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Sample records for antidiabetic properties effect

  1. Antidiabetic Effects of Aronia melanocarpa and Its Other Therapeutic Properties

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    Ines Banjari

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a global pandemic which warrants urgent attention due to its rising prevalence and economic burden. Thus, many alternative therapies are being researched for antidiabetic properties, given the inefficacy of current medicinal treatments. From this perspective, Aronia melanocarpa or black chokeberry has been investigated for its therapeutic properties in many studies, especially for its ability to combat hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress and the macrovascular complications of diabetes including cardiovascular disease. Though A. melanocarpa is native to the eastern areas of North America, it has been planted extensively in Europe and Asia as well. Several in vivo studies have displayed the antioxidant properties of A. melanocarpa berry juice and plant extract in rat models where oxidative stress markers were observed to have significant reductions. Some of the potent bioactive compounds present in the fruits and other parts of the plant were identified as (−-epicatechin, chlorogenic acid, neochlorogenic acid, and cyanidin-3-galactoside. Overall, A. melanocarpa could be considered a good source of antioxidants which is effective in combating hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress.

  2. Antidiabetic Effects of Tea

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    Qiu-Yue Fu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a chronic endocrine disease resulted from insulin secretory defect or insulin resistance and it is a leading cause of death around the world. The care of DM patients consumes a huge budget due to the high frequency of consultations and long hospitalizations, making DM a serious threat to both human health and global economies. Tea contains abundant polyphenols and caffeine which showed antidiabetic activity, so the development of antidiabetic medications from tea and its extracts is increasingly receiving attention. However, the results claiming an association between tea consumption and reduced DM risk are inconsistent. The advances in the epidemiologic evidence and the underlying antidiabetic mechanisms of tea are reviewed in this paper. The inconsistent results and the possible causes behind them are also discussed.

  3. Antidiabetic Effects of Tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiu-Yue; Li, Qing-Sheng; Lin, Xiao-Ming; Qiao, Ru-Ying; Yang, Rui; Li, Xu-Min; Dong, Zhan-Bo; Xiang, Li-Ping; Zheng, Xin-Qiang; Lu, Jian-Liang; Yuan, Cong-Bo; Ye, Jian-Hui; Liang, Yue-Rong

    2017-05-20

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic endocrine disease resulted from insulin secretory defect or insulin resistance and it is a leading cause of death around the world. The care of DM patients consumes a huge budget due to the high frequency of consultations and long hospitalizations, making DM a serious threat to both human health and global economies. Tea contains abundant polyphenols and caffeine which showed antidiabetic activity, so the development of antidiabetic medications from tea and its extracts is increasingly receiving attention. However, the results claiming an association between tea consumption and reduced DM risk are inconsistent. The advances in the epidemiologic evidence and the underlying antidiabetic mechanisms of tea are reviewed in this paper. The inconsistent results and the possible causes behind them are also discussed.

  4. Marine Organisms with Anti-Diabetes Properties

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    Chiara Lauritano

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a chronic degenerative metabolic disease with high morbidity and mortality rates caused by its complications. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in looking for new bioactive compounds to treat this disease, including metabolites of marine origin. Several aquatic organisms have been screened to evaluate their possible anti-diabetes activities, such as bacteria, microalgae, macroalgae, seagrasses, sponges, corals, sea anemones, fish, salmon skin, a shark fusion protein as well as fish and shellfish wastes. Both in vitro and in vivo screenings have been used to test anti-hyperglycemic and anti-diabetic activities of marine organisms. This review summarizes recent discoveries in anti-diabetes properties of several marine organisms as well as marine wastes, existing patents and possible future research directions in this field.

  5. Antidiabetic properties of the methanolic extract of Bridelia grandis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-03-28

    Mar 28, 2011 ... Bridelia grandis is used in most parts of tropical Africa for the treatment of diabetes. The anti-diabetic properties of the methanolic stem bark extract of this plant was studied in ob/ob and db/db mice. The plant extract induced hypoglycaemic effects of long duration in the ob/ob mice, while its effects were.

  6. Antidiabetic Properties of Germinated Brown Rice: A Systematic Review

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    Mustapha Umar Imam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diet is an important variable in the course of type 2 diabetes, which has generated interest in dietary options like germinated brown rice (GBR for effective management of the disease among rice-consuming populations. In vitro data and animal experiments show that GBR has potentials as a functional diet for managing this disease, and short-term clinical studies indicate encouraging results. Mechanisms for antidiabetic effects of GBR due to bioactive compounds like γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, γ-oryzanol, dietary fibre, phenolics, vitamins, acylated steryl β-glucoside, and minerals include antihyperglycemia, low insulin index, antioxidative effect, antithrombosis, antihypertensive effect, hypocholesterolemia, and neuroprotective effects. The evidence so far suggests that there may be enormous benefits for diabetics in rice-consuming populations if white rice is replaced with GBR. However, long-term clinical studies are still needed to verify these findings on antidiabetic effects of GBR. Thus, we present a review on the antidiabetic properties of GBR from relevant preclinical and clinical studies, in order to provide detailed information on this subject for researchers to review the potential of GBR in combating this disease.

  7. Chemical composition and anti-diabetic properties of Jatropha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluates the chemical composition and anti-diabetic properties of fresh and shade dried Jatropha curcas aqueous leaves extracts (JCLE) on alloxan induced diabetic female wistar rats. Seven (7) kg of J. curcas leaves were pulverized and aqueous extracts produced. Thirty five (35) mature female rats were ...

  8. Distribution of Phenolic Contents, Antidiabetic Potentials, Antihypertensive Properties, and Antioxidative Effects of Soursop (Annona muricata L.) Fruit Parts In Vitro.

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    Adefegha, Stephen A; Oyeleye, Sunday I; Oboh, Ganiyu

    2015-01-01

    Soursop fruit has been used in folklore for the management of type-2 diabetes and hypertension with limited information on the scientific backing. This study investigated the effects of aqueous extracts (1 : 100 w/v) of Soursop fruit part (pericarp, pulp, and seed) on key enzymes linked to type-2 diabetes (α-amylase and α-glucosidase) and hypertension [angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE)]. Radicals scavenging and Fe(2+) chelation abilities and reducing property as well as phenolic contents of the extracts were also determined. Our data revealed that the extracts inhibited α-amylase and α-glucosidase and ACE activities dose-dependently. The effective concentration of the extract causing 50% antioxidant activity (EC50) revealed that pericarp extract had the highest α-amylase (0.46 mg/mL), α-glucosidase (0.37 mg/mL), and ACE (0.03 mg/mL) inhibitory activities while the seed extract had the least [α-amylase (0.76 mg/mL); α-glucosidase (0.73 mg/mL); and ACE (0.20 mg/mL)]. Furthermore, the extracts scavenged radicals, reduced Fe(3+) to Fe(2+), and chelated Fe(2+). The phenolic contents in the extracts ranged from 85.65 to 560.21 mg/100 g. The enzymes inhibitory and antioxidants potentials of the extracts could be attributed to their phenolic distributions which could be among the scientific basis for their use in the management of diabetes and hypertension. However, the pericarp appeared to be most promising.

  9. Trigonelline and vildagliptin antidiabetic effect: improvement of insulin signalling pathway.

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    Aldakinah, Amat-Alrazaq A; Al-Shorbagy, Muhammad Y; Abdallah, Dalaal M; El-Abhar, Hanan S

    2017-07-01

    Trigonelline (TRG) is known to have an antidiabetic efficacy; however, its mechanism is not entirely elucidated. Hence, its effect on insulin signaling, besides its effectiveness in combination with vildagliptin (VLD) in a Type 2 diabetes model has been tested. TRG (50 mg/kg; p.o) lowered serum glucose, fructosamine, insulin, and HOMA-IR index and increased insulin sensitivity in soleus muscle via augmenting insulin receptor autophosphorylation (IR-PH), pT308-Akt, and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4). Additionally, it reduced muscle advanced glycation end products and lipid peroxides with increased glutathione. TRG showed an anti-lipidemic effect lowering serum and/or muscle total cholesterol, triglycerides, and FFAs to decrease body weight, and visceral/epididymal indices. Furthermore, VLD (3 and 10 mg/kg, p.o) increased IR-PH, pT308-Akt, and GLUT4 to improve insulin signaling. The combined effect of TRG with the low dose of VLD was mostly confined to the reduction of the aberrant lipid profile. The beneficial effect of TRG on insulin sensitivity and glucose/ lipid homeostasis is mediated by the enhancement of the insulin signaling and antioxidant property. Moreover, the positive impact of VLD on pT308-Akt is an integral part in insulin signaling, and hence its antidiabetic effect. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  10. Recommendations on the effect of antidiabetic drugs in bone.

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    Rozas-Moreno, Pedro; Reyes-García, Rebeca; Jódar-Gimeno, Esteban; Varsavsky, Mariela; Luque-Fernández, Inés; Cortés-Berdonces, María; Muñoz-Torres, Manuel

    2017-03-01

    To provide recommendations on the effect of antidiabetic drugs on bone fragility to help select the most adequate antidiabetic treatment, especially in diabetic patients with high risk of fracture. Members of the Bone Metabolism Working Group of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology. The GRADE system (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) was used to establish both the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. A systematic search was made in MEDLINE (Pubmed) using the following terms associated to the name of each antidiabetic drug: AND "osteoporosis", "fractures", "bone mineral density", "bone markers", "calciotropic hormones". Papers in English with publication date before 30 April 2016 were reviewed. Recommendations were jointly discussed by the Working Group. The document summaries the data on the potential effects of antidiabetic drugs on bone metabolism and fracture risk. Copyright © 2017 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Antioxidant and antidiabetic properties of tartary buckwheat rice flavonoids after in vitro digestion.

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    Bao, Tao; Wang, Ye; Li, Yu-Ting; Gowd, Vemana; Niu, Xin-He; Yang, Hai-Ying; Chen, Li-Shui; Chen, Wei; Sun, Chong-de

    Oxidative stress and diabetes have a tendency to alter protein, lipid, and DNA moieties. One of the strategic methods used to reduce diabetes-associated oxidative stress is to inhibit the carbohydrate-digesting enzymes, thereby decreasing gastrointestinal glucose production. Plant-derived natural antioxidant molecules are considered a therapeutic tool in the treatment of oxidative stress and diabetes. The objective of this study was to identify tartary buckwheat rice flavonoids and evaluate the effect of in vitro digestion on their antioxidant and antidiabetic properties. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis indicated the presence of rutin as a major component and quercitrin as a minor component of both digested and non-digested flavonoids. Both extracts showed a significant antioxidant capacity, but digested flavonoids showed reduced activity compared to non-digested. There were some decreases of the antioxidant activities (2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazy (DPPH) radical, and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP)) of digested tartary buckwheat rice flavonoids compared with non-digested. Flavonoids from both groups significantly inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and α-glucosidase activity. Both digested and non-digested flavonoids markedly increased glucose consumption and glycogen content in HepG2 cells. Tartary buckwheat rice flavonoids showed appreciable antioxidant and antidiabetic properties, even after digestion. Tartary buckwheat rice appears to be a promising functional food with potent antioxidant and antidiabetic properties.

  12. Antidiabetic effect of taurine in cultured rat skeletal l6 myotubes.

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    Cheong, Sun Hee; Chang, Kyung Ja

    2013-01-01

    Taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid), a sulfur-containing β-amino acid, is found in all animal cells at millimolar concentrations and has been reported to show various health promoting activities including antidiabetic properties. The beneficial effects of taurine in diabetes mellitus have been known. However, the exact mechanism of hypoglycemic action of taurine is not properly defined. In this study, we investigated antidiabetic effect of taurine in the cell culture system using rat skeletal muscle cells. In cultured rat skeletal L6 myotubes, we studied the effect of taurine (0-100 μM) on glucose uptake to plasma membrane from the aspects of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling. Taurine stimulated glucose uptake in a dose-dependent manner by activating AMPK signaling. From these results, it may suggest that taurine show antidiabetic effect by stimulating insulin-independent glucose uptake in rat skeletal muscle.

  13. Antidiabetic and haematinic effects of Parquetina nigrescens on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antidiabetic and haematinic effects of Parquetina nigrescens on alloxan induced type-1 diabetes and normocytic normochromic anaemia in Wistar rats. ... Background: The plant, Parquetina nigrescens is used in folklore medicine to treat diabetes mellitus and its complications in several parts of West Africa. Objective: To ...

  14. Evaluation of Antidiabetic and Antioxidant Properties of Brucea javanica Seed

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    Abdulwali Ablat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ethanol extract of B. javanica seed was fractionated with solvents of different polarities and tested for antioxidant activities by several assays including DPPH radical scavenging activity, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP, ferrous ion chelating activity (FCA, and nitric oxide radical scavenging activity (NORSA along with their polyphenolic contents. Antidiabetic activity was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo using a glycogen phosphorylase α (GPα inhibition assay and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT in nondiabetic rats. The ethyl acetate fraction (EAF, rich in tannin, exhibited the strongest antioxidant activities to DPPH, FRAP, and NORSA, except for FCA. The EAF also exerted a dose-depended inhibition of GPα (IC50 = 0.75 mg/ml. Further evaluation of hypoglycemic effect on OGGT indicated that rats treated with EAF (125 mg/kg bw showed a 39.91% decrease (P < 0.05 in blood glucose levels at 30 min, and continuous fall (P < 0.05 of 28.89% and 20.29% was observed in the following hours (60 and 90 min compared to the normal control during OGTT. The EAF was applied to polyamide column chromatography, and the resulting tannin-free fraction was tested for both GPα inhibition and antioxidant (DPPH only activity. The GPα inhibitory activity was retained, while antioxidant activity was lost (4.6-fold after tannin removal. These results concluded that the GPα inhibitory activity initially detected was primarily due to the compounds other than tannins, whereas antioxidant activity was mainly due to the tannins.

  15. Hypoglycemic effect of plants used in Mexico as antidiabetics.

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    Román Ramos, R; Alarcón-Aguilar, F; Lara-Lemus, A; Flores-Saenz, J L

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the hypoglycemic effect of 12 "antidiabetic" plants used in Mexico. The studies were performed using 27 healthy rabbits with the gastric administration of water, tolbutamide or decoction of the "antidiabetic" plant before the induction of temporary hyperglycemia by subcutaneous injection of 50% dextrose solution (4 ml/kg of weight) at the beginning of the experiment and after 60 min. Blood glucose was determined every 60 min for a period of 5 h. Tolbutamide and eight of the studied plants decreased significantly the hyperglycemia as compared with control test (water) (p Marrubium vulgare, Crataegus pubescens, Cynodon dactylon, Calea zacatechichi, Buddleia americana, Bauhinia divaricata and Coix lachryma. The decrease of hyperglycemia caused by Physalis phyladelphyca, Pavonia schiedeana and Eucaliptus globulus was not significant (p > 0.05). Urtica dioica increased glycemia slightly.

  16. Potential of Lichen Compounds as Antidiabetic Agents with Antioxidative Properties: A Review

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    Karunaratne, Veranja

    2017-01-01

    The advancement in the knowledge of potent antioxidants has uncovered the way for greater insight in the treatment of diabetic complications. Lichens are a rich resource of novel bioactive compounds and their antioxidant potential is well documented. Herein we review the antidiabetic potential of lichens which have received considerable attention, in the recent past. We have correlated the antidiabetic and the antioxidant potential of lichen compounds. The study shows a good accordance between antioxidant and antidiabetic activity of lichens and points out the need to look into gathering the scarce and scattered data on biological activities for effective utilization. The review establishes that the lichen extracts, especially of Parmotrema sp. and Ramalina sp. have shown promising potential in both antidiabetic and antioxidant assays. Ubiquitous compounds, namely, zeorin, methylorsellinate, methyl-β-orcinol carboxylate, methyl haematommate, lecanoric acid, salazinic acid, sekikaic acid, usnic acid, gyrophoric acid, and lobaric acid have shown promising potential in both antidiabetic as well as antioxidant assays highlighting their potential for effective treatment of diabetic mellitus and its associated complications. The available compilation of this data provides the future perspectives and highlight the need for further studies of this potent herbal source to harvest more beneficial therapeutic antidiabetic drugs. PMID:28491237

  17. Determination of in vitro antidiabetic effects of Zingiber officinale Roscoe

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    Naila Abdul Sattar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous extracts of Zingiber officinale rhizomes were studied to evaluate their antidiabetic effects on protein glycation and on the diffusion of glucose in vitro in the present study. Zingiber officinale rhizome aqueous extract were examined at concentrations of 5, 10, 20 and 40 g/L. The antidiabetic effects were found to be dose-dependent. Antidiabetic potential of Zingiber officinale was mainly through inhibition of the glucose diffusion and to a limited extent by reducing the glycation. However, further studies are needed to determine in vitro effects of therapeutic potential by restraining postprandial glucose absorptions and plasma protein glycations in diabetic subjects.Extratos aquosos de rizomas Zingiber officinale foram estudados para avaliar os seus efeitos antidiabéticos em glicação de proteínas e sobre a difusão de glicose in vitro, no presente estudo. Extratos aquosos de Zingiber officinale foram examinados nas concentrações de 5, 10, 20 e 40 g extrato de planta/L. Os efeitos antidiabéticos observados eram dependentes da dose. O potencial antidiabético de Zingiber officinale se verificou, principalmente, através da inibição da difusão de glicose e, em menor extensão, através da redução da glicação. Estudos adicionais são necessários para elucidar se efeitos in vitro representam potencial terapêutico, restringindo a absorção de glicose pós-prandial e a glicação de proteínas plasmáticas em indivíduos diabéticos.

  18. Anti-diabetic effects of Ganoderma lucidum.

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    Ma, Haou-Tzong; Hsieh, Jung-Feng; Chen, Shui-Tein

    2015-06-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is a white rot fungus widely used as a tonic for the promotion of longevity and health. Extracts of G. lucidum have been recognized as an alternative adjuvant treatment for diabetes. Among the many biologically active constituents of G. lucidum, polysaccharides, proteoglycans, proteins and triterpenoids have been shown to have hypoglycemic effects. G. lucidum polysaccharides have been reported to have hypoglycemic activity by increasing plasma insulin levels and decreasing plasma sugar levels in mice. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B is a promising therapeutic target in diabetes, and G. lucidum proteoglycan can inhibit this enzyme in vitro. Moreover, G. lucidum triterpenoids were shown to have inhibitory activity on aldose reductase and α-glucosidase that can suppress postprandial hyperglycemia. In addition, a protein Ling Zhi-8 extracted from G. lucidum significantly decreased lymphocyte infiltration and increased the antibody detection of insulin in diabetic mice. This review summarizes most of the research about the hypoglycemic action effects of polysaccharides, proteoglycans, proteins and tritrerpenoids from G. lucidum as a guide for future research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Antidiabetic Effect of Galantamine: Novel Effect for a Known Centrally Acting Drug.

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    Mennatallah A Ali

    Full Text Available The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is one of the putative biochemical pathways that link diabetes with Alzheimer disease. Hence, we aimed to verify the potential antidiabetic effect of galantamine, unveil the possible mechanisms and evaluate its interaction with vildagliptin. The n5-STZ rat model was adopted and the diabetic animals were treated with galantamine and/or vildagliptin for 4 weeks. Galantamine lowered the n5-STZ-induced elevation in body weight, food/water intake, serum levels of glucose, fructosamine, and ALT/AST, as well as AChE in the tested organs. Moreover, it modulated successfully the lipid profile assessed in serum, liver, and muscle, and increased serum insulin level, as well as % β-cell function, in a pattern similar to that of vildagliptin. Additionally, galantamine confirmed its antioxidant (Nrf2, TAC, MDA, anti-inflammatory (NF-κB, TNF-α, visfatin, adiponectin and anti-apoptotic (caspase-3, cytochrome c capabilities by altering the n5-STZ effect on all the aforementioned parameters. On the molecular level, galantamine/vildagliptin have improved the insulin (p-insulin receptor, p-Akt, GLUT4/GLUT2 and Wnt/β-catenin (p-GSK-3β, β-catenin signaling pathways. On almost all parameters, the galantamine effects surpassed that of vildagliptin, while the combination regimen showed the best effects. The present results clearly proved that galantamine modulated glucose/lipid profile possibly through its anti-oxidant, -apoptotic, -inflammatory and -cholinesterase properties. These effects could be attributed partly to the enhancement of insulin and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways. Galantamine can be strongly considered as a potential antidiabetic agent and as an add-on therapy with other oral antidiabetics.

  20. Mushroom Polysaccharides: Chemistry and Antiobesity, Antidiabetes, Anticancer, and Antibiotic Properties in Cells, Rodents, and Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Mendel

    2016-01-01

    More than 2000 species of edible and/or medicinal mushrooms have been identified to date, many of which are widely consumed, stimulating much research on their health-promoting properties. These properties are associated with bioactive compounds produced by the mushrooms, including polysaccharides. Although β-glucans (homopolysaccharides) are believed to be the major bioactive polysaccharides of mushrooms, other types of mushroom polysaccharides (heteropolysaccharides) also possess biological properties. Here we survey the chemistry of such health-promoting polysaccharides and their reported antiobesity and antidiabetic properties as well as selected anticarcinogenic, antimicrobial, and antiviral effects that demonstrate their multiple health-promoting potential. The associated antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulating activities in fat cells, rodents, and humans are also discussed. The mechanisms of action involve the gut microbiota, meaning the polysaccharides act as prebiotics in the digestive system. Also covered here are the nutritional, functional food, clinical, and epidemiological studies designed to assess the health-promoting properties of polysaccharides, individually and as blended mixtures, against obesity, diabetes, cancer, and infectious diseases, and suggestions for further research. The collated information and suggested research needs might guide further studies needed for a better understanding of the health-promoting properties of mushroom polysaccharides and enhance their use to help prevent and treat human chronic diseases. PMID:28231175

  1. Antidiabetic effects of Momordica charantia (bitter melon) and its medicinal potency

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    Joseph, Baby; Jini, D

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is among the most common disorder in developed and developing countries, and the disease is increasing rapidly in most parts of the world. It has been estimated that up to one-third of patients with diabetes mellitus use some form of complementary and alternative medicine. One plant that has received the most attention for its anti-diabetic properties is bitter melon, Momordica charantia (M. charantia), commonly referred to as bitter gourd, karela and balsam pear. Its fruit is also used for the treatment of diabetes and related conditions amongst the indigenous populations of Asia, South America, India and East Africa. Abundant pre-clinical studies have documented in the anti-diabetic and hypoglycaemic effects of M. charantia through various postulated mechanisms. However, clinical trial data with human subjects are limited and flawed by poor study design and low statistical power. The present review is an attempt to highlight the antidiabetic activity as well as phytochemical and pharmacological reports on M. charantia and calls for better-designed clinical trials to further elucidate its possible therapeutic effects on diabetes.

  2. Antidiabetic effects of Momordica charantia (bitter melon and its medicinal potency

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    Baby Joseph

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is among the most common disorder in developed and developing countries, and the disease is increasing rapidly in most parts of the world. It has been estimated that up to one-third of patients with diabetes mellitus use some form of complementary and alternative medicine. One plant that has received the most attention for its anti-diabetic properties is bitter melon, Momordica charantia (M. charantia, commonly referred to as bitter gourd, karela and balsam pear. Its fruit is also used for the treatment of diabetes and related conditions amongst the indigenous populations of Asia, South America, India and East Africa. Abundant pre-clinical studies have documented in the anti-diabetic and hypoglycaemic effects of M. charantia through various postulated mechanisms. However, clinical trial data with human subjects are limited and flawed by poor study design and low statistical power. The present review is an attempt to highlight the antidiabetic activity as well as phytochemical and pharmacological reports on M. charantia and calls for better-designed clinical trials to further elucidate its possible therapeutic effects on diabetes.

  3. Anti-Diabetic Effects of Madecassic Acid and Rotundic Acid

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    Yuan-Man Hsu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Anti-diabetic effects of madecassic acid (MEA and rotundic acid (RA were examined. MEA or RA at 0.05% or 0.1% was supplied to diabetic mice for six weeks. The intake of MEA, not RA, dose-dependently lowered plasma glucose level and increased plasma insulin level. MEA, not RA, intake dose-dependently reduced plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity and fibrinogen level; as well as restored antithrombin-III and protein C activities in plasma of diabetic mice. MEA or RA intake decreased triglyceride and cholesterol levels in plasma and liver. Histological data agreed that MEA or RA intake lowered hepatic lipid droplets, determined by ORO stain. MEA intake dose-dependently declined reactive oxygen species (ROS and oxidized glutathione levels, increased glutathione content and maintained the activity of glutathione reductase and catalase in the heart and kidneys of diabetic mice. MEA intake dose-dependently reduced interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels in the heart and kidneys of diabetic mice. RA intake at 0.1% declined cardiac and renal levels of these inflammatory factors. These data indicated that MEA improved glycemic control and hemostatic imbalance, lowered lipid accumulation, and attenuated oxidative and inflammatory stress in diabetic mice. Thus, madecassic acid could be considered as an anti-diabetic agent.

  4. Ocimum basilicum extract exhibits antidiabetic effects via inhibition of hepatic glucose mobilization and carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes.

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    Ezeani, Chinelo; Ezenyi, Ifeoma; Okoye, Theophine; Okoli, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Ocimum basilicum L (Lamiaceae) is used as a traditional remedy for different ailments, including diabetes mellitus. This study investigated the antidiabetic effects of an extract of aerial parts of O. basilicum . Antihyperglycemic effect of the extract was determined by its effects on α-amylase and α-glucosidase in vitro , while antidiabetic properties were studied in alloxan induced diabetic rats treated for 28 days with extract and compared to those treated with oral metformin (150 mg/kg). The study and analysis was conducted between 2014 and 2015. The treatment with 100 and 200 mg/kg extract significantly ( P < 0.05) reduced fasting blood glucose concentration and slightly increased mean body weight in treated groups. Oral glucose tolerance was also significantly ( P < 0.05, 0.001) improved in 100 and 400 mg/kg extract-treated groups. The extract caused a dose-dependent increase in liver glycogen content, while it decreased alanine transferase (18.9-30.56%) and aspartate transferase (6.48-34.3%) levels in a non-dose-dependent manner. A dose of 100 mg/kg also reduced serum cholesterol and triglycerides by 19.3 and 39.54%, compared to a 2.6% reduction of cholesterol seen in the metformin-treated group. The extract was observed to produce significant ( P < 0.001) concentration-dependent inhibition of α-glucosidase (35.71-100%) and also α-amylase (23.55-81.52%), with estimated inhibitory concentration values of 1.62 and 3.86 mg/mL, respectively. The antidiabetic properties of the extract may be due to its ability to suppress endogenous glucose release, inhibit glycogenolysis and/or stimulate glycogenesis.

  5. Anti-diabetic effect of methanolic leaf extract of Pongamia pinnata on streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

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    Selvaraju Kavipriya

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the anti-diabetic effect of methanolic leaf extract of Pongamia pinnata (P. pinnata on streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Methods: Anti-diabetic activity of P. pinnata leaf extract at dosage of 500 mg/kg and 1 g/kg body weight was evaluated. Results: The levels of glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol and serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase were significantly increased in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats when compared to that of the normal rats. After supplemented with plant extract, significant lower blood glucose level was recorded. Conclusions: The methanolic leaf extract of P. pinnata has been potent anti-diabetic effect in male albino rats.

  6. Identification of plant extracts with potential antidiabetic properties: effect on human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), adipocyte differentiation and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kathrine B; Minet, Ariane; Svenstrup, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    , and their use is associated with several side effects. Partial PPARgamma agonists appear to be associated with fewer side effects but may still confer the desired insulin sensitizing action. Extracts from common medicinal/food plants were tested in a screening platform comprising a series of bioassays...... and stimulating insulin-dependent glucose uptake with no or little effect on adipocyte differentiation warranting further studies and characterization. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  7. Essential Oil Composition, Antioxidant, Antidiabetic and Antihypertensive Properties of Two Afromomum Species.

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    Adefegha, Stephen Adeniyi; Olasehinde, Tosin Abiola; Oboh, Ganiyu

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the antioxidant, antidiabetic and antihypertensive effects of essential oils from A. melegueta and A. danielli seeds. The essential oils were extracted via hydrodistillation, dried with anhydrous Na 2 SO 4 and characterized using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Antioxidant properties and inhibition of some pro-oxidant induced lipid peroxidation in rats' pancreas and heart homogenates were also determined. The results revealed that eugenol, eucalyptol, α-terpineol, α-caryophyllene and β-caryophyllene were the most abundant components in A. melegueta and A. danielli seeds. The essential oils inhibited α-amylase, α-glucosidase and angiotensin-I-converting enzyme in vitro. A.melegueta oil showed a higher α-amylase and α- glucosidase inhibitory activities with EC 50 values of 139.00 µL/mL and 91.83 µL/mL respectively than A. danielli. However, A. danielli oil (EC 50 = 48.73 µL/mL) showed the highest ACE inhibitory acivity. The highest NO radical scavenging ability was observed in A. melegueta oil while A. danielli had the highest OH radical scavenging and Fe 2+ - chelating ability. Furthermore, both essential oils inhibited SNP and Fe 2+ - induced lipid peroxidation in rats' pancreas and heart respectively in a dose dependent manner. This study reveals the biochemical principle by which essential oils from A. danielli and A.melegueta seed elicits their therapeutic effects on type-2 diabetes and hypertension.

  8. Antidiabetic potentials of Momordica charantia: multiple mechanisms behind the effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Padmaja

    2012-02-01

    Momordica charantia fruits are used as a vegetable in many countries. From time immemorial, it has also been used for management of diabetes in the Ayurvedic and Chinese systems of medicine. Information regarding the standardization of this vegetable for its usage as an antidiabetic drug is scanty. There are many reports on its effects on glucose and lipid levels in diabetic animals and some in clinical trials. Reports regarding its mechanism of action are limited. So in the present review all the information is considered to produce some concrete findings on the mechanism behind its hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects. Studies have shown that M. charantia repairs damaged β-cells, increases insulin levels, and also enhance the sensitivity of insulin. It inhibits the absorption of glucose by inhibiting glucosidase and also suppresses the activity of disaccharidases in the intestine. It stimulates the synthesis and release of thyroid hormones and adiponectin and enhances the activity of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Effects of M. charantia like transport of glucose in the cells, transport of fatty acids in the mitochondria, modulation of insulin secretion, and elevation of levels of uncoupling proteins in adipose and skeletal muscles are similar to those of AMPK and thyroxine. Therefore it is proposed that effects of M. charantia on carbohydrate and fat metabolism are through thyroxine and AMPK.

  9. Anti-Diabetic Effect of Portulaca oleracea L. Polysaccharideandits Mechanism in Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Bai

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a metabolic syndrome caused by multiple genetic and environmental factors. Traditional Chinese medicine preparations have shown a comprehensive and function-regulating characteristic. Purslane (Portulaca oleracea L. is an annual succulent herb. Currently, there have been some related reports on the treatment of diabetes with purslane. The current study was designed to separate and purify the polysaccharide, a systematic study of its physical and chemical properties, antioxidant activity, and anti-diabetic mechanism, in order to provide a theoretical basis for the development of drugs of purslane. A crude water soluble polysaccharide extracted from purslane was named CPOP (crude Portulaca oleracea L. polysaccharide. Effects of CPOP on bodyweight, glucose tolerance test (GTT, fasting blood glucose (FBG, fasting serum insulin (FINS, insulin sensitivity index (ISI, interleukin-6 (IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA, and superoxygen dehydrogenises (SOD were investigated. The results indicate that the oral administration of CPOP could significantly increase the body weight and significantly improve the glucose tolerance in diabetic rats. Meanwhile, CPOP could significantly reduce the FBG level, and elevate the FINS level and ISI value in diabetic rats. In addition, CPOP could significantly reduce TNF-α and IL-6 levels in diabetic rats; CPOP could also reduce MDA and SOD activities in the liver tissue of diabetic rats. These results suggest that the anti-diabetic effect of CPOP may be associated with its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects.

  10. Anti-Diabetic Effect of Portulaca oleracea L. Polysaccharideandits Mechanism in Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yu; Zang, Xueli; Ma, Jinshu; Xu, Guangyu

    2016-07-25

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic syndrome caused by multiple genetic and environmental factors. Traditional Chinese medicine preparations have shown a comprehensive and function-regulating characteristic. Purslane (Portulaca oleracea L.) is an annual succulent herb. Currently, there have been some related reports on the treatment of diabetes with purslane. The current study was designed to separate and purify the polysaccharide, a systematic study of its physical and chemical properties, antioxidant activity, and anti-diabetic mechanism, in order to provide a theoretical basis for the development of drugs of purslane. A crude water soluble polysaccharide extracted from purslane was named CPOP (crude Portulaca oleracea L. polysaccharide). Effects of CPOP on bodyweight, glucose tolerance test (GTT), fasting blood glucose (FBG), fasting serum insulin (FINS), insulin sensitivity index (ISI), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA), and superoxygen dehydrogenises (SOD) were investigated. The results indicate that the oral administration of CPOP could significantly increase the body weight and significantly improve the glucose tolerance in diabetic rats. Meanwhile, CPOP could significantly reduce the FBG level, and elevate the FINS level and ISI value in diabetic rats. In addition, CPOP could significantly reduce TNF-α and IL-6 levels in diabetic rats; CPOP could also reduce MDA and SOD activities in the liver tissue of diabetic rats. These results suggest that the anti-diabetic effect of CPOP may be associated with its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects.

  11. ANTI-DIABETIC EFFECTS OF TURMERIC IN ALLOXAN INDUCE D DIABETIC RATS

    OpenAIRE

    Jeevangi; Manjunath; Deepak D; Prakash G; Prashant; Chetan

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE AND BACKGROUND: Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is one of the common constituents of our daily food. The present study wa s undertaken to evaluate the anti-diabetic effects of ethanolic extract of Rhizomes of curcuma longa in alloxan induced diabetic rats and compared with of Pioglitazone, which is the standard anti-diabetic agent. METHODS: Alloxan monohydrate is used to induce diabetes mellitus in albino rats in the dose of 120mg/kg i.p. and ...

  12. Antidiabetic properties of the ethanolic extract of Rhus coriaria fruits in rats

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    S Mohammadi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available "n  Background and the purpose of the study: Fruits of Rhus coriaria L. (Anacardiaceae are traditionally used as a table spice in Iran and are highly recommended for diabetic patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the antidiabetic properties of the ethanolic extract of Rhus coriaria fruits and also its mechanisms of action. Methods: The effects of ethanolic extract of Rhus coriaria fruits were measured on blood glucose, lipids and antioxidant enzymes by commercial kits. mRNA levels of insulin (INS and glucose transporter type-4 (GLUT-4 genes were investigated by RT-PCR (Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction technique. Moreover, its effects on intestinal α-glucosidases was measured using an in vitro method. Results and Conclusion: Following a single dose administration of the extract it was found that extract could significantly reduce postprandial blood glucose by 24% (at 5 hrs. In the long term experiment, on the day of 21, postprandial blood glucose (PBG was found to be significantly lower (by 26% compared to diabetic control group. The plant extract raised markedly serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL by 34% and also reduced low-density lipoprotein (HDL by 32%. Also it had noticeable antioxidant effects by elevating superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase(CAT activities by 46% and 77%, respectively. However it did not show a strong effect on glutathione peroxidase (GPX activity. The extract inhibited maltase and sucrase activities by 44% and 27%, respectively. However it made no changes in the transcript levels of INS and GLUT-4 genes. It can be concluded that constituents of Rhus coriaria fruits have effective components which can be utilized as useful herb for alleviation of diabetes complications.

  13. Antidiabetic and Renal Protective Properties of Berrycactus Fruit (Myrtillocactus geometrizans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynoso-Camacho, Rosalia; Martinez-Samayoa, Paola; Ramos-Gomez, Minerva; Guzmán, Horacio; Salgado, Luis M

    2015-05-01

    Native plants are exceedingly valuable because they are sources of natural products with applications for the treatment of various diseases. Berrycactus fruit (Myrtillocactus geometrizans) has been consumed in Mexico since ancient times due to its sweetness. The hypoglycemic and antioxidant effects of this fruit were evaluated in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by replacing the drinking water with berrycactus juice (2 or 4 g/kg). After 4 weeks of treatment, the diabetic animals showed an improvement in their conditions, as reflected by diminished circulating glucose levels (up to 50%), diminished triglycerides (up to 67%), and diminished total cholesterol (up to 35%) compared with diabetic nontreated controls, and these effects were dose dependent. The dose of 4 g/kg produced the best results. The administration of the juice improved renal function and helped to restore normal levels of glutathione and glutathione S-transferase in the kidney. The expressions of two transcription factors that are relevant to normal functioning of the kidney changed due to the administration of the juice; compared to the diabetic nontreated controls, the level of nuclear factor kappa of B-cells diminished, and the total level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma increased. The results of this study highlight the importance of the compounds that are present in berrycactus fruit as adjuvants in the treatment of diabetes and its renal complications.

  14. Antioxidant, anti-diabetic and renal protective properties of Stevia rebaudiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivanna, Naveen; Naika, Mahadev; Khanum, Farhath; Kaul, Vijay K

    2013-01-01

    Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni has been used for the treatment of diabetes in, for example, Brazil, although a positive effect on antidiabetic and its complications has not been unequivocally demonstrated. This herb also has numerous therapeutic properties which have been proven safe and effective over hundreds of years. Streptozotocin is a potential source of oxidative stress that induces genotoxicity. We studied the effects of stevia leaves and its extracted polyphenols and fiber on streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. We hypothesize that supplementation of polyphenols extract from stevia to the diet causes a reduction in diabetes and its complications. Eighty Wistar rats were randomly divided into 8 groups; a standard control diet was supplemented with either stevia whole leaves powder (4.0%) or polyphenols or fiber extracted from stevia separately and fed for one month. Streptozotocin (60 mg/kg body weight, i.p) was injected to the diabetic groups on the 31st day. Several indices were analyzed to assess the modulation of the streptozotocin induced oxidative stress, toxicity and blood glucose levels by stevia. The results showed a reduction of blood glucose, ALT and AST, and increment of insulin level in the stevia whole leaves powder and extracted polyphenols fed rats compared to control diabetic group. Its feeding also reduced the MDA concentration in liver and improved its antioxidant status through antioxidant enzymes. Glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity were improved by their feeding. Streptozotocin was also found to induce kidney damage as evidenced by decreased glomerular filtration rate; this change was however alleviated in the stevia leaves and extracted polyphenol fed groups. The results suggested that stevia leaves do have a significant role in alleviating liver and kidney damage in the STZ-diabetic rats besides its hypoglycemic effect. It might be adequate to conclude that stevia leaves could protect rats against streptozotocin induced diabetes

  15. Nutrient-deprivation autophagy factor-1 (NAF-1: biochemical properties of a novel cellular target for anti-diabetic drugs.

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    Sagi Tamir

    Full Text Available Nutrient-deprivation autophagy factor-1 (NAF-1 (synonyms: Cisd2, Eris, Miner1, and Noxp70 is a [2Fe-2S] cluster protein immune-detected both in endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondrial outer membrane. It was implicated in human pathology (Wolfram Syndrome 2 and in BCL-2 mediated antagonization of Beclin 1-dependent autophagy and depression of ER calcium stores. To gain insights about NAF-1 functions, we investigated the biochemical properties of its 2Fe-2S cluster and sensitivity of those properties to small molecules. The structure of the soluble domain of NAF-1 shows that it forms a homodimer with each protomer containing a [2Fe-2S] cluster bound by 3 Cys and one His. NAF-1 has shown the unusual abilities to transfer its 2Fe-2S cluster to an apo-acceptor protein (followed in vitro by spectrophotometry and by native PAGE electrophoresis and to transfer iron to intact mitochondria in cell models (monitored by fluorescence imaging with iron fluorescent sensors targeted to mitochondria. Importantly, the drug pioglitazone abrogates NAF-1's ability to transfer the cluster to acceptor proteins and iron to mitochondria. Similar effects were found for the anti-diabetes and longevity-promoting antioxidant resveratrol. These results reveal NAF-1 as a previously unidentified cell target of anti-diabetes thiazolidinedione drugs like pioglitazone and of the natural product resveratrol, both of which interact with the protein and stabilize its labile [2Fe-2S] cluster.

  16. Characterization and comparison of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors: Part 2. Antidiabetic effects in type 2 diabetic mice

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    Atsuo Tahara

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Previously we investigated the pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and pharmacologic properties of all six sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT 2 inhibitors commercially available in Japan using normal and diabetic mice. We classified the SGLT2 inhibitors with respect to duration of action as either long-acting (ipragliflozin and dapagliflozin or intermediate-acting (tofogliflozin, canagliflozin, empagliflozin, and luseogliflozin. In the present study, antidiabetic effects of repeated administration of these SGLT2 inhibitors in type 2 diabetic mice were investigated. When repeatedly administered for 4 weeks, all SGLT2 inhibitors significantly exhibited antihyperglycemic, antihyperinsulinemic, and pancreas-protective effects, as well as insulin resistance-improving effects. When compared at doses producing comparable reduction in hyperglycemia across all drugs, the antidiabetic effects of ipragliflozin and dapagliflozin were more potent than those of the other four drugs, but these differences among the six drugs were not statistically significant. Further, an oral glucose tolerance test performed after repeated administration demonstrated significant improvement in glucose tolerance only with ipragliflozin and dapagliflozin, implying improved insulin resistance and secretion. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that, although all SGLT2 inhibitors exert antidiabetic effects in type 2 diabetic mice, these pharmacologic effects might be slightly superior with the long-acting drugs, which are able to provide favorable blood glucose control throughout the day.

  17. Antidiabetic property of Symplocos cochinchinensis is mediated by inhibition of alpha glucosidase and enhanced insulin sensitivity.

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    Kalathookunnel Antony Antu

    Full Text Available The study is designed to find out the biochemical basis of antidiabetic property of Symplocos cochinchinensis (SC, the main ingredient of 'Nisakathakadi' an Ayurvedic decoction for diabetes. Since diabetes is a multifactorial disease, ethanolic extract of the bark (SCE and its fractions (hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate and 90% ethanol were evaluated by in vitro methods against multiple targets relevant to diabetes such as the alpha glucosidase inhibition, glucose uptake, adipogenic potential, oxidative stress, pancreatic beta cell proliferation, inhibition of protein glycation, protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP-1B and dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV. Among the extracts, SCE exhibited comparatively better activity like alpha glucosidase inhibition (IC50 value-82.07 ± 2.10 µg/mL, insulin dependent glucose uptake (3 fold increase in L6 myotubes, pancreatic beta cell regeneration in RIN-m5F (3.5 fold increase and reduced triglyceride accumulation (22% decrease in 3T3L1 cells, protection from hyperglycemia induced generation of reactive oxygen species in HepG2 cells (59.57% decrease with moderate antiglycation and PTP-1B inhibition. Chemical characterization by HPLC revealed the superiority of SCE over other extracts due to presence and quantity of bioactives (beta-sitosterol, phloretin 2'glucoside, oleanolic acid in addition to minerals like magnesium, calcium, potassium, sodium, zinc and manganese. So SCE has been subjected to oral sucrose tolerance test to evaluate its antihyperglycemic property in mild diabetic and diabetic animal models. SCE showed significant antihyperglycemic activity in in vivo diabetic models. We conclude that SC mediates the antidiabetic activity mainly via alpha glucosidase inhibition, improved insulin sensitivity, with moderate antiglycation and antioxidant activity.

  18. Antidiabetic Properties and Mechanism of Action of Gynura procumbens Water Extract in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

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    Mariam Ahmad

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Gynura procumbens (Lour. Merr (family Compositae is cultivated in Southeast Asia, especially Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand, for medicinal purposes. This study evaluated the in vivo hypoglycemic properties of the water extract of G. procumbens following 14 days of treatment and in vitro in RIN-5F cells. Glucose absorption from the intestines and its glucose uptake in abdominal skeletal muscle were assessed. The antidiabetic effect of water extract of G. procumbens leaves was investigated in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT was performed in diabetic rats treated with G. procumbens water extract for 14 days. In the IPGTT, blood was collected for insulin and blood glucose measurement. After the IPGTT, the pancreases were collected for immunohistochemical study of β-cells of the islets of Langerhans. The possible antidiabetic mechanisms of G. procumbens were assessed through in vitro RIN-5F cell study, intestinal glucose absorption and glucose uptake by muscle. The results showed that G. procumbens significantly decreased blood glucose levels after 14 days of treatment and improved outcome of the IPGTT. However, G. procumbens did not show a significant effect on insulin level either in the in vivo test or the in vitro RIN-5F cell culture study. G. procumbens also showed minimal effects on β-cells of the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas. However, G. procumbens only significantly increased glucose uptake by muscle tissues. From the findings we can conclude that G. procumbens water extract exerted its hypoglycemic effect by promoting glucose uptake by muscles.

  19. Antidiabetic and antioxidant properties of Ficus deltoidea fruit extracts and fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misbah, Hasni; Aziz, Azlina Abdul; Aminudin, Norhaniza

    2013-05-29

    phenolic content (121.62 ± 4.86 mg/g extract). Fractionation of the crude extracts resulted in loss of antioxidant activities. There was no positive correlation between phenolic and flavonoid content with α-glucosidase inhibitory activities. However, phenolic content correlated well with antioxidant activities of the crude extracts but not with the fractions. The antioxidant activities of the fruits of F. deltoidea might be asserted by the phenolic content but other polar plant components were possibly involved in the antidiabetic properties. The study of these compounds having both antihyperglycemic and antioxidant activities may provide a new approach in the treatment of diabetes mellitus.

  20. Are vanadium compounds drugable? Structures and effects of antidiabetic vanadium compounds: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scior, Thomas; Guevara-García, Antonio; Bernard, Philippe; Do, Quoc-Tuan; Domeyer, David; Laufer, Stefan

    2005-11-01

    Vanadate can be bioequivalent to phosphate and replace it in cellular metabolism. The detection of insulin-like activity has spurred interest in the development of oral anti-diabetic drugs containing vanadium. We collected and evaluated a vast toxicity data set and discussed molecular aspects related to insulin-mimetic effects of vanadium complexes.

  1. Anti-diabetic effect of ethanol leaf extract of Combretum micranthum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research was aimed to investigate the anti-diabetic effects of ethanol leaf extract of Combretum micranthum on blood glucose levels and oxidative stress biomarkers such as malondaldehyde, superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase on alloxan induced Diab tes in Wistar rats. Diabetes was induced ...

  2. Antidiabetic Effects of Resveratrol: The Way Forward in Its Clinical Utility

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    Omolola R. Oyenihi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in the understanding and management of diabetes mellitus, the prevalence of the disease is increasing unabatedly with resulting disabling and life-reducing consequences to the global human population. The limitations and side effects associated with current antidiabetic therapies have necessitated the search for novel therapeutic agents. Due to the multipathogenicity of diabetes mellitus, plant-derived compounds with proven multiple pharmacological actions have been postulated to “hold the key” in the search for an affordable, efficacious, and safer therapeutic agent in the treatment of the disease and associated complications. Resveratrol, a phytoalexin present in few plant species, has demonstrated beneficial antidiabetic effects in animals and humans through diverse mechanisms and multiple molecular targets. However, despite the enthusiasm and widespread successes achieved with the use of resveratrol in animal models of diabetes mellitus, there are extremely limited clinical data to confirm the antidiabetic qualities of resveratrol. This review presents an update on the mechanisms of action and protection of resveratrol in diabetes mellitus, highlights challenges in its clinical utility, and suggests the way forward in translating the promising preclinical data to a possible antidiabetic drug in the near future.

  3. Antidiabetic effects of Momordica charantia (bitter melon) and its medicinal potency

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph, Baby; Jini, D

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is among the most common disorder in developed and developing countries, and the disease is increasing rapidly in most parts of the world. It has been estimated that up to one-third of patients with diabetes mellitus use some form of complementary and alternative medicine. One plant that has received the most attention for its anti-diabetic properties is bitter melon, Momordica charantia (M. charantia), commonly referred to as bitter gourd, karela and balsam p...

  4. Chemical and Biological Aspects of Extracts from Medicinal Plants with Antidiabetic Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gushiken, Lucas F; Beserra, Fernando P; Rozza, Ariane L; Bérgamo, Patrícia L; Bérgamo, Danilo A; Pellizzon, Cláudia H

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease and a leading cause of death in western countries. Despite advancements in the clinical management of the disease, it is not possible to control the late complications of diabetes. The main characteristic feature of diabetes is hyperglycemia, which reflects the deterioration in the use of glucose due to a faulty or poor response to insulin secretion. Alloxan and streptozotocin (STZ) are the chemical tools that are most commonly used to study the disease in rodents. Many plant species have been used in ethnopharmacology or to treat experimentally symptoms of this disease. When evaluated pharmacologically, most of the plants employed as antidiabetic substances have been shown to exhibit hypoglycemic and antihyperglycemic activities, and to contain chemical constituents that may be used as new antidiabetic agents. There are many substances extracted from plants that offer antidiabetic potential, whereas others may result in hypoglycemia as a side effect due to their toxicity, particularly their hepatotoxicity. In this article we present an updated overview of the studies on extracts from medicinal plants, relating the mechanisms of action by which these substances act and the natural principles of antidiabetic activity.

  5. Anti-diabetic and hypoglycaemic effects of Momordica charantia (bitter melon): a mini review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Lawrence; Birtwhistle, Richard; Kotecha, Jyoti; Hannah, Susan; Cuthbertson, Sharon

    2009-12-01

    It has been estimated that up to one-third of patients with diabetes mellitus use some form of complementary and alternative medicine. Momordica charantia (bitter melon) is a popular fruit used for the treatment of diabetes and related conditions amongst the indigenous populations of Asia, South America, India and East Africa. Abundant pre-clinical studies have documented the anti-diabetic and hypoglycaemic effects of M. charantia through various postulated mechanisms. However, clinical trial data with human subjects are limited and flawed by poor study design and low statistical power. The present article reviews the clinical data regarding the anti-diabetic potentials of M. charantia and calls for better-designed clinical trials to further elucidate its possible therapeutic effects.

  6. Hypoglycemic and Antidiabetic Effect of Pleurotus sajor-caju Aqueous Extract in Normal and Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Sze Han; Mohd Zain, Mohd Shazwan; Zakaria, Fatariah; Wan Ishak, Wan Rosli; Wan Ahmad, Wan Amir Nizam

    2015-01-01

    Pleurotus sajor-caju (PSC) is an edible oyster mushroom featuring high nutritional values and pharmacological properties. Objective. To investigate the hypoglycemic and antidiabetic effects of single and repeated oral administration of PSC aqueous extract in normal and diabetic rats. A single dose of 500, 750, or 1000 mg/kg of the PSC extract was given to experimental rats to determine the effects on blood glucose (BG) and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The effective dose (750 mg/kg) of PSC extract was repeatedly administrated daily for 21 days in diabetic rats to examine its antidiabetic effects in terms of BG control, body weight, urine sugar, HbA1c, and several serum profiles. The dose of 750 mg/kg showed the most significant BG reduction (23.5%) in normal rats 6 hours after administration in BG study (p < 0.05). In OGTT study, the same dose produced a maximum BG fall of 41.3% in normal rats and 36.5% in diabetic rats 3 hours after glucose administration. In 21-day study, treated diabetic rats showed significant improvement in terms of fasting BG, body weight, and urine sugar as compared to control diabetic rats. The study evidenced scientifically the beneficial use of PSC as an alternative medicine in diabetes management.

  7. Hypoglycemic and Antidiabetic Effect of Pleurotus sajor-caju Aqueous Extract in Normal and Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sze Han Ng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pleurotus sajor-caju (PSC is an edible oyster mushroom featuring high nutritional values and pharmacological properties. Objective. To investigate the hypoglycemic and antidiabetic effects of single and repeated oral administration of PSC aqueous extract in normal and diabetic rats. Materials and Methods. A single dose of 500, 750, or 1000 mg/kg of the PSC extract was given to experimental rats to determine the effects on blood glucose (BG and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT. The effective dose (750 mg/kg of PSC extract was repeatedly administrated daily for 21 days in diabetic rats to examine its antidiabetic effects in terms of BG control, body weight, urine sugar, HbA1c, and several serum profiles. Results. The dose of 750 mg/kg showed the most significant BG reduction (23.5% in normal rats 6 hours after administration in BG study (p<0.05. In OGTT study, the same dose produced a maximum BG fall of 41.3% in normal rats and 36.5% in diabetic rats 3 hours after glucose administration. In 21-day study, treated diabetic rats showed significant improvement in terms of fasting BG, body weight, and urine sugar as compared to control diabetic rats. Conclusion. The study evidenced scientifically the beneficial use of PSC as an alternative medicine in diabetes management.

  8. Anti-diabetic effects of brown algae derived phlorotannins, marine polyphenols through diverse mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Hong; Jeon, You-Jin

    2013-04-01

    Marine algae are popular and abundant food ingredients mainly in Asian countries, and also well known for their health beneficial effects due to the presence of biologically active components. The marine algae have been studied for biologically active components and phlorotannins, marine polyphenols are among them. Among marine algae, brown algae have extensively studied for their potential anti-diabetic activities. Majority of the investigations on phlorotannins derived from brown algae have exhibited their various anti-diabetic mechanisms such as α-glucosidase and α-amylase inhibitory effect, glucose uptake effect in skeletal muscle, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP 1B) enzyme inhibition, improvement of insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetic db/db mice, and protective effect against diabetes complication. In this review, we have made an attempt to discuss the various anti-diabetic mechanisms associated with phlorotannins from brown algae that are confined to in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Anticoagulant effects of an antidiabetic drug on monocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, C E; Hellum, M; Haug, K B F; Aass, H C; Joø, G B; Øvstebø, R; Trøseid, A M; Klingenberg, O; Kierulf, P

    2011-11-01

    Monocyte- and microparticle (MP)-associated tissue factor (TF) is upregulated in diabetes. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces expression of TF and alternatively spliced TF (asTF) and increases MP release from monocytes. Using LPS-stimulated TF-bearing human monocytes, we examined whether glibenclamide, a sulfonylurea used to treat diabetes type 2, might possess anticoagulant properties. We studied the effects of glibenclamide on cell- and supernatant-associated procoagulant activity (Factor Xa-generating assay and clot formation assay), on expression of TF and asTF (flow cytometry, RT-qPCR, western blot) and on cell viability and MP release (flow cytometry). Glibenclamide dose-dependently decreased procoagulant activity of cells and supernatants. The reduction in cellular procoagulant activity coincided with reduced expression of TF and asTF in cells, whereas cell viability remained almost unchanged. The glibenclamide-induced reduction in procoagulant activity of supernatants appeared to be associated with a decreased number of released MPs. Reduction of monocyte- and supernatant-associated procoagulant activity by glibenclamide is associated with decreased expression of TF and asTF and possibly with a reduced MP number. Our data indicate that glibenclamide reduces the prothrombotic state in LPS-stimulated monocytes in vitro. Glibenclamide might therefore also have an anticoagulant effect in vivo, but this needs to be further evaluated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Anti-diabetic properties of Momordica charantia L. polysaccharide in alloxan-induced diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Shan, Bin; Liao, Cai-Hu; Xie, Jian-Hua; Wen, Ping-Wei; Shi, Jia-Yi

    2015-11-01

    A water-soluble polysaccharide (MCP) was isolated from the fruits of Momordica charantia L., and the hypoglycemic effects of MCP were investigated in both normal healthy and alloxan-induced diabetic mice. MCP was orally administered once a day after 3 days of alloxan-induction at 100, 200 and 300mg/kg body weight for 28 day. Results showed that fasting blood glucose level (BGL) was significantly decreased, whereas the glucose tolerance was marked improvement in alloxan-induced diabetic mice, and loss in body weight was also prevented in diabetic mice compared to the diabetic control group. The dosage of 300mg/kg body weight exhibited the best effects. In addition, MCP did not exhibit any toxic symptoms in the limited toxicity evaluation in mice. The results suggest that MCP possess significantly dose-dependent anti-diabetic activity on alloxan-induced diabetic mice. Hence, MCP can be incorporated as a supplement in health-care food, drugs and/or combined with other hypoglycemic drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Quinoa seeds leach phytoecdysteroids and other compounds with anti-diabetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Brittany L.; Poulev, Alexander; Kuhn, Peter; Grace, Mary H.; Lila, Mary Ann; Raskin, Ilya

    2014-01-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) contains high levels of biologically active phytoecdysteroids, which have been implicated in plant defense from insects, and have shown a range of beneficial pharmacological effects in mammals. We demonstrated that the most prevalent phytoecdysteroid, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20HE), was secreted (leached) from intact quinoa seeds into water during the initial stages of seed germination. Leaching efficiency was optimized by ethanol concentration (70% ethanol), temperature (80°C), time (4 h), and solvent ratio (5 ml/g seed). When compared to extraction of macerated seeds, the leaching procedure released essentially all the 20HE available in the seeds (491 μg/g seed). The optimized quinoa leachate (QL), containing 0.86% 20HE, 1.00% total phytoecdysteroids, 2.59% flavonoid glycosides, 11.9% oil, and 20.4% protein, significantly lowered fasting blood glucose in obese, hyperglycemic mice. Leaching effectively releases and concentrates bioactive phytochemicals from quinoa seeds, providing an efficient means to produce a food-grade mixture that may be useful for anti-diabetic applications. PMID:24912714

  12. Blood pressure and cardiovascular effects of new and emerging antidiabetic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfour, Pelbreton C; Rodriguez, Carlos J; Ferdinand, Keith C

    2014-08-01

    Despite remarkable declines in US cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality over the last several decades, the prevalence of risk factors such as type 2 diabetes and hypertension remains high, associated with increasing obesity rates. Although optimal glycemic control remains a primary focus to decrease the disease burden, the FDA has issued guidance recommendations for documenting cardiovascular disease-related safety with research trials on new antidiabetic agents with more demanding requirements compared to past approval of existing therapies. This review will discuss the public health impact of type 2 diabetes, specifically with comorbid hypertension; mechanisms of action of the newest antidiabetic drug classes; and preliminary findings and potential clinical significance of the favorable blood pressure and body weight effects of the sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists; and additionally discuss two recent large cardiovascular outcome trials with dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors.

  13. Update of Cardiovascular Effects of Older and Newer Anti-diabetic Medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleftheriadou, Ioanna; Grigoropoulou, Pinelopi; Liberopoulos, Evangelos; Liatis, Stavros; Kokkinos, Alexandros; Tentolouris, Nikolaos

    2017-05-29

    It is known that cardiovascular (CV) disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Over the last years one of the most discussed topics is the CV safety of anti-diabetic medications. Regarding CV safety of older anti-diabetic agents the data are less clear and conclusions about their CV safety is based mostly on randomized controlled trials designed to assess their glucose lowering efficacy. In this review we summarize current knowledge about the CV safety of older and newer anti-diabetic medications. According to the published literature metformin is the first line agent for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and seems to have cardio-protective effects. The choice of the second line agent when metformin monotherapy fails to achieve HbA1c targets is less clear. In the light of the findings of the EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial and the recently published LEADER trial, empagliflozin and liraglutide seem reasonable options as second line agents for patients with CV disease. Sulfonylureas on the other hand, with the exception of gliclazide, should be avoided in those patients, although CV safety trials are still lacking. In individuals without CV disease any of the other classes of anti-diabetic medication can be selected on a patient-centered approach. Saxagliptin, alogliptin, sitagliptin and lixisenatide have been evaluated in CV safety trials and have neutral effects on CV outcomes, while pioglitazone may have some CV benefits. Saxagliptine and alogliptine, however, should be avoided in patients with heart failure, while pioglitazone is contraindicated in this population. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Molecular Mechanisms of the Anti-Obesity and Anti-Diabetic Properties of Flavonoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Kawser Hossain

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and diabetes are the most prevailing health concerns worldwide and their incidence is increasing at a high rate, resulting in enormous social costs. Obesity is a complex disease commonly accompanied by insulin resistance and increases in oxidative stress and inflammatory marker expression, leading to augmented fat mass in the body. Diabetes mellitus (DM is a metabolic disorder characterized by the destruction of pancreatic β cells or diminished insulin secretion and action insulin. Obesity causes the development of metabolic disorders such as DM, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, and inflammation-based pathologies. Flavonoids are the secondary metabolites of plants and have 15-carbon skeleton structures containing two phenyl rings and a heterocyclic ring. More than 5000 naturally occurring flavonoids have been reported from various plants and have been found to possess many beneficial effects with advantages over chemical treatments. A number of studies have demonstrated the potential health benefits of natural flavonoids in treating obesity and DM, and show increased bioavailability and action on multiple molecular targets. This review summarizes the current progress in our understanding of the anti-obesity and anti-diabetic potential of natural flavonoids and their molecular mechanisms for preventing and/or treating obesity and diabetes.

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of the Anti-Obesity and Anti-Diabetic Properties of Flavonoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawser Hossain, Mohammed; Abdal Dayem, Ahmed; Han, Jihae; Yin, Yingfu; Kim, Kyeongseok; Kumar Saha, Subbroto; Yang, Gwang-Mo; Choi, Hye Yeon; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2016-04-15

    Obesity and diabetes are the most prevailing health concerns worldwide and their incidence is increasing at a high rate, resulting in enormous social costs. Obesity is a complex disease commonly accompanied by insulin resistance and increases in oxidative stress and inflammatory marker expression, leading to augmented fat mass in the body. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder characterized by the destruction of pancreatic β cells or diminished insulin secretion and action insulin. Obesity causes the development of metabolic disorders such as DM, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, and inflammation-based pathologies. Flavonoids are the secondary metabolites of plants and have 15-carbon skeleton structures containing two phenyl rings and a heterocyclic ring. More than 5000 naturally occurring flavonoids have been reported from various plants and have been found to possess many beneficial effects with advantages over chemical treatments. A number of studies have demonstrated the potential health benefits of natural flavonoids in treating obesity and DM, and show increased bioavailability and action on multiple molecular targets. This review summarizes the current progress in our understanding of the anti-obesity and anti-diabetic potential of natural flavonoids and their molecular mechanisms for preventing and/or treating obesity and diabetes.

  16. Cafestol, a Bioactive Substance in Coffee, Has Antidiabetic Properties in KKAy Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellbye, Fredrik Brustad; Jeppesen, Per Bendix; Shokouh, Pedram

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Daily coffee consumption is inversely associated with risk of type-2 diabetes (T2D). Cafestol, a bioactive substance in coffee, increases glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in vitro and increases glucose uptake in human skeletal muscle cells. We hypothesized that cafestol can postpone...... in coffee consumers and has a potential role as an antidiabetic drug....

  17. Antidiabetic effect of kolaviron, a biflavonoid complex isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hypoglycaemic effect of kolaviron (KV), (biflavonoid from Garcinia kola) in streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats has been established. Objectives: To evaluate the possible protective effects of KV on cardiac, renal and hepatic tissues of STZ-diabetic rats. Methods: This study consists of four groups of 6 rats each.

  18. Antidiabetic and Hypolipidemic Effects of Methanol Leaf Extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The 6th group, normal rats were given distilled water. Treatment was continued daily and orally for 14 days. Blood glucose levels were monitored at 0, 2, 4, 8 and 24 h, and 14th days. ... Keywords: Napoleona vogelii, Lipid profile, Diabetes, Glibenclamide, Hypoglycemic effect ..... Tannic acid stimulates glucose transport and.

  19. Antidiabetic and hypolipidemic effects of methanol leaf extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the antihyperglycaemic and hypolipidemic effects of Napoleona vogelii Hook. & Planch (Lecythidaceae) methanol leaves extract in alloxan-induced diabetes in rats. Methods: The leaves were extracted via cold maceration using 70 % methanol. Diabetes was then induced using alloxan (150 mg/kg I.P) ...

  20. Antidiabetic, hypolipidemic and hepatoprotective effects of Arctium lappa root’s hydro-alcoholic extract on nicotinamide-streptozotocin induced type 2 model of diabetes in male mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahangarpour, Akram; Heidari, Hamid; Oroojan, Ali Akbar; Mirzavandi, Farhang; Nasr Esfehani, Khalil; Dehghan Mohammadi, Zeinab

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Arctium lappa (burdock), (A. lappa) root has hypoglycemic and antioxidative effects, and has been used for treatment of diabetes in tradition medicine. This study was conducted to evaluate the antidiabetic and hypolipidemic properties of A. lappa root extract on nicotinamide-streptozotocin (NA-STZ)-induced type2 diabetes in mice. Materials and Methods: In this investigation, 70 adult male NMRI mice (30-35g) randomly divided into 7 groups (n=10) as follow: 1-control, 2-type 2 diabetic mice, 3-diabetic mice that received glibenclamide (0.25 mg/kg) as an anti-diabetic drug, 4, 5, 6 and 7- diabetic and normal animals that were pre-treated with 200 and 300 mg/kg A. lappa root extract, respectively, for 28 days. Diabetes has been induced by intraperitoneal injection of NA and STZ. Finally, the blood sample was taken and insulin, glucose, SGOT, SGPT, alkaline phosphatase, leptin and lipid levels was evaluated. Results: Induction of diabetes decreased the level of insulin, leptin and high density lipoprotein (HDL) and increased the level of other lipids, glucose, and hepatic enzymes significantly (plappa root extract, at specific doses, has an anti-diabetic effect through its hypolipidemic and insulinotropic properties. Hence, this plant extract may be beneficial in the treatment of diabetes. PMID:28348972

  1. Antidiabetic, hypolipidemic and hepatoprotective effects ofArctium lapparoot's hydro-alcoholic extract on nicotinamide-streptozotocin induced type 2 model of diabetes in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahangarpour, Akram; Heidari, Hamid; Oroojan, Ali Akbar; Mirzavandi, Farhang; Nasr Esfehani, Khalil; Dehghan Mohammadi, Zeinab

    2017-01-01

    Arctium lappa (burdock), (A. lappa) root has hypoglycemic and antioxidative effects, and has been used for treatment of diabetes in tradition medicine. This study was conducted to evaluate the antidiabetic and hypolipidemic properties of A. lappa root extract on nicotinamide-streptozotocin (NA-STZ)-induced type2 diabetes in mice. In this investigation, 70 adult male NMRI mice (30-35g) randomly divided into 7 groups (n=10) as follow: 1-control, 2-type 2 diabetic mice, 3-diabetic mice that received glibenclamide (0.25 mg/kg) as an anti-diabetic drug, 4, 5, 6 and 7- diabetic and normal animals that were pre-treated with 200 and 300 mg/kg A. lappa root extract, respectively, for 28 days. Diabetes has been induced by intraperitoneal injection of NA and STZ. Finally, the blood sample was taken and insulin, glucose, SGOT, SGPT, alkaline phosphatase, leptin and lipid levels was evaluated. Induction of diabetes decreased the level of insulin, leptin and high density lipoprotein (HDL) and increased the level of other lipids, glucose, and hepatic enzymes significantly (plappa root extract, at specific doses, has an anti-diabetic effect through its hypolipidemic and insulinotropic properties. Hence, this plant extract may be beneficial in the treatment of diabetes.

  2. [Effects of anti-diabetic therapy on cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avogaro, Angelo

    2013-12-01

    It is debatable whether metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes is followed by a commensurate reduction in cardiovascular risk. Large clinical outcome trials have shown that lowering glucose is a poor predictor of cardiovascular outcome; rather a too tight metabolic control exposes patients, particularly those at risk for hypoglycemia, and with renal failure, to severe adverse events. This article reviews the specific effects of the most commonly used glucose-lowering agents on the cardiovascular system, and specifies which drug is best suited for a given clinical condition related to cardiovascular disease.

  3. Antidiabetic effects of glucokinase regulatory protein small-molecule disruptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, David J.; St Jean, David J.; Kurzeja, Robert J. M.; Wahl, Robert C.; Michelsen, Klaus; Cupples, Rod; Chen, Michelle; Wu, John; Sivits, Glenn; Helmering, Joan; Komorowski, Renée; Ashton, Kate S.; Pennington, Lewis D.; Fotsch, Christopher; Vazir, Mukta; Chen, Kui; Chmait, Samer; Zhang, Jiandong; Liu, Longbin; Norman, Mark H.; Andrews, Kristin L.; Bartberger, Michael D.; van, Gwyneth; Galbreath, Elizabeth J.; Vonderfecht, Steven L.; Wang, Minghan; Jordan, Steven R.; Véniant, Murielle M.; Hale, Clarence

    2013-12-01

    Glucose homeostasis is a vital and complex process, and its disruption can cause hyperglycaemia and type II diabetes mellitus. Glucokinase (GK), a key enzyme that regulates glucose homeostasis, converts glucose to glucose-6-phosphate in pancreatic β-cells, liver hepatocytes, specific hypothalamic neurons, and gut enterocytes. In hepatocytes, GK regulates glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis, suppresses glucose production, and is subject to the endogenous inhibitor GK regulatory protein (GKRP). During fasting, GKRP binds, inactivates and sequesters GK in the nucleus, which removes GK from the gluconeogenic process and prevents a futile cycle of glucose phosphorylation. Compounds that directly hyperactivate GK (GK activators) lower blood glucose levels and are being evaluated clinically as potential therapeutics for the treatment of type II diabetes mellitus. However, initial reports indicate that an increased risk of hypoglycaemia is associated with some GK activators. To mitigate the risk of hypoglycaemia, we sought to increase GK activity by blocking GKRP. Here we describe the identification of two potent small-molecule GK-GKRP disruptors (AMG-1694 and AMG-3969) that normalized blood glucose levels in several rodent models of diabetes. These compounds potently reversed the inhibitory effect of GKRP on GK activity and promoted GK translocation both in vitro (isolated hepatocytes) and in vivo (liver). A co-crystal structure of full-length human GKRP in complex with AMG-1694 revealed a previously unknown binding pocket in GKRP distinct from that of the phosphofructose-binding site. Furthermore, with AMG-1694 and AMG-3969 (but not GK activators), blood glucose lowering was restricted to diabetic and not normoglycaemic animals. These findings exploit a new cellular mechanism for lowering blood glucose levels with reduced potential for hypoglycaemic risk in patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

  4. Enzyme inhibitory and radical scavenging effects of some antidiabetic plants of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilüfer Orhan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Ethnopharmacological field surveys demonstrated that many plants, such as Gentiana olivieri, Helichrysum graveolens, Helichrysum plicatum ssp. plicatum, Juniperus oxycedrus ssp. oxycedrus, Juniperus  communis var. saxatilis, Viscum album (ssp. album, ssp. austriacum, are used as traditional medicine for diabetes in different regions of Anatolia. The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro antidiabetic effects of some selected plants, tested in animal models recently. Materials and Methods: α-glucosidase and α-amylase enzyme inhibitory effects of the plant extracts were investigated and Acarbose was used as a reference drug. Additionally, radical scavenging capacities were determined using 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid ABTS radical cation scavenging assay and total phenolic content of the extracts were evaluated using Folin Ciocalteu method. Results: H. graveolens ethanol extract exhibited the highest inhibitory activity (55.7 % ± 2.2 on α-amylase enzyme. Additionally, J. oxycedrus hydro-alcoholic leaf extract had potent α-amylase inhibitory effect, while the hydro-alcoholic extract of J. communis fruit showed the highest α-glucosidase inhibitory activity (IC50: 4.4 μg/ml. Conclusion:Results indicated that, antidiabetic effect of hydro-alcoholic extracts of H. graveolens capitulums, J. communis fruit and J. oxycedrus leaf might arise from inhibition of digestive enzymes.

  5. An experimental evaluation of the antidiabetic and antilipidemic properties of a standardized Momordica charantia fruit extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Nafisa PC; Lagishetty, Chakradhar V; Panda, Vandana S; Naik, Suresh R

    2007-01-01

    experimental findings with respect to the mechanism of action of MCE in alloxan diabetic rats suggest that it enhances insulin secretion by the islets of Langerhans, reduces glycogenesis in liver tissue, enhances peripheral glucose utilisation and increases serum protein levels. Furthermore, MCE treatment restores the altered histological architecture of the islets of Langerhans. Hence, the biochemical, pharmacological and histopathological profiles of MCE clearly indicate its potential antidiabetic activity and other beneficial effects in amelioration of diabetes associated complications. Further, an evaluation of its antilipidemic activity in old obese rats demonstrated significant lowering of cholesterol and triglyceride levels while elevating HDL-cholesterol levels. Also, the extract lowered serum lipids in alloxan diabetic rats, suggesting its usefulness in controlling metabolic alterations associated with diabetes. PMID:17892543

  6. An experimental evaluation of the antidiabetic and antilipidemic properties of a standardized Momordica charantia fruit extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Nafisa P C; Lagishetty, Chakradhar V; Panda, Vandana S; Naik, Suresh R

    2007-09-24

    mechanism of action of MCE in alloxan diabetic rats suggest that it enhances insulin secretion by the islets of Langerhans, reduces glycogenesis in liver tissue, enhances peripheral glucose utilisation and increases serum protein levels. Furthermore, MCE treatment restores the altered histological architecture of the islets of Langerhans. Hence, the biochemical, pharmacological and histopathological profiles of MCE clearly indicate its potential antidiabetic activity and other beneficial effects in amelioration of diabetes associated complications. Further, an evaluation of its antilipidemic activity in old obese rats demonstrated significant lowering of cholesterol and triglyceride levels while elevating HDL-cholesterol levels. Also, the extract lowered serum lipids in alloxan diabetic rats, suggesting its usefulness in controlling metabolic alterations associated with diabetes.

  7. An experimental evaluation of the antidiabetic and antilipidemic properties of a standardized Momordica charantia fruit extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naik Suresh R

    2007-09-01

    observed. Conclusion Our experimental findings with respect to the mechanism of action of MCE in alloxan diabetic rats suggest that it enhances insulin secretion by the islets of Langerhans, reduces glycogenesis in liver tissue, enhances peripheral glucose utilisation and increases serum protein levels. Furthermore, MCE treatment restores the altered histological architecture of the islets of Langerhans. Hence, the biochemical, pharmacological and histopathological profiles of MCE clearly indicate its potential antidiabetic activity and other beneficial effects in amelioration of diabetes associated complications. Further, an evaluation of its antilipidemic activity in old obese rats demonstrated significant lowering of cholesterol and triglyceride levels while elevating HDL-cholesterol levels. Also, the extract lowered serum lipids in alloxan diabetic rats, suggesting its usefulness in controlling metabolic alterations associated with diabetes.

  8. Rediscovering medicinal plants' potential with OMICS: microsatellite survey in expressed sequence tags of eleven traditional plants with potent antidiabetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Jagajjit; Sen, Priyabrata; Choudhury, Manabendra Dutta; Dehury, Budheswar; Barooah, Madhumita; Modi, Mahendra Kumar; Talukdar, Anupam Das

    2014-05-01

    Herbal medicines and traditionally used medicinal plants present an untapped potential for novel molecular target discovery using systems science and OMICS biotechnology driven strategies. Since up to 40% of the world's poor people have no access to government health services, traditional and folk medicines are often the only therapeutics available to them. In this vein, North East (NE) India is recognized for its rich bioresources. As part of the Indo-Burma hotspot, it is regarded as an epicenter of biodiversity for several plants having myriad traditional uses, including medicinal use. However, the improvement of these valuable bioresources through molecular breeding strategies, for example, using genic microsatellites or Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs) or Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs)-derived SSRs has not been fully utilized in large scale to date. In this study, we identified a total of 47,700 microsatellites from 109,609 ESTs of 11 medicinal plants (pineapple, papaya, noyontara, bitter orange, bermuda brass, ratalu, barbados nut, mango, mulberry, lotus, and guduchi) having proven antidiabetic properties. A total of 58,159 primer pairs were designed for the non-redundant 8060 SSR-positive ESTs and putative functions were assigned to 4483 unique contigs. Among the identified microsatellites, excluding mononucleotide repeats, di-/trinucleotides are predominant, among which repeat motifs of AG/CT and AAG/CTT were most abundant. Similarity search of SSR containing ESTs and antidiabetic gene sequences revealed 11 microsatellites linked to antidiabetic genes in five plants. GO term enrichment analysis revealed a total of 80 enriched GO terms widely distributed in 53 biological processes, 17 molecular functions, and 10 cellular components associated with the 11 markers. The present study therefore provides concrete insights into the frequency and distribution of SSRs in important medicinal resources. The microsatellite markers reported here markedly add to the genetic

  9. Evidence of Immunosuppressive and Th2 Immune Polarizing Effects of Antidiabetic Momordica charantia Fruit Juice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoussa, Abdou Madjid; Adjagba, Marius; Lagnika, Latifou; Lalèyè, Anatole

    2017-01-01

    The mechanism of action of the antidiabetic capacity of Momordica charantia is still under investigation. Here, we assessed phytochemical compositions, antioxidant activity, and effects of total and filtered fruit and leafy stem juices of Momordica charantia on human T cell proliferation and differentiation through quantification of Th1/Th2 cytokines. In the absence of stimulation, total fruit and leafy stem juices induced significant T cell proliferation. Under PHA stimulation, both juices potentiated plant-induced T cell proliferation. However, the filtered fruit and leafy stem juices significantly inhibited PHA-stimulated T cell proliferation, while neither juice influenced T cell proliferation. Moreover, total and filtered fruit juice increased IL-4 secretion, while total and filtered leafy stem juice enhanced IFN-γ production. Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of tannins, flavonoids, anthocyans, steroids, and triterpenoids in both juices. Alkaloids, quinone derivatives, cardenolides, and cyanogenic derivatives were undetectable. The saponins present in total juices were undetectable after filtration. Moreover, both juices had appreciable antioxidant capacity. Our study supports the type 1 antidiabetic effect of filtered fruit juice of M. charantia which may be related to its immunosuppressive and T-helper 2 cell inducing capacities. Due to their immune-stimulatory activities and their ability to increase T-helper 1 cell cytokines, total fruit and leafy stem juices may serve in the treatment of immunodeficiency and certain infections. PMID:28812026

  10. Effect of salinity medium on antioxidant and antidiabetic activity marine endophytic fungus of asperegillus elegans ptf 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulyani, Hani; Artanti, Nina; Fitria, Irni; Filailla, Euis; Kandace, Yoice Sri; Udin, Linar Zalinar

    2017-11-01

    Our previous studies on screening of antioxidant activities from various endophytic fungi isolated from marine bioata showed that A. elegans PTF9 isolated from sea weed is one of the fungus that has good antioxidant activity. In current study we reported the effect of medium salinity (0, 3 and 10% salt in PDB medium) on antioxidant and antidiabetes activity of mycelium and filtrate ethyl acetate extracts of A. elegans Ptf 9. The antioxidant assay was conducted using DPPH free radical scavenging activity method. The antidiabetes assay was conducted using a-glucosidase inhibitory activity method. The results showed that the best antioxidant activity was obtained from filtrate extract of fungus cultures with 0% salt (IC50=1.56 ppm), whereas the best antidiabetes activity was obtained from filtrate extract of fungus culture with 10% salt (IC50= 3.64 ppm). Addition of salt reduced the antioxidant activity, but not the antidiabetes activity. The results suggest that A. elegans PTF9 showed potential for further studies on isolation of antioxidant and antidiabetes lead compounds that could be use for further development of new drugs.

  11. Assessing the effect of treatment duration on the association between anti-diabetic medication and cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna But

    Full Text Available Most studies that have evaluated the association between anti-diabetic medication and cancer risk have suffered from methodological drawbacks. To avoid time-related biases, we evaluated the effect of treatment duration on the cancer risk among naive users of anti-diabetic medication as compared to non-users. In addition, we addressed the influence of common risk factors such as smoking and BMI. The study population comprised 23,394 participants of FINRISK surveys. Data on cancer and anti-diabetic medication were linked with the study cohorts. We applied Lexis tabulation to the data and analyzed split records by using Poisson regression. Changes in cancer incidence in relation to treatment duration were examined by modeling the rate ratio (RR. After a median follow-up of 9 years, 53 cancer cases among users of anti-diabetic medication and 1,028 among non-users were diagnosed. No significant difference in cancer risk between users and non-users was observed after adjustment. The RR for all medication regardless of its duration was 1.01 [95% CI 0.75-1.33], and 1.37 [0.94-1.94] for period of 1-4 years. The results were similar for metformin, sulfonylurea, and insulin. This study demonstrates that evaluation of the variation in cancer risk in relation to treatment duration is of particular importance for enhancing the accuracy of conclusions on the link between exposure to anti-diabetic medication and cancer risk.

  12. Assessing the effect of treatment duration on the association between anti-diabetic medication and cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    But, Anna; Wang, Haining; Männistö, Satu; Pukkala, Eero; Haukka, Jari

    2014-01-01

    Most studies that have evaluated the association between anti-diabetic medication and cancer risk have suffered from methodological drawbacks. To avoid time-related biases, we evaluated the effect of treatment duration on the cancer risk among naive users of anti-diabetic medication as compared to non-users. In addition, we addressed the influence of common risk factors such as smoking and BMI. The study population comprised 23,394 participants of FINRISK surveys. Data on cancer and anti-diabetic medication were linked with the study cohorts. We applied Lexis tabulation to the data and analyzed split records by using Poisson regression. Changes in cancer incidence in relation to treatment duration were examined by modeling the rate ratio (RR). After a median follow-up of 9 years, 53 cancer cases among users of anti-diabetic medication and 1,028 among non-users were diagnosed. No significant difference in cancer risk between users and non-users was observed after adjustment. The RR for all medication regardless of its duration was 1.01 [95% CI 0.75-1.33], and 1.37 [0.94-1.94] for period of 1-4 years. The results were similar for metformin, sulfonylurea, and insulin. This study demonstrates that evaluation of the variation in cancer risk in relation to treatment duration is of particular importance for enhancing the accuracy of conclusions on the link between exposure to anti-diabetic medication and cancer risk.

  13. New arylalkanones from Horsfieldia macrobotrys, effective antidiabetic agents concomitantly inhibiting α-glucosidase and free radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadhan, Rico; Phuwapraisirisan, Preecha

    2015-10-15

    In search of effective antidiabetic agents having therapeutic effect by inhibiting α-glucosidase and preventive effect by scavenging free radicals, Horsfieldia macrobotrys showed promising bioactivity required for the proposed criteria. Bioassay-guided isolation of the stem bark extract resulted in two new arylalkanones named horsfieldone A (1) and maingayone D (2), together with a new flavanone C-glucoside named 8-C-β-d-glucopyranosylpinocembrin (3). Their structures and stereochemistry were determined by spectroscopic techniques as well as Mosher's method. Of isolated compounds, maingayone D (2) was the most potent inhibitors against both α-glucosidases and free radicals. The presence of additional phenolic moieties in 2 clearly indicated their critical roles in inhibitory effects. Further investigation on mechanism underlying α-glucosidase inhibition indicated that maingayone D (2) could retard the enzyme function by both competitive and noncompetitive manners. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Antidiabetic Effect of Salvianolic Acid A on Diabetic Animal Models via AMPK Activation and Mitochondrial Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guifen Qiang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Diabetes mellitus (DM characterized by hyperglycemia contributes to macrovascular and microvascular complications. Salvianolic acid A (SalA is a polyphenolic compound isolated from the root of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, which is a traditional Chinese medicine widely used to treat cardiovascular diseases. However, little is known about its antidiabetic effect. Our study aimed to investigate the in vivo and in vitro antidiabetic effect of SalA and the underlying mechanisms. Methods: Alloxan-induced type 1 diabetic mice and high-fat diet (HFD and low-dose streptozotocin (STZ-induced type 2 diabetic rats received SalA treatment. Blood glucose, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT, 24-h food and water intake were monitored. In vitro, glucose consumption and uptake were measured in HepG2 cells and L6 myotubes. Mitochondrial function was detected in hepatic and skeletal muscle mitochondria. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and Akt were analyzed by western blot. Results: In both type 1 and type 2 diabetic animals, SalA lowered fasting blood glucose (FBG and fed blood glucose in dose-dependent manner, as well as reduced 24-h food and water intake. In vitro, SalA caused dose-dependent increase in glucose consumption and enhanced glucose uptake. SalA significantly increased ATP production from 10 min to 12 h in HepG2 cells and L6 myotubes. Interestingly, SalA decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, SalA improved hepatic and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function, increased ATP production, and concurrently decreased MMP. In particularly, SalA activated AMPK phosphorylation through Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ/AMPK signaling pathway, independent of liver kinase 1 (LKB1/AMPK pathway. However, SalA didn't show any effect on insulin secretagogue and activation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Conclusion: SalA exhibits the antidiabetic effects in diabetic animal models through

  15. Capparis spinosa L. aqueous extract evokes antidiabetic effect in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Eddouks

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: As the aqueous extract of Capparis spinosa (CS possess antidiabetic effect, he present study aims to reveal the possible  mechanism of action of CS in diabetic mice.Materials and Methods: Both single and repeated oral administrations of aqueous extract of CS were performed in multi-low dose streptozotocin-induced (MLDS diabetic mice. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp was used in association with the endogenous glucose production (perfusion rate of 3-3H glucose to evaluate the effect of CS aqueous extract on insulin sensitivity.Results: Our study showed that aqueous extract of CS possess a potent hypoglycaemic activity in MLDS diabetic mice. Furthermore, the analysis perfusion of 3-3H glucose demonstrated  the parallel decrease of basal endogenous glucose production (EGP with the hypoglycaemic activity. EGP was lower in CS-Treated group when compared to the control group (p

  16. Antidiabetic and antioxidant effects of Annona muricata (Annonaceae), aqueous extract on streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florence, Ngueguim Tsofack; Benoit, Massa Zibi; Jonas, Kouamouo; Alexandra, Tchuidjang; Désiré, Dzeufiet Djomeni Paul; Pierre, Kamtchouing; Théophile, Dimo

    2014-02-03

    The leaves of Annona muricata are used in Cameroon to manage diabetes and its complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antidiabetic, antioxidant activities and the potential toxicity of aqueous extract of Annona muricata in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Oral administration of Annona muricata aqueous extract (100mg/kg or 200mg/kg) was studied in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In long term treatment, 2 weeks after streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, animals received plant extract during 28 consecutive days. For a protective effect, extract was administered 3 days prior to streptozotocin exposure and animals were observed 2 weeks without treatment. The plant extract was not effective in normal rats. In diabetic rats, single administration of the extract significantly reduced blood glucose levels by 75% and 58.22% respectively at the dose of 100mg/kg and 200mg/kg as compared to the initial value. Treatment of normal rats 3 days prior to diabetes induction showed that, Annona muricata extract has no effect within 72h following STZ injection. However, after 14 days post-treatment, the extract at the dose of 100mg/kg significantly reduced blood glucose levels as compared with initial value and diabetic control rats. Immunohistochemical staining of pancreatic β-cells of diabetic rats treated with the dose of 100mg/kg expressed strong staining for β-cell compared to diabetic control. In a long-term study daily administration of Annona muricata aqueous extract for 28 days to diabetic rats, reduced blood glucose levels, serum creatinine, MDA, AST, ALT activity, and nitrite levels LDL-cholesterol. Total cholesterol, triglycerides, SOD, and CAT activity contents were restored. These different results show that the antidiabetic activity of Annona muricata aqueous extract can be explained by its hypolipidaemic effect, its antioxidant and protective action on pancreatic β-cells, which in turn improve glucose metabolism. © 2013

  17. Anti-diabetic effects including diabetic nephropathy of anti-osteoporotic trace minerals on diabetic mice.

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    Maehira, Fusako; Ishimine, Nau; Miyagi, Ikuko; Eguchi, Yukinori; Shimada, Katsumasa; Kawaguchi, Daisuke; Oshiro, Yoshihide

    2011-04-01

    In our previous study to evaluate the effects of soluble silicon (Si) on bone metabolism, Si and coral sand (CS) as a natural Si-containing material suppressed peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), which regulates both glucose and bone metabolism and increases adipogenesis at the expense of osteogenesis, leading to bone loss. In this study, we investigated the anti-diabetic effects of bone-seeking elements, Si and stable strontium (Sr), and CS as a natural material containing these elements using obese diabetic KKAy mice. Weanling male mice were fed diets containing 1% Ca supplemented with CaCO(3) as the control and CS, and diets supplemented with 50 ppm Si or 750 ppm Sr to control diet for 56 d. The mRNA expressions related to energy expenditure in the pancreas and kidney were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. At the end of feeding, plasma glucose, insulin, leptin, and adiponectin levels decreased significantly in three test groups, while pancreatic PPARγ and adiponectin mRNA expression levels increased significantly toward the normal level, improving the glucose sensitivity of β-cells and inducing a significant decrease in insulin expression. The renal PPARγ, PPARα, and adiponectin expression levels, histologic indices of diabetic glomerulopathy, and plasma indices of renal function were also improved significantly in the test groups. Taken together, anti-osteoporotic trace minerals, Si and Sr, and CS containing them showed novel anti-diabetic effects of lowering blood glucose level, improving the tolerance to insulin, leptin, and adiponectin, and reducing the risk of glomerulopathy through modulation of related gene expression in the pancreas and kidney. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Combining insulins with oral antidiabetic agents: effect on hyperglycemic control, markers of cardiovascular risk and disease

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    Kjeld Hermansen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Kjeld Hermansen, Lene Sundahl Mortensen, Marie-Louise HermansenDepartment of Endocrinology and Metabolism C, Aarhus University Hospital, DK-8000 Aarhus, DenmarkAbstract: Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Unfortunately, several potential barriers exist for CVD risk management in diabetes, including the need for significant lifestyle changes, potential problems with hypoglycemia, weight gain, injection tolerability, treatment complexity with current diabetes therapies and other, unmodifiable factors. Improving glycemic control may impact CVD risk. Treatment of T2DM usually starts with lifestyle changes such as diet and exercise. When these become insufficient, pharmacotherapy is required. Various oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs are available that reduce hyperglycemia. The first line of therapy is usually metformin, since it does not increase weight and seems to have a beneficial effect on CVD mortality and risk factors. As T2DM progresses, insulin treatment becomes necessary for the majority of patients. The last few years have seen the development of long-acting, rapid-acting, and premixed insulin analog formulations. The treat-to-target algorithms of recent studies combining OADs plus insulin analogs have demonstrated that patients can reach glycemic treatment targets with low risk of hypoglycemia, greater convenience, and – with some analogs – limited weight gain vs conventional insulins. These factors may possibly have a positive influence on CVD risk. Future studies will hopefully elucidate the benefits of this approach.Keywords: diabetes mellitus, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hyperglycemia, insulin, oral antidiabetic drugs

  19. Evaluation of the antidiabetic property of aqueous leaves extract of Zanthoxylum armatum DC. using in vivo and in vitro approaches

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    Carey Vana Rynjah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to evaluate the antidiabetic potential of the aqueous leaves extract of Zanthoxylum armatum DC. leaves using in vivo and in vitro approaches. For in vivo studies, blood glucose level was monitored at different intervals after administration of varying doses of the extract for its hypoglycemic (100–6000 mg/kg b.w. and antihyperglycemic (250 mg/kg b.w. effect in normoglycemic and diabetic mice. In vitro enzymatic inhibition activity was tested against α-amylase, α- and β-glucosidase and lipase. Additionally hydroxyl radical, hydrogen peroxide scavenging assay and phytochemical screening were also performed. Element analysis of the plant was studied by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS and Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES. The plant extract showed significant hypoglycemic and antihyperglycemic effect in normoglycemic and diabetic mice. The IC50 values of extract for α-amylase, β-glucosidase, lipase, hydroxyl radical scavenging activity, hydrogen peroxide scavenging activity were 7.40 mg/ml, 0.30 mg/ml, 8.35 mg/ml, 3.25 mg/ml, 9.62 mg/ml respectively and the percentage of inhibition for α-glucosidase was 79.82% at 0.8 mg/ml. In vitro studies were compared with their respective standards. Elemental analysis revealed the presence of essential elements such as Mg, V, Fe, Cr, Zn, Cu, Mo, Mn, K, Ca, P and Sr which are all known to play a role in regulating blood glucose. The results demonstrate that Z. armatum aqueous leaves extract possess antidiabetic property in both in vivo and in vitro condition.

  20. Development and phytochemical characterization of high polyphenol red lettuce with anti-diabetic properties.

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    Diana M Cheng

    Full Text Available Polyphenol-rich Rutgers Scarlet Lettuce (RSL (Lactuca sativa L. was developed through somaclonal variation and selection in tissue culture. RSL may contain among the highest reported contents of polyphenols and antioxidants in the category of common fruits and vegetables (95.6 mg/g dry weight and 8.7 mg/g fresh weight gallic acid equivalents and 2721 µmol/g dry weight and 223 µmol/g fresh weight Trolox equivalents. Three main compounds accumulate at particularly high levels in RSL: chlorogenic acid, up to 27.6 mg/g dry weight, cyanidin malonyl-glucoside, up to 20.5 mg/g dry weight, and quercetin malonyl-glucoside, up to 35.7 mg/g dry weight. Major polyphenolic constituents of RSL have been associated with health promotion as well as anti-diabetic and/or anti-inflammatory activities. Daily oral administration of RSL (100 or 300 mg/kg for up to eight days acutely reduced hyperglycemia and improved insulin sensitivity in high fat diet-induced obese hyperglycemic mice compared to vehicle (water control. Data presented here support possible use of RSL as a functional food for the dietary management of diabetes.

  1. Isolated flavonoids from Ficus racemosa stem bark possess antidiabetic, hypolipidemic and protective effects in albino Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshari, Amit K; Kumar, Ghanendra; Kushwaha, Priya S; Bhardwaj, Monika; Kumar, Pranesh; Rawat, Atul; Kumar, Dinesh; Prakash, Anand; Ghosh, Balaram; Saha, Sudipta

    2016-04-02

    to diabetic control at the same time. Docking studies revealed that isolated flavonoids showed their antidiabetic potential via binding to PPARγ and GLUT1 receptors. The isolated four flavonoids demonstrated good antidiabetic, hypolipidemic and antioxidant properties in STZ diabetic rats which supported the use of FR stem bark as useful supplementary drug for future antidiabetic therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Red ginseng powder fermented with probiotics exerts antidiabetic effects in the streptozotocin-induced mouse diabetes model.

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    Jang, Sun-Hee; Park, Jisang; Kim, Sae-Hae; Choi, Kyung-Min; Ko, Eun-Sil; Cha, Jeong-Dan; Lee, Young-Ran; Jang, Hyonseok; Jang, Yong-Suk

    2017-12-01

    Red ginseng (heat-processed Panax ginseng) is a well-known alternative medicine with pharmacological antidiabetic activity. It exerts pharmacological effects through the transformation of saponin into metabolites by the intestinal microbiota. Given that intestinal conditions and intestinal microflora vary among individuals, the pharmacological effects of orally administered red ginseng likely may vary among individuals. To overcome this variation and produce homogeneously effective red ginseng, we evaluated the antidiabetic effects of probiotic-fermented red ginseng in a mouse model. The antidiabetic efficacy of orally administered probiotic-fermented red ginseng was assessed in ICR mice after induction of diabetes using streptozotocin (170 mg/kg body weight). Samples were given orally for 8 weeks, and indicators involved in diabetic disorders such as body weight change, water intake, blood glucose, glucose tolerance and various biochemical parameters were determined. Oral administration of probiotic-fermented red ginseng significantly decreased the level of blood glucose of about 62.5% in the fasting state and induced a significant increase in glucose tolerance of about 10.2% compared to the control diabetic mice. Additionally, various indicators of diabetes and biochemical data (e.g., blood glycosylated haemoglobin level, serum concentrations of insulin, and α-amylase activity) showed a significant improvement in the diabetic conditions of the mice treated with probiotic-fermented red ginseng in comparison with those of control diabetic mice. Our results demonstrate the antidiabetic effects of probiotic-fermented red ginseng in the streptozotocin-induced mouse diabetes model and suggest that probiotic-fermented red ginseng may be a uniformly effective red ginseng product.

  3. Anti-diabetic effects of Sargassum oligocystum on Streptozotocin- induced diabetic rat

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    Samad Akbarzadeh

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Diabetes is a metabolic syndrome which is associated with the worldwide major public health problems. There are many natural compounds from the sea-market, as a valuable aquatic source, along with the variety of health and therapeutic benefits. In the present research, with respect to the traditional and ethnic uses of Sargassum oligocystum algae for healing of some diseases which have similar metabolic mechanism to the diabetes, its anti-diabetic effects in animal model was proposed. Materials and Methods: The animals (rat were divided into the normal control, diabetic control, positive control and, the test groups. The test groups were gavaged with oral doses of 150 and 300 mg/kg of algae hydroalcoholic extracts. After 30 days of intervention the serum glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, HDLC, LDLC, insulin, insulin resistance, β-cells function and, the histopathology of pancreatic tissue were evaluated. Results: In animals that were fed with algae extracts a significant decrease in the fasting blood glucose, triglyceride and HOMA-IR and an increase in the HOMA-B with no significant impacts on the insulin, cholesterol and HDL were observed. Also, the histopathology evaluations in the groups which were treated with algae extract revealed the regeneration and reconstitution of damaged pancreatic β-cells. Conclusion: The results give evidence that, the S. oligocystum algae extract has a healing effect on diabetes which can be considered as a new research prospect for the natural therapy of diabetes.

  4. Modulation of some gluconeogenic enzyme activities in diabetic rat liver and kidney: effect of antidiabetic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, D; Raju, J; Baquer, N Z

    1999-02-01

    The effects of insulin, sodium orthovanadate and a hypoglycemic plant material, Trigonella foenum graecum (fenugreek) seed powder were studied on the activities of glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase in diabetic liver and kidney. The significantly increased activities of the two enzymes during diabetes in liver and kidney were found to be lowered to almost control values by the use of the antidiabetic compounds. Diabetic liver exhibited a much greater increase in the activities of the two enzymes than diabetic kidney. The highest percentage of reversal to normal values was seen using the combination of vanadate and Trigonella seed powder. The lowered rate of growth of the animals as well as the increased blood sugar were reversed almost to the control levels by the Trigonella seed powder and vanadate treatment. The inclusion of the Trigonella seed powder overcame the toxicity of vanadium encountered when it was given alone as insulin mimetic agent. Much lower levels of vanadate were needed when it was given in combination with Trigonella seed powder. Their combined effects were better at restoring the above parameters than those induced by insulin administration.

  5. In Vivo Subacute Toxicity and Antidiabetic Effect of Aqueous Extract of Nigella sativa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacimi, Ghouti; Haffaf, El-Mehdi; Aouichat-Bouguerra, Souhila

    2017-01-01

    Context. Nigella sativa seeds are usually used as traditional medicine for a wide range of therapeutic purposes. Objective. To investigate the subacute toxicity of NS aqueous extract and select its lowest dose to study its antidiabetic effect. Methods. 5 AqE.NS doses (2, 6.4, 21, 33, and 60 g/Kg) were daily administered to mice by gavage. Biochemical parameters measurements and histological study of the liver and the kidney were performed after 6 weeks of supplementation. Thereafter, and after inducing diabetes by alloxan, rats were treated by 2 g/Kg of AqE.NS during 8 weeks. Metabolic parameters were measured on sera. A horizontal electrophoresis of plasmatic lipoprotein was conducted. Glycogen, total lipids, and triglycerides were measured in the liver. TBARS were evaluated on adipose tissue, liver, and pancreas. Results. AqE.NS showed no variation in urea and albumin at the 5 doses, but hepatotoxicity from 21 g/Kg was confirmed by histopathological observations of the liver. In diabetic rats, AqE.NS significantly decreased glycemia, TG, T-cholesterol, LDL-c, and TBARS and showed a restored insulinemia and a significant increase in HDL-c. Results on the liver indicated a decrease in lipids and a possible glycogenogenesis. Conclusion. AqE.NS showed its safety at low doses and its evident antihyperglycemic, antihyperlipidemic, and antioxidant effect. PMID:29479371

  6. In Vivo Subacute Toxicity and Antidiabetic Effect of Aqueous Extract of Nigella sativa

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    Karima Bensiameur-Touati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context. Nigella sativa seeds are usually used as traditional medicine for a wide range of therapeutic purposes. Objective. To investigate the subacute toxicity of NS aqueous extract and select its lowest dose to study its antidiabetic effect. Methods. 5 AqE.NS doses (2, 6.4, 21, 33, and 60 g/Kg were daily administered to mice by gavage. Biochemical parameters measurements and histological study of the liver and the kidney were performed after 6 weeks of supplementation. Thereafter, and after inducing diabetes by alloxan, rats were treated by 2 g/Kg of AqE.NS during 8 weeks. Metabolic parameters were measured on sera. A horizontal electrophoresis of plasmatic lipoprotein was conducted. Glycogen, total lipids, and triglycerides were measured in the liver. TBARS were evaluated on adipose tissue, liver, and pancreas. Results. AqE.NS showed no variation in urea and albumin at the 5 doses, but hepatotoxicity from 21 g/Kg was confirmed by histopathological observations of the liver. In diabetic rats, AqE.NS significantly decreased glycemia, TG, T-cholesterol, LDL-c, and TBARS and showed a restored insulinemia and a significant increase in HDL-c. Results on the liver indicated a decrease in lipids and a possible glycogenogenesis. Conclusion. AqE.NS showed its safety at low doses and its evident antihyperglycemic, antihyperlipidemic, and antioxidant effect.

  7. Antidiabetic Effect of Morinda citrifolia (Noni Fermented by Cheonggukjang in KK-Ay Diabetic Mice

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    So-Young Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Antidiabetic effects of Morinda citrifolia (aka Noni fermented by Cheonggukjang (fast-fermented soybean paste were evaluated using a T2DM (type 2 diabetes mellitus murine model. Six-week-old KK-Ay/TaJcl mice were randomly divided into four groups: (1 the diabetic control (DC group, provided with a normal mouse diet; (2 the positive control (PC group, provided with a functional health food diet; (3 the M. citrifolia (MC group, provided with an MC-based diet; (4 the fermented M. citrifolia (FMC group, provided with an FMC-based diet. Over a testing period of 90 days, food and water intake decreased significantly in the FMC and PC groups compared with the DC group. Blood glucose levels in the FMC group were 211.60–252.20 mg/dL after 90 days, while those in the control group were over 400 mg/dL after 20 days. In addition, FMC supplementation reduced glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c levels, enhanced insulin sensitivity, and significantly decreased serum triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol. Furthermore, a fermented M. citrifolia 70% ethanolic extract (FMCE activated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-(PPAR- γ and stimulated glucose uptake via stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK in cultured C2C12 cells. These results suggest that FMC can be employed as a functional health food for T2DM management.

  8. Effects of culture medium compositions on antidiabetic activity and anticancer activity of marine endophitic bacteria isolated from sponge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryani, Faiza; Mulyani, Hani; Artanti, Nina; Udin, Linar Zalinar; Dewi, Rizna Triana; Hanafi, Muhammad; Murniasih, Tutik

    2017-01-01

    High diversity of Indonesia marine spesies and their ability in producing secondary metabolite that can be used as a drug candidate cause this fascinating topic need to explore. Most of marine organisms explored to discover drug is macroorganism whereas microorganism (such as Indonesia marine bacteria) is very limited. Therefore, in this report, antidiabetic and anticancer activity of Indonesia marine bacteria isolated from Sponges's extract have been studied. Bacteria strain 8.9 which are collection of Research Center for Oseanography, Indonesian Institute of Sciences were from Barrang Lompo Island, Makasar, Indonesia. Bacteria were cultured in different culture medium compositions (such as: different pH, source of glucose and water) for 48 hours on a shaker, then they were extracted with ethyl asetate. Extracts of bacteria were tested by DPPH method (antioxidant activity), alpha glucosidase inhibitory activity method (antidiabetic activity), and Alamar Blue assay (anticancer activity) at 200 ppm. According to result, extract of bacteria in pH 8.0 exhibited the greatest antioxidant (19.27% inhibition), antidiabetic (63.95% inhibition) and anticancer activity of T47D cell line (44.62% cell viability) compared to other extracts. However, effect of addition of sugar sources (such as: glucose, sucrose, and soluble starch) and effect of addition of water/sea water exhibited less influence on their bioactivities. In conclusion, Indonesia marine bacteria isolated from sponge have potential a source of bioactive compound in drug discovery field.

  9. Starch composition, glycemic indices, phenolic constituents, and antioxidative and antidiabetic properties of some common tropical fruits

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    Ganiyu Oboh

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: The fruits' low glycemic indices, strong antioxidant properties, and inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase activities could be possible mechanisms for their use in the management and prevention of type-2 diabetes.

  10. Insulino-mimetic and anti-diabetic effects of vanadium compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, A K; Mehdi, M Z

    2005-01-01

    Compounds of the trace element vanadium exert various insulin-like effects in in vitro and in vivo systems. These include their ability to improve glucose homeostasis and insulin resistance in animal models of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes mellitus. In addition to animal studies, several reports have documented improvements in liver and muscle insulin sensitivity in a limited number of patients with Type 2 diabetes. These effects are, however, not as dramatic as those observed in animal experiments, probably because lower doses of vanadium were used and the duration of therapy was short in human studies as compared with animal work. The ability of these compounds to stimulate glucose uptake, glycogen and lipid synthesis in muscle, adipose and hepatic tissues and to inhibit gluconeogenesis, and the activities of the gluconeogenic enzymes: phosphoenol pyruvate carboxykinase and glucose-6-phosphatase in the liver and kidney as well as lipolysis in fat cells contributes as potential mechanisms to their anti-diabetic insulin-like effects. At the cellular level, vanadium activates several key elements of the insulin signal transduction pathway, such as the tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and protein kinase B activation. These pathways are believed to mediate the metabolic actions of insulin. Because protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases) are considered to be negative regulators of the insulin-signalling pathway, it is suggested that vanadium can enhance insulin signalling and action by virtue of its capacity to inhibit PTPase activity and increase tyrosine phosphorylation of substrate proteins. There are some concerns about the potential toxicity of available inorganic vanadium salts at higher doses and during long-term therapy. Therefore, new organo-vanadium compounds with higher potency and less toxicity need to be evaluated for their efficacy as potential treatment

  11. Antidiabetic, hypolipidemic and hepatoprotective effects of Arctium lappa root’s hydro-alcoholic extract on nicotinamide-streptozotocin induced type 2 model of diabetes in male mice

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    Akram Ahangarpour

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Arctium lappa (burdock, (A. lappa root has hypoglycemic and antioxidative effects, and has been used for treatment of diabetes in tradition medicine. This study was conducted to evaluate the antidiabetic and hypolipidemic properties of A. lappa root extract on nicotinamide-streptozotocin (NA-STZ-induced type2 diabetes in mice.Materials and Methods: In this investigation, 70 adult male NMRI mice (30-35g randomly divided into 7 groups (n=10 as follow: 1-control, 2-type 2 diabetic mice, 3-diabetic mice that received glibenclamide (0.25 mg/kg as an anti-diabetic drug, 4, 5, 6 and 7- diabetic and normal animals that were pre-treated with 200 and 300 mg/kg A. lappa root extract, respectively, for 28 days. Diabetes has been induced by intraperitoneal injection of NA and STZ. Finally, the blood sample was taken and insulin, glucose, SGOT, SGPT, alkaline phosphatase, leptin and lipid levels was evaluated.Results: Induction of diabetes decreased the level of insulin, leptin and high density lipoprotein (HDL and increased the level of other lipids, glucose, and hepatic enzymes significantly (p

  12. Rose hip exerts antidiabetic effects via a mechanism involving downregulation of the hepatic lipogenic program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Ulrika; Henriksson, Emma; Ström, Kristoffer; Alenfall, Jan; Göransson, Olga; Holm, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the metabolic effects of a dietary supplement of powdered rose hip to C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). Two different study protocols were used; rose hip was fed together with HFD to lean mice for 20 wk (prevention study) and to obese mice for 10 wk (intervention study). Parameters related to obesity and glucose tolerance were monitored, and livers were examined for lipids and expression of genes and proteins related to lipid metabolism and gluconeogenesis. A supplement of rose hip was capable of both preventing and reversing the increase in body weight and body fat mass imposed by a HFD in the C57BL/6J mouse. Oral and intravenous glucose tolerance tests together with lower basal levels of insulin and glucose showed improved glucose tolerance in mice fed a supplement of rose hip compared with control mice. Hepatic lipid accumulation was reduced in mice fed rose hip compared with control, and the expression of lipogenic proteins was downregulated, whereas AMP-activated protein kinase and other proteins involved in fatty acid oxidation were unaltered. Rose hip intake lowered total plasma cholesterol as well as the low-density lipoprotein-to-high-density lipoprotein ratio via a mechanism not involving altered gene expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 or 3-hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase. Taken together, these data show that a dietary supplement of rose hip prevents the development of a diabetic state in the C57BL/6J mouse and that downregulation of the hepatic lipogenic program appears to be at least one mechanism underlying the antidiabetic effect of rose hip.

  13. Studies on the antidiabetic effects of Mangifera indica stem-barks and leaves on nondiabetic, type 1 and type 2 diabetic model rats

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    Amrita Bhowmik

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Mangifera indica Linn, locally known as mango tree has been claimed to possess antidiabetic properties by many investigators. The present study was undertaken to screen the hypo- and antihyperglycemic activity of both ethanol and water extracts of leaves and stem-barks of M. indica in nondiabetic and diabetic model rats in different prandial states. The results showed that all of the extracts had significant antihyperglycemic effect in type 2 model rats when fed simultaneously with glucose load (p< 0.05-0.01; p< 0.005-0.001. Moreover, the ethanol extract of stem-barks showed significant antihyperglycemic effect when the extract was fed 30 min prior to the glucose load (p< 0.01. Investigations were carried out to evaluate the effect of M. indica on glucose absorption using a rat intestinal preparation in situ. The ethanol extracts of stem-barks reduced glucose absorption gradually during the whole perfusion period in type 2 rats.

  14. Antidiabetic Plants of Iran

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    Ashrafeddin Goushegir

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available To identify the antidiabetic plants of Iran, a systematic review of the published literature on the efficacy of Iranian medicinal plant for glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus was conducted. We performed an electronic literature search of MEDLINE, Science Direct, Scopus, Proquest, Ebsco, Googlescholar, SID, Cochrane Library Database, from 1966 up to June 2010. The search terms were complementary and alternative medicine (CAM, diabetes mellitus, plant (herb, Iran, patient, glycemic control, clinical trial, RCT, natural or herbal medicine, hypoglycemic plants, and individual herb names from popular sources, or combination of these key words. Available Randomized Controlled Trials (RCT published in English or Persian language examined effects of an herb (limited to Iran on glycemic indexes in type 2 diabetic patients were included. Among all of the articles identified in the initial database search, 23 trials were RCT, examining herbs as potential therapy for type 2 diabetes mellitus. The key outcome for antidiabetic effect was changes in blood glucose or HbA1 c, as well as improves in insulin sensitivity or resistance. Available data suggest that several antidiabetic plants of Iran need further study. Among the RCT studies, the best evidence in glycemic control was found in Citrullus colocynthus, Ipomoea betatas, Silybum marianum and Trigonella foenum graecum.

  15. Hepatoprotective and antidiabetic effects of Pistacia lentiscus leaf and fruit extracts

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    Chafiaâ Mehenni

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pistacia lentiscus (Anacardiaceae is commonly used in folk medicine to treat various diseases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective and antioxidant activities of extracts of P. lentiscus leaves (PL and fruits (PF against experimentally induced liver damage. Furthermore, characterization of extracts was attempted by a spectroscopic methodology (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection analysis. A hepatoprotective potential against paracetamol [165 mg/kg body weight (b.w.] toxicity was noticed in mice pretreated with the same dose of PL or PF extract (125 mg/kg b.w. or a combination of both (PL/PF 63/63 mg/kg b.w., as revealed by an analysis of biochemical parameters (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase activities and total bilirubin. These results were confirmed by histological examination of the liver, which revealed significant protection against paracetamol-induced hepatic necrosis. Furthermore, PF extract exhibited a promising antidiabetic activity in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, similar to the reference drug glibenclamide (0.91 g/L, a result confirmed by in vitro inhibition of α-amylase. We demonstrated that the leaf crude extract showed the best effect in all tested methods, compared to its fruit counterpart, probably due to the presence of higher amounts of phenolic compounds, as determined by phytochemical and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses. Moreover, high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection led to the identification of six compounds for each part of the plant. Gallic acid, a characteristic compound of Pistacia species, was most abundant in leaves and fruits, while luteolin was detected for the first time in fruits. Obtained activities of P. lentiscus extracts may well be due, at least in part, to the presence of the above compounds.

  16. Antidiabetic and antioxidant effects and phytochemicals of mulberry fruit (Morus alba L. polyphenol enhanced extract.

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    Yihai Wang

    Full Text Available The antidiabetic and antioxidant activities of the ethyl acetate-soluble extract (MFE of mulberry fruit (Morus alba L. were investigated. In vitro, MFE showed potent α-glucosidase inhibitory activity and radical-scavenging activities against DPPH and superoxide anion radicals. In vivo, MFE could significantly decrease fasting blood glucose (FBG and glycosylated serum protein (GSP, and increase antioxidant enzymatic activities (SOD, CAT, GSH-Px in streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic mice. Bioactivity-guided fractionation of the MFE led to the isolation of 25 phenolic compounds, and their structures were identified on the basis of MS and NMR data. All the 25 compounds were isolated from mulberry fruit for the first time. Also, the α-glucosidase inhibitory activity and antioxidant activity of the phenolics were evaluated. Potent α-glucosidase inhibitory and radical-scavenging activities of these phenolics suggested that they may be partially responsible for the antidiabetic and antioxidant activities of mulberry fruit.

  17. Antidiabetic and antioxidant effects and phytochemicals of mulberry fruit (Morus alba L.) polyphenol enhanced extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yihai; Xiang, Limin; Wang, Chunhua; Tang, Chao; He, Xiangjiu

    2013-01-01

    The antidiabetic and antioxidant activities of the ethyl acetate-soluble extract (MFE) of mulberry fruit (Morus alba L.) were investigated. In vitro, MFE showed potent α-glucosidase inhibitory activity and radical-scavenging activities against DPPH and superoxide anion radicals. In vivo, MFE could significantly decrease fasting blood glucose (FBG) and glycosylated serum protein (GSP), and increase antioxidant enzymatic activities (SOD, CAT, GSH-Px) in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. Bioactivity-guided fractionation of the MFE led to the isolation of 25 phenolic compounds, and their structures were identified on the basis of MS and NMR data. All the 25 compounds were isolated from mulberry fruit for the first time. Also, the α-glucosidase inhibitory activity and antioxidant activity of the phenolics were evaluated. Potent α-glucosidase inhibitory and radical-scavenging activities of these phenolics suggested that they may be partially responsible for the antidiabetic and antioxidant activities of mulberry fruit.

  18. Antidiabetic effects of Mangifera indica Kernel Flour?supplemented diet in streptozotocin?induced type 2 diabetes in rats

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    Irondi, Emmanuel A.; Oboh, Ganiyu; Akindahunsi, Afolabi A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Our previous report showed that Mangifera indica kernel flour (MIKF) is a rich source of pharmacologically important flavonoids and phenolic acids; and that its methanolic extract inhibits some key enzymes linked to the pathology and complications of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in vitro. Hence, this study evaluated the antidiabetic effects of 10% and 20% MIKF?supplemented diets in T2D in rats. T2D was induced in rats using a high?fat diet (HFD), low?dose streptozotocin (HFD/STZ) model, by ...

  19. Tissue lipid lowering-effect of a traditional Nigerian anti-diabetic infusion of Rauwolfia vomitoria foilage and Citrus aurantium fruit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, J. I. A.; Mortensen, Alicja; Mølgaard, P.

    2006-01-01

    The toxicity and anti-diabetic properties of an aqueous plant extract made by boiling Rauwolfia vomitoria foilage and Citrus aurantium fruits were evaluated in mice. A single dosage corresponding to 70 x the human-daily-dose was non-toxic when administered to 6-week-old NMRI lean mice or 6- or 11...

  20. Differential anti-diabetic effects and mechanism of action of charantin-rich extract of Taiwanese Momordica charantia between type 1 and type 2 diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsien-Yi; Kan, Wei-Chih; Cheng, Tain-Junn; Yu, Sung-Hsun; Chang, Liang-Hao; Chuu, Jiunn-Jye

    2014-07-01

    Momordica charantia Linn. (Cucurbitaceae), also called bitter melon, has traditionally been used as a natural anti-diabetic agent for anti-hyperglycemic activity in several animal models and clinical trials. We investigated the differences in the anti-diabetic properties and mechanism of action of Taiwanese M. charantia (MC) between type 1 diabetic (T1D) and type 2 diabetic (T2D) mice. To clarify the beneficial effects of MC, we measured non-fasting glucose, oral glucose tolerance, and plasma insulin levels in KK/HIJ mice with high-fat diet-induced diabetes (200 mg/kg/day of charantin-rich extract of MC [CEMC]) and in ICR mice with STZ-induced diabetes. After 8 weeks, all the mice were exsanguinated, and the expression of the insulin-signaling-associated proteins in their tissue was evaluated, in coordination with the protective effects of CEMC against pancreatic β-cell toxicity (in vitro). Eight weeks of data indicated that CEMC caused a significant decline in non-fasting blood glucose, plasma glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance in the KK/HIJ mice, but not in the ICR mice. Furthermore, CEMC decreased plasma insulin and promoted the sensitivity of insulin by increasing the expression of GLUT4 in the skeletal muscle and of IRS-1 in the liver of KK/HIJ mice; however, CEMC extract had no effect on the insulin sensitivity of ICR mice. In vitro study showed that CEMC prevented pancreatic β cells from high-glucose-induced cytotoxicity after 24 h of incubation, but the protective effect was not detectable after 72 h. Collectively, the hypoglycemic effects of CEMC suggest that it has potential for increasing insulin sensitivity in patients with T2D rather than for protecting patients with T1D against β-cell dysfunction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Antidiabetic Effects of Carassius auratus Complex Formula in High Fat Diet Combined Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice

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    Zhi-Hong Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carassius auratus complex formula, including Carassius auratus, Rhizoma dioscoreae, Lycium chinense, and Rehmannia glutinosa Libosch, is a combination prescription of traditional Chinese medicine, which has always been used to treat diabetes mellitus in ancient China. In this study, we provided experimental evidence for the use of Carassius auratus complex formula in the treatment of high fat diet combined streptozotocin- (STZ- induced type 2 diabetes. Carassius auratus complex formula aqueous extract was prepared and the effects of it on blood glucose, serum insulin, adipose tissue weight, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT, total cholesterol, and triglyceride (TG levels in mice were measured. Moreover, adiponectin, TG synthesis related gene expressions, and the inhibitory effect of aldose reductase (AR were performed to evaluate its antidiabetic effects. After the 8-week treatment, blood glucose, insulin levels, and adipose tissue weight were significantly decreased. OGTT and HOMA-IR index showed improved glucose tolerance. It could also lower plasma TG, TC, and liver TG levels. Furthermore, Carassius auratus complex formula could inhibit the activity of AR and restore adiponectin expression in serum. Based on these findings, it is suggested that Carassius auratus complex formula possesses potent anti-diabetic effects on high fat diet combined STZ-induced diabetic mice.

  2. Evaluation of in vitro/in vivo anti-diabetic effects and identification of compounds from Physalis alkekengi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Pan-Pan; Sun, Li-Juan; Liang, Ji-Chao; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Chen, Yong; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2018-02-12

    The aims of the present study were to assess the anti-diabetic effects of Physalis alkekengi L. (PA) in 3T3-L1 pre-adipocyte cells and HepG2-GFP-CYP2E1 (E47) cells and in a pre-diabetic rat model, as well as to identify the active chemical constituents. The in vitro results showed that PA has a strong anti-diabetic capacity to relieve oxidative stress and inhibit α-glucosidase activity. Mechanistic analysis also showed that ethyl acetate extracts of aerial parts and fruit of PA (PAG-EA and PAF-EA) enhanced glucose transporter 4 expression and function as well as enhanced insulin sensitivity by inhibiting the expression of cytochrome P450-2E1 (CYP2E1) mRNA and protein. In vivo, PAG-EA and PAF-EA significantly decreased the levels of fasting blood glucose and fasting insulin, as well as total cholesterol and triglyceride, in the pre-diabetic rats. The results from insulin sensitivity index and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance index along with an oral glucose tolerance test also showed that PAG-EA and PAF-EA could significantly enhance the insulin sensitivity, which confirmed the in vitro findings. Moreover, HPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS analysis identified flavonoids, physalins and phenolic acids as the main plant constituents. Our findings support the ethnopharmacological use of PA fruit, along with its aerial parts, as a strong anti-diabetic agent. The EA fraction, especially the constituent polyphenols and flavonoids, may have a good potential to treat diabetes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Antidiabetic effects of SGLT2 inhibitor ipragliflozin in type 2 diabetic mice fed diets containing different carbohydrate contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Atsuo; Takasu, Toshiyuki

    2018-03-15

    Daily intake of carbohydrates differs among individual patients with type 2 diabetes. Here, we investigated whether or not dietary carbohydrate content affects the efficacy of the sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor ipragliflozin in type 2 diabetic mice. Diabetic mice were fed a regular (50% kcal), high (75% kcal)-, or low (25% kcal)-carbohydrate diet. Ipragliflozin was orally administered once a day for 4 weeks. In all groups, mice exhibited characteristics of type 2 diabetes, including hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and obesity. Hyperglycemia was more severe in the high-carbohydrate diet group and milder in the low-carbohydrate diet group than in the regular diet group. In all diabetic mice, ipragliflozin significantly increased urinary glucose excretion and improved hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, obesity, and nephropathy. Although these antidiabetic effects of ipragliflozin were more marked in the high-carbohydrate diet group (which showed more severe hyperglycemia) than in the other two groups, no significant differences in effective dose or degree of response were observed among the three groups. The antidiabetic effects of ipragliflozin were not greatly affected by dietary carbohydrate content, suggesting that ipragliflozin may have similar efficacy for patients with type 2 diabetes regardless of carbohydrate intake. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative effectiveness of oral antidiabetic drugs in preventing cardiovascular mortality and morbidity: A network meta-analysis.

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    Gyeongsil Lee

    Full Text Available In the Guidance for Industry from the Food and Drug Administration in 2008, excess cardiovascular risk should be ruled out in trials of all new antidiabetic drugs; however, relatively few studies have focused on cardiovascular safety with antidiabetic drug use. We aimed to examine mortality and cardiovascular risk using a network meta-analysis. We searched the Medline, Embase, Cochrane, and ClinicalTrials.gov registry databases in March 2016 to identify randomized controlled trials reporting cardiovascular risk with the following oral antidiabetic drugs: metformin, sulfonylureas, thiazolidinedione (TZD, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4 inhibitors, and sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 (SGLT2 inhibitors. We assessed the differences in the risks of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular-related mortality, acute coronary syndrome (ACS, and myocardial infarction (MI among antidiabetic drugs with fixed effect models for direct pairwise comparisons and Bayesian network meta-analyses to integrate direct and indirect comparisons. Of the 101,183 patients in 73 randomized controlled trials, 3,434 (3.4% died. The relative risks of all-cause mortality with SGLT2 inhibitor use were 0.68 (95% credible interval: 0.57-0.80, 0.74 (0.49-1.10, 0.63 (0.46-0.87, 0.71 (0.55-0.90, and 0.65 (0.54-0.78, compared with placebo, metformin, sulfonylurea, TZD, and DPP4 inhibitor, respectively. The relative risks of cardiovascular-related mortality with SGLT2 inhibitor use were 0.61 (0.50-0.76, 0.81(0.36-1.90, 0.52(0.31-0.88, 0.66(0.49-0.91, and 0.61(0.48-0.77, compared with placebo, metformin, sulfonylurea, TZD, and DPP4 inhibitor, respectively. The relative risks of ACS with SGLT2 inhibitor use was consistent with that of all-cause mortality. SGLT2 inhibitor use was associated with a lower risk of ACS than the other OADs and placebo. The relative risks of MI with SGLT2 inhibitor use were 0.77 (0.63-0.93 and 0.75 (0.60-0.94, compared with placebo and DPP4 inhibitor, respectively. The

  5. Medicinal Chemistry of the Anti-Diabetic Effects of Momordica Charantia: Active Constituents and Modes of Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaipaul; Cumming, Emmanuel; Manoharan, Gunasekar; Kalasz, Huba; Adeghate, Ernest

    2011-01-01

    medicinal chemistry and use(s) of M. charantia and its various extracts and compounds, their biochemical properties and how they act as anti-diabetic (hypoglycemic) drugs and the various mechanisms by which they exert their beneficial effects in controlling and treating DM. PMID:21966327

  6. Medicinal chemistry of the anti-diabetic effects of momordica charantia: active constituents and modes of actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaipaul; Cumming, Emmanuel; Manoharan, Gunasekar; Kalasz, Huba; Adeghate, Ernest

    2011-01-01

    chemistry and use(s) of M. charantia and its various extracts and compounds, their biochemical properties and how they act as anti-diabetic (hypoglycemic) drugs and the various mechanisms by which they exert their beneficial effects in controlling and treating DM.

  7. Identification of PPARgamma partial agonists of natural origin (II: in silico prediction in natural extracts with known antidiabetic activity.

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    Laura Guasch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Natural extracts have played an important role in the prevention and treatment of diseases and are important sources for drug discovery. However, to be effectively used in these processes, natural extracts must be characterized through the identification of their active compounds and their modes of action. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: From an initial set of 29,779 natural products that are annotated with their natural source and using a previously developed virtual screening procedure (carefully validated experimentally, we have predicted as potential peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ partial agonists 12 molecules from 11 extracts known to have antidiabetic activity. Six of these molecules are similar to molecules with described antidiabetic activity but whose mechanism of action is unknown. Therefore, it is plausible that these 12 molecules could be the bioactive molecules responsible, at least in part, for the antidiabetic activity of the extracts containing them. In addition, we have also identified as potential PPARγ partial agonists 10 molecules from 16 plants with undescribed antidiabetic activity but that are related (i.e., they are from the same genus to plants with known antidiabetic properties. None of the 22 molecules that we predict as PPARγ partial agonists show chemical similarity with a group of 211 known PPARγ partial agonists obtained from the literature. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results provide a new hypothesis about the active molecules of natural extracts with antidiabetic properties and their mode of action. We also suggest plants with undescribed antidiabetic activity that may contain PPARγ partial agonists. These plants represent a new source of potential antidiabetic extracts. Consequently, our work opens the door to the discovery of new antidiabetic extracts and molecules that can be of use, for instance, in the design of new antidiabetic drugs or functional foods focused

  8. Antidiabetic effects of natural plant extracts via inhibition of carbohydrate hydrolysis enzymes with emphasis on pancreatic alpha amylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etxeberria, Usune; de la Garza, Ana Laura; Campión, Javier; Martínez, J Alfredo; Milagro, Fermín I

    2012-03-01

    The increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and the negative clinical outcomes observed with the commercially available anti-diabetic drugs have led to the investigation of new therapeutic approaches focused on controlling postprandrial glucose levels. The use of carbohydrate digestive enzyme inhibitors from natural resources could be a possible strategy to block dietary carbohydrate absorption with less adverse effects than synthetic drugs. This review covers the latest evidence regarding in vitro and in vivo studies in relation to pancreatic alpha-amylase inhibitors of plant origin, and presents bioactive compounds of phenolic nature that exhibit anti-amylase activity. Pancreatic alpha-amylase inhibitors from traditional plant extracts are a promising tool for diabetes treatment. Many studies have confirmed the alpha-amylase inhibitory activity of plants and their bioactive compounds in vitro, but few studies corroborate these findings in rodents and very few in humans. Thus, despite some encouraging results, more research is required for developing a valuable anti-diabetic therapy using pancreatic alpha-amylase inhibitors of plant origin.

  9. Acute Hypoglycemic and Antidiabetic Effect of Teuhetenone A Isolated from Turnera diffusa

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    Aída Parra-Naranjo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a chronic degenerative disease that causes long-term complications and represents a serious public health problem. Turnera diffusa (damiana is a shrub that grows throughout Mexico and is traditionally used for many illnesses including diabetes. Although a large number of plant metabolites are known, there are no reports indicating which of these are responsible for this activity, and this identification was the objective of the present work. Through bioassay-guided fractionation of a methanolic extract obtained from the aerial part of T. diffusa, teuhetenone A was isolated and identified as the main metabolite responsible for the plant’s hypoglycemic activity. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity and cytotoxicity of this metabolite were determined. Hypoglycemic and antidiabetic activities were evaluated in a murine model of diabetes in vivo, by monitoring glucose levels for six hours and comparing them with levels after administering various controls. Teuhetenone A was not cytotoxic at the tested concentrations, and did not show inhibitory activity in the glucosidase test, and the in vivo assays showed a gradual reduction in glucose levels in normoglycemic and diabetic mice. Considering these results, we suggest that teuhetenone A has potential as an antidiabetic compound, which could be further submitted to preclinical assays.

  10. Induced desensitization of the insulinotropic effects of antidiabetic drugs, BTS 67 582 and tolbutamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClenaghan, N H; Ball, A J; Flatt, P R

    2000-05-01

    Acute and chronic mechanisms of action of novel insulinotropic antidiabetic drug, BTS 67 582 (1, 1-dimethyl-2-(2-morpholinophenyl)guanidine fumarate), were examined in the stable cultured BRIN-BD11 cell line. BTS 67 582 (100 - 400 microM) stimulated a concentration-dependent increase (PBTS 67 582 in culture time-dependently decreased subsequent responsiveness to acute challenge with 200 microM BTS 67 582 or 200 microM tolbutamide at 12 - 18 h (PBTS 67 582 and tolbutamide. Culture with 100 microM BTS 67 582 or 100 microM tolbutamide did not affect basal insulin secretion, cellular insulin content, or cell viability and exerted no influence on the secretory responsiveness to 200 microM of the imidazoline, efaroxan. While 18 h BTS 67 582 culture did not affect the insulin-releasing actions (PBTS 67 582 shares a common signalling pathway to sulphonylurea but not imidazoline drugs. Desensitization of drug action may provide an important approach to dissect sites of action of novel and established insulinotropic antidiabetic agents.

  11. Induced desensitization of the insulinotropic effects of antidiabetic drugs, BTS 67 582 and tolbutamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClenaghan, Neville H; Ball, Andrew J; Flatt, Peter R

    2000-01-01

    Acute and chronic mechanisms of action of novel insulinotropic antidiabetic drug, BTS 67 582 (1,1-dimethyl-2-(2-morpholinophenyl)guanidine fumarate), were examined in the stable cultured BRIN-BD11 cell line. BTS 67 582 (100–400 μM) stimulated a concentration-dependent increase (PBTS 67 582 in culture time-dependently decreased subsequent responsiveness to acute challenge with 200 μM BTS 67 582 or 200 μM tolbutamide at 12–18 h (PBTS 67 582 and tolbutamide. Culture with 100 μM BTS 67 582 or 100 μM tolbutamide did not affect basal insulin secretion, cellular insulin content, or cell viability and exerted no influence on the secretory responsiveness to 200 μM of the imidazoline, efaroxan. While 18 h BTS 67 582 culture did not affect the insulin-releasing actions (PBTS 67 582 shares a common signalling pathway to sulphonylurea but not imidazoline drugs. Desensitization of drug action may provide an important approach to dissect sites of action of novel and established insulinotropic antidiabetic agents. PMID:10807689

  12. Effectiveness and content analysis of interventions to enhance oral antidiabetic drug adherence in adults with type 2 diabetes: systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vignon Zomahoun, H.T.; de Bruin, M.; Guillaumie, L.; Moisan, J.; Grégoire, J.P.; Pérez, N.; Vézina-Im, L.A.; Guénette, L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the pooled effect size of oral antidiabetic drug (OAD) adherence-enhancing interventions and to explore which of the behavior change techniques (BCTs) applied in the intervention groups modified this pooled intervention effect size. Methods We searched relevant studies

  13. NN2211: a long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 derivative with anti-diabetic effects in glucose-intolerant pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribel, Ulla; Larsen, Marianne O; Rolin, Bidda

    2002-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an effective anti-diabetic agent, but its metabolic instability makes it therapeutically unsuitable. This study investigated the pharmacodynamics of a long-acting GLP-1 derivative (NN2211: (Arg(34)Lys(26)-(N- epsilon -(gamma-Glu(N-alpha-hexadecanoyl)))-GLP-1...... a hyperglycaemic glucose clamp and chronic treatment results in better daily metabolic control. Therefore, NN2211, a GLP-1 derivative that can be administered once daily, holds promise as a new anti-diabetic drug with a minimal risk of hypoglycaemia....

  14. Next generation sequencing and de novo transcriptome analysis of Costus pictus D. Don, a non-model plant with potent anti-diabetic properties

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    Annadurai Ramasamy S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phyto-remedies for diabetic control are popular among patients with Type II Diabetes mellitus (DM, in addition to other diabetic control measures. A number of plant species are known to possess diabetic control properties. Costus pictus D. Don is popularly known as “Insulin Plant” in Southern India whose leaves have been reported to increase insulin pools in blood plasma. Next Generation Sequencing is employed as a powerful tool for identifying molecular signatures in the transcriptome related to physiological functions of plant tissues. We sequenced the leaf transcriptome of C. pictus using Illumina reversible dye terminator sequencing technology and used combination of bioinformatics tools for identifying transcripts related to anti-diabetic properties of C. pictus. Results A total of 55,006 transcripts were identified, of which 69.15% transcripts could be annotated. We identified transcripts related to pathways of bixin biosynthesis and geraniol and geranial biosynthesis as major transcripts from the class of isoprenoid secondary metabolites and validated the presence of putative norbixin methyltransferase, a precursor of Bixin. The transcripts encoding these terpenoids are known to be Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR agonists and anti-glycation agents. Sequential extraction and High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC confirmed the presence of bixin in C. pictus methanolic extracts. Another significant transcript identified in relation to anti-diabetic, anti-obesity and immuno-modulation is of Abscisic Acid biosynthetic pathway. We also report many other transcripts for the biosynthesis of antitumor, anti-oxidant and antimicrobial metabolites of C. pictus leaves. Conclusion Solid molecular signatures (transcripts related to bixin, abscisic acid, and geranial and geraniol biosynthesis for the anti-diabetic properties of C. pictus leaves and vital clues related to the other phytochemical functions

  15. Metabolic effects of various antidiabetic and hypolipidaemic agents on a high-fat diet and multiple low-dose streptozocin (MLDS) mouse model of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arulmozhi, Dakshinamoorty Kandasamy; Kurian, Rubin; Bodhankar, Subodh L; Veeranjaneyulu, Addepalli

    2008-09-01

    Insulin resistance and subsequent insulin secretory defect are two main features of type 2 diabetes and associated metabolic disorders. The animal models of type 2 diabetes are very complex and are as heterogeneous as the disease. We have evaluated the effect of various antidiabetic and lipid lowering agents (fenofibrate, rosiglitazone, glimepiride, metformin and simvastatin) on the metabolic abnormalities induced by combining a high-fat diet and multiple low-dose streptozocin (MLDS) in mice. Male Swiss albino mice were orally treated with the above agents and fed with a diet containing high fat for 28 days. On day 15 the animals were injected intraperitoneally with low-dose streptozocin (40 mg kg(-1)), which was administered for five consecutive days. At the end of the 28-day treatment plasma metabolic parameters (glucose, triglyceride and immunoreactive insulin) were estimated. The antidiabetic and hypolipidaemic agents exhibited differential effects on these metabolic parameters. With the exception of fenofibrate all these agents reduced the plasma glucose levels, and the effects of metformin and rosiglitazone on glucose were found to be statistically significant. Although the effect of the test drugs on cholesterol was modest, a significant decrease in triglyceride levels was observed with sub-chronic treatment with these agents. Interestingly, glimepiride mildly elevated the insulin levels while the other antidiabetics and hypolipidaemics reduced the insulin levels, with metformin and rosiglitazone exhibiting statistically significant effects on insulin. To our knowledge this is the first report on the effect of various peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor modulators and newer antidiabetics on the metabolic effects induced by the combined high-fat diet and MLDS model of type 2 diabetes in Swiss albino mice. The results suggested the complexity of the hyperglycaemia, hyperinsulinaemia and hypertriglyceridaemia induced by the high-fat diet and MLDS mouse

  16. Antidiabetic Effect of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Its Association with Inflammation in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

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    Ceren Eyileten

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a neurotrophin, which plays an important role in the central nervous system, and systemic or peripheral inflammatory conditions, such as acute coronary syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. BDNF is also expressed in several nonneuronal tissues, and platelets are the major source of peripheral BDNF. Here, we reviewed the potential role of BDNF in platelet reactivity in T2DM and its association with selected inflammatory and platelet activation mediators. Besides that, we focused on adipocytokines such as leptin, resistin, and adiponectin which are considered to take part in inflammation and both lipid and glucose metabolism in diabetic patients as previous studies showed the relation between adipocytokines and BDNF. We also reviewed the evidences of the antidiabetic effect of BDNF and the association with circulating inflammatory cytokines in T2DM.

  17. Antidiabetic dietary materials and animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sunan; Zhu, Fan

    2016-07-01

    The ever-increasing occurrence of diabetes worldwide demands cost-effective anti-diabetic strategies. Food-based materials have great potential as efficient anti-diabetic agents. Focusing on the literatures of the recent 5years, this review summarizes the methods, findings, and limitations of each research involving non-medicinal foods (individual and mixed) and diabetic animal models. Various types of fruits, vegetables, legumes, cereals, spices, beverages, oilseeds, and edible oils showed antidiabetic effects in different animal models. Animal feeding trials rarely had identical designs in food doses, feeding schedules, and routes of administration, as well as biochemical markers for antidiabetic evaluation. Various possible cellular and metabolic targets were speculated for the anti-hyperglycemic effects of the dietary materials, and the molecular mechanisms of action remain to be better explored. Short-term (maximum 16weeks) antidiabetic studies have been established. Limited safety/tolerability data are available for antidiabetic dietary materials. Findings from current animal studies present a generic antidiabetic dietary pattern associated with plant-based whole foods, which agrees well with the findings of epidemiological studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Honey - A Novel Antidiabetic Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erejuwa, Omotayo O.; Sulaiman, Siti A.; Wahab, Mohd S. Ab

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus remains a burden worldwide in spite of the availability of numerous antidiabetic drugs. Honey is a natural substance produced by bees from nectar. Several evidence-based health benefits have been ascribed to honey in the recent years. In this review article, we highlight findings which demonstrate the beneficial or potential effects of honey in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), on the gut microbiota, in the liver, in the pancreas and how these effects could improve glycemic control and metabolic derangements. In healthy subjects or patients with impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes mellitus, various studies revealed that honey reduced blood glucose or was more tolerable than most common sugars or sweeteners. Pre-clinical studies provided more convincing evidence in support of honey as a potential antidiabetic agent than clinical studies did. The not-too-impressive clinical data could mainly be attributed to poor study designs or due to the fact that the clinical studies were preliminary. Based on the key constituents of honey, the possible mechanisms of action of antidiabetic effect of honey are proposed. The paper also highlights the potential impacts and future perspectives on the use of honey as an antidiabetic agent. It makes recommendations for further clinical studies on the potential antidiabetic effect of honey. This review provides insight on the potential use of honey, especially as a complementary agent, in the management of diabetes mellitus. Hence, it is very important to have well-designed, randomized controlled clinical trials that investigate the reproducibility (or otherwise) of these experimental data in diabetic human subjects. PMID:22811614

  19. Phenolics composition and antidiabetic property of Brachystegia eurycoma seed flur in high-fat diet, low-dose streptozotocin-induced type 2 diabetes in rats

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    Emmanuel Anyachukwu Irondi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To quantify some major pharmacologically important flavonoids and phenolic acids in Brachystegia eurycoma seed flour (BESF and evaluate its antidiabetic activity in type 2 diabetic rats. Method: Flavonoids and phenolic acids were quantified using a reverse-phase high pressure liquid chromatrography coupled with diode array detection. Type 2 diabetes was induced in rats using high-fat diet, low-dose streptozotocin (HFD/STZ model, by feeding the rats with HFD for 2 weeks followed by single dose administration of STZ (40 mg/kg body weight, intraperitoneally. The diabetic rats were later fed BESF-supplemented (10% and 20% diets, or administered with metformin (25 mg/kg b.w. for 21 days; the control rats were fed basal diet during this period. After the dietary regimen, the rats were sacrificed, and their blood, liver and pancreas samples were collected for biochemical assays. Results: The flavonoids (catechin, rutin, quercitrin, quercetin and kaempferol and phenolic acids (gallic acid, caffeic, chlorogenic and ellagic acid were abundant in BESF. BESFsupplemented diets (BESF-SD significantly (P 0.05 with metformin administration in some of the biomarkers. Conclusion: The flavonoids and phenolic acids in BESF may have acted synergistically to produce the observed antidiabetic effects. BESF could therefore be an effective and affordable dietary therapy for the management of T2DM; and an excellent source for drug discovery.

  20. Antidiabetic effect of Chloroxylon swietenia bark extracts on streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

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    B. Jayaprasad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes has been increasing at an alarming rate around the world, and experts have relied on remedies from the utilization of ancient drugs that are essentially derived from plants. The present study aimed to evaluate the antidiabetic potential of Chloroxylon swietenia bark extracts on streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in male albino Wistar rats by single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ (50 mg/kg b.w.. The diabetic rats were administered orally with C. swietenia bark (CSB methanolic (CSBMEt and aqueous (CSBAEt (250 mg/kg b.w. extracts and glibenclamide (600 µg/kg b.w. by intragastric intubation for 45 days. The result showed a heavy loss in weight, increase in blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin level, and decline in plasma insulin and total hemoglobin content. Furthermore, glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bis phosphatase were found to be increased whereas hexokinase and glycogen contents were decreased in STZ induced diabetic rats. CSBAEt, CSBMEt and glibenclamide treated diabetic rats showed moderate reduction in blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels; in addition, plasma insulin and hemoglobin levels were elevated. The altered activities of carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes and liver glycogen were improved remarkably. CSBMEt results were comparable to the standard drug glibenclamide. The present findings support the usage of the plant extracts for the traditional treatment of diabetes.

  1. Studies on the antidiabetic effects of Mangifera indica stem-barks and leaves on nondiabetic, type 1 and type 2 diabetic model rats

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    Amrita Bhowmik, Liakot Ali Khan, Masfida Akhter and Begum Rokeya

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Mangifera indica Linn, locally known as mango tree has been claimed to possess antidiabetic properties by many investigators. The present study was undertaken to screen the hypoglycemic and antihyperglycemic activity of both ethanol and water extracts of leaves and stem-barks of M. indica in nondiabetic and diabetic model rats in different prandial state. The results showed that all of the extracts had significant antihyperglycemic effect in type 2 diabetic model rats when fed simultaneously with glucose load (p<0.05-0.01; p<0.005-0.001. Moreover, the ethanol extract of stem-barks showed significant antihyperglycemic effect when the extract was fed 30 min prior to the glucose load (p<0.01. Investigations were carried out to evaluate the effect of M. indica on glucose absorption using a rat intestinal preparation in situ. The ethanol extracts of stem-barks reduced glucose absorption gradually during the whole perfusion period in type 2 diabetic rats.

  2. Antidiabetic activity of Terminalia catappa Linn fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagappa, A N; Thakurdesai, P A; Venkat Rao, N; Singh, Jiwan

    2003-09-01

    In view of alleged antidiabetic potential, effect of the petroleum ether, methanol, and aqueous extracts of Terminalia catappa Linn (combretaceae) fruit, on fasting blood sugar levels and serum biochemical analysis in alloxan-induced diabetic rats were investigated. All the three extracts of Terminalia catappa produced a significant antidiabetic activity at dose levels 1/5 of their lethal doses. Concurrent histological studies of the pancreas of these animals showed comparable regeneration by methanolic and aqueous extracts which were earlier, necrosed by alloxan.

  3. Antidiabetic and Synergistic Effects of Anthocyanin Fraction from Berberis integerrima Fruit on Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats Model

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    Zahra Sabahi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a complex endocrine disorder. There is a serious attempt to identify antidiabetic compounds from natural sources to use with other drugs for reduction of diabetes complications. Present study is based on the investigation of antihyperglycemic effect of anthocyanin fraction of Berberis integerrima Bunge (AFBI fruits on some physiological parameters (glucose level, glycogen content, and body weight in normal and streptozotocin-induced (STZ-induced diabetic rats and evaluation of synergic effect of this fraction with metformin and glibenclamide. Male Sprague dawley rats were divided into nine groups: healthy control group, diabetic control group, diabetic groups treated with anthocyanin fraction (200, 400 and 1000 mg/kg, respectively; diabetic groups treated with glibenclamide and metformin separately, diabetic groups treated with glibenclamide + anthocyanin fraction (1000 mg/kg, metformin + anthocyanin fraction (1000 mg/kg. Treatment of diabetic rats with AFBI (400, 1000mg/kg significantly decreased blood glucose as compared with control. Moreover, AFBI (400, 1000mg/kg significantly increased liver glycogen and body weight compared to control. Nevertheless, there were no synergistic effects between anthocyanin fraction and metformin or glibenclamide on blood glucose, liver glycogen, and body weight. The results of this study indicate that AFBI possesses hypoglycemic effects and may be considered for evaluation in future diabetes clinical studies.

  4. Newer antidiabetic drugs and calorie restriction mimicry

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    Sanjay Kalra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available De-acceleration of aging and delayed development of age-related morbidity accompanies the restriction of calories (without malnutrition in laboratory mice, nematodes, yeast, fish, and dogs. Recent results from long-term longitudinal studies conducted on primates have suggested longevity benefits of a 30% restriction of calories in rhesus monkeys as well. Among calorie restricted rhesus monkeys one of the mechanisms for the improvement in lifespan was the reduction in the development of glucose intolerance and cardiovascular disease. Although there are no comparable human studies, it is likely that metabolic and longevity benefits will accompany a reduction in calories in humans as well. However, considering the difficulties in getting healthy adults to limit food intake science has focused on understanding the biochemical processes that accompany calorie restriction (CR to formulate drugs that would mimic the effects of CR without the need to actually restrict calories. Drugs in this emerging therapeutic field are called CR mimetics. Some of the currently used anti-diabetic agents may have some CR mimetic like effects. This review focuses on the CR mimetic properties of the currently available anti-diabetic agents.

  5. POTENTIAL APPLICATIONS OF SOS-GFP BIOSENSOR TO IN VITRO RAPID SCREENING OF CYTOTOXIC AND GENOTOXIC EFFECT OF ANTICANCER AND ANTIDIABETIC PHARMACIST RESIDUES IN SURFACE WATER

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    Marzena Matejczyk

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli K-12 GFP-based bacterial biosensors allowed the detection of cytotoxic and genotoxic effect of anticancer drug– cyclophosphamide and antidiabetic drug – metformin in PBS buffer and surface water. Experimental data indicated that recA::gfpmut2 genetic system was sensitive to drugs and drugs mixture applied in experiment. RecA promoter was a good bioindicator in cytotoxic and genotoxic effect screening of cyclophosphamide, metformin and the mixture of the both drugs in PBS buffer and surface water. The results indicated that E. coli K-12 recA::gfp mut2 strain could be potentially useful for first-step screening of cytotoxic and genotoxic effect of anticancer and antidiabetic pharmacist residues in water. Next steps in research will include more experimental analysis to validate recA::gfpmut2 genetic system in E. coli K-12 on different anticancer drugs.

  6. Verification of the antidiabetic effects of cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) using insulin-uncontrolled type 1 diabetic rats and cultured adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yan; Fukushima, Misato; Ito, Yoshimasa; Muraki, Etsuko; Hosono, Takashi; Seki, Taiichiro; Ariga, Toyohiko

    2010-01-01

    It has long been believed that an intake of cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) alleviates diabetic pathological conditions. However, it is still controversial whether the beneficial effect is insulin-dependent or insulin-mimetic. This study was aimed at determining the insulin-independent effect of cinnamon. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were divided into four groups and orally administered with an aqueous cinnamon extract (CE) for 22 d. The diabetic rats that had taken CE at a dose of more than 30 mg/kg/d were rescued from their hyperglycemia and nephropathy, and these rats were found to have upregulation of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP-1) and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) in their brown adipose tissues as well as in their muscles. This was verified by using 3T3-L1 adipocytes in which CE upregulates GLUT4 translocation and increases the glucose uptake. CE exhibited its anti-diabetic effect independently from insulin by at least two mechanisms: i) upregulation of mitochondrial UCP-1, and ii) enhanced translocation of GLUT4 in the muscle and adipose tissues.

  7. Antidiabetic Effect of Hydroalcholic Urtica dioica Leaf Extract in Male Rats with Fructose-Induced Insulin Resistance

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    Akram Ahangarpour

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urtica dioica has been used as antihypertensive, antihyperlipidemic and antidiabetic herbal medicine. The purpose of this study was to study the effect of hydroalcoholic extract of Urtica dioica on fructose-induced insulin resistance rats. Methods: Forty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups including control, fructose, extract 50, extract 100 and extract 200. The control rat received vehicle, the fructose and extract groups received fructose 10% for eight weeks. The extract groups received single daily injection of vehicle, 50, 100 or 200 mg/kg/day for the two weeks. Blood glucose, insulin, last fasting insulin resistance index (FIRI, serum triglyceride (TG, low-density lipoprotein (LDL, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL, alanin trasaminase (AST and alkaline phosphatase (ALP, leptin and LDL/HDL ratio were determined.Results: Compared to control group, daily administration of fructose was associated with significant increase in FIRI, blood glucose and insulin, significant decrease in lepin, and no significant change in TG, HDL, LDL, LDL/HDL ratio, VLDL, ALT, and ALP. The extract significantly decreased serum glucose, insulin, LDL and leptin, and LDL/HDL ratio and FIRI. It also significantly increased serum TG, VLDL, and AST, but did not change serum ALP.Conclusion: We suggest that Urtica dioica extract, by decreasing serum glucose, and FIRI, may be useful to improve type 2 diabetes mellitus. Also, by positive effect on lipid profile and by decreasing effect on leptin, it may improve metabolic syndrome.

  8. Antidiabetic Effect of Hydroalcholic Urtica dioica Leaf Extract in Male Rats with Fructose-Induced Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahangarpour, Akram; Mohammadian, Maryam; Dianat, Mahin

    2012-01-01

    Background: Urtica dioica has been used as antihypertensive, antihyperlipidemic and antidiabetic herbal medicine. The purpose of this study was to study the effect of hydroalcoholic extract of Urtica dioica on fructose-induced insulin resistance rats. Methods: Forty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups including control, fructose, extract 50, extract 100 and extract 200. The control rat received vehicle, the fructose and extract groups received fructose 10% for eight weeks. The extract groups received single daily injection of vehicle, 50, 100 or 200 mg/kg/day for the two weeks. Blood glucose, insulin, last fasting insulin resistance index (FIRI), serum triglyceride (TG), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), alanin trasaminase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), leptin and LDL/HDL ratio were determined. Results: Compared to control group, daily administration of fructose was associated with significant increase in FIRI, blood glucose and insulin, significant decrease in lepin, and no significant change in TG, HDL, LDL, LDL/HDL ratio, VLDL, ALT, and ALP. The extract significantly decreased serum glucose, insulin, LDL and leptin, and LDL/HDL ratio and FIRI. It also significantly increased serum TG, VLDL, and AST, but did not change serum ALP. Conclusion: We suggest that Urtica dioica extract, by decreasing serum glucose, and FIRI, may be useful to improve type 2 diabetes mellitus. Also, by positive effect on lipid profile and by decreasing effect on leptin, it may improve metabolic syndrome. PMID:23115450

  9. Anti-Obesity and Anti-Diabetic Effect of Neoagarooligosaccharides on High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity in Mice

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    Hong, Sun Joo; Lee, Je-Hyeon; Kim, Eun Joo; Yang, Hea Jung; Park, Jae-Seon; Hong, Soon-Kwang

    2017-01-01

    Neoagarooligosaccharides (NAOs), mainly comprising neoagarotetraose and neoagarohexaose, were prepared by hydrolyzing agar with β-agarase DagA from Streptomyces coelicolor, and the anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects of NAOs on high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity in mice were investigated after NAOs-supplementation for 64 days. Compared to the HFD group, the HFD-0.5 group that was fed with HFD + NAOs (0.5%, w/w) showed remarkable reduction of 36% for body weight gain and 37% for food efficiency ratios without abnormal clinical signs. Furthermore, fat accumulation in the liver and development of macrovesicular steatosis induced by HFD in the HFD-0.5 group were recovered nearly to the levels found in the normal diet (ND) group. NAOs intake could also effectively reduce the size (area) of adipocytes and tissue weight gain in the perirenal and epididymal adipose tissues. The increased concentrations of total cholesterol, triglyceride, and free fatty acid in serum of the HFD group were also markedly ameliorated to the levels found in serum of the ND group after NAOs-intake in a dose dependent manner. In addition, insulin resistance and glucose intolerance induced by HFD were distinctly improved, and adiponectin concentration in the blood was notably increased. All these results strongly suggest that intake of NAOs can effectively suppress obesity and obesity-related metabolic syndromes, such as hyperlipidemia, steatosis, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance, by inducing production of adiponectin in the HFD-induced obese mice. PMID:28333098

  10. Anti-diabetic and hypolipidemic effects of Sargassum yezoense in db/db mice

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    Kim, Su-Nam, E-mail: snkim@kist.re.kr [Natural Medicine Center, KIST Gangneung Institute, Gangneung 210-340 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Woojung [Natural Medicine Center, KIST Gangneung Institute, Gangneung 210-340 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Gyu-Un [College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Research Center for Cell Fate Control, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Kee, E-mail: yksnbk@sookmyung.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sargassum yezoense (SY) treatment improved glucose and lipid impairment in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This pharmacological action is associated with PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} dual activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It decreases the expression of G6Pase for gluconeogenesis in liver. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It increases the expression of UCP3 for lipid metabolism in adipose tissue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There are no significant side effects such as body weight gain and hepatomegaly. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been considered to be desirable targets for metabolic syndrome, even though their specific agonists have several side effects including body weight gain, edema and tissue failure. Previously, we have reported in vitro effects of Sargassum yezoense (SY) and its ingredients, sargaquinoic acid (SQA) and sargahydroquinoic acid (SHQA), on PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} dual transcriptional activation. In this study, we describe in vivo pharmacological property of SY on metabolic disorders. SY treatment significantly improved glucose and lipid impairment in db/db mice model. More importantly, there are no significant side effects such as body weight gain and hepatomegaly in SY-treated animals, indicating little side effects of SY in liver and lipid metabolism. In addition, SY led to a decrease in the expression of G6Pase for gluconeogenesis in liver responsible for lowering blood glucose level and an increase in the expression of UCP3 in adipose tissue for the reduction of total and LDL-cholesterol level. Altogether, our data suggest that SY would be a potential therapeutic agent against type 2 diabetes and related metabolic disorders by ameliorating the glucose and lipid metabolism.

  11. Anti-diabetic and hypolipidemic effects of Sargassum yezoense in db/db mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Su-Nam; Lee, Woojung; Bae, Gyu-Un; Kim, Yong Kee

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Sargassum yezoense (SY) treatment improved glucose and lipid impairment in vivo. ► This pharmacological action is associated with PPARα/γ dual activation. ► It decreases the expression of G6Pase for gluconeogenesis in liver. ► It increases the expression of UCP3 for lipid metabolism in adipose tissue. ► There are no significant side effects such as body weight gain and hepatomegaly. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been considered to be desirable targets for metabolic syndrome, even though their specific agonists have several side effects including body weight gain, edema and tissue failure. Previously, we have reported in vitro effects of Sargassum yezoense (SY) and its ingredients, sargaquinoic acid (SQA) and sargahydroquinoic acid (SHQA), on PPARα/γ dual transcriptional activation. In this study, we describe in vivo pharmacological property of SY on metabolic disorders. SY treatment significantly improved glucose and lipid impairment in db/db mice model. More importantly, there are no significant side effects such as body weight gain and hepatomegaly in SY-treated animals, indicating little side effects of SY in liver and lipid metabolism. In addition, SY led to a decrease in the expression of G6Pase for gluconeogenesis in liver responsible for lowering blood glucose level and an increase in the expression of UCP3 in adipose tissue for the reduction of total and LDL-cholesterol level. Altogether, our data suggest that SY would be a potential therapeutic agent against type 2 diabetes and related metabolic disorders by ameliorating the glucose and lipid metabolism.

  12. PLANTS WITH ANTIDIABETIC ACTIVITIES AND THEIR MEDICINAL VALUES

    OpenAIRE

    B. V. Raman; A. Naga Vamsi Krishna; B. Narasimha Rao; M. Pardha Saradhi; M. V. Basaveswara Rao

    2012-01-01

    The anti-diabetic drugs from plants in current clinical use and their similar mechanism of action of herbal components are preferred mainly due to lesser side effects and low cost. So many medicinal plants with anti-diabetic activity related beneficial effects and of herbal drugs used in diabetes is pressurized. The present review focused on the some of the herbal plants and their medicinal uses have shown experimental or clinical anti-diabetic activity. The essential values of some plants ha...

  13. Lansoprazole enhances the antidiabetic effect of sitagliptin in mice with diet-induced obesity and healthy human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, ShaoJun; Sun, JianHua; Tian, XiKui; Sun, Xu; Zhang, ZhenXing; Gao, Yuan

    2014-08-01

    Proton pump inhibitors as adjunctive therapy would improve diabetes control and could enhance the hypoglycaemic activity of DPP-4 inhibitors. The aim of the study was to investigate the short-term effects of lansoprazole (LPZ), sitagliptin (SITA) and their combination therapy on glucose regulation and gut peptide secretion. Glucose and gut peptide were determined and compared after short-term administration of LPZ or SITA, or in combination to mice with diet-induced obesity (DIO) and to healthy human subjects (n = 16) in a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) by a crossover design. In DIO mice, LPZ significantly improve glucose metabolism, increase plasma C-peptide and insulin compared with vehicle treatment. Furthermore, the combination of LPZ and SITA improved glucose tolerance additively, with higher plasma insulin and C-peptide levels compared with SITA-treated mice. Similarly, in human in the OGTT, the combination showed significant improvement in glucose-lowering and insulin increase vs SITA-treated group. However, no significant differences in area under curve (AUC) of insulin, glucose and C-peptide between the LPZ-treated group and baseline, except that mean AUCgastrin was significantly increased by LPZ. LPZ and SITA combination therapy appears to have complementary mechanisms of action and additive antidiabetic effect. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  14. Epifluorescent imaging study of the effect of anti-diabetic drug metformin on colorectal cancer cell lines in vitro

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    Venkatasubramani P

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Metformin, a widely used anti-diabetic drug, has recently been associated with inhibition of cell proliferation in multiple cancers. However, it is not clear if the reduction in proliferation on treatment with metformin is a result of cell death or slowdown in the rate of growth of cancer cells, because cell viability assays measure only the number of cells at the beginning and end of the experiment. The aim of this study is to utilize a fluorescent imaging technique to directly follow cell death overtime in order to investigate the effect of metformin on colorectal cancer cells HCT116 and SW480. Epifluorescent imaging analysis carried out using ImageXpress Micro XLS High-Content Imaging System show that there is no significant change in cell death observed in the cancer cell lines, as compared to the control, over multiple closely spaced time points, suggesting that metformin in pharmacological doses may not be an effective inducer of cell death in these colon cancer cell lines.

  15. Effect of the antidiabetic agent pioglitazone on bone metabolism in rats

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    Junkichi Kanda

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Thiazolidinediones (TZDs are synthetic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ agonists used as therapy for type 2 diabetes. However, clinical studies reported that the therapeutic modulation of PPARγ activity using TZDs may induce negative effects on bone metabolism. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of the TZD pioglitazone on bone metabolism in rats. Male Wistar rats were treated orally with pioglitazone 5 or 20 mg/kg daily for 24 weeks. Bone strength was evaluated using a 3-point bending method, and bone histomorphometry was analyzed. Bone mineral density (BMD was measured using quantitative computed tomography, and serum biochemical markers were examined. Pioglitazone caused a decrease in cortical and trabecular BMD of whole femur. A reduction in bone strength properties of the femoral mid-diaphysis was observed in the 20 mg/kg pioglitazone treated group. Bone histomorphometric analysis revealed that osteoblast surface and mineralizing surface were decreased, whereas osteoclast surface and number were increased after treatment with 20 mg/kg pioglitazone. Altogether, this study demonstrated that pioglitazone may repress bone formation and facilitate bone resorption. The resulting imbalance of bone metabolism leads to a reduction in BMD with a subsequent increase in bone fragility.

  16. Identification of novel human dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitors of natural origin (Part II: in silico prediction in antidiabetic extracts.

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    Laura Guasch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Natural extracts play an important role in traditional medicines for the treatment of diabetes mellitus and are also an essential resource for new drug discovery. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV inhibitors are potential candidates for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and the effectiveness of certain antidiabetic extracts of natural origin could be, at least partially, explained by the inhibition of DPP-IV. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using an initial set of 29,779 natural products that are annotated with their natural source and an experimentally validated virtual screening procedure previously developed in our lab (Guasch et al.; 2012 [1], we have predicted 12 potential DPP-IV inhibitors from 12 different plant extracts that are known to have antidiabetic activity. Seven of these molecules are identical or similar to molecules with described antidiabetic activity (although their role as DPP-IV inhibitors has not been suggested as an explanation for their bioactivity. Therefore, it is plausible that these 12 molecules could be responsible, at least in part, for the antidiabetic activity of these extracts through their inhibitory effect on DPP-IV. In addition, we also identified as potential DPP-IV inhibitors 6 molecules from 6 different plants with no described antidiabetic activity but that share the same genus as plants with known antidiabetic properties. Moreover, none of the 18 molecules that we predicted as DPP-IV inhibitors exhibits chemical similarity with a group of 2,342 known DPP-IV inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study identified 18 potential DPP-IV inhibitors in 18 different plant extracts (12 of these plants have known antidiabetic properties, whereas, for the remaining 6, antidiabetic activity has been reported for other plant species from the same genus. Moreover, none of the 18 molecules exhibits chemical similarity with a large group of known DPP-IV inhibitors.

  17. Antidiabetic and Antioxidant Effect of Cinnamon in poorly Controlled Type-2 Diabetic Iraqi Patients: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

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    Ahmed Salih Sahib

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Intake of 1g of cinnamon for 12 weeks reduces fasting blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin among poorly controlled type 2 diabetes patients, as well as, there is improvement in the oxidative stress markers, indicating the beneficial effect of adjuvant cinnamon as antidiabetic and antioxidant along with conventional medications to treat poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus. [J Complement Med Res 2016; 5(2.000: 108-113

  18. Anti-diabetic potentials of Momordica charantia and Andrographis paniculata and their effects on estrous cyclicity of alloxan-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, B A S; Bautista, N D; Tanquilut, N C; Anunciado, R V; Leung, A B; Sanchez, G C; Magtoto, R L; Castronuevo, P; Tsukamura, H; Maeda, K-I

    2006-04-21

    Momordica charantia and Andrographis paniculata are the commonly used herbs by the diabetic patients in Pampanga, Philippines. While the anti-diabetic potential of Momordica charantia is well established in streptozocin- or alloxan-induced diabetic animals, the anti-diabetic potential of Andrographis paniculata in alloxan-induced diabetic rat is not known. Neither the effects of these herbs on estrous cyclicity of alloxan-induced diabetic rats are elucidated. Thus, in these experiments, Momordica charantia fruit juice or Andrographis paniculata decoction was orally administered to alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Rats that were treated with Momordica charantia and Andrographis paniculata had higher body weight (BW) compared with diabetic positive control (P Momordica charantia and Andrographis paniculata-treated diabetic rats (5 days; P Momordica charantia and Andrographis paniculata could restore impaired estrous cycle in alloxan-induced diabetic rats.

  19. In vitro anti-diabetic effect and chemical component analysis of 29 essential oils products

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    Hsiu-Fang Yen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-nine commercial essential oil (EO products that were purchased from the Taiwan market, including three different company-made Melissa officinalis essential oils, were assayed on their glucose consumption activity and lipid accumulation activity on 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The EOs of M. officinalis were significantly active in both model assays. By contrast, EOs of peppermint, lavender, bergamot, cypress, niaouli nerolidol, geranium-rose, and revensara did not increase glucose consumption activity from media, but displayed inhibited lipid accumulation activity (65–90% of lipid accumulation vs. the control 100%. Because of the promising activity of M. officinalis EOs, three different products were collected and compared for their gas chromatography chemical profiles and bioactivity. The Western blot data suggest that the key factors of the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase/acetyl-CoA carboxylase pathway can be mediated by M. officinalis EOs. Together with biodata, gas chromatography–mass spectrometry profiles suggested mixtures of citrals and minor compounds of M. officinalis EOs may play an important role on effect of antidiabetes.

  20. In vitro characterization of Lactobacillus brevis KU15006, an isolate from kimchi, reveals anti-adhesion activity against foodborne pathogens and antidiabetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Sung-Ho; Jeon, Hye-Lin; Yang, Seo-Jin; Lee, Na-Kyoung; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the functional and probiotic properties of three lactic acid bacterial (LAB) strains isolated from kimchi. The selected LAB strains, which had potential probiotic functions, were identified by 16S rRNA sequence analysis as Lactobacillus brevis G1, L. brevis KU15006, and Lactobacillus curvatus KCCM 200173. All LAB strains were able to tolerate incubation at pH 2.5 with 0.3% pepsin for 3 h and with 0.3% Oxgall for 24 h and showed similar enzyme production levels, antimicrobial activities, and antibiotic susceptibilities. L. brevis G1 and KU15006 presented higher adhesion ability, auto-aggregation, and cell surface hydrophobicity than Lactobacillus rhamnosus KCTC 12202BP, a commercial strain used as positive control. All LAB strains showed 50-60% co-aggregation activity with selected foodborne pathogens. L. brevis KU15006 showed anti-adhesion activity against Escherichia coli and Salmonella Typhimurium. In addition, cell-free supernatant and cell-free extract from L. brevis KU15006 displayed the highest inhibitory activities against α-glucosidase. These results indicate that L. brevis KU15006 has the best properties, with pathogen antagonistic and antidiabetic activity, for use in probiotic products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Perioperative handling of antidiabetic drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, J; Luber, V; Lock, J F; Dietz, U A; Lichthardt, S; Matthes, N; Krajinovic, K; Germer, C-T; Knop, S; Wiegering, A

    2018-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most frequent metabolic disorder in the western world with a prevalence of 3% in adults under 65 years of age and 14.3% in adults over 65 years of age. Due to the increasing age of our population, the number of patients taking oral antidiabetic drugs has increased. Thus, operating physicians must make a risk-adapted decision whether the medication can be continued perioperatively or if certain drugs must be paused, and if so, with what risks. Operative interventions can lead to a number of metabolic shifts, which change the normal glucose metabolism. Hyperglycemia in the perioperative period is a risk factor for postoperative sepsis, dysfunction of the endothelium, cerebral ischemia and poor wound healing. Due to perioperative fasting oral antidiabetic medication can lead to severe hypoglycemia if taken during this period. This leads to an increased morbidity and mortality in the perioperative period and extends the duration of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) as well as the overall hospital stay. Oral antidiabetic medication should be paused on the day of the operation and restarted in line with the gradual postoperative return to solid food. Especially metformin, the most commonly used medication in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, should be paused perioperatively due to the severe side effect of lactate acidosis.

  2. Evaluation of Traditional Indian Antidiabetic Medicinal Plants for Human Pancreatic Amylase Inhibitory Effect In Vitro

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    Sudha Ponnusamy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic α-amylase inhibitors offer an effective strategy to lower the levels of post prandial hyperglycemia via control of starch breakdown. Eleven Ayurvedic Indian medicinal plants with known hypoglycemic properties were subjected to sequential solvent extraction and tested for α-amylase inhibition, in order to assess and evaluate their inhibitory potential on pancreatic α-amylase. Analysis of 91 extracts, showed that 10 exhibited strong Human Pancreatic Amylase (HPA inhibitory potential. Of these, 6 extracts showed concentration dependent inhibition with IC50 values, namely, cold and hot water extracts from Ficus bengalensis bark (4.4 and 125 μgmL-1, Syzygium cumini seeds (42.1 and 4.1 μgmL-1, isopropanol extracts of Cinnamomum verum leaves (1.0 μgmL-1 and Curcuma longa rhizome (0.16 μgmL-1. The other 4 extracts exhibited concentration independent inhibition, namely, methanol extract of Bixa orellana leaves (49 μgmL-1, isopropanol extract from Murraya koenigii leaves (127 μgmL-1, acetone extracts from C. longa rhizome (7.4 μgmL-1 and Tribulus terrestris seeds (511 μgmL-1. Thus, the probable mechanism of action of the above fractions is due to their inhibitory action on HPA, thereby reducing the rate of starch hydrolysis leading to lowered glucose levels. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of alkaloids, proteins, tannins, cardiac glycosides, flavonoids, saponins and steroids as probable inhibitory compounds.

  3. Effects of antidiabetic drugs on the incidence of macrovascular complications and mortality in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a new perspective on sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahelić, Dario; Javor, Eugen; Lucijanić, Tomo; Skelin, Marko

    2017-02-01

    Elevated hemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c ) values correlate with microvascular and macrovascular complications. Thus, patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are at an increased risk of developing macrovascular events. Treatment of T2DM should be based on a multifactorial approach because of its evidence regarding reduction of macrovascular complications and mortality in T2DM. It is well known that intensive glucose control reduces the risk of microvascular complications in T2DM, but the effects of antidiabetic drugs on macrovascular complications and mortality in T2DM are less clear. The results of recent trials have demonstrated clear evidence that empagliflozin and liraglutide reduce cardiovascular (CV) and all-cause mortality in T2DM, an effect that is absent in other members of antidiabetic drugs. Empagliflozin is a member of a novel class of antidiabetic drugs, the sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. Two ongoing randomized clinical trials involving other SGLT2 inhibitors, canagliflozin and dapagliflozin, will provide additional evidence of the beneficial effects of SGLT2 inhibitors in T2DM population. The aim of this paper is to systematically present the latest evidence regarding the usage of antidiabetic drugs, and the reduction of macrovascular complications and mortality. A special emphasis is put on the novel class of antidiabetic drugs, of SGLT2 inhibitors. Key messages Macrovascular complications and mortality are best clinical trial endpoints for evaluating the efficacy of antidiabetic drugs. The first antidiabetic drug that demonstrated a reduction in mortality in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) was empagliflozin, a sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor. SGLT2 inhibitors are novel class of antidiabetic drugs that play a promising role in the treatment of T2DM.

  4. Antidiabetic effects of the Cimicifuga racemosa extract Ze 450 in vitro and in vivo in ob/ob mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, C; Vickers, S P; Brammer, R; Cheetham, S C; Drewe, J

    2014-09-25

    It was the aim of the present experiments to examine potential antidiabetic effects of the Cimicifuga racemosa extract Ze 450. Ze 450 and some of its components (23-epi-26-deoxyactein, protopine and cimiracemoside C) were investigated in vitro for their effects on AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) compared to metformin in HepaRG cells. Ze 450 (given orally (PO) and intraperitonally (IP)), metformin (PO) and controls were given over 7 days to 68 male ob/ob mice. Glucose and insulin concentrations were measured at baseline and during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Ze 450 and its components activated AMPK to the same extent as metformin. In mice, Ze 450 (PO/IP) decreased significantly average daily and cumulative weight gain, average daily food and water intake, while metformin had no effect. In contrast to metformin, PO Ze 450 virtually did not change maximum glucose levels during OGTT, however, prolonged elimination. Ze 450 administered PO and IP decreased significantly post-stimulated insulin, whereas metformin did not. HOMA-IR index of insulin resistance improved significantly after IP and PO Ze 450 and slightly after metformin. In summary, the results demonstrate that Ze 450 reduced significantly body weight, plasma glucose, improved glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity in diabetic ob/ob mice. In vitro experiments suggest that part of the effects may be related to AMPK activation. Ze 450 may have utility in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. However, longer term studies in additional animal models or patients with disturbed glucose tolerance or diabetes may be of use to investigate this further. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic effects of ethanolic extract of leaves of Punica granatum in alloxan-induced non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Swarnamoni; Barman, Sarajita

    2012-03-01

    Punica granatum L., (Family: Punicaceae) is used in Indian Unani medicine for treatment of diabetes mellitus. Therefore, the present study was done to evaluate the antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic effects of ethanolic extract of leaves of P. granatum in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Healthy Wistar albino rats (100-150 g) were divided into four groups of six animals each. Groups A and B received normal saline [(10 ml/kg/day/per oral (p.o.)]; group C received ethanolic extract of leaves of P. granatum (500 mg/kg/p.o.); and group D received glibenclamide (0.5 mg/kg/day/p.o.). The extracts were given for 1 week in all groups. To induce diabetes, alloxan 150 mg/kg, intraperitoneal (i.p.) single dose was administered to groups B, C, and D. Blood glucose and serum lipids [Total Cholesterol (TC), Triglycerides (TG), Low Density Lipoproteins (LDL), and High Density Lipoproteins (HDL)] and the atherogenic index were estimated after one week. For mechanism of antidiabetic action glycogen estimation on the liver, cardiac and skeletal muscle, and intestinal glucose absorption was done. Group B showed a significant (Pgranatum leaves possess significant antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic activity.

  6. Antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic effects of ethanolic extract of leaves of Punica granatum in alloxan-induced non–insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus albino rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Swarnamoni; Barman, Sarajita

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Punica granatum L., (Family: Punicaceae) is used in Indian Unani medicine for treatment of diabetes mellitus. Therefore, the present study was done to evaluate the antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic effects of ethanolic extract of leaves of P. granatum in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: Healthy Wistar albino rats (100-150 g) were divided into four groups of six animals each. Groups A and B received normal saline [(10 ml/kg/day/per oral (p.o.)]; group C received ethanolic extract of leaves of P. granatum (500 mg/kg/p.o.); and group D received glibenclamide (0.5 mg/kg/day/p.o.). The extracts were given for 1 week in all groups. To induce diabetes, alloxan 150 mg/kg, intraperitoneal (i.p.) single dose was administered to groups B, C, and D. Blood glucose and serum lipids [Total Cholesterol (TC), Triglycerides (TG), Low Density Lipoproteins (LDL), and High Density Lipoproteins (HDL)] and the atherogenic index were estimated after one week. For mechanism of antidiabetic action glycogen estimation on the liver, cardiac and skeletal muscle, and intestinal glucose absorption was done. Results: Group B showed a significant (Pgranatum leaves possess significant antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic activity. PMID:22529479

  7. Phyto-constituents, Pharmacological Properties and Biotechnological Approaches for Conservation of the Anti-diabetic Functional Food Medicinal Plant Salacia: A Review Note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Bagnazari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Genus Salacia L. (Celastraceae is a woody climbing medicinal plant consisting of about 200 species with many endangered species located throughout the world’s tropical areas. Various parts of the plant as food, functional food additive and tea have been extensively used to treat a variety of ailments like diabetes and obesity as well as inflammatory and skin diseases. The present work reviews the phytochemical properties, pharmacological activities, biotechnological strategy for conservation and safety evaluation of this valuable genus.Results and Conclusion: More efforts are needed to isolate new phytoconstituents from this important medicinal plant. The  echanism of anti-diabetic action has not been done at molecular and cellular levels, thus the fundamental biological understanding is required for future applications. Though the safety of plant species has been well documented and has been confirmed by many toxicological studies, further toxicity research and clinical trials arerecommended. In order to sustain harvest and conservation, agronomic practices for cultivation have to be developed. Establishment of more efficient protocols for in vitro propagation is necessary too. Approaches like genetic manipulation, hairy root culture, media standardization, and use of inducers/precursors for elevation of secondary metabolite levels could also be attractive.Conflict of interest: The authors report no conflicts of interest.

  8. Yhhu4488, a novel GPR40 agonist, promotes GLP-1 secretion and exerts anti-diabetic effect in rodent models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dan-yang; Li, De-wen; Ning, Meng-meng; Dang, Xiang-yu; Zhang, Li-na; Zeng, Li-min; Hu, You-hong; Leng, Ying

    2015-10-30

    G protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40) is predominantly expressed in pancreatic β-cells and activated by long-chain fatty acids. GPR40 has drawn considerable interest as a potential therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) due to its important role in enhancing glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Encouragingly, GPR40 is also proven to be highly expressed in glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-producing enteroendocrine cells afterwards, which opens a potential role of GPR40 in enhancing GLP-1 secretion to exert additional anti-diabetic efficacy. In the present study, we discovered a novel GPR40 agonist, yhhu4488, which is structurally different from other reported GPR40 agonists. Yhhu4488 showed potent agonist activity with EC50 of 49.96 nM, 70.83 nM and 58.68 nM in HEK293 cells stably expressing human, rat and mouse GPR40, respectively. Yhhu4488 stimulated GLP-1 secretion from fetal rat intestinal cells (FRIC) via triggering endogenous calcium store mobilization and extracellular calcium influx. The effect of yhhu4488 on GLP-1 secretion was further confirmed in type 2 diabetic db/db mice. Yhhu4488 exhibited satisfactory potency in in vivo studies. Single administration of yhhu4488 improved glucose tolerance in SD rats. Chronic administration of yhhu4488 effectively decreased fasting blood glucose level, improved β-cell function and lipid homeostasis in type 2 diabetic ob/ob mice. Taken together, yhhu4488 is a novel GPR40 agonist that enhances GLP-1 secretion, improves metabolic control and β-cell function, suggesting its promising potential for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Biomolecular Characterization of Putative Antidiabetic Herbal Extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadlbauer, Verena; Haselgrübler, Renate; Lanzerstorfer, Peter; Plochberger, Birgit; Borgmann, Daniela; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Winkler, Stephan M.; Schröder, Klaus; Höglinger, Otmar; Weghuber, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Induction of GLUT4 translocation in the absence of insulin is considered a key concept to decrease elevated blood glucose levels in diabetics. Due to the lack of pharmaceuticals that specifically increase the uptake of glucose from the blood circuit, application of natural compounds might be an alternative strategy. However, the effects and mechanisms of action remain unknown for many of those substances. For this study we investigated extracts prepared from seven different plants, which have been reported to exhibit anti-diabetic effects, for their GLUT4 translocation inducing properties. Quantitation of GLUT4 translocation was determined by total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy in insulin sensitive CHO-K1 cells and adipocytes. Two extracts prepared from purslane (Portulaca oleracea) and tindora (Coccinia grandis) were found to induce GLUT4 translocation, accompanied by an increase of intracellular glucose concentrations. Our results indicate that the PI3K pathway is mainly responsible for the respective translocation process. Atomic force microscopy was used to prove complete plasma membrane insertion. Furthermore, this approach suggested a compound mediated distribution of GLUT4 molecules in the plasma membrane similar to insulin stimulated conditions. Utilizing a fluorescent actin marker, TIRF measurements indicated an impact of purslane and tindora on actin remodeling as observed in insulin treated cells. Finally, in-ovo experiments suggested a significant reduction of blood glucose levels under tindora and purslane treated conditions in a living organism. In conclusion, this study confirms the anti-diabetic properties of tindora and purslane, which stimulate GLUT4 translocation in an insulin-like manner. PMID:26820984

  10. Antidiabetic and antiulcer effects of extract of Eugenia jambolana seed in mild diabetic rats: study on gastric mucosal offensive acid-pepsin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Aditi; Bhawani, G; Agarwal, P K; Goel, Shalini; Singh, A; Goel, R K

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes has been reported to increase propensity to peptic ulceration through its effect both on offensive and defensive mucosal factors. Seeds of Eugenia jambolana (EJ) have been reported to have both antidiabetic as well as ulcer protective effects. The present study evaluates the antidiabetic effects of ethanolic extract of dried seed kernel of Eugenia jambolana (EJE) and its comparative effect on gastric ulceration and acid-pepsin secretion with standard antisecretory FL-blocker. Ranitidine and antidiabetic glibenclamide with a premise that Eugenia jambolana may show better ulcer healing effects by promoting defensive or reducing offensive mucosal factors in mild diabetes (MD) rats. MD was produced in adult rats by administration of streptozotocin (45 mg/kg, ip). EJE was given orally in the doses of 100-400 mg/kg for 10 days and in the dose of 200 mg/kg for 30 days respectively to study its dose- and time-dependent effects on various diabetic parameters like blood glucose, serum cholesterol and triglycerides, insulin level and glycosylated hemoglobin. For ulcer protective and gastric secretion studies, EJE (200 mg/kg) was given orally for 10 days against 2 h cold restraint stress (CRS)-, 4 h pylorus ligation (PL), aspirin (ASP, 200 mg/kg, 4 h)--and 95% ethanol (EtOH, 1 ml/200 g, 1 h)-induced gastric ulcers and offensive acid-pepsin secretion after 4 h PL with co-occurring MD in rats. EJE showed dose-dependent decrease in blood glucose level in MD rats. Blood glucose level remained stable in mild diabetic rats from 3rd day onwards after streptozotocin administration (taken as 1st day for treatment) and EJE (200 mg/kg) showed anti-hyperglycemic effect on 10th day of its administration. Further, EJE in the above dose also decreased cholesterol level with little or no effect on triglycerides level and reversed the decrease and increase in insulin and glycosylated hemoglobin level near to the normal level as observed alter 30 days treatment in MD rats. MD rats

  11. Effects of some anti-diabetic plants on the hepatic marker enzymes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was embarked upon in order to evaluate the effects of the chloroform extracts of the leaves of Psidium guajava, Anacardium occidentale and Eucalyptus globulus and fruits of Xylopia aethiopica on hepatic marker enzymes of diabetic rats. The degree of hepatic damage caused by diabetes mellitus and the effects ...

  12. Validation of the antidiabetic effects of Vernonia amygdalina delile leaf fractions in fortified diet-fed streptozotocin-treated rat model of type-2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Irobekhian Reuben Okoduwa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vernonia amygdalina (VA is used in the traditional management of diabetes in Nigeria. Previous scientific verification of VA is on Type-1 diabetes model, in spite of the continuous increase in Type-2 diabetes (T2D among adults. This study aimed to validate the antidiabetic effects of VA leaf fraction (VALF in a unique T2D rat model. Materials and Methods: Methanol crude extract of VA leaf was fractionated with solvents of increasing order of polarity (n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl-acetate, n- butanol and water. The antidiabetic activities of the fractions were evaluated in vivo in T2D model rats. Albino Wistar rats were induced with T2D and treated with the VALF. Several T2D-related parameters were measured. Results: T2D rats showed significant increase in serum levels of fasting blood glucose (FBG, liver and kidney biomarkers. At 28-day post-oral treatment with the VALF, FBG levels were significantly (P < 0.05 reduced (n- hexane [29.3%], chloroform [66.7%], ethyl acetate [36.2%], n- butanol [45.59%] and aqueous [39.3%]. The glucose tolerance ability was significantly improved in the chloroform fraction (Vernonia amygdalina chloroform fraction [VAc]-treated groups compared to the other fractions-treated group and diabetic control group. Furthermore, the VAc was found to be most effective as it ameliorates most of the alterations caused in the studied parameters in diabetic rats when compared with n- hexane, ethyl acetate, n- butanol and aqueous fractions. Conclusion: The study validates the anti-diabetic effects of VALF in fortified diet-fed streptozotocin-treated rat model of T2D, and suggests that the VAc is a potential candidate for development of a more effective drug for the management of T2D.

  13. Anti-diabetic effect of ethanol leaf extract of Cissampelos owariensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cissampelos owariensis (lungwort) is a medicinal plant used in Ayurveda for treating diseases. One of such disease is diabetes mellitus. In the present study, ethanol leaf extract of this plant was prepared, and phytochemical composition, acute toxicity, blood glucose lowering effect and improvement of body weight gain in ...

  14. Anti-diabetic and anti-oxidant effects of Zingiber Officinale on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to investigate the hypoglycaemic and anti-oxidant effects of Zingiber officinale on experimentally induced diabetes mellitus using alloxan and insulin resistance. Aqueous extracts of raw ginger was administered orally at a chosen dose of 500mg/ml for a period of 4 weeks to alloxan-induced diabetic ...

  15. Immunomodulatory effects of oral antidiabetic drugs in lymphocyte cultures from patients with type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Mello, Karina Faccio; Lunardelli, Adroaldo; Donadio, Márcio Vinícius Fagundes; Caberlon, Eduardo; Oliveira, Carmen Silvana Araújo de; Bastos, Carolina Maria Alves; Pires, Melissa Guerra Simões; Nunes, Fernanda Bordignon; Oliveira, Jarbas Rodrigues de

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE: It has been suggested that type 2 diabetes is an inflammatory response manifestation. The main drugs used to treat type 2 diabetes are sulphonylureas and biguanides. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the modulatory effects of oral hypoglycemic drugs (chlorpropamide and metformin) on lymphocyte proliferation in vitro and ex vivo. METHODS: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from human blood by gradient centrifugation. T-lymphocytes were stimulate...

  16. Anti-diabetic effect of Cyclo-His-Pro (CHP)-enriched yeast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was designed to investigate the hypoglycemic effects of the daily oral dose of 0.50 to 0.75 g/kg of yeast hydrolysate (YH) containing high Cyclo-His-Pro (51.0 mg CHP/g YH) on normal and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats for 14 days. In STZ-induced diabetic rats, after administrations of the YH for ...

  17. Report - Antidiabetic effects of native date fruit Aseel (Phoenix dactylifera L.) in normal and hyperglycemic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shadab; Khan, Rafeeq Alam; Jamil, Subia; Afroz, Syeda

    2017-09-01

    Change in dietary pattern, sedentary life style and increasing stresses are contributing factors for high prevalence of diabetes mellitus. Diabetic complications often lead to cardiovascular diseases, hypertension and hyperlipidemia that are the leading cause death and disability all over the world. Apart from pharmacotherapy, use of antihyperglycemic medicinal food is a new aspect in diabetes management and prevention of its complications. Phoenix dactylifera (date palm) has been traditionally used for different diseases because of the presence of bioactive agents like anthocyanin, phenols, sterols, carotenoids, procyanidins and flavonoids however its potential as a medicinal food is still unclear. Native date fruit variety Aseel oral suspension was evaluated using 32 normoglycemic and hyperglycemic Sprague dawley rats with two doses (300 and 600mg/kg) against control, disease control and standard drug (Glibenclamide 2.5mg/kg). Outcomes of normoglycemic studies reveals insignificant glucose lowering effects however hyperglycemic studies (glucose challenge and Alloxan inducted hyperglycemia) demonstrates significant glucose lowering effect of Aseel date especially with 300mg/kg dose. Data obtained during this study reveal significant anti-hyperglycemic effects of Aseel dates in diabetes management however further preclinical and clinical studies are required to verify the same.

  18. Anti-Diabetic Effects of CTB-APSL Fusion Protein in Type 2 Diabetic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlong Liu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To determine whether cholera toxin B subunit and active peptide from shark liver (CTB-APSL fusion protein plays a role in treatment of type 2 diabetic mice, the CTB-APSL gene was cloned and expressed in silkworm (Bombyx mori baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS, then the fusion protein was orally administrated at a dose of 100 mg/kg for five weeks in diabetic mice. The results demonstrated that the oral administration of CTB-APSL fusion protein can effectively reduce the levels of both fasting blood glucose (FBG and glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb, promote insulin secretion and improve insulin resistance, significantly improve lipid metabolism, reduce triglycerides (TG, total cholesterol (TC and low density lipoprotein (LDL levels and increase high density lipoprotein (HDL levels, as well as effectively improve the inflammatory response of type 2 diabetic mice through the reduction of the levels of inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interleukin-6 (IL-6. Histopathology shows that the fusion protein can significantly repair damaged pancreatic tissue in type 2 diabetic mice, significantly improve hepatic steatosis and hepatic cell cloudy swelling, reduce the content of lipid droplets in type 2 diabetic mice, effectively inhibit renal interstitial inflammatory cells invasion and improve renal tubular epithelial cell nucleus pyknosis, thus providing an experimental basis for the development of a new type of oral therapy for type 2 diabetes.

  19. Effectiveness and Safety of Newer Antidiabetic Medications for Ramadan Fasting Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudher Mikhael, Ehab

    2016-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is the most common side effects for most glucose-lowering therapies. It constitutes a serious risk that faces diabetic patients who fast during Ramadan (the 9th month in the Islamic calendar). New glucose-lowering classes like dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist (GLP-1 RA), and sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors are efficacious in controlling blood glucose level with less tendency to induce hypoglycemia and thus may constitute a good choice for diabetic patients during Ramadan. This study reviews the safety and efficacy of newer glucose-lowering therapies during Ramadan. This study was accomplished through a careful literature search about studies that assess the benefit and side effects of these new glucose-lowering therapies during Ramadan during September 2015. Vildagliptin, sitagliptin, liraglutide, exenatide, and dapagliflozin were the only studied glucose-lowering therapies. All of the studied newer glucose-lowering therapies except dapagliflozin were associated with reduced risk to induce hypoglycemia. Gastrointestinal upset was common with the usage of liraglutide while increased thirst sensation was common with dapagliflozin. In conclusion DPP-4 inhibitors such as vildagliptin and sitagliptin may form a suitable glucose-lowering therapy option for Ramadan fasting patients.

  20. Antidiabetic And Antioxidant Effects Of Parsley Extract (Petroselinum Crispum) On Diabetic Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, K.A.

    2011-01-01

    Parsley (Petroselinum crispum) is one of the medicinal herbs in Egypt. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of parsley (10 mg/kg/day) on diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in male albino rats with a single intraperitoneal injection of alloxan (150 mg/kg). The volatile compounds were separated by gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) for analysis of essential oils. The results showed that 18 compounds could be identified (natural antioxidants). Experimental rats were divided into four groups: control, diabetic, diabetic received parsley, and diabetic received irradiated parsley through gastric intubation for 4 weeks. A single administrative dose of alloxan (150 mg/kg) resulted in hyperglycemia, increase in AST, ALT, urea, creatinine, triglycerides, total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels and decrease in body weight, serum insulin, total protein and high density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels. Concurrent with those changes, an increased TBARS level was observed. This oxidative stress was related to a decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) levels of alloxan diabetic rats. Intake of parsley extract after diabetes ameliorated hyperglycemia, AST, ALT, body weight, total protein insulin and lipid profiles, and blunted the increase in TBARS and modulated the levels of SOD, CAT and GSH of alloxan treated rats. It could be concluded that parsley extract has a protective effect against hepatotoxicity caused by diabetes

  1. Effectiveness and Safety of Newer Antidiabetic Medications for Ramadan Fasting Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehab Mudher Mikhael

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoglycemia is the most common side effects for most glucose-lowering therapies. It constitutes a serious risk that faces diabetic patients who fast during Ramadan (the 9th month in the Islamic calendar. New glucose-lowering classes like dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitors, glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist (GLP-1 RA, and sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2 inhibitors are efficacious in controlling blood glucose level with less tendency to induce hypoglycemia and thus may constitute a good choice for diabetic patients during Ramadan. This study reviews the safety and efficacy of newer glucose-lowering therapies during Ramadan. This study was accomplished through a careful literature search about studies that assess the benefit and side effects of these new glucose-lowering therapies during Ramadan during September 2015. Vildagliptin, sitagliptin, liraglutide, exenatide, and dapagliflozin were the only studied glucose-lowering therapies. All of the studied newer glucose-lowering therapies except dapagliflozin were associated with reduced risk to induce hypoglycemia. Gastrointestinal upset was common with the usage of liraglutide while increased thirst sensation was common with dapagliflozin. In conclusion DPP-4 inhibitors such as vildagliptin and sitagliptin may form a suitable glucose-lowering therapy option for Ramadan fasting patients.

  2. Antidiabetic Effects of Yam (Dioscorea batatas) and Its Active Constituent, Allantoin, in a Rat Model of Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Hyeon-Kyu; Rahman, Md Mahbubur; Kim, Gi-Beum; Na, Chong-Sam; Song, Choon-Ho; Kim, Jin-Shang; Kim, Shang-Jin; Kang, Hyung-Sub

    2015-10-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the therapeutic efficacies of crude yam (Dioscorea batatas) powder (PY), water extract of yam (EY), and allantoin (the active constituent of yam) in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats with respect to glucose, insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), C-peptide, glycated hemoglobin (HbAlc), lipid metabolism, and oxidative stress. For this purpose, 50 rats were divided into five groups: normal control (NC), diabetic control (STZ), and STZ plus treatment groups (STZ + PY, STZ + EY, and STZ + allantoin). After treatment for one-month, there was a decrease in blood glucose: 385 ± 7 in STZ, 231 ± 3 in STZ + PY, 214 ± 11 in STZ + EY, and 243 ± 6 mg/dL in STZ + allantoin, respectively. There were significant statistical differences (p < 0.001) compared to STZ (100%): 60% in STZ + PY, 55% in STZ + EY, and 63% in STZ + allantoin. With groups in the same order, there were significant decreases (p < 0.001) in HbAlc (100% as 24.4 ± 0.6 ng/mL, 78%, 75%, and 77%), total cholesterol (100% as 122 ± 3 mg/dL, 70%, 67%, and 69%), and low-density lipoprotein (100% as 29 ± 1 mg/dL, 45%, 48%, and 38%). There were also significant increases (p < 0.001) in insulin (100% as 0.22 ± 0.00 ng/mL, 173%, 209%, and 177%), GLP-1 (100% as 18.4 ± 0.7 pmol/mL, 160%, 166%, and 162%), and C-peptide (100% as 2.56 ± 0.10 ng/mL, 129%, 132%, and 130%). The treatment effectively ameliorated antioxidant stress as shown by a significant decrease (p < 0.001) in malondialdehyde (100% as 7.25 ± 0.11 nmol/mL, 87%, 86%, and 85%) together with increases (p < 0.01) in superoxide dismutase (100% as 167 ± 6 IU/mL, 147%, 159%, and 145%) and reduced glutathione (100% as 167 ± 6 nmol/mL, 123%, 141%, and 140%). The results indicate that yam and allantoin have antidiabetic effects by modulating antioxidant activities, lipid profiles and by promoting the release of GLP-1, thereby improving the function of β-cells maintaining normal insulin and glucose

  3. Antidiabetic effects of Eucalyptus globulus on pancreatic islets: a stereological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudzadeh-Sagheb, H; Heidari, Z; Bokaeian, M; Moudi, B

    2010-05-01

    The leaves of Eucalyptus globulus (eucalyptus) are used for the treatment of diabetes mellitus in traditional medicine. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of eucalyptus on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced damage in pancreatic islands by stereological methods. Fifty mature normoglycaemic male Wistar rats, weighing 200-250 g, were selected and randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 10): control; STZ-induced diabetic (D) - by intraperitoneal injection of 60 mg/kg streptozotocin; treated control (TC); and treated diabetic (TD1, 2), respectively, received 20 and 62.5 g/kg of eucalyptus in their diet, and 2.5 g/L aqueous extract of eucalyptus in their drinking water from one week after induction of diabetes. After four weeks of the experiment, stereological estimation of volume density and total volume of islets and beta cells, volume-weighted mean islet volume, mass of the islets and pancreas, and total number of islets were carried out. Administration of eucalyptus significantly decreased the weight loss and increase of water and food intake in the treated diabetic groups in comparison to the STZ-induced diabetic (D) group. Volume density and total volume of islets, volume-weighted mean islet volume, mass of islets, and mass of pancreas of both treated diabetic groups were higher than the D group. In TD2, these stereological parameters increased significantly compared to the D group (p 0.05). The results suggested that Eucalyptus globulus with a dose-dependent manner ameliorates diabetic states by partial restoration of pancreatic beta cells and repair of STZ-induced damage in rats. This study suggests a beneficial effect of eucalyptus in the treatment of diabetes.

  4. Anti-diabetic effects of palm fruit juice in the Nile rat (Arvicanthis niloticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolsinger, Julia; Pronczuk, Andrzej; Sambanthamurthi, Ravigadevi; Hayes, K C

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing incidence of metabolic diseases, numerous bioactive phytochemicals have been proffered in the dietary prevention of these conditions. Palm fruit juice (PFJ) possesses bioactive phenolic compounds (referred to as oil palm phenolics; OPP) that may deter diabetes. The objective of the present experiments was to document the degree to which PFJ reduces diabetes symptoms in a variety of circumstances in the Nile rat (Arvicanthis niloticus), a novel model for carbohydrate-induced type 2 diabetes (type 2 diabetes mellitus; T2DM) and the metabolic syndrome. Wild-type male Nile rats (n 100) were fed laboratory chow or semi-purified diabetogenic diets in five experiments lasting 4-36 weeks. PFJ was provided as a drink or mixed into the diet to provide OPP intakes from 170 to 720 mg gallic acid equivalents/kg body weight per d. Body weight and random and fasting blood glucose were assessed at different time points, and were analysed along with terminal fasting organ weights, insulin, plasma and liver lipids as measures of diabetes progression. PFJ proved to be anti-hyperglycaemic and anti-lipaemic in all experiments relative to untreated controls, delaying T2DM onset and even reversing advancing diabetes. Protection by PFJ was directly related to its OPP content, and no negative effects on energy intake or growth were observed. PFJ was effective both as a drink and mixed into the diet. Results suggest that PFJ may slow the rate of glucose absorption, reduce insulin resistance and/or enhance insulin secretion.

  5. [Recombinant human gapM1 expressed in Pichia pastoris and its anti-diabetic effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Xiang; Du, Renqian; Li, Xi; Huang, Haiyan; Yu, Min; Tang, Qiqun

    2009-08-01

    Adiponectin is an adipokine predominantly synthesized and secreted by adipocytes in the white adipose tissue, and it can lower the blood glucose level and increase free fatty acid oxidation. In the current study, we developed the globular domain of adiponectin (gapM1) to treat type II diabetes. In both flask and fermentor, we cultivated Pichia pastoris expressing recombinant gapM1 and established the purification procedure by using gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. To evaluate the biological activity of recombinant gapM1, we used rat type II diabetes model fed high-fat diet in combination with low-dose STZ (Streptozocin) induction. We purified 200 mg gapM1 with purity of 96% from 10 liters of supernatant. The recombinant gapM1 significantly lowered blood glucose (34.2%), serum triglyceride (79.6%) and total cholesterol (62.1%) in type II diabetes induced rat. Therefore, the recombinant human gapM1 is successfully expressed in Pichia pastoris and effectively treated type II diabetes in rat models.

  6. PROTECTIVE EFFECT OF CAMEL MILK AS ANTI-DIABETIC SUPPLEMENT: BIOCHEMICAL, MOLECULAR AND IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Ahmed A; Nassan, Mohammed A; Saleh, Osama M; Soliman, Mohamed M

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes is a serious disease affects human health. Diabetes in advanced stages is accompanied by general weakness and alteration in fats and carbohydrates metabolism. Recently there are some scientific trends about the usage of camel milk (CM) in the treatment of diabetes and its associated alterations. CM contains vital active particles with insulin like action that cure diabetes and its complications but how these effects occur, still unclear. Seventy-five adult male rats of the albino type divided into five equal groups. Group 1 served as a negative control (C). Group 2 was supplemented with camel milk (CM). Diabetes was induced in the remaining groups (3, 4 and 5). Group 3 served as positive diabetic control (D). Group 4 served as diabetic and administered metformin (D+MET). Group 5 served as diabetes and supplemented with camel milk (D+CM). Camel milk was supplemented for two consecutive months. Serum glucose, leptin, insulin, liver, kidney, antioxidants, MDA and lipid profiles were assayed. Tissues from liver and adipose tissues were examined using RT-PCR analysis for the changes in mRNA expression of genes of carbohydrates and lipid metabolism. Pancreas and liver were used for immunohistochemical examination using specific antibodies. Camel milk supplementation ameliorated serum biochemical measurements that altered after diabetes induction. CM supplementation up-regulated mRNA expression of IRS-2 , PK , and FASN genes, while down-regulated the expression of CPT-1 to control mRNA expression level. CM did not affect the expression of PEPCK gene. On the other hand, metformin failed to reduce the expression of CPT-1 compared to camel milk administered rats. Immunohistochemical findings revealed that CM administration restored the immunostaining reactivity of insulin and GLUT-4 in the pancreas of diabetic rats. CM administration is of medical importance and helps physicians in the treatment of diabetes mellitus.

  7. The fatty acid-rich fraction of Eruca sativa (rocket salad) leaf extract exerts antidiabetic effects in cultured skeletal muscle, adipocytes and liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetta, Mona H; Owis, Asmaa I; Haddad, Pierre S; Eid, Hoda M

    2017-12-01

    Eruca sativa Mill. (Brassicaceae), commonly known as rocket salad, is a popular leafy-green vegetable with many health benefits. To evaluate the antidiabetic activities of this plant in major insulin-responsive tissues. Five E. sativa leaf extracts of varying polarity were prepared (aqueous extract, 70% and 95% ethanol extracts, the n-hexane-soluble fraction of the 95% ethanol extract (ES3) and the defatted 95% ethanol extract). Eruca sativa extracts were investigated through a variety of cell-based in vitro bioassays for antidiabetic activities in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells, H4IIE hepatocytes and 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Guided by the results of these bioassays, ES3 was fractionated into the saponifiable (SM) and the unspaonifiable (USM) fractions. Glucose uptake was measured using [ 3 H]-deoxy-glucose, while the effects on hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and adipogenesis were assessed using Wako AutoKit Glucose and AdipoRed assays, respectively. ES3 and its SM fraction significantly stimulated glucose uptake with EC 50 values of 8.0 and 5.8 μg/mL, respectively. Both extracts significantly inhibited G6Pase activity (IC 50 values of 4.8 and 9.3 μg/mL, respectively). Moreover, ES3 and SM showed significant adipogenic activities with EC 50 of 4.3 and 6.1 μg/mL, respectively. Fatty acid content of SM was identified by GC-MS. trans-Vaccenic and palmitoleic acids were the major unsaturated fatty acids, while palmitic and azelaic acids were the main saturated fatty acids. These findings indicate that ES3 and its fatty acid-rich fraction exhibit antidiabetic activities in insulin-responsive cell lines and may hence prove useful for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  8. Anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects of mazindol in yellow KK mice: its activating effect on brown adipose tissue thermogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, T; Umekawa, T; Wakabayashi, Y; Yoshimoto, K; Sakane, N; Kondo, M

    1996-01-01

    1. The anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects of mazindol were evaluated in obese diabetic yellow KK mice and C57Bl control mice. 2. The study compound was fed through a gastric tube at a rate of 1 or 2 mg/kg per day (0.01 mol/L HCl as control) for 2 weeks. The following parameters were compared in treated and control animals: bodyweight, food intake, white adipose tissue (WAT) weight, brown adipose tissue (BAT) weight and its thermogenesis, noradrenaline (NA) turnover, blood glucose and serum insulin levels and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4). 3. Furthermore, bodyweight loss of mice pair-fed the same amount of food as the mazindol-treated mice for 2 weeks was measured. 4. Mazindol significantly decreased food intake and significantly increased guanosine-5'-diphosphate-binding in BAT mitochondria and NA turnover in BAT in both yellow KK and C57Bl groups. The amounts of WAT in subcutaneous, mesenteric and retroperitoneal regions and bodyweights were significantly decreased in both groups. Bodyweight loss in mice pair fed with the mazindol-treated groups was approximately 70% compared with that in the mazindol-treated groups. Furthermore, mazindol decreased the levels of blood glucose and serum insulin during the glucose overloading test in yellow KK mice, but it did not influence the GLUT4 protein concentration in WAT and muscle. 5. These observations suggest that mazindol possesses both an anti-obesity action, due to the inhibition of appetite as well as the activation of BAT thermogenesis via increased NA turnover in BAT, and an anti-diabetic action. Consequently, mazindol may be useful for the treatment of obesity as well as non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in obese persons.

  9. Novel anti-diabetic effect of SCM-198 via inhibiting the hepatic NF-κB pathway in db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui; Xin, Hong; Liu, Xinhua; Xu, Yajun; Wen, Danyi; Zhang, Yahua; Zhu, Yi Zhun

    2012-04-01

    There are reports of early evidence that suggest the involvement of chronic low-grade inflammation in the pathogenesis of Type 2 diabetes. Thus, substances that have effects in reducing inflammation could be potential drugs for Type 2 diabetes. Leonurine (4-guanidino-n-butyl syringate; SCM-198) is an alkaloid in HL (Herba leonuri), which was reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. We hypothesize that SCM-198 may have beneficial effects on Type 2 diabetes. In the present study, we attempted to test this hypothesis by evaluating the anti-diabetic effect of SCM-198 and the possible underlying mechanisms of its effects in db/db mice. SCM-198 (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg of body weight), pioglitazone (50 mg/kg of body weight, as a positive control) or 1% CMC-Na (sodium carboxymethylcellulose) were administered to the db/db or db/m mice once daily for 3 weeks. After 3 weeks, SCM-198 (200 mg/kg of body weight) treatment significantly reduced the fasting blood glucose level and increased the plasma insulin concentration in the db/db mice, meanwhile it significantly lowered the plasma TAG (triacylglycerol) concentration and increased the HDL (high-density lipoprotein)-cholesterol concentration. Moreover, the dysregulated transcription of the hepatic glucose metabolic enzymes, including GK (glucokinase), G6Pase (glucose-6-phosphatase) and PEPCK (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase), was recovered by an Akt-dependent pathway. The pro-inflammatory mediators {such as TNFα (tumour necrosis factor α), IL (interleukin)-6, IL-1β, degradation of IκB [inhibitor of NF-κB (nuclear factor-κB)] α and thereafter activation of NF-κB} were reversed by SCM-198 treatment in the db/db mice. The present study provides first evidence that SCM-198 exhibits anti-inflammatory activity and has an ameliorating effect on diabetic symptoms via inhibiting of NF-κB/IKK (IκB kinase) pathway. Consequently, we suggest that SCM-198 may be a prospective agent for prevention and

  10. Antidiabetic Effects of a Chinese Herbal Medicinal Compound Sangguayin Preparation via PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway in db/db Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qichang Xing

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sangguayin (SGY, comprising four types of Chinese herbs, can be used as both food and medicine and has been clinically used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM for a long time. Our previous study demonstrated the antidiabetic effect of SGY in experimental T2DM rats fed with a high-fat diet and treated with a low dose of streptozotocin. However, its mechanism of action is questionable. In this study, we refined the traditional SGY decoction and investigated its antidiabetic activity in db/db mice. We evaluated the possible molecular mechanism using skeletal muscle tissues. The results show that the treatment with SGY preparation resulted in a decrease in the blood glucose, glycated serum protein, and blood lipid levels and an improvement in the glucose tolerance as well as insulin resistance. In addition, SGY preparation remarkably upregulated the expression of insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate-1, phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K, protein kinase B (Akt, and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4. Thus, SGY preparation is an effective agent for the treatment of T2DM, and its molecular mechanism may be related to the regulation of PI3K/Akt signaling in the skeletal muscle.

  11. Antidiabetic and Antihyperlipidemic Effects of Clitocybe nuda on Glucose Transporter 4 and AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphorylation in High-Fat-Fed Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Hsing Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the antihyperlipidemic and antihyperglycemic effects and mechanism of the extract of Clitocybe nuda (CNE, in high-fat- (HF- fed mice. C57BL/6J was randomly divided into two groups: the control (CON group was fed with a low-fat diet, whereas the experimental group was fed with a HF diet for 8 weeks. Then, the HF group was subdivided into five groups and was given orally CNE (including C1: 0.2, C2: 0.5, and C3: 1.0 g/kg/day extracts or rosiglitazone (Rosi or vehicle for 4 weeks. CNE effectively prevented HF-diet-induced increases in the levels of blood glucose, triglyceride, insulin (P<0.001, P<0.01, P<0.05, resp. and attenuated insulin resistance. By treatment with CNE, body weight gain, weights of white adipose tissue (WAT and hepatic triacylglycerol content were reduced; moreover, adipocytes in the visceral depots showed a reduction in size. By treatment with CNE, the protein contents of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4 were significantly increased in C3-treated group in the skeletal muscle. Furthermore, CNE reduces the hepatic expression of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase and glucose production. CNE significantly increases protein contents of phospho-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK in the skeletal muscle and adipose and liver tissues. Therefore, it is possible that the activation of AMPK by CNE leads to diminished gluconeogenesis in the liver and enhanced glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. It is shown that CNE exhibits hypolipidemic effect in HF-fed mice by increasing ATGL expression, which is known to help triglyceride to hydrolyze. Moreover, antidiabetic properties of CNE occurred as a result of decreased hepatic glucose production via G6Pase downregulation and improved insulin sensitization. Thus, amelioration of diabetic and dyslipidemic states by CNE in HF-fed mice occurred by regulation of GLUT4, G6Pase, ATGL, and AMPK phosphorylation.

  12. In vivo Investigation of Anti-diabetic Properties of Ripe Onion Juice in Normal and Streptozotocin-induced Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chul-Won; Lee, Hyung-Seok; Cha, Yong-Jun; Joo, Woo-Hong; Kang, Dae-Ook; Moon, Ja-Young

    2013-01-01

    The acute and subacute hypoglycemic and antihyperglycemic effects of drinkable ripe onion juice (Commercial product name is “Black Onion Extract”) were investigated in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. For tests of acute and subacute hypoglycemic effects, ripe onion juice (5 and 15 mL/kg b.w.) was administered by oral gavage to normal Sprague Dawley rats and measurements of fasting glucose levels and oral glucose tolerance tests were performed. Tolbutamide was used as a reference drug at a single oral dose of 250 mg/kg b.w. To test anti-hyper-glycemic activity, the ripe onion juice was administered to streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by oral gavage at single dose of 15 mL/kg b.w. per day for 7 consecutive days. Oral administration of the ripe onion juice at either dosed level of 5 or 15 mL/kg b.w. showed no remarkable acute hypoglycemic effect in normal rats. The two dosed levels caused a relatively small reduction, only 18% and 12% (5 and 15 mL/kg b.w., respectively) decrease in glucose levels at 2 h after glucose loading in normal rats. However, at 3 h after glucose loading, blood glucose levels in the ripe onion juice-dosed rats were decreased to the corresponding blood glucose level in tolbutamide-dosed rats. Although showing weak hypoglycemic potential compared to that of tolbutamide, oral administration of ripe onion juice (15 mL/kg b.w.) for a short period (8 days) resulted in a slight reduction in the blood glucose levels that had elevated in Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In conclusion, these results suggest that the commercial product “Black Onion Extract” may possess anti-hyperglycemic potential in diabetes. PMID:24471128

  13. Antidiabetic potential of Brachylaena discolor | Mellem | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The traditional African herbal medicinal system has many reports of anti-diabetic food plants with no known side effects. Such plants and their products have been widely prescribed for diabetic treatment with little known mechanistic basis of their functioning. Therefore, these natural products need to be ...

  14. Effect of sitagliptin on blood glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who are treatment naive or poorly responsive to existing antidiabetic drugs: the JAMP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakura, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Naotake; Sasamoto, Kazuo; Ohashi, Hiroshi; Hasumi, Sumiko; Ujihara, Noriko; Kasahara, Tadasu; Tomonaga, Osamu; Nunome, Hideo; Honda, Masashi; Iwamoto, Yasuhiko

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the ameliorating effect of sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, on blood glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were previously untreated with or who have a poor responsive to existing antidiabetic drugs. Sitagliptin (50 mg/day) was added on to the pre-existing therapy for type 2 diabetes and changes in the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level after 3 months of treatment were compared with the baseline and performed exploratory analysis. HbA1c levels were significantly decreased after 1 month of treatment compared to baseline, with a mean change in HbA1c level from baseline of -0.73% (range, -0.80 to -0.67) in the entire study population at 3 months. Patients who received a medium dose of glimepiride showed the least improvement in HbA1c levels. The percentage of patients who achieved an HbA1c level of blood glucose level of type 2 diabetes mellitus who were previously untreated with, or poorly responsive to, existing antidiabetic drugs. Thus, sitagliptin is expected to be useful in this patient group. However, the additional administration of sitagliptin in patients treated with medium-dose glimepiride only slightly improved blood glucose control when corrected for baseline HbA1c level.

  15. Absence of antidiabetic and hypolipidemic effect of Gymnema sylvestre in non-diabetic and alloxan-diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Galletto

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the antidiabetic and hypolipidemic potential of dried powdered leaves of Gymnema sylvestre (GS. The acute effect of GS administered by oral gavage on glucose blood level of and lipids in non-diabetic and alloxan-diabetic rats were investigated in the following conditions: a after a balanced meal; b after the ingestion of 1000 mg/kg amylose or 1000 mg/kg glucose; c after the ingestion of a mixture of 12 mL/kg soybean oil + 1% cholesterol (SOC. In addition, the effect of the treatment with GS during two (sub-acute or four weeks (chronic on body weight, food and water ingestion, glucose blood level and lipids in non-diabetic and alloxan-diabetic rats were measured. The dose of GS utilized in the majority of the experiments, i.e., 30 mg/kg, corresponds to that given to treat diabetes in Brazil. GS acutely did not influence the elevation of glycemia promoted by a balanced meal or by the administration of amylose or glucose; but promoted more intense (PNeste estudo foi investigado o potencial antidiabético e hipolipemiante da Gymnema sylvestre (GS. O efeito agudo da GS administrada via oral sobre a glicemia e lipidemia foi avaliado em ratos Wistar sob as seguintes condições: a após refeição balanceada; b após ingestão de 1000 mg de amylose ou 1000 mg/kg de glicose; c após ingestão de uma mistura de 12 mL/kg de óleo de soja + 1% de colesterol (OSC. Foi avaliado também o efeito do tratamento com GS durante duas (sub-agudo ou quatro semanas (crônico sobre o peso corporal, ingestão de água e alimento, glicemia e lipidemia em ratos não diabéticos e diabéticos induzidos com aloxana. A dose de GS utilizada na maioria dos experimentos (30 mg/kg corresponde a dose empregada para tratar diabetes no Brasil. A administração aguda de GS não influenciou a elevação da glicemia durante a refeição balanceada, administração de amilose ou glicose; mas intensificou a elevação da concentração sérica de lip

  16. Anti-diabetic effects of shubat in type 2 diabetic rats induced by combination of high-glucose-fat diet and low-dose streptozotocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaer, Tabusi; Yu, Lan; Zhang, Yi; Xiao, Xue-Jun; Nabi, Xin-Hua

    2015-07-01

    Shubat, probiotic fermented camel milk, has been used both as a drink with ethnic flavor and a medicine among Kazakh population for diabetic patients. Kazakh people have lower diabetic prevalence and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) than do other ethnic groups living in Xinjiang China, which might be related to the beneficial properties of shubat. We therefore prepared shubat in laboratory and tested anti-diabetic activity and evaluated its possible hypolipidemic and renoprotective effects in type 2 diabetic rats. Type 2 diabetic rats were induced by an administration of high-glucose-fat diet for 6 weeks and an intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 30mg/kg). Diabetic rats were divided randomly into four groups and treated for 28 days with sitagliptin (30mg/kg) or shubat (6.97×10(6) lactic acid bacteria+2.20×10(4) yeasts) CFU/mL, (6.97×10(7) lactic acid bacteria+2.20×10(5) yeasts) CFU/mL and (6.97×10(8) lactic acid bacteria+2.20×10(6) yeasts) CFU/mL. In addition, a normal control group and a diabetic control group were used for comparison. All drugs were given orally once daily 10mL/kg for 4 weeks. Fasting blood glucose (FBG) and body weight (BW) were measured before treatment and every week thereafter. Total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), serum creatinine (SCr), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), C-peptide, glycated hemoglobin (HbAlc), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels and pancreas tissue sections were tested after 4 weeks. Shubat demonstrated positive hypoglycemic activity on FBG, HbAlc, C-peptide and GLP-1 levels, high dose shubat decreased FBG (Pdiabetic controls. Histological analysis showed shubat protected the function of islets of type 2 diabetic rats. The results of this study indicate that shubat has significant hypoglycemic potential in T2D rats and may modulate lipid metabolism and protect renal function in the type 2 diabetic condition, which

  17. Antidiabetic and antioxidant potentials of spent turmeric oleoresin, a by-product from curcumin production industry

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    Suresh V Nampoothiri

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the antidiabetic and antioxidant activity of spent turmeric oleoresin (STO. Methods: Antidiabetic activity of STO evaluated by α - amylase and α - glucosidase enzyme inhibition assays. The antioxidant capacity studied by DPPH. , ABTS., superoxide radical scavenging and metal chelating activity methods. Results: The STO showed good antidiabetic activity by inhibiting key enzymes linked to type 2 diabetes, viz α -glucosidase and α -amylase with an IC50values of 0.71 and 0.16毺 g/mL respectively. The IC50 values for DPPH. and ABTS. assay were 58.1 and 33 毺 g/mL respectively. STO effectively scavenged the superoxide free radical with an IC50 value of 61.5毺 g/mL and showed a moderate iron chelation property. Conclusions: The above study reveals that the spent turmeric oleoresin being wasted at present can be used as antioxidant and antidiabetic agent in food and neutraceutical products.

  18. Anti-diabetic potential of Catharanthus roseus Linn. and its effect on the glucose transport gene (GLUT-2 and GLUT-4) in streptozotocin induced diabetic wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shaqha, Waleed M; Khan, Mohsin; Salam, Nasir; Azzi, Arezki; Chaudhary, Anis Ahmad

    2015-10-21

    Catharanthus roseus is an important Ayurvedic medication in traditional medicine. It is potentially used in countries like India, South Africa, China and Malaysia for the healing of diabetes mellitus. Although, the molecular mechanisms behind this effect are yet to be exclusively explored. Due to the great antidiabetic and hyperlipidemic potential of c. roseus, we hypothesized that the insulin mimetic effect of ethanolic extract of c. roseus might add to glucose uptake through improvement in the expression of genes of the glucose transporter (GLUT) family messenger RNA (mRNA) in liver. STZ-induced diabetic rats treated by ethanolic extract of c. roseus 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg; and one group treated with Metformin (100 mg/kg). After final administration of treatment of 4 weeks, blood samples were collected under fasting conditions, and the body weights (BWs) were measured. Total RNA from liver was extracted with the Qiagen RNEasy Micro kit (GERMANY) as described in the manufacturer's instructions. First-strand complementary DNA (cDNA) was synthesized at 40 °C by priming with oligo-dT12-18 (Invitrogen, USA) and using Super ScriptII reverse transcriptase according to the protocol provided by the manufacturer (Invitrogen, USA). Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplifications for GLUT-4 (gene ID: 25139) were conducted using Light-Cycler 480 (Roche, USA) with the SyBr® I nucleic acid stain (Invitrogen, USA) according to the manufacturer's instructions. Polymerase chain reaction products of β-actin primer gene were used as an internal standard. The proposed study was framed to look at the antidiabetic efficacy of ethanolic extract of c. roseus and an expression of GLUT-2 and GLUT-4 gene in streptozotocin induced diabetic wistar rats. The doses were administered orally at a rate of 100 and 200 mg/kg and detrain the glucose transport system in liver for 4 weeks. The observed results showed a good positive correlation between intracellular calcium and insulin

  19. Hypolipidemic and Antidiabetic Effects of Functional Rice Cookies in High-Fat Diet-Fed ICR Mice and db/db Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sun Hee; Woo, Minji; Kim, Mijeong; Song, Yeong Ok

    2018-02-23

    We have previously reported the lipid-lowering effects of a Korean rice cookie called dasik (RCD) in comparison with a western style cookie. In this study, Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill. (Chinese magnolia vine) fruit-supplemented RCD (SRCD) was added to a diet, and the hypolipidemic and antidiabetic effects of different diets were examined by using the ICR and db/db mouse models, respectively. ICR mice were fed the AIN-76 diet, or high-fat diet (HFD), or the RCD- or SRCD-supplemented HFD (10%, w/w) for 9 weeks (n = 7 per group). Compared with the RCD group, plasma and hepatic triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations were decreased in the SRCD group. Hepatic expressions for fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis were downregulated, whereas those for beta-oxidation and cholesterol export were upregulated (P RCD with respect to the suppression of lipid synthesis, oxidative stress, and inflammation and the improvement of glucose metabolism.

  20. Effect of bromocriptine-QR on glycemic control in subjects with uncontrolled hyperglycemia on one or two oral anti-diabetes agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinik, Aaron I; Cincotta, Anthony H; Scranton, Richard E; Bohannon, Nancy; Ezrokhi, Michael; Gaziano, J Michael

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the effect of Bromocriptine-QR on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes whose glycemia is poorly controlled on one or two oral anti-diabetes agents. Five hundred fifteen Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) subjects (ages 18 to 80 and average body mass index [BMI] of 32.7) with baseline HbA1c ≥ 7.5 and on one or two oral anti-diabetes (OAD) medications (metformin, sulfonylurea, and/or thiazolidinediones) were randomized 2:1 to bromocriptine-QR (1.6 to 4.8 mg/day) or placebo for a 24 week treatment period. Study investigators were allowed to adjust, if necessary, subject anti-diabetes medications during the study to attempt to achieve glycemic control in case of glycemic deterioration. The impact of bromocriptine-QR treatment intervention on glycemic control was assessed in subjects on any one or two OADs (ALL treatment category) (N = 515), or on metformin with or without another OAD (Met/OAD treatment category) (N = 356), or on metformin plus a sulfonylurea (Met/SU treatment category) (N = 245) 1) by examining the between group difference in change from baseline a) concomitant OAD medication changes during the study, and b) HbA1c and 2) by determining the odds of reaching HbA1c of ≤ 7.0% on bromocriptine-QR versus placebo. Significantly more patients (approximately 1.5 to 2-fold more; PQR arm. In subjects that did not change the intensity of the baseline diabetes therapy (72%), and that were on any one or two OADs (ALL), or on metformin with or without another OAD (Met/OAD), or on metformin plus sulfonylurea (Met/SU), the HbA1c change for bromocriptine-QR versus placebo was -0.47 versus +0.22 (between group delta of -0.69, PQR therapy for 24 weeks can provide significant added improvement in glycemic control relative to adding placebo.

  1. Anti-Diabetic Effects of Phenolic Extract from Rambutan Peels (Nephelium lappaceum) in High-Fat Diet and Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qingyu; Guo, Yan; Sun, Liping; Zhuang, Yongliang

    2017-07-26

    Recent studies have shown that rambutan peel phenolic (RPP) extract demonstrate high antioxidant and antiglycation activities in vitro and in vivo. This study further evaluated the anti-diabetic activity of RPP in a mouse model of Type II diabetes induced by streptozotocin combined with high-fat diet. Results showed that RPP increased the body weight and reduced the fasting blood glucose level of the diabetic mice. RPP significantly reduced the serum levels of total cholesterol, triglyceride, creatinine, and glycated serum protein in diabetic mice in a dose-dependent manner. Glycogen content in mice liver was recovered by RPP, which further increased the activity of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase and reduced lipid peroxidation in diabetic mice. Histological analysis showed that RPP effectively protected the tissue structure of the liver, kidney, and pancreas. In addition, RPP decreased the mesangial index and inhibited the expression of TGF-β in the kidney of diabetic mice.

  2. Anti-diabetic medications: How to make a choice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiker, Amir; Al Dubayee, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes is the third commonest chronic illness in children following asthma and epilepsy. More recently the overall prevalence of diabetes in children and adults continued to increase dramatically. In children, this has partially been contributed to by the pandemic of obesity. Understandably, this posed an economic burden on health authorities and countries dealing with significant morbidity of the disease with potentially serious complications. In parallel to this, more therapeutic discoveries expanded the list of choice for available medications. We hypothesize that specialist clinicians are requested by an authority to submit a report of prioritization for anti-diabetic drugs. The authority new policy is to purchase for only three of anti-diabetic medications among a long list of old and new drugs. We gave a recommendation here in response to this request based on different properties of these medications and also based on the largest known clinical trials in the field. Some may have a different choice for a third medication besides insulin and metformin and physicians in many clinical settings may have a choice of more than three at a time. However, we, at least, provide here a thorough review of these drugs, their mechanistic of action, benefits and side effects to facilitate a better choice for individual patients according to underlying pathophysiological cause, other medical needs and tolerance to different medications. Paediatricians are increasingly managing adolescents with type 2 diabetes these days. Hence, we wrote this review as a quick reference guide to anti-diabetic medications to which they might be less familiar.

  3. Bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) is a cornucopia of health: a review of its credited antidiabetic, anti-HIV, and antitumor properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, E F; Ng, T B

    2011-07-01

    Bitter gourd (Momordica charantia, BG) is both a nutritious and healthy food with a distinctive bitter flavor, and it is also widely exploited in folklore medicine. This review focuses on the efficacies and molecular mechanisms of BG-induced anti-diabetic, anti-HIV, and antitumor activities contributed by over twenty active components. The intent of this review is to provide comprehensive and valuable information for medicinal researchers, drug investigators, clinicians, and even patients with an interest in BG. In conclusion, BG is a cornucopia of health and it deserves in-depth investigations for clinical application in the future.

  4. Anti-diabetic effects of the acetone fraction of Senna singueana stem bark in a type 2 diabetes rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mohammed Auwal; Islam, M Shahidul

    2014-04-28

    Senna singueana is currently used in the traditional treatment of diabetes mellitus in Nigeria. The present study examined the anti-diabetic activity of the Senna singueana acetone fraction (SSAF) of stem bark in a type 2 diabetes (T2D) rat model. Crude ethyl acetate extract of the Senna singueana stem bark was fractionated with various solvents and the acetone fraction was selected for in vivo studies based on the high α-glucosidase and α-amylase inhibitory activities. In the in vivo study, male Sprague-Dawley rats were induced with T2D and treated with the SSAF at 150 and 300 mg/kg body weight. Several T2D-related parameters were measured in the study. After 4 weeks of intervention, non-fasting blood glucose concentrations were significantly decreased and the glucose tolerance ability was significantly improved in the SSAF treated groups compared to the diabetic control group. Serum insulin concentrations, pancreatic β-cell function (HOMA-β) and liver glycogen were significantly (Pdiabetic rats compared to the diabetic control group. Though insignificantly (P>0.05), other T2D-induced abnormalities such as food and fluid intake, body weight, serum lipids, serum fructosamine level and peripheral insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were also partially ameliorated by the SSAF treatment. Data of this study suggest that orally administered SSAF could ameliorate most of the T2D-induced abnormalities in a T2D model of rats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Oral Antidiabetic Agents and Cardiovascular Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pareek, Manan; Bhatt, Deepak L

    2018-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with type 2 diabetes; however, a direct protective effect of tight glycemic control remains unproven. In fact, until 2008, when concerns related to rosiglitazone prompted regulatory agencies to mandate assessment...... of cardiovascular safety of new antidiabetic agents, little was known about how these medications affected cardiovascular outcomes. Since then, there has been a considerable increase in the number of cardiovascular trials, which employ a noninferiority design and focus on high-risk populations to establish safety...... in the shortest time possible. In this article, we summarize the 4 major cardiovascular outcome trials of oral antidiabetic agents, completed so far. These include 3 dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (saxagliptin, alogliptin, and sitagliptin) and 1 sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitor (empagliflozin). We...

  6. In vitro evaluation of anti-diabetic activity and cytotoxicity of chemically analysed Ocimum basilicum extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadan, Sleman; Saad, Bashar; Sasson, Yoel; Zaid, Hilal

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4) in the anti-diabetic effects of methanol, hexane and dichloromethane extracts of the aerial parts of Ocimum basilicum (OB) and to analyze their phytochemical composition. Phytochemical analysis of the three extracts by GC/MS using the silylation derivatization technique revealed 53 compounds, 17 of them were found for the first time in OB. Cytotoxic and anti-diabetic properties of the extracts were evaluated using L6-GLUT4myc muscle cells stably expressing myc epitope at the exofacial loop (GLUT4). No cytotoxic effects were observed in treated cells up to 0.25 mg/ml extract as measured with MTT and LDH-leakage assays. GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane was elevated by 3.5 and 7 folds (-/+ insulin) after treatment with OB extracts for 20 h. Our findings suggest that the observed anti-diabetic properties of OB extracts are possibly mediated in part through one or more of the 17 new identified compound. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A comparative study of the antidiabetic effects exerted by live and dead multi-strain probiotics in the type 2 diabetes model of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangfei; Xu, Qi; Jiang, Tian; Fang, Shuguang; Wang, Gang; Zhao, Jianxin; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2016-12-07

    Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic syndrome characterized by insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency. In this study, the anti-diabetic effects of live and dead multi-strain probiotics were explored and compared in a high-fat and streptozotocin-induced model of type 2 diabetes in mice. Either live or dead probiotics were daily administered orally to the mice over 10 weeks. Both live and dead multi-strain probiotics reduced HbA1C and leptin levels, improved glucose tolerance, and protected against the impairment of the pancreas, while the live probiotic showed a greater ability to reduce fasting and postprandial blood glucose levels. In addition, the live multi-strain probiotic exerted the beneficial effect of ameliorating insulin resistance. This effect was associated with the gut microbiota, butyrate production, and the inflammatory response, and was more effective for the live probiotic than the dead probiotic. These findings showed that the viable probiotic more effectively relieved hypoglycemic symptoms in the host by ameliorating insulin resistance. Furthermore, a pathway related to insulin resistance, i.e., the gut microbiota-butyrate-inflammatory axis, provided a promising rationale for further research into preventing or treating type 2 diabetes.

  8. Anti-Diabetic Effects of Jiang Tang Xiao Ke Granule via PI3K/Akt Signalling Pathway in Type 2 Diabetes KKAy Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Yu

    Full Text Available Jiang Tang Xiao Ke (JTXK granule, a Chinese herbal formula, has been used clinically to treat type 2 diabetes (T2DM for decades. Our previous studies showed that JTXK granule exhibited anti-diabetic and anti-oxidative functions in experimental diabetic rats induced by a high fat diet and streptozotocin. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Herein, we aimed to investigate the therapeutic effect of JTXK granule on T2DM KKAy mice and the possible associations with skeletal muscle in the current study. Our results showed that JTXK granule significantly reduced food intake and body weight in T2DM KKAy mice. JTXK granule treatment also decreased the blood glucose and HbA1c levels and increased the insulin sensitivity in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, it ameliorated hyperlipidaemia and induced a lower free fatty acid level, displaying an effect on disorders of lipid metabolism. JTXK granule significantly increased the expression of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K, protein kinase B (PKB/Akt and glucose transporter 4 (Glut4 and decreased the expression of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β. We concluded that JTXK granule is an effective drug for T2DM through regulating the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway in skeletal muscle.

  9. Anti-diabetic effects of Inonotus obliquus polysaccharides-chromium (III) complex in type 2 diabetic mice and its sub-acute toxicity evaluation in normal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Chen, Zhongqin; Pan, Yuxiang; Gao, Xudong; Chen, Haixia

    2017-10-01

    Polysaccharides are important bioactive ingredients from Inonotus obliquus. This study aimed to synthesize and characterize a novel I. obliquus polysaccharides-chromium (III) complex (UIOPC) and investigate the anti-diabetic effects in streptozotocin (STZ) induced type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) mice and sub-acute toxicity in normal mice. The molecular weight of UIOPC was about 11.5 × 10 4  Da with the chromium content was 13.01% and the chromium was linked with polysaccharides through coordination bond. After treatment of UIOPC for four weeks, the body weight, fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels, plasma insulin levels of the diabetic mice were significantly reduced when compared with those of the diabetic mice (p < 0.05). The results on serum profiles and antioxidant enzymes activities revealed that UIOPC had a positive effect on hypoglycemic and antioxidant ability. Histopathology results showed that UIOPC could effectively alleviate the STZ-lesioned tissues in diabetic mice. Furthermore, high dose administration of UIOPC had no obviously influence on serum profiles levels and antioxidant ability of the normal mice and the organ tissues maintained organized and integrity in the sub-acute toxicity study. These results suggested that UIOPC might be a good candidate for the functional food or pharmaceuticals in the treatment of T2DM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Anti-diabetic effect of dietary mango (Mangifera indica L.) peel in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondi, Mahendranath; Basha, Shaik Akbar; Bhaskar, Jamuna J; Salimath, Paramahans V; Rao, Ummiti J S Prasada

    2015-03-30

    In the present study, the composition of mango peel powder (MPP) collected from the mango pulp industry was determined and the effect of MPP on ameliorating diabetes and its associated complications was studied. Mango peel was rich in polyphenols, carotenoids and dietary fibre. Peel extract contained various bioactive compounds and was found to be rich in soluble dietary fibre. Peel extract exhibited antioxidant properties and protected against DNA damage. Therefore, the effect of peel on ameliorating diabetes was investigated in a rat model of diabetes. A significant increase in urine sugar, urine volume, fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides and low density lipoprotein, and decrease in high density lipoprotein were observed in the rats; however, these parameters were ameliorated in diabetic rats fed with diet supplemented with mango peel at 5% and 10% levels in basal diet. Treatment of diabetic rats with MPP increased antioxidant enzyme activities and decreased lipid peroxidation in plasma, kidney and liver compared to untreated diabetic rats. Glomerular filtration rate and microalbuminuria levels were ameliorated in MPP treated diabetic group. Mango peel, a by-product, can be used as an ingredient in functional and therapeutic foods. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Extracts of Coreopsis tinctoria Nutt. Flower Exhibit Antidiabetic Effects via the Inhibition of α-Glucosidase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wujie Cai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assay the effects of Coreopsis tinctoria Nutt. flower extracts on hyperglycemia of diet-induced obese mice and the underlying mechanisms. Coreopsis tinctoria flower was extracted with ethanol and water, respectively. The total phenol, flavonoid levels, and the constituents of the extracts were measured. For the animal experiments, C57BL/6 mice were fed with a chow diet, high-fat diet, or high-fat diet mixed with 0.4% (w/w water and ethanol extracts of Coreopsis tinctoria flower for 8 weeks. The inhibitory effects of the extracts on α-glucosidase activity and the antioxidant properties were assayed in vitro. We found that the extracts blocked the increase of fasting blood glucose, serum triglyceride (TG, insulin, leptin, and liver lipid levels and prevented the development of glucose tolerance impairment and insulin resistance in the C57BL/6 mice induced by a high-fat diet. The extracts inhibited α-glycosidase activity and increased oxidant activity in vitro. In conclusion, Coreopsis tinctoria flower extracts may ameliorate high-fat diet-induced hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. The underling mechanism may be via the inhibition of α-glucosidase activity. Our data indicate that Coreopsis tinctoria flower could be used as a beverage supplement and a potential source of drugs for treatment of diabetics.

  12. Anti-Diabetic Effects of the Ethyl-Acetate Fraction of Trichilia catigua in Streptozo-tocin-Induced Type 1 Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Mello Gomes

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Trichilia catigua A. Juss., known as “catuaba” in Brazil, has been popularly used as a tonic for fatigue, impotence and memory deficits. Previously, our group demonstrated that the ethyl-acetate fraction (EAF of T. catigua has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. The present study evaluated the anti-diabetic activity of EAF in type 1 diabetic rats. Methods: Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups (N: non-diabetic group, D: type 1 diabetic group, NC: non-diabetic + EAF group and DC: type 1 diabetic + EAF group. The latter two groups were treated with 200 mg/kg EAF. Type 1 diabetes was induced by intravenous streptozotocin (STZ injection (35 mg/kg. Starting two days after STZ injection, EAF was administered daily by gavage for 8 weeks. Results: EAF attenuated body mass loss and reduced food and water intake. EAF improved hyperglycaemia and other biochemical parameters, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP, alanine aminotransferase (ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST. Furthermore, the number of pancreatic β-cells and the size of the islets had increased by β-cell proliferation in the DC group. EAF promoted reduction in kidney tissue damage in STZ-induced diabetic rats by reduction of renal fibrosis. Conclusion: The present study showed that EAF improves glucose homeostasis and endocrine pancreas morphology and inhibits the development of diabetic nephropathy in STZ-induced diabetic rats.

  13. Anti-diabetic effect of balanced deep-sea water and its mode of action in high-fat diet induced diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Byung Geun; Shin, Eun Ji; Park, Jung-Eun; Shon, Yun Hee

    2013-10-29

    In this study, we investigated the effects of balanced deep-sea water (BDSW) on hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced diabetic C57BL/6J mice. BDSW was prepared by mixing deep-sea water (DSW) mineral extracts and desalinated water to give a final hardness of 500-2000. Mice given an HFD with BDSW showed lowered fasting plasma glucose levels compared to HFD-fed mice. Oral and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests showed that BDSW improves impaired glucose tolerance in HFD-fed mice. Histopathological evaluation of the pancreas showed that BDSW recovers the size of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans, and increases the secretion of insulin and glucagon in HFD-fed mice. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction results revealed that the expression of hepatic genes involved in glucogenesis, glycogenolysis and glucose oxidation were suppressed, while those in glucose uptake, β-oxidation, and glucose oxidation in muscle were increased in mice fed HFD with BDSW. BDSW increased AMP-dependent kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in 3T3-L1 pre- and mature adipocytes and improved impaired AMPK phosphorylation in the muscles and livers of HFD-induced diabetic mice. BDSW stimulated phosphoinositol-3-kinase and AMPK pathway-mediated glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Taken together, these results suggest that BDSW has potential as an anti-diabetic agent, given its ability to suppress hyperglycemia and improve glucose intolerance by increasing glucose uptake.

  14. Antidiabetic Effect of Tibetan Medicine Tang-Kang-Fu-San on High-Fat Diet and Streptozotocin-Induced Type 2 Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailu Duan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the antidiabetic effects of a Tibetan medicine, Tang-Kang-Fu-San (TKFS, on experimental type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM rats and to explore its underlying mechanisms. Firstly two major chemical compositions of TKFS, gallic acid and curcumin, were characterized by HPLC fingerprint analysis. Next T2DM in rats was induced by high-fat diet and a low-dose streptozotocin (STZ 35 mg/kg. Then oral gavage administration of three different doses of TKFS (0.3 g/kg, 0.6 g/kg, and 1.2 g/kg was given to T2DM rats. Experimental results showed that TKFS dramatically reduced the levels of fasting blood glucose, fasting blood insulin, triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol, even though it did not alter the animal body weight. The downregulation of phosphorylation-AKT (p-AKT and glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4 in skeletal muscle of T2DM rats was restored and abnormal pathological changes in pancreas tissues were also improved. Our work showed that TKFS could alleviate diabetic syndromes, maintain the glucose homeostasis, and protect against insulin resistance in T2DM rats, and the improvement of AKT phosphorylation and GLUT4 translocation in skeletal muscle would be one of its possible underlying mechanisms.

  15. Anti-diabetic effects of hydroalcohlic juglans regia male flower extract on blood glucose level and on liver enzymes activity in intact and diabetogenized adult male rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Ebrahim Hosseini

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Diabetes is a metabolic disorder resulting from defects in insulin secretion or function. Walnut is a nutrient used in traditional medicine to treat diabetes. In the current study, anti-diabetic effects of the Hydroalcoholic extract of walnut male flowers on diabetogenized rats by using Streptozocin were evaluated.   Materials and Methods: Seventy two adult male Wistar rats weighing 200-225 g each were randomly selected and divided into three main groups, i.e. control, diabetic, and non-diabetic(intact The control group included 8 rats (n=8. The diabetic and non-diabetic groups covered 32 rats each. Each of these groups were divided into four 8 rats including the control, diabetic, experimental 1, 2, and 3 which received 2, 4, or 6 g/kg of the extract per day for 15 days ,respectively. The three diabetic groups were each treated with the above doses of the extract, and the fourth group received no treatment. Diabetes was induced in diabetic rats through intraperitoneal injection of 60 mg/kg of Streptozotocin. At the end, blood samples were taken from the experimental and control groups and the serum levels of insulin and glucose were measured.   Results: A significant reduction in blood sugar and increase of insulin in diabetics receiving Hydroalcoholic extract of male flowers walnut was observed compared with non-diabetic ones.   Conclusion: Hydroalcoholic extract of male Walnut flowers, due to increasing insulin, causes reduction of blood sugar.

  16. Oxidative/Nitrosative Stress and Protein Damages in Aqueous Humor of Hyperglycemic Rabbits: Effects of Two Oral Antidiabetics, Pioglitazone and Repaglinide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Gumieniczek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to determine oxidative/nitrosative stress in aqueous humor of alloxan-induced hyperglycemic rabbits and to investigate the effects of two oral antidiabetic drugs, pioglitazone from peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ agonists and repaglinide from nonsulfonylurea KATP channel blockers. Ascorbic acid (AA, glutathione (GSH, total antioxidant status (TAS, lipid peroxidation products (LPO, total nitrites (NO2, advanced oxidized protein products (AOPP, and protein carbonyl groups (PCG were determined using respective colorimetric and ELISA methods. In our hyperglycemic animals, AA decreased by 77%, GSH by 45%, and TAS by 66% as compared to control animals. Simultaneously, LPO increased by 78%, PCG by 60%, AOPP by 84%, and NO2 by 70%. In pioglitazone-treated animals, AA and TAS increased above control values while GSH and PCG were normalized. In turn, LPO was reduced by 54%, AOPP by 84%, and NO2 by 24%, in relation to hyperglycemic rabbits. With repaglinide, AA and TAS were normalized, GSH increased by 20%, while LPO decreased by 45%. Our results show that pioglitazone and repaglinide differ significantly in their ability to ameliorate the parameters like NO2, PCG, and AOPP. In this area, the multimodal action of pioglitazone as PPARγ agonist is probably essential.

  17. Harnessing the potential clinical use of medicinal plants as anti-diabetic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell-Tofte JI

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Joan IA Campbell-Tofte,1 Per Mølgaard,2 Kaj Winther11Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Frederiksberg University Hospital, Frederiksberg, Denmark; 2Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, DenmarkAbstract: Diabetes is a metabolic disorder arising from complex interactions between multiple genetic and/or environmental factors. The characteristic high blood sugar levels result from either lack of the hormone insulin (type 1 diabetes, T1D, or because body tissues do not respond to the hormone (type 2 diabetes, T2D. T1D patients currently need exogenous insulin for life, while for T2D patients who do not respond to diet and exercise regimes, oral anti-diabetic drugs (OADs and sometimes insulin are administered to help keep their blood glucose as normal as possible. As neither the administration of insulin nor OADs is curative, many patients develop tissue degenerative processes that result in life-threatening diabetes comorbidities. Several surveys of medicinal plants used as anti-diabetic agents amongst different peoples have been published. Some of this interest is driven by the ongoing diabetes pandemic coupled with the inadequacies associated with the current state of-the-art care and management of the syndrome. However, there is a huge cleft between traditional medicine and modern (Western medicine, with the latter understandably demanding meaningful and scientific validation of anecdotal evidence for acceptance of the former. The main problems for clinical evaluation of medicinal plants with promising anti-diabetic properties reside both with the complexity of components of the plant materials and with the lack of full understanding of the diabetes disease etiology. This review is therefore focused on why research activities involving an integration of Systems Biology-based technologies of pharmacogenomics, metabolomics, and bioinformatics with standard clinical data

  18. Arylalkylamine vanadium salts as new anti-diabetic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzano, Antonio; Palacín, Manuel; Marti, Luc; García-Vicente, Silvia

    2009-04-01

    Vanadium compounds show insulin-like effects in vivo and in vitro. Several clinical studies have shown the efficacy of vanadium compounds in type 2 diabetic subjects. However, a major concern is safety, which calls for the development of more potent vanadium compounds. For that reason different laboratories develop strategies to decrease the therapeutic dose of vanadate. One of these strategies use substrates of semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO)/vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1), a bifunctional protein with amine oxidase activity and adhesive properties implicated in lymphocyte homing at inflammation sites. Substrates of SSAO combined with low concentrations of vanadate strongly stimulate glucose transport and GLUT4 glucose transporter recruitment to the plasma membrane in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and in rat adipocytes. This combination also shows anti-diabetic effects in various animal models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Benzylamine/vanadate administration generates peroxovanadium locally in pancreatic islets, which stimulates insulin secretion, and also produces peroxovanadium in adipose tissue, thereby activating glucose metabolism in adipocytes and in neighboring muscle. This opens up the possibility of using the SSAO/VAP-1 activity as a local generator of protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors in anti-diabetic therapy. More recently a novel class of arylalkylaminevanadium salts have shown potent insulin-mimetic effects downstream of the insulin receptor. Administration of these compounds lowers glycemia and normalizes the plasma lipid profile in type 1 and type 2 models of diabetes. The combination of different approaches to decrease vanadium doses, among them chelating agents and SSAO substrates, should permit to develop safe and efficient vanadium based agents safe for diabetes treatment.

  19. Carbon dots for fluorescent detection of α-glucosidase activity using enzyme activated inner filter effect and its application to anti-diabetic drug discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Weiheng [Key Laboratory of Life-Organic Analysis of Shandong Province, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Wu, Di [School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Xia, Lian [Key Laboratory of Life-Organic Analysis of Shandong Province, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Chen, Xuefeng [School of Food and Biological Engineering, Shaanxi University of Science & Technology, Xian 710021 (China); Li, Guoliang, E-mail: 61254368@163.com [School of Food and Biological Engineering, Shaanxi University of Science & Technology, Xian 710021 (China); Key Laboratory of Life-Organic Analysis of Shandong Province, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Key Laboratory of Food Safety Risk Assessment, Ministry of Health, China National Centre for Food Safety Risk Assessment, Beijing 100021 (China); Qiu, Nannan [Key Laboratory of Food Safety Risk Assessment, Ministry of Health, China National Centre for Food Safety Risk Assessment, Beijing 100021 (China); Chen, Guang; Sun, Zhiwei; You, Jinmao [Key Laboratory of Life-Organic Analysis of Shandong Province, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Wu, Yongning, E-mail: wuyongning@cfsa.net.cn [Key Laboratory of Food Safety Risk Assessment, Ministry of Health, China National Centre for Food Safety Risk Assessment, Beijing 100021 (China)

    2017-06-22

    Recently, α-glucosidase inhibitor has been widely used in clinic for diabetic therapy. In the present study, a facile and sensitive fluorescent assay based on enzyme activated inner filter effect (IFE) on nitrogen-doped carbon dots (CDs) was first developed for the detection of α-glucosidase. The N-doped CDs with green emission were prepared by a one-step hydrothermal synthesis and gave the fluorescence quantum yield of 30%, which were used as the signal output. Through α-glucosidase catalysis, 4-nitrophenol was released from 4-nitrophenyl-α-D-glucopyranoside (NGP). Interestingly, the absorption of 4-nitrophenol and the excitation of CDs were completely overlapping. Due to its great molar absorptivity, 4-nitrophenol was capable of acting as a powerful absorber to affect the fluorescent signal of CDs (i.e. IFE). By converting the absorption signals into fluorescence signals, the facile fluorescence assay strategy could be realized for α-glucosidase activity sensing, which effectively avoided the complex modification of the surface of CDs or construction of the nanoprobes. The established IFE-based sensing platform offered a low detection limit of 0.01 U/mL (S/N = 3). This proposed sensing approach has also been expanded to the inhibitor screening and showed excellent applicability. As a typical α-glucosidase inhibitor, acarbose was investigated with a low detection limit of 10{sup −8} M. This developed method enjoyed many merits including simplicity, lost cost, high sensitivity, good reproducibility and excellent selectivity, which also provided a new insight on the application of CDs to develop the facile and sensitive biosensor. - Highlights: • Green N-doped CDs were first prepared by a facile synthesis process. • IFE-based sensor without covalent linking or surface modifications was developed. • The method was successfully applied to α-glucosidase detection. • The method can be employed for sensitive screening of anti-diabetes drugs.

  20. Anti-diabetic and antioxidant effect of cinnamon in poorly controlled type-2 diabetic Iraqi patients: A randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahib, Ahmed Salih

    2016-01-01

    To determine the effect of cinnamon on fasting blood glucose, hemoglobin (Hb) A1c, and oxidative stress markers in poorly controlled type 2 diabetes. A total of 25 type 2 diabetic patients of both sexes, aged 49.1 ± 6.0, treated only with hypoglycemic agent sulfonylurea (glibenclamide) were randomly assigned to receive either 1 g of cinnamon or placebo daily for 12 weeks. A highly significant (P ≤ 0.001) reduction (10.12%) of fasting blood glucose level after 6 and 12 weeks of treatment 10.12% and 17.4%, respectively, compared to baseline value and to placebo group at corresponding duration. Meanwhile, the value of glycosylated Hb reduced in cinnamon treated group by (2.625%) and (8.25%) after 6 and 12 weeks, respectively, although this reduction was non-significant compared to baseline value. Concerning the oxidative stress markers, the level of serum glutathione showed highly significant (P ≤ 0.001) elevation after 12 weeks as compared to baseline value and placebo group at corresponding duration, malondialdehyde serum level decreased after treatment of diabetic patients with cinnamon resulted in highly significant (P ≤ 0.001) reduction after 6 and 12 weeks compared to placebo group, but when compared to baseline value, there is a (15%) reduction only after 12 weeks of treatment which was considered highly significant (P ≤ 0.001) change, Finally, administration of cinnamon to diabetic patients for 12 weeks resulted in significant (P ≤ 0.05) elevation of superoxide dismutase level. Intake of 1 g of cinnamon for 12 weeks reduces fasting blood glucose and glycosylated Hb among poorly controlled type 2 diabetes patients, as well as, there is improvement in the oxidative stress markers, indicating the beneficial effect of adjuvant cinnamon as anti-diabetic and antioxidant along with conventional medications to treat poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  1. Blood glucose lowering effect of aqueous extract of Graptophyllum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was aimed at evaluating the claimed anti-diabetic property of the aqueous extract of Graptophyllum pictum leaf and to establish an effective dose for the extract. It also attempted to unravel if the extract could be acutely toxic to mice. The anti-diabetic study was carried out on alloxan-induced diabetic Wistar rats.

  2. Antidiabetic Effect of Fresh Nopal (Opuntia ficus-indica in Low-Dose Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats Fed a High-Fat Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Hwan Hwang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate α-glucosidase inhibitory and antidiabetic effects of Nopal water extract (NPWE and Nopal dry power (NADP in low-dose streptozotocin- (STZ- induced diabetic rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD. The type 2 diabetic rat model was induced by HFD and low-dose STZ. The rats were divided into four groups as follows: (1 nondiabetic rats fed a regular diet (RD-Control; (2 low-dose STZ-induced diabetic rats fed HFD (HF-STZ-Control; (3 low-dose STZ-induced diabetic rats fed HFD and supplemented with NPWE (100 mg/kg body weight, HF-STZ-NPWE; and (4 low-dose STZ-induced diabetic rats fed HFD and supplemented with comparison medication (rosiglitazone, 10 mg/kg, body weight, HF-STZ-Rosiglitazone. In results, NPWE and NADP had IC50 values of 67.33 and 86.68 μg/mL, both of which exhibit inhibitory activities but lower than that of acarbose (38.05 μg/mL while NPWE group significantly decreased blood glucose levels compared to control and NPDP group on glucose tolerance in the high-fat diet fed rats model (P<0.05. Also, the blood glucose levels of HR-STZ-NPWE group were significantly lower (P<0.05 than HR-STZ-Control group on low-dose STZ-induced diabetic rats fed HFD. Based on these findings, we suggested that NPWE could be considered for the prevention and/or treatment of blood glucose and a potential use as a dietary supplement.

  3. Antidiabetic Effect of Fresh Nopal (Opuntia ficus-indica) in Low-Dose Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats Fed a High-Fat Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Seung Hwan; Kang, Il-Jun; Lim, Soon Sung

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate α -glucosidase inhibitory and antidiabetic effects of Nopal water extract (NPWE) and Nopal dry power (NADP) in low-dose streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced diabetic rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD). The type 2 diabetic rat model was induced by HFD and low-dose STZ. The rats were divided into four groups as follows: (1) nondiabetic rats fed a regular diet (RD-Control); (2) low-dose STZ-induced diabetic rats fed HFD (HF-STZ-Control); (3) low-dose STZ-induced diabetic rats fed HFD and supplemented with NPWE (100 mg/kg body weight, HF-STZ-NPWE); and (4) low-dose STZ-induced diabetic rats fed HFD and supplemented with comparison medication (rosiglitazone, 10 mg/kg, body weight, HF-STZ-Rosiglitazone). In results, NPWE and NADP had IC 50 values of 67.33 and 86.68  μ g/mL, both of which exhibit inhibitory activities but lower than that of acarbose (38.05  μ g/mL) while NPWE group significantly decreased blood glucose levels compared to control and NPDP group on glucose tolerance in the high-fat diet fed rats model ( P < 0.05). Also, the blood glucose levels of HR-STZ-NPWE group were significantly lower ( P < 0.05) than HR-STZ-Control group on low-dose STZ-induced diabetic rats fed HFD. Based on these findings, we suggested that NPWE could be considered for the prevention and/or treatment of blood glucose and a potential use as a dietary supplement.

  4. Evaluating the antidiabetic effects of Chinese herbal medicine: Xiao-Ke-An in 3T3-L1 cells and KKAy mice using both conventional and holistic omics approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenzhong; Wang, Linli; Zhang, Feng; Li, Zheng

    2015-08-13

    Xiao-Ke-An (XKA) is a Chinese medicine widely used for treating type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). It is composed of eight herbal medicines traditionally used for T2D, including Rehmannia glutinosa Libosch, Anemarrhena asphodeloides Bunge, Coptis chinensis Franch, etc. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antidiabetic effects of XKA with both conventional and holistic omics approaches. The antidiabetic effect of XKA was first investigated in 3T3-L1 cells to study the effect of XKA on adipogenesis in vitro. Oil Red O staining was performed to determine the lipid accumulation. The intracellular total cholesterol (TC) and triglyceride (TG) contents in XKA treated 3T3-L1 cells were also evaluated. The therapeutic effects of XKA was further evaluated in KKAy mice with both conventional and holistic omics approaches. Body weight, fasting and non-fasting blood glucose, and oral glucose tolerance were measured during the experiment. At the time of sacrifice, serum was collected for the measurement of TG, TC, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c). The liver, kidney, spleen, pancreas, heart and adipose tissues were harvested and weighted. The liver was used for further microarray experiment. Omics approaches were adopted to evaluate the holistic rebalancing effect of XKA at molecular network level. XKA significantly inhibited adipogenic differentiation, lowered the intracellular TC and TG contents in 3T3-L1 cells. XKA improved the glucose homeostasis and lipid metabolism, ameliorated insulin resistance in KKAy mice. Furthermore, XKA also exhibited effective therapeutic effects by reversing the molecular T2D disease network from an unbalanced state. This study investigated the antidiabetic effects of XKA with both conventional and holistic omics approaches, providing both phenotypic evidence and underlying action mechanisms for the clinical use of XKA treating T2D.

  5. Fumosorinone, a novel PTP1B inhibitor, activates insulin signaling in insulin-resistance HepG2 cells and shows anti-diabetic effect in diabetic KKAy mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhi-Qin [College of Life Sciences, Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Diagnosis of Ministry of Education, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, key laboratory of pharmaceutical quality control of Hebei province, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Liu, Ting; Chen, Chuan [College of Life Sciences, Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Diagnosis of Ministry of Education, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Li, Ming-Yan; Wang, Zi-Yu; Chen, Ruo-song; Wei, Gui-xiang; Wang, Xiao-yi [College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, key laboratory of pharmaceutical quality control of Hebei province, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Luo, Du-Qiang, E-mail: duqiangluo999@126.com [College of Life Sciences, Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Diagnosis of Ministry of Education, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Insulin resistance is a characteristic feature of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and is characterized by defects in insulin signaling. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a key negative regulator of the insulin signaling pathways, and its increased activity and expression are implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Therefore, the inhibition of PTP1B is anticipated to become a potential therapeutic strategy to treat T2DM. Fumosorinone (FU), a new natural product isolated from insect fungi Isaria fumosorosea, was found to inhibit PTP1B activity in our previous study. Herein, the effects of FU on insulin resistance and mechanism in vitro and in vivo were investigated. FU increased the insulin-provoked glucose uptake in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells, and also reduced blood glucose and lipid levels of type 2 diabetic KKAy mice. FU decreased the expression of PTP1B both in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells and in liver tissues of diabetic KKAy mice. Furthermore, FU increased the phosphorylation of IRβ, IRS-2, Akt, GSK3β and Erk1/2 in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells, as well as the phosphorylation of IRβ, IRS-2, Akt in liver tissues of diabetic KKAy mice. These results showed that FU increased glucose uptake and improved insulin resistance by down-regulating the expression of PTP1B and activating the insulin signaling pathway, suggesting that it may possess antidiabetic properties. - Highlights: • Fumosorinone is a new PTP1B inhibitor isolated from insect pathogenic fungi. • Fumosorinone attenuated the insulin resistance both in vitro and in vivo. • Fumosorinone decreased the expression of PTP1B both in vitro and in vivo. • Fumosorinone activated the insulin signaling pathway both in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Fumosorinone, a novel PTP1B inhibitor, activates insulin signaling in insulin-resistance HepG2 cells and shows anti-diabetic effect in diabetic KKAy mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zhi-Qin; Liu, Ting; Chen, Chuan; Li, Ming-Yan; Wang, Zi-Yu; Chen, Ruo-song; Wei, Gui-xiang; Wang, Xiao-yi; Luo, Du-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a characteristic feature of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and is characterized by defects in insulin signaling. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a key negative regulator of the insulin signaling pathways, and its increased activity and expression are implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Therefore, the inhibition of PTP1B is anticipated to become a potential therapeutic strategy to treat T2DM. Fumosorinone (FU), a new natural product isolated from insect fungi Isaria fumosorosea, was found to inhibit PTP1B activity in our previous study. Herein, the effects of FU on insulin resistance and mechanism in vitro and in vivo were investigated. FU increased the insulin-provoked glucose uptake in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells, and also reduced blood glucose and lipid levels of type 2 diabetic KKAy mice. FU decreased the expression of PTP1B both in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells and in liver tissues of diabetic KKAy mice. Furthermore, FU increased the phosphorylation of IRβ, IRS-2, Akt, GSK3β and Erk1/2 in insulin-resistant HepG2 cells, as well as the phosphorylation of IRβ, IRS-2, Akt in liver tissues of diabetic KKAy mice. These results showed that FU increased glucose uptake and improved insulin resistance by down-regulating the expression of PTP1B and activating the insulin signaling pathway, suggesting that it may possess antidiabetic properties. - Highlights: • Fumosorinone is a new PTP1B inhibitor isolated from insect pathogenic fungi. • Fumosorinone attenuated the insulin resistance both in vitro and in vivo. • Fumosorinone decreased the expression of PTP1B both in vitro and in vivo. • Fumosorinone activated the insulin signaling pathway both in vitro and in vivo

  7. Anti-diabetic effect of amorphastilbol through PPARα/γ dual activation in db/db mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Woojung; Ham, Jungyeob; Kwon, Hak Cheol; Kim, Yong Kee; Kim, Su-Nam

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Amorphastilbol stimulates the transcriptional activities of both PPARα and PPARγ. ► Amorphastilbol improves glucose and lipid impairment in db/db mice. ► There are no side effects, such as hepatomegaly, in amorphastilbol-treated mice. ► Amorphastilbol can be used as a potential therapeutic agent against T2DM. - Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been considered as desirable targets for metabolic syndrome treatments, even though their specific agonists have several side effects, including body weight gain, edema, and tissue failure. The effects of amorphastilbol (APH) on glucose- and lipid metabolism were investigated with in vitro 3T3-L1 adipocyte systems and in vivo db/db mice model. APH selectively stimulates the transcriptional activities of both PPARα and PPARγ, which are able to enhance fatty acid oxidation and glucose utilization. Furthermore, APH improves glucose and lipid impairment in db/db mice. More importantly, there are no significant side effects, such as weight gain or hepatomegaly, in APH-treated animals, implying that APH do not adversely affect liver or lipid metabolism. All our data suggest that APH can be used as potential therapeutic agents against type 2 diabetes and related metabolic disorders, including obesity, by enhancing glucose and lipid metabolism

  8. Anti-diabetic effect of amorphastilbol through PPARα/γ dual activation in db/db mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woojung; Ham, Jungyeob; Kwon, Hak Cheol [Natural Medicine Center, KIST Gangneung Institute, Gangneung 210-340 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Kee, E-mail: yksnbk@sookmyung.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women’s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Su-Nam, E-mail: snkim@kist.re.kr [Natural Medicine Center, KIST Gangneung Institute, Gangneung 210-340 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-01

    Highlights: ► Amorphastilbol stimulates the transcriptional activities of both PPARα and PPARγ. ► Amorphastilbol improves glucose and lipid impairment in db/db mice. ► There are no side effects, such as hepatomegaly, in amorphastilbol-treated mice. ► Amorphastilbol can be used as a potential therapeutic agent against T2DM. - Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been considered as desirable targets for metabolic syndrome treatments, even though their specific agonists have several side effects, including body weight gain, edema, and tissue failure. The effects of amorphastilbol (APH) on glucose- and lipid metabolism were investigated with in vitro 3T3-L1 adipocyte systems and in vivo db/db mice model. APH selectively stimulates the transcriptional activities of both PPARα and PPARγ, which are able to enhance fatty acid oxidation and glucose utilization. Furthermore, APH improves glucose and lipid impairment in db/db mice. More importantly, there are no significant side effects, such as weight gain or hepatomegaly, in APH-treated animals, implying that APH do not adversely affect liver or lipid metabolism. All our data suggest that APH can be used as potential therapeutic agents against type 2 diabetes and related metabolic disorders, including obesity, by enhancing glucose and lipid metabolism.

  9. Anti-diabetic effect of camel milk in alloxan-induced diabetic dogs: a dose-response experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sboui, A; Khorchani, T; Djegham, M; Agrebi, A; Elhatmi, H; Belhadj, O

    2010-08-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of camel milk in alloxan-induced diabetic dogs and to follow this effect at three doses of milk. Firstly, three groups of dogs were used: two groups composed each of four diabetic dogs and receiving raw camel milk (treatment 1) or cow milk (treatment 2), and four healthy dogs getting raw camel milk (treatment 3) were used as control. Each animal was treated with 500 ml of milk daily. Secondly, we compared the effects of three amounts of camel milk: 100 ml, 250 ml and 500 ml to treat the diabetic dogs. After week 3, the dogs treated with camel milk showed a statistically significant decrease in blood glucose (from 10.88 +/- 0.55 to 6.22 +/- 0.5 mmol/l) and total protein concentrations (from 78.16 +/- 2.61 g/l to 63.63 +/- 4.43 g/l). For cholesterol levels, there was a decrease from week 2 (from 6.17 +/- 0.5 mmol/l to 4.79 +/- 0.5 mmol/l). There were no significant difference in blood glucose, cholesterol or total protein concentrations in dogs drinking 250 and 500 ml of camel milk. The dogs treated with 100 ml of camel milk did not show any significant decrease in blood glucose levels, and cholesterol and total protein concentrations. The investigation was not limited to the improvement in glycemic balance, lipids and proteins control in diabetic dogs getting camel milk, but we also noted a stability of this state after the dogs stopped to drink milk. This effect depended on the quantity of camel milk used to treat diabetic dogs.

  10. Antidiabetic and renoprotective effect of Fagonia cretica L. methanolic extract and Citrus paradise Macfad. juice in alloxan induced diabetic rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sairah H. Kamran

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Context: Fagonia cretica is a medicinal herb reported to have flavanoids of potential therapeutic value and Citrus paradisi is a fruit, whose juice is of great therapeutic value due to its anti-hyperglycemic effects. Aims: To determine anti-hyperglycemic and renal protective effect of methanolic extract of Fagonia cretica and Citrus paradisi juice (grapefruit juice in alloxan induced diabetic rabbits. Methods: Diabetes was induced in rabbits by alloxan monohydrate (150 mg/kg, i.p.. The therapies including Fagonia cretica methanolic extract (500 mg/kg, Citrus paradisi juice (7 mL/kg and sitagliptin (10 mg/kg were administered (p.o. to diabetic groups for 14 days. The biochemical parameters, glucose, creatinine, urea, bilirubin, albumin, total protein, globulins and albumin/globulin ratio were estimated. Results: Fagonia cretica extract and grapefruit juice therapy significantly (p<0.05 reduced glucose levels in diabetic rats. Fagonia cretica extract was more effective anti-hyperglycemic agent than Citrus paradisi juice and sitagliptin. Significant (p<0.05 improvement in kidney function was observed in treated groups, the plant extract showing significant improvement as compared to the other two treatments. The histopathological results verified improvement in structural damage of kidney, liver and pancreas with these treatments. Conclusions: Fagonica cretica and Citrus paradisi juice therapy markedly improved hyperglycemia and kidney functions in alloxan-induced diabetic rabbits.

  11. In vitro biological effects of two anti-diabetic medicinal plants used in Benin as folk medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothon, Fifa T D; Debiton, Eric; Avlessi, Felicien; Forestier, Christiane; Teulade, Jean-Claude; Sohounhloue, Dominique K C

    2013-03-01

    Extracts from Polygonum senegalensis (Polygonaceae) and Pseudocedrela kotschyi (Meliaceae) are two important traditionally used medicinal plants in rural Benin to treat many diseases and notably type 2 diabetes. The aim of the study was to investigate the α-glucosidase inhibition, antioxidant and antibacterial activities of those plants extract: Polygonum senegalensis leaves, and Pseudocedrela kotschyi root. Hydro-alcoholic (50%) extracts were analyzed for their phytochemical content and tested for their inhibition potency on α-glucosidase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Antioxidant activities were assessed using the DPPH, ORAC, FRAP and DCFH-DA (cell based) assay. Finally, the antibacterial activity was evaluated using MIC determination on four Gram-positive cocci (Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium difficile, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus), three Gram-negative bacilli (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae), and the yeast Candida albicans. Each extract presented significant α-glucosidase inhibition and antioxidant activities. Polygonum senegalensis leaf extracts were the most active in each in vitro assay with an IC50 = 1.5 μg/ml for α-glucosidase inhibition and an IC50 = 6.8 μg/ml for DPPH scavenging, - 4.5 μmol Fe II/g of dry matter - 9366 μmol Trolox / g DW - for FRAP and ORAC values, respectively. IC50 = 2.3 μg GA / ml for DCFH-DA assay. Concerning its antibacterial activity, a growth inhibitory effect was observed only against three Gram negative bacilli: B. subtilis, E. faecalis, S. aureus and the yeast C. albicans at high concentration. The results showed that the semi alcoholic extract of the two studied plants possess α-glucosidase inhibitory activity, antioxidant potency, and low antibacterial effect.

  12. Immunomodulatory and Antidiabetic Effects of a New Herbal Preparation (HemoHIM) on Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Jin; Choi, Jina; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Kang, Kyung-Yun; Paik, Man-Jeong; Jo, Sung-Kee; Jung, Uhee; Park, Hae-Ran; Yee, Sung-Tae

    2014-01-01

    Angelica gigas Nakai, Cnidium officinale Makino, and Paeonia japonica Miyabe) was developed to protect immune, hematopoietic, and self-renewal tissues against radiation. This study determined whether or not HemoHIM could alter hyperglycemia and the immune response in diabetic mice. Both nondiabetic and diabetic mice were orally administered HemoHIM (100 mg/kg) once a day for 4 weeks. Diabetes was induced by single injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 200 mg/kg, i.p.). In diabetic mice, HemoHIM effectively improved hyperglycemia and glucose tolerance compared to the diabetic control group as well as elevated plasma insulin levels with preservation of insulin staining in pancreatic β-cells. HemoHIM treatment restored thymus weight, white blood cells, lymphocyte numbers, and splenic lymphocyte populations (CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T), which were reduced in diabetic mice, as well as IFN-γ production in response to Con A stimulation. These results indicate that HemoHIM may have potential as a glucose-lowering and immunomodulatory agent by enhancing the immune function of pancreatic β-cells in STZ-induced diabetic mice.

  13. Immunomodulatory and Antidiabetic Effects of a New Herbal Preparation (HemoHIM on Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Jin Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available HemoHIM (a new herbal preparation of three edible herbs: Angelica gigas Nakai, Cnidium officinale Makino, and Paeonia japonica Miyabe was developed to protect immune, hematopoietic, and self-renewal tissues against radiation. This study determined whether or not HemoHIM could alter hyperglycemia and the immune response in diabetic mice. Both nondiabetic and diabetic mice were orally administered HemoHIM (100 mg/kg once a day for 4 weeks. Diabetes was induced by single injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 200 mg/kg, i.p.. In diabetic mice, HemoHIM effectively improved hyperglycemia and glucose tolerance compared to the diabetic control group as well as elevated plasma insulin levels with preservation of insulin staining in pancreatic β-cells. HemoHIM treatment restored thymus weight, white blood cells, lymphocyte numbers, and splenic lymphocyte populations (CD4+ T and CD8+ T, which were reduced in diabetic mice, as well as IFN-γ production in response to Con A stimulation. These results indicate that HemoHIM may have potential as a glucose-lowering and immunomodulatory agent by enhancing the immune function of pancreatic β-cells in STZ-induced diabetic mice.

  14. Anti-diabetic effect of a preparation of vitamins, minerals and trace elements in diabetic rats: a gender difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Although multivitamin products are widely used as dietary supplements to maintain health or as special medical food in certain diseases, the effects of these products were not investigated in diabetes mellitus, a major cardiovascular risk factor. Therefore, here we investigated if a preparation of different minerals, vitamins, and trace elements (MVT) for human use affects the severity of experimental diabetes. Methods Two days old neonatal Wistar rats from both genders were injected with 100 mg/kg of streptozotocin or its vehicle to induce diabetes. At week 4, rats were fed with an MVT preparation or vehicle for 8 weeks. Well established diagnostic parameters of diabetes, i.e. fasting blood glucose and oral glucose tolerance test were performed at week 4, 8 and 12. Moreover, serum insulin and blood HbA1c were measured at week 12. Results An impaired glucose tolerance has been found in streptozotocin-treated rats in both genders at week 4. In males, fasting blood glucose and HbA1c were significantly increased and glucose tolerance and serum insulin was decreased at week 12 in the vehicle-treated diabetic group as compared to the vehicle-treated non-diabetic group. All of the diagnostic parameters of diabetes were significantly improved by MVT treatment in male rats. In females, streptozotocin treatment resulted in a less severe prediabetic-like phenotype as only glucose tolerance and HbA1c were altered by the end of the study in the vehicle-treated diabetic group as compared to the vehicle-treated non-diabetic group. MVT treatment failed to improve the diagnostic parameters of diabetes in female streptozotocin-treated rats. Conclusion This is the first demonstration that MVT significantly attenuates the progression of diabetes in male rats with chronic experimental diabetes. Moreover, we have confirmed that females are less sensitive to STZ-induced diabetes and MVT preparation did not show protection against prediabetic state. This may suggest a gender

  15. Effect of number and type of antidiabetes medications on adherence and glycemia of ambulatory type 2 diabetes patients in southwestern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adisa R

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the influence of number and type of antidiabetes medications on adherence and glycemia of ambulatory type 2 diabetes patients in southwestern Nigeria.Methods: A cross-sectional study using pre-tested structured questionnaire among 176 consented patients recruited from the endocrinology clinics of two teaching hospitals between November, 2010 and January, 2011; and a retrospective review of case notes of the cohort for details of prescribed medications and blood glucose values. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data. Tests of proportions were evaluated using Chi-square or Fisher’s exact test as appropriate. The differences in mean fasting blood glucose (FBG between and among categorical variables were compared using student t-test and ANOVA respectively, with p4 medications. Adherence was better among patients on >4 medications compared to those on ≤4 medications (p=0.05. However, patients on >4 medications were mostly older adults (>60 years of age, and they were in the majority (66.7% who had tertiary education compared to 33.3% of those on ≤4 medications who had tertiary education (p=0.02. Adherence rates to antidiabetes medications were in the ranking of oral antidiabetes medications (OAM alone (50.0% > insulin plus OAM (44.0% > insulin alone (41.7% with no significant difference (p=0.77. There was a significant difference in mean FBG among patients on >4 medications (172.1 ±61.1mg/dL versus (198.8 ±83.8mg/dL among those on ≤4 medications (p=0.02. Conclusion: Prescribing more than four medications is linked to improved adherence and glycemic outcome. However, age and educational background of patients are important factors that need to be considered when prescribing multiple medications for type 2 diabetes.

  16. Evaluation of Antioxidant, Antidiabetic and Anticholinesterase Activities of Smallanthus sonchifolius Landraces and Correlation with Their Phytochemical Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Daniela; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B; Fernandez, Eloy C; Milella, Luigi

    2015-07-31

    The present study aimed to investigate the phytochemical profile of leaf methanol extracts of fourteen Smallanthus sonchifolius (yacon) landraces and their antioxidant, anticholinesterase and antidiabetic activities that could lead to the finding of more effective agents for the treatment and management of Alzheimer's disease and diabetes. For this purpose, antioxidant activity was assessed using different tests: ferric reducing ability power (FRAP), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH), nitric oxide (˙NO) and superoxide (O2˙-) scavenging and lipid peroxidation inhibition assays. Anticholinesterase activity was investigated by quantifying the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitory activities, whereas antidiabetic activity was investigated by α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibition tests. To understand the contribution of metabolites, phytochemical screening was also performed by high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector (HPLC-DAD) system. Among all, methanol extract of PER09, PER04 and ECU44 landraces exhibited the highest relative antioxidant capacity index (RACI). ECU44 was found to be rich in 4,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (CQA) and 3,5-di-O-CQA and displayed a good α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibition, showing the lowest IC50 values. Flavonoids, instead, seem to be involved in the AChE and BChE inhibition. The results of this study revealed that the bioactive compound content differences could be determinant for the medicinal properties of this plant especially for antioxidant and antidiabetic activities.

  17. Ficus Deltoidea: A potential source for new oral antidiabetic agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zainah Adam; Juliana Mahamad Napiah; Shafii Khamis; Muhajir Hamid

    2012-01-01

    Ficus deltoidea or locally known as Mas Cotek is one of the common medicinal plant used in Malaysia. Ethno botanical approaches showed that this plant possess antidiabetic property. Previous study had shown that F. deltoidea reduced hyperglycemia in type I diabetic rats at different prandial state. This study was done to elucidate the possible antihyperglycemic mechanisms of F. deltoidea. The results showed that F. deltoidea significantly stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells with the highest magnitude of stimulation was 7.31-fold (p 50 value was 4.15±0.25 mg/ml. Kinetic analysis of the enzyme activity revealed the F. deltoidea exhibited a mixed-type inhibition mechanism against sucrase activity. Such observations showed that F. deltoidea has the potential to be developed as new oral antidiabetic agent for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. (author)

  18. In Vitro and In Vivo Antidiabetic Evaluation of Selected Culinary-Medicinal Mushrooms (Agaricomycetes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Varinder; Bedi, Gurleen Kaur; Shri, Richa

    2017-01-01

    Management of type 2 diabetes by delaying or preventing glucose absorption using natural products is gaining significant attention. Edible mushrooms are well documented for their nutritional and medicinal properties. This investigation was designed to evaluate the antidiabetic activity of aqueous extracts of selected culinary-medicinal mushrooms, namely, Pleurotus ostreatus, Calocybe indica, and Volvariella volvacea, using in vitro models (α-amylase inhibition assay, glucose uptake by yeast cells, and glucose adsorption capacity). The most active extract was subsequently examined in vivo using the oral starch tolerance test in mice. All prepared extracts showed dose-dependent inhibition of α-amylase and an increase in glucose transport across yeast cells. C. indica extract was the most active α-amylase inhibitor (half-maximal inhibitory concentration, 18.07 ± 0.75 mg/mL) and exhibited maximum glucose uptake by yeast cells (77.53 ± 0.97% at 35 mg/mL). All extracts demonstrated weak glucose adsorption ability. The positive in vitro tests for C. indica paved the way for in vivo studies. C. indica extract (200 and 400 mg/kg) significantly (P < 0.05) reduced postprandial blood glucose peaks in mice challenged with starch. The extract (400 mg/kg) and acarbose normalized blood glucose levels at 180 minutes, when they were statistically similar to values in normal mice. Thus, it may be concluded that the antidiabetic effect of C. indica is mediated by inhibition of starch metabolism (α-amylase inhibition), increased glucose uptake by peripheral cells (promotion of glucose uptake by yeast cells), and mild entrapment (adsorption) of glucose. Hence, C. indica can be developed as antidiabetic drug after detailed pharmacological studies.

  19. PHARMACOLOGICAL EFFECTS AND THERAPEUTIC PROPERTIES OF HIBISCUS CANNABINUS- A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Esmail Al-Snafi

    2018-01-01

    The phytochemical analysis of Hibiscus cannabinus showed the presence of phytosterols, flavonoids, polyphenols, tannins, steroids, alkaloids, saponins, lignans, essential oils, glucosides such as cannabiscitrin, cannabiscetin and anthocyanin glycoside. The pharmacological studies revealed that Hibiscus cannabinus possessed cytotoxic, anthelmintic, antibacterial, antiulcer, antidiabetic, hypolipidemic, antioxidant, immunological, haematinic and hepatoprotective effects. This review will highli...

  20. Antidiabetic Evaluation of Momordica charantia L Fruit Extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahira, S; Hussain, F

    2014-01-01

    To investigate hypoglycaemic, hypolipidaemic and pancreatic beta cell regeneration activities of Momordica charantia L fruits (MC). Alloxan-induced diabetic rabbits were treated with methanolic and ethanolic MC extract. Effects of plant extracts and the drug glibenclamide on serum glucose, lipid profile and pancreatic beta cell were determined after two weeks of treatment. Serum glucose and lipid profiles were assayed by kit methods. Pancreatic tissue histopathology was performed to study pancreatic beta cell regeneration. Momordica charantia extracts produced significant hypoglycaemic effects (p Momordica charantia supplementations were unable to normalize glucose and lipid profiles. Glibenclamide, a standard drug, not only lowered hyperglycaemia and hyperlipidaemia but also restored the normal levels. Regeneration of pancreatic beta cells by MC extracts was minimal, with fractional improvement produced by glibenclamide. The most significant finding of the present study was a 28% reduction in hyperglycaemia by MC ethanol extracts. To determine reliable antidiabetic potentials of MC, identification of the relevant antidiabetic components and underlying mechanisms is warranted. PMID:25429471

  1. Isolation of Antidiabetic Principle from Bougainvillea spectabilis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rhamnopyranoside were isolated from the stem bark of B. spectabilis Willd. Conclusion: An antidiabetic principle, pinitol, was successfully isolated from the stem bark of B. spectabilis Willd. Keywords: Bougainvillea spectabilis, Column chromatography, ...

  2. The Antioxidant Capacity and Anti-diabetic Effect of Boswellia serrata Triana and Planch Aqueous Extract in Fertile Female Diabetic Rats and the Possible Effects on Reproduction and Histological Changes in the Liver and Kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azemi, Mohamad Ebrahim; Namjoyan, Foroogh; Khodayar, Mohammad Javad; Ahmadpour, Forouzan; Darvish Padok, Azam; Panahi, Marziyeh

    2012-01-01

    Boswellia serrata has been used in a wide variety of diseases, including diabetes mellitus and inflammatory diseases. This study focused on the effects of Boswellia serrata aqueous extract on blood glucose and the complications of diabetes in the liver and kidneys and examined the impact of plant on reproduction in diabetic rats. The antioxidant capacity of plant extract was performed using FRAP assay. Diabetic and control rats were administered 200, 400, and 600 mg/kg Boswellia serrata extract. Vaginal plaque was mentioned as a positive sign of pregnancy ;and treatment started with extract or vehicle from 1th to 17th day of gestation by gastric gavage. Blood glucose was measured during 17 days. The Administration of Boswellia serrata in diabetic rats significantly decreased the level of blood glucose and HbA1c after 17th days (P ≤ 0.01). In diabetic group that received no treatment, the abortion of fetus spontaneous was 19.14%. The percentage of absorptions significantly was elevated in vehicle-treated diabetic rats, in comparison with vehicle- treated healthy rats. In the diabetic group, separated necrosis of hepatocytes, anarchism of liver plates, and lymphocytic inflammation were improved. Diabetic complications were not seen and the severity of damage was reduced. These damages include: lymphocytic inflammation in the port areas, irregularities, apoptosis of liver cells, and dilatation of the sinusoids. The results suggest that Boswellia serrata extract has the antidiabetic effects and can prevent the complications of diabetes in the kidneys and liver.

  3. Continuous-Flow Synthesis of Deuterium-Labeled Antidiabetic Chalcones: Studies towards the Selective Deuteration of the Alkynone Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sándor B. Ötvös

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Flow chemistry-based syntheses of deuterium-labeled analogs of important antidiabetic chalcones were achieved via highly controlled partial C≡C bond deuteration of the corresponding 1,3-diphenylalkynones. The benefits of a scalable continuous process in combination with on-demand electrolytic D2 gas generation were exploited to suppress undesired over-reactions and to maximize reaction rates simultaneously. The novel deuterium-containing chalcone derivatives may have interesting biological effects and improved metabolic properties as compared with the parent compounds.

  4. Antidiabetic and anticancer activities of Mangifera indica cv. Okrong leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganogpichayagrai, Aunyachulee; Palanuvej, Chanida; Ruangrungsi, Nijsiri

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes and cancer are a major global public health problem. Plant-derived agents with undesirable side-effects were required. This study aimed to evaluate antidiabetic and anticancer activities of the ethanolic leaf extract of Mangifera indica cv. Okrong and its active phytochemical compound, mangiferin. Antidiabetic activities against yeast α-glucosidase and rat intestinal α-glucosidase were determined using 1 mM of p-nitro phenyl-α-D-glucopyranoside as substrate. Inhibitory activity against porcine pancreatic α-amylase was performed using 1 mM of 2-chloro-4 nitrophenol-α-D-maltotroside-3 as substrate. Nitrophenol product was spectrophotometrically measured at 405 nm. Anticancer activity was evaluated against five human cancer cell lines compared to two human normal cell lines using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Mango leaf extract and mangiferin exhibited dose-dependent inhibition against yeast α-glucosidase with the IC50 of 0.0503 and 0.5813 mg/ml, respectively, against rat α-glucosidase with the IC50 of 1.4528 and 0.4333 mg/ml, respectively, compared to acarbose with the IC50 of 11.9285 and 0.4493 mg/ml, respectively. For anticancer activity, mango leaf extract, at ≥200 μg/ml showed cytotoxic potential against all tested cancer cell lines. In conclusion, mango leaf possessed antidiabetic and anticancer potential in vitro. PMID:28217550

  5. Increase in insulin sensitivity by the association of chicoric acid and chlorogenic acid contained in a natural chicoric acid extract (NCRAE) of chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) for an antidiabetic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrare, Karine; Bidel, Luc P R; Awwad, Abdulmomem; Poucheret, Patrick; Cazals, Guillaume; Lazennec, Françoise; Azay-Milhau, Jacqueline; Tournier, Michel; Lajoix, Anne-Dominique; Tousch, Didier

    2018-04-06

    Chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) is an indigenous vegetable widely cultivated in Europe, America and Asia. In ancient times, the leaves, flowers, seeds, and roots have been used as a wealth of health benefits including its tonic effects, the ability to ease digestive problems and to detoxify liver. In Indian traditional therapy, chicory was known to possess antidiabetic effect. In the traditional medicine of Bulgaria and Italy, chicory was used as hypoglycemic decoctions. We wanted to obtain the complete chemical composition of the natural chicoric acid extract (NCRAE), a chicory root extract rich in chicoric acid, which previously showed its glucose tolerance effect in normal rats. To investigate if the whole NCRAE is required to be effective, we performed a comparative in vivo experiment on STZ diabetic rats treated either with NCRAE or a mixture composed of the two major compounds of NCRAE. LC-MS method has been used to analyze the exhaustive composition of NCRAE: we have determined that chicoric acid and chlorogenic acid represented 83.8% of NCRAE. So, we have prepared a solution mixture of chicoric acid and chlorogenic acid named SCCAM, in order to compare in vivo the antidiabetic effects of this last and NCRAE in streptozotocin diabetic rats. In vitro experiments were performed on L6 cell line both for glucose uptake and for the protective effect against H 2 O 2 oxidative stress. Also, we have evaluated DPPH and ORAC (Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity) antioxidative capacities of the two compositions. The LC-MS analysis confirmed the high abundance of chicoric acid (64.2%) in NCRAE and a second part of NCRAE is composed of caffeoylquinic acids (CQAs) at 19.6% with among them the chlorogenic acid. This result has permitted us to prepare a mixture of synthetic L-chicoric acid (70%) and synthetic chlorogenic acid (30%): the solution is designated SCCAM. Our results showed that both NCRAE and SCCAM are able to improve a glucose tolerance in STZ diabetic rats after

  6. Metformin: a metabolic disruptor and anti-diabetic drug to target human leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosilio, Célia; Ben-Sahra, Issam; Bost, Frédéric; Peyron, Jean-François

    2014-05-01

    There is a global and urgent need for expanding our current therapeutical arsenal against leukemia in order to improve their actual cure rates and fight relapse. Targeting the reprogrammed, altered cancer metabolism is an emerging strategy which should profoundly affect cancer cells in their intimate and irrepressible needs and addictions for nutrients uptake and incorporation into the biomass during malignant proliferation. We present here how metformin, an anti-diabetic drug that has attracted a strong interest for its recently discovered anti-cancer properties, can be envisioned as a new adjuvant approach to treat leukemia. Metformin may have a double-edged sword effect (i) by acting on the organism to decrease hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinemia in diabetic patients and (ii) at the cellular level, by inhibiting the mTORC1-cancer supporting pathway through AMPK-dependent and independent mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Antidiabetic activity of Momordica charantia seeds on streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, D Sathish; Sivagnanam, K; Subramanian, S

    2005-05-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the hypoglycemic efficacy in an aqueous extract of seeds of two varieties, namely a country and a hybrid variety of Momordica charantia (MCSEt1 and MCSEt2) respectively in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. STZ-induced diabetic rats were treated with aqueous extracts of MCSEt1 and t2 for a period of 30 days. MCSEt1 and t2 extract treatment to diabetic rats resulted in a significant reduction in blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, lactate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and glycogen phosphorylase, and a concomitant increase in the levels of hemoglobin, glycogen and activities of hexokinase and glycogen synthase. These results clearly show the antidiabetic properties of Momordica charantia. Both the varieties showed safe and significant hypoglycemic effects which were more pronounced in MCSEt1 compared to MCSEt2 and glibenclamide.

  8. ORGANIZATION OF AVAILABILITY OF THE CIRCULATION OF ANTIDIABETIC MEDICINES BASED ON PHARMACEUTICAL LAW IN UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbrozhek SI

    2016-12-01

    contingent of citizens to timely access to vital antidiabetic drugs in full and the required range. It was also studied the availability of treatment antidiabetic medicines by pharmacoeconomic, forensic and pharmaceutical indicators and found the changes to the average price of antidiabetic drugs for the period from 2012 to 2015 according to changes of the US dollar exchange course, which reduced the availability of antidiabetic drugs for patients with diabetes. In difficult conditions, healthcare financing of urgent issues needs to achieve effective supplement of antidiabetic drugs with optimal use of funds. At the national and regional levels consistently implemented organizational and legal measures to improve the availability of antidiabetic drugs in the healthcare system for patients with diabetes: the development of a system of recovery of insulin; pharmaceutical needs for support from the targeted expenditure of regional budgets; targeted distribution of expenditures among local budgets of administrative units; control over pricing for antidiabetic drugs; optimization of implementation of the statement of the Cabinet of Ministers of Ukraine № 73 "Questions of the realization of the pilot project concerning the introduction of state regulation of prices for insulin" by drafting the amendments thereto. Conclusions. Our studies indicate the need for in-depth reform of the healthcare system by providing subsidies from the state budget of Ukraine, the increase the accessibility of antidiabetic medicines for diabetics.

  9. Antidiabetic, Antihyperlipidemic and Antioxidant Activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Those with blood glucose levels > 190 ± 8 mg/dl were administered the methanol leaf extract of. Buchanania lanzan ... blood glucose level, serum lipid profile, and significantly (p < 0.05) increased antioxidant activity as ... Conclusion: MEBL exhibits antidiabetic, antihyperlipidemic and antioxidant activities in diabetic rat and.

  10. Preparation and antidiabetic activity of polysaccharide from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Extraction parameters of polysaccharide from Portulaca oleracea L. (POP) and antidiabetic activity of POP on alloxan induced diabetic mice were studied. Better extraction parameters of POP were obtained by the single factor test, as follows: extraction temperature 95°C, extraction time 5 h, and ratio of solvent to raw ...

  11. Antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic activity of Piper longum root aqueous extract in STZ induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabi Shaik Abdul

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The available drugs for diabetes, Insulin or Oral hypoglycemic agents have one or more side effects. Search for new antidiabetic drugs with minimal or no side effects from medicinal plants is a challenge according to WHO recommendations. In this aspect, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic effects of Piper longum root aqueous extract (PlrAqe in streptozotocin (STZ induced diabetic rats. Methods Diabetes was induced in male Wister albino rats by intraperitoneal administration of STZ (50 mg/kg.b.w. Fasting blood glucose (FBG levels were measured by glucose-oxidase & peroxidase reactive strips. Serum biochemical parameters such as glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, total cholesterol (TC, triglycerides (TG, very low density lipoprotein (VLDL, low density lipoprotein (LDL and high density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol were estimated. The activities of liver and kidney functional markers were measured. The statistical analysis of results was carried out using Student t-test and one-way analysis (ANOVA followed by DMRT. Results During the short term study the aqueous extract at a dosage of 200 mg/kg.b.w was found to possess significant antidiabetic activity after 6 h of the treatment. The administration of aqueous extract at the same dose for 30 days in STZ induced diabetic rats resulted in a significant decrease in FBG levels with the corrections of diabetic dyslipidemia compared to untreated diabetic rats. There was a significant decrease in the activities of liver and renal functional markers in diabetic treated rats compared to untreated diabetic rats indicating the protective role of the aqueous extract against liver and kidney damage and its non-toxic property. Conclusions From the above results it is concluded that the plant extract is capable of managing hyperglycemia and complications of diabetes in STZ induced diabetic rats. Hence this plant may be considered as one of the

  12. Effectively designed molecularly imprinted polymers for selective isolation of the antidiabetic drug metformin and its transformation product guanylurea from aqueous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyzas, George Z.; Nanaki, Stavroula G. [Laboratory of Polymer Chemistry and Technology, Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-541 24 Thessaloniki (Greece); Koltsakidou, Anastasia; Papageorgiou, Myrsini; Kechagia, Maria [Laboratory of Environmental Pollution Control, Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-541 24 Thessaloniki (Greece); Bikiaris, Dimitrios N. [Laboratory of Polymer Chemistry and Technology, Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-541 24 Thessaloniki (Greece); Lambropoulou, Dimitra A., E-mail: dlambro@chem.auth.gr [Laboratory of Environmental Pollution Control, Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-541 24 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2015-03-25

    Highlights: • Preparation of novel MIPs with remarkable recognition properties. • Selective isolation and removal of metformin and guanylurea from aqueous media. • Detailed adsorbent characterization and adsorption studies. • Successful application of synthesized MIPs as dispersive SPE sorbents. • Estimation of expanded uncertainty following a bottom-up approach. - Abstract: In the present study, two novel molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with remarkable recognition properties for metformin and its transformation product, guanylurea, have been prepared for their selective, enrichment, isolation and removal from aqueous media. The prepared adsorbents were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and swelling experiments. The performance of the prepared MIPs was evaluated by various parameters including the influence of pH, contact time, temperature and initial compound concentration. The effects on the adsorption behavior of the removal process parameters were studied and the equilibrium data were fitted by the Langmuir and Freundlich models. Due to the imprinting effect, adsorption performance of MIPs was always superior to its corresponding NIP (non-imprinted polymer), with maximum adsorption capacity ∼80 mg g{sup −1} for both MIPs. Stability and reusability of the MIPs up to the 5th cycle meant that they could be applied repeatedly without losing substantial removal ability. In the next step, the prepared MIP nanoparticles were evaluated as sorbents in a dispersive solid phase extraction (D-SPE) configuration for selective enrichment and determination of metformin and guanylurea in different aqueous matrices. Under the working extraction conditions, the D-SPE method showed good linearity in the range of 50–1000 ng L{sup −1}, repeatability of the extractions (RSD 2.1–5.1%, n = 3), and low limits of detection (1.5–3.4 ng L{sup −1}). The expanded uncertainty of the data obtained

  13. Evaluation of Antioxidant, Antidiabetic and Anticholinesterase Activities of Smallanthus sonchifolius Landraces and Correlation with Their Phytochemical Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Russo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate the phytochemical profile of leaf methanol extracts of fourteen Smallanthus sonchifolius (yacon landraces and their antioxidant, anticholinesterase and antidiabetic activities that could lead to the finding of more effective agents for the treatment and management of Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes. For this purpose, antioxidant activity was assessed using different tests: ferric reducing ability power (FRAP, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH, nitric oxide (˙NO and superoxide (O2˙− scavenging and lipid peroxidation inhibition assays. Anticholinesterase activity was investigated by quantifying the acetylcholinesterase (AChE and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE inhibitory activities, whereas antidiabetic activity was investigated by α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibition tests. To understand the contribution of metabolites, phytochemical screening was also performed by high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector (HPLC-DAD system. Among all, methanol extract of PER09, PER04 and ECU44 landraces exhibited the highest relative antioxidant capacity index (RACI. ECU44 was found to be rich in 4,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (CQA and 3,5-di-O-CQA and displayed a good α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibition, showing the lowest IC50 values. Flavonoids, instead, seem to be involved in the AChE and BChE inhibition. The results of this study revealed that the bioactive compound content differences could be determinant for the medicinal properties of this plant especially for antioxidant and antidiabetic activities.

  14. Thiazolidinediones are associated with a decreased risk of atrial fibrillation compared with other antidiabetic treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallisgaard, Jannik Langtved; Lindhardt, Tommi Bo; Staerk, Laila

    2017-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between thiazolidinediones (TZDs) vs. other antidiabetic drugs and risk of atrial fibrillation (AF) in diabetic patients. METHOD AND RESULTS: Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) increases the risk of AF by approximately 34%. TZD is an insulin...... drugs. The decreased risk of AF remained significant after adjusting for age, sex, and comorbidities with a hazard ratio (95% CI) of 0.76 (0.57-1.00), P = 0.047 associated with TZD treatment compared with other antidiabetic drugs. CONCLUSION: Use of a TZD to treat diabetes was associated with reduced...... sensitizer that also has anti-inflammatory effects, which might decrease the risk of AF compared with other antidiabetic drugs. We used data from the Danish nationwide registries to study 108 624 patients with diabetes and without prior AF who were treated with metformin or sulfonylurea as first-line drugs...

  15. In vitro and in vivo anti-diabetic and hepatoprotective effects of edible pods of Parkia roxburghii and quantification of the active constituent by HPLC-PDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Yunus; Maibam, Beebina Chanu; Talukdar, Narayan Chandra; Deka, Dibakar Chandra; Borah, Jagat Chandra

    2016-09-15

    Parkia roxburghii G. Don. is a traditional medicinal plant and its pods are extensively used as food and medicine. It is believed by the traditional healers to have medicinal properties to treat diabetes, hypertension and urinary tract infections (Jamaluddin et al., 1994). The methanolic extract of pods of P roxburghii and fractions were screened for their α-glucosidase and α-amylase inhibitory activity. Anti-hyperglycemic effects were studied on streptozotocin (45mg/kg b.w.) induced diabetes in albino rats (seven groups, n=7 n=6), using different doses for 14 days. Plasma glucose concentration (HbA1c) was analysed using whole blood, while SGOT, SGPT, TG, TC and uric acid were analysed using serum, employing commercial kits. Quantitative analysis of the major active constituent was carried out by HPLC-PDA. Bioactivity guided chemical investigation of the edible pods of P roxburghii identified sub-fraction EA-Fr 5 which significantly inhibited α-glucosidase (IC50 0.39±0.06 µgmL(-1)), reduced the blood glucose level to normal, and lowered the elevated levels of liver function enzymes SGOT and SGPT in STZ-induced diabetic rats. EA-Fr 5 was found to contain epigallocatechin gallate (1) and hyperin (2) which exhibited significantly higher α-glucosidase inhibitory potency with IC50 0.51±0.09 and 0.71±0.03µM respectively. EA-Fr 5 contained 379.82±2.90mg/g of EGCG, the major active constituent which manifests a broad spectrum of biological activities. The present investigation for the first time reports the occurrence of EGCG and hyperin in P roxburghii and substantiates the traditional use of pods of P roxburghii as dietary supplement for management of diabetes with significantly promising α-glucosidase inhibitory potency and anti-hyperglycemic as well as hepatoprotective effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. PAM-1616, a selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ modulator with preserved anti-diabetic efficacy and reduced adverse effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi-Kyung; Chae, Yu Na; Choi, Song-hyen; Moon, Ho Sang; Son, Moon-Ho; Bae, Myung-Ho; Choi, Hyun-ho; Hur, Youn; Kim, Eunkyung; Park, Yoo Hoi; Park, Chan Sun; Kim, Jae Gyu; Lim, Joong In; Shin, Chang Yell

    2011-01-15

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ is known to be a key regulator of insulin resistance. PAM-1616 is a novel, non-thiazolidinedione small molecule compound synthesized in Dong-A Research Center. In this study, we characterized the pharmacological and safety profiles of PAM-1616 as a selective PPARγ modulator. PAM-1616 selectively binds to human PPARγ (IC(50), 24.1±5.6 nM) and is a partial agonist for human PPARγ with an EC(50) of 83.6±43.7 nM and a maximal response of 24.9±7.1% relative to the full agonist, rosiglitazone. PAM-1616 was selective for human PPARγ than for human PPARα (EC(50), 2658±828 nM) without activating human PPARδ, which makes it a selective modulator of PPARγ. Treatment of high fat diet-induced obese C57BL/6J mice with PAM-1616 for 21 days improved HOMA-IR. Furthermore, PAM-1616 significantly improved hyperglycemia in db/db mice with little side effect when orally administered at a dose of 1 mg/kg/day for 28 days. Intriguingly, PAM-1616 was seen to increase the gene expression of inducible glucose transporter (GLUT4), while it partially induced that of a fatty acid carrier, aP2 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and it also showed partial recruitment of an adipogenic cofactor, TRAP220 as compared to rosiglitazone. PAM-1616 did not cause a significant increase in plasma volume of ICR mice when orally administered at a dose of 10 mg/kg/day for 9 days. PAM-1616 increased the expression of fluid retention-inducing genes such as serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase (SGK)-1 to a lesser extent as compared to rosiglitazone in human renal epithelial cells. These results suggest that PAM-1616 acts as a selective modulator of PPARγ with excellent antihyperglycemic property. The differential modulation of target gene by PAM-1616 might contribute to the improved side effect profiles. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Anti-diabetic activity-guided screening of aqueous-ethanol Moringa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To explore the anti-diabetic effects of Moringa oleifera extracts and fractions, and to identify their active/marker compounds. Methods: Five different aqueous ethanol extracts (95, 75, 50, 25 %v/v and 100 % water) of Moringa oleifera were given orally to normal rats to assess their hypoglycemic activities and effect ...

  18. Antidiabetic and Antihyperlipidemic Activity of Cucurbita maxima Duchense (Pumpkin) Seeds on Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Ashish K. Sharma; Ashok Sharma

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic effect of petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and alcohol extract of seeds of Cucurbita maxima for its purported use in diabetes. The antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic activity of different extracts of Cucurbita maxima seeds was evaluated in wistar albino rats against streptozotocin (50 mg/kg i.p.) at dose of 200 mg/kg p.o. for 21 days. Glibenclamide (500µg/kg) was used as reference drug. Fasting blood g...

  19. Structural and redox requirements for the action of anti-diabetic vanadium compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Yutaka; Sakurai, Hiromu; Crans, Debbie C; Micera, Giovanni; Garribba, Eugenio

    2014-05-21

    This study presents the first systematic investigation of the anti-diabetic properties of non-oxido V(IV) complexes. In particular, the insulin-mimetic activity of [V(IV)(taci)2](4+), [V(IV)(inoH-3)2](2-), [V(IV)(dhab)2], [V(IV)(hyph(Ph))2], [V(IV)(cat)3](2-) and [V(IV)(pdbh)2]--where taci is 1,3,5-triamino-1,3,5-trideoxy-cis-inositol, ino is cis-inositol, H2dhab is 2,2'-dihydroxyazobenzene, H2hyph(Ph) is 3,5-bis(2-hydroxyphenyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole, H2cat is catechol and H2pdbh is pentan-2,4-dione benzoylhydrazone--was evaluated in terms of free fatty acid (FFA) release. Among the six compounds examined, only [V(IV)(pdbh)2], [V(IV)(cat)3](2-) and [V(IV)(hyph(Ph))2], which at the physiological pH convert to the corresponding V(IV)O complexes, were found to exhibit a significant insulin-mimetic activity compared to VOSO4. In contrast, [V(taci)2](4+), [V(inoH-3)2](2-) and [V(dhab)2], which at pH 7.4 keep their 'bare' non-oxido structure, did not cause any inhibition of FFA. The results, therefore, suggest that a V(IV)O functionality is necessary for vanadium complexes to exhibit anti-diabetic effects. This agrees with the notion that the biotransformations of V compounds in the organism are more important than the nature of the species.

  20. Characterization of the Antidiabetic Role of Parkinsonia aculeata (Caesalpineaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Catarina Rezende Leite

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the characterization of the antidiabetic role of a hydroethanolic extract from Parkinsonia aerial parts (HEPA, in normal and alloxan-induced diabetic rats, treated with HEPA (125 and 250 mg/kg; p.o.. Oral glucose tolerance test, acute oral toxicity test and preliminary phytochemical analyses were performed. The diabetic rats treated with HEPA showed a significant reduction in serum and urinary glucose, urinary urea and triglyceride levels, as compared to the diabetic untreated group. However, in the normal treated groups, a significant reduction was found only in serum triglyceride levels. In all treated diabetic groups, an improvement in hepatic glycogen was observed, as well as a decrease in liquid intake and urinary volume, and an enhancement in the weight of skeletal muscles (soleus and extensor digitorum longus, kidneys and epididymal adipose tissue. Nevertheless, body and liver weights were ameliorated only in the diabetic group treated with HEPA (250 mg/kg. Moreover, oral glucose tolerance was higher in animals treated with HEPA, while results also showed that HEPA could be considered toxicologically safe. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of tanins, flavonoids and steroids in HEPA. In conclusion, P. aculeata presents an antidiabetic activity and other beneficial effects that ameliorate diabetes and associated complications.

  1. In Vitro Antioxidant Effects of Aloe barbadensis Miller Extracts and the Potential Role of These Extracts as Antidiabetic and Antilipidemic Agents on Streptozotocin-Induced Type 2 Diabetic Model Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Ibrahim Khalil

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the total phenolic and flavonoid contents, the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging ability and the ferric reducing power (FRAP of Aloe vera were measured to determine the antioxidant activity of this species. The in vivo antidiabetic effects of the plant were also investigated using streptozotocin-induced type 2 diabetic model rats that were divided into five groups based on the treatment received: (1 water (WC; (2 glibenclamide; (3 concentrated gel extract (Gel-C; (4 ethanol (80% gel extract (Gel-Et; and (5 ethanol (80% skin extract of Aloe vera (Skin-Et. Skin-Et, which contained the highest level of total phenolics (62.37 ± 1.34 mggallic acid/kg and flavonoids (20.83 ± 0.77 mg/kg, exhibited the highest scavenging activity (85.01 ± 0.52% and the greatest reducing power (185.98 ± 0.41 µM, indicating that the skin contained the highest level of antioxidants. The oral consumption of Gel-Et for 4 weeks a caused significant reduction in the fasting serum glucose levels of the rats. The rats in the Gel-C-, Gel-Et- and Skin-Et-treated groups experienced a reduction in their total cholesterol levels by 11%, 17% and 25%, respectively and a reduction in their LDL cholesterol levels by 45%, 3% and 69%, respectively. The in vivo experimental antioxidant parameter MDA is strongly correlated with the in vitro antioxidant parameters of flavonoids and polyphenols, namely the DPPH and FRAP values (r = 0.94, 0.92, 0.93, 0.90, thus confirming the antioxidant potential of the Aloe vera extracts.

  2. Antidiabetic Activity of Different Extracts of Myrtus Communis in Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panjeshahin Mohammad Reza

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Hydroalcoholic (70° extract of leaves of Myrtus communis has been shown to have antidiabetic effect in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats in our previous study. In this study, we intended to determine the components of the mentioned extract and identify the mechanism for its action.

  3. Anti-diabetic potential of aerial parts of Galium tricornutum (Dandy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the anti-diabetic potential of methanol extract of the aerial parts of Galium tricornutum (Dandy) in diabetic rats. Methods: The methanol extract of the aerial parts of Galium tricornutum was first subjected to acute toxicity studies. Thereafter, the effect of the extract on oral glucose tolerance was determined ...

  4. Phyto-metals screening of selected anti-diabetic herbs and infused concoctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olanrewaju O. Olujimi

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: The study thus shows that the herbs and concoctions are safe from the heavy metals considered. However, right dosage of the anti-diabetic concoctions should always be considered to prevent possible chronic side effects from bio-accumulation of heavy metals.

  5. A study on ethosomes as mode for transdermal delivery of an antidiabetic drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodade, Siddhodhan S; Shaikh, Karimunnisa Sameer; Kamble, Meghana S; Chaudhari, Praveen D

    2013-01-01

    A transdermal delivery system is warranted for repaglinide (RPG) which possesses half-life of 1 h and oral bioavailability of 56%. Ethosomes are useful tools for transdermal drug delivery. To prepare and evaluate ethosomes as mode for transdermal delivery of RPG. Ethosomes loaded with RPG were prepared from dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine and ethanol by the cold method. They were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. They were evaluated for vesicle size, entrapment efficiency and ex-vivo skin permeation. Ethosomal composition was optimized using the 3(2) factorial design. Gel containing optimzsed ethosomes was studied for antidiabetic activity in rats. RPG ethosomes possessing the size of 0.171-1.727 µm and entrapment efficiency of 75-92% were obtained. They demonstrated a significantly higher permeation (64-97% of the administered dose) across excised rat skin when compared to free drug and its hydro alcoholic solution. In-vivo, RPG ethosomal system caused sustained antidiabetic effect. The lipid and ethanol concentration affected the physicochemical attributes and performance of ethosomes. The flexible ethosomes permeated the stratum corneum and improvized the availability of RPG for antidiabetic action. They prolonged the antidiabetic effect of RPG over a significantly longer period of time in comparison with the equivalent oral dose. Ethosomal system can successfully deliver RPG transdermally; sustain its effect and thus reduce its dosing frequency. Ethosomes are useful for enhancing the efficacy of RPG in the treatment of diabetes.

  6. Are the effects of drugs to prevent and to treat heart failure always concordant? The statin paradox and its implications for understanding the actions of antidiabetic medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Milton

    2018-03-22

    Most treatments for chronic heart failure are effective both in preventing its onset and reducing its progression. However, statins prevent the development of heart failure, but they do not decrease morbidity and mortality in those with established heart failure. This apparent discordance cannot be explained by an effect to prevent interval myocardial infarctions. Instead, it seems that the disease that statins were preventing in trials of patients with a metabolic disorder was different from the disease that they were treating in trials of chronic heart failure. The most common phenotype of heart failure in patients with obesity and diabetes is heart failure with a preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). In this disorder, the anti-inflammatory effects of statins might ameliorate myocardial fibrosis and cardiac filling abnormalities, but these actions may have little relevance to patients with heart failure and a reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), whose primary derangement is cardiomyocyte loss and stretch. These distinctions may explain why statins were ineffective in trials that focused on HFrEF, but have been reported to produce with favourable effects in observational studies of HFpEF. Similarly, selective cytokine antagonists were ineffective in HFrEF, but have been associated with benefits in HFpEF. These observations may have important implications for our understanding of the effects of antihyperglycaemic medications. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists have had neutral effects on heart failure events in people at risk for HFpEF, but have exerted deleterious actions in HFrEF. Similarly, sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors, which exert anti-inflammatory effects and reduce heart failure events in patients who are prone to HFpEF, may not be effective in HFrEF. The distinctions between HFrEF and HFpEF may explain why the effects of drugs on heart failure events in diabetes trials may not be relevant to their use in patients with systolic dysfunction

  7. Effect of stevia and citric acid on the stability of phenolic compounds and in vitro antioxidant and antidiabetic capacity of a roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) beverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ramírez, Iza F; Castaño-Tostado, Eduardo; Ramírez-de León, José A; Rocha-Guzmán, Nuria E; Reynoso-Camacho, Rosalía

    2015-04-01

    Plant infusions are consumed due to their beneficial effects on health, which is attributed to their bioactive compounds content. However, these compounds are susceptible to degradation during processing and storage. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of stevia and citric acid on the stability of phenolic compounds, antioxidant capacity and carbohydrate-hydrolysing enzyme inhibitory activity of roselle beverages during storage. The optimum extraction conditions of roselle polyphenolic compounds was of 95 °C/60 min, which was obtained by a second order experimental design. The incorporation of stevia increased the stability of colour and some polyphenols, such as quercetin, gallic acid and rosmarinic acid, during storage. In addition, stevia decreased the loss of ABTS, DPPH scavenging activity and α-amylase inhibitory capacity, whereas the incorporation of citric acid showed no effect. These results may contribute to the improvement of technological processes for the elaboration of hypocaloric and functional beverages. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Differential Effect of Glycosylated Hemoglobin Value and Antidiabetic Treatment on the Risk of 30-day Readmission Following a Hospitalization for Acute Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Julio; Bonanad, Clara; Navarro, Juan Paulo; Bondanza, Lourdes; Artero, Ana; Ventura, Silvia; Núñez, Eduardo; Miñana, Gema; Sanchis, Juan; Real, José

    2015-10-01

    In patients with heart failure and type 2 diabetes, low glycosylated hemoglobin has been related with higher risk of mortality but information regarding morbidity is scarce. We sought to evaluate the association between glycosylated hemoglobin and 30-day readmission in patients with type 2 diabetes and acute heart failure. Glycosylated hemoglobin was measured before discharge in 835 consecutive patients with acute heart failure and type 2 diabetes. Cox regression analysis adapted for competing events was used. Mean (standard deviation) age was 72.9 (9.6) years and median glycosylated hemoglobin was 7.2% (6.5%-8.0%). Patients treated with insulin or insulin/sulfonylurea/meglitinides were 41.1% and 63.2% of the cohort, respectively. At 30 days post-discharge, 109 (13.1%) patients were readmitted. A multivariate analysis revealed that the effect of glycosylated hemoglobin on the risk of 30-day readmission was differentially affected by the type of treatment (P for interaction<.01). Glycosylated hemoglobin (per 1% decrease) was inversely associated with higher risk in those receiving insulin (hazard ratio = 1.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-1.86; P=.003) or insulin/sulfonylurea/meglitinides (hazard ratio = 1.44; 95% confidence interval, 1.16-1.80; P=.001). Conversely, glycosylated hemoglobin (per 1% increase) had no effect in non-insulin dependent diabetes (hazard ratio = 1.01; 95% confidence interval, 0.87-1.17; P=.897) or even a positive effect in patients not receiving insulin/sulfonylurea/meglitinides (hazard ratio = 1.12; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.22; P=.011). In acute heart failure, glycosylated hemoglobin showed to be inversely associated to higher risk of 30-day readmission in insulin-dependent or those treated with insulin/sulfonylurea/meglitinides. A marginal effect was found in the rest. Whether this association reflects a treatment-related effect or a surrogate of more advanced disease should be clarified in further studies. Copyright © 2014

  9. Antioxidant, hypoglycemic and anti-diabetic activities of Ziziphus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antioxidant, hypoglycemic and anti-diabetic activities of Ziziphus spina-christi (L) Willd (Rhamnacae) leaf extract. Amal AM Al-Ghamdi, Abdelaaty A Shahat. Abstract. Purpose: To investigate the antioxidant, hypoglycemic and antidiabetic activities as well as the phenolic composition of Ziziphus spina-christi (ZSC) Methods: ...

  10. Nano-preparation of Andrographis paniculata extract by casein micelle for antidiabetic agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbianti, Rita; Dewi, Veronica; Imansari, Farisa; Hermansyah, Heri; Sahlan, Muhamad

    2017-02-01

    Side effects caused by oral medications for person with diabetic are the background of the development of alternative treatments by traditional medicine, herbs. Andrographis paniculata (AP) is one of the herbs that is potent to be anti-diabetic agent. The active compound of AP, andrographolide have been examined to have anti-diabetic activity as α-glucosidase enzyme inhibitor. This research aims to encapsulate sambiloto's extract with casein micelle and produce nanoparticles which have anti-diabetic activity as α-glucosidase inhibitor. Extract of AP is encapsulated by casein micelle and made into nano size using sonicator. The dominant active compounds in AP extract coated by casein are andrographolide, neoandrographolide, 14-deoxy-11,12didehydroandrographolide with encapsulation efficiency of 68.83%, 89.15% and 81.69%, the average diameter of the particles is about 120.57 nm and its loading capacity is 28.85%. AP's extract has antidiabetic activity as α-glucosidase inhibitor with percent inhibition of 95%. The morphology of nanoencapsulated AP's extract analyzed by FE-SEM, were similar with casein micelle.

  11. Antidiabetic effects of chamomile flowers extract in obese mice through transcriptional stimulation of nutrient sensors of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Weidner

    Full Text Available Given the significant increases in the incidence of metabolic diseases, efficient strategies for preventing and treating of these common disorders are urgently needed. This includes the development of phytopharmaceutical products or functional foods to prevent or cure metabolic diseases. Plant extracts from edible biomaterial provide a potential resource of structurally diverse molecules that can synergistically interfere with complex disorders. In this study we describe the safe application of ethanolic chamomile (Matricaria recutita flowers extract (CFE for the treatment and prevention of type 2 diabetes and associated disorders. We show in vitro that this extract activates in particular nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ and its isotypes. In a cellular context, in human primary adipocytes CFE administration (300 µg/ml led to specific expression of target genes of PPARγ, whereas in human hepatocytes CFE-induced we detected expression changes of genes that were regulated by PPARα. In vivo treatment of insulin-resistant high-fat diet (HFD-fed C57BL/6 mice with CFE (200 mg/kg/d for 6 weeks considerably reduced insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, plasma triacylglycerol, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA and LDL/VLDL cholesterol. Co-feeding of lean C57BL/6 mice a HFD with 200 mg/kg/d CFE for 20 weeks showed effective prevention of fatty liver formation and hepatic inflammation, indicating additionally hepatoprotective effects of the extract. Moreover, CFE treatment did not reveal side effects, which have otherwise been associated with strong synthetic PPAR-targeting molecules, such as weight gain, liver disorders, hemodilution or bone cell turnover. Taken together, modulation of PPARs and other factors by chamomile flowers extract has the potential to prevent or treat type 2 diabetes and related disorders.

  12. Antidiabetic effects of chamomile flowers extract in obese mice through transcriptional stimulation of nutrient sensors of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, Christopher; Wowro, Sylvia J; Rousseau, Morten; Freiwald, Anja; Kodelja, Vitam; Abdel-Aziz, Heba; Kelber, Olaf; Sauer, Sascha

    2013-01-01

    Given the significant increases in the incidence of metabolic diseases, efficient strategies for preventing and treating of these common disorders are urgently needed. This includes the development of phytopharmaceutical products or functional foods to prevent or cure metabolic diseases. Plant extracts from edible biomaterial provide a potential resource of structurally diverse molecules that can synergistically interfere with complex disorders. In this study we describe the safe application of ethanolic chamomile (Matricaria recutita) flowers extract (CFE) for the treatment and prevention of type 2 diabetes and associated disorders. We show in vitro that this extract activates in particular nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and its isotypes. In a cellular context, in human primary adipocytes CFE administration (300 µg/ml) led to specific expression of target genes of PPARγ, whereas in human hepatocytes CFE-induced we detected expression changes of genes that were regulated by PPARα. In vivo treatment of insulin-resistant high-fat diet (HFD)-fed C57BL/6 mice with CFE (200 mg/kg/d) for 6 weeks considerably reduced insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, plasma triacylglycerol, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and LDL/VLDL cholesterol. Co-feeding of lean C57BL/6 mice a HFD with 200 mg/kg/d CFE for 20 weeks showed effective prevention of fatty liver formation and hepatic inflammation, indicating additionally hepatoprotective effects of the extract. Moreover, CFE treatment did not reveal side effects, which have otherwise been associated with strong synthetic PPAR-targeting molecules, such as weight gain, liver disorders, hemodilution or bone cell turnover. Taken together, modulation of PPARs and other factors by chamomile flowers extract has the potential to prevent or treat type 2 diabetes and related disorders.

  13. A Pilot Study On Anti-Diabetic Effect Of A Siddha Herbal Confection In Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thembamala. C. R

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ilavankaathy ilekiyam is an authentic siddha herbal confection recommended for the treatment of Diabetes mellitus. This present study has been carried out to scientifically emphasize the therapeutic effectiveness of Ilavankaathy ilekiyam as a monotherapy in the management of NIDDM at a dose of 2.5mg by oral route and it is taken two times daily. An open clinical study was conducted on 15 patients at Meegoda Ayurveda hospital Sri Lanka. The effectiveness of the herbal confection was assessed by subjective and objective clinical parameters by means of changes in the severity of clinical manifestations and the fasting blood sugar levels for consecutive 25 weeks using a self-reported assessment criteria. The data was statistically analyzed by SPSS16 software. The diet and other regimens which could aggravate Diabeties mellitus were well instructed to the patients. The herbal confection showed statistically high significance p0.01 in improvement of the overall clinical manifestations of Diabeties mellitus and reduced levels of fasting blood sugar was a concordance.

  14. Evaluation of antidiabetic, antihyperlipidemic and antioxidant effects of Boehmeria nivea (L. Gaudich., Urticaceae, root extract in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Sancheti

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The potential role of 80% methanolic extract of Boehmeria nivea (L. Gaudich., Urticaceae, root in the treatment of diabetes, along with its antihyperlipidemic and antioxidant effects, was studied in streptozotocin-induced diabetic male Wistar rats. Preliminary screening of the extract revealed the presence of polyphenolics and flavonoids. The animal study was conducted with variable doses of 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg of extract for 21 days in diabetic rats. A significant effect was observed at a dose of 500 mg/kg, which was comparable to the standard drug, glibenclamide. Administration of the extract at a 500 mg/kg dose resulted in a significant reduction of fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, blood urea, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, urine sugar and urine ketone levels in diabetic rats in comparison with the diabetic control group. Additionally, this dose significantly increased body weight, hemoglobin, plasma total protein, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, liver glycogen content, superoxide dismutase, reduced glutathione and catalase levels in diabetic rats at the end of 21 days of treatment. Therefore, dietary supplementation with Boehmeria nivea root extract could be beneficial for correcting hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and enhancing the antioxidant defense system.

  15. Evidence based study of antidiabetic potential of C. maxima seeds - In vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushawaha, Devesh Kumar; Yadav, Manjulika; Chatterji, Sanjukta; Srivastava, Amrita Kumari; Watal, Geeta

    2017-10-01

    In vitro antidiabetic efficacy of Cucurbita maxima seed extract (CMSE) has already been studied in our previous findings. Thus, in order to validate these findings in biological system, in vivo antidiabetic activity of aqueous extract was investigated in normal as well as diabetic experimental models. Variable doses of extract were administered orally to normal and STZ induced mild diabetic rats during fasting blood glucose (FBG) and glucose tolerance test (GTT) studies. In order to determine the extract's antidiabetic potential long-term FBG and post prandial glucose (PPG) studies were also carried out. Most effective dose of 200 mg kg -1 of CMSE decreases the blood glucose level (BGL) in normal rats by 29.02% at 6 h during FBG studies and 23.23% at 3 h during GTT. However, the maximum reduction observed in BGL of mild diabetic rats during GTT the same interval of time was 26.15%. Moreover, in case of severely diabetic rats a significant reduction of 39.33% was observed in FBG levels whereas, in case of positive control, rats treated with 2.5 mg kg -1 of glipizide, a fall of 42.9% in FBG levels was observed after 28 days. Results of PPG level also showed a fall of 33.20% in severely diabetic rats as compared to the positive control showing a fall of 44.2% at the end of the 28 days. Thus, the present study validate the hypoglycemic and antidiabetic effect of CMSE and hence this extract could be explored further for developing as a novel antidiabetic agent.

  16. Plants used as antidiabetics in popular medicine in Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojan-Rodrigues, M; Alves, T L S; Soares, G L G; Ritter, M R

    2012-01-06

    Plants are widely as antidiabetics. The study of these plants is essential because many of them may have undesirable effects, such as acute or chronic toxicity; or their use may even delay or discourage the adoption of the proper and effective treatment. The present study surveyed the plant species that are popularly used to treat diabetes mellitus in the state of Rio Grande do Sul in southern Brazil. Sixteen ethnobotanical surveys performed in the state were consulted, and the species used to treat diabetes were listed. For species cited in at least two of the studies, scientific data related to antidiabetic activity were searched in the ISI Knowledge database. The scientific binomial of each species was used as keywords, and data found in review papers were also included. A total of 81 species in 42 families were mentioned; the most important families were Asteraceae and Myrtaceae. Twenty eight species were cited at least twice as being used to treat diabetes in the state. For 11 of these, no scientific data regarding antidiabetic activity could be located. The species most frequently mentioned for use with diabetes were Syzygium cumini (Myrtaceae) and Bauhinia forficata (Fabaceae), in 12 studies each, followed by Sphagneticola trilobata (Asteraceae), in six studies; and Baccharis trimera (Asteraceae), Bidens pilosa (Asteraceae), Cynara scolymus (Asteraceae), and Leandra australis (Melastomataceae) in four studies each. Bauhinia forficata and Syzygium cumini have been studied in more detail for antidiabetic activity. A considerable number of plant species are traditionally used for the treatment of diabetes melitus in the Rio Grande do Sul State. The majority of those plants that have been studied for antidiabetic activity showed promising results, mainly for Bauhinia forficata and Syzygium cumini. However, for most of the plants mentioned, the studies are not sufficient to guarantee the efficacy and safety in the use of these plants in the treatment against

  17. Comparison of the Chemical Profiles and Antioxidant and Antidiabetic Activities of Extracts from Two Ganoderma Species (Agaricomycetes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaoqing; Cai, Weixi; Xu, Baojun

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the mycochemical profiles, antioxidant activities, and antidiabetic effects of 2 species of genus Ganoderma, the red lingzhi (G. lucidum) and purple lingzhi (G. sinense) mushrooms. In Chinese medicinal practice, hot water and ethanol are used as solvents to extract samples. In this study, a total of 4 extracts (ethanol and hot water extracts from G. lucidum and G. sinense) were prepared for further assays. Hot water extracts presented much higher values for total phenolic content and ferric-reducing antioxidant power than the ethanol extracts. Ethanol (70%) extract of G. lucidum had the strongest α-glycosidase inhibitory capacity, but the lingzhi polysaccharides showed no inhibitory effect. It also had the largest amount of total ganoderic acids. The results indicated that ethanol extracts from both G. lucidum and G. sinense showed better antidiabetic effects than the hot water extracts. Ganoderic acids, rather than polysaccharides, may contribute the antidiabetic effects of both the Ganoderma species.

  18. Antidiabetic Indian Plants: A Good Source of Potent Amylase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menakshi Bhat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is known as a multifactorial disease. The treatment of diabetes (Type II is complicated due to the inherent patho-physiological factors related to this disease. One of the complications of diabetes is post-prandial hyperglycemia (PPHG. Glucosidase inhibitors, particularly α-amylase inhibitors are a class of compounds that helps in managing PPHG. Six ethno-botanically known plants having antidiabetic property namely, Azadirachta indica Adr. Juss.; Murraya koenigii (L. Sprengel; Ocimum tenuflorum (L. (syn: Sanctum; Syzygium cumini (L. Skeels (syn: Eugenia jambolana; Linum usitatissimum (L. and Bougainvillea spectabilis were tested for their ability to inhibit glucosidase activity. The chloroform, methanol and aqueous extracts were prepared sequentially from either leaves or seeds of these plants. It was observed that the chloroform extract of O. tenuflorum; B. spectabilis; M. koenigii and S. cumini have significant α-amylase inhibitory property. Plants extracts were further tested against murine pancreatic, liver and small intestinal crude enzyme preparations for glucosidase inhibitory activity. The three extracts of O. tenuflorum and chloroform extract of M. koenigi showed good inhibition of murine pancreatic and intestinal glucosidases as compared with acarbose, a known glucosidase inhibitor.

  19. Essential Oils of Oregano: Biological Activity beyond Their Antimicrobial Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayely Leyva-López

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils of oregano are widely recognized for their antimicrobial activity, as well as their antiviral and antifungal properties. Nevertheless, recent investigations have demonstrated that these compounds are also potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic and cancer suppressor agents. These properties of oregano essential oils are of potential interest to the food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. The aim of this manuscript is to review the latest evidence regarding essential oils of oregano and their beneficial effects on health.

  20. Fractionation of Plant Bioactives from Black Carrots (Daucus carota subspecies sativus varietas atrorubens Alef.) by Adsorptive Membrane Chromatography and Analysis of Their Potential Anti-Diabetic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esatbeyoglu, Tuba; Rodríguez-Werner, Miriam; Schlösser, Anke; Liehr, Martin; Ipharraguerre, Ignacio; Winterhalter, Peter; Rimbach, Gerald

    2016-07-27

    Black and purple carrots have attracted interest as colored extracts for coloring food due to their high content of anthocyanins. This study aimed to investigate the polyphenol composition of black carrots. Particularly, the identification and quantification of phenolic compounds of the variety Deep Purple carrot (DPC), which presents a very dark color, was performed by HPLC-PDA and HPLC-ESI-MS(n) analyses. The separation of polyphenols from a DPC XAD-7 extract into an anthocyanin fraction (AF) and co-pigment fraction (CF; primarily phenolic acids) was carried out by membrane chromatography. Furthermore, possible anti-diabetic effects of the DPC XAD-7 extract and its AF and CF were determined. DPC samples (XAD-7, CF, and AF) inhibited α-amylase and α-glucosidase in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, DPC XAD-7 and chlorogenic acid, but not DPC CF and DPC AF, caused a moderate inhibition of intestinal glucose uptake in Caco-2 cells. However, DPC samples did not affect glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion and dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-4) activity. Overall, DPC exhibits an inhibitory effect on α-amylase and α-glucosidase activity and on cellular glucose uptake indicating potential anti-diabetic properties.

  1. Antidiabetic Activity of Artemisia amygdalina Decne in Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Ghazanfar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Artemisia species have been extensively used for the management of diabetes in folklore medicine. The current study was designed to investigate the antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic effects of Artemisia amygdalina. Petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, methanol, and hydroethanolic extracts of Artemisia amygdalina were tested for their antidiabetic potentials in diabetic rats. The effect of extracts was observed by checking the biochemical, physiological, and histopathological parameters in diabetic rats. The hydroethanolic and methanolic extracts each at doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg b. w significantly reduced glucose levels in diabetic rats. The other biochemical parameters like cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoproteins (LDL, serum creatinine, serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT, serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT, and alkaline phosphatise (ALP, were found to be reduced by the hydroethanolic and methanolic extracts. The extracts also showed reduction in the feed and water consumption of diabetic rats when compared with the diabetic control. The histopathological results of treated groups showed the regenerative/protective effect on β-cells of pancreas in diabetic rats. The current study revealed the antidiabetic potential of Artemisia amygdalina being effective in hyperglycemia and that it can effectively protect against other metabolic aberrations caused by diabetes in rats, which seems to validate its therapeutic traditional use.

  2. Design, synthesis and antidiabetic evaluation of oxazolone derivatives

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    one derivatives were syn- thesized and assayed in vivo to investigate their antidiabetic activities by streptozotocin-induced model in rat. These derivatives showed considerable biological efficacy when compared to rosiglitazone, a potent and ...

  3. Effects of composition on waste glass properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellinger, G.B.; Chick, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    The electrical conductivity, viscosity, chemical durability, devitrification, and crystallinity of a defense waste glass were measured. Each oxide component in the glass was varied to determine its effect on these properties. A generic study is being developed which will determine the effects of 26 oxides on the above and additional properties of a wide field of possible waste glasses. 5 figures, 2 tables

  4. ANTIDIABETIC ACTIVITY FROM ETHANOL EXTRACT OF KLUWIH’S LEAF (Artocarpus camansi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Marianne

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Research on antidiabetic activity of ethanol leaf extracts Kluwih (Artocarpus camansi has been carried out to determine the antidiabetic activity of ethanol extract of leaves kluwih (EELK of mice using glucose tolerance test. The study began by dividing the mice into 6 groups. Group 1 was given 1% CMC, group 2 to group 4, given EELK 50, 100, 200, 400 mg / kg bw, respectively, and group 6  administered with glibenclamide 0.45 mg/kg bw. Thirty minutes later each group was given glucose 30 mg/kg bw. After 30 min of glucose loading, blood glucose levels of mice were measured, and measured again at minute 60, 90, 120 and 150 minutes. The results showed that the glucose tolerance test EELK a significant effect in lowering blood glucose levels compared to controls at 30 and 60 minutes after administration of glucose. At minute 90 to 150, the effect of blood glucose levels EELK restore back to normal. EELK demonstrated ability to reduce blood glucose levels, and EELK doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg bw showed antidiabetic effects better than a dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg bw. Increasing doses showed antagonistic effects: the ability to increase blood glucose levels.

  5. Triglyceride/HDL ratio as a screening tool for predicting success at reducing anti-diabetic medications following weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamaner Subash Shantha, Ghanshyam; Kumar, Anita Ashok; Kahan, Scott; Irukulla, Pavan Kumar; Cheskin, Lawrence Jay

    2013-01-01

    Intentional weight loss, by reducing insulin resistance, results in both better glycemic control and decreased need for anti-diabetic medications. However, not everyone who is successful with weight loss is able to reduce anti-diabetic medication use. In this retrospective cohort study, we assessed the predictive accuracy of baseline triglyceride (TGL)/HDL ratio, a marker of insulin resistance, to screen patients for success in reducing anti-diabetic medication use with weight loss. Case records of 121 overweight and obese attendees at two outpatient weight management centers were analyzed. The weight loss intervention consisted of a calorie-restricted diet (~1000Kcal/day deficit), a behavior modification plan, and a plan for increasing physical activity. Mean period of follow-up was 12.5 ± 3.5 months. By study exit, mean weight loss and mean HbA1c% reduction were 15.4 ± 5.5 kgs and 0.5 ± 0.2% respectively. 81 (67%) in the study cohort achieved at least 1 dose reduction of any anti-diabetic medication. Tests for predictive accuracy of baseline TGL/HDL ratio ≤ 3 to determine success with dose reductions of anti-diabetic medications showed a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, area under the curve, likelihood ratio (LR) + and LR-of 81, 83, 90, 70, 78, 4.8 and 0.2, respectively. Reproducibility of TGL/HDL ratio was acceptable. TGL/HDL ratio shows promise as an effective screening tool to determine success with dose reductions of anti-diabetic medications. The results of our study may inform the conduct of a systematic review using data from prior weight loss trials.

  6. Review of Antidiabetic Fruits, Vegetables, Beverages, Oils and Spices commonly consumed in the Diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beidokhti, Maliheh Najari; Jäger, Anna K

    2017-01-01

    of the fruits, vegetables, beverages, oils and spices and the words 'antidiabetic', 'hypoglycemic', 'anti-hyperglycemic', 'type 2 diabetes' were used as keywords for search. RESULTS: Certain fruits and vegetables are functional foods and their consumption reduces the incidence of type 2 diabetes. Hypoglycemic......-hyperglycemic and anti-diabetic activities of some dietary fruits, vegetables, beverages, oils and spices and their active hypoglycemic constituents. Including such plant species in the diet might improve management of type 2 diabetes....... for patients with type 2 diabetes. The ethnopharmacological use of herbal medicines, many of them part of our diet as spices, vegetables and fruits, has been developed for the treatment of diabetes due to inexpensiveness, easy availability and few side effects. AIM OF THE STUDY: Our aim is to present a review...

  7. Plant foods in the management of diabetes mellitus: spices as beneficial antidiabetic food adjuncts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, K

    2005-09-01

    Diet has been recognized as a corner stone in the management of diabetes mellitus. Spices are the common dietary adjuncts that contribute to the taste and flavour of foods. Besides, spices are also known to exert several beneficial physiological effects including the antidiabetic influence. This review considers all the available information from animal experimentation as well as clinical trials where spices, their extracts or their active principles were examined for treatment of diabetes. Among the spices, fenugreek seeds (Trigonella foenumgraecum), garlic (Allium sativum), onion (Allium cepa), and turmeric (Curcuma longa) have been experimentally documented to possess antidiabetic potential. In a limited number of studies, cumin seeds (Cuminum cyminum), ginger (Zingiber officinale), mustard (Brassica nigra), curry leaves (Murraya koenigii) and coriander (Coriandrum sativum) have been reported to be hypoglycaemic.

  8. Anti-Diabetic Potential of the Leaves of Anisomeles malabarica in Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peddanna Kotha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Diabetes mellitus is a pandemic metabolic disorder that is affecting a majority of populations in recent years. There is a requirement for new drugs that are safer and cheaper due to the side effects associated with the available medications. Methods: We investigated the anti-diabetic activity of leaves of Anisomeles malabarica following bioactivity guided fractionation. The different solvent (hexane, ethyl acetate, methanol and water extracts of A. malabarica leaves were used in acute treatment studies to evaluate and identify the active fraction. The ethyl acetate extract was subjected to further fractionation using silica gel column chromatography and the compounds were identified by LC-SRM/MS and GC-MS. Additional chronic treatment studies were carried out using this active fraction (AMAF for 30 days in experimental diabetic rats. Fasting blood glucose (FBG, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, plasma insulin levels and glucose tolerance were measured along with insulin resistance/sensitivity indicators (HOMA-IR, HOMA-β and QUICKI to assess the beneficial effects of A. malabarica in the management of diabetes mellitus. Results: Among the different solvent extracts tested, ethyl acetate extract showed maximum (66% anti-hyperglycemic activity. The hexane and ethyl acetate (1: 1 fraction that has maximum anti-diabetic activity was identified as active fraction of A. malabarica (AMAF. The FBG, HbA1c, plasma insulin levels and insulin sensitivity/resistance indicators such as glucose tolerance, HOMA-IR, HOMA-β and QUICKI were significantly improved to near normal in diabetic rats treated with AMAF. Further, we identified key flavonoids and fatty acids as the anti-diabetic active principles from the AMAF of A. malabarica leaves. Conclusion: The results of our study suggest that Anisomeles malabarica has potential anti-diabetic activity in STZ induced diabetic rats.

  9. Antidiabetic activity of extracts ofAnacardium occidentaleLinn. leaves onn-streptozotocin diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Y S; Tatke, P A; Gabhe, S Y; Vaidya, A B

    2017-10-01

    Anacardium occidentale L. (Anacardiaceae) is used in South Cameroon as well as in other tropical countries by traditional practitioners as a folk remedy for treatment of diabetes mellitus. We demonstrated the antidiabetic potential of the plant extracts in n -streptozotocin diabetic rats. The aim of the current study was to investigate the antidiabetic effects of ethanol extract of leaves of A. occidentale on neonatal streptozotocin diabetic rats. Two day old neonates were injected with 100 mg/kg of streptozotocin. At the end of the experimental period of 30 days, reduction in the fasting blood glucose levels, serum insulin, glycated hemoglobin levels, serum lipid parameters, and renal function biomarkers were estimated in the control and treated rats. Histopathological examination of liver, kidney and pancreas were also carried out. On administration of 100 mg/kg of plant extract, blood glucose levels of the rats showed 8.01% and 19.25% decrease in the fasting blood glucose levels on day 15 and day 30, respectively. The administration of extract showed that the effects of extract treatment are comparable to treatment with the standard drug Pioglitazone. These results demonstrate significant antidiabetic potential of the ethanol extract of leaves of A. occidentale , justifying the use of plant in the indigenous system of medicine. Further studies for investigating the specific compound(s) responsible for such beneficial role in diabetes would open new outlook in the therapy of type 2 diabetes.

  10. Lamium album or Urtica dioica? Which is more effective in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Diabetes mellitus, the most common endocrine disorder, is defined by hyperglycaemia. Urtica dioica or stinging nettle is known to have antidiabetic effects. Lamium album or non stinging nettle is shown to have some beneficial effects such as antioxidant, and cytoprotective properties. The purpose of this study ...

  11. Anti-diabetic medications and risk of primary liver cancer in persons with type II diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagberg, K W; McGlynn, K A; Sahasrabuddhe, V V; Jick, S

    2014-10-28

    Type II diabetes increases liver cancer risk but the risk may be mitigated by anti-diabetic medications. However, choice of medications is correlated with diabetes duration and severity, leading to confounding by indication. To address this association, we conducted a nested case-control study among persons with type II diabetes in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Cases had primary liver cancer and controls were matched on age, sex, practice, calendar time, and number of years in the database. Exposure was classified by type and combination of anti-diabetic prescribed and compared to non-use. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using conditional logistic regression. In 305 cases of liver cancer and 1151 controls, there was no association between liver cancer and anti-diabetic medication use compared to non-use (OR=0.74 (95% CI=0.45-1.20) for metformin-only, 1.10 (95% CI=0.66-1.84) for other oral hypoglycaemic (OH)-only, 0.89 (95% CI=0.58-1.37) for metformin+other OH, 1.11 (95% CI=0.60-2.05) for metformin+insulin, 0.81 (95% CI=0.23-2.85) for other OH+insulin, and 0.72 (95% CI=0.18-2.84) for insulin-only). Stratification by duration of diabetes did not alter the results. Use of any anti-diabetic medications in patients with type II diabetes was not associated with liver cancer, though there was a suggestion of a small protective effect for metformin.

  12. Generic substitution of antidiabetic drugs in the elderly does not affect adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Trotta

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The possibility that variation in packaging and pill appearance may reduce adherence is a reason for concern, especially for chronic diseases. The objectives of the study were to quantify the extent of switches between generic antidiabetics and to verify whether switching between different products of the same substance affects adherence. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All elderly residents of the Umbria Region who received at least 2 prescriptions of antidiabetics in 2010 and 2011 were included in the study. Switching was defined as the dispensing of two different products of the same substance in a series of two prescriptions. Single and multiple switchers were identified according to the number of switches during 2011. Switching relevant to the three off-patent substances with generic use ≥ 5% (metformin, gliclazide and repaglinide was quantified. The effect of switching on adherence, defined as the proportion of days in 2011 covered by prescriptions (Medication Possession Ratio, MPR, was estimated. RESULTS: Among the 15 964 patients receiving antidiabetics (14.4% of the elderly population 9211 were prescribed at least one of the generic substances. Of these patients, 23.3% experienced a single switch and 15.7% were multiple switchers (61.0% never switched. The proportion of multiple switchers increased with the number of prescriptions, reaching 26% among patients with ≥ 11 prescriptions. MPR was 62%, 62% and 72%, respectively among non-switchers, single and multiple switchers. CONCLUSIONS: In elderly patients treated with antidiabetics, the substitution between branded and unbranded products (as well as between generics of the same substance, did not negatively affect adherence.

  13. Potential of Icariin Metabolites from Epimedium koreanum Nakai as Antidiabetic Therapeutic Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Hye Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic properties of Epimedium koreanum are presumed to be due to the flavonoid component icariin, which has been reported to have broad pharmacological potential and has demonstrated anti-diabetic, anti-Alzheimer’s disease, anti-tumor, and hepatoprotective activities. Considering these therapeutic properties of icariin, its deglycosylated icaritin and glycosylated flavonoids (icaeriside II, epimedin A, epimedin B, and epimedin C were evaluated for their ability to inhibit protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B and α-glucosidase. The results show that icaritin and icariside II exhibit potent inhibitory activities, with 50% inhibition concentration (IC50 values of 11.59 ± 1.39 μM and 9.94 ± 0.15 μM against PTP1B and 74.42 ± 0.01 and 106.59 ± 0.44 μM against α-glucosidase, respectively. With the exceptions of icaritin and icariside II, glycosylated flavonoids did not exhibit any inhibitory effects in the two assays. Enzyme kinetics analyses revealed that icaritin and icariside II demonstrated noncompetitive-type inhibition against PTP1B, with inhibition constant (Ki values of 11.41 and 11.66 μM, respectively. Moreover, molecular docking analysis confirmed that icaritin and icariside II both occupy the same site as allosteric ligand. Thus, the molecular docking simulation results were in close agreement with the experimental data with respect to inhibition activity. In conclusion, deglycosylated metabolites of icariin from E. koreanum might offer therapeutic potential for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  14. Antidiabetic Activity of Polyherbal Formulation in Streptozotocin – Nicotinamide Induced Diabetic Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendran Ramesh Petchi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Glycosmis pentaphylla, Tridax procumbens, and Mangifera indica are well-known plants available throughout India and they are commonly used for the treatment of various diseases including diabetes mellitus. The antidiabetic activity of the individual plant parts is well known, but the synergistic or combined effects are unclear. The concept of polyherbalism has been highlighted in Sharangdhar Samhita, an Ayurvedic literature dating back to 1300 AD. Polyherbal formulations enhance the therapeutic action and reduce the concentrations of single herbs, thereby reducing adverse events. The aim of the present study is to formulate a polyherbal formulation and evaluate its antidiabetic potential in animals. The polyherbal formulation was formulated using the ethanol extracts of the stem bark of G. pentaphylla, whole plant of T. procumbens, and leaves of M. indica. The polyherbal formulation contains the ethanol extracts of G. pentaphylla, T. procumbens, and M. indica in the ratio of 2:2:1. The quality of the finished product was evaluated as per the World Health Organization’s guidelines for the quality control of herbal materials. The quality testing parameters of the polyherbal formulation were within the limits. Fingerprint analysis of the polyherbal formulation showed effective separation at 366 nm, and it revealed that the active compound present in the polyherbal formulation and the active compounds present in all the three extracts were the same. The acute toxicity studies of the polyherbal formulation did not show any toxic symptoms in doses up to 2000 mg/kg over 14 days. The oral antidiabetic activity of the polyherbal formulation (250 and 500 mg/kg was screened against streptozotocin (50 mg/kg; i.p.+nicotinamide (120 mg/kg; i.p. induced diabetes mellitus in rats. The investigational drug was administered for 21 consecutive days, and the effect of the polyherbal formulation on blood glucose levels was studied at regular intervals. At

  15. Application of Herbal Medicines with Bitter Flavor and Cold Property on Treating Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongdong Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus has been a global pandemic. Traditional Chinese Medicine has been used on diabetes mellitus for thousands of years and the modern Chinese medicine studies have found a curative effect of herbal medicine with bitter flavor and cold property on diabetes. This review will introduce the theory summary of flavor and property in TCM, argument basis, the evidences from clinical trails and animal experiments, the possible antidiabetic mechanisms, and advantages on lowering glucose of herbal medicines with bitter flavor and cold property and take rhizome, Chinese rhubarb, and Momordica charantia, the three herbal medicines with bitter flavor and cold property, as examples to illustrate the exact antidiabetic effect. It is hoped that this review can provide some ideas and inspiration for the treatment of diabetes with herbal medicine.

  16. Application of Herbal Medicines with Bitter Flavor and Cold Property on Treating Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongdong; Guo, Jing; Pang, Bing; Zhao, Linhua; Tong, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus has been a global pandemic. Traditional Chinese Medicine has been used on diabetes mellitus for thousands of years and the modern Chinese medicine studies have found a curative effect of herbal medicine with bitter flavor and cold property on diabetes. This review will introduce the theory summary of flavor and property in TCM, argument basis, the evidences from clinical trails and animal experiments, the possible antidiabetic mechanisms, and advantages on lowering glucose of herbal medicines with bitter flavor and cold property and take rhizome, Chinese rhubarb, and Momordica charantia, the three herbal medicines with bitter flavor and cold property, as examples to illustrate the exact antidiabetic effect. It is hoped that this review can provide some ideas and inspiration for the treatment of diabetes with herbal medicine.

  17. Application of Herbal Medicines with Bitter Flavor and Cold Property on Treating Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongdong; Guo, Jing; Pang, Bing; Zhao, Linhua; Tong, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus has been a global pandemic. Traditional Chinese Medicine has been used on diabetes mellitus for thousands of years and the modern Chinese medicine studies have found a curative effect of herbal medicine with bitter flavor and cold property on diabetes. This review will introduce the theory summary of flavor and property in TCM, argument basis, the evidences from clinical trails and animal experiments, the possible antidiabetic mechanisms, and advantages on lowering glucose of herbal medicines with bitter flavor and cold property and take rhizome, Chinese rhubarb, and Momordica charantia, the three herbal medicines with bitter flavor and cold property, as examples to illustrate the exact antidiabetic effect. It is hoped that this review can provide some ideas and inspiration for the treatment of diabetes with herbal medicine. PMID:26557150

  18. Equilibrium properties of proximity effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteve, D.; Pothier, H.; Gueron, S.; Birge, N.O.; Devoret, M.

    1996-12-31

    The proximity effect in diffusive normal-superconducting (NS) nano-structures is described by the Usadel equations for the electron pair correlations. We show that these equations obey a variational principle with a potential which generalizes the Ginzburg-Landau energy functional. We discuss simple examples of NS circuits using this formalism. In order to test the theoretical predictions of the Usadel equations, we have measured the density of states as a function of energy on a long N wire in contact with a S wire at one end, at different distances from the NS interface. (authors). 12 refs.

  19. A novel class of α-glucosidase and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors from Ganoderma leucocontextum and the anti-diabetic properties of ganomycin I in KK-Ay mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Bao, Li; Ma, Ke; Zhang, Jinjin; Chen, Baosong; Han, Junjie; Ren, Jinwei; Luo, Huajun; Liu, Hongwei

    2017-02-15

    Three new meroterpenoids, ganoleucin A-C (1-3), together with five known meroterpenoids (4-8), were isolated from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma leucocontextum. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analysis, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and chemical transformation. The inhibitory effects of 1-8 on HMG-CoA reductase and α-glucosidase were tested in vitro. Ganomycin I (4), 5, and 8 showed stronger inhibitory activity against HMG-CoA reductase than the positive control atorvastatin. Compounds 1, and 3-8 presented potent noncompetitive inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase from both yeast and rat small intestinal mucosa. Ganomycin I (4), the most potent inhibitor against both α-glucosidase and HMG-CoA reductase, was synthesized and evaluated for its in vivo bioactivity. Pharmacological results showed that ganomycin I (4) exerted potent and efficacious hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic, and insulin-sensitizing effects in KK-A y mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Stevia rebaudiana loaded titanium oxide nanomaterials as an antidiabetic agent in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadna Langle

    Full Text Available Abstract Stevia rebaudiana (Bertoni Bertoni, Asteraceae, is a plant with hypoglycemic and antihyperlipidemic properties. S. rebaudiana (SrB has become a lead candidate for the treatment of the diabetes mellitus. However, chronic administrations of S. rebaudiana are required to cause the normoglycemic effect. Importantly, nanomaterials in general and titanium dioxide (TiO2 in particular have become effective tools for drug delivery. In this work, we obtained TiO2 nanomaterials with SrB at different concentrations (10, 20 and 30 µM by sol–gel method. After this nanomaterials were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Where it was demonstrated, the presence of the S. rebaudiana in TiO2 nanomaterials, which were observed as hemispherical agglomerated particles of different sizes. The nanomaterials were evaluated in male rats whose diabetes mellitus-phenotype was induced by alloxan (200 mg/kg, i.p.. The co-administration of TiO2-SrB (20 and 30 µM induced a significant and permanent decrease in the glucose concentration since 4 h, until 30 days post-administration. Likewise, the concentrations of insulin, glycosylated hemoglobin, cholesterol, and triacylglycerides showed a significant recovery to basal levels. The major finding of the study was that the TiO2-SrB (20 and 30 µM has a potent and prolonged activity antidiabetic. TiO2 can be considered like an appropriated vehicle in the continuous freeing of active substances to treat of diabetes mellitus.

  1. An in vitro evaluation of the antioxidant and antidiabetic potential of Sutherlandia montana E. Phillips & R.A. Dyer leaf extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afolakemi Abibat Alimi

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: The observed properties might be linked to the presence of active principles as shown by the results of the phytochemical analyses of the extracts. This research has validated the folkloric application of Sutherlandia montana as a potential antidiabetic agent, which is evident from the inhibition of specific activities of key enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism.

  2. Antioxidant and antidiabetic profiles of two African medicinal plants: Picralima nitida (Apocynaceae) and Sonchus oleraceus (Asteraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teugwa, Clautilde Mofor; Mejiato, Pascaline Chouadeu; Zofou, Denis; Tchinda, Bruno Tugnoua; Boyom, Fabrice Fekam

    2013-07-15

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disease characterized by chronic hyperglycaemia generally associated with oxidative stress. The present study aims at evaluating the antioxidant and antidiabetic potential of methanol and hydroethanol extracts of the stem bark and leaves of Pricralima nitida and the Sonchus oleraceus whole plant respectively. The in vitro antioxidant activity was assessed using 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrilhydrazyl (DPPH) for free radical-scavenging properties of the extracts, and the Folin-Ciocalteu method in determining their phenol contents. The antidiabetic activity was tested in mice following streptozotocin diabetes induction, and selected oxidative stress markers (Malondialdehyde, Hydrogen peroxides and Catalase) were measured in order to evaluate the level of oxidative stress in treated animals. The in vitro antioxidant activity using DPPH showed IC50 ranging from 0.19 ± 0.08 to 1.00 ± 0.06 mg/mL. The highest activity was obtained with the hydroethanol extracts of S. oleraceus (0.19 mg/mL and P. nitida (0.24 mg/mL). Polyphenol contents ranged from 182.25 ± 16.76 to 684.62 ± 46.66 μg Eq Cat/g. The methanol extract of P. nitida showed the highest activity, followed by the hydroethanol extract of S. oleraceus (616.89 ± 19.20 μEq Cat/g). The hydroethanol extract of whole plants (150 mg/Kg) and methanol leave extract of P. nitida (300 mg/Kg) exhibited significant antidiabetic activities with 39.40% and 38.48% glycaemia reduction, respectively. The measurement of stress markers in plasma, liver and kidney after administration of both extracts showed significant reduction in MDA and hydrogen peroxide levels, coupled with a substantial increase in catalase activity. These findings suggest that S. oleraceus whole plant and P. nitida leaves possess both antidiabetic and antioxidant properties, and therefore could be used as starting point for the development of herbal medicines and/or source of new drug molecules against

  3. Anti-diabetic properties of Securinega virosa (Euphorbiaceae) leaf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-01-04

    Jan 4, 2008 ... 1Department of Human Physiology, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria. 2Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacy Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria. 3Department of Pharmacology, Bayero University, Kano, Nigeria. Accepted 5 December, 2007. This study was undertaken to evaluate ...

  4. Chemical composition and anti-diabetic properties of Jatropha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Joy

    The aim of performing acute toxicity study was for establishing the therapeutic index of a particular treatment and to ensure the safety in vivo. The LD50 of the 50% aqueous extract of J. curcas was found to be. 2500 mg/kg. The proximate composition of shade dried and fresh J. curcas leaves extracts (JCLE) as displayed.

  5. Anti-diabetic activity of crude Pistacia lentiscus in alloxan-induced diabetes in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Saad Ur Rehman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-diabetic effect of crude Pistacia lentiscus gum (mastic gum in alloxan-treated diabetic rat model. The crude P. lentiscus (100 mg/kg showed significant (p<0.001 reduction in blood glucose as compared to control. Liver function test also showed significant changes (p<0.001 as compared to alloxan-treated group. The results of this study showed that crude P. lentiscus gum have considerable efficacy in curing diabetes and have hepatoprotective effect.

  6. Bis(allixinato)oxovanadium(IV) complex is a potent antidiabetic agent: studies on structure-activity relationship for a series of hydroxypyrone-vanadium complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Yusuke; Yoshida, Jiro; Kodera, Yukihiro; Katoh, Akira; Takada, Jitsuya; Sakurai, Hiromu

    2006-06-01

    There is an urgent medical need for orally effective drugs to replace insulin injections for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Vanadium complexes with insulin-mimetic activities have recently been proposed as candidates as new antidiabetic drugs. Following in vitro and in vivo studies on a group of bis(3-hydroxy-4-pyronato)oxovanadium(IV) (1) complexes with VO(O4) coordination mode, bis(allixinato)oxovanadium(IV) (3) which contains allixin, a garlic component, was found to be the most potent antidiabetic agent among them. Complex 3 with a high in vitro insulin-mimetic activity in terms of both free fatty acid (FFA)-release inhibitory and glucose-uptake enhancing activities in isolated rat adipocytes exhibited a high hypoglycemic effect in type 1 diabetic model mice by both intraperitoneal injections and oral administrations. Complex 3 is thus proposed to be one of the most effective candidates for antidiabetic therapy.

  7. Antidiabetic activity of water extract of Solanum trilobatum (Linn.) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... changes in body weight, serum lipid profiles and liver glycogen levels assessed in the extract treated diabetic rats ... of medicine. Key words: Antidiabetic activity, alloxan monohydrate, Gliben clamide, rats, Solanum trilobatum. .... either six weighing 150 - 200 g bred in Animal Tissue Culture Lab,. Karpagam ...

  8. Studies on in vitro evaluation of antidiabetic potentials of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Among various therapeutic approaches implemented to prevent diabetes is to regulate the blood glucose levels by various mechanisms. This is being assessed by in vitro antidiabetic assays such as inhibition of carbohydrate digesting enzymes and non-enzymatic glycosylation of haemoglobin. Inhibition of alpha-amylase ...

  9. Antidiabetic Efficacy of Aqueous Fruit Extract of Amla ( Emblica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the antidiabetic potential of Emblica officinalis, Gaertn on diabetic rats. Methods: The study investigated the anti-hyperglycemic potential of the aqueous fruit extract of amla (E. officianalis, for eleven weeks in streptozotocin-induced diabetic obese rats. The study utilized forty eight rats divided into four ...

  10. Antidiabetic activity of ethanolic leaf extract of Croton zambesicus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antidiabetic activity of ethanolic leaf extract of Croton zambesicus Muell. Arg. was evaluated using alloxan-induced (150mg/kg) hyperglycaemic rats. The activity of the ethanolic leaf extract was compared with that of a reference drug Chlorpropamide. The Blood Glucose Levels were measured using glucometer. The extract ...

  11. Antidiabetic And Toxicological Evaluation Of Aqueous Ethanol Leaf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Secamone afzelii Rhoem is used in ethnomedicine for hepatic diseases, diabetes, venereal diseases, amenorrhoea and toothaches. This present study was aimed at evaluating the antidiabetic activity and to establish the toxicological profile of the plant to confirm its traditional application and justify continuous usage.

  12. Factors Associated with Treatment Response to Antidiabetic Agents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors Associated with Treatment Response to. Antidiabetic Agents in Compliant Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Patients: A Brief Summary of 5-Year Data. Hasniza Zaman Huri1,2* and Lee Tze Xiang2. 1Clinical Investigation Centre, Faculty of Medicine,13th Floor Main Tower, University Malaya Medical Centre, 59100 Lembah.

  13. Investigation into the prescribing patterns and cost of antidiabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and soluble insulin aspartame and protamine) together accounted for 63% of all the insulin prescribed, and 67% of the total cost of prescribed insulin. Almost 39% (n = 62 717) of the “combination therapy” prescriptions were for a sulfonylurea in combination with a biguanide plus at least one other antidiabetic product.

  14. Scale dependence of effective media properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tidwell, V.C.; VonDoemming, J.D.; Martinez, K.

    1992-01-01

    For problems where media properties are measured at one scale and applied at another, scaling laws or models must be used in order to define effective properties at the scale of interest. The accuracy of such models will play a critical role in predicting flow and transport through the Yucca Mountain Test Site given the sensitivity of these calculations to the input property fields. Therefore, a research programhas been established to gain a fundamental understanding of how properties scale with the aim of developing and testing models that describe scaling behavior in a quantitative-manner. Scaling of constitutive rock properties is investigated through physical experimentation involving the collection of suites of gas permeability data measured over a range of discrete scales. Also, various physical characteristics of property heterogeneity and the means by which the heterogeneity is measured and described are systematically investigated to evaluate their influence on scaling behavior. This paper summarizes the approach that isbeing taken toward this goal and presents the results of a scoping study that was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed research

  15. Beyond local effective material properties for metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnasri, K.; Khrabustovskyi, A.; Stohrer, C.; Plum, M.; Rockstuhl, C.

    2018-02-01

    To discuss the properties of metamaterials on physical grounds and to consider them in applications, effective material parameters are usually introduced and assigned to a given metamaterial. In most cases, only weak spatial dispersion is considered. It allows to assign local material properties, e.g., a permittivity and a permeability. However, this turned out to be insufficient. To solve this problem, we study here the effective properties of metamaterials with constitutive relations beyond a local response and take strong spatial dispersion into account. This research requires two contributions. First, bulk properties in terms of eigenmodes need to be studied. We particularly investigate the isofrequency surfaces of their dispersion relation are investigated and compared to those of an actual metamaterial. The significant improvement to effectively describe it provides evidence for the necessity to use nonlocal material laws in the effective description of metamaterials. Second, to be able to capitalize on such constitutive relations, also interface conditions need to be known. They are derived in this contribution for our form of the nonlocality using a generalized (weak) formulation of Maxwell's equations. Based on such interface conditions, Fresnel expressions are obtained that predict the amplitude of the reflected and transmitted plane wave upon illuminating a slab of such a nonlocal metamaterial. This all together offers the necessary means for the in-depth analysis of metamaterials characterized by strong spatial dispersion. The general formulation we choose here renders our approach applicable to a wide class of metamaterials.

  16. EFFECT OF SURFACTANTS ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of non ionic surfactant on the mechanical properties of acetaminophen-wax matrix tablet and hence its implication on dissolution profile. Acetaminophen-wax matrix granules were prepared by melt granulation technique. This was formed by triturating acetaminophen ...

  17. How gluten properties are effected by pentosans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, M.; Vliet, van T.; Hamer, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    During the wet separation of starch and gluten, both water extractable pentosans (WEP) and water unextractable solids (WUS) have a negative effect on gluten yield. Gluten properties are also affected: the gluten becomes less extensible. In comparison to the control, addition of WUS or WEP resulted

  18. Isolation of Antidiabetic Principle from Fruit Rinds of Punica granatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vishal; Viswanatha, G. L.; Manohar, D.; Shivaprasad, H. N.

    2012-01-01

    Present study was aimed to isolate and evaluate the antidiabetic activity of phytoconstituents from fruit rinds of Punica granatum. With the above objectives Valoneic acid dilactone (VAD) was isolated from methanolic fruit rind extracts of Punica granatum (MEPG) and confirmed by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, and mass spectral data. Antidiabetic activity was evaluated by Aldose reductase, α-amylase and PTP1B inhibition assays in in vitro and Alloxan-induced diabetes in rats was used as an in vivo model. In bioactivity studies, MEPG and VAD have showed potent antidiabetic activity in α-amylase, aldose reductase, and PTP1B inhibition assays with IC50 values of 1.02, 2.050, 26.25 μg/mL and 0.284, 0.788, 12.41 μg/mL, respectively. Furthermore, in alloxan-induced diabetes model MEPG (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) and VAD (10, 25, and 50 mg/kg, p.o.) have showed significant and dose dependent antidiabetic activity by maintaining the blood glucose levels within the normal limits. Inline with the biochemical findings histopathology of MEPG (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.), VAD (10, 25, and 50 mg/kg, p.o.), and glibenclamide (10 mg/kg, p.o.) treated animals showed significant protection against alloxan-induced pancreatic tissue damage. These findings suggest that MEPG and VAD possess significant antidiabetic activity in both in vitro and in vivo models. PMID:22919408

  19. Isolation of Antidiabetic Principle from Fruit Rinds of Punica granatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Jain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Present study was aimed to isolate and evaluate the antidiabetic activity of phytoconstituents from fruit rinds of Punica granatum. With the above objectives Valoneic acid dilactone (VAD was isolated from methanolic fruit rind extracts of Punica granatum (MEPG and confirmed by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, and mass spectral data. Antidiabetic activity was evaluated by Aldose reductase, α-amylase and PTP1B inhibition assays in in vitro and Alloxan-induced diabetes in rats was used as an in vivo model. In bioactivity studies, MEPG and VAD have showed potent antidiabetic activity in α-amylase, aldose reductase, and PTP1B inhibition assays with IC50 values of 1.02, 2.050, 26.25 μg/mL and 0.284, 0.788, 12.41 μg/mL, respectively. Furthermore, in alloxan-induced diabetes model MEPG (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o. and VAD (10, 25, and 50 mg/kg, p.o. have showed significant and dose dependent antidiabetic activity by maintaining the blood glucose levels within the normal limits. Inline with the biochemical findings histopathology of MEPG (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o., VAD (10, 25, and 50 mg/kg, p.o., and glibenclamide (10 mg/kg, p.o. treated animals showed significant protection against alloxan-induced pancreatic tissue damage. These findings suggest that MEPG and VAD possess significant antidiabetic activity in both in vitro and in vivo models.

  20. Effect of mixing on properties of SCC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Mette Rica; Ekstrand, John Peter; Hansen, Rune

    2007-01-01

    The method of mixing may affect the degree of agglomeration of particles in cement-based materials and thus the properties of the materials in their fresh, hardening, and hardened state. The larger the external force applied during mixing, the larger surface forces can be overcome and the smaller...... agglomerates will remain. The paper focuses on the effect of mixing schedule on self-compacting concrete properties. Workability and micro structure of a typical Danish self-compacting concrete mixed at varying intensity and with addition of superplasticizer in either one or two batches are described...

  1. Evaluation of antidiabetic, hypolipedimic and antioxidant activity of hydroalcoholic extract of leaves and fruit peel of Punica granatum in male Wistar albino rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salwe, Kartik J.; Sachdev, Devender O.; Bahurupi, Yogesh; Kumarappan, Manimekalai

    2015-01-01

    Background: We investigated anti-diabetic, hypolipedimic and antioxidant activity of hydroalcoholic extract from leaves and fruit peel of Punica granatum. Materials and Methods: Streptozotocin induced diabetic Wister rats were used in this study consisting of seven groups of six animals each. Groups (1) normal control, (2) diabetic control, (3) leaves extract 100 mg/kg b.w. of P. granatum, (4) leaves extract 200 mg/kg b.w. of P. granatum, (5) fruit peel extract 100 mg/kg b.w. of P. granatum, (6) peel extract 200 mg/kg b.w. of P. granatum and (7) glibenclamide respectively. Fasting blood sugar was recorded on 1st, 7th, 14th, 21st and 28th day. At the end of the experiment Lipid profile and levels of antioxidants were determined. Safety profile of both extracts was evaluated using acute and chronic toxicity studies. Results: Higher dose of fruit peel extract of P. granatum (PEPG) and glibenclamide significantly lowered blood glucose level from 7th day onwards however glibenclamide was found to be more effective. Leaves extract at higher dose and fruit extract at lower dose also significantly lowered blood glucose level from 14th day onwards. Leaves extract at lower dose also significantly lowered blood glucose level from 21st day onwards. Glibenclamide and higher dose of fruit PEPG extract significantly reduced the total cholesterol, triglyceride levels and significantly increased the high density lipoprotein cholesterol level. Glibenclamide followed by higher dose was found more effective in reducing plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and increasing levels of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase and catalase). No toxicity was observed even when both extracts were administered at 10 times of higher dose used in this study and no significant changes were seen when it were used chronically. Conclusion: Leaves and fruit PEPG possesses significant anti-diabetic, hypolipedimic and antioxidant properties. This study supports the traditional use of P

  2. Evaluation of antidiabetic, hypolipedimic and antioxidant activity of hydroalcoholic extract of leaves and fruit peel of Punica granatum in male Wistar albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salwe, Kartik J; Sachdev, Devender O; Bahurupi, Yogesh; Kumarappan, Manimekalai

    2015-01-01

    We investigated anti-diabetic, hypolipedimic and antioxidant activity of hydroalcoholic extract from leaves and fruit peel of Punica granatum. Streptozotocin induced diabetic Wister rats were used in this study consisting of seven groups of six animals each. Groups (1) normal control, (2) diabetic control, (3) leaves extract 100 mg/kg b.w. of P. granatum, (4) leaves extract 200 mg/kg b.w. of P. granatum, (5) fruit peel extract 100 mg/kg b.w. of P. granatum, (6) peel extract 200 mg/kg b.w. of P. granatum and (7) glibenclamide respectively. Fasting blood sugar was recorded on 1(st), 7(th), 14(th), 21(st) and 28(th) day. At the end of the experiment Lipid profile and levels of antioxidants were determined. Safety profile of both extracts was evaluated using acute and chronic toxicity studies. Higher dose of fruit peel extract of P. granatum (PEPG) and glibenclamide significantly lowered blood glucose level from 7(th) day onwards however glibenclamide was found to be more effective. Leaves extract at higher dose and fruit extract at lower dose also significantly lowered blood glucose level from 14(th) day onwards. Leaves extract at lower dose also significantly lowered blood glucose level from 21(st) day onwards. Glibenclamide and higher dose of fruit PEPG extract significantly reduced the total cholesterol, triglyceride levels and significantly increased the high density lipoprotein cholesterol level. Glibenclamide followed by higher dose was found more effective in reducing plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and increasing levels of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase and catalase). No toxicity was observed even when both extracts were administered at 10 times of higher dose used in this study and no significant changes were seen when it were used chronically. Leaves and fruit PEPG possesses significant anti-diabetic, hypolipedimic and antioxidant properties. This study supports the traditional use of P. granatum in diabetes. Fruit peel which is

  3. Effective Optical Properties of Plasmonic Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etrich, Christoph; Fahr, Stephan; Hedayati, Mehdi Keshavarz; Faupel, Franz; Elbahri, Mady; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2014-01-27

    Plasmonic nanocomposites find many applications, such as nanometric coatings in emerging fields, such as optotronics, photovoltaics or integrated optics. To make use of their ability to affect light propagation in an unprecedented manner, plasmonic nanocomposites should consist of densely packed metallic nanoparticles. This causes a major challenge for their theoretical description, since the reliable assignment of effective optical properties with established effective medium theories is no longer possible. Established theories, e.g., the Maxwell-Garnett formalism, are only applicable for strongly diluted nanocomposites. This effective description, however, is a prerequisite to consider plasmonic nanocomposites in the design of optical devices. Here, we mitigate this problem and use full wave optical simulations to assign effective properties to plasmonic nanocomposites with filling fractions close to the percolation threshold. We show that these effective properties can be used to properly predict the optical action of functional devices that contain nanocomposites in their design. With this contribution we pave the way to consider plasmonic nanocomposites comparably to ordinary materials in the design of optical elements.

  4. Effective Optical Properties of Plasmonic Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Etrich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic nanocomposites find many applications, such as nanometric coatings in emerging fields, such as optotronics, photovoltaics or integrated optics. To make use of their ability to affect light propagation in an unprecedented manner, plasmonic nanocomposites should consist of densely packed metallic nanoparticles. This causes a major challenge for their theoretical description, since the reliable assignment of effective optical properties with established effective medium theories is no longer possible. Established theories, e.g., the Maxwell-Garnett formalism, are only applicable for strongly diluted nanocomposites. This effective description, however, is a prerequisite to consider plasmonic nanocomposites in the design of optical devices. Here, we mitigate this problem and use full wave optical simulations to assign effective properties to plasmonic nanocomposites with filling fractions close to the percolation threshold. We show that these effective properties can be used to properly predict the optical action of functional devices that contain nanocomposites in their design. With this contribution we pave the way to consider plasmonic nanocomposites comparably to ordinary materials in the design of optical elements.

  5. Extracts and compounds with anti-diabetic complications and anti-cancer activity from Castanea mollissina Blume (Chinese chestnut).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Gao, Hui-yuan; Baba, Masaki; Okada, Yoshihito; Okuyama, Toru; Wu, Li-jun; Zhan, Li-bin

    2014-10-28

    Castanea mollissima Blume (Chinese chestnut), as a food product is known for its various nutrients and functional values to the human health. The present study was carried out to analyze the anti-diabetic complications and anti-cancer activities of the bioactive compounds present in C. mollissima. The kernels (CK), shells (CS) and involucres (CI) parts of C. Blume were extracted with 90% alcohol. The water suspension of these dried alcohol extracts were extracted using EtOAc and n-BuOH successively. The n-BuOH fraction of CI (CI-B) was isolated by silica gel column, Sephadex LH 20 column and preparative HPLC. The isolated compounds were identified by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, HMBC, HMQC and ESI-Q-TOF MS, All the fractions and compounds isolated were evaluated on human recombinant aldose reductase (HR-AR) assay, advanced glycation end products (AGEs) formation assay and human COLO 320 DM colon cancer cells inhibitory assay. CI-B was found to show a significant inhibitory effect in above biological screenings. Six flavonoids and three polyphenolic acids were obtained from CI-B. They were identified as kaempferol (1), kaempferol-3-O-[6''-O-(E)-p-coumaroyl]-β-D-glucopyranoside (2), kaempferol-3-O-[6''-O-(E)-p-coumaroyl]-β-D-galactopyranoside (3), kaempferol-3-O-[2''-O-(E)-p-coumaroyl]-β-D-glucopyranoside (4), kaempferol-3-O-[2", 6"-di-O-(E)-p-coumaroyl]-β-D-glucopyranoside (5) and kaempferol-3-O-[2", 6"-di-O-(E)-p-coumaroyl]-β-D-galactopyranoside (6), casuariin (7), casuarinin (8) and castalagin (9). Compounds 2-9 were found to show higher activity than quercetin (positive control) in the AR assay. Compounds 3-6, 8, and 9 showed stronger inhibitory effects than amino guanidine (positive control) on AGEs production. Compounds 4-6, 7, and 8 showed much higher cytotoxic activity than 5-fluorouracil (positive control) against the human COLO 320 DM colon cancer cells. Our results suggest that flavonoids and polyphenolic acids possesses anti-diabetes complications and anti

  6. Prognostic significance of anti-diabetic medications in pancreatic cancer: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dong-Chu; Gong, Hui; Tan, Chong-Qing; Luo, Jian-Quan

    2017-09-22

    The role of anti-diabetic medications in pancreatic cancer remains conflicting. We carried out a systematic search of Pubmed and Embase databases for studies published before August 2016, which assessed the associations between anti-diabetic medications (metformin, sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones and insulin) intake and pancreatic cancer prognosis. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using the random-effects model. The primary outcomes of interest were overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Fourteen studies enrolling 94778 participants were eligible for inclusion, with 12 cohort studies and 2 randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Significant association between metformin (adjusted HR=0.77, 95% CI=0.68-0.87) use and OS was found in cohort studies, whereas no significant association between metformin use and PFS (HR=1.22; 95% CI=0.76-1.95) or OS (HR=1.20, 95% CI=0.84-1.72) in RCTs. No significant survival benefits were identified for insulin (HR=1.18, 95% CI=0.83-1.69), sulfonylureas (HR=1.03, 95% CI=0.81-1.30), or thiazolidinediones (HR=0.84, 95% CI=0.58-1.22). The trim-and-fill method and subgroup analyses stratified by the study characteristics confirmed the robustness of the results. Our findings provide strong evidence that metformin is associated with improved OS in pancreatic cancer patients in cohort studies. However, the effect of other anti-diabetic medications should be interpreted with caution owing to the limited number of studies.

  7. Nepalese patients' anti-diabetic medication taking behaviour: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapkota, Sujata; Brien, Jo-Anne E; Aslani, Parisa

    2017-02-25

    To explore anti-diabetic medication taking behaviour in Nepalese patients with type 2 diabetes and investigate the factors impacting medication taking in this population. Face-to-face interviews (n = 48) were conducted with Nepalese patients with type 2 diabetes in Sydney (Australia) and Kathmandu (Nepal). All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Participants' medication adherence was also assessed quantitatively using the summary of diabetes self-care activity (SDSCA) questionnaire. The medication taking behaviour of Nepalese participants aligned with the Stages of Change Model, with some notable patterns of behaviour. Most participants initiated and implemented anti-diabetic medications soon after obtaining their prescription. However, a few, delayed initiation and/or ceased medications after initiation to recommence later. Nonetheless, upon recommencement, participants persisted fairly well with their medications. The self-reported medication adherence was high (97.3%). Although some participants expressed adherence as a challenge at the start of therapy, medication taking on a day-to-day basis was not reported as difficult. Factors such as participants' reluctance towards using medications and preference for natural methods of treatment, together with inadequate understanding about diabetes and treatment resulted in the delay in initiating therapy, and contributed to cessation of therapy. On the other hand, ooccasional non-adherence in daily medication taking was mostly related to inconsistency in meal practices and forgetfulness. Encouragement from doctors and increased awareness about the disease and treatment facilitated medication adherence, including initiation of therapy. This study demonstrates that Nepalese patients are likely to delay or cease anti-diabetic medications until they fully accept and acknowledge the benefits and necessity of medications for effective diabetes management. Thus, educating

  8. Alcohol's Effects on Lipid Bilayer Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingólfsson, Helgi I.; Andersen, Olaf S.

    2011-01-01

    Alcohols are known modulators of lipid bilayer properties. Their biological effects have long been attributed to their bilayer-modifying effects, but alcohols can also alter protein function through direct protein interactions. This raises the question: Do alcohol's biological actions result predominantly from direct protein-alcohol interactions or from general changes in the membrane properties? The efficacy of alcohols of various chain lengths tends to exhibit a so-called cutoff effect (i.e., increasing potency with increased chain length, which that eventually levels off). The cutoff varies depending on the assay, and numerous mechanisms have been proposed such as: limited size of the alcohol-protein interaction site, limited alcohol solubility, and a chain-length-dependent lipid bilayer-alcohol interaction. To address these issues, we determined the bilayer-modifying potency of 27 aliphatic alcohols using a gramicidin-based fluorescence assay. All of the alcohols tested (with chain lengths of 1–16 carbons) alter the bilayer properties, as sensed by a bilayer-spanning channel. The bilayer-modifying potency of the short-chain alcohols scales linearly with their bilayer partitioning; the potency tapers off at higher chain lengths, and eventually changes sign for the longest-chain alcohols, demonstrating an alcohol cutoff effect in a system that has no alcohol-binding pocket. PMID:21843475

  9. Compositional analysis and in vivo anti-diabetic activity of wild Algerian Marrubium vulgare L. infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjelal, Amel; Henchiri, Cherifa; Siracusa, Laura; Sari, Madani; Ruberto, Giuseppe

    2012-03-01

    Marrubium vulgare (Lamiaceae) is a plant traditionally used for the treatment of diabetes in Algeria. Compositional analysis of the aqueous infusion revealed the presence of fifteen metabolites, all belonging to the class of polyphenols. Particularly, seven flavonoids have been detected, together with 5-caffeoylquinic (chlorogenic) acid in small amounts; the extract is dominated by the presence of a series of complex molecules, characterized as verbascoside (acteoside) derivatives. Concerning the anti-diabetic effectiveness a series of in vivo experiments were carried out on albinos Wistar rats. Diabetes was induced in the animals by intra-peritoneal injection of alloxane; they were treated twice a day with aqueous extract from aerial part infusion (100, 200 and 300 mg/kg body weight) and glibenclamide (5mg/kg body weight) for 15 days. Oral administration of 200 and 300 mg/kg body weight of aqueous extract the Marrubium vulgare induced an significant effect antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic (dose-dependent effect). A decrease in blood glucose by 50% for the dose 100 mg/kg and more than 60% for doses 200 and 300 mg/kg, as well as a significant lowering of total lipids, triglycerides, and total cholesterol levels in treated animals, compared with diabetic controls group (p<0.001), have been observed. Glibenclamide was used as reference and showed similar effects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Hancornia speciosa Gomes (Apocynaceae) as a potential anti-diabetic drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Aline C; Pereira, Ana Bárbara D; Moreira, Carolina C L; Botion, Leida M; Lemos, Virgínia S; Braga, Fernão C; Cortes, Steyner F

    2015-02-23

    The leaves of Hancornia speciosa Gomes are traditionally used to treat diabetes in Brazil. The aim of the study is to evaluate the potential anti-diabetic effect of Hancornia speciosa extract and derived fractions. The ethanolic extract from Hancornia speciosa leaves and chromatographic fractions thereof were evaluated on α-glucosidase assay, on hyperglycemic effect and glucose uptake. The chemical composition of the extract and its most active fraction was investigated by ESI-LC-MS. The ethanolic extract and derived fractions inhibited α-glucosidase in vitro. However, only the crude extract and the dichloromethane fraction inhibited the hyperglycemic effect induced by starch or glucose. Both the extract and dichloromethane fraction were also able to increase glucose uptake in adipocytes. Bornesitol, quinic acid, and chorogenic acid were identified in the extract, along with flavonoid glycosides, whereas the dichloromethane fraction is majorly composed by esters of lupeol and/or α/β-amirin. Hancornia speciosa has a potential anti-diabetic effect through a mechanism dependent on inhibition of α-glucosidase and increase on glucose uptake. These results give support to the use on traditional medicine of this medicinal plant. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical usage of hypolipidemic and antidiabetic drugs in the prevention and treatment of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berstein, Lev M

    2005-06-28

    Factors predisposing hormone-dependent tissues to the development of tumors coincide, at least partly, with hormonal-metabolic promoters (like insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, visceral obesity, etc.) of other main non-communicable diseases. This important knowledge poses the question of whether the same approach which is applied for prevention/treatment of a metabolic syndrome and the associated endocrine disorders might also be used in preventive and therapeutic oncology. Whereas an answer to this question remains controversial and is based mainly on experimental evidence, there is accumulating clinical data suggesting a practical significance of such a strategy, even though it is not to be considered as directly cytostatic. Among the many drugs under discussion, three groups of medicines (statins, antidiabetic biguanides, and thiazolidinediones) are the most attractive. The concept of metabolic rehabilitation is proposed and used practically in an adjuvant setting for the correction of the above-mentioned endocrine-metabolic disorders commonly found in cancer patients. The current use and aim of this approach is to improve the survival of patients and limit cancer progression. Nonetheless, it also appears potentially useful as a neoadjuvant therapy as well as a prophylactic treatment earlier in life for specific groups of people with hormone-associated enhanced oncological risk. It seems possible that certain hypolipidemic and antidiabetic medicines with pleiotropic effects might be combined with traditional antisteroid prevention/therapeutic approaches in routine clinical situations as well as for overcoming resistance to standard cancer hormonal therapies including receptor-negative cases. Characteristic at the end of the 20th and at the beginning of the 21st century is an epidemic of diabetes and obesity, which might further increase the incidence of certain cancers. This makes it timely to apply hypolipidemic and antidiabetic drugs (in combination

  12. Effects of irradiation on mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Server, W.L.; Griesbach, T.J.; Dragunov, Y.; Amaev, A.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. The effects of irradiation on the mechanical properties of reactor pressure vessel steels are explained. This chapter provides some background on the critical elements controlling neutron damage effects. Distinction is made between vessels made in the USA and in the former USSR

  13. Anti-Diabetic Potential of Noni: The Yin and the Yang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratibha V. Nerurkar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Escalating trends of chronic diseases such as type-2 diabetes (T2D have sparked a renewed interest in complementary and alternative medicine, including herbal products. Morinda citrifolia (noni has been used for centuries by Pacific Islanders to treat various ailments. Commercial noni fruit juice has been marketed as a dietary supplement since 1996. In 2003, the European Commission approved Tahitian noni juice as a novel food by the Health and Consumer Protection Directorate General. Among noni’s several health benefits, others and we have demonstrated the anti-diabetic effects of fermented noni fruit juice in animal models. Unfortunately, noni’s exciting journey from Polynesian medicine to the research bench does not reach its final destination of successful clinical outcomes when translated into commercial products. Noni products are perceived to be safe due to their “natural” origin. However, inadequate evidence regarding bioactive compounds, molecular targets, mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, long-term safety, effective dosages, and/or unanticipated side effects are major roadblocks to successful translation “from bench side to bedside”. In this review we summarize the anti-diabetic potential of noni, differences between traditional and modern use of noni, along with beneficial clinical studies of noni products and challenges in clinical translation of noni’s health benefits.

  14. Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy as a Result of Mild Hypercaloric Challenge in Absence of Signs of Diabetes: Modulation by Antidiabetic Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Assi, Ola; Ghali, Rana; Mroueh, Ali; Kaplan, Abdullah; Mougharbil, Nahed; Eid, Ali H.; Zouein, Fouad A.; El-Yazbi, Ahmed F.

    2018-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is an early cardiovascular complication of diabetes occurring before metabolic derangement is evident. The cause of CAN remains elusive and cannot be directly linked to hyperglycemia. Recent clinical data report cardioprotective effects of some antidiabetic drugs independent of their hypoglycemic action. Here, we used a rat model receiving limited daily increase in calories from fat (HC diet) to assess whether mild metabolic challenge led to CAN in absence o...

  15. [Prebiotics: concept, properties and beneficial effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corzo, N; Alonso, J L; Azpiroz, F; Calvo, M A; Cirici, M; Leis, R; Lombó, F; Mateos-Aparicio, I; Plou, F J; Ruas-Madiedo, P; Rúperez, P; Redondo-Cuenca, A; Sanz, M L; Clemente, A

    2015-02-07

    Prebiotics are non-digestible food ingredients (oligosaccharides) that reach the colon and are used as substrate by microorganisms producing energy, metabolites and micronutrients used for the host; in addition they also stimulate the selective growth of certain beneficial species (mainly bifidobacteria and lactobacilli) in the intestinal microbiota. In this article, a multidisciplinary approach to understand the concept of prebiotic carbohydrates, their properties and beneficial effects in humans has been carried out. Definitions of prebiotics, reported by relevant international organizations and researchers, are described. A comprehensive description of accepted prebiotics having strong scientific evidence of their beneficial properties in humans (inulin-type fructans, FOS, GOS, lactulose and human milk oligosaccharides) is reported. Emerging prebiotics and those which are in the early stages of study have also included in this study. Taken into account that the chemical structure greatly influences carbohydrates prebiotic properties, the analytical techniques used for their analysis and characterization are discussed. In vitro and in vivo models used to evaluate the gastrointestinal digestion, absorption resistance and fermentability in the colon of prebiotics as well as major criteria to design robust intervention trials in humans are described. Finally, a comprehensive summary of the beneficial effects of prebiotics for health at systemic and intestinal levels is reported. The research effort on prebiotics has been intensive in last decades and has demonstrated that a multidisciplinary approach is necessary in order to claim their health benefits. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  16. Discovery of p1736, a novel antidiabetic compound that improves peripheral insulin sensitivity in mice models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessy Anthony

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance is a characteristic feature of Type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Currently used thiazolidinedione (TZD insulin sensitizers although effective, have adverse side effects of weight gain, fluid retention and heart failure. Using fat cell-based phenotypic drug discovery approach we identified P1736, a novel antidiabetic molecule that has completed Phase II clinical trials. The present study evaluated the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological properties of P1736. P1736 is a non-TZD and it did not activate human PPAR(Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Gamma receptors. P1736 caused dose dependent increase in glucose uptake (EC50-400 nM in the insulin resistant 3T3 adipocytes. The compound (10 µM induced translocation of GLUT-4 (Glucose Transporter type 4 transporters in these adipocytes while metformin (1.0mM was inactive. In diabetic db/db mice, P1736 (150 mg/kg was more efficacious than metformin in lowering plasma glucose (35% vs 25% and triglyceride levels (38% vs 31%. P1736 tested at 5mg/kg, twice daily doses, reduced glucose by 41% and triglycerides by 32%, in db/db mice. These effects were not associated with adverse effects on body weight or liver function. Rosiglitazone (5mg/kg, twice daily caused 60% and 40 % decreases in glucose and triglyceride levels, respectively. However, rosiglitazone induced 13% weight gain (p<0.05 in db/db mice. P1736 was also efficacious in ob/ob mice wherein 30-35% decrease in glucose and significant improvement in hyperinsulinemia were observed. Administration of P1736 to ob/ob mice resulted in 70% increase in glucose uptake in soleus muscles while metformin caused 38% increase. P1736 exhibited excellent safety profile and was weight neutral in all preclinical models of diabetes. Thus, P1736 with its unique pharmacology coupled with PPAR- independent mode of action could represent an alternative option in the

  17. Discovery of p1736, a novel antidiabetic compound that improves peripheral insulin sensitivity in mice models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Jessy; Kelkar, Aditya; Wilankar, Chandan; Ranjith, Vijayalakshmi; Bhumra, Sujit Kaur; Mutt, Shivaprakash Jagalur; Mutt, Shivaprakash; Deka, Nabajyoti; Sivaramakrishnan, Hariharan; Sharma, Somesh; Marita, Adaikalasamy Rosalind

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a characteristic feature of Type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Currently used thiazolidinedione (TZD) insulin sensitizers although effective, have adverse side effects of weight gain, fluid retention and heart failure. Using fat cell-based phenotypic drug discovery approach we identified P1736, a novel antidiabetic molecule that has completed Phase II clinical trials. The present study evaluated the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological properties of P1736. P1736 is a non-TZD and it did not activate human PPAR(Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Gamma )receptors. P1736 caused dose dependent increase in glucose uptake (EC50-400 nM) in the insulin resistant 3T3 adipocytes. The compound (10 µM) induced translocation of GLUT-4 (Glucose Transporter type 4) transporters in these adipocytes while metformin (1.0mM) was inactive. In diabetic db/db mice, P1736 (150 mg/kg) was more efficacious than metformin in lowering plasma glucose (35% vs 25%) and triglyceride levels (38% vs 31%). P1736 tested at 5mg/kg, twice daily doses, reduced glucose by 41% and triglycerides by 32%, in db/db mice. These effects were not associated with adverse effects on body weight or liver function. Rosiglitazone (5mg/kg, twice daily) caused 60% and 40 % decreases in glucose and triglyceride levels, respectively. However, rosiglitazone induced 13% weight gain (p<0.05) in db/db mice. P1736 was also efficacious in ob/ob mice wherein 30-35% decrease in glucose and significant improvement in hyperinsulinemia were observed. Administration of P1736 to ob/ob mice resulted in 70% increase in glucose uptake in soleus muscles while metformin caused 38% increase. P1736 exhibited excellent safety profile and was weight neutral in all preclinical models of diabetes. Thus, P1736 with its unique pharmacology coupled with PPAR- independent mode of action could represent an alternative option in the management of

  18. Prescribing of Antidiabetic Medicines before, during and after Pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charlton, Rachel A.; Klungsøyr, Kari; Neville, Amanda J.

    2016-01-01

    and 88.8% in the Netherlands received an insulin analogue alone or in combination with human insulin, this proportion increasing over time. Oral products were mainly metformin and prescribing was highest in the 3 months before pregnancy. Metformin use during pregnancy increased in some countries......Aim: To explore antidiabetic medicine prescribing to women before, during and after pregnancy in different regions of Europe. Methods: A common protocol was implemented across seven databases in Denmark, Norway, The Netherlands, Italy (Emilia Romagna/Tuscany), Wales and the rest of the UK. Women...... with a pregnancy starting and ending between 2004 and 2010, (Denmark, 2004–2009; Norway, 2005–2010; Emilia Romagna, 2008–2010), which ended in a live or stillbirth, were identified. Prescriptions for antidiabetic medicines issued (UK) or dispensed (non-UK) during pregnancy and/or the year before or year after...

  19. Effect of molecular weight on polyphenylquinoxaline properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Brian J.

    1991-01-01

    A series of polyphenyl quinoxalines with different molecular weight and end-groups were prepared by varying monomer stoichiometry. Thus, 4,4'-oxydibenzil and 3,3'-diaminobenzidine were reacted in a 50/50 mixture of m-cresol and xylenes. Reaction concentration, temperature, and stir rate were studied and found to have an effect on polymer properties. Number and weight average molecular weights were determined and correlated well with viscosity data. Glass transition temperatures were determined and found to vary with molecular weight and end-groups. Mechanical properties of films from polymers with different molecular weights were essentially identical at room temperature but showed significant differences at 232 C. Diamine terminated polymers were found to be much less thermooxidatively stable than benzil terminated polymers when aged at 316 C even though dynamic thermogravimetric analysis revealed only slight differences. Lower molecular weight polymers exhibited better processability than higher molecular weight polymers.

  20. Synthesis and antidiabetic activity of β-acetamido ketones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-hua Zhang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the use of trifluoroacetic acid as a catalyst in the Dakin–West reaction for the synthesis of β-acetamido ketones. The method has several advantages such as requiring only mild conditions and a low concentration of catalyst. Screening of 19 β-acetamido ketones for antidiabetic activity in vitro showed that their activity as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR agonists and as dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-IV inhibitors was fairly weak.

  1. Nonadherence and factors affecting adherence of diabetic patients to anti-diabetic medication in Assela General Hospital, Oromia Region, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashebir Kassahun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus is a major global health problem covering approximately 347 million persons worldwide. Glycemic control has a main role in its management which mainly depends upon patient adherence to the treatment plan. Accurate assessment of medication adherence is necessary for effective management of diabetes. Objective: To assess nonadherence and factors affecting adherence of diabetic patients to anti-diabetic medication in Assela General Hospital (AGH, Oromia Region, Ethiopia. Materials and Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on patients seeking anti-diabetic drug treatment and follow-up at AGH using structured questionnaire and reviewing the patient record card using check list from January 24, 2014 to February 7, 2014. Descriptive analysis was used to describe the percentages and number of distributions of the variables in the study; and association was identified for categorical data. P ≤ 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Result: Of all respondents, 149 (52.3% and 136 (47.7% were female and male, respectively. The majority of the study participants 189 (66.3% were in the age group of 30–60 years. Two-hundred nineteen (76.8% of respondents were married currently. The majority, 237 (83.2% of respondents did not have blood glucose self-monitoring equipment (glucometer. A total of 196 (68.8% respondents were adhered to anti-diabetic medication. There was a significant association between adherence to the medication and side effect, level of education, monthly income and presence of glucometer at home (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The participants in the area of study were moderately adherent to their anti-diabetic medications with nonadherence rate of 31.2%. Different factors of medication nonadherence were identified such as side effect and complexity of regimen, failure to remember, and sociodemographic factors such as educational level and monthly income.

  2. Role of the antidiabetic drugs: Glibenclamide and metformin on the contractility of isolated rat uteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelany, Mohamed Elsayed; Alqahtani, Saeed; Alkuriji, Afrah; Al-Omar, SulimanYousef

    2016-01-01

    The current investigation has designed to study the role of two antidiabetics, glibenclamide and metformin on the spontaneous uterine contractions in the non-diabetic non-pregnant female rats. The rat uteri were isolated and allocated to two groups: 1)the glibenclamide group: After recording the normal spontaneous uterine contractions, the vehicle (ethanol) and glibenclamide molar concentrations (10(-7), 10(-6) and 10(-5) M) were analyzed on uterine contractions by recording on smoked paper on a rotating kymograph drum, and 2) the metformin group: After recording the normal spontaneous uterine contractions, the metformin concentrations (10(-7), 10(-6) and 10(-5) M) were analyzed on uterine contractions. Responses to the two drugs and vehicle control (ethanol) were recorded for 30 min. Glibenclamide has not significantly effected on the amplitude and frequency of spontaneous contractions of the isolated rat uteri. Metformin also has no significant effect on the amplitude and frequency of spontaneous contractions of the isolated rat uteri. In conclusion, the two oral antidiabetics glibenclamide and metformin have not changed both the amplitude and frequency of spontaneous uterine contractions in the non-pregnant non-diabetic female rats.

  3. Preliminary evaluation of the encapsulation of new antidiabetic sulphonylhydrazone and antitumor N-acylhydrazone derivatives using PLGA nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, F N; Ibiapino, A L; De Figueiredo, L P; De Castro, C E; Giacomelli, F C; Ferreira, F F; Barreiro, E J; Lima, L M; Do Amaral, D N

    2015-01-01

    It has been demonstrated the feasibly of using PLGA nanoparticles to promote the encapsulation of novel anti-diabetic sulphonylhydrazone and antitumor N-acylhydrazone derivatives. The motivation is to further demonstrate the possibility of long-term release of anti-diabetic as well as higher accumulation of the antitumor derivative by using the nanotechnology-based production. The produced nanoparticles were obtained by the nanoprecipitation method, which revealed to be effective in the encapsulation of the bioactive compounds. The determined sizes were in the range of ∼100 nm, which are supposed to be suitable for both potential applications. The preliminary experimental data demonstrated the formation of stable nanosystems and further experiments are underway in order to determine the loading content, encapsulation efficiency and release profile of the hydrophobic bioactive compounds. (paper)

  4. Studies on the Antidiabetic Activities of Cordyceps militaris Extract in Diet-Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Sprague-Dawley Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Dong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to substantial morbidity and high complications, diabetes mellitus is considered as the third “killer” in the world. A search for alternative antidiabetic drugs from herbs or fungi is highly demanded. Our present study aims to investigate the antidiabetic activities of Cordyceps militaris on diet-streptozotocin-induced type 2 diabetes mellitus in rats. Diabetic rats were orally administered with water extract or alcohol extract at 0.05 g/kg and 2 g/kg for 3 weeks, and then, the factors levels related to blood glucose, lipid, free radicals, and even nephropathy were determined. Pathological alterations on liver and kidney were examined. Data showed that, similar to metformin, Cordyceps militaris extracts displayed a significant reduction in blood glucose levels by promoting glucose metabolism and strongly suppressed total cholesterol and triglycerides concentration in serum. Cordyceps militaris extracts exhibit antioxidative effects indicated by normalized superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase levels. The inhibitory effects on blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, uric acid, and protein revealed the protection of Cordyceps militaris extracts against diabetic nephropathy, which was confirmed by pathological morphology reversion. Collectively, Cordyceps militaris extract, a safe pharmaceutical agent, presents excellent antidiabetic and antinephropathic activities and thus has great potential as a new source for diabetes treatment.

  5. Studies on the antidiabetic activities of Cordyceps militaris extract in diet-streptozotocin-induced diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yuan; Jing, Tianjiao; Meng, Qingfan; Liu, Chungang; Hu, Shuang; Ma, Yihang; Liu, Yan; Lu, Jiahui; Cheng, Yingkun; Wang, Di; Teng, Lirong

    2014-01-01

    Due to substantial morbidity and high complications, diabetes mellitus is considered as the third "killer" in the world. A search for alternative antidiabetic drugs from herbs or fungi is highly demanded. Our present study aims to investigate the antidiabetic activities of Cordyceps militaris on diet-streptozotocin-induced type 2 diabetes mellitus in rats. Diabetic rats were orally administered with water extract or alcohol extract at 0.05 g/kg and 2 g/kg for 3 weeks, and then, the factors levels related to blood glucose, lipid, free radicals, and even nephropathy were determined. Pathological alterations on liver and kidney were examined. Data showed that, similar to metformin, Cordyceps militaris extracts displayed a significant reduction in blood glucose levels by promoting glucose metabolism and strongly suppressed total cholesterol and triglycerides concentration in serum. Cordyceps militaris extracts exhibit antioxidative effects indicated by normalized superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase levels. The inhibitory effects on blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, uric acid, and protein revealed the protection of Cordyceps militaris extracts against diabetic nephropathy, which was confirmed by pathological morphology reversion. Collectively, Cordyceps militaris extract, a safe pharmaceutical agent, presents excellent antidiabetic and antinephropathic activities and thus has great potential as a new source for diabetes treatment.

  6. Antidiabetic drugs for stroke prevention in patients with type-2 diabetes. The neurologist's point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Blanca

    2018-04-13

    To date, stroke prevention in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) has been based on the control of other risk factors and comorbidities, as clinical trials aimed at intensive glycemic control have failed to prove the existence of any sort of benefit in reducing macrovascular complications. However, thanks to the FDA's requirement to evaluate the vascular risk of antidiabetic drugs, there has been significant progress in the knowledge of their benefits on the risk of vascular death, acute myocardial infarction and non-fatal stroke in patients with type 2 DM and high vascular risk. This implies the need to incorporate these drugs into the overall vascular prevention strategy in patients with DM who have already suffered a stroke. This manuscript is a critical, non-systematic review on the oral antidiabetics that have demonstrated any sort of effect on stroke risk, interpreting the results of the main clinical trials from the neurologist's point of view. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Combretum lanceolatum flowers extract shows antidiabetic activity through activation of AMPK by quercetin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Roberto Porto Dechandt

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the antidiabetic activity of the Combretum lanceolatum Pohl ex Eichler, Combretaceae, flowers extract (ClEtOH in diabetic rats. Streptozotocin-diabetic rats were divided into four groups: diabetic control, diabetic treated with 500 mg/kg of metformin and diabetic treated with 250 or 500 mg/kg of ClEtOH for 21 days. The treatment of diabetic rats with 500 mg/kg of ClEtOH promoted an increase in the weight of liver, white adipose tissues and skeletal muscles, improving body weight gain. Diabetic rats treated with 500 mg/kg of ClEtOH also presented reduction in glycemia, glycosuria and urinary urea levels, and increase in liver glycogen content. HPLC chromatogram showed that quercetin is the major compound in the extract. The phosphorylation levels of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase were increased in liver slices incubated in vitro with 50 µg/mL of ClEtOH, similarly to the incubation with metformin (50 µg/mL or quercetin (10 µg/mL. The antihyperglycemic effect of ClEtOH was similar to that of metformin and appears to be through inhibition of gluconeogenesis, since urinary urea was reduced and skeletal muscle mass was increased. These data indicate that the antidiabetic activity of the Combretum lanceolatum extract could be mediated, at least in part, through activation of adenosine monophosphateactivated protein kinase by quercetin.

  8. Antidiabetics and diuretics show phototoxicity in HaCaT cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaag, Edgar; Petersen, Anita B.; Gniadecki, Robert; Thorn, Tine; Wulf, Hans Christian

    2001-10-01

    The antidiabetics tolbutamide, glibenclamide, and glipizide, and the diuretics bendroflumethiazide, butizide, furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide, and trichlormethiazide were investigated for potential phototoxicity in the HaCaT cell line. The cells were incubated with the drugs and then exposed to UVA1 irradiation. The effects of the antioxidants L-ascorbic acid, and (alpha) -tocopherol on oxidative DNA damage were assessed. Bendroflumethiazide, furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide, trichlormethiazide, or tolbutamide induced dose-dependent phototoxicity. Cells incubated with bendroflumethiazide, tolbutamide, and glibenclamide, and irradiated with UVA1 demonstrated an increased oxidative DNA damage. Pre-treatment with L-ascorbic acid, or (alpha) -tocopherol, suppressed the UVA-induced DNA damage in cells incubated with 1 mM of bendroflumethiazide, furosemide, glibenclamide, glipizide, tolbutamide, and trichloromethiazide, further implying the involvement of reactive oxygen species in the phototoxic DNA damage. These results may indicate a link between phototoxic and photocancerogenic potential of the sulfonamide-derived oral antidiabetic and diuretic drugs, as it has previously been recognized for psoralen, chlorpromazine, and fluoroquinolones. Excessive exposure to UV light may be deleterious for patients treated with these drugs.

  9. Combretum lanceolatum flowers extract shows antidiabetic activity through activation of AMPK by quercetin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Roberto Porto Dechandt

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the antidiabetic activity of the Combretum lanceolatum Pohl ex Eichler, Combretaceae, flowers extract (ClEtOH in diabetic rats. Streptozotocin-diabetic rats were divided into four groups: diabetic control, diabetic treated with 500 mg/kg of metformin and diabetic treated with 250 or 500 mg/kg of ClEtOH for 21 days. The treatment of diabetic rats with 500 mg/kg of ClEtOH promoted an increase in the weight of liver, white adipose tissues and skeletal muscles, improving body weight gain. Diabetic rats treated with 500 mg/kg of ClEtOH also presented reduction in glycemia, glycosuria and urinary urea levels, and increase in liver glycogen content. HPLC chromatogram showed that quercetin is the major compound in the extract. The phosphorylation levels of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase were increased in liver slices incubated in vitro with 50 µg/mL of ClEtOH, similarly to the incubation with metformin (50 µg/mL or quercetin (10 µg/mL. The antihyperglycemic effect of ClEtOH was similar to that of metformin and appears to be through inhibition of gluconeogenesis, since urinary urea was reduced and skeletal muscle mass was increased. These data indicate that the antidiabetic activity of the Combretum lanceolatum extract could be mediated, at least in part, through activation of adenosine monophosphateactivated protein kinase by quercetin.

  10. Synthesis and Evaluation of Novel Triterpene Analogues of Ursolic Acid as Potential Antidiabetic Agent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panpan Wu

    Full Text Available Ursolic acid (UA is a naturally bioactive compound that possesses potential anti-diabetic activity. The relatively safe and effective molecule intrigued us to further explore and to improve its anti-diabetic activity. In the present study, a series of novel UA analogues was synthesized and their structures were characterized. Their bioactivities against the α-glucosidase from baker's yeast were determined in vitro. The results suggested that most of the analogues exhibited significant inhibitory activity, especially analogues 8b and 9b with the IC50 values of 1.27 ± 0.27 μM (8b and 1.28 ± 0.27 μM (9b, which were lower than the other analogues and the positive control. The molecular docking and 2D-QSAR studies were carried out to prove that the C-3 hydroxyl could interact with the hydrophobic region of the active pocket and form hydrogen bonds to increase the binding affinity of ligand and the homology modelling protein. Thus, these results will be helpful for understanding the relationship between binding mode and bioactivity and for designing better inhibitors from UA analogues.

  11. Piston core properties and disturbance effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, H.W.; Rice, T.L.; Mayne, P.W.; Singh, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    Laboratory geotechnical data on piston cores for 31 sites on the mid-Atlantic Upper Continental Slope show the near-surface sediments vary from normally consolidated to somewhat overconsolidated clayey silts and silty clays of low to high plasticity. They also exhibit normalized behavior and their index property correlations with the effective-stress friction angle, the undrained strength ratio, and the compression index are reasonably consistent with existing knowledge. Because existing knowledge concerning disturbance effect suggests that in-situ preconsolidation stress values should lie between those derived from the triaxial and laboratory vane data, the preconsolidation stress values obtained from the consolidation data appear to be appreciably smaller than in-situ values. -from ASCE Publications Information

  12. Pairing properties of realistic effective interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargano A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the pairing properties of an effective shell-model interaction defined within a model space outside 132Sn and derived by means of perturbation theory from the CD-Bonn free nucleon-nucleon potential. It turns out that the neutron pairing component of the effective interaction is significantly weaker than the proton one, which accounts for the large pairing gap difference observed in the two-valence identical particle nuclei 134Sn and 134Te. The role of the contribution arising from one particle-one hole excitations in determining the pairing force is discussed and its microscopic structure is also analyzed in terms of the multipole decomposition.

  13. Efek Antidiabetes Kombinasi Ekstrak Bawang Putih (Allium sativum Linn. dan Rimpang Kunyit (Curcumma domestica Val. dengan Pembanding Glibenklamid pada Penderita Diabetes Melitus Tipe 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ame Suciati Setiawan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The combination of garlic (Allium sativum Linn. and curcumin extract (Curcumma domestica Val. can be used as an antidiabetic oral to type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM patients and the clinical trial showed that the extract can decrease blood glucose at a dose 2.4 g/day. This clinical trial was conducted to know the antidiabetic effect of the combination of garlic and curcumin extract compared with antidiabetic oral, glibenclamide. The subjects were >35 years of age with type 2 DM who came to internal and endocrine clinic RSUP. Hasan Sadikin Bandung and has been treated with medical nutrition therapy for 2 weeks period November 2007–December 2008. The research design was parallel, randomized and double blind. The combination of garlic and curcumin extract decreased mean value of fasting blood glucose 9.25 mg/dL, 2h PP blood glucose 22.25 mg/dL, HbA1c 1,30% and insulin 12.57 mg/ dL compared with baseline whereas glibenclamide decreased the mean value of fasting blood glucose 72.37 mg/dL, 2h PP 114,25 mg/dL, HbA1c 4.12% and increased insulin 3.34 mg/dL. In conclusion, the extract combination has antidiabetic effect eventhough the effect was not as high as glibenclamide

  14. In vivo assessment of antidiabetic and antioxidative activity of natural phytochemical isolated from fruit-pulp of Eugenia jambolana in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanwar, Reenu Singh; Sharma, Suman Bala; Prabhu, Krishna Madhava

    2017-11-01

    Eugenia jambolana (E. jambolana) is well known for its antidiabetic potential. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antidiabetic and antioxidative effect of an active compound (FIIc) isolated from fruit-pulp of E. jambolana in streptozotocin (45 mg/kg body weight)-induced diabetic rats. FIIc was isolated from the crude aqueous extract of fruit-pulp by ion-exchange column chromatography and high-performance column chromatography. Detailed UV, NMR, and IR spectra suggested that FIIc is α-hydroxy succinamic acid. FIIc was orally administered to diabetic rats at a dose of 10, 15, and 20 mg/kg body weight (mg/kg bwt.) to determine its effective dose. Thereafter, effective dose was administered to 8 weeks to determine its antidiabetic and antioxidative activity by estimation of glycemic index, lipid profile, key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, and oxidative stress parameters. Administration of 15 mg/kg dose daily for 8 weeks led to significant (P glucose. Treatment with FIIc (15 mg/kg bwt.) showed significant improvement (P < 0.001) in all the biochemical parameters. The results demonstrate that FIIc possesses significant antidiabetic and antioxidative activity.

  15. Effect of cryogel on soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunina, L. K.; Fufaeva, M. S.; Filatov, D. A.; Svarovskaya, L. I.; Rozhdestvenskii, E. A.; Gan-Erdene, T.

    2014-05-01

    Samples from the A1 and A1A2 horizons of sandy loamy gray forest soil containing 3.1% organic matter have been mixed with a 5% solution of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) at a ratio of 7 : 1 under laboratory conditions. The samples were frozen at -20°C in a refrigerator; after a freezing-thawing cycle, the evaporation of water from their surface, their thermal conductivity coefficient, their elasticity modulus, and other properties were studied. It has been experimentally found that the thermal conductivity coefficient of cryostructured soil is lower than that of common soil by 25%. It has been shown that the cryostructured soil retains water for a longer time and that the water evaporation rate from its surface is significantly lower compared to the control soil. Cryogel has no negative effect on the catalase activity of soil; it changes the physical properties of soils and positively affects the population of indigenous soil microflora and the growth of the sown plants.

  16. Effect of torcetrapib on glucose, insulin, and hemoglobin A1c in subjects in the Investigation of Lipid Level Management to Understand its Impact in Atherosclerotic Events (ILLUMINATE) trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barter, Philip J.; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Waters, David D.; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Breazna, Andrei; Kastelein, John J. P.

    2011-01-01

    High-density lipoproteins have antidiabetic properties in vitro. Furthermore, elevated high-density lipoprotein levels accompanying a genetic deficiency of cholesteryl ester transfer protein are associated with decreased levels of plasma glucose. We now investigate effects on glucose homeostasis of

  17. Effects of recycled fiber on the properties of fiberboard panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin-yin Hwang; Chung-yun Hse; Todd F. Shupe

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the effects of recycled and virgin wood fiber on the properties of fiberboard. Replacing virgin fiber with recycled fiber adversely affected physical and mechanical properties of fiberboard. Bending properties and dimensional stability were linearly dependent on virgin fiber ratios. Based on strength properties, panels with 20 and 40 percent...

  18. Effect of Chitosan Properties on Immunoreactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindranathan, Sruthi; Koppolu, Bhanu prasanth; Smith, Sean G.; Zaharoff, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan is a widely investigated biopolymer in drug and gene delivery, tissue engineering and vaccine development. However, the immune response to chitosan is not clearly understood due to contradicting results in literature regarding its immunoreactivity. Thus, in this study, we analyzed effects of various biochemical properties, namely degree of deacetylation (DDA), viscosity/polymer length and endotoxin levels, on immune responses by antigen presenting cells (APCs). Chitosan solutions from various sources were treated with mouse and human APCs (macrophages and/or dendritic cells) and the amount of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) released by the cells was used as an indicator of immunoreactivity. Our results indicate that only endotoxin content and not DDA or viscosity influenced chitosan-induced immune responses. Our data also indicate that low endotoxin chitosan (chitosan in preclinical studies in order for this valuable biomaterial to achieve widespread clinical application. PMID:27187416

  19. The Antidiabetic Potential Of Jatropha tanjorensis Leaves ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Southwest Nigeria, infusion of Jatropha tanjorensisi leaves is taken orally for the treatment of diabetic symptoms. The hypoglycemic effect of EtOH/H2O (1:1) leaf extract was evaluated in fasted and glucose-loaded rats at the doses of 1 and 2g/kg in-vivo, while three fractions of the extract were assessed for their ...

  20. Diabetic Complications and Insight into Antidiabetic Potentialities of Ethno-medicinal Plants: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Muhammad; Iqbal, Muhammad Sarfaraz; Shah, Syed Bilal; Rasheed, Tahir; Iqbal, Hafiz M N

    2018-02-21

    The naturally inspired treatment options for several disease conditions and human-health related disorders such as diabetes mellitus have gained considerable research interest. In this context, naturally occurring plants and herbs with medicinal functionalities have gained special place than ever before in the current medicinal world. The objective of this review is to extend the current knowledge in the clinical field related to the diabetic complications. A special focus has also been given to the anti-diabetic potentialities of ethnomedicinal plants. Herein, we reviewed and compiled salient information from the authentic bibliographic databases including PubMed, Scopus, Elsevier, Springer, Bentham Science and other scientific databases. The patents were searched and reviewed from http://www.freepatentsonline.com. Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic disorders associated with the endocrine system that resulted in hyperglycemic conditions. Metabolic disorders can cause many complications such as neuropathy, retinopathy, nephropathy, ischemic heart disease, stroke, and microangiopathy. Traditional botanical therapies have been used around the world to treat diabetes. Among several medications and different medicines, various herbs are known to cure and control diabetes; also have no side effects. History has shown that medicinal plants have long been used for traditional healing around the world to treat diabetes. More than 800 plants around the world are shown by ethnobotanical information as traditional remedies for the treatment of diabetes. Several parts of these plants have been evaluated and appreciated for hypoglycemic activity. Medicinal plants have been found to be more effective than conventional drug compounds with no/fewer side effects and relatively inexpensive. In this review paper, we have reviewed plants with anti-diabetic and related beneficial medicinal effects. This review may be helpful for researchers, diabetic patient and decision makers

  1. Micro-Environmental Signature of The Interactions between Druggable Target Protein, Dipeptidyl Peptidase-IV, and Anti-Diabetic Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Mallick, Bidyut; Sharma, Ashish Ranjan; Sharma, Garima; Jagga, Supriya; Doss, C George Priya; Nam, Ju-Suk; Lee, Sang-Soo

    2017-01-01

    Druggability of a target protein depends on the interacting micro-environment between the target protein and drugs. Therefore, a precise knowledge of the interacting micro-environment between the target protein and drugs is requisite for drug discovery process. To understand such micro-environment, we performed in silico interaction analysis between a human target protein, Dipeptidyl Peptidase-IV (DPP-4), and three anti-diabetic drugs (saxagliptin, linagliptin and vildagliptin). During the theoretical and bioinformatics analysis of micro-environmental properties, we performed drug-likeness study, protein active site predictions, docking analysis and residual interactions with the protein-drug interface. Micro-environmental landscape properties were evaluated through various parameters such as binding energy, intermolecular energy, electrostatic energy, van der Waals'+H-bond+desolvo energy (E VHD ) and ligand efficiency (LE) using different in silico methods. For this study, we have used several servers and software, such as Molsoft prediction server, CASTp server, AutoDock software and LIGPLOT server. Through micro-environmental study, highest log P value was observed for linagliptin (1.07). Lowest binding energy was also observed for linagliptin with DPP-4 in the binding plot. We also identified the number of H-bonds and residues involved in the hydrophobic interactions between the DPP-4 and the anti-diabetic drugs. During interaction, two H-bonds and nine residues, two H-bonds and eleven residues as well as four H-bonds and nine residues were found between the saxagliptin, linagliptin as well as vildagliptin cases and DPP-4, respectively. Our in silico data obtained for drug-target interactions and micro-environmental signature demonstrates linagliptin as the most stable interacting drug among the tested anti-diabetic medicines.

  2. An antidiabetic polyherbal phytomedicine confers stress resistance and extends lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathor, Laxmi; Pant, Aakanksha; Awasthi, Harshika; Mani, Dayanandan; Pandey, Rakesh

    2017-02-01

    An Ayurvedic polyherbal extract (PHE) comprising six herbs viz. Berberis aristata, Cyperus rotundus, Cedrus deodara, Emblica officinalis, Terminalia chebula and Terminalia bellirica is mentioned as an effective anti-hyperglycemic agent in 'Charaka Samhita', the classical text of Ayurveda. Previously, antidiabetic drug metformin was found to elicit antiaging effects and PHE was also found to exhibit antidiabetic effects in humans. Therefore, we screened it for its in vivo antioxidant antiaging effect on stress and lifespan using human homologous Caenorhabditis elegans model system. The effect on aging is evaluated by studying effect of PHE on mean survival in worms. The stress modulatory potential was assessed by quantification of intracellular ROS level, autofluorescent age pigment lipofuscin, oxidative and thermal stress assays. Additionally, stress response was quantified using gene reporter assays. The 0.01 µg/ml dose of PHE was able to enhance mean lifespan by 16.09% (P elegans. Furthermore, PHE treated worms demonstrated oxidative stress resistance in both wild type and stress hypersensitive mev-1 mutant along with upregulation of stress response genes sod-3 and gst-4. The delayed aging under stress can be attributed to its direct reactive oxygen species-scavenging activity and regulation of some age associated genes like daf-2, daf-16, skn-1, sod-3 and gst-4 in wild-type worms. Additonally, PHE delayed age related paralysis phenotype in CL4176 transgenic worms. Altogether, our results suggest PHE significantly improves the oxidative stress and life span in C. elegans. Overall the present study suggests this polyherbal formulation might play important role in regultaing aging and related complications like diabetes.

  3. The efficacy of Prosopis glandulosa as antidiabetic treatment in rat models of diabetes and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, C; Lochner, A; Huisamen, B

    2011-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus is rampantly increasing and the need for therapeutics is crucial. In recognition of this, untested antidiabetic agents are flooding the market. Diavite™ which is a product consisting solely of the dried and ground pods of Prosopis glandulosa (Torr.) [Fabaceae] is currently marketed as a food supplement with glucose stabilizing properties. However, these are anecdotal claims lacking scientific evidence. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of Prosopis glandulosa as an antidiabetic agent. Male Wistar rats were rendered (a) type 1 diabetic after an intraperitoneal injection of STZ (40 mg/kg) and (b) insulin resistant after a 16-week high caloric diet (DIO). Zucker fa/fa ZDF rats were used in a pilot study. Half of each group of animals was placed on Prosopis glandulosa treatment (100mg/kg/day) for 8 weeks and the remaining animals served as age-matched controls. At the time of sacrifice, blood was collected for glucose and insulin level determination, the pancreata of the STZ rats were harvested for histological analysis and cardiomyocytes prepared from the DIO and Zucker fa/fa hearts for determination of insulin sensitivity. Type 1 diabetic model: Prosopis glandulosa treatment resulted in significant increased insulin levels (pProsopis glandulosa treatment resulted in increased small β-cells (pProsopis glandulosa treatment partially preventing this. Zucker fa/fa rats: Prosopis glandulosa treatment significantly reduced fasting glucose levels (pProsopis glandulosa treatment resulted in an increased basal (pProsopis glandulosa treatment moderately lowers glucose levels in different animal models of diabetes, stimulates insulin secretion, leads to the formation of small β-cells and improves insulin sensitivity of isolated cardiomyocytes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic activity of p-coumaric acid in diabetic rats, role of pancreatic GLUT 2: In vivo approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalan, Venkatesan; Vijayakumar, Natesan; Indumathi, Dhananjayan; Ramakrishnan, Arumugam

    2016-12-01

    P-coumaric acid (p-CA, 3-[4-hydroxyphenyl]-2-propenoic acid), the major component widely found in nutritious plant foods, has various antioxidant, antiinflammatory and anticancer property. To evaluate the antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic mechanisms, via the effects on carbohydrate, lipids and lipoproteins responses in adult male albino Wistar rats were examined by treated with p-CA. Rats were injected with streptozotocin (STZ, 40mg/kg b.w.) by intraperitonially (i.p.) 30days for the induction of experimental diabetes mellitus. Diabetic rats were treated with p-CA orally at a dose of 100mg/kg b.w. The potential defending character of p-CA against diabetic rats was evaluated by performing the various biochemical parameters and glucose transporter such as GLUT2 mRNA expression of pancreas. Administration of p-CA significantly lowers the blood glucose level, gluconeogenic enzymes such as glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase whereas increases the activities of hexokinase, glucose-6 phosphatase dehydrogenase and GSH via by increasing level of insulin. p-CA reduces the total cholesterol and triglycerides in both plasma and tissues i.e. liver and kidney. p-CA also decreases the LDL-C, VLDL-C and it considerably increase the level of HDL-C. A significant decreased expression of GLUT 2 mRNA in the pancreas was recorded in the supplementation of p-CA treated groups. Taken together, these results suggest that p-CA modulates glucose and lipid metabolism via GLUT 2 activation in the pancreatic and has potentially beneficial effects in improving or treating metabolic disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Inventory of antidiabetic plants in selected districts of Lagos State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gbolade, Adebayo A

    2009-01-12

    This study reports an ethnobotanical survey by means of semi-structured questionnaire of medicinal plants in five districts of Lagos State of Nigeria reputed for the treatment of diabetes. 100 respondents from the predominantly Yoruba tribe mostly males (76%) were knowledgeable in traditional treatment of diabetes. About half of the respondents with 20-30 years experience in treating diabetes used mainly herbs (96%) and have developed effective and easily recognised diagnostic tools. 92% of diabetic patients were usually out-patients aged 21-60 years. Diabetes trado-specialists (80%) rarely referred their patients but usually treated referred cases (96%). Fifty multi-component herbal recipes covered in the survey were mainly liquid preparations often administered without serious side effects (92%). The principal antidiabetic plants included Vernonia amygdalina, Bidens pilosa, Carica papaya, Citrus aurantiifolia, Ocimum gratissimum, Momordica charantia and Morinda lucida. Dietary recommendations also accompanied therapy.

  6. The spectrum of antidiabetic actions of GLP-1 in patients with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilsbøll, Tina; Holst, Jens J; Knop, Filip K

    2009-01-01

    This article focusses on the antidiabetic therapeutic potential of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). T2DM is characterised by insulin resistance, impaired glucose-induced insulin secretion and inappropriately...... regulated glucagon secretion, which in combination eventually result in hyperglycaemia and, in the longer term, microvascular and macrovascular diabetic complications. Traditional treatment modalities - even multidrug approaches - for T2DM are often unsatisfactory in making patients reach glycaemic goals...... effects. Therefore, the actions of GLP-1, which include the potentation of meal-induced insulin secretion and trophic effects on the beta-cell, have attracted a lot of interest. GLP-1 also inhibits glucagon secretion and suppresses food intake and appetite....

  7. Antidiabetic and Free Radicals Scavenging Potential of Euphorbia hirta Flower Extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S; Malhotra, R; Kumar, D

    2010-07-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate antidiabetic and in vitro free radicals scavenging effects of flower extract of Euphorbia hirta. The ethanolic and petroleum ether extracts (250 and 500 mg/kg) were orally tested for 21 days in alloxan induced diabetic mice and blood glucose level was measured with glucometer. Administration of extract resulted in significant reduction in serum cholesterol, triglycerides, creatinine, urea, alkaline phosphatase levels but high density lipoprotein levels and total proteins were found to be increased after treatments. Free radicals scavenging effect of ethanolic extract was also evaluated by various antioxidant assays, including 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl free radical scavenging activity, superoxide anion radical scavenging, nitric oxide scavenging, and reducing power assay. It was compared with standard antioxidants compounds such as butylated hydroxyl anisole and ascorbic acid. All the extracts showed antioxidant activity in all the tested methods.

  8. [Effectiveness of phytotherapy in supportive treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus II. Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koupý, David; Kotolová, Hana; Rudá Kučerová, Jana

    2015-06-01

    Fenugreek seeds are known for their characteristic smell of soup seasoning and as an ingredient of Indian curry. Traditionally the seeds are used as macerate for the treatment of diabetes, cough, and flatulence, to increase breast milk secretion, and for anti-inflammatory and aphrodisiac effects. The use is limited by its unpleasant smell and bitter taste which can be modified by adding mint leaves to the macerate. Antidiabetic properties are attributed mainly to galactomannan, 4-hydroxyisoleucin (4-OH-Ile), diosgenin and trigonelline. These substances demonstrate direct antidiabetic properties in clinical studies by increasing insulin secretion (4-OH-Ile), decreasing insulin resistance and glucose resorption from the GIT (galactomannan) and improvement in B-cells regeneration (trigonelline). Besides this main effect, the herb improves blood lipid spectre (4-OH-Ile, diosgenin), and has reno-protective (4-OH-Ile, trigonelline), neuroprotective (trigonelline) and antioxidant (diosgenin, trigonelline) effects. Antidiabetic efficacy of trigonelline is comparable to glibenclamide treatment and more effective than sitagliptine therapy. Given the large body of evidence and promising results in comparison with standard pharmacotherapy, fenugreek active substances have a potential to become a source of new antidiabetic medication.Key words: fenugreek Trigonella foenum-graecum diabetes mellitus type 2 biological activity.

  9. Effect of Chitosan Properties on Immunoreactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sruthi Ravindranathan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan is a widely investigated biopolymer in drug and gene delivery, tissue engineering and vaccine development. However, the immune response to chitosan is not clearly understood due to contradicting results in literature regarding its immunoreactivity. Thus, in this study, we analyzed effects of various biochemical properties, namely degree of deacetylation (DDA, viscosity/polymer length and endotoxin levels, on immune responses by antigen presenting cells (APCs. Chitosan solutions from various sources were treated with mouse and human APCs (macrophages and/or dendritic cells and the amount of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α released by the cells was used as an indicator of immunoreactivity. Our results indicate that only endotoxin content and not DDA or viscosity influenced chitosan-induced immune responses. Our data also indicate that low endotoxin chitosan (<0.01 EU/mg ranging from 20 to 600 cP and 80% to 97% DDA is essentially inert. This study emphasizes the need for more complete characterization and purification of chitosan in preclinical studies in order for this valuable biomaterial to achieve widespread clinical application.

  10. Impact of the use of anti-diabetic drugs on survival of diabetic dialysis patients: a 5-year retrospective cohort study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Po-Jen; Wu, Kun-Lin; Chiu, Szu-Han; Chan, Jenq-Shyong; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Wu, Chung-Ze; Wu, Chia-Chao; Kao, SenYeong; Fang, Te-Chao; Lin, Shih-Hua; Chen, Jin-Shuen

    2017-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and associated complications are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and can increase morbidity and mortality. A longitudinal 5-year observational study was conducted to investigate whether the use of anti-diabetic medications or not affected survival rates of diabetic dialysis patients. Using a data sample of a million patients from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Database, a retrospective cohort study surveyed patients with type 2 DM who began dialysis between 2002 and 2007. The study population was classified into groups using or not using anti-diabetic drugs. The group using anti-diabetic drugs was then categorized into 3 subgroups, including use of only oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs), only insulin, and OHAs-combined insulin groups. Subjects of these four groups were followed 5 years or to date of death. Three major areas were analyzed: (1) demographic data and medical history; (2) survival prognosis and causes of death; and (3) effects on survival prognosis of different classes of OHAs. A total of 912 patients fitting inclusion criteria were enrolled and followed-up for 5 years or to date of death. A total 465 patients died, and those not using anti-diabetic drugs (67.34 %) had a higher mortality rate than those using anti-diabetic drugs (46.42 %). After the multivariate analysis, group of OHAs-combined insulin had the lowest risk of death (HR 0.36, 95 % CI 0.27-0.47), followed by OHAs alone (HR 0.49, 95 % CI 0.38-0.63) and then insulin alone (HR 0.67, 95 % CI 0.51-0.88). To clarify four classes of OHAs (sulfonylurea, α-glucosidase inhibitors, meglitinide, and thiazolidinedione) are used in Taiwan for uremia patient with type 2 DM, and in our study, there were no significant differences in survival prognosis for the four drugs. Finally, the most common cause of death was infectious disease and there were no significant differences among the four groups. This 5-year observational study results suggested

  11. The optimal extraction parameters and anti-diabetic activity of flavonoids from Ipomoea batatas leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fenglin; Li, Qingwang; Gao, Dawei; Peng, Yong

    2009-03-07

    Extraction parameters of flavonoids from Ipomoea batatas leaf (FIBL) and anti-diabetic activity of FIBL on alloxan induced diabetic mice were studied. The optimal extraction parameters of FIBL were obtained by single factor test and orthogonal test, as follows: ethanol concentration 60 %, ratio of solvent to raw material 30, extraction temperature 75 degrees and extraction time 1.5 h, while extraction yield of FIBL was 5.94 %. FIBL treatment (50, 100, and 150 mg/ kg body weight) for 28 days resulted in a significant decrease in the concentration of fasting blood glucose (FBG), total cholesterol (TC) and triglyceride (TG) in diabetes mellitus mice. Furthermore, FIBL significantly increased body weight (bw) and serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) level. The data demonstrated FIBL at the dose of 100 mg/kg bw exhibited the optimal effect. The above results suggest that FIBL can control blood glucose and modulate the metabolism of blood lipid in diabetes mellitus mice.

  12. Studies on dynamic dissociation constant of 99Mo-insulin complex as anti-diabetic agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, Swadesh; Nayak, Dalia

    2009-01-01

    The anti-diabetic effects of group VI metals have already been found. This is due to the fact that the oxo-anions of Group VI metals may replace phosphate group in the active centre of enzymes and thus enhancing the insulin signaling. In order to find out an appropriate ligand which may be used as a vehicle of 99 Mo we report the complexation of 99 Mo with insulin protein. The dynamic dissociation constant of the 99 Mo-Insulin complex was studied through dialysis technique against triple distilled water. The K d value of 99 Mo-Insulin complex against triple distilled water is 0.18 h -1 at pH 6.5. The half life of this complex calculated from K d value is 3.85 h against triple distilled water. (author)

  13. Simultaneous Quantification of Antidiabetic Agents in Human Plasma by a UPLC-QToF-MS Method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Millan Fachi

    Full Text Available An ultra-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous quantification of chlorpropamide, glibenclamide, gliclazide, glimepiride, metformin, nateglinide, pioglitazone, rosiglitazone, and vildagliptin in human plasma was developed and validated, using isoniazid and sulfaquinoxaline as internal standards. Following plasma protein precipitation using acetonitrile with 1% formic acid, chromatographic separation was performed on a cyano column using gradient elution with water and acetonitrile, both containing 0.1% formic acid. Detection was performed in a quadrupole time-of-flight analyzer, using electrospray ionization operated in the positive mode. Data from validation studies demonstrated that the new method is highly sensitive, selective, precise (RSD 0.99, free of matrix and has no residual effects. The developed method was successfully applied to volunteers' plasma samples. Hence, this method was demonstrated to be appropriate for clinical monitoring of antidiabetic agents.

  14. Using nonlinearity and spatiotemporal property modulation to control effective structural properties: dynamic rods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jon Juel; Blekhman, Iliya I.

    2007-01-01

    What are the effective properties of a generally nonlinear material or structure, whose local properties are modulated in both space and time? It has been suggested to use spatiotemporal modulation of structural properties to create materials and structures with adjustable effective properties......, and exemplified. Then simple approximate analytical expressions are derived for the effective wave speed and natural frequencies for one-dimensional wave propagation in a nonlinear elastic rod, where the spatiotemporal modulation is imposed as a high-frequency standing wave, supposed to be given. Finally the more...

  15. DETERMINATION OF EFFECTIVE PROPERTIES OF FIBER-REINFORCED COMPOSITE LAMINATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Skrzat

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The determination of effective mechanical properties of multi-layer composite is presented in this paper. Computations based on finite element method predicting properties of inhomogeneous materials require solving huge tasks. More effective is Mori-Tanaka approach, typical for micromechanics problems. For regularly distributed fibers closed-forms for effective composite material properties are possible to derive. The results of homogenization are used in strength analysis of the composite pressure vessel.

  16. Long-term antidiabetic activity of vanadyl after treatment withdrawal: restoration of insulin secretion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cros, G H; Cam, M C; Serrano, J J; Ribes, G; McNeill, J H

    In its vanadate (V5+) or vanadyl (V4+) forms, vanadium has been demonstrated to possess antidiabetic activity. Oral treatment of streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic animals with either form is associated with correction of hyperglycemia, and prevention of diabetes-induced complications, although weight gain is unaffected. Vanadium treatment of non-diabetic animals lowers plasma insulin levels by reducing insulin demand, as these animals remain normoglycemic. These results suggest that vanadium has in vivo insulin-mimetic or insulin-enhancing effects, in agreement with several in vitro observations. Chronic treatment with vanadium has also been shown to result in sustained antidiabetic effects in STZ-diabetic animals long after treatment has ceased. Thus, at 13 weeks after withdrawal from treatment, corrected animals had normalized glucose and weight gain, and improved basal insulin levels. In addition, near-normal glucose tolerance was found despite an insignificant insulin response. Since vanadium accumulates in several tissue sites (e.g. bone, kidney) when pharmacological doses are administered, it is possible that stored vanadium may be important in maintaining near-normal glucose tolerance at least in the short-term following withdrawal from treatment. Recently, following withdrawal of vanadyl treatment up to 30 weeks, diabetic animals which had remained normoglycemic and had normalized glucose tolerance showed improvements in plasma insulin levels both in the basal state and in response to oral glucose, as compared to those which had reverted to hyperglycemia. The observed significant improvements in insulin capacity over the long-term ( > 3 months) suggests that a restored and/or preserved insulin secretion may be essential for maintained reversal of the diabetic state over a prolonged period after treatment is withdrawn.

  17. Review of antidiabetic fruits, vegetables, beverages, oils and spices commonly consumed in the diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beidokhti, Maliheh Najari; Jäger, Anna K

    2017-04-06

    Type 2 diabetes is the most common type of diabetes and its prevalence is rapidly increasing throughout the world. Modifications of lifestyle such as suitable diet and exercise programs along with pharmacotherapy and education of patients are beneficial therapies for patients with type 2 diabetes. The ethnopharmacological use of herbal medicines, many of them part of our diet as spices, vegetables and fruits, has been developed for the treatment of diabetes due to inexpensiveness, easy availability and few side effects. Our aim is to present a review for researchers who are interested in the biologically active dietary plants traditionally utilized in the treatment of diabetes. Information was obtained from a literature search of electronic databases such as Google Scholar, Pubmed, Sci Finder and Cochrane. Common and scientific name of the fruits, vegetables, beverages, oils and spices and the words 'antidiabetic', 'hypoglycemic', 'anti-hyperglycemic', 'type 2 diabetes' were used as keywords for search. Certain fruits and vegetables are functional foods and their consumption reduces the incidence of type 2 diabetes. Hypoglycemic effects of fruits and vegetables may be due to their inducing nature on pancreatic β-cells for insulin secretion, or bioactive compounds such as flavonoids, alkaloids and anthocyanins, which act as insulin-like molecules or insulin secretagogues. This write-up covers hypoglycemic, anti-hyperglycemic and anti-diabetic activities of some dietary fruits, vegetables, beverages, oils and spices and their active hypoglycemic constituents. Including such plant species in the diet might improve management of type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Tillage Effects on Soil Properties & Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Teodor; Bogdan, Ileana; Moraru, Paula; Pop, Adrian; Duda, Bogdan; Cacovean, Horea; Coste, Camelia

    2015-04-01

    Soil tillage systems can be able to influence soil compaction, water dynamics, soil temperature and soil structural condition. These processes can be expressed as changes of soil microbiological activity, soil respiration and sustainability of agriculture. Objectives of this study were: 1) to assess the effects of tillage systems (Conventional System-CS, Minimum Tillage-MT, No-Tillage-NT) on soil compaction, soil temperature, soil moisture and soil respiration and 2) to establish the relationship that exists in changing soil properties. Three treatments were installed: CS-plough + disc; MT-paraplow + rotary grape; NT-direct sowing. The study was conducted on an Argic-Stagnic Faeoziom. The MT and NT applications reduce or completely eliminate the soil mobilization, due to this, soil is compacted in the first year of application. The degree of compaction is directly related to soil type and its state of degradation. The state of soil compaction diminished over time, tending toward a specific type of soil density. Soil moisture was higher in NT and MT at the time of sowing and in the early stages of vegetation and differences diminished over time. Moisture determinations showed statistically significant differences. The MT and NT applications reduced the thermal amplitude in the first 15 cm of soil depth and increased the soil temperature by 0.5-2.20C. The determinations confirm the effect of soil tillage system on soil respiration; the daily average was lower at NT (315-1914 mmoli m-2s-1) and followed by MT (318-2395 mmoli m-2s-1) and is higher in the CS (321-2480 mmol m-2s-1). Comparing with CS, all the two conservation tillage measures decreased soil respiration, with the best effects of no-tillage. An exceeding amount of CO2 produced in the soil and released into the atmosphere, resulting from aerobic processes of mineralization of organic matter (excessive loosening) is considered to be not only a way of increasing the CO2 in the atmosphere, but also a loss of

  19. Anti-diabetic analysis and insulin expression study of a wild leafy vegetable Acalypha alnifolia Klein ex wild. on streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponnusamy Revathi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Assessing the antidiabetic potential of Acalypha alnifolia is the main objective of the present study. Two doses of leaf extracts were treated with streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats for 21 days. The glucose level, insulin level, plasma lipids, total protein, electrolytes and plasma enzymes were monitored. The acetone extract of 400 mg/kg had potentiated to diminish the glucose and lipid level as well as other diabetic complications. Internal structures of pancreas were studied by histopathological sections and insulin expression was also observed by immunohistochemical study. Though the extracts having good antioxidant capability it might have to reduce the beta cell destruction or helps to repair it. The result of the toxicity analysis, histopathology and insulin expression supports the acetone extract. The present study attesting the antidiabetic properties of A. alnifolia hence this plant would be focused and taken for cultivation leads to add in human diet for getting therapeutic benefit.

  20. Effects of Various Quenching Media on the Mechanical Properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of quenching media used and the intercritical annealing temperatures on tensile, hardness, ductility and notch impact toughness properties are discussed. The quenching media increased the strength and hardness properties but decreased the ductility and notch impact properties of the original hot-rolled steel.

  1. Evaluation of biological properties and clinical effectiveness of Aloe vera: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha, Maharjan H.; Laxmipriya, Nampoothiri P.

    2014-01-01

    Aloe vera (蘆薈 lú huì) is well known for its considerable medicinal properties. This plant is one of the richest natural sources of health for human beings coming. The chemistry of the plant has revealed the presence of more than 200 different biologically active substances. Many biological properties associated with Aloe species are contributed by inner gel of the leaves. Most research has been centralized on the biological activities of the various species of Aloe, which include antibacterial and antimicrobial activities of the nonvolatile constituents of the leaf gel. Aloe species are widely distributed in the African and the eastern European continents, and are spread almost throughout the world. The genus Aloe has more than 400 species but few, such as A. vera, Aloe ferox, and Aloe arborescens, are globally used for trade. A. vera has various medicinal properties such as antitumor, antiarthritic, antirheumatoid, anticancer, and antidiabetic properties. In addition, A. vera has also been promoted for constipation, gastrointestinal disorders, and for immune system deficiencies. However, not much convincing information is available on properties of the gel. The present review focuses on the detailed composition of Aloe gel, its various phytocomponents having various biological properties that help to improve health and prevent disease conditions. PMID:26151005

  2. Studies on the antidiabetic activities of Momordica charantia fruit juice in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Mona F; El Ashry, Fatma El Zahraa Z; El Maraghy, Nabila N; Fahmy, Ahmed

    2017-12-01

    Momordica charantia Linn (Cucurbitaceae) (MC) is used in folk medicine to treat various diseases including diabetes mellitus. This study investigates the antidiabetic activities of Momordica charantia (bitter gourd) on streptozotocin-induced type 2 diabetes mellitus in rats. Male Wister rats were randomly assigned to 4 groups. Group I, Normal control; Group II, STZ diabetic; Group III and IV, Momordica charantia fruit juice was orally administered to diabetic rats (10 mL/kg/day either as prophylaxis for 14 days before induction of diabetes then 21 days treatment, or as treatment given for 21 days after induction of diabetes). The effects of MC juice were studied both in vivo and in vitro by studying the glucose uptake of isolated rat diaphragm muscles in the presence and absence of insulin. Histopathological examination of pancreas was also performed. This study showed that MC caused a significant reduction of serum glucose (135.99 ± 6.27 and 149.79 ± 1.90 vs. 253.40* ± 8.18) for prophylaxis and treatment respectively, fructosamine (0.99 ± 0.01 and 1.01 ± 0.04 vs. 3.04 ± 0.07), total cholesterol, triglycerides levels, insulin resistance index (1.13 ± 0.08 and 1.19 ± 0.05 vs. 1.48 ± 1.47) and pancreatic malondialdehyde content (p Momordica charantia presents excellent antidiabetic and antioxidant activities and thus has great potential as a new source for diabetes treatment whether it is used for prophylaxis or treatment.

  3. Nonadherence and factors affecting adherence of diabetic patients to anti-diabetic medication in Assela General Hospital, Oromia Region, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassahun, Ashebir; Gashe, Fanta; Mulisa, Eshetu; Rike, Wote Amelo

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major global health problem covering approximately 347 million persons worldwide. Glycemic control has a main role in its management which mainly depends upon patient adherence to the treatment plan. Accurate assessment of medication adherence is necessary for effective management of diabetes. To assess nonadherence and factors affecting adherence of diabetic patients to anti-diabetic medication in Assela General Hospital (AGH), Oromia Region, Ethiopia. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on patients seeking anti-diabetic drug treatment and follow-up at AGH using structured questionnaire and reviewing the patient record card using check list from January 24, 2014 to February 7, 2014. Descriptive analysis was used to describe the percentages and number of distributions of the variables in the study; and association was identified for categorical data. P ≤ 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Of all respondents, 149 (52.3%) and 136 (47.7%) were female and male, respectively. The majority of the study participants 189 (66.3%) were in the age group of 30-60 years. Two-hundred nineteen (76.8%) of respondents were married currently. The majority, 237 (83.2%) of respondents did not have blood glucose self-monitoring equipment (glucometer). A total of 196 (68.8%) respondents were adhered to anti-diabetic medication. There was a significant association between adherence to the medication and side effect, level of education, monthly income and presence of glucometer at home (P diabetic medications with nonadherence rate of 31.2%. Different factors of medication nonadherence were identified such as side effect and complexity of regimen, failure to remember, and sociodemographic factors such as educational level and monthly income.

  4. Immunomodulatory effects of oral antidiabetic drugs in lymphocyte cultures from patients with type 2 diabetes Efeito imunomodulador de hipoglicemiantes orais em cultura de linfócitos de pacientes com diabetes tipo 2

    OpenAIRE

    Karina Faccio Mello; Adroaldo Lunardelli; Márcio Vinícius Fagundes Donadio; Eduardo Caberlon; Carmen Silvana Araújo de Oliveira; Carolina Maria Alves Bastos; Melissa Guerra Simões Pires; Fernanda Bordignon Nunes; Jarbas Rodrigues de Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE: It has been suggested that type 2 diabetes is an inflammatory response manifestation. The main drugs used to treat type 2 diabetes are sulphonylureas and biguanides. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the modulatory effects of oral hypoglycemic drugs (chlorpropamide and metformin) on lymphocyte proliferation in vitro and ex vivo. METHODS: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from human blood by gradient centrifugation. T-lymphocytes were stimulate...

  5. Effect of fibril shape on adhesive properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Daniel; Hill, Ginel; Parness, Aaron; Esparza, Noé; Cutkosky, Mark; Kenny, Tom

    2010-08-01

    Research into the gecko's adhesive system revealed a unique architecture for adhesives using tiny hairs. By using a stiff material (β-keratin) to create a highly structured adhesive, the gecko's system demonstrates properties not seen in traditional pressure-sensitive adhesives which use a soft, unstructured planar layer. In contrast to pressure sensitive adhesives, the gecko adhesive displays frictional adhesion, in which increased shear force allows it to withstand higher normal loads. Synthetic fibrillar adhesives have been fabricated but not all demonstrate this frictional adhesion property. Here we report the dual-axis force testing of single silicone rubber pillars from synthetic adhesive arrays. We find that the shape of the adhesive pillar dictates whether frictional adhesion or pressure-sensitive behavior is observed. This work suggests that both types of behavior can be achieved with structures much larger than gecko terminal structures. It also indicates that subtle differences in the shape of these pillars can significantly influence their properties.

  6. The antidiabetic drug metformin decreases mitochondrial respiration and tricarboxylic acid cycle activity in cultured primary rat astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hohnholt, Michaela C; Blumrich, Eva-Maria; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2017-01-01

    cycling ratio in metformin-treated astrocytes. Finally, the oxygen consumption of mitochondria isolated from metformin-treated astrocytes was drastically reduced in the presence of complex I substrates, but not of complex II substrates. These data demonstrate that exposure to metformin strongly impairs......Metformin is an antidiabetic drug that is used daily by millions of patients worldwide. Metformin is able to cross the blood-brain barrier and has recently been shown to increase glucose consumption and lactate release in cultured astrocytes. However, potential effects of metformin on mitochondrial...

  7. Property Tax Reform in China : Optional property tax proposals and the effects on residence price

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yiyi

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives some theoretical instructions of China’s property tax reform which include the reform of land lease system, the design of tax base, tax rates and tax relief, and also provides some interesting property tax proposals for Shanghai and estimates the effects of property tax reform on residence price.This paper selects a case study of Shanghai which can provide useful methods or findings to other cases characterized by similar traits and situations. Through observation and analysi...

  8. Convergence properties of the effective interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, P.J.; Engeland, T.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Holt, A.; Osnes, E.

    1994-01-01

    The convergence properties of two perturbative schemes to sum the so-called folded diagrams are critically reviewed in this work, with an emphasis on the intruder state problem. The methods we study are the approaches of Kuo and co-workers and Lee and Suzuki. The suitability of the two schemes for shell-model calculations is discussed. ((orig.))

  9. EFFECTS OF POLYTHENE FIBRES ON SELECTED PROPERTIES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    solid waste recycling companies in Nigeria. Despite the fact that these bags have elastic properties yet the ... be used in making of man-made timber. Brick, stone, concrete and other waste can replace sand after ... quality of concrete produced with polymer waste as partial replacement of fine aggregate with a view to.

  10. The effect of fire on soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard F. DeBano

    1991-01-01

    Fire affects nutrient cycling and the physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils occupied by western montane forests. Combustion of litter and soil organic matter (OM) increases the availability of some nutrients, although others are volatilized (for example, N, P, S). Soil OM loss also affects cation exchange capacity, organic chelation, aggregate...

  11. Forage density effect on sound insulation properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Ole; Tortajada, Vicent Gassó; Gislum, René

    2010-01-01

    One of the main parameters affecting forage management and quality is density. Existing methods used for measuring physical properties of forage involve costly destructive analysis. A frequent and appropriate control of the forage density is required for optimizing the management of silage, hay a...

  12. Aviation-fuel property effects on combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosfjord, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    The fuel chemical property influence on a gas turbine combustor was studied using 25 test fuels. Fuel physical properties were de-emphasized by using fuel injectors which produce highly-atomized, and hence rapidly vaporizing sprays. A substantial fuel spray characterization effort was conducted to allow selection of nozzles which assured that such sprays were achieved for all fuels. The fuels were specified to cover the following wide ranges of chemical properties: hydrogen, 9.1 to 15 (wt) pct; total aromatics, 0 to 100 (vol) pct; and naphthalene, 0 to 30 (vol) pct. standard fuels (e.g., Jet A, JP4), speciality products (e.g., decalin, xylene tower bottoms) and special fuel blends were included. The latter group included six, 4-component blends prepared to achieve parametric variations in fuel hydrogen, total aromatics and naphthalene contents. The principle influences of fuel chemical properties on the combustor behavior were reflected by the radiation, liner temperature, and exhaust smoke number (or equivalently, soot number density) data. Test results indicated that naphthalene content strongly influenced the radiative heat load while parametric variations in total aromatics did not.

  13. Antidiabetic and antioxidant potentials of Euphorbia hirta leaves extract studied in streptozotocin-induced experimental diabetes in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Sorimuthu P; Bhuvaneshwari, Subramanian; Prasath, Gopalan S

    2011-09-01

    Euphorbia hirta, commonly known as asthma weed, is a popular folk remedy for the treatment of various ailments. Recent studies have indicated that plant has potent antioxidant properties. As part of an ongoing programme to validate the use of some reputed herbs in Indian traditional medicines, the present study was aimed to evaluate the antidiabetic and antioxidant potentials of E. hirta leaves in streptozotocin-induced experimental diabetes in rats. Oral administration of E. hirta leaves extract (300 mg/kg b.w./rat/day) for a period of 30 days indicated the antidiabetic nature of the leaves extract. Determination of the lipid peroxides, hydroperoxides, and both enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants evidenced the antioxidant potential of the leaves extract. Assay of enzymes such as serum aspartate transaminase (AST), serum alanine transaminase (ALT) and serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) revealed the non-toxic nature of E. hirta leaves. The hypoglycemic activity of the leaves extract was comparable with gliclazide, a standard reference drug.

  14. Quantifying effects of particulate properties on powder flow properties using a ring shear tester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Hao; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2008-09-01

    Effects of particle size, morphology, particle density, and surface silicification, on powder flow properties were investigated using a ring shear tester. Flow properties were quantified by flow function (FF), that is, unconfined yield strength, f(c), as a function of major principal stress. A total of 11 powders from three series of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC): Avicel (regular MCC, elongated particles), Prosolv (silicified MCC, elongated particles), and Celphere (spherical MCC), were studied. Particle size distribution in each type of MCC was systematically different. Within each series, smaller particles always led to poorer powder flow properties. The slope of FF line was correlated to degree of powder consolidation by external stress. A key mechanism of the detrimental effect of particle size reduction on flow properties was the larger powder specific surface area. Flow properties of Celphere were significantly better than Avicel of comparable particles size, suggesting spherical morphology promoted better powder flow properties. Flow properties of powders different in densities but similar in particle size, shape, and surface properties were similar. When corrected for density effect, higher particle density corresponded to better flow behavior. Surface silicification significantly improved flow properties of finer MCC, but did not improve those of coarser.

  15. Immunomodulatory effects of oral antidiabetic drugs in lymphocyte cultures from patients with type 2 diabetes Efeito imunomodulador de hipoglicemiantes orais em cultura de linfócitos de pacientes com diabetes tipo 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Faccio Mello

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE: It has been suggested that type 2 diabetes is an inflammatory response manifestation. The main drugs used to treat type 2 diabetes are sulphonylureas and biguanides. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the modulatory effects of oral hypoglycemic drugs (chlorpropamide and metformin on lymphocyte proliferation in vitro and ex vivo. METHODS: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from human blood by gradient centrifugation. T-lymphocytes were stimulated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA and oral hypoglycemic drugs. RESULTS: In both in vitro and ex vivo experiments, there was a reduction in cell proliferation after treatment with oral hypoglycemic drugs. When both drugs were used in combination, a high level of cytotoxicity was observed, which made analysis of immunomodulatory effects unfeasible. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: We demonstrated that diabetes itself may reduce cell proliferation significantly when stimulated by PHA, which may indicate that diabetic patients have difficulties in promoting an efficient inflammatory response. Moreover, the use of oral hypoglycemic drugs may aggravate this situation.INTRODUÇÃO E OBJETIVOS: Tem sido sugerido que o diabetes mellitus tipo 2 (DM2 é uma manifestação da resposta inflamatória. As principais drogas utilizadas no tratamento do DM2 são as sulfonilureias e as biguanidas. O objetivo deste trabalho é demonstrar os efeitos moduladores na proliferação de linfócitos causada pelos hipoglicemiantes orais (clorpropamida e metformina, in vitro e ex vivo. MÉTODOS: Células mononucleares de sangue periférico foram isoladas de seres humanos por gradiente de centrifugação. Os linfócitos T foram estimulados com fito-hemaglutinina (PHA e hipoglicemiantes. RESULTADOS: Nos experimentos in vitro e ex vivo, mostramos a redução da proliferação celular quando do tratamento com drogas hipoglicemiantes orais. Quando as drogas foram utilizadas em combinação, foi

  16. Effect of a Residential Integrated Yoga Program on Blood Glucose Levels, Physiological Variables, and Anti-Diabetic Medication Score of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Singh

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is a highly prevalent disease characterized by chronic hyperglycemia. Yoga is a form of mind-body intervention shown to have a positive impact on several health conditions in both healthy and diseased patients. The present study is intended to assess the effects of the Residential Integrated Yoga Program (RIYP on blood glucose levels in patients with T2DM. Material and Methods: Data of 598 (186 females T2DM patients from a holistic health center in Bengaluru, India, who attended a 15-day RIYP between January 2013 and December 2015 was obtained retrospectively. Average age of the participants was 56.45 ± 11.02 years. All subjects underwent a 15-day RIYP which involved yoga-based lifestyle changes with components of regulated sleep, balanced diet, asanas, pranayama, relaxation techniques, meditations, yogic cleaning procedures, and tuning to the nature. Fasting and post-prandial blood sugar, medication score, symptom score, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, pulse rate, and respiratory rate were assessed before and after intervention. Result: There was a significant decrease in fasting (p < 0.001 and post-prandial blood sugar levels (p < 0.001 along with a significant reduction in medication and symptom scores after 15 days of RIYP compared to baseline. Conclusion: The present study indicates that 2 weeks of a yoga-based residential program improves blood glucose levels, blood pressure, and medication score in patients with T2DM. However, further randomized controlled studies need to be performed in order to confirm the present findings.

  17. Duration of diabetes and effectiveness of insulin in the management of insulin-naïve Korean patients uncontrolled on oral antidiabetic drugs: a sub-analysis of the MOdaliTy of Insulin treatment eValuation (MOTIV) registry results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, In Joo; Kim, Yong Ki; Yoon, Kun Ho; Son, Ho Young; Park, Sung Woo; Sung, Yeon Ah; Baek, Hong Sun; Ha, Kyoung Soo

    2014-08-01

    To investigate whether duration of diabetes has an impact on the effectiveness of insulinization in diabetes management. This open-label, noninterventional, observational registry was conducted at >500 centers in Korea. Patients with diabetes, on oral antidiabetic drugs, with HbA1c ≥7 % (53 mmol/mol) in the preceding 3 months, being considered for initiation of basal insulin by their physicians, were included. Data were collected at baseline and at 3 and 6 months. Of 6,616 patients evaluated, 62.5 % had diabetes for <10 years, while only 6.5 % patients had diabetes for ≥20 years. At the end of study, average HbA1c in patients with diabetes for <10 years, for 10 to <20 years, and for ≥20 years was 7.3 ± 1.0 % (56 ± 10.9 mmol/mol), 7.4 ± 1.0 % (57 ± 10.9 mmol/mol), and 7.6 ± 1.1 % (60 ± 12.0 mmol/mol), respectively. Over half the patients (50.7 %) with diabetes <10 years achieved HbA1c <7 % (53 mmol/mol) by the end of study, while only 42.1 and 35.1 % patients with diabetes for 10 to <20 and ≥20 years, respectively, achieved their target. The average insulin dosage required for per unit HbA1c reduction was significantly different among the groups according to duration of type 2 diabetes mellitus (p < 0.05). Among patients who achieved HbA1c <7 %, proportion of patients with hypoglycemia in the ≥20 years group was higher than that in the <10 years, 10 to <20 years groups. Early insulin administration provided a better glycemic control with less insulin dosage and lower frequency of hypoglycemic events. Thus, early insulinization might hold the key to better management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  18. The Antidiabetic Mechanisms of Polyphenols Related to Increased Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP1) and Insulin Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez Avila, J Abraham; Rodrigo García, Joaquín; González Aguilar, Gustavo A; de la Rosa, Laura A

    2017-05-30

    Type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is an endocrine disease related to impaired/absent insulin signaling. Dietary habits can either promote or mitigate the onset and severity of T2DM. Diets rich in fruits and vegetables have been correlated with a decreased incidence of T2DM, apparently due to their high polyphenol content. Polyphenols are compounds of plant origin with several documented bioactivities related to health promotion. The present review describes the antidiabetic effects of polyphenols, specifically related to the secretion and effects of insulin and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1), an enteric hormone that stimulates postprandial insulin secretion. The evidence suggests that polyphenols from various sources stimulate L-cells to secrete GLP1, increase its half-life by inhibiting dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4), stimulate β-cells to secrete insulin and stimulate the peripheral response to insulin, increasing the overall effects of the GLP1-insulin axis. The glucose-lowering potential of polyphenols has been evidenced in various acute and chronic models of healthy and diabetic organisms. Some polyphenols appear to exert their effects similarly to pharmaceutical antidiabetics; thus, rigorous clinical trials are needed to fully validate this claim. The broad diversity of polyphenols has not allowed for entirely describing their mechanisms of action, but the evidence advocates for their regular consumption.

  19. The Antidiabetic Mechanisms of Polyphenols Related to Increased Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP1 and Insulin Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Abraham Domínguez Avila

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is an endocrine disease related to impaired/absent insulin signaling. Dietary habits can either promote or mitigate the onset and severity of T2DM. Diets rich in fruits and vegetables have been correlated with a decreased incidence of T2DM, apparently due to their high polyphenol content. Polyphenols are compounds of plant origin with several documented bioactivities related to health promotion. The present review describes the antidiabetic effects of polyphenols, specifically related to the secretion and effects of insulin and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1, an enteric hormone that stimulates postprandial insulin secretion. The evidence suggests that polyphenols from various sources stimulate L-cells to secrete GLP1, increase its half-life by inhibiting dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4, stimulate β-cells to secrete insulin and stimulate the peripheral response to insulin, increasing the overall effects of the GLP1-insulin axis. The glucose-lowering potential of polyphenols has been evidenced in various acute and chronic models of healthy and diabetic organisms. Some polyphenols appear to exert their effects similarly to pharmaceutical antidiabetics; thus, rigorous clinical trials are needed to fully validate this claim. The broad diversity of polyphenols has not allowed for entirely describing their mechanisms of action, but the evidence advocates for their regular consumption.

  20. Evaluation of the Antidiabetic Activity and Chemical Composition of Geranium collinum Root Extracts—Computational and Experimental Investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sodik Numonov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The root of Geranium collinum Steph is known in Tajik traditional medicine for its hepatoprotective, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory therapeutic effects. The present study was conducted to evaluate of potential antidiabetic, antioxidant activities, total polyphenolic and flavonoid content from the different extracts (aqueous, aqueous-ethanolic and individual compounds isolated of the root parts of G. collinum. The 50% aqueous-ethanolic extract possesses potent antidiabetic activity, with IC50 values of 0.10 μg/mL and 0.09 μg/mL for the enzymes protein-tyrosine phosphatase (1B PTP-1B and α-glucosidase, respectively. Phytochemical investigations of the 50% aqueous-ethanolic extract of G. collinum, led to the isolation of ten pure compounds identified as 3,3′,4,4′-tetra-O-methylellagic acid (1, 3,3′-di-O-methylellagic acid (2, quercetin (3, caffeic acid (4, (+-catechin (5, (–-epicatechin (6, (–-epigallocatechin (7, gallic acid (8, β-sitosterol-3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (9, and corilagin (10. Their structures were determined based on 1D and 2D NMR and mass spectrometric analyses. Three isolated compounds exhibited strong inhibitory activity against PTP-1B, with IC50 values below 0.9 μg/mL, more effective than the positive control (1.46 μg/mL. Molecular docking analysis suggests polyphenolic compounds such as corilagin, catechin and caffeic acid inhibit PTP-1B and β-sitosterol-3-O-β-d-gluco-pyranoside inhibits α-glucosidase. The experimental results suggest that the biological activity of G. collinum is related to its polyphenol contents. The results are also in agreement with computational investigations. Furthermore, the potent antidiabetic activity of the 50% aqueous-ethanolic extract from G. collinum shows promise for its future application in medicine. To the best of our knowledge, we hereby report, for the first time, the antidiabetic activity of G. collinum.

  1. Physical properties of beryllium oxide - Irradiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elston, J.; Caillat, R.

    1958-01-01

    This work has been carried out in view of determining several physical properties of hot-pressed beryllium oxide under various conditions and the change of these properties after irradiation. Special attention has been paid on to the measurement of the thermal conductivity coefficient and thermal diffusivity coefficient. Several designs for the measurement of the thermal conductivity coefficient have been achieved. They permit its determination between 50 and 300 deg. C, between 400 and 800 deg. C. Some measurements have been made above 1000 deg. C. In order to measure the thermal diffusivity coefficient, we heat a perfectly flat surface of a sample in such a way that the heat flux is modulated (amplitude and frequency being adjustable). The thermal diffusivity coefficient is deduced from the variations of temperature observed on several spots. Tensile strength; compressive strength; expansion coefficient; sound velocity and crystal parameters have been also measured. Some of the measurements have been carried out after neutron irradiation. Some data have been obtained on the change of the properties of beryllium oxide depending on the integrated neutron flux. (author) [fr

  2. Oral anti-diabetic agents for women with pre-existing diabetes mellitus/impaired glucose tolerance or previous gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieu, Joanna; Coat, Suzette; Hague, William; Middleton, Philippa

    2010-10-06

    While most guidelines recommend the use of insulin in women whose pregnancies are affected by pre-existing diabetes, oral agents have obvious benefits for patient acceptability and adherence. It is necessary, however, to assess the effects of these anti-diabetic agents on maternal and infant health outcomes. Additionally, women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus are increasingly found to be predisposed to impaired glucose tolerance and, despite the potential need for intervention for these women, there has been little evidence about the use of oral anti-diabetic agents by these women pre-conceptionally or during a subsequent pregnancy. To investigate the effect of oral anti-diabetic agents in women with pre-existing diabetes mellitus, impaired glucose tolerance or previous gestational diabetes planning a pregnancy or pregnant women with diabetes mellitus on maternal and infant health.The use of oral antidiabetic agents for management of gestational diabetes in a current pregnancy is evaluated in a separate Cochrane review. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (March 2010). We included randomised and quasi-randomised trials. Two review authors independently assessed trial eligibility for inclusion. We identified 13 trials published as 25 papers using the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth group literature search, and an additional ongoing trial. We have not included any trials in the review. One trial is awaiting assessment and we have excluded twelve trials because they evaluated treatment of women with gestational diabetes or women with polycystic ovary syndrome, were not randomised controlled trials or data were not available. Little randomised evidence is available evaluating the use of oral anti-diabetic agents in women with diabetes mellitus, impaired glucose tolerance, previous gestational diabetes mellitus planning a pregnancy or pregnant women with pre-existing diabetes mellitus. Large trials comparing any

  3. Intentional Weight Loss and Dose Reductions of Anti-Diabetic Medications – A Retrospective Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Anita Ashok; Palamaner Subash Shantha, Ghanshyam; Kahan, Scott; Samson, Rohit Joshua; Boddu, Nelson David; Cheskin, Lawrence Jay

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Intentional weight loss, primarily by improving insulin resistance, is known to decrease the need for anti-diabetic medications. In this study, we assess the magnitude of weight loss that resulted in dose reductions or discontinuation of anti-diabetic medications in overweight or obese patients with type 2 diabetes (DM) undergoing weight loss treatment. METHODS: Case records of 50 overweight or obese patients with DM who successfully decreased dosage or discontinued diabet...

  4. Phyto-metals screening of selected anti-diabetic herbs and infused concoctions

    OpenAIRE

    Olanrewaju O. Olujimi; Olusegun N. Onifade; Adeleke T. Towolawi; Temilade F. Akinhanmi; Adeniyi A. Afolabi; Kabir A. Olanite

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the levels of some selected heavy metals in both the selected anti-diabetic herbal plants and infused concoctions for diabetes treatment. Methods: Ten anti-diabetic plant samples: pawpaw leaves (Carica papaya), bitter melon leaves (Momordica charantia), holy basil leaves (Ocimum sanctum), bitter leaf (Vernonia amygdalina), ginger rhizome (Zingiber officinale), garlic (Allium sativum), African red pepper fruits (Capsicum frutescens), negro pepper grain (Xylopia aethi...

  5. Barriers and facilitators to adherence to anti-diabetic medications: Ethiopian patients’ perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Bruck M. Habte; Tedla Kebede; Teferi G. Fenta; Heather Boon

    2017-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the experiences of Ethiopian patients with type 2 diabetes related to adherence to their anti-diabetic medications. This may limit attempts to develop and implement patient-centred approaches that consider Ethiopian contexts.Objectives: To conduct an exploratory study with a focus on identifying barriers and facilitators to anti-diabetic medications adherence in Ethiopian patients with type 2 diabetes.Methods: Qualitative methods were used to conduct semi-str...

  6. Rapid increase in the use of oral antidiabetic drugs in the United States, 1990-2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysowski, Diane K; Armstrong, George; Governale, Laura

    2003-06-01

    To describe the use of oral antidiabetic drugs for management of type 2 diabetes in the U.S. from 1990 through 2001. Data on oral antidiabetic drugs were derived from two pharmaceutical marketing databases from IMS Health, the National Prescription Audit Plus and the National Disease and Therapeutic Index. In 1990, 23.4 million outpatient prescriptions of oral antidiabetic agents were dispensed. By 2001, this number had increased 3.9-fold, to 91.8 million prescriptions. Glipizide and glyburide, two sulfonylurea medications, accounted for approximately 77% of prescriptions of oral antidiabetic drugs in 1990 and 35.5% of prescriptions in 2001. By 2001, the biguanide metformin (approved in 1995) had captured approximately 33% of prescriptions, and the thiazolidinedione insulin sensitizers (rosiglitazone and pioglitazone marketed beginning in 1999) accounted for approximately 17% of market share. Compared with patients treated in 1990, those in 2001 were proportionately younger and they more often used oral antidiabetic drugs and insulin in combination. Internists and general and family practitioners were the primary prescribers of this class of drugs. Consistent with the reported increase in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes, the number of dispensed outpatient prescriptions of oral antidiabetic drugs increased rapidly between 1990 and 2001. This period was marked by an increase in the treatment of younger people and the use of oral antidiabetic drugs in combination. With the approval in the last decade of several new types of oral antidiabetic medications with different mechanisms of action, options for management of type 2 diabetes have expanded.

  7. Effect of monohydric alcohols on structural properties of macromolecular solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giordano, R.; Wanderlingh, F.; Cordone, L.; Cupane, A.

    1983-01-01

    A report on the effects of monohydric alcohols on the thixotropic properties of a 1% (by weight) BSA solution is given. The presence of alcohols in the solution medium, even in a very small amount, weakens the structure responsible for the thixotropic properties: this effect increases with increasing alcohol concentration and alkyl group size. Indirect evidence relating the observed effects to the alteration, in the presence of alcohol, of protein-solvent hydrophobic interactions is also presented

  8. ?-Cell protection and antidiabetic activities of Crassocephalum crepidioides (Asteraceae) Benth. S. Moore extract against alloxan-induced oxidative stress via regulation of apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS)

    OpenAIRE

    Bahar, Entaz; Akter, Kazi-Marjahan; Lee, Geum-Hwa; Lee, Hwa-Young; Rashid, Harun-Or; Choi, Min-Kyung; Bhattarai, Kashi Raj; Hossain, Mir Mohammad Monir; Ara, Joushan; Mazumder, Kishor; Raihan, Obayed; Chae, Han-Jung; Yoon, Hyonok

    2017-01-01

    Background Medicinal plants are becoming more popular in the treatment of various diseases because of the adverse effects of the current therapy, especially antioxidant plant components such as phenols and flavonoids have a protective role against oxidative stress-induced degenerative diseases like diabetes. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate ?-cell protection and antidiabetic activities of Crassocephalum crepidioides (Asteraceae) Benth. S. Moore. Method The in-vitro study was...

  9. Protective effect of camel milk as anti-diabetic supplement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diabetes is a serious disease affects human health. Diabetes in advanced stages is accompanied by general weakness and alteration in fats and carbohydrates metabolism. Recently there are some scientific trends about the usage of camel milk (CM) in the treatment of diabetes and its associated alterations.

  10. Phytochemical analysis and evaluation of antidiabetic effects in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    At the end of the experiment, fasting blood glucose and glycogen content of the liver and skeletal muscle were determined. The study findings indicate that the extract was relatively safe with LD50 above 5000 mg/kg. Treatment with Acanthospermum hispidum extract resulted in a significant (P<0.05) reduction in FBG as well ...

  11. Anti-diabetic effects of Zhuoduqing formula, a Chinese herbal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The model rats were given ZDQ for 4 weeks. Insulin sensitivity was evaluated by homeostasis model assessment of basal insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT). Blood insulin and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels as well as SOCS-3 levels in skeletal muscles were analyzed ...

  12. Possible modulation of the antidiabetic effect of rosiglitazone by buspirone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wafaa R. Mohamed

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a group of metabolic disorders characterized by chronic hyperglycemia resulting from relative or absolute insulin deficiency with or without insulin resistance. As anxiolytics may have influence on glycemic control in diabetics, the present study was conducted to investigate the possible influence of buspirone in streptozotocin-induced DM and its possible interactions with rosiglitazone, an insulin sensitizer. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (50 mg/kg i.p.. Rats were classified into five groups namely: normal control, diabetic control, rosiglitazone (10 mg/kg p.o., buspirone (20 mg/kg i.p. or combination of both rosiglitazone and buspirone, respectively. All groups received daily treatments for 2 weeks after induction of DM including the normal group which received 1% Tween 80. There was no significant interaction between rosiglitazone and buspirone on the levels of serum glucose, insulin and C-peptide or liver glycogen content. Similarly, no interaction was observed between rosiglitazone and buspirone on oxidative stress parameters including serum malondialdehyde and blood glutathione levels or blood superoxide dismutase activity. In conclusion, the present study revealed that co-administration of buspirone with rosiglitazone does not produce serious reactions and buspirone can be safely administered as an anxiolytic in diabetic patients treated with rosiglitazone.

  13. Antidiabetic effect of aqueous extract of Basella alba leaves and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Group I rats served as the healthy control group and were neither induced with diabetes nor given any treatment. Group II rats served as the diabetic control. They were induced with diabetes but not given any treatment throughout the experiment. Rats in group III and IV were induced with diabetes and administered B. alba ...

  14. Effect of fibre content and alkali treatment on mechanical properties ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Roystonea regia fibre; epoxy resin; alkali treatment; mechanical properties. Abstract. The present paper investigates the effect of fibre content and alkali treatment on tensile, flexural and impact properties of unidirectional Roystonea regia natural-fibre-reinforced epoxy composites which are partially biodegradable.

  15. Effect of ozone gas processing on physical and chemical properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of ozone treatment on chemical and physical properties of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) gluten, glutenin and gliadin. Methods: Wheat proteins isolated from wheat flour were treated with ozone gas. The physical and chemical properties of gluten proteins were investigated after treatment ...

  16. Effect of Some Oligosaccharides on Functional Properties of Wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of oligosaccharides on the functional properties of wheat starch. Methods: The blue value, retrogradation and pasting properties of wheat starch were determined. In addition, water activity (Aw), melting enthalpy and melting temperature of wheat starch paste were analyzed. Results: ...

  17. Effect Of Formulating Additives On The Properties Of Ibuprofen Tablets

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study of the comparative effects of different formulating additives and film coating on the properties of ibuprofen tablets was made. The tested properties were hardeness (H), friability (F), the disintegration time (D) and dissolution characteristics of ibuprofen tablets. The hardeness, friability, the hardeness friability ratio ...

  18. Effect of antimicrobial agents on cellulose acetate nano composites properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Francisco J.; Bruna, Julio E.; Galotto, Maria J.; Guarda, Abel; Sepulveda, Hugo, E-mail: francisco.rodriguez.m@usach.cl [Center for the Development of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (CEDENNA). Universidad de Santiago de Chile. Faculty of Technology. Department of Food Science and Technology. Food Packaging Laboratory. Santiago (Chile)

    2011-07-01

    Nano composites based on cellulose acetate, Cloisite 30B, triethyl citrate and thymol or cinnamaldehyde were prepared using a dissolution casting technique. The effect of thymol and cinnamaldehyde on the cellulose acetate nano composite properties was evaluated by XRD and DSC. Important changes on the thermal properties and morphological structure were observed according to thymol and cinnamaldehyde content. (author)

  19. Effect of Zr on dielectric, ferroelectric and impedance properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. A polycrystalline sample of Zr-doped barium titanate (BaTiO3) was prepared by conventional solid state reaction method. The effect of Zr (0⋅15) on the structural and microstructural properties of BaTiO3 was investigated by XRD and SEM. The electrical properties (dielectric, ferroelectric and impedance spectro-.

  20. Effects of Decortication Temperature on the Functional Properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of decortication temperature on the functional and sensory properties of the cowpea flour (Vigna unguiculata) and steam flour paste were studied. Cowpea seeds were soaked at different temperatures (20oC, 40oC, 60oC, 80oC and 100oC) prior to decortication. The functional properties of the cowpea flour, ...

  1. Effect of Zr on dielectric, ferroelectric and impedance properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A polycrystalline sample of Zr-doped barium titanate (BaTiO3) was prepared by conventional solid state reaction method. The effect of Zr (0.15) on the structural and microstructural properties of BaTiO3 was investigated by XRD and SEM. The electrical properties (dielectric, ferroelectric and impedance spectroscopy) were ...

  2. Effect of aluminum addition on electrical properties, dielectric ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effect of aluminum addition on electrical properties, dielectric characteristics, and its stability of (Pr, Co, Cr, Y)-added zinc oxide-based varistors. Choon-W Nahm. Electrical Properties Volume 33 Issue 3 June 2010 pp 239-245 ... Department of Electrical Engineering, Dongeui University, Busan 614-714, Republic of Korea ...

  3. Effect of Zn doping on optical properties and photoconductivity of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 36; Issue 3. Effect of Zn doping on optical properties and ... Surprisingly, regardless of doping level, the luminescent properties of films are related to the fundamental bandgap energy and deep levels inside the bandgap. Photoconductivity of the films have been ...

  4. Effect of antimicrobial agents on cellulose acetate nano composites properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Francisco J.; Bruna, Julio E.; Galotto, Maria J.; Guarda, Abel; Sepulveda, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    Nano composites based on cellulose acetate, Cloisite 30B, triethyl citrate and thymol or cinnamaldehyde were prepared using a dissolution casting technique. The effect of thymol and cinnamaldehyde on the cellulose acetate nano composite properties was evaluated by XRD and DSC. Important changes on the thermal properties and morphological structure were observed according to thymol and cinnamaldehyde content. (author)

  5. Effect of oven residence time on mechanical properties in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In rotational moulding of plastics, improving the mechanical properties without sacrificing the processibility is a challenging task. In this paper, an attempt has been made to investigate the effect of oven residence time on the mechanical properties of the rotationally moulded products made using linear low ...

  6. Efficacy and risk profile of anti-diabetic therapies: Conventional vs traditional drugs-A mechanistic revisit to understand their mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Prachi; Bala, Manju; Gupta, Sanjeev; Dua, Anita; Dabur, Rajesh; Injeti, Elisha; Mittal, Ashwani

    2016-11-01

    An increasing array of anti-diabetic drugs are available today, yet Type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) - remains a life threatening disease, causing high mortality and morbidity in developing and developed countries. As of now, no effective therapy is available for the complete eradication/cure of diabetes and its associated complications. Therefore, it is time to re-think and revisit molecular pathways and targets of each existing drug in order to identify multiple targets from different signaling pathways that may be manipulated simultaneously to treat or manage T2DM effectively. Bearing this goal in mind, the article reviews the mechanisms of action of available anti-diabetic drugs with in-depth mechanistic analysis of each therapy. The conventional and herbal strategies are analysed and compared for their benefits and the associated possible side effects. This critical information is necessary not only for the development of better, novel and potent anti-diabetic therapy in future but also for best possible combinational therapies and strategies with the available drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Agrimonia eupatoria L. and Cynara cardunculus L. Water Infusions: Comparison of Anti-Diabetic Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anika Kuczmannová

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is frequently diagnosed at a time when patients already suffer from several cardiovascular complications. Our previously published data (Molecules 201520 (11: 20538-50 on the anti-oxidative properties of Agrimonia eupatoria L. (AE and Cynara cardunculus L. (CC prompted us to extend the available evidence on their possible protective activities on selected DM-related parameters in a streptozotocin-induced DM rat model and in a series of in vitro experiments. Male rats were divided into four groups: control group, untreated diabetic group, AE and CC treated diabetic groups. During a five-week period, changes in blood glucose and body weight were monitored. Then, rats were sacrificed and subjected to the assessment of changes in the reactivity of aortas and measurement of butyrylcholinesterase activity. To complete the panel of experiments, α-glucosidase activity was assessed in vitro. Our results demonstrate that both tested extracts exert similar anti-diabetic activities. However, better anti-oxidant activity of the A. eupatoria extract indicates its higher clinical potential in the prevention and/or adjuvant therapy of developing cardiovascular complications related to DM and diseases associated with oxidative stress.

  8. Comparison of Antidiabetic Medications during the Treatment of Atherosclerosis in T2DM Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojie Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes is often associated with arterial atherosclerosis in large blood vessels. We set out to elucidate whether commonly used antidiabetic drugs metformin, sitagliptin, and pioglitazone will reduce atherosclerosis in T2DM patients. We enrolled 176 individuals with type 2 diabetes, which were divided into four treatment groups according to different oral drugs: metformin alone, sitagliptin alone, pioglitazone alone, or combination of metformin and sitagliptin. We assessed changes in glycometabolism, lipid metabolism, cytokine released, and carotid artery intima-media thickness as the readout for improvement in atherosclerosis. HbA1c levels were significantly decreased in all treatment groups (p<0.05, and FBG levels were also decreased in metformin and combined groups (p<0.05. In addition, we found IL-6 levels significantly decreased in all treatment groups (p<0.05. Treatment with pioglitazone showed a significant increase in BMI, HDL, and ADPN levels (p<0.05. We also observed a significant decrease in NHDL levels in the combined treatment group (p<0.05. Our data revealed that in addition to hypoglycemic properties of metformin, sitagliptin, and pioglitazone, these drugs also have the potential to promote an anti-inflammatory response. Therefore, combination therapy may be more beneficial for reducing atherosclerosis in patients with type 2 diabetes. The clinical trial is registered with ChiCTR-ORC-17010835.

  9. [EFFECT OF BIOACTIVE ALDEHYDES ON GELATIN PROPERTIES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysyuk, I P; Dzvonkevych, N D; Volodina, T T; Popova, N N; Shandrenko, S G

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive aldehydes are among main factors of proteins postsynthetic modifications, which are the cause and consequence of many diseases. Comparative study of some aldehydes modifying action on gelatin was carried out in vitro. Gelatin samples (20 mM) were incubated with: ribose, deoxyribose, glyoxal, methylglyoxal, formaldehyde, acrolein (20 mM each) and their combinations in 0.1 M Naphosphate buffer (pH 7.4) containing 0.02% sodium azide at 37 °C in the dark for 30 days. We investigated the fluorescent properties of these samples and their molecular weight distribution by electrophoresis. It has been revealed that formed adducts had different fluorescence spectra. According to fluorescence intensity these aldehydes were put in order: formaldehyde acrolein acrolein test of a patients' skin surface for collagen crosslinks determination has to be verified by other tests for proteins postsynthetic modifications.

  10. The Action of Antidiabetic Plants of the Canadian James Bay Cree Traditional Pharmacopeia on Key Enzymes of Hepatic Glucose Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abir Nachar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We determined the capacity of putative antidiabetic plants used by the Eastern James Bay Cree (Canada to modulate key enzymes of gluconeogenesis and glycogen synthesis and key regulating kinases. Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase and glycogen synthase (GS activities were assessed in cultured hepatocytes treated with crude extracts of seventeen plant species. Phosphorylation of AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK, Akt, and Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3 were probed by Western blot. Seven of the seventeen plant extracts significantly decreased G6Pase activity, Abies balsamea and Picea glauca, exerting an effect similar to insulin. This action involved both Akt and AMPK phosphorylation. On the other hand, several plant extracts activated GS, Larix laricina and A. balsamea, far exceeding the action of insulin. We also found a significant correlation between GS stimulation and GSK-3 phosphorylation induced by plant extract treatments. In summary, three Cree plants stand out for marked effects on hepatic glucose homeostasis. P. glauca affects glucose production whereas L. laricina rather acts on glucose storage. However, A. balsamea has the most promising profile, simultaneously and powerfully reducing G6Pase and stimulating GS. Our studies thus confirm that the reduction of hepatic glucose production likely contributes to the therapeutic potential of several antidiabetic Cree traditional medicines.

  11. Treating Diet-Induced Diabetes and Obesity with Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Pancreatic Progenitor Cells and Antidiabetic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E. Bruin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cell (hESC-derived pancreatic progenitor cells effectively reverse hyperglycemia in rodent models of type 1 diabetes, but their capacity to treat type 2 diabetes has not been reported. An immunodeficient model of type 2 diabetes was generated by high-fat diet (HFD feeding in SCID-beige mice. Exposure to HFDs did not impact the maturation of macroencapsulated pancreatic progenitor cells into glucose-responsive insulin-secreting cells following transplantation, and the cell therapy improved glucose tolerance in HFD-fed transplant recipients after 24 weeks. However, since diet-induced hyperglycemia and obesity were not fully ameliorated by transplantation alone, a second cohort of HFD-fed mice was treated with pancreatic progenitor cells combined with one of three antidiabetic drugs. All combination therapies rapidly improved body weight and co-treatment with either sitagliptin or metformin improved hyperglycemia after only 12 weeks. Therefore, a stem cell-based therapy may be effective for treating type 2 diabetes, particularly in combination with antidiabetic drugs.

  12. Antidiabetic and Antioxidant Impacts of Desert Date (Balanites aegyptiaca and Parsley (Petroselinum sativum Aqueous Extracts: Lessons from Experimental Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser S. Abou Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants are effective in controlling plasma glucose level with minimal side effects and are commonly used in developing countries as an alternative therapy for the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential antidiabetic and antioxidant impacts of Balanites aegyptiaca and Petroselinum sativum extracts on streptozotocin-induced diabetic and normal rats. The influences of these extracts on body weight, plasma glucose, insulin, total antioxidant capacity (TAC, malondialdehyde (MDA levels, and liver-pyruvate kinase (L-PK levels were assessed. Furthermore, the weight and histomorphological changes of the pancreas were studied in the different experimental groups. The herbal preparations significantly reduced the mean plasma glucose and MDA levels and significantly increased the mean plasma insulin, L-PK, and TAC levels in the treated diabetic groups compared to the diabetic control group. An obvious increase in the weight of the pancreas and the size of the islets of Langerhans and improvement in the histoarchitecture were evident in the treated groups compared to untreated ones. In conclusion, the present study provides a scientific evidence for the traditional use of these extracts as antidiabetic and antioxidant agents in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  13. Binding Energy calculation of GSK-3 protein of Human against some anti-diabetic compounds of Momordica charantia linn (Bitter melon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Ridip; Parida, Pratap; Neog, Bijoy; Yadav, Raj Narain Singh

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is one of the major life threatening diseases worldwide. It creates major health problems in urban India. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK-3) protein of human is known for phosphorylating and inactivating glycogen synthase which also acts as a negative regulator in the hormonal control of glucose homeostasis. In traditional medicine, Momordica charantia is used as antidiabetic plant because of its hypoglycemic effect. Hence to block the active site of the GSK-3 protein three anti-diabetic compounds namely, charantin, momordenol & momordicilin were taken from Momordica charantia for docking study and calculation of binding energy. The aim of present investigation is to find the binding energy of three major insulin-like active compounds against glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3), one of the key proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism, with the help of molecular docking using ExomeTM Horizon suite. The study recorded minimum binding energy by momordicilin in comparison to the others.

  14. effects of sulphur addition on addition on and mechanical properties

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    234-8034714355. 8034714355. 1. EFFECTS OF SULPHUR ADDITION ON. ADDITION ON. 2. AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES O. 3. 4. C. W. Onyia. 5. 1DEPT. OF METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS. 6. 2, 4DEPT. OF METALLURGICAL ...

  15. Effect of crosslinker on the swelling and adsorption properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    016-1220-0. Effect of crosslinker on the swelling and adsorption properties of cationic superabsorbent. TARUN SHARMA and GIRIDHAR MADRAS. ∗. Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  16. Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-alpha with anti-diabetic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzawa, M; Satoh, J; Qiang, X; Miyaguchi, S; Sakata, Y; Nakazawa, T; Ikehata, F; Ohta, S; Toyota, T

    1999-03-01

    It has recently been indicated that tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production is increased under chronic hyperglycemia and TNF-alpha has harmful effects on insulin sensitivity and possibly on chronic diabetic complications. Therefore it will be favorable for diabetes treatment if anti-diabetic agents also have anti-TNF-alpha activities. In this study, we have investigated effects of hypoglycemic sulfonylureas (gliclazide and glibenclamide) and a thiazolidinedione (troglitazone) on lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-alpha production, which was evaluated by immunoassay and bioassay, in vivo using mice and partly in vitro using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Gliclazide significantly inhibited TNF-alpha production in vivo and also in vitro at a concentration of 10(-3) mol/l. However, glibenclamide had neither effect on TNF-alpha production nor action. On the other hand, troglitazone inhibited action rather than production of TNF-alpha in vivo. In vitro troglitazone (10(-4) mol/l) significantly reduced cytolytic activity of TNF-alpha against LM cells. These results indicate that gliclazide and troglitazone have inhibitory effect on TNF-alpha.

  17. Momordica charantia constituents and antidiabetic screening of the isolated major compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harinantenaina, Liva; Tanaka, Michi; Takaoka, Shigeru; Oda, Munehiro; Mogami, Orie; Uchida, Masayuki; Asakawa, Yoshinori

    2006-07-01

    Bioguided fractionation of the methanol extract of Momordica charantia dried gourds led to the isolation of three new cucurbitane triterpenoids (1-3), together with eight known compounds (4-11). The aglycone of momordicoside I was isolated from the ether soluble fraction in a high amount. The structures of the metabolites were established on the basis of one and two dimensional NMR spectroscopic evidence, X-ray analysis, and comparison with the reported data in the literature. A number of phytochemicals have been isolated from Momordica charantia but the constituents responsible for the hypoglycaemic/antihyperglycaemic activities have not been determined. Therefore, in order to evaluate the contribution of the cucurbitane triterpenoids of the ether fraction of M. charantia methanol extract to in vivo anti-diabetic effects, the major compounds, 5beta,19-epoxy-3beta,25-dihydroxycucurbita-6,23(E)-diene (4), and 3beta,7beta,25-trihydroxycucurbita-5,23(E)-dien-19-al (5) have been tested and have shown blood hypoglycaemic effects in the diabetes-induced male ddY mice strain at 400 mg/kg. The two aglycones of charantin did not show any hypoglycaemic effects. Our finding is the first demonstration that major pure cucurbutanoid compounds of M. charantia have in vivo hypoglycaemic effects.

  18. Effect of bioactive aldehydes on gelatin properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Krysyuk

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive aldehydes are among main factors of proteins postsynthetic modifications, which are the cause and consequence of many diseases. Comparative study of some aldehydes modifying action on gelatin was carried out in vitro. Gelatin samples (20 mM were incubated with: ribose, deoxyribose, glyoxal, methylglyoxal, formaldehyde, acrolein (20 mM each and their combinations in 0.1 M Na-phosphate buffer (pH 7.4 containing 0.02% sodium azide at 37 °C in the dark for 30 days. We investigated the fluorescent properties of these samples and their molecular weight distribution by electrophoresis. It has been revealed that formed adducts had different fluorescence spectra. According to fluorescence intensity these aldehydes were put in order: formaldehyde < methylglyoxal < acrolein < ribose < deoxy­ribose < glyoxal. The electrophoresis results showed fragments of gelatin molecular weight redistribution. By this index, the aldehydes rating was as follows: ribose < deoxyribose < acrolein < glyoxal < formaldehyde < methylglyoxal. Comparison of these two ratings indicates that aldehydes with a lower ability to form fluorescent adducts have higher abili­ty to form intermolecular crosslinks. Therefore, the traditional clinical fluorescent test of a patients’ skin surface for collagen crosslinks determination has to be verified by other tests for proteins postsynthetic modifications.

  19. Optimizing weight control in diabetes: antidiabetic drug selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Kalra

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available S Kalra1, B Kalra1, AG Unnikrishnan2, N Agrawal3, S Kumar41Bharti Hospital, Karnal; 2Amrita Institute of Medical Science, Kochi; 3Medical College, Gwalior; 4Excel Life Sciences, Noida, IndiaDate of preparation: 18th August 2010Conflict of interest: SK has received speaker fees from Novo Nordisk, sanofi-aventis, MSD, Eli Lilly, BMS, and AstraZeneca.Clinical question: Which antidiabetic drugs provide optimal weight control in patients with type 2 diabetes?Results: Metformin reduces weight gain, and may cause weight loss, when given alone or in combination with other drugs. Pioglitazone and rosiglitazone use is associated with weight gain. Use of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 analogs, liraglutide and exenatide, is associated with weight loss. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitors are considered weight-neutral. Results with insulin therapy are conflicting. Insulin detemir provides weight control along with glycemic control.Implementation: • Weight gain is considered an inevitable part of good glycemic control using conventional modalities of treatment such as sulfonylureas.• Use of metformin, weight-sparing insulin analogs such as insulin detemir, and liraglutide, should be encouraged as monotherapy, or in combination with other drugs.Keywords: weight control, diabetes

  20. Tropospheric ozone. Formation, properties, effects. Expert opinion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elstner, E.F.

    1996-01-01

    The formation and dispersion of tropospheric ozone are discussed only marginally in this expert opinion; the key interest is in the effects of ground level ozone on plants, animals, and humans. The expert opinion is based on an analysis of the available scientific publications. (orig./MG) [de

  1. Barriers of Adherence and Possible Solutions to Nonadherence to Antidiabetic Therapy in Women with Diabetes in Pregnancy: Patients’ Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doreen Mukona

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes in pregnancy contributes to maternal mortality and morbidity though it receives little attention in developing countries. The purpose of the study was to explore the barriers to adherence and possible solutions to nonadherence to antidiabetic therapy in women with diabetes in pregnancy. Antidiabetic therapy referred to diet, physical activity, and medications. Four focus group discussions (FGDs, each with 7 participants, were held at a central hospital in Zimbabwe. Included were women with a diagnosis of diabetes in pregnancy, aged 18 to 49 years, and able to speak Shona or English. Approval was obtained from respective ethical review boards. FGDs followed a semistructured questionnaire. Detailed notes were taken during the interviews which were also being audiotaped. Data were analysed thematically and manually. Themes identified were barriers and possible solutions to nonadherence to therapy. Barriers were poor socioeconomic status, lack of family, peer and community support, effects of pregnancy, complicated therapeutic regimen, pathophysiology of diabetes, cultural and religious beliefs, and poor health care system. Possible solutions were fostering social support, financial support, and improvement of hospital services. Individualised care of women with diabetes is essential, and barriers and possible solutions identified can be utilised to improve care.

  2. Effect of capping agents: Structural, optical and biological properties of ZnO nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javed, Rabia [Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Usman, Muhammad, E-mail: uk_phy@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, School of Science and Engineering, Lahore University of Management Sciences, Lahore 54729 (Pakistan); Tabassum, Saira; Zia, Muhammad [Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • ZnO nanoparticles have been effectively capped with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) shown by the data of XRD, FTIR and UV–visible spectroscopy. • Reduction in size occurred from 34 nm to 26 nm due to capping agent and band gap energy increases with the decrease in the particle size. • Antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria is greater than the Gram-negative bacteria. • All biological assays reveal highest activities in capped ZnO nanoparticles as compared to the uncapped ZnO nanoparticles. • Highest antibacterial activity has been exhibited by ZnO-PVP while highest antioxidant and antidiabetic activities have been conferred by ZnO- PEG. - Abstract: Different biological activities of capped and uncapped ZnO nanoparticles were investigated, and the effects of potential capping agents on these biological activities were studied. ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized and capped by polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) using a simple chemical method of co-precipitation. Characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and UV–vis spectroscopy confirmed the crystallinity, size, functional group, and band gap of synthesized nanoparticles. Reduction in size occurred from 34 nm to 26 nm due to surfactant. Results of all biological activities indicated significantly higher values in capped as compared to uncapped nanoparticles. Antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538), Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 6633), Escherichia coli (ATCC15224), and Acetobacter was obtained. This activity was more prominent against Gram-positive bacteria, and ZnO-PVP nanoparticles elucidated highest antibacterial activity (zone of inhibition 17 mm) against Gram-positive, Bacillus subtilis species. Antioxidant activities including total flavonoid content, total phenolic content, total antioxidant capacity, total reducing power and %age inhibition of DPPH, and

  3. Antidiabetic Medicinal Plants Used by the Basotho Tribe of Eastern Free State: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatai Oladunni Balogun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM belongs to the group of five leading important diseases causing death globally and remains a major health problem in Africa. A number of factors such as poverty, poor eating habit, and hormonal imbalance are responsible for the occurrence of the disease. It poses a major health challenge in Africa continent today and the prevalence continues to increase at an alarming rate. Various treatment options particularly the usage of herbs have been effective against diabetes because they have no adverse effects. Interestingly, South Africa, especially the Basotho tribe, is blessed with numerous medicinal plants whose usage in the treatment of DM has been effective since the conventional drugs are expensive and often unaffordable. The present study attempted to update the various scientific evidence on the twenty-three (23 plants originating from different parts of the world but widely used by the Sotho people in the management of DM. Asteraceae topped the list of sixteen (16 plant families and remained the most investigated according to this review. Although limited information was obtained on the antidiabetic activities of these plants, it is however anticipated that government parastatals and scientific communities will pay more attention to these plants in future research.

  4. In vitro antidiabetic activity of various crude extracts of Boletus variipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniandy, Sutha; Fazry, Shazrul; Daud, Fauzi; Senafi, Sahidan

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a complex metabolic disease that progressively spread worldwide and difficult to treat due to various physical and metabolic complications. Current treatment using synthetic drugs has lead to various undesirable side effects. Here we determined the effect of Boletus variipes extracts on diabetes related enzymes. In this study, hot water, cold water and methanol extracts of B. variipes were utilized in order to assess their in vitro antidiabetic activity by measuring the effect on α-amylase and α-glucosidase enzyme. Hot water extract possessed the highest inhibition activity of α-amylase and α-glucosidase in a concentration dependent manner with the IC50 value 87 mg/mL and 89 mg/mL respectively. The methanol extract also showed inhibition activity of α-amylase and α-glucosidase but significantly lower than the hot water extract. Whereas cold water extract did not show any inhibition activity towards both the enzymes. Therefore, it is hypothesized that the hot water extract of Boletus variipes contains bioactive compound that can inhibit alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase enzyme activity. At the request of all authors of the paper an updated version was published on 11 May 2016. The original version identified the species of mushroom as Boletus variipes, but new findings have proved the species of mushroom to be Boletus qriseipurpureus. The species name has been updated throughout the revised version of this paper.

  5. The antidiabetic agent glibenclamide protects airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Wei; Zhang, Shufang; Cai, Zhijian; Hu, Xinlei; Zhang, Ruifeng; Wang, Yong; Li, Na; Chen, Zhihua; Zhang, Gensheng

    2015-04-01

    Glibenclamide has a newly discovered role in inflammation regulation besides its antidiabetic effect. As an inhibitor of ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel, glibenclamide antagonizes the relaxation of the tracheal smooth muscle. This indicates that glibenclamide might attenuate airway inflammation while aggravate airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in asthmatics. Clinically, many diabetics with asthma are prescribed with glibenclamide to control blood glucose. However, whether glibenclamide could exert any effects on asthmatic inflammation remains unknown. Using an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced mouse model of asthma, we evaluated the effects of glibenclamide on the AHR and inflammation. Interestingly, glibenclamide reduced all the cardinal features of asthma in OVA-challenged mice, including AHR, airway inflammation, and T-helper type 2 (Th2) cytokines. Glibenclamide also downregulated OVA-induced expressions of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) and phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (p-STAT6) in the lung. In addition, increased sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1) expression in the lung was observed after the OVA challenge. These findings suggest that the classic sulfonylurea glibenclamide plays an important protective role in the development of asthma, which not only provides the evidence for the safety of prescribed glibenclamide in diabetics combined with asthma but also indicates a possible new therapeutic for asthma via targeting glibenclamide-related pathways.

  6. [Effectiveness of phytotherapy in supportive treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus Billberry (Vaccinium myrtillus)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koupý, David; Kotolová, Hana; Kučerová, Jana

    2015-01-01

    The billberry is well-known for its tasty blue-dyeing fruits. Historically the leaves and fruits were used to treat diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, dementia and cancer. Antidiabetic properties of the plant are attributed mostly to the content of anthocyanins and polyphenols. These compounds have proven their antidiabetic potential in various studies. Their mechanism of action is an increase in insulin secretion (anthocyanin pelargonidin), reduction of insulin resistance (anthocyanin cyanidin-3-glucoside), glucose resorption from the GIT (polyphenols) and enhancement of beta-cells regeneration. Besides these effects, anthocyanins contribute to the improvement of the lipid spectrum and have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and cardioprotective activities. Antidiabetic effects of anthocyanin cyanidin-3-galactoside were compared to acarbose (synergistic effect), hypocholesterolemic activity of cyanidin-3-O-glucoside to atorvastatin (synergistic effect) and hypolipidemic properties of blueberry leaf extract to ciprofibrate (extract has a lower effect). However, in many preclinical and clinical studies different species of the Vaccinium genus and other plants with asimilar effect as the billberry were also assessed. Therefore, in order to convincingly assess the efficacy and safety of blueberry herbal medicines more studies are necessary. Such studies should shed light into the variety of anthocyanins, their particular effects and optimal doses and compare their effects with intake of foods generally rich in anthocyanins.Key words: billberry Vaccinium myrtillus diabetes mellitus phytotherapy antocyanines.

  7. Synthesis of a new insulin-mimetic anti-diabetic drug containing vitamin A and vanadium(IV) salt: Chemico-biological characterizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Abdel Majid A; Naglah, Ahmed M; Al-Omar, Mohamed A; Refat, Moamen S

    2017-09-01

    Diabetes patients suffer from chronic disorders in the metabolism due to high blood sugar caused by anomalies in insulin excretion. Recently, vanadium compounds have been prepared and functionalized to decrease the level of hyperglycemia. Vitamin A boosts beta cell activity; therefore, the lack of this vitamin plays a role in the development of type 2 diabetes. The aim of this article focused on the synthesis of a new anti-diabetic drug formed from the complexation of a vanadium(IV) salt with vitamin A. Vitamin A acts as a unidentate chelate through the oxygen of its -OH group. The vanadium(IV) compound is surrounded by two vitamin A molecules. The [VO(vitamin A) 2 (H 2 O) 2 ] compound was synthesized in a binary solvent system consisting of MeOH/H 2 O (1:1 ratio) in alkaline media at pH = 8. This compound was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), electronic spectra (UV-vis), effective magnetic moment, electron spin resonance (ESR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and thermal analysis (thermogravimetry (TG)-differential thermal analysis (DTA)). Anti-diabetic efficiency for the vanadium(IV) compound was assessed in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. The results of the animal studies demonstrate the ability of the vanadium(IV) complex to act as an anti-diabetic agent, as measured by improvements of lipid profile, antioxidant activity (superoxide dismutase), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione, methionine synthase, and kidney and liver functions.

  8. A study of the anti-diabetic agents of camel milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Ajamaluddin; Al-Senaidy, Abdulrahman; Skrzypczak-Jankun, Ewa; Jankun, Jerzy

    2012-09-01

    The number of people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes has risen steeply recently exhausting the ability of health care systems to deal with the epidemic. Seventy-five percent of people with diabetes live in low- and middle-income countries. The largest populations of diabetics are in China and India, with many of those people living in extreme poverty. Combined forces of governmental health care, charities and donation of pharmaceutical companies would not be able to cope with the financial demands needed for medicaments and treatments for these people. Therefore, it is worth looking into traditional folk remedies to find if there is any scientific merit to justify their claims for alleviating symptoms of diabetes. There is a traditional belief in the Middle East that regular consumption of camel milk helps in the prevention and control of diabetes. Recently, it has been reported that camel milk can have such properties. Literature review suggests the following possibilities: i) insulin in camel milk possesses special properties that makes absorption into circulation easier than insulin from other sources or cause resistance to proteolysis; ii) camel insulin is encapsulated in nanoparticles (lipid vesicles) that make possible its passage through the stomach and entry into the circulation; iii) some other elements of camel milk make it anti-diabetic. Sequence of camel insulin and its predicted digestion pattern do not suggest differentiability to overcome the mucosal barriers before been degraded and reaching the blood stream. However, we cannot exclude the possibility that insulin in camel milk is present in nanoparticles capable of transporting this hormone into the bloodstream. Although, much more probable is that camel milk contains 'insulin-like' small molecule substances that mimic insulin interaction with its receptor.

  9. Antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic properties of aqueous root extract of Icacina senegalensis in alloxan induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GC Akuodor

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: The results suggest that the root extract of I. senegalensis possesses antidiabetic and hypolipidemic properties, which might be a potential source for isolation of new orally active agent in the treatment of diabetes and its associated complications.

  10. The Antidiabetic Drug Metformin Inhibits the Proliferation of Bladder Cancer Cells in Vitro and in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that metformin, a widely used antidiabetic agent, may reduce cancer risk and improve prognosis of certain malignancies. However, the mechanisms for the anti-cancer effects of metformin remain uncertain. In this study, we investigated the effects of metformin on human bladder cancer cells and the underlying mechanisms. Metformin significantly inhibited the proliferation and colony formation of 5637 and T24 cells in vitro; specifically, metformin induced an apparent cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phases, accompanied by a strong decrease of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4, E2F1 and an increase of p21waf-1. Further experiments revealed that metformin activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and suppressed mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, the central regulator of protein synthesis and cell growth. Moreover, daily treatment of metformin led to a substantial inhibition of tumor growth in a xenograft model with concomitant decrease in the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, cyclin D1 and p-mTOR. The in vitro and in vivo results demonstrate that metformin efficiently suppresses the proliferation of bladder cancer cells and suggest that metformin may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of bladder cancer.

  11. Ethiopian patients' perceptions of anti-diabetic medications: implications for diabetes education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habte, Bruck Messele; Kebede, Tedla; Fenta, Teferi Gedif; Boon, Heather

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore medication-related perceptions of adult patients with type 2 diabetes attending treatment in public hospitals of urban centers in central Ethiopia. Qualitative in-depth interviews were held with 39 participants selected to represent a range of treatment experiences and socio-demographic characteristics who were attending their treatment in 3 public hospitals. Interviews continued until key themes were saturated. The interview and analysis was guided by Horne's necessity-concerns model. The findings revealed medication-related perceptions some of which were similar to those of Western patients and others that seem to be informed by local socio-cultural contexts. Participants' perceptions focused on the necessity of and concerns about their anti-diabetic medications, giving more emphasis to the latter. Concerns were expressed about both perceived and experienced adverse effects, inconveniences in handling the medications and access. It was evident that some of these concerns were exaggerated but could nevertheless negatively affect adherence to prescribed medications including resistance to initiate insulin with potential impact on health outcomes. Understanding patients' perceptions of their medications is critical for developing a diabetes education program that considers local contexts and beliefs to enhance adherence. Education programs should consider patients' concerns about medication adverse effects and reasons for use so as to improve their adherence and health outcomes.

  12. Ozone Effect On the Properties of Aramid Fabric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The limitation of aramid fiber is its surface property, which results in its very poor interfacial adhesion to most of commercial resins. In order to improve the surface property of the aramid fiber, ozone treatment was carried out in this work. The aramid fabrics were evaluated in terms of surface morphology, wicking effect, tensile property, and ball bursting test. The results showed that the surface morphology of aramid fabrics did not undergo an obvious change; the wicking effect increased slightly with an increase in ozone treatment time; the tenacity and elongation of aramid fibers and fabrics did not significant change after ozone treatment, but the tenacity and elongation of aramid yarns showed significant improvement after ozone treatment, and increased with the increase of ozone treatment time; the ball bursting load and penetration displacement had a slight increase as well after ozone treatment. Therefore, ozone treatment could be one method to improve the surface property of the aramid fiber.

  13. Effect of starch binder on charcoal briquette properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Gabriel; Stępniewski, Witold; Wójcik-Oliveira, Katarzyna

    2017-10-01

    The paper shows the results of a study on the effect of starch binder on the mechanical, physical and burning properties of charcoal briquettes. Two types of binders were repeatedly used to make briquettes of native wheat starch and modified wheat starch, at 8% of the whole. Briquetting was performed in a roller press unit, and pillow-shaped briquettes were made. The moisture of the mixed material ranged from 28 to 32%. The product, whether the former or the latter, was characterized by very good mechanical properties and satisfactory physical properties. Moreover, the type of starch binder had no effect on toughness, calorific heating value, volatiles, fixed carbon content and ash content. However, the combustion test showed quite different burning properties. As briquettes should have short firing up time and lower smokiness, as well as high maximum temperature and long burning time, we have concluded that briquettes with native wheat starch as a binder are more appropriate for burning in the grill.

  14. Transport properties in a superconducting proximity sandwich, Kondo effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, N.

    1981-01-01

    Temperature-dependent properties are evaluated in a superconducting Kondo alloy induced by the proximity effect. These include (i) the order parameter, (ii) the dc Josephson current, and (iii) the thermal conductivity and ultrasonic attenuation, in the case when there is reentance of superconductivity. The calculations are based on the theory given by Kaiser, in which the McMillan tunneling model and the Mueller-Hartmann-Zittartz theory are combined. The temperature dependence of pair-breaking is reflected directly in the above properties in much the same way as in an intrinsic Kondo superconductor, indicating that proximity-effect studies may provide detailed information on the Kondo effect in superconductivity

  15. Artificial immune system for effective properties optimization of magnetoelectric composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteralski, Arkadiusz; Dziatkiewicz, Grzegorz

    2018-01-01

    The optimization problem of the effective properties for magnetoelectric composites is considered. The effective properties are determined by the semi-analytical Mori-Tanaka approach. The generalized Eshelby tensor components are calculated numerically by using the Gauss quadrature method for the integral representation of the inclusion problem. The linear magnetoelectric constitutive equation is used. The effect of orientation of the electromagnetic materials components is taken into account. The optimization problem of the design is formulated and the artificial immune system is applied to solve it.

  16. Effect of Zn doping on optical properties and photoconductivity of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effect of Zn doping on optical properties and photoconductivity of SnS2 nanocrystalline thin films. R ETEFAGH1, N .... samples show the effect of both uniform and non-uniform strain in the structure of the films. But, the ... ions creates local states and tails near the edge of conduction band giving rise to decrease in bandgap.

  17. Tillage and manure effect on soil physical and chemical properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this work was to study the effects of tillage and liquid manure applications on some physical and chemical properties and also on the carbon and nitrogen mineralization potential from a meadow soil. Our results indicated that tillage and manure applications had no effect on the concentration of Cu, Mn, total ...

  18. Antidiabetic activities of polysaccharides from Anoectochilus roxburghii and Anoectochilus formosanus in STZ-induced diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tingting; Duan, Xiaoyu; Ke, Yu; Zhang, Lan; Shen, Yingbin; Hu, Bin; Liu, Aiping; Chen, Hong; Li, Cheng; Wu, Wenjuan; Shen, Li; Liu, Yuntao

    2018-02-10

    Six polysaccharides were extracted from different parts (whole plants, roots and leaves) of Anoectochilus roxburghii and Anoectochilus formosanus (ARPs, ARPs-1, ARPs-2, AFPs, AFPs-1 and AFPs-2). Their primary characteristics were identified and their antidiabetic activities were evaluated in STZ-induced diabetic mice. Root polysaccharides (ARPs-1and AFPs-1) and leaf polysaccharides (ARPs-2 and AFPs-2) were distinct from each other in terms of the Mws, monosaccharide compositions and functional groups. Notably, the primary structures of ARPs and AFPs were similar to those of ARPs-1and AFPs-1, respectively. In animal experiment, after feeding with polysaccharides samples, the body weight, blood glucose, glycogen, insulin, total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), malondiadehyde (MDA) and antioxidant enzyme activities in liver and kidney of mice were tested to investigate the antidiabetic activities. All polysaccharides exhibited varying antidiabetic activities (antihyperglycemic, antioxidant and antihyperlipidemic activities), which were closely related to their primary characteristics. Furthermore, root polysaccharides with higher Mws and glucose content in both A. roxburghii and A. formosanus, exhibited better antidiabetic activities than leaf polysaccharides, and ARPs which showed the best antidiabetic activities had the potential to be used as functional food or medicine for diabetes treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Patients' Adherence to Anti-Diabetic Medications in a Hospital at Ajman, UAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifulla, Mohammed; John, Lisha Jenny; Sreedharan, Jayadevan; Muttappallymyalil, Jayakumary; Basha, Sheikh Altaf

    2014-01-01

    Anti-diabetic medications are integral for glycemic control in diabetes. Non-adherence to drugs can alter blood glucose levels, resulting in complications. Adherence to anti-diabetic medications reported by patients and the factors associated with medication adherence among adult patients with diabetes mellitus were explored. This cross-sectional study was carried out among patients with type II diabetes mellitus attending the Internal Medicine Department of a hospital in the United Arab Emirates. Consecutive patients were selected, and data regarding their medication adherence were collected using a questionnaire. Data analysis was carried out using SPSS-20. The chi-square test was performed to examine the associations between categorical variables; a two-sided P Value patients participated in the study (63 males; 69 females). The mean age (standard deviation) of the respondents was 54 years (SD 10.2). The self-reported adherence rate to anti-diabetic drugs was 84%. The most common reason for non-adherence was forgetfulness, and the adherence rate was similar in both genders. Patients with Bachelor's and Master's degree reported greater adherence rate to anti-diabetic medication in comparison to the secondary school educated. The self-reported adherence rate to anti-diabetic medications was 84%, and forgetfulness was the most common reason for non-adherence. Future studies on strategies to improve adherence rate should be considered.

  20. Antidiabetic Activities and Identification of Chemical Compound from Samama (Anthocephalus macrophyllus (Roxb Havil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laela Nur Anisah

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Samama (Anthocephalus macrophyllus is one of a pioneer indigenous fast growing species in Indonesia which have been used as traditional medicine for various diseases. The objectives were to determine the yield extract, to analyze their antidiabetic activity by inhibition assay for α-glucosidase enzyme activity and chemical analysis with GCMS. Extraction of leaves, bark and wood samples were done by using ethanol 95%. Fractionation the most active  ethanol extract was conducted by using n-hexane and ethyl acetate. The yield of ethanol extracts in leaves, bark and wood were 13.90%, 12.87%, and 2.18% respectively. Based on antidiabetic activity assay, the bark ethanol extract was the most active extract by the IC50 value of 5.86 μg mL-1. Phytochemical analysis on bark ethanol extracts showed that they contained flavonoid, quinon, triterpenoid, saponin and tannin which were assumed have high contribution in antidiabetic activities. The result of fractionation ethanol extract bark showed that the ethyl acetate fraction was the most active fraction (IC50 6.82 μg mL-1. GCMS analysis indicated the presence of dominant phenolic compounds such as pyrocatechol, antiarol, isopropyl myristate and phenol in which were suspected have antidiabetic activity. These results strongly suggested that ethyl acetate fraction of Samama bark was a potential natural source for antidiabetic agents.

  1. Korean traditional natural herbs and plants as immune enhancing, antidiabetic, chemopreventive, and antioxidative agents: a narrative review and perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunjin; Kim, Hyun-Sook

    2014-01-01

    The world is becoming increasingly interested in Korean food and its ingredients. The attention goes beyond the typical examples, such as kimchi and fermented sauces; peculiar food ingredients that are widely consumed in Korea are now entering the world's functional food markets. This trend was supported by scientific research, and this review seeks to combine and summarize the findings of the past 10 years. The results are organized into four groups depending on whether the ingredient strengthens the immune system, has antidiabetic effects, has chemopreventive effects, or has an antioxidative effects. We would also like to point out that this review only covers the topic of Korean traditional plants and herbs. After the summary of research findings, we discuss challenges and opportunities, exploring the direction of future research and the potential of Korean traditional food ingredients in food industry and markets.

  2. Functional properties of low Mr wheat proteins, II : effects on dough properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weegels, P.L.; Orsel, R.; Pijpekamp, A.M. van de; Lichtendonk, W.J.; Hamer, R.J.; Schofield, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of non-gluten low Mr wheat proteins on bread-making quality and dough properties were investigated. Low Mr proteins retarded the re-polymerisation of SDS-unextractable glutenin (glutenin macropolymer-GMP; gel protein) during resting of doughs from the cultivars Obelisk, Camp Remy, Castan

  3. Modelling the electrical properties of concrete for shielding effectiveness prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandrolini, L; Reggiani, U; Ogunsola, A

    2007-01-01

    Concrete is a porous, heterogeneous material whose abundant use in numerous applications demands a detailed understanding of its electrical properties. Besides experimental measurements, material theoretical models can be useful to investigate its behaviour with respect to frequency, moisture content or other factors. These models can be used in electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) to predict the shielding effectiveness of a concrete structure against external electromagnetic waves. This paper presents the development of a dispersive material model for concrete out of experimental measurement data to take account of the frequency dependence of concrete's electrical properties. The model is implemented into a numerical simulator and compared with the classical transmission-line approach in shielding effectiveness calculations of simple concrete walls of different moisture content. The comparative results show good agreement in all cases; a possible relation between shielding effectiveness and the electrical properties of concrete and the limits of the proposed model are discussed

  4. Modelling the electrical properties of concrete for shielding effectiveness prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrolini, L.; Reggiani, U.; Ogunsola, A.

    2007-09-01

    Concrete is a porous, heterogeneous material whose abundant use in numerous applications demands a detailed understanding of its electrical properties. Besides experimental measurements, material theoretical models can be useful to investigate its behaviour with respect to frequency, moisture content or other factors. These models can be used in electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) to predict the shielding effectiveness of a concrete structure against external electromagnetic waves. This paper presents the development of a dispersive material model for concrete out of experimental measurement data to take account of the frequency dependence of concrete's electrical properties. The model is implemented into a numerical simulator and compared with the classical transmission-line approach in shielding effectiveness calculations of simple concrete walls of different moisture content. The comparative results show good agreement in all cases; a possible relation between shielding effectiveness and the electrical properties of concrete and the limits of the proposed model are discussed.

  5. Antiobesity, antioxidant and antidiabetic activities of red Ginseng plant extract in obese diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Abbas Shalaby

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to investigate the effects of red ginseng extract (RGE on adiposity index, some serum biochemical parameters and tissue antioxidant activity in obese diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: Five groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Group (1 was negative control and the other 4 groups were fed on high fat-diet for 6 weeks to induce obesity. The obese rats were then rendered diabetic by intraperitoneal injection of alloxan for 5 days. Group (2 was kept obese diabetic (positive control and the other 3 groups were orally given RGE at 100, 200 and 400 mg /kg /day, respectively, for 4 weeks. Blood samples were collected for biochemical analyses and kidneys were taken to assay of activities of antioxidant enzymes. Results: oral dosage of RGE to obese diabetic rats significantly (P < 0.05 reduced adiposity index; decreased serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, gamma- glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT enzymes, total cholesterol (TC, triglycerides (TG, and low density lipoproteins (LDL-c and improved atherogenic index. Blood glucose and leptin hormone decreased, but insulin increased by administration of RGE. it increased activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx and catalase (CAT antioxidant enzymes in kidneys tissues. Conclusion: Red ginseng extract produces antiobesity, antioxidant, and antidiabetic activities in obese diabetic rats. The study suggests that red ginseng plant may be beneficial for the treatment of patients who suffer from obesity associated with diabetes. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2013; 2(3.000: 165-172

  6. Anti-diabetic rosiglitazone remodels the adipocyte transcriptome by redistributing transcription to PPARγ-driven enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Step, Sonia E; Lim, Hee-Woong; Marinis, Jill M; Prokesch, Andreas; Steger, David J; You, Seo-Hee; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Lazar, Mitchell A

    2014-05-01

    Rosiglitazone (rosi) is a powerful insulin sensitizer, but serious toxicities have curtailed its widespread clinical use. Rosi functions as a high-affinity ligand for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), the adipocyte-predominant nuclear receptor (NR). The classic model, involving binding of ligand to the NR on DNA, explains positive regulation of gene expression, but ligand-dependent repression is not well understood. We addressed this issue by studying the direct effects of rosi on gene transcription using global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq). Rosi-induced changes in gene body transcription were pronounced after 10 min and correlated with steady-state mRNA levels as well as with transcription at nearby enhancers (enhancer RNAs [eRNAs]). Up-regulated eRNAs occurred almost exclusively at PPARγ-binding sites, to which rosi treatment recruited coactivators, including MED1, p300, and CBP. In contrast, transcriptional repression by rosi involved a loss of coactivators from eRNA sites devoid of PPARγ and enriched for other transcription factors, including AP-1 factors and C/EBPs. Thus, rosi activates and represses transcription by fundamentally different mechanisms that could inform the future development of anti-diabetic drugs.

  7. The association of diabetes and anti-diabetic medications with clinical outcomes in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, W; Merriman, K; Nabaah, A; Seval, N; Seval, D; Lin, H; Wang, M; Qazilbash, M H; Baladandayuthapani, V; Berry, D; Orlowski, R Z; Lee, M-H; Yeung, S-C J

    2014-07-29

    Insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 signalling may underlie the promoting effect of type 2 diabetes on cancer. This study examined the association of diabetes, including steroid-induced diabetes (SID), and the impact of anti-diabetic medication on clinical outcomes of multiple myeloma (MM). A retrospective review was conducted of 1240 MM patients. Overall survival (OS) and MM disease status prior to death were analysed. Diabetic patients had a significantly shorter OS than non-diabetic patients (median: 65.4 vs 98.7 months). In multivariate analysis, SID was a significant predictor of decreased OS, along with age, comorbidity, MM stage, and cytogenetic abnormalities. Analyzing only the diabetic MM patients, Cox regression showed that metformin predicted an increased OS, whereas use of insulin/analogues predicted a decreased OS. Competing risk analysis showed that DM was associated with increased cumulative incidence of death with progressive MM. Among the diabetics, multivariate regression showed that insulin/analogues were associated with increased, but metformin with decreased death with progressive MM. Potential immortal time bias was evaluated by landmark analyses. DM, SID in particular, is associated with poor clinical outcomes in MM. Insulin/analogues are associated with poor outcomes, whereas metformin is associated with improved outcomes. No conclusion about causal relationships can be made at this time. Managing hyperglycaemia with non-insulin regimens should be investigated in randomised trials.

  8. Nutritional efects of antidiabetic diets on concentartion of tissue antioksidant on rats with induced diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crceva - Nikolovska Radmila

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is currently suggested to play as a pathogenesis in the development of diabetes mellitus. There are many reports indicating the changes in parameters of oxidative stress in diabetes mellitus. The role of dietary management in diabetes mellitus is to provide a proper balance of total nutrients while meeting the special dietary needs of the patient. Complex carbohydrates and dietary fiber help to delay the absorption of glucose from the intestinal tract and minimize postprandial fluctuation of glucose. The present study was designated to evaluate the effect of special antidiabetic diet treatment upon oxidative stress parameters in the initial stages of the development of diabetes. The findings of the present study suggest that special diet formula useful for prevention of progressive hyperglycaemia in aged provoked diabetes in dogs could not restore the imbalance of cellular defense mechanism provoked by streptozotocin. Soluble fiber in the diet may also prolong gastrointestinal transit time, allow greater water absorption, and promote the production of short chain fatty acids which nourish the intestinal mucosa.

  9. Facile green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using leaf extract of antidiabetic potent Cassia auriculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, V Ganesh; Gokavarapu, S Dinesh; Rajeswari, A; Dhas, T Stalin; Karthick, V; Kapadia, Zainab; Shrestha, Tripti; Barathy, I A; Roy, Anindita; Sinha, Sweta

    2011-10-01

    A simple biological method for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using Cassia auriculata aqueous leaf extract has been carried out in the present study. The reduction of auric chloride led to the formation of AuNPs within 10 min at room temperature (28°C), suggesting a higher reaction rate than chemical methods involved in the synthesis. The size, shape and elemental analysis were carried out using X-ray diffraction, TEM, SEM-EDAX, FT-IR and visible absorption spectroscopy. Stable, triangular and spherical crystalline AuNPs with well-defined dimensions of average size of 15-25 nm were synthesized using C. auriculata. Effect of pH was also studied to check the stability of AuNPs. The main aim of the investigation is to synthesize AuNPs using antidiabetic potent medicinal plant. The stabilizing and reducing molecules of nanoparticles may promote anti-hyperglycemic if tested further. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Anti-diabetic Activity of Tabat Barito Leafs (Ficus deltoidea, Jack Extract in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heru Agus Cahyanto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Tabat barito (Ficus deltoidea, Jack leaf is believed could be used to treat diabetes. But more scientific data are needed. The aim of this study is to investigate  antidiabetic activity of  Tabat Barito extract by glucose tolerance method. The treatment was given in three doses (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg BW and two controls using aquoeus and glibenklamid.  Tabat barito extract was obtained by maceration and made into dry extract with addition of starch. The result showed that chemical compound of the ethanol extract were fenolic and saponin. The extract showed effects in lowering blood sugar levels with glucose tolerance methods at 30 to 60 minutes. Blood glucose levels of mice treated with the extract extract ranged between 132.60 to 258.00 mg/dL , glibenklamide ranged from 130.20 to 144.60 mg/dL, and aqua ranged between 227.60 to 260.20 mg/dL. The percentage decrease in blood sugar levels compared to controls is 32.54%.

  11. Selenylation of Polysaccharide from the Sweet Potato and Evaluation of Antioxidant, Antitumor, and Antidiabetic Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bo; Yang, Xu-Qin; Kou, Meng; Lu, Chang-Yan; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Peng, Jun; Chen, Ping; Jiang, Ji-Hong

    2017-01-25

    Interest in sweet potato as a functional food is growing. A polysaccharide (SWP) was isolated from the sweet potato tuber and elucidation of its structure as composed of rhamnose, glucose, and galactose undertaken. To improve its activity, selenylation of this novel polysaccharide (Se-SWP) was undertaken by using microwave synthesis. In vitro evaluation showed that the Se-SWP has excellent antioxidant activity on scavenging free radicals and reducing capacity. In vivo antitumor evaluation showed selenylation polysaccharide could effectively inhibit tumor growth (>50%) and adjust immune factor levels in the mice (IL-2, TNF-α, and VEGF). The antidiabetic potential of Se-SWP was tested in STZ-induced diabetic rats. The results indicated that the Se-SWP treatment significantly reduced the levels of malondialdehyde and other disadvantageous factors that were increased by the STZ treatment. Meanwhile, the Se-SWP treatment caused a significant increase in the activities of enzymatic antioxidants and the levels of nonenzymatic antioxidants in the organs of diabetic rats. All of the activity evaluations indicated that the selenylation method could improve the activity of sweet potato polysaccharide and its efficacy as a potential therapeutic, which will be the focus of further study.

  12. Insulin-releasing action of the novel antidiabetic agent BTS 67 582.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClenaghan, N H; Flatt, P R; Bailey, C J

    1998-02-01

    1. BTS 67582 (1,1-dimethyl-2-(2-morpholinophenyl)guanidine fumarate) is a novel antidiabetic agent with a short-acting insulin-releasing effect. This study examined its mode of action in the clonal B-cell line BRIN-BD11. 2. BTS 67582 increased insulin release from BRIN-BD11 cells in a concentration-dependent manner (10[-8] to 10[-4] M) at both non-stimulating (1.1 mM) and stimulating (16.7 mM) concentrations of glucose. 3. BTS 67582 (10[-4] M) potentiated the insulin-releasing effect of a depolarizing concentration of K+ (30 mM), whereas the K+ channel openers pinacidil (400 microM) and diazoxide (300 microM) inhibited BTS 67582-induced release. 4. Suppression of Ca+ channel activity with verapamil (20 microM) reduced the insulin-releasing effect of BTS 67582 (10[-4] M). 5. BTS 67582 (10[-4] M) potentiated insulin release induced by amino acids (10 mM), and enhanced the combined stimulant effects of glucose plus either the fatty acid palmitate (10 mM), or agents which raise intracellular cyclic AMP concentrations (25 microM forskolin and 1 mM isobutylmethylxanthine), or the cholinoceptor agonist carbachol (100 microM). 6. Inhibition of glucose-stimulated insulin release by adrenaline or noradrenaline (10 microM) was partially reversed by BTS 67582 (10[-4] M). 7. These data suggest that the insulin-releasing effect of BTS 67582 involves regulation of ATP-sensitive K+ channel activity and Ca2+ influx, and that the drug augments the stimulant effects of nutrient insulin secretagogues and agents which enhance adenylate cyclase and phospholipase C. BTS 67582 may also exert insulin-releasing effects independently of ATP-sensitive K+ channel activity.

  13. Size Effect of Defects on the Mechanical Properties of Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Youngho; Hyun, Sangil

    2018-03-01

    Graphene, a two-dimensional material, has been studied and utilized for its excellent material properties. In reality, achieving a pure single-crystalline structure in graphene is difficult, so usually graphene may have various types of defects in it. Vacancies, Stone-Wales defects, and grain boundaries can drastically change the material properties of graphene. Graphene with vacancy defects has been of interest because it is a two-dimensional analogy of three-dimensional porous materials. It has efficient material properties, and can function as a part of modern devices. The mechanical properties have been studied by using molecular dynamics for either a single vacancy defect with various sizes or multiple vacancy defects with same defect ratios. However, it is not clear which one has more influence on the mechanical properties between the size of the defects and the defect ratio. Therefore, we investigated the hole-size effect on the mechanical properties of single-crystalline graphene at various defect ratios. A void defect with large size can have a rather high tensile modulus with a low fracture strain compared to a void defect with small size. We numerically found that the tensile properties of scattered single vacancies is similar to that of amorphous graphene. We suspect that this is due to the local orbital change of the carbon atoms near the boundary of the void defects, so-called the interfacial phase.

  14. Predicting metal toxicity revisited: general properties vs. specific effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolterbeek, H T; Verburg, T G

    2001-11-12

    The present paper addresses the prediction of metal toxicity by evaluation of the relationships between general metal properties and toxic effects. For this, metal toxicity data were taken from 30 literature data sets, which varied largely in exposure times, organisms, effects and effect levels. General metal properties were selected on basis of literature reviewing of basic metal property classifications: used were the electrochemical potential deltaE0; the ionization potential IP; the ratio between atomic radius and atomic weight AR/AW; and the electronegativity Xm. The results suggest that toxicity prediction may be performed on basis of these fixed metal properties without any adoption to specific organisms, without any division of metals into classes, or grouping of toxicity tests. The results further indicate that metal properties contribute to the observed effects in relative importances which depend on specific effects, effect levels, exposure times, selected organisms and ambient conditions. The discussion strongly suggests that prediction should be by interpolation rather than by extrapolation of calibrated toxicity data: the concept here is that unknown metal toxicities are predicted on basis of observed metal toxicities in calibration experiments. Considering the used metal properties, the calibration covers the largest number of metals by the simultanuous use of Ge(IV), Cs(I), Li(I), Mn(VII), Sc and Bi in toxicity studies. Based on the data from the 30 studies considered, metal toxicities could be ordered in a relative way. This ordering indicates that the natural abundance of metals or metal ions in the Earth's crust may be regarded as a general comparative measure of the metal toxicities. The problems encountered in toxicity interpretation and ordering of toxicities indicate that control of the solution acidity, the metal's solubility and the metal's oxidation state may be key problems to overcome in future metal ion toxicity studies.

  15. Assessment of the antidiabetic potential of Cassia grandis using an in vivo model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandesh R Lodha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aqueous and ethanolic extracts of C. grandis (Family: Leguminosae were evaluated for antidiabetic activity by a glucose tolerance test, in normal rats and alloxan-induced diabetic rats. The aqueous and ethanolic extracts showed that they significantly lowered the blood glucose levels to normal in the glucose tolerance test. In alloxan-induced diabetic rats the maximum reduction in blood glucose was observed after three hours, at a dose level of 150 mg/kg of body weight. The percentage of protection given by the aqueous and ethanolic extracts was 32.72 and 46.42%, respectively. In the long-term treatment of alloxan-induced diabetic rats, the degree of protection was determined by measuring the blood glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides on the tenth day. Both the extracts showed a significant antidiabetic activity comparable to that of glibenclamide. These results showed that the Cassia grandis possessed significant antidiabetic activity.

  16. Antidiabetic Activity of Cocor Bebek Leaves (Kalanchoe pinnata Lam.Pers. Ethanolic Extract from Various Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indah Dwiatmi Dewiyanti

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Antidiabetic activity of Cocor Bebek leaves (Kalanchoe pinnata Lam.Pers. ethanolic extract from Bogor city, kabupaten Bogor and south of Tangerang city has been studied. The study was conducted in vitro using α glucosidase inhibitor method. The results of the study showed that IC50 of the extract from Bogor city, kabupaten Bogor, and Tangerang Selatan city is 40.94 ppm, 33.58 ppm and 16.12 ppm respectively. Meanwhile, IC50 of quersetin which has antidiabetic activity is 10.22 ppm. The results showed that Cocor Bebek leaves (Kalanchoe pinnata Lam.Pers. ethanolic extract had antidiabetic activity with IC50 less than 100 ppm. However, the activity is lesser than quercetin.

  17. Effects of different tillage systems and amendments on root properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mengyu; Yan, Yang; Li, Na; Luo, Peiyu; Yang, Jinfeng

    2017-06-01

    The object of this study was to investigate the effect of different tillage systems and amendments on root properties. There were five treatments: maize continuous cropping, maize and peanuts rotation, peanuts continuous cropping, peanuts continuous cropping with low level of amendment and peanuts continuous cropping with high level of amendment. The results showed that maize continuous cropping increased total root length by 118.95%, projected area by 204.86%, projected area by 150.70%, total root volume by 20.66%, and average root diameter by184.53%. The amendments also improved root properties and the high level of amendment had much more better effect.

  18. Effect of extrusion processing on the microstructure, mechanical properties, biocorrosion properties and antibacterial properties of Ti-Cu sintered alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Erlin; Li, Shengyi; Ren, Jing; Zhang, Lan; Han, Yong

    2016-12-01

    Ti-Cu sintered alloys, Ti-Cu(S) alloy, have exhibited good anticorrosion resistance and strong antibacterial properties, but low ductility in previous study. In this paper, Ti-Cu(S) alloys were subjected to extrusion processing in order to improve the comprehensive property. The phase constitute, microstructure, mechanical property, biocorrosion property and antibacterial activity of the extruded alloys, Ti-Cu(E), were investigated in comparison with Ti-Cu(S) by X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy (OM), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) with energy disperse spectroscopy (EDS), mechanical testing, electrochemical testing and plate-count method in order to reveal the effect of the extrusion process. XRD, OM and SEM results showed that the extrusion process did not change the phase constitute but refined the grain size and Ti2Cu particle significantly. Ti-Cu(E) alloys exhibited higher hardness and compressive yield strength than Ti-Cu(S) alloys due to the fine grain and Ti2Cu particles. With the consideration of the total compressive strain, it was suggested that the extrusion process could improve the ductility of Ti-Cu alloy(S) alloys. Electrochemical results have indicated that the extrusion process improved the corrosion resistance of Ti-Cu(S) alloys. Plate-count method displayed that both Ti-Cu(S) and Ti-Cu(E) exhibited strong antibacterial activity (>99%) against S. aureus. All these results demonstrated that hot forming processing, such as the extrusion in this study, refined the microstructure and densified the alloy, in turn improved the ductility and strength as well as anticorrosion properties without reduction in antibacterial properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Racial differences in long-term adherence to oral antidiabetic drug therapy: a longitudinal cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meigs James B

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adherence to oral antidiabetic medications is often suboptimal. Adherence differences may contribute to health disparities for black diabetes patients, including higher microvascular event rates, greater complication-related disability, and earlier mortality. Methods In this longitudinal retrospective cohort study, we used 10 years of patient-level claims and electronic medical record data (1/1/1992–12/31/2001 to assess differences in short- and long-term adherence to oral antidiabetic medication among 1906 newly diagnosed adults with diabetes (26% black, 74% white in a managed care setting in which all members have prescription drug coverage. Four main outcome measures included: (1 time from diabetes diagnosis until first prescription of oral antidiabetic medication; (2 primary adherence (time from first prescription to prescription fill; (3 time until discontinuation of oral antidiabetic medication from first prescription; and (4 long-term adherence (amount dispensed versus amount prescribed over a 24-month follow-up from first oral antidiabetic medication prescription. Results Black patients were as likely as whites to initiate oral therapy and fill their first prescription, but experienced higher rates of medication discontinuation (HR: 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2, 2.7 and were less adherent over time. These black-white differences increased over the first six months of therapy but stabilized thereafter for patients who initiated on sulfonylureas. Significant black-white differences in adherence levels were constant throughout follow-up for patients initiated on metformin therapy. Conclusion Racial differences in adherence to oral antidiabetic drug therapy persist even with equal access to medication. Early and continued emphasis on adherence from initiation of therapy may reduce persistent racial differences in medication use and clinical outcomes.

  20. Compositional Studies: Antioxidant and Antidiabetic Activities of Capparis decidua (Forsk. Edgew

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zia-Ul-Haq

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Capparis decidua is one of the traditional remedies used for various medicinal treatments in Pakistan. This study presents the determination of proximate composition, amino acids, fatty acids, tocopherols, sterols, glucosinolate and phenolic content in extracts obtained from different aerial parts of C. decidua, as well as their antidiabetic and antioxidant activity. All examined extracts were prominently rich in phenolics and glucosinates, and they showed potent antidiabetic and antihemolytic activity. The present study could be helpful in developing medicinal preparations for the treatment of diabetes and related symptoms.

  1. Stereospermum tetragonam as an antidiabetic agent by activating PPARγ and GLUT4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bino Kingsley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Present study evaluates the anti-diabetic activity of S. tetragonam LC-MSMS experiments showed the presence of two novel molecules C1 and C2, which were further taken for in silico study against PPARγ. Cell culture studies with A431 cells in the presence of crude aqueous extract showed the elevated level of PPARγ and GLUT4 and also confirmed using in silico studies. Thus, the present study proves the mecode of action of S. tetragonam as an antidiabetic drug.

  2. Effective elastic properties of sintered materials with branched cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedelinski, Piotr

    2018-01-01

    The aim of work is analysis of sintered materials with branched cracks growing from the voids situated at corners of fibers. The material is modelled as a two-dimensional linear-elastic structure using the boundary element method (BEM). The materials without voids and with voids having different shapes are considered. The influence of lengths of cracks and shapes of voids on stress intensity factors (SIF) and effective elastic properties (the Young modulus and the Poisson ratio) are studied. The overall properties of the sintered materials are determined by considering the representative volume element (RVE) with large number of branched cracks. The sensitivity of effective elastic properties on boundary conditions imposed on the RVE is studied.

  3. Effect of additives on CuO/Al nanothermite properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeev, V. V.; Kazutin, M. V.; Kozyrev, N. V.

    2017-10-01

    The effect of additives on CuO/Al nanothermite properties is reported. The incorporation of additives resulted in the decreased sensitivity. It had an adverse impact on gas dynamic characteristics of CuO/Al nanothermite, up to the loss of the unique capability of burning in narrow channels.

  4. Tillage and manure effect on soil physical and chemical properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... tillage and liquid manure applications on some physical and chemical properties and also on the carbon and nitrogen mineralization potential from a meadow soil. Our results indicated that tillage and manure applications had no effect on the concentration of Cu, Mn, total N and organic C in the 0 - 15 cm layer of soil after ...

  5. Effect of sodium chloride concentration on the functional properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sodium Chloride (NaCl) is the common salt used at household and industry levels to improve palatability of processed foods. Therefore, the main aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of different concentrations of NaCl on the functional properties of selected legume flours. The effect of increasing ...

  6. Effect of Tillage and Mulch Combination on Soil Physical Properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of tillage method and mulching on selected soil physical properties and performance of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) was studied in rainforest zone of South West Nigeria. Treatments were 4 x 2 factorial combination of tillage methods (zero tillage, manual clearing, heap, ridge), 12t/ha dry plant residue mulch, and ...

  7. Effect Of Tillage And Mulching Practices On Soil Properties And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports the field evaluation of the effect of tillage [tilled (MT) and untilled, (NT)], mulching material [Panicum maximum (p) and Chromolaena odorata (c)] and mulching method [incorporated (b), surface (s) and no mulch (o)] on soil properties and growth and yield of cowpea (Vigna unquiculata) in 2000 and 2001 ...

  8. Effects of moisture on the mechanical properties of glass fibre ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    SEM study of the fractured surfaces showed heavy fibre pull-out in the tensile zone whilst shear fracture of the fibre bundles was predominant at the compressive zone of the samples tested for flexural strength properties. Keywords. Nascent glass fibre; vinylester resin; moisture effects; fibre pull-out. 1. Introduction. Over the ...

  9. Geotechnical Properties of Makurdi Shale and Effects on Foundations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Geotechnical Properties of Makurdi Shale and Effects on Foundations. IO Agbede, P Smart ... Ten disturbed soil samples were collected from a third site of a proposed site for a light building and subjected to engineering classification tests. Based on the outcome of the second set of experiments, a foundation other than the ...

  10. Effect of Process Factors on the Properties of Doxycycline ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The vesicles were evaluated for entrapment and in vitro release as well as for their thermal properties and shape by ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The effect of process conditions - sonication time, pH, hydration temperature and ...

  11. Effect of heat treatment on structure and magnetic properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Abstract. Fe46Co35Ni19/CNTs nanocomposites have been prepared by an easy two-step route including adsorp- tion and heat treatment processes. We investigated the effect of heat treatment conditions on structure, mor- phology, nanoparticle sizes and magnetic properties of the Fe46Co35Ni19 alloy nanoparticles ...

  12. Effect of acrylic acid on the properties of polyvinylpyrrolidone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydrogels based on polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) networks grafted with acrylic acid (AAc) was prepared by using γ-rays from a Co-60 source at room temperature. The parameters like effect of radiation dose and concentration of AAc were studied. The properties such as gel content, swelling behavior and thermal stability ...

  13. The effects of Tb 3 doping concentration on luminescence properties ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper is aimed at explaining the effects of Tb3+ concentration on structure and luminescence properties and clarifying the concentration quenching mechanism of Tb3+. The lattice of BaF2 decreases with the increase of Tb3+ ions concentration. The emission spectrum of BaF2:Tb3+ consists of blue emission band and ...

  14. Effect of oxygen on the hydrogenation properties of magnesium films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostenfeld, Christopher Worsøe; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2006-01-01

    The effect of magnesium oxide on the magnesium and hydrogen desorption properties of magnesium films have been investigated. We find that by capping metallic magnesium films with oxide overlayers the apparent desorption energy of magnesium is increased from 146 kJ/mol to 314 kJ/mol. The results...... are discussed in light of previous investigations of ball-milled magnesium powders....

  15. Effect of Cassava Processing Effluent on Soil Properties, Growth and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study, comprising a survey, greenhouse and field experiments was conducted to examine the effect of Cassava Processing Effluent (CPE) on soil chemical properties, maize growth performances and grain yield. In the survey, soil samples were taken (0-15 and 15 – 30cm) of CPE contaminated and non contaminated ...

  16. Effects of reaction temperature on size and optical properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Effects of reaction temperature on size and optical properties of. CdSe nanocrystals. SHUTANG CHEN, XIAOLING ZHANG*, YANBING ZHAO and QIUHUA ZHANG. Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081, P.R. China. MS received 15 March 2009; revised 6 July 2009.

  17. Effect of Honey as Partial Sugar Substitute on Pasting Properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of partial substitution of sugar with liquid honey on the pasting properties of cooked dough made from cassava-wheat composite (10:90) flour as well as the sensory preference and shelf stability of its bread was investigated. Sucrose (S) in the bread recipe formulation was substituted with honey (H) at levels 0, 10, ...

  18. Effects of iron supply on the rheological properties and sensory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most basic is the world wheat crops. In Iran Bread is a staple food staple Food and because, as a bearer of good food to enrich bread with iron has been considered. The effect of flour fortification star with iron, folic acid, the chemical properties (dry gluten, wet gluten, gluten-free number, protein and Ddzlny) Rheological ...

  19. Effects of Weathering on Mechanical Properties of Granite Gneiss ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper describes the geotechnical characteristics of granite gneiss and dolerite from Oban and Obuduregions in South-eastern Nigeria. The suitability of these rocks for civil construction purposes and the effects of weathering on their mechanical properties are examined. The results indicate that compressive strength ...

  20. Effect of Process Factors on the Properties of Doxycycline ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The effect of process conditions - sonication time, pH, hydration temperature and centrifuge speed - on niosome properties was investigated. Results: DSC of pure lipids, vesicles dispersion and mixture of lipids confirmed the formation of niosomes.

  1. Conservation and conventional tillage effects on soil properties and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four conservation tillage practices and two conventional tillage practices were evaluated for two years to determine their effects on soil properties (moisture content, bulk density, porosity, shear strength, cone index), weed control, germination, growth and yield of soybean (Glycine max (L) Merril). The soil was sandy loam ...

  2. Effects of Polyethylene Glycol on the Mechanical Properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of polyethylene glycol [H(OCH2CH2)nOH] as quenchant was studied with a view to investigate the mechanical properties and microstructural evaluation of steel. The test samples were subjected to a conventional heat treatment process followed by quenching using prepared polymer solution with a definite ...

  3. The Effects of Moisture Content on Mechanical Properties of Soybean

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some mechanical properties were determined for four varieties of soybean (TGX 297-129C, Samsoy1, TGX 306-636C and TGX 536-02D). The hardness, compressive and tensile strength determination were carried out using a Rockwell Hardness machine and tensometer. The effect of moisture content on the hardness ...

  4. Properties of Manganites: Phase Diagram, Jahn-Teller effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzero, M.; Gor' kov, L.; Kresin, V.

    2001-07-27

    Properties of manganites are greatly affected by cooperative Jahn-Teller effect and Hund's interaction. The insulating (undoped) as well as metallic ferromagnetic states can be described from a unified point of view based on two-band picture. The system is intrinsically inhomogeneous and the metal-insulator transition is treated by means of percolation theory.

  5. Effects of Urban Renewal on Residential Property Values in Two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was carried out to examine Urban Renewal exercise and its effect on residential property values in Oke–Aro and Odopetu neighbourhoods in Akure, A structured questionnaire was administered on selected residents in the two neighbourhoods (Oke–Aro and Odopetu) using the Systematic Random Sampling ...

  6. Tillage Effects on Maize Performance and Physical Properties of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of six tillage methods on soil physical properties maize (Zea mays L.) germination, growth and yield were evaluated in field experiments during 1995 and 1996 cropping seasons. The selected treatments represented both conventional and conservation tillage practices common within the study area. The soil ...

  7. Effects of Chromolaena and Tithonia Mulches on Soil Properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Experiments were conducted on an Oxic Tropuldalf of southwestern Nigeria at Owo to study the effect of Chromolaena and Tithonia mulches applied at 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0 and 12.5 t ha-1 on soil chemical properties, leaf nutrient composition, growth and tuber yield of white yam (Dioscorea rotundata Poir). Both Chromolaena ...

  8. Effects of carbonization conditions on properties of bamboo pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhijia Liu; Zehui Jiang; Zhiyong Cai; Benhua Fei; Yan Yu; Xing' e Liu

    2013-01-01

    Bamboo is a biomass material and has great potential as a bio-energy resource of the future in China. Bamboo pellets were successfully manufactured using a laboratory pellet mill in preliminary work. This study was therefore carried out to investigate the effect of carbonization conditions (temperature and time) on properties of bamboo pellets and to evaluate product...

  9. Effect of Penetron Admix on the Properties of Concrete

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012r

    2014-07-02

    Jul 2, 2014 ... This research investigates the effects of the waterproofing admixture Penetron. Admix on the fresh and hardened properties of structural concrete and assesses whether the product is suitable for use on construction projects in Mauritius. A grade 25 control mix (mix Y-0) and three mixes, each containing ...

  10. Effect of Dielectric Property of Hydrous Dispersoid on Electrorheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Akiko; Uchida, Kunio; Kamiya, Kunio; Gotoh, Akihiro; Yoda, Satoshi; Urabe, Kei; Ikazaki, Fumikazu

    The effect of the dielectric property was investigated of titania and microcrystalline cellulose particles dispersed in a silicon oil on Electrorheology(ER). A commom understanding of the mechanism of ER is the electrical interaction by the interfacial polarization of dispersed particles. Block et al. reported the relaxation frequency of ER fluids, i. e. the rate of polarization, was very important to have an appreciable ER effect. We found that the free water on the cellulose and the titania particles dispersed in the silicon oil, which is respectively dehydrated below the temperature of ca. 110 and 300 degree centigrade, was necessary for an appreciable ER effect. The relation was measured between the water content and the dielectric properties such as dielectric constant ɛ ’ and dielectric loss factor ɛ ", as the water adsorbed on the particles was estimated to alter the dielectric properties of the ER fluid. Both the dielectric constant and the relaxation frequency, which is defined by the applied frequency for a peak of the dielectric loss factor, increased with the increase of the water content The relation was discussed between the ER effect and the dielectric properties.

  11. Electronic properties of germanane field-effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Madhushankar, B.N.; Kaverzin, A.; Giousis, T.; Potsi, G.; Gournis, D.; Rudolf, P.; Blake, G.R.; van der Wal, C.H.; van Wees, B.J.

    2017-01-01

    A new two dimensional (2D) material—germanane—has been synthesised recently with promising electrical and optical properties. In this paper we report the first realisation of germanane field-effect transistors fabricated from multilayer single crystal flakes. Our germanane devices show transport in

  12. Effects of fibre orientation on mechanical properties of hybrid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Effects of fibre orientation on mechanical properties of hybrid bamboo/glass fibre polymer composites. B STANLY JONES RETNAM1,*, M SIVAPRAGASH1 and P PRADEEP2. 1Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2Department of Automobile Engineering,. Noorul Islam Centre for Higher Education, Kumaracoil 629 180, ...

  13. Effect of web formation on properties of hydroentangled nonwoven fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of two popular web-forming technologies, viz., the Rando air-laid technology and the traditional carding technology, on properties of the hydroentangled nonwoven fabrics made therewith. The fibers used in the study were greige cotton, bleached cotton, ...

  14. Effects of greige cotton lint properties on hydroentangled nonwoven fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study determined the effects of fiber length, the length uniformity index, micronaire (fineness), and strength of greige cotton lint on properties of nonwoven fabrics. Seven bales of pre-cleaned greige (non-bleached) cotton were procured from a U.S cotton producer and ginner. Each bale primar...

  15. Effects of soil physical properties on erodibility and infiltration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study looked at the physical properties of soil of selected areas of Gidan Kwano campus of Federal University of Technology Minna, Nigeria and their effects on erodibility and infiltration parameters. Infiltration rate of the selected areas were conducted using a double ring infiltrometer and soil samples collected at ...

  16. effect of fines content on the engineering properties of reconstituted

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-11-03

    Nov 3, 2012 ... ISSN 1115-8443. EFFECT OF FINES CONTENT ON THE ENGINEERING. PROPERTIES OF RECONSTITUTED LATERITIC SOILS IN. WASTE CONTAINMENT APPLICATION. K.J. Osinubia, A.O. Eberemub, A.O. Belloc, A. Adzegah. Department of Civil Engineering, Ahmadu Bello University Zaria, Nigeria.

  17. Effect of conduction band nonparabolicity on the optical properties in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of conduction band nonparabolicity on the linear and nonlinear optical properties such as absorption coefficients, and changes in the refractive index are calculated in the Al0.3Ga0.7As/GaAs heterostructure-based symmetric rectangular quantum well under applied hydrostatic pressure and electric field.

  18. Effect of conduction band nonparabolicity on the optical properties in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effect of conduction band nonparabolicity on the linear and nonlinear optical properties such as absorption coefficients, and changes in the refractive index are calculated in the Al0.3Ga0.7As/GaAs heterostructure-based symmetric rectangular quantum well under applied hydrostatic pressure and electric field.

  19. Effects of Various Quenching Media on Mechanical Properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The machined specimen of the steel was heated at 8800Cthen quenched in water, engine oil, palm kernel oil, cotton seed oil and olive oil. Tensile strength, hardness and impact energy were used to measure the quenching effectiveness of the various media. The microstructures and mechanical properties of the quenched ...

  20. Thickness effect on properties of titanium film deposited by dc ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper reports effect of thickness on the properties of titanium (Ti) film deposited on Si/SiO2 (100) substrate using two different methods: d.c. magnetron sputtering and electron beam (e-beam) evaporation technique. The structural and morphological characterization of Ti film were performed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) ...