular signature associated with diarrheal protection by Pro+RB, a global non-targeted metabolomics approach was applied to investigate the large intestinal contents and serum of neonatal gnotobiotic pigs. The ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry platform revealed significantly different metabolites (293 in LIC and 84 in serum in the pigs fed Pro+RB compared to Pro, and many of these metabolites were lipids and amino acid/peptides. Lipid metabolites included 2-oleoylglycerol (increased 293.40-fold in LIC of Pro+RB, p = 3.04E-10, which can modulate gastric emptying, andhyodeoxycholate (decreased 0.054-fold in the LIC of Pro+RB, p = 0.0040 that can increase colonic mucus production to improve intestinal barrier function. Amino acid metabolites included cysteine (decreased 0.40-fold in LIC, p = 0.033, and 0.62-fold in serum, p = 0.014 of Pro+RB, which has been found to reduce inflammation, lower oxidative stress and modulate mucosal immunity, and histamine (decreased 0.18-fold in LIC, p = 0.00030, of Pro+RB and 1.57-fold in serum, p = 0.043, which modulates local and systemic inflammatory responses as well as influences the enteric nervous system. Alterations to entire LIC and serum metabolic pathways further contributed to the anti-diarrheal and anti-viral activities of Pro+RB such as sphingolipid, mono/diacylglycerol, fatty acid, secondary bile acid, and polyamine metabolism. Sphingolipid and long chain fatty acid profiles influenced the

  1. Psidium guajava leaf extract prevents intestinal colonization of Citrobacter rodentium in the mouse model

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    Pooja Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diarrheal diseases are the second highest cause of mortality of children under 5 years worldwide. There is a continuous search for developing a cost-effective treatment for diarrhea as the present ones are facing challenges. Medicinal plants can be explored further as an alternative treatment for diarrhea. Psidium guajava leaves have been used as an antidiarrheal globally. Citrobacter rodentium, a common mouse pathogen, is known to mimic the pathogenecity of enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic E. coli. It can thus present an effective model to study infectious diarrhea. In the present study, the P. guajava leaf extract was tested for its efficacy in treating infectious diarrhea using a C. rodentium mouse model. The mice in the test group (treated with P. guajava leaf extract showed quicker clearance of infection as compared with the control group. The bacterial load in the fecal sample of the mice in the test group was high on Day 4 as compared with that in the control group, suggesting a flush out of the bacteria. In the test group, 6/7 (85.71% mice showed clearance of infection by Day 19. The control group continued to show infection till Day 29. P. guajava leaf extract thus has the potential for use in the treatment of infectious diarrhea.

  2. Jatropha gossypiifolia L. (Euphorbiaceae): A Review of Traditional Uses, Phytochemistry, Pharmacology, and Toxicology of This Medicinal Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix-Silva, Juliana; Giordani, Raquel Brandt; da Silva-Jr, Arnóbio Antonio; Zucolotto, Silvana Maria; Fernandes-Pedrosa, Matheus de Freitas

    2014-01-01

    Jatropha gossypiifolia L. (Euphorbiaceae), widely known as “bellyache bush,” is a medicinal plant largely used throughout Africa and America. Several human and veterinary uses in traditional medicine are described for different parts and preparations based on this plant. However, critical reviews discussing emphatically its medicinal value are missing. This review aims to provide an up-to-date overview of the traditional uses, as well as the phytochemistry, pharmacology, and toxicity data of J. gossypiifolia species, in view of discussing its medicinal value and potential application in complementary and alternative medicine. Pharmacological studies have demonstrated significant action of different extracts and/or isolated compounds as antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antidiarrheal, antihypertensive, and anticancer agents, among others, supporting some of its popular uses. No clinical trial has been detected to date. Further studies are necessary to assay important folk uses, as well as to find new bioactive molecules with pharmacological relevance based on the popular claims. Toxicological studies associated with phytochemical analysis are important to understand the eventual toxic effects that could reduce its medicinal value. The present review provides insights for future research aiming for both ethnopharmacological validation of its popular use and its exploration as a new source of herbal drugs and/or bioactive natural products. PMID:25002902

  3. Traditional uses and pharmacological properties of Clerodendrum phytochemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Hui Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Clerodendrum is a genus of ca. 500 species in the family Lamiaceae and widely distributed throughout the whole world. Up to now, many species of this genus have been described in various indigenous systems of medicine and are used in preparation of folklore medicines for the treatment of various life-threatening diseases, and more than eleven species of the Clerodendrum genus have been very well studied for their chemical constituents and biological activities, and 283 compounds, including monoterpene and its derivatives, sesquiterpene, diterpenoids, triterpenoids, flavonoid and flavonoid glycosides, phenylethanoid glycosides, steroids and steroid glycosides, cyclohexylethanoids, anthraquinones, cyanogenic glycosides, and others have been isolated and identified. Pharmacological studies have shown that these compounds and extracts from the Clerodendrum genus have extensive activities, such as anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive, anti-oxidant, anti-hypertensive, anticancer, antimicrobial, anti-diarrheal, hepatoprotective, hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic, memory enhancing and neuroprotective, and other activities. In this review, we attempt to highlight over phytochemical progress and list the phytoconstituents isolated from the genus Clerodendrum reported so far. The biological activities of this genus are also covered.

  4. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of the edible medicinal halophyte Tamarix gallica L. and related polyphenolic constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksouri, Riadh; Falleh, Hanen; Megdiche, Wided; Trabelsi, Najla; Mhamdi, Baya; Chaieb, Kamel; Bakrouf, Amina; Magné, Christian; Abdelly, Chedly

    2009-08-01

    Tamarix gallica is a halophytic species having hepatotonic and stimulant properties, as it was traditionally used in the treatment of various liver disorders. Leaf and flower infusion have anti-inflammatory and anti-diarrheic properties. In this work, we have investigated antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of leaf and flower extracts and their phenolic composition. Results showed that flowers exhibit a higher antioxidant activity as compared to the leaves, IC(50) values of the flower extracts are being 1.3 (beta-carotene bleaching) to 19 times (lipid peroxidation inhibition) lower than those for leaves. Accordingly, flower extracts exhibited the highest total phenolic content (135.35 mgGAE/gDW) and RP-HPLC analysis showed that syringic acid, isoquercitin as well as catechin were the major phenolics. Furthermore, Tamarix extracts showed appreciable antibacterial properties against human pathogen strains. The mean inhibition zone was from 0 to 6.5mm when the concentration increased from 2 to 100mg/l. The strongest activity was recorded against Micrococcus luteus and the lowest activity was observed against Escherichia coli. Moreover, organ extracts show a weakly to moderate activity against the tested Candida. These findings suggest that Tamarix may be considered as an interesting source of antioxidants for therapeutic or nutraceutical industries and for food manufactures.

  5. Environmental degradation and its health implications for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiva, M

    1992-01-01

    Several types of environmental degradation and their philosophical implications are discussed in this essay. Environmental degradation causes chemicalization and degradation of the health of the body and harm to the soul and mind because of the resulting unmet needs of the many and the greedy consumption of the few. Degradation of the water supply is caused by overuse of water for cash crops, contamination of water by night soil, and improper disposal and piping of sewage. The resulting water-borne diseases, such as cholera, are then mistreated by giving children anti-diarrheal drugs that keep the germs in the body. Bottling of mineral water further reduces the supply for the poor. People should instead put bottles of water in the sun or use wood apple or drumstick seeds to purify water. Chemicalization of the environment has resulted in major disasters such as Mina inmates disease, the Bhopal disaster, the Bichri acid drinking water tragedy, crippling of youths in Karnataka by pesticide-poisoned crabs, and poisoning by use of pesticide containers for food. Usually those responsible go free, and socially conscious officers are fired. People have to protect themselves by taking such action as: recycling envelopes, eating non-processed foods, composting instead of burning leaves, and trying to get codes passed for baby food, drugs, vehicle emissions, and factory effluents.

  6. Functional nature of the spasmolytic effect, phytochemical composition and acute toxicity studies on Sauromatum guttatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabi Shah

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to study the functional nature of the potential spasmolytic effect of the crude extract of Sauromatum guttaum. It was found positive for the presence of alkaloid and tannins. In isolated rabbit jejunum preparation, S. guttaum caused inhibition of spontaneous and high K+ (80 mM-induced contractions, with respective EC50 values (95% confidence intervals of 1.50 mg/mL (0.69-3.02 and 1.17 mg/mL (0.81-1.61, similar to verapamil. Inhibition of high K+ -induced contractions suggests Ca++ antagonistic effect. The Ca++channel blocker activity of S. guttaum was confirmed when pre-treatment of the tissues with extract (0.3-3 mg/mL caused a rightward displacement in the Ca++ concentration-response curves. Moreover, in the acute toxicity test, S. guttaum was found safe up to the dose of 3 g/kg. The findings of the current study suggest that the S. guttaum exhibited spasmolytic activity, possibly mediated through inhibitory effect on Ca++ entry and was found safe and this current study provides first evidence to the potential use of this plant as antispasmodic and can play a possible role as antidiarrheal.

  7. Antimicrobial, anti-oxidant and calcium channel blocking activities of Amberboa divaricata

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    Shahid Muhammad Iqbal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Traditional healers in Pakistan use the herb Amberboa divaricata as tonic, aperiant, deobstruent, febrifuge, anti-diarrheal, antiperiodic, antipyretic, anti-cough and in skin disorders. In vitro tissue experiments were carried out on rabbit jejunum to elucidate the possible mechanism of its prescribed effects on gastrointestinal tract, while antibacterial and antioxidant experiments were performed to provide pharmacological evidence of its traditional use in skin disorders. The 70%methanolic crude extract of A. divaricata produced dose dependent relaxation in isolated rabbit jejunum tissue in a concentration range of 0.1–3.0 mg/mL (n=5. Calcium response curves were constructed at concen-tration of 0.03 and 0.1 mg/mL (n=5, which produced rightward shift in a pattern similar to that of verapamil, confirming the calcium channel blocking activity. Agar disc diffusion assay at a concentration of 10 mg crude extract/disc showed clear zones of inhibition.

  8. Essential oils from neotropical Myrtaceae: chemical diversity and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanello, Maria Élida Alves; Pascoal, Aislan C R F; Salvador, Marcos J

    2011-01-01

    Myrtaceae family (121 genera, 3800-5800 spp.) is one of the most important families in tropical forests. They are aromatic trees or shrubs, which frequently produce edible fruits. In the neotropics, ca. 1000 species were found. Several members of this family are used in folk medicine, mainly as an antidiarrheal, antimicrobial, antioxidant, cleanser, antirheumatic, and anti-inflammatory agent and to decrease the blood cholesterol. In addition, some fruits are eaten fresh or used to make juices, liqueurs, and sweets very much appreciated by people. The flavor composition of some fruits belonging to the Myrtaceae family has been extensively studied due to their pleasant and intense aromas. Most of the essential oils of neotropical Myrtaceae analyzed so far are characterized by predominance of sesquiterpenes, some with important biological properties. In the present work, chemical and pharmacological studies carried out on neotropical Myrtaceae species are reviewed, based on original articles published since 1980. The uses in folk medicine and chemotaxonomic importance of secondary metabolites are also briefly discussed. Copyright © 2011 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  9. Review of Finger millet (Eleusine coracana (L. Gaertn: A power house of health benefiting nutrients

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    Dinesh Chandra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The bulk of the world's millet crop is produced by India, Nigeria, Niger, Mali, Burkina Faso, Chad, and China. Finger millet (Eleusine coracana (L. Gaertn, little millet (Panicum sumatrense Roth ex Roem. & Schult., foxtail millet (Setaria italica (L. P. Beauvois and proso millet (Panicum miliaceum L. are most commonly found species among various millet varieties. In India, finger millet occupy the largest area under cultivation among the small millets. Finger millet stands unique among the cereals such as barley, rye and oats with higher nutritional contents and has outstanding properties as a subsistence food crop. It is rich in calcium (0.34%, dietary fiber (18%, phytates (0.48%, protein (6%–13% minerals (2.5%–3.5%, and phenolics (0.3%–3%. Moreover, it is also a rich source of thiamine, riboflavin, iron, methionine, isoleucine, leucine, phenylalanine and other essential amino acids. The abundance of these phytochemicals enhances the nutraceutical potential of finger millet, making it a powerhouse of health benefiting nutrients. It has distinguished health beneficial properties, such as anti-diabetic (type 2 diabetes mellitus, anti-diarrheal, antiulcer, anti-inflammatory, antitumerogenic (K562 chronic myeloid leukemia, atherosclerogenic effects, antimicrobial and antioxidant properties.

  10. Investigation of the Effect of the Degree of Processing of Radix Rehmanniae Preparata (Shu Dihuang on Shu Dihuangtan Carbonization Preparation Technology

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    Xianglong Meng

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbonization of Radix Rehmanniae Preparata (Shu Dihuangtan via stir-frying could increase its homeostasis maintaining and antidiarrheal effects. To ensure these pharmacological functions, the quality of the raw material (processed Rehmanniae Radix must be well controlled. Therefore, we analyzed the effects of different degrees of processing and adjuvants on processed Rehmanniae Radix (Shu Dihuang by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC chromatographic fingerprints, thermal gravimetric analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. Based on the results from HPLC fingerprints combined with similarity analysis (SA and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA the optimum processing method for Shu Dihuang was five cycles of steaming and polishing, which follows the ancient processing theory. The intensity of thermal weight loss rate peaked near 210.33 ± 4.32 °C or 211.33 ± 2.62 °C, which was an important indicator for the degree of processing of Shu Dihuang. A temperature near 290.89 ± 2.51 °C was the upper limit for carbonizing Shu Dihuangtan. FTIR spectroscopy analysis showed that the overall chemical composition of Shu Dihuangtan was affected by both the degree of processing and adjuvant, which are very important for its quality.

  11. Gastric Antiulcerogenic and Hypokinetic Activities of Terminalia fagifolia Mart. & Zucc. (Combretaceae

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    Paulo Humberto M. Nunes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The acute toxicity, the antioxidant activity, and the pharmacological activity on the gastrointestinal tract of rodents of the ethanolic extract (TFEE from the bark of Terminalia fagifolia Mart. & Zucc. (Combretaceae and of its aqueous (TFAqF, hydroalcoholic (TFHAF, and hexanic (TFHEXF partition fractions have been evaluated. TFEE presented low acute toxicity, antioxidant, and antiulcerogenic activity against ethanol-induced ulcers, which was partially blocked by pretreatment with L-NAME and indomethacin. It reduced the total acidity and raised the pH of gastric secretion. Additionally, TFEE delayed gastric emptying and slightly inhibited the small intestinal transit and also presented a weakly antidiarrheal activity. The antiulcerogenic and antioxidant activity were also detected in TFAqF and TFHAF but not in TFHEXF. The antisecretory and gastroprotective activity of TFEE partially involve the nitric oxide and prostaglandin participation. Nevertheless, TFEE, TFAqF, and TFHAF drastically reduced the mucus layer adhered to the gastric wall of rats treated with ethanol or indomethacin. Complementary studies are required in order to clarify the paradox of the presence of a gastroprotector activity in this plant that, at the same time, reduces the mucus layer adhered to the gastric wall.

  12. Aegle marmelos (L.) Correa (Bael) and its phytochemicals in the treatment and prevention of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath; Thilakchand, Karadka Ramdas; Rai, Manoj Ponadka; Rao, Suresh; Venkatesh, Ponemone

    2013-05-01

    Aegle marmelos, commonly known as Bael and belonging to the family Rutaceae is an important medicinal plant in the traditional Indian system of medicine, the Ayurveda. The extract prepared by boiling the bark, leaves or roots in water is useful as laxative, febrifuge, and expectorant. The extract is also useful in ophthalmia, deafness, inflammations, catarrh, diabetes, and asthmatic complaints. The fruits are used in treating diarrhea, dysentery, stomach ache, and cardiac ailments. Scientific studies have validated many of Bael's ethnomedicinal properties and its potential antimicrobial effects, hypoglycemic, astringent, antidiarrheal, antidysenteric, demulcent, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antipyretic, wound-healing, insecticidal, and gastroprotective properties. In addition, studies have also shown that Bael and some of the Bael phytochemicals possess antineoplastic, radioprotective, chemoprotective, and chemopreventive effects, properties efficacious in the treatment and prevention of cancer. For the first time, the current review summarizes the results related to these properties and emphasizes aspects that require further investigation for Bael's safe and effective use in the near future.

  13. Pharmacotherapy of Ebola hemorrhagic fever: a brief review of current status and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszanecki, Rafał; Gawlik, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 outbreak clearly showed that Ebola viruses (EBOV) remain a substantial threat for public health. The mainstay of management of patients with Ebola disease is isolation of patients and use of strict barrier nursing procedures; the present treatment strategies are mainly symptomatic and supportive (fluid resuscitation, antypyretics, antidiarrheal drugs). Currently, there is no approved therapy for Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF), however several advanced treatment options were tested in animal models (on non-human primates or rodents). They include use of both symptomatic (e.g. use of tissue factor inhibitors - rhNAPc2, rhAPC - to abolish coagulopathy) and specific antiviral approaches: e.g. monoclonal anti EBOV antibodies (ZMapp, MB-003), phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs), liposomes containing siRNA (LNP-siRNA:TKM-Ebola) and small molecule inhibitors (e.g. BCX4430, favipiravir). The scope of this article is to briefly review the most promising therapeutics for EHF, based on the data coming from rare clinical reports, studies on animals and results from in vitro models.

  14. [Diarrheal disease in the region of Marrakech, Morocco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourrous, M; Elmjati, H; Amine, M; El Omari, J; Bouskraoui, M

    2010-04-01

    Diarrhea is the second cause of child morbidity and mortality in Morocco after acute respiratory infection. Each child suffers from 4 to 8 episodes of diarrhea per year. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the knowledge as well as diagnostic and therapeutic practices of general practitioners regarding children presenting with diarrhea. Study was based on an epidemiologic survey using a written questionnaire completed by general practitioners in state-run hospitals in the Marrakesh (Tensift El Haouz) region. The anonymous questionnaire containing items on the epidemiological, clinical, laboratory, and therapeutic aspects was distributed in all 5 medical districts in the region. Analysis of reponses concerning therapeutic practices showed heavy reliance on oral rehydration that was prescribed by 98.2% of general practitioners. Dietary analysis was performed by only 24% of practitioners and blood/stool testing was not systematically ordered. Only 3% of practitioners recommended early resumption of feeding. However, data showed excessive use of additional laboratory tests (57.8%) and prescription drugs (48.8%). Overprescription mainly involved antiemetics and anti-diarrheals (77.7%). This study demonstrates an urgent need to develop a strategy to improve the quality of dietary management of diarrhea by general practitioners and rationalize prescription drug use. A continuing medical education program would be useful to increase the awareness of general practitioners and reduce child/infant morbidity and mortality relating to this disease.

  15. Crosstalk between Zinc Status and Giardia Infection: A New Approach

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    Humberto Astiazarán-García

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Zinc supplementation has been shown to reduce the incidence and prevalence of diarrhea; however, its anti-diarrheal effect remains only partially understood. There is now growing evidence that zinc can have pathogen-specific protective effects. Giardiasis is a common yet neglected cause of acute-chronic diarrheal illness worldwide which causes disturbances in zinc metabolism of infected children, representing a risk factor for zinc deficiency. How zinc metabolism is compromised by Giardia is not well understood; zinc status could be altered by intestinal malabsorption, organ redistribution or host-pathogen competition. The potential metal-binding properties of Giardia suggest unusual ways that the parasite may interact with its host. Zinc supplementation was recently found to reduce the rate of diarrhea caused by Giardia in children and to upregulate humoral immune response in Giardia-infected mice; in vitro and in vivo, zinc-salts enhanced the activity of bacitracin in a zinc-dose-dependent way, and this was not due to zinc toxicity. These findings reflect biological effect of zinc that may impact significantly public health in endemic areas of infection. In this paper, we shall explore one direction of this complex interaction, discussing recent information regarding zinc status and its possible contribution to the outcome of the encounter between the host and Giardia.

  16. In Vitro Antiviral Activity of Rubia Cordifolia Aerial Part Extract Against Rotavirus

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    Yuanyuan Sun

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The root of Rubia cordifolia (R. cordifolia has been used traditionally as a hemostatic agent, while the aerial part of the plant consisting of leaf and stem is known to exhibit anti-diarrheal properties and has been widely used as a remedy in many parts of China. As rotavirus is one of the most commonly associated diarrhea-causing pathogen, this study aims to investigate the anti-rotaviral effect of R. cordifolia aerial part (RCAP. The cytotoxicity of RCAP towards MA-104 cells was evaluated using the WST-8 assay. Colloidal gold method and real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR assay were used to confirm the findings of the antiviral assay. Then, 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI staining method was subsequently used to investigate the mode of death among the cells. And the representative components of aqueous extract were isolated and identified. It was shown that both the viability of MA-104 cells and the viral load were reduced with increasing concentration of the extract. DAPI staining showed that virus-induced apoptosis was the cause of the low cell viability and viral load, an effect which was accelerated with incubation in the aqueous herbal extract. The major compounds postulated to exhibit this activity were isolated from the aqueous herbal extract and identified to be compounds Xanthopurpurin and Vanillic Acid. This study showed that RCAP extract effectively inhibited rotavirus multiplication by promoting virus-induced apoptosis in MA-104 cells.

  17. Cachexia Syndrome, anorexia patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roldán, G.; Musé, I.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Two thirds of patients (ptes) cancer present slimming recognized a negative prognostic factor. Anorexia cachexia syndrome (SCA) results from the interaction of multiple factors and causes death of 22% of these patients. Nutritional support produces a moderate recovery weight without affecting the underlying metabolic disorders. Objectives: Conduct a review of current knowledge of the underlying pathophysiology and management the cachexia-anorexia syndrome in cancer patients. Designing indications possible policy interventions in the management of these patients. Method: Performed an a literature review on SCA. Conclusions: We identify patients at risk for early implementation of non-pharmacological measures preventive. The control side effects to treatment oncospecific with particular attention to the need for antiemetics, laxatives / antidiarrheal control dental and proper pain management is fundamental. Keep track enteral is a priority. In those with swallowing disorders or dysphagia, nasogastric feeding tube should be considered early. Indications for gastrostomy / jejunostomy and total parenteral nutrition (TPN) are very limited. The NPT is a complementary treatment maneuver a temporary and reversible complication, in order to prevent deterioration

  18. Evaluation of antinociceptive activity of aqueous extract of bark of psidium guajava in albino rats and albino mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, N Chandra; Jayasree, T; Ubedulla, Shaikh; Dixit, Rohit; V S, Manohar; J, Shankar

    2014-09-01

    Psidium guajava is commonly known as guava. Psidium guajava is a medium sized tree belonging to the family Myrtaceae found throughout the tropics. All the parts of the plant, the leaves, followed by the fruits, bark and the roots are used in traditional medicine. The traditional uses of the plant are Antidiarrheal, Antimicrobial Activity, Antimalarial/Antiparasitic Activity, Antitussive and antihyperglycaemic. Leaves are used as Anti-inflammatory, Analgesic and Antinociceptive effects. To evaluate the antinociceptive activity of aqueous extract of bark of Psidium guajava in albino rats with that of control and standard analgesic drugs aspirin and tramadol. Mechanical (Tail clip method) and thermal (Tail flick method using Analgesiometer), 0.6% solution of acetic acid writhing models of nociception were used to evaluate the extract antinociceptive activity. Six groups of animals, each consists of 10 animals, first one as control, second and third as standard drugs, Aspirin and Tramadol, fourth, fifth and sixth groups as text received the extract (100, 200, and 400 mg/ kg) orally 60 min prior to subjection to the respective test. The results obtained demonstrated that aqueous extract of bark of Psidium guajava produced significant antinociceptive response in all the mechanical and thermal-induced nociception models. AEPG antinociceptive activity involves activation of the peripheral and central mechanisms.

  19. Psidium guajava leaf extract prevents intestinal colonization of Citrobacter rodentium in the mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pooja; Birdi, Tannaz

    2015-01-01

    Diarrheal diseases are the second highest cause of mortality of children under 5 years worldwide. There is a continuous search for developing a cost-effective treatment for diarrhea as the present ones are facing challenges. Medicinal plants can be explored further as an alternative treatment for diarrhea. Psidium guajava leaves have been used as an antidiarrheal globally. Citrobacter rodentium, a common mouse pathogen, is known to mimic the pathogenecity of enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic E. coli. It can thus present an effective model to study infectious diarrhea. In the present study, the P. guajava leaf extract was tested for its efficacy in treating infectious diarrhea using a C. rodentium mouse model. The mice in the test group (treated with P. guajava leaf extract) showed quicker clearance of infection as compared with the control group. The bacterial load in the fecal sample of the mice in the test group was high on Day 4 as compared with that in the control group, suggesting a flush out of the bacteria. In the test group, 6/7 (85.71%) mice showed clearance of infection by Day 19. The control group continued to show infection till Day 29. P. guajava leaf extract thus has the potential for use in the treatment of infectious diarrhea. PMID:25878465

  20. Phytochemical characterization of essential oil from Ocimum selloi

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    LILIA A.S. MORAES

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Ocimum selloi Benth, a native plant of Brazil, has medicinal uses as anti-diarrheic, antispasmodic and anti-inflammatory product. The yield of essential oils of the inflorescences, containing flowers and seeds, was 0.6%, and the yield of leaves, collected in two different seasons, was 0.25% (June 2000 and 0.20% (January 2001, respectively. The essential oils of the inflorescences and leaves presented as major constituents trans-anethol (41.34%, 45.42%, 58.59% and methyl chavicol (27.10%, 24.14%, 29.96%.Ocimum selloi Benth, planta nativa do Brasil de uso medicinal, tem sido utilizada como antidiarréico, antiespasmódico e antiinflamatório. O rendimento dos óleos essenciais das inflorescências, contendo flores e sementes, foi de 0,6% e das folhas, coletadas em duas épocas do ano, foi de 0,25% (junho/00 e 0,20% (janeiro/01, respectivamente. Os óleos essenciais das inflorescências e folhas apresentaram como constituintes majoritários o trans-anethol (41,34%, 45,42%, 58,59% e methyl chavicol (27,10%, 24,14%, 29,96%.

  1. Cocos nucifera (L.) (Arecaceae): A phytochemical and pharmacological review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, E B C; Sousa, C N S; Meneses, L N; Ximenes, N C; Santos Júnior, M A; Vasconcelos, G S; Lima, N B C; Patrocínio, M C A; Macedo, D; Vasconcelos, S M M

    2015-11-01

    Cocos nucifera (L.) (Arecaceae) is commonly called the "coconut tree" and is the most naturally widespread fruit plant on Earth. Throughout history, humans have used medicinal plants therapeutically, and minerals, plants, and animals have traditionally been the main sources of drugs. The constituents of C. nucifera have some biological effects, such as antihelminthic, anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive, antioxidant, antifungal, antimicrobial, and antitumor activities. Our objective in the present study was to review the phytochemical profile, pharmacological activities, and toxicology of C. nucifera to guide future preclinical and clinical studies using this plant. This systematic review consisted of searches performed using scientific databases such as Scopus, Science Direct, PubMed, SciVerse, and Scientific Electronic Library Online. Some uses of the plant were partially confirmed by previous studies demonstrating analgesic, antiarthritic, antibacterial, antipyretic, antihelminthic, antidiarrheal, and hypoglycemic activities. In addition, other properties such as antihypertensive, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antioxidant, cardioprotective, antiseizure, cytotoxicity, hepatoprotective, vasodilation, nephroprotective, and anti-osteoporosis effects were also reported. Because each part of C. nucifera has different constituents, the pharmacological effects of the plant vary according to the part of the plant evaluated.

  2. A systematic review study of therapeutic effects of Matricaria recuitta chamomile (chamomile)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miraj, Sepide; Alesaeidi, Samira

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Matricaria recuitta chamomilla is a plant that grows and is cultivated in some parts of Iran. The aim of this study was to overview the therapeutic effects of this valuable plant. This systematic review was aimed to introduce Matricaria recuitta chamomile, its chemical compounds, and its traditional usages. Methods This review article was carried out by searching studies in PubMed, Medline, Web of Science, and IranMedex databases. The initial search strategy identified about 87 references. In this study, 69 studies were accepted for further screening and met all our inclusion criteria [in English, full text, therapeutic effects of Matricaria recuitta chamomilla L and dated mainly from the year 1990 to 2016]. The search terms were “Matricaria recuitta chamomilla L.,” “therapeutic properties,” “pharmacological effects.” Result It is commonly used for its antioxidant, antimicrobial, antidepressant, anti-inflammatory, antidiarrheal activities, angiogenesis activity, anticarcinogenic, hepatoprotective, and antidiabetic effects. Besides, it is beneficial for knee osteoarthritis, ulcerative colitis, premenstrual syndrome, and gastrointestinal disorders. Conclusion Matricaria recuitta chamomilla L. is widely used for therapeutic and nontherapeutic purposes that trigger its significant value. Various combinations and numerous medicinal properties of its extract, oil, and leaves demand further studies about other useful and unknown properties of this multipurpose plant. PMID:27790360

  3. Ethnobotanical, Ethnopharmacological, and Phytochemical Studies of Myrtus communis Linn: A Popular Herb in Unani System of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisay, Mekonnen; Gashaw, Tigist

    2017-10-01

    Myrtus communis L (Myrtaceae) is one of the popular drugs being used in the Unani system of phytomedicine since ancient Greece period. From time immemorial, different parts of this plant and essential oil have been used for a variety of purposes such as cosmetics (hair fall control), flavoring of food and drinks as well as extensive therapeutic purposes. Ethnobotanical information revealed that M communis L has been a folkloric repute for the treatment of several diseases like gastric ulcer, diarrhea, dysentery, cancer, rheumatism, hemorrhage, deep sinuses, leucorrhoea, hemorrhoid, inflammation, dyspepsia, anxiety, insomnia, diabetes, hypertension, pulmonary disorders, and skin diseases. Moreover, ethnopharmacological studies revealed that the plant is endowed with extensive pharmacological activities, including antimicrobial, antidiarrheal, antidiabetic, antispasmodic, vasodilator, antiulcer, antioxidant, anticancer, anxiolytic, sedative-hypnotic, and anti-inflammatory activities, among others. The plant has been known to contain phenolic acids, tannins, flavonoids, glycosides, and terpenes. The myrtle oil was also found to be rich in a variety of bioactive monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes with their derivatives. Most of these studies validate the aforementioned traditional claims of this medicinal plant. Further studies are needed to unravel other pharmacological activities of this plant in the long run.

  4. A modified inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire and the Vaizey Incontinence questionnaire are more sensitive measures of acute gastrointestinal toxicity during pelvic radiotherapy than RTOG grading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, Usman; McGough, Camilla; Hackett, Claire; Blake, Peter; Harrington, Kevin J.; Khoo, Vincent S.; Tait, Diana; Norman, Andrew R.; Andreyev, H. Jervoise N.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Simple scales with greater sensitivity than Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading to detect acute gastrointestinal toxicity during pelvic radiotherapy, could be clinically useful. Methods and Materials: Do questionnaires used in benign gastrointestinal diseases detect toxicity in patients undergoing radiotherapy? The patient-completed Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBDQ) and Vaizey Incontinence questionnaires were compared prospectively at baseline and at Week 5 to physician-completed RTOG grading. Results: A total of 107 patients, median age 63 years, were recruited. After 5 weeks of treatment, patients with gynecologic and gastrointestinal cancer were more symptomatic than urologic patients (p 0.012; p = 0.014). Overall, 94% had altered bowel habits, 80% loose stool, 74% frequency, 65% difficult gas, 60% pain, >48% distress, 44% tenesmus, >40% restrictions in daily activity, 39% urgency, 37% fecal incontinence, and 40% required antidiarrheal medication. The median RTOG score was 1 (range, 0-2), median IBDQ score 204.5 (range, 74-224), and median Vaizey score 5 (range, 0-20). Chemotherapy preceding radiotherapy increased fecal incontinence (p 0.002). RTOG scores stabilized after 3 weeks, IBDQ scores peaked at Week 4, and Vaizey scores worsened throughout treatment. IBDQ and Vaizey scores distinguished between groups with different RTOG scores. Conclusion: The IBDQ and Vaizey questionnaires are reliable and sensitive, offering greater insight into the severity and range of symptoms compared with RTOG grading

  5. Medicinal Properties ofAdiantum capillus-venerisLinn. in Traditional Medicine and Modern Phytotherapy: A Review Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehdari, Sahar; Hajimehdipoor, Homa

    2018-02-01

    Adiantum capillus-veneris Linn (Maidenhair fern) is an herb belonging to the family Pteridaceae. It is named as " Pare-siavashan " in medical and pharmaceutical textbooks of Iranian Traditional Medicine. The fronds of Maidenhair fern were mainly administrated by ancient physicians as single medicine or in combination with other plants in multi-herbal formulations for curing different diseases. Because of different chemical compositions, the herb fronds were also assessed for its numerous pharmacological effects. Therefore, the current study was done to review the traditional usage and modern pharmacological and toxicological effects of Maidenhair fern. Scientific databases and publications including Web of Science, PubMed, Scopus, Science direct, Cochrane Library, SID (for Persian papers) and medical and pharmaceutical textbooks of traditional medicine as well were searched for " Adiantum capillus-veneris ", " Maidenhair fern " and " Pare-siavashan " without limitation up to 2016. Maidenhair fern exhibited to possess anti-diabetic, anticonvulsant, analgesic, hypocholesterolemic, goitrogenic, anti-thyroidal, antibacterial, antifungal, wound healing, antiobesity, anti hair loss, anti-asthmatic, anti-inflammatory, antidiarrheal and antispasmodic, antioxidant as well as diuretic, anti-urolithiatic and detoxifying effects in modern medicine. Ancient physicians declared some of the confirmed pharmacological effects. Maidenhair fern frond can be a good candidate for clinical purpose. Therefore, future researches on the other mentioned effects in traditional medicine are recommended.

  6. Toward modulation of the endocannabinoid system for treatment of gastrointestinal disease: FAAHster but not "higher".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Y; Bashashati, M; Andrews, C N

    2014-04-01

    Cannabis has been used to treat various afflictions throughout the centuries, including nausea, vomiting, and pain. It has also been used recreationally for its psychotropic properties, which can include a pleasurable 'high' feeling and a decrease in anxiety and tension; however, other may experience dysphoria. Changes in cognition and psychomotor performance are also well-known with cannabis use. In recent years, our understanding of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) has progressed dramatically; the objective of identifying agents which may allow modulation of the ECS without significant psychotropic side effects may be possible. Inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), an important enzyme for the degradation of anandamide and other endogenous cannabinoids, is a promising target to achieve this goal. In this issue of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Fichna and colleagues report on a novel selective FAAH inhibitor, PF-3845, with potent antinociceptive and antidiarrheal effects in a mouse model. In this context, we briefly review the components of the ECS, discuss pharmacologic targets for indirect cannabinoid receptor stimulation, and describe recent research with cannabinoids for gut disorders. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Rubus fruticosus L.: constituents, biological activities and health related uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zia-Ul-Haq, Muhammad; Riaz, Muhammad; De Feo, Vincenzo; Jaafar, Hawa Z E; Moga, Marius

    2014-07-28

    Rubus fruticosus L. is a shrub famous for its fruit called blackberry fruit or more commonly blackberry. The fruit has medicinal, cosmetic and nutritive value. It is a concentrated source of valuable nutrients, as well as bioactive constituents of therapeutic interest highlighting its importance as a functional food. Besides use as a fresh fruit, it is also used as ingredient in cooked dishes, salads and bakery products like jams, snacks, desserts, and fruit preserves. R. fruticosus contains vitamins, steroids and lipids in seed oil and minerals, flavonoids, glycosides, terpenes, acids and tannins in aerial parts that possess diverse pharmacological activities such as antioxidant, anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial anti-diabetic, anti-diarrheal, and antiviral. Various agrogeoclimatological factors like cultivar, environmental conditions of the area, agronomic practices employed, harvest time, post-harvest storage and processing techniques all influence the nutritional composition of blackberry fruit. This review focuses on the nutrients and chemical constituents as well as medicinal properties of different parts of R. fruticosus. Various cultivars and their physicochemical characteristics, polyphenolic content and ascorbic acid content are also discussed. The information in the present work will serve as baseline data and may lead to new biomedical applications of R. fruticosus as functional food.

  8. Rubus Fruticosus L.: Constituents, Biological Activities and Health Related Uses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zia-Ul-Haq

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rubus fruticosus L. is a shrub famous for its fruit called blackberry fruit or more commonly blackberry. The fruit has medicinal, cosmetic and nutritive value. It is a concentrated source of valuable nutrients, as well as bioactive constituents of therapeutic interest highlighting its importance as a functional food. Besides use as a fresh fruit, it is also used as ingredient in cooked dishes, salads and bakery products like jams, snacks, desserts, and fruit preserves. R. fruticosus contains vitamins, steroids and lipids in seed oil and minerals, flavonoids, glycosides, terpenes, acids and tannins in aerial parts that possess diverse pharmacological activities such as antioxidant, anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial anti-diabetic, anti-diarrheal, and antiviral. Various agrogeoclimatological factors like cultivar, environmental conditions of the area, agronomic practices employed, harvest time, post-harvest storage and processing techniques all influence the nutritional composition of blackberry fruit. This review focuses on the nutrients and chemical constituents as well as medicinal properties of different parts of R. fruticosus. Various cultivars and their physicochemical characteristics, polyphenolic content and ascorbic acid content are also discussed. The information in the present work will serve as baseline data and may lead to new biomedical applications of R. fruticosus as functional food.

  9. New insights in insect prey choice by chimpanzees and gorillas in southeast Cameroon: the role of nutritional value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deblauwe, Isra; Janssens, Geert P J

    2008-01-01

    The insect diet of chimpanzees and gorillas living at the northern periphery of the Dja Biosphere Reserve in southeast Cameroon and its nutritional contribution is described. We analyzed fecal samples and recorded additional evidence of insectivory. A detailed prey species list is presented for both apes. We carried out nutritional analyses (macronutrients, macro- and micro-minerals) on 11 important and eight nonimportant, but accessible, ant and termite prey species, and estimated the average nutrient intake/day through insects. Although gorillas ate insects more frequently, the average prey biomass intake/day by chimpanzees was twice that by gorillas. The lack of tool-use by gorillas cannot be the main reason for the small overlap of important prey species. Both apes did not seem to consume ant prey for one or more specific nutrients. Also other factors, such as medicinal use, should be considered. Termites, on the other hand, seemed to be selected for particular nutrients. Gorilla intake of the important termite prey, Cubitermes and Thoracotermes, met with estimated iron requirements. Their potential role as antidiarrheal treatment is as yet unclear. Chimpanzee intake of the important termite prey, Macrotermes spp., met with estimated manganese requirements and the protein intake/day (mean: 2 g/d) reached significant values (>20 g/d). To fully understand the importance of nutritional contributions of insects to ape diets in Cameroon, the chemical composition and nutrient intake of fruit and foliage in their diets should be investigated. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Analgesic effects of various extracts of the root of Abutilon indicum linn

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    Naveen Goyal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Abutilon indicum (Linn. sweet (Malvaceae commonly called ′Country Mallow′ is a perennial plant up to 3 m in height. It is abundantly found as a weed in the sub-Himalayan tract and in the hotter parts of India. The plant is traditionally used for treatment of several diseases like bronchitis, body ache, toothache, jaundice, diabetes, fever, piles, leprosy, ulcers, cystitis, gonorrhea, diarrhea, and so on. Abutilon indicum Linn. is reported to have hepatoprotective, hypoglycemic, antimicrobial, male contraceptive, and antidiarrheal activities. The present study was done to evaluate the analgesic potential of various extracts of the root of Abutilon indicum Linn. Materials and Methods : The powdered root (900 g was subjected to successive solvent extraction, with solvents in increasing order of polarity, namely, petroleum ether (60 - 80΀C, methanol, and ethanol, using the soxhlet apparatus for 72 hours. The marc was extracted by cold maceration for 72 hours, to obtain a water-soluble extract. The peripheral analgesic activity was studied using acetic acid-induced writhing method in Swiss albino mice (20 - 30 g, while the central analgesic activity was evaluated by the tail flick method and the tail immersion method. Results : Results indicated that all the tested extracts, except the methanol extract, exhibited significant analgesic activity in both animals′ models. Petroleum ether extract showed higher analgesic activity. The activity may be related to the central mechanism or may be due to the peripheral analgesic mechanisms. Conclusion : The present study authenticates the traditional use.

  11. A review on therapeutic potential of Nigella sativa: A miracle herb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Aftab; Husain, Asif; Mujeeb, Mohd; Khan, Shah Alam; Najmi, Abul Kalam; Siddique, Nasir Ali; Damanhouri, Zoheir A.; Anwar, Firoz

    2013-01-01

    Nigella sativa (N. sativa) (Family Ranunculaceae) is a widely used medicinal plant throughout the world. It is very popular in various traditional systems of medicine like Unani and Tibb, Ayurveda and Siddha. Seeds and oil have a long history of folklore usage in various systems of medicines and food. The seeds of N. sativa have been widely used in the treatment of different diseases and ailments. In Islamic literature, it is considered as one of the greatest forms of healing medicine. It has been recommended for using on regular basis in Tibb-e-Nabwi (Prophetic Medicine). It has been widely used as antihypertensive, liver tonics, diuretics, digestive, anti-diarrheal, appetite stimulant, analgesics, anti-bacterial and in skin disorders. Extensive studies on N. sativa have been carried out by various researchers and a wide spectrum of its pharmacological actions have been explored which may include antidiabetic, anticancer, immunomodulator, analgesic, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, spasmolytic, bronchodilator, hepato-protective, renal protective, gastro-protective, antioxidant properties, etc. Due to its miraculous power of healing, N. sativa has got the place among the top ranked evidence based herbal medicines. This is also revealed that most of the therapeutic properties of this plant are due to the presence of thymoquinone which is major bioactive component of the essential oil. The present review is an effort to provide a detailed survey of the literature on scientific researches of pharmacognostical characteristics, chemical composition and pharmacological activities of the seeds of this plant. PMID:23646296

  12. Radiolabelling of cholera toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, R.G.; Neves, Nicoli M.J.; Abdalla, L.F.; Brandao, R.L.; Etchehebehere, L.; Lima, M.E. de; Nicoli, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Binding of cholera toxin to ganglioside receptors of enterocyte microvilli catalyzes the activation of adenylate cyclase causing a rise in cAMP which final result is a copious diarrhea. Saccharomyces boulardii, a nonpathogenic yeast has been used to prevent diarrhea. Although the antidiarrheic properties of S. boulardii are widely recognized, this yeast has been used on empirical basis, and the mechanism of this protective effect is unknown. The addition of cholera toxin to S. boulardii induces the raising of cAMP that triggers the activation of neutral trehalase. This suggests that toxin specifically binding to cells, is internalized and active the protein phosphorylation cascade. Our objective is labeling the cholera toxin to verify the presence of binding sites on yeast cell surfaces for the cholera toxin. Cholera toxin was radiolabelled with Na 125 I by a chloramine-T method modified from Cuatrecasas and Griffiths et alii. The 125 I-Cholera toxin showed a specific radioactivity at about 1000 cpm/fmol toxin. Biological activity of labeled cholera toxin measured by trehalase activation was similar to the native toxin. (author)

  13. Radiolabelling of cholera toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, R.G.; Neves, Nicoli M.J. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Abdalla, L.F.; Brandao, R.L.; Etchehebehere, L. [Ouro Preto Univ., MG (Brazil). Escola de Farmacia. Lab. de Fisiologia e Bioquimica de Microorganismos; Lima, M.E. de [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biologicas. Dept. de Bioquimica e Imunologia; Nicoli, J.R. [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biologicas. Dept. de Microbiologia

    1999-11-01

    Binding of cholera toxin to ganglioside receptors of enterocyte microvilli catalyzes the activation of adenylate cyclase causing a rise in cAMP which final result is a copious diarrhea. Saccharomyces boulardii, a nonpathogenic yeast has been used to prevent diarrhea. Although the antidiarrheic properties of S. boulardii are widely recognized, this yeast has been used on empirical basis, and the mechanism of this protective effect is unknown. The addition of cholera toxin to S. boulardii induces the raising of cAMP that triggers the activation of neutral trehalase. This suggests that toxin specifically binding to cells, is internalized and active the protein phosphorylation cascade. Our objective is labeling the cholera toxin to verify the presence of binding sites on yeast cell surfaces for the cholera toxin. Cholera toxin was radiolabelled with Na {sup 125} I by a chloramine-T method modified from Cuatrecasas and Griffiths et alii. The {sup 125} I-Cholera toxin showed a specific radioactivity at about 1000 cpm/fmol toxin. Biological activity of labeled cholera toxin measured by trehalase activation was similar to the native toxin. (author) 5 refs., 3 figs.; e-mail: nevesmj at urano.cdtn.br

  14. Jatropha gossypiifolia L. (Euphorbiaceae: A Review of Traditional Uses, Phytochemistry, Pharmacology, and Toxicology of This Medicinal Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Félix-Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha gossypiifolia L. (Euphorbiaceae, widely known as “bellyache bush,” is a medicinal plant largely used throughout Africa and America. Several human and veterinary uses in traditional medicine are described for different parts and preparations based on this plant. However, critical reviews discussing emphatically its medicinal value are missing. This review aims to provide an up-to-date overview of the traditional uses, as well as the phytochemistry, pharmacology, and toxicity data of J. gossypiifolia species, in view of discussing its medicinal value and potential application in complementary and alternative medicine. Pharmacological studies have demonstrated significant action of different extracts and/or isolated compounds as antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antidiarrheal, antihypertensive, and anticancer agents, among others, supporting some of its popular uses. No clinical trial has been detected to date. Further studies are necessary to assay important folk uses, as well as to find new bioactive molecules with pharmacological relevance based on the popular claims. Toxicological studies associated with phytochemical analysis are important to understand the eventual toxic effects that could reduce its medicinal value. The present review provides insights for future research aiming for both ethnopharmacological validation of its popular use and its exploration as a new source of herbal drugs and/or bioactive natural products.

  15. Antispasmodic and bronchodilator activities of Artemisia vulgaris are mediated through dual blockade of muscarinic receptors and calcium influx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arif-ullah; Gilani, Anwarul Hassan

    2009-12-10

    The present study describes antispasmodic, antidiarrheal, bronchodilatory and tracheo-relaxant activities of Artemisia vulgaris to rationalize some of its traditional uses. Crude extract of Artemisia vulgaris (Av.Cr) was studied in the isolated tissue preparations of rabbit jejunum and guinea-pig trachea, as well as in the in vivo castor oil-induced diarrhea and bronchodilatory techniques. Av.Cr which tested positive for alkaloids, coumarins, flavonoids, saponins, sterols, tannins and terpenes caused concentration-dependent (0.03-10mg/mL) relaxation of jejunum spontaneous contractions. Av.Cr inhibited the carbachol (CCh, 1 microM) and K(+) (80 mM)-induced contractions in a pattern, similar to that of dicyclomine. Av.Cr shifted the Ca(2+) concentration-response curves to right, like that caused by verapamil and dicyclomine. Av.Cr produced rightward parallel shift in CCh-curves, followed by non-parallel shift at higher concentration with the suppression of the maximum response, similar to that caused by dicyclomine. It exhibited protective effect against castor oil-induced diarrhea and CCh-mediated bronchoconstriction in rodents. In trachea, Av.Cr relaxed the CCh (1 microM) and K(+) (80 mM)-induced contractions and shifted the CCh-curves to right. These results indicate that Artemisia vulgaris exhibits combination of anticholinergic and Ca(2+) antagonist mechanisms, which provides pharmacological basis for its folkloric use in the hyperactive gut and airways disorders, such as abdominal colic, diarrhea and asthma.

  16. Antiulcerogenic Activity and Toxicity of Bauhinia holophylla Hydroalcoholic Extract

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    A. L. Rozza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Several species of Bauhinia are used in traditional medicine for the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases, diabetes, and inflammation, among other conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the antiulcer effect of a hydroalcoholic extract from the leaves of B. holophylla. The chemical profile of the extract was determined by HPLC-PAD-ESI-IT-MS. A dose-effect relation was constructed using the ethanol-induced gastric ulcer model in male Wistar rats. Histological analyses and studies of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities were performed in stomach samples. The involvement of SH compounds, NO, K+ATP channels, and α2-adrenergic receptors in the gastroprotective effect was evaluated. A toxicity study was performed with a single oral dose of 5000 mg/kg. The extract was composed mainly of cyanoglucoside and flavonol-O-glycosides derivatives of quercetin and myricetin. SH compounds, NO release, K+ATP channel activation, and presynaptic α2-adrenergic receptor stimulation each proved to be involved in the antiulcer effect. The levels of GSH and activity of GR and GPx were increased, and the levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 were modulated. There was an antidiarrheal effect and there were no signs of toxicity. B. holophylla presents antiulcer activity mainly by decreasing oxidative stress and attenuating the inflammatory response, without inducing side effects.

  17. Antiulcerogenic Activity and Toxicity of Bauhinia holophylla Hydroalcoholic Extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozza, A L; Cesar, D A S; Pieroni, L G; Saldanha, L L; Dokkedal, A L; De-Faria, F M; Souza-Brito, A R M; Vilegas, W; Takahira, R K; Pellizzon, C H

    2015-01-01

    Several species of Bauhinia are used in traditional medicine for the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases, diabetes, and inflammation, among other conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the antiulcer effect of a hydroalcoholic extract from the leaves of B. holophylla. The chemical profile of the extract was determined by HPLC-PAD-ESI-IT-MS. A dose-effect relation was constructed using the ethanol-induced gastric ulcer model in male Wistar rats. Histological analyses and studies of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities were performed in stomach samples. The involvement of SH compounds, NO, K(+) ATP channels, and α 2-adrenergic receptors in the gastroprotective effect was evaluated. A toxicity study was performed with a single oral dose of 5000 mg/kg. The extract was composed mainly of cyanoglucoside and flavonol-O-glycosides derivatives of quercetin and myricetin. SH compounds, NO release, K(+) ATP channel activation, and presynaptic α 2-adrenergic receptor stimulation each proved to be involved in the antiulcer effect. The levels of GSH and activity of GR and GPx were increased, and the levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 were modulated. There was an antidiarrheal effect and there were no signs of toxicity. B. holophylla presents antiulcer activity mainly by decreasing oxidative stress and attenuating the inflammatory response, without inducing side effects.

  18. Initial experience with taTME in patients undergoing laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy for familial adenomatous polyposis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambe, P C; Zirngibl, H; Möslein, G

    2017-12-01

    Transanal total mesorectal excision (taTME) is a minimally invasive technique which was developed to overcome the difficulties associated with the "top-down" pelvic dissection by enabling a "bottom-up" dissection in patients with mid- and low rectal cancer. While this technique was primarily designed to manage tumors in the mid- and lower rectum, its spectrum of indications has been broadened to include benign colorectal pathologies. The aim of the present study was to assess our initial experience with taTME in patients undergoing restorative proctocolectomy for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). All consecutive patients (undergoing prophylactic restorative proctocolectomy with IPAA for FAP using taTME between April and October 2016 at our institution) were included in the study. There were 8 patients (6 females and 2 males). The median age was 19.5 years (range 16-31 years). In all cases, surgery was successfully completed using with taTME. No perioperative complications were recorded. A median of 5 bowel movements (range 4-6 bowel movements) with intermittent anti-diarrheal medication was recorded in all cases. Our initial experience with 8 consecutive cases suggests taTME is safe and effective in patients undergoing prophylactic restorative proctocolectomy with IPAA for FAP.

  19. Crosstalk between Zinc Status and Giardia Infection: A New Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astiazarán-García, Humberto; Iñigo-Figueroa, Gemma; Quihui-Cota, Luis; Anduro-Corona, Iván

    2015-06-03

    Zinc supplementation has been shown to reduce the incidence and prevalence of diarrhea; however, its anti-diarrheal effect remains only partially understood. There is now growing evidence that zinc can have pathogen-specific protective effects. Giardiasis is a common yet neglected cause of acute-chronic diarrheal illness worldwide which causes disturbances in zinc metabolism of infected children, representing a risk factor for zinc deficiency. How zinc metabolism is compromised by Giardia is not well understood; zinc status could be altered by intestinal malabsorption, organ redistribution or host-pathogen competition. The potential metal-binding properties of Giardia suggest unusual ways that the parasite may interact with its host. Zinc supplementation was recently found to reduce the rate of diarrhea caused by Giardia in children and to upregulate humoral immune response in Giardia-infected mice; in vitro and in vivo, zinc-salts enhanced the activity of bacitracin in a zinc-dose-dependent way, and this was not due to zinc toxicity. These findings reflect biological effect of zinc that may impact significantly public health in endemic areas of infection. In this paper, we shall explore one direction of this complex interaction, discussing recent information regarding zinc status and its possible contribution to the outcome of the encounter between the host and Giardia.

  20. Safety and efficacy of Bixa orellana (achiote, annatto) leaf extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohs, Sidney J

    2014-07-01

    Bixa orellana leaf preparations have been used for many years by indigenous people for a variety of medicinal applications. Published research studies in animals indicate that various extracts of Bixa leaves exhibit antioxidant, broad antimicrobial (antibacterial and antifungal), anti-inflammatory, analgesic, hypoglycemic, and antidiarrheal activities. No studies have specifically assessed the ability of leaf extracts to inhibit urogenital infections although Bixa products have been used in folkloric medicine to treat gonorrhea and other infections. Few human studies have been conducted and published using Bixa leaf preparations. Many more studies have been conducted and published involving Bixa seed (annatto) extracts than with leaf extracts. No subchronic safety (toxicity) studies have been conducted in animals. A 6 month study in humans given 750 mg of leaf powder per day demonstrated no significant or serious adverse effects. Bixa leaf extracts appear to be safe when given under current conditions of use. However, additional human and animal controlled safety and efficacy studies are needed. In addition, detailed chemical analyses are required to establish structure-function relationships. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Influence of environmental factors on the concentration of phenolic compounds in leaves of Lafoensia pacari

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Leite Sampaio

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Lafoensia pacari A. St.-Hil., Lythraceae, a plant from the Cerrado known as pacari or dedaleiro, is widely used as an antipyretic, wound healing, anti-inflammatory, antidiarrheal and in the treatment of gastritis and cancer. Notable among the metabolite groups identified in leaves of L. pacari are the polyphenols, such as tannins and flavonoids, related to the pharmacological activities of pacari. Studies on the influence of environmental factors over production of major groups of secondary metabolites in pacari are important because they contribute data for its cultivation and harvest, and establish quantitative parameters of secondary metabolites in the plant drug. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of environmental factors on concentrations of phenolic metabolites in the leaves of L. pacari. Compounds quantified in the leaves were: total phenols, tannins by protein precipitation, hydrolysable tannins, total flavonoids, ellagic acid and mineral nutrients, while soil fertility was also analyzed, all over a period of one year. The data were analyzed using multivariate analysis, and the results suggest that metabolite concentrations in the leaves of this plant are influenced by seasonal factors, in particular the temperature and foliar micronutrients (Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn.

  2. Influence of environmental factors on the concentration of phenolic compounds in leaves of Lafoensia pacari

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Leite Sampaio

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Lafoensia pacari A. St.-Hil., Lythraceae, a plant from the Cerrado known as pacari or dedaleiro, is widely used as an antipyretic, wound healing, anti-inflammatory, antidiarrheal and in the treatment of gastritis and cancer. Notable among the metabolite groups identified in leaves of L. pacari are the polyphenols, such as tannins and flavonoids, related to the pharmacological activities of pacari. Studies on the influence of environmental factors over production of major groups of secondary metabolites in pacari are important because they contribute data for its cultivation and harvest, and establish quantitative parameters of secondary metabolites in the plant drug. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of environmental factors on concentrations of phenolic metabolites in the leaves of L. pacari. Compounds quantified in the leaves were: total phenols, tannins by protein precipitation, hydrolysable tannins, total flavonoids, ellagic acid and mineral nutrients, while soil fertility was also analyzed, all over a period of one year. The data were analyzed using multivariate analysis, and the results suggest that metabolite concentrations in the leaves of this plant are influenced by seasonal factors, in particular the temperature and foliar micronutrients (Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn.

  3. Phytochemistry and potential therapeutic actions of Boswellic acids: A mini-review

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    Farah Iram

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The pentacyclic triterpenic acids isolated from the oleo gum resin of various Boswellia species are collectively called as Boswellic acids (BA. The oleo gum resin obtained from Indian variety i.e. Boswellia serrata (Family – Burseraceae is commonly known as Salai guggal. The resin fraction of Salai guggal is rich in Boswellic acids and its essential oil is composed of a mixture of mono, di and sesquiterpenes while gum fraction chiefly contains pentose and hexose sugars. This oleo-gum resin is quite popular among traditional practitioners of traditional Chinese and Indian Systems of medicine owing to their wide range of useful biological properties such as anti-inflammatory, anti-arthritic, anti-rheumatic, anti-diarrheal, anti-hyperlipidemic, anti-asthmatic, anti-cancer, anti-microbial anti-fungal, anti-complementary and analgesic activity, etc. It has been used as a herbal medicine since the prehistoric time to cure acute and chronic ailments including inflammatory diseases. Phytochemical investigation of this herbal medicine lead to identification of Boswellic acids which are found to be novel, potent, specific anti-inflammatory agents due to non-redox inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO enzyme. However, the other important targets of Boswellic acids also include topoisomerases, angiogenesis, and cytochrome p450 enzymes. This review is a sincere attempt to discuss and present the current status of therapeutic potential, phytochemical as well as pharmacological profile of Boswellic acids primarily obtained from B. serrata.

  4. Anti-diarrhea activity of the aqueous root bark extract of Byrsocarpus coccineus on castor oil-induced diarrhea in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejeh, Sunday A; Onyeyili, Patrick; Abalaka, Samson E

    2017-07-01

    The use of traditional medicine as an alternative source of cure for many ailments has played an important role in health care delivery in both developing and developed countries. Byrsocarpus coccineus Schum and Thonn ( Connaraceae ) is used in traditional medicine for treatment of various disease conditions, including diarrhea. The anti-diarrhea activity of the root bark aqueous extract of B. coccineus was investigated in this study. Acute toxicity evaluation of the aqueous extract of B. coccineus root bark was performed in exposed rats. Diarrhea was induced in exposed rats with castor oil, and the effect of the extract on castor oil-induced gastrointestinal motility and enteropooling was consequently investigated. In the acute toxicity study, the extract caused no death in treated rats nor produced signs of delayed toxicity, even at 5000 mg/kg. The aqueous root bark extract of B. coccineus also decreased the distance travelled by activated charcoal in the gastrointestinal tract of treated rats when compared to control rats. Results of castor oil-induced enteropooling revealed slight reduction in the weight of intestinal contents of treated rats compared to control rats. There was significant (pcastor oil-induced diarrhea at 100 mg/kg dose with 74.96% inhibition of defecation. The study demonstrated the anti-diarrheic property of the aqueous extract of B. coccineus root bark as currently exploited in our traditional herbal therapy.

  5. Sucralfate for the treatment of radiation induced mucositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belka, C.; Hoffmann, W.; Paulsen, F.; Bamberg, M.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy, a cornerstone in the management of head and neck cancer, pelvic cancer, and esophageal cancer is associated with a marked mucosal toxicity. Pain, malnutrition and diarrhea are the most prevalent clinical symptoms of radiation induced mucosal damage. Because there is no known way to obviate radiation mucositis all efforts to prevent aggravation and accelerate healing of mucosal changes are of great importance. Numerous agents including antimicrobials, local and systemic analgesics, antiinflammatory drugs, antidiarrheal drugs, in combination with intensive dietetic care are used to relieve symptoms. Recently coating agents like the polyaluminum-sucrose complex sucralfate were suggested for the prevention and treatment of mucosal reactions. Since sucralfate protects ulcerated epithelium by coating, liberates protective prostaglandins and increases the local availability of protective factors this drug might directly interact with the pathogenesis of mucositis. Patients and Method: The results of available studies are analysed and discussed. Results: The results of several studies indicate that sucralfate treatment especially during radiotherapy for pelvic cancer leads to a significant amelioration of clinical symptoms and morphological changes. An application of sucralfate during radiotherapy of head and neck cancer reveals only limited benefits in most studies performed. Conclusion: Nevertheless sucralfate is a save, cheap and active drug for the prevention and treatment of radiation mucositis especially in patients with pelvic irradiation. (orig.) [de

  6. Cleome viscosa (wild mustard): a review on ethnobotany, phytochemistry, and pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, Ravindra G

    2010-01-01

    Cleome viscosa Linn. (Capparidaceae), commonly known as "wild or dog mustard," is an annual, sticky herb found as a common weed all over the plains of India and throughout the tropics of the world. The whole plant and its parts (leaves, seeds, and roots) are widely used in traditional and folkloric systems of medicine. In traditional systems of medicine the plant is reported to possess beneficial effects as an anthelmintic, antiseptic, carminative, antiscorbutic, sudorific, febrifuge, and cardiac stimulant. Following the various traditional claims for the use of C. viscosa (CV) as a cure of numerous diseases, considerable efforts have been made by researchers to verify its utility through scientific pharmacological screenings. The pharmacological studies have shown that CV possesses various notable biological activities such as anthelmintic, antimicrobial, analgesic, antiinflammatory, immunomodulatory, antipyretic, psychopharmacological, antidiarrheal, and hepatoprotective activities. A wide variety of phytoprinciples have been isolated from the plant. The present review is an effort to consolidate traditional, ethnobotanical, phytochemical, and pharmacological information available on C. viscosa.

  7. Syzygium Cordatum Hochst. ex Krauss: An Overview of Its Ethnobotany, Phytochemistry and Pharmacological Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Maroyi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Syzygium cordatum is a valuable medicinal plant in the materia medica of east and southern Africa. The aim of this study was to review the botany, medicinal uses, phytochemistry and ethnopharmacological properties of S. cordatum. Relevant literature search was carried out using internet sources such as ACS, Web of Science, Wiley, SpringerLink, Scopus, Mendeley, Google Scholar, Pubmed, SciFinder, BioMed Central, Science Direct and Elsevier. Other literature sources were conference papers, book chapters, books, theses and websites. The leaves, roots, bark and fruits of S. cordatum are used as ethnomedicines against 24 human diseases such as gastro-intestinal disorders, burns, sores, wounds, colds, cough, respiratory complaints, sexually transmitted infections (STIs, tuberculosis, fever and malaria. Several phytochemical compounds including alkaloids, anthocyanidin, essential oils, flavonoids, leucoanthocyanidin, phenols, phytosterols, saponins, simple sugars, terpenoids and triterpenoid have been identified from S. cordatum. Pharmacological evaluations revealed that S. cordatum is characterized by several biological activities including antibacterial, antifungal, antidiarrheal, anti-sexually transmitted infections, antidiabetic, anticholinesterase, anti-inflammatory, antileishmanial, antioxidant, antiplasmodial and anti-proteus. These pharmacological findings lend credence to the traditional ethnomedicinal uses and ethnopharmacological importance of S. cordatum. Future research on the species should identify the biological compounds, their mode of action and physiological pathways and clinical relevance.

  8. Effects of zeolite supplementation on parameters of intestinal barrier integrity, inflammation, redoxbiology and performance in aerobically trained subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamprecht, Manfred; Bogner, Simon; Steinbauer, Kurt; Schuetz, Burkhard; Greilberger, Joachim F; Leber, Bettina; Wagner, Bernhard; Zinser, Erwin; Petek, Thomas; Wallner-Liebmann, Sandra; Oberwinkler, Tanja; Bachl, Norbert; Schippinger, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Zeolites are crystalline compounds with microporous structures of Si-tetrahedrons. In the gut, these silicates could act as adsorbents, ion-exchangers, catalysts, detergents or anti-diarrheic agents. This study evaluated whether zeolite supplementation affects biomarkers of intestinal wall permeability and parameters of oxidation and inflammation in aerobically trained individuals, and whether it could improve their performance. In a randomized, double-blinded, placebo controlled trial, 52 endurance trained men and women, similar in body fat, non-smokers, 20-50 years, received 1.85 g of zeolite per day for 12 weeks. Stool samples for determination of intestinal wall integrity biomarkers were collected. From blood, markers of redox biology, inflammation, and DNA damage were determined at the beginning and the end of the study. In addition, VO2max and maximum performance were evaluated at baseline and after 12 weeks of treatment. For statistical analyses a 2-factor ANOVA was used. At baseline both groups showed slightly increased stool zonulin concentrations above normal. After 12 weeks with zeolite zonulin was significantly (p zonulin. This was accompanied by mild anti-inflammatory effects in this cohort of aerobically trained subjects. Further research is needed to explore mechanistic explanations for the observations in this study.

  9. Colon in acute intestinal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Alfredo; Buccigrossi, Vittoria; Armellino, Carla

    2009-04-01

    The colon is actively implicated in intestinal infections not only as a target of enteric pathogens and their products but also as a target organ for treatment. In the presence of diarrhea, both of osmotic and secretory nature, the colon reacts with homeostatic mechanisms to increase ion absorption. These mechanisms can be effectively exploited to decrease fluid discharge. A model of intestinal infections using rotavirus (RV) in colonic cells was set up and used to define a dual model of secretory and osmotic diarrhea in sequence. Using this model, antidiarrheal drugs were tested, namely zinc and the enkephalinase inhibitor racecadotril. Zinc was able to decrease the enterotoxic activity responsible for secretory diarrhea. It also inhibited the cytotoxic effect of RV. The mechanism of zinc was related at least in part to the activation of MAPK activity, but also a direct antiviral effect was observed. Racecadotril showed a potent and selective inhibition of active secretion, being particularly effective in the first phase of RV diarrhea. The use of drugs active at the colonic level, therefore, offers effective options to treat intestinal infections in childhood. In addition, the colon is the natural site of colonic microflora, a target of probiotic therapy, which is the first line of approach recommended by the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition to treat infectious diarrhea.

  10. Zinc treatment ameliorates diarrhea and intestinal inflammation in undernourished rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Queiroz, Camila A A; Fonseca, Said Gonçalves C; Frota, Priscila B; Figueiredo, Italo L; Aragão, Karoline S; Magalhães, Carlos Emanuel C; de Carvalho, Cibele B M; Lima, Aldo Ângelo M; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A; Guerrant, Richard L; Moore, Sean R; Oriá, Reinaldo B

    2014-08-05

    WHO guidelines recommend zinc supplementation as a key adjunct therapy for childhood diarrhea in developing countries, however zinc's anti-diarrheal effects remain only partially understood. Recently, it has been recognized that low-grade inflammation may influence stunting. In this study, we examined whether oral zinc supplementation could improve weight, intestinal inflammation, and diarrhea in undernourished weanling rats. Rats were undernourished using a northeastern Brazil regional diet (RBD) for two weeks, followed by oral gavage with a saturated lactose solution (30 g/kg) in the last 7 days to induce osmotic diarrhea. Animals were checked for diarrhea daily after lactose intake. Blood was drawn in order to measure serum zinc levels by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Rats were euthanized to harvest jejunal tissue for histology and cytokine profiles by ELISA. In a subset of animals, spleen samples were harvested under aseptic conditions to quantify bacterial translocation. Oral zinc supplementation increased serum zinc levels following lactose-induced osmotic diarrhea. In undernourished rats, zinc improved weight gain following osmotic diarrhea and significantly reduced diarrheal scores by the third day of lactose intake (p diarrhea and undernutrition and support the use of zinc to prevent the vicious cycle of malnutrition and diarrhea.

  11. Therapeutic Targeting of CPT-11 Induced Diarrhea: A Case for Prophylaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Umang; Goel, Sanjay; Mani, Sridhar

    2014-01-01

    CPT-11 (irinotecan), a DNA topoisomerase I inhibitor is one of the main treatments for colorectal cancer. The main dose limiting toxicities are neutropenia and late onset diarrhea. Though neutropenia is manageable, CPT-11 induced diarrhea is frequently severe, resulting in hospitalizations, dose reductions or omissions leading to ineffective treatment administration. Many potential agents have been tested in preclinical and clinical studies to prevent or ameliorate CPT-11 induced late onset diarrhea. It is predicted that prophylaxis of CPT-11 induced diarrhea will reduce sub-therapeutic dosing as well as hospitalizations and will eventually lead to dose escalations resulting in better response rates. This article reviews various experimental agents and strategies employed to prevent this debilitating toxicity. Covered topics include schedule/dose modification, intestinal alkalization, structural/chemical modification, genetic testing, anti-diarrheal therapies, transporter (ABCB1, ABCC2, BCRP2) inhibitors, enzyme (β-glucuronidase, UGT1A1, CYP3A4, carboxylesterase, COX-2) inducers and inhibitors, probiotics, antibiotics, adsorbing agents, cytokine and growth factor activators and inhibitors and other miscellaneous agents. PMID:23597015

  12. Hydroxylase inhibition attenuates colonic epithelial secretory function and ameliorates experimental diarrhea.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ward, Joseph B J

    2011-02-01

    Hydroxylases are oxygen-sensing enzymes that regulate cellular responses to hypoxia. Transepithelial Cl(-) secretion, the driving force for fluid secretion, is dependent on O(2) availability for generation of cellular energy. Here, we investigated the role of hydroxylases in regulating epithelial secretion and the potential for targeting these enzymes in treatment of diarrheal disorders. Ion transport was measured as short-circuit current changes across voltage-clamped monolayers of T(84) cells and mouse colon. The antidiarrheal efficacy of dimethyloxallyl glycine (DMOG) was tested in a mouse model of allergic disease. Hydroxylase inhibition with DMOG attenuated Ca(2+)- and cAMP-dependent secretory responses in voltage-clamped T(84) cells to 20.2 ± 2.6 and 38.8 ± 6.7% (n=16; P≤0.001) of those in control cells, respectively. Antisecretory actions of DMOG were time and concentration dependent, being maximal after 18 h of DMOG (1 mM) treatment. DMOG specifically inhibited Na(+)\\/K(+)-ATPase pump activity without altering its expression or membrane localization. In mice, DMOG inhibited agonist-induced secretory responses ex vivo and prevented allergic diarrhea in vivo. In conclusion, hydroxylases are important regulators of epithelial Cl(-) and fluid secretion and present a promising target for development of new drugs to treat transport disorders.

  13. Hydroxylase inhibition attenuates colonic epithelial secretory function and ameliorates experimental diarrhea.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ward, Joseph B J

    2012-02-01

    Hydroxylases are oxygen-sensing enzymes that regulate cellular responses to hypoxia. Transepithelial Cl(-) secretion, the driving force for fluid secretion, is dependent on O(2) availability for generation of cellular energy. Here, we investigated the role of hydroxylases in regulating epithelial secretion and the potential for targeting these enzymes in treatment of diarrheal disorders. Ion transport was measured as short-circuit current changes across voltage-clamped monolayers of T(84) cells and mouse colon. The antidiarrheal efficacy of dimethyloxallyl glycine (DMOG) was tested in a mouse model of allergic disease. Hydroxylase inhibition with DMOG attenuated Ca(2+)- and cAMP-dependent secretory responses in voltage-clamped T(84) cells to 20.2 +\\/- 2.6 and 38.8 +\\/- 6.7% (n=16; P<\\/=0.001) of those in control cells, respectively. Antisecretory actions of DMOG were time and concentration dependent, being maximal after 18 h of DMOG (1 mM) treatment. DMOG specifically inhibited Na(+)\\/K(+)-ATPase pump activity without altering its expression or membrane localization. In mice, DMOG inhibited agonist-induced secretory responses ex vivo and prevented allergic diarrhea in vivo. In conclusion, hydroxylases are important regulators of epithelial Cl(-) and fluid secretion and present a promising target for development of new drugs to treat transport disorders.

  14. [Gastroenteritis due to Plesiomonas shigelloides--rare cases in the Western world].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knebel, U; Sloot, N; Eikenberg, M; Borsdorf, H; Höffler, U; Riemann, J F

    2001-02-15

    Plesiomonas shigelloides is a common pathogen in tropical regions, whereas it is rarely isolated in temperate climates. It is most often found in surface water and fish. During the last 10 years it was found to cause gastroenteritis 6 times in Ludwigshafen. Not all of these patients reported a trip to foreign countries. A 54-year-old male patient was hospitalized after a trip to Malaysia with strong greenish watery diarrhea and chills. On physical examination we saw a dehydrated patient in severely reduced general condition. The stool frequency was 30/d. The laboratory examinations only showed elevated parameters of inflammation. Plesiomonas shigelloides was cultivated in the stool cultures. With appropriate substitution of fluid and electrolytes, and antidiarrheal therapy the patient resumed a normal diet without any complications. Three days later his bowel movements were normal and his general condition was greatly improved. We withheld antibiotic therapy because of the noncomplicated course of illness. In Germany infections with Plesiomonas shigelloides are rare, an increase is observed because of increasing tourism to tropical regions. The course of infection is sometimes asymptomatic, but usually patients develop an acute gastroenteritis. Especially immunocompromised patients can show serious courses of infection. Plesiomonas shigelloides should be included in the differential diagnosis of acute gastroenteritis after journeys to tropical regions. Some of our patients, however, denied traveling to tropical regions. They also denied consuming seafood, which indicates a risk of infection in Germany. Still an infection with Plesiomonas shigelloides seems to be rare in northern European countries.

  15. Is Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni a Non Cariogenic Sweetener? A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrazzano, Gianmaria Fabrizio; Cantile, Tiziana; Alcidi, Brunella; Coda, Marco; Ingenito, Aniello; Zarrelli, Armando; Di Fabio, Giovanni; Pollio, Antonino

    2015-12-26

    Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni is a small perennial shrub of the Asteraceae (Compositae) family that is native to South America, particularly Brazil and Paraguay, where it is known as "stevia" or "honey leaf" for its powerful sweetness. Several studies have suggested that in addition to their sweetness, steviosides and their related compounds, including rebaudioside A and isosteviol, may offer additional therapeutic benefits. These benefits include anti-hyperglycaemic, anti-hypertensive, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor, anti-diarrheal, diuretic, and immunomodulatory actions. Additionally, critical analysis of the literature supports the anti-bacterial role of steviosides on oral bacteria flora. The aim of this review is to show the emerging results regarding the anti-cariogenic properties of S. rebaudiana Bertoni. Data shown in the present paper provide evidence that stevioside extracts from S. rebaudiana are not cariogenic. Future research should be focused on in vivo studies to evaluate the effects on dental caries of regular consumption of S. rebaudiana extract-based products.

  16. Efficacious rat model displays non-toxic effect with Korean beechwood creosote: a possible antibiotic substitute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quynh, Anh Nguyen Thai; Sharma, Neelesh; Cho, Kwang Keun; Yeo, Tae Jong; Kim, Ki Beom; Jeong, Chul Yon; Min, Tae Sun; Young, Kim Jae; Kim, Jin Nam; Jeong, Dong-Kee

    2014-05-04

    Wood creosote, an herbal anti-diarrheal and a mixture of major volatile compounds, was tested for its non-toxicological effects, using a rat model, with the objective to use the creosote as an antibiotic substitute. A total of 30 Sprague-Dawley rats were studied to form five groups with 6 rats each. Korea beechwood creosote was supplemented into three test groups with 0.03 g/kg, 0.07 g/kg and 0.1 g/kg body weight/day without antibiotic support, along with a positive control of Apramycin sulphate (at 0.5% of the daily feed) and a negative control. Korean beechwood creosote supplementation showed no negative effect on the body weight gain in comparison to the negative and the positive control groups and the feed conversion ratio was also comparable with that of the control groups. The clinical pathology parameters studied were also under the umbrella of normal range, including liver specific enzymes, blood glucose, total protein, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), which indicated no toxic effect of creosote at the given doses. The non-hepatotoxic effect was also confirmed using hepatic damage specific molecular markers like Tim-p1, Tim-p2 and Tgf-β1. The results suggested that Korean beechwood may be used as antibiotic substitute in weanling pigs feed without any toxic effect on the body. Although the antimicrobial properties of creosote were not absolutely similar to those of apramycin sulphate, they were comparable.

  17. Loperamide Induced Life Threatening Ventricular Arrhythmia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Upadhyay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Loperamide is over-the-counter antidiarrheal agent acting on peripherally located μ opioid receptors. It is gaining popularity among drug abusers as opioid substitute. We report a case of a 46-year-old male that was presented after cardiac arrest. After ruling out ischemia, cardiomyopathy, pulmonary embolism, central nervous system pathology, sepsis, and other drug toxicity, we found out that patient was using around 100 mg of Loperamide to control his chronic diarrhea presumably because of irritable bowel syndrome for last five years and consumed up to 200 mg of Loperamide daily for last two days before the cardiac arrest. We hypothesize that the patient’s QTc prolongation and subsequent cardiac arrest are due to Loperamide toxicity. Patient experienced gradual resolution of tachyarrhythmia and gradual decrease in QTc interval during hospitalization which supports the evidence of causal relationship between Loperamide overdose and potentially fatal arrhythmias. It also provided the clue that patient may have congenital long QT syndrome which was unmasked by Loperamide causing ventricular arrhythmias. This case adds one more pearl in the literature to support that Loperamide overdose related cardiac toxicity does exist and it raises concerns over Loperamide abuse in the community.

  18. Black henbane and its toxicity – a descriptive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahita Alizadeh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Black henbane (BH or Hyoscyamus niger, has been used as a medicine since last centuries and has been described in all traditional medicines. It applies as a herbal medicine, but may induce intoxication accidentally or intentionally. All part of BH including leaves, seeds and roots contain some alkaloids such as Hyoscyamine, Atropine, Tropane and Scopolamine. BH has pharmacological effects like bronchodilating, antisecretory, urinary bladder relaxant, spasmolytic, hypnotic, hallucinogenic, pupil dilating, sedative and anti-diarrheal properties. Clinical manifestations of acute BH poisoning are very wide which include mydriasis, tachycardia, arrhythmia, agitation, convulsion and coma, dry mouth, thirst, slurred speech, difficulty speaking, dysphagia, warm flushed skin, pyrexia, nausea, vomiting, headache, blurred vision and photophobia, urinary retention, distension of the bladder, drowsiness, hyper reflexia, auditory, visual or tactile hallucinations, confusion, disorientation, delirium, aggressiveness, and combative behavior. The main treatment of BH intoxicated patients is supportive therapies including gastric emptying (not by Ipecac, administration of activated charcoal and benzodiazepines. Health care providers and physicians particularly emergency physicians and clinical toxicologists should know the nature, medical uses, clinical features, diagnosis and management of BH poisoning.

  19. Shikonin inhibits intestinal calcium-activated chloride channels and prevents rotaviral diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jiang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Secretory diarrhea remains a global health burden and causes major mortality in children. There have been some focuses on antidiarrheal therapies that may reduce fluid losses and intestinal motility in diarrheal diseases. In the present study, we identified shikonin as an inhibitor of TMEM16A chloride channel activity using cell-based fluorescent-quenching assay. The IC50 value of shikonin was 6.5 μM. Short-circuit current measurements demonstrated that shikonin inhibited Eact-induced Cl current in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 value of 1.5 μM. Short-circuit current measurement showed that shikonin exhibited inhibitory effect against CCh-induced Cl currents in mouse colonic epithelia but did not affect cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration as well as the other major enterocyte chloride channel CFTR. Characterization study found that shikonin inhibited basolateral K+ channel activity without affecting Na+/K+-ATPase activities. In-vivo studies revealed that shikonin significantly delayed intestinal motility in mice and reduced stool water content in a neonatal mice model of rotaviral diarrhea without affecting the viral infection process in-vivo. Taken together, the results suggested that shikonin inhibited enterocyte CaCCs, the inhibitory effect was partially through inhbition of basolateral K+ channel acitivty, and shikonin could be a lead compound in the treatment of rotaviral secretory diarrhea.

  20. The inhibitory effect of colloidal bismuth hydroxide gel on Escherichia coli O157:H7 and on the activity of Shiga toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subils, Tomás; Casabonne, Cecilia; Balagué, Claudia

    2014-12-04

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is the causative agent of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Colloidal bismuth hydroxide gel (CBHG) is an anti-diarrheal and antisecretory compound, which does not inhibit gastrointestinal motility and reaches an in vivo gut concentration of 10.8 mg/ml of bismuth. Its action on bacteria has not been studied. We analyzed its inhibitory effects on STEC, as well as the deactivation of the Shiga toxin (Stx) and its ability to block the spread of genes encoding Stx. We determined a minimum inhibitory concentration and bactericidal concentration for the STEC O157:H7 strain (EDL933), with CBHG and Chobet® bismuth cream with pectin (CBCHP). We analyzed its effect on Stx by means of cytotoxicity assay and ELISA, as well as its effect on the free 933 W Stx phage. Effect on the EDL933 strain: CBHG: MIC 10 mg/ml of bismuth. MIC 6 mg/ml and MBC 15 mg/ml of bismuth. Effect on EDL933 virulence factors: significant decrease in active Stx and 933 W Stx phage titer. ELISA did not find significant differences with treatment. The results obtained may be useful in the development of new therapeutic strategies based on the use of CBHG to prevent or improve the prognosis of HUS, as it can be used to control STEC infections.

  1. Does the gastroprotective action of a medicinal plant ensure healing effects? An integrative study of the biological effects of Serjania marginata Casar. (Sapindaceae) in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Périco, Larissa Lucena; Heredia-Vieira, Silvia Cristina; Beserra, Fernando Pereira; de Cássia Dos Santos, Raquel; Weiss, Marcio Barczyszyn; Resende, Flavia Aparecida; Dos Santos Ramos, Matheus Aparecido; Bonifácio, Bruna Vidal; Bauab, Taís Maria; Varanda, Eliana Aparecida; de Gobbi, Juliana Irani Fratucci; da Rocha, Lúcia Regina Machado; Vilegas, Wagner; Hiruma-Lima, Clélia Akiko

    2015-08-22

    Serjania marginata (Sapindaceae), a medicinal plant commonly found in the Brazilian Cerrado, Paraguay, Bolivia and Argentina, is also known as "cipó-uva" or "cipó-timbó". Ethnopharmacological studies indicate that the leaves from this medicinal plant are used in folk medicine to treat gastric pain. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the gastroprotective and healing effect of the hydroalcoholic extract obtained from S. marginata (HESM) leaves using rodent experimental models. As part of the integrative study of this medicinal plant, we also evaluated the acute toxicity, antimicrobial, antidiarrheal, (anti)mutagenic, and hemodynamic effects. We performed a pharmacological study to test the acute toxicity and antimutagenic effect (Ames assay) of the HESM. The HESM was tested against different necrosis-promoting agents and experimental manipulations, such as absolute ethanol, cysteamine, pyloric ligature, and ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. The gastroprotective effect of the HESM was assessed by analyzing the gastric juice (volume, pH, total acidity) and the mucus in the gastric mucosa from rats. We assessed the levels of NO, sulfhydryl compounds, PGE2, vanilloid receptor, glutathione (GSH), and malondialdehyde (MDA), as well as the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. The gastric healing effects of the HESM were evaluated during 7 or 14 days of treatment. The intestinal motility, antidiarrheal action, and antibacterial effects (microdilution methods) of the HESM were also evaluated. The phytochemical analysis of the HESM revealed the presence of saponins, flavonoid glycosides, and tannins. The extract exhibited no sign of acute toxicity or mutagenic effect in vitro. In contrast, this extract exhibited a protective effect against the mutagenic action of direct- and indirect-acting mutagens. Only the oral administration of HESM (250mg/kg) significantly decreased the severity of gastric damage induced by ethanol (60.13%) and I/R (58.31%). The HESM

  2. Gastrointestinal disease outbreak detection using multiple data streams from electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Sharon K; Huang, Jie; Abrams, Allyson M; Gilliss, Debra; Reed, Mary; Platt, Richard; Huang, Susan S; Kulldorff, Martin

    2012-05-01

    Passive reporting and laboratory testing delays may limit gastrointestinal (GI) disease outbreak detection. Healthcare systems routinely collect clinical data in electronic medical records (EMRs) that could be used for surveillance. This study's primary objective was to identify data streams from EMRs that may perform well for GI outbreak detection. Zip code-specific daily episode counts in 2009 were generated for 22 syndromic and laboratory-based data streams from Kaiser Permanente Northern California EMRs, covering 3.3 million members. Data streams included outpatient and inpatient diagnosis codes, antidiarrheal medication dispensings, stool culture orders, and positive microbiology tests for six GI pathogens. Prospective daily surveillance was mimicked using the space-time permutation scan statistic in single and multi-stream analyses, and space-time clusters were identified. Serotype relatedness was assessed for isolates in two Salmonella clusters. Potential outbreaks included a cluster of 18 stool cultures ordered over 5 days in one zip code and a Salmonella cluster in three zip codes over 9 days, in which at least five of six cases had the same rare serotype. In all, 28 potential outbreaks were identified using single stream analyses, with signals in outpatient diagnosis codes most common. Multi-stream analyses identified additional potential outbreaks and in one example, improved the timeliness of detection. GI disease-related data streams can be used to identify potential outbreaks when generated from EMRs with extensive regional coverage. This process can supplement traditional GI outbreak reports to health departments, which frequently consist of outbreaks in well-defined settings (e.g., day care centers and restaurants) with no laboratory-confirmed pathogen. Data streams most promising for surveillance included microbiology test results, stool culture orders, and outpatient diagnoses. In particular, clusters of microbiology tests positive for specific

  3. Zinc Sensing Receptor Signaling, Mediated by GPR39, Reduces Butyrate-Induced Cell Death in HT29 Colonocytes via Upregulation of Clusterin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Limor; Azriel-Tamir, Hagit; Arotsker, Natan; Sekler, Israel; Hershfinkel, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Zinc enhances epithelial proliferation, protects the digestive epithelial layer and has profound antiulcerative and antidiarrheal roles in the colon. Despite the clinical significance of this ion, the mechanisms linking zinc to these cellular processes are poorly understood. We have previously identified an extracellular Zn2+ sensing G-protein coupled receptor (ZnR) that activates Ca2+ signaling in colonocytes, but its molecular identity as well as its effects on colonocytes' survival remained elusive. Here, we show that Zn2+, by activation of the ZnR, protects HT29 colonocytes from butyrate induced cell death. Silencing of the G-protein coupled receptor GPR39 expression abolished ZnR-dependent Ca2+ release and Zn2+-dependent survival of butyrate-treated colonocytes. Importantly, GPR39 also mediated ZnR-dependent upregulation of Na+/H+ exchange activity as this activity was found in native colon tissue but not in tissue obtained from GPR39 knock-out mice. Although ZnR-dependent upregulation of Na+/H+ exchange reduced the cellular acid load induced by butyrate, it did not rescue HT29 cells from butyrate induced cell death. ZnR/GPR39 activation however, increased the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein clusterin in butyrate-treated cells. Furthermore, silencing of clusterin abolished the Zn2+-dependent survival of HT29 cells. Altogether, our results demonstrate that extracellular Zn2+, acting through ZnR, regulates intracellular pH and clusterin expression thereby enhancing survival of HT29 colonocytes. Moreover, we identify GPR39 as the molecular moiety of ZnR in HT29 and native colonocytes. PMID:22545109

  4. Effects of rhubarb (Rheum ribes L.) syrup on dysenteric diarrhea in children: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khiveh, Ali; Hashempur, Mohammad Hashem; Shakiba, Mehrdad; Lotfi, Mohammad Hassan; Shakeri, Afsaneh; Kazemeini, SeidKazem; Mousavi, Zohre; Jabbari, Marzie; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Emtiazy, Majid

    2017-09-01

    Rheum ribes L. is a plant native to China, Iran, Turkey, India, and a few other countries. Antidiarrheal activity is considered to be one of its important properties according to various systems of traditional medicine. An increasing rate of bacterial resistance to antibiotics has led to treatment failure in some cases of shigellosis in children, and underlines a need for safe, efficient and valid options. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of R. ribes syrup as a complementary medicine for treatment of shigellosis in children. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial started with a group of 150 children aged between 12-72 months with suspected Shigella dysentery. R. ribes syrup or placebo syrup was administered to the intervention and control groups, respectively for 5 days. In addition, the standard antibiotic treatment (ceftriaxone for the first 3 days and cefixime syrup for 2 further days) was administered to both groups. Body temperature, abdominal pain, need for antipyretics, defecation frequency, stool volume and consistency and microscopic stool examination were recorded as outcome measures. Any observed adverse effects were also recorded. Mean duration of fever and diarrhea in the R. ribes group was significantly lower than that in the placebo group (P = 0.016 and 0.001, respectively). In addition, patients in the R. ribes group showed shorter duration of need for antipyretics and shorter duration of abdominal pain (P = 0.012 and 0.001, respectively). However, there were no significant differences between the two groups regarding the microscopic stool analyses. Furthermore, no adverse effect was reported. R. ribes syrup can be recommended as a complementary treatment for children with Shigella dysentery. Iranian Registry of Clinical Trial: IRCT2014070518356N1.

  5. Traditional Persian topical medications for gastrointestinal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laleh Dehghani Tafti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug delivery across the skin is used for several millennia to ease gastrointestinal (GI ailments in Traditional Persian Medicine (TPM. TPM topical remedies are generally being applied on the stomach, lower abdomen, lower back and liver to alleviate GI illnesses such as dyspepsia, gastritis, GI ulcers, inflammatory bowel disease, intestinal worms and infections. The aim of the present study is to survey the topical GI remedies and plant species used as ingredients for these remedies in TPM. In addition, pharmacological activities of the mentioned plants have been discussed. For this, we searched major TPM textbooks to find plants used to cure GI problems in topical use. Additionally, scientific databases were searched to obtain pharmacological data supporting the use of TPM plants in GI diseases. Rosa × damascena, Pistacia lentiscus, Malus domestica, Olea europaea and Artemisia absinthium are among the most frequently mentioned ingredients of TPM remedies. β-asarone, amygdalin, boswellic acids, guggulsterone, crocin, crocetin, isomasticadienolic acid, and cyclotides are the most important phytochemicals present in TPM plants with GI-protective activities. Pharmacological studies demonstrated GI activities for TPM plants supporting their extensive traditional use. These plants play pivotal role in alleviating GI disorders through exhibiting numerous activities including antispasmodic, anti-ulcer, anti-secretory, anti-colitis, anti-diarrheal, antibacterial and anthelmintic properties. Several mechanisms underlie these activities including the alleviation of oxidative stress, exhibiting cytoprotective activity, down-regulation of the inflammatory cytokines, suppression of the cellular signaling pathways of inflammatory responses, improving re-epithelialization and angiogenesis, down-regulation of anti-angiogenic factors, blocking activity of acetylcholine, etc.

  6. Limitations of indirect methods of estimating small bowel transit in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressman, J.H.; Hofmann, A.F.; Witztum, K.F.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in healthy volunteers to explore the utility of a new [ 14 C]lactulose breath test for measuring small intestinal transit time in man and to use this procedure to test whether two antidiarrheal agents, codeine and clonidine, alter small intestinal transit time during digestion of a liquid meal. In an initial validation study performed in 12 subjects, a liquid test meal containing 10 g [ 14 C]lactulose was administered and the colonic entry time estimated from the time course of 14 CO 2 excretion in breath compared with that of H 2 excretion. There was a fair correlation (r = 0.77; P less than 0.001) between results obtained by the two methods; both methods gave similar results, but 14 CO 2 output was delayed when compared to H 2 output and was incomplete. The meal also contained xylose and [ 13 C]glycine, permitting the duodenal entry time of the meal to be estimated by the appearance of xylose in blood and 13 CO 2 in breath, respectively. The same liquid meal was then used to examine the effect on small intestinal transit time (colonic entry time minus duodenal entry time) of codeine or clonidine. 99Tc-sulfur colloid was also added to the meal to permit a comparison of small intestinal transit estimated by imaging with that estimated by the 14 CO 2 -lactulose breath test. 99 Tc radioactivity appeared in the cecum (as assessed using gamma scintigraphy) about 2 hr before 14 CO 2 radioactivity appeared in breath; the correlation between transit time estimated by the two methods was moderate (r = 0.61; P less than 0.05). Based on the [ 14 C]lactulose data, small intestinal transit time ranged from less than 1 to 3 hr for a liquid meal containing 10 g lactulose; within-subject variation was considerably less than between-subject variation

  7. Anti-diarrhea activity of the aqueous root bark extract of Byrsocarpus coccineus on castor oil-induced diarrhea in Wistar rats

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    Sunday A. Ejeh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The use of traditional medicine as an alternative source of cure for many ailments has played an important role in health care delivery in both developing and developed countries. Byrsocarpus coccineus Schum and Thonn (Connaraceae is used in traditional medicine for treatment of various disease conditions, including diarrhea. The anti-diarrhea activity of the root bark aqueous extract of B. coccineus was investigated in this study. Materials and Methods: Acute toxicity evaluation of the aqueous extract of B. coccineus root bark was performed in exposed rats. Diarrhea was induced in exposed rats with castor oil, and the effect of the extract on castor oil-induced gastrointestinal motility and enteropooling was consequently investigated. Results: In the acute toxicity study, the extract caused no death in treated rats nor produced signs of delayed toxicity, even at 5000 mg/kg. The aqueous root bark extract of B. coccineus also decreased the distance travelled by activated charcoal in the gastrointestinal tract of treated rats when compared to control rats. Results of castor oil-induced enteropooling revealed slight reduction in the weight of intestinal contents of treated rats compared to control rats. There was significant (p<0.05 decrease in the frequency of defecation as well as in the number of unformed feces produced by castor oil-induced diarrhea at 100 mg/kg dose with 74.96% inhibition of defecation. Conclusion: The study demonstrated the anti-diarrheic property of the aqueous extract of B. coccineus root bark as currently exploited in our traditional herbal therapy.

  8. Pharmacologic Comparison of Clinical Neutral Endopeptidase Inhibitors in a Rat Model of Acute Secretory Diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinsen, Michael J.; Oliva, Jonathan; Campbell, Mary A.; Arnett, Stacy D.; Tajfirouz, Deena; Ruminski, Peter G.; Yu, Ying; Bond, Brian R.; Ji, Yuhua; Neckermann, Georg; Choy, Robert K. M.; de Hostos, Eugenio; Meyers, Marvin J.

    2016-01-01

    Racecadotril (acetorphan) is a neutral endopeptidase (NEP) inhibitor with known antidiarrheal activity in animals and humans; however, in humans, it suffers from shortcomings that might be improved with newer drugs in this class that have progressed to the clinic for nonenteric disease indications. To identify potentially superior NEP inhibitors with immediate clinical utility for diarrhea treatment, we compared their efficacy and pharmacologic properties in a rat intestinal hypersecretion model. Racecadotril and seven other clinical-stage inhibitors of NEP were obtained or synthesized. Enzyme potency and specificity were compared using purified peptidases. Compounds were orally administered to rats before administration of castor oil to induce diarrhea. Stool weight was recorded over 4 hours. To assess other pharmacologic properties, select compounds were orally administered to normal or castor oil–treated rats, blood and tissue samples collected at multiple time points, and active compound concentrations determined by mass spectroscopy. NEP enzyme activity was measured in tissue homogenates. Three previously untested clinical NEP inhibitors delayed diarrhea onset and reduced total stool output, with little or no effect on intestinal motility assessed by the charcoal meal test. Each was shown to be a potent, highly specific inhibitor of NEP. Each exhibited greater suppression of NEP activity in intestinal and nonintestinal tissues than did racecadotril and sustained this inhibition longer. These results suggest that newer clinical-stage NEP inhibitors originally developed for other indications may be directly repositioned for treatment of acute secretory diarrhea and offer advantages over racecadotril, such as less frequent dosing and potentially improved efficacy. PMID:26907621

  9. Drug-induced angioedema: experience of Italian emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertazzoni, G; Spina, M T; Scarpellini, M G; Buccelletti, F; De Simone, M; Gregori, M; Valeriano, V; Pugliese, F R; Ruggieri, M P; Magnanti, M; Susi, B; Minetola, L; Zulli, L; D'Ambrogio, F

    2014-06-01

    Acute angioedema represents a cause of admission to the emergency department requiring rapid diagnosis and appropriate management to prevent airway obstruction. Several drugs, including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and oral antidiabetics, have been reported to induce angioedema. The aim of this prospective observational study conducted in a setting of routine emergency care was to evaluate the incidence and extent of drug-induced non-histaminergic angioedema in this specific clinical setting, and to identify the class of drugs possibly associated with angioedema. Patients admitted to seven different emergency departments (EDs) in Rome with the diagnosis of angioedema and urticaria were enrolled during a 6-month period. Of the 120,000 patients admitted at the EDs, 447 (0.37 %) were coded as having angioedema and 655 (0.5 %) as having urticaria. After accurate clinical review, 62 cases were defined as drug-induced, non-histaminergic angioedema. NSAIDs were the most frequent drugs (taken by 22 out of 62 patients) associated with the angioedema attack. Of the remaining patients, 15 received antibiotic treatment and 10 antihypertensive treatment. In addition, we observed in our series some cases of angioedema associated with drugs (such as antiasthmatics, antidiarrheal and antiepileptics) of which there are few descriptions in the literature. The present data, which add much needed information to the existing limited literature on drug-induced angioedema in the clinical emergency department setting, will provide more appropriate diagnosis and management of this potentially life-threatening adverse event.

  10. Chemical profile and antioxidant capacity verification of Psidium guajava (Myrtaceae) fruits at different stages of maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Heverton M; Rodrigues, Fabíola F G; Costa, Wégila D; Nonato, Carla de F A; Rodrigues, Fábio F G; Boligon, Aline A; Athayde, Margareth L; Costa, José G M

    2015-01-01

    Psidium guajava (Myrtaceae), a common plant in Cariri region, Ceara, Brazil, as well as in various parts of the world, contains high concentrations of bioactive compounds and in many communities its parts are used for therapeutic purposes. Studies describe antioxidant, antimicrobial and anti-diarrheal actions from extracts obtained from leaves, but information about the activities of the fruits and comparison of these at different maturity stages (immature, partially mature and mature) are scarce. This study aims to evaluate the antioxidant properties by quantifying the levels of phenolic and flavonoid compounds, carotenoids and vitamin C of P. guajava fruits at different stages of maturation. The content of phenolic compounds for the immature fruit, partially mature and mature were: 22.41; 34.61 and 32.92 mg of AG/g fraction. The flavonoid content for immature fruits, intermediate and mature were: 2.83; 5.10 and 5.65 mg RUT/g fraction, respectively. Following the same standards of maturation stages, the ascorbic acid content was determined with values of 0.48; 0.38 and 0.21 mg AA/g fraction, respectively. HPLC analysis identified and quantified the presence of gallic acid, catechin, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, epicatechin, rutin, quercitrin, isoquercitrin, quercetin, kaempferol, glycosylated campeferol, tocopherol, β-carotene and lycopene. The antioxidant activity carried out by DPPH method showed the mature fruits bearing the best results, whereas chelation of Fe2+ ions showed higher percentage for the immature fruit. The results obtained by lipidic peroxidation were not satisfactory.

  11. Incidence and impact of travelers' diarrhea among foreign backpackers in Southeast Asia: a result from Khao San road, Bangkok.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piyaphanee, Watcharapong; Kusolsuk, Teera; Kittitrakul, Chatporn; Suttithum, Waraporn; Ponam, Thitiya; Wilairatana, Polrat

    2011-01-01

    Travelers' diarrhea is the most common disease reported among travelers visiting developing countries, including Southeast Asia, a region visited by large numbers of backpackers each year. Currently, the knowledge of travelers' diarrhea among this group is limited. This study aimed to determine the incidence and impact of travelers' diarrhea in this group. Foreign backpackers in Khao San road, Bangkok, Thailand, were invited to fill out a study questionnaire, in which they were queried about their demographic background, travel characteristics, pretravel preparations and actual practices related to the risk of travelers' diarrhea. For backpackers who had experienced diarrhea, the details and impact of each diarrheal episode were also assessed. In the period April to May 2009, 404 completed questionnaires were collected and analyzed. Sixty percent of participants were male; overall, the median age was 26 years. Nearly all backpackers (96.8%) came from developed countries. Their main reason for travel was tourism (88%). The median stay was 30 days. More than half of the backpackers (56%) carried some antidiarrheal medication. Antimotility drugs were the most common medications carried by backpackers, followed by oral rehydration salts (ORS), and antibiotics. Their practices were far from ideal; 93.9% had bought food from street vendors, 92.5% had drunk beverages with ice-cubes, and 33.8% had eaten leftover food from a previous meal. In this study, 30.7% (124/404) of backpackers had experienced diarrhea during their trip. Most diarrhea cases (88%) were mild and recovered spontaneously. However, 8.8% of cases required a visit to a doctor, and 3.2% needed hospitalization. Longer duration of stay and drinking beverages with ice-cubes were associated with higher risk of diarrhea. About one third of the foreign backpackers in Southeast Asia had experienced diarrhea during their trip. Their current practices related to the risk of travelers' diarrhea were inadequate and

  12. [Therapeutic perspectives in the irritable bowel syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaussade, S

    1990-01-01

    Future treatments of functional intestinal disorders (FID) are essentially dependent on the possible pathophysiologic hypotheses. Schematically, symptoms experienced by patients with FID can be attributed to intestinal (small or large intestine) motor disturbances or to visceral sensitivity derangement, which, in turn, may be primary or secondary to an anomalous response to alimentation, liberation of hormones or neuromediators, or to a "stress" situation. New therapeutic agents can be directed against the symptoms experienced by patients (? action on pain or intestinal transit disorders) or against the initial pathophysiologic mechanisms. In the treatment of functional diarrhea, several substances have been proposed recently. Encephalines are peptides with extremely short duration of action which are degraded by two membranous enzymes, encephalinase and carboxypeptidase. Recently, it has been shown that acetorphan, an inhibitor of encephalinase, is efficacious in acute diarrhea. Alpha-2-antagonists are substances which are capable of slowing intestinal transit time and increasing intestinal absorption. Their antidiarrheic action is moderate, and they do not act on abdominal pain. Molecules that do not traverse the neuromeningeal barrier but that act selectively on the digestive tract and are better tolerated are expected. In patients complaining of severe idiopathic constipation substances capable of stimulating colonic motility are useful: substance P or neurotensin analogues might prove interesting. Antagonists of opium receptors such as Naloxone have proved efficacious in the treatment of certain cases of chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstructions or severe constipation. The development of orally active substances or with hepatic elimination are a prerequisite. Therapy based on well characterized pathophysiologic abnormalities would be welcome.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Chronic Diarrhea: Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Lawrence R; Pardi, Darrell S; Sellin, Joseph H

    2017-02-01

    Chronic diarrhea is a common problem affecting up to 5% of the population at a given time. Patients vary in their definition of diarrhea, citing loose stool consistency, increased frequency, urgency of bowel movements, or incontinence as key symptoms. Physicians have used increased frequency of defecation or increased stool weight as major criteria and distinguish acute diarrhea, often due to self-limited, acute infections, from chronic diarrhea, which has a broader differential diagnosis, by duration of symptoms; 4 weeks is a frequently used cutoff. Symptom clusters and settings can be used to assess the likelihood of particular causes of diarrhea. Irritable bowel syndrome can be distinguished from some other causes of chronic diarrhea by the presence of pain that peaks before defecation, is relieved by defecation, and is associated with changes in stool form or frequency (Rome criteria). Patients with chronic diarrhea usually need some evaluation, but history and physical examination may be sufficient to direct therapy in some. For example, diet, medications, and surgery or radiation therapy can be important causes of chronic diarrhea that can be suspected on the basis of history alone. Testing is indicated when alarm features are present, when there is no obvious cause evident, or the differential diagnosis needs further delineation. Testing of blood and stool, endoscopy, imaging studies, histology, and physiological testing all have roles to play but are not all needed in every patient. Categorizing patients after limited testing may allow more directed testing and more rapid diagnosis. Empiric antidiarrheal therapy can be used to mitigate symptoms in most patients for whom a specific treatment is not available. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Is There a Role for the Enteral Administration of Serum-Derived Immunoglobulins in Human Gastrointestinal Disease and Pediatric Critical Care Nutrition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Arsdall, Melissa; Haque, Ikram; Liu, Yuying; Rhoads, J Marc

    2016-05-01

    Twenty years ago, there was profound, international interest in developing oral human, bovine, or chicken egg-derived immunoglobulin (Ig) for the prevention and nutritional treatment of childhood malnutrition and gastrointestinal disease, including acute diarrhea and necrotizing enterocolitis. Although such Ig products were shown to be effective, with both nutritional and antidiarrheal benefits, interest waned because of their cost and because of the perceived risk of bovine serum encephalitis (BSE). BSE is no longer considered a barrier to use of oral Ig, because the WHO has declared the United States to be BSE-free since the early 2000s. Low-cost bovine-derived products with high Ig content have been developed and are regulated as medical foods. These new products, called serum bovine Igs (SBIs), facilitate the management of chronic or severe gastrointestinal disturbances in both children and adults and are regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration. Well-established applications for use of SBIs include human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated enteropathy and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. However, SBIs and other similar products could potentially become important components of the treatment regimen for other conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, by aiding in disease control without immunosuppressive side effects. In addition, SBIs may be helpful in conditions associated with the depletion of circulating and luminal Igs and could potentially play an important role in critical care nutrition. The rationale for their use is to facilitate intraluminal microbial antibody coating, an essential process in immune recognition in the gut which is disturbed in these conditions, thereby leading to intestinal inflammation. Thus, oral Ig may emerge as an important "add-on" therapy for a variety of gastrointestinal and nutritional problems during the next decade. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  15. Obstetric anal sphincter injury: incidence, risk factors, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudding, Thomas C; Vaizey, Carolynne J; Kamm, Michael A

    2008-02-01

    Obstetric sphincter damage is the most common cause of fecal incontinence in women. This review aimed to survey the literature, and reach a consensus, on its incidence, risk factors, and management. This systematic review identified relevant studies from the following sources: Medline, Cochrane database, cross referencing from identified articles, conference abstracts and proceedings, and guidelines published by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (United Kingdom), Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (United Kingdom), and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. A total of 451 articles and abstracts were reviewed. There was a wide variation in the reported incidence of anal sphincter muscle injury from childbirth, with the true incidence likely to be approximately 11% of postpartum women. Risk factors for injury included instrumental delivery, prolonged second stage of labor, birth weight greater than 4 kg, fetal occipitoposterior presentation, and episiotomy. First vaginal delivery, induction of labor, epidural anesthesia, early pushing, and active restraint of the fetal head during delivery may be associated with an increased risk of sphincter trauma. The majority of sphincter tears can be identified clinically by a suitably trained clinician. In those with recognized tears at the time of delivery repair should be performed using long-term absorbable sutures. Patients presenting later with fecal incontinence may be managed successfully using antidiarrheal drugs and biofeedback. In those who fail conservative treatment, and who have a substantial sphincter disruption, elective repair may be attempted. The results of primary and elective repair may deteriorate with time. Sacral nerve stimulation may be an appropriate alternative treatment modality. Obstetric anal sphincter damage, and related fecal incontinence, are common. Risk factors for such trauma are well recognized, and should allow for reduction of injury by proactive

  16. The chemistry and pharmacology of Cleome genus: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harpreet; Mishra, Amrita; Mishra, Arun Kumar

    2018-05-01

    Since ancient times, species of Cleome genus are used to cure various ailments in human beings and same is stated in traditional treatises. Each part of the plant has its own significance, therefore, in background of its significance, upto date information in systematic manner is required. The present review embarks on variety of naturally occurring compounds that have been isolated from various species of Cleome genus. The present study furnishes an overview of all naturally isolated compounds diterpenes, triterpenoids, trinorterpenoids, flavonol glycoside, coumarinolignoids, dipyridodiazepinone, essential oils, sesquiterpenes, flavonoids, carboxylic acid derivatives, lactone derivatives, sterols and pharmacological activities of various species of Cleome genus. These plants of Cleome genus are often used as conventional drugs to treat several ailments therefore information on analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antifungal, antimicrobial, anti-diarrheal, anticancer, anti-arthritic, hepatoprotective, antinociceptive, wound healing and psychopharmacological activity etc were compiled. Literature regarding the compounds isolated and pharmacological studies performed by various researchers in the last 40 years who worked on different species belonging to genus Cleome was summarized in the present review. On the basis of references, this review covers the phytochemistry and pharmacology of Cleome species, describing compounds previously reported current trends and future prospects. From a wellbeing point of view, species belonging toCleome genus presents an excellent option for curing variety of ailments in human beings due to its isolated phytocompounds that reveal significant biological activities or for developing a variety of new pharmaceutical products. The observed pharmacological activities and no toxicity profile of extracts obtained from species of Cleome genus support the statement that these extracts might be used in the formation of new formulations that can be

  17. [In vitro effect against Giardia of 14 plant extracts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce-Macotela, M; Navarro-Alegría, I; Martínez-Gordillo, M N; Alvarez-Chacón, R

    1994-01-01

    To investigate antigiardiasic activity in plants used in Mexico as antidiarrheics and/or antiparasitics. Fourteen species were evaluated. The antigiardiasic activity was measured in vitro in a blinded fashion using trophozoites of Giardia duodenalis incubated with plant extracts. The viability of trophozoites was ascertained using MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-il]-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) which is reduced to MTT-formazan by the activity of live trophozoites. The reduced MTT was extracted with an acidified alcohol (2-propanol with HCI 0.04 M) and measured in a spectrophotometer at 570 nm. Negative (trophozoites without extract) and positive controls (incubated with tinadazol) were included. The scientific and trivial names of the plants are given (trivials in Spanish marked by an asterisk). They had the following trophozoite mortality (mean +/- SD in percent): Justicia spicigera (muicle*) = 91 +/- 0.5; Lipia beriandieri (oregano) = 90 +/- 0.6; Psidium guajava (guava) = 87 +/- 1.0; positive control of tinidazol = 79 +/- 1.9; Punica granutus (granado*) = 78 +/- 1.3; Magnifera indica (mango) = 77 +/- 1.0; Plantago major (lante*) = 76 +/- 1.2; Cupressus semperbirens (cipres) = 73 +/- 1.2; Castella tormentosa (chaparro amargoso*) = 70 +/- 0.7; Hematoxilon campechanum (palo de Campeche*) = 67 +/- 1.2. Without or with a low mean activity were Prosopis juliflora (mesquite*) and Rizophora mangle (mangle*) with 0%, Oriza sativa (rice) with 5%, Capsicum annum (pimiento*) with 21% and Persea americana (avocado) with 23%. There were no associations of the antigiardiasic effect with concentration or osmolality of the extracts. A clear in vitro antigiardiasic effects was seen in nine species. Three of them were superior to tinidazol which is a drug of common use in the treatment of giardiasis.

  18. Management strategies in the treatment of neonatal and pediatric gastroenteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciccarelli S

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Simona Ciccarelli,1 Ilaria Stolfi,1 Giuseppe Caramia2 1Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy; 2Division of Neonatology and Pediatrics, Maternal and Child Hospital "G. Salesi", Ancona, Italy Abstract: Acute gastroenteritis, characterized by the onset of diarrhea with or without vomiting, continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children in mostly resource-constrained nations. Although generally a mild and self-limiting disease, gastroenteritis is one of the most common causes of hospitalization and is associated with a substantial disease burden. Worldwide, up to 40% of children aged less than 5 years with diarrhea are hospitalized with rotavirus. Also, some microorganisms have been found predominantly in resource-constrained nations, including Shigella spp, Vibrio cholerae, and the protozoan infections. Prevention remains essential, and the rotavirus vaccines have demonstrated good safety and efficacy profiles in large clinical trials. Because dehydration is the major complication associated with gastroenteritis, appropriate fluid management (oral or intravenous is an effective and safe strategy for rehydration. Continuation of breastfeeding is strongly recommended. New treatments such as antiemetics (ondansetron, some antidiarrheal agents (racecadotril, and chemotherapeutic agents are often proposed, but not yet universally recommended. Probiotics, also known as “food supplement,” seem to improve intestinal microbial balance, reducing the duration and the severity of acute infectious diarrhea. The European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and the European Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases guidelines make a stronger recommendation for the use of probiotics for the management of acute gastroenteritis, particularly those with documented efficacy such as Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactobacillus reuteri, and Saccharomyces boulardii. To date, the

  19. Purification and characterization of a CkTLP protein from Cynanchum komarovii seeds that confers antifungal activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cynanchum komarovii Al Iljinski is a desert plant that has been used as analgesic, anthelminthic and antidiarrheal, but also as a herbal medicine to treat cholecystitis in people. We have found that the protein extractions from C. komarovii seeds have strong antifungal activity. There is strong interest to develop protein medication and antifungal pesticides from C. komarovii for pharmacological or other uses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An antifungal protein with sequence homology to thaumatin-like proteins (TLPs was isolated from C. komarovii seeds and named CkTLP. The three-dimensional structure prediction of CkTLP indicated the protein has an acid cleft and a hydrophobic patch. The protein showed antifungal activity against fungal growth of Verticillium dahliae, Fusarium oxysporum, Rhizoctonia solani, Botrytis cinerea and Valsa mali. The full-length cDNA was cloned by RT-PCR and RACE-PCR according to the partial protein sequences obtained by nanoESI-MS/MS. The real-time PCR showed the transcription level of CkTLP had a significant increase under the stress of abscisic acid (ABA, salicylic acid (SA, methyl jasmonate (MeJA, NaCl and drought, which indicates that CkTLP may play an important role in response to abiotic stresses. Histochemical staining showed GUS activity in almost the whole plant, especially in cotyledons, trichomes and vascular tissues of primary root and inflorescences. The CkTLP protein was located in the extracellular space/cell wall by CkTLP::GFP fusion protein in transgenic Arabidopsis. Furthermore, over-expression of CkTLP significantly enhanced the resistance of Arabidopsis against V. dahliae. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest that the CkTLP is a good candidate protein or gene for contributing to the development of disease-resistant crops.

  20. The application of 1,8-cineole, a terpenoid oxide present in medicinal plants, inhibits castor oil-induced diarrhea in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilzadeh-Amin, Ghader; Maham, Massoud

    2015-04-01

    1,8-Cineole, a terpene, characterized as a major constituent occurring in the essential oils of several aromatic plants. It is widely used in pharmaceutical industry, as a food additive and for culinary purposes. This study investigates the inhibitory effect of 1,8-cineole on transit time and diarrhea in animal models. Acute toxicity and lethality of 1-8-cineole was determined by Lork's guidelines. The antidiarrheal effect of 1,8-cineole was investigated by determining the intestinal transit and enterpooling in rats. In all experiments, different doses of 1,8-cineole (20-120 mg/kg), atropine, and loperamide were administered orally. The LD50 of 1,8-cineole for oral administration was estimated to be 1280 mg/kg. 1,8-Cineole (20-120 mg/kg) did not show a significant decrease in small intestine transit (p > 0.05); however, the highest dose displayed a significant decrease in comparison with atropine (p castor oil transit test. 1,8-Cineole significantly delayed the onset of diarrhea to -142.33 ± 6.08 min at 120 mg/kg, while the time was 103.66 ± 20.73 min for the control and >240 min for the loperamide. Moreover, 1,8-cineole significantly decreased intestinal fluid accumulation (p < 0.05). This study demonstrated antispasmodic and antisecretory activities of 1,8-cineole and rationalized the traditional use of the plant containing various levels of this terpene in the treatment of gastrointestinal complains such as diarrhea.

  1. Burden of acute gastroenteritis among children younger than 5 years of age – a survey among parents in the United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite its high incidence among children under the age of five, little is known about the burden of pediatric gastroenteritis outside the medical setting. The objective of this study was to describe the burden of acute gastroenteritis among children residing in the United Arab Emirates, including those not receiving medical care. Methods A quantitative cross-sectional survey of 500 parents of children under 5 years of age who had suffered from acute gastroenteritis the preceding three months was conducted in the cities of Abu Dhabi and Al Ain. Data collected included respondent characteristics, disease symptoms, medical care sought, and parental expenditures and work loss. Data were analyzed using parametric and non-parametric statistical methods. Results Vomiting and diarrhea episodes lasted on average between 3 and 4 days. Overall, 87% of parents sought medical care for their children; 10% of these cases required hospitalization with an average length of stay of 2.6 days. When medical care was sought, the average parental cost per gastroenteritis episode was US$64, 4.5 times higher than with home care only (US$14). Nearly 60% of this difference was attributable to co-payments and medication use: 69% of children used oral rehydration solution, 68% antiemetics, 65% antibiotics and 64% antidiarrheals. Overall, 38 parents missed work per 100 gastroenteritis episodes for an average of 1.4 days. Conclusions Given its high incidence, pediatric gastroenteritis has an important financial and productivity impact on parents in the United Arab Emirates. To reduce this impact, efforts should be made both to prevent acute gastroenteritis and to optimize its treatment. PMID:22708988

  2. Big Data and Heath Impacts of Drinking Water Quality Violation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaire, M.; Zheng, S.; Lall, U.

    2017-12-01

    Health impacts of drinking water quality violations are only understood at a coarse level in the United States. This limits identification of threats to water security in communities across the country. Substantial under-reporting is suspected due to requirements at U.S. public health institutes that water borne illnesses be confirmed by health providers. In the era of `big data', emerging information sources could offer insight into waterborne disease trends. In this study, we explore the use of fine-resolution sales data for over-the-counter medicine to estimate the health impacts of drinking water quality violations. We also demonstrate how unreported water quality issues can be detected by observing market behavior. We match a panel of supermarket sales data for the U.S. at the weekly level with geocoded violations data from 2006-2015. We estimate the change in anti-diarrheal medicine sale due to drinking water violations using a fixed effects model. We find that water quality violations have considerable effects on medicine sales. Sales nearly double due to Tier 1 violations, which pose an immediate health risk, and sales increase 15.1 percent due to violations related to microorganisms. Furthermore, our estimate of diarrheal illness cases associated with water quality violations indicates that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reporting system may only capture about one percent of diarrheal cases due to impaired water. Incorporating medicine sales data could offer national public health institutes a game-changing way to improve monitoring of disease outbreaks. Since many disease cases are not formally diagnosed by health providers, consumption information could provide additional information to remedy under-reporting issues and improve water security in communities across the United States.

  3. Pathophysiology and therapy of irinotecan-induced delayed-onset diarrhea in patients with advanced colorectal cancer: a prospective assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, F; Hagipantelli, R; Misset, J L; Bastian, G; Vassal, G; Bonnay, M; Herait, P; Cote, C; Mahjoubi, M; Mignard, D; Cvitkovic, E

    1998-08-01

    Irinotecan (CPT-11), a camptothecin derivative, has shown efficacy against colorectal cancer. Delayed-onset diarrhea is its main limiting toxicity. The aim of this study was to determine the pathophysiology of CPT-11-induced delayed-onset diarrhea and assess the efficacy of combined antidiarrheal medication in a phase II, prospective, successive-cohorts, open study. Twenty-eight patients with advanced colorectal cancer refractory to fluorouracil (5-FU) therapy received CPT-11 350 mg/m2 every 3 weeks. The first cohort of 14 consecutive patients explored for the mechanism of diarrhea received acetorphan (a new enkephalinase inhibitor) 100 mg three times daily; the second 14-patient cohort received, in addition to acetorphan, loperamide 4 mg three times daily. Before treatment, and if late diarrhea occurred, patients underwent colon mucosal biopsies for CPT-11 and topoisomerase I levels; intestinal transit time; fecalogram; fat and protein excretion; alpha1-antitrypsin clearance; D-xylose test; blood levels for vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, glucagon, gastrin, somatostatin, prostaglandin E2, and carboxylesterase; CPT-11/SN-38 and SN-38 glucuronide pharmacokinetics; and stool cultures. Delayed-onset diarrhea occurred during the first three treatment cycles in 23 patients (82%). Electrolyte fecal measurements showed a negative or small osmotic gap in nine of nine patients and an increased alpha1-antitrypsin clearance in six of six patients. There were no modifications in stool cultures or hormonal dysfunction. Four of 11 patients (36%) with delayed-onset diarrhea in the first cohort responded to acetorphan, whereas nine of 10 patients (90%) responded to the combination of acetorphan and loperamide (P diarrhea is caused by a secretory mechanism with an exudative component. Early combined treatment with loperamide and acetorphan seems effective in controlling the diarrheal episodes.

  4. Improved Childhood Diarrhea Treatment Practices in Ghana: A Pre-Post Evaluation of a Comprehensive Private-Sector Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Khoury, Marianne; Banke, Kathryn; Sloane, Phoebe

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Diarrhea is the fourth leading cause of child mortality in Ghana. In 2010, Ghana endorsed guidelines from the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children’s Fund for use of zinc with low-osmolarity oral rehydration salts (ORS) for the treatment of acute childhood diarrhea. From late 2011 through 2014, the Strengthening Health Outcomes through the Private Sector (SHOPS) project implemented a comprehensive program in 3 regions of Ghana to increase the availability and use of ORS and zinc and to decrease incorrect use of antibiotics and antidiarrheals. The program included (1) partnering with local pharmaceutical firms to introduce and market locally produced zinc products, (2) collaborating with the Ghanaian Pharmacy Council to provide training and supportive supervision of private-sector providers on diarrhea management, and (3) conducting mass media campaigns to raise caregiver awareness. We evaluated the effect of this program using a baseline survey of 754 caregivers of children under 5 with diarrhea at the start of the intervention in 2012 and a follow-up survey of 751 caregivers in 2014. Regression analysis showed that use of ORS with zinc increased from 0.8% in 2012 to 29.2% in 2014 (P<.001), and antibiotic use declined from 66.2% to 38.2% (P<.001) during the same period. The magnitude and statistical significance of these results remained the same after including potential confounding factors as covariates. Inappropriate antibiotic use, however, remained high at follow-up. We conclude that similar programs applied in other settings have the potential to rapidly scale up use of ORS and zinc. Additional efforts are required to reduce persistent incorrect antibiotic use. PMID:27353619

  5. Chemical composition and in vitro cytotoxic effects of the essential oil from Nectandra leucantha leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecco, Simone dos S; Martins, Euder Glendes A; Girola, Natália; de Figueiredo, Carlos R; Matsuo, Alisson L; Soares, Marisi G; Bertoldo, Bruno de C; Sartorelli, Patricia; Lago, João Henrique G

    2015-01-01

    Nectandra (Lauraceae) species have been used in folk medicine as an antidiarrheal, analgesic, antifungal, etc., and have many pharmacological proprieties. Investigation of the chemical composition and cytotoxicity of essential oil from Nectandra leucantha Nees & Mart. leaves. This is the first study involving N. leucantha reported in the literature. The essential oil of N. leucantha leaves was obtained by hydrodistillation. Its chemical composition was determined using a combination of GC/FID, GC/MS, and determination of Kovats index (KI). In vitro cytotoxic activity was evaluated against six cancer cell lines - murine melanoma (B16F10-Nex2), human glioblastome (U-87), human cervical carcinoma (HeLa), human colon carcinoma (HCT), human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF7), and human cervical tumor (Siha) as well as against one non-tumorigenic cell line - human foreskin fibroblast (HFF). Thirty-three compounds were identified primarily sesquiterpenes (81.41%), the main compounds being bicyclogermacrene (28.44%), germacrene A (7.34%), spathulenol (5.82%), and globulol (5.25%). Furthermore, monoterpenes were also found in the analyzed oil (12.84%), predominantly α- and β-pinenes (6.59 and 4.57%, respectively). The crude essential oil displayed significant cytotoxic activity against B16F10-Nex2 (IC50 33 ± 1 μg/mL) and U87 (IC50 75.95 ± 0.03 μg/mL) and HeLa (IC50 60 ± 12 μg/mL) cell lines. The main identified compound, bicyclogermacrene, displayed IC50 ranging from 3.1 ± 0.2 to 21 ± 6 μg/mL. The results indicate that the crude oils from leaves of N. leucantha displayed cytotoxic activity being bicyclogermacrene, the main compound identified in the crude oil responsible, at least in part, for this potential.

  6. Anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of the stem bark of Byrsonima intermedia A. Juss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandi, Lidiane; Vilela, Fabiana C; Santa-Cecília, Flávia V; Dias, Danielle F; Alves-da-Silva, Geraldo; Giusti-Paiva, Alexandre

    2011-10-11

    Byrsonima intermedia A. Juss. is popularly known as "murici pequeno" and is native to the Brazilian Cerrado. This species has been used as an antimicrobial, anti-hemorrhagic, anti-diarrheal and anti-inflammatory. Nevertheless, scientific information regarding Byrsonima intermedia is limited; there are no reports related to its possible anti inflammatory and antinociceptive effects. This study employed in vivo inflammatory and nociceptive models to evaluate the scientific basis for the traditional use of Byrsonima intermedia. Carrageenan-induced paw edema, peritonitis and fibrovascular tissue growth induced by s.c. cotton pellet implantation tests were used to investigate the anti-inflammatory activity of Byrsonima intermedia aqueous extract (BiAE) in rats. Mechanical nociceptive paw, formalin and hot plate tests were used to evaluate the antinociceptive activity in mice. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), phytochemistry screening and determination of total phenolics and flavonoids were used to determine the chemical profile of the BiAE. BiAE at test doses of 30-300 mg/kg p.o. clearly demonstrated anti-inflammatory effects by reduced carrageenan-induced paw edema, by inhibited leukocyte recruitment into the peritoneal cavity and, in the model of chronic inflammation, by using the cotton pellet-induced fibrovascular tissue growth in rats. The extracts at test doses of 30-300 mg/kg p.o. clearly demonstrated antinociceptive activity in all tests. Administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone completely inhibited the antinociceptive effect induced by BiAE (100 mg/kg). BiAE markedly exhibits anti-inflammatory action in rats and antinociceptive activity in mice. Thus, it may be useful in the treatment of inflammatory hyperalgesic disorders, which supports previous claims of its traditional use. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Efficacious rat model displays non-toxic effect with Korean beechwood creosote: a possible antibiotic substitute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quynh, Anh Nguyen Thai; Sharma, Neelesh; Cho, Kwang Keun; Yeo, Tae Jong; Kim, Ki Beom; Jeong, Chul Yon; Min, Tae Sun; Young, Kim Jae; Kim, Jin Nam; Jeong, Dong-Kee

    2014-01-01

    Wood creosote, an herbal anti-diarrheal and a mixture of major volatile compounds, was tested for its non-toxicological effects, using a rat model, with the objective to use the creosote as an antibiotic substitute. A total of 30 Sprague-Dawley rats were studied to form five groups with 6 rats each. Korea beechwood creosote was supplemented into three test groups with 0.03 g/kg, 0.07 g/kg and 0.1 g/kg body weight/day without antibiotic support, along with a positive control of Apramycin sulphate (at 0.5% of the daily feed) and a negative control. Korean beechwood creosote supplementation showed no negative effect on the body weight gain in comparison to the negative and the positive control groups and the feed conversion ratio was also comparable with that of the control groups. The clinical pathology parameters studied were also under the umbrella of normal range, including liver specific enzymes, blood glucose, total protein, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), which indicated no toxic effect of creosote at the given doses. The non-hepatotoxic effect was also confirmed using hepatic damage specific molecular markers like Tim-p1, Tim-p2 and Tgf-β1. The results suggested that Korean beechwood may be used as antibiotic substitute in weanling pigs feed without any toxic effect on the body. Although the antimicrobial properties of creosote were not absolutely similar to those of apramycin sulphate, they were comparable. PMID:26019530

  8. Identification of known chemicals and their metabolites from Alpinia oxyphylla fruit extract in rat plasma using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with selected reaction monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Li, Hai-Long; Tan, Yin-Feng; Li, Yong-Hui; Lai, Wei-Yong; Guan, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Jun-Qing; Zhao, Yuan-Sheng; Qin, Zhen-Miao

    2014-08-01

    Alpinia oxyphylla (Yizhi) capsularfruits are commonly used in traditional medicine. Pharmacological studies have demonstrated that A. oxyphylla capsularfruits have some beneficial roles. Besides volatile oil, sesquiterpenes, diarylheptanoids and flavonoids are main bioactive constituents occurring in the Yizhi capsularfruits. The representative constituents include tectochrysin, izalpinin, chrysin, apigenin-4',7-dimethylether, kaempferide, yakuchinone A, yakuchinone B, oxyphyllacinol and nootkatone. Their content levels in the fruit and its pharmaceutical preparations have been reported by our group. The nine phytochemicals are also the major components present in the Yizhi alcoholic extracts, which have anti-diarrheal activities. However, the fates of these constituents in the body after oral or intravenous administration remain largely unknown. In the present study, we focus on these phytochemicals albeit other concomitant compounds. The chemicals and their metabolites in rat plasma were identified using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry with selected reaction monitoring mode after orally administered Yizhi extract to rats. Rat plasma samples were treated by methanol precipitation, acidic or enzymatic hydrolysis. This target analysis study revealed that: (1) low or trace plasma levels of parent chemicals were measured after p.o. administration of Yizhi extract, Suoquan capsules and pills to rats; (2) flavonoids and diarylheptanoids formed mainly monoglucuronide metabolites; however, diglucuronide metabolites for chrysin, izalpinin and kaempferide were also detected; (3) metabolic reduction of Yizhi diarylheptanoids occurred in rats. Yakuchinone B was reduced to yakuchinone A and then to oxyphyllacinol in a stepwise manner and subsequently glucuronidated by UDP-glucuronosyl transferase. Further research is needed to characterize the UDP-glucuronosyl transferase and reductase involved in the biotransformation of Yizhi chemicals. Copyright © 2014

  9. Prevalence of Self-Medication among Students of Pharmacy and Medicine Colleges of a Public Sector University in Dammam City, Saudi Arabia

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    Fatimah Ali Albusalih

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacy and medical students are expected to be more knowledgeable regarding rational use of medications as compared to the general public. A cross-sectional study was conducted among students of pharmacy and medicine colleges of Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University in Dammam, Saudi Arabia using a survey questionnaire. The duration of the study was six months. The aim was to report self-medication prevalence of prescription and non-prescription drugs among pharmacy and medical students. The prevalence of self-medication in the pharmacy college was reported at 19.61%. Prevalence of self-medication at the medical college was documented at 49.3%. The prevalence of multivitamin use was reported at 30.53%, analgesics; 72.35%, antihistamines; 39.16%, and antibiotic use at 16.59%. The prevalence of anti-diarrheal medicines and antacids use among students was found to be 8.63% and 6.64%, respectively. The variable of college and study year was statistically associated with the nature of the medicines. The most common justifications given by students indulging in self-medication were ‘mild problems’ and ‘previous experience with medicines’. Our study reported that prevalence of self-medication in the College of Clinical Pharmacy was low, i.e., 19.61%. The figure has been reported for the first time. Students were mostly observed self-medicating with OTC drugs, however, some reported using corticosteroids and isotretenoin, which are quite dangerous if self-medicated. Students have a positive outlook towards pharmacists as drug information experts.

  10. The effect of biologically active feed additives of humilid substances on the antioxidant system in liver mitochondria of gerbils

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    O. O. Dyomshina

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are organelles that are most sensitive to the action of stressors on any cell of the entire organism and exposure to chemicals which can cause its dysfunction and cell death in general. Especially sensitive to adverse conditions are liver mitochondria, where the processes of biotransformation of endogenous and exogenous metabolites are formed, not only in the liver, but also in other organs and tissues. Mitochondrial dysfunction can cause instant hepatic cytolysis and steatosis. Therefore, early detection of mitochondrial toxicity is important during preclinical studies of new pharmacological agents, as this will help avoid remote negative effects. The biologically active feed additive Humilid, a complex of humic acids known for their antidiarrheal, analgesic, immune-stimulating, and antimicrobial properties; shows a corrective effect on the activity of the lysosomal cathepsin; enhances the positive effect of hematopoiesis on hemoglobin and its quality indicators consisting of red blood cells; and activates the synthesis and accumulation of fibronectin expression that takes part in the formation of immunological protection of animals. The objective of our experiment was to determine the effect of complex biologically active feed additives based on humic substances on the biochemical indicators of the liver mitochondrial antioxidant system of Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus Milne-Edwards, 1867. The experiment was conducted on mature (6 months Mongolian gerbils. The data obtained showing the influence of the biologically active feed additives Humilid, alone or in combination with ascorbate and Eco-impulse Animal, on the antioxidant defense system of liver mitochondria of gerbils are presented in this article. The proven antioxidant effect of humic substances in the mitochondrial fraction of the liver which inhibits the accumulation of oxidized products in the cells is shown, confirmed by the decrease in the number of TBA

  11. Flavonoids from whole Plant ofEuphorbia hirtaand their Evaluation against Experimentally induced Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shyam Sundar; Azmi, Lubna; Mohapatra, P K; Rao, Ch V

    2017-01-01

    Euphorbia hirta possesses antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, galactogenic, antidiarrheal, antioxidant, hypoglycemic, antiasthmatic, antiamebic, antifungal, and antimalarial activities. The overall objective of the current study was the investigation of the whole plant extract of E. hirta and flavonoids from E. hirta on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in rats. The whole plant extract of E. hirta was characterized by analysis of flavonoids (HPLC: HPLC, UV, IR, MS and 1 HNMR). GERD model was induced surgically in Wistar rats under pentobarbitone sodium anesthesia (50 mg/kg, i.p.) and the tissue esophagus and stomach were removed. The tissues were washed with physiological saline and were examined for GERD. The whole plant extract of E. hirta in doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg were administered orally twice daily at 10:00 and 16:00 hours, respectively, for 5 days and kaempferol (100 mg/kg) or omeprazole (OMZ) in the dose of 30 mg/kg 1 hour prior to the induction of GERD. Control groups received suspension of 1% carboxymethyl cellulose in distilled water (10 mL/kg). The levels of gastric wall mucus increased and of plasma histamine and H + , K + ATPase significantly decreased in groups treated by both the plant extract and flavonoids. Both the plant extract and flavonoids reduced the lipid peroxidation and superoxide dismutase and increased the levels of catalase and reduced glutathione. The whole plant extract of E. hirta is attributed to its antisecretory, gastroprotective, and antioxidant potential as that of quercetin, rutin, kaempferol, and proton pump blocker (omeprazole) to treat GERD. The aqueous extract of whole plant of Euphorbia hirta revealed the presence of kaempferol (0.0256%), quercetin (0.0557%), and rutin (0.0151%), and the ethyl acetate fraction of whole plant of E. hirta possesses kaempferol (0.0487%), quercetin (0.0789%), and rutin (0.0184%).The levels of gastric wall mucus increased and of plasma histamine and H + -K + -ATPase significantly

  12. Side-to-end vs. straight stapled colorectal anastomosis after low anterior resection: results of randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybakov, E G; Pikunov, D Yu; Fomenko, O Yu; Chernyshov, S V; Shelygin, Yu A

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to compare surgical, functional, physiologic outcomes and QOL after low anterior resection (LAR) with andside-to-end or straight colorectal anastomosis. Between 2012 and 2015, 86 patients with mid and low rectal tumors were enrolled into randomized trial. Wexner score, number of defecations, use of antidiarrheal medicine or laxatives, enemas, pads, episodes of nocturnal incontinence, and urgency were recorded. The Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life (FIQL) scale was used for assessment of QOL. Anal manometry and volumetric examination were performed. Six patients were excluded from the study. There was no mortality. The morbidity rate was 6 (14.6 %) for side-to-end vs. 8 (20.0 %) for straight anastomosis (p = 0.57). The median Wexner score was 5 vs. 6 (p = 0.033), 4 vs. 5 (p = 0.006), and 2 vs. 3 (p = 0.1) at 1, 3, and 6 months after stoma reversal, respectively. Side-to-end anastomosis resulted in a fewer mean numbers of bowel movements per day at the same check points of follow-up: 5.8 ± 0.14 vs. 6.4 ± 0.15 (p = 0.006), 3.7 ± 0.1 vs. 4.2 ± 0.1 (p = 0.003), and 2.5 ± 0.1 vs. 3.0 ± 0.10 (p = 0.0002), correspondingly. Maximal tolerated volume was higher for side-to-end anastomosis at 3 and 6 months of follow-up: 152.0 vs. 137.8 cm(3) (p = 0.002) and 180.5 vs. 167.0 cm(3) (p = 0.006), respectively. Better FIQL score was found at 1 and 3 months in the side-to-end group. Better functional outcomes and QOL were observed in a short period after stoma closure, but at 6 months of follow-up, the only benefit of side-to-end anastomosis was a lower number of bowel movements.

  13. Morfoanatomia de folha e caule de Genipa americana L., Rubiaceae Leaf and stem morpho-anatomy of Genipa americana L., Rubiaceae

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    Marianna Erbano

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Genipa americana L., conhecida como jenipapo, é uma Rubiaceae nativa do Brasil e as suas folhas são utilizadas pela população como antidiarreico e febrífugo, e o caule como anti-hemorrágico, contra luxações e contusões. Com o objetivo de caracterizar macro e microscopicamente folhas adultas e caules jovens para o controle de qualidade farmacognóstico, essa planta medicinal foi analisada segundo a metodologia clássica de morfoanatomia vegetal. Genipa americana apresenta folhas simples, opostas, de formato obovado a oblanceolado e pecíolos curtos. A epiderme foliar é uniestratificada e revestida por cutícula delgada e levemente estriada. Os estômatos são paracíticos e restritos à superfície abaxial. Há tricomas tectores uni e pluricelulares predominantemente na superfície abaxial. O mesofilo é dorsiventral. Em secção transversal, a nervura central é plano-convexa e o pecíolo é circular, ambos apresentando um feixe vascular colateral em disposição cilíndrica e outros menores. O caule possui felogênio localizado nas camadas subepidérmicas, colênquima anelar e um cilindro floemático externo ao de xilema, sendo ambos percorridos por raios parenquimáticos estreitos. Ocorrem idioblastos contendo compostos fenólicos, areia cristalina e drusas de oxalato de cálcio na folha e no caule.Genipa americana L., known as jenipapo, is a Rubiaceae species native to Brazil. Its leaves are used by the population as anti-diarrheic and febrifuge, and its stem as anti-hemorrhagic and for trauma injuries. Aiming to identify macro and microscopically mature leaves and young stems for the pharmacognostic quality control, this medicinal plant was investigated according to standard morpho-anatomical techniques. The leaves are simple, opposite, obovate-oblanceolate, presenting short petiole. The epidermis is uniseriate and coated with thin and slightly striate cuticle. The stomata are paracytic and restricted to the abaxial surface. It

  14. Oroxylum indicum (L.) Kurz, an important Asian traditional medicine: from traditional uses to scientific data for its commercial exploitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinda, B; SilSarma, I; Dinda, M; Rudrapaul, P

    2015-02-23

    Oroxylum indicum\\ (L.) Kurz has been used for centuries as a traditional medicine in Asia in ethnomedicinal systems for the prevention and treatment of several diseases, such as jaundice, arthritic and rheumatic problems, gastric ulcers, tumors, respiratory diseases, diabetes, and diarrhea and dysentery, among others. The present review provides scientific evidence supporting the therapeutic potency of the plant for ethnomedicinal uses and identifies gaps for future research to facilitate commercial exploitation. This review is based on available information on traditional uses and phytochemical, pharmacological, clinical and toxicity data for Oroxylum indicum that was collected from electronic (SciFinder, PubMed, Science Direct, and ACS, among others) and library searches. A variety of traditional medicinal uses of Oroxylum indicum in different Southeast and South Asian countries have been reported in books describing the uses of these plants. Phytochemical investigations of the different parts of the plant resulted in identification of approximately 111 compounds, among which flavonoids, naphthalenoids and cyclohexylethanoids are the predominant groups. The crude extracts and their isolates exhibit a wide spectrum of in vitro and in vivo pharmacological activities involving antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anti-arthritic, anticancer, anti-ulcer, hepatoprotective, antidiabetic, antidiarrheal and antioxidant activities. Flavonoids are the major constituents of all parts of the plant. From a toxicity perspective, only aqueous and ethanolic extracts of stem bark, root bark and fruits have been assessed and found to be safe. The major flavonoids of the stem bark, such as baicalein, chrysin and oroxylin A, were reported for the first time as natural flavonoids with potent inhibitory activity against endoprotease enzymes and proprotein convertases, which play a key role in the growth of cancer and in viral and bacterial infections. Flavonoids are the active components

  15. Observational Study of Travelers' Diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuris

    1995-03-01

    Background: European air travelers returning from Algeria, Egypt, Mexico, Morocco, and Tunisia were interviewed about their experience of travelers' diseases upon arrival in Brussels. Diarrhea was mentioned by 37% of the adults and 27% of the children. These subjects were questioned about the types of measures taken, type and duration of drug treatment (if any), and about duration of diarrhea and side effects experienced. Methods: Final analysis was performed based on 2160 interviews. The largest proportion of diarrhea was reported in the age group 15-24 years (46%). Results: The majority of the 2160 subjects had opted for drug treatment (81%): 927 subjects for loperamide alone, 235 for loperamide in combination with nifuroxazide, and 178 for nifuroxazide alone. Other drugs had been used less frequently. The median time to recovery was 2.4 days with loperamide compared to 3.2 days with nifuroxazide and to 3.4 days for the no-treatment group. Conclusions: A stratification of the results by severity of the diarrhea suggests a rank of antidiarrheal potency as follows: loperamide > nifuroxazide > no-drug treatment. The side effect with the highest incidence was constipation (2.4% with loperamide). (J Travel Med 2:11-15, 1995) Travelers' diarrhea is usually defined as the passage of at least three unformed stools per day or any number of such stools when accompanied by fever, abdominal cramping, or vomiting. The definition may be broadened to include more trivial bowel disturbance.1,2 The duration of this self-limited disease generally is 3 to 5 days. Medical intervention aims at shortening the duration of disease, thus allowing the sufferer to resume his or her usual activities at an early stage. A shortened period of recovery to physical well-being has obvious favorable economic implications if the traveler is on business and may help the maintenance of a desired level of quality of life while a traveler is on holiday. An observational study of various medical

  16. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Nanomedicine for the Management of Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayawardena, Dulari; Anbazhagan, Arivarasu N; Guzman, Grace; Dudeja, Pradeep K; Onyuksel, Hayat

    2017-11-06

    was abrogated in VIP-SSM treated mice and not with free VIP. Furthermore, reduced protein and mRNA levels of the major chloride bicarbonate exchanger, down regulated in adenoma (DRA), seen with DSS was reversed with VIP-SSM, but not with the free peptide. Similarly, VIP-SSM treatment significantly reduced the elevated mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and showed significant histologic recovery when compared to mice treated with free VIP. Therefore, these results demonstrated that as a single dose, the anti-inflammatory and antidiarrheal effects of VIP can be achieved effectively when administered as a nanomedicine. Therefore, we propose VIP-SSM to be developed as a potential therapeutic tool for treating ulcerative colitis, a type of IBD.

  17. Kaolinite in pharmaceutics and biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Mahmoud E; López-Galindo, Alberto; Setti, Massimo; El-Rahmany, Mahmoud M; Iborra, César Viseras

    2017-11-25

    Kaolinite Al 2 Si 2 O 5 (OH) 4 is an abundant and inexpensive geomaterial regarded as one of the most common clay minerals in the earth's crust and the most widespread phase among the other kaolin polymorphs (halloysite, dickite and nacrite). Structurally, it is a hydrous aluminum phyllosilicate member belonging to the dioctahedral 1:1 kaolin mineral group. The particle size of the pseudohexagonal kaolinite platelets is normally kaolinite platelets, either stacked together with a common booklet-like shape in a highly ordered structure (well crystallized) or disordered structure (poorly crystallized), consist of layers considered as a strong dipole of hydrophobic siloxane surface dominated by negative charges, and the other hydrophilic aluminol surface carries positive charges. Kaolinite has been used in many pharmaceutical applications as excipient or active ingredient, because it exhibits excellent physical, chemical and surface physicochemical properties. In addition to their classical pharmaceutical uses, kaolinite and its derivatives have been recently considered as a promising material in many biomedical innovation areas such as drug, protein and gene delivery based on the high interaction capacities with organic and biochemical molecules, bioadhesion and cellular uptake. Pharmaceutical kaolin grades are considerably demanded for usage as excipient in formulations of solid and semi-solid dosage forms. The most important functionalities of kaolin used as excipient are reported as diluent, binder, disintegrant, pelletizing and granulating, amorphizing, particle film coating, emulsifying and suspending agent. Because of its uninjured bioactivity, kaolinite has been also used as active agent for treatment of some common diseases. It can be topically administered as hemostatic agent, dermatological protector, anti-inflammatory agent and in pelotherapy, or orally as gastrointestinal protector, and antibacterial, antiviral, detoxification or antidiarrheal agent. With

  18. Limitations of indirect methods of estimating small bowel transit in man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pressman, J.H.; Hofmann, A.F.; Witztum, K.F.; Gertler, S.L.; Steinbach, J.H.; Stokes, K.; Kelts, D.G.; Stone, D.M.; Jones, B.R.; Dharmsathaphorn, K.

    1987-07-01

    Experiments were carried out in healthy volunteers to explore the utility of a new (/sup 14/C)lactulose breath test for measuring small intestinal transit time in man and to use this procedure to test whether two antidiarrheal agents, codeine and clonidine, alter small intestinal transit time during digestion of a liquid meal. In an initial validation study performed in 12 subjects, a liquid test meal containing 10 g (/sup 14/C)lactulose was administered and the colonic entry time estimated from the time course of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ excretion in breath compared with that of H/sub 2/ excretion. There was a fair correlation (r = 0.77; P less than 0.001) between results obtained by the two methods; both methods gave similar results, but /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ output was delayed when compared to H/sub 2/ output and was incomplete. The meal also contained xylose and (/sup 13/C)glycine, permitting the duodenal entry time of the meal to be estimated by the appearance of xylose in blood and /sup 13/CO/sub 2/ in breath, respectively. The same liquid meal was then used to examine the effect on small intestinal transit time (colonic entry time minus duodenal entry time) of codeine or clonidine. 99Tc-sulfur colloid was also added to the meal to permit a comparison of small intestinal transit estimated by imaging with that estimated by the /sup 14/CO/sub 2/-lactulose breath test. /sup 99/Tc radioactivity appeared in the cecum (as assessed using gamma scintigraphy) about 2 hr before /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ radioactivity appeared in breath; the correlation between transit time estimated by the two methods was moderate (r = 0.61; P less than 0.05). Based on the (/sup 14/C)lactulose data, small intestinal transit time ranged from less than 1 to 3 hr for a liquid meal containing 10 g lactulose; within-subject variation was considerably less than between-subject variation.

  19. Identifying factors associated with clinical success in patients treated with NASHA®/Dx injection for fecal incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin H

    2016-03-01

    duration (P=0.0289, or obstetric causes of FI (P=0.0384. Patients without a history of specific FI treatments (eg, antidiarrheal medications, biofeedback, surgery were more likely to respond to NASHA/Dx versus sham treatment for both end points. Conclusion: Although all subgroups analyzed showed evidence of quantitative and qualitative benefit from NASHA/Dx therapy, patients with characteristics indicative of mild-to-moderate FI may exhibit the greatest benefit. Keywords: responder analysis, quality of life, coping/behavior, Solesta

  20. American Brachytherapy Society recommendations for reporting morbidity after prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nag, Subir; Ellis, Rodney J.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Bahnson, Robert; Wallner, Kent; Stock, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To standardize the reporting of brachytherapy-related prostate morbidity to guide ongoing clinical practice and future investigations. Methods: Members of the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) with expertise in prostate brachytherapy performed a literature review and, guided by their clinical experience, formulated specific recommendations for reporting on morbidity related to prostate brachytherapy. Results: The ABS recommends using validated, patient-administered health-related quality-of-life instruments for the determination of baseline and follow-up data regarding bowel, urinary, and sexual function. Both actuarial and crude incidences should be reported, along with the temporal resolution of specific complications, and correlated with the doses to the normal tissues. The International Prostate Symptom Score is recommended to assess urinary morbidity, and any dysuria, gross hematuria, urinary retention, incontinence, or medication use should be quantified. Likewise, the ''Sexual Health Inventory for Men,'' which includes the specific erectile questions of the International Index of Erectile Function, is the preferred instrument for reporting sexual function, and the loss of sexual desire, incidence of hematospermia, painful orgasm (orgasmalgia), altered orgasm intensity, decreased ejaculatory volume, use of erectile aids, and use of hormones for androgen deprivation should be quantified. The ABS recommends adoption of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer acute and late radiation morbidity scoring scheme for reporting rectal morbidity and noting the incidence of rectal steroid, laser, or antidiarrheal use. Conclusion: It is important to focus on health-related quality-of-life issues in the treatment of prostate cancer, because the control rates are very similar between appropriate treatment modalities. The ABS recommends using the International Prostate Symptom Score, International Index of

  1. The correlation of acute toxicity and late rectal injury in radiotherapy for cervical carcinoma: Evidence suggestive of consequential late effect (CQLE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.-J.; Leung, Stephen Wan; Chen, H.-C.; Sun, L.-M.; Fang, F.-M.; Huang, E.-Y.; Hsiung, C.-Y.; Changchien, C.-C.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate the acute toxicity during pelvic irradiation and the development of late rectal injury following radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Two hundred and twenty patients treated with curative-intent radiation therapy between November 1987 and January 1992 were analyzed. Patients were treated initially with external beam irradiation, 40-44 Gy/20-22 fractions to whole pelvis, followed by high dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy, 7.2 Gy to point A for 3 fractions. Severity of diarrhea during radiation therapy was scored according to six criteria: fecal characteristics, frequency, onset, prescription of antidiarrheal agents, body weight loss during irradiation, and extramedical care needed. Patients were categorized as group ND (no obvious diarrhea), group MD (moderate diarrhea), and group SD (severe diarrhea) for sum score 0-1, 2-5, and ≥6, respectively. The rate of radiation proctitis was expressed, analyzed, and compared with actuarial proctitis-free rate and prevalence. Results: 1) According to the score, 76 (35%), 89 (40%), and 55 (25%) patients were categorized as group ND, group MD, and group SD, respectively. Distribution of patients and treatment characteristics among the three groups appeared similar. Patients treated with a larger field size, ≥16.5 cm 2 , tended to have increased severity of diarrhea. 2) Overall, 103 patients (47%, 103 of 220) developed radiation proctitis. Twenty-one patients were in group ND (28%, 21 of 76), 43 in group MD (48%, 43 of 89), and 39 in group SD (71%, 39 of 55). 3) The five-year actuarial proctitis-free rate was 72, 52, and 29% for group ND, MD, and SD, respectively (p s = 0.229, p = 0.098). 6) Cox's multivariate analysis revealed that severity of diarrhea was the only factor that significantly correlated with the development of radiation proctitis. Conclusion: Patients with increased acute toxicity and diarrhea during radiation therapy of cervical carcinoma significantly

  2. The efficacy of octreotide in the therapy of acute radiation-induced diarrhea: a randomized controlled study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavuz, Melek N.; Yavuz, A. Aydin; Aydin, Fazil; Can, Gamze; Kavgaci, Halil

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Although the somatostatin analog octreotide is currently used in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced diarrhea and secretory diarrhea associated with various disorders, its role in the management of radiation enteritis is not well defined. We performed a randomized study that compared octreotide acetate with diphenoxylate hydrochloride plus atropine sulfate, the drug commonly used as therapy for acute radiation-induced diarrhea (ARID). Methods and Materials: Sixty-one patients with Grade 2 (four to six stools per day) or Grade 3 (≥ seven stools per day, National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria) diarrhea associated with pelvic radiotherapy were assigned randomly to receive octreotide s.c., 100 μg three times daily (n=33) or diphenoxylate and atropine orally, 2.5 mg four times daily (n = 28). Radiotherapy was delivered to all patients in a conventional manner, with high-energy photons in a total dose ≥45 Gy, which exceeds the tolerance of intestine. Overall, there was no significant difference in patient characteristics or radiotherapy applied between the two arms. Patients were evaluated daily for the primary study end point, resolution of diarrhea, as well as for interruption of pelvic radiotherapy. Results: Within 3 days, ARID completely resolved in 20 patients in the octreotide arm (2 within the first day, 11 within the second day, and 7 within the third day) vs. only 4 (all within the second day of therapy) in the diphenoxylate arm (p=0.002). On the diphenoxylate arm, 15/28 patients were required to discontinue pelvic radiotherapy; on the octreotide arm, 6/33 patients were required to discontinue pelvic radiotherapy for an average of 1.89±0.5 and 0.45±0.2 days, respectively (p=0.003). No side effects were observed in either arm. Three patients on the diphenoxylate arm and only 1 on the octreotide arm required further treatment for parenteral replenishment of fluids and electrolytes or other antidiarrheal treatments. Conclusion

  3. Zinc Resistance within Swine-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates in the United States Is Associated with Multilocus Sequence Type Lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hau, Samantha J; Frana, Timothy; Sun, Jisun; Davies, Peter R; Nicholson, Tracy L

    2017-08-01

    Zinc resistance in livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) sequence type 398 (ST398) is primarily mediated by the czrC gene colocated with the mecA gene, encoding methicillin resistance, within the type V staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCC mec ) element. Because czrC and mecA are located within the same mobile genetic element, it has been suggested that the use of zinc in feed as an antidiarrheal agent has the potential to contribute to the emergence and spread of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in swine, through increased selection pressure to maintain the SCC mec element in isolates obtained from pigs. In this study, we report the prevalence of the czrC gene and phenotypic zinc resistance in U.S. swine-associated LA-MRSA ST5 isolates, MRSA ST5 isolates from humans with no swine contact, and U.S. swine-associated LA-MRSA ST398 isolates. We demonstrated that the prevalence of zinc resistance in U.S. swine-associated LA-MRSA ST5 isolates was significantly lower than the prevalence of zinc resistance in MRSA ST5 isolates from humans with no swine contact and swine-associated LA-MRSA ST398 isolates, as well as prevalences from previous reports describing zinc resistance in other LA-MRSA ST398 isolates. Collectively, our data suggest that selection pressure associated with zinc supplementation in feed is unlikely to have played a significant role in the emergence of LA-MRSA ST5 in the U.S. swine population. Additionally, our data indicate that zinc resistance is associated with the multilocus sequence type lineage, suggesting a potential link between the genetic lineage and the carriage of resistance determinants. IMPORTANCE Our data suggest that coselection thought to be associated with the use of zinc in feed as an antimicrobial agent is not playing a role in the emergence of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) ST5 in the U.S. swine population. Additionally, our data indicate

  4. The Promising Pharmacological Effects and Therapeutic/Medicinal applications of Punica Granatum L. (Pomegranate) as a Functional Food in Humans and Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Muhammad; Naveed, Muhammad; BiBi, Jannat; Kamboh, Asghar Ali; Arain, Muhammad Asif; Shah, Qurban Ali; Alagawany, Mahmoud; Abd El-Hack, Mohamed Ezzat; Abdel-Latif, Mervat A.; Yatoo, Mohd. Iqbal; Tiwari, Ruchi; Chakraborty, Sandip; Dhama, Kuldeep

    2018-02-21

    Punica granatum L (pomegranate), is a shrub mostly available in the Mediterranean Sea region. The fruits have gained the substantial attention among researchers due to its promising biological activities including anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antidiarrheal, immune modulatory, antitumor, wound healing and antifungal that have been attributed to various constituents of seeds, bark, juice, pericarp and leaf of this tree across the globe. The phenolic compounds of pomegranate have been documented to possess numbers of prophylactic and therapeutic utilities against various pathological infections as well as non-infectious disorders. The current review expedites the pharmacological role of Punica granatum L. in curing elements related to infectious and non-infectious disorders. Commencing a thorough review of the published literature and patents available on Punica granatum and its therapeutic role in countering infectious disorders present review is prepared by using various published resources available on PubMed, Med line, PubMed Central, Science Direct and other scientific databases. The information retrieved has been compiled and analyzed pertaining to the theme of the study. Multi-dimensional beneficial application of pomegranate plant is recorded. The pomegranate seed oil has phytoestrogenic compounds and the fruit is rich in phenolic compounds with strong antioxidant activity. The fruit and bark of pomegranate are used against intestinal parasites, dysentery, and diarrhea in different animals and human models. Since, ancient time the juice and seeds had considered the best therapy for throat and heart disorders. Ellagic acid is one of the main components of pomegranate with potent antioxidant activity. Results from different studies reported that Punica granatum L or its byproducts can be used as natural food additives in human and animal nutrition in order to boost immunity, microbial safety and provide the housing environment without affecting body weight

  5. A double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled phase II study to assess the safety and efficacy of orally administered SP-303 for the symptomatic treatment of diarrhea in patients with AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holodniy, M; Koch, J; Mistal, M; Schmidt, J M; Khandwala, A; Pennington, J E; Porter, S B

    1999-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and effectiveness of orally administered SP-303 in patients with AIDS and diarrhea. This is a multicenter, phase II, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled study. HIV-positive subjects with a history of a CD4 count AIDS-defining illness were admitted to an inpatient study unit and screened for diarrhea defined as at least three abnormal (i.e., soft or watery) stools and >200 g of abnormal stool weight over a 24-h period. Subjects discontinued all antidiarrheal agents >24 h before enrollment. Stool samples were studied for routine pathogens. Subjects received 500 mg p.o. of SP-303 or placebo every 6 h for 96 h (4 days). Stool frequency and weights were recorded. Subjects were monitored for symptoms and side effects and were seen 1 wk later in follow-up. A total of 26 subjects received SP-303, and 25 received placebo. There were no significant demographic differences between treatment arms. A total of 41 subjects (80%) were receiving antiretroviral therapy and 39 subjects (77%) were receiving at least one protease inhibitor. Stool studies revealed no pathogens in 48 of 51 patients (94%). There were no serious adverse events or laboratory abnormalities. The SP-303 treatment group demonstrated a mean reduction from baseline stool weight of 451 g/24 h versus 150 g/24 h with placebo on day 4 of treatment (p = 0.14), and a mean reduction in abnormal stool frequency of three abnormal stools in 24 h versus two in 24 h in the placebo group (p = 0.30). Daily measures analysis over 4 days of treatment demonstrated that SP-303 subjects had a significant reduction in stool weight (p = 0.008) and abnormal stool frequency (p = 0.04) when compared to placebo-treated subjects. SP-303 is safe and well tolerated. These results suggest that SP-303 may be effective in reducing stool weight and frequency in patients with AIDS and diarrhea.

  6. Intensity-modulated whole pelvic radiotherapy in women with gynecologic malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundt, Arno J.; Lujan, Anthony E.; Rotmensch, Jacob; Waggoner, Steven E.; Yamada, S. Diane; Fleming, Gini; Roeske, John C.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To describe our initial clinical experience with intensity-modulated whole pelvic radiotherapy (IM-WPRT) in women with gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: Between February 2000 and August 2001, 40 gynecology patients underwent IM-WPRT. After fabrication of customized immobilization, all patients underwent contrast-enhanced CT, and a clinical target volume was contoured consisting of the upper vagina, parametria, uterus (if present), and presacral and pelvic lymph node regions. The clinical target volume was expanded by 1 cm to create a planning target volume (PTV). Using commercially available software, 7- or 9-field, 6-MV, coplanar IM-WPRT plans were generated for all patients. The worst acute gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity during treatment was scored on a 4-point scale: 0, none; 1, mild, no medications required; 2, moderate, medications required; and 3, severe, treatment breaks or cessation, hospitalization. As a comparison, acute toxicities in 35 previously treated conventional WPRT patients were analyzed. No significant differences were noted in the clinicopathologic and treatment factors between the two groups. Results: IM-WPRT plans provided excellent PTV coverage, with considerable sparing of the surrounding normal tissues. On average, 98.1% of the PTV received the prescription dose. The average percentage of the PTV receiving 110% and 115% of the prescription dose was 9.8% and 0.2%, respectively. IM-WPRT was well tolerated, with no patient developing Grade 3 toxicity. Grade 2 acute gastrointestinal toxicity was less common in the IM-WPRT group (60 vs. 91%, p=0.002) than in the conventional WPRT group. Moreover, the percentage of IM-WPRT and WPRT patients requiring no or only infrequent antidiarrheal medications was 75% and 34%, respectively (p=0.001). Although less Grade 2 genitourinary toxicity was seen in the IM-WPRT group (10% vs. 20%), this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.22). Conclusion: IM-WPRT is a

  7. Postoperative radiotherapy-induced morbidity in rectal cancer Morbilidad de la radioterapia postoperatoria en el cáncer de recto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Garay Burdeos

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: we analyzed long-term morbidity and bowel function alteration after postoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer following resection with anastomosis. Patients and methods: thirty-seven patients who underwent surgery with intention to cure and a minimal follow-up period of 3 years were included. These patients were divided into two groups: in the first group, 14 patients received postoperative chemo-radiotherapy, 5-fluorouracil plus folinic acid, and 45 Gy plus 5 Gy boost. In the second group, there were 23 patients regarded as controls. We designed a questionnaire about their bowel function and analyzed the morbidity detected in their follow-up. Results: the group that was treated with postoperative chemo-radiotherapy had more daily bowel movements (p = 0.03 and night-time movements (p = 0.04; incontinence (69.2 versus 17.4% in the control group; p = 0.002, and perianal skin irritation (p = 0.04 versus the control group. Although without meaningful differences, the group under treatment wore a pad more often, had more defecatory urgency, could distinguish worse gas from stool, and needed more frequently antidiarrheal measures. Major complications were present in 28.6% of the under-treatment group: three intestinal resections were performed due to actinic stenosis; one patient had a residual stercoral fistula; another had several occlusive crises solved with medical treatment. Conclusions: postoperative chemo-radiotherapy had a high morbidity rate, which determined a significant alteration in quality of life. Accuracy in indication is therefore necessary, as well as a consideration of other alternatives for treatment, such as preoperative chemo-radiotherapy and total mesorectal excision.Objetivos: analizar la morbilidad y alteración del funcionalismo rectal a largo plazo de la radioterapia postoperatoria tras resección con anastomosis en el cáncer de recto. Material y métodos: se incluyen 37 pacientes intervenidos con intenci

  8. Vigilância de eventos adversos a medicamentos em hospitais: aplicação e desempenho de rastreadores Surveillance of adverse drug events in hospitals: implementation and performance of triggers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabíola Giordani

    2012-09-01

    application and performance of these triggers in a teaching hospital. The information on the triggers and ADE were collected through a retrospective chart review of patients discharged from January to June 2008. Four hundred and ninety-seven triggers were identified in 177 charts, and each chart had 2.33 (SD = 2.7 triggers on average. The most frequent triggers were: "antiemetic" (72.1/100 charts, "abrupt cessation of medication" (70.0/100 charts and "over-sedation, drowsiness, numbness, lethargy, hypotension and fall" (34.6/100 charts. The most effective triggers for capturing ADE were "benzodiazepine antagonist", "antidiarrheal" and "rash", which, when identified in charts, were related to an event. The ADE most commonly found were related to the triggers, "abrupt cessation of medication" (8.3/100 charts, "antiemetic" (4.6/100 charts, "rash" and "anti-allergy" (2.1/100 charts. These results may help to decide which triggers are more useful in each situation.

  9. Determinación de atropina sulfato y difenoxilato clorhidrato en reasec tabletas.: Validación

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Porto Verdecia

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available El reasec es un antidiarreico cuyo efecto viene dado por la asociación de 2 principios activos, atropina sulfato y difenoxilato clorhidrato. La unión de ambos trae como resultado la inhibición del peristaltismo del tracto gastrointestinal que puede ser posible tanto a nivel central como local. De la literatura revisada para el caso del difenoxilato clorhidrato se escogió el método por cromatografía líquida de alta eficiencia por aprovechar la posibilidad de que se trataba del método propuesto en el registro de medicamentos para el estudio de estabilidad en la formulación de este principio activo. El método para la determinación de atropina sulfato se encuentra reportado en la USP 23 y el criterio de selección fue uno de los menos complejos en la cuantificación de esta. Teniendo en cuenta las regulaciones establecidas que aseguran el cumplimiento de las buenas prácticas de producción, el presente trabajo se propone la validación prospectiva de los métodos para la cuantificación de los principios activos componentes del reasec, por lo que se realizaron los estudios de especificidad, exactitud, precisión, linealidad y rango. En ambos casos se cumplieron con los requisitos establecidos a los métodos analíticos que se encuentran dentro de la categoría I por ser empleados para la cuantificación de los componentes activos de la formulación. Los resultados obtenidos demostraron que ambos métodos analíticos son fiables por permitir la cuantificación de los 2 principios activos y cumplir además, con los requisitos establecidos para los parámetros evaluados dentro de la categoría a la que pertenecen cada uno.Reasec is an antidiarrheal whose effect lies in the association of two active principles: atropine sulphate and diphenoxilate chlorhydrate. Their union results in the inhibition of peristalsism of the gastrointestinal tract that may be possible at both local and central levels. From the reviewed literature on diphenoxilate

  10. Stability Analysis of ISS Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotring, V. E.

    2014-01-01

    It is known that medications degrade over time, and that extreme storage conditions will hasten their degradation. The temperature and humidity conditions of the ISS have been shown to be within the ideal ranges for medication storage, but the effects of other environmental factors, like elevated exposure to radiation, have not yet been evaluated. Current operational procedures ensure that ISS medications are re-stocked before expiration, but this may not be possible on long duration exploration missions. For this reason, medications that have experienced long duration storage on the ISS were returned to JSC for analysis to determine any unusual effects of aging in the low- Earth orbit environment. METHODS Medications were obtained by the JSC Pharmacy from commercial distributors and were re-packaged by JSC pharmacists to conserve up mass and volume. All medication doses were part of the ISS crew medical kit and were transported to the International Space Station (ISS) via NASA's Shuttle Transportation System (Space Shuttle). After 568 days of storage, the medications were removed from the supply chain and returned to Earth on a Dragon (SpaceX) capsule. Upon return to Earth, medications were transferred to temperature and humidity controlled environmental chambers until analysis. Nine medications were chosen on the basis of their availability for study. The medications included several of the most heavily used by US crewmembers: 2 sleep aids, 2 antihistamines/decongestants, 3 pain relievers, an antidiarrheal and an alertness medication. Each medication was available at a single time point; analysis of the same medication at multiple time points was not possible. Because the samples examined in this study were obtained opportunistically from medical supplies, there were no control samples available (i.e. samples aged for a similar period of time on the ground); a significant limitation of this study. Medications were analyzed using the HPLC/MS methods described in

  11. Flavonoids from whole Plant of Euphorbia hirta and their Evaluation against Experimentally induced Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shyam Sundar; Azmi, Lubna; Mohapatra, P. K.; Rao, Ch. V.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Euphorbia hirta possesses antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, galactogenic, antidiarrheal, antioxidant, hypoglycemic, antiasthmatic, antiamebic, antifungal, and antimalarial activities. Objective: The overall objective of the current study was the investigation of the whole plant extract of E. hirta and flavonoids from E. hirta on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in rats. Materials and Methods: The whole plant extract of E. hirta was characterized by analysis of flavonoids (HPLC: HPLC, UV, IR, MS and 1HNMR). GERD model was induced surgically in Wistar rats under pentobarbitone sodium anesthesia (50 mg/kg, i.p.) and the tissue esophagus and stomach were removed. The tissues were washed with physiological saline and were examined for GERD. The whole plant extract of E. hirta in doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg were administered orally twice daily at 10:00 and 16:00 hours, respectively, for 5 days and kaempferol (100 mg/kg) or omeprazole (OMZ) in the dose of 30 mg/kg 1 hour prior to the induction of GERD. Control groups received suspension of 1% carboxymethyl cellulose in distilled water (10 mL/kg). Results: The levels of gastric wall mucus increased and of plasma histamine and H+, K+ ATPase significantly decreased in groups treated by both the plant extract and flavonoids. Both the plant extract and flavonoids reduced the lipid peroxidation and superoxide dismutase and increased the levels of catalase and reduced glutathione. Conclusions: The whole plant extract of E. hirta is attributed to its antisecretory, gastroprotective, and antioxidant potential as that of quercetin, rutin, kaempferol, and proton pump blocker (omeprazole) to treat GERD. SUMMARY The aqueous extract of whole plant of Euphorbia hirta revealed the presence of kaempferol (0.0256%), quercetin (0.0557%), and rutin (0.0151%), and the ethyl acetate fraction of whole plant of E. hirta possesses kaempferol (0.0487%), quercetin (0.0789%), and rutin (0.0184%).The levels of gastric wall mucus

  12. Anti-secretory, anti-inflammatory and anti-Helicobacter pylori activities of several fractions isolated from Piper carpunya Ruiz & Pav.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quílez, A; Berenguer, B; Gilardoni, G; Souccar, C; de Mendonça, S; Oliveira, L F S; Martín-Calero, M J; Vidari, G

    2010-04-21

    The leaves of Piper carpunya Ruiz & Pav. (syn Piper lenticellosum C.D.C.) (Piperaceae), are widely used in folk medicine in tropical and subtropical countries of South America as an anti-inflammatory, anti-ulcer, anti-diarrheal and anti-parasitical remedy as well as an ailment for skin irritations. To study the anti-inflammatory, anti-secretory and anti-Helicobacter pylori activities of different fractions isolated from an ethanolic extract of the leaves of Piper carpunya, in order to provide evidence for the use of this plant as an anti-ulcer remedy. Moreover, to isolate the main compounds of the extract and relate their biological activity to the experimental results obtained with the fractions. Sixteen fractions were obtained from the ethanolic extract (F I-XVI) and 16 pure compounds were isolated and identified from these fractions. We studied the effects of the fractions (0.1-400microg/mL) on the release of myeloperoxidase (MPO) enzyme from rat peritoneal leukocytes, on rabbit gastric microsomal H(+), K(+)-ATPase activity and anti-Helicobacter pylori anti-microbial activity using the microdilution method (MM). The main compounds contained in the fractions were isolated and identified by (1)H- and (13)C NMR spectra analysis and comparison with the literature data. Eight fractions showed inhibition of MPO enzyme (F I-IV, X, XII, XIV and XV). The highest inhibition was observed with F XIV (50microg/mL, 60.9%, p<0.001). F X and XII were the most active ones, inhibiting the gastric H(+), K(+)-ATPase activity with IC(50) values equal to 22.3microg/mL and 28.1microg/mL, respectively. All fractions, except F XV, presented detectable anti-Helicobacter pylori activity, with a diameter of inhibition zones ranging from 11mm up to 50mm. The best anti-Helicobacter pylori activity was obtained with F III and V. Both fractions killed Helicobacter pylori with lowest concentration values, about 6.25mug/mL. Sixteen pure compounds were isolated, five of them are flavonoids that

  13. Atividade Antimicrobiana de Extratos Etanólicos de Peperomia pellucida e Portulaca pilosa

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    LORENA PAULA MERCêS MENDES

    2011-06-01

    antimicrobial activity. In this article we focus on Peperomia pellucida (erva-de-jabuti and Portulaca pilosa (amor crescido, both commonly used in the Amazon. P. pellucida is popularly used as a wound dressing, to stop bleeding, and in cases of abdominal pain and cramps, abscesses, acne, boils, kidney problems, hypertension and raised cholesterol, and P. pilosa as a hepato-protective, antidiarrheal and diuretic and for burns, erysipelas and injuries. In this study, we investigated the phytochemistry and antimicrobial activity of extracts of these two plant materials. Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of reducing sugars, phenols and tannins, steroids and terpenoids, cardiac glycosides and carotenoids in the dried ethanol extract (DEE of P. pilosa and of proteins and amino acids, phenols and tannins, flavonoids, steroids and triterpenoids, azulenes, carotenoids, depsides and depsidones in the P. pellucida DEE. The antimicrobial activity of the ethanol extracts was assayed by the agar disc diffusion method, at concentrations of 500, 250, 125 and 62.5 μg/mL. The plant extracts that showed antimicrobial activity in the preliminary assessment were subjected to the broth microdilution test to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC. The P. pellucida extract had antimicrobial activity against S. aureus and P. aeruginosa and that of P. pilosa against P. aeruginosa. Keywords: Antimicrobial activity. Peperomia pellucida. Portulaca pilosa. Erva-de-jabuti. Amor-crescido.

  14. Produção e composição química da macela em função da época de colheita Production and chemical composition of macela as a result of the harvesting dates

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    Antonio Marcos Esmeraldo Bezerra

    2008-03-01

    patamares: 31,8±1,72% (de 85 a 105 DAT e 49,2±1,15% (115 a 135 DAT.Macela (Egletes viscosa (L. Less. is a medicinal herb that possesses antidyspeptic, antidiarrheic, and hepatic protecting properties. Its harvest should allow assembling large biomass production and high yield of active principles. The main goal of this work was to evaluate the influence of harvesting dates over both biomass components and qualitative and quantitative chemical composition of macela. Treatments corresponded to seven harvesting dates (75; 85; 95; 105; 115; 125 and 135 days after the transplant (DAT, displayed in a randomized blocks design, with four replications, and two useful-plant plots (1.0 x 0.5 m. Harvesting dates affected both yield components and the content of active principles in macela. Biomass production showed a mounting increase during harvests, especially in stem and leaves. Capitulum production in the last three harvests (2.6; 3.4; and 6.7 t ha-1 surpassed the previous ones. The harvesting indexes (ratio between capitulum and aboveground dry mass to the same periods were 47, 46 and 48%, respectively. Aboveground (stem and leaves and capitulum had a higher yield of both ethanolic (YEE and chloroformic (YCE extracts than roots. YEE and YEC varied throughout plant reproductive phase, with peaks at 105 DAT (roots: 0.17 g plant-1 for YEC; 125 DAT (flower buds: 3.92 and 18.02 g plant-1 for respectively YEE and YEC; roots: 0.34 g plant-1 for YEE, and 135 DAT (aboveground part: 3.02 and 11.70 g plant-1 respectively for YEE and YEC. The yield of essential oil reached the maximum value at 135 DAT (44.4 L ha-1. The content of trans-pinocarveyl acetate in the capitulum ranged from 52.3 to 73.5% in harvests from 75 to 95 DAT, remaining constant around 53.3% after that. The content of mirtenila acetate remained stable throughout harvests (6,98±0,56%. The content of â-pineno in capitulum fluctuated in two steps: 31.8±1.72% (from 85 to 105 DAT, and 49.2±1.15% (from 115 to 135 DAT.

  15. The Development of Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Adverse Health Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann

    human trials necessary to demonstrate "efficacy" for a beneficial effect on the long term adverse health effects of radiation, such as the development of cancer, cataracts, etc., is expected to take particularly long periods of time. To avoid the long time delay in the development of new drugs as countermeasures for radiation induced adverse health effects, the NSBRI Center for Acute Radiation Research (CARR) is currently focused on the use of drugs that have already been approved for human use by the FDA. Currently there are no approved countermeasures for external radiation exposure by the US Army or by NASA. The appropriate medications for symptoms of the Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS) due to exposure to solar particle event (SPE) radiation are unknown, but there are medications appropriate for ARS symptoms caused by exposure to conventional ra-diation. The Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) has medical guidelines for ARS medications (http://www.afrri.usuhs.mil/outreach/guidance.htm#policies), as does the US Dept. of Health and Human Services (the REMM (Radiation Event Medical Manage-ment) site (http://www.remm.nlm.gov). Supportive care when ARS symptoms develop include the administration of antimicrobial agents (which can include systemic antibiotics [especially those directed at gram-negative bacteria]), antiemetic agents, antidiarrheal agents, fluids, elec-trolytes, analgesic agents and topical burn creams (Waselenko, J.K. et al. Ann. Intern. Med. 140: 1037, 2004). For nausea and vomiting, serotonin receptor antagonists (5HT3 receptor antagonists) are very effective prophylaxis. There are two drugs that have been approved by the FDA (Zofran and Kytril) for radiation induced nausea and vomiting. Kytril (granisetron) is preferred by the US Army and is currently maintained in the US National Stockpile. Both of these drugs are known to stop retching and vomiting when given either before or after irradi-ation, even when vomiting and/or retching are