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Sample records for antidepressant restores hippocampo-hypothalamic

  1. Treatment with an SSRI antidepressant restores hippocampo-hypothalamic corticosteroid feedback and reverses insulin resistance in low-birth-weight rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhl, Esben S; Jensen, Thomas Korgaard; Jessen, Niels; Elfving, Betina; Buhl, Christian S; Kristiansen, Steen B; Pold, Rasmus; Solskov, Lasse; Schmitz, Ole; Wegener, Gregers; Lund, Sten; Petersen, Kitt Falck

    2010-05-01

    Low birth weight (LBW) is associated with type 2 diabetes and depression, which may be related to prenatal stress and insulin resistance as a result of chronic hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity. We examined whether treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor [escitalopram (ESC)] could downregulate HPA axis activity and restore insulin sensitivity in LBW rats. After 4-5 wk of treatment, ESC-exposed LBW (SSRI-LBW) and saline-treated control and LBW rats (Cx and LBW) underwent an oral glucose tolerance test or a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp to assess whole body insulin sensitivity. Hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) mRNA expression and red skeletal muscle PKB Ser(473) phosphorylation were used to assess tissue-specific insulin sensitivity. mRNA expression of the hypothalamic mineralocorticoid receptor was fivefold upregulated in LBW (P < 0.05 vs. Cx), accompanied by increased corticosterone release during restraint stress and total 24-h urinary excretion (P < 0.05 vs. Cx), whole body insulin resistance (P < 0.001 vs. Cx), and impaired insulin suppression of hepatic PEPCK mRNA expression (P < 0.05 vs. Cx). Additionally, there was a tendency for reduced red muscle PKB Ser(473) phosphorylation. The ESC treatment normalized corticosterone secretion (P < 0.05 vs. LBW), whole body insulin sensitivity (P < 0.01) as well as postprandial suppression of hepatic mRNA PEPCK expression (P < 0.05), and red muscle PKB Ser(473) phosphorylation (P < 0.01 vs. LBW). We conclude that these data suggest that the insulin resistance and chronic HPA axis hyperactivity in LBW rats can be reversed by treatment with an ESC, which downregulates HPA axis activity, lowers glucocorticoid exposure, and restores insulin sensitivity in LBW rats.

  2. Antidepressant Withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions Depression (major depressive disorder) If you stop taking antidepressants, could you experience antidepressant withdrawal? Do withdrawal symptoms mean you were addicted to the drug? Answers from Daniel K. Hall-Flavin, M.D. Antidepressant withdrawal is possible if you ...

  3. Tricyclic Antidepressants and Tetracyclic Antidepressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions Depression (major depressive disorder) Tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants affect brain chemicals to ease depression symptoms. Explore their possible side effects and whether one of these antidepressants may be a good option for you. By Mayo Clinic ...

  4. Antidepressant treatment with tianeptine reduces apoptosis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and temporal cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, P.J.; Fuchs, E.; Czeh, B.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent clinical and preclinical studies suggest that major depression may be related to impairments of structural plasticity. Consequently, antidepressants may act by restoring altered rates of cell birth or death. Here, we investigated whether the antidepressant tianeptine would affect

  5. IC Treatment: Antidepressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... restrictions than MAOIs. Studies Testing Antidepressants to Treat IC With the exception of the TCA called amitriptyline ( ... when you have IC). Antidepressants Used to Treat IC Some of the current antidepressants your physician may ...

  6. Treating Depression: Should You Consider an Antidepressant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treating Depression: Should You Consider An Antidepressant? What are antidepressants? Antidepressants are drugs used to treat the symptoms of depression. Do I need an antidepressant? You probably do ...

  7. Antidepressants and dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that antidepressants may have neuroprotective abilities but it has newer been investigated lately whether treatment with antidepressants reduces the risk of dementia. METHOD: Linkage of registers of all prescribed antidepressants and diagnoses of dementia...... in Denmark during a period from 1995 to 2005. RESULTS: Persons who purchased antidepressants once (N=687,552) had an increased rate of dementia compared to persons unexposed to antidepressants (N=779,831). Nevertheless, the rate of dementia changed over time; thus during the initial prescription periods...... the rate increased with the number of prescriptions but continued long-term antidepressants treatment was associated with a reduction in the rate of dementia, however, not to the same level as the rate for the general population. This pattern was found for all classes of antidepressants (SSRIs, newer non...

  8. Antidepressants: Safe during Pregnancy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you need to know about antidepressants and pregnancy. Pregnancy hormones were once thought to protect women from depression, but researchers now say this isn't true. In addition, pregnancy can trigger a range of emotions that make ...

  9. Ketamine: A New Antidepressant?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feride Karacaer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Standart antidepressants are needed for the many individuals with major depressive disorder. However they do not respond adequately to treatment and because of a delay of weeks before the emergence of therapeutic effects. Recent studies show that subanesthetic dose of ketamine is efficacy and safety for the treatment of depression. Antidepressant effects of ketamine have been found to be short-lived and its psychotomimetic properties may limit the use of ketamine to depressive patients. Future research studies should focus on identifying predictors of response (pharmalogical and clinical , investigating application of different doses and routes of administration and maintaining antidepressant effect. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2015; 7(1: 30-40

  10. Adherence to antidepressants

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    Abimbola Farinde

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available While major depression is considered a frequent mental illness there are ongoing reports of high non-adherence to antidepressant medications which places suffers at high risk for relapse, recurrence, or greater impairment,. The World Health Organization (WHO defines adherence as the extent to which a person′s behavior (e.g. taking medications can align with the agreed recommendations of a health care provider. Unfortunately while patient may recognize the importance of adherence to antidepressant medications the majority of patients do not adhere to their prescribed antidepressants. Some of the factors that may contribute to or lead to non-adherence include knowingly or unknowingly missing doses, taking extra doses, delaying administration times, or taking drug holidays. Pharmacists have the unique ability to deter non-adherence through the performance of continuous assessment and monitoring of adherence in this population given these accessibility. Additionally, pharmacists are able to develop therapeutic alliances with patients that can help to increase the likelihood of achieving positive patient outcomes. Antidepressant non-adherence can be viewed as a significant public health concern so it is important for patients to be educated about the importance of adherence, and health care professionals should be aware of factors or patient characteristics that can serve as barriers to non-adherence.

  11. Antidepressant medications and osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzoli, R; Cooper, C; Reginster, J-Y

    2012-01-01

    Use of antidepressant medications that act on the serotonin system has been linked to detrimental impacts on bone mineral density (BMD), and to osteoporosis. This article reviews current evidence for such effects, and identifies themes for future research. Serotonin receptors are found in all major...

  12. Milnacipran: a unique antidepressant?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegfried Kasper

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Siegfried Kasper, Gerald PailDepartment of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, AustriaAbstract: Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs are among the most effective antidepressants available, although their poor tolerance at usual recommended doses and toxicity in ­overdose make them difficult to use. While selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs are ­better tolerated than TCAs, they have their own specific problems, such as the aggravation of sexual dysfunction, interaction with coadministered drugs, and for many, a discontinuation syndrome. In addition, some of them appear to be less effective than TCAs in more severely depressed patients. Increasing evidence of the importance of norepinephrine in the etiology of depression has led to the development of a new generation of antidepressants, the serotonin and ­norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs. Milnacipran, one of the pioneer SNRIs, was designed from theoretic considerations to be more effective than SSRIs and better tolerated than TCAs, and with a simple pharmacokinetic profile. Milnacipran has the most balanced potency ratio for reuptake inhibition of the two neurotransmitters compared with other SNRIs (1:1.6 for milnacipran, 1:10 for duloxetine, and 1:30 for venlafaxine, and in some studies milnacipran has been shown to inhibit norepinephrine uptake with greater potency than serotonin (2.2:1. Clinical studies have shown that milnacipran has efficacy comparable with the TCAs and is superior to SSRIs in severe depression. In addition, milnacipran is well tolerated, with a low potential for pharmacokinetic drug–drug interactions. Milnacipran is a first-line therapy suitable for most depressed patients. It is frequently successful when other treatments fail for reasons of efficacy or tolerability.Keywords: milnacipran, SNRI, antidepressant efficacy, tolerability

  13. Mechanisms of antidepressant resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wissam eEl Hage

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Depression is one of the most frequent and severe mental disorder. Since the discovery of antidepressant properties of the imipramine and then after of other tricyclic compounds, several classes of psychotropic drugs have shown be effective in treating major depressive disorder. However, there is a wide range of variability in response to antidepressants that might lead to non response or partial response or in increased rate of relapse or recurrence. The mechanisms of response to antidepressant therapy are poorly understood, and few biomarkers are available than can predict response to pharmacotherapy. Here, we will first review markers that can be used to predict response to pharmacotherapy, such as markers of drug metabolism or blood-brain barrier function, the activity of specific brain areas or neurotransmitter systems, hormonal dysregulations or plasticity, and related molecular targets. We will describe both clinical and preclinical studies and describe factors that might affect the expression of these markers, including environmental or genetic factors and comorbidities. This information will permit us to suggest practical recommendations and innovative treatment strategies to improve therapeutic outcomes.

  14. A REVIEW ON HERBAL PLANTS SHOWING ANTIDEPRESSANT ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talha Jawaid et al.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a heterogenous mood disorder that has been classified and treated in variety of ways. Although a number of synthetic drugs are being used as standard treatment for clinically depressed patient, they have adverse effects that can compromise the therapeutic treatment .Thus, it is worthwhile to look for antidepressant from plants with proven advantage and favorable benefit to risk ratio. A number of medicinal plants and medicine derived from these plants have shown antidepressant properties by virtue of combined effect of their medicinal constituents. The causes of depression are decreased brain levels of monoamines like noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin. Therefore, drugs restoring the reduced levels of these monoamines in the brain either by inhibiting monoamine oxidase or by inhibiting reuptake of these neurotransmitters might be fruitful in the treatment of depression. The present review is focused on the medicinal plants and plants based formulations having antidepressant activity in animal studies and in humans.

  15. Special focus on antidepressants

    OpenAIRE

    Balk-Møller, Carl August; Mogensen, Sofia Lin; Raatræ Lundstein, Sarah; Haubroe Larsen, André; Lohse, Mayasarah; Reininger Ardilsø, Lisa; Henrysdóttir, Gu∂run; Sondergaard, Nikolai

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the developments of SSRIs and the presence of them in the market. Dr. Peter Gøtszche’s book “Deadly Medicines and Organized Crime”, claims that scientific fraud is a big part of the pharmaceutical industry and the whole healthcare system in general. Through analyzing Peter Gøtszche’s book and several of his sources, the study aims to create a roadmap in the project, that resembles the process of the antidepressant drugs have to go through, to go from an idea to a patient. ...

  16. Antidepressants: Can They Lose Effectiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be having the same effect. Can antidepressants lose effectiveness? Answers from Daniel K. Hall-Flavin, M.D. ... Policy Notice of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization ...

  17. Negotiating the neurochemical self: anti-depressant consumption in women's recovery from depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullagar, Simone

    2009-07-01

    Anti-depressant treatment can be viewed as an exercise of biopower that is articulated through policies and practices aimed at the reduction of depression, population healthcare costs and effects on labour force productivity. Drawing upon a feminist governmentality perspective, this article examines the discourses that shaped women's experiences of anti-depressant medication in an Australian qualitative study on recovery from depression. The majority of women had been prescribed anti-depressants to treat a chemical imbalance in the brain, manage symptoms and restore normal functioning. One-third of participants identified anti-depressants as helpful in their recovery, while two-thirds were either highly ambivalent about, or critical of, medication as a solution to depression. Thirty-one women who identified the ;positive' benefits of anti-depressants actively constituted themselves as biomedical consumers seeking to redress a chemical imbalance. The problem of depression, the emergence of molecular science and the push for pharmacological solutions are contributing to the discursive formation of new subject positions - such as the neurochemically deficient self. Three themes were identified in relation to medication use, namely restoring normality, signifying recovery success and control/uncertainty. Anti-depressant medication offered women a normalized pathway to successful recovery that stood in stark contrast to the biologically deficient and morally failing self. These women's stories importantly reveal the gender relations and paradoxes arising from biopolitical technologies that shape selfhood for women in advanced liberal societies.

  18. Mechanisms of antidepressant resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hage, Wissam; Leman, Samuel; Camus, Vincent; Belzung, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Depression is one of the most frequent and severe mental disorder. Since the discovery of antidepressant (AD) properties of the imipramine and then after of other tricyclic compounds, several classes of psychotropic drugs have shown be effective in treating major depressive disorder (MDD). However, there is a wide range of variability in response to ADs that might lead to non response or partial response or in increased rate of relapse or recurrence. The mechanisms of response to AD therapy are poorly understood, and few biomarkers are available than can predict response to pharmacotherapy. Here, we will first review markers that can be used to predict response to pharmacotherapy, such as markers of drug metabolism or blood-brain barrier (BBB) function, the activity of specific brain areas or neurotransmitter systems, hormonal dysregulations or plasticity, and related molecular targets. We will describe both clinical and preclinical studies and describe factors that might affect the expression of these markers, including environmental or genetic factors and comorbidities. This information will permit us to suggest practical recommendations and innovative treatment strategies to improve therapeutic outcomes. PMID:24319431

  19. Neuroimmune endocrine effects of antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonioli M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Marco Antonioli, Joanna Rybka, LA CarvalhoPsychoimmunology Translational Laboratory, Health Science Research Centre, Roehampton University, London, UKAbstract: Antidepressant pharmacotherapy is to date the most often used treatment for depression, but the exact mechanism of action underlying its therapeutic effect is still unclear. Many theories have been put forward to account for depression, as well as antidepressant activity, but none of them is exhaustive. Neuroimmune endocrine impairment is found in depressed patients; high levels of circulating corticosteroids along with hyperactivation of the immune system, high levels of proinflammatory cytokines, low levels of melatonin in plasma and urine, and disentrainment of circadian rhythms have been demonstrated. Moreover, antidepressant treatment seems to correct or at least to interfere with these alterations. In this review, we summarize the complex neuroimmune endocrine and chronobiological alterations found in patients with depression and how these systems interact with each other. We also explain how antidepressant therapy can modify these systems, along with some possible mechanisms of action shown in animal and human models.Keywords: antidepressant agents, biological markers, human, cytokines, neuroinflammation, psychoneuroimmunology, endophenotype

  20. Antidepressant-Resistant Depression and Antidepressant-Associated Suicidal Behaviour: The Role of Underlying Bipolarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltan Rihmer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The complex relationship between the use of antidepressants and suicidal behaviour is one of the hottest topics of our contemporary psychiatry. Based on the literature, this paper summarizes the author's view on antidepressant-resistant depression and antidepressant-associated suicidal behaviour. Antidepressant-resistance, antidepressant-induced worsening of depression, antidepressant-associated (hypomanic switches, mixed depressive episode, and antidepressant-associated suicidality among depressed patients are relatively most frequent in bipolar/bipolar spectrum depression and in children and adolescents. As early age at onset of major depressive episode and mixed depression are powerful clinical markers of bipolarity and the manic component of bipolar disorder (and possible its biological background shows a declining tendency with age antidepressant-resistance/worsening, antidepressant-induced (hypomanic switches and “suicide-inducing” potential of antidepressants seem to be related to the underlying bipolarity.

  1. Antidepressant-resistant depression and antidepressant-associated suicidal behaviour: the role of underlying bipolarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihmer, Zoltan; Gonda, Xenia

    2011-01-01

    The complex relationship between the use of antidepressants and suicidal behaviour is one of the hottest topics of our contemporary psychiatry. Based on the literature, this paper summarizes the author's view on antidepressant-resistant depression and antidepressant-associated suicidal behaviour. Antidepressant-resistance, antidepressant-induced worsening of depression, antidepressant-associated (hypo)manic switches, mixed depressive episode, and antidepressant-associated suicidality among depressed patients are relatively most frequent in bipolar/bipolar spectrum depression and in children and adolescents. As early age at onset of major depressive episode and mixed depression are powerful clinical markers of bipolarity and the manic component of bipolar disorder (and possible its biological background) shows a declining tendency with age antidepressant-resistance/worsening, antidepressant-induced (hypo)manic switches and "suicide-inducing" potential of antidepressants seem to be related to the underlying bipolarity.

  2. [Switching and combining strategies of antidepressant medications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpeaud, Thomas; Moliere, Fanny; Bubrovszky, Maxime; Haesebaert, Frédéric; Allaïli, Najib; Bation, Rémy; Nieto, Isabel; Richieri, Raphaëlle; Saba, Ghassen; Bellivier, Frank; Bennabi, Djamila; Holtzmann, Jérôme; Camus, Vincent; Courtet, Philippe; Courvoisier, Pierre; d'Amato, Thierry; Doumy, Olivier; Garnier, Marion; Bougerol, Thierry; Lançon, Christophe; Haffen, Emmanuel; Leboyer, Marion; Llorca, Pierre-Michel; Vaiva, Guillaume; El-Hage, Wissam; Aouizerate, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    Switching antidepressant medication may be helpful in depressed patients having no benefit from the initial antidepressant treatment. Before considering switching strategy, the initial antidepressant treatment should produce no therapeutic effect after at least 4 weeks of administration at adequate dosage. Choosing an antidepressant of pharmacologically distinct profile fails to consistently demonstrate a significant superiority in terms of effectiveness over the switching to another antidepressant within the same pharmacological class. Augmenting SSRI/SNRIs with mirtazapine/mianserin has become the most recommended strategy of antidepressant combinations. Augmenting SSRI with tricyclic drugs is now a less recommended strategy of antidepressant combinations given the increased risk for the occurrence of pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions and adverse effects.

  3. Outcome measures of antidepressive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, R

    2000-01-01

    A variety of outcome measures assessing antidepressive therapy are available. However, in randomized clinical trials, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) is often the primary outcome measure. Results from factor analysis and Rasch item analysis indicate that the HAM-D is heterogeneous and that the sum of items scores may not be an adequate measure of the severity of depression. A Melancholia Scale of 11 items has been suggested as a more valid measure of the core symptoms of affective syndrome. Other global outcome measures, focusing on health-related quality of life issues and on social functioning as well as macro-economic analyses are also used in depression. Applying stringent and well-documented outcome measures in randomized clinical trials of antidepressants may give the clinician a better indication of the most appropriate drug for treatment of the individual patient.

  4. Invited review: the evolution of antidepressant mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, D A; Hudson, A L; Nutt, D J

    2004-02-01

    Present antidepressants are all descendents of the serendipitous findings in the 1950s that the monoamine oxidase inhibitor iproniazid and the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine were effective antidepressants. The identification of their mechanism of action, and those of reserpine and amphetamine, in the 1960s, led to the monoamine theories of depression being postulated; first, with noradrenaline then 5-hydroxytryptamine being considered the more important amine. These monoamine theories of depression predominated both industrial and academic research for four decades. Recently, in attempts to design new drugs with faster onsets of action and more universal therapeutic action, downstream alterations common to current antidepressants are being examined as potential antidepressants. Additionally, the use of animal models has identified a number of novel targets some of which have been subjected to clinical trials in humans. However, monoamine antidepressants remain the best current medications and it may be some time before they are dislodged as the market leaders.

  5. Orchiectomy modifies the antidepressant-like response of nicotine in the forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla-Jaime, H; Limón-Morales, O; Arteaga-Silva, M; Hernández-González, M; Guadarrama-Cruz, G; Alarcón-Aguilar, F; Vázquez-Palacios, G

    2010-11-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that nicotine (NIC) exhibits antidepressant-like effects. In addition, it has been suggested that sexual hormones participate in the antidepressant actions of antidepressives. The present study was designed to analyze the effect of orchiectomy and the supplementation of testosterone propionate (TP) or 17β-estradiol (E(2)) on the antidepressant properties of NIC using the forced swimming test (FST), as well as to determine possible changes in the FST during different time periods after orchiectomy. In order to evaluate the influences of orchiectomy on the effects of NIC, the study first evaluated the effects of different time periods on orchiectomized rats (15, 21, 30, 45 and 60 days) that were subjected to the FST. Then, different doses of NIC (0.2, 0.4, 0.8, 1.6 mg/kg, sc) were administered for 14 days to both intact and orchiectomized rats (after 21 day) which were then also subjected to the FST. Finally, the influence of the TP or E(2) supplementation on the antidepressant-like effect of NIC on orchiectomized rats (after 21 days) was also analyzed. Results reveal that orchiectomy significantly increased immobility behavior and decreased swimming and climbing up to 60 days after castration. In contrast, NIC decreased immobility behavior and increased swimming in intact rats; whereas orchiectomy suppressed this antidepressant effect of NIC. Only with E(2) supplementation was it possible to restore the sensitivity of the castrated rats to NIC. These results suggest that E(2) was able to facilitate the antidepressant response of NIC in orchiectomized rats.

  6. Placebo and antidepressant treatment for major depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Esben

    2010-01-01

    Antidepressant medication is generally considered the primary treatment for major depressive disorders (MDD), but antidepressant treatment has recently approached a crisis with shrinking specific effects and growing placebo responses in current trials. The aim of the paper is to review the placebo...

  7. Antidepressant-like effects of BCEF0083 in the chronic unpredictable stress models in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Lan-lan; MING Liang; MA Chuan-geng; CHENG Yan; JIANG Qin

    2005-01-01

    Background Up to now there have been no satisfactory drugs to treat psychiatric disorders, and now bioactive compound from entomagenous fungi (BCEF0083) is a new type of bioactive compound from entomopathogenic fungi. Our previous investigations have shown that BCEF has an inhibition effect on monoamine oxidase. So, BCEF may be a latent antidepressant. This study aimed at observing the antidepressant effects and its mechanism of BCEF in the chronic unpredictable stress models in mice. Methods The antidepressant effects of BCEF were examined on the chronic unpredictable stress models in mice. Sixty mice were randomly divided to six groups. Animals were housed and isolated except saline group. Mice were exposed to different stressors per day randomly from day 1 to day 21. Body weight were weighed on day 1,day 10 and on day 21 during the 21-day stress procedure. Awarding response was detected by using method of calculating the 24-hour consumption of saccharum water. Step through test was used to evaluate the behavioral response. AVP contents in plasma were also detected by using radioimmunoassays. Results Chronic unpredictable stress resulted in a significant decrease of the body weight and could apparently cause escape behavior disturbance and gradual reduction of sensitivity to reward in animal models. Drug treatment (BCEF 25, 50, 100 mg/kg) could significantly ameliorate the decreased body weight and effectively reverse the escape behavior disturbance. The gradual reduction of sensitivity to reward, the anhedonic state, was also effectively reversed by BCEF. BCEF (50, 100 mg/kg) could also effectively restore the AVP content in the plasma.Conclusions This evidence suggests that BCEF can effectively inhibit the depression behavior and show strong antidepressant effect. BCEF can effectively restore the plasma AVP release and this may be an important mechanism of its antidepressant effect.

  8. Restoring forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobs, Douglass F.; Oliet, Juan A.; Aronson, James;

    2015-01-01

    Forest loss and degradation is occurring at high rates but humankind is experiencing historical momentum that favors forest restoration. Approaches to restoration may follow various paradigms depending on stakeholder objectives, regional climate, or the degree of site degradation. The vast amount...

  9. Voice restoration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilgers, F.J.M.; Balm, A.J.M.; van den Brekel, M.W.M.; Tan, I.B.; Remacle, M.; Eckel, H.E.

    2010-01-01

    Surgical prosthetic voice restoration is the best possible option for patients to regain oral communication after total laryngectomy. It is considered to be the present "gold standard" for voice rehabilitation of laryngectomized individuals. Surgical prosthetic voice restoration, in essence, is alwa

  10. HCN channel dendritic targeting requires bipartite interaction with TRIP8b and regulates antidepressant-like behavioral effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ye; Heuermann, Robert J.; Lyman, Kyle A.; Fisher, Daniel; Ismail, Quratul-Ain; Chetkovich, Dane M.

    2016-01-01

    Major Depressive Disorder is a prevalent psychiatric condition with limited therapeutic options beyond monoaminergic therapies. Although effective in some individuals, many patients fail to respond adequately to existing treatments and new pharmacologic targets are needed. HCN channels regulate excitability in neurons and blocking HCN channel function has been proposed as a novel antidepressant strategy. However, systemic blockade of HCN channels produces cardiac effects that limit this approach. Knockout (KO) of the brain-specific HCN channel auxiliary subunit TRIP8b also produces antidepressant-like behavioral effects and suggests that inhibiting TRIP8b function could produce antidepressant-like effects without affecting the heart. We examined the structural basis of TRIP8b-mediated HCN channel trafficking and its relationship to antidepressant-like behavior using a viral rescue approach in TRIP8b KO mice. We found that restoring TRIP8b to the hippocampus was sufficient to reverse the impaired HCN channel trafficking and antidepressant-like behavioral effects caused by TRIP8b KO. Moreover, we found that hippocampal expression of a mutated version of TRIP8b further impaired HCN channel trafficking and increased the antidepressant-like behavioral phenotype of TRIP8b KO mice. Thus, modulating the TRIP8b-HCN interaction bidirectionally influences channel trafficking and antidepressant-like behavior. Overall, our work suggests that small molecule inhibitors of the interaction between TRIP8b and HCN should produce antidepressant-like behaviors and could represent a new paradigm for the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder. PMID:27400855

  11. The effects of antidepressants on gastric ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Latif Güneş

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In their daily practice, psychiatrists often experience gastriccomplaints in patients beside psychiatric disorders.Peptic ulcer is one of the diseases, which accompanyto psychiatric disorders including mainly depression. Itis shown that antidepressants can inflame the bleedingsincluding gastrointestinal (GI bleedings, while they havepositive effect on ulcer healing. In this review, studies,which conducted about the positive or negative effects ofantidepressant drugs on ulcer treatment were examined.Accordingly; it was found that opipramol, amitriptyline,imipramine that of tricyclic antidepressants was found tobe helpful in healing of the ulcer. It was stated that SelectiveSerotonin Reuptake Inhibitors generally inflamedulcers, exceptionally fluvoxamine and fluoxetine reducedulcer; moclobemide that of monoamine-oxidase inhibitorand tianeptine and mirtazapine that of atypical antidepressantshad positive effect in ulcer healing. To be carefulin choosing the appropriate antidepressant in psychiatricpatients with gastric ulcer is important in the prognosisof both ulcer and depression.Key words: peptic ulcer; depression; antidepressant drugs

  12. Antidepressants: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... antidepressants in primary care: descriptive study of... Article: Comparison chart of drugs for migraine prevention. Article: Sixty ... the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get ...

  13. New generation of antidepressants in pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladan Kashani

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Although pregnancy was once thought to protect against psychiatric disorders, gravid and non gravid women have similar risks for major depression, at 10% to 15%. Both depression and antidepressant treatment during pregnancy have been associated with risks. Few medications have been proved unequivocally safe during pregnancy. Although certain antidepressants have not been linked with an increased risk of birth defects or impaired development including bupropion, citalopram, escitalopram and venlafaxine, the latest studies aren't necessarily reassuring. As researchers continue to learn more about antidepressants, the risks and benefits of taking the drugs during pregnancy must be weighed carefully on a case-by-case basis. This review discusses about the use of new generation of antidepressants in pregnancy

  14. Adherence to anti-depressant medication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The study of medicine taking is controversial as it often reveals a discrepancy between healthcare professionals' advice and patients' actual behaviour. Qualitative researchers have examined depressed people's adherence to prescriptions of antidepressants by exploring the meaning they impute to t...

  15. Antidepressants: update on new agents and indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ables, Adrienne Z; Baughman, Otis L

    2003-02-01

    A number of antidepressants have emerged in the U.S. market in the past two decades. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have become the drugs of choice in the treatment of depression, and they are also effective in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder, and social phobia. New indications for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors include post-traumatic stress disorder, premenstrual dysphoric disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder. Extended-release venlafaxine has recently been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder. Mirtazapine, which is unrelated to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, is unique in its action--stimulating the release of norepinephrine and serotonin. The choice of antidepressant drug depends on the agent's pharmacologic profile, secondary actions, and tolerability. Sexual dysfunction related to the use of antidepressants may be addressed by reducing the dosage, switching to another agent, or adding another drug to overcome the sexual side effects. Augmentation with lithium or triiodothyronine may be useful in patients who are partially or totally resistant to antidepressant treatment. Finally, tapering antidepressant medication may help to avoid discontinuation syndrome or antidepressant withdrawal.

  16. Semen abnormalities with SSRI antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of widespread use, the adverse effect profile of "selective" serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants has still not been fully elucidated. Studies in male animals have shown delayed sexual development and reduced fertility. Three prospective cohort studies conducted in over one hundred patients exposed to an SSRI for periods ranging from 5 weeks to 24 months found altered semen param-eters after as little as 3 months of exposure: reduced sperm concentration, reduced sperm motility, a higher percentage of abnormal spermatozoa, and increased levels of sperm DNA fragmentation. One clinical trial showed growth retardation in children considered depressed who were exposed to SSRls. SSRls may have endocrine disrupting properties. Dapoxetine is a short-acting serotonin reuptake inhibitor that is chemically related to fluoxetine and marketed in the European Union for men complaining of premature ejaculation. But the corresponding European summary of product characteristics does not mention any effects on fertility. In practice, based on the data available as of mid-2014, the effects of SSRI exposure on male fertility are unclear. However, it is a risk that should be taken into account and pointed out to male patients who would like to father a child or who are experiencing fertility problems.

  17. Antidepressant effects of ketamine: mechanisms underlying fast-acting novel antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Ann Browne

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Newer antidepressants are needed for the many individuals with major depressive disorder that do not respond adequately to treatment and because of a delay of weeks before the emergence of therapeutic effects. Recent evidence from clinical trials shows that the NMDA antagonist ketamine is a revolutionary novel antidepressant because it acts rapidly and is effective for treatment-resistant patients. A single infusion of ketamine alleviates depressive symptoms in treatment-resistant depressed patients within hours and these effects may be sustained for up to 2 weeks. Although the discovery of ketamine’s effects has reshaped drug discovery for antidepressants, the psychotomimetic properties of this compound limit the use of this therapy to the most severely ill patients. In order to develop additional antidepressants like ketamine, adequate preclinical behavioral screening paradigms for fast-acting antidepressants need to be established and used to identify the underlying neural mechanisms. This review examines the preclinical literature attempting to model the antidepressant-like effects of ketamine. Acute administration of ketamine has produced effects in behavioral screens for antidepressants like the forced swim test, novelty suppression of feeding and in rodent models for depression. Protracted behavioral effects of ketamine have been reported to appear after a single treatment that last for days. This temporal pattern is similar to its clinical effects and may serve as a new animal paradigm for rapid antidepressant effects in humans. In addition, protracted changes in molecules mediating synaptic plasticity have been implicated in mediating the antidepressant-like behavioral effects of ketamine. Current preclinical studies are examining compounds with more specific pharmacological effects at glutamate receptors and synapses in order to develop additional rapidly acting antidepressants without the hallucinogenic side effects or abuse

  18. Potentials of Curcumin as an Antidepressant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.K. Kulkarni

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Major depression, a debilitating psychiatric disorder, is predicted to be the second most prevalent human illness by the year 2020. Various antidepressants, ranging from monoamine oxidase inhibitors to recently developed dual reuptake inhibitors, are prescribed for alleviating the symptoms of depression. Despite the availability of these blockbuster molecules, approximately 30% of depressed patients do not respond to the existing drug therapies and the remaining 70% fails to achieve complete remission. Moreover, antidepressants are associated with a plethora of side effects and drug-drug/drug-food interactions. In this context, novel approaches are being tried to find more efficacious and safer drugs for the treatment of major depression. Curcumin is one such molecule that has shown promising efficacy in various animal models of major depression. Although the mechanism of the antidepressant effect of curcumin is not fully understood, it is hypothesized to act through inhibiting the monoamine oxidase enzyme and modulating the release of serotonin and dopamine. Moreover, evidences have shown that curcumin enhances neurogenesis, notably in the frontal cortex and hippocampal regions of the brain. The use of curcumin in clinics for the treatment of major depression is limited due to its poor gastrointestinal absorption. The present review attempts to discuss the pharmacological profile along with molecular mechanisms of the antidepressant effect of curcumin in animal models of depression. A need for clinical trials in order to explore the antidepressant efficacy and safety profile of curcumin is emphasized.

  19. ramic restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish R Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation of a patient with severely worn dentition after restoring the vertical dimension is a complex procedure and assessment of the vertical dimension is an important aspect in these cases. This clinical report describes the full mouth rehabilitation of a patient who was clinically monitored to evaluate the adaptation to a removable occlusal splint to restore vertical dimension for a period 1 month and provisional restorations to determine esthetic and functional outcome for a period of 3 months. It is necessary to recognizing that form follows function and that anterior teeth play a vital role in the maintenance of oral health. Confirmation of tolerance to changes in the vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO is of paramount importance. Articulated study casts and a diagnostic wax-up can provide important information for the evaluation of treatment options. Alteration of the VDO should be conservative and should not be changed without careful consideration.

  20. Drug treatment episodes in pharmacoepidemiology - antidepressant use as a model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gardarsdottir, H.

    2009-01-01

    In the Netherlands, antidepressants are indicated for treating depression, generalized anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorders, social phobia, panic disorders, eating disorders, neuropathic pain and nocturnal enuresis. In addition, antidepressants are sometimes used for treating off-label

  1. Reconsidering GHB: orphan drug or new model antidepressant?

    OpenAIRE

    Bosch, O G; Quednow, B. B.; Seifritz, E.; Wetter, T C

    2012-01-01

    For six decades, the principal mode of action of antidepressant drugs is the inhibition of monoamine re-uptake from the synaptic cleft. Tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and the new generation of dual antidepressants all exert their antidepressant effects by this mechanism. In the early days of the monoaminergic era, other efforts have been made to ameliorate the symptoms of depression by pharmacological means. The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) syste...

  2. Hippocampal Neurogenesis, Depressive Disorders, and Antidepressant Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Paizanis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing body of evidence that neural stem cells reside in the adult central nervous system where neurogenesis occurs throughout lifespan. Neurogenesis concerns mainly two areas in the brain: the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus and the subventricular zone, where it is controlled by several trophic factors and neuroactive molecules. Neurogenesis is involved in processes such as learning and memory and accumulating evidence implicates hippocampal neurogenesis in the physiopathology of depression. We herein review experimental and clinical data demonstrating that stress and antidepressant treatments affect neurogenesis in opposite direction in rodents. In particular, the stimulation of hippocampal neurogenesis by all types of antidepressant drugs supports the view that neuroplastic phenomena are involved in the physiopathology of depression and underlie—at least partly—antidepressant therapy.

  3. Cardiovascular Effects of Antidepressants and Mood Stabilizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Akhondzadeh

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a serious disorder in today’s society, with the estimates of lifetime prevalence being as high as 21% of the general population in some developed countries. As defined by the American Psychiatric Association, depression is a heterogeneous disorder often manifested with symptoms at the psychological, behavioral, and physiological levels. Such patients are often reluctant to take synthetic antidepressants in their appropriate doses due to their anticipated side effects including inability to drive a car, dry mouth, constipation, and sexual dysfunction. As a therapeutic alternative, effective herbal drugs may offer advantages in terms of safety and tolerability, possibly also improving patient compliance. The advent of the first antidepressants, Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOIs and Tricyclic Antidepressants (TCAs, in the 1950s and 1960s represented a dramatic leap forward in the clinical management of depression. The subsequent development of the Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs and the Serotonin Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitor (SNRI venlafaxine in the past decade and a half has greatly enhanced the treatment of depression by offering patients medications that are as effective as the older agents but are generally more tolerable and safer in an overdose. The introduction of atypical antidepressants, such as bupropion, nefazadone, and mirtazapine, has added substantially to the available pharmacopoeia for depression. Nonetheless, rates of remission tend to be low and the risk of relapse and recurrence remains high. One of the concerns regarding the safety of antidepressant is its potential risk of cardiotoxicity and cardiovascular side effects. In this review, we will focus on the cardiovascular side effects of different types of antidepressants.

  4. [Depression and treatment. Apoptosis, neuroplasticity and antidepressants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arantes-Gonçalves, Filipe; Coelho, Rui

    2006-01-01

    Depression's neurobiology begins to be better understood. The last decade data considers neuroplasticity and stress as implicated factors on the pathophisiology of depression. Because antidepressants have a lag-time on their action it is possible that inhibition of neurotransmitters recaptation is not sufficient to explain long term changes. For that purpose, neurogenesis increase, nervous fibers sprouting, new synapses and stabilization of the old ones can be responsible for those changes. AMPc-MAPcinases-CREB-BDNF cellular cascade can play a significant role in the mechanisms of dendritic restructuration, hippocampal neurogenesis increase and nervous cells survival. The aim of this article is to discuss if apoptosis could play a key role as an ethiopathogenic factor on the patogenesis of depression. It was done a medline search for references with apoptosis, stress, neuroplasticity, depression and antidepressants key-words. It were found 101 original or review references about these subjects. Stress plays a key role in the etiopathogeny of depression. Its deletery effects on apoptosis and neuroplasticity can be changed by antidepressants. Neurogenesis' increase is necessary for their action. This increase is reached with chronic antidepressant treatment and not with other psychotropic drugs which means some pharmacological specificity of antidepressants. AMPc, CREB, BDNF and Bcl-2 can be considered as target genes in antidepressant synthesis. At the level of this neurotrophic factors apoptosis might be included in the neuroplastic model of depression and play a prominent role in etiopathogeny of depression. To confirm that, we need more research on the field to know which are the mechanisms that trigger apoptosis and its biological significance. In relation to the last one, we can say that is possible to be physiological apoptosis in deteriorated neurons death which cannot make strong connections and pathological apoptosis because of stress via, namely, HPA axis.

  5. GPs motivations of prescribing antidepressants and their practical relevance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkers, A.; Jong, A. de; Braspenning, J.C.C.; Bakker, D. de; Dijk, L. van

    2004-01-01

    Background: Insight in the motivations of prescribing antidepressants may contribute to advance the efficiency of the current, large antidepressant prescription rate. Less is known about why general practitioners (GPs) treat patients with antidepressants or not and choose modern SSRIs instead of the

  6. Prevalence of antidepressants and biosimilars in elite sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machnik, M; Sigmund, G; Koch, A; Thevis, M; Schänzer, W

    2009-06-01

    The use of prescribed antidepressants by athletes has not been restricted in human sports since 2003, after the antidepressants bupropion and amineptine were removed from the list of prohibited substances. Recent awareness of antidepressants has been stimulated by reports from the media concerning possible misuse of antidepressants among healthy athletes. The prevalence of antidepressants has been monitored over the past ten years with screening procedures routinely used by WADA-accredited laboratories. The growth in antidepressant use among athletes peaked in 2007 and 2008 after a modest increase over the first eight years of this survey. Pharmacy prescriptions for antidepressants in Germany did not show a correlated growth during this period. The increasing variety of antidepressant medications has led to a continued increase in the diversity of antidepressant substances used by athletes and the 'normal' population. The number of different sports affected by the presence of antidepressants has increased in the past decade, especially in endurance sports. The predominance of female antidepressant users in the normal population was reflected in the athletes' group. We concluded from our results that the development of antidepressant prevalence in elite sports did not correlate with that among the general public in Germany.

  7. Antidepressant Prescription and Suicide Rates: Effect of Age and Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmar, Sandor; Szanto, Katalin; Rihmer, Zoltan; Mazumdar, Sati; Harrison, Katrin; Mann, J. John

    2008-01-01

    To determine whether the effect of antidepressant exposure on suicide rate is modified by age and gender in Hungary, annual antidepressant prescription rates and suicide rates of about 10 million inhabitants between 1999-2005 were analyzed by age and gender groups. The suicide rate was inversely related to the increased use of antidepressants in…

  8. Site Restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noynaert, L.; Bruggeman, A.; Cornelissen, R.; Massaut, V.; Rahier, A

    2001-04-01

    The objectives, the programme, and the achievements of the Site Restoration Department of SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. Main activities include the decommissioning of the BR3 PWR-reactor as well as other clean-up activities, projects on waste minimisation and activities related to the management of decommissioning projects. The department provides consultancy and services to external organisations.

  9. Restorative neuroscience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andres, Robert H; Meyer, Morten; Ducray, Angélique D

    2008-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the search for therapeutic options for diseases and injuries of the central nervous system (CNS), for which currently no effective treatment strategies are available. Replacement of damaged cells and restoration of function can be accomplished by transplantation of...

  10. Environmental Restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeevaert, T.; Vanmarcke, H

    1998-07-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's programme on environmental restoration are (1) to optimize and validate models for the impact assessment from environmental, radioactive contaminations, including waste disposal or discharge; (2) to support the policy of national authorities for public health and radioactive waste management. Progress and achievements in 1997 are reported.

  11. Cost variation study of antidepressant drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar Shukla

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: There is wide price variation of different brands of the same generic antidepressant drug in Indian market. Cost of a drug plays an important role in treatment of depression as it follows a long course and adherence to the treatment is related with drug cost. To decrease the wide cost variation among different brands of antidepressant drugs; it is high time to generate physician awareness about impact of cost effectiveness of drug regimen and for regulation of drug prices by the concerned agencies. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(5.000: 1816-1821

  12. Poisoining with Tricyclic Antidepressants and Current Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muge Gulen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Poisoning with tricyclic antidepressants is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality compared to all the antidepressants. Main toxic effects are on the cardiovascular system and central nervous system and manifests itself as anticholinergic symptoms. There is no antidote known to be used in the treatment. But sodium bicarbonate treatment is effective in preventing ventricular arrhythmias and hypotension, and resolving metabolic acidosis. There are some treatments that has been used for relief of symptoms and some of them still are in research stage. The drugs that are used can be customized according to the patients symptoms. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(4.000: 608-621

  13. Evaluating Early Preventive Antipsychotic and Antidepressant Drug Treatment in an Infection-Based Neurodevelopmental Mouse Model of Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Urs; Spoerri, Erica; Yee, Benjamin K.; Schwarz, Markus J; Feldon, Joram

    2008-01-01

    Current pharmacotherapy of schizophrenia remains unsatisfactory with little hope for complete functional restoration in patients once the disease has developed. A preventive approach based on intervention in the prodromal stage of the disease aiming to preserve functional integrity by halting the progress of the disease is therefore extremely attractive. Here, we investigated the effects of preventive antipsychotic or antidepressant drug treatment in a well-established neurodevelopmental mous...

  14. Inflammatory Biomarkers as Differential Predictors of Antidepressant Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Hashimoto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Although antidepressants are generally effective in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD, it can still take weeks before patients feel the full antidepressant effects. Despite the efficacy of standard treatments, approximately two-thirds of patients with MDD fail to respond to pharmacotherapy. Therefore, the identification of blood biomarkers that can predict the treatment response to antidepressants would be highly useful in order to improve this situation. This article discusses inflammatory molecules as predictive biomarkers for antidepressant responses to several classes of antidepressants, including the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine.

  15. The mechanism of action of antidepressants revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackenheil, M

    1990-01-01

    The discovery of the clinical efficacy of imipramine and of the MAO-inhibitor iproniazid intensively stimulated biochemical-pharmacological research on the mechanism of action of antidepressants. Due to these investigations, until recently an enhanced activity of the central noradrenergic and/or serotonergic transmitter system was considered essential for the clinical antidepressive action. Such enhancement could be achieved either presynaptically by blocking alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, or in the synaptic cleft by inhibiting the transmitter reuptake or the main metabolic enzyme, MAO. The common final result, especially of chronic treatment, was the down-regulation of postsynaptic beta-receptors, modulated by interaction with the serotonergic system, neuropeptides, and hormones. The delay of clinical response corresponded better with such receptor alterations. However, the introduction of new, more selective antidepressants led to new reflections upon the mechanism of action. On the level of transmitters, alpha 1-upregulation, increased activity of the dopaminergic system, an alteration in the balance between the different transmitter systems, are reported and seem to be important. Most promising are recent investigations of the second messenger systems, the adenylate cyclase system and the phosphatidylinositol system. Both systems are modulated by antidepressant drugs including lithium and carbamazepine. These second messengers, in turn, modulate the phosphorylation status of neuronal proteins via protein kinase, which may lead to elevations of the above mentioned receptors and again their transduction systems.

  16. Antidepressant prescribing in five European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbing-Karahagopian, V; Huerta, C; Souverein, P C

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Drug utilization studies have applied different methods to various data types to describe medication use, which hampers comparisons across populations. The aim of this study was to describe the time trends in antidepressant prescribing in the last decade and the variation in the prevalen...

  17. Physiological Bases of Bulimia, and Antidepressant Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getzfeld, Andrew R.

    This paper reviews the literature on the physiological causes of bulimia and investigates the rationale behind the usage of antidepressant medication in the treatment of bulimia nervosa. No definite conclusions can be stated regarding the physiology of bulimia, but a number of hypotheses are suggested. It appears that the hypothalamus is involved…

  18. Prenatal Antidepressants and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1Sept 2013-31Aug2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Prenatal Antidepressants and Autism Spectrum Disorder 5a...Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT According to the CDC Autism Spectrum Disorder

  19. Potential antidepressant constituents of Nigella sativa seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehab S Elkhayat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nigella sativa Linn. is well known seed in the Middle East, Asia, and the Far East as a natural remedy for many ailments and as a flavoring agent proclaimed medicinal usage dating back to the ancient Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans. An authentic saying of the Prophet Muhammad (Peace Be Upon Him about black seed is also quoted in Al-Bukhari. Objective: This study was carried out to evaluate the antidepressant effect and isolate the potential antidepressant constituents of the polar extract of N. sativa seeds. Materials and Methods: The antidepressant effect was evaluated through the immobility duration in tail suspension and forced swim tests (FSTs. Albino mice were orally treated with N. sativa polar extract and its RP-18 column chromatography fractions (50 and 100 mg/kg,. Results: The polar extract and two of its sub-fractions were significantly able to decrease the immobility time of mice when subjected to both tail suspension and FSTs, the effects are comparable to standard drug (Sertraline, 5 mg/kg. However, these treatments did not affect the number of crossings and rearing in the open field test. Phytochemical investigation of the two active fractions led to the isolation of quercetin-3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside 1, quercetin-7-O-β-D-gluco- pyranoside 2, tauroside E 3, and sapindoside B as the potential antidepressant constituents.

  20. Antidepressants administration in rheumatoid arthritiswith comorbid depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N V Yaltseva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study comorbid depression influence on course of rheumatoid arthritis (RAand antidepressants efficacy in such pts. Material and methods. 70 pts with RA (all women fulfilled the 1987 ACR criteria with comorbid depression disturbances were included. 30 from them received course of treatment with antidepressants (main group. 20 refused proposed therapy (main control group. 20 RA pts without depression were included in an additional control group which was also followed up. Hamilton scales of depression and anxiety were used. Results. Baseline clinical measures did not significantly differ between study groups. Antidepressants application in main group pts was accompanied by significant improvement of tender and swollen joint count, morning stiffness duration, pain intensity (score,functional disability index (FDI after 3 months (<0,001,<0,001, <0,01, <0,001,<0,001. This improvement further increased to sixth month of follow up. Comparison of main and additional control groups showed better outcome in the absence of comorbid depression and its negative influence on results of treatment. Conclusion. Effective treatment of depression with modern antidepressants (selective inhibitors of reverse serotonin capture in pts with RA improves clinical course of the disease, its prognosis and pts quality of life.

  1. Evaluating the tolerability of the newer antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewan, M J; Anand, V S

    1999-02-01

    Given their equal efficacy, the choice of a specific antidepressant is largely influenced by side effect (SE) profiles. A number of new agents have recently become available. However, data directly comparing the side effects of these agents are scarce. As suggested by AHCPR guidelines, we used the 1998 Physicians' Desk Reference (PDR) to construct a comparison table using treatment emergent, placebo-adjusted incidence rates for the major (gastrointestinal, central nervous system, and sexual) side effects caused by nine antidepressants (fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, fluvoxamine, nefazodone, bupropion SR, mirtazapine, venlafaxine XR, and citalopram). The results were tabulated to show the relative propensity of each drug to cause a particular side effect. Bupropion SR had the most favorable overall side-effect profile, and fluvoxamine the least favorable. However, there are several limitations in using the PDR to compare the newer antidepressants. Clinical studies directly comparing SEs of newer antidepressants are needed. Sexual SEs substantially affected total SE liability. A simplified summary table, with its advantages and some limitations, is not simple to construct. Pitfalls in this process are discussed.

  2. Antidepressants in the treatment of neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindrup, Søren H.; Otto, Marit; Finnerup, Nanna Brix;

    2005-01-01

    options such as tramadol and oxycodone, whereas the serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor venlafaxine appears to be equally effective with these drugs and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors apparently have lower efficacy. Head-to-head comparisons between antidepressants and the other analgesics...

  3. Neurogenesis and The Effect of Antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Taupin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent evidence that neurogenesis occurs throughout adulthood and neural stem cells (NSCs reside in the adult central nervous system (CNS suggests that the CNS has the potential for self-repair. Beside this potential, the function of newly generated neuronal cells in the adult brain remains the focus of intense research. The hippocampus of patients with depression show signs of atrophy and neuronal loss. This suggests that adult neurogenesis may contribute to the biology of depression. The observations that antidepressants, like fluoxetine, increase neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG and neurogenesis is required for the behavioral effect of antidepressants, lead to a new theory for depression and the design of new strategies and drugs for the treatment of depression. However, the role of adult neurogenesis in the etiology of depression remains the source of controversies and debates.

  4. Extracorporeal treatment for tricyclic antidepressant poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yates, Christopher; Galvao, Tais; Sowinski, Kevin M;

    2014-01-01

    The Extracorporeal Treatments In Poisoning (EXTRIP) workgroup was formed to provide recommendations on the use of extracorporeal treatments (ECTR) in poisoning. Here, the workgroup presents its results for tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). After an extensive literature search, using a predefined...... methodology, the subgroup responsible for this poison reviewed the articles, extracted the data, summarized findings, and proposed structured voting statements following a predetermined format. A two-round modified Delphi method was chosen to reach a consensus on voting statements and RAND...

  5. New Generation Antidepressants in Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Gutiérrez-Álvarez, Ángela-María; Carlos B. Moreno

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of diabetic neuropathy increases with the duration of diabetes and the degree of hyperglycaemia. Pain is one of the most common and incapacitating symptoms of diabetic neuropathy and its pharmacological control is complex. The effectiveness of antidepressive agents has been described in different types of neuropathic pain, but their effectiveness, when used as analgesics in painful diabetic neuropathy, still remains controversial. Objective: To review the possible role of new-ge...

  6. Cost variation study of antidepressant drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Ajay Kumar Shukla; Parag Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Background: Depression and anxiety disorders are the most common mental illnesses, each affecting in excess of 10-15% of the population at some time in their lives. Approximately 10-15% of those with severe depression attempt suicide at some point of time. Thus, it is important that symptoms of depression be recognized and treated appropriately. Methods: The prices of 15 antidepressant drugs, available in 43 different formulations were analyzed. Costs of different brands of a particular ge...

  7. Antidepressant drugs: evaluation of price variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhumika Jayantilal Patel

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Price variation was wide for antidepressant drugs. Generic drug prescribing can decrease the expenditure of patient on the drug. Prescribers should be provided updated knowledge of the cost of different drugs. Modifications in pharmaceutical policy are required, and prices of the drug should be controlled in effective way for all the drugs. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2015; 4(3.000: 432-437

  8. ANTI-DEPRESSANT POTENTIAL OF GHIYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur Satbir

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Lagenaria siceraria (Cucurbitaceae, popularly known as bottle gourd, lauki or ghiya, is a climbing plant, which bears hard-shelled and bottle-shaped gourds as fruits. Ghiya forms an excellent diet for people having digestive problems being rich in vitamins, iron and minerals. Since, it contains low calories, bottle gourd is an awesome foodstuff for shedding extra calories. The fruit possesses diuretic, emetic, and refrigerant properties. The ghiya (lauki juice is helpful in constipation, premature graying hair, urinary disorders and insomnia. However, there are no reports in literature pertaining to CNS actions of Lagenaria siceraria fruit. In the light of above, the present study was undertaken to test the anti-depressant potential of Lagenaria siceraria juice (LSJ. Lagenaria siceraria juice was administered at various concentrations ranging from 4%-16% v/v orally to Swiss mice (30g, once daily for 15 successive days. The anti-depressant activity was measured using Forced Swim Test (FST and Tail Suspension Test (TST. The efficacy of Lagenaria siceraria was compared to standard anti-depressant drugs viz: fluoxetine (20mg/kg, p.o, imipramine (15mg/kg, p.o and phenelzine (20 mg/kg, p.o. Lagenaria siceraria significantly reduced the immobility time of mice in both FST and TST. Prazosin, Baclofen, Sulpiride and p-CPA significantly antagonized this reduction in immobility duration. Furthermore, Lagenaria siceraria juice inhibited the monoamine oxidase (MAO enzyme and reduced significantly malondialdehyde (MDA levels. These findings reveal the anti-depressant potential of ghiya.

  9. Sex-Specific and Estrous Cycle-Dependent Antidepressant-Like Effects and Hippocampal Akt Signaling of Leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Nicole; Wang, Xuezhen; Sun, Linshan; Lu, Xin-Yun

    2015-10-01

    Sex differences in the incidence of depression and antidepressant treatment responses are well documented. Depression is twice as common in women as in men. Recent studies indicate that low levels of leptin, an adipocyte-derived hormone, are associated with increased symptoms of depression in women. Leptin has been shown to produce antidepressant-like effects in male rodents. In the present study, we examined sex differences and estrous cycle variations in antidepressant-like responses to leptin. Leptin administration significantly reduced immobility, a putative measure of behavioral despair, in the forced swim test in intact female mice in the proestrus phase but not in the diestrus phase of the estrous cycle. Moreover, leptin administration stimulated Akt phosphorylation in the hippocampus of female mice in proestrus but not in diestrus, in correlation with its differential behavioral effects in these two phases of the cycle. Leptin-induced behavioral responses and stimulation of hippocampal Akt phosphorylation in female mice were abolished by ovariectomy. By contrast, the antidepressant-like effect of leptin in male mice was not affected by gonadectomy (castration). Pretreatment with 17β-estradiol restored sensitivity to the effects of leptin on behavior and hippocampal Akt phosphorylation in ovariectomized female mice. These results suggest leptin regulates depression-like behavior and hippocampal Akt signaling in a sex-specific and estrous cycle-dependent manner.

  10. Antidepressants and Suicide Risk: A Comprehensive Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Tatarelli

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The annual worldwide suicide rate currently averages approximately 13 per 100,000 individuals per year (0.013% per year, with higher average rates for men than for women in all but a few countries, very low rates in children, and relatively high rates in elderly men. Suicide rates vary markedly between countries, reflecting in part differences in case-identification and reporting procedures. Rates of attempted suicide in the general population average 20–30 times higher than rates of completed suicide, but are probably under-reported. Research on the relationship between pharmacotherapy and suicidal behavior was rare until a decade ago. Most ecological studies and large clinical studies have found that a general reduction in suicide rates is significantly correlated with higher rates of prescribing modern antidepressants. However, ecological, cohort and case-control studies and data from brief, randomized, controlled trials in patients with acute affective disorders have found increases, particularly in young patients and particularly for the risk of suicide attempts, as well as increases in suicidal ideation in young patients. whether antidepressants are associated with specific aspects of suicidality (e.g., higher rates of completed suicide, attempted suicide and suicidal ideation in younger patients with major affective disorders remains a highly controversial question. In light of this gap this paper analyzes research on the relationship between suicidality and antidepressant treatment.

  11. Choice of treatment with antidepressants: influencing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmerich, Hubertus; Wranik, Dominika W

    2012-01-01

    Depressive disorders place a large burden on patients and on society. Although efficacious treatment options for unipolar depressive disorders exist, substantial gaps in care remain. In part, the challenge lies in the matching of individual patients with appropriate care. This is complicated by the steady increases in the variety of antidepressants available in the market. The goal of this study is to highlight the decision processes in the selection of antidepressants by clinicians, given that most treatments have similar clinical effectiveness profiles. We conducted a systematic literature review of studies that referred to the decisions surrounding treatment with antidepressants for the treatment of non-psychotic unipolar depression. Our analysis of the literature reveals that the choice of treatment is based on a variety of factors, of which clinical evidence is only one. These factors can be categorized into clinical factors such as illness and treatment characteristics, individual factors such as patient and physician characteristics, and contextual factors such as setting characteristics, decision supports and pharmacoeconomic aspects. Illness characteristics are defined by the type and severity of depression. Treatment characteristics include drug properties, efficacy, effectiveness and favorable as well as unintended adverse effects of the drug. Examples for patient characteristics are co-morbidities and individual preferences, and physician characteristics include knowledge, experience, values and beliefs, and the relationship with the patient. Treatment guidelines, algorithms, and most recently, computational supports and biological markers serve as decision supports.

  12. Linking tricyclic antidepressants to ionotropic glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Laura; Gentile, Lisa

    2005-07-29

    Although tricyclic antidepressants have been in existence since the 1940s when they were discovered upon screening iminodibenzyl derivatives for other potential therapeutic uses, their mechanism of action has remained unclear [A. Goodman Gilman, T.W. Rall, A.S. Nies, P. Taylor, Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, eighth ed., Pergamon Press, New York, 1990]. In addition to their ability to hinder the reuptake of biogenic amines, there is mounting evidence that the tricyclic antidepressants inhibit glutamate transmission. Here, intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy is used to document the binding of desipramine, a member of the tricyclic antidepressant family, to a well-defined extracellular glutamate binding domain (S1S2) of the GluR2 subunit of the amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor. The binding is distinct from those of other known effectors of the receptor, including the endogenous sulfated neurosteroids pregnenolone sulfate and 3alpha-hydroxy-5beta-pregnan-20-one sulfate, and is consistent with a conformational change upon binding that is allosterically transmitted to the channel region of the receptor.

  13. Antidepressant induced excessive yawning and indifference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Palazzo Nazar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Antidepressant induced excessive yawning has been described as a possible side effect of pharmacotherapy. A syndrome of indifference has also been described as another possible side effect. The frequency of those phenomena and their physiopathology are unknown. They are both considered benign and reversible after antidepressant discontinuation but severe cases with complications as temporomandibular lesions, have been described. Methods We report two unprecedented cases in which excessive yawning and indifference occurred simultaneously as side effects of antidepressant therapy, discussing possible physiopathological mechanisms for this co-occurrence. Case 1: A male patient presented excessive yawning (approximately 80/day and apathy after venlafaxine XR treatment. Symptoms reduced after a switch to escitalopram, with a reduction to 50 yawns/day. Case 2: A female patient presented excessive yawning (approximately 25/day and inability to react to environmental stressors with desvenlafaxine. Conclusion Induction of indifference and excessive yawning may be modulated by serotonergic and noradrenergic mechanisms. One proposal to unify these side effects would be enhancement of serotonin in midbrain, especially paraventricular and raphe nucleus.

  14. Site Restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noynaert, L.; Bruggeman, A.; Cornelissen, R.; Massaut, V.; Rahier, A

    2002-04-01

    The objectives, the programme, and the achievements of SCK-CEN's Site Restoration Department for 2001 are described. Main activities include the decommissioning of the BR3 PWR-reactor as well as other clean-up activities, projects on waste minimisation and the management of spent fuel and the flow of dismantled materials and the recycling of materials from decommissioning activities based on the smelting of metallic materials in specialised foundries. The department provides consultancy and services to external organisations and performs R and D on new techniques including processes for the treatment of various waste components including the reprocessing of spent fuel, the treatment of tritium, the treatment of liquid alkali metals into cabonates through oxidation, the treatment of radioactive organic waste and the reconditioning of bituminised waste products.

  15. Antidepressants triggering suicidal ideation: An area of concern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himali Rajgadhi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a report of four cases of possible suicidal ideation with the use of antidepressants in Indian population. The patients presented to emergency department of a tertiary care hospital with attempted suicide. All of them were prescribed at least one antidepressant. The association of increased suicidal attempts/ideation with antidepressant drugs themselves has been reported in the West, but data in the Indian population are lacking. Antidepressants are widely used not only for treatment of depression but also many other psychiatric illnesses; it is yet unclear whether suicidal ideation is because of these drugs or the progression of the disease. Hence, careful prescribing of these medicines is warranted.

  16. Benzodiazepines and adequacy of initial antidepressant treatment for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Paul N; Ganoczy, Dara; Zivin, Kara; Valenstein, Marcia

    2011-06-01

    In short-term efficacy studies, coprescription of a benzodiazepine improves first-month adherence and response to antidepressant treatment. We used Veterans Health Administration data to examine the impact of coprescribed benzodiazepines on initial antidepressant adherence in routine clinical practice and the risks of long-term benzodiazepine use, abuse, and dependence. Our study population was 43,915 Veterans Health Administration patients diagnosed with depression and started on an antidepressant between October 2006 and September 2007. Using logistic regression, adjusting for demographic and clinical covariates, we predicted the likelihood that patients received antidepressant treatment for an adequate duration (90 days), with our primary independent variable of interest being receipt of a benzodiazepine on the same day as the start of the antidepressant. We also assessed the frequency and characteristics of patients whose benzodiazepine use persisted for 1 year or who were diagnosed with anxiolytic abuse or dependence after receiving combined treatment. The adjusted probability of receiving antidepressant treatment of adequate duration was 42.4% for patients who received a benzodiazepine with their initial antidepressant compared with 39.3% for patients initially treated with an antidepressant alone (P benzodiazepines for at least 1 year, and 0.7% were diagnosed with anxiolytic abuse or dependence. Anxiolytic abuse or dependence, but not long-term benzodiazepine use, was associated with other substance use disorders. These findings should be considered by clinicians when assessing the individual risks and benefits of combining a benzodiazepine with antidepressant treatment.

  17. Is the antidepressive effect of second-generation antidepressants a myth?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, P

    2010-01-01

    Two recent meta-analyses on second-generation antidepressants versus placebo in mild to moderate forms of major depression, based on data on all randomized clinical trials using the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) submitted to FDA, have shown an effect size of approximately 0.30 in favour of ant...

  18. Is the antidepressive effect of second-generation antidepressants a myth?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, P

    2010-01-01

    Two recent meta-analyses on second-generation antidepressants versus placebo in mild to moderate forms of major depression, based on data on all randomized clinical trials using the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) submitted to FDA, have shown an effect size of approximately 0.30 in favour...

  19. Antidepressant Effects of Ginsenosides from Panax notoginseng

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Yang; SANG Wei; YANG Xiu-shi; ZHAI Mei-jing; WANG Li-li; QIN Pei-you; WU Li; ZHOU Xian-rong; WANG Li-jun; ZHU Zhi-hua; REN Gui-xing

    2012-01-01

    Ginsenosides Rg1,Rb1,R1,Rd,and Re are major constituents of Panax notoginseng,a famous traditional Chinese medicinal herb,which has both stimulative and inhibitory effects on the central nervous system (CNS).The monoamine hypothesis proposes that depression is a result of the depletion of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT),norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) in addition to the activation of monoamine oxidase in the CNS.The purpose of this study was to determine whether P.notoginseng Saponin (PNS) has an antidepressant activity.We investigated the antidepressant-like activities of Rg1,Rb1,R1,Rd,and Re in mice,using two animal models of depression.In addition,we analyzed the neurochemicals by the chronic unpredictable mild stress test.Our results showed that Rb 1,Rd,and Re treatment at 10 mg kg-1 significantly reduced the duration of immobility in both the tail suspension and forced swimming tests.Rb1,Rd,and Re increases in 5HT and NE levels at 10 mg kg-1 in both the frontal cortex and hippocampus.Dopamine levels increased in the hippocampus and the striatum.Moreover,5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels were found increased in the hippocampus.These findings suggest that the antidepressant effects of Rb1,Rd,and Re may be related to the increase in 5-HT and NE in the CNS,and through the alterations in the synthesis or metabolism of dopamine.

  20. Emerging antidepressants to treat major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Samantha G; Nemeroff, Charles B

    2014-12-01

    Depression is a common disorder with an annual risk of a depressive episode in the United States of 6.6%. Only 30-40% of patients remit with antidepressant monotherapy, leaving 60-70% of patients who do not optimally respond to therapy. Unremitted depressive patients are at increased risk for suicide. Considering the prevalence of treatment resistant depression and its consequences, treatment optimization is imperative. This review summarizes the latest treatment modalities for major depressive disorder including pharmacotherapy, electroconvulsive therapy, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and psychotherapy. Through advancements in research to better understand the pathophysiology of depression, advances in treatment will be realized.

  1. Clinical implications of antidepressant drug effects on sexual function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, K V; Balon, R

    1995-12-01

    Sexual dysfunction in a patient being treated with antidepressant medications may be due to the underlying depression, a coexisting medical illness, disruption of interpersonal relationships, or it may be a side effect of the medication. Almost all antidepressants are associated with sexual side effects that go above and beyond any symptoms that can be explained by the disease process itself. The incidence of such sexual side effects can be as high as 92% for some antidepressants. Some of the newer antidepressants currently on the market seem to have a lower incidence of sexual dysfunction as a side effect. In view of the fairly common occurrence of these unwanted effects, and their potential contribution to noncompliance, careful selection of antidepressant medications is necessary. A variety of treatment options is available, including decreasing the dosage of medication to the lowest-effective level, adjunctive medications (such as cyproheptadine, bethanechol, yohimbine, and amantadine, as well as other antidepressants) to counteract the adverse sexual effects, or switching to another antidepressant. The treatment of antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction requires a creative approach on the part of the treating psychiatrist, and must be individualized to the patient.

  2. nfluence of antidepressants on glucose homeostasis : effects and mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derijks, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    Depression has shown to be a common morbidity in patients with diabetes mellitus and comorbid depression in diabetes mellitus patients is frequently treated with antidepressants. It has been postulated that antidepressants may interfere with glucose homeostasis and that the interference of antidepre

  3. Neuroplasticity and major depression, the role of modern antidepressant drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Serafini, Gianluca

    2012-01-01

    The pathophysiology of depression has been traditionally attributed to a chemical imbalance and critical interactions between genetic and environmental risk factors, and antidepressant drugs suggested to act predominantly amplifying monoaminergic neurotransmission. This conceptualization may be currently considered reductive. The current literature about the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying depression, stress-related disorders and antidepressant treatment was examined. In order to pro...

  4. Antidepressive interventions : On state and vulnerability of the brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korf, J

    1996-01-01

    An attempt is made to relate drug and non-drug antidepressive interventions to brain processes. In the present context two concepts are proposed: vulnerability towards depressogenic factors and depression as a state of the brain. Accordingly, it is assumed that the current antidepressants make the b

  5. Efficacy of antidepressants on orofacial pain: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J.J.M. Martin; R.S.G.M. Perez; D.B. Tuinzing; T. Forouzanfar

    2012-01-01

    Orofacial pain is a common complaint with multiple diagnoses. There is controversy about the effectiveness of antidepressants for the management of orofacial pain disorders. In order to be able to make a best evidence choice between available antidepressants for the treatment of orofacial pain, a sy

  6. SSRI antidepressants: altered psychomotor development following exposure in utero?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants (SSRIs) are sometimes prescribed to pregnant women. The potential consequences for the unborn child are gradually becoming clearer. In a case-control study of 298 children with autism and 1507 controls, 6.7% of mothers of autistic children had been prescribed an antidepressant during the year before delivery, compared to 3.3% of control mothers. The antidepressant was usually an SSRI. A dozen other small epidemiological studies of neurological development in children exposed to antidepressants in utero have provided mixed results. Two of these studies suggested a risk of psychomotor retardation. In practice, SSRI antidepressants should only be considered for pregnant women when non-drug measures fail and when symptoms are sufficiently serious to warrant drug therapy.

  7. Increased use of antidepressants and decreasing suicide rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlangsen, Annette; Canudas-Romo, V; Conwell, Y

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the present study was to examine if the change in the suicide rate is associated with individuals' use of antidepressants as has been suggested by ecological studies. DESIGN: Decomposition of suicide rates by antidepressant treatment group. SETTING: Population......-based record linkage. PARTICIPANTS: All individuals aged 50 years and older living in Denmark between 1 January 1996 and 31 December 2000 (N = 2,100,808). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Suicide rates are calculated according to current antidepressant treatment status (no treatment, tricyclic antidepressants (TCA......), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), other antidepressants). The change in the suicide rate during 1996-2000 was decomposed by treatment group. RESULTS: Only one in five older adults dying by suicide was in treatment at the time of death. Whereas the male suicide rate declined by 9.7 suicides per...

  8. Prenatal exposure to antidepressants and risk of epilepsy in childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mao, Yanyan; Pedersen, Lars Henning; Christensen, Jakob;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study aimed to estimate the association between prenatal exposure to antidepressants and risk of epilepsy in childhood, taking maternal depression into account. METHODS: We conducted a population-based cohort study including all Danish singletons born alive between 1997 and 2008 (n...... = 734 237). Information on antidepressant medication and diagnosis of depression and epilepsy was obtained from Danish National Registers. The exposed group comprised children of mothers who used antidepressants from 30 days before pregnancy until the date of birth. The reference group comprised...... children of mothers who used no antidepressants from 6 months before pregnancy to birth. We estimated the hazard ratios (HR) of epilepsy and 95% confidence intervals (CI) using Cox proportional hazard models. RESULTS: We identified 12 438 (1.7%) children exposed to antidepressants during pregnancy...

  9. Evaluation of antidepressant activity of tramadol in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayal Vandana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate antidepressant like effect of tramadol in mice. Materials and Methods: Tramadol was administered at three different doses (10,20 and 40 mg/kg,i.p once daily for 7 days to Swiss albino mice of either sex. The immobility period of control and drug treated mice were recorded in tail suspension test (TST.The antidepressant effect of tramadol was compared to that of fluoxetine (20 mg/kg, i.p, administered for seven days. Results: Tramadol produced significant antidepressant effect at all the doses, as indicated by reduction in immobility times as compared to control. The efficacy of tramadol at doses of 20 and 40 mg/kg was comparable with that of fluoxetine. Tramadol at 10 mg/kg dose showed significantly less antidepressant activity compared to fluoxetine. Conclusion: The results of the present study indicate antidepressant like activity of tramadol.

  10. ANTIDEPRESSANT ACTIVITY OF HYDROALCOHOLIC EXTRACT OF ZINGIBER OFFICINALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Rudra Pratap

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study was design to evaluate the effect of Zingiber officinale hydro-alcoholic extract as well as its interaction with conventional anxiolytic and antidepressant drugs using tail suspension test and forced swim test (FST and to evaluate the possible mechanisms involved in its actions. The rhizomes of ginger were collected and authenticated. Extraction of dried rhizomes was carried out using soxhlet apparatus to obtain its Hydro alcoholic extract. The extract of Zingiber officinale showed the significant antidepressant activity comparable to the standard drug. The oral administration of Zingiber officinale extract at 150 mg/ kg and 300 mg/kg respectively as compared to the control treated group showed an antidepressant activity comparable to that of standard drug. The antidepressant effects of Zingiber officinale extract seem to be mainly associated with the activation of dopamineergic system and possess potential anxiolytic and antidepressant activities.

  11. Increased use of antidepressants at the end of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dorte Gilså; Rosholm, Jens-Ulrik; Gichangi, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The new antidepressants are generally effective and safe for older people, but may have serious side-effects. The use has been rapidly increasing, but focus on upper age groups has been limited. The pattern of antidepressant use as death approaches has never been analysed. OBJECTIVE......: To analyse the use of antidepressants among individuals aged 65 years and above with respect to time trends, age and proximity to death. DESIGN: Population-based prescription study. SETTING: The County of Funen, Denmark, 1992-2004 (approximately 470,000 inhabitants). RESULTS: The 1-year prevalence...... groups the use of antidepressants increases substantially with proximity to death in the last 3 years of life. In the last phase of life the use is independent of whether the patient dies at age 65 or 90 about 33% of females and 25% of males receive antidepressants in the last 6 months. CONCLUSIONS...

  12. Antidepressant utilization after hospitalization with depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallach-Kildemoes, Helle; Thomsen, Louise Thirstrup; Kriegbaum, Margit;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antidepressant (AD) therapy is recommended for patients 4-12 months after remission from depression. The aim was to examine whether immigrants (refugees or family reunited immigrants) from non-Western countries are at greater risk than Danish-born residents of 1) not initiating AD the...... only minor impact on these associations. CONCLUSION: Immigrants seem less likely to receive the recommended AD treatment after hospitalization with depression. This may indicate a need for a better understanding of the circumstances of this vulnerable group.......BACKGROUND: Antidepressant (AD) therapy is recommended for patients 4-12 months after remission from depression. The aim was to examine whether immigrants (refugees or family reunited immigrants) from non-Western countries are at greater risk than Danish-born residents of 1) not initiating AD...... therapy after discharge and 2) early AD discontinuation. METHODS: A cohort of immigrants from non-Western countries (n = 132) and matched Danish-born residents (n = 396) discharged after first admission with moderate to severe depression between 1 January 1996 and 31 May 2008 was followed in the Danish...

  13. Antidepressant drug discovery in the postgenomic era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsboer, F

    2001-10-01

    The progress made in genome research raises the question whether the new knowledge bases that have emerged may also lead to better antidepressants. The past has seen many remarkable improvements over traditional drugs, but not a real breakthrough. More recently hypothesis-driven research in depression has focussed upon stress-hormone regulation as a possible target, but validation of new drugs is not yet in sight. In parallel, we see an upsurge of systematic unbiased research in a biotechnology-driven drug discovery effort. This research can only lead to results if clinical research adapts to these new demands by phenotyping depressed patients not only according to psychopathological characteristics but also by utilising functional (e.g. neuroendocrine, neuropsychological, neurophysiological, neuroimaging and clinical drug response) data that are to be correlated with data from genotyping. To achieve the goal of genotype/phenotype-based differential therapy, large-scale efforts with regards to both patient samples and genotyping capacities are needed. In the long term, increasingly detailed patient information, if translated into specific pharmacological treatments, will lead to customized drugs and thus to a partial fragmentation of the antidepressant market. Concurrently, the improved genotyping/phenotyping efforts will also lead to more widely applicable drugs that promise to avoid side effects and refractoriness and also to hasten the time to onset of action. Once these goals are achieved notorious undertreatment of depression may come to an end.

  14. Antidepressant therapy with milnacipran and venlafaxine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucilla Mansuy

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Lucilla MansuyPierre Fabre Médicament, Toulouse, FranceAbstract: Specific serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs have been described as “better tolerated tricyclic antidepressants” or as “boosted” selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs. Venlafaxine has become a therapeutic reference treatment for major depression. Although less widely studied, indirect comparisons with another SNRI, milnacipran, suggest an equivalent efficacy. This paper discusses these indirect comparisons and the recently published first double-blind, head-to-head comparison. Venlafaxine has potency at serotonin transporters which is about 30-fold greater than that at norepinephrine transporters while milnacipran has a similar potency at each transporter. Thus, at low doses, venlafaxine acts essentially as a SSRI, with significant noradrenergic activity only occurring at higher doses. To overcome the problem of the differing profile of venlafaxine at increasing doses, the first head-to-head study compared the therapeutic effects and tolerability of the two antidepressants when flexibly titrated to the high dose of 200 mg/day. The study showed that the two SNRIs have similar efficacy and safety profiles. Both drugs produced about 42% remissions at the end of the 20-week study. The most frequent adverse events in both groups were nausea, dizziness, headache, and sweating. Certain specific differences in tolerability are discussed.Keywords: milnacipran, venlafaxine, antidepressant efficacy, tolerability, dose-titration

  15. Antidepressant utilization after hospitalization with depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallach-Kildemoes, Helle; Thomsen, Louise Thirstrup; Kriegbaum, Margit;

    2014-01-01

    Background: Antidepressant (AD) therapy is recommended for patients 4-12months after remission from depression. The aim was to examine whether immigrants (refugees or family reunited immigrants) from non-Western countries are at greater risk than Danish-born residents of 1) not initiating AD ther...... treatment after hospitalization with depression. This may indicate a need for a better understanding of the circumstances of this vulnerable group.......Background: Antidepressant (AD) therapy is recommended for patients 4-12months after remission from depression. The aim was to examine whether immigrants (refugees or family reunited immigrants) from non-Western countries are at greater risk than Danish-born residents of 1) not initiating AD...... therapy after discharge and 2) early AD discontinuation. Methods: A cohort of immigrants from non-Western countries (n=132) and matched Danish-born residents (n=396) discharged after first admission with moderate to severe depression between 1 January 1996 and 31 May 2008 was followed in the Danish...

  16. Role of corticosteroids in the antidepressant response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierscionek T

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Tomasz Pierscionek, Oluyemi Adekunte, Stuart Watson, I Nicol Ferrier, Akintunde Alabi Wolfson Research Institute, Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Campus for Ageing and Health, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK Abstract: Anything that engenders a homeostatic response in the tightly regulated hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA axis may be thought of as a stressor and may exert an allostatic load, engendering a sustained change in the regulation of this system. Genetic, epigenetic, endocrine, post mortem, and animal studies suggest that dysregulation of the HPA axis plays a part in the pathophysiology of mood disorders and negatively impacts the antidepressant response and prognosis. Neuropsychological impairment, which is a common and disabling concomitant of depression, has been linked to disturbance of the HPA axis. A number of HPA axis-mediated treatment strategies have shown benefit in open or small-scale preliminary trials, and there are ongoing studies seeking both to replicate these initial findings and to develop new targets. HPA axis-based treatments are a fertile area of research, and much current thought pertains to the optimum targets, optimum population (including the potential for stratified medicine, and optimum outcome measures. We have, for instance, argued here that neuropsychological performance may be more sensitive and robust than scores on traditional depression rating scales. Keywords: hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, cortisol, corticotrophin-releasing hormone, arginine vasopressin, depression, bipolar disorder, antidepressant response

  17. [Drug dependence on benzodiazepines and antidepressants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbanck, P

    2009-09-01

    Since years, the concepts of drug abuse and drug dependence changed, due to new knowledge coming from the neurosciences. Specifically, the role of a brain structure called "reward circuit" was emphasized. Therefore, the diagnosis criteria for abuse and dependence on drugs are presently defined mostly from a behavioral point of view: both in animal models and in clinical situations, it was stressed the importance of drug-seeking behavior and of the loss of control of the consumption. The occurrence of a pharmacological dependence is in fact of concern for only some of addictive drugs. According to these new criteria, dependence on benzodiazepines or antidepressants is certainly not frequent, even if withdrawal manifestations can occur after a long-term exposition. Furthermore, it is important to keep in mind the risk for non-medical use of benzodiazepines in persons with illicit drug use.

  18. Antidepressants and Advertising: Psychopharmaceuticals in Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslit, Nathan P.; Kaptchuk, Ted J.

    2012-01-01

    As the efficacy and science of psychopharmaceuticals has become increasingly uncertain, marketing of these drugs to both physicians and consumers continues to a central part of a multi-billion dollar per year industry in the United States. We explore how such drug marketing portrays idealized scientific relationships between psychopharmaceuticals and depression; how multiple stakeholders, including scientists, regulatory agencies, and patient advocacy groups, negotiate neurobiological explanations of mental illness; and how the placebo effect has become a critical issue in these debates, including the possible role of drug advertising to influence the placebo effect directly. We argue that if and how antidepressants “work” is not a straightforward objective question, but rather a larger social contest involving scientific debate, the political history of the pharmaceutical industry, cultural discourses surrounding the role of drugs in society, and the interpretive flexibility of personal experience. PMID:22461754

  19. Antidepressants alleviate the impact of reinforcer downshift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforuk, Agnieszka; Popik, Piotr

    2009-01-01

    Depressive disorder is associated with problems of coping with life's difficulties, including episodes of frustration and disappointment, operationally defined as an unexpected reinforcer omission or a reduction of reinforcer magnitude. In a novel model aimed at detecting potential antidepressants, rats were trained in the operant task under progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement with the break point (BP, the value of the last completed response ratio) as a behavioral endpoint. In the main experiment, a 32% sucrose solution was initially used as the reinforcer. Once the stable responding was achieved, for the following 5 days animals were treated once daily with the experimental drugs, and were offered a 4% sucrose solution instead. In vehicle-treated controls, the reduction of sucrose concentration resulted in a decrease in responding from a BP of about 40 (totaling 166 responses) to a BP of about 9 (totaling 22 responses). Chlordiazepoxide (4 and 8 mg/kg), fluoxetine (3 mg/kg), citalopram (6 mg/kg) and cocaine (2.5 and 5 mg/kg) markedly inhibited this response decrement, while fluoxetine (6 mg/kg) augmented it. Neither desipramine (1-6 mg/kg) nor morphine (1-5 mg/kg) affected responding under the reduced sucrose concentration condition. In the control experiment, the rats have never been offered 32% sucrose solution but their responding was always maintained by 4% sucrose. Under these unchanged conditions, only cocaine (5 mg/kg) affected (increased) responding. The present results suggest that the antidepressants selectively inhibiting serotonin reuptake and a benzodiazepine anxiolytic but not psychostimulant cocaine may specifically protect animals from the effects of a reinforcer downshift.

  20. Factors influencing the choice of antidepressants: A study of antidepressant prescribing practice at University psychiatric clinic in Belgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marić Nađa P.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Antidepressants are a widely used class of drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate different aspects of antidepressant prescribing practice at University Psychiatric Clinic in Belgrade. Methods. This cross-sectional study was carried out by retrospective analysis of the patient's medical charts. The study included all patients with antidepressant prescribed at discharge during 2009 (n = 296. The evaluation was focused on patient- related factors (socio-demographic and illness related, psychiatrist-related factors (sex and duration of working experience and drug related factors (type of antidepressant, dose, polypharmacy and reimbursement by national health insurance. Results. Antidepressants were prescribed for unipolar depression (F32-34, ICD X either without comorbidity (46.2% or with comorbidity (24.7%, mostly as a monotherapy (91% had one antidepressant, to the patients who were 65% female, aged 50.1 ± 8.9, most of them with 12 years of education (52.6%, married (69.3% and employed (55.9%. The majority of patients had a history of two hospitalizations (Med 2; 25th-75th perc. 1-4 during nine years (Med 9; 25th-75th perc. 2-15 after the first episode of depression. Among them, 19% were found to be suicidal in a lifetime. The single most prescribed antidepressant was sertraline (20.4%, followed by fluoxetine (13.3% and maprotiline (11.7%. Utilization of antidepressants was positively correlated with the rate of reimbursement (p < 0.01. The most prescribed antidepressant group was selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI (47.8%, followed by tricyclic antidepresants (TCA (25.3% and new antidepressants - venlafaxine, tianeptine, mirtazapine, bupropion, trazodone (15.1%. Most of the drugs were prescribed in doses which are at the lower end of the recommended dose-range. Regarding severity of the actual depressive episode, TCA were prescribed for severe depression with psychotic features, while SSRI were choice for

  1. Anti-depressant activity of Nyctanthes arbor-tristis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumeet Gupta

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study assesses the protective effect of Nyctanthes arbor-tristis (Nyctaginaceae extracts and in combination with fluoxetine on stress-induced depression in mice. Leaves were extracted using different solvents (petroleum ether, chloroform and hydroethanol and administered orally for 14 days. These extracts showed significant improvement in the mobility percentage but among these, hydroethanol extract showed better protective effect from day 1 to 14 in both forced swimming and tail suspension test model. Hydroethanol (100 mg/kg and chloroform (100 mg/kg extracts with fluoxetine showed synergistic effect when compared with fluoxetine treated group (10 mg/kg alone at day 7 and 14. Among monoamine levels only hydroethanol extract (400 mg/kg restored the 5-HT level near to level of fluoxetine-treated group. Hydroethanol extracts with two higher doses showed significant decrease in glucose and triglycerides levels. Clinically, it may useful as anti-depressant drug.

  2. Substituted urea derivatives: a potent class of antidepressant agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perveen, Shahnaz; Mustafa, Sana; Khan, Muhammad A; Dar, Ahsana; Khan, Khalid M; Voelter, Wolfgang

    2012-05-01

    A series of fourteen (14) N-nitrophenyl-N'-(alkyl/aryl)urea and symmetrical 1,3-disubstituted urea derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their antidepressant activity in mice. Among them, N-(4-nitrophenyl)-N'-(1'-phenylethyl)urea (1), demonstrated profound antidepressant property as reflected by significant reduction in the immobility time (89.83%), whereas compounds 2-6 showed activity values between 36 to 59% which were also larger than the standard phenelzine. Compounds 7-9 were less effective in reducing the immobility period of mice 26.20 to 31.01%). This variable magnitude of antidepressant activity appears to be related to the position of the nitro group to the parent molecules 1, 2, and 8. Compound 1 with the nitro group at para position showed to be the most effective antidepressant. However, the activity declined, if the nitro is attached to ortho and meta positions.

  3. Antidepressant treatment of depression in rural nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerber, Cindy Sullivan; Dyck, Mary J; Culp, Kennith R; Buckwalter, Kathleen

    2008-09-01

    Under-diagnosis and under-treatment of depression are major problems in nursing home residents. The purpose of this study was to determine antidepressant use among nursing home residents who were diagnosed with depression using three different methods: (1) the Geriatric Depression Scale, (2) Minimum Data Set, and (3) primary care provider assessments. As one would expect, the odds of being treated with an antidepressant were about eight times higher for those diagnosed as depressed by the primary care provider compared to the Geriatric Depression Scale or the Minimum Data Set. Men were less likely to be diagnosed and treated with antidepressants by their primary care provider than women. Depression detected by nurses through the Minimum Data Set was treated at a lower rate with antidepressants, which generates issues related to interprofessional communication, nursing staff communication, and the need for geropsychiatric role models in nursing homes.

  4. Exposure to antidepressants during pregnancy--prevalences and outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jimenez-Solem, Espen

    2014-01-01

    is challenging. The best available method is through epidemiological studies. During the past decade use of antidepressants during pregnancy has been associated with negative birth outcomes, such as congenital malformations. In spite of a considerable number of studies on the subject, the data are still...... malformations and perinatal mortality. We performed our analysis with focus on women pausing treatment before pregnancy to account for special characteristics associated with women redeeming a prescription for an antidepressant. Furthermore, we reported prevalences of antidepressant use, in Denmark, in relation...... saw a halving in prevalence of antidepressant exposure and a steep increase after delivery. Our analyses showed an association between being in treatment with an SSRI and congenital malformations. However, this increased risk was also found for women pausing treatment before pregnancy. We conclude...

  5. Genome-wide association studies in pharmacogenomics of antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Eugene; Lane, Hsien-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most common psychiatric disorders worldwide. Doctors must prescribe antidepressants based on educated guesses due to the fact that it is unmanageable to predict the effectiveness of any particular antidepressant in an individual patient. With the recent advent of scientific research, the genome-wide association study (GWAS) is extensively employed to analyze hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms by high-throughput genotyping technologies. In addition to the candidate-gene approach, the GWAS approach has recently been utilized to investigate the determinants of antidepressant response to therapy. In this study, we reviewed GWAS studies, their limitations and future directions with respect to the pharmacogenomics of antidepressants in MDD.

  6. Antidepressant-associated sexual dysfunction: impact, effects, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Higgins

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Agnes Higgins, Michael Nash, Aileen M LynchSchool of Nursing and Midwifery Studies, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, IrelandAbstract: Sexual dysfunction is a common side effect of antidepressants and can have significant impact on the person’s quality of life, relationships, mental health, and recovery. The reported incidence of sexual dysfunction associated with antidepressant medication varies considerably between studies, making it difficult to estimate the exact incidence or prevalence. The sexual problems reported range from decreased sexual desire, decreased sexual excitement, diminished or delayed orgasm, to erection or delayed ejaculation problems. There are a number of case reports of sexual side effects, such as priapism, painful ejaculation, penile anesthesia, loss of sensation in the vagina and nipples, persistent genital arousal and nonpuerperal lactation in women. The focus of this article is to explore the incidence, pathophysiology, and treatment of antidepressant iatrogenic sexual dysfunction.Keywords: depression, antidepressant, iatrogenic sexual dysfunction, SSRI, SNRI

  7. Antidepressants and local anesthetics: drug interactions of interest to dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Rosa Chioca

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Since there is a vast variety of pharmacological treatments for mental conditions, it has been increasingly more common that patients seeking dentistry treatment are continually using psychoactive drugs as antidepressants. The number of people taking antidepressants is increasing; consequently, dentists should update their knowledge on the interaction between this drug class and those used in dental daily practice, such as local anesthetics and vasoconstrictors. Objective: To conduct a literature review on this subject. Literature review and conclusion: Literature data suggest that sympathomimetic vasoconstrictors (epinephrine, norepinephrine, and phenylephrine associated with local anesthetics may potentiate the side effects of antidepressants, particularly tricyclics and MAO inhibitors, on the cardiovascular system. There are few clinical trials and preclinical studies on this subject, and most of them were carried out between the 60s and 80s. Current studies are needed, since many new antidepressant drugs with different mechanisms of action are currently marketed and being used.

  8. Musical Hallucinations And Antidepressants: Case Report Involving Serotoninergic Ways

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    A case of musical hallucination (MII) triggered by different antidepressive drugs is described. This is an uncommon side effect, probably more related to individual factors than to high doses. Musical hallucinations seems to be a releasing phenomenon, associated to sensorial deficit and neuronal compensatory activation. The present case report suggests that not only classical tricyclic antidepressives (AD) can cause MH, but also more selective drugs such as the SSRIs and venlafaxine. Aminedip...

  9. Why is mechanism of action important in antidepressant treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Thomas L

    2016-05-01

    Antidepressants are one of the most common treatment strategies for patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD). However, antidepressant medications have different mechanisms of action that can theoretically and in practice affect how patients respond. Clinicians should assess their patients' symptoms and response to medication at every visit to determine whether or not the treatment is fully effective. Here, follow the case of Maria, a 42-year-old teacher who is experiencing her first depressive episode.

  10. Antidepressants-Associated Sexual Dysfunction: Impact, Effects and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Higgins, Agnes; LYNCH, AILEEN MARIA; Nash, Michael

    2010-01-01

    PUBLISHED Sexual dysfunction is a common side effect of antidepressants and can have significant impact on the person?s quality of life, relationships, mental health, and recovery. The reported incidence of sexual dysfunction associated with antidepressant medication varies considerably between studies, making it difficult to estimate the exact incidence or prevalence. The sexual problems reported range from decreased sexual desire, decreased sexual excitement, diminished or...

  11. Antidepressant-associated sexual dysfunction: impact, effects, and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Agnes Higgins; Michael Nash; Lynch, Aileen M.

    2010-01-01

    Agnes Higgins, Michael Nash, Aileen M LynchSchool of Nursing and Midwifery Studies, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, IrelandAbstract: Sexual dysfunction is a common side effect of antidepressants and can have significant impact on the person’s quality of life, relationships, mental health, and recovery. The reported incidence of sexual dysfunction associated with antidepressant medication varies considerably between studies, making it difficult to estimate the exact incidence or prev...

  12. Voluntary exercise produces antidepressant and anxiolytic behavioral effects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duman, Catharine H; Schlesinger, Lee; Russell, David S; Duman, Ronald S

    2008-03-14

    Reports of beneficial effects of exercise on psychological health in humans are increasingly supported by basic research studies. Exercise is hypothesized to regulate antidepressant-related mechanisms and we therefore characterized the effects of chronic exercise in mouse behavioral paradigms relevant to antidepressant actions. Mice given free access to running wheels showed antidepressant-like behavior in learned helplessness, forced-swim (FST) and tail suspension paradigms. These responses were similar to responses of antidepressant drug-treated animals. When tested under conditions where locomotor activity was not altered, exercising mice also showed reduced anxiety compared to sedentary control mice. In situ hybridization analysis showed that BDNF mRNA was increased in specific subfields of hippocampus after wheel running. We chose one paradigm, the FST, in which to investigate a functional role for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the behavioral response to exercise. We tested mice heterozygous for a deletion of the BDNF gene in the FST after wheel-running. Exercising wild-type mice showed the expected antidepressant-like behavioral response in the FST but exercise was ineffective in improving FST performance in heterozygous BDNF knockout mice. A possible functional contribution of a BDNF signaling pathway to FST performance in exercising mice was investigated using the specific MEK inhibitor PD184161 to block the MAPK signaling pathway. Subchronic administration of PD184161 to exercising mice blocked the antidepressant-like behavioral response seen in vehicle-treated exercising mice in the FST. In summary, chronic wheel-running exercise in mice results in antidepressant-like behavioral changes that may involve a BDNF related mechanism similar to that hypothesized for antidepressant drug treatment.

  13. The Antidepressant Effect of L-Tyrosine-Loaded Nanoparticles: Behavioral Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabsi, Abdelrahman; Khoudary, Adel Charbel; Abdelwahed, Wassim

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression has been linked to disruption in the cerebral levels of specific neurotransmitters. L-tyrosine is a precursor of more than one of the neurotransmitters affected by depression. Even though setbacks of monoamines precursors include high doses and low efficiency, many studies have suggested using L-tyrosine as antidepressant. Purpose The purpose of this study was to explore the possible antidepressant effect of L-tyrosine loaded in a nanoparticle-designed formula, using behavioral tests in acute and chronic mild stress (CMS) models of depression in rats. Methods Animals from both models received L-tyrosine-loaded nanoparticles (5 or 10 mg/kg), L-tyrosine solution (10 mg/kg), fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) or placebo daily for 21 days. Rats from the acute stress model of depression were subjected to open field and forced swim tests (FSTs). For the CMS model, sucrose preference test was carried out. Additionally, 3 profiles of the nanoparticles formula were tested in vitro. High dissolution rate and entrapment efficiency were obtained from the in vitro tests. Moreover, L-tyrosine-loaded nanoparticles 10 mg/kg and fluoxetine 10 mg/kg significantly decreased the immobility time in the FST, concomitant with restoration of the basal levels of locomotor activity, distance travelled and rearing counts. Also, an increase of the sucrose consumption was recorded in the sucrose preference test after treatment with L-tyrosine-loaded nanoparticles 10 mg/kg and fluoxetine 10 mg/kg. Results The positive results after treatment with L-tyrosine-loaded nanoparticles, through behavioral tests, are probably attributed to restorating the basal levels of the cerebral noradrenaline. Conclusion The effects of L-tyrosine administration on the cerebral levels of tyrosine hydroxylase and corticotropin-releasing factor should be further investigated. PMID:27647959

  14. Antidepressant Treatment for Acute Bipolar Depression: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben H. Amit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While studies in the past have focused more on treatment of the manic phase of bipolar disorder (BD, recent findings demonstrate the depressive phase to be at least as debilitating. However, in contrast to unipolar depression, depression in bipolar patients exhibits a varying response to antidepressants, raising questions regarding their efficacy and tolerability. Methods. We conducted a MEDLINE and Cochrane Collaboration Library search for papers published between 2005 and 2011 on the subject of antidepressant treatment of bipolar depression. Sixty-eight articles were included in the present review. Results. While a few studies did advocate the use of antidepressants, most well-controlled studies failed to show a robust effect of antidepressants in bipolar depression, regardless of antidepressant class or bipolar subtype. There was no significant increase in the rate of manic/hypomanic switch, especially with concurrent use of mood stabilizers. Prescribing guidelines published in recent years rely more on atypical antipsychotics, especially quetiapine, as a first-line therapy. Conclusions. Antidepressants probably have no substantial role in acute bipolar depression. However, in light of conflicting results between studies, more well-designed trials are warranted.

  15. A model of placebo response in antidepressant clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Bret R; Roose, Steven P

    2013-07-01

    Placebo response in clinical trials of antidepressant medications is substantial and has been increasing. High placebo response rates hamper efforts to detect signals of efficacy for new antidepressant medications, contributing to trial failures and delaying the delivery of new treatments to market. Media reports seize upon increasing placebo response and modest advantages for active drugs as reasons to question the value of antidepressant medication, which may further stigmatize treatments for depression and dissuade patients from accessing mental health care. Conversely, enhancing the factors responsible for placebo response may represent a strategy for improving available treatments for major depressive disorder. A conceptual framework describing the causes of placebo response is needed in order to develop strategies for minimizing placebo response in clinical trials, maximizing placebo response in clinical practice, and talking with depressed patients about the risks and benefits of antidepressant medications. In this review, the authors examine contributors to placebo response in antidepressant clinical trials and propose an explanatory model. Research aimed at reducing placebo response should focus on limiting patient expectancy and the intensity of therapeutic contact in antidepressant clinical trials, while the optimal strategy in clinical practice may be to combine active medication with a presentation and level of therapeutic contact designed to enhance treatment response.

  16. Reconsidering GHB: orphan drug or new model antidepressant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Oliver G; Quednow, Boris B; Seifritz, Erich; Wetter, Thomas C

    2012-05-01

    For six decades, the principal mode of action of antidepressant drugs is the inhibition of monoamine re-uptake from the synaptic cleft. Tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and the new generation of dual antidepressants all exert their antidepressant effects by this mechanism. In the early days of the monoaminergic era, other efforts have been made to ameliorate the symptoms of depression by pharmacological means. The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system was and possibly still is one of the main alternative drug targets. Gammahydroxybutyrate (GHB) was developed as an orally active GABA analogue. It was tested in animal models of depression and human studies. The effects on sleep, agitation, anhedonia and depression were promising. However, the rise of benzodiazepines and tricyclic antidepressants brought GHB out of the scope of possible treatment alternatives. GHB is a GABA(B) and GHB receptor agonist with a unique spectrum of behavioural, neuroendocrine and sleep effects, and improves daytime sleepiness in various disorders such as narcolepsy, Parkinson's disease and fibromyalgia. Although it was banned from the US market at the end of the 1990s because of its abuse and overdose potential, it later was approved for the treatment of narcolepsy. New research methods and an extended view on other neurotransmitter systems as possible treatment targets of antidepressant treatment brought GHB back to the scene. This article discusses the unique neurobiological effects of GHB, its misuse potential and possible role as a model substance for the development of novel pharmacological treatment strategies in depressive disorders.

  17. Antidepressants and inflammatory bowel disease: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrews Jane M

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of studies have suggested a link between the patient's psyche and the course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Although pharmacotherapy with antidepressants has not been widely explored, some investigators have proposed that treating psychological co-morbidities with antidepressants may help to control disease activity. To date a systematic analysis of the available studies assessing the efficacy of antidepressants for the control of somatic symptoms in IBD patients has not been performed. Methods We searched electronic databases, without any language restriction. All relevant papers issued after 1990 were examined. Results 12 relevant publications were identified. All of them referred to non-randomised studies. Antidepressants reported in these publications included paroxetine, bupropion, amitriptyline, phenelzine, and mirtazapine. In 10 articles, paroxetine, bupropion, and phenelzine were suggested to be effective for treating both psychological and somatic symptoms in patients suffering from IBD. Amitriptyline was found ineffective for treating somatic symptoms of IBD. Mirtazapine was not recommended for IBD patients. Conclusion Although most of reviewed papers suggest a beneficial effect of treatment with antidepressants in patients with IBD, due to the lack of reliable data, it is impossible to judge the efficacy of antidepressants in IBD. Properly designed trials are justified and needed based upon the available uncontrolled data.

  18. Evaluating early preventive antipsychotic and antidepressant drug treatment in an infection-based neurodevelopmental mouse model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Urs; Spoerri, Erica; Yee, Benjamin K; Schwarz, Markus J; Feldon, Joram

    2010-05-01

    Current pharmacotherapy of schizophrenia remains unsatisfactory with little hope for complete functional restoration in patients once the disease has developed. A preventive approach based on intervention in the prodromal stage of the disease aiming to preserve functional integrity by halting the progress of the disease is therefore extremely attractive. Here, we investigated the effects of preventive antipsychotic or antidepressant drug treatment in a well-established neurodevelopmental mouse model of multiple schizophrenia-related abnormalities. Pregnant mice on gestation day 9 were exposed to the viral mimic polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (2 mg/kg, intravenously) or corresponding vehicle treatment, and the resulting offspring from both prenatal treatment conditions were subjected to chronic antipsychotic (haloperidol or clozapine), antidepressant (fluoxetine), or placebo treatment during the periadolescent stage of development. The effects of the preventive pharmacotherapy on behavioral and pharmacological functions were then investigated in adulthood using paradigms relevant to schizophrenia, namely prepulse inhibition, latent inhibition, and sensitivity to psychostimulant drugs. We show that periadolescent treatment with the reference antipsychotic and antidepressant drugs can successfully block the emergence of multiple psychosis-related behavioral and pharmacological abnormalities in subjects predisposed to adult brain pathology by exposure to prenatal immune challenge. At the same time, however, our study reveals numerous negative influences of the early pharmacological intervention on normal behavioral development in control subjects. Hence, even though preventive pharmacotherapy may be beneficial in individuals with predisposition to psychosis-related brain dysfunctions, chronic antipsychotic or antidepressant drug treatment in false-positive subjects is associated with substantial risk for long-term behavioral disturbances in adulthood.

  19. Global Ecosystem Restoration Index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, Miguel; Garcia, Monica; Fernandez, Nestor

    2015-01-01

    The Global ecosystem restoration index (GERI) is a composite index that integrates structural and functional aspects of the ecosystem restoration process. These elements are evaluated through a window that looks into a baseline for degraded ecosystems with the objective to assess restoration...

  20. Restorative dentistry for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donly, Kevin J

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses contemporary pediatric restorative dentistry. Indications and contraindications for the choice of different restorative materials in different clinical situations, including the risk assessment of the patient, are presented. The specific use of glass ionomer cement or resin-modified glass ionomer cement, resin-based composite, and stainless steel crowns is discussed so that preparation design and restoration placement is understood.

  1. Linking restoration ecology with coastal dune restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lithgow, D.; Martínez, M. L.; Gallego-Fernández, J. B.; Hesp, P. A.; Flores, P.; Gachuz, S.; Rodríguez-Revelo, N.; Jiménez-Orocio, O.; Mendoza-González, G.; Álvarez-Molina, L. L.

    2013-10-01

    Restoration and preservation of coastal dunes is urgently needed because of the increasingly rapid loss and degradation of these ecosystems because of many human activities. These activities alter natural processes and coastal dynamics, eliminate topographic variability, fragment, degrade or eliminate habitats, reduce diversity and threaten endemic species. The actions of coastal dune restoration that are already taking place span contrasting activities that range from revegetating and stabilizing the mobile substrate, to removing plant cover and increasing substrate mobility. Our goal was to review how the relative progress of the actions of coastal dune restoration has been assessed, according to the ecosystem attributes outlined by the Society of Ecological Restoration: namely, integrity, health and sustainability and that are derived from the ecological theory of succession. We reviewed the peer reviewed literature published since 1988 that is listed in the ISI Web of Science journals as well as additional references, such as key books. We exclusively focused on large coastal dune systems (such as transgressive and parabolic dunefields) located on natural or seminatural coasts. We found 150 articles that included "coastal dune", "restoration" and "revegetation" in areas such as title, keywords and abstract. From these, 67 dealt specifically with coastal dune restoration. Most of the studies were performed in the USA, The Netherlands and South Africa, during the last two decades. Restoration success has been assessed directly and indirectly by measuring one or a few ecosystem variables. Some ecosystem attributes have been monitored more frequently (ecosystem integrity) than others (ecosystem health and sustainability). Finally, it is important to consider that ecological succession is a desirable approach in restoration actions. Natural dynamics and disturbances should be considered as part of the restored system, to improve ecosystem integrity, health and

  2. A new strategy for antidepressant prescription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Lavergne

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available From our research and literature search we propose an understanding of the mechanism of action of antidepressants (ADs that should lead to increase efficacy and tolerance.We understand that ADs promote synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis. This promotion is linked with dopamine (DA stimulation. Literature shows that all ADs (chemical, electroconvulsive therapy, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, sleep deprivation increase at least one neuromodulator (serotonin, noradrenaline or DA; this article focuses on DA release or turn-over in the frontal cortex. DA increase promotes synaptic plasticity with an inverted U shape dose-response curve. Specific interaction between DA and glutamate relies on DA (D1 receptors and Glutamate (NMDA receptors and/or on neurotrophic factors activation. With the understanding that all ADs have a common, final, DArgic stimulation that promotes synaptic plasticity we can predict that:1AD efficiency is related to the compound strength for inducing DArgic stimulation.2AD efficiency presents a therapeutic window that coincides with the inverted U shape DA response curve.3AD delay of action is related to a synaptogenesis and neurogenesis delay of action.4The minimum efficient dose can be found by starting at a low dosage and increasing up to the patient response. 5An increased tolerance requires a concomitant prescription of a few ADs, with different or opposite adverse effects, at a very low dose.6ADs could improve all diseases with cognitive impairments and synaptic depression by increasing synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis.

  3. Cytisine-based nicotinic partial agonists as novel antidepressant compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineur, Yann S; Eibl, Christoph; Young, Grace; Kochevar, Christopher; Papke, Roger L; Gündisch, Daniela; Picciotto, Marina R

    2009-04-01

    Nicotine and other nicotinic agents are thought to regulate mood in human subjects and have antidepressant-like properties in animal models. Recent studies have demonstrated that blockade of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) including those containing the beta2 subunit (beta2(*)), results in antidepressant-like effects. Previous studies have shown that cytisine, a partial agonist at alpha4/beta2(*) nAChRs, and a full agonist at alpha3/beta4(*) and alpha7 nAChRs, has antidepressant-like properties in several rodent models of antidepressant efficacy; however, it is not clear whether more selective partial agonists will also be effective in these models. We tested cytisine and two derivatives, 5-bromo-cytisine (5-Br-Cyt) and 3-(pyridin-3'-yl)-cytisine (3-pyr-Cyt) for their ability to act as a partial agonist of different nAChR subtypes and to show antidepressant-like activity in C57/BL6 mice in the tail suspension, the forced-swim, and the novelty-suppressed feeding tests. 3-pyr-Cyt was a partial agonist with very low efficacy at alpha4/beta2(*) nAChRS but had no agonist effects at other nAChRs normally targeted by cytisine, and it was effective in mouse models of antidepressant efficacy. Animals showed dose-dependent antidepressant-like effects in all three behavioral paradigms. 5-Br-Cyt was not effective in behavioral tests when administered peripherally, probably because of its inability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier, because it efficiently reduced immobility in the tail suspension test when administered intraventricularly. These results suggest that novel nicotinic partial agonists may provide new possibilities for development of drugs to treat mood disorders.

  4. Treatment Resistant Depression with Loss of Antidepressant Response: Rapid—Acting Antidepressant Action of Dextromethorphan, A Possible Treatment Bridging Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterbach, Edward C.

    2016-01-01

    Dextromethorphan (DM) may have ketamine—like rapid—acting, treatment—resistant, and conventional antidepressant effects.1,2 This reports our initial experience with DM in unipolar Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). A patient with treatment—resistant MDD (failing adequate trials of citalopram and vortioxetine) with loss of antidepressant response (to fluoxetine and bupropion) twice experienced a rapid—acting antidepressant effect within 48 hours of DM administration and lasting 7 days, sustained up to 20 days with daily administration, then gradually developing labile loss of antidepressant response over the ensuing 7 days. Upon full relapse in DSM-5 MDD while taking 600 mg/day of the strong CYP2D6 inhibitor bupropion XL, a 300 mg oral loading dose of DM was given, followed by 60 mg po bid after an additional dose—finding period, without side effects. DM exhibited a ketamine—like rapid—acting antidepressant effect, thought to be mediated by mTOR activation (related to NMDA PCP site antagonism, sigma-1 and beta adrenergic receptor stimulation) and 5HTT inhibition, resulting in AMPA receptor trafficking, and dendritogenesis, spinogenesis, synaptogenesis, and increased neuronal survival (related to NMDA antagonism and sigma-1 and mTOR signaling). This report appears to be the first report of a rapid—acting effect in unipolar MDD and adds to antidepressant effects observed in the retrospective chart review of 77 patients with Bipolar II Disorder (Kelly and Lieberman 2014). If replicated, there is some reason to think that the administration of other agents with DM, such as lithium or D-cycloserine, might prolong the duration of the rapid-antidepressant effect. PMID:27738380

  5. Is there a placebo problem in antidepressant trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huaiyu; Cusin, Cristina; Fava, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    In psychiatry, particularly in antidepressant clinical studies, placebo-controlled trials often yield results that are very difficult to interpret because of robust placebo responses. Meta-analyses of trials in major depressive disorder (MDD) suggest that drug-placebo differences in response rates range from 11% to 18%. However, in trials of marketed antidepressants present in the FDA databases, antidepressant drugs were superior to placebo in only 45 out of 93 RCTs (48%), and the placebo response overall appears to have increased over time. This gradual increase in placebo response rates may lead to delays in bringing new antidepressant treatments to the market, increased costs of antidepressant drug development and, in some cases, decisions to stop the development of certain compounds, or FDA decisions to not approve new treatments. A number of possible contributing factors to this significant placebo response in MDD have been identified, but further studies are needed. Many of the remedies used by researchers to minimize the placebo response, such as lead-in periods or shortening the duration of study visits, have failed to show consistent benefits. From our analysis of published studies, it appears that expectations about the speed of response may be shaped by the duration of the trial and that most of the placebo response occurs in the first half of the trial, regardless of its duration. These observations have led us to develop a novel approach to the placebo response problem called the Sequential Parallel Comparison Design.

  6. Peripheral administration of lactate produces antidepressant-like effects

    KAUST Repository

    Carrard, A

    2016-10-18

    In addition to its role as metabolic substrate that can sustain neuronal function and viability, emerging evidence supports a role for l-lactate as an intercellular signaling molecule involved in synaptic plasticity. Clinical and basic research studies have shown that major depression and chronic stress are associated with alterations in structural and functional plasticity. These findings led us to investigate the role of l-lactate as a potential novel antidepressant. Here we show that peripheral administration of l-lactate produces antidepressant-like effects in different animal models of depression that respond to acute and chronic antidepressant treatment. The antidepressant-like effects of l-lactate are associated with increases in hippocampal lactate levels and with changes in the expression of target genes involved in serotonin receptor trafficking, astrocyte functions, neurogenesis, nitric oxide synthesis and cAMP signaling. Further elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the antidepressant effects of l-lactate may help to identify novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of depression.

  7. Mechanisms Underlying the Antidepressant Response and Treatment Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Rose Levinstein

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a complex and heterogeneous disorder affecting millions of Americans. There are several different medications and other treatments that are available and effective for many patients with depression. However, a substantial percentage of patients fail to achieve remission with these currently available interventions, and relapse rates are high. Therefore, it is necessary to determine both the mechanisms underlying the antidepressant response and the differences between responders and non-responders to treatment. Delineation of these mechanisms largely relies on experiments that utilize animal models. Therefore, this review provides an overview of the various mouse models that are currently used to assess the antidepressant response, such as chronic mild stress, social defeat, and chronic corticosterone. We discuss how these mouse models can be used to advance our understanding of the differences between responders and non-responders to antidepressant treatment. We also provide an overview of experimental treatment modalities that are used for treatment-resistant depression, such as deep brain stimulation and ketamine administration. We will then review the various genetic polymorphisms and transgenic mice that display resistance to antidepressant treatment. Finally, we synthesize the published data to describe a potential neural circuit underlying the antidepressant response and treatment resistance.

  8. Impact of Antidepressant Drugs on Sexual Function and Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, David S; Manson, Chris; Nowak, Magda

    2015-11-01

    Pleasurable sexual activity is important in many human relationships and can provide a sense of physical, emotional and social well-being. Depressive symptoms and depressive illness are associated with impairments in sexual function and sexual dissatisfaction in untreated and treated patients. Most currently available antidepressant drugs are associated with development or worsening of sexual dysfunction in a substantial proportion of patients. Sexual difficulties during antidepressant treatment often resolve as depression lifts, but can persist over long periods, reducing self-esteem and affecting mood and relationships adversely. Sexual difficulties during antidepressant treatment typically have many possible causes but the incidence and nature of dysfunction varies between drugs. Many interventions can be considered when managing sexual dysfunction associated with antidepressants but no approach is 'ideal'. Because treatment-emergent sexual difficulties are less frequent with certain drugs, presumably related to differences in pharmacological properties, and since current interventions are suboptimal, a lower incidence of sexual dysfunction is a relevant tolerability target when developing novel antidepressants.

  9. Acute antidepressant drug administration and autobiographical memory recall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadatou-Pastou, Marietta; Miskowiak, Kamilla W; Williams, J Mark G

    2012-01-01

    Antidepressants affect memory and neural responses to emotionally valenced stimuli in healthy volunteers. However, it is unclear whether this extends to autobiographical memory for personally experienced events. The current study investigated the effects of acute administration of the antidepress......Antidepressants affect memory and neural responses to emotionally valenced stimuli in healthy volunteers. However, it is unclear whether this extends to autobiographical memory for personally experienced events. The current study investigated the effects of acute administration...... of the antidepressant reboxetine on emotional autobiographical retrieval in healthy volunteers (14 men, 10 women). Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used in a double-blind between-groups investigation with reboxetine (4 mg) and placebo. Consistent with previous reports using lab-based stimuli, neural activation...... of reboxetine on emotional memory extends to recall of personally experienced events. Such effects may be relevant to the cognitive improvements found with recovery from depression and with the mechanism of action of contemporary antidepressant drugs. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)....

  10. Restoring the worn dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibsen, R L; Ouellet, D F

    1992-01-01

    Strong dental materials and dental porcelains are providing dentists with restorative opportunities that are more conservative because they require less destruction of healthy tooth structure and yield a more esthetic result. In cases of severe wear due to attrition, abrasion, and erosion, this process can be stopped, restoring the esthetics and function by using proper techniques and materials. The case report described in this article demonstrates the conservative restoration of severe wear due to attrition and erosion. Teeth were lengthened, wear was restored, and further wear was ceased by using a combination of bonded porcelain, a heat, light, and self-cure resin system, and a new glass-ionomer restorative material. The result was a strong, durable restoration (that required no anesthesia) with high esthetics.

  11. Watershed Restoration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julie Thompson; Betsy Macfarlan

    2007-09-27

    In 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy issued the Eastern Nevada Landscape Coalition (ENLC) funding to implement ecological restoration in Gleason Creek and Smith Valley Watersheds. This project was made possible by congressionally directed funding that was provided through the US Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of the Biomass Program. The Ely District Bureau of Land Management (Ely BLM) manages these watersheds and considers them priority areas within the Ely BLM district. These three entities collaborated to address the issues and concerns of Gleason Creek and Smith Valley and prepared a restoration plan to improve the watersheds’ ecological health and resiliency. The restoration process began with watershed-scale vegetation assessments and state and transition models to focus on restoration sites. Design and implementation of restoration treatments ensued and were completed in January 2007. This report describes the restoration process ENLC undertook from planning to implementation of two watersheds in semi-arid Eastern Nevada.

  12. Patient and GP characteristics associated with antidepressant treatment in depressed patients: a multilevel analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, L. van; Volkers, A.; Bakker, D. de

    2007-01-01

    Background: Antidepressants are frequently prescribed drugs in Dutch general practice, but patients differ in the treatment they receive. Both patient and GP characteristics may explain this difference. Objectives: To identify patient and GP characteristics associated with antidepressant treatment i

  13. Effects of calcium channel blocker, nifedipine, on antidepressant activity of fluvoxamine, venlafaxine and tianeptine in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok K. Sharma

    2015-02-01

    Conclusions: Nifedipine, fluvoxamine, venlafaxine and tianeptine possess antidepressant activity and nifedipine exhibits synergistic antidepressant activity with fluvoxamine, venlafaxine and tianeptine. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2015; 4(1.000: 82-88

  14. Evaluation of antidepressant effect of ethanolic extract of Rosa damascena using forced swimming test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Dolati

    2011-12-01

    Conclusion: Although ethanolic extract did not have antidepressant effect, we cannot rule out this effect altogether. In our opinion, antidepressant effect is masked by CNS depression effect of ethanolic extract of R. damascena.

  15. Factors associated with the prescription of antidepressive medication to breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suppli, Nis P; Deltour, Isabelle; Damkjaer, Lars H;

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated factors associated with use of antidepressant medication subsequent to a diagnosis of breast cancer. We also evaluated the effect of participation in a cancer rehabilitation program on use of antidepressants.......We evaluated factors associated with use of antidepressant medication subsequent to a diagnosis of breast cancer. We also evaluated the effect of participation in a cancer rehabilitation program on use of antidepressants....

  16. Explanatory models of depression and treatment adherence to antidepressant medication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels; Johannessen, Helle; Stage, Kurt Bjerregaard

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adherence to antidepressant medication is a challenging clinical issue, which reduces treatment efficacy: 30-60% of all patients commencing treatment with antidepressants are estimated to stop taking the medication within the first 12 weeks. Patients' personal beliefs about depression...... interviews of 16 depressed patients one, four, eight and twelve months after hospital discharge supplemented by diagnostic interviews and self-report measures. Kleinman's notion of "explanatory model" was used as the theoretical perspective on the patients' illness narratives. Interview transcripts were...... analysed thematically with "explanatory models" as the starting point. RESULTS: Patients had ambiguous experiences of depression and antidepressants. Patients explained their illness and the medical treatment in experience-near terms. Explanations of the reasons for depression were psychosocial and biology...

  17. Evaluations of antidepressant activity of Anacyclus pyrethrum root extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badhe S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to screen antidepressant activity of Anacyclus pyrethrum (AP root extract. An experiment was designed by different method such as Locomotor activity, Haloperidol-induced catalepsy, Forced swim test (FST, Tail suspension test (TST, Clonidine-induced hypothermia and Reserpine-induced hypothermia on Swiss male albino mice. Standard root extract of Anacyclus pyrethrum (AP root extract showed an increase in ambulatory behaviour indicating a stimulant effect of the photoactometer. AP root extract produces a significant antidepressant effect in both FST and TST as they reduced the immobility. AP root extract was found to be effective in reversing hypothermia produced by clonidine and reserpine. In our study, we found that AP root extract inhibited haloperidol-induced catalepsy. These study suggest that AP root extract might produce antidepressant effect by interaction with adrenergic and dopamine receptor thereby increasing the level of noradrenaline and dopamine in brains of mice.

  18. Sudden cardiac death secondary to antidepressant and antipsychotic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicouri, Serge; Antzelevitch, Charles

    2008-03-01

    A number of antipsychotic and antidepressant drugs are known to increase the risk of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Based largely on a concern over QT prolongation and the development of life-threatening arrhythmias, a number of antipsychotic drugs have been temporarily or permanently withdrawn from the market or their use restricted. Some antidepressants and antipsychotics have been linked to QT prolongation and the development of Torsade de pointes arrhythmias, whereas others have been associated with a Brugada syndrome phenotype and the development of polymorphic ventricular arrhythmias. This review examines the mechanisms and predisposing factors underlying the development of cardiac arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death, associated with antidepressant and antipsychotic drugs in clinical use.

  19. Parasomnias and antidepressant therapy: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierlin, Lara; Littner, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    There exists a varying level of evidence linking the use of antidepressant medication to the parasomnias, ranging from larger, more comprehensive studies in the area of REM sleep behavior disorder to primarily case reports in the NREM parasomnias. As such, practice guidelines are lacking regarding specific direction to the clinician who may be faced with a patient who has developed a parasomnia that appears to be temporally related to use of an antidepressant. In general, knowledge of the mechanisms of action of the medications, particularly with regard to the impact on sleep architecture, can provide some guidance. There is a potential for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors to suppress REM, as well as the anticholinergic properties of the individual drugs to further disturb normal sleep architecture.

  20. Antidepressant-associated sexual dysfunction: impact, effects, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Agnes; Nash, Michael; Lynch, Aileen M

    2010-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common side effect of antidepressants and can have significant impact on the person's quality of life, relationships, mental health, and recovery. The reported incidence of sexual dysfunction associated with antidepressant medication varies considerably between studies, making it difficult to estimate the exact incidence or prevalence. The sexual problems reported range from decreased sexual desire, decreased sexual excitement, diminished or delayed orgasm, to erection or delayed ejaculation problems. There are a number of case reports of sexual side effects, such as priapism, painful ejaculation, penile anesthesia, loss of sensation in the vagina and nipples, persistent genital arousal and nonpuerperal lactation in women. The focus of this article is to explore the incidence, pathophysiology, and treatment of antidepressant iatrogenic sexual dysfunction.

  1. Cardiovascular Considerations in Antidepressant Therapy: An Evidence-Based Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibeh Yekehtaz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a definite correlation between cardiovascular diseases and depressive disorders. Nevertheless, many aspects of this association have yet to be fully elucidated. Up to half of coronary artery disease patients are liable to suffer from some depressive symptoms, with approximately 20% receiving a diagnosis of major depressive disorders. Pharmacotherapy is a key factor in the management of major depression, not least in patients with chronic diseases who are likely to fail to show proper compliance and response to non-pharmacological interventions. Antidepressants are not deemed completely safe. Indeed, numerous side effects have been reported with the administration of antidepressants, among which cardiovascular adverse events are of paramount importance owing to their disabling and life-threatening nature. We aimed to re-examine some of the salient issues in antidepressant therapy vis-à-vis cardiovascular considerations, which should be taken into account when prescribing such medications.

  2. Risk of drug interaction: combination of antidepressants and other drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyasaka Lincoln Sakiara

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency of combination of antidepressants with other drugs and risk of drug interactions in the setting public hospital units in Brazil. METHODS: Prescriptions of all patients admitted to a public hospital from November 1996 to February 1997 were surveyed from the hospital's data processing center in São Paulo, Brazil. A manual search of case notes of all patients admitted to the psychiatric unit from January 1993 to December 1995 and all patients registered in the affective disorders outpatient clinic in December 1996 was carried out. Patients taking any antidepressant were identified and concomitant use of drugs was checked. By means of a software program (Micromedex® drug interactions were identified. RESULTS: Out of 6,844 patients admitted to the hospital, 63 (0.9% used antidepressants and 16 (25.3% were at risk of drug interaction. Out of 311 patients in the psychiatric unit, 63 (20.2% used antidepressants and 13 of them (20.6% were at risk. Out of 87 patients in the affective disorders outpatient clinic, 43 (49.4% took antidepressants and 7 (16.2% were at risk. In general, the use of antidepressants was recorded in 169 patients and 36 (21.3% were at risk of drug interactions. Twenty different forms of combinations at risk of drug interactions were identified: four were classified as mild, 15 moderate and one severe interaction. CONCLUSION: In the hospital general units the number of drug interactions per patient was higher than in the psychiatric unit; and prescription for depression was lower than expected.

  3. Antidepressant activity of Simvastatin in behavioral models of depression in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archit Patke

    2015-07-01

    Conclusions: Lowering cholesterol levels with statins not only reduces risks for cardiovascular events, but also affect serotonergic neurotransmission, leading to clinical efficacy of standard antidepressants. Simvastatin can augment the antidepressant effects of fluoxetine in rats, raising the possibility that statins could be used to facilitate the effects of antidepressants in humans. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(7.000: 1666-1671

  4. Drugs on the Internet, part II: antidepressant medication web sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Melissa; Montagne, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Antidepressant medications have been the fastest growing category of use of pharmaceutical products over the past decade. Selected Internet web sites providing information on antidepressant medications were identified and assessed using code of conduct criteria for posting health information on the Internet as developed by the Health on the Internet Foundation. Thirteen representative web sites were evaluated. Degree of compliance with each of the eight criterion varied by site, though all 13 sites met the criterion for legality of content and conduct on their web site. WebMD and FamilyDoctor.org met most of the criteria, while pharmaceutical company sites tended to meet the fewest criteria.

  5. CLINICAL EFFICACY OF CENTPORPAZINE-A NEW ANTIDEPRESSANT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, J.S.; Gupta, P.P.; Asthana, O.P.; Nityanand, S.; Devi, S.; Doongaji, D.R.; Sethi, B.B.; Singh, Gurmeet; Srimal, R.C.; Dhawan, B.N.

    1992-01-01

    Efficacy of centpropazine, a new antidepressant, has been evaluated in forty two patients of endogenous depression. The 4 week open trial was carried out in a dose-range of 40 to 120mg per day. A significant lowering of Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) score was observed in 34 patient. The antidepressant effect could be detected in 9 patients within one week, in 28 cases in two weeks and in all the 34 patients by third week. Giddiness, headache, dryness of mouth and weakness were reported by 11 patients. PMID:21776129

  6. Toponymic Restoration in Irkutsk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Snarsky

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the discussion on restoration of historical names of public spaces in Irkutsk. It also reviews different approaches to the problem that appeared in the historical science and publicism. The author says about the necessity of a strictly historical approach to the toponymic restoration.

  7. Guiding Restoration Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    restoration of important ecosystem functions requires reintegrating landscapes or restorating the func- tional aspects of landscapes ( Risser 1992...51-64. Risser , P. G. 1992. Landscape ecology approach to ecosystem rehabilitation. Pages 37-46 in M. L. Wali (ed.), Ecosystem Rehabilitation

  8. Prevalence and patterns of antidepressant drug use during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ververs, Tessa; Kaasenbrood, Hans; Visser, Gerard; Schobben, Fred; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T. W.; Egberts, Toine

    2006-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine the extent and patterns of antidepressant use before, during and after pregnancy in a large population in The Netherlands. Methods Health care records and prescription data from one of the largest Dutch health insurance companies were analysed. The st

  9. Antidepressant exposure during early pregnancy and congenital malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars Henning

    are reassuring, however, an association with heart malformations has been suggested for e.g. paroxetine. A potential biological explanation will be reviewed. The potential teratogenic potential of antidepressants needs to be balanced against the obvious problems associated with under-treated maternal depression...

  10. Antidepressant use during pregnancy and asthma in the offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Olsen, Jørn; Pedersen, Lars Henning;

    2015-01-01

    in the offspring. METHODS: A cohort study was performed among all live singletons born in Denmark between 1996 and 2007. Mothers who had a diagnosis of depressive disorder and/or who used antidepressants 1 year before or during the index pregnancy were identified. Using a Cox proportional hazards regression model...

  11. Continuation and maintenance use of antidepressants in recurrent depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bockting, Claudi L H; ten Doesschate, Mascha C; Spijker, Jan; Spinhoven, Philip; Koeter, Maarten W J; Schene, Aart H

    2008-01-01

    Background: Maintenance antidepressant (AD) medication is the most commonly used preventive strategy in a highly recurrent disease, i. e. depression. Little is known about the discontinuation of maintenance AD use and the association with recurrence in daily clinical practice. The purpose was to exa

  12. Effect of antidepressants on spatial memory deficit induced by dizocilpine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Chenjuan; Yan, Weiwei; Li, Yuan; Lu, Xiaodong

    2016-10-30

    Cognitive deficits are a core symptom of schizophrenia. It is controversial whether antidepressants could improve cognitive symptoms in schizophrenia patients. The present study was designed to identify the therapeutic effect of antidepressants on cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. In the present study, adolescent rats were repeatedly exposed to dizocilpine, which can induce cognitive deficits associated with schizophrenia. Then these rats were treated by six antidepressants (fluvoxamine, sertraline, paroxetine, escitalopram, venlafaxine, mirtazapine) or vehicle. The rats in the control group were exposed to vehicle during the study. Lastly, all rats' spatial memory (a major part of cognition) was assessed using the Morris water maze (MWM) test, and the density of hippocampal parvalbumin (PV) interneurons was evaluated to explore possible mechanisms underlying spatial memory change in schizophrenia. The results of the present study supported the hypothesis of a therapeutic effect of fluvoxamine and escitalopram on spatial memory deficit induced by dizocilpine. Additionally, the data of the present study suggested that fluvoxamine and escitalopram remitted hippocampal PV interneuron reduction induced by dizocilpine. The neuroprotective effect of fluvoxamine and escitalopram may partly explain the therapeutic effect of antidepressants on spatial memory deficit in schizophrenia patients.

  13. Antidepressant and anti-stress effects of curcumin inmice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YingXU; Bao-shanKU; Hai-yanYAO; Yong-heZHANG; Xue-junLI

    2004-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a yellow colouring agent contained in the rhizome of Curcuma Longa (turmeric), has a wide array of pharmacological and biological activities, such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulating and anticarcinogenic effects. In this study, curcumin was examined for the antidepressant and anti-stress effects in forced swimming,

  14. Interaction of antidepressants with the serotonin and norepinephrine transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lena; Andersen, Jacob; Thomsen, Mette

    2012-01-01

    as treatment of depression and anxiety disorders or as psychostimulant drugs of abuse. Despite their clinical importance, the molecular mechanisms by which various types of antidepressant drugs bind and inhibit SERT and NET are still elusive for the majority of the inhibitors, including the molecular basis...

  15. Dopaminergic mechanism of antidepressant action in depressed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willner, Paul; Hale, Anthony S; Argyropoulos, Spilios

    2005-05-01

    Clinical studies have not yet determined a common mechanism of action for antidepressant drugs, which have primary sites of action on a variety of different neurotransmitter systems. However, a large body of evidence from animal studies demonstrates that sensitisation of D2-like dopamine receptors in the mesolimbic dopamine system may represent a 'final common pathway' in antidepressant action. The present study aimed to determine whether, consistent with data from animal studies, the clinical antidepressant action of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is reversed by acute administration of a receptor antagonist selective for D2-like receptors in the mesolimbic dopamine system. The participants were patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder (n = 8) who had been treated successfully (Hamilton Depression Scale depressed, untreated volunteers (n = 10). They attended a psychiatric research ward on an out-patient basis, and received double-blind acute administration of either placebo, or a low dose of the selective dopamine D2/D3 receptor antagonist sulpiride (200 mg), in a counterbalanced order. Mood and psychomotor effects were assessed using visual analogue scales and the Fawcett-Clark Pleasure Capacity Scale. Sulpiride slightly improved subjective well-being in the control group, but in the antidepressant-treated patients, sulpiride caused a substantial reinstatement of depressed mood. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that sensitisation of D2-like receptors may be central to the clinical action of SSRIs.

  16. Suicides in Adolescents: Benefit/Harm Balance of Antidepressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saz, Ulas Eylem; Arslan, Mehmet Tayyip; Egemen, Ayten

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Depression is an important cause of suicide in adolescents. It has been speculated that antidepressants themselves can increase the risk of suicide. Method: Cases of adolescents admitted to the Ege University Pediatric Emergency Department in Turkey due to suicide attempt were assessed. Results: Nine of 13 suicide attempts during…

  17. The Association of Antidepressant Medication and Body Weight Gain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Ranjbar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To review the literature and discover which antidepressants are responsible for weight gain and then to discuss the areas with lack of adequate knowledge. Method: An electronic search was conducted through Medline, Pubmed, Cochrane library, and ScienceDirect. Forty nine empirical researches were identified and reviewed. Results: Amitriptyline, clomipramine, and mirtazapine have been associated with more weight gain induction in clinical studies, but not in animal-based studies. All TCAs have been reported to cause weight gain except protriptyline. MAOIs have been associated with weight gain. In SSRI group, citalopram and ecitalopram induce weight, yet mixed results exist for paroxetine and fluoxetine. Researches unanimously reported weight loss effect for bupropion. Some studies suggest contributing factors in the relationship of antidepressants with body weight changes including age, gender, base-line weights and treatment duration. Various results of different treatment durations have been reported in some cases but there are not continuous time-dependent studies for the influences of antidepressants on body weight changes. Conclusion: More studies are required to discover underlying mechanisms and the time-dependent effects of antidepressants on body weight changes.

  18. Are gender differences important for the clinical effects of antidepressants?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Malene Grubbe; Steyerberg, Ewout Willem; Stage, Kurt Bjerregaard;

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Gender differences in antidepressant treatment response, side effects, dropout rates, and plasma concentrations were examined in patients with major and predominantly melancholic depression. METHOD: The study included a subgroup of 292 inpatients (96 men, 196 women) from three Danish d...

  19. Antidepressants: Get Tips to Cope with Side Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... because you have a better appetite when your depression symptoms ease up. Some antidepressants are more likely to cause ... bedtime if your doctor approves. Agitation, restlessness or anxiety can result ... Get regular exercise, such as jogging, biking or aerobics, or some ...

  20. Antidepressants are selective serotonin neuronal reuptake inhibitors: 40-year history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Danilov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents historical prerequisites for designing antidepressants from a group of selective serotonin neuronal reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs: to determine a lower serotonin concentration in the different tissues of depressed patients; to establish a higher serotonin concentration in the treatment of depressed patients with tricyclic antidepressants, and to formulate the serotonergic theory of depression. It also provides a consecutive account of the history of clinical introduction of individual SSRI representatives, such as fluoxetine, zimelidine, fluvoxamine, indalpine, citalopram, sertraline, paroxetine, and escitalopram. There are data from the history of studying the mechanism of SSRI action: from the theory of the importance of an increase in the concentration of serotonin in the synaptic cleft to the current understanding of complex successive intracellular rearrangements at the level of the postsynaptic neuron. The history of studying the efficacy of SSRIs in treating depression is considered in detail. Emphasis is laid on the reasons for a paradoxical difference in the evaluations of the efficiency of therapy with SSRIs versus other groups of antidepressants at different developmental stages of psychopharmacology. The role of marketing technologies in disseminating the data on the efficacy of this or that group of antidepressants is described. The practical significance of differences in individual SSRI representatives (the potency of serotonin uptake inhibition; the degree of selectivity and activity against the serotonergic system; the likelihood of an unfavorable pharmacokinetic interaction with other drugs; the half-life of elimination; the quickness of achieving a therapeutic dose is analyzed. Whether it is possible and reasonable to differentially choose different SSRI representatives in the treatment of depressions at the present stage is discussed. The authors state their belief that researches should be continued to

  1. EVALUATION OF ANTIDEPRESSANT ACTIVITY OF ALOCASIA MACRORRHIZOS ON MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateel Ramya

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The increased prevalence of depression at 12.3% rate and side effect profile of the existing antidepressants led to the present study which was designed to establish the role of natural herbal medicine Alocasia macrorrhizos as an antidepressant and to extend these results before the safe application in humans. 48 Albino male mice were divided into 2 sets each consisting of 4 groups with 6 animals in each group. Group1and 2 served as control and standard where as group3 and 4 were treated with hydroalcoholic extract of Alocasia macrorrhizos at the dose of 250mg/kg and 500mg/kg respectively. Drugs were suspended in 1% gumacasia and administered to mice orally one hour before test procedure. Forced swim test and tail suspension tests were standard animal models used for assessing antidepressant activity by recording the immobility time. Results from the study showed that hydroalcoholic extract of Alocasia macrorrhizos had significantly reduced immobility duration at the dose of 250mg/kg and 500mg/kg where it has shown better result than control group when subjected to the test procedures. Significant difference in immobility duration were noticed when these groups were compared to standard imipramine and there was a definite antidepressant effect observed with AM 500mg/kg whereas AM 250mg/kg values were comparable to imipramine. Hence we have concluded from the results of the study that hydroalcoholic extract of leaves of Alocasia macrorrhizos has the definite antidepressant effect which is comparable to Imipramine at 250mg/kg dose.

  2. Neuroplasticity and major depression, the role of modern antidepressant drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Gianluca

    2012-06-22

    The pathophysiology of depression has been traditionally attributed to a chemical imbalance and critical interactions between genetic and environmental risk factors, and antidepressant drugs suggested to act predominantly amplifying monoaminergic neurotransmission. This conceptualization may be currently considered reductive. The current literature about the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying depression, stress-related disorders and antidepressant treatment was examined. In order to provide a critical overview about neuroplasticity, depression and antidepressant drugs, a detailed Pubmed/Medline, Scopus, PsycLit, and PsycInfo search to identify all papers and book chapters during the period between 1980 and 2011 was performed. Pathological stress and depression determine relevant brain changes such as loss of dendritic spines and synapses, dendritic atrophy as well as reduction of glial cells (both in number and size) in specific areas such as the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. An increased dendritic arborisation and synaptogenesis may instead be observed in the amygdala as a consequence of depression and stress-related disorders. While hippocampal and prefrontal functioning was impaired, amygdala functioning was abnormally amplified. Most of molecular abnormalities and biological changes of aberrant neuroplasticity may be explained by the action of glutamate. Antidepressant treatment is associated with neurogenesis, gliogenesis, dendritic arborisation, new synapse formation and cell survival both in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Antidepressants (ADs) induce neuroplasticity mechanisms reversing the pathological effects of depression and stress-related disorders. The neuroplasticity hypothesis may explain the therapeutic and prophylactic action of ADs representing a new innovative approach to the pathophysiology of depression and stress-related disorders.

  3. Restoring primary anterior teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, William F

    2002-01-01

    A variety of esthetic restorative materials are available for restoring primary incisors. Knowledge of the specific strengths, weakness, and properties of each material will enhance the clinician's ability to make the best choice of selection for each individual situation. Intracoronal restorations of primary teeth may utilize resin composites, glass ionomer cements, resin-modified ionomers, or polyacid-modified resins. Each has distinct advantages and disadvantages and the clinical conditions of placement may be a strong determining factor as to which material is utilized. Full coronal restoration of primary incisors may be indicated for a number of reasons. Crowns available for restoration of primary incisors include those that are directly bonded onto the tooth, which generally are a resin material, and those crowns that are luted onto the tooth and are some type of stainless steel crown. However, due to lack of supporting clinical data, none of the crowns can be said to be superior to the others under all circumstances. Though caries in the mandibular region is rare, restorative solutions for mandibular incisors are needed. Neither stainless steel crowns nor celluloid crown forms are made specifically for mandibular incisors. Many options exist to repair carious primary incisors, but there is insufficient controlled, clinical data to suggest that one type of restoration is superior to another. This does not discount the fact that dentists have been using many of these crowns for years with much success. Operator preferences, esthetic demands by parents, the child's behavior, and moisture and hemorrhage control are all variables which affect the decision and ultimate outcome of whatever restorative treatment is chosen.

  4. Image restoration scale space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Luis; Mazorra, L.; Santana, F.

    1995-09-01

    We present a study of some image resoration techniques based on partial differential equations. We study separately the denoising problem and the restoration of discontinuities. We analyze the capabilities of the differential operators to restore images. In particular, we analyze a number of models present in the literature, and we present comparative results. Finally, we present a model based in the combination of the anisotropic diffusion of Alvarez, Lions, and Morel and the shock filters of Osher and Rudin.

  5. Thymol produces an antidepressant-like effect in a chronic unpredictable mild stress model of depression in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xue-Yang; Li, Hong-Yan; Chen, Jun-Jun; Li, Rui-Peng; Qu, Rong; Fu, Qiang; Ma, Shi-Ping

    2015-09-15

    Thymol, a bioactive monoterpene isolated from Thymus vulgaris, has displayed inspiring neuroprotective properties. The present study was designed to evaluate the antidepressant-like effects of thymol on a chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) model of depression in mice and explore the underlying mechanisms. It was observed that thymol treatment (15 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg) significantly reversed the decrease of sucrose consumption, the loss of body weight, the reduction of immobile time in the tail suspension tests (TST) and forced swimming tests (FST) induced by CUMS paradigm. The levels of norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin (5-HT) in the hippocampus decreased in the CUMS-treated mice. Chronic treatments with thymol significantly restored the CUMS-induced alterations of monoamine neurotransmitters in the hippocampus. Our results further demonstrated that thymol administration negatively regulated the induction of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α in CUMS mice. Furthermore, thymol inhibited the activation of nod-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome and its adaptor, and subsequently decreased the expression of caspase-1. In sum, our findings suggested that thymol played a potential antidepressant role in CUMS mice model through up-regulating the levels of central neurotransmitters and inhibiting the expressions of proinflammatory cytokines, which might provide potential for thymol in the light of opening up new therapeutic avenues for depression.

  6. Iptakalim confers an antidepressant effect in a chronic mild stress model of depression through regulating neuro-inflammation and neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming; Yang, Jing-Zhe; Geng, Fan; Ding, Jian-Hua; Hu, Gang

    2014-09-01

    Depression is a serious mental disorder in the world, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear and the effective cures are scarce. Iptakalim (Ipt), an ATP-sensitive potassium (K-ATP) channel opener that can cross the blood-brain barrier freely, has been demonstrated to inhibit neuro-inflammation and enhance adult hippocampal neurogenesis. But it is unknown whether Ipt is beneficial to therapy of depression by modulating neurogenesis and neuro-inflammation. This study aimed to determine the potential antidepressant efficacy of Ipt in a chronic mild stress (CMS) mouse model of depression. We showed that treatment with Ipt (10 mg/kg/day, i.p) for 4 wk restored the decrease of sucrose preference and shortened the immobile time in forced swimming tests (FST) and tail suspension tests (TST) in CMS model mice. We further found that Ipt reversed the CMS-induced reduction of the adult hippocampal neurogenesis and improved cerebral insulin signalling in the CMS mice. Furthermore, Ipt negatively regulated nod-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3) expression and, in turn, inhibited microglia-mediated neuro-inflammation by suppressing the activation of NLRP3-inflammasome/caspase-1/interleukin 1β axis in the hippocampus of CMS mice. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that Ipt plays a potential antidepressant role in CMS model mice through regulating neuro-inflammation and neurogenesis, which will provide potential for Ipt in terms of opening up novel therapeutic avenues for depression.

  7. Fat cell-secreted adiponectin mediates physical exercise-induced hippocampal neurogenesis:an alternative anti-depressive treatment?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suk Yu Yau; Ang Li; Aimin Xu; Kwok-fai So

    2015-01-01

    Psychological depression is drawing accumulating attention nowadays, due to the skyrocketing incidence worldwide and the enormous burdens it incurs. Physical exercise has been long recog-nized for its therapeutic effects on depressive disorders, although knowledge of the underlying mechanisms remains limited. Suppressed hippocampal neurogenesis in adult brains has been regarded, at least partly, contributive to depression, whereas physical exercise that restores neuro-genesis accordingly exerts the anti-depressive action. Several recent publications have suggested the potential role of adiponectin, a protein hormone secreted by peripheral mature adipocytes, in mediating physical exercise-triggered enhancement of hippocampal neurogenesis and alleviation of depression. Here, we brielfy review these novel ifndings and discuss the possibility of counter-acting depression by modulating adiponectin signaling in the hippocampus with interventions including physical exercise and administration of pharmacological agents.

  8. EMSAM (deprenyl patch: how a promising antidepressant was underutilized

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asnis GM

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gregory M Asnis,1,2 Margaret A Henderson2 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, NY, USA; 2Anxiety and Depression Clinic, Montefiore Medical Center, New York, NY, USA Abstract: The EMSAM patch is a unique monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI being the only antidepressant utilizing a transdermal delivery system. This was welcomed by clinicians who hoped that EMSAM would be better tolerated than oral MAOIs and non-MAOI antidepressants, as well as being effective for treatment in a wide spectrum of depressed patients including atypical depression, bipolar depression, and refractory depression. Unfortunately, the clinical use of EMSAM has been underutilized and its potential usefulness overlooked. This article suggests that fear of possible side effects, particularly the “cheese reaction” and serotonin syndrome, are some of the main contributors to underutilization by clinicians. These risks have been significantly exaggerated with the 6 mg/day dose not even requiring a special diet. Other contributing factors leading to underutilization are reviewed such as: the lack of studies addressing many important clinical questions; inadequate data analyses; not evaluating the effect of EMSAM on comorbid psychiatric conditions, particularly anxiety disorders; lack of antidepressant comparators versus EMSAM; no dose–response relationship examined; various depressive subtypes and conditions are unexplored, eg, bipolar depression and refractory depression; poor insurance coverage for an expensive medication; as well as minimal marketing efforts and postmarketing studies. On the other hand, many potential advantages of EMSAM are not highlighted enough in the literature and by pharmaceutical companies which might have increased clinical interest and utilization of the antidepressant. For example, the advantages of EMSAM include: avoidance of swallowing issues, as can be seen with oral antidepressants

  9. Poor guideline adherence in the initiation of antidepressant treatment in children and adolescents in the Netherlands : choice of antidepressant and dose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Ymkje Anna; de Jonge, Peter; Kalverdijk, Luuk; Bos, Jens H. J.; Schuiling-Veninga, Catharina C. M.; Hak, Eelko

    2016-01-01

    The Dutch guideline for the treatment of depression in young people recommends initiating antidepressant treatment with fluoxetine, as the evidence for its efficacy is strongest and the risk of suicidality may be lower than with other antidepressants. Furthermore, low starting doses are recommended.

  10. Caffeine enhances the antidepressant-like activity of common antidepressant drugs in the forced swim test in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szopa, Aleksandra; Poleszak, Ewa; Wyska, Elżbieta; Serefko, Anna; Wośko, Sylwia; Wlaź, Aleksandra; Pieróg, Mateusz; Wróbel, Andrzej; Wlaź, Piotr

    2016-02-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used behaviorally active drug in the world which exerts its activity on central nervous system through adenosine receptors. Worrying data indicate that excessive caffeine intake applies to patients suffering from mental disorders, including depression. The main goal of the present study was to evaluate the influence of caffeine on animals' behavior in forced swim test (FST) as well as the effect of caffeine (5 mg/kg) on the activity of six typical antidepressants, such as imipramine (15 mg/kg), desipramine (10 mg/kg), fluoxetine (5 mg/kg), paroxetine (0.5 mg/kg), escitalopram (2 mg/kg), and reboxetine (2.5 mg/kg). Locomotor activity was estimated to verify and exclude false-positive/negative results. In order to assess the influence of caffeine on the levels of antidepressant drugs studied, their concentrations were determined in murine serum and brains using high-performance liquid chromatography. The results showed that caffeine at a dose of 10, 20, and 50 mg/kg exhibited antidepressant activity in the FST, and it was not related to changes in locomotor activity in the animals. Caffeine at a dose of 5 mg/kg potentiated the activity of all antidepressants, and the observed effects were not due to the increase in locomotor activity in the animals. The interactions between caffeine and desipramine, fluoxetine, escitalopram, and reboxetine were exclusively of pharmacodynamic character, because caffeine did not cause any changes in the concentrations of these drugs neither in blood serum nor in brain tissue. As a result of joint administration of caffeine and paroxetine, an increase in the antidepressant drug concentrations in serum was observed. No such change was noticed in the brain tissue. A decrease in the antidepressant drug concentrations in brain was observed in the case of imipramine administered together with caffeine. Therefore, it can be assumed that the interactions caffeine-paroxetine and caffeine-imipramine occur at least in

  11. Parasomnias and Antidepressant Therapy: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara eKierlin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available There exists a varying level of evidence linking the use of antidepressant medication to the parasomnias, ranging from larger, more comprehensive studies in the area of RBD to primarily case reports in the NREM parasomnias. As such, practice guidelines are lacking regarding specific direction to the clinician who may be faced with a patient who has developed a parasomnia that appears to be temporally related to use of an antidepressant. In general, knowledge of the mechanisms of action of the medications, particularly with regard to the impact on sleep architecture, can provide some guidance. There is a potential for SSRIs, TCAs, and SNRIs to suppress REM, as well as the anticholinergic properties of the individual drugs to further disturb normal sleep architecture.

  12. The Antidepressant-like Effects of Estrogen-mediated Ghrelin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pu; Liu, Changhong; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xingyi; Ren, Bingzhong; Li, Bingjin

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin, one of the brain-gut peptides, stimulates food-intake. Recently, ghrelin has also shown to play an important role in depression treatment. However, the mechanism of ghrelin’s antidepressant-like actions is unknown. On the other hand, sex differences in depression, and the fluctuation of estrogens secretion have been proved to play a key role in depression. It has been reported that women have higher level of ghrelin expression, and ghrelin can stimulate estrogen secretion while estrogen acts as a positive feedback mechanism to up-regulate ghrelin level. Ghrelin may be a potential regulator of reproductive function, and estrogen may have additional effect in ghrelin’s antidepressantlike actions. In this review, we summarize antidepressant-like effects of ghrelin and estrogen in basic and clinical studies, and provide new insight on ghrelin’s effect in depression. PMID:26412072

  13. Tricyclic antidepressants: effects on extinction and fear learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, G; Handel, J; Rogers, R; Weiss, J

    1975-01-01

    Rats trained to run an alley for a food reward were extinguished following injections of different antidepressants. When retested several days later, the animals extinguished following pretreatment with the NE reuptake blocker protriptyline showed faster running speeds than did the other groups. Other rats given electrical shocks following pretreatment with protriptyline avoided the compartment in which they had been shocked less than did animals shocked following pretreatment with other antidepressants. This implies an interferance with some aspect of the learning or consolidation process which is correlated with the degree of NE reuptake blockage. It is hypothesized that NE terminals are deactivated following frustrative nonreward or punishment by the conversion and reuptake of the released NE to an altered extinction molecule.

  14. A review on antidepressant effect of medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Rabiei

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a life-threatening, debilitating, and common disease affecting different segments of community. Chemical and synthetic drugs available to treat this disease cause many adverse effects and may lead to complete recovery in only 50% of patients. At the same time, medicinal plants have been reported to exert optimal pharmacological effects in treating depression in different models. In this review, the relevant articles indexed in the reliable databases PubMed, PubMed central, Scopus and Web of Science were review-ed. The review indicated that most medicinal plants exerted antidepressant effects through synaptic regulation of serotonin, noradrenaline, and dopamine, regulating activity of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, reinfor-cing anti-oxidant defense system, and decreasing inflammatory mediators. The medicinal plants and their active compounds can relieve depression through different pathways and hence are considered a new source to produce antidepressants.

  15. Antidepressant effect of Melissa officinalis in the forced swimming test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Emamghoreishi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: In Iranian and other traditional medicines, an antidepressant effect has been indicated for Melissa officinalis (Lamiaceae. However, studies showing its antidepressant effect is lacking. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to examine whether the aqueous extract and essential oil from leaves of Melissa officinalis have an antidepressant-like activity in mice.  Materials and Methods: The effect of subchronic administration of different doses of the aqueous extract (25, 75, 150, 300 mg/kg or water; n=9-10 and the essential oil (10, 25, 75, 150, 300 mg/kg or almond oil; n=9-10 on immobility, climbing, and swimming behaviors were evaluated in the forced swimming test. Fluoxetine (20mg/kg and imipramine (15 mg/kg were used as reference drugs. Additionally, the effect of both plant preparations on spontaneous activity was examined. Results: All doses of the aqueous extract, used in this study, produced a significant reduction in immobility along with an increase in climbing behavior which is similar to those which have been observed with imipramine. Essential oil caused a dose-dependent reduction in immobility and an increase in climbing at all studied doses, compared to control group. Only the highest dose (300mg/kg of essential oil showed a significant increase in swimming behavior. The aqueous extract, but not the essential oil, decreased spontaneous activity in a dose dependent manner. Conclusion: The results of this study suggests that the Melissa officinalis possess an antidepressant-like activity similar to imipramine which may have a potential clinical value for treatment of depression.

  16. Psychosocial work environment and antidepressant medication: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westergaard-Nielsen Niels

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adverse psychosocial work environments may lead to impaired mental health, but it is still a matter of conjecture if demonstrated associations are causal or biased. We aimed at verifying whether poor psychosocial working climate is related to increase of redeemed subscription of antidepressant medication. Methods Information on all antidepressant drugs (AD purchased at pharmacies from 1995 through 2006 was obtained for a cohort of 21,129 Danish public service workers that participated in work climate surveys carried out during the period 2002–2005. Individual self-reports of psychosocial factors at work including satisfaction with the work climate and dimensions of the job strain model were obtained by self-administered questionnaires (response rate 77,2%. Each employee was assigned the average score value for all employees at his/her managerial work unit [1094 units with an average of 18 employees (range 3–120]. The risk of first-time AD prescription during follow-up was examined according to level of satisfaction and psychosocial strain by Cox regression with adjustment for gender, age, marital status, occupational status and calendar year of the survey. Results The proportion of employees that received at least one prescription of ADs from 1995 through 2006 was 11.9% and prescriptions rose steadily from 1.50% in 1996 to the highest level 6.47% in 2006. ADs were prescribed more frequent among women, middle aged, employees with low occupational status and those living alone. None of the measured psychosocial work environment factors were consistently related to prescription of antidepressant drugs during the follow-up period. Conclusion The study does not indicate that a poor psychosocial work environment among public service employees is related to prescription of antidepressant pharmaceuticals. These findings need cautious interpretation because of lacking individual exposure assessments.

  17. Synthesis of antidepressant duloxetine via asymmetric transfer hydrogenation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Zhen He; Xue Ming Li; Jia Dai; Ming Yan

    2008-01-01

    Antidepressant duloxetine (1) was prepared via asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of 3-(dimethylamino)-1-(thiophen-2-yl)propan-1-one (3). The Ru(Ⅱ), Rh(Ⅲ) and Ir(Ⅲ) complexes of several chiral ligands were examined as the catalyst and(S,S)-N-tosyl-1,2-diphenyl ethylenediamine (TsDPEN)-Ru(Ⅱ) complex was found to provide good yield and excellent enantios-electivity.

  18. Translocator protein mediates the anxiolytic and antidepressant effects of midazolam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhi-Kun; Li, Ming-Sheng; He, Jia-Li; Liu, Xu; Zhang, Guan-Hua; Lai, Sha; Ma, Jian-Chun; Zeng, Jia; Li, Yan; Wu, Hong-Wei; Chen, Yong; Shen, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Sheng

    2015-12-01

    The translocator protein (18 kDa) (TSPO) plays an important role in stress-related disorders, such as anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), caused by neurosteroids (e.g. allopregnanolone). The present study sought to evaluate the significance of TSPO in anxiolytic and antidepressant effects induced by midazolam. The animals were administrated midazolam (0.25, 0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.) and subjected to behavioral tests, including Vogel-type conflict test, elevated plus-maze test, forced swimming test. Midazolam produced anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects Vogel-type conflict test (1 mg/kg, i.p.), elevated plus-maze test (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.), and forced swimming test (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.). These effects of Midazolam were totally blocked by the TSPO antagonist PK11195 (3 mg/kg, i.p.). To evaluate the role of allopregnanolone in the anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects of midazolam, the animals were decapitated at the end of the behavioral tests. The allopregnanolone levels of the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The allopregnanolone level of the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus was increased by midazolam (0.5, 1 mg/kg, i.p.) and the increase was reversed by PK11195 (3 mg/kg, i.p.). Overall, the results indicated that the anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects of midazolam were mediated by TSPO, via stimulation of allopregnanolone biosynthesis.

  19. Combining clinical variables to optimize prediction of antidepressant treatment outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Iniesta, R.; Malki, K.; Maier, W; Rietschel, M.; Mors, O; Hauser, J; Henigsberg, N.; Dernovsek, M. Z.; Souery, D.; Stahl, D.; Dobson, R.; Aitchison, K. J.; Farmer, A; Lewis, C.M.; McGuffin, P.

    2016-01-01

    The outcome of treatment with antidepressants varies markedly across people with the same diagnosis. A clinically significant prediction of outcomes could spare the frustration of trial and error approach and improve the outcomes of major depressive disorder through individualized treatment selection. It is likely that a combination of multiple predictors is needed to achieve such prediction. We used elastic net regularized regression to optimize prediction of symptom improvement and remissio...

  20. [Antidepressive pharmacotherapy. In slight and severe disease, young and old].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghai, T C; Volz, H P; Möller, H J

    2009-02-01

    During the past decade a variety of promising new compounds launched onto the market not only enhancing serotonergic and noradrenergic neurotransmission, but also influencing the dopamine and the melatonergic receptor system. In spite of misleading discussions both in the specialized and in the lay press the clinical effectiveness of antidepressants still is indisputable. The main advantages of the newer drugs are the broadening of the spectrum treatments and a far better tolerability profile in comparison to older compounds. Predominantly depression of medium to high severity should be treated pharmacologically. Especially severe depression seems to respond better to dually acting antidepressants. In children effectiveness of Omega3-fatty acids has been shown, in adolescents SSRI treatment was efficacious. Older patients respond to all antidepressant mechanisms, but more selective substances should be preferred due to a better tolerability. The study of new treatment options is of major importance to provide better strategies for the clinical management of depression in the future, and is thus also of great socio-economic importance.

  1. Increased risk of antidepressant use in childhood cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Lasse Wegener; Winther, J F; Cederkvist, L;

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Childhood cancer survivors are at risk of both somatic and mental late effects, but large population-based studies of depression are lacking. METHODS: Risk of antidepressant use was evaluated in a population-based cohort of 5452 Danish children treated for cancer in 1975-2009 by linkage...... survivors were at increased risk of having antidepressants prescribed (HR, 1.4; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.3-1.5). The excess absolute risk of antidepressant use was 2.5 per 1000 person-years (95% CI, 1.7-3.3), equivalent to an excess of 2.5 survivors for every 100 survivors followed for 10years....... Increased HRs of 30-50% were seen for survivors of cancers of all main groups (haematological malignancies, central nervous system (CNS) and solid tumors); the highest risk was among children treated with haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.2-3.1). Our data suggested that the risk...

  2. Role of 5-HT3 Receptors in the Antidepressant Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connie Sanchez

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin (5-HT3 receptors are the only ligand-gated ion channel of the 5-HT receptors family. They are present both in the peripheral and central nervous system and are localized in several areas involved in mood regulation (e.g., hippocampus or prefrontal cortex. Moreover, they are involved in regulation of neurotransmitter systems implicated in the pathophysiology of major depression (e.g., dopamine or GABA. Clinical and preclinical studies have suggested that 5-HT3 receptors may be a relevant target in the treatment of affective disorders. 5-HT3 receptor agonists seem to counteract the effects of antidepressants in non-clinical models, whereas 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, such as ondansetron, present antidepressant-like activities. In addition, several antidepressants, such as mirtazapine, also target 5-HT3 receptors. In this review, we will report major advances in the research of 5-HT3 receptor’s roles in neuropsychiatric disorders, with special emphasis on mood and anxiety disorders.

  3. Accelerated antidepressant response to lithium augmentation of imipramine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Saini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treatment of depressive episode often poses a challenge. Although there are numerous medicines available for its treatment but they all have a lag period of 2–3 weeks before they start showing their result. Aim: The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that an initial lithium-tricyclic antidepressant (TCA combination has a quicker and better antidepressant effect than standard TCA treatment in unipolar depression. Materials and Methods: Twenty unipolar depressed inpatients under lithium-TCA treatment were compared with twenty patients with similar diagnosis treated with TCA-placebo combination. The duration of the study was 4 weeks under double-blind conditions. Results: Initial lithium-TCA treatment reduced depressive symptoms significantly more than TCA alone. The difference was evident from 1st week onward and persisted at 4 weeks. Conclusion: Lithium augmentation of TCA at the outset offers a strategy to reduce the lag period of antidepressant action. The choice can be made for those patients who are likely to benefit from long-term prophylaxis.

  4. Concurrent use of amphetamine stimulants and antidepressants by undergraduate students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vo K

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kim Vo,1 Patricia J Neafsey,2 Carolyn A Lin3 1University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, 2School of Nursing and Center for Health Information and Prevention, University of Connecticut, Storrs, 3Department of Communication Sciences and Center for Health Information and Prevention, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA Abstract: Undergraduate students were recruited to participate in an online survey to report their use of amphetamine stimulants and other drugs. Significant differences were found between students reporting (n=79; 4.0% and not reporting (n=1,897; 96% amphetamine-stimulant use in the past month – in terms of race/ethnicity, class standing, residence, health symptoms, self-health report – in addition to alcohol, tobacco, pain-reliever, and antidepressant use. Health symptoms reported more often by stimulant users included depression, diarrhea, difficulty sleeping, fatigue, dizziness, difficulty concentrating, and nicotine craving. Health care providers of college students should query these patients about symptoms that could be related to depression and amphetamine use. In particular, they should provide education at the point of care around the risks of amphetamine use in general and the specific risks in those students who have symptoms of depression and/or are taking antidepressant medication. Prevention programs should also target the risks of concurrent use of amphetamines, antidepressants, and other drugs among college students. Keywords: stimulant use, depression, college students, self-medication

  5. Antidepressant Use Amongst College Students: Findings of a Phenomenological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshmi L. Singh, Ph.D

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depression among college students is an escalating problem and could have serious consequences such as suicide. There has been an increase in use of antidepressants on college campuses in United States. However, an in depth understanding of this phenomenon from the college student’s perspective is lacking in the literature. Objective: This study examined college students’ experiences and treatment decision making during their depression treatment. Methods: A longitudinal, phenomenological research methodology was completed. The participants were nine students who were taking antidepressants for diagnosis of depression. Recruitment was done via brochures placed at University bulletin boards, and a mental health clinic. Three audio taped, unstructured interviews were conducted with each participant over four months. The central question asked was: What has the experience of treating depression been for you? Analysis of text was done using Van Manen’s lifeworld existentials of lived body, lived time, lived relation and lived space as the organizing framework. Results: Thirteen themes were identified within the four lifeworlds. The results showed that lived relation with providers was important for college students’ decision to both initiate and continue antidepressant use. Students’ role was defined in conjunction with provider’s role by them as wanting to be a ‘player’ in their treatment decisions and needing to be ‘acknowledged’ as such by their providers. Conclusions: Overall, the underlying essential theme of ‘autonomy’ was portrayed by the students’ experiential accounts of their depression treatment and treatment decision making.

  6. Perinatal antidepressant use: understanding women's preferences and concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battle, Cynthia L; Salisbury, Amy L; Schofield, Casey A; Ortiz-Hernandez, Samia

    2013-11-01

    Perinatal depression is prevalent and linked with a host of adverse consequences for women and newborns. Rates of engagement in depression treatment are, however, strikingly low among pregnant and postpartum women, with the majority of affected women receiving no mental health treatment. Research indicates that perinatal women are extremely reluctant to take antidepressant medications, yet the nature of women's concerns and treatment decision- making patterns have not been well documented. Developing a clearer understanding of women's treatment preferences and behaviors may help identify solutions to the under-treatment of perinatal depression. In this mixed methods study, we conducted in-depth interviews with 61 pregnant women, approximately half of whom were experiencing clinical levels of depression. In addition to assessing psychiatric diagnoses, symptoms, and functional impairment, we conducted qualitative interviews addressing women's preferences for depression treatment, concerns, and decision-making patterns. Consistent with prior reports, women were significantly more likely to voice a preference for non-pharmacologic depression treatments, as opposed to antidepressant medications. Many depressed women reported a great degree of uncertainty regarding how to treat their depression, and those with more severe depression symptoms were more likely to endorse decisional conflict. Analysis of qualitative comments yielded detailed information about the nature of women's concerns and preferences related to use of antidepressant medications and other aspects of treatment engagement. We discuss findings in the context of improving patient-centered care for perinatal depression.

  7. Antidepressant-Like Effect of Ilex paraguariensis in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizete De Moraes Reis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the possible antidepressant-like effect of I. paraguariensis in rats. Rats were treated for four weeks with an aqueous extract of I. paraguariensis in drinking water, following the traditional preparation of this beverage. After the period of treatment, behavioral (elevated plus-maze, open field test, and forced swimming test and biochemical parameters (lipid peroxidation assay, thiol content, vitamin C levels, and monoamine oxidase activity were evaluated. Animals were also analyzed on forced swimming test after 24 hours of I. paraguariensis intake. An additional group was injected with selegiline 24 hours and 30 minutes before forced swimming test as positive control. HPLC analysis revealed the profile of I. paraguariensis extract. I. paraguariensis reduced the immobility time on forced swimming test without significant changes in locomotor activity in the open field test. Any anxiolytic/anxiogenic effect of I. paraguariensis was observed in rats through the elevated plus-maze test. The antidepressant-like effect of I. paraguariensis was not accompanied by inhibitory effect on monoamine oxidase activity. There were no significant alterations on lipid peroxidation, thiol content, and vitamin C levels among the groups. In conclusion, aqueous extract of I. paraguariensis decreases the time of immobility in rats suggesting an antidepressant-like effect.

  8. The failure of the antidepressant drug discovery process is systemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrie, Colin; Pickles, Alasdair; Stanford, S Clare; Robinson, Emma

    2013-05-01

    Current antidepressants are crude compared with the ideal and patents on most have expired. There are therefore strong clinical and commercial pressures for new drugs to replace them. The prospects for this are, however, now markedly reduced as several major pharmaceutical companies have abandoned work in this area whilst many others have sharply decreased their research investment. These changes and the lack of progress over such a long period are indicative of a catastrophic systems failure which, it is argued, has been caused in large part by a logical flaw at the animal modelling stage. This tautology has served to lock the current antidepressant drug discovery process into an iterative loop capable only of producing further variations of that which has gone before. Drugs produced by this approach have proved to be only poorly effective in the context of the clinically depressed population as a whole. Hence, the inevitable failure of the current antidepressant drug discovery process has left little behind that can be salvaged. Therefore, it is suggested that this be urgently reformulated on more rational grounds using more appropriate species in new animal models based upon a thorough understanding of the behavioural expressions of depression in the clinic.

  9. Potential Antidepressant Role of Neurotransmitter CART: Implications for Mental Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peizhong Mao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Depression is one of the most prevalent and debilitating public health concerns. Although no single cause of depression has been identified, it appears that interaction among genetic, epigenetic, biochemical, environmental, and psychosocial factors may explain its etiology. Further, only a fraction of depressed patients show full remission while using current antidepressants. Therefore, identifying common pathways of the disorder and using that knowledge to develop more effective pharmacological treatments are two primary targets of research in this field. Brain-enriched neurotransmitter CART (cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript has multiple functions related to emotions. It is a potential neurotrophic factor and is involved in the regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and stress response as well as in energy homeostasis. CART is also highly expressed in limbic system, which is considered to have an important role in regulating mood. Notably, adolescents carrying a missense mutation in the CART gene exhibit increased depression and anxiety. Hence, CART peptide may be a novel promising antidepressant agent. In this paper, we summarize recent progress in depression and CART. In particular, we emphasize a new antidepressant function for CART.

  10. Effects of antidepressants on P2X7 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Xiang, Zheng-Hua; Jiang, Chun-Lei; Liu, Wei-Zhi; Shang, Zhi-Lei

    2016-08-30

    Antidepressants including paroxetine, fluoxetine and desipramine are commonly used for treating depression. P2×7 receptors are member of the P2X family. Recent studies indicate that these receptors may constitute a novel potential target for the treatment of depression. In the present study, we examined the action of these antidepressants on cloned rat P2×7 receptors that were stably expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells by using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, and found that paroxetine at a dose of 10µM could significantly reduce the inward currents evoked by the P2×7 receptors agonist BzATP by pre-incubation for 6-12 but not by acute application (10µM) or pre-incubation for 2-6h at a dose of 1µM, 3µM or 10µM paroxetine. Neither fluoxetine nor desipramine had significant effects on currents evoked by BzATP either applied acutely or by pre-incubation at various concentrations. These results suggest that the sensitivity of rat P2×7 receptors to antidepressants is different, which may represent an unknown mechanism by which these drugs exert their therapeutic effects and side effects.

  11. /sup 13/C NMR studies of the molecular flexibility of antidepressants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munro, S.L.; Andrews, P.R.; Craik, D.J.; Gale, D.J.

    1986-02-01

    The solution dynamics of a series of clinically potent antidepressants have been investigated by measuring /sup 13/C NMR relaxation parameters. Correlation times and internal motional rates were calculated from spin-lattice relaxation times and nuclear Overhauser effects for the protonated carbons in mianserin, imipramine-like antidepressants, and amitriptyline-like antidepressants. These data were interpreted in terms of overall molecular tumbling, internal rotations, and inherent flexibility of these structures. Of particular interest was the conformational variability of the tricyclic nucleus of the tricyclic antidepressants, where the data indicated a fivefold difference in mobility of the dimethylene bridge of imipramine-like antidepressants relative to amitriptyline-like compounds. The implications of such a difference in internal motions is discussed in relation to previous NMR studies and to the reported differences in pharmacological activity of these antidepressants.

  12. Antidepressant Use and Risk of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weeke, P; Jensen, Aksel Karl Georg; Folke, F;

    2012-01-01

    Treatment with some types of antidepressants has been associated with sudden cardiac death. It is unknown whether the increased risk is due to a class effect or related to specific antidepressants within drug classes. All patients in Denmark with an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) were.......17-12.2). An association between cardiac arrest and antidepressant use could be documented in both the SSRI and TCA classes of drugs....

  13. Economic Effects of Anti-Depressant Usage on Elective Lumbar Fusion Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirali Sayadipour

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been suggested, although not proven, that presence of concomitant psychiatric disorders may increase the inpatient costs for patients undergoing elective surgery. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that elective lumbar fusion surgery is more costly in patients with under treatment for depression. Methods: This is a retrospective case-control study of 142 patients who underwent elective lumbar fusion. Of those 142 patients, 41 patients were chronically using an antidepressant medication that considered as a "study group", and 101 patients were not taking an antidepressant medication that considered as a "control group". Data was collected for this cohort regarding antidepressant usage patient demographics, length of stay (LOS, age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity index scores and cost. Costs were compared between those with a concomitant antidepressant usage and those without antidepressant usage using multivariate analysis. Results: Patients using antidepressants and those with no history of antidepressant usage were similar in terms of gender, age and number of operative levels. The LOS demonstrated a non-significant trend towards longer stays in those using anti-depressants. Total charges, payments, variable costs and fixed costs were all higher in the antidepressant group but none of the differences reached statistical significance. Using Total Charges as the dependent variable, gender and having psychiatric comorbidities were retained independent variables. Use of an antidepressant was independently predictive of a 36% increase in Total Charges . Antidepressant usage as an independent variable also conferred a 22% increase in cost and predictive of a 19% increase in Fixed Cost . Male gender was predictive of a 30% increase in Total Charges . Conclusion: This study suggests use of antidepressant in patients who undergo elective spine fusion compared with control group is associated with increasing total cost and

  14. Evaluation of antidepressant and analgesic activity of tapentadol with mirtazapine: an experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Pankaj K. Chaudhary; Atul Jain; Asha Pathak; Neha Sharma; Atul K. Mishra; Arvind K. Maurya; Vikas Gaur

    2015-01-01

    Background: Data comparing tapentadol with an antidepressant is limited. A comparison of tapentadol with mirtazapine at different dose has not been performed, the other antidepressant in the same therapeutic class with a significant market share, has been undertaken. In the absence of relevant data to assess the place that tapentadol should occupy in the therapeutic arsenal, indirect comparisons are the most rigorous way to go. We conducted a study evaluate antidepressant and analgesic activi...

  15. Clonidine as a sensitizing agent in the forced swimming test for revealing antidepressant activity.

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    The forced swimming test (FST) in mice has failed to predict antidepressant activity for drugs having beta adrenoreceptor agonist activity and for serotonin uptake inhibitors. We investigated the potential for clonidine to render the FST sensitive to antidepressants by using a behaviorally inactive dose of this agent (0.1 mg/kg). All antidepressants studied (tricyclics, 5-HT uptake inhibitors, iprindole, mianserin, viloxazine, trazodone) showed either activity at lower doses or activity at pr...

  16. A prospective naturalistic study of antidepressant-induced jitteriness/anxiety syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harada T

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Tsuyoto Harada, Ken Inada, Kazuo Yamada, Kaoru Sakamoto, Jun Ishigooka Department of Psychiatry, Tokyo Women’s Medical University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan Objective: Patients often develop neuropsychiatric symptoms such as anxiety and agitation after they have started taking an antidepressant, and this is thought to be associated with a potentially increased risk of suicide. However, the incidence of antidepressant-induced jitteriness/anxiety syndrome has not been fully investigated, and little has been reported on its predictors. The aim of this study was to survey the incidence of antidepressant-induced jitteriness/anxiety syndrome and clarify its predictors in a natural clinical setting.Materials and methods: Between January 2009 and July 2012, we prospectively surveyed 301 patients who had not taken any antidepressants for 1 month before presentation, and who were prescribed antidepressants for 1 month after their initial visit. Patients were classified as developing antidepressant-induced jitteriness/anxiety syndrome if they experienced any symptoms of anxiety, agitation, panic attacks, insomnia, irritability, hostility, aggressiveness, impulsivity, akathisia, hypomania, or mania during the first month.Results: Among the 301 patients, 21 (7.0% developed antidepressant-induced jitteriness/anxiety syndrome. Major depressive disorder and a diagnosis of mood disorder in first-degree relatives of patients were significantly associated with induction of antidepressant-induced jitteriness/anxiety syndrome (odds ratio 10.2, P=0.001; odds ratio 4.65, P=0.02; respectively. However, there was no such relationship for sex, age, class of antidepressant, combined use of benzodiazepines, or diagnosis of anxiety disorder.Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest that major depressive disorder and a diagnosis of mood disorder in first-degree relatives may be clinical predictors of antidepressant-induced jitteriness/anxiety syndrome

  17. Effects of depression and antidepressant medications on hip fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bi-Hua; Chen, Pau-Chung; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Lee, Chuan-Pin; Huang, Ko-En; Chen, Vincent C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study was conducted to investigate the effects of depression and antidepressant medications on hip fracture. The database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance with medical records of more than 1,000,000 individuals was searched for patients who had hip fracture with or without depression from 1998 to 2009. Patients with the following conditions were excluded: hip fracture due to cancer or traffic accidents, hip fracture that occurred before the diagnosis of depression, and use of antidepressants before the diagnosis of depression. A matched cohort of 139,110 patients was investigated, including 27,822 (17,309 females; 10,513 males) with depression and 111,288 (69,236 females; 42,052 males) without depression (1:4 randomly matched with age, sex, and index date). Among these patients, 232 (158 females and 74 males) had both hip fracture and depression, and 690 (473 females and 217 males) had hip fracture only. The Cox proportional-hazards regression method was used to determine the effect of depression on hip fracture. The hazard ratio (HR) for each clinical parameter was calculated after adjusting for confounders including sex, age, Charlson comorbidity index, urbanization, osteoporosis, and antidepressants. Results showed that patients with major depressive disorder had a 61% higher incidence of hip fracture than those without depression (HR 1.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.19–2.18, P = 0.002). The risk of hip fracture for patients with less severe depressive disorder (dysthymia or depressive disorder, not otherwise specified) was not statistically higher than that of patients with no depression (HR 1.10, 95% CI = 0.91–1.34, P = 0.327). Among the patients with depression, females had a 49% higher incidence for hip fracture than males (HR 1.49, 95% CI 1.30–1.72, P < 0.001). The incidence of hip fracture also increased with age and Charlson comorbidity index scores. Analyses of both all (139,110) patients and only patients (27,822) with

  18. Differential role of AMPA receptors in mouse tests of antidepressant and anxiolytic action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jesper T; Fitzpatrick, Ciaran M; Larsen, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Depression and anxiety often co-occur, and conventional monoamine-facilitating antidepressants show efficacy against symptoms in both disorders. Rodent studies indicate that antidepressant effects of monoamine-based antidepressants involve increased α-amino-3-hydroxy-5- methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic...... and memory we also tested if GYKI-53655 disrupted performance in the V-maze test for attention-dependent behaviour, and the social transmission of food preference (STFP) test of long-term memory. LY451646 (3 mg/kg) showed an antidepressant-like profile in the FST and TST, and GYKI-53655 (≥ 5 mg/kg) had...

  19. Antidepressants and Valvular Heart Disease: A Nested Case-Control Study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Hui; Hsiao, Fei-Yuan; Liu, Yen-Bin; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Wang, Chi-Chuan; Shen, Li-Jiuan

    2016-04-01

    Empirical evidence regarding the association between antidepressants and valvular heart disease (VHD) is scarce.Using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research database, this nested case-control study assessed the association between antidepressants and VHD in a Chinese population.Among a cohort of patients who used at least 3 prescription antidepressants, 874 cases with VHD and 3496 matched controls (1:4 ratio) were identified. Conditional logistic regression models were used to examine the timing, duration, dose and type of antidepressants use, and the risk of VHD.Current use of antidepressants was associated with a 1.4-fold increase in the risk of VHD (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.44; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17-1.77). Among current users, a dose-response association was observed in terms of the cumulative duration and the cumulative antidepressant dose. Significantly higher risks of VHD were observed among the current users of tricyclic antidepressants (aOR 1.40 [1.05-1.87]).We found that the use of antidepressants was associated with a greater risk of VHD and that the risks varied according to different antidepressants.

  20. Challenges of ecological restoration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halme, Panu; Allen, Katherine A.; Aunins, Ainars

    2013-01-01

    The alarming rate of ecosystem degradation has raised the need for ecological restoration throughout different biomes and continents. North European forests may appear as one of the least vulnerable ecosystems from a global perspective, since forest cover is not rapidly decreasing and many ecosys...

  1. [Influence of implant restoration on traditional restoration idea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H C

    2016-01-01

    Implant restoration affected the traditional restoration idea. Artificial implant restoration has a profound influence on the design of dental restoration. Implant supported prostheses have not only changed the method of oral rehabilitation, but also integrated revolutionary concept with the traditional treatment protocol. By using implants, posterior missing molars can be effectively restored and thus eliminating the disadvantages of traditional removable partial denture for Kennedy classification Ⅰ, Ⅱ partically edentulous dentition. Full edentulous arch can also be restored with implant fixed denture which provide much better oral health related quality of life compared with the traditional complete denture. It is useful to master the theory and skills of artificial implant restoration, and to provide a reference for the restoration of oral physiological function.

  2. Papahanaumokuakea - Laysan Island Restoration 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Goal of the Laysan Island Restoration is to restore Laysan to a "Pristine" state which would require minimal monitoring and habitat for Endemic Endangered...

  3. Antidepressants for bipolar disorder A meta-analysis of randomized, double-blind, controlled trials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingli Zhang; Huan Yang; Shichang Yang; Wei Liang; Ping Dai; Changhong Wang; Yalin Zhang

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the efficacy and safety of short-term and long-term use of antidepres-sants in the treatment of bipolar disorder. DATA SOURCES:A literature search of randomized, double-blind, control ed trials published until December 2012 was performed using the PubMed, ISI Web of Science, Medline and Cochrane Central Register of Control ed Trials databases. The keywords“bipolar disorder, bipolar I disorder, bipolar II disorder, bipolar mania, bipolar depression, cyclothymia, mixed mania and depression, rapid cycling and bipolar disorder”, AND “antidepressant agent, antidepressive agents second-generation, antidepressive agents tricyclic, monoamine oxidase inhibitor, noradrenaline uptake in-hibitor, serotonin uptake inhibitor, and tricyclic antidepressant agent” were used. The studies that were listed in the reference list of the published papers but were not retrieved in the above-mentioned databases were supplemented. STUDY SELECTION: Studies selected were double-blind randomized control ed trials assessing the efficacy and safety of antidepressants in patients with bipolar disorder. Al participants were aged 18 years or older, and were diagnosed as having primary bipolar disorder. Antidepressants or antidepressants combined with mood stabilizers were used in experimental interventions. Placebos, mood stabilizers, antipsychotics and other antide pressants were used in the control interventions. Studies that were quasi-randomized studies, or used antidepressants in combination with antipsy-chotics in the experimental group were excluded. Al analyses were conducted using Review Man-ager 5.1 provided by the Cochrane Col aboration. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:The primary outcome was the response and switching to mania. The secondary outcomes included remission, discontinuation rate, and suicidality. RESULTS: Among 5 001 treatment studies published, 14 double-blind randomized control ed trials involving 1 244 patients were included in the meta

  4. Effects of Calcium Channel Blockers on Antidepressant Action of Alprazolam and Imipramine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorash ZM

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Alprazolam is effective as an anxiolytic and in the adjunct treatment of depression. In this study, the effects of calcium channel antagonists on the antidepressant action of alprazolam and imipramine were investigated. A forced swimming maze was used to study behavioral despair in albino mice. Mice were divided into nine groups (n = 7 per group. One group received a single dose of 1% Tween 80; two groups each received a single dose of the antidepressant alone (alprazolam or imipramine; two groups each received a single dose of the calcium channel blocker (nifedipine or verapamil; four groups each received a single dose of the calcium channel blocker followed by a single dose of the antidepressant (with same doses used for either in the previous four groups. Drug administration was performed concurrently on the nine groups. Our data confirmed the antidepressant action of alprazolam and imipramine. Both nifedipine and verapamil produced a significant antidepressant effect (delay the onset of immobility when administered separately. Verapamil augmented the antidepressant effects of alprazolam and imipramine (additive antidepressant effect. This may be due to the possibility that verapamil might have antidepressant-like effect through different mechanism. Nifedipine and imipramine combined led to a delay in the onset of immobility greater than their single use but less than the sum of their independent administration. This may be due to the fact that nifedipine on its own might act as an antidepressant but blocks one imipramine mechanism that depends on L-type calcium channel activation. Combining nifedipine with alprazolam produced additional antidepressant effects, which indicates that they exert antidepressant effects through different mechanisms.

  5. Adaptive wiener image restoration kernel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ding

    2007-06-05

    A method and device for restoration of electro-optical image data using an adaptive Wiener filter begins with constructing imaging system Optical Transfer Function, and the Fourier Transformations of the noise and the image. A spatial representation of the imaged object is restored by spatial convolution of the image using a Wiener restoration kernel.

  6. Restoring proximal caries lesions conservatively with tunnel restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu CH

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Chun-Hung Chu1, May L Mei,1 Chloe Cheung,1 Romesh P Nalliah2 1Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Restorative Dentistry and Biomaterials Sciences, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: The tunnel restoration has been suggested as a conservative alternative to the conventional box preparation for treating proximal caries. The main advantage of tunnel restoration over the conventional box or slot preparation includes being more conservative and increasing tooth integrity and strength by preserving the marginal ridge. However, tunnel restoration is technique-sensitive and can be particularly challenging for inexperienced restorative dentists. Recent advances in technology, such as the contemporary design of dental handpieces with advanced light-emitting diode (LED and handheld comfort, offer operative dentists better vision, illumination, and maneuverability. The use of magnifying loupes also enhances the visibility of the preparation. The advent of digital radiographic imaging has improved dental imaging and reduced radiation. The new generation of restorative materials has improved mechanical properties. Tunnel restoration can be an option to restore proximal caries if the dentist performs proper case selection and pays attention to the details of the restorative procedures. This paper describes the clinical technique of tunnel restoration and reviews the studies of tunnel restorations. Keywords: operative, practice, tunnel preparation, composite, amalgam, glass ionomer

  7. Relativistic Linear Restoring Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-01-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke's law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: d"p"/d"t" or d"p"/d["tau"]. Either formulation recovers Hooke's law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we…

  8. How can we realize the promise of personalized antidepressant medicines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsboer, Florian

    2008-08-01

    Personalized medication that is based on pharmacogenetic data has long been expected to improve the efficacy of treatments for neurological and psychiatric disorders, including depression. However, the complexity of the regulation of gene transcription and its interactions with environmental factors means that straightforward translation of individual genetic information into tailored treatment is unlikely. Nevertheless, when data from genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, neuroimaging and neuroendocrinology are used in combination, they could lead to the development of effective personalized antidepressant treatment that is based on both genotypes and biomarkers. This process will require many further steps and collaboration between basic and clinical neuroscience.

  9. Antidepressive Wirksamkeit und neuropsychologische Effekte einer kombinierten Escitalopram- / Magnetstimulationstherapie

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Franziska van

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a well-tolerated non-invasive method, which has also been proved to have mild antidepressant effects and is used as “add-on“-therapy in treating pharmaco-resistant major depression. Objective: The efficacy of an escitalopram plus rTMS-combination-treatment was evaluated and compared to escitalopram plus sham rTMS. Methods: We designed a four week-, randomized, rater-blinded, and controlled add-on study with two trea...

  10. Comparative efficacy of behavioral despair models in depicting antidepressant-like effect of tramadol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitabh A. Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: The results of the present study depict antidepressant-like activity of tramadol in both the models of depression TST and FST. But TST in mice seems to be more efficacious in appraising the antidepressant like effect of tramadol. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2013; 2(6.000: 763-767

  11. PHARMACOEPIDEMIOLOGICAL MONITORING OF ANTIDEPRESSANT USAGE IN PATIENTS WITH ANXIOUS AND DEPRESSIVE SYNDROMES IN INTERNAL MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Ivanova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study antidepressant usage in treatment of anxious and depressive disorders in real internal medicine practice.Material and methods. Retrospective analysis of 290 charts of patients, which were observed in Pskov region hospital from 2004 to 2005 was held. All patients suffered from different internal diseases and were treated with antidepressants because of anxious and depressive concomitant disorders.Results. Arterial hypertension observed in 28% of patients, ischemic heart disease – in 20%, heart failure – in 14%, cerebrovascular and peripheral nervous system diseases – in 18% and gastroduodenal diseases – in 20% of patients. Amitriptyline took the first place (49% among antidepressant prescriptions. Next antidepressants according to prescription popularity were paroxetine (22% and tianeptine (12%. Rate of other antidepressant prescriptions were not higher than 5%. There were differences in antidepressant prescriptions between physicians of different specialties.Conclusion. Reasonable approaches should be used to choose antidepressants. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have benefit for the therapy of concomitant anxious and depressive disorders due to their good tolerability. Nevertheless tricyclic antidepressants are essential in some clinical situations.

  12. PHARMACOEPIDEMIOLOGICAL MONITORING OF ANTIDEPRESSANT USAGE IN PATIENTS WITH ANXIOUS AND DEPRESSIVE SYNDROMES IN INTERNAL MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Ivanova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study antidepressant usage in treatment of anxious and depressive disorders in real internal medicine practice.Material and methods. Retrospective analysis of 290 charts of patients, which were observed in Pskov region hospital from 2004 to 2005 was held. All patients suffered from different internal diseases and were treated with antidepressants because of anxious and depressive concomitant disorders.Results. Arterial hypertension observed in 28% of patients, ischemic heart disease – in 20%, heart failure – in 14%, cerebrovascular and peripheral nervous system diseases – in 18% and gastroduodenal diseases – in 20% of patients. Amitriptyline took the first place (49% among antidepressant prescriptions. Next antidepressants according to prescription popularity were paroxetine (22% and tianeptine (12%. Rate of other antidepressant prescriptions were not higher than 5%. There were differences in antidepressant prescriptions between physicians of different specialties.Conclusion. Reasonable approaches should be used to choose antidepressants. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have benefit for the therapy of concomitant anxious and depressive disorders due to their good tolerability. Nevertheless tricyclic antidepressants are essential in some clinical situations.

  13. Maternal depression, antidepressant use in pregnancy and Apgar scores in infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans Mørch; Grøn, Randi; Lidegaard, Øjvind

    2013-01-01

    Use of antidepressants during pregnancy has been associated with a low Apgar score in infants but a contribution from the underlying depressive disorder might influence this association.......Use of antidepressants during pregnancy has been associated with a low Apgar score in infants but a contribution from the underlying depressive disorder might influence this association....

  14. Psychiatric and psychological factors in patient decision making concerning antidepressant use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, A.; Jaspers, M.; Van Zwieten, A.

    2008-01-01

    The observation that the use of antidepressants has strongly increased during the past decade implies that on a micro level doctors and patients more often decide that antidepressants are the appropriate treatment. Therefore, it is important to increase insight into patients' decision making regardi

  15. Hippocampal volume correlates with attenuated negative psychotic symptoms irrespective of antidepressant medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Bernasconi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Reduced GMV in the hippocampus and precuneus is associated with short-term antidepressant medication and more severe depressive symptoms. Hippocampal volume is further negatively correlated with attenuated negative psychotic symptoms. Longitudinal studies are needed to distinguish whether hippocampal volume deficits in the ARMS are related to attenuated negative psychotic symptoms or to antidepressant action.

  16. Antidepressant Utilization and Suicide in Europe : An Ecological Multi-National Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gusmao, Ricardo; Quintao, Sonia; McDaid, David; Arensman, Ella; Van Audenhove, Chantal; Coffey, Claire; Vaernik, Airi; Vaernik, Peeter; Coyne, James; Hegerl, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Background: Research concerning the association between use of antidepressants and incidence of suicide has yielded inconsistent results and is the subject of considerable controversy. The first aim is to describe trends in the use of antidepressants and rates of suicide in Europe, adjusted for gros

  17. Intra-lateral septal infusions of folic acid alone or combined with various antidepressant drugs produce antidepressant-like actions in male Wistar rats forced to swim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Hernández, Miguel; Téllez-Alcántara, N Patricia; Olivera-López, Jorge I; Jaramillo, M Teresa

    2012-01-10

    Intra-cerebral administrations of folic acid produce antidepressant-like effects; either alone or combined with several antidepressant drugs. However, the specific limbic structures implied in the antidepressant-like actions of folic acid are un-known. Thus, intra-lateral septal infusions of folic acid (5.0 nmol, Pimmobility by increasing swimming behavior in the forced swimming test (FST) of male Wistar rats. Conversely, desipramine (10.0 mg/kg, Pimmobility by increasing climbing behavior. Subthreshold doses of folic acid (2.5 nmol/intra-LSN) combined with subthreshold doses of folic acid (25.0 mg/kg, p.o., Pimmobility in the FST. These antidepressant-like actions, probably, were due to modifications of the serotonergic system since swimming behavior was increased and these effects were canceled by ketanserin.

  18. Prescription of antidepressants to patients on opioid maintenance therapy – a pharmacoepidemiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingeborg Hartz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Depression and anxiety are commonly reported among patients in opioid maintenance treatment (OMT. The aim of the present study was to describe aspects of prescription of antidepresant drug therapy among patients on OMT. Our research questions were: 1 What is the prevalence of antidepressant use according to age and gender? 2 Which antidepressants are used? 3 How are antidepressants used in terms of reimbursement codes, dispensed dose and duration of therapy?Methods: Pharmacoepidemiological data were retrieved from the complete national Norwegian Prescription Database which contains information on all prescription drugs (such as Anatomical Theraputical Chemical (ATC-code, Defined Daily Dose (DDDs, dispensed at pharmacies to individual patients. Norwegian OMT-patients (N=4374, 3035 men and 1339 women who received methadone mixture, buprenorphine capsules or combined buprenorphine-naloxone capsules for at least 6 months in 2009 were included. Prevalence of antidepressant use in the studied patients was measured in terms of retrieval of prescriptions.Results: During 2009 21.7% of the studied patients filled at least one prescription for an antidepressant drugs (men: 21.2%; women: 22.9%. The subgroup of antidepressants most frequently dispensed was selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs (33%, followed by the sedative antidepressants mianserin and mirtazapin (22% and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs (20%. Except for TCAs, prescriptions of all antidepressant subgroups were reimbursed for either anxiety or depression in 90% of the cases. Overall, 46.9% of the antidepressant users were prescribed antidepressants in the category < 1 DDD per day and/or treatment < 3 months, with no gender difference.Conclusions: About one out of five OMT-patients filled a prescription for an antidepressant drug in 2009. Above 90% had their prescriptions reimbursed for either depression or anxiety. Use at low doses and/or sporadic use among half

  19. Drugs, genes and the blues: pharmacogenetics of the antidepressant response from mouse to man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Olivia F; O'Brien, Fionn E; O'Connor, Richard M; Cryan, John F

    2014-08-01

    While antidepressant drugs are beneficial to many patients, current treatments for depression remain sub-optimal. Up to half of patients with a major depressive episode fail to achieve remission with a first line antidepressant treatment. Identification of the molecular mechanisms that dictate whether a patient will successfully respond to a particular antidepressant treatment while tolerating its side-effects is not only a major challenge in biological psychiatry research but is also one that shows great promise. This review summarises data from both clinical and preclinical studies that point to a role of specific genes in the response and resistance to antidepressant therapeutics. Moreover, we discuss how such findings have increased our understanding of the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs. Finally, we comment on how this information may potentially influence the future development of personalised medicine approaches for the treatment of depression.

  20. [Unpredictable chronic mild stress effects on antidepressants activities in forced swim test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashov, N V; Kalinina, T S; Voronina, T A

    2015-02-01

    The experiments has been designed to study unpredictable chronic mild stress effect on anti-depressive activities of amitriptyline (10 mg/kg) and fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) in forced swim test in male outbred mice. It is shown that acute treatment with fluoxetine does not produce any antidepressant effects in mice following stress of 14 days while the sub-chronic injections of fluoxetine result in more deep depressive-like behavior. In 28 daily stressed mice, antidepressant effect of fluoxetine is observed independently of the injection rates. Amitriptyline demonstrates the antidepressant activity regardless of the duration of stress or administration scheduling, but at the same time the severity of anti-immobilization effect of amitriptyline in stressed mice is weaker in compare to non-stressed trails. Thus, the injection rates and duration of unpredictable mild chronic stress are the parameters that determine the efficiency of antidepressants in the mouse forced swimming test.

  1. Fructus Aurantii induced antidepressant effect via its monoaminergic mechanism and prokinetic action in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying-Jin; Huang, Wei; Huang, Xi; Wang, Yang; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Cheng; Zhong, Bing-Wu; Sheng, Chen-Xia; Wang, Bing; Zhang, Si-Fang; Su, Nan-Xiang; Liu, Zhao-Qian; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Ren, Ping

    2012-09-15

    Depression could hardly get a satisfactory effect from the currently available antidepressants. To get a more effective treatment, antidepressant effect and monoaminergic mechanism of Fructus Aurantii (FRA) in the rat forced swimming test (FST) and open field test (OFT), and its prokinetics were examined. FST and OFT were respectively used to evaluate the antidepressant effect and locomotor activity of FRA. We observed the effects of monoamine receptor antagonists on FRA-induced antidepressant effect in rat. The effects of FRA on intestinal transit, gastric emptying and in vitro jejunum contractile activity were assessed. FRA decreased significantly the immobility time (32.6±8.5, 30.3±5.2 vs 56.4±9.4, all psulpiride, yohimbine, but not prazosin. FRA could simultaneously induce prokinetics and antidepressant effect, deserves further to investigate.

  2. Pharmacogenetics of antidepressant treatment in obsessive-compulsive disorder: an update and implications for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zai, Gwyneth; Brandl, Eva J; Müller, Daniel J; Richter, Margaret A; Kennedy, James L

    2014-06-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a chronic neuropsychiatric disorder with high genetic influence. Antidepressants such as serotonin reuptake inhibitors, are widely accepted as the first-line medications for OCD; however, approximately 50% of OCD patients show poor response. Personalized medicine utilizing genetic testing has recently received much attention because the variability of antidepressant response and tolerability are partly due to an individual's genetic variations. This has led to researchers investigating the role of specific genetic factors on antidepressant response and utility of testing in the clinical realm. Genetic test panels are showing promise for guiding antidepressant treatment to improve outcomes in depression. This article will review the most recent findings in the pharmacogenetics of OCD and its related disorders. Promising results have been reported for several serotonergic and glutamatergic system genes and the cytochrome CYP450 liver enzyme genes, which appear to play an important role in OCD and antidepressant response.

  3. The effects of antidepressants in Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisina, Pasquale G; Tenenbaum, Harriet R; Borod, Joan C; Foldi, Nancy S

    2008-05-01

    This study explored the therapeutic effect of antidepressants in Parkinson's disease (PD) using a meta-analysis. Altogether, 24 placebo-controlled trials qualified for inclusion and revealed that tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) had a greater antidepressant effect relative to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), Qb(1) = 8.87, p < .01, and the mono-amine-oxidase inhibitor, selegiline, Qb(1) = 7.90, p < .01. Whereas TCAs produced a significant side effect profile (odds ratio = 3.07), adverse events were negligible with SSRIs (odds ratio = 1.83) and selegeline (odds ratio = 1.63). Antidepressants can be beneficial for patients with PD. However, the choice of antidepressants needs to take depressive symptomatologies into account while monitoring side effects.

  4. Gene expression profile analysis of genes in rat hippocampus from antidepressant treated rats using DNA microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Minkyu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular and biological mechanisms by which many antidepressants function are based on the monoamine depletion hypothesis. However, the entire cascade of mechanisms responsible for the therapeutic effect of antidepressants has not yet been elucidated. Results We used a genome-wide microarray system containing 30,000 clones to evaluate total RNA that had been isolated from the brains of treated rats to identify the genes involved in the therapeutic mechanisms of various antidepressants, a tricyclic antidepressant (imipramine. a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (fluoxetine, a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (phenelzine and psychoactive herbal extracts of Nelumbinis Semen (NS. To confirm the differential expression of the identified genes, we analyzed the amount of mRNA that was isolated from the hippocampus of rats that had been treated with antidepressants by real-time RT-PCR using primers specific for selected genes of interest. These data demonstrate that antidepressants interfere with the expression of a large array of genes involved in signaling, survival and protein metabolism, suggesting that the therapeutic effect of these antidepressants is very complex. Surprisingly, unlike other antidepressants, we found that the standardized herbal medicine, Nelumbinis Semen, is free of factors that can induce neurodegenerative diseases such as caspase 8, α-synuclein, and amyloid precursor protein. In addition, the production of the inflammatory cytokine, IFNγ, was significantly decreased in rat hippocampus in response to treatment with antidepressants, while the inhibitory cytokine, TGFβ, was significantly enhanced. Conclusions These results suggest that antidepressants function by regulating neurotransmission as well as suppressing immunoreactivity in the central nervous system.

  5. Potential involvement of serotonergic signaling in ketamine's antidepressant actions: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Jardin, Kristian Gaarn; Müller, Heidi Kaastrup; Elfving, Betina; Dale, Elena; Wegener, Gregers; Sanchez, Connie

    2016-11-03

    A single i.v. infusion of ketamine, classified as an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, may alleviate depressive symptoms within hours of administration in treatment resistant depressed patients, and the antidepressant effect may last for several weeks. These unique therapeutic properties have prompted researchers to explore the mechanisms mediating the antidepressant effects of ketamine, but despite many efforts, no consensus on its antidepressant mechanism of action has been reached. Recent preclinical reports have associated the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) with the antidepressant-like action of ketamine. Here, we review the current evidence for a serotonergic role in ketamine's antidepressant effects. The pharmacological profile of ketamine may include equipotent activity on several non-NMDA targets, and the current hypotheses for the mechanisms responsible for ketamine's antidepressant activity do not appear to preclude the possibility that non-glutamate neurotransmitters are involved in the antidepressant effects. At multiple levels, the serotonergic and glutamatergic systems interact, and such crosstalk could support the notion that changes in serotonergic neurotransmission may impact ketamine's antidepressant potential. In line with these prospects, ketamine may increase 5-HT levels in the prefrontal cortex of rats, plausibly via hippocampal NMDA receptor inhibition and activation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors. In addition, a number of preclinical studies suggest that the antidepressant-like effects of ketamine may depend on endogenous activation of 5-HT receptors. Recent imaging and behavioral data predominantly support a role for 5-HT1A or 5-HT1B receptors, but the full range of 5-HT receptors has currently not been systematically investigated in this context. Furthermore, the nature of any 5-HT dependent mechanism in ketamine's antidepressant effect is currently not

  6. Combining clinical variables to optimize prediction of antidepressant treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesta, Raquel; Malki, Karim; Maier, Wolfgang; Rietschel, Marcella; Mors, Ole; Hauser, Joanna; Henigsberg, Neven; Dernovsek, Mojca Zvezdana; Souery, Daniel; Stahl, Daniel; Dobson, Richard; Aitchison, Katherine J; Farmer, Anne; Lewis, Cathryn M; McGuffin, Peter; Uher, Rudolf

    2016-07-01

    The outcome of treatment with antidepressants varies markedly across people with the same diagnosis. A clinically significant prediction of outcomes could spare the frustration of trial and error approach and improve the outcomes of major depressive disorder through individualized treatment selection. It is likely that a combination of multiple predictors is needed to achieve such prediction. We used elastic net regularized regression to optimize prediction of symptom improvement and remission during treatment with escitalopram or nortriptyline and to identify contributing predictors from a range of demographic and clinical variables in 793 adults with major depressive disorder. A combination of demographic and clinical variables, with strong contributions from symptoms of depressed mood, reduced interest, decreased activity, indecisiveness, pessimism and anxiety significantly predicted treatment outcomes, explaining 5-10% of variance in symptom improvement with escitalopram. Similar combinations of variables predicted remission with area under the curve 0.72, explaining approximately 15% of variance (pseudo R(2)) in who achieves remission, with strong contributions from body mass index, appetite, interest-activity symptom dimension and anxious-somatizing depression subtype. Escitalopram-specific outcome prediction was more accurate than generic outcome prediction, and reached effect sizes that were near or above a previously established benchmark for clinical significance. Outcome prediction on the nortriptyline arm did not significantly differ from chance. These results suggest that easily obtained demographic and clinical variables can predict therapeutic response to escitalopram with clinically meaningful accuracy, suggesting a potential for individualized prescription of this antidepressant drug.

  7. Antidepressant drugs and breastfeeding: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davanzo, Riccardo; Copertino, Marco; De Cunto, Angela; Minen, Federico; Amaddeo, Alessandro

    2011-04-01

    The use of antidepressants in breastfeeding mothers is controversial: Manufacters often routinely discourage breastfeeding for the nursing mother despite the well-known positive impact that breastfeeding carries on the health of the nursing infant and on his or her family and society. We conducted a systematic review of drugs commonly used in the treatment of postpartum depression. For every single drug two sets of data were provided: (1) selected pharmacokinetic characteristics such as half-life, milk-to-plasma ratio, protein binding, and oral bioavailability and (2) information about lactational risk, according to some authoritative sources of the literature: Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation edited by Briggs et al. (Lippincott Williams, Philadelphia, 2008), Medications and Mothers' Milk by Hale (Hale Publishing, Amarillo, TX, 2010), and the LactMed database of TOXNET ( www.pubmed.gov ; accessed June 2010). Notwithstanding a certain variability of advice, we found that (1) knowledge of pharmacokinetic characteristics are scarcely useful to assess safety and (2) the majority of antidepressants are not usually contraindicated: (a) Selective serotinin reuptake inhibitors and nortryptiline have a better safety profile during lactation, (b) fluoxetine must be used carefully, (c) the tricyclic doxepine and the atypical nefazodone should better be avoided, and (d) lithium, usually considered as contraindicated, has been recently rehabilitated.

  8. Antidepressant and anxiolytic effects of hydroalcoholic extract from Salvia elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Ruiz, Maribel; García-Beltrán, Yolanda; Mora, Sergio; Díaz-Véliz, Gabriela; Viana, Glauce S B; Tortoriello, Jaime; Ramírez, Guillermo

    2006-08-11

    Salvia elegans Vahl (Lamiaceae), popularly known as "mirto", is a shrub that has been widely used in Mexican traditional medicine for the treatment of different central nervous system (CNS) diseases, principally, anxiety. Nevertheless, the available scientific information about this species is scarce and there are no reports related to its possible effect on the CNS. In this work, the antidepressant and anxiolytic like effects of hydroalcoholic (60%) extract of Salvia elegans (leaves and flowers) were evaluated in mice. The extract, administered orally, was able to increase the percentage of time spent and the percentage of arm entries in the open arms of the elevated plus-maze, as well as to increase the time spent by mice in the illuminated side of the light-dark test, and to decrease the immobility time of mice subjected to the forced swimming test. The same extract was not able to modify the spontaneous locomotor activity measured in the open field test. These results provide support for the potential antidepressant and anxiolytic activity of Salvia elegans.

  9. Ginkgo biloba for antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, A J; Bartlik, B

    1998-01-01

    In an open trial ginkgo biloba, an extract derived from the leaf of the Chinese ginkgo tree and noted for its cerebral enhancing effects, was found to be 84% effective in treating antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction predominately caused by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs, N = 63). Women (n = 33) were more responsive to the sexually enhancing effects of ginkgo biloba than men (N = 30), with relative success rates of 91% versus 76%. Ginkgo biloba generally had a positive effect on all 4 phases of the sexual response cycle: desire, excitement (erection and lubrication), orgasm, and resolution (afterglow). This study originated from the observation that a geriatric patient on ginkgo biloba for memory enhancement noted improved erections. Patients exhibited sexual dysfunction secondary to a variety of antidepressant medications including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRIs), serotonin and nonrepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRIs) monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOIs), and tricyclics. Dosages of ginkgo biloba extract ranged from 60 mg qd to 120 mg bid (average = 209mg/d). The common side effects were gastrointestinal disturbances, headache, and general central nervous system activation. The article includes a discussion of presumed pharmacologic mechanisms, including effects on platelet activating factor, prostaglandins, peripheral vasodilatation, and central serotonin and norepinephrine receptor factor modulation.

  10. Common mechanisms of pain and depression: Are antidepressants also analgesics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza eNekovarova

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Neither pain, nor depression exist as independent phenomena per se, they are highly subjective inner states, formed by our brain and built on the bases of our experiences, cognition and emotions. Chronic pain is associated with changes in brain physiology and anatomy. It has been suggested that the neuronal activity underlying subjective perception of chronic pain may be divergent from the activity associated with acute pain. We will discuss the possible common pathophysiological mechanism of chronic pain and depression with respect to the default mode network of the brain, neuroplasticity and the effect of antidepressants on these two pathological conditions. The default mode network of the brain has an important role in the representation of introspective mental activities and therefore can be considered as a nodal point, common for both chronic pain and depression. Neuroplasticity which involves molecular, cellular and synaptic processes modifying connectivity between neurons and neuronal circuits can also be affected by pathological states such as chronic pain or depression. We suppose that pathogenesis of depression and chronic pain shares common negative neuroplastic changes in the central nervous system. The positive impact of antidepressants would result in a reduction of these pathological cellular/molecular processes and in the amelioration of symptoms, but it may also increase survival times and quality of life of patients with chronic cancer pain.

  11. Newer antidepressants in pregnancy: prospective outcome of a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaris, Fusun; Kadioglu, Mine; Kesim, Murat; Ulku, Cunay; Yaris, Ersin; Kalyoncu, Nuri Ihsan; Unsal, Mesut

    2004-12-01

    Antidepressant drug choice in pregnancy is a complex problem especially for new drugs. Among 590 cases exposed to drugs during pregnancy who were followed by our center, 21 cases used newer antidepressants, i.e., venlafaxine, mirtazapine, nefazodone. We present the gestational findings and fetal outcomes of these cases. Ten cases had used venlafaxine, one case had used both venlafaxine and mirtazapine, eight had used mirtazapine alone or with some other drugs and two had used nefazodone, in the first trimester. Of the 21 cases, 17 (80.9%) had healthy babies, 3 (14.3%) decided to terminate the pregnancy, and 1 (4.8%) spontaneous abortion was observed in a case exposed to mirtazapine, alprazolam, diazepam and trifluoperazine. All obstetrical findings were normal during the pregnancy of each case. No congenital abnormality and developmental problem was observed in the babies followed up for 12 months. The aim of the present study is to contribute the data to the limited knowledge available in the literature regarding human pregnancy.

  12. Secondary metabolites from three Florida sponges with antidepressant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanowska, Anna J; Rao, Karumanchi V; Childress, Suzanne; El-Alfy, Abir; Matsumoto, Rae R; Kelly, Michelle; Stewart, Gina S; Sufka, Kenneth J; Hamann, Mark T

    2008-02-01

    Brominated indole alkaloids are a common class of metabolites reported from sponges of the order Verongida. Herein we report the isolation, structure determination, and activity of metabolites from three Florida sponges, namely, Verongula rigida (order Verongida, family Aplysinidae), Smenospongia aurea, and S. cerebriformis (order Dictyoceratida, family Thorectidae). All three species were investigated chemically, revealing similarities in secondary metabolites. Brominated compounds, as well as sesquiterpene quinones and hydroquinones, were identified from both V. rigida and S. aurea despite their apparent taxonomic differences at the ordinal level. Similar metabolites found in these distinct sponge species of two different genera provide evidence for a microbial origin of the metabolites. Isolated compounds were evaluated in the Porsolt forced swim test (FST) and the chick anxiety-depression continuum model. Among the isolated compounds, 5,6-dibromo- N,N-dimethyltryptamine ( 1) exhibited significant antidepressant-like action in the rodent FST model, while 5-bromo- N,N-dimethyltryptamine ( 2) caused significant reduction of locomotor activity indicative of a potential sedative action. The current study provides ample evidence that marine natural products with the diversity of brominated marine alkaloids will provide potential leads for antidepressant and anxiolytic drugs.

  13. Inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase by tricyclic antidepressants and analogons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Nadine; Sharma, Deepa; Gulbins, Erich; Becker, Katrin Anne; Edelmann, Bärbel

    2014-01-01

    Amitriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant, has been used in the clinic to treat a number of disorders, in particular major depression and neuropathic pain. In the 1970s the ability of tricyclic antidepressants to inhibit acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) was discovered. The enzyme ASM catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to ceramide. ASM and ceramide were shown to play a crucial role in a wide range of diseases, including cancer, cystic fibrosis, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and major depression, as well as viral (e.g., measles virus) and bacterial (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) infections. Ceramide molecules may act in these diseases by the alteration of membrane biophysics, the self-association of ceramide molecules within the cell membrane and the ultimate formation of larger ceramide-enriched membrane domains/platforms. These domains were shown to serve the clustering of certain receptors such as CD95 and may also act in the above named diseases. The potential to block the generation of ceramide by inhibiting the ASM has opened up new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of these conditions. Since amitriptyline is one of the longest used clinical drugs and side effects are well studied, it could potentially become a cheap and easily accessible medication for patients suffering from these diseases. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of current in vitro and in vivo studies and clinical trials utilizing amitriptyline to inhibit ASM and contemplate possible future applications of the drug.

  14. Skjern River Restoration Counterfactual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Thomas Juel

    2014-01-01

    heritage. While the meanders of the Skjern River were reconstructed according to its assumed course in 1870s, the embanked canal, which was the main feature and symbol of a comprehensive cultivation project from the 1960s, was deconstructed and reduced to incomprehensible traces of the past. Not only did...... history and more openness towards constant change. In this approach the idea of palimpsest as metaphor for the cultural landscape plays an important role. Rather than being an obstacle for the restoration of nature, the historical layer following the comprehensive cultivation project from the 1960s...

  15. Chromosome 1 replacement increases brain orexins and antidepressive measures without increasing locomotor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Pingfu; Hu, Yufen; Vurbic, Drina; Akladious, Afaf; Strohl, Kingman P

    2014-12-01

    Decreased orexin level has been well demonstrated in patients suffering from narcolepsy, depression accompanied with suicide attempt; obstructive sleep apnea and comorbidity were also demonstrated in these diseases. As C57BL/6J (B6) mice are more "depressed" and have lower brain orexins than A/J mice, B6 mice having chromosome 1 replacement (B6A1 mice) might have restored orexin levels and less depressive behavior. We studied the behavior of 4-6 month old B6, A/J and B6A1 mice with forced swim, tail suspension, and locomotor activity tests. The animals were then sacrificed and hypothalamus and medullas dissected from brain tissue. Orexins-A and -B were determined by radioimmunoassay. Compared with A/J mice, B6 mice displayed several signs of depression, including increased immobility, increased locomotors activity, and decreased orexin A and -B levels in both the hypothalamus and medulla. Compared to B6 mice, B6A1 mice exhibited significantly higher levels of orexins-A and -B in both brain regions. B6A1 mice also exhibited antidepressive features in most of measured variables, including decreased locomotor activity, decreased immobility and increased swim in tail suspension test; compared with B6 mice, however. B6A1 mice also reversed immobility in the early phase of the swim test. In summary, B6 mice exhibited depressive attributes compared with A/J mice, including increased locomotor activity, greater immobility, and decreased brain orexins, these were largely reversed in B6A1 mice. We conclude that orexin levels modulate these B6 behaviors, likely due to expression of A/J alleles on Chromosome 1.

  16. Age dependence of the rapid antidepressant and synaptic effects of acute NMDA receptor blockade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena eNosyreva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ketamine is a NMDA receptor antagonist that produces rapid antidepressant responses in individuals with major depressive disorder. The antidepressant action of ketamine has been linked to blocking NMDA receptor activation at rest, which inhibits eukaryotic elongation factor2 kinase leading to desuppression of protein synthesis and synaptic potentiation in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Here, we investigated ketamine mediated antidepressant response and the resulting synaptic potentiation in juvenile animals. We found that ketamine did not produce an antidepressant response in juvenile animals in the novelty suppressed feeding or the forced swim test. In addition ketamine application failed to trigger synaptic potentiation in hippocampal slices obtained from juvenile animals, unlike its action in slices from older animals (6-9 weeks old. The inability of ketamine to trigger an antidepressant response or subsequent synaptic plasticity processes suggests a developmental component to ketamine mediated antidepressant efficacy. We also show that the NMDAR antagonist AP5 triggers synaptic potentiation in mature hippocampus similar to the action of ketamine, demonstrating that global competitive blockade of NMDA receptors is sufficient to trigger this effect. These findings suggest that global blockade of NMDA receptors in developmentally mature hippocampal synapses are required for the antidepressant efficacy of ketamine.

  17. Assessing substrates underlying the behavioral effects of antidepressants using the modified rat forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cryan, John F; Valentino, Rita J; Lucki, Irwin

    2005-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most widely prescribed antidepressant class today and exert their antidepressant-like effects by increasing synaptic concentrations of serotonin (5-HT). The rat forced swim test (FST) is the most widely used animal test predictive of antidepressant action. Procedural modifications recently introduced by our laboratory have enabled SSRI-induced behavioral responses to be measured in the modified FST. The use of this model to understand the pharmacological and physiological mechanisms underlying the role of 5-HT in the behavioral effects of antidepressant drugs is reviewed. Although all antidepressants reduced behavioral immobility, those antidepressants that increase serotonergic neurotransmission predominantly increase swimming behavior whereas those that increase catacholaminergic neurotransmission increase climbing behavior. The 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(1B/1D) and 5-HT(2C) receptors are the 5-HT receptors most important to the therapeutic effects of SSRIs, based on extensive evaluation of agonists and antagonists of individual 5-HT receptor subtypes. Studies involving chronic administration have shown that the effects of antidepressants are augmented following chronic treatment. Other studies have demonstrated strain differences in the response to serotonergic compounds. Finally, a physiological model of performance in the rat FST has been proposed involving the regulation of 5-HT transmission by corticotropin releasing factor (CRF).

  18. The discovery of antidepressant drugs by computer-analyzed human cerebral bio-electrical potentials (CEEG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itil, T M

    1983-01-01

    Antidepressant properties of six compounds were predicted based on their computer-analyzed human electroencephalographical (CEEG) profiles. The clinical investigations with mianserin (GB-94) confirmed the CEEG prediction. This compound has now been marketed as the first antidepressant of which the clinical effects were discovered solely by the quantitative pharmaco-EEG method. As predicted by the CEEG, clinical antidepressant properties of GC-46, mesterolone, and estradiol valerate were observed in preliminary investigations. No extensive studies with definite statistical results were yet carried out with these compounds. No systematic large studies could be conducted with cyclozocine and cyproterone acetate because of the intolerable side effects with these compounds. The optical isomers of mianserin, GF-59 and GF-60, both predicted as antidepressant by the computer EEG data base, have not yet been tested in depressive patients. None of these compounds possess the "typical" pharmacological and/or biochemical profiles of marketed antidepressants. Thus, the discovery of the established antidepressant properties of mianserin (GB-94) by computer analyzed EEG method challenges the well-known biochemical hypotheses of depression and the "classical" development of antidepressant drugs.

  19. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor as a marker for use of antidepressants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Haastrup

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of depression. A few cross-sectional population-based studies have found that depression is associated with increased levels of inflammatory markers. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activation receptor (suPAR is known to be a stable marker for inflammation. We investigated the bidirectional association between suPAR levels and use of antidepressants. METHODS: suPAR level was measured in 9305 blood donors and analysed in relation to 5-years follow-up data on purchase of antidepressants and hospital diagnoses of depression from a nationwide Danish register. RESULTS: For men and women without prior use of antidepressants we found a significantly higher risk for incident use of antidepressants with higher suPAR values. For men, the risk of first use of antidepressants increased by 72% from the 1st to the 4th quartile (HR = 1.72, 95% CI: 1.11-2.69. For women, it increased by 108% from the 1st to the 4th quartile (HR = 2.08, 95% CI: 1.45-2.98. Previous use of antidepressants was also significantly associated with higher suPAR levels (p = 0.002. CONCLUSIONS: High suPAR levels are associated with an increased risk for both previous and future use of antidepressants in healthy men and women. High suPAR are also associated with increased risk for a hospital diagnosis of depression.

  20. REM sleep homeostasis in the absence of REM sleep: Effects of antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Andrew; Wafford, Keith; Shanks, Elaine; Ligocki, Marcin; Edgar, Dale M; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2016-09-01

    Most antidepressants suppress rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, which is thought to be important to brain function, yet the resulting REM sleep restriction is well tolerated. This study investigated the impact of antidepressants with different mechanisms of action, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and tricyclic antidepressants (TCA), on the regulation of REM sleep in rats. REM sleep was first demonstrated to be homeostatically regulated using 5, 8 and 10 h of REM-sleep specific restriction through EEG-triggered arousals, with an average of 91 ± 10% of lost REM sleep recovered following a 26-29 -hour recovery period. Acute treatment with the antidepressants paroxetine, citalopram and imipramine inhibited REM sleep by 84 ± 8, 84 ± 8 and 69 ± 9% respectively relative to vehicle control. The pharmacologically-induced REM sleep deficits by paroxetine and citalopram were not fully recovered, whereas, after imipramine the REM sleep deficit was fully compensated. Given the marked difference between REM sleep recovery following the administration of paroxetine, citalopram, imipramine and REM sleep restriction, the homeostatic response was further examined by pairing REM sleep specific restriction with the three antidepressants. Surprisingly, the physiologically-induced REM sleep deficits incurred prior to suppression of REM sleep by all antidepressants was consistently recovered. The data indicate that REM sleep homeostasis remains operative following subsequent treatment with antidepressants and is unaffected by additional pharmacological inhibition of REM sleep.

  1. Rats bred for helplessness exhibit positive reinforcement learning deficits which are not alleviated by an antidepressant dose of the MAO-B inhibitor deprenyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Daniela; Henn, Fritz A; Petri, David; Huston, Joseph P

    2016-08-04

    Principles of negative reinforcement learning may play a critical role in the etiology and treatment of depression. We examined the integrity of positive reinforcement learning in congenitally helpless (cH) rats, an animal model of depression, using a random ratio schedule and a devaluation-extinction procedure. Furthermore, we tested whether an antidepressant dose of the monoamine oxidase (MAO)-B inhibitor deprenyl would reverse any deficits in positive reinforcement learning. We found that cH rats (n=9) were impaired in the acquisition of even simple operant contingencies, such as a fixed interval (FI) 20 schedule. cH rats exhibited no apparent deficits in appetite or reward sensitivity. They reacted to the devaluation of food in a manner consistent with a dose-response relationship. Reinforcer motivation as assessed by lever pressing across sessions with progressively decreasing reward probabilities was highest in congenitally non-helpless (cNH, n=10) rats as long as the reward probabilities remained relatively high. cNH compared to wild-type (n=10) rats were also more resistant to extinction across sessions. Compared to saline (n=5), deprenyl (n=5) reduced the duration of immobility of cH rats in the forced swimming test, indicative of antidepressant effects, but did not restore any deficits in the acquisition of a FI 20 schedule. We conclude that positive reinforcement learning was impaired in rats bred for helplessness, possibly due to motivational impairments but not deficits in reward sensitivity, and that deprenyl exerted antidepressant effects but did not reverse the deficits in positive reinforcement learning.

  2. Antidepressant-like effect of lead in adult mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantovani M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that lead can cause behavioral impairment by inhibiting the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor complex. MK-801, a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist, exhibits an antidepressant-like action in the forced swimming test. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether subacute lead exposure in adult male Swiss mice weighing 30-35 g causes an antidepressant-like action in a forced swimming test. Mice were injected intraperitoneally (ip with 10 mg/kg lead acetate or saline daily for 7 consecutive days. Twenty-four hours after the last treatment, the saline and lead-treated mice received an injection of MK-801 (0.01 mg/kg, ip or saline and were tested in forced swimming and in open-field tests. Immobility time was similarly reduced in the saline-MK-801, Pb-saline and Pb-MK-801 groups compared to the saline-saline group (mean ± SEM; 197.3 ± 18.5, 193.5 ± 15.8, 191.3 ± 12.3 and 264.0 ± 14.4 s, respectively; N = 9. These data indicate that lead may exert its effect on the forced swimming test by directly or indirectly inhibiting the NMDA receptor complex. Lead treatment caused no deficit in memory of habituation and did not affect locomotor activity in an open-field (N = 14. However, mice that received MK-801 after lead exhibited a deficit in habituation (22% reduction in rearing responses between session 3 and 1; N = 14 as compared to control (41% reduction in rearing responses; N = 15, further suggesting that lead may have affected the NMDA receptor activity. Forced-swim immobility in a basin in two daily consecutive sessions was also significantly decreased by lead exposure (mean ± SEM; day 1 = 10.6 ± 3.2, day 2 = 19.6 ± 3.6; N = 16 as compared to control (day 1 = 18.4 ± 3.8, day 2 = 34.0 ± 3.7; N = 17, whereas the number of crossings was not affected by lead treatment, further indicating a specific antidepressant-like action of lead.

  3. Involvement of sigma-1 receptors in the antidepressant-like effects of dextromethorphan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Nguyen

    Full Text Available Dextromethorphan is an antitussive with a high margin of safety that has been hypothesized to display rapid-acting antidepressant activity based on pharmacodynamic similarities to the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine. In addition to binding to NMDA receptors, dextromethorphan binds to sigma-1 (σ1 receptors, which are believed to be protein targets for a potential new class of antidepressant medications. The purpose of this study was to determine whether dextromethorphan elicits antidepressant-like effects and the involvement of σ1 receptors in mediating its antidepressant-like actions. The antidepressant-like effects of dextromethorphan were assessed in male, Swiss Webster mice using the forced swim test. Next, σ1 receptor antagonists (BD1063 and BD1047 were evaluated in conjunction with dextromethorphan to determine the involvement of σ receptors in its antidepressant-like effects. Quinidine, a cytochrome P450 (CYP 2D6 inhibitor, was also evaluated in conjunction with dextromethorphan to increase the bioavailability of dextromethorphan and reduce exposure to additional metabolites. Finally, saturation binding assays were performed to assess the manner in which dextromethorphan interacts at the σ1 receptor. Our results revealed dextromethorphan displays antidepressant-like effects in the forced swim test that can be attenuated by pretreatment with σ1 receptor antagonists, with BD1063 causing a shift to the right in the dextromethorphan dose response curve. Concomitant administration of quinidine potentiated the antidepressant-like effects of dextromethorphan. Saturation binding assays revealed that a Ki concentration of dextromethorphan reduces both the Kd and the Bmax of [(3H](+-pentazocine binding to σ1 receptors. Taken together, these data suggest that dextromethorphan exerts some of its antidepressant actions through σ1 receptors.

  4. Modulation of muscarinic system with serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor antidepressant attenuates depression in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paramdeep Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Several studies suggest that muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine is a rapidly acting antidepressant for the treatment-resistant depression. Therefore, this study was carried out to investigate the possibility of synergistic potential of scopolamine with antidepressants for the treatment of depression without memory impairment in mice. Materials and Methods: Antidepressants such as citalopram, duloxetine, fluvoxamine, and venlafaxine at their median effective dose that is 12.5, 42.8, 17.5, 15.7 mg/kg p.o., respectively, were evaluated in combination with scopolamine 0.2 mg/kg intraperitoneally for the synergistic potential for ameliorating depression in Swiss albino mice. A battery of tests including forced swim test (FST and tail suspension test (TST were performed in all the groups comprising vehicle control, scopolamine, antidepressants per se, and the combinations of antidepressants with scopolamine. This was followed by the locomotor activity and memory tests. Results: Behavioral studies indicated that only antidepressant venlafaxine with scopolamine resulted in 95.5% and 93.6% reduction in immobility time compared to the vehicle control in FST and TST, respectively. This is significant (P < 0.0001 synergistic hyper-additive antidepressive-like effect compared to scopolamine per se and venlafaxine per se treatment effects in antidepressant paradigms. All the data were evaluated using the one-way analysis of variance followed by individual comparisons using Tukey′s post-hoc test. Control open field studies demonstrated no significant increase in general locomotion after co-administration of the compounds. Step down avoidance paradigm confirmed that scopolamine at the selected dose has no cognition deficit in any mice. Conclusions: The dose of scopolamine selected for synergistic potential has no detrimental effect on memory. The present results suggest the concoction of scopolamine with venlafaxine for enhanced synergistic

  5. Further evaluation of mechanisms associated with the antidepressant-like signature of scopolamine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Anna E; Schober, Douglas A; Nikolayev, Alexander; Tolstikov, Vladimir V; Anderson, Wesley H; Higgs, Richard E; Kuo, Ming-Shang; Laksmanan, Anastasia; Catlow, John T; Li, Xia; Felder, Christian C; Witkin, Jeffrey M

    2017-03-09

    Conventional antidepressants lack efficacy for many patients (treatment-resistant depression or TRD) and generally take weeks to produce full therapeutic response in others. Emerging data has identified certain drugs such as ketamine as rapidly-acting antidepressants for major depressive disorder and TRD. Scopolamine, a drug used to treat motion sickness and nausea, has also been demonstrated to function as a rapidly-acting antidepressant. The mechanisms associated with efficacy in TRD patients and rapid onset of action have been suggested to involve a-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. Since the work on these mechanisms with scopolamine has been limited, the present set of experiments was designed to further explore these mechanisms of action. Male, NIH Swiss mice demonstrated a robust and immediate antidepressant signature when studied under the forced-swim test. The AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX prevented this antidepressant-like effect of scopolamine and ketamine. An orally-bioavilable mTOR inhibitor (ADZ8055) also attenuated the antidepressant-like effects of scopolamine and ketamine. Scopolamine was also shown to augment the antidepressant-like effect of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram. When given in combination, scopolamine and ketamine acted synergistically to produce antidepressant-like effects. Although drug interaction data suggested that additional mechanisms might be at play, metabolomic analysis of frontal cortex and plasma from muscarinic M1+/+ and M1 -/- mice given scopolamine or vehicle did not reveal any hints as to the nature of these additional mechanisms of action. Overall, the data substantiate and extend the idea that AMPA and mTOR signaling pathways are necessary for the antidepressant-like effects of scopolamine and ketamine, mechanisms that appear to be of general significance for TRD therapeutic agents.

  6. Involvement of Sigma-1 Receptors in the Antidepressant-like Effects of Dextromethorphan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Linda; Robson, Matthew J.; Healy, Jason R.; Scandinaro, Anna L.; Matsumoto, Rae R.

    2014-01-01

    Dextromethorphan is an antitussive with a high margin of safety that has been hypothesized to display rapid-acting antidepressant activity based on pharmacodynamic similarities to the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine. In addition to binding to NMDA receptors, dextromethorphan binds to sigma-1 (σ1) receptors, which are believed to be protein targets for a potential new class of antidepressant medications. The purpose of this study was to determine whether dextromethorphan elicits antidepressant-like effects and the involvement of σ1 receptors in mediating its antidepressant-like actions. The antidepressant-like effects of dextromethorphan were assessed in male, Swiss Webster mice using the forced swim test. Next, σ1 receptor antagonists (BD1063 and BD1047) were evaluated in conjunction with dextromethorphan to determine the involvement of σ receptors in its antidepressant-like effects. Quinidine, a cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 inhibitor, was also evaluated in conjunction with dextromethorphan to increase the bioavailability of dextromethorphan and reduce exposure to additional metabolites. Finally, saturation binding assays were performed to assess the manner in which dextromethorphan interacts at the σ1 receptor. Our results revealed dextromethorphan displays antidepressant-like effects in the forced swim test that can be attenuated by pretreatment with σ1 receptor antagonists, with BD1063 causing a shift to the right in the dextromethorphan dose response curve. Concomitant administration of quinidine potentiated the antidepressant-like effects of dextromethorphan. Saturation binding assays revealed that a Ki concentration of dextromethorphan reduces both the Kd and the Bmax of [3H](+)-pentazocine binding to σ1 receptors. Taken together, these data suggest that dextromethorphan exerts some of its antidepressant actions through σ1 receptors. PMID:24587167

  7. The effects of antenatal depression and antidepressant treatment on placental gene expression

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    Jocelien DA Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of antenatal depression and antidepressant treatment during pregnancy on both mother and child are vigorously studied, but the underlying biology for these effects is largely unknown. The placenta plays a crucial role in the growth and development of the fetus. We performed a gene expression study on the fetal side of the placenta to investigate gene expression patterns in mothers with antenatal depression and in mothers using antidepressant treatment during pregnancy.Placental samples from mothers with normal pregnancies, from mothers with antenatal depression, and from mothers using antidepressants were collected. We performed a pilot microarray study to investigate alterations in the gene expression and selected several genes from the microarray for biological validation with qPCR in a larger sample.In mothers with antenatal depression 108 genes were differentially expressed, whereas 109 genes were differentially expressed in those using antidepressants. Validation of the microarray revealed more robust gene expression differences in the seven genes picked for confirmation in antidepressant-treated women than in depressed women. Among the genes that were validated ROCK2 and C12orf39 were differentially expressed in both depressed and antidepressant-treated women, whereas ROCK1, GCC2, KTN1, and DNM1L were only differentially expressed in the antidepressant-treated women. In conclusion, antenatal depression and antidepressant exposure during pregnancy are associated with altered gene expression in the placenta. Findings on those genes picked for validation were more robust among antidepressant-treated women than in depressed women, possibly due to the fact that depression is a multifactorial condition with varying degrees of endocrine disruption. It remains to be established whether the alterations found in the gene expression of the placenta are found in the fetus as well.

  8. Neuronal and immunological basis of action of antidepressants in chronic pain - clinical and experimental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mika, Joanna; Zychowska, Magdalena; Makuch, Wioletta; Rojewska, Ewelina; Przewlocka, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The current knowledge of the pharmacological actions of the tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) has slowly evolved through their over 40-year history. Chronic pain represents one of the most important public health problems, and antidepressants are an essential part of the therapeutic strategy in addition to classical analgesics. This article reviews the available evidence on the efficacy and safety of antidepressants in chronic pain conditions; namely, headaches, low back pain, fibromyalgia, cancer pain and especially neuropathic pain. TCAs are traditionally the main type of depression medication used to treat chronic pain. Recently, new antidepressants were introduced into clinical use, with a significant reduction in side effects and equivalent efficacy on mood disorders. These new drugs that are effective for chronic pain belong to the tetracyclic antidepressants (TeCAs) group (amoxapine, maprotiline), the serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) group (duloxetine, venlafaxine, milnacipran) and the atypical antidepressants group (bupropion, trazodone, mirtazapine, nefazodone). In this review, we present the available publications on TCAs (amitriptyline, doxepin, imipramine, desipramine, nortriptyline), TeCAs (amoxapine, maprotiline), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (citalopram, fluoxetine, paroxetine), SNRIs (duloxetine, venlafaxine, milnacipran) and atypical antidepressants (bupropion) for the treatment of neuropathic pain. We also review analgesics acting as both opioid receptor agonists and also acting as aminergic reuptake inhibitors. Existing data are insufficient to conclude which of these new classes of antidepressants has the best clinical profile and will be the most effective in the treatment of neuropathic pain; in addition, a lower incidence of side effects should be considered. Increased experimental and translational research is a key for further improvement of the treatment of chronic pain with antidepressants. However

  9. Antidepressant Utilization and Suicide in Europe: An Ecological Multi-National Study.

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    Ricardo Gusmão

    Full Text Available Research concerning the association between use of antidepressants and incidence of suicide has yielded inconsistent results and is the subject of considerable controversy. The first aim is to describe trends in the use of antidepressants and rates of suicide in Europe, adjusted for gross domestic product, alcohol consumption, unemployment, and divorce. The second aim is to explore if any observed reduction in the rate of suicide in different European countries preceded the trend for increased use of antidepressants.Data were obtained for 29 European countries between 1980 and 2009. Pearson correlations were used to explore the direction and magnitude of associations. Generalized linear mixed models and Poisson regression distribution were used to clarify the effects of antidepressants on suicide rates, while an autoregressive adjusted model was used to test the interaction between antidepressant utilization and suicide over two time periods: 1980-1994 and 1995-2009.An inverse correlation was observed in all countries between recorded Standardised Death Rate (SDR for suicide and antidepressant Defined Daily Dosage (DDD, with the exception of Portugal. Variability was marked in the association between suicide and alcohol, unemployment and divorce, with countries depicting either a positive or a negative correlation with the SDR for suicide. Every unit increase in DDD of an antidepressant per 1000 people per day, adjusted for these confounding factors, reduces the SDR by 0.088. The correlation between DDD and suicide related SDR was negative in both time periods considered, albeit more pronounced between 1980 and 1994.Suicide rates have tended to decrease more in European countries where there has been a greater increase in the use of antidepressants. These findings underline the importance of the appropriate use of antidepressants as part of routine care for people diagnosed with depression, therefore reducing the risk of suicide.

  10. Technologies for lake restoration

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    Helmut KLAPPER

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Lakes are suffering from different stress factors and need to be restored using different approaches. The eutrophication remains as the main water quality management problem for inland waters: both lakes and reservoirs. The way to curb the degradation is to stop the nutrient sources and to accelerate the restoration with help of in-lake technologies. Especially lakes with a long retention time need (eco- technological help to decrease the nutrient content in the free water. The microbial and other organic matter from sewage and other autochthonous biomasses, causes oxygen depletion, which has many adverse effects. In less developed countries big reservoirs function as sewage treatment plants. Natural aeration solves problems only partly and many pollutants tend to accumulate in the sediments. The acidification by acid rain and by pyrite oxidation has to be controlled by acid neutralizing technologies. Addition of alkaline chemicals is useful only for soft waters, and technologies for (microbial alkalinization of very acidic hardwater mining lakes are in development. The corrective measures differ from those in use for eutrophication control. The salinization and water shortage mostly occurs if more water is used than available. L. Aral, L. Tschad, the Dead Sea or L. Nasser belong to waters with most severe environmental problems on a global scale. Their hydrologic regime needs to be evaluated. The inflow of salt water at the bottom of some mining lakes adds to stability of stratification, and thus accumulation of hydrogen sulphide in the monimolimnion of the meromictic lakes. Destratification, which is the most used technology, is only restricted applicable because of the dangerous concentrations of the byproducts of biological degradation. The contamination of lakes with hazardous substances from industry and agriculture require different restoration technologies, including subhydric isolation and storage, addition of nutrients for better self

  11. Rising Trend of Use of Antidepressants Induced Non- Puerperal Lactation: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Wazid; Jiloha, R.C.

    2016-01-01

    Non puerperal lactation or galactorrhea is a well known side effect of antipsychotic drugs but has been infrequently described with the use of antidepressants. In past few decades, there have been emerging trend of isolated case reports of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors induced non puerperal lactation. We report a case of non puerperal lactation following usage of second generation tricyclic antidepressant, nortriptyline and resolution on withdrawing the drug. Literature review has been done for antidepressant induced galactorrhea to understand the current trends, putative mechanism as different from one implicated for antipsychotics and its clinical utility. PMID:27504388

  12. Aquatic blues: modeling depression and antidepressant action in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Michael; Stewart, Adam Michael; Kalueff, Allan V

    2014-12-01

    Depression is a serious psychiatric condition affecting millions of patients worldwide. Unipolar depression is characterized by low mood, anhedonia, social withdrawal and other severely debilitating psychiatric symptoms. Bipolar disorder manifests in alternating depressed mood and 'hyperactive' manic/hypomanic states. Animal experimental models are an invaluable tool for research into the pathogenesis of bipolar/unipolar depression, and for the development of potential treatments. Due to their high throughput value, genetic tractability, low cost and quick reproductive cycle, zebrafish (Danio rerio) have emerged as a promising new model species for studying brain disorders. Here, we discuss the developing utility of zebrafish for studying depression disorders, and outline future areas of research in this field. We argue that zebrafish represent a useful model organism for studying depression and its behavioral, genetic and physiological mechanisms, as well as for anti-depressant drug discovery.

  13. St. John's wort and antidepressant drug interactions in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, M S; Buchalter, E; Giambanco, V

    1999-01-01

    There is increasing interest in and use of the herbal preparation St. John's wort. Hypericin, the major active ingredient, has many psychoactive properties. The agent is sold in the US as a nutritional supplement and is recommended for numerous conditions, including depression, anxiety, insomnia, and inflammation. We report a series of five cases of clinically diagnosed central serotonergic syndrome among elderly patients who combined prescription antidepressants with St. John's wort. Older adults are large consumers of both over-the-counter and prescription medications. They are particularly vulnerable to interactions between medications and products sold as nutritional or herbal supplements. St. John's wort requires further evaluation due to potential for drug interactions with central nervous system agents and for more definitive therapeutic indications.

  14. Synthesis and anti-depressant evaluation of novel pyrazolone derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar Merugumolu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Diazotization of substituted anilines with NaNO2 and concentrated hydrochloric acid at 0ºC gave the diazonium chlorides. Coupling of substituted aryl diazonium chlorides with ethyl acetoacetate in methanol gave ethyl-2-aryl-hydrazono-3-oxobutyrates (2a-h. Reaction of (2a-h with naphthoic carbohydrazide (3 gave the title compounds pyrazolone derivatives (4a-h. The newly synthesized compounds were screened for their in vivo anti-depressant activity by tail suspension test and forced swimming test. Some of the tested compounds 4f, 4g showed very good activity when compared to the standard drug imipramine. The newly synthesized compounds were characterized by physical parameters and the structures were elucidated by spectral data.

  15. Patients' perspectives on antidepressant treatment in consultations with physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosgerau, Christina Fogtmann; Davidsen, Annette Sofie

    2014-05-01

    Patient perspectives on antidepressant treatment and physician attention, and responses toward these in consultations with patients diagnosed with depression, are rarely studied. We analyzed video-recorded consultations with general practitioners (GPs) and psychiatrists. We used conversation analysis and systemic functional linguistics and found that the perspectives patients expressed related to the possibility of achieving, and the inability to retain, a sense of agency. Patients also presented indirect expressions of shame and expressions suggesting alienation toward medical treatment. GPs attended to patient perspectives by talking about medication indirectly. When patients expressed their perspectives, GPs responded by being nonauthoritative but also without prompting patients to elaborate on their reflections. Psychiatrists responded authoritatively and never urged patients to reflect on their perspectives. Shared decision making did not take place because physicians did not explore patients' perspectives in depth or offer their expertise by taking these perspectives into consideration.

  16. Profitable failure: antidepressant drugs and the triumph of flawed experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGoey, Linsey

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on an analysis of Irving Kirsch and colleagues' controversial 2008 article in "PLoS [Public Library of Science] Magazine" on the efficacy of SSRI antidepressant drugs such as Prozac, I examine flaws within the methodologies of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that have made it difficult for regulators, clinicians and patients to determine the therapeutic value of this class of drug. I then argue, drawing analogies to work by Pierre Bourdieu and Michael Power, that it is the very limitations of RCTs -- their inadequacies in producing reliable evidence of clinical effects -- that help to strengthen assumptions of their superiority as methodological tools. Finally, I suggest that the case of RCTs helps to explore the question of why failure is often useful in consolidating the authority of those who have presided over that failure, and why systems widely recognized to be ineffective tend to assume greater authority at the very moment when people speak of their malfunction.

  17. Anti-depressants make amphipods see the light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, Yasmin; Ford, Alex T

    2010-09-01

    The effects of serotonin altering parasites, serotonin, the anti-depressant fluoxetine, plus two other highly prescribed pharmaceuticals (carbamazepine and diclofenac) on the behaviour of the marine amphipod, Echinogammarus marinus were investigated. Acanthocephalan parasites are known to alter the swimming behaviour in their amphipod hosts through changes in serotonergic activity resulting in increased predation. Behavioural assays were adapted to record changes in phototaxis and geotaxis behaviour in male E. marinus following 7, 14 and 21 days exposure to serotonin and each pharmaceutical compound at 4 concentrations compared to a control (between 10 ng/L and 10 microg/L). E. marinus infected with acanthocephalans parasites had both significantly higher phototaxis and geotaxis scores than those of uninfected specimens. Phototaxis and geotaxis behaviour increased significantly in a concentration-dependent manner with exposure to serotonin. Fluoxetine significantly altered phototaxis and geotaxis activity in what appeared to be a non-monotonic concentration response curve with the greatest behavioural changes observed at 100 ng/L. The main patterns of these behavioural responses were consistent between two trials and the 3 weeks exposure with specimens spending more time within the light and occurring higher in the water column. No obvious trends could be concluded in the phototaxis and geotaxis scores from individuals exposed to carbamazepine or diclofenac as might be expected from their known mode of action. From this study phototaxis and geotaxis behaviour have been observed to be affected by exposure to serotonin modulators. Parasite studies have shown strong links between changes in behaviour and increased predation risk correlating with changes in serotonergic activity. This study has highlighted the potential for highly prescribed anti-depressant drugs to change the behaviour of an ecologically relevant marine species in ways which could conceivably lead to

  18. Antidepressant Binding Site in a Bacterial Homologue of Neurotransmitter Transporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh,S.; Yamashita, A.; Gouaux, E.

    2007-01-01

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 {angstrom} above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the

  19. Possible Involvement of µ Opioid Receptor in the Antidepressant-Like Effect of Shuyu Formula in Restraint Stress-Induced Depression-Like Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-rong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently μ opioid receptor (MOR has been shown to be closely associated with depression. Here we investigated the action of Shuyu, a Chinese herbal prescription, on repeated restraint stress induced depression-like rats, with specific attention to the role of MOR and the related signal cascade. Our results showed that repeated restraint stress caused significant depressive-like behaviors, as evidenced by reduced body weight gain, prolonged duration of immobility in forced swimming test, and decreased number of square-crossings and rearings in open field test. The stress-induced depression-like behaviors were relieved by Shuyu, which was accompanied by decreased expression of MOR in hippocampus. Furthermore, Shuyu upregulated BDNF protein expression, restored the activity of CREB, and stimulated MEK and ERK phosphorylation in hippocampus of stressed rats. More importantly, MOR is involved in the effects of Shuyu on these depression-related signals, as they can be strengthened by MOR antagonist CTAP. Collectively, these data indicated that the antidepressant-like properties of Shuyu are associated with MOR and the corresponding CREB, BDNF, MEK, and ERK signal pathway. Our study supports clinical use of Shuyu as an effective treatment of depression and also suggests that MOR might be a target for treatment of depression and developing novel antidepressants.

  20. Archived film analysis and restoration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rares, A.

    2004-01-01

    The progressive degradation of current film archives poses a serious threat to the preservation of our cultural and technical heritage. Digitization and digital restoration are currently the most viable solutions for the long term preservation and high quality restoration of filmed material. They al

  1. SOCIAL WELFARE AND RESTORATIVE JUSTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrell Fox

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the links and connections between social work and restorative justice. After a brief description of social work, restorative justice and family group conferencing, I will explore some the complementary theoretical links and practice applications, critically examining the potential implications and opportunities for social work practitioners and academics in relation to practice.

  2. Association between antidepressant drug use and hyponatremia. A case control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Movig, K.L.L.; Egberts, A.C.G.; Lenderink, A.W.; van den Akker, V.G.A.; Hodiamont, P.P.G.; Goldschmidt, H.M.J.; Leufkens, H.G.M.

    2002-01-01

    Conclusions SSRIs are more frequently associated with hyponatraemia than other classes of antidepressant drugs. This adverse drug reaction was more common in older patients (65 years) and in those using diuretics.

  3. Studies on antidepressant action of a new oxazolidinone derivative AS-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostowski, W; Płaźnik, A; Bidziński, A; Rosnowska, E; Jessa, M; Nazar, M

    1994-01-01

    On the basis of previous laboratory studies AS-8 was suggested to possess antidepressant-like activity. Forced swim test, learned helplessness and conflict Vogel's test were performed after three prior administrations of AS-8 (24, 5 and 1 h before the test). The data have shown that AS-8 produces moderate antidepressant effect but did not induce anxiolytic-like action. Biochemical data revealed increased brain 5-HT and 5-HIAA levels following AS-8 administration. The combined treatment of rats with AS-8 (100 mg/kg) and amitriptyline (5 mg/kg) or desipramine (1.25 mg/kg) significantly stimulated active behavior in the forced swim test above the level obtained with each of the drug given separately. The present data suggest the potential antidepressant efficacy of AS-8 in conjunction with small doses of tricyclic antidepressants.

  4. Induction of neuroserpin expression in rat frontal cortex after chronic antidepressant treatment and electroconvulsive treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Yamada, Misa; Kitahara, Sari; Higuchi, Teruhiko; Honda, Kazuo; Kamijima, Kunitoshi; Yamada, Mitsuhiko

    2006-02-01

    Using expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis, we previously identified certain molecular machinery that mediates antidepressant effects. To date, several partial cDNA fragments, termed antidepressant-related genes (ADRGs), have been isolated as ESTs from rat brain. In the present study, we identified two of the ADRGs to be rat neuroserpin. Using real-time quantitative PCR, we demonstrated increased neuroserpin mRNA expression in rat frontal cortex after chronic treatment with several classes of antidepressants, including imipramine, fluoxetine, sertraline, and venlafaxine. Electroconvulsive treatment (ECT), another therapeutic treatment for depression, also increased neuroserpin expression in rat frontal cortex. Neuroserpin is a serine protease inhibitor that is implicated in the regulation of synaptic plasticity, neuronal migration, and axogenesis in the central nervous system. In conclusion, our results support the hypothesis that neuroserpin-mediated plastic changes in frontal cortex may underlie the therapeutic action of antidepressants and ECT.

  5. Do patients initiate therapy? Primary non-adherence to statins and antidepressants in Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thengilsdõttir, G.; Pottegård, A.; Halldõrsson, M.;

    2015-01-01

    Background Primary non-adherence occurs when a drug has been prescribed but the patient fails to have it dispensed at the pharmacy. Aims To assess primary non-adherence to statins and antidepressants in Iceland, the association of demographic factors with primary non-adherence, and the time from...... when a prescription is issued until it is dispensed. Methods Data on patients receiving a new prescription for a statin or an antidepressant from the Primary Health Care database were linked with dispensing histories from The Icelandic Prescription Database. The proportion of patients who did not have.......0% for statins and antidepressants, respectively. The majority of patients had their prescription dispensed within 7 days (85% for statins, 87% for antidepressants). Being disabled and receiving a prescription for an expensive drug was associated with higher rates of primary non-adherence. Conclusion The rate...

  6. The International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) Task Force Report on Antidepressant Use in Bipolar Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pacchiarotti, Isabella; Bond, David J.; Baldessarini, Ross J.; Nolen, Willem A.; Grunze, Heinz; Licht, Rasmus W.; Post, Robert M.; Berk, Michael; Goodwin, Guy M.; Sachs, Gary S.; Tondo, Leonardo; Findling, Robert L.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Tohen, Mauricio; Undurraga, Juan; Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Goldberg, Joseph F.; Yildiz, Aysegul; Altshuler, Lori L.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Mitchell, Philip B.; Thase, Michael E.; Koukopoulos, Athanasios; Colom, Francesc; Frye, Mark A.; Malhi, Gin S.; Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N.; Vazquez, Gustavo; Perlis, Roy H.; Ketter, Terence A.; Cassidy, Frederick; Akiskal, Hagop; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Valenti, Marc; Mazzei, Diego Hidalgo; Lafer, Beny; Kato, Tadafumi; Mazzarini, Lorenzo; Martinez-Aran, Anabel; Parker, Gordon; Souery, Daniel; Ozerdem, Aysegul; McElroy, Susan L.; Girardi, Paolo; Bauer, Michael; Yatham, Lakshmi N.; Zarate, Carlos A.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Birmaher, Boris; Kanba, Shigenobu; El-Mallakh, Rif S.; Serretti, Alessandro; Rihmer, Zoltan; Young, Allan H.; Kotzalidis, Georgios D.; MacQueen, Glenda M.; Bowden, Charles L.; Ghaemi, S. Nassir; Lopez-Jaramillo, Carlos; Rybakowski, Janusz; Ha, Kyooseob; Perugi, Giulio; Kasper, Siegfried; Amsterdam, Jay D.; Hirschfeld, Robert M.; Kapczinski, Flavio; Vieta, Eduard

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The risk-benefit profile of antidepressant medications in bipolar disorder is controversial. When conclusive evidence is lacking, expert consensus can guide treatment decisions. The International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) convened a task force to seek consensus recommendations

  7. Do continued antidepressants protect against dementia in patients with severe depressive disorder?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Forman, Julie Lyng; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2011-01-01

    Studies on humans show that depressive disorder is associated with an increased risk of developing cognitive dysfunction, and animal studies suggest that antidepressants may have neuroprotective abilities. On the basis of these observations, it was hypothesized that treatment with antidepressants...... may decrease the risk of developing dementia in patients with depression. We investigated whether continued treatment with antidepressants is associated with a decreased rate of dementia in a population of patients discharged from psychiatric healthcare service with a diagnosis of depression. We used...... register data on all prescribed antidepressants in all patients discharged from psychiatric healthcare service with a diagnosis of depression and with subsequent diagnoses of dementia in Denmark from 1995 to 2005. A total of 37 658 patients with a diagnosis of depression at their first psychiatric contact...

  8. The hippocampus and dorsal raphe nucleus are key brain areas associated with the antidepressant effects of lithium augmentation of desipramine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cussotto, Sofia; Cryan, John F; O'Leary, Olivia F

    2017-03-27

    Approximately 50% of depressed individuals fail to achieve remission with first-line antidepressant drugs and a third remain treatment-resistant. When first-line antidepressant treatment is unsuccessful, second-line strategies include dose optimisation, switching to another antidepressant, combination with another antidepressant, or augmentation with a non-antidepressant medication. Much of the evidence for the efficacy of augmentation strategies comes from studies using lithium to augment the effects of tricyclic antidepressants. The neural circuitry underlying the therapeutic effects of lithium augmentation is not yet fully understood. Recently, we reported that chronic treatment with a combination of lithium and the antidepressant desipramine, exerted antidepressant-like behavioural effects in a mouse strain (BALB/cOLaHsd) that did not exhibit an antidepressant-like behavioural response to either drug alone. In the present study, we used this model in combination with ΔFosB/FosB immunohistochemistry to identify brain regions chronically affected by lithium augmentation of desipramine when compared to either treatment alone. The data suggest that the dorsal raphe nucleus and the CA3 regions of the dorsal hippocampus are key nodes in the neural circuitry underlying antidepressant action of lithium augmentation of desipramine. These data give new insight into the neurobiology underlying the mechanism of lithium augmentation in the context of treatment-resistant depression.

  9. Fluoxetine potentiation of omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect: evaluating pharmacokinetic and brain fatty acid-related aspects in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laino, Carlos Horacio; Garcia, Pilar; Podestá, María Fernanda; Höcht, Christian; Slobodianik, Nora; Reinés, Analía

    2014-10-01

    We previously reported that combined fluoxetine administration at antidepressant doses renders additive antidepressant effects, whereas non-antidepressant doses potentiate the omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate putative pharmacokinetic and brain omega-3 fatty acid-related aspects for fluoxetine potentiation of omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant effect in rats. Coadministration of omega-3 fatty acids with a non-antidepressant dose of fluoxetine (1 mg/kg day) failed to affect both brain fluoxetine concentration and norfluoxetine plasma concentration profile. Fluoxetine plasma concentrations remained below the sensitivity limit of the detection method. Either antidepressant (10 mg/kg day) or non-antidepressant (1 mg/kg day) doses of fluoxetine in combination with omega-3 fatty acids increased hippocampal docosapentaenoic acid (DPA, 22:5 omega-3) levels. Although individual treatments had no effects on DPA concentration, DPA increase was higher when omega-3 were combined with the non-antidepressant dose of fluoxetine. Chronic DPA administration exerted antidepressant-like effects in the forced swimming test while increasing hippocampal docosahexaenoic (22:6 omega-3) and DPA levels. Our results suggest no pharmacokinetic interaction and reveal specific hippocampal DPA changes after fluoxetine and omega-3 combined treatments in our experimental conditions. The DPA role in the synergistic effect of fluoxetine and omega-3 combined treatments will be for sure the focus of future studies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 103:3316-3325, 2014.

  10. Efficacy and safety of antidepressant's use in the treatment of depressive episodes in bipolar disorder - review of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosik-Wójcińska, Anna Zofia; Stefanowski, Bogdan; Święcicki, Łukasz

    2015-01-01

    The use of antidepressants in treatment of depression in course of bipolar disorders (BD) is controversial. In case of no improvement during monotherapy with mood stabilizer, the use of antidepressants is often necessary. The safety of this group (in context of phase change, mixed states and rapid cycling) is essential and is the subject of many research. In the paper, the authors review the literature concerning efficacy and safety of use of antidepressants in the treatment of affective disorders and long-term impact on the course of the disease. Selection of articles have been made by searching the Medline and Pubmed databases using keywords: antidepressant drugs, bipolar depression, bipolar disorder, efficacy, safety, mania, hypomania. The risk of mania is greater in bipolar disorder type I, than in type II or during treatment with Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) and treatment with venlafaxine. The use of SSRIs and bupropion is associated with a relatively small increase of phase change risk. There are different opinions concerning recommended duration of antidepressant treatment. Generally antidepressant use should end after 2-3 months of remission, the risk of recurrence of depression after discontinuation of antidepressants is, however, higher than in case of continuation. In BD type II or BD spectrum, antidepressant monotherapy is allowed in severe depression. In bipolar disorder type I and in case of phase change after antidepressants use in the past, use of antidepressants should be very cautious. Antidepressants are contraindicated in rapid cycling and in mixed episodes. Further work is needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of antidepressants use.

  11. Restoration of optic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You SW

    2017-03-01

    . Many genes, such as Bcl-2, PTEN, and mTOR, are crucial in cell proliferation, axon guidance, and growth during development, and play important roles in the regeneration and extension of RGC axons. With transgenic mice and related gene regulations, robust regeneration of RGC axons has been observed after ON injury in laboratories. Although various means of experimental treatments such as cell transplantation and gene therapy have achieved significant progress in neuronal survival, axonal regeneration, and restoration of the visual function after ON injury, many unresolved scientific problems still exist for their clinical applications. Therefore, we still need to overcome hurdles before developing effective therapy to treat optic neuropathy diseases in patients. Keywords: retinal ganglion cells, optic nerve injury, neuronal survival, axonal regeneration, vision restoration

  12. To evaluate and compare antidepressant activity of Rosa damascena in mice by using forced swimming test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemapriya Tirupathi

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: Antidepressant activity of R. damascena was studied by forced swimming test in mice in the doses of 20 mg/kg and 40 mg/kg .This test shows that R. damascena significantly decreased the immobility time in mice. The results suggest that R. damascena has dose dependent antidepressant activity comparable with imipramine. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(5.000: 1949-1952

  13. Attitudes and beliefs of patients with chronic depression toward antidepressants and depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob SA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Sabrina Anne Jacob,1 Ab Fatah Ab Rahman,2 Mohamed Azmi Ahmad Hassali3 1School of Pharmacy, Monash University Malaysia, Sunway, 2Faculty of Health Sciences, Gong Badak Campus, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin (UniSZA, Kuala Terengganu, 3School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Science Malaysia, Minden, Malaysia Background: Many patients have erroneous views with regard to depression and its management, and it was noted that these attitudes and beliefs significantly affected their adherence rates.Objectives: The primary aim of this study was to determine the attitudes and beliefs of patients with depression toward depression and antidepressants. A secondary aim was to assess the influence of ethnicity on patients’ attitudes and beliefs.Patients and methods: The study involved patients with chronic depression being followed up at an outpatient clinic at a government-run hospital in Malaysia. Patients’ attitudes and beliefs were assessed using the Antidepressant Compliance Questionnaire.Results: A total of 104 patients of Malay, Chinese, and Indian ethnic groups met the selection criteria. Chinese patients had significantly negative attitudes and beliefs toward depression and antidepressants compared to Malays and Indians (b=-8.96, t103=-3.22; P<0.05. Component analysis revealed that 59% of patients believed that antidepressants can cause a person to have less control over their thoughts and feelings, while 67% believed that antidepressants could alter one’s personality; 60% believed it was okay to take fewer tablets on days when they felt better, while 66% believed that antidepressants helped solve their emotional problems and helped them worry less.Conclusion: Patients had an overall positive view as to the benefits of antidepressants, but the majority had incorrect views as to the acceptable dosing of antidepressants and had concerns about the safety of the medication. Assessing patients’ attitudes and beliefs, as well as the

  14. What is an antidepressant binding site doing in a bacterial transporter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, Gary

    2007-09-21

    LeuT is a bacterial amino acid transporter belonging to a large family of membrane proteins, including the neurotransmitter transporters that are targets for antidepressant drugs. The high-resolution structure of LeuT has provided an important model for understanding structure and function in this family. Two recent papers found that LeuT can bind tricyclic antidepressants, raising the possibility that it may also serve as a model for the pharmacological properties of neurotransmitter transporters.

  15. Persistence and compliance to antidepressant treatment in patients with depression: A chart review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawada Norifusa

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adherence has recently been suggested to be divided into these two components: persistence (i.e., whether patients continue treatment or not and compliance (i.e., whether patients take doses as instructed. However, no study has yet assessed these two clinically relevant components at the same time in adherence to antidepressant treatment in the clinical outpatient setting. Methods In this retrospective chart-review, 6-month adherence to antidepressants was examined in 367 outpatients with a major depressive disorder (ICD-10 (170 males; mean ± SD age 37.6 ± 13.9 years, who started antidepressant treatment from April 2006 through March 2007. Additionally, we evaluated Medication Possession Rate (MPR, defined as the total days a medication was dispensed to patients divided by the treatment period. Results Only 161 patients (44.3% continued antidepressant treatment for 6 months. Among 252 patients who discontinued their initial antidepressant, 63.1% of these patients did so without consulting their physicians. Sertraline use was associated with a higher persistence rate at month 6 (odds ratio 2.59 in comparison with sulpiride, and the use of anxiolytic benzodiazepines had a positive effect on persistence to antidepressant treatment only at month 1 (odds ratio 2.14. An overall MPR was 0.77; 55.6% of patients were considered compliant (i.e., a MPR of ≥ 0.8. Conclusion Given a high rate of antidepressant discontinuation without consulting their physicians, closer communication between patients and their physicians should be encouraged. Although the use of anxiolytic benzodiazepines was associated with a higher persistence to antidepressant treatment at month 1, the use of these drugs should be avoided as a rule, given their well-known serious adverse effects.

  16. Antidepressant Potential of (R)-Ketamine in Rodent Models: Comparison with (S)-Ketamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, Kenichi; Toki, Hidetoh; Iijima, Michihiko; Hashihayata, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Jun-Ichi; Hashimoto, Kenji; Chaki, Shigeyuki

    2017-04-01

    The rapid-acting and long-lasting antidepressant effects of (R,S)-ketamine have recently gained much attention. Although (S)-ketamine has been studied as an active isomer, recent evidence suggests that (R)-ketamine exhibits longer-lasting antidepressant effects than (S)-ketamine in rodents. However, the antidepressant potential of (R)-ketamine has not been fully addressed. In the present study, we compared the antidepressant effects of (R)-ketamine with those of (S)-ketamine in animal models of depression, including a model that is refractory to current medications. Both (R)-ketamine and (S)-ketamine exhibited antidepressant effects at 30 minutes as well as at 24 hours after administration in forced-swimming and tail-suspension tests in mice. At 48 hours after administration, however, (R)-ketamine still exerted a significant antidepressant effect in the tail-suspension test, whereas the effect of (S)-ketamine was no longer observed. Moreover, (R)-ketamine, but not (S)-ketamine, significantly reversed the depressive-like behavior induced by repeated treatments with corticosterone in rats at 24 hours after a single administration. This effect was attenuated by an α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA) receptor antagonist, suggesting the involvement of AMPA receptor stimulation in the effects. Both (R)-ketamine and (S)-ketamine exhibited practically the same exposure levels in plasma, brain, and cerebrospinal fluid in mice and rats, and both compounds were rapidly eliminated from plasma (S)-ketamine in animal models of depression. Moreover, our study is the first to demonstrate that (R)-ketamine exerted a sustained antidepressant effect even in a model that is refractory to currently prescribed antidepressants.

  17. Electrochemical Synthesis and Kinetic Evaluation of Electrooxidation of Acetaminophen in the Presence of Antidepressant Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Nematollahi, Davood; Feyzi Barnaji, Bahareh; Amani, Ameneh

    2015-01-01

    With the aim of obtaining information about drug-drug interaction (DDI) between acetaminophen and some of antidepressant drugs (fluoxetine, sertraline and nortriptyline), in the present work we studied the electrochemical oxidation of acetaminophen (paracetamol) in the presence of these drugs by means of cyclic voltammetry and Controlled-potential coulometry. The reaction between N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone-imine (NAPQI) produced from electrooxidation of acetaminophen and antidepressant drugs (se...

  18. Analysis of the cost-effectiveness and costs rationalization of antidepressants consumption in Lithuania

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been much debate regarding the rationality of consumption and cost effectiveness of antidepressants. The economic aspects of treating depression are becoming more frequently evaluated as newer antidepressants become available and as healthcare entities attempt to address increasing costs. The aim of the research. To investigate and assess the possibilities of a more rational use of the public and private funds of the Lithuanian population in the cases of medicam...

  19. Persistence and compliance to antidepressant treatment in patients with depression: A chart review

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Background Adherence has recently been suggested to be divided into these two components: persistence (i.e., whether patients continue treatment or not) and compliance (i.e., whether patients take doses as instructed). However, no study has yet assessed these two clinically relevant components at the same time in adherence to antidepressant treatment in the clinical outpatient setting. Methods In this retrospective chart-review, 6-month adherence to antidepressants was examined in 367 outpati...

  20. Antidepressant effects of right versus left unilateral ECT and the lateralization theory of ECT action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, R; Swartz, C M; Vedak, C

    1989-09-01

    In a random-assignment, double-blind, controlled comparison of right versus left unilateral ECT in 30 melancholic men, the two methods were not significantly different in overall antidepressant potency, although there was a significantly faster rate of improvement with left unilateral ECT. These results imply that the antidepressant effects of ECT cannot be attributed primarily to right hemisphere mechanisms, as others have postulated.

  1. Selective uptake and biological consequences of environmentally relevant antidepressant pharmaceutical exposures on male fathead minnows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, M.M.; Painter, M.M.; Bartell, S.E.; Logue, A.; Furlong, E.T.; Werner, S.L.; Schoenfuss, H.L.

    2011-01-01

    Antidepressant pharmaceuticals have been reported in wastewater effluent at the nanogram to low microgram-per-liter range, and include bupropion (BUP), fluoxetine (FLX), sertraline (SER), and venlafaxine (VEN). To assess the effects of antidepressants on reproductive anatomy, physiology, and behavior, adult male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exposed for 21 days either to a single concentration of the antidepressants FLX, SER, VEN, or BUP, or to an antidepressant mixture. The data demonstrated that exposure to VEN (305. ng/L and 1104. ng/L) and SER (5.2. ng/L) resulted in mortality. Anatomical alterations were noted within the testes of fish exposed to SER and FLX, both modulators of the neurotransmitter serotonin. Additionally, FLX at 28. ng/L induced vitellogenin in male fish-a common endpoint for estrogenic endocrine disruption. Significant alterations in male secondary sex characteristics were noted with single exposures. Effects of single compound exposures neither carried over, nor became additive in the antidepressant mixtures, and reproductive behavior was not affected. Analysis of brain tissues from the exposed fish suggested increased uptake of FLX, SER and BUP and minimal uptake of VEN when compared to exposure water concentrations. Furthermore, the only metabolite detected consistently in the brain tissues was norfluoxetine. Similar trends of uptake by brain tissue were observed when fish were exposed to antidepressant mixtures. The present study demonstrates that anatomy and physiology, but not reproductive behavior, can be disrupted by exposure to environmental concentrations of some antidepressants. The observation that antidepressant uptake into fish tissues is selective may have consequences on assessing the mode-of-action and effects of these compounds in future studies. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  2. The Strategy of Combining Antidepressants in the Treatment of Major Depression: Clinical Experience in Spanish Outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M. Martín-López

    2011-01-01

    The most frequent combinations are SSRIs and tricyclic antidepressants. The active principle most widely combined is fluoxetine. Conclusions. The prevalence of use of antidepressant combination therapy is 2.2% of the global sample and 8.3% of treated patients. Other than duration of the depressive episode, no clinical characteristics exclusive to patients who received combination rather than monotherapy were found. Our study found that the most frequent combination is SSRIs + TCAs, also being the most studied.

  3. Selective uptake and biological consequences of environmentally relevant antidepressant pharmaceutical exposures on male fathead minnows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Melissa M.; Painter, Meghan M.; Bartell, Stephen E.; Logue, Amanda; Furlong, Edward T.; Werner, Stephen L.; Schoenfuss, Heiko L.

    2011-01-01

    Antidepressant pharmaceuticals have been reported in wastewater effluent at the nanogram to low microgram-per-liter range, and include bupropion (BUP), fluoxetine (FLX), sertraline (SER), and venlafaxine (VEN). To assess the effects of antidepressants on reproductive anatomy, physiology, and behavior, adult male fathead minnows (Pimeplwles promelas) were exposed for 21 days either to a single concentration of the antidepressants FLX, SER, VEN, or BUP, or to an antidepressant mixture. The data demonstrated that exposure to VEN (305 ng/L and 1104 ng/L) and SER (5.2 ng/L) resulted in mortality. Anatomical alterations were noted within the testes of fish exposed to SER and FLX, both modulators of the neurotransmitter serotonin. Additionally, FLX at 28 ng/L induced vitellogenin in male fish—a common endpoint for estrogenic endocrine disruption. Significant alterations in male secondary sex characteristics were noted with single exposures. Effects of single compound exposures neither carried over, nor became additive in the antidepressant mixtures, and reproductive behavior was not affected. Analysis of brain tissues from the exposed fish suggested increased uptake of FLX, SER and BUP and minimal uptake of VEN when compared to exposure water concentrations. Furthermore, the only metabolite detected consistently in the brain tissues was norfluoxetine. Similar trends of uptake by brain tissue were observed when fish were exposed to antidepressant mixtures. The present study demonstrates that anatomy and physiology, but not reproductive behavior, can be disrupted by exposure to environmental concentrations of some antidepressants. The observation that antidepressant uptake into fish tissues is selective may have consequences on assessing the mode-of-action and effects of these compounds in future studies.

  4. Augmentation Strategies for Patients with Major Depressive Disorder with an Inadequate Response to Antidepressant Monotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moica Th

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Major depressive disorder is a chronic and debilitating disease characterized by a wide range of emotional and physical symptoms that coexist during a depressive episode and may reoccur at some point during the progression of the disease for the majority of patients. The purpose of the study was to investigate psychiatrists’ experience regarding the response to antidepressive treatment and their options regarding augmentation strategies in depression with incomplete response to antidepressant monotherapy.

  5. Effects of H1–receptor antagonists in antidepressant tests in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Chitra C. Khanwelkar

    2008-01-01

    : Considering the vast data suggesting the role of brain histamine(HA) in behaviour,emotions,anxiety and depression;four H1-receptor antagonists; promethazine, diphenhydramine, cyclizine and pheniramine were subjected to antidepressant tests in rats. All H1 – antagonists behaved like antidepressants in animal tests. They antagonized reserpine induced catalepsy, potentiated methamphetamine induced stereotypy and reduced the period of immobility in Porsolt’s behavioural despair test. It is sug...

  6. Antidepressant-like effect of different estrogenic compounds in the forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada-Camarena, Erika; Fernández-Guasti, Alonso; López-Rubalcava, Carolina

    2003-05-01

    The present study evaluated the possible antidepressant-like action of the natural estrogen 17beta-estradiol (E(2), 2.5-10 microg/rat), the synthetic steroidal estrogen ethinyl-estradiol (EE(2), 1.25-10.0 microg/rat), and the nonsteroidal synthetic estrogen, diethyl-stilbestrol (DES, 0.25-1.0 mg/rat) in ovariectomized adult female Wistar rats using the forced swimming test (FST). The behavioral profile induced by the estrogens was compared with that induced by the antidepressants fluoxetine (FLX, 2.5-10 mg/kg) and desipramine (DMI, 2.5-10 mg/kg). In addition, the temporal course of the antidepressant-like action of the estrogenic compounds was analyzed. FLX and DMI induced an antidepressant-like effect characterized by a reduced immobility and increased swimming for FLX and decreased immobility and increased climbing for DMI. Both E(2) and EE(2) produced a decrease in immobility and an increase in swimming, suggesting an antidepressant-like action. DES did not affect the responses in this animal model of depression at any dose tested. The time course analysis of the actions of E(2) (10 microg/rat) and EE(2) (5 microg/rat) showed that both compounds induced an antidepressant-like effect observed 1 h after their injection lasting for 2-3 days.

  7. Effects of an antidepressant mixture on the brain serotonin and predation behavior of hybrid striped bass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisesi, Joseph H; Sweet, Lauren E; van den Hurk, Peter; Klaine, Stephen J

    2016-04-01

    Antidepressants have been found in measurable concentrations in final treated wastewater effluent and receiving waters throughout the world. Studies have shown that these concentrations are typically not overtly toxic, but the psychotropic mode of action of these chemicals warrants examination of their behavioral effects. Exposure of hybrid striped bass to the antidepressants fluoxetine or venlafaxine alone has been shown to cause decreased brain serotonin levels and increased time to capture prey at concentrations typically 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher than environmentally relevant concentrations. In the present study, equally effective doses of fluoxetine and venlafaxine were used to perform a mixture study, using a toxic unit approach to determine whether these antidepressants may act in an additive manner at lower concentrations. The results indicated that mixtures of these antidepressants caused decreased brain serotonin and increased time to capture prey at concentrations lower than reported in previous studies. Low concentration mixtures caused an additive effect on brain serotonin levels and time to capture prey, whereas higher concentrations were less than additive. The results were consistent with the dose addition concept, with higher concentration mixtures potentially saturating the effects on serotonin in the brain. Results from the present study indicate that antidepressants have the potential to be additive on the biochemical and individual scale, which necessitates more robust analysis of antidepressant mixtures and their potential to act together in low concentration scenarios.

  8. Antidepressant-like activity of flunarizine in modified tail suspension test in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Shinde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Flunarizine, a Ca 2+ channel blocker, crosses blood brain barrier (BBB, antagonizes calcium influx and interferes with neurotransmitter system. Flunarizine 20 mg/kg exhibited significant antidepressant activity in our previous study using forced swim test (FST in mice, which was contradictory to the findings of other authors. Hence, the present study was designed to strengthen the results of our previous study, using the modified tail suspension test (TST in rats. Aim: Aim of this study was to evaluate the antidepressant activity of flunarizine versus standard antidepressant drug fluoxetine in modified TST in rats. Materials and Methods: The study approved by Institutional Animal Ethics Committee was conducted using 24 adult albino rats (n = 6 in each group. Antidepressant effect of normal saline (0.1 ml/100 g, fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (ip, and flunarizine (2 and 10 mg/kg, ip was evaluated by using modified TST in rats. Thirty minutes after administration of all test drugs the duration of immobility was recorded for a period of 5 min in all rats by using modified TST. The data was analyzed by Student′s t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and P 0.05. Also, currently used human dose of flunarizine when extrapolated to rats (i. e., 2 mg/kg, ip failed to show significant antidepressant effect in modified TST in rats. Conclusion: The results of the present study indicate antidepressant-like activity of flunarizine.

  9. Antidepressant-like effects of Acorus calamus in forced swimming and tail suspension test in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pawar Vinod S; Anup Akhade; Shrikrishna Baokar; Shivakumar H

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antidepressant activity of methanolic extract of rhizomes of Acoruscalamus (A. calamus). Methods: Tail suspension test (TST) and forced swimming test (FST) in mice were used to evaluate the antidepressant activity of methanolic extract of rhizomes of A. calamus. Methanolic extracts (50 and 100 mg/kg i.p.) were administered daily for 7 days. Imipramine 5 mg/kg was used as standard antidepressant agent throughout the study. Results: Test extracts of A. calamus decreased immobility periods significantly in a dose dependent manner in both TST and FST. The observed results were also comparable with known standard drug i.e. imipramine. The flavonoid apigenin, which selectively binds with high affinity to the central benzodiazepines receptor, possesses important anxiolytic and antidepressant activities. The review of literature reveals that the A. calamus contains saponin, glycosides, tannin and flavonoid. Conclusions:Methanolic extract of A. calamus rhizomes shows antidepressant activity probably through interaction with adrenergic, dopaminergic serotonergic and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) nergic system. Both the models have been proved to be equally valuable for demonstration of substances with a potential antidepressant activity.

  10. Reduced treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction as a potential target in the development of new antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, David S; Palazzo, M Carlotta; Masdrakis, Vasilios G

    2013-01-01

    Pleasurable sexual activity is an essential component of many human relationships, providing a sense of physical, psychological, and social well-being. Epidemiological and clinical studies show that depressive symptoms and depressive illness are associated with impairments in sexual function and satisfaction, both in untreated and treated patients. The findings of randomized placebo-controlled trials demonstrate that most of the currently available antidepressant drugs are associated with the development or worsening of sexual dysfunction, in a substantial proportion of patients. Sexual difficulties during antidepressant treatment often resolve as depression lifts but can endure over long periods and may reduce self-esteem and affect mood and relationships adversely. Sexual dysfunction during antidepressant treatment is typically associated with many possible causes, but the risk and type of dysfunction vary with differing compounds and should be considered when making decisions about the relative merits and drawbacks of differing antidepressants. A range of interventions can be considered when managing patients with sexual dysfunction associated with antidepressants, including the prescription of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, but none of these approaches can be considered "ideal." As treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction is less frequent with certain drugs, presumably related to differences in their pharmacological properties, and because current management approaches are less than ideal, a reduced burden of treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction represents a tolerability target in the development of novel antidepressants.

  11. Reduced Treatment-Emergent Sexual Dysfunction as a Potential Target in the Development of New Antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Baldwin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pleasurable sexual activity is an essential component of many human relationships, providing a sense of physical, psychological, and social well-being. Epidemiological and clinical studies show that depressive symptoms and depressive illness are associated with impairments in sexual function and satisfaction, both in untreated and treated patients. The findings of randomized placebo-controlled trials demonstrate that most of the currently available antidepressant drugs are associated with the development or worsening of sexual dysfunction, in a substantial proportion of patients. Sexual difficulties during antidepressant treatment often resolve as depression lifts but can endure over long periods and may reduce self-esteem and affect mood and relationships adversely. Sexual dysfunction during antidepressant treatment is typically associated with many possible causes, but the risk and type of dysfunction vary with differing compounds and should be considered when making decisions about the relative merits and drawbacks of differing antidepressants. A range of interventions can be considered when managing patients with sexual dysfunction associated with antidepressants, including the prescription of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, but none of these approaches can be considered “ideal.” As treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction is less frequent with certain drugs, presumably related to differences in their pharmacological properties, and because current management approaches are less than ideal, a reduced burden of treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction represents a tolerability target in the development of novel antidepressants.

  12. [Threshold of Application of Antidepressant Drugs for Treatment of Depressive Disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroki, Toshihide; Tanaka, Teppei

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, along with the expansion of medical care for depressive disorder, there has been much controversy regarding the application of antidepressant drugs for its treatment. The aim of this paper is to consider critical issues concerning the threshold of application of antidepressant drugs for the treatment of depression. It was formerly important to diagnose the 'quality' of depression (melancholia or non-melancholia) in order to choose antidepressant treatment, whereas an assessment of the 'quantity' of depression (severity of symptoms) is crucial today to decide on the threshold. Recent guidelines for the treatment of major depressive disorder do not positively recommend the use of medication for the treatment of mild depression. The guidelines published by the Japanese Society of Mood Disorders also state that doctors have to give priority to treatments avoiding medication, although the effectiveness of antidepressant drugs for mild depression is controversial. Actually, in a clinical setting, doctors have to understand the conditions of individual cases and cope with many issues, such as a risk of suicide, comorbidity of other psychiatric disorders, target symptoms of pharmacotherapy, and choices of classes and doses of antidepressant drugs. The threshold of application of antidepressant drugs for the treatment of depression may vary according to the doctor-patient relationship and surrounding conditions. Doctors are required to provide treatment options other than pharmacotherapy.

  13. Yueju Pill Rapidly Induces Antidepressant-Like Effects and Acutely Enhances BDNF Expression in Mouse Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenda Xue

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional antidepressants have a major disadvantage in delayed onset of efficacy, and the emerging fast-acting antidepressant ketamine has adverse behavioral and neurotoxic effects. Yueju pill, an herb medicine formulated eight hundred years ago by Doctor Zhu Danxi, has been popularly prescribed in China for alleviation of depression-like symptoms. Although several clinical outcome studies reported the relative short onset of antidepressant effects of Yueju, this has not been scientifically investigated. We, therefore, examined the rapid antidepressant effect of Yueju in mice and tested the underlying molecular mechanisms. We found that acute administration of ethanol extract of Yueju rapidly attenuated depressive-like symptoms in learned helpless paradigm, and the antidepressant-like effects were sustained for at least 24 hours in tail suspension test in ICR mice. Additionally, Yueju, like ketamine, rapidly increased the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the hippocampus, whereas the BDNF mRNA expression remained unaltered. Yueju rapidly reduced the phosphorylation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2, leading to desuppression of BDNF synthesis. Unlike ketamine, both the BDNF expression and eEF2 phosphorylation were revered at 24 hours after Yueju administration. This study is the first to demonstrate the rapid antidepressant effects of an herb medicine, offering an opportunity to improve therapy of depression.

  14. Evaluation of Antidepressant activity of Simvastatin, Lovastatin and Atorvastatin in Male Swiss Mice - An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudadappanavar Anupama M

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Context: Depression is the commonest mood disorder, could also be secondary to a number of physical disorders. Pharmacological treatment of such co-morbidities is difficult. If statins show antidepressant activity that could appear to be better lipid-lowering agents as they provide additional benefits in cardiovascular disorders with co-morbidity like depression. Aims: To investigate the effect of simvastatin, lovastatin and atorvastatin for their antidepressant activity using forced swim test and tail suspension test on behavioral models of depression in male swiss mice. Design: Experimental Study Methods and Material: The in vivo antidepressant activity of simvastatin and lovastatin was studied using forced swim test and tail suspension test. The mice received the drug as per their weight and subjected for experimentation. Group mean immobility time was calculated in treated and control groups for comparison. Statistical analysis used: One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA followed by Bonferroni’s multiple comparison test. (P / 0.05 Results: Simvastatin and Lovastatin used in the present study showed significant antidepressant activity in both behavioral models of depression (p<0.05 while atorvastatin failed to show significant antidepressant action. Conclusion: The study suggests that the antidepressant activity of simvastatin and lovastatin, if could be extrapolated to clinical situations, appear to be better lipid-lowering agents as they provide additional benefits in cardiovascular disorders with co-morbidity like depression.

  15. The Hip Restoration Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Allston Julius; Atilla, Halis Atil

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Despite the rapid advancement of imaging and arthroscopic techniques about the hip joint, missed diagnoses are still common. As a deep joint and compared to the shoulder and knee joints, localization of hip symptoms is difficult. Hip pathology is not easily isolated and is often related to intra and extra-articular abnormalities. In light of these diagnostic challenges, we recommend an algorithmic approach to effectively diagnoses and treat hip pain. Methods In this review, hip pain is evaluated from diagnosis to treatment in a clear decision model. First we discuss emergency hip situations followed by the differentiation of intra and extra-articular causes of the hip pain. We differentiate the intra-articular hip as arthritic and non-arthritic and extra-articular pain as surrounding or remote tissue generated. Further, extra-articular hip pain is evaluated according to pain location. Finally we summarize the surgical treatment approach with an algorithmic diagram. Conclusion Diagnosis of hip pathology is difficult because the etiologies of pain may be various. An algorithmic approach to hip restoration from diagnosis to rehabilitation is crucial to successfully identify and manage hip pathologies. Level of evidence: V. PMID:28066734

  16. Fernald restoration: ecologists and engineers integrate restoration and cleanup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, Eric; Homer, John

    2002-07-15

    As cleanup workers excavate pits and tear down buildings at the Fernald site in southwest Ohio, site ecologists are working side-by-side to create thriving wetlands and develop the early stages of forest, prairie, and savanna ecosystems to restore natural resources that were impacted by years of site operations. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy-Fernald Office (DOE-FN) and its cleanup contractor, Fluor Fernald, Inc., initiated several ecological restoration projects in perimeter areas of the site (e.g., areas not used for or impacted by uranium processing or waste management). The projects are part of Fernald's final land use plan to restore natural resources over 904 acres of the 1,050-acre site. Pete Yerace, the DOE-FN Natural Resource Trustee representative is working with the Fernald Natural Resource Trustees in an oversight role to resolve the state of Ohio's 1986 claim against DOE for injuries to natural resources. Fluor Fernald, Inc., and DOE-FN developed the ''Natural Resource Restoration Plan'', which outlines 15 major restoration projects for the site and will restore injured natural resources at the site. In general, Fernald's plan includes grading to maximize the formation of wetlands or expanded floodplain, amending soil where topsoil has been removed during excavation, and establishing native vegetation throughout the site. Today, with cleanup over 35 percent complete and site closure targeted for 2006, Fernald is entering a new phase of restoration that involves heavily remediated areas. By working closely with engineers and cleanup crews, site ecologists can take advantage of remediation fieldwork (e.g., convert an excavated depression into a wetland) and avoid unnecessary costs and duplication. This collaboration has also created opportunities for relatively simple and inexpensive restoration of areas that were discovered during ongoing remediation. To ensure the survival of the plant material in heavily

  17. VT River Restoration Data in Lamoille County

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) Documented river and riparian buffer restoration projects in Lamoille County, Vermont. Restoration includes buffer plantings (trees and shrubs),...

  18. Evaluation of patient outcomes in an area where prescribing of anticholinergic antidepressants was influenced by academic detailing

    OpenAIRE

    Eijk, M.E.C. van; Belitser, S V; Porsius, A. J.; de Boer, A.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate, on a patient level, the effect of a "physician-level intervention" that successfully reduced the incidence of anticholinergic antidepressant prescribing. DESIGN: Cross-sectional surveys with questionnaires sent before and after intervention. SETTING: Additional study in an RCT to reduce the prescribing of highly anticholinergic antidepressants in the elderly in the South Holland Islands. PARTICIPANTS: Elderly patients (age 60-95 years) who used antidepressants in 1995 ...

  19. Papahanaumokuakea - Laysan Island Restoration 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This project supports restoration activities at Laysan Island. Staff and volunteers continue efforts to eradicate alien invasive species such as Indian dropseed...

  20. Papahanaumokuakea - Laysan Island Restoration 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This project will support restoration activities at Laysan Island. Staff and volunteers continue efforts to eradicate alien invasive species such as Indian dropseed...

  1. Wetland Restoration and Sediment Removal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 2008, Minnesota’s Private Lands Program and Wetland Management Districts began to compare different methods of restoring prairie pothole wetlands to see if there...

  2. Basic research for environmental restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the midst of a major environmental restoration effort to reduce the health and environmental risks resulting from past waste management and disposal practices at DOE sites. This report describes research needs in environmental restoration and complements a previously published document, DOE/ER-0419, Evaluation of Mid-to-Long Term Basic Research for Environmental Restoration. Basic research needs have been grouped into five major categories patterned after those identified in DOE/ER-0419: (1) environmental transport and transformations; (2) advanced sampling, characterization, and monitoring methods; (3) new remediation technologies; (4) performance assessment; and (5) health and environmental effects. In addition to basic research, this document deals with education and training needs for environmental restoration. 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Comparison of effect of antidepressants on psychomotor functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranjali P Mendhe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The comparison of the effect of antidepressants on psychomotor functions in patients with endogenous depression. Materials and Methods: This prospective interventional study was carried out at a tertiary care teaching hospital on 95 literate patients with newly diagnosed endogenous depression matching inclusion and exclusion criteria. Patients were prescribed either desvenlafaxine (50 mg or fluoxetine (40 mg or sertraline (50 mg. Psychomotor functions were assessed by digit letter substitution, six letter cancellation, choice reaction time, hand steadiness and flicker fusion test at the baseline 1st month and 3rd month. Efficacy of drugs was also measured by Hamilton rating scale for depression. Data were analyzed by using ANOVA and P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: A total of 95 patients were enrolled. Fluoxetine, desvenlafaxine, and sertraline were prescribed in 32, 32, and 31 patients, respectively. At the end of 3 months, a significant improvement in psychomotor functions was observed in patients treated with sertraline (P < 0.05, while desvenlafaxine-treated patients did not show any significant change in any of the tests. Surprisingly, fluoxetine-treated patients showed deterioration in all psychomotor tests (P < 0.05. Hamilton rating score improved at the end of 3 months treatment as compared to baseline. Most commonly observed adverse reactions in all three drug groups were nausea (n = 20, dizziness (n = 3, headache (n = 20, and diarrhea (n = 3. Conclusion: Sertraline significantly improves psychomotor function as compared to desvenlafaxine while fluoxetine impairs.

  4. Adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of the antidepressant drug sulpiride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farghaly, O A

    2000-10-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of the antidepressant drug sulpiride (SP) at a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) is investigated. Linear sweep cathodic stripping voltammetry (LSCSV) was used to determine sulpiride in the presence of 0.01 M sodium acetate medium pH 10.5 and 25 +/- 1 degrees C. Different parameters such as, supporting electrolyte, pH, accumulation potential, scan rate, accumulation time and ionic strength, were tested to optimize the conditions for the determination of SP. The adsorbed form is reduced irreversibly. The linear concentration range is from 2 x 10(-9) to 5 x 10(-8) M SP. Experimentally, 2 x 10(-9) M (0.68 ppb) with accumulation time 60 s can be determined successfully. Furthermore, a theoretical detection limit of 2 x 10(-10) M (0.068 ppb) Sp was calculated. The interferences of some metal ions, ascorbic acid and some amino acids were studied. The method was applied to the analysis of tablets and spiked urine, with recoveries of 104 +/- 3 and 101 + 3, and the relative standard deviation of 3.3 and 3.4%, respectively.

  5. ENZYMATIC RESOLUTION OF ANTIDEPRESSANT DRUG PRECURSORS IN AN UNDERGRADUATE LABORATORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís M. R. Solano

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of biocatalysts in synthetic chemistry is a conventional methodology for preparing enantiomerically enriched compounds. Despite this fact, the number of experiments in chemical teaching laboratories that demonstrate the potential of enzymes in synthetic organic chemistry is limited. We describe a laboratory experiment in which students synthesized a chiral secondary alcohol that can be used in the preparation of antidepressant drugs. This experiment was conducted by individual students as part of a Drug Synthesis course held at the Pharmacy Faculty, Lisbon University. This laboratory experiment requires six laboratory periods, each lasting four hours. During the first four laboratory periods, students synthesized and characterized a racemic ester using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and gas chromatography. During the last two laboratory periods, they performed enzymatic hydrolysis resolution of the racemic ester using Candida antarctica lipase B to yield enantiomerically enriched secondary alcohol. Students successfully prepared the racemic ester with a 70%-81% overall yield in three steps. The enzymatic hydrolysis afforded (R- secondary alcohol with good enantioselectivity (90%-95% and reasonable yields (10%-19%. In these experiments, students were exposed to theoretical and practical concepts of aromatic acylation, ketone reduction, esterification, and enzymatic hydrolysis.

  6. Comparison of Effect of Antidepressants on Psychomotor Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendhe, Pranjali P.; Shah, Samidh P.; Desai, Mira K.; Parikh, Minakshi N.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The comparison of the effect of antidepressants on psychomotor functions in patients with endogenous depression. Materials and Methods: This prospective interventional study was carried out at a tertiary care teaching hospital on 95 literate patients with newly diagnosed endogenous depression matching inclusion and exclusion criteria. Patients were prescribed either desvenlafaxine (50 mg) or fluoxetine (40 mg) or sertraline (50 mg). Psychomotor functions were assessed by digit letter substitution, six letter cancellation, choice reaction time, hand steadiness and flicker fusion test at the baseline 1st month and 3rd month. Efficacy of drugs was also measured by Hamilton rating scale for depression. Data were analyzed by using ANOVA and P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: A total of 95 patients were enrolled. Fluoxetine, desvenlafaxine, and sertraline were prescribed in 32, 32, and 31 patients, respectively. At the end of 3 months, a significant improvement in psychomotor functions was observed in patients treated with sertraline (P < 0.05), while desvenlafaxine-treated patients did not show any significant change in any of the tests. Surprisingly, fluoxetine-treated patients showed deterioration in all psychomotor tests (P < 0.05). Hamilton rating score improved at the end of 3 months treatment as compared to baseline. Most commonly observed adverse reactions in all three drug groups were nausea (n = 20), dizziness (n = 3), headache (n = 20), and diarrhea (n = 3). Conclusion: Sertraline significantly improves psychomotor function as compared to desvenlafaxine while fluoxetine impairs.

  7. [Pulp response to restorative materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advokaat, J G

    1990-03-01

    Restorations may affect the pulp negatively, rather due to microleakage than to toxic properties of the materials used. Hyperalgesia occurs more frequently after restoration with composite resins than with amalgam, though the resins in contrast to amalgam may be bonded to the enamel margins. A number of recommendations are presented in order to minimize the marginal gap between cavity walls and amalgam and to prevent marginal fracture.

  8. Antidepressants Accumulate in Lipid Rafts Independent of Monoamine Transporters to Modulate Redistribution of the G Protein, Gαs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, Samuel J; Schappi, Jeffrey M; Rasenick, Mark M

    2016-09-16

    Depression is a significant public health problem for which currently available medications, if effective, require weeks to months of treatment before patients respond. Previous studies have shown that the G protein responsible for increasing cAMP (Gαs) is increasingly localized to lipid rafts in depressed subjects and that chronic antidepressant treatment translocates Gαs from lipid rafts. Translocation of Gαs, which shows delayed onset after chronic antidepressant treatment of rats or of C6 glioma cells, tracks with the delayed onset of therapeutic action of antidepressants. Because antidepressants appear to specifically modify Gαs localized to lipid rafts, we sought to determine whether structurally diverse antidepressants accumulate in lipid rafts. Sustained treatment of C6 glioma cells, which lack 5-hydroxytryptamine transporters, showed marked concentration of several antidepressants in raft fractions, as revealed by increased absorbance and by mass fingerprint. Closely related molecules without antidepressant activity did not concentrate in raft fractions. Thus, at least two classes of antidepressants accumulate in lipid rafts and effect translocation of Gαs to the non-raft membrane fraction, where it activates the cAMP-signaling cascade. Analysis of the structural determinants of raft localization may both help to explain the hysteresis of antidepressant action and lead to design and development of novel substrates for depression therapeutics.

  9. Brain 5-HT deficiency increases stress vulnerability and impairs antidepressant responses following psychosocial stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Benjamin D; Ni, Jason R; Caron, Marc G

    2015-02-24

    Brain serotonin (5-HT) deficiency and exposure to psychosocial stress have both been implicated in the etiology of depression and anxiety disorders, but whether 5-HT deficiency influences susceptibility to depression- and anxiety-like phenotypes induced by psychosocial stress has not been formally established. Most clinically effective antidepressants increase the extracellular levels of 5-HT, and thus it has been hypothesized that antidepressant responses result from the reversal of endogenous 5-HT deficiency, but this hypothesis remains highly controversial. Here we evaluated the impact of brain 5-HT deficiency on stress susceptibility and antidepressant-like responses using tryptophan hydroxylase 2 knockin (Tph2KI) mice, which display 60-80% reductions in brain 5-HT. Our results demonstrate that 5-HT deficiency leads to increased susceptibility to social defeat stress (SDS), a model of psychosocial stress, and prevents the fluoxetine (FLX)-induced reversal of SDS-induced social avoidance, suggesting that 5-HT deficiency may impair antidepressant responses. In light of recent clinical and preclinical studies highlighting the potential of inhibiting the lateral habenula (LHb) to achieve antidepressant and antidepressant-like responses, we also examined whether LHb inhibition could achieve antidepressant-like responses in FLX-insensitive Tph2KI mice subjected to SDS. Our data reveal that using designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADDs) to inhibit LHb activity leads to reduced SDS-induced social avoidance behavior in both WT and Tph2KI mice. This observation provides additional preclinical evidence that inhibiting the LHb might represent a promising alternative therapeutic approach under conditions in which selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitors are ineffective.

  10. The Effect of Sympathetic Antagonists on the Antidepressant Action of Alprazolam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorash ZM

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Alprazolam is an anti-anxiety drug shown to be effective in the treatment of depression. In this study, the effect of sympathetic receptor antagonists on alprazolam–induced antidepressant action was studied using a mouse model of forced swimming behavioral despair. The interaction of three sympathetic receptor antagonists with benzodiazepines, which may impact the clinical use of alprazolam, was also studied. Behavioral despair was examined in six groups of albino mice. Drugs were administered intraperitoneally. The control group received only a single dose of 1% Tween 80. The second group received a single dose of alprazolam, and the third group received an antagonist followed by alprazolam. The fourth group was treated with imipramine, and the fifth group received an antagonist followed by imipramine. The sixth group was treated with a single dose of an antagonist alone (atenolol, a β1-selective adrenoceptor antagonist; propranolol, a non selective β-adrenoceptor antagonist; and prazocin, an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist. Results confirmed the antidepressant action of alprazolam and imipramine. Prazocin treatment alone produced depression, but it significantly potentiated the antidepressant actions of imipramine and alprazolam. Atenolol alone produced an antidepressant effect and potentiated the antidepressant action of alprazolam. Propranolol treatment alone produced depression, and antagonized the effects of alprazolam and imipramine, even producing depression in combined treatments. In conclusion, our results reveal that alprazolam may produce antidepressant effects through the release of noradrenaline, which stimulates β2 receptors to produce an antidepressant action. Imipramine may act by activating β2 receptors by blocking or down-regulating β1 receptors.

  11. The effect of antidepressant medication treatment on serum levels of inflammatory cytokines: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannestad, Jonas; DellaGioia, Nicole; Bloch, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Serum levels of inflammatory cytokines, for example, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and IL-1 beta (IL-1β), are elevated in subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD). The reason why this occurs is unclear. Elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines could be a result of brain dysfunction in MDD. It is also possible that inflammatory cytokines contribute to depressive symptoms in MDD. If the first assumption is correct, one would expect levels to normalize with resolution of the depressive episode after treatment. Several studies have measured changes in cytokine levels during antidepressant treatment; however, the results vary. The purpose of this study was to pool all available data on changes in serum levels of TNFα, IL-6, and IL-1β during antidepressant treatment to determine whether these levels change. Studies were included if they used an approved pharmacological treatment for depression, patients had a diagnosis of MDD, and serum levels of TNFα, IL-6, and/or IL-1β were measured before and after treatment. Twenty-two studies fulfilled these criteria. Meta-analysis of these studies showed that, overall, while pharmacological antidepressant treatment reduced depressive symptoms, it did not reduce serum levels of TNFα. On the other hand, antidepressant treatment did reduce levels of IL-1β and possibly those of IL-6. Stratified subgroup analysis by class of antidepressant indicated that serotonin reuptake inhibitors may reduce levels of IL-6 and TNFα. Other antidepressants, while efficacious for depressive symptoms, did not appear to reduce cytokine levels. These results argue against the notion that resolution of a depressive episode is associated with normalization of levels of circulating inflammatory cytokines; however, the results are consistent with the possibility that inflammatory cytokines contribute to depressive symptoms and that antidepressants block the effects of inflammatory cytokines on the brain.

  12. THE RESTORATIVE CLASSROOM: Using Restorative Approaches to Foster Effective Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reviewed by Martha A. BROWN

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The book is divided into three sections. Part One, chapters 1-3, provides the reader with a framework for understanding relational and restorative pedagogy based on the Five Key Restorative Themes: Everyone has their own unique and equally valued perspectives Thoughts influence emotions, emotions influence actions Empathy and consideration Needs and unmet needs Collective responsibility for problem solving and decision making. (Hopkins, 2011, p.32These five themes form the basis for the rest of the book. Part Two, chapters 4-9, describes a range of restorative practices and exercises, such as mixers, circles, and community-building games, as well as the step-by-step instructions on how to implement and conduct them. Part Three, Chapter 10, succinctly discusses the whole-school approach, which is explained in greater detail in Just Schools (Hopkins, 2004. Still, Hopkins would be remiss not to emphasize the need for the whole-school adoption of restorative practices based on current school effectiveness and improvement literature, and again asserts that "developing a restorative staffroom and staff team is likely to be a pre-requisite for a successful, high-achieving school" (Hopkins, 2011, p. 225.

  13. Cancer Mortality in People Treated with Antidepressants before Cancer Diagnosis: A Population Based Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuelian Sun

    Full Text Available Depression is common after a cancer diagnosis and is associated with an increased mortality, but it is unclear whether depression occurring before the cancer diagnosis affects cancer mortality. We aimed to study cancer mortality of people treated with antidepressants before cancer diagnosis.We conducted a population based cohort study of all adults diagnosed with cancer between January 2003 and December 2010 in Denmark (N = 201,662. We obtained information on cancer from the Danish Cancer Registry, on the day of death from the Danish Civil Registry, and on redeemed antidepressants from the Danish National Prescription Registry. Current users of antidepressants were defined as those who redeemed the latest prescription of antidepressant 0-4 months before cancer diagnosis (irrespective of earlier prescriptions, and former users as those who redeemed the latest prescription five or more months before cancer diagnosis. We estimated an all-cause one-year mortality rate ratio (MRR and a conditional five-year MRR for patients who survived the first year after cancer diagnosis and confidence interval (CI using a Cox proportional hazards regression model. Overall, 33,111 (16.4% patients redeemed at least one antidepressant prescription in the three years before cancer diagnosis of whom 21,851 (10.8% were current users at the time of cancer diagnosis. Current antidepressant users had a 32% higher one-year mortality (MRR = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.29-1.35 and a 22% higher conditional five-year mortality (MRR = 1.22, 95% CI: 1.17-1.26 if patients survived the first year after the cancer diagnosis than patients not redeeming antidepressants. The one-year mortality was particularly high for patients who initiated antidepressant treatment within four months before cancer diagnosis (MRR = 1.54, 95% CI: 1.47-1.61. Former users had no increased cancer mortality.Initiation of antidepressive treatment prior to cancer diagnosis is common and is associated with an increased

  14. Antidepressant drugs and the risk of suicide in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isacsson, Göran; Rich, Charles L

    2014-04-01

    Government agencies have issued warnings about the use of antidepressant medications in children, adolescents, and young adults since 2003. The statements warn that such medications may cause de novo 'suicidality' in some people. This review explores the data on the treatment of depression that led to these warnings and subsequent data that are relevant to the warnings. It also addresses the effectiveness of antidepressant treatment in general and the relationship of suicide rates to antidepressant treatment. It concludes that the decisions for the 'black box' warnings were based on biased data and invalid assumptions. Furthermore, the decisions were unsupported by the observational data regarding suicide in young people that existed in 2003. The following recommendations would seem to follow from these observations. First, drug authorities should re-evaluate the basis for their imposed warnings on antidepressant medicines, and analyze the actual public health consequences the warnings have had. In the absence of substantial evidence supporting the warnings, they should be removed. Second, physicians and other providers with prescription privileges should continue to be educated regarding the importance of aggressively treating depression in young people, using antidepressants when indicated. Third, physicians and other professionals who treat depressed young people must always be aware of the risk of suicide (albeit quite low) and observe them closely for any signs of increased risk of suicide. This is necessary regardless of the type of treatment being provided.

  15. Chronic administration of anticonvulsants but not antidepressants impairs bone strength: clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, P W; Pavlatou, M G; Michelson, D; Mouro, C M; Kling, M A; Wong, M-L; Licinio, J; Goldstein, S A

    2015-06-02

    Major depression and bipolar disorder are associated with decreased bone mineral density (BMD). Antidepressants such as imipramine (IMIP) and specific serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been implicated in reduced BMD and/or fracture in older depressed patients. Moreover, anticonvulsants such as valproate (VAL) and carbamazepine (CBZ) are also known to increase fracture rates. Although BMD is a predictor of susceptibility to fracture, bone strength is a more sensitive predictor. We measured mechanical and geometrical properties of bone in 68 male Sprague Dawley rats on IMIP, fluoxetine (FLX), VAL, CBZ, CBZ vehicle and saline (SAL), given intraperitoneally daily for 8 weeks. Distinct regions were tested to failure by four-point bending, whereas load displacement was used to determine stiffness. The left femurs were scanned in a MicroCT system to calculate mid-diaphyseal moments of inertia. None of these parameters were affected by antidepressants. However, VAL resulted in a significant decrease in stiffness and a reduction in yield, and CBZ induced a decrease in stiffness. Only CBZ induced alterations in mechanical properties that were accompanied by significant geometrical changes. These data reveal that chronic antidepressant treatment does not reduce bone strength, in contrast to chronic anticonvulsant treatment. Thus, decreased BMD and increased fracture rates in older patients on antidepressants are more likely to represent factors intrinsic to depression that weaken bone rather than antidepressants per se. Patients with affective illness on anticonvulsants may be at particularly high risk for fracture, especially as they grow older, as bone strength falls progressively with age.

  16. [Antidepressant-resistant depression and the bipolar spectrum -- diagnostic and therapeutic considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihmer, Zoltán; Gonda, Xénia; Rihmer, Annamária; Döme, Péter

    2016-01-01

    According to the results of epidemiological studies mood disorders with unipolar (major and minor depressive disorder; dysthymia) or bipolar features are among the most prevalent psychiatric disorders. These disorders with their frequent comorbidities (alcohol and/or drug use disorders, smoking, suicide, cardiovascular disorders) pose great public health challenge and cause substantial individual and familar burdens as well. Since SSRIs and other new antidepressant agents entered the market the possibilities to treat depression improved substantially but 25-35 percent of major depressives do not respond even to the second antidepressant trial but the rate of patients who are resistant after the third and fourth adequate antidepressant trial are around only 15-25 and 10 percent, respectively. Pharmacotherapy-resistant depression is a multicausal phenomenon. Along with its well-known risk-factors investigations of the past decade have revealed that unrecognised or hidden (subsyndromal or subthreshold) bipolarity is one of the most frequent causes of treatment resistance. In the case of bipolar depression (either as a part of syndromal bipolar I or II disorder or a subsyndromal manifestation) antidepressant monotherapy should be avoided and, instead of it, the administration of a mood stabilizer (primarily lithium and lamotrigine) or some atypical antipsychotics (preferably quetiapine) are recommended. If antidepressant is inevitably necessary in bipolar depression, we should use it always in combination with mood stabilizers or atypical antipsychotics.

  17. Regulation of neurotrophic factors and energy metabolism by antidepressants in astrocytes

    KAUST Repository

    Martin, Jean Luc

    2013-09-01

    There is growing evidence that astrocytes are involved in the neuropathology of major depression. In particular, decreases in glial cell density observed in the cerebral cortex of individuals with major depressive disorder are accompanied by a reduction of several astrocytic markers suggesting that astrocyte dysfunction may contribute to the pathophysiology of major depression. In rodents, glial loss in the prefrontal cortex is sufficient to induce depressive-like behaviors and antidepressant treatment prevents the stress-induced reduction of astrocyte number in the hippocampus. Collectively, these data support the existence of a link between astrocyte loss or dysfunction, depressive-like behavior and antidepressant treatment. Astrocytes are increasingly recognized to play important roles in neuronal development, neurotransmission, synaptic plasticity and maintenance of brain homeostasis. It is also well established that astrocytes provide trophic, structural, and metabolic support to neurons. In this article, we review evidence that antidepressants regulate energy metabolism and neurotrophic factor expression with particular emphasis on studies in astrocytes. These observations support a role for astrocytes as new targets for antidepressants. The contribution of changes in astrocyte glucose metabolism and neurotrophic factor expression to the therapeutic effects of antidepressants remains to be established. © 2013 Bentham Science Publishers.

  18. Chronic antidepressant administration alleviates frontal and hippocampal BDNF deficits in CUMS rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Gu, Fenghua; Chen, Jia; Dong, Wenxin

    2010-12-17

    Stress activates the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, regulates the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the brain, and mediates mood. Antidepressants alleviate stress and up-regulate BDNF gene expression. In this study, we investigated the effect of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) and the different kinds of antidepressant treatments on the HPA axis and the BDNF expression in the rat brain. Adult Wistar male rats were exposed to a six-week CUMS procedure and received different antidepressant treatments including venlafaxine, mirtazapine, and fluoxetine. Immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR were used to measure BDNF expression levels in the rat brain, and ELISAs were used to investigate the plasma corticosterone (CORT) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels. CUMS significantly decreased the BDNF protein level in the DG, CA1, and CA3 of the hippocampus and increased plasma CORT level. Chronic antidepressant treatments all significantly increased BDNF protein levels in the hippocampus and the pre-frontal cortex. In addition, venlafaxine and mirtazapine inhibited the increase of plasma CORT level. These results suggested that an increase in the BDNF level in the brain could be a pivotal mechanism of various antidepressants to exert their therapeutic effects.

  19. Behavioral and Biochemical Evidences for Antidepressant-Like Activity of Celastrus Paniculatus Seed Oil in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valecha, Rekha; Dhingra, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Celastrus paniculatus seed oil, commonly known as Malkangni or Jyotishmati, was in use from time immemorial to treat brain related disorders. Celastrus paniculatus seed oil has significant antidepressant-like activity in chronic unpredictable stressed mice. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the antidepressant-like effect of Celastrus paniculatus seed oil in unstressed mice and to explore its mechanism of action. Methods: The seed oil (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, PO) and fluoxetine per se were administered for 14 successive days to Swiss young albino mice. On the 14th day, 60 min after drug administration, animals were subjected to Tail Suspension Test (TST) and Forced Swim Test (FST). The mechanism of action was also studied. Results: The oil significantly decreased immobility period of mice in both tail suspension test and forced swim test, indicating its significant antidepressant-like activity. The efficacy was found to be comparable to fluoxetine (PSulpiride (selective D2-receptor antagonist), p-CPA (tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor), and baclofen (GABAB agonist) significantly attenuated the oil-induced antidepressant-like effect, when assessed during TST. Discussion: Celastrus paniculatus seed oil produced significant antidepressant-like effect in mice possibly through interaction with dopamine D2, serotonergic, and GABAB receptors; as well as inhibition of MAO–A activity and decrease in plasma corticosterone levels. PMID:27303599

  20. Myricitrin induces antidepressant-like effects and facilitates adult neurogenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Erika; Mori, Marco Aurélio; Campos, Alline Cristina; Andreatini, Roberto; Guimarães, Francisco Silveira; Milani, Humberto; de Oliveira, Rúbia Maria Weffort

    2017-01-01

    Myricitrin (MYR) is a natural flavonoid that inhibits nitric oxide (NO) transmission and has an atypical antipsychotic-like profile in animal models. Considering that several NO inhibitors exert antidepressant-like effects, the present study evaluated the antidepressant-like effect of MYR (3-30mg/kg) in the tail suspension test (TST). Because of the putative relationship between adult neurogenesis and antidepressant activity, we also assessed cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation in adult neurogenic niches, including the subgranular zone (SGZ) and subventricular zone (SVZ). Similar to the positive control imipramine (IMI; 10mg/kg), repeated treatment with 10mg/kg MIR but not acute treatment reduced immobility time in the TST, indicating an antidepressant-like effect. No effect on general motor activity was observed. Myricitrin also facilitated cell proliferation in the SGZ of the hippocampal dentate gyrus and SVZ. In the SGZ, MYR increased the number of doublecortin- and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine/neuronal nuclei-positive cells. Our results suggest that MYR facilitates hippocampal neurogenesis, which might contribute to its antidepressant-like effect and atypical antipsychotic-like profile.

  1. Is nitric oxide signalling involved in the antidepressant action of ketamine?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebenberg, Nico; Müller, Heidi Kaastrup; Elfving, Betina

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aim: Stress-induced excessive glutamate transmission at N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors may underlie a major mechanism in the pathophysiology that leads to depression, while ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist, has been shown to induce a rapid antidepressant effect in depre......Background and Aim: Stress-induced excessive glutamate transmission at N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors may underlie a major mechanism in the pathophysiology that leads to depression, while ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist, has been shown to induce a rapid antidepressant effect......-arginine, a precursor and a stimulant of NO production can attenuate behavioural and cellular antidepressant-like effects induced by ketamine. Four groups of FSL rats received vehicle (saline, i.p.), ketamine (15 mg/kg, i.p.), l-arginine (250 mg/kg, i.p.) or a combination of ketamine and l-arginine, and assessed....../FRL model in more detail with regard to the regulation of these proteins. Results: The behavioural data from the FST showed that l-arginine significantly attenuated the antidepressant-like action of ketamine, suggesting that ketamine may indeed exert its antidepressant action by reducing NO signalling...

  2. Modifying 5-HT1A receptor gene expression as a new target for antidepressant therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul R Albert

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Major depression is the most common form of mental illness, and is treated with antidepressant compounds that increase serotonin (5-HT neurotransmission. Increased 5-HT1A autoreceptor levels in the raphe nuclei act as a “brake” to inhibit the 5-HT system, leading to depression and resistance to antidepressants. Several 5-HT1A receptor agonists (buspirone, flesinoxan, ipsapirone that preferentially desensitize 5-HT1A autoreceptors have been tested for augmentation of antidepressant drugs with mixed results. One explanation could be the presence of the C(-1019G 5-HT1A promoter polymorphism that prevents gene repression of the 5-HT1A autoreceptor. Furthermore, down-regulation of 5-HT1A autoreceptor expression, not simply desensitization of receptor signaling, appears to be required to enhance and accelerate antidepressant action. The current review focuses on the transcriptional regulators of 5-HT1A autoreceptor expression, their roles in permitting response to 5-HT1A-targeted treatments and their potential as targets for new antidepressant compounds for treatment-resistant depression.

  3. Treatment patterns in major depressive disorder after an inadequate response to first-line antidepressant treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia-Toro Mauro

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to determine the most common pharmacological strategies used in the management of major depressive disorder (MDD after an inadequate response to first-line antidepressant treatment in clinical practice. Methods Multicenter, non-interventional study in adult outpatients with a DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of MDD and inadequate response to first-line antidepressant medication. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to identify independent factors associated with the adoption of a specific second-line strategy. Results A total of 273 patients were analyzed (mean age: 46.8 years, 67.8% female. Baseline mean Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale total score was 32.1 (95%CI 31.2-32.9. The most common strategies were: switching antidepressant medication (39.6%, augmentation (18.8%, and combination therapy (17.9%. Atypical antipsychotic drugs were the most commonly used agent for augmenting antidepressant effect. The presence of psychotic symptoms and the number of previous major depressive episodes were associated with the adoption of augmenting strategy (OR = 3.2 and 1.2, respectively. Conclusion The switch to another antidepressant agent was the most common second-line therapeutic approach. Psychiatrists chose augmentation based on a worse patients’ clinical profile (number of previous episodes and presence of psychotic symptoms.

  4. Drug use pattern of antidepressant agents in psychiatric patients – A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aksha Memon

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depression is a major public health problem. It causes clinically significant distress, impairment of social, occupational or other important areas of function. Objective: To evaluate the prescribing pattern of antidepressant agents in patients attending psychiatry OPD at a tertiary care teaching hospital. Method: A prospective study was carried out at psychiatry outpatient department (OPD at VS General Hospital for 6 months. Patients who were prescribed any of the antidepressant medications irrespective of clinical indication either as monotherapy or in combination with other psychotherapeutic agents were included in the study. Result: Total 455 patients were enrolled for 6 months. Major Depressive Disorder (MDD was the most common diagnosis (85.93%. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs was the most commonly prescribed drug group (56.7% followed by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs (46.8%. Amongst TCAs, imipramine was most frequently prescribed drug (65.89% followed by sertraline (56.8% among the SSRIs. Both the TCAs and newer antidepressants were prescribed with equal frequencies. Conclusion: Amongst antidepressants most frequently prescribed medication was imipramine followed by sertraline.

  5. Modulatory Effects of Antidepressant Classes on the Innate and Adaptive Immune System in Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyre, H A; Lavretsky, H; Kartika, J; Qassim, A; Baune, B T

    2016-05-01

    Current reviews exploring for unique immune-modulatory profiles of antidepressant classes are limited by focusing mainly on cytokine modulation only and neglecting other aspects of the innate and adaptive immune system. These reviews also do not include recent comparative clinical trials, immune-genetic studies and therapeutics with unique neurotransmitter profiles (e. g., agomelatine). This systematic review extends the established literature by comprehensively reviewing the effects of antidepressants classes on both the innate and adaptive immune system. Antidepressants appear, in general, to reduce pro-inflammatory factor levels, particularly C-reactive protein (CRP), tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6. We caution against conclusions as to which antidepressant possesses the greater anti-inflammatory effect, given the methodological heterogeneity among studies and the small number of comparative studies. The effects of antidepressant classes on adaptive immune factors are complex and poorly understood, and few studies have been conducted. Methodological heterogeneity is high among these studies (e. g., length of study, cohort characteristics, dosage used and immune marker analysis). We recommend larger, comparative studies - in clinical and pre-clinical populations.

  6. DNA methylation and clinical response to antidepressant medication in major depressive disorder: A review and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisoway, Amanda J; Zai, Clement C; Tiwari, Arun K; Kennedy, James L

    2017-01-04

    Antidepressant medications are the most common treatment for major depression and related disorders. Pharmacogenetic studies have demonstrated that response to these medications is associated with genetic variation. While these studies have been invaluable they have yet to explain why a significant number of patients do not respond to their initial medication. The epigenetic modification known as DNA methylation has recently been studied in the context of antidepressant treatment response. As such, the purpose of this article is to review the advances made in the relatively new field of pharmaco-epigenetics of antidepressant response. We included all published articles examining DNA methylation in association with antidepressant treatment response in Major Depressive Disorder from April 2006 to June 2016 using the PubMed, Medline, PsychInfo and Web of Science databases. At the present time, although original articles are limited, epigenetic modifications of SLC6A4, BDNF, and IL11 genes are showing promising results as biomarkers for prediction of antidepressant response. However, research methods and results are heterogeneous and additional studies are required before results are generalizable. At the end of this review we provide recommendations for study design and analytic approaches.

  7. Time-dependent biphasic modulation of human BDNF by antidepressants in neuroblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musazzi Laura

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent rodent studies reported that antidepressant treatments affect the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF mRNA in a way that is dependent on treatment duration, by selective modulation of different BDNF transcripts. However, no data are available for the human BDNF gene. We studied the effect of different antidepressants on BDNF mRNA expression in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Results Cultured cells were treated with the antidepressants fluoxetine, reboxetine and desipramine for different time lengths (6, 24, 48 hours. Expression of total BDNF mRNA was analyzed by reverse transcription PCR and levels of different BDNF transcripts were detected by hemi-nested PCR with specific primers. Short-term treatment (6 hours with reboxetine or desipramine reduced total BDNF, whereas long-term treatment (48 hours significantly increased total BDNF mRNA levels. These changes were accounted for by differential regulation of BDNF IV and VIa/b transcripts. Fluoxetine showed no significant effects. Conclusion This is the first study showing biphasic changes in the expression of total and specific BDNF transcripts in human cells following antidepressant treatments. These findings suggest that biphasic induction of BDNF by antidepressants could be a feature common to rodents and humans and encourage the use of SH-SY5Y cells as a tool for investigation of drug effects on human genes.

  8. Antidepressant use and risk for mortality in 121,252 heart failure patients with or without a diagnosis of clinical depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brouwers, Corline; Christensen, Stefan B; Damen, Nikki L

    2016-01-01

    of clinical depression were independently associated with antidepressant use. Patients using no antidepressants with clinical depression and patients using antidepressants, with or without clinical depression, had a significantly higher risk for all-cause mortality (HR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.15-1.36; HR, 1.24; 95....... CONCLUSION: Patients with HF taking antidepressants had an increased risk for all-cause and CV-mortality, irrespectively of having clinical depression. These results highlight the importance of further examining the antidepressant prescription pattern in patients with HF, as this may be crucial......BACKGROUND: Depression is a risk factor for mortality in patients with heart failure (HF), however, treating depression with antidepressant therapy does not seem to improve survival. We examined the prevalence of antidepressant use in HF patients, the correlates of antidepressant use subsequent...

  9. Restoration of primary anterior teeth: review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jacob K

    2002-01-01

    This paper reviews the published data on restorations of primary anterior teeth. The discussion includes Class III restorations, Class V restorations, various forms of full coronal restorations, atraumatic restorative technique (ART) and recommendations for future research.

  10. 76 FR 46149 - Financial Assistance: Wildlife Restoration, Sport Fish Restoration, Hunter Education and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    ... Assistance: Wildlife Restoration, Sport Fish Restoration, Hunter Education and Safety; Final Rule #0;#0... Restoration, Hunter Education and Safety AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Final rule... Restoration, Sport Fish Restoration, and Hunter Education and Safety (Enhanced Hunter Education and...

  11. Methodology for ranking restoration options

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Hedemann

    1999-01-01

    The work described in this report has been performed as a part of the RESTRAT Project FI4P-CT95-0021a (PL 950128) co-funded by the Nuclear Fission Safety Programme of the European Commission. The RESTRAT project has the overall objective of developinggeneric methodologies for ranking restoration...... techniques as a function of contamination and site characteristics. The project includes analyses of existing remediation methodologies and contaminated sites, and is structured in the following steps:-characterisation of relevant contaminated sites -identication and characterisation of relevant restoration...... techniques -assessment of the radiological impact -development and application of a selection methodology for restoration options -formulation ofgeneric conclusions and development of a manual The project is intended to apply to situations in which sites with nuclear installations have been contaminated...

  12. Neurobiology of stress, depression, and rapid acting antidepressants: remodeling synaptic connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duman, Ronald S

    2014-04-01

    Stress and depression are associated with atrophy and loss of neurons in limbic and cortical brain regions that could contribute to the symptoms of depression. Typical monoamine reuptake inhibitor antidepressants have only modest efficacy and require long-term treatment, and are only weakly effective in blocking or reversing these structural changes caused by stress. Recent findings demonstrate that ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist, produces rapid antidepressant actions in difficult to treat depressed patients. In addition, preclinical studies demonstrate that ketamine rapidly increases synaptic connections in the prefrontal cortex by increasing glutamate signaling and activation of pathways that control the synthesis of synaptic proteins. Moreover, ketamine rapidly reverses the synaptic deficits caused by exposure to chronic stress in rodent models. Studies of the signaling mechanisms underlying the actions of ketamine have provided novel approaches and targets for new rapid acting antidepressants with decreased side effects, as well as a better understanding of the neurobiology of stress, depression, and treatment response.

  13. [Antidepressant action of emoxipin and mexidol in mice with alloxan diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volchegorskiĭ, I A; Rassokhina, L M; Miroshnichenko, I Iu

    2009-01-01

    The development of alloxan diabetes in mice is accompanied by prolonged desperate behavior (analogous to human depression) and decreased activity of animals in the open field test. Course administration of emoxypin and mexidol in doses corresponding to the human therapeutic range renders the antidepressant action manifested by reduced desperate behavior and increased activity in the open field. The antidepressant effect of emoxypin and mexidol is accompanied by a decrease in the blood glucose level after 14 days of administration. Emoxypin, in contrast to mexidol, provokes transient deterioration of diabetic hyperglycemia after 7 days of administration. Mexidol is characterized by an optimal combination of antidepressant action and favorable impact on carbohydrate metabolism that makes this 3-oxypyridine derivative a promising substance for the treatment of depression in diabetic patients.

  14. Metabonomic Study on the Antidepressant-Like Effects of Banxia Houpu Decoction and Its Action Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanqiang Ma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to establish an experimental model for metabonomic profiles of the rat’s brain and then to investigate the antidepressant effect of Banxia Houpu decoction (BHD and its possible mechanisms. Behavioral research and metabonomics method based on UPLC-MS were used to assess the efficacy of different fractions of BHD on chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS model of depression. There was a significant difference between the BHD group and the model group. Eight endogenous metabolites, which are contributing to the separation of the model group and control group, were detected, while BHD group regulated the perturbed metabolites showing that there is a tendency of recovery compared to control group. Therefore, we think that those potential metabolite biomarkers have some relationship with BHD’s antidepression effect. This work appraised the antidepressant effect of Banxia Houpu decoction as well as revealing a metabonomics method, a valuable parameter in the TCM research.

  15. Effects of antidepressants and antihistaminics on catalepsy induced by intracerebroventricular administration of histamine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onodera, K

    1991-01-01

    The intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of histamine but not N-telemethylhistamine and 1-methyl-4-imidazole acetic acid induced catalepsy in mice. Histamine H1-receptor blockers such as cyproheptadine, mepyramine and diphenhydramine reduced histamine-induced catalepsy. However, astemizole which is known to be without central effects, did not reduce histamine-induced catalepsy. The icv pretreatment with histamine H2-receptor blockers, such as metiamide and cimetidine, also had no effect. Moreover, various antidepressants, both imipramine- and atypical-type drugs antagonized histamine-induced catalepsy to various degrees in this experiment. Thus, the induction of catalepsy by icv administration of histamine was mediated through histamine H1-receptors, and suggested that antidepressants reduced histamine-induced catalepsy via this mechanism. Histamine-induced catalepsy is a possible new animal model of depression which can also be used for evaluation of atypical antidepressants.

  16. Antidepressant potential of nitrogen-containing heterocyclic moieties: An updated review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeem Siddiqui

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Depression is currently the fourth leading cause of disease or disability worldwide. Antidepressant is approved for the treatment of major depression (including paediatric depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder (in both adult and paediatric populations, bulimia nervosa, panic disorder and premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Antidepressant is a psychiatric medication used to alleviate mood disorders, such as major depression and dysthymia and anxiety disorders such as social anxiety disorder. Many drugs produce an antidepressant effect, but restrictions on their use have caused controversy and off-label prescription a risk, despite claims of superior efficacy. Our current understanding of its pathogenesis is limited and existing treatments are inadequate, providing relief to only a subset of people suffering from depression. Reviews of literature suggest that heterocyclic moieties and their derivatives has proven success in treating depression.

  17. How do antidepressants work? New perspectives for refining future treatment approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmer, Catherine J; Duman, Ronald S; Cowen, Philip J

    2017-01-30

    Most currently available antidepressants target monoamine neurotransmitter function. However, a purely neurotransmitter-based explanation for antidepressant drug action is challenged by the delayed clinical onset of most agents and the need to explain how neurochemical changes reverse the many different symptoms of depression. Novel approaches to understanding of antidepressant drug action include a focus on early changes in emotional and social processing and the role of neural plasticity. In this Review, we discuss the ways in which these two different theories reflect different or complementary approaches, and how they might be integrated to offer novel solutions for people with depression. We consider the predictions made by these mechanistic approaches for the stratification and development of new therapeutics for depression, and the next steps that need to be made to facilitate this translation of science to the clinic.

  18. Fear erasure in mice requires synergy between antidepressant drugs and extinction training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpova, Nina N; Pickenhagen, Anouchka; Lindholm, Jesse; Tiraboschi, Ettore; Kulesskaya, Natalia; Agústsdóttir, Arna; Antila, Hanna; Popova, Dina; Akamine, Yumiko; Bahi, Amine; Sullivan, Regina; Hen, René; Drew, Liam J; Castrén, Eero

    2011-12-23

    Antidepressant drugs and psychotherapy combined are more effective in treating mood disorders than either treatment alone, but the neurobiological basis of this interaction is unknown. To investigate how antidepressants influence the response of mood-related systems to behavioral experience, we used a fear-conditioning and extinction paradigm in mice. Combining extinction training with chronic fluoxetine, but neither treatment alone, induced an enduring loss of conditioned fear memory in adult animals. Fluoxetine treatment increased synaptic plasticity, converted the fear memory circuitry to a more immature state, and acted through local brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Fluoxetine-induced plasticity may allow fear erasure by extinction-guided remodeling of the memory circuitry. Thus, the pharmacological effects of antidepressants need to be combined with psychological rehabilitation to reorganize networks rendered more plastic by the drug treatment.

  19. A ventral view on antidepressant action: roles for adult hippocampal neurogenesis along the dorsoventral axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Olivia F; Cryan, John F

    2014-12-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is implicated in antidepressant action, stress responses, and cognitive functioning. The hippocampus is functionally segregated along its longitudinal axis into dorsal (dHi) and ventral (vHi) regions in rodents, and analogous posterior and anterior regions in primates, whereby the vHi preferentially regulates stress and anxiety, while the dHi preferentially regulates spatial learning and memory. Given the role of neurogenesis in functions preferentially regulated by the dHi or vHi, it is plausible that neurogenesis is preferentially regulated in either the dHi or vHi depending upon the stimulus. We appraise here the literature on the effects of stress and antidepressants on neurogenesis along the hippocampal longitudinal axis and explore whether preferential regulation of neurogenesis in the vHi/anterior hippocampus contributes to stress resilience and antidepressant action.

  20. Antidepressant activity of standardized extract of Bacopa monniera in experimental models of depression in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sairam, K; Dorababu, M; Goel, R K; Bhattacharya, S K

    2002-04-01

    Bacopa monniera Wettst. (syn. Herpestis monniera L.; Scrophulariaceae) is a commonly used Ayurvedic drug for mental disorders. The standardized extract was reported earlier to have significant anti-oxidant effect, anxiolytic activity and improve memory retention in Alzheimer's disease. Presently, the standardized methanolic extract of Bacopa monniera (bacoside A - 38.0+/-0.9) was investigated for potential antidepressant activity in rodent models of depression. The effect was compared with the standard antidepressant drug imipramine (15 mg/kg, ip). The extract when given in the dose of 20 and 40 mg/kg, orally once daily for 5 days was found to have significant antidepressant activity in forced swim and learned helplessness models of depression and was comparable to that of imipramine.

  1. Investigating nitric oxide signalling involvement in the antidepressant action of ketamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebenberg, Nico; Müller, Heidi Kaastrup; Elfving, Betina

    2012-01-01

    Stress-induced excessive glutamate transmission at N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDA-R’s) may underlie a primary mechanism in the physiology that leads to depression, and ketamine, an NMDA-R antagonist, has been shown to rapidly relieve depression in humans. A number of downstream mechanisms...... oxide (NO) signalling. We used a genetic rat model of depression, the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats, and their control, the Flinders Resistant Line (FRL) rats, to investigate whether l-arginine, a precursor of NO, can attenuate the behavioural antidepressant-like effect of ketamine in FSL rats......-arginine significantly attenuated the antidepressant-like action of ketamine in the FST, indicating that ketamine may exert its antidepressant action by reducing NO signalling. Western blotting and nNOS activity experiments are on going and these results are imminent....

  2. Synthesis of Chlorinated Tetracyclic Compounds and Testing for Their Potential Antidepressant Effect in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usama Karama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of the tetracyclic compounds 1-(4,5-dichloro-9,10-dihydro-9,10-ethanoanthracen-11-yl-N-methylmethanamine (5 and 1-(1,8-dichloro-9,10-dihydro-9,10-ethanoanthracen-11-yl-N-methylmethanamine (6 as a homologue of the anxiolytic and antidepressant drugs benzoctamine and maprotiline were described. The key intermediate aldehydes (3 and (4 were successfully synthesized via a [4 + 2] cycloaddition between acrolein and 1,8-dichloroanthracene. The synthesized compounds were investigated for antidepressant activity using the forced swimming test. Compounds (5, (6 and (3 showed significant reduction in the mice immobility indicating significant antidepressant effects. These compounds significantly reduced the immobility times at a dose 80 mg/kg by 84.0%, 86.7% and 71.1% respectively.

  3. Role of AC-cAMP-PKA Cascade in Antidepressant Action of Electroacupuncture Treatment in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-hua Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenylyl cyclase (AC-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP-cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA cascade is considered to be associated with the pathogenesis and treatment of depression. The present study was conducted to explore the role of the cAMP cascade in antidepressant action of electroacupuncture (EA treatment for chronic mild stress (CMS-induced depression model rats. The results showed that EA improved significantly behavior symptoms in depression and dysfunction of AC-cAMP-PKA signal transduction pathway induced by CMS, which was as effective as fluoxetine. Moreover, the antidepressant effects of EA rather than Fluoxetine were completely abolished by H89, a specific PKA inhibitor. Consequently, EA has a significant antidepressant treatment in CMS-induced depression model rats, and AC-cAMP-PKA signal transduction pathway is crucial for it.

  4. Effort-reward imbalance at work and the risk of antidepressant treatment in the Danish workforce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Maj Britt D.; Madsen, Ida E. H.; Aust, Birgit;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have shown that high effort-reward imbalance (ERI) at work is a risk factor for the onset of self-reported depressive symptoms. In this study, we examined whether ERI predicts risk of treatment with antidepressant medication in a representative sample of the Danish...... workforce. Methods: We linked survey data on ERI and covariates of 4541 participants from the Danish Work Environment Cohort Study 2000 with the Danish National Prescription Registry that includes all legally purchased prescription drugs at pharmacies in Denmark since 1995. Participants with a history...... of antidepressant treatment or with self-reported depressive symptoms at baseline were excluded. Using Cox proportional hazard analyses we examined the prospective association between ERI at baseline and incident antidepressant treatment while adjusting for potential confounders. Time of follow-up was 5 years...

  5. The inhibition of phosphodiesterase type 5 as a novel target for antidepressant action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebenberg, Nico

    2010-01-01

    therapy of depression. A recent study from our laboratory reported an antidepressant-like response in the rat forced swim test (FST) following chronic (11 day) co-administration of the phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor sildenafil and the muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor antagonist atropine......-related, suggesting that it may differentially affect the regulation of neurotransmission associated with antidepressant and depressogenic responses at different doses. Unlike the mood-regulating responses, however, the anxiolytic-like responses following chronic PDE5 inhibition does not appear to involve...... not involve up-regulation of frontal cortical and hippocampal mACh receptors. In summary, this project emphasises the potential of PDE5 inhibition as a novel antidepressant and anxiolytic strategy, and provides important insight into the specific neuronal mechanism(s) that may be involved...

  6. Influence of baseline severity on antidepressant efficacy for anxiety disorders : meta-analysis and meta-regression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Ymkje Anna; de Jonge, Peter; van den Heuvel, Edwin; Turner, Erick H; Roest, Annelieke M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antidepressants are established first-line treatments for anxiety disorders, but it is not clear whether they are equally effective across the severity range. AIMS: To examine the influence of baseline severity of anxiety on antidepressant efficacy for generalised anxiety disorder (GAD),

  7. The antidepressant tianeptine persistently modulates glutamate receptor currents of the hippocampal CA3 commissural associational synapse in chronically stressed rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kole, MHP; Swan, L; Fuchs, E

    2002-01-01

    Recent hypotheses on the action of antidepressants imply a modulation of excitatory amino acid transmission. Here, the effects of long-term antidepressant application in rats with the drug tianeptine were examined at hippocampal CA3 commissural associational (c/a) glutamate receptor ion channels, em

  8. Ionization pattern obtained in electrospray ionization or atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interfaces for authorized antidepressants in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecu, Iulia; Ionicǎ, Mihai; Vlǎdescu, Marian; Truţǎ, Elena; Sultan, Carmen; Viscol, Oana; Horhotǎ, Luminiţa; Radu, Simona

    2016-12-01

    Antidepressants were found in 1950. In the 1990s there was a new generation of antidepressants. They act on the level of certain neurotransmitters extrasinpatic by its growth. After their mode of action antidepressants may be: SSRIs (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors); (Serotonin-Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors); SARIs (Serotonin Antagonist Reuptake Inhibitors); NRIs (Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors); NDRIs (Norepinephrine-Dopamine Reuptake Inhibitors) NDRAs (Norepinephrine-Dopamine Releasing Agents); TCAs (Tricyclic Antidepressants); TeCAs (Tetracyclic Antidepressants); MAOIs (Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors); agonist receptor 5-HT1A (5- hydroxytryptamine); antagonist receptor 5-HT2; SSREs (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Enhancers) and Sigma agonist receptor. To determine the presence of antidepressants in biological products, it has been used a system HPLC-MS (High Performance Liquid Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry) Varian 12001. The system is equipped with APCI (Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization) or ESI (ElectroSpray Ionization) interface. To find antidepressants in unknown samples is necessary to recognize them after mass spectrum. Because the mass spectrum it is dependent on obtaining private parameters work of HPLC-MS system, and control interfaces, the mass spectra library was filled with the mass spectra of all approved antidepressants in Romania. The paper shows the mass spectra obtained in the HPLCMS system.

  9. Potential population impact of antidepressant use on hip fractures rate in Denmark (DK), Norway (NO) and the Netherlands (NL)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goldenberg, Jennifer S.B.; Petri, Hans; Khong, Phuong T.; Klungel, Olaf H.; De Vries, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Background: The use of antidepressants has been associated with an increased hip fracture risk in observational studies. However, the potential impact of antidepressant consumption on the population rate of hip fractures has not been estimated. Objectives: To evaluate the population impact of antide

  10. Concomitant medication use and its implications on the hazard pattern in pharmacoepidemiological studies: example of antidepressants, benzodiazepines and fracture risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Louise De Bruin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antidepressants and benzodiazepines are often co-prescribed and both associated with an increased fracture risk, albeit with distinctive hazard patterns. Timing of initiation of one with respect to the other and duration of use may influence the combined fracture hazard.The objective of our study was to describe patterns of concomitant use of benzodiazepine and antidepressants in terms of timing of initiation and duration and to illustrate the potential impact of various scenarios of timing of co-use on hip fracture hazard. Methods: Patients initiating antidepressant therapy (2002-2009 were identified from the Netherlands Primary Care Research Database. Concomitant benzodiazepine use was assessed according to the start time of benzodiazepine with respect to antidepressant therapy start. Duration of concomitant use was estimated relative to the length of antidepressant treatment episode. Results: Among 16,087 incident antidepressant users, 39.0% used benzodiazepines concomitantly during their first antidepressant treatment episode. The time of initiation of benzodiazepine use was variable (64.4% starting before, 13.7% simultaneous and 21.9% after antidepressants. Duration of concomitant use in the three groups varied. Conclusions: Co-prescribed medications with a common adverse event, may not only require accounting for concomitant use, but also the timing of start and duration of use as the overall hazard may vary accordingly.

  11. Steric hindrance mutagenesis in the conserved extracellular vestibule impedes allosteric binding of antidepressants to the serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plenge, Per; Shi, Lei; Beuming, Thijs;

    2012-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) controls synaptic serotonin levels and is the primary target for antidepressants, including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (e.g. (S)-citalopram) and tricyclic antidepressants (e.g. clomipramine). In addition to a high affinity binding site, SERT possesses...

  12. Testing the antidepressant properties of the peptide ARA290 in a human neuropsychological model of drug action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerit, Hilâl; Veer, Ilya M; Dahan, Albert

    2015-01-01

    such hematopoietic side-effects but may have neurotrophic and antidepressant effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible antidepressant effects of ARA290 in a neuropsychological model of drug action. Healthy participants (N=36) received ARA290 (2mg) or placebo in a double-blind, randomized...

  13. Conservative preparations for cast restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shillingburg, H T

    1976-04-01

    Partial veneer crowns still play a role in modern restorative dentistry. They must be used in the right situation with thoughtful treatment planning, and they must be done well in accordance with certain principles. Three-quarter crowns are less retentive than full crowns, but they can be used successfully as single unit restorations and retainers for short span bridges. Retention can be enhanced by the use of proximal boxes. The M.O.D. onlay, a modified inlay with occlusal coverage, minimizes the damaging effects of stress generated by occlusal forces. There is little indication for the use of M.O.D. inlays or large two surface inlays.

  14. Antidepressant properties of bioactive fractions from the extract of Crocus sativus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Han, Ting; Zhu, Yu; Zheng, Cheng-Jian; Ming, Qian-Liang; Rahman, Khalid; Qin, Lu-Ping

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antidepressant properties of stigmas and corms of Crocus sativus L. The aqueous ethanol extract of C. sativus corms was fractionated on the basis of polarity. Among the different fractions, the petroleum ether fraction and dichloromethane fraction at doses of 150, 300, and 600 mg/kg showed significant antidepressant-like activities in dose-dependent manners, by means of behavioral models of depression. The immobility time in the forced swimming test and tail suspending test was significantly reduced by the two fractions, without accompanying changes in ambulation when assessed in the open-field test. By means of a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry technique, twelve compounds of the petroleum ether fraction were identified. These data show that administration of C. sativus corms extract produces antidepressant-like effects. Aqueous stigmas extract also exerted antidepressive effects in the behavioral models. Crocin 1 and crocin 2 of the aqueous stigmas extract were identified by a reversed-phase HPLC analysis. In addition, the bioactive compound crocin 1 in this herb was quantitatively determined. The data indicate that antidepressant-like properties of aqueous stigma extracts may be due to crocin 1, giving support to the validity of the use of this plant in traditional medicine. All these results suggest that the low polarity parts of C. sativus corms should be considered as a new plant material for curing depression, which merit further studies regarding antidepressive-like activities of chemical compounds isolated from the two fractions and mechanism of action.

  15. The impact of direct-to-consumer television and magazine advertising on antidepressant use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Rosemary J; Eisenberg, Matthew D; Simon, Kosali I

    2012-09-01

    We examine whether exposure to direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) for antidepressant drugs affects individual use of these medications among those suffering from depression. Prior studies have almost exclusively relied on making connections between national or market-level advertising volume/expenditures and national or individual-level usage of medications. This is the first study to: estimate the impact of individual-level exposure to DTCA on individual-level use of antidepressants; estimate the impact of individual-level exposure to television DTCA on individual-level use in any drug class; consider the relative and interactive impact of DTCA in two different media in any drug class; and, consider the heterogeneity of impact among different populations in an econometric framework in the antidepressant market. There are also important limitations to note. Unlike prior market level studies that use monthly data, we are limited to aggregated annual data. Our measures of potential advertising exposure are constructed assuming that media consumption patterns are stable during the year. We are also not able to study the impact of advertising on use of antidepressants for conditions other than depression, such as anxiety disorders. We find that: DTCA impacts antidepressant use in a statistically and economically significant manner; that these effects are present in both television and magazine advertising exposure but do not appear to have interactive effects; are stronger for women than for men in the magazine medium, but are about equally strong for men and women in the TV medium; and, are somewhat stronger for groups suffering from more severe forms of depression. The overall size of the effect is a 6-10 percentage point increase in antidepressant use from being exposed to television advertising; the corresponding magazine effects are between 3 and 4 percentage points.

  16. Sensitivity during the forced swim test is a key factor in evaluating the antidepressant effects of abscisic acid in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Cong-Cong; Shu, Yu-Mian; Chen, Fang-Han; Ding, Yu-Qiang; Zhou, Jiang-Ning

    2016-03-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), a crucial phytohormone, is distributed in the brains of mammals and has been shown to have antidepressant effects in the chronic unpredictable mild stress test. The forced swim test (FST) is another animal model that can be used to assess antidepressant-like behavior in rodents. Here, we report that the antidepressant effects of ABA are associated with sensitivities to the FST in mice. Based on mean immobility in the 5-min forced swim pre-test, ICR mice were divided into short immobility mice (SIM) and long immobility mice (LIM) substrains. FST was carried out 8 days after drug administration. Learned helplessness, as shown by increased immobility, was only observed in SIM substrain and could be prevented by an 8-day ABA treatment. Our results show that ABA has antidepressant effects in SIM substrain and suggest that mice with learned helplessness might be more suitable for screening potential antidepressant drugs.

  17. Pharmacokinetic study of yohimbine and its pharmacodynamic effects on salivary secretion in patients treated with tricyclic antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, H; Picault, P; Schmitt, L; Houin, G; Berlan, M; Montastruc, J L

    1994-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic parameters and the time course of the effect after acute oral administration of yohimbine on salivary secretion in patients treated with tricyclic antidepressants were investigated. Yohimbine (10 mg) increased both salivary outflow and plasma noradrenaline levels for 4 h. Pharmacokinetic parameters (t1/2, tmax, Cmax and AUCexp) and plasma concentrations of noradrenaline were higher in patients treated with tricyclic antidepressants than in controls. At this dose, yohimbine induced a relatively large number of side effects. A lower dose (4 mg) increased salivary secretion for 3 h without any side effects in patients treated with tricyclic antidepressants but not in healthy volunteers. These data describe an interaction between yohimbine and tricyclic antidepressants and thus show that a relatively low dose (4 mg) of yohimbine could be useful in the treatment of dry mouth due to tricyclic antidepressants. PMID:8148228

  18. Prevalence and factors associated with off-label antidepressant prescriptions for insomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai L

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available L Leanne Lai¹, Mooi Heong Tan¹, Yen Chi Lai²¹Department of Sociobehavioral and Administrative Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA; ²Department of Internal Medicine, Golen Hospital, Pintong City, TaiwanBackground: The primary objective of our study was to investigate the prevalence of off-label antidepressant drug use in insomnia. The secondary objective was to compare prescribing patterns between off-label antidepressants vs hypnotics approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for insomnia, with particular emphasis on socioeconomic characteristics of patients and physicians.Methods: We undertook a secondary data analysis using the national longitudinal database from the 2006 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. Subjects were identified from outpatient visits in which at least one insomnia drug was prescribed. A series of weighted Chi-squared statistics was used to compare drug use for insomnia across various patient and physician characteristics. Multivariate logistic regression was conducted to identify factors associated with off-label antidepressant drug use.Results: Among 901.95 million outpatient visits that took place in the US in 2006, an estimated 30.43 million visits included at least one drug prescription for insomnia. Off-label antidepressants were prescribed significantly more frequently (45.1% than nonbenzodiazepine z-hypnotics (43.2% and benzodiazepines (11.7%. Insomnia prescribing patterns were significantly influenced by physician specialty and physician office settings. Pediatricians (odds ratio [OR]: 65.892; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.536–810.564 and neurologists (OR: 4.784; 95% CI: 2.044–11.201 were more likely to prescribe off-label antidepressants than psychiatrists. Self-paying patients were more likely to receive off-label antidepressants as treatment for insomnia than patients with private insurance (OR 2.594; 95% CI: 1.128–5.967.Conclusion: Our

  19. Natural products as antidepressants documented in Chinese patents from 1992 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chang-Li; Geng, Chang-An; Yin, Xiu-Juan; Huang, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Ji-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Depressive disorder is a severe psychiatric problem all over the world. Clinical therapeutic agents for the treatment of depression in the market targeting on monoamine neurotransmitters are far from satisfaction due to their adverse effects. Novel classes of antidepressant agents with different mechanisms and low toxicity are needed. Natural products from traditional Chinese medicines have been revealed as new sources to cure the depressive symptoms with various chemical structures and promising activities. This paper reviews natural products as antidepressants documented in Chinese patents so far.

  20. Antidepressant-like effects and mechanisms of flavonoids and related analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Li-Ping; Liu, Bing-Yu

    2016-10-04

    Flavonoids, possessing a basic phenylbenzopyrone core, are important components of the human diet, and are found in many medicinal plants. Flavonoids include chalcones, flavanones and their derivatives. Synthetic and natural isolated flavonoids display an enormous number of biological activities such as antitumor, antiplatelet, anti-malarial, anti-inflammatory, antidepressant and anticonvulsant properties. This review article focuses on the antidepressant-like effect, structure-activity relationship and mechanism of action of total flavonoid extracts isolation from natural sources, flavonoid compounds and their related analogues.

  1. The 5-HT7 receptor as a mediator and modulator of antidepressant-like behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkisyan, Gor; Roberts, Amanda J.; Hedlund, Peter B.

    2010-01-01

    The 5-HT7 receptor has been suggested as a target for treating depression since inactivation or blockade of the receptor has an antidepressant-like behavioral effect. The present study investigated possible interactions between various classes of drugs with antidepressant properties and blockade or inactivation of the 5-HT7 receptor. Immobility despair in the tail suspension test and the forced swim test was evaluated in mice lacking the 5-HT7 receptor (5-HT7−/−) and in wild-type controls (5-...

  2. Liver Function Test Abnormalities in Depressed Patients Treated with Antidepressants: A Real-World Systematic Observational Study in Psychiatric Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstuyft, Céline; Corruble, Emmanuelle; Perlemuter, Gabriel; Colle, Romain

    2016-01-01

    Background Concerning the risk of antidepressant induced liver injury, it is not clear whether psychiatrists perform a liver function test (LFT) and whether an increase in aminotransferase levels should contraindicate antidepressant treatment. Aim To evaluate LFT availability, the prevalence of LFT abnormalities and the probable cause of an altered LFT in patients with a major depressive episode (MDE) requiring an antidepressant drug. Methods We studied LFT evaluation in a real world psychiatric setting, in a sample of 321 consecutive patients with a current major depressive episode (MDE) requiring an antidepressant drug treatment, but without current alcohol or drug dependence or unstable medical disease. Results An LFT is performed in 36.1% (116/321) of depressed patients. One fifth of antidepressant-treated patients who had an LFT evaluation had abnormal results. The most frequent causes of LFT abnormalities were: NAFLD (nonalcoholic fatty liver disease) (7/321; 2.1%), acute alcohol consumption (4/321; 1.2%), antidepressant-induced liver injury (3/321; 0.9%), hepatitis C virus infection (2/321; 0.6%) and heart failure (1/321; 0.3%). The cause of LFT abnormalities was unknown in 32% of patients (8/25) due to the absence of etiological investigations. Conclusion These results demonstrate that an LFT is infrequently performed by psychiatrists in depressed patients requiring an antidepressant drug. Baseline LFT assessment and observations during the first six months of antidepressant treatment may be useful for detection of patients with pre-existing liver disease such as NAFLD, and early identification of cases of antidepressant-induced liver injury. An increase in aminotransferase levels may be related to an underlying liver disease, but does not contraindicate antidepressant treatment. PMID:27171561

  3. Meta-analyses of comparative efficacy of antidepressant medications on peripheral BDNF concentration in patients with depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianjun; Deng, Xiao; Zhang, Lin; Zhao, Xiang; Qu, Zehui; Lei, Yang; Lei, Ting

    2017-01-01

    Background Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is one of the most important regulatory proteins in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). Increasing numbers of studies have reported the relationship between serum/plasma BDNF and antidepressants (ADs). However, the potential effects of several classes of antidepressants on BDNF concentrations are not well known. Hence, our meta-analyses aims to review the effects of differential antidepressant drugs on peripheral BDNF levels in MDD and make some recommendations for future research. Methods Electronic databases including PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and PsycINFO were searched from 1980 to June 2016. The change in BDNF levels were compared between baseline and post-antidepressants treatment by use of the standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). All statistical tests were two-sided. Results We identified 20 eligible trials of antidepressants treatments for BDNF in MDD. The overall effect size for all drug classes showed that BDNF levels were elevated following a course of antidepressants use. For between-study heterogeneity by stratification analyses, we detect that length of treatment and blood samples are significant effect modifiers for BDNF levels during antidepressants treatment. While both SSRIs and SNRIs could increase the BDNF levels after a period of antidepressant medication treatment, sertraline was superior to other three drugs (venlafaxine, paroxetine or escitalopram) in the early increase of BDNF concentrations with SMD 0.53(95% CI = 0.13–0.93; P = 0.009). Conclusions There is some evidence that treatment of antidepressants appears to be effective in the increase of peripheral BDNF levels. More robust evidence indicates that different types of antidepressants appear to induce differential effects on the BDNF levels. Since sertraline makes a particular effect on BDNF concentration within a short amount of time, there is

  4. Location of the Antidepressant Binding Site in the Serotonin Transporter IMPORTANCE OF SER-438 IN RECOGNITION OF CITALOPRAM AND TRICYCLIC ANTIDEPRESSANTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob; Taboureau, Olivier; Hansen, Kasper B.

    2009-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) regulates extracellular levels of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5HT) in the brain by transporting 5HT into neurons and glial cells. The human SERT (hSERT) is the primary target for drugs used in the treatment of emotional disorders, including depression. h......-function relationships. However, the precise structural mechanism by which antidepressants inhibit hSERT and the location of their binding pockets are still elusive. We have identified a residue (Ser-438) located within the 5HT-binding pocket in hSERT to be a critical determinant for the potency of several......- and inhibitor-binding sites in hSERT suggesting that antidepressants function by a mechanism that involves direct occlusion of the 5HT-binding site....

  5. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI antidepressants, prolactin and breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet eAshbury

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs are a widely prescribed class of anti-depressants. Laboratory and epidemiologic evidence suggests that a prolactin-mediated mechanism secondary to increased serotonin levels at neuronal synapses could lead to a potentially carcinogenic effect of SSRIs. In this population-based case-control study, we evaluated the association between SSRI use and breast cancer risk as a function of their relative degree of inhibition of serotonin reuptake as a proxy for their impact on prolactin levels. Cases were 2,129 women with primary invasive breast cancer diagnosed from 2003-2007, and controls were 21,297 women randomly selected from the population registry. Detailed information for each SSRI prescription dispensed was compiled using the Saskatchewan prescription database. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the impact of use of high and lower inhibitors of serotonin reuptake and duration of use, as well as to assess the effect of individual high inhibitors on the risk of breast cancer. Exclusive users of high or lower inhibitors of serotonin reuptake were not at increased risk for breast cancer compared with nonusers of SSRIs (OR = 1.01, CI = 0.88-1.17 and OR = 0.91, CI = 0.67-1.25 respectively, regardless of their duration of use or menopausal status. While we cannot rule out the possibility of a clinically important risk increase (OR = 1.83, CI = 0.99-3.40 for long-term users of sertraline (≥24 prescriptions, given the small number of exposed cases (n=12, the borderline statistical significance and the wide confidence interval, these results need to be interpreted cautiously. In this large population-based case-control study, we found no conclusive evidence of breast cancer risk associated with the use of SSRIs even after assessing the degree of serotonin reuptake inhibition and duration of use. Our results do not support the serotonin-mediated pathway for the prolactin-breast cancer hypothesis.

  6. Diphenyl diselenide elicits antidepressant-like activity in rats exposed to monosodium glutamate: A contribution of serotonin uptake and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quines, Caroline B; Rosa, Suzan G; Velasquez, Daniela; Da Rocha, Juliana T; Neto, José S S; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2016-03-15

    Depression is a disorder with symptoms manifested at the psychological, behavioral and physiological levels. Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is the most widely used additive in the food industry; however, some adverse effects induced by this additive have been demonstrated in experimental animals and humans, including functional and behavioral alterations. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible antidepressant-like effect of diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)2, an organoselenium compound with pharmacological properties already documented, in the depressive-like behavior induced by MSG in rats. Male and female newborn Wistar rats were divided in control and MSG groups, which received, respectively, a daily subcutaneous injection of saline (0.9%) or MSG (4g/kg/day) from the 1st to 5th postnatal day. At 60th day of life, animals received (PhSe)2 (10mg/kg, intragastrically) 25min before spontaneous locomotor and forced swimming tests (FST). The cerebral cortices of rats were removed to determine [(3)H] serotonin (5-HT) uptake and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity. A single administration of (PhSe)2 was effective against locomotor hyperactivity caused by MSG in rats. (PhSe)2 treatment protected against the increase in the immobility time and a decrease in the latency for the first episode of immobility in the FST induced by MSG. Furthermore, (PhSe)2 reduced the [(3)H] 5-HT uptake and restored Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity altered by MSG. In the present study a single administration of (PhSe)2 elicited an antidepressant-like effect and decrease the synaptosomal [(3)H] 5-HT uptake and an increase in the Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity in MSG-treated rats.

  7. Weed biocontrol in landscape restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed biological control programs in natural areas are often undertaken with the goal of restoring native plant communities and/or ecosystem services to a pre-invasion level. These objectives may be achieved in some areas with biological control alone; however, in other sites integration of biologica...

  8. Origins of the Restoration Playhouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Dennis D.

    Contrary to the popular theory that the proscenium type of playhouse was imported from France by the Court of Charles II in 1660, the Restoration playhouse in fact developed from Elizabethan theatres and court masques. These Elizabethan theatres were the private theatres, and were generally small, rectangular, roofed structures where aristocratic…

  9. Zirconia-reinforced dental restorations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Chen

    2013-01-01

    The series of studies conducted in this thesis showed that there are several ways to enhance the performance of fixed restorations regarding the application of zirconia. One possible way is to change the sintering procedure of zirconia, so that the physical properties of zirconia such BFS, density o

  10. Bayesian image restoration, using configurations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorarinsdottir, Thordis

    configurations are expressed in terms of the mean normal measure of the random set. These probabilities are used as prior probabilities in a Bayesian image restoration approach. Estimation of the remaining parameters in the model is outlined for salt and pepper noise. The inference in the model is discussed...

  11. Bayesian image restoration, using configurations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorarinsdottir, Thordis Linda

    2006-01-01

    configurations are expressed in terms of the mean normal measure of the random set. These probabilities are used as prior probabilities in a Bayesian image restoration approach. Estimation of the remaining parameters in the model is outlined for the salt and pepper noise. The inference in the model is discussed...

  12. A review on anterior teeth restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Solanki

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Restorations of teeth have been a need of time since very long. As the time have passed, there have been different advances in the field of restorative materials and tooth restorations. Many newer restorative materials are now available to us for the purpose of tooth restorations still some of the older materials are materials of choice for a sector of society. This article focuses on few such restorative materials and also tells us about a few patents granted in such field.

  13. Phonemic restoration in developmental dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie N. Del Tufo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The comprehension of fluent speech in one’s native language requires that listeners integrate the detailed acoustic-phonetic information available in the sound signal with linguistic knowledge. This interplay is especially apparent in the phoneme restoration effect, a phenomenon in which a missing phoneme is ‘restored’ via the influence of top-down information from the lexicon and through bottom-up acoustic processing. Developmental dyslexia is a disorder characterized by an inability to read at the level of one’s peers without any clear failure due to environmental influences. In the current study we utilized the phonemic restoration illusion paradigm, to examine individual differences in phonemic restoration across a range of reading ability, from very good to dyslexic readers. Results demonstrate that restoration occurs less in those who have high scores on measures of phonological processing. Based on these results, we suggest that the processing or representation of acoustic detail may not be as reliable in poor and dyslexic readers, with the result that lexical information is more likely to override acoustic properties of the stimuli. This pattern of increased restoration could result from a failure of perceptual tuning, in which unstable representations of speech sounds result in the acceptance of non-speech sounds as speech. An additional or alternative theory is that degraded or impaired phonological processing at the speech sound level may reflect architecture that is overly plastic and consequently fails to stabilize appropriately for speech sound representations. Therefore the inability to separate speech and noise may result as a deficit in separating noise from the acoustic signal.

  14. Rhythms and blues: modulation of oscillatory synchrony and the mechanism of action of antidepressant treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuchter, Andrew F; Hunter, Aimee M; Krantz, David E; Cook, Ian A

    2015-05-01

    Treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD) act at different hierarchical levels of biological complexity, ranging from the individual synapse to the brain as a whole. Theories of antidepressant medication action traditionally have focused on the level of cell-to-cell interaction and synaptic neurotransmission. However, recent evidence suggests that modulation of synchronized electrical activity in neuronal networks is a common effect of antidepressant treatments, including not only medications, but also neuromodulatory treatments such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. Synchronization of oscillatory network activity in particular frequency bands has been proposed to underlie neurodevelopmental and learning processes, and also may be important in the mechanism of action of antidepressant treatments. Here, we review current research on the relationship between neuroplasticity and oscillatory synchrony, which suggests that oscillatory synchrony may help mediate neuroplastic changes related to neurodevelopment, learning, and memory, as well as medication and neuromodulatory treatment for MDD. We hypothesize that medication and neuromodulation treatments may have related effects on the rate and pattern of neuronal firing, and that these effects underlie antidepressant efficacy. Elucidating the mechanisms through which oscillatory synchrony may be related to neuroplasticity could lead to enhanced treatment strategies for MDD.

  15. "Killing the Blues": a role for cellular suicide (apoptosis) in depression and the antidepressant response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKernan, Declan P; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F

    2009-08-01

    Apoptosis or programmed cell death is a critical regulator of tissue homeostasis and emerging evidence is focused on the role of apoptosis mechanisms in the central nervous system. Generally, apoptosis is necessary to prevent cancerous growths. However, excessive apoptosis in post-mitotic cells such as neurons leads to neurodegeneration. Chronic stress, which can precipitate depression, has been shown to increase the susceptibility of certain populations of neurons to cell death while antidepressant treatment, in general, shows the ability to oppose these effects and promote neuroprotection. Here, we discuss the major players in cell death pathways, the physiological implications of chronic stress and depression, chronic stress models in animals which result in cell death and the different classes of antidepressants and mood stabilizers that have been shown to prevent cell death. We discuss the cellular effects of antidepressants and possible modes of action in preventing apoptosis. Investigations on the role of apoptosis in mediating the molecular, physiological and behavioural effects of antidepressants may help gain a better mechanistic insight into drug action and allow refinement of current therapeutics in order to target these pathways in a specific manner.

  16. Antidepressant imipramine induces human astrocytes to differentiate into cells with neuronal phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabras, Stefano; Saba, Francesca; Reali, Camilla; Scorciapino, Maria Laura; Sirigu, Annarita; Talani, Giuseppe; Biggio, Giovanni; Sogos, Valeria

    2010-06-01

    Several recent studies have expanded our conception of the role of astrocytes in neurogenesis, proposing that these cells may contribute to this phenomenon not only as a source of trophic substances, but also as stem cells themselves. We recently observed in vitro that human mature astrocytes can be induced to differentiate into cells with a neuronal phenotype. Antidepressant drugs have been shown to increase neurogenesis in the adult rodent hippocampus. In order to better understand the role of astroglia in antidepressant-induced neurogenesis, primary astrocyte cultures were treated with the antidepressant imipramine. Cell morphology was rapidly modified by treatment. In fact, whereas untreated astrocytes showed large, flat morphology, after a few hours of treatment cells exhibited a round-shaped cell body with long, thin processes. The expression of neuronal markers was analysed by immunocytochemistry, Western Blot and RT-PCR at different treatment times. Results showed an increase in neuronal markers such as neurofilament and neuron-specific enolase (NSE), whereas glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and nestin expression were not significantly modified by treatment. Similar results were obtained with fluoxetine and venlafaxine. Hes1 mRNA significantly increased after 2 h of treatment, suggesting involvement of this transcription factor in this process. These results confirm the role of astrocytes in neurogenesis and suggest that these cells may represent one of the targets of antidepressants.

  17. Regioselective synthesis and evaluation of 3-alkylidene-1, 3-dihydroisobenzofurans as potential antidepressant agents

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C Praveen; C Iyyappan; K Girija; K Suresh Kumar; P T Perumal

    2012-03-01

    3-Alkylidene-1,3-dihydroisobenzofurans exhibited moderate antidepressant activity as evaluated by forced swim and tail suspension test methods. Virtual screening was carried out by docking the designed compounds into the serotonin binding sites of arabinase protein to predict the analogue binding mode of the compounds to the SSRIs.

  18. Initiation, execution and discontinuation of antidepressant therapy: considerations and decisions of patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geffen, E.C.G.

    2008-01-01

    Antidepressants have shown to be effective in the treatment of depression and anxiety by reducing symptoms, as well as the risk of relapse and recurrence. Yet, several obstacles have been acknowledged in the process of adequate diagnosis and treatment of patients with these diseases: underrecognitio

  19. Salivary testosterone : Associations with depression, anxiety disorders, and antidepressant use in a large cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giltay, Erik J.; Enter, Dorien; Zitman, Frans G.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; van Pelt, Johannes; Spinhoven, Phillip; Roelofs, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Low circulating levels of testosterone have been associated with major depression, but there is more limited evidence for differences in patients with anxiety disorders. The use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and other antidepressants is associated with sexual side eff

  20. Salivary testosterone: associations with depression, anxiety disorders, and antidepressant use in a large cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giltay, E.J.; Enter, D.; Zitman, F.G.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Pelt, J. van; Spinhoven, P.; Roelofs, K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Low circulating levels of testosterone have been associated with major depression, but there is more limited evidence for differences in patients with anxiety disorders. The use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and other antidepressants is associated with sexual side effe

  1. Antidepressant effect of bioactive compounds from Paecilomyces tenuipes in mice and rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongwei Kan; Liang Ming; Chunru Li; Hongxing Kan; Bei Sun; Yan Liang

    2010-01-01

    A bioactive compound from Paecilomyces tenuipes(BCPT)has an inhibitory effect on monoamine oxidase A(MAO-A)in vitro.Researchers have thought that BCPT may be a potential antidepressant.The MAO-A suppressor moclobemide served as a control,and this study investigated the mechanisms of BCPT as an antidepressant.Results demonstrated that BCPT induced significantly increased sucrose intake in chronic unpredictable stressed rats,shortened immobility time in forced swimming mice,improved the scores of blepharoptosis and akinesia in reserpine-treated mice,increased the number of 5-hydroxy tryptophan-induced head-twitches,remarkably enhanced the expression of hippocampus mineralcorticoid receptor and glucocorticoid receptor mRNA,decreased the ratio of mineralcorticoid receptor to glucocorticoid receptor and raised the levels of dopamine,norepinephrine and 5-hydroxytryptamine,while decreasing hydroxyindole acetic acid levels or dihydroxy-phenyl acetic acid in chronic unpredictable stressed rats.Behavioral test results suggested that BCPT potentially had antidepressant-like activity.Meanwhile,BCPT increased the levels of neurotransmitters,and mineralcorticoid receptor and glucocorticoid receptor mRNA in the hippocampus,which may be an important mechanism of its antidepressant effect.

  2. Brain ischemia changes the long term response to antidepressant drugs in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deplanque, Dominique; Venna, Venugopal Reddy; Bordet, Régis

    2011-06-01

    Depression is a frequent but often unrecognized and under treated complication of stroke that has scarcely been investigated in animal models particularly regarding treatment issues. Using the Forced Swim Test (FST) and testing spontaneous motor activity, we studied whether a transient focal cerebral ischemia modifies mice behaviours and antidepressant drug effects. We first evaluated whether FST realized 2 days or 1 week after brain reperfusion may be routinely used in male Swiss mice previously submitted to a 15, 30 or 60-min transient occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery. We then evaluated behavioural changes up to 5 weeks in mice previously submitted to a 15-min ischemia. Behaviours according to the administration of imipramine or fluvoxamine at 1 and 5 weeks after a 15-min ischemia were finally evaluated. Transient ischemia was associated with a decrease in immobility in the FST performed 2 days after reperfusion while no changes were observed in 1 and 5 weeks post-ischemia groups. Changes were related neither to brain ischemia duration nor to infarct volume. At both 1 and 5 weeks after brain ischemia, a dramatic decrease in the antidepressant response to imipramine related to a decrease in climbing behaviour was observed while the effects of fluvoxamine were improved through an increase in both climbing and swimming. Behaviours in the FST were unrelated to any spontaneous motor activity changes. Responses to anti-depressant drugs are strongly modified in mice previously submitted to brain ischemia. Present results underline that not all antidepressant drugs are appropriate after ischemic stroke.

  3. Evidences for the agmatine involvement in antidepressant like effect of bupropion in mouse forced swim test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotagale, Nandkishor R; Tripathi, Sunil J; Aglawe, Manish M; Chopde, Chandrabhan T; Umekar, Milind J; Taksande, Brijesh G

    2013-06-01

    Although bupropion has been widely used in the treatment of depression, the precise mechanism of its therapeutic actions is not fully understood. The present study investigated the role of agmatine in an antidepressant like effect of bupropion in mouse forced swim test. The antidepressant like effect of bupropion was potentiated by pretreatment with agmatine (10-20mg/kg, ip) and by the drugs known to increase endogenous agmatine levels in brain viz., l-arginine (40 μg/mouse, icv), an agmatine biosynthetic precursor, ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor, dl-α-difluoromethyl ornithine hydrochloride, DFMO (12.5 μg/mouse, icv), diamine oxidase inhibitor, aminoguanidine (6.5 μg/mouse, icv) and agmatinase inhibitor, arcaine (50 μg/mouse, icv) as well as imidazoline I1 receptor agonists, moxonidine (0.25mg/kg, ip) and clonidine (0.015 mg/kg, ip) and imidazoline I2 receptor agonist, 2-(2-benzofuranyl)-2-imidazoline hydrochloride, 2-BFI (5mg/kg, ip). Conversely, prior administration of I1 receptor antagonist, efaroxan (1mg/kg, ip) and I2 receptor antagonist, idazoxan (0.25mg/kg, ip) blocked the antidepressant like effect of bupropion and its synergistic combination with agmatine. These results demonstrate involvement of agmatine in the antidepressant like effect of bupropion and suggest agmatine and imidazoline receptors as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of depressive disorders.

  4. Antidepressant-like effects of erythropoietin: a focus on behavioural and hippocampal processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meagan Osborn

    Full Text Available Depression is a chronic and debilitating condition with a significant degree of relapse and treatment resistance that could stem, at least in part, from disturbances of neuroplasticity. This has led to an increased focus on treatment strategies that target brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, synaptic plasticity and adult neurogenesis. In the current study we aimed to assess whether erythropoietin (EPO would have antidepressant-like effects given its already established pro-trophic actions. In particular, we assessed whether EPO would diminish the deleterious effects of a social stressor in mice. Indeed, EPO induced anxiolytic and antidepressant-like responses in a forced swim test, open field, elevated-plus maze, and a novelty test, and appeared to blunt some of the negative behavioural effects of a social stressor. Furthermore, EPO promoted adult hippocampal neurogenesis, an important feature of effective antidepressants. Finally, a separate study using the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin revealed that antagonizing this pathway prevented the impact of EPO upon forced swim performance. These data are consistent with previous findings showing that the mTOR pathway and its neurogenic and synaptogenic effects might mediate the behavioral consequences of antidepressant agents. Our findings further highlight EPO as a possible adjunct treatment for affective disorders, as well as other stressor associated disorders of impaired neuroplasticity.

  5. Sex Differences in the Pharmacokinetics of Antidepressants : Influence of Female Sex Hormones and Oral Contraceptives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damoiseaux, Valerie A.; Proost, Johannes H.; Jiawan, Vincent C. R.; Melgert, Barbro N.

    2014-01-01

    Women are twice as likely to develop depression as men. Moreover, the symptoms they experience also show sex differences: women tend to develop depression at an earlier age and show more severe symptoms than men. Likewise, the response to antidepressant pharmacotherapy appears to have sex difference

  6. Decreased Total Antioxidant Activity in Major Depressive Disorder Patients Non-Responsive to Antidepressant Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Song-Eun; Lee, Gyoung-Ja; Rhee, Chang-Kyu; Rho, Dae-Young; Kim, Do-Hoon; Huh, Sun

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the total antioxidant activity (TAA) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and the effect of antidepressants on TAA using a novel potentiometric method. Methods Twenty-eight patients with MDD and thirty-one healthy controls were enrolled in this study. The control group comprised 31 healthy individuals matched for gender, drinking and smoking status. We assessed symptoms of depression using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). We measured TAA using potentiometry. All measurements were made at baseline and four and eight weeks later. Results There was a significant negative correlation between BDI scores and TAA. TAA was significantly lower in the MDD group than in controls. When the MDD group was subdivided into those who showed clinical response to antidepressant therapy (response group) and those who did not (non-response group), only the non-response group showed lower TAA, while the response group showed no significant difference to controls at baseline. After eight weeks of antidepressant treatment, TAA in both the response and non-response groups was similar, and there was no significant difference among the three groups. Conclusion These results suggest that the response to antidepressant treatment in MDD patients might be predicted by measuring TAA. PMID:27081384

  7. Antidepressant Drugs for Chronic Urological Pelvic Pain: An Evidence-Based Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Papandreou

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of antidepressant drugs for the management of chronic pelvic pain has been supported in the past. This study aimed to evaluate the available evidence for the efficacy and acceptability of antidepressant drugs in the management of urological chronic pelvic pain. Studies were selected through a comprehensive literature search. We included all types of study designs due to the limited evidence. Studies were classified into levels of evidence according to their design. Ten studies were included with a total of 360 patients. Amitriptyline, sertraline, duloxetine, nortriptyline, and citalopram are the antidepressants that have been reported in the literature. Only four randomized controlled trials (RCTs were identified (two for amitriptyline and two for sertraline with mixed results. We conclude that the use of antidepressants for the management of chronic urological pelvic pain is not adequately supported by methodologically sound RCTs. From the existing studies amitriptyline may be effective in interstitial cystitis but publication bias should be considered as an alternative explanation. All drugs were generally well tolerated with no serious events reported.

  8. Premature ejaculation and serotonergic antidepressants-induced delayed ejaculation : the involvement of the serotonergic system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waldinger, MD; Berendsen, HHG; Blok, BFM; Olivier, B; Holstege, G

    1998-01-01

    Premature ejaculation has generally been considered a psychosexual disorder with psychogenic aetiology. Although still mainly treated by behavioural therapy, in recent years double-blind studies have indicated the beneficial effects of some of the serotonergic antidepressants (SSRIs) in delaying eja

  9. Age-related response to redeemed antidepressants measured by completed suicide in older adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlangsen, Annette; Conwell, Yeates

    2014-01-01

    (95% CI: 20-35). Logistic regression showed a 2% and 3% decline in the rate for men and women, respectively, considered in treatment with antidepressants, with each additional year of age. An opposite trend was found for persons not in treatment. Fewer persons aged 80+ dying by suicide had received...

  10. CT-Screening for lung cancer does not increase the use of anxiolytic or antidepressant medication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaerlev, Linda; Iachina, Maria; Pedersen, Jesper Holst

    2012-01-01

    CT screening for lung cancer has recently been shown to reduce lung cancer mortality, but screening may have adverse mental health effects. We calculated risk ratios for prescription of anti-depressive (AD) or anxiolytic (AX) medication redeemed at Danish pharmacies for participants in The Danish...... Lung Cancer Screening Trial (DLCST)....

  11. Antidepressant-like effects of methanol extract of Hibiscus tiliaceus flowers in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanzella Cláudia

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hibiscus tiliaceus L. (Malvaceae is used in postpartum disorders. Our purpose was to examine the antidepressant, anxiolytic and sedative actions of the methanol extract of H. tiliaceus flowers using animal models. Methods Adult male Swiss albino mice were treated with saline, standard drugs or methanol extract of H. tiliaceus and then subjected to behavioral tests. The forced swimming and tail suspension tests were used as predictive animal models of antidepressant activity, where the time of immobility was considered. The animals were submitted to the elevated plus-maze and ketamine-induced sleeping time to assess anxiolytic and sedative activities, respectively. Results Methanol extract of H. tiliaceus significantly decreased the duration of immobility in both animal models of antidepressant activity, forced swimming and tail suspension tests. This extract did not potentiate the effect of ketamine-induced hypnosis, as determined by the time to onset and duration of sleeping time. Conclusion Our results indicate an antidepressant-like profile of action for the extract of Hibiscus tiliaceus without sedative side effect.

  12. Antidepressant-like effect of agmatine is not mediated by serotonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krass, Maarja; Wegener, Gregers; Vasar, Eero;

    2008-01-01

    tested (50mg/kg) decreased immobility of mice in the forced swimming test. The magnitude of the effect was slightly smaller than that of the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine (15mg/kg). Agmatine did not change the locomotion of mice in the open field. Pretreatment with the tryptophane hydroxylase...

  13. Neural Plasticity and Proliferation in the Generation of Antidepressant Effects: Hippocampal Implication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuencisla Pilar-Cuéllar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that changes underlying depression and antidepressant-like effects involve not only alterations in the levels of neurotransmitters as monoamines and their receptors in the brain, but also structural and functional changes far beyond. During the last two decades, emerging theories are providing new explanations about the neurobiology of depression and the mechanism of action of antidepressant strategies based on cellular changes at the CNS level. The neurotrophic/plasticity hypothesis of depression, proposed more than a decade ago, is now supported by multiple basic and clinical studies focused on the role of intracellular-signalling cascades that govern neural proliferation and plasticity. Herein, we review the state-of-the-art of the changes in these signalling pathways which appear to underlie both depressive disorders and antidepressant actions. We will especially focus on the hippocampal cellularity and plasticity modulation by serotonin, trophic factors as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF through intracellular signalling pathways—cAMP, Wnt/β-catenin, and mTOR. Connecting the classic monoaminergic hypothesis with proliferation/neuroplasticity-related evidence is an appealing and comprehensive attempt for improving our knowledge about the neurobiological events leading to depression and associated to antidepressant therapies.

  14. Diagnostic conversion to bipolar disorder in unipolar depressed patients participating in trials on antidepressants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmskov, J; Licht, R W; Andersen, K

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In unipolar depressed patients participating in trials on antidepressants, we investigated if illness characteristics at baseline could predict conversion to bipolar disorder. METHOD: A long-term register-based follow-up study of 290 unipolar depressed patients with a mean age of 50...

  15. Simvastatin treatment exerts antidepressant-like effect in rats exposed to chronic mild stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pao-Yen; Chang, Alice Y W; Lin, Tsu-Kung

    2014-09-01

    Hyperlipidemia is associated with increased risk of coronary artery disease and stroke, both of which, in turn, are risk factors of old-age depression. Statins are extensively used for decreasing cholesterol levels. Clinical investigations revealed that long-term use of statins appeared to be associated with a lower risk of anxiety and depression. However, the antidepressant property of statins has not been well examined. This study aimed at examining the antidepressant-like effects of statins in rats exposed to chronic mild stress (CMS). We found that animals exposed to CMS for 4 weeks developed depressive-like state, shown by forced swim test and sucrose preference test. However, these CMS-induced behavioral changes were reversed by simvastatin (5 or 10mg/kg/day) for 14 days, comparable to imipramine (10mg/kg/day) treatment. Locomotor activity and anxiety-like behaviors were not altered by CMS or these treatments. These results demonstrated antidepressant-like effects of statin in CMS model of rats and suggested the potential that statins could be used to facilitate antidepressant treatment in clinical setting.

  16. Antidepressant- like effects of BCEF0083 in the chronic unpredictable stress models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LanlanZhou; LiangMING; ChuangengMa; YanCheng; QinJiang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Depression is a complicated disease, There are no satisfactory drugs to therapy depression so far. BCEF is a new type of bioactive compounds from entomogenous fungi. Depression animal models are effective to evaluate the antidepressant property of drugs. Several animal models of depression have been inn'oduced, however, only a few have been

  17. Prevalence of depression, quality of life and antidepressant treatment in the Danish General Suburban Population Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellervik, Christina; Kvetny, Jan; Christensen, Kaj Sparle

    2014-01-01

    to describe the prevalence of antidepressants received by the respondents in the GESUS study and the correspondence to their subjective well-being on the WHO-5 questionnaire. METHODS: To evaluate the validity (scalability) of the MDI and the WHO-5 in the GESUS study we performed the non-parametric Mokken...

  18. Ten years after the FDA black box warning for antidepressant drugs: a critical narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Martínez-Aguayo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA has warned about the increased suicidality risk associated with the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI and venlafaxine in children and adolescents. Objectives To critically appraise the available evidence supporting the FDA Black box warning concerning to the use of antidepressants in child and adolescents. Methods A critical review of articles in Medline/PubMed and SciELO databases regarding the FDA Black box warning for antidepressants, and the impact of FDA warnings on antidepressant prescriptions and suicide rates. Results The warning was based on surveys that did not report either cases of suicide nor a significant difference supporting an increased suicidality rate. The concept was defined in an ambiguous way and there is currently more available evidence to support such definition. The use of SSRI and venlafaxine has been associated to lower suicidality rates, but the prescription fall due to the warning increased suicide rates. Discussion Suicidality is an inherent feature of depressive disorders so it would be desirable to consider how much of the phenomenon may be attributed to antidepressants per se. It would be appropriate to consider that suicide rates might increase also as a consequence of the warning.

  19. Antidepressant versus neuroleptic activities of sulpiride isomers on four animal models of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccheri, A; Dall'Olio, R; Gaggi, R; Gandolfi, O; Montanaro, N

    1984-01-01

    The atypical neuroleptic sulpiride is also prescribed for depression because of its activating effect. However, such an effect does not necessarily imply an action identical to that of classical antidepressants, and a laboratory comparison of the neuroleptic and antidepressant activities of sulpiride may contribute to a better definition of its psychotherapeutic profile. Sulpiride isomers were studied in the rat in four behavioural models of depression which are thought to be influenced by neuroleptics in different ways. Desipramine (imipramine) and haloperidol were employed in each test as a standard antidepressant and neuroleptic, respectively. The four tests were: 1) prevention of apomorphine-induced sedation: 2) antagonism of apomorphine-induced hypothermia; 3) behavioural despair (swim test); 4) learned helplessness ( FR2 lever pressing escape). Desipramine ameliorated behaviour in all tests; haloperidol ameliorated the response to test 1, influenced that to test 2 in a neuroleptic-like way and worsened the responses to tests 3 and 4. (-)-Sulpiride worked in a similar way to haloperidol in all tests. (+)-Sulpiride significantly and dose-dependently ameliorated the responses to test 3 and was inactive in the others. No conclusion was drawn from test 1 owing to its lack of specificity; the results of the remaining tests indicated a neuroleptic profile of (-)-sulpiride and suggested a potential "antidepressant" activity of (+)-sulpiride which merits further investigation.

  20. Neural Plasticity and Proliferation in the Generation of Antidepressant Effects: Hippocampal Implication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilar-Cuéllar, Fuencisla; Vidal, Rebeca; Díaz, Alvaro; Castro, Elena; dos Anjos, Severiano; Pascual-Brazo, Jesús; Linge, Raquel; Vargas, Veronica; Blanco, Helena; Martínez-Villayandre, Beatriz; Pazos, Ángel; Valdizán, Elsa M.

    2013-01-01

    It is widely accepted that changes underlying depression and antidepressant-like effects involve not only alterations in the levels of neurotransmitters as monoamines and their receptors in the brain, but also structural and functional changes far beyond. During the last two decades, emerging theories are providing new explanations about the neurobiology of depression and the mechanism of action of antidepressant strategies based on cellular changes at the CNS level. The neurotrophic/plasticity hypothesis of depression, proposed more than a decade ago, is now supported by multiple basic and clinical studies focused on the role of intracellular-signalling cascades that govern neural proliferation and plasticity. Herein, we review the state-of-the-art of the changes in these signalling pathways which appear to underlie both depressive disorders and antidepressant actions. We will especially focus on the hippocampal cellularity and plasticity modulation by serotonin, trophic factors as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) through intracellular signalling pathways—cAMP, Wnt/β-catenin, and mTOR. Connecting the classic monoaminergic hypothesis with proliferation/neuroplasticity-related evidence is an appealing and comprehensive attempt for improving our knowledge about the neurobiological events leading to depression and associated to antidepressant therapies. PMID:23862076

  1. Modelling depression in animals and the potential antidepressant effect of histaminergic modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Magara, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Depression is at the top position for "years lived with disability" (Smith, 2014). Its aetiology is unknown, but the pathogenesis implicates changes in glutamatergic neuronal plasticity. Glutamatergic plasticity likely mediates the effects of antidepressants acting through monoamines. Histamine is a monoaminergic neuromodulator able to regulate glutamatergic plasticity and synaptic transmission. The Flinders sensitive line (FSL) rat has face and predictive validity as model ...

  2. Antioxidant and antidepressant-like activities of semi-synthetic α-phenylseleno citronellal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victoria, Francine Novack; Anversa, Roberta; Penteado, Filipe; Castro, Micheli; Lenardão, Eder João; Savegnago, Lucielli

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the antioxidant and antidepressant-like activities of the semi-synthetic compound α-phenylseleno citronellal (PhSeCIT) and the natural terpenoid R-citronellal (CIT) were evaluated. The biological potential of PhSeCIT and CIT was evaluated by antioxidant in vitro assays, such as 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS), ferric ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and linoleic acid oxidation. The compounds were also assessed by ex vivo tests to determine the acute toxicity, levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS), δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase (δ-Ala-D) and Na(+)/K(+) ATPase activities. The antidepressant-like activity of compounds in the tail suspension test (TST) and forced swimming test (FST) was also investigated. The results demonstrated that the addition of an organoselenium group to (R)-citronellal increased its antioxidant properties, since PhSeCIT showed better activity than CIT. The treatment of mice with both compounds did not cause death of any animals. The levels of TBARS were significantly reduced by PhSeCIT in liver and cortex of animals, whereas CIT did not alter these parameters. In the TST and FST, PhSeCIT showed promising antidepressant-like activity, while CIT was not active in this test. Taken together, these data demonstrate the role of selenium in the antioxidant and antidepressant-like activities of (R)-citronellal.

  3. Ferulic acid chronic treatment exerts antidepressant-like effect: role of antioxidant defense system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzi, Juliana; Rodrigues, Andre Felipe; Rós, Adriana de Sousa; de Castro, Amanda Blanski; de Castro, Bianca Blanski; de Lima, Daniela Delwing; Magro, Débora Delwing Dal; Zeni, Ana Lúcia Bertarello

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative stress has been claimed a place in pathophysiology of depression; however, the details of the neurobiology of this condition remains incompletely understood. Recently, treatments employing antioxidants have been thoroughly researched. Ferulic acid (FA) is a phenolic compound with antioxidant and antidepressant-like effects. Herein, we investigated the involvement of the antioxidant activity of chronic oral FA treatment in its antidepressant-like effect using the tail suspension test (TST) and the forced swimming test (FST) in mice. The modulation of antioxidant system in blood, hippocampus and cerebral cortex was assessed after stress induction through TST and FST. Our results show that FA at the dose of 1 mg/kg has antidepressant-like effect without affecting locomotor activity. The stress induced by despair tests was able to decrease significantly the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the blood, catalase (CAT) in the blood and cerebral cortex and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in the cerebral cortex. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS) levels were increased significantly in the cerebral cortex. Furthermore, the results show that FA was capable to increase SOD, CAT and GSH-Px activities and decrease TBA-RS levels in the blood, hippocampus and cerebral cortex. These findings demonstrated that FA treatment in low doses is capable to exert antidepressant-like effect with the involvement of the antioxidant defense system modulation.

  4. Prescribing pattern of antidepressants in psychiatric unit of a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Avanthi

    2014-08-01

    Conclusions: Depression is more commonly seen in married people predominantly in females and housewives. Fluoxetine is more commonly used followed by escitalopram. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are preferred over other antidepressant because of their relative lesser side effects. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(4.000: 667-670

  5. The effects of antenatal depression and antidepressant treatment on placental gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivier, Jocelien D A; Åkerud, Helena; Skalkidou, Alkistis; Kaihola, Helena; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger

    2015-01-01

    The effects of antenatal depression and antidepressant treatment during pregnancy on both mother and child are vigorously studied, but the underlying biology for these effects is largely unknown. The placenta plays a crucial role in the growth and development of the fetus. We performed a gene expres

  6. Antidepressant-like Effect of Insulin in Streptozotocin-induced Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sestile, Caio C; Maraschin, Jhonatan C; Rangel, Marcel P; Cuman, Roberto K N; Audi, Elisabeth A

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated the antidepressant-like effect of insulin compared to sertraline and a combination of insulin and sertraline in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) rats submitted to the forced swim test (FST). Male Wistar rats were daily treated for 21 days with insulin (1 or 2 IU/kg, i.p.), with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), sertraline (10 mg/kg, i.p.), or with a combination of insulin (1 or 2 IU/kg, i.p.) and sertraline (10 mg/kg, i.p.) and submitted to the FST. We also evaluated the water and food intake, urine volume and weight gain of the rats. Rats treated with STZ showed impaired glucose tolerance. Chronic treatment with sertraline showed an antidepressant-like effect in non-diabetic and diabetic rats. Furthermore, sertraline promoted lower weight gain in diabetic rats. Insulin reduced the immobility behaviour in T2DM rats with impaired glucose tolerance. In conclusion, our results showed that insulin has an antidepressant-like effect comparable to that of sertraline. Sertraline is effective as an antidepressant and reduces weight gain, which reinforces its superiority over other SSRIs in the treatment of major depression disorder in patients with T2DM.

  7. Screening of a novel furan compound for its antidepressant activity in albino mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayakumar JK

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: It can be concluded that the test drug has produced significant inhibition in duration of immobility by FST and also had significant protection against passive behavior. Hence substituted furan had potential antidepressant activity. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(6.000: 2389-2392

  8. Antidepressant-like effect of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichna, Jakub; Janecka, Anna; Piestrzeniewicz, Mariola; Costentin, Jean; do Rego, Jean-Claude

    2007-04-01

    Endomorphin-1 (Tyr-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH(2)) and endomorphin-2 (Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH(2)) are two recently isolated mu-opioid selective peptides with a potent antinociceptive activity, involved in a number of physiological processes, including food intake, vasomotricity, sexual behavior, as well as neuroendocrine and cardiorespiratory functions. The neuroanatomical distribution of endomorphins prompted us to study their antidepressant activity in two animal behavioral models of depression: forced-swimming and tail-suspension tests. In both tests, the intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of either endomorphin-1 or endomorphin-2 significantly decreased the duration of immobility, interpreted as an expression of 'behavioral despair', which could be related to the depression syndrome. These effects of endomorphins did not result from the stimulation of the animal motor activity. We have also demonstrated that the antidepressant-like effect of endomorphins was antagonized by the universal opioid antagonist, naloxone and the mu-opioid receptor selective antagonist, beta-funaltrexamine. In contrast, this effect was not antagonized by delta- and kappa-opioid receptor selective antagonists, naltrindole and nor-binaltorphimine, respectively. The results of the present study demonstrate that endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 produce potent antidepressant-like effects after i.c.v. injection in mice. We may suggest that endomorphins and the mu-opioid receptors might be involved in the physiopathology of depressive disorders, and that the endomorphinergic system could serve as a novel target for the development of antidepressant drugs.

  9. The association between lifting an administrative restriction on antidepressant dispensing and treatment patterns in Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thengilsdottir, G; Gardarsdottir, H; Almarsdottir, A B;

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: On March 1st 2009, restrictions on the dispensing of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) in Iceland were lifted. Incident rates and changes in early discontinuation and switching before and after the change were investigated. METHODS: New users of antidepressants between March...

  10. Time-Lag Bias in Trials of Pediatric Antidepressants: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Magdalena M.; Panza, Kaitlyn E.; Martin, Andres; Bloch, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether there is evidence of a time-lag bias in the publication of pediatric antidepressant trials. Method: We conducted a meta-analysis of published and unpublished randomized placebo-controlled trials of serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) in subjects less than 18 years of age with major depressive disorder. Our main…

  11. Continuation and maintenance therapy with antidepressive agents. Meta-analysis of research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loonen, A.J.M.; Peer, P.G.M.; Zwanikken, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the clinical benefits of long-term antidepressant drug treatment in patients with recurrent major depression. Bibliographic reviews of four textbooks and five review articles, literature searches using MEDLINE (1977-1987) and EXCERPTA MEDICA (1974-1987), ha

  12. Longitudinal Evidence for Unfavorable Effects of Antidepressants on Heart Rate Variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Licht, Carmilla M. M.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; van Dyck, Richard; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: It was previously shown that antidepressants are associated with diminished vagal control over the heart. Longitudinal studies are needed to test the causality of this association further. Methods: Longitudinal data were obtained in the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. At bas

  13. Elevated plasma fibrinogen, psychological distress, antidepressant use, and hospitalization with depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wium-Andersen, Marie Kim; Ørsted, David Dynnes; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Low-grade systemic inflammation may contribute to the development of depression. We tested the hypothesis that elevated plasma levels of the inflammatory marker fibrinogen are associated with psychological distress, use of antidepressant medication, and with hospitalization with depre......OBJECTIVES: Low-grade systemic inflammation may contribute to the development of depression. We tested the hypothesis that elevated plasma levels of the inflammatory marker fibrinogen are associated with psychological distress, use of antidepressant medication, and with hospitalization...... with depression in the general population. METHODS: We examined 73,367 20-100 year old men and women from two large population-based studies, the Copenhagen General Population Study and the Copenhagen City Heart Study. We measured plasma fibrinogen and recorded symptoms of psychological distress, use...... of antidepressant medication, and hospitalization with depression in both cross-sectional and prospective studies. RESULTS: In cross-sectional analyses, a stepwise increase in fibrinogen percentile categories was associated with a stepwise increase in risk of psychological distress, use of antidepressant medication...

  14. Transcriptomic profiling of human hippocampal progenitor cells treated with antidepressants and its application in drug repositioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Timothy R; Murphy, Tytus; Lee, Sang H; Price, Jack; Thuret, Sandrine; Breen, Gerome

    2017-01-01

    Current pharmacological treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD) are ineffective in a significant proportion of patients, and the identification of new antidepressant compounds has been difficult. ‘Connectivity mapping’ is a method that can be used to identify drugs that elicit similar downstream effects on mRNA levels when compared to current treatments, and thus may point towards possible repositioning opportunities. We investigated genome-wide transcriptomic changes to human hippocampal progenitor cells treated with therapeutically relevant concentrations of a tricyclic antidepressant (nortriptyline) and a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (escitalopram). We identified mRNA changes common to both drugs to create an ‘antidepressant mRNA signature’. We used this signature to probe the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS) and to identify other compounds that elicit similar changes to mRNA in neural progenitor cells. Results from LINCS revealed that the tricyclic antidepressant clomipramine elicited mRNA changes most similar to our mRNA signature, and we identified W-7 and vorinostat as functionally relevant drug candidates, which may have repositioning potential. Our results are encouraging and represent the first attempt to use connectivity mapping for drug repositioning in MDD. PMID:28208023

  15. Declining efficacy in controlled trials of antidepressants: effects of placebo dropout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalkwijk, S.J.; Undurraga, J.; Tondo, L.; Baldessarini, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    Drug-placebo differences (effect-sizes) in controlled trials of antidepressants for major depressive episodes have declined for several decades, in association with selectively increasing clinical improvement associated with placebo-treatment. As these trends require adequate explanation, we tested

  16. Are antidepressants effective in quality of life improvement among children and adolescents? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevanovic, Dejan; Tadic, Ivana; Knez, Rajna

    2014-04-01

    There is some evidence indicating that psychotropic medications might lead to health-related quality of life (QOL) improvements among children and adolescents with psychiatric disorders. The aim of this systematic review is to assess evidence regarding whether antidepressant treatment improves QOL among children and adolescents with depressive or anxiety disorders. A comprehensive search resulted in 5 clinical trials to be included in this review: 4 trials with major depressive disorder (MDD) and 1 trial with social anxiety disorder (SAD). In one MDD trial, fluoxetine combined with cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) significantly improved QOL compared to fluoxetine or CBT alone (effect sizes were 0.53 and 0.69, respectively). In 2 combined trials, sertraline alone significantly improved QOL among adolescents with MDD (effect size was 0.29), but not among children with MDD. Essentially, it was observed that antidepressants in these trials had minor positive effects on QOL improvement, which were lower than their potential to improve depressive symptoms. Although fluoxetine with CBT or sertraline monotherapy were shown to have some potential to improve QOL, this systematic review found inconclusive evidence that antidepressant treatments improve QOL among children and adolescents with depressive or anxiety disorders. More research is required, considering that QOL is currently under-evaluated in clinical trials with antidepressants among children and adolescents and available trials have limited methodological quality when reporting QOL data.

  17. COMPARISON OF ANTIDEPRESSANT ACTIVITY OF LOSARTAN WITH IMIPRAMINE IN ALBINO MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choppadandi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES Comparison of antidepressant activity of Losartan with Imipramine in albino mice. BACKGROUND Of all the afflictions that trouble the soul, depression is the commonest characterised by a state of low mood and aversion to activity that can affect a person's thoughts, behaviour, feelings and physical well-being. Similarly, hypertension is another condition which has emerged as a major public health problem in India and many other developing countries. There is compulsion that 35% of the population has to use the antihypertensives and antidepressants simultaneously for a long period of time to maintain their health. The present work is aimed at comparing antidepressant activity of losartan with imipramine which acts by raising brain BDNF (Brain derived neurotrophic factor levels so that a single agent can be used for both the conditions avoiding multiple medications. METHOD 18 Albino mice were taken, divided into 6 mice in each group and subjected to Forced swim test. All the drugs were administered orally. Drugs were administered and time of onset of immobility is measured 60 min. after the drug administration along with total duration of immobility. Animals are exposed to pretest of 15 min., 24 hrs. prior to the 6 min. swim test. Each animal is considered immobile when it ceased to struggle and swim and remained floating in the water, only moving to keep its head above water. Control group received distilled water (10 mL/kg. Standard group received Imipramine (5 mg/kg and test group was treated with Losartan (3 mg/kg. The Forced swim test for each mouse was video captured which was later analysed to count the time of onset of immobility and total duration of immobility. RESULTS Data was analysed using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA. Losartan showed significant antidepressant activity indicated by significant delay (P<0.05 in the time of onset of immobility and significant reduction (P<0.05 in the total duration of immobility compared to

  18. Ascorbic acid administration produces an antidepressant-like effect: evidence for the involvement of monoaminergic neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binfaré, Ricardo W; Rosa, Angelo O; Lobato, Kelly R; Santos, Adair R S; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2009-04-30

    Ascorbic acid is highly concentrated in the brain, being considered as a neuromodulator. This study investigated the effect of ascorbic acid in the tail suspension test (TST) and in the forced swimming test (FST) in mice and the contribution of the monoaminergic system to its antidepressant-like effect. Moreover, the effects of fluoxetine, imipramine and bupropion in combination with ascorbic acid in the TST were investigated. Ascorbic acid (0.1-10 mg/kg, i.p., 1-10 mg/kg p.o. or 0.1 nmol/mice i.c.v.) produced an antidepressant-like effect in the TST, but not in the FST, without altering the locomotor activity. The effect of ascorbic acid (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) in the TST was prevented by i.p. pre-treatment with NAN-190 (0.5 mg/kg), ketanserin (5 mg/kg), MDL72222 (0.1 mg/kg), prazosin (62.5 microg/kg), yohimbine (1 mg/kg), propranolol (2 mg/kg), haloperidol (0.2 mg/kg), sulpiride (50 mg/kg), but not with SCH23390 (0.05 mg/kg, s.c.). Additionally, ascorbic acid (1 mg/kg, p.o.) potentiated the effect of subeffective doses (p.o. route) of fluoxetine (1 mg/kg), imipramine (0.1 mg/kg), or bupropion (1 mg/kg) in the TST. The combined treatment of ascorbic acid with antidepressants produced no alteration in the locomotion in the open-field test. In conclusion, our results show that administration of ascorbic acid produces an antidepressant-like effect in TST, which is dependent on its interaction with the monoaminergic system. Moreover, ascorbic acid caused a synergistic antidepressant-like effect with conventional antidepressants. Therefore, the present findings warrant further studies to evaluate the therapeutical relevance of ascorbic acid for the treatment of depression and as a co-adjuvant treatment with antidepressants.

  19. The ethics of self-change: becoming oneself by way of antidepressants or psychotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenaeus, Fredrik

    2009-06-01

    This paper explores the differences between bringing about self-change by way of antidepressants versus psychotherapy from an ethical point of view, taking its starting point in the concept of authenticity. Given that the new antidepressants (SSRIs) are able not only to cure psychiatric disorders but also to bring about changes in the basic temperament structure of the person--changes in self-feeling--does it matter if one brings about such changes of the self by way of antidepressants or by way of psychotherapy? Are antidepressants a less good alternative than psychotherapy because antidepressants are in some way less authentic than psychotherapy? And, if so, what does this mean exactly? In this paper I try to show that the self-change brought about by way of antidepressants challenges basic assumptions of authentic self-change that are deeply ingrained in our Western culture: that changes in self should be brought about by laborious 'self-work' in which one explores the deep layers of the self (the unconscious) and comes to realise who one really is and should become. To become oneself has been held to presuppose such a journey. While the assumed importance of self-work appears to be badly founded on closer inspection, the notions of exploring and knowing oneself appear to be more promising in fleshing out an ethical distinction between psychopharmacological and psychotherapeutic practice with the help of the concept of authenticity. Psychotherapy, to a much greater extent than psychopharmacological interventions, involves the whole profile of the self in its attempts to effect a change, not only in the temperament but also in the character of the person in question, and this is important from an ethical point of view. In the article, the concepts of self-change, authenticity, temperament and character are presented and used in order to understand and flesh out the relevant ethical differences between the practice of psychotherapy and the use of antidepressants

  20. Efficient restoration of variable area soundtracks:

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelâali Hassaïne; Etienne Decencière; Bernard Besserer

    2009-01-01

    The restoration of motion picture films using digital image processing has been an active research field for many years. The restoration of the soundtrack however, has mainly been performed in the sound domain, using signal processing methods, in spite of the fact that it is recorded as a continuous image between the images of the film and the perforations. In this paper a restoration method for variable area soundtrack restoration at the image level is presented. First, a novel method is pro...

  1. Trace analysis of antidepressant pharmaceuticals and their select degradates in aquatic matrixes by LC/ESI/MS/MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, M.M.; Furlong, E.T.

    2008-01-01

    Treated wastewater effluent is a potential environmental point source for antidepressant pharmaceuticals. A quantitative method was developed for the determination of trace levels of antidepressants in environmental aquatic matrixes using solid-phase extraction coupled with liquid chromatography- electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Recoveries of parent antidepressants from matrix spiking experiments for the individual antidepressants ranged from 72 to 118% at low concentrations (0.5 ng/L) and 70 to 118% at high concentrations (100 ng/L) for the solid-phase extraction method. Method detection limits for the individual antidepressant compounds ranged from 0.19 to 0.45 ng/L. The method was applied to wastewater effluent and samples collected from a wastewater-dominated stream. Venlafaxine was the predominant antidepressant observed in wastewater and river water samples. Individual antidepressant concentrations found in the wastewater effluent ranged from 3 (duloxetine) to 2190 ng/L (venlafaxine), whereas individual concentrations in the waste-dominated stream ranged from 0.72 (norfluoxetine) to 1310 ng/L (venlafaxine). ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  2. Digital color restoration of old paintings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, M; Pitas, I

    2000-01-01

    Physical and chemical changes can degrade the visual color appearance of old paintings. Five digital color restoration techniques, which can be used to simulate the original appearance of paintings, are presented. Although a small number of color samples is employed in the restoration procedure, simulation results indicate that good restoration quality can be attained.

  3. 5 CFR 353.301 - Restoration rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restoration rights. 353.301 Section 353... DUTY FROM UNIFORMED SERVICE OR COMPENSABLE INJURY Compensable Injury § 353.301 Restoration rights. (a.... Although these restoration rights are agencywide, the employee's basic entitlement is to the...

  4. Inhibition of G protein-activated inwardly rectifying K+ channels by different classes of antidepressants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Kobayashi

    Full Text Available Various antidepressants are commonly used for the treatment of depression and several other neuropsychiatric disorders. In addition to their primary effects on serotonergic or noradrenergic neurotransmitter systems, antidepressants have been shown to interact with several receptors and ion channels. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie the effects of antidepressants have not yet been sufficiently clarified. G protein-activated inwardly rectifying K(+ (GIRK, Kir3 channels play an important role in regulating neuronal excitability and heart rate, and GIRK channel modulation has been suggested to have therapeutic potential for several neuropsychiatric disorders and cardiac arrhythmias. In the present study, we investigated the effects of various classes of antidepressants on GIRK channels using the Xenopus oocyte expression assay. In oocytes injected with mRNA for GIRK1/GIRK2 or GIRK1/GIRK4 subunits, extracellular application of sertraline, duloxetine, and amoxapine effectively reduced GIRK currents, whereas nefazodone, venlafaxine, mianserin, and mirtazapine weakly inhibited GIRK currents even at toxic levels. The inhibitory effects were concentration-dependent, with various degrees of potency and effectiveness. Furthermore, the effects of sertraline were voltage-independent and time-independent during each voltage pulse, whereas the effects of duloxetine were voltage-dependent with weaker inhibition with negative membrane potentials and time-dependent with a gradual decrease in each voltage pulse. However, Kir2.1 channels were insensitive to all of the drugs. Moreover, the GIRK currents induced by ethanol were inhibited by sertraline but not by intracellularly applied sertraline. The present results suggest that GIRK channel inhibition may reveal a novel characteristic of the commonly used antidepressants, particularly sertraline, and contributes to some of the therapeutic effects and adverse effects.

  5. Long-Term Weight Change after Initiating Second-Generation Antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Arterburn

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available (1 Objective: To examine the relationship between the choice of second-generation antidepressant drug treatment and long-term weight change; (2 Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study to investigate the relationship between choice of antidepressant medication and weight change at two years among adult patients with a new antidepressant treatment episode between January, 2006 and October, 2009 in a large health system in Washington State. Medication use, encounters, diagnoses, height, and weight were collected from electronic databases. We modeled change in weight and BMI at two years after initiation of treatment using inverse probability weighted linear regression models that adjusted for potential confounders. Fluoxetine was the reference treatment; (3 Results: In intent-to-treat analyses, non-smokers who initiated bupropion treatment on average lost 7.1 lbs compared to fluoxetine users who were non-smokers (95% CI: −11.3, −2.8; p-value < 0.01; smokers who initiated bupropion treatment gained on average 2.2 lbs compared to fluoxetine users who were smokers (95% CI: −2.3, 6.8; p-value = 0.33. Changes in weight associated with all other antidepressant medications were not significantly different than fluoxetine, except for sertraline users, who gained an average of 5.9 lbs compared to fluoxetine users (95% CI: 0.8, 10.9; p-value = 0.02; (4 Conclusion: Antidepressant drug therapy is significantly associated with long-term weight change at two years. Bupropion may be considered as the first-line drug of choice for overweight and obese patients unless there are other existing contraindications.

  6. Neonatal adaptation in infants prenatally exposed to antidepressants--clinical monitoring using Neonatal Abstinence Score.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Forsberg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intrauterine exposure to antidepressants may lead to neonatal symptoms from the central nervous system, respiratory system and gastrointestinal system. Finnegan score (Neonatal Abstinence Score, NAS has routinely been used to assess infants exposed to antidepressants in utero. AIM: The purpose was to study neonatal maladaptation syndrome in infants exposed to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI or serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI in utero. METHOD: Retrospective cohort study of women using antidepressants during pregnancy and their infants. Patients were identified from the electronic health record system at Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge containing pre-, peri- and postnatal information. Information was collected on maternal and infant health, social factors and pregnancy. NAS sheets were scrutinized. RESULTS: 220 women with reported 3rd trimester exposure to SSRIs or SNRIs and who gave birth between January 2007 and June 2009 were included. Seventy seven women (35% used citalopram, 76 used (35% sertraline, 34 (15% fluoxetine and 33 (15% other SSRI/SNRI. Twenty-nine infants (13% were admitted to the neonatal ward, 19 were born prematurely. NAS was analyzed in 205 patients. Severe abstinence was defined as eight points or higher on at least two occasions (on a scale with maximum 40 points, mild abstinence as 4 points or higher on at least two occasions. Seven infants expressed signs of severe abstinence and 46 (22% had mild abstinence symptoms. Hypoglycemia (plasma glucose <2.6 mmol/L was found in 42 infants (19%. CONCLUSION: Severe abstinence in infants prenatally exposed to antidepressants was found to be rare (3% in this study population, a slightly lower prevalence than reported in previous studies. Neonatal hypoglycemia in infants prenatally exposed to antidepressant may however be more common than previously described.

  7. Paroxetine-The Antidepressant from Hell? Probably Not, But Caution Required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevels, Robert M; Gontkovsky, Samuel T; Williams, Bryman E

    2016-03-01

    Paroxetine, also known by the trade names Aropax, Paxil, Pexeva, Seroxat, Sereupin and Brisdelle, was first marketed in the U.S. in 1992. Effective for major depression and various anxiety disorders, it quickly gained a sizable share of the antidepressant prescription market. By the late 1990s, paroxetine frequently was being associated with serious drug interactions and medication side effects. Most significantly, in a major Canadian epidemiological study examining the relationship between antidepressants and diseases, paroxetine was associated with a 620 percent increase in the rate of breast cancer in women who had taken it over a four-year period. Though re-analyses of this investigation discounted the magnitude of these findings, other studies have associated paroxetine with numerous side effects and adverse events not reported in clinical trials. Among these are effects on male fertility, birth defects, gestational hypertension, prolonged QT interval in infants, hyperprolactinemia, cognitive impairment in the elderly, autism, sexual side effects, weight gain, and suicidality, aggression, and akathisia in children and adolescents. Paroxetine has the highest inhibitory constant for the P450 2D6 isoenzyme of all antidepressants (Ki = 0.065-4.65 micromoles). This high affinity explains its high inhibitory interaction profile with substrates for 2D6. Paroxetine's potent 2D6 inhibition also implies that significant inhibition of the metabolism of 2D6 carcinogen substrates occurs which implies an increased probability of oncogenesis. Through 2D6 inhibition, tamoxifen metabolism is inhibited, which has been found to increase the risk of dying from breast cancer over a five-year period in women on both medications. Paroxetine also is a potent inhibitor of 3A4 with multiple 3A4 substrate interactions. Paroxetine has the highest known affinity for the serotonin transporter (0.13 nanomoles) of any currently used antidepressant. These characteristics and their potential

  8. Antidepressant stimulation of CDP-diacylglycerol synthesis does not require monoamine reuptake inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aboukhatwa Marwa A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies demonstrate that diverse antidepressant agents increase the cellular production of the nucleolipid CDP-diacylglycerol and its synthetic derivative, phosphatidylinositol, in depression-relevant brain regions. Pharmacological blockade of downstream phosphatidylinositide signaling disrupted the behavioral antidepressant effects in rats. However, the nucleolipid responses were resistant to inhibition by serotonin receptor antagonists, even though antidepressant-facilitated inositol phosphate accumulation was blocked. Could the neurochemical effects be additional to the known effects of the drugs on monoamine transmitter transporters? To examine this question, we tested selected agents in serotonin-depleted brain tissues, in PC12 cells devoid of serotonin transporters, and on the enzymatic activity of brain CDP-diacylglycerol synthase - the enzyme that catalyzes the physiological synthesis of CDP-diacylglycerol. Results Imipramine, paroxetine, and maprotiline concentration-dependently increased the levels of CDP-diacylglycerol and phosphatidylinositides in PC12 cells. Rat forebrain tissues depleted of serotonin by pretreatment with p-chlorophenylalanine showed responses to imipramine or maprotiline that were comparable to respective responses from saline-injected controls. With fluoxetine, nucleolipid responses in the serotonin-depleted cortex or hippocampus were significantly reduced, but not abolished. Each drug significantly increased the enzymatic activity of CDP-diacylglycerol synthase following incubations with cortical or hippocampal brain tissues. Conclusion Antidepressants probably induce the activity of CDP-diacylglycerol synthase leading to increased production of CDP-diacylglycerol and facilitation of downstream phosphatidylinositol synthesis. Phosphatidylinositol-dependent signaling cascades exert diverse salutary effects in neural cells, including facilitation of BDNF signaling and neurogenesis. Hence

  9. Antidepressant-like activity of gallic acid in mice subjected to unpredictable chronic mild stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhillar, Ritu; Dhingra, Dinesh

    2013-08-01

    This study was designed to evaluate antidepressant-like activity of gallic acid in Swiss young male albino mice subjected to unpredictable chronic mild stress and to explore the possible underlying mechanisms for this activity. Gallic acid (5, 10, 20 mg/kg, i.p.) and fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) per se were administered daily to unstressed mice and other groups of mice subjected to unpredictable mild stress, 30 min after the injection for 21 successive days. The antidepressant-like activity was evaluated using forced swim test (FST) and sucrose preference test. Stress significantly increased immobility period of mice in FST. Gallic acid (10 and 20 mg/kg, i.p.) and fluoxetine significantly decreased immobility period of unstressed and stressed mice in FST and prevented the stress-induced decrease in sucrose preference, indicating significant antidepressant-like activity. There was no significant effect on locomotor activity of the mice by the drugs. Gallic acid (10 and 20 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly decreased Monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) activity, malondialdehyde levels, and catalase activity in unstressed mice; and significantly prevented the stress-induced decrease in reduced glutathione and catalase activity; and also significantly prevented stress-induced increase in MAO-A activity, malondialdehyde levels, plasma nitrite, and corticosterone levels. Thus, gallic acid showed antidepressant-like activity in unstressed and stressed mice probably due to its antioxidant activity and through inhibition of MAO-A activity and decrease in plasma nitrite levels. In addition, gallic acid also showed antidepressant-like activity in stressed mice probably through decrease in plasma corticosterone levels.

  10. Subchronic peripheral neuregulin-1 increases ventral hippocampal neurogenesis and induces antidepressant-like effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Mahar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adult hippocampal neurogenesis has been implicated in the mechanism of antidepressant action, and neurotrophic factors can mediate the neurogenic changes underlying these effects. The neurotrophic factor neuregulin-1 (NRG1 is involved in many aspects of brain development, from cell fate determination to neuronal maturation. However, nothing is known about the influence of NRG1 on neurodevelopmental processes occurring in the mature hippocampus. METHODS: Adult male mice were given subcutaneous NRG1 or saline to assess dentate gyrus proliferation and neurogenesis, as well as cell fate determination. Mice also underwent behavioral testing. Expression of ErbB3 and ErbB4 NRG1 receptors in newborn dentate gyrus cells was assessed at various time points between birth and maturity. The phenotype of ErbB-expressing progenitor cells was also characterized with cell type-specific markers. RESULTS: The current study shows that subchronic peripheral NRG1β administration selectively increased cell proliferation (by 71% and neurogenesis (by 50% in the caudal dentate gyrus within the ventral hippocampus. This pro-proliferative effect did not alter neuronal fate, and may have been mediated by ErbB3 receptors, which were expressed by newborn dentate gyrus cells from cell division to maturity and colocalized with SOX2 in the subgranular zone. Furthermore, four weeks after cessation of subchronic treatment, animals displayed robust antidepressant-like behavior in the absence of changes in locomotor activity, whereas acute treatment did not produce antidepressant effects. CONCLUSIONS: These results show that neuregulin-1β has pro-proliferative, neurogenic and antidepressant properties, further highlight the importance of peripheral neurotrophic factors in neurogenesis and mood, and support the role of hippocampal neurogenesis in mediating antidepressant effects.

  11. Antidepressants reduce extinction-induced withdrawal and biting behaviors: a model for depressive-like behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, J P; van den Brink, J; Komorowski, M; Huq, Y; Topic, B

    2012-05-17

    The withholding of expected rewards results in extinction of behavior and, hypothetically, to depression-like symptoms. In a test of this hypothesis, we examined the effects of extinction of food-reinforced lever-pressing on collateral behaviors that might be indices of depression. Operant extinction is known to be aversive to the organism and results in avoidance behavior. We hypothesized that avoidance of, or withdrawal from, the former source of reward may serve as a marker for "despair." Adult male Wistar rats (n=6-7 animals per group) were exposed to a Skinner box attached to a second compartment of the same size, providing opportunity for the animals to leave the operant chamber and to enter the "withdrawal" compartment. The animals spent a portion of the time during the extinction trials in this second chamber. To assess the predictive validity of this behavior as a potential marker of "despair," we tested the effects of chronic administration of two common antidepressant drugs on this measure. The tricyclic antidepressant imipramine (20 mg/kg) as well as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram (20 mg/kg) reduced the number of entries and time spent in the withdrawal compartment. We propose that entries into and time spent in the withdrawal compartment may operationalize "avoidance," a core symptom of major depression. Rearing as well as biting behaviors during the extinction trials were also attenuated by the antidepressant treatment. These results lend support to the hypothesis that extinction of positively reinforced operants evokes behaviors that reflect elements of "despair/depression" because these behaviors are modulated by antidepressant treatment. The avoidance of the operant chamber as a consequence of extinction, together with rearing and biting behaviors, may serve as useful measures for the testing of antidepressant treatments.

  12. Image Restoration with New Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow-Møller, Anne Marie

    The article examines the role played by the corporate website while a company - Arla - attempted to restore an image tarnished by unethical behaviour. The company's strategy focussed on dialogue: it introduced a large number of authentic employees in their natural role as cook, dairy farmer, etc...... their image as a faceless monopoly with a humanized, personalised version. However, it should also be questioned if, in the long run, it was the image campaign rather than the visible efforts of the company to behave with consideration that brought about the desired change. Keywords: Image restoration......., and made them available to readers as experts providing inspiration and advice, or as writers blogging about the world of company, or as responsible people answering readers' frank questions about their practices in an open forum. It is argued that the electronic platform allowed the company to substitute...

  13. Resilience and Restoration of Lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn L. Cottingham

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Lake water quality and ecosystem services are normally maintained by several feedbacks. Among these are nutrient retention and humic production by wetlands, nutrient retention and woody habitat production by riparian forests, food web structures that cha nnel phosphorus to consumers rather than phytoplankton, and biogeochemical mechanisms that inhibit phosphorus recycling from sediments. In degraded lakes, these resilience mechanisms are replaced by new ones that connect lakes to larger, regional economi c and social systems. New controls that maintain degraded lakes include runoff from agricultural and urban areas, absence of wetlands and riparian forests, and changes in lake food webs and biogeochemistry that channel phosphorus to blooms of nuisance al gae. Economic analyses show that degraded lakes are significantly less valuable than normal lakes. Because of this difference in value, the economic benefits of restoring lakes could be used to create incentives for lake restoration.

  14. Procedures for restoring vestibular disorders

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    This paper will discuss therapeutic possibilities for disorders of the vestibular organs and the neurons involved, which confront ENT clinicians in everyday practice. Treatment of such disorders can be tackled either symptomatically or causally. The possible strategies for restoring the body's vestibular sense, visual function and co-ordination include medication, as well as physical and surgical procedures. Prophylactic or preventive measures are possible in some disorders which involve vert...

  15. Articulator selection for restorative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobo, S; Shillingburg, H T; Whitsett, L D

    1976-07-01

    There are many types of articulators that can be used for making fixed restorations. While unquestionably the most accurate, the fully adjustable instrument is not feasible or necessary for many forms of simple occlusal treatment. The effects of tooth-hinge axis radius, intercondylar distance, and condylar inclination on occlusal morphology have been discussed. Guidelines have been proposed for matching the type of articulator with the extent of treatment anticipated. The use of small, nonadjustable hinge articulators is not recommended.

  16. Minimum thickness anterior porcelain restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radz, Gary M

    2011-04-01

    Porcelain laminate veneers (PLVs) provide the dentist and the patient with an opportunity to enhance the patient's smile in a minimally to virtually noninvasive manner. Today's PLV demonstrates excellent clinical performance and as materials and techniques have evolved, the PLV has become one of the most predictable, most esthetic, and least invasive modalities of treatment. This article explores the latest porcelain materials and their use in minimum thickness restoration.

  17. Image Restoration And Resolution Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Charles L.; Fitzgerald, Raymond M.

    1983-09-01

    We consider mathematical algorithms for the restoration of object information from finitely many measurements of the object's spectrum, with particular emphasis on the development of linear and nonlinear non-iterative methods that can incorporate prior information about object extent and shape. The linear method presented here generalizes the minimum energy bandlimited extrapolation procedure, which is the closed form limit of Gerchberg-Papoulis iteration in this case. The nonlinear method generalizes the maximum entropy method (MEM) of Burg.

  18. Methodology for ranking restoration options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedemann Jensen, Per

    1999-04-01

    The work described in this report has been performed as a part of the RESTRAT Project FI4P-CT95-0021a (PL 950128) co-funded by the Nuclear Fission Safety Programme of the European Commission. The RESTRAT project has the overall objective of developing generic methodologies for ranking restoration techniques as a function of contamination and site characteristics. The project includes analyses of existing remediation methodologies and contaminated sites, and is structured in the following steps: characterisation of relevant contaminated sites; identification and characterisation of relevant restoration techniques; assessment of the radiological impact; development and application of a selection methodology for restoration options; formulation of generic conclusions and development of a manual. The project is intended to apply to situations in which sites with nuclear installations have been contaminated with radioactive materials as a result of the operation of these installations. The areas considered for remedial measures include contaminated land areas, rivers and sediments in rivers, lakes, and sea areas. Five contaminated European sites have been studied. Various remedial measures have been envisaged with respect to the optimisation of the protection of the populations being exposed to the radionuclides at the sites. Cost-benefit analysis and multi-attribute utility analysis have been applied for optimisation. Health, economic and social attributes have been included and weighting factors for the different attributes have been determined by the use of scaling constants. (au)

  19. Materials for chairside CAD/CAM restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasbinder, Dennis J

    2010-01-01

    Chairside computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) systems have become considerably more accurate, efficient, and prevalent as the technology has evolved in the past 25 years. The initial restorative material option for chairside CAD/CAM restorations was limited to ceramic blocks. Restorative material options have multiplied and now include esthetic ceramics, high-strength ceramics, and composite materials for both definitive and temporary restoration applications. This article will review current materials available for chairside CAD/CAM restorations.

  20. The science and practice of river restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, Ellen; Lane, Stuart N.; Wilcox, Andrew C.

    2015-08-01

    River restoration is one of the most prominent areas of applied water-resources science. From an initial focus on enhancing fish habitat or river appearance, primarily through structural modification of channel form, restoration has expanded to incorporate a wide variety of management activities designed to enhance river process and form. Restoration is conducted on headwater streams, large lowland rivers, and entire river networks in urban, agricultural, and less intensively human-altered environments. We critically examine how contemporary practitioners approach river restoration and challenges for implementing restoration, which include clearly identified objectives, holistic understanding of rivers as ecosystems, and the role of restoration as a social process. We also examine challenges for scientific understanding in river restoration. These include: how physical complexity supports biogeochemical function, stream metabolism, and stream ecosystem productivity; characterizing response curves of different river components; understanding sediment dynamics; and increasing appreciation of the importance of incorporating climate change considerations and resiliency into restoration planning. Finally, we examine changes in river restoration within the past decade, such as increasing use of stream mitigation banking; development of new tools and technologies; different types of process-based restoration; growing recognition of the importance of biological-physical feedbacks in rivers; increasing expectations of water quality improvements from restoration; and more effective communication between practitioners and river scientists.

  1. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with indirect composite inlay and onlay restorations – An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibraheem F. Alshiddi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, endodontically treated teeth were successfully restored with indirect composite inlay and onlay restorations. However, the fractures that accompanied the inlay restorations were more severe and were unable to be restored.

  2. Effectiveness of antidepressants: an evidence myth constructed from a thousand randomized trials?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannidis John PA

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Antidepressants, in particular newer agents, are among the most widely prescribed medications worldwide with annual sales of billions of dollars. The introduction of these agents in the market has passed through seemingly strict regulatory control. Over a thousand randomized trials have been conducted with antidepressants. Statistically significant benefits have been repeatedly demonstrated and the medical literature is flooded with several hundreds of "positive" trials (both pre-approval and post-approval. However, two recent meta-analyses question this picture. The first meta-analysis used data that were submitted to FDA for the approval of 12 antidepressant drugs. While only half of these trials had formally significant effectiveness, published reports almost ubiquitously claimed significant results. "Negative" trials were either left unpublished or were distorted to present "positive" results. The average benefit of these drugs based on the FDA data was of small magnitude, while the published literature suggested larger benefits. A second meta-analysis using also FDA-submitted data examined the relationship between treatment effect and baseline severity of depression. Drug-placebo differences increased with increasing baseline severity and the difference became large enough to be clinically important only in the very small minority of patient populations with severe major depression. In severe major depression, antidepressants did not become more effective, simply placebo lost effectiveness. These data suggest that antidepressants may be less effective than their wide marketing suggests. Short-term benefits are small and long-term balance of benefits and harms is understudied. I discuss how the use of many small randomized trials with clinically non-relevant outcomes, improper interpretation of statistical significance, manipulated study design, biased selection of study populations, short follow-up, and selective and distorted

  3. Effectiveness of antidepressants: an evidence myth constructed from a thousand randomized trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidis, John P A

    2008-05-27

    Antidepressants, in particular newer agents, are among the most widely prescribed medications worldwide with annual sales of billions of dollars. The introduction of these agents in the market has passed through seemingly strict regulatory control. Over a thousand randomized trials have been conducted with antidepressants. Statistically significant benefits have been repeatedly demonstrated and the medical literature is flooded with several hundreds of "positive" trials (both pre-approval and post-approval). However, two recent meta-analyses question this picture. The first meta-analysis used data that were submitted to FDA for the approval of 12 antidepressant drugs. While only half of these trials had formally significant effectiveness, published reports almost ubiquitously claimed significant results. "Negative" trials were either left unpublished or were distorted to present "positive" results. The average benefit of these drugs based on the FDA data was of small magnitude, while the published literature suggested larger benefits. A second meta-analysis using also FDA-submitted data examined the relationship between treatment effect and baseline severity of depression. Drug-placebo differences increased with increasing baseline severity and the difference became large enough to be clinically important only in the very small minority of patient populations with severe major depression. In severe major depression, antidepressants did not become more effective, simply placebo lost effectiveness. These data suggest that antidepressants may be less effective than their wide marketing suggests. Short-term benefits are small and long-term balance of benefits and harms is understudied. I discuss how the use of many small randomized trials with clinically non-relevant outcomes, improper interpretation of statistical significance, manipulated study design, biased selection of study populations, short follow-up, and selective and distorted reporting of results has built

  4. Evaluation of antidepressant-like effects of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Pimpinella anisum fruit in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Shahamat

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that P. anisum possesses an antidepressant-like activity similar to that of fluoxetine, which has a potential clinical value for application in the management of depression.

  5. Antidepressant-like activity of anthocyanidins from Hibiscus rosa-sinensis flowers in tail suspension test and forced swim test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi B Shewale

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: It can be concluded that MHR and AHR possess potential antidepressant activity (through dopaminergic, noradrenergic and serotonergic mechanisms and has therapeutic potential in the treatment of CNS disorders and provides evidence at least at preclinical levels.

  6. Antidepressant-like effect of centrally acting non-narcotic antitussive caramiphen in a forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaura, Kazuaki; Miki, Risa; Shima, Eriko; Honda, Sokichi; Soeda, Fumio; Shirasaki, Tetsuya; Takahama, Kazuo

    2010-09-13

    Recently, we reported that a centrally acting non-narcotic antitussive (cough suppressant drug), tipepidine produces an antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test in rats. Because pharmacological properties of tipepidine apparently differ from those of typical antidepressants developed to date, we speculated that caramiphen, another centrally acting antitussive, has an antidepressant-like effect. That effect of caramiphen was studied in rats using the forced swimming test. Caramiphen at 20 and 40mg/kg i.p. significantly reduced immobility. At 40mg/kg i.p., it increased climbing behavior. Even at 40mg/kg, this drug had no effect on locomotor activity. Results suggest that a centrally acting antitussive possessing inhibition of GIRK channels has an antidepressant-like effect.

  7. Antidepressant-like properties of sildenafil in a genetic rat model of depression: Role of cholinergic cGMP-interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebenberg, Nico; Brink, Christiaan; Brand, Linda

    2008-01-01

    a strategy for the treatment of depression, using a PDE5 inhibitor in the presence of cholinergic inhibition. Sildenafil-induced augmentation of imipramine, an antidepressant with inherent anticholinergic properties, concurs with this suggestion, and highlights the potential clinical value...

  8. The promise of the quantitative electroencephalogram as a predictor of antidepressant treatment outcomes in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Aimee M; Cook, Ian A; Leuchter, Andrew F

    2007-03-01

    Recent studies have shown overall accuracy rates of 72% and 88% using baseline and/or 1-week change in QEEG biomarkers to predict clinical outcome to treatment with various antidepressant medications. In some cases, findings have been replicated across academic institutions and have been studied in the context of randomized, placebo-controlled trials. Recent EEG findings are corroborated by studies that use techniques with greater spatial resolution (eg, PET, MEG) in localizing brain regions pertinent to clinical response. As such, EEG measurements increasingly are validated by other physiologic measurements that have the ability to assess deeper brain structures. Continued progress along these lines may lead to the realized promise of QEEG biomarkers as predictors of antidepressant treatment outcome in routine clinical practice. In the larger context, use of QEEG technology to predict antidepressant response in major depression may mean that more patients will achieve response and remission with less of the trial-and-error approach that currently accompanies antidepressant treatment.

  9. Long-term evaluation of extensive restorations in permanent teeth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieuwenhuysen, J.-P. van; D'hoore, W.D.; Carvalho, J.;

    2003-01-01

    Biostatistics, cast crowns, complex restorations, composite resins, decision making, dental amalgam, metal ceramic crowns, multi-surfaced restorations, prosthodontics, restorative dentistry......Biostatistics, cast crowns, complex restorations, composite resins, decision making, dental amalgam, metal ceramic crowns, multi-surfaced restorations, prosthodontics, restorative dentistry...

  10. Executive summary of the report by the WPA section on pharmacopsychiatry on general and comparative efficacy and effectiveness of antidepressants in the acute treatment of depressive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghai, Thomas C; Blier, Pierre; Baldwin, David S; Bauer, Michael; Goodwin, Guy M; Fountoulakis, Kostas N; Kasper, Siegfried; Leonard, Brian E; Malt, Ulrik F; Stein, Dan J; Versiani, Marcio; Möller, Hans-Jürgen

    2012-02-01

    Current gold standard in the treatment of depression includes pharmacotherapeutic and psychotherapeutic strategies together with social support. Due to the actually discussed controversies concerning the differential efficacy of antidepressants, a contribution to a comprehensive clarification seems to be necessary to avert further deterioration and uncertainty from patients, relatives, and their treating psychiatrists and general practitioners. Both efficacy and clinical effectiveness of antidepressants in the treatment of depressive disorders can be confirmed. Clinically meaningful antidepressant treatment effects were confirmed in different types of studies. Methodological issues of randomized controlled studies, meta-analyses, and effectiveness studies will be discussed. Furthermore, actual data about the differential efficacy and effectiveness of antidepressants with distinct pharmacodynamic properties and about outcome differences in studies using antidepressants and/or psychotherapy are discussed. This is followed by a clinically oriented depiction-the differential clinical effectiveness of different pharmacodynamic modes of action of antidepressants in different subtypes of depressive disorders. It can be summarized that the spectrum of different antidepressant treatments has broadened during the last decades. The efficacy and clinical effectiveness of antidepressants is statistically significant and clinically relevant and proven repeatedly. For further optimizing antidepressant treatment plans, clearly structured treatment algorithms and the implementation of psychotherapy seem to be useful. A modern individualized antidepressant treatment in most cases is a well-tolerated and efficacious tool to minimize the negative impact of the otherwise devastating and life-threatening outcome of depressive disorders.

  11. Diverse antidepressants increase CDP-diacylglycerol production and phosphatidylinositide resynthesis in depression-relevant regions of the rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Undieh Ashiwel S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major depression is a serious mood disorder affecting millions of adults and children worldwide. While the etiopathology of depression remains obscure, antidepressant medications increase synaptic levels of monoamine neurotransmitters in brain regions associated with the disease. Monoamine transmitters activate multiple signaling cascades some of which have been investigated as potential mediators of depression or antidepressant drug action. However, the diacylglycerol arm of phosphoinositide signaling cascades has not been systematically investigated, even though downstream targets of this cascade have been implicated in depression. With the ultimate goal of uncovering the primary postsynaptic actions that may initiate cellular antidepressive signaling, we have examined the antidepressant-induced production of CDP-diacylglycerol which is both a product of diacylglycerol phosphorylation and a precursor for the synthesis of physiologically critical glycerophospholipids such as the phosphatidylinositides. For this, drug effects on [3H]cytidine-labeled CDP-diacylglycerol and [3H]inositol-labeled phosphatidylinositides were measured in response to the tricyclics desipramine and imipramine, the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors fluoxetine and paroxetine, the atypical antidepressants maprotiline and nomifensine, and several monoamine oxidase inhibitors. Results Multiple compounds from each antidepressant category significantly stimulated [3H]CDP-diacylglycerol accumulation in cerebrocortical, hippocampal, and striatal tissues, and also enhanced the resynthesis of inositol phospholipids. Conversely, various antipsychotics, anxiolytics, and non-antidepressant psychotropic agents failed to significantly induce CDP-diacylglycerol or phosphoinositide synthesis. Drug-induced CDP-diacylglycerol accumulation was independent of lithium and only partially dependent on phosphoinositide hydrolysis, thus indicating that antidepressants

  12. Factors influencing bonding fixed restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medić Vesna

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Crown displacement often occurs because the features of tooth preparations do not counteract the forces directed against restorations. OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of preparation designs on retention and resistance of fixed restorations. METHOD The study was performed on 64 differently sized stainless steel dies. Also, caps which were used for evaluated retention were made of stainless steel for each die. After cementing the caps on experimental dies, measuring of necessary tensile forces to separate cemented caps from dies was done. Caps, which were made of a silver-palladium alloy with a slope of 60° to the longitudinal axis formed on the occlusal surface, were used for evaluating resistance. A sudden drop in load pressure recorded by the test machine indicated failure for that cap. RESULTS A significant difference was found between the tensile force required to remove the caps from the dies with different length (p<0.05 and different taper (p<0.01. The greatest retentive strengths (2579.2 N and 2989.8 N were noticed in experimental dies with the greatest length and smallest taper. No statistically significant (p>0.05 differences were found between tensile loads for caps cemented on dies with different diameter. Although there was an apparent slight increase in resistance values for caps on dies with smaller tapers, the increase in resistance for those preparation designs was not statistically significant. There was a significant difference among the resistance values for caps on dies with different length (p<0.01 and diameter (p<0.05. CONCLUSION In the light of the results obtained, it could be reasonably concluded that retention and resistance of the restoration is in inverse proportion to convergence angle of the prepared teeth. But, at a constant convergence angle, retention and resistance increase with rising length and diameter.

  13. Influence of enrichment on behavioral and neurogenic effects of antidepressants in Wistar rats submitted to repeated forced swim test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possamai, Fernanda; dos Santos, Juliano; Walber, Thais; Marcon, Juliana C; dos Santos, Tiago Souza; Lino de Oliveira, Cilene

    2015-04-01

    Repeated forced swimming test (rFST) may detect gradual effects of antidepressants in adult rats. Antidepressants, as enrichment, affected behavior and neurogenesis in rats. However, the influence of enrichment on behavioral and neurogenic effects of antidepressants is unknown. Here, effects of antidepressants on rFST and hippocampal neurogenesis were investigated in rats under enriched conditions. Behaviors of male Wistar rats, housed from weaning in standard (SE) or enriched environment (EE), were registered during rFST. The rFST consisted of 15min of swimming (pretest) followed by 5min of swimming in the first (test), seventh (retest 1) and fourteenth (retest 2) days after pretest. One hour before the test, rats received an intraperitoneal injection of saline (1ml/kg), fluoxetine (2.5mg/kg) or imipramine (2.5 or 5mg/kg). These treatments were performed daily until the day of the retest 2. After retest 2, rats were euthanized for the identification of markers for neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Fluoxetine or imipramine decreased immobility in retests 1 and 2, as compared to saline. EE abolished these differences. In EE, fluoxetine or imipramine (5mg/kg) reduced immobility time in retest 2, as compared to the test. Independent of the housing conditions, fluoxetine and imipramine (5mg/kg) increased the ratio of immature neurons per progenitor cell in the hippocampus. In summary, antidepressants or enrichment counteracted the high immobility in rFST. Enrichment changed the effects of antidepressants in rFST depending on the type, and the dose of a substance but failed to change neurogenesis in control or antidepressant treated-rats. Effects of antidepressants and enrichment on rFST seemed neurogenesis-independent.

  14. The centrally acting non-narcotic antitussive tipepidine produces antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaura, Kazuaki; Ogata, Yukino; Inoue, Masako; Honda, Sokichi; Soeda, Fumio; Shirasaki, Tetsuya; Takahama, Kazuo

    2009-12-14

    The antidepressant-like effect of tipepidine was studied in rats. Tipepidine at 20 and 40 mg/kg i.p. reduced immobility in the forced swimming test and tipepidine at 40 mg/kg, i.p. increased climbing in the test. The drug at 40 mg/kg, i.p. had no effect on the locomotor activity and motor coordination. These results suggest that tipepidine may be a novel drug with antidepressant-like activity.

  15. Concomitant medication use and its implications on the hazard pattern in pharmacoepidemiological studies: example of antidepressants, benzodiazepines and fracture risk

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background: Antidepressants and benzodiazepines are often co-prescribed and both associated with an increased fracture risk, albeit with distinctive hazard patterns. Timing of initiation of one with respect to the other and duration of use may influence the combined fracture hazard.The objective of our study was to describe patterns of concomitant use of benzodiazepine and antidepressants in terms of timing of initiation and duration and to illustrate the potential impact of various scenarios...

  16. Concomitant medication use and its implications on the hazard pattern in pharmacoepidemiological studies : Example of antidepressants, benzodiazepines and fracture risk

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background: Antidepressants and benzodiazepines are often co-prescribed and both associated with an increased fracture risk, albeit with distinctive hazard patterns. Timing of initiation of one with respect to the other and duration of use may influence the combined fracture hazard. The objective of our study was to describe patterns of concomitant use of benzodiazepine and antidepressants in terms of timing of initiation and duration and to illustrate the potential impact of various scenario...

  17. Changes in antidepressant use by young people and suicidal behavior after FDA warnings and media coverage: quasi-experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Christine Y; Zhang, Fang; Lakoma, Matthew D; Madden, Jeanne M; Rusinak, Donna; Penfold, Robert B; Simon, Gregory; Ahmedani, Brian K.; Clarke, Gregory; Hunkeler, Enid M; Waitzfelder, Beth; Owen-Smith, Ashli; Raebel, Marsha A.; Rossom, Rebecca; Coleman, Karen J

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate if the widely publicized warnings in 2003 from the US Food and Drug Administration about a possible increased risk of suicidality with antidepressant use in young people were associated with changes in antidepressant use, suicide attempts, and completed suicides among young people. Design: Quasi-experimental study assessing changes in outcomes after the warnings, controlling for pre-existing trends. Setting: Automated healthcare claims data (2000-10) derived from the...

  18. Contribution of genetics to ecological restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijangos, Jose Luis; Pacioni, Carlo; Spencer, Peter B S; Craig, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Ecological restoration of degraded ecosystems has emerged as a critical tool in the fight to reverse and ameliorate the current loss of biodiversity and ecosystem services. Approaches derived from different genetic disciplines are extending the theoretical and applied frameworks on which ecological restoration is based. We performed a search of scientific articles and identified 160 articles that employed a genetic approach within a restoration context to shed light on the links between genetics and restoration. These articles were then classified on whether they examined association between genetics and fitness or the application of genetics in demographic studies, and on the way the studies informed restoration practice. Although genetic research in restoration is rapidly growing, we found that studies could make better use of the extensive toolbox developed by applied fields in genetics. Overall, 41% of reviewed studies used genetic information to evaluate or monitor restoration, and 59% provided genetic information to guide prerestoration decision-making processes. Reviewed studies suggest that restoration practitioners often overlook the importance of including genetic aspects within their restoration goals. Even though there is a genetic basis influencing the provision of ecosystem services, few studies explored this relationship. We provide a view of research gaps, future directions and challenges in the genetics of restoration.

  19. Tramadol Pretreatment Enhances Ketamine-Induced Antidepressant Effects and Increases Mammalian Target of Rapamycin in Rat Hippocampus and Prefrontal Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence have demonstrated that acute administration of ketamine elicits fast-acting antidepressant effects. Moreover, tramadol also has potential antidepressant effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of pretreatment with tramadol on ketamine-induced antidepressant activity and was to determine the expression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR in rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Rats were intraperitoneally administrated with ketamine at the dose of 10 mg/kg or saline 1 h before the second episode of the forced swimming test (FST. Tramadol or saline was intraperitoneally pretreated 30 min before the former administration of ketamine or saline. The locomotor activity and the immobility time of FST were both measured. After that, rats were sacrificed to determine the expression of mTOR in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Tramadol at the dose of 5 mg/kg administrated alone did not elicit the antidepressant effects. More importantly, pretreatment with tramadol enhanced the ketamine-induced antidepressant effects and upregulated the expression of mTOR in rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Pretreatment with tramadol enhances the ketamine-induced antidepressant effects, which is associated with the increased expression of mTOR in rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.

  20. Permanent relief from intermittent cold stress-induced fibromyalgia-like abnormal pain by repeated intrathecal administration of antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukae Takehiro

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibromyalgia (FM is characterized by chronic widespread pain, which is often refractory to conventional painkillers. Numerous clinical studies have demonstrated that antidepressants are effective in treating FM pain. We previously established a mouse model of FM-like pain, induced by intermittent cold stress (ICS. Results In this study, we find that ICS exposure causes a transient increase in plasma corticosterone concentration, but not in anxiety or depression-like behaviors. A single intrathecal injection of an antidepressant, such as milnacipran, amitriptyline, mianserin or paroxetine, had an acute analgesic effect on ICS-induced thermal hyperalgesia at post-stress day 1 in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, repeated daily antidepressant treatments during post-stress days 1-5 gradually reversed the reduction in thermal pain threshold, and this recovery was maintained for at least 7 days after the final treatment. In addition, relief from mechanical allodynia, induced by ICS exposure, was also observed at day 9 after the cessation of antidepressant treatment. In contrast, the intravenous administration of these antidepressants at conventional doses failed to provide relief. Conclusions These results suggest that the repetitive intrathecal administration of antidepressants permanently cures ICS-induced FM pain in mice.

  1. Rapid Antidepressant Activity of Ethanol Extract of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis Is Associated with Upregulation of BDNF Expression in the Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailou Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol extract of Yueju pill, a Traditional Chinese Medicine herbal formula widely used to treat mood disorders, demonstrates rapid antidepressant effects similar to ketamine, likely via instant enhancement of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF expression in the hippocampus. Here we investigated ethanol extracts of the constituent herbs of Yueju responsible for rapid antidepressant effects. Screening with tail suspension test in Kunming mice at 24 hours after a single administration of five individual constituent herbs of Yueju, we found that only Gardenia jasminoides Ellis (GJ showed a significant effect. The antidepressant response started at 2 hours after GJ administration. Similar to Yueju and ketamine, a single administration of GJ significantly reduced the number of escape failures in the learned helplessness test. Furthermore, GJ decreased latency of food consumption in the novelty suppressed-feeding test. Additionally, starting from 2 hours and continuing for over 20 hours after GJ administration, BDNF expression in the hippocampus was upregulated, temporally linked with the antidepressant response. These findings suggest that GJ has rapid antidepressant effects, which are associated with the elevated expression of BDNF in the hippocampus. In Yueju formula, Yue represents GJ, as thus our study demonstrates the primary role of GJ in rapid antidepressant efficacy of Yueju.

  2. Sales of antidepressants, suicides and hospital admissions for depression in Veneto Region, Italy, from 2000 to 2005: an ecological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biancosino Bruno

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased prescription of antidepressants has been consistently associated with a decrease in suicide rates in several countries. The aim of this study is to explore antidepressant consumption, suicide rates and admission for depression in the Veneto Region, Italy, in order to see whether the same pattern could be detected. Methods Data from the Italian Ministry of Health (admissions for depression, the Pharmacy Service of a Local Health Unit (antidepressant prescribing and from the Epidemiological System of the Veneto region (suicide rates were collected from 2000 to 2005 for the Veneto region. Results Suicide rates did not show any marked increase but were stable in males and females. Antidepressant prescribing increased exponentially over the period examined, whilst admissions for depression markedly decreased. The trend for an exponential increase in antidepressant prescribing in the Veneto region is shared with other countries and locales. Conclusions It is possible that the increase in antidepressant prescribing might be associated with earlier treatment of depression, thus decreasing the likelihood of aggravation of depression.

  3. Obesity and Its Potential Effects on Antidepressant Treatment Outcomes in Patients with Depressive Disorders: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Young Sup; Seo, Hye-Jin; McIntyre, Roger S; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2016-01-12

    Accumulating evidence regarding clinical, neurobiological, genetic, and environmental factors suggests a bidirectional link between obesity and depressive disorders. Although a few studies have investigated the link between obesity/excess body weight and the response to antidepressants in depressive disorders, the effect of weight on treatment response remains poorly understood. In this review, we summarized recent data regarding the relationship between the response to antidepressants and obesity/excess body weight in clinical studies of patients with depressive disorders. Although several studies indicated an association between obesity/excess body weight and poor antidepressant responses, it is difficult to draw definitive conclusions due to the variability of subject composition and methodological differences among studies. Especially, differences in sex, age and menopausal status, depressive symptom subtypes, and antidepressants administered may have caused inconsistencies in the results among studies. The relationship between obesity/excess body weight and antidepressant responses should be investigated further in high-powered studies addressing the differential effects on subject characteristics and treatment. Moreover, future research should focus on the roles of mediating factors, such as inflammatory markers and neurocognitive performance, which may alter the antidepressant treatment outcome in patients with comorbid obesity and depressive disorder.

  4. Effects of Antidepressants on DSP4/CPT-Induced DNA Damage Response in Neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Hilton, Benjamin A; Cui, Kui; Zhu, Meng-Yang

    2015-08-01

    DNA damage is a form of cell stress and injury. Increased systemic DNA damage is related to the pathogenic development of neurodegenerative diseases. Depression occurs in a relatively high percentage of patients suffering from degenerative diseases, for whom antidepressants are often used to relieve depressive symptoms. However, few studies have attempted to elucidate why different groups of antidepressants have similar effects on relieving symptoms of depression. Previously, we demonstrated that neurotoxins N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4)- and camptothecin (CPT) induced the DNA damage response in SH-SY5Y cells, and DSP4 caused cell cycle arrest which was predominately in the S-phase. The present study shows that CPT treatment also resulted in similar cell cycle arrest. Some classic antidepressants could reduce the DNA damage response induced by DSP4 or CPT in SH-SY5Y cells. Cell viability examination demonstrated that both DSP4 and CPT caused cell death, which was prevented by spontaneous administration of some tested antidepressants. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that a majority of the tested antidepressants protect cells from being arrested in S-phase. These results suggest that blocking the DNA damage response may be an important pharmacologic characteristic of antidepressants. Exploring the underlying mechanisms may allow for advances in the effort to improve therapeutic strategies for depression appearing in degenerative and psychiatric diseases.

  5. MIF-1 potentiates the action of tricyclic antidepressants in an animal model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostowski, W; Danysz, W; Dyr, W; Jankowska, E; Krzaścik, P; Pałejko, W; Stefański, R; Płaźnik, A

    1991-01-01

    In the present paper, the effect of simultaneous treatment of rats with low doses of MIF-1 and tricyclic antidepressants on rat behavior in the forced swim test was studied. It was found that MIF-1 stimulated in a dose-dependent manner "active" behavior of animals in this paradigm. The effect of MIF-1 appeared to be independent of changes in rats' locomotion in the open field test. The combined treatment of rats with MIF-1 (0.01 mg/kg IP) and amitriptyline (5 mg/kg IP) or desipramine (1.25 mg/kg) IP) significantly stimulated active behavior in the forced swim test above the level obtained with each of the drugs given separately. The present data suggest the potential clinical efficacy of a combined therapy of depressive patients with MIF-1 and small doses of tricyclic antidepressants.

  6. Research progress of antidepressants%抗抑郁药的研究新进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李亮亮

    2014-01-01

    Depression is becoming a serious global problem.Now antidepressants are divided into four types:monoamine oxidase inhibitors(MAOIs),tricyclicantide pressants(TCAs),selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SS-RIs) and new antidepressants.%抑郁症正成为一个严重的全球问题。目前抗抑郁药物分四大类:单胺氧化酶抑制剂(Monoamine oxidase inhibitors,MAOIs)、三环类药物(Tricyclicantide pressants,TCAs)、选择性5-色胺再摄取抑制剂(Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors,SSRIs)、新型抗抑郁药。

  7. LeuT-desipramine structure reveals how antidepressants block neurotransmitter reuptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zheng; Zhen, Juan; Karpowich, Nathan K; Goetz, Regina M; Law, Christopher J; Reith, Maarten E A; Wang, Da-Neng

    2007-09-07

    Tricyclic antidepressants exert their pharmacological effect-inhibiting the reuptake of serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine-by directly blocking neurotransmitter transporters (SERT, NET, and DAT, respectively) in the presynaptic membrane. The drug-binding site and the mechanism of this inhibition are poorly understood. We determined the crystal structure at 2.9 angstroms of the bacterial leucine transporter (LeuT), a homolog of SERT, NET, and DAT, in complex with leucine and the antidepressant desipramine. Desipramine binds at the inner end of the extracellular cavity of the transporter and is held in place by a hairpin loop and by a salt bridge. This binding site is separated from the leucine-binding site by the extracellular gate of the transporter. By directly locking the gate, desipramine prevents conformational changes and blocks substrate transport. Mutagenesis experiments on human SERT and DAT indicate that both the desipramine-binding site and its inhibition mechanism are probably conserved in the human neurotransmitter transporters.

  8. LeuT-Desipramine Structure Reveals How Antidepressants Block Neurotransmitter Reuptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou,Z.; Zhen, J.; Karpowich, N.; Goetz, R.; Law, C.; Reith, M.; Wang, D.

    2007-01-01

    Tricyclic antidepressants exert their pharmacological effect -- inhibiting the reuptake of serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine -- by directly blocking neurotransmitter transporters (SERT, NET, and DAT, respectively) in the presynaptic membrane. The drug-binding site and the mechanism of this inhibition are poorly understood. We determined the crystal structure at 2.9 angstroms of the bacterial leucine transporter (LeuT), a homolog of SERT, NET, and DAT, in complex with leucine and the antidepressant desipramine. Desipramine binds at the inner end of the extracellular cavity of the transporter and is held in place by a hairpin loop and by a salt bridge. This binding site is separated from the leucine-binding site by the extracellular gate of the transporter. By directly locking the gate, desipramine prevents conformational changes and blocks substrate transport. Mutagenesis experiments on human SERT and DAT indicate that both the desipramine-binding site and its inhibition mechanism are probably conserved in the human neurotransmitter transporters.

  9. What is the role of sedating antidepressants, antipsychotics, and anticonvulsants in the management of insomnia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Catherine; McCall, W Vaughn

    2012-10-01

    Psychiatric medications such as antidepressants, antipsychotics, and anticonvulsants are commonly prescribed by physicians for the off-label use of improving sleep. Reasons for preferential prescription of these medications over FDA-approved insomnia drugs may include a desire to treat concurrent sleep problems and psychiatric illness with a single medication, and/or an attempt to avoid hypnotic drugs due to their publicized side effects. However, there have been few large studies demonstrating the efficacy and safety of most off-label medications prescribed to treat insomnia. In addition, many of these medications have significant known side effect profiles themselves. Here we review the pertinent research studies published in recent years on antidepressant, antipsychotic, and anticonvulsant medications frequently prescribed for sleep difficulties. Although there have been few large-scale studies for most of these medications, some may be appropriate in the treatment of sleep issues in specific well-defined populations.

  10. Mortality in major affective disorder: relationship to subtype of depression. The Danish University Antidepressant Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchholtz-Hansen, P E; Wang, A G; Kragh-Sørensen, P

    1993-01-01

    A total of 219 inpatients with a DSM-III diagnosis of major depression, 150 women and 69 men, were followed prospectively for 3-10 years and mortality was recorded. The patients were previous participants in psychopharmacological multicenter trials, which were carried out for the purpose...... of comparing the antidepressant effect of newer 5-HT reuptake inhibitors with that of the tricyclic antidepressant drug, clomipramine. The study comprised patients with a total Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression score of > or = 18 and/or a Hamilton subscale score of > or = 9. Diagnostic classification...... according to the Newcastle I Scale in endogenous and nonendogenous depression was performed. The observed mortality was significantly greater than that expected. The increased mortality was essentially due to suicides and mainly found among women. Patients scored as nonendogenously depressed had...

  11. Antidepressant-Like and Antioxidant Effects of Plinia trunciflora in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassia Sacchet

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The jaboticaba tree, Plinia trunciflora (O. Berg Kausel, is popularly named “jabuticabeira” in Brazil and is used in folk medicine to treat diabetes and chronic inflammation of the tonsils, but studies evaluating the central effects of this species are limited. This study evaluated the antidepressant-like and antioxidant effects of P. trunciflora (PT aqueous extract, in which five different anthocyanins were identified. PT showed significant ferric-reduction power and DPPH radical scavenging activity in vitro and reduced lipid peroxidation both in vitro and ex vivo. At the behavioural level, PT (400 and 800 mg/kg, i.p. dose-dependently reduced immobility time in the tail suspension test in Swiss male mice. The identification of bioactive compounds accompanied by the in vitro and ex vivo antioxidant activity of PT suggests that these activities might be related to the antidepressant-like activity of P. trunciflora.

  12. Antidepressant-like activity of adhyperforin, a novel constituent of Hypericum perforatum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jingwei; Zhang, Fangxi; Cheng, Jucan; Guo, Shuren; Liu, Pinglan; Wang, Hongbo

    2014-07-09

    Adhyperforin is a novel constituent of Hypericum perforatum L., but its antidepressant-like activity remains unclear. To explore that, several well-validated animal models of depression as well as neurotransmitter reuptake and transporter binding assays were conducted. The results showed adhyperforin could reduce the immobility time of mice in the forced swimming test and tail suspension assay, antagonize the behaviors induced by reserpine, and have no effect on locomotor activity. Furthermore, following establishment of a chronic unpredictable mild stress model, adhyperforin increased the number of crossings and rearings in rats in the open field test and increased the sucrose consumption. Finally, adhyperforin inhibited uptake of serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine, and displayed robust binding affinities for the serotonin and norepinephrine transporters. Overall, the current study provides the first evidence that adhyperforin is a novel, active ingredient of Hypericum perforatum L. with robust antidepressant-like activity.

  13. Mitochondrial plasticity of the hippocampus in a generic rat model of depression after antidepressant treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Fenghua; Wegener, Gregers; Madsen, Torsten Meldgaard;

    2012-01-01

    investigated the changes in mitochondrial plasticity and its correlation to morphological alterations of neuroplasticity in the hippocampus, both associated with a depressive phenotype, and after treatment, with antidepressant imipramine. Design-based stereological methods were used to estimate the number...... and volume of mitochondria in CA1 of the hippocampus in two different strains of rats, the Sprague-Dawley (SD) and Flinders rats, which display a genetic susceptibility to depressive behavior, the Flinders-sensitive line (FSL) and their corresponding controls, the Flinders-resistant line (FRL). Results...... of mitochondrial plasticity in the hippocampus and antidepressant treatment may counteract with the structural impairments. Moreover, the changes in mitochondrial morphology and number are a consistent feature of neuroplasticity. Synapse, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  14. Mondia whitei, a medicinal plant from Africa with aphrodisiac and antidepressant properties: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oketch-Rabah, Hellen A

    2012-12-01

    This paper reviews the literature concerning the ethnobotany, phytochemistry, and pharmacology of Mondia whitei, which is also known as Mondia whytei, African ginger or simply as mondia. Mondia is used in many parts of Africa as a traditional remedy to improve appetite and libido, as a galactagogue, as a fertility medication, and as an antidepressant. In African countries, where it is used medicinally, the most commonly cited use is as an aphrodisiac. The scientific studies reviewed in this report employed either in vivo rodent models or isolated organ techniques, and therefore the results cannot be directly extrapolated to humans. Nevertheless, these studies provide scientific evidence that support the traditional uses of mondia as an aphrodisiac and an antidepressant. Based on the safety data available in the literature, mondia is reasonably expected to be safe when prepared and used according to traditional practices.

  15. A study on evalution of antidepressant effect of imipramine adjunct with Aswagandha and Bramhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, T; Adhikari, A; Bhattacharya, K; Biswas, S; Debnath, P K; Maharana, C S

    2011-12-01

    Depressive disorders increase the risks of self-harm or even suicide in patients. Indigenous drugs are being tried to treat such patient along with conventional antidepressant drugs. This study was planned to investigate the antidepressant action of Ashwagandha and Bramhi and also to confirm its efficacy in the behavioural despair animal model of depression. Normal saline as control (5 ml/kg), Imipramine as standard (16, 32, 64 mg/ kg) and Ashwagandha (50, 100, 150 mg/kg), Bramhi (20, 40, 80 mg/kg) as test drugs were introduced to the albino rats weighing between 200-250 gm for 2 weeks, 1 hr before electric shock in Learned helplessness test (LHT) and swimming in Forced swimming test (FST). Effects of individual drugs as well as their combination were evaluated. Avoidance response, escape failure and immobility period in case of Imipramine and Ashwagandha showed highly significant (p Imipramine gave a highly significant result (p Imipramine showed high efficacy in animal model.

  16. CNS effects of citalopram, a new serotonin inhibitor antidepressant (a quantitative pharmaco-electroencephalography study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itil, T M; Menon, G N; Bozak, M M; Itil, K Z

    1984-01-01

    Citalopram, a new phthalane derivative and a specific serotonin re-uptake inhibitor in animal pharmacological tests, was evaluated in a double-blind, crossover, quantitative pharmaco-EEG (QPEEGTM) study in healthy human volunteers. The CNS effects of citalopram are linear, dose- and time-related, can statistically be differentiated from placebo, and indicate a rapid onset of effects with short duration. According to the Computer Data Bank, citalopram has a mode of action similar to mood elevators (antidepressants) with fewer sedative properties. Thus the therapeutic action of citalopram is predicted to be similar to desipramine and protriptyline from the tricyclics, and fluvoxamine from non-tricyclics. According to data bank assessment, it is hypothesized that the single antidepressant dose of citalopram is to be more than 25 mg, which should be given t.i.d. in clinical trials.

  17. DeltaFosB in brain reward circuits mediates resilience to stress and antidepressant responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vialou, Vincent; Robison, Alfred J; Laplant, Quincey C; Covington, Herbert E; Dietz, David M; Ohnishi, Yoshinori N; Mouzon, Ezekiell; Rush, Augustus J; Watts, Emily L; Wallace, Deanna L; Iñiguez, Sergio D; Ohnishi, Yoko H; Steiner, Michel A; Warren, Brandon L; Krishnan, Vaishnav; Bolaños, Carlos A; Neve, Rachael L; Ghose, Subroto; Berton, Olivier; Tamminga, Carol A; Nestler, Eric J

    2010-06-01

    In contrast with the many studies of stress effects on the brain, relatively little is known about the molecular mechanisms of resilience, the ability of some individuals to escape the deleterious effects of stress. We found that the transcription factor DeltaFosB mediates an essential mechanism of resilience in mice. Induction of DeltaFosB in the nucleus accumbens, an important brain reward-associated region, in response to chronic social defeat stress was both necessary and sufficient for resilience. DeltaFosB induction was also required for the standard antidepressant fluoxetine to reverse behavioral pathology induced by social defeat. DeltaFosB produced these effects through induction of the GluR2 AMPA glutamate receptor subunit, which decreased the responsiveness of nucleus accumbens neurons to glutamate, and through other synaptic proteins. Together, these findings establish a previously unknown molecular pathway underlying both resilience and antidepressant action.

  18. Synthesis, antidepressant evaluation and docking studies of long-chain alkylnitroquipazines as serotonin transporter inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsen, Mari; Wołosewicz, Karol; Zawadzka, Anna; Kossakowski, Jerzy; Nowak, Gabriel; Wolak, Małgorzata; Stachowicz, Katarzyna; Siwek, Agata; Ravna, Aina W; Kufareva, Irina; Kozerski, Lech; Bednarek, Elżbieta; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Bocian, Wojciech; Abagyan, Ruben; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Sylte, Ingebrigt; Chilmonczyk, Zdzisław

    2013-06-01

    Twelve alkyl analogues (1-12) of the high-affinity serotonin transporter (SERT) inhibitor 6-nitroquipazine (6-NQ) were synthesized and studied using in vitro radioligand competition binding assays to determine their binding affinity (Ki ). The putative antidepressant activity of five of the binders with the highest SERT binding affinities was studied by the forced swim and locomotor activity mouse tests. The three-dimensional (3D) structures of 8 and 9 were determined using NOE NMR technique. Flexible docking of the compounds was undertaken to illustrate the binding of the compounds in the SERT model. Our results showed that several of the 6-NQ analogues are high-affinity SERT inhibitors and indicated that the octyl (8), decyl (10) and dodecyl (12) 6-NQ analogues exhibit moderate antidepressant activity.

  19. Case report of adjunctive use of olanzapine with an antidepressant to treat sleep paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jingfeng; Huang, Wanli; Zhou, Mincong; Li, Xujuan; Cai, Wei

    2013-10-01

    Sleep paralysis (SP) is a condition of unknown etiology that usually occurs when falling asleep or when awakening in which the individual remains conscious but is unable to control their voluntary movements. This case report is about a 68-year-old man with a 40-year history of symptoms of SP and associated panic attacks upon awakening. Neurological examination and neuroimaging identified no abnormalities. Five years before the current evaluation he had been diagnosed with depression and treated with various anti-depressants which ameliorated, but did not cure, his SP. However, this 40-year history of SP was abruptly terminated - and did not return over the subsequent two years - after adjunctive treatment with 2.5 mg olanzapine each night was added to his antidepressant.

  20. Antidepressant, psychostimulant, and nootropic effects of major and trace element composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasieva, O G; Suslov, N I; Shilova, I V

    2013-06-01

    The antidepressant, psychostimulant, and nootropic effects of a composition of major and trace elements including KCl, RbNO3, magnesium sulfate, and zinc sulfate were studied on the models of behavioural despair (Porsolt test) and conditioned passive avoidance test. The preparation was found to shorten the immobilization time in the Porsolt test and promote retention of the conditioned passive avoidance. The most pronounced psychostimulant effect of the substance was observed at a dose of 4.68 mg/kg and the most pronounced antidepressant effect was found at a dose of 18.72 mg/kg. Maximum nootropic activity of the preparation was found at a dose of 93.6 mg/kg.

  1. Mitochondrial DNA, restoring Beethovens music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merheb, Maxime; Vaiedelich, Stéphane; Maniguet, Thiérry; Hänni, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Great ancient composers have endured many obstacles and constraints which are very difficult to understand unless we perform the restoration process of ancient music. Species identification in leather used during manufacturing is the key step to start such a restoration process in order to produce a facsimile of a museum piano. Our study reveals the species identification in the leather covering the hammer head in a piano created by Erard in 1802. This is the last existing piano similar to the piano that Beethoven used with its leather preserved in its original state. The leather sample was not present in a homogeneous piece, yet combined with glue. Using a DNA extraction method that avoids PCR inhibitors; we discovered that sheep and cattle are the origin of the combination. To identify the species in the leather, we focused on the amounts of mitochondrial DNA in both leather and glue and results have led us to the conclusion that the leather used to cover the hammer head in this piano was made of cattle hide.

  2. Purchases of Prescription Antidepressants in the Swedish Population in Relation to Major Workplace Downsizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson Hanson, Linda L; Westerlund, Hugo; Chungkham, Holendro Singh; Vahtera, Jussi; Sverke, Magnus; Alexanderson, Kristina

    2016-03-01

    Organizational downsizing may be a risk factor for morbidity among both the displaced and those who remain in work. However, the knowledge is limited regarding its impact on clinically relevant mental health problems. Our objective was to investigate purchases of prescription antidepressants across 5 years in relation to workplace downsizing. We studied all Swedish residents 2004 throughout 2010, 22-54 years old in 2006, gainfully employed, and with a stable labor market position up to 2006. People primarily employed at a workplace with ≥18% staff reduction were considered exposed to major downsizing (in 2006-2007, 2007-2008, or 2008-2009). We applied repeated measures regression analyses through generalized estimating equations, calculating odds of any purchase of prescription antidepressants (inferred from the prescribed drug register) within five 12-month periods from 2 years before to 2 years after the period of major downsizing and compared the trends for newly exposed (n = 632,500) and unexposed (n = 1,021,759) to major downsizing. The odds of purchasing prescription antidepressants for exposed increased more than for nonexposed, mainly peridownsizing (1 year before to 1 year after), and postdownsizing (1 year after to 2 years after) for survivors (odds ratio 1.24 vs. 1.14 peridownsizing and 1.12 vs. 1.00 postdownsizing) and those changing workplace (odds ratio 1.22 vs. 1.14 peridownsizing and 1.10 vs. 1.00 postdownsizing) with no previous sickness absence or disability pension (≥7% more than unexposed peri- and postdownsizing). This large-scale study indicates that downsizing is associated with a slight increase in the odds of purchasing prescription antidepressants among people without previous sickness absence or disability pension.

  3. Molecular analysis of the interaction of the four histamine receptor subtypes with antidepressant and antipsychotic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Appl, Heidrun

    2010-01-01

    Antidepressant and antipsychotic drugs are known to affect multiple molecular targets. Beside their determinant effects on the neurotransmission of serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine via several transporters and receptors, they may also modulate muscarinic acetylcholine receptors and the histamine H1 receptor (H1R). Consequently, these drugs do not only yield unique profiles of desired effects but also several unwanted side effects that may impact therapy. In addition to the H1R, the hist...

  4. Recent developments in the design of anti-depressive therapies: targeting the serotonin transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, S G; Meegan, M J

    2008-01-01

    The serotonin transporter protein (SERT) has been the target for the development of several modern antidepressants with an objective of achieving selectivity over other monoamine transporters, thereby minimising side effects observed in the older generation of tricyclic antidepressants. The clinical selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been shown to be among the most effective therapies in the treatment of depression. However they have clinical disadvantages over other classes of antidepressant drugs such as slow onset of action nausea and sleep disruption. The negative feedback loop attributed to the presynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptors has been implicated in the "time lag" observed in many patients between the administration of the SSRI and its observed therapeutic action. In recent years the focus has been on developing compounds with dual affinity for serotonergic auto-receptors along with an inhibitory activity at SERT. These structurally diverse products promise to be the next generation of anti-depressant medicines. This review presents an analysis of the recently reported structural classes with SSRI activity and rationalises the unique relationship between their molecular properties and biological activities. Specific emphasis is placed on the development of molecular structures with dual serotonergic activity. Recent advances in the design and synthesis of single molecular entities possessing 5-HT reuptake inhibition together with 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(1B), 5-HT(1D), 5-HT(2A), DAT, NET, alpha (2)-adrenoceptor and acetylcholinesterase antagonism are reviewed. The structural studies to identify proposed SERT binding sites together with the role of structure and ligand based design in the development of more effective SSRIs are summarised.

  5. Differential effects of antidepressants escitalopram versus lithium on Gs alpha membrane relocalization

    OpenAIRE

    Donati, Robert J.; Schappi, Jeffrey; Czysz, Andrew H; Jackson, Alexander; Mark M Rasenick

    2015-01-01

    Background Plasma membrane localization can play a significant role in the ultimate function of certain proteins. Specific membrane domains like lipid rafts have been shown to be inhibitory domains to a number of signaling proteins, including Gsα, and chronic antidepressant treatment facilitates Gs signaling by removing Gsα form lipid rafts. The intent of this study is to compare the effects of the selective serotnin reuptake inhibitor, escitalopram, with that of the mood stabilizing drug, li...

  6. Antidepressants stimulate hippocampal neurogenesis by inhibiting p21 expression in the subgranular zone of the hipppocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert N Pechnick

    Full Text Available The relationships among hippocampal neurogenesis, depression and the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs have generated a considerable amount of controversy. The cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk inhibitor p21(Cip1 (p21 plays a crucial role in restraining cellular proliferation and maintaining cellular quiescence. Using in vivo and in vitro approaches the present study shows that p21 is expressed in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in early neuronal progenitors and in immature neurons, but not in mature neurons or astroglia. In vitro, proliferation is higher in neuronal progenitor cells derived from p21-/- mice compared to cells derived from wild-type mice. Proliferation is increased in neuronal progenitor cells after suppression of p21 using lentivirus expressing short hairpin RNA against p21. In vivo, chronic treatment with the non-selective antidepressant imipramine as well as the norepinephrine-selective reuptake inhibitor desipramine or the serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine all decrease p21 expression, and this was associated with increased neurogenesis. Chronic antidepressant treatment did not affect the expression of other Cdk inhibitors. Untreated p21-/- mice exhibit a higher degree of baseline neurogenesis and decreased immobility in the forced swim test. Although chronic imipramine treatment increased neurogenesis and reduced immobility in the forced swim test in wild-type mice, it reduced neurogenesis and increased immobility in p21-/- mice. These results demonstrate the unique role of p21 in the control of neurogenesis, and support the hypothesis that different classes of reuptake inhibitor-type antidepressant drugs all stimulate hippocampal neurogenesis by inhibiting p21 expression.

  7. The involvement of serotonergic system in the antidepressant effect of zinc in the forced swim test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Poleszak, Ewa; Wlaź, Piotr; Wróbel, Andrzej; Blicharska, Eliza; Cichy, Agnieszka; Dybała, Małgorzata; Siwek, Agata; Pomierny-Chamioło, Lucyna; Piotrowska, Anna; Brański, Piotr; Pilc, Andrzej; Nowak, Gabriel

    2009-03-17

    Recent preclinical data indicated the antidepressant-like activity of zinc in different tests and models of depression. The present study investigates the involvement of the serotonergic system in zinc activity in the forced swim test (FST) in mice and rats. The combined treatment of sub-effective doses of zinc (hydroaspartate, 2.5 mg Zn/kg) and citalopram (15 mg/kg), fluoxetine (5 mg/kg) but not with reboxetine (2.5 mg/kg) significantly reduces the immobility time in the FST in mice. These treatments had no influence on the spontaneous locomotor activity. Moreover, while the antidepressant-like effect of zinc (5 mg/kg) in the FST was significantly blocked by pretreatment with inhibitor of serotonin synthesis, p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA, 3x200 mg/kg), 5HT-2(A/C) receptor antagonist, ritanserin (4 mg/kg) or 5HT-1A receptor antagonist, WAY 1006335 (0.1 mg/kg), the zinc-induced reduction in the locomotor activity was not affected by these serotonin modulator agents. These results indicate the specific involvement of the serotonergic system in antidepressant but not the motion behavior of zinc in mice. Also, an increase in the swimming but not climbing parameter of the rat FST observed following zinc administration (2.5 and 5 mg Zn/kg) indicates the serotonin pathway participation. This present data indicates that the antidepressant-like activity of zinc observed in the FST involves interaction with the serotonergic system.

  8. Anxiolytic and antidepressant effect of zinc on rats and its impact on general behavioural parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Samardžić Janko; Savić Kristina; Stefanović Nemanja; Matunović Radomir; Baltezarević Dragana; Obradović Miljana; Jančić Jasna; Oprić Dejan; Obradović Dragan

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim. Zinc is an essential element which has considerable interaction with gamma-aminobutyric acid A type receptors (GABAA) and glutamate receptors in the central nervous system (CNS). It is believed that zinc acts as a potent inhibitor of glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, and binding to structurally specific site on the GABAA receptor leads to inhibition of GABA dependent Cl-pass. The aim of our research was to test the anxiolytic and antidepressant effects of ...

  9. Paroxetine—The Antidepressant from Hell? Probably Not, But Caution Required

    OpenAIRE

    Nevels, Robert M.; Gontkovsky, Samuel T.; Williams, Bryman E.

    2016-01-01

    Paroxetine, also known by the trade names Aropax, Paxil, Pexeva, Seroxat, Sereupin and Brisdelle, was first marketed in the U.S. in 1992. Effective for major depression and various anxiety disorders, it quickly gained a sizable share of the antidepressant prescription market. By the late 1990s, paroxetine frequently was being associated with serious drug interactions and medication side effects. Most significantly, in a major Canadian epidemiological study examining the relationship between a...

  10. Isosakuranetin-5-O-rutinoside: A New Flavanone with Antidepressant Activity Isolated from Salvia elegans Vahl.

    OpenAIRE

    Manáses González-Cortazar; Ana María Maldonado-Abarca; Enrique Jiménez-Ferrer; Silvia Marquina; Elsa Ventura-Zapata; Alejandro Zamilpa; Jaime Tortoriello; Maribel Herrera-Ruiz

    2013-01-01

    Ursolic acid (1) and a new flavanone, 5-O-(6-rhamnosylglucoside)-7-hydroxy-4'-methoxyflavanone (2), were isolated from the leaves of Salvia elegans Vahl. These natural products displayed antidepressant activity in mice as determined by means of a forced swimming test (FST) evaluation. Structural elucidation was carried out by chemical derivatization (acetylation) and spectroscopic analyses, such as 1H- and 13C-NMR and two-dimensional (2-D) COSY, heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (...

  11. Brain arousal regulation as response predictor for antidepressant therapy in major depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Frank M.; Sander, Christian; Dietz, Marie-Elisa; Nowak, Claudia; Schröder, Thomas; Mergl, Roland; Schönknecht, Peter; Himmerich, Hubertus; Hegerl, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    A tonically high level of brain arousal and its hyperstable regulation is supposed to be a pathogenic factor in major depression. Preclinical studies indicate that most antidepressants may counteract this dysregulation. Therefore, it was hypothesized that responders to antidepressants show a) a high level of EEG-vigilance (an indicator of brain arousal) and b) a more stable EEG-vigilance regulation than non-responders. In 65 unmedicated depressed patients 15-min resting-state EEGs were recorded off medication (baseline). In 57 patients an additional EEG was recorded 14 ± 1 days following onset of antidepressant treatment (T1). Response was defined as a ≥50% HAMD-17-improvement after 28 ± 1 days of treatment (T2), resulting in 29 responders and 36 non-responders. Brain arousal was assessed using the Vigilance Algorithm Leipzig (VIGALL 2.1). At baseline responders and non-responders differed in distribution of overall EEG-vigilance stages (F2,133 = 4.780, p = 0.009), with responders showing significantly more high vigilance stage A and less low vigilance stage B. The 15-minutes Time-course of EEG-vigilance did not differ significantly between groups. Exploratory analyses revealed that responders showed a stronger decline in EEG-vigilance levels from baseline to T1 than non-responders (F2,130 = 4.978, p = 0.005). Higher brain arousal level in responders to antidepressants supports the concept that dysregulation of brain arousal is a possible predictor of treatment response in affective disorders. PMID:28345662

  12. Neuropeptidomics of mouse hypothalamus after imipramine treatment reveal somatostatin as a potential mediator of antidepressant effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Anna; Stroth, Nikolas; Zhang, Xiaoqun; Qi, Hongshi; Fälth, Maria; Sköld, Karl; Hoyer, Daniel; Andrén, Per E; Svenningsson, Per

    2012-01-01

    Excessive activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been associated with numerous diseases, including depression, and the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine has been shown to suppress activity of the HPA axis. Central hypothalamic control of the HPA axis is complex and involves a number of neuropeptides released from multiple hypothalamic subnuclei. The present study was therefore designed to determine the effects of imipramine administration on the mouse hypothalamus using a peptidomics approach. Among the factors found to be downregulated after acute (one day) or chronic (21 days) imipramine administration were peptides derived from secretogranin 1 (chromogranin B) as well as peptides derived from cerebellin precursors. In contrast, peptides SRIF-14 and SRIF-28 (1-11) derived from somatostatin (SRIF, somatotropin release inhibiting factor) were significantly upregulated by imipramine in the hypothalamus. Because diminished SRIF levels have long been known to occur in depression, a second part of the study investigated the roles of individual SRIF receptors in mediating potential antidepressant effects. SRA880, an antagonist of the somatostatin-1 autoreceptor (sst1) which positively modulates release of endogenous SRIF, was found to synergize with imipramine in causing antidepressant-like effects in the tail suspension test. Furthermore, chronic co-administration of SRA880 and imipramine synergistically increased BDNF mRNA expression in the cerebral cortex. Application of SRIF or L054264, an sst2 receptor agonist, but not L803807, an sst4 receptor agonist, increased phosphorylation of CaMKII and GluR1 in cerebrocortical slices. Our present experiments thus provide evidence for antidepressant-induced upregulation of SRIF in the brain, and strengthen the notion that augmented SRIF expression and signaling may counter depressive-like symptoms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Anxiety and Depression'.

  13. Pharmacoscintigraphic evaluation of potential of lipid nanocarriers for nose-to-brain delivery of antidepressant drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, M Intakhab; Baboota, Sanjula; Ahuja, Alka; Ali, Mushir; Ali, Javed; Sahni, Jasjeet K; Bhatnagar, Aseem

    2014-08-15

    Efficacy of antidepressants relies upon their continued presence at the site of action (brain) over a prolonged period of time. The BBB restricts the access of antidepressants to the brain on oral as well as intravenous administration. Direct delivery (by-passing the BBB) of antidepressant drugs can increase the CSF concentration with concomitant reduction in dose and side effects. Intranasal administration of nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) containing antidepressant drug circumvent the BBB and maintain the prolonged release at the site of action. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the enhancement in brain uptake of NLC containing duloxetine (DLX) after intranasal administration. Duloxetine loaded NLC (DLX-NLC) was evaluated pharmacoscintigraphically for drug targeting potential (DTP), drug targeting efficiency (DTE) and biodistribution studies in different organs including brain. The radiolabeling efficiency of DLX and DLX-NLC was found to be 98.41 ± 0.96 and 98.87 ± 0.82 after 30 min, respectively. The biodistribution studies exhibited higher percentage of radioactivity/g for DLX-NLC formulations in brain as compared with the DLX. The higher DTP (86.80%) and DTE (757.74%) suggested that DLX-NLC formulation has a better brain targeting efficiency than DLX solution (DTP=65.12%; DTE=287.34%) when administered intranasally. Moreover, the intranasal administration exhibited about 8-times higher concentration of DLX in brain when compared with the intravenous administration of DLX solution. The intranasal NLC containing DLX can be employed as an effective method for the treatment of depression.

  14. Adherence to antidepressant medications: an evaluation of community pharmacists’ counseling practices [Corrigendum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong WW

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Chong WW, Aslani P, Chen TF. Patient Prefer Adherence. 2013;7:813–825.On page 815, Figure 1 should have the following note listed beneath it: "Note: Reprinted from Res Social Adm Pharm, Chong WW, Aslani P, Chen TF, Pharmacist–patient communication on use of antidepressants: A simulated patient study in community pharmacy, Epub, Copyright © 2013, with permission from Elsevier.27"Read the original article

  15. Antidepressant, antioxidant and neurotrophic properties of the standardized extract of Cocos nucifera husk fiber in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Eliane Brito Cortez; de Sousa, Caren Nádia Soares; Vasconcelos, Germana Silva; Meneses, Lucas Nascimento; E Silva Pereira, Yuri Freitas; Ximenes, Naiara Coelho; Santos Júnior, Manuel Alves; Matos, Natália Castelo Branco; Brito, Rayanne; Miron, Diogo; Leal, Luzia Kalyne Almeida Moreira; Macêdo, Danielle; Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes

    2016-07-01

    The plant Cocos nucifera and its derivatives have shown antidepressant-like effects, although its hydroalcoholic extract has not been studied with this end in mind. Therefore, we decided to determine the antidepressant-like effects of the standardized hydroalcoholic extract of Cocos nucifera husk fiber (HECN) as well as oxidative alterations in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus (HC) and striatum (ST), and the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the HC of mice. The extract was characterized based on the content of total polyphenols as well as two phenol compounds-catechin and chlorogenic acid-by HPLC-PDA. Male animals were treated per os (p.o.) for 7 days with distilled water or HECN (50, 100 or 200 mg/kg), or intraperitoneally with vitamin E (Vit E 400 mg/kg). One hour after the last drug administration, the animals were submitted to the open field test, forced swimming test (FST), tail suspension test (TST) and, immediately after the behavioral tests, had their brain removed for neurochemical determinations. The results showed that HECN100 decreased the immobility time in the FST and TST presenting, thus demonstrating an antidepressant-like effect. The administration of HECN decreased malondialdehyde levels in all doses and brain areas studied with the exception of HECN50 in the HC. The administration of HECN also decreased nitrite levels in all doses and brain regions studied. HECN100 also increased the levels of BDNF in HC of mice. In conclusion, we demonstrated that HECN has antidepressant-like properties, probably based on its antioxidant and neurotrophic effects, and is thus relevant for the treatment of depression.

  16. The analgesic effect of different antidepressants combined with aspirin on thermally induced pain in Albino mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdalla S. Elhwuegi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background:Combination analgesics provide more effective pain relief for a broader spectrum of pain. This research examines the possible potentiation of the analgesic effect of different classes of antidepressants when combined with aspirin in thermal model of pain using Albino mice.Methods:Different groups of six animals each were injected intraperitoneally by different doses of aspirin (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg, imipramine (2.5, 7.5, 15 or 30 mg/kg, fluoxetine (1.25, 2.5, 5 or 7.5 mg/kg, mirtazapine (1.25, 2.5, or 5 mg/kg and a combination of a fixed dose of aspirin (100 mg/kg with the different doses of the three antidepressants. One hour later the analgesic effect of these treatments were evaluated against thermally induced pain. All data were subjected to statistical analysis using unpaired Student's t-test.Results:Aspirin had no analgesic effect in thermally induced pain. The three selected antidepressants produced dose dependent analgesia. The addition of a fixed dose of aspirin to imipramine significantly increased the reaction time (RT of the lowest dose (by 23% and the highest dose (by 20%. The addition of the fixed dose of aspirin to fluoxetine significantly increased RT by 13% of the dose 2.5 mg/Kg. Finally, the addition of the fixed dose of aspirin significantly potentiated the antinociceptive effect of the different doses of mirtazapine (RT was increased by 24, 54 and 38% respectively.Conclusion:Combination of aspirin with an antidepressant might produce better analgesia, increasing the efficacy of pain management and reduces side effects by using smaller doses of each drug.

  17. Involvement of monoaminergic systems in the antidepressant-like effect of nobiletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Li-Tao; Xu, He-Li; Feng, Jing; Zhan, Xia; Zhou, Li-Pan; Cui, Cun-Cang

    2011-01-10

    Nobiletin isolated from citrus peels up-regulates synaptic transmission and improves memory impairment in rodents. This study investigated the antidepressant-like effect of nobiletin in the forced swimming test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST) in mice. Additionally, the monoaminergic mechanisms involved in the antidepressant-like effect of nobiletin in mice were also assessed. Nobiletin (25, 50 and 100mg/kg, p.o.) decreased the immobility time in both the FST and TST without locomotor alterations in the open-field test (OFT). The anti-immobility effect of nobiletin (50mg/kg, p.o.) was completely prevented by the pretreatment of mice with WAY 100635 (0.1mg/kg, s.c., a serotonin 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist), cyproheptadine (3mg/kg, i.p., a serotonin 5-HT(2) receptor antagonist), prazosin (62.5μg/kg, i.p., an α(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist), SCH23390 (0.05mg/kg, s.c., a dopamine D(1) receptor antagonist) or sulpiride (50mg/kg, i.p., a dopamine D(2) receptor antagonist). On the other hand, the pretreatment of mice with yohimbine (1mg/kg, i.p., an α(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist) or propranolol (5mg/kg, i.p., a β-adrenoceptor antagonist) did not block the antidepressant-like effect of nobiletin in the TST. Taken together, the data demonstrated that nobiletin produced an antidepressant-like effect that seems to be dependent on its interaction with the serotonergic, noradrenergic and dopaminergic systems. Thus, the present study suggests the therapeutic potential of this dietary flavonoid for the treatment of depression.

  18. A longitudinal functional neuroimaging study in medication-naive depression after antidepressant treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroi Tomioka

    Full Text Available Recent studies have indicated the potential clinical use of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS as a tool in assisting the diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD; however, it is still unclear whether NIRS signal changes during cognitive task are state- or trait-dependent, and whether NIRS could be a neural predictor of treatment response. Therefore, we conducted a longitudinal study to explore frontal haemodynamic changes following antidepressant treatment in medication-naïve MDD using 52-channel NIRS. This study included 25 medication-naïve individuals with MDD and 62 healthy controls (HC. We performed NIRS scans before and after antidepressant treatment and measured changes of [oxy-Hb] activation during a verbal fluency task (VFT following treatment. Individuals with MDD showed significantly decreased [oxy-Hb] values during a VFT compared with HC in the bilateral frontal and temporal cortices at baseline. There were no [oxy-Hb] changes between pre- and post-antidepressant treatment time points in the MDD cohort despite significant improvement in depressive symptoms. There was a significant association between mean [oxy-Hb] values during a VFT at baseline and improvement in depressive symptoms following treatment in the bilateral inferior frontal and middle temporal gyri in MDD. These findings suggest that hypofrontality response to a VFT may represent a potential trait marker for depression rather than a state marker. Moreover, the correlation analysis indicates that the NIRS signals before the initiation of treatment may be a biological marker to predict patient's clinical response to antidepressant treatment. The present study provides further evidence to support a potential application of NIRS for the diagnosis and treatment of depression.

  19. Molecular determinants for selective recognition of antidepressants in the human serotonin and norepinephrine transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob; Stuhr-Hansen, Nicolai; Zachariassen, Linda

    2011-01-01

    /NET selectivity are poorly understood. In this study, the structural basis for selectivity of the SERT selective inhibitor citalopram and the structurally closely related NET selective inhibitor talopram is delineated. A systematic structure-activity relationship study allowed identification of the substituents......, these findings provide important insight into the molecular basis for SERT/NET selectivity of antidepressants, which can be used to guide rational development of unique transporter inhibitors with fine-tuned transporter selectivity....

  20. Antidepressant Treatment and Adherence to Antiretroviral Medications among Privately Insured Persons with HIV/AIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Akincigil, Ayse; Wilson, Ira; Walkup, James T.; Michele J Siegel; Huang, Cecilia; Crystal, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    In order to examine relationships between depression treatments (antidepressant and/or psychotherapy utilization) and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), we conducted a retrospective analysis of medical and pharmacy insurance claims for privately insured persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) diagnosed with depression (n=1,150). Participants were enrolled in 80 insurance plans from all 50 states. Adherence was suboptimal. Depression treatment initiators were significantly more likely to ...