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Sample records for anticonvulsant activity evaluation

  1. Anticonvulsant activity of extracts from six Cameroonian plants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epilepsy remains one of the leading public health problems that affects about 50 million people worldwide, thus stressing the need for new anticonvulsant drug. This study was designed to evaluate the anticonvulsant activity against Penty lenetetrazole induced–convulsion in mice. Plants were extracted by maceration with ...

  2. Evaluation of anticonvulsant activity of ethanolic leaves extract of Desmodium triflorum in mice

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    Girish Gowda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation was aimed to study an anticonvulsant activity of ethanolic extract of Desmodium triflorum (L. DC., Fabaceae, in mice. Animal models of epilepsy namely the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ, isoniazid or isonicotinic hydrazide (INH and maximal electroshock induced convulsion (MES were used to evaluate the anticonvulsant effects of the extracts. The biochemical estimation was done by measuring the lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione (GSH. In the PTZ induced convulsion, ethanolic extract of D. triflorum (EEDT 400 mg/kg significant delayed the onset of convulsion, reduced the duration of convulsion and reduced mortality. Similarly a dose of 800 mg/kg of EDDT significantly delayed the onset of convulsion, reduced the duration of convulsion and showed 33.33% protection in mice against INH induced convulsion. Further no mortality was found. Both the doses reduced hind limb tonic extension (HLTE phase of MES induced convulsion in mice. The pretreated EEDT showed significant inhibition of lipid peroxidation and increases the reduced glutathione level in mice brain tissue. The results revealed that D. triflorum possesses a significant dose dependent anticonvulsant activity.

  3. Evaluation of anticonvulsant activity of ethanolic leaves extract of Desmodium triflorum in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish Gowda

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation was aimed to study an anticonvulsant activity of ethanolic extract of Desmodium triflorum (L. DC., Fabaceae, in mice. Animal models of epilepsy namely the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ, isoniazid or isonicotinic hydrazide (INH and maximal electroshock induced convulsion (MES were used to evaluate the anticonvulsant effects of the extracts. The biochemical estimation was done by measuring the lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione (GSH. In the PTZ induced convulsion, ethanolic extract of D. triflorum (EEDT 400 mg/kg significant delayed the onset of convulsion, reduced the duration of convulsion and reduced mortality. Similarly a dose of 800 mg/kg of EDDT significantly delayed the onset of convulsion, reduced the duration of convulsion and showed 33.33% protection in mice against INH induced convulsion. Further no mortality was found. Both the doses reduced hind limb tonic extension (HLTE phase of MES induced convulsion in mice. The pretreated EEDT showed significant inhibition of lipid peroxidation and increases the reduced glutathione level in mice brain tissue. The results revealed that D. triflorum possesses a significant dose dependent anticonvulsant activity.

  4. Synthesis and anticonvulsant activity of certain chalcone based pyrazoline compounds

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    Sudhakara Rao Gerapati

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Convulsions are involuntary, violent, spasmodic and prolonged contractions of skeletal muscles. That means a patient may have epilepsy without convulsions and vice versa. Epilepsy is a common neurological abnormality affecting about 1% of the world population. The primary objectives of these synthesized compounds are to suppress seizures and provide neuroprotection by minimizing the effects from seizure attacks. Here some of the chalcones and chalcone based various pyrazolines were evaluated for anticonvulsant activity. Their structures have been elucidated on the basis of elemental analyses and spectroscopic studies (IR, 1H-NMR & Mass spectroscopy. A preliminary evaluation of the prepared compounds has indicated that some of them exhibit moderate to significant anticonvulsant activity compared to a diazepam standard1-3.  All compounds were tested for their anticonvulsant activity using maximal electroshock induced convulsions (MES in mice at a dose level of 4 mg/kg.b.w. The compounds  Ph1, Ph2 , Py2 ,Py3 and Py4 have shown  to  good anticonvulsant activity when doses are administered as 25mg/ kg.b.w  , reduced the phases of seizures severity and  found to be active and also  increased survival rate. Remaining compounds are less efficacious.

  5. Anticonvulsant Activity of Extracts of Plectranthus barbatus Leaves in Mice

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    Luciana Cristina Borges Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plectranthus barbatus is a medicinal plant used to treat a wide range of disorders including seizure. However, the anticonvulsant activity of this plant has not been studied in depth. We therefore sought to evaluate the anticonvulsant activity of a hydroalcoholic extract of P. barbatus leaves on seizures induced by strychnine sulphate (2.0 mg/kg and pilocarpine (600 mg/kg in mice. The extract was administered orally at 1, 10, 30, and 100 mg/kg. We report that the P. barbatus extract had marked anticonvulsant activity against strychnine-induced convulsions, but was quite ineffective against pilocarpine-induced convulsions. Further experiments will be required to identify the active molecules(s and their mechanism(s of action.

  6. Study of Convolvulus pluricaulis for antioxidant and anticonvulsant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sristi; Sinha, Reema; Kumar, Puspendra; Amin, Faizal; Jain, Jainendra; Tanwar, Shivani

    2012-03-01

    Convolvulus pluricaulis Choisy is a perennial wild herb commonly found on sandy & rocky areas under xerophytic conditions in northern India. It is a reputed drug of ayurveda and reported to posses antioxidant, brain tonic, nervine tonic, laxative and has been used in anxiety, neurosis, epilepsy, insomnia, burning sensation, oedema and urinary disorders. In the present study, methanolic extract of whole plant of Convolvulus pluricaulis Choisy was evaluated for antioxidant activity by using 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picryl- hydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging model and anticonvulsant activity by using maximal electroshock seizure model. In antioxidant activity, ascorbic acid was used as standard agent while results of anticonvulsant studies were compared with phenytoin. Results of antioxidant activity have demonstrated significant free radical scavenging effect for methanolic extract of Convolvulus pluricaulis Choisy. IC50 value of methanolic extract was observed as 41.00μg/ml as compared to 2.03μg/ml of ascorbic acid. Methanolic extract of C. pluricaulis was evaluated for anticonvulsant activity at 250, 500 and 1000mg/kg. Experimental results have shown that at the dose of 500 and 1000mg/kg, C. pluricaulis didn't abolish the hind limb extension, but reduced the mean recovery time from convulsion.

  7. Anticonvulsants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillebrand, Marc; Young, John L.

    1994-01-01

    Anticonvulsants have gained recognition for their beneficial effect in the treatment of aggressive behavior, particularly carbamazepine. Empirical studies of the effectiveness of anticonvulsants in decreasing aggression are reviewed and evaluated, and cost-benefit factors related to the use of anticonvulsants are evaluated. A protocol for the…

  8. Evaluation of anticonvulsant, antimicrobial and hemolytic activity of Aitchisonia rosea

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    Shahid Rasool

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anticonvulsant, antimicrobial and hemolytic effect of Aitchisonia rosea. The anticonvulsant effect was studied at doses 400 and 800 mg/kg against pentylenetetrazole, strychnine and picrotoxin-induced seizures in albino mice. The antimicrobial assay was conducted by disc diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentration. Hemolytic effect was analyzed by reported method. Phenolic compounds present in the n-butanol fraction of the plant were estimated by HPLC. The plant showed maximum response against drug-induced convulsions and provided protection to animals at both doses. It also showed maximum zone of inhibition and highly significant MIC against all bacterial and fungal strains. The plant protected the RBCs from hemolysis. The highest amount of phenolics found was caffeic acid (7.5 ± 0.04.

  9. Anticonvulsive evaluation of THIP in the murine pentylenetetrazole kindling model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Charlotte; Boddum, Kim; von Schoubye, Nadia L

    2017-01-01

    . Evaluation of THIP as a potential anticonvulsant has given contradictory results in different animal models and for this reason, we reevaluated the anticonvulsive properties of THIP in the murine pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) kindling model. As loss of δ-GABAA R in the dentate gyrus has been associated...... the observed upregulation of δ-GABAA Rs. Even in the demonstrated presence of functional δ-GABAA Rs, THIP (0.5-4 mg/kg) showed no anticonvulsive effect in the PTZ kindling model using a comprehensive in vivo evaluation of the anticonvulsive properties....

  10. Anticonvulsant activity of bioflavonoid gossypin

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    Srinivasan Duraisamy

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The anticonvulsant activity of gossypin was investigated by studying the effects on seizures induced by pentelentetrazole, strychnine and maximal electroshock convulsive methods in mice. Gossypin (10 and 20 mg/kg significantly reduced the duration of convulsion in tonic seizure induced by pentelenetetrazole (95 mg/kg, intraperitoneally. Gossypin (20 mg/kg p.o significantly reduced the tonic extensor convulsion induced by strychnine and maximum electroshock-induced convulsions. The data obtained suggest that gossypin have anticonvulsant property and may probably be affecting both GABA aminergic and glycine inhibitory mechanism.

  11. Anticonvulsant activity of bioflavonoid gossypin

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    Duraisami Rasilingam

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The anticonvulsant activity of gossypin was investigated by studying the effects on seizures induced by pentelentetrazole, strychnine and maximal electroshock convulsive methods in mice. Gossypin (10 and 20 mg/kg significantly reduced the duration of convulsion in tonic seizure induced by pentelenetetrazole (95 mg/kg, intraperitoneally. Gossypin (20 mg/kg p.o significantly reduced the tonic extensor convulsion induced by strychnine and maximum electroshock-induced convulsions. The data obtained suggest that gossypin have anticonvulsant property and may probably be affecting both GABA aminergic and glycine inhibitory mechanism.

  12. Molecular Docking and Anticonvulsant Activity of Newly Synthesized Quinazoline Derivatives

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    Hatem A. Abuelizz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A new series of quinazoline-4(3H-ones are evaluated for anticonvulsant activity. After intraperitoneal (ip injection to albino mice at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight, synthesized quinazolin-4(3H-ones (1–24 were examined in the maximal electroshock (MES induced seizures and subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole (scPTZ induced seizure models in mice. The Rotarod method was applied to determine the neurotoxicity. Most of the compounds displayed anticonvulsant activity in the scPTZ screen at a dose range of 0.204–0.376 mmol/mL. Out of twenty-four, compounds 8, 13 and 19 proved to be the most active with a remarkable protection (100% against PTZ induced convulsions and four times more potent activity than ethosuximide. The structure-activity relationship concluded valuable pharmacophoric information, which was confirmed by the molecular docking studies using the target enzyme human carbon anhydrase II (HCA II. The studied quinazoline analogues suggested that the butyl substitution at position 3 has a significant effect on preventing the spread of seizure discharge and on raising the seizure threshold. However, benzyl substitution at position 3 has shown a strong anticonvulsant activity but with less seizure prevention compared to the butyl substitution.

  13. Evaluation of anticonvulsant effects of methanolic extract of Olax ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anticonvulsant activity of MEOS was evaluated in chicks using maximal electroshock test, and in mice using pentylenetetrazole and strychnine-induced seizure models at doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg. The intraperitoneal median lethal dose of MEOS was estimated to be 3800 mg/kg body weight in mice. MEOS at doses ...

  14. Behavioral and electroencephalographic evaluation of the anticonvulsive activity of Moringa oleifera leaf non-polar extracts and one metabolite in PTZ-induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Trujano, María Eva; Martínez-González, Claudia Lizbeth; Flores-Carrillo, Maricela; Luna-Nophal, Sara Ibeth; Contreras-Murillo, Gerardo; Magdaleno-Madrigal, Víctor Manuel

    2018-01-15

    Moringa oleifera Lamarck is a species that has long been used in high demand in folk medicine, including for the treatment of epilepsy. Nevertheless, scientific studies demonstrating its anticonvulsant properties and the nature of the bioactive constituents are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anticonvulsant activities of the Moringa oleifera leaves in non-polar vs. polar extracts using behavioral and electroencephalographic (EEG) analyses in rodents. First, PTZ (80 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced tonic-clonic seizures were assayed via a dose-response (100, 200 and 300 mg/kg, i.p.) evaluation in mice. Then, a dosage of the extracts (100 or 300 mg/kg) and one metabolite (30 mg/kg, i.p.) was selected to evaluate its effect on PTZ (35 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced EEG paroxystic activities in rats compared to the effects of ethosuximide (reference anticonvulsant drug, 100 mg/kg, i.p.). Latent onset of the first paroxystic spike, first seizure and frequency as well as seizure severity, were determined using Racine's scale. Moringa oleifera ethanol and hexane extracts produced a delay in the seizure latency in mice and rats; this effect was improved in the presence of the hexane extract containing the active metabolite hexadecanoic acid. The anticonvulsant effects were corroborated in the spectral analysis by the potency of the EEG due to a reduction in the spike frequency and amplitude, as well as in the duration and severity of the seizures. The effects of the hexane extract resembled those observed in the reference antiepileptic drug ethosuximide. Moringa oleifera leaves possess anticonvulsant activities due to the complementary of the non-polar and polar constituents. However, the non-polar constituents appear to exert an important influence via the partial participation of fatty acids, providing evidence of the effects of this plant in epilepsy therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  15. Evaluation of Analgesic, Anticonvulsant and Hypnotic activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AqPs (100-400mg/kg i.p.) also demonstrated a protective effect against strychnine-induced convulsion. The extract potentiated the hypnotic effect of hexobarbitone following i.p. injection at the dose levels studied. The results suggested that AqPs possesses potential analgesic, anticonvulsive and hypnotic properties.

  16. Anticonvulsant activity of 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranose isolated from leaves of Mangifera indica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanatha, G L; Mohan, C G; Shylaja, H; Yuvaraj, H C; Sunil, V

    2013-07-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the anticonvulsant activity of 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranose (PGG) isolated from methanolic leaf extracts of Mangifera indica in mice. Anticonvulsant activity of PGG was evaluated against pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced and maximal electroshock (MES)-induced convulsions in mice. Additionally, locomotor activity and GABA levels in the brain were estimated to explore the possible CNS-depressant activity and mechanism behind the anticonvulsant activity, respectively. In these studies, PGG (2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal (i.p.)) showed significant and dose-dependent inhibition of PTZ and MES-induced convulsions. Furthermore, PGG administration showed significant decrease in the locomotor activity as an indication of its CNS-depressant property; also, PGG has significantly increased the GABA levels in the cerebellum and whole brain other than the cerebellum. In conclusion, PGG isolated from M. indica showed potent anticonvulsant activity, and possible mechanism may be due to enhanced GABA levels in the brain.

  17. Design, synthesis and evaluation of benzofuran-acetamide scaffold as potential anticonvulsant agent

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    Shakya Ashok K.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A series of N-(2-(benzoyl/4-chlorobenzoyl-benzofuran- 3-yl-2-(substituted-acetamide derivatives (4a-l, 5a-l was synthesized in good yield. All synthesized compounds were in agreement with elemental and spectral data. The anticonvulsant activity of all synthesized compounds was assessed against the maximal electroshock induced seizures (MES model in mice. Neurotoxicity was evaluated using the rotarod method. The majority of compounds exhibited anticonvulsant activity at a dose of 30 mg kg-1 body mass during 0.5-4 h, indicating their ability to prevent seizure spread at low doses. Relative to phenytoin, [N-(2-(4-chlorobenzoylbenzofuran-3-yl-2-(cyclohexyl( methyl amino-acetamide] (5i and [N-(2-(4-chlorobenzoylbenzofuran-3-yl-2-(4-methylpiperidin-1- yl-acetamide] (5c demonstrated comparable relative anticonvulsant potency of 0.74 and 0.72, respectively, whereas [(N-(2-(4-chlorobenzoylbenzofuran-3-yl-2-(4-(furan-2-carbonyl-piperazin-1-yl-acetamide] (5f exhibited the lowest relative potency of 0.16. The ALD50 of tested compounds ranged from 1.604 to 1.675 mmol kg-1 body mass. The ED50 of synthesized compounds ranged from 0.055 to 0.259 mmol kg-1 (~23.4 to 127.6 mg kg-1 body mass. The pharmacophore mapping of the examined compounds on standard drugs (phenobarbital, phenytoin, ralitolin and carbamazepine strongly suggests that these compounds may exert their anticonvulsant activity via the same established mechanism as that of known drugs.

  18. Correlation of [14C]muscimol concentration in rat brain with anticonvulsant activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, W.D.; Intoccia, A.P.; Osborne, V.L.; McCafferty, G.P.

    1981-01-01

    Muscimol, an in vivo and in vitro GABA agonist, has anticonvulsant activity against bicuculline-induced seizures when given systemically to rats. To determine whether parent compound or a metabolite possessed the anticonvulsant activity, experiments were performed with [ 14 C]muscimol. Anticonvulsant activity was determined by the percent of animals protected against tonic forelimb extension induced by bicuculline. Brain and urine were analyzed for unchanged [ 14 C]muscimol by thin-layer chromatography. The time course of anticonvulsant activity and [ 14 C]muscimol concentration in brain after intravenous injection were similar. Peak brain concentration of [ 14 C]muscimol and maximal protection against bicuculline-induced seizures occurred simultaneously. These data suggest that intravenously administered [ 14 C]muscimol rapidly penetrates brain tissue and parent compound is responsible for antagonism of bicuculline-induced convulsions. (Auth.)

  19. Design, synthesis and anticonvulsant activity evaluation of 7-substituted-4H-[1,2,4]triazino[3,4-alpha]phthalazin-4-one derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xian-Yu; Quan, Zhe-Shan [Yanbian Univ., Yanji, Jilin (China). Key Lab. of Organism Functional Factors of the Changbai Mountain; Yanbian Univ., Yanji, Jilin (China). Coll. of Pharmacy; Guan, Li-Ping; Zhang, Lei; Wei, Cheng-Xi; Piao, Hu-Ri [Yanbian Univ., Yanji, Jilin (China). Key Lab. of Organism Functional Factors of the Changbai Mountain

    2009-07-01

    In this study, a novel series of 7-substituted-4H-[1,2,4]triazino[3,4-a]phthalazin-4-one derivatives was synthesized as potential anticonvulsant agents. Their anticonvulsant activities were evaluated by the maximal electroshock (MES) test, and their neurotoxicities were evaluated by the rotarod neurotoxicity test. The pharmacological results showed that 7-hexyloxy-4H-[1,2,4]triazino[3,4-alpha]phthalazin-4-one 4e was the most potent with median effective dose (ED{sub 50}) value of 6.6 mg kg-1, median toxicity dose (TD{sub 50}) of 39.4 mg kg{sup -1}, providing a protective index (PI=TD{sub 50} /ED{sub 50}) value of 6.0. (author)

  20. Role of neurosteroids in the anticonvulsant activity of midazolam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhir, Ashish; Rogawski, Michael A

    2012-04-01

    Midazolam is a short-acting benzodiazepine that is widely used as an i.v. sedative and anticonvulsant. Besides interacting with the benzodiazepine site associated with GABA(A) receptors, some benzodiazepines act as agonists of translocator protein (18 kDa) (TSPO) to enhance the synthesis of steroids, including neurosteroids with positive modulatory actions on GABA(A) receptors. We sought to determine if neurosteroidogenesis induced by midazolam contributes to its anticonvulsant action. Mice were pretreated with neurosteroid synthesis inhibitors and potentiators followed by midazolam or clonazepam, a weak TSPO ligand. Anticonvulsant activity was assessed with the i.v. pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) threshold test. Midazolam (500-5000 µg·kg(-1) , i.p.) caused a dose-dependent increase in seizure threshold. Pretreatment with the neurosteroid synthesis inhibitors finasteride, a 5α-reductase inhibitor, and a functional TSPO antagonist PK 11195, reduced the anticonvulsant action of midazolam. The anticonvulsant action of midazolam was enhanced by the neurosteroidogenic drug metyrapone, an 11β-hydroxylase inhibitor. In contrast, the anticonvulsant action of clonazepam (100 µg·kg(-1) ) was reduced by finasteride but not by PK 11195, indicating a possible contribution of neurosteroids unrelated to TSPO. Enhanced endogenous neurosteroid synthesis, possibly mediated by an interaction with TSPO, contributed to the anticonvulsant action of midazolam. Enhanced neurosteroidogenesis may also be a factor in the actions of other benzodiazepines, even those that only weakly interact with TSPO. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  1. Anticonvulsant activity of Granisetron in Albino mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathisha Aithal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the anticonvulsant activity of  5-HT3 antagonist, granisetron in albino mice. In this study granisetron (0.5mg/kg, i.p. was administered 30 minutes prior to application of electroshock (60mA, 02.seconds or administration of pentylenetetrazole. Granisetron significantly reduced the duration of tonic hind limb extension in maximum electroshock seizure (MES test. In pentylenetetrazole (PTZ test, granisetron delayed the onset and the decreased the duration of convulsions compared to control group. The percentage of animals protected in MES and PTZ  models were 66 and 83 respectively. The results showed that granisetron at dose of 0.5mg possess anticonvulsant activity in both MES and PTZ models.

  2. Coumarin incorporated triazoles: a new class of anticonvulsants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Mashooq A; Al-Omar, Mohammed A

    2011-01-01

    A series of coumarin incorporated 1,2,4- triazole compounds (1-14) were evaluated for their possible anticonvulsant and neurotoxic properties, log P values, pharmacophoric mapping and three dimensional structure analysis. Compound (6) with para-fluoro substitution showed significant anticonvulsant activity.

  3. Evaluation of anticonvulsant activity of methanol leaf extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hymenocardia acida is a plant used in African folkloric medicine in the treatment of headache, rheumatic pain, sickle cell crisis, malaria, epilepsy and cancer. This study was aimed at investigating the anticonvulsant potential of the methanol leaf extract of H. acida (MLEHA) in chicks and mice. Preliminary phytochemical ...

  4. In silico Screening and Evaluation of the Anticonvulsant Activity of Docosahexaenoic Acid-Like Molecules in Experimental Models of Seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharibi Loron, Ali; Sardari, Soroush; Narenjkar, Jamshid; Sayyah, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Resistance to antiepileptic drugs and the intolerability in 20-30% of the patients raises demand for developing new drugs with improved efficacy and safety. Acceptable anticonvulsant activity, good tolerability, and inexpensiveness of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) make it as a good candidate for designing and development of the new anticonvulsant medications. Ten DHA-based molecules were screened based on in silico screening of DHA-like molecules by root-mean-square deviation of atomic positions, the biological activity score of Professional Association for SQL Server, and structural requirements suggested by pharmacophore design. Anticonvulsant activity was tested against clonic seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ, 60 mg/kg, i.p.) and tonic seizures induced by maximal electroshock (MES, 50 mA, 50 Hz, 1 ms duration) by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of the screened compounds to mice. Among screened compounds, 4-Phenylbutyric acid, 4-Biphenylacetic acid, phenylacetic acid, and 2-Phenylbutyric acid showed significant protective activity in pentylenetetrazole test with ED50 values of 4, 5, 78, and 70 mM, respectively. In MES test, shikimic acid and 4-tert-Butylcyclo-hexanecarboxylic acid showed significant activity with ED50 values 29 and 637 mM, respectively. Effective compounds had no mortality in mice up to the maximum i.c.v. injectable dose of 1 mM. Common electrochemical features and three-dimensional spatial structures of the effective compounds suggest the involvement of the anticonvulsant mechanisms similar to the parent compound DHA.

  5. Synthesis, Anticonvulsant, Sedative and Anxiolytic Activities of Novel Annulated Pyrrolo[1,4]benzodiazepines

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    Kumaraswamy Sorra

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Four new pentacyclic benzodiazepine derivatives (PBDTs 13–16 were synthesized by conventional thermal heating and microwave-assisted intramolecular cyclocondensation. Their anticonvulsant, sedative and anxiolytic activities were evaluated by drug-induced convulsion models, a pentobarbital-induced hypnotic model and an elevated plus maze in mice. PBDT 13, a triazolopyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepin-8-one fused with a thiadiazolone ring, exhibited the best anticonvulsant, sedative and anxiolytic effects in our tests. There was no significant difference in potency between PBDT 13 and diazepam, and we proposed that the action mechanism of PBDT 13 could be similar to that of diazepam via benzodiazepine receptors.

  6. Anticonvulsant use after formulary status change for brand-name second-generation anticonvulsants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hemal; Toe, Diana C; Burke, Shawn; Rasu, Rafia S

    2010-08-01

    Anticonvulsant medications are commonly used for off-label indications. However, managed care organizations can restrict utilization of medication to indicated uses only. To evaluate the pattern of off-label use of second-generation anticonvulsants after implementing a formulary change. We did a retrospective analysis of an administrative pharmacy claims database for a managed care plan with more than 1 million members continuously enrolled during 2004-2005. The study evaluated off-label use and explored pharmacy utilization patterns (by physician specialty, region, plan type, age, sex, copayment) across the study population following the formulary change. A total of 10,185 patients had at least 1 pharmacy claim (total of 137,638 claims) for a second-generation anticonvulsant during the study period. Most members were female (68%), and 4.9% were anticonvulsants prescribed for off-label use in 2004 and 2005, respectively (P = .162). The off-label usage pattern varied for individual anticonvulsants in 2004 and 2005 (P anticonvulsants for off-label uses, followed by neurologists (9.4%), psychiatrists (2.8%), and other (46.5%). The coverage change resulted in cost savings for the plan of $0.16 per member per month. The off-label usage pattern varied for individual anticonvulsants in 2004 and 2005. Future considerations for controlling off-label use may include requiring prior authorization and provider education.

  7. Anticonvulsant effect of AMP by direct activation of adenosine A1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzzi, Mirko; Coppi, Elisabetta; Pugliese, Anna Maria; Chiarugi, Alberto

    2013-12-01

    Purinergic neurotransmission mediated by adenosine (Ado) type 1 receptors (A1Rs) plays pivotal roles in negative modulation of epileptic seizures, and Ado is thought to be a key endogenous anticonvulsant. Recent evidence, however, indicates that AMP, the metabolic precursor of Ado, also activate A1Rs. Here, we evaluated the antiepileptic effects of AMP adopting in vitro and in vivo models of epilepsy. We report that AMP reversed the increase in population spike (PS) amplitude and the decrease in PS latency induced by a Mg(2+)-free extracellular solution in CA1 neurons of mouse hippocampal slices. The AMP effects were inhibited by the A1R antagonist DPCPX, but not prevented by inhibiting conversion of AMP into Ado, indicating that AMP inhibited per se sustained hippocampal excitatory neurotransmission by directly activating A1Rs. AMP also reduced seizure severity and mortality in a model of audiogenic convulsion. Of note, the anticonvulsant effects of AMP were potentiated by preventing its conversion into Ado and inhibited by DPCPX. When tested in a model of kainate-induced seizure, AMP prolonged latency of convulsions but had no effects on seizure severity and mortality. Data provide the first evidence that AMP is an endogenous anticonvulsant acting at A1Rs. © 2013.

  8. [Effect of psychotropic drugs on activity of anticonvulsants in maximal electroshock test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alikina, N A; Tregubov, A L; Kotegov, V P

    2010-08-01

    The effect ofpsychotropic drugs on the pharmacological properties of anticonvulsants was studied on white mice under maximal electroshock (ME) test conditions. Changes in the anticonvulsant effect of phenobarbital, diphenin, carbamazepine, hexamidine were traced upon their joint administration with psychotropic drugs, including piracetam, aminalon, amitriptyline, imizine, levomepromazine, and lithium oxybutyrate. An important result of research is the fact, that in no one of combinations the basic pharmacological effect of anticonvulsants was decreased. Based on the results of experiments, the most rational combinations of anticonvulsants with psychotropic preparations were revealed as manifested in the ME test. As criterion of rational combination was the increase in the activity of anticonvulsants and reduction of their toxicity in combination or at least invariance of this parameter. Rational combinations include (i) phenobarbital with piracetam, amitriptyline, levomepromazine, and lithium oxybutyrate; (ii) carbamazepine with piracetam; and (iii) hexamidine with amitriptyline, levomepromazine and imizine.

  9. Anticonvulsant activity of methanolic extract from Kalanchoe pinnata Lam. stems and roots in mice: A comparison to diazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Pérez, A; Hernández-Medel, M del R

    2016-04-01

    In ancient and current traditional medicine in México, extracts from the leaves or whole plant of 'life leaf' (Kalanchoe pinnata [K. pinnata]Lam) have been used to treat an entity known locally as 'yellow epilepsy' (alferecía amarilla) when it is accompanied by seizures. However, the anticonvulsive activity of its stems and roots remains unexplored The anticonvulsant activity of the methanolic root extract (MER) or stem (MES) of K. pinnata Lam. was evaluated in a pentylenetetrazol-induced seizure model in Balb/C mice, and effects were compared to those of diazepam. The stem extract fractions that produced anticonvulsant activity were subsequently evaluated using the pentylenetetrazol -induced seizure model. We observed increased latency of tonic-clonic seizures that was inversely proportional to the dose of MRE, with a similar impact on the lethal effects of pentylenetetrazol. Different doses of the MSE showed a dose-dependent increase in latency to myoclonus, clonus, and tonic-clonic seizures, acting similarly to diazepam and offering 100% protection against the lethal effects of pentylenetetrazol. Fractioning MSE decreased its effectiveness, but when fractions were mixed with fractions of chloroform and ethyl acetate, anticonvulsive activity was restored. The preliminary phytochemical analysis identified alkaloids and sterols in MRE, and sterols and terpenes in MSE CONCLUSIONS: The anticonvulsant activity of K. pinnata Lam. decreases with increased doses of MRE, whereas the effect of MSE is dose-dependent and preserved in the mixture chloroform and ethyl acetate. We suggest that the metabolites responsible for these effects are sterols in MRE, and sterols and terpenes in MSE. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Synthesis and evaluation of 3-[(2,4-dioxo-1,3,8-triazaspiro[4.6]undec-3-yl)methyl]benzonitrile derivatives as potential anticonvulsants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaiah, Malavalli; Prashanth, Maralekere K; Revanasiddappa, Hosakere D; Veeresh, Bantal

    2013-03-01

    New 3-[(2,4-dioxo-1,3,8-triazaspiro[4.6]undec-3-yl)methyl]benzonitrile derivatives 8-37 were synthesized and their pharmacological activities were determined with the objective to better understand their structure-activity relationship (SAR) for anticonvulsant activity. All the compounds were evaluated for their possible anticonvulsant activity by maximal electroshock seizure (MES) and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) test. Compounds 11, 18, 31, and 32 showed significant and protective effect on seizure, when compared with the standard drug valproate. The same compounds were found to exhibit advanced anticonvulsant activity as well as lower neurotoxicity than the reference drug. From this study, it is quite apparent that there are at least three parameters for the activity of anticonvulsant drugs, that is, a lipophilic domain, a hydrophobic center, and a two-electron donor. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Comparative Anticonvulsant Study of Epoxycarvone Stereoisomers

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    Paula Regina Rodrigues Salgado

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Stereoisomers of the monoterpene epoxycarvone (EC, namely (+-cis-EC, (−-cis-EC, (+-trans-EC, and (−-trans-EC, were comparatively evaluated for anticonvulsant activity in specific methodologies. In the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ-induced anticonvulsant test, all of the stereoisomers (at 300 mg/kg increased the latency to seizure onset, and afforded 100% protection against the death of the animals. In the maximal electroshock-induced seizures (MES test, prevention of tonic seizures was also verified for all of the isomers tested. However, the isomeric forms (+ and (−-trans-EC showed 25% and 12.5% inhibition of convulsions, respectively. In the pilocarpine-induced seizures test, all stereoisomers demonstrated an anticonvulsant profile, yet the stereoisomers (+ and (−-trans-EC (at 300 mg/kg showed a more pronounced effect. A strychnine-induced anticonvulsant test was performed, and none of the stereoisomers significantly increased the latency to onset of convulsions; the stereoisomers probably do not act in this pathway. However, the stereoisomers (+-cis-EC and (+-trans-EC greatly increased the latency to death of the animals, thus presenting some protection. The four EC stereoisomers show promise for anticonvulsant activity, an effect emphasized in the isomers (+-cis-EC, (+-trans-EC, and (−-trans-EC for certain parameters of the tested methodologies. These results serve as support for further research and development of antiepileptic drugs from monoterpenes.

  12. Evaluation of Anti-Convulsant Activity of Methanolic Extract of Seeds of Cassia Fistula against Pentylenetetrazole induced convulsions in mice

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    Nilesh P. Sawadadkar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cassia Fistula is a popular Indian herb which is used as tonic, laxative, anti-pyretic, astringent, febrifuge, strong purgative etc. The aim of present study was to evaluate anticonvulsant activity of methanolic extract of seeds of Cassia Fistula against pentylenetetrazol (PTZ induced convulsions in mice. All the animals were divided into four groups of six mice each and were injected PTZ (60mg/kg intraperitonially Group I was served as toxic control, Group II was pretreated with  Gabapentin (200mg/kg P.O.. Group III was pretreated with  methanolic extract of seeds of Cassia Fistula (100 mg/kg P.O. for 7 days. Group IV was pretreated with  methanolic extract of seeds of Cassia Fistula (200mg/kg P.O. for 7 days.The result shows that methanolic extract of seeds of Cassia Fistula significantly reduced duration of clonic convulsions and also delayed the onset of convulsions induced by pentylenetetrazol. The result was expressed as mean ± SEM and were statistically analyzed by one way ANOVA. It is concluded that methanolic extract of seeds of Cassia Fistula can show anticonvulsant activity against pentylenetetrazol induced convulsions in mice.

  13. Anti-Convulsant Activity of Boerhaavia diffusa: Plausible Role of Calcium Channel Antagonism

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    Mandeep Kaur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available “Ethnopharmacological” use of roots of Boerhaavia diffusa (B. diffusa in the treatment of epilepsy in Nigerian folk medicine and reports showing the presence of a calcium channel antagonistic compound “liriodendrin” in its roots, led us to undertake the present study. The study was designed to investigate the methanolic root extract of B. diffusa and its different fractions including liriodendrin-rich fraction for exploring the possible role of liriodendrin in its anti-convulsant activity. Air-dried roots of B. diffusa were extracted with methanol by cold maceration. The methanol soluble fraction of extract thus obtained was successively extracted to obtain liriodendrin-rich fraction and two side fractions, that is, chloroform fraction and phenolic compound fraction. Anti-convulsant activity of methanolic extract (1000, 1500 and 2000 mg kg-1, intraperitoneally (i.p. and its different fractions, that is, liriodendrin-rich fraction (10, 20 and 40 mg kg-1, i.p., chloroform fraction (20 mg kg-1, i.p. and phenolic compound fraction (1 mg kg-1, i.p. were studied in pentylenetetrazol (PTZ-induced seizures (75 mg kg-1, i.p.. The crude methanolic extract of B. diffusa and only its liriodendrin-rich fraction showed a dose-dependent protection against PTZ-induced convulsions. The liriodendrin-rich fraction also showed significant protection against seizures induced by BAY k-8644. These findings reiterated the anti-convulsant activity of methanolic extract of B. diffusa roots. Furthermore, it can be concluded that the observed anti-convulsant activity was due to its calcium channel antagonistic action as this activity was retained only in the liodendrin-rich fraction, which has additionally been confirmed by significant anti-convulsant activity of liriodendrin-rich fraction in BAY k-8644-induced seizures.

  14. Anticonvulsant activity of Bacopa monniera in rodents

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    Darpan Kaushik

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacopa monnieri (L, belonging to the Scrophulariaceae family and commonly known as Brahmi, is well known in India for its CNS activity but its neuropharmacological effect has not yet been explored. In the present study, the antiepileptic effects of the plant were investigated. The ethanolic extract of Bacopa monniera was tested for anticonvulsant activity in albino rats, using different convulsive models. The ethanolic extract of leaves produced significant anticonvulsant activity for all the different models studied. The present study shows a probable mechanism of action similar to that of benzodiazepines (GABA agonist. Thus, these results emphasize the need to diversify by using alternative therapeutic approaches pertaining to herbal medicine, where a single easily available plant may provide solutions to several therapeutic challenges, as observed in the anticonvulsant action of ethanolic extract of B. monniera.Bacopa monniera, da família Scrophulariaceae, e comumente denominada Brahmi, é bem conhecida na Índia por sua atividade no Sistema Nervoso Central, mas seu efeito neurofarmacológico não foi, ainda, explorado. No presente estudo, investigaram-se os efeitos antiepilépticos da planta. O extrato etanólico da Bacopa monniera foi testado quanto à atividade anticonvulsivante em ratos albinos, utilizando-se diferentes modelos de convulsão. O extrato etanólico das folhas produziu atividade anticonvulsivante significativa para todos os diferentes modelos estudados. O presente estudo mostra provável mecanismo de ação semelhante ao dos benzodiazepínicos (agonista do GABA. Assim sendo, esses resultados enfatizam a necessidade de diversificar, utilizando-se abordagens terapêuticas alternativas da medicina natural, em que uma planta facilmente disponível pode fornecer soluções para vários desafios terapêuticos, como o observado na ação anticonvulsivante do extrato etanólico de Bacopa monniera.

  15. Application of Green Chemistry Principle in Synthesis of Phenytoin and Its Biogical Evaluation as Anticonvulsant Agents

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    Abhijit Kadam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenytoin (5,5'-dipenylimidazolidine-2,4-dione is the prime example of anticonvulsant agent. According to reported procedure, it is synthesized by condensation of benzil and urea in presence of base (30% w/v NaOH using ethanol as solvent which itself acts as CNS stimulant. Removal of solvent after synthesis is most difficult and non-assured process. In case of phenytoin transformation in polymorphism plays an important role when solvent other than water is used. About 30% extra cost is calculated if solvent other than water is used. Therefore by application of green chemistry principle phenytoin was synthesized by condensation of benzil and urea in presence of base (30% NaOH and water as green solvent. This compound was characterized on the basis of its spectral (IR, 1H NMR data and evaluated for anticonvulsant activity using MES induced and PTZ induced seizure models in Swiss albino mice. Significant anticonvulsant activity was found by using 25 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg of phenytoin compared with standard phenytoin at 25 mg/kg dose.

  16. Preliminary Screening of a Classical Ayurvedic Formulation for Anticonvulsant Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Arnab; Maurya, Santosh Kumar; Mishra, Ashish; Singh, Gireesh Kumar; Singh, Manoj Kumar; Seth, Ankit

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a serious and complex central nervous system disorder associated with recurrent episodes of convulsive seizures due to the imbalance between excitatory (glutamatergic) and inhibitory (GABAergic) neurotransmitters level in the brain. The available treatments are neither competent to control the seizures nor prevent progress of disease. Since ages, Herbal medicines have remained important sources of medicines in many parts of world which is evidenced through their uses in traditional systems of medicine i.e. Ayurveda, Siddha, Unani, Homeopathy and Chinese etc. A polyherbal formulation (containing Terminalia chebula Retz., Asparagus racemosus Willd., Embelia ribes Burm. F, Acorus calamus L., Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Miers, Convolvulus pluricaulis Choisy, Saussurea lappa C.B.Clarke, Achyranthes aspera L.) is mentioned in Ayurvedic classics Bhaiṣajya Ratnāvali . The aim of the study was to evaluate the anticonvulsant activity of the formulation in Maximum electroshock and Pentylenetetrazole induced convulsions in rats. In the present study, a polyherbal formulation was developed as directed by classical text and evaluated for the anticonvulsant activity using Maximal Electroshock Shock (MES) and Pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced convulsions in rats. Statistical comparison was done by one way ANOVA followed by the Tukey's multiple comparison test. The obtained results showed that the PHF had a protective role on epilepsy. Treatment with PHF significantly improves antioxidant enzymes activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) levels significantly as compared to controls. PHF also significantly decreased malonaldialdehyde (MDA) levels in the brain. Moreover, it also attenuated the PTZ-induced increase in the activity of GABA-T in the rat brain. These findings suggest that PHF might have possible efficacy in the treatment of epilepsy.

  17. Design, synthesis, molecular docking and anticonvulsant evaluation of novel 6-iodo-2-phenyl-3-substituted-quinazolin-4(3H-ones

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    Mohamed-Kamal Ibrahim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A new series of 6-iodo-2-phenyl-3-substituted-quinazolin-4(3H-one (5–12a–b derivatives were synthesized, evaluated for their anticonvulsant activity against pentylenetetrazole (PTZ-induced seizures and maximal electroshock test and compared with the reference drugs phenobarbital sodium and methaqualone. The neurotoxicity was assessed using rotarod test. The molecular docking was performed for all the synthesized compounds to assess their binding affinities to GABA-A receptor in order to rationalize their anticonvulsant activities in a qualitative way. The data obtained from the molecular modeling were correlated with those obtained from the biological screening. Compounds 9a, 9b, 12a and 7a showed the highest anticonvulsant activities of this series with relatively low neurotoxicity and low toxicity in the median lethal dose test when compared with the reference drugs. The obtained results proved that the most active compounds could be a useful model for future design, adaptation and investigation to construct more active analogs.

  18. [The original nootropic and neuroprotective drug noopept potentiates the anticonvulsant activity of valproate in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, E V; Ponteleeva, I V; Trofimov, S S; Lapa, V I; Ostrovskaia, R U; Voronina, T A

    2009-01-01

    The influence of the original dipeptide drug noopept, known to possess nootrope, neuroprotector, and anxiolytic properties, on the anticonvulsant activity of the antiepileptic drug valproate has been studied on the model of corazole-induced convulsions in mice. Neither a single administration of noopept (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) nor its repeated introduction in 10 or 35 days enhanced the convulsant effect of corazole, which is evidence that noopept alone does not possess anticonvulsant properties. Prolonged (five weeks) preliminary administration of noopept enhanced the anticonvulsant activity of valproate. This result justifies the joint chronic administration of noopept in combination with valproate in order to potentiate the anticonvulsant effect of the latter drug. In addition, the administration of noopept favorably influences the cognitive functions and suppresses the development of neurodegenerative processes.

  19. Screening of the anticonvulsant activity of some plants from Fabaceae family in experimental seizure models in mice

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    S Sardari

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available "n  Background and purpose of the study: Fabaceae is the third largest family of flowering plants. Lack of essential oils in the plants of this family can be an advantage in search for safe and effective medicines. In this study the anticonvulsant effect of the leaves of Albizzia julibrissin, Acacia juliflora, Acacia nubica and aerial parts of Astragalus obtusifolius was evaluated in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ and maximal electroshock (MES seizure tests. "n  Methods: The hydroalcoholic extracts of the plants were obtained by percolation. Different doses of the extracts were injected to the mice intraperitoneally (i.p. and occurrence of clonic seizures induced by PTZ (60 mg/kg, i.p. or tonic seizures induced by MES (50 mA, 50Hz, 1sec were monitored up to 30 min after administration. Acute toxicity of the extracts was also assessed. The safe and effective extract was then fractionated by dichloromethane and anticonvulsant activity of the fractions was determined. Finally, the constituents of the extract and the fractions were screened by thin layer chromatography. "n  Results: Among the extracts, only A. obtusifolius extract showed low toxicity and protective effect against clonic seizures with ED50 value of 3.97 g/kg. Fractionation of the extract led to increase in anticonvulsant activity and ED50 value of 2.86 g/kg was obtained for the aqueous fraction. Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, anthrones and saponins in the aqueous fraction. "n  Major conclusion: The presence of anticonvulsant compounds in A. obtusifolius suggests further activity-guided fractionation and analytical studies to find out the potential of this plant as a source of anticonvulsant agent.

  20. Anticonvulsant evaluation of Rauvolfia ligustrina Willd. ex Roem. & Schult., Apocynaceae, in rodents

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    Lucindo J. Quintans-Júnior

    Full Text Available The Aim of this study was to evaluated the effects of the ethanol extract of Rauvolfia ligustrina Willd. ex Roem. & Schult., Apocynaceae, roots (EER in animal models of epilepsy. The EER increased the latency for convulsions significantly different from control (p<0,05 and in the PTZ induced convulsions test on 62,5 mg/kg (i.p. decreased mortality. This effect was blocked by flumazenil administration, suggesting an involvement of GABAergic system in the anticonvulsant activity of EER. The EER had a moderate effect only against PIC- or STR-induced convulsions at doses 125 and 250 mg/kg. But in the MES test it did not demonstrate effect on this animal model. Therefore, the EER reduced the development of PTZ-induced kindling in both experimental groups. It also significantly (p<0.05 decreased the latency for convulsions and reduced its percentage. Our results suggest that EER owns anticonvulsant property.

  1. Anticonvulsant activity of the ethanolic extract of Punica granatum L. seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrzadi, Saeed; Sadr, Samir; Hosseinzadeh, Azam; Gholamine, Babak; Shahbazi, Ali; FallahHuseini, Hasan; Ghaznavi, Habib

    2015-06-01

    Various morphological parts of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) have extensively been used in the folk medicine to treat an array of human ailments. The aim of the present study is to demonstrate the anticonvulsant potential of the ethanolic extract of P. granatum L. seed in chemoconvulsant-induced seizures in mice. The anticonvulsant activity of the ethanolic extract was investigated in strychnine (STR)-induced and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizure models in mice. Diazepam was used as reference anticonvulsant drug. Ethanolic extract (150, 300, and 600 mg/kg per os, p.o.), diazepam (1 mg/kg intraperitoneally, i.p.), and distilled water (10 ml/kg, i.p.) were administered before induction of seizures by PTZ (60 mg/kg, i.p.) or STR (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.). The latent time before the onset of convulsions, the duration of convulsions, the percentage of seizure protection, and mortality rate were recorded. The seed ethanolic extract did not show any toxicity and did not protect the animals against seizures but demonstrated a significant increase in seizure latency at 300 and 600 mg/kg in both STR and PTZ seizure models (P < 0.001). It also showed a significant reduction in seizure duration at 300 mg/kg (P < 0.05) and 600 mg/kg (P < 0.001) in the STR seizure model and 600 mg/kg (P < 0.01) in the PTZ seizure model compared with the control group. Ethanol extract has dose-dependent anticonvulsant activity against STR- and PTZ-induced seizures. This activity might be due to its saponins, flavonoids, triterpenes, and alkaloids ingredients.

  2. Anticonvulsant activity of DNS II fraction in the acute seizure models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Muhammad Liaquat; Zeeshan, Mohammad; Ahmad, Manzoor; Shaheen, Farzana; Simjee, Shabana U

    2010-04-21

    Delphinium nordhagenii belongs to family Ranunculaceae, it is widely found in tropical areas of Pakistan. Other species of Delphinium are reported as anticonvulsant and are traditionally used in the treatment of epilepsy. Delphinium nordhagenii is used by local healer in Pakistan but never used for scientific investigation as anticonvulsant. Thus, Delphinium nordhagenii was subjected to bioassay-guided fractionation and the most active fraction, i.e. DNS II acetone was chosen for further testing in the acute seizure models of epilepsy to study the antiepileptic potential in male mice. Different doses (60, 65 and 70mg/kg, i.p.) of DNS II acetone fraction of Delphinium nordhagenii was administered 30min prior the chemoconvulsant's injection in the male mice. Convulsive doses of chemoconvulsants (pentylenetetrazole 90mg/kg, s.c. and picrotoxin 3.15mg/kg, s.c.) were used. The mice were observed 45-90min for the presence of seizures. Moreover, four different doses of DNS II (60, 65, 70 and 100mg/kg, i.p.) were tested in the MES test. The DNS II acetone fraction of Delphinium nordhagenii has exhibited the anticonvulsant actions by preventing the seizures against PTZ- and picrotoxin-induced seizure as well as 100% seizure protection in MES test. The results are comparable with standard AEDs (diazepam 7.5mg/kg, i.p. and phenytoin 20mg/kg, i.p.). These findings suggest that the Delphinium nordhagenii possesses the anticonvulsant activity. Further analysis is needed to confirm the structure and target the extended activity profile. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Preliminary Screening of a Classical Ayurvedic Formulation for Anticonvulsant Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnab Dhar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epilepsy is a serious and complex central nervous system disorder associated with recurrent episodes of convulsive seizures due to the imbalance between excitatory (glutamatergic and inhibitory (GABAergic neurotransmitters level in the brain. The available treatments are neither competent to control the seizures nor prevent progress of disease. Since ages, Herbal medicines have remained important sources of medicines in many parts of world which is evidenced through their uses in traditional systems of medicine i.e. Ayurveda, Siddha, Unani, Homeopathy and Chinese etc. Aim: A polyherbal formulation (containing Terminalia chebula Retz., Asparagus racemosus Willd., Embelia ribes Burm. F, Acorus calamus L., Tinospora cordifolia (Willd. Miers, Convolvulus pluricaulis Choisy, Saussurea lappa C.B.Clarke, Achyranthes aspera L. is mentioned in Ayurvedic classics Bhaiṣajya Ratnāvali. The aim of the study was to evaluate the anticonvulsant activity of the formulation in Maximum electroshock and Pentylenetetrazole induced convulsions in rats. Materials and Methods: In the present study, a polyherbal formulation was developed as directed by classical text and evaluated for the anticonvulsant activity using Maximal Electroshock Shock (MES and Pentylenetetrazole (PTZ induced convulsions in rats. Statistical comparison was done by one way ANOVA followed by the Tukey's multiple comparison test. Results: The obtained results showed that the PHF had a protective role on epilepsy. Treatment with PHF significantly improves antioxidant enzymes activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione (GSH levels significantly as compared to controls. PHF also significantly decreased malonaldialdehyde (MDA levels in the brain. Moreover, it also attenuated the PTZ-induced increase in the activity of GABA-T in the rat brain. Conclusion: These findings suggest that PHF might have possible efficacy in the treatment of epilepsy.

  4. Anticonvulsants for alcohol withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minozzi, Silvia; Amato, Laura; Vecchi, Simona; Davoli, Marina

    2010-03-17

    Alcohol abuse and dependence represents a most serious health problem worldwide with major social, interpersonal and legal interpolations. Besides benzodiazepines, anticonvulsants are often used for the treatment of alcohol withdrawal symptoms. Anticonvulsants drugs are indicated for the treatment of alcohol withdrawal syndrome, alone or in combination with benzodiazepine treatments. In spite of the wide use, the exact role of the anticonvulsants for the treatment of alcohol withdrawal has not yet bee adequately assessed. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of anticonvulsants in the treatment of alcohol withdrawal. We searched Cochrane Drugs and Alcohol Group' Register of Trials (December 2009), PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL (1966 to December 2009), EconLIT (1969 to December 2009). Parallel searches on web sites of health technology assessment and related agencies, and their databases. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examining the effectiveness, safety and overall risk-benefit of anticonvulsants in comparison with a placebo or other pharmacological treatment. All patients were included regardless of age, gender, nationality, and outpatient or inpatient therapy. Two authors independently screened and extracted data from studies. Fifty-six studies, with a total of 4076 participants, met the inclusion criteria. Comparing anticonvulsants with placebo, no statistically significant differences for the six outcomes considered.Comparing anticonvulsant versus other drug, 19 outcomes considered, results favour anticonvulsants only in the comparison carbamazepine versus benzodiazepine (oxazepam and lorazepam) for alcohol withdrawal symptoms (CIWA-Ar score): 3 studies, 262 participants, MD -1.04 (-1.89 to -0.20), none of the other comparisons reached statistical significance.Comparing different anticonvulsants no statistically significant differences in the two outcomes considered.Comparing anticonvulsants plus other drugs versus other drugs (3 outcomes considered), results

  5. Sedative and Anticonvulsant Activities of the Ethanol Root Extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the sedative, hypnotic and anticonvulsant activities of the ethanol extract of the roots of the Flemingia chappar (ERFC) on the central nervous system (CNS) of mice. Methods: The ..... Higher extract doses (400 and.

  6. Synthesis and anticonvulsant activity of Schiff’s bases of 3-{[2-({(E-[(substituted phenyl] methylidene} amino ethyl] amino} quinoxalin-2(1H-one

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratnadeep V. Ghadage

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to develop potent anticonvulsant agents, we have synthesized some novel schiff’s bases of 3-{[2-({(E-[substituted phenyl] methylidene} amino ethyl] amino} quinoxalin-2(1H-one and evaluated for in vivo anticonvulsant activity. All the compounds were characterized by IR, 1H NMR data. This activity was carried out on pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure model. Compounds (IIIb and (IIIc Showed maximum time for straub tail and clonic convulsions. That means they possess good activity compared with standard. Animals treated with compounds (IIIb and (IIIe were recovered from this activity.

  7. Staged anticonvulsant screening for chronic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdichevsky, Yevgeny; Saponjian, Yero; Park, Kyung-Il; Roach, Bonnie; Pouliot, Wendy; Lu, Kimberly; Swiercz, Waldemar; Dudek, F Edward; Staley, Kevin J

    2016-12-01

    Current anticonvulsant screening programs are based on seizures evoked in normal animals. One-third of epileptic patients do not respond to the anticonvulsants discovered with these models. We evaluated a tiered program based on chronic epilepsy and spontaneous seizures, with compounds advancing from high-throughput in vitro models to low-throughput in vivo models. Epileptogenesis in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures was quantified by lactate production and lactate dehydrogenase release into culture media as rapid assays for seizure-like activity and cell death, respectively. Compounds that reduced these biochemical measures were retested with in vitro electrophysiological confirmation (i.e., second stage). The third stage involved crossover testing in the kainate model of chronic epilepsy, with blinded analysis of spontaneous seizures after continuous electrographic recordings. We screened 407 compound-concentration combinations. The cyclooxygenase inhibitor, celecoxib, had no effect on seizures evoked in normal brain tissue but demonstrated robust antiseizure activity in all tested models of chronic epilepsy. The use of organotypic hippocampal cultures, where epileptogenesis occurs on a compressed time scale, and where seizure-like activity and seizure-induced cell death can be easily quantified with biomarker assays, allowed us to circumvent the throughput limitations of in vivo chronic epilepsy models. Ability to rapidly screen compounds in a chronic model of epilepsy allowed us to find an anticonvulsant that would be missed by screening in acute models.

  8. Anticonvulsant action of gamma-irradiated diazepam with correlation to certain brain amino acids and electrocorticogram activity in experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saad, S.F.; Roushdy, H.M.; Hassan, S.H.M.; Elkashef, H.S.; Mahdy, A.M.; Elsayeh, B.M.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of sterilization by gamma irradiation (215 KGy) of diazepam on is anticonvulsant action, on norma and depleted cerebral gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), on glutamic acid, as well as electrocorticogram activity (ECOG) was determined in the experimental animals. For the evaluation of the anticonvulsant action of either diazepam (D) or irradiated diazepam (ID), pentyl ene tetrazole seizure test, was used and the protective dose 50 (PD50) was determined in adult male mice. GABA, the main central inhibitory transmitter which is implicated in the mechanism of the anticonvulsant action of D and its precursor glutamic acid, were electrophoretically separated and spectrophotometrical evaluated. Moreover, brain electrical activity was recorded using an electroencephalograph apparatus. Although the PD50 of ID as well the effect on normal brain cerebral GABA and glutamic acids did not differ significantly from that of D, yet there was certain variabilities. Thus, the effect of D was about 4 times more potent than the ID on elevating depleted cerebral GABA. Also, electrocorticogram records demonstrated that D produced a slight inhibition while ID induced a decrease in B rhythm with remarkable in the amplitude of ECOG waves. The same pattern of effects were obtained when D or ID were used in combination with INH (250 mg kg-1). 1 tab. 1 fig

  9. Anticonvulsant Activity of Argyreia speciosa in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyawahare, N S; Bodhankar, S L

    2009-03-01

    Argyreia speciosa commonly known as Vridha daraka in Sanskrit is one of the important plants used in indigenous system of medicine. The root is regarded as an alternative tonic and useful in the diseases of nervous system. To confirm the veracity of aforementioned claim, we have evaluated the anticonvulsant effect of the extract. In this investigation, the mice were pretreated with different doses of Argyreia speciosa extract (100, 200, 400 mg/kg) for 10 days and then, they were subjected to either pentylenetetrazole (80 mg/kg) or maximal electroshock seizures (50 mA, 0.2 s) treatment. The hydroalcoholic extract of Argyreia speciosa at the dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg significantly delayed the latency to the onset of first clonus as well as onset of death in unprotected mice and exhibited protection in 16.66% and 33.33% of pentylenetetrazole treated mice respectively. Whereas in case of maximal electroshock-seizures, the dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg significantly reduced the duration of hind limb extension and both the doses were statistically found to be equipotent. The reference standards, clonazepam (0.1 mg/kg) and phenytoin (20 mg/kg) provided complete protection. Thus, present study revealed anticonvulsant effect of Argyreia speciosa against pentylenetetrazole- and maximal electroshock-induced convulsions in mice.

  10. Lysine and pipecolic acid and some of their derivatives show anticonvulsant activity, and stimulation of benzodiazepine receptor activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Yung-Feng; Gao, Xue-Min

    1989-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are one of the most widely prescribed drugs in the treatment of anxiety, epilepsy and muscle tension. The natural products lysine and pipecolic acid known to be present in the animal, plant and microorganism, have been shown to be anticonvulsant against pentetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures in mice. Methyl and ethyl esters of L-lysine and the N-isopropanol derivative of pipecolic acid appear to increase the anticonvulsant potency of the parent compounds, presumably due to their increase in hydrophobicity. Lysine and pipecolic acid showed significant stimulation of specific [ 3 H]flunitrazepam (FZ) binding to mouse brain membranes. This stimulation was enhanced by chloride ions and stereospecific with L-isomer having higher effect. The dose-dependent anticonvulsant activity of lysine and pipecolic acid, and their stimulation of [ 3 H]FZ binding appear to be correlated. The antiepileptic activity lysine, pipecolic acid and their derivatives therefore may be mediated through the γ-aminobutyric acid-benzodiazepine receptor complex

  11. Studies on anticonvulsant agents. Achievements and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, Sh; Shukla, Sh; Pandey, D; Srivastava, R S

    2011-01-01

    The data published over the past 15 years on the search for newer anticonvulsant drugs are generalized. Pyrrolidinedione, quinazolinone, xanthone, hydrazine and thiadiazole derivatives manifesting anticonvulsant activity in model in vivo tests in rodents are considered.

  12. Studies on anticonvulsant agents. Achievements and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Sh; Shukla, Sh; Pandey, D; Srivastava, R S

    2011-02-28

    The data published over the past 15 years on the search for newer anticonvulsant drugs are generalized. Pyrrolidinedione, quinazolinone, xanthone, hydrazine and thiadiazole derivatives manifesting anticonvulsant activity in model in vivo tests in rodents are considered.

  13. Synthesis and Pharmacological Evaluation of Novel Benzenesulfonamide Derivatives as Potential Anticonvulsant Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiming Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel series of benzenesulfonamide derivatives containing 4-aminobenzenesul-fonamide and α-amides branched valproic acid or 2,2-dimethylcyclopropanecarboxylic acid moieties were synthesized and screened for their anticonvulsant activities in mice maximal electroshock seizure (MES and subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole (scPTZ test. The activity experimental study showed that 2,2-dipropyl-N1-(4-sulfamoylphenylmalonamide (18b had the lowest median effective dose (ED50 of 16.36 mg/kg in MES test, and 2,2-dimethyl-N-(4-sulfamoylphenylcyclopropane-1,1-dicarboxamide (12c had the lowest ED50 of 22.50 mg/kg in scPTZ test, which resulted in the protective indexe (PI of 24.8 and 20.4, respectively. These promising data suggest the new compounds have good potential as new class of anticonvulsant agents with high effectiveness and low toxicity for the treatment of epilepsy.

  14. Synthesis and Evaluation of the Anticonvulsant Activities of 4-(2-(Alkylthiobenzo[d]oxazol-5-yl-2,4-dihydro-3H-1,2,4-triazol-3-ones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Xia Song

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a novel series of 4-(2-(alkylthiobenzo[d]oxazol-5-yl-2,4-dihydro-3H-1,2,4-triazol-3-ones (4a–m was designed and synthesized. The anticonvulsant activities of these compounds were evaluated by using the maximal electroshock seizure (MES and subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole (scPTZ seizure models in mice. The neurotoxicity of these compounds was evaluated using the rotarod neurotoxicity test. The majority of compounds showed anti-MES activities at 100 or 300 mg/kg. Compound 4g was considered to be the most promising, based on its potency against MES- and PTZ-induced seizures with ED50 values of 23.7 and 18.9 mg/kg, respectively. The TD50 value of 4g was 284.0 mg/kg, which resulted in a higher protective index (PI = TD50/ED50 value than that of carbamazepine and valproate. In an ELISA test, compound 4g significantly increased the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA content in mouse brain. In addition, pretreatment with thiosemicarbazide (an inhibitor of the GABA synthesizing enzyme significantly decreased the activity of 4g in the MES model, which suggests that the mechanism through which compound 4g elicits its anticonvulsive action is at least in part through increasing the GABA level in the brain.

  15. Natural products as potential anticonvulsants: caffeoylquinic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyo Geun; Oh, Myung Sook

    2012-03-01

    Current anticonvulsant therapies are generally directed at symptomatic treatment by suppressing excitability within the brain. Consequently, they have adverse effects such as cognitive impairment, dependence, and abuse. The need for more effective and less toxic anticonvulsants has generated renewed interest in natural products for the treatment of convulsions. Caffeoylquinic acids (CQs) are naturally occurring phenolic acids that are distributed widely in plants. There has been increasing interest in the biological activities of CQs in diseases of the central nervous system. In this issue, Nugroho et al. give evidence for the anticonvulsive effect of a CQ-rich extract from Aster glehni Franchet et Sckmidt. They optimized the extract solvent conditions, resulting in high levels of CQs and peroxynitrite-scavenging activity. Then, they investigated the sedative and anticonvulsive effects in pentobarbital- and pentylenetetrazole-induced models in mice. The CQ-rich extract significantly inhibited tonic convulsions as assessed by onset time, tonic extent, and mortality. They suggested that the CQ-rich extract from A. glehni has potential for treating convulsions. This report provides preclinical data which may be used for the development of anticonvulsants from natural products.

  16. Anticonvulsant activity of B2, an adenosine analog, on chemical convulsant-induced seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Li

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder characterized by recurrent seizures. However, approximately one-third of epilepsy patients still suffer from uncontrolled seizures. Effective treatments for epilepsy are yet to be developed. N (6-(3-methoxyl-4-hydroxybenzyl adenine riboside (B2 is a N(6-substitued adenosine analog. Here we describe an investigation of the effects and mechanisms of B2 on chemical convulsant-induced seizures. Seizures were induced in mice by administration of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, pentylenetetrazol (PTZ, picrotoxin, kainite acid (KA, or strychnine. B2 has a dose-related anticonvulsant effect in these chemical-induced seizure models. The protective effects of B2 include increased latency of seizure onset, decreased seizure occurrence, shorter seizure duration and reduced mortality rate. Radioligand binding and cAMP accumulation assays indicated that B2 might be a functional ligand for both adenosine A1 and A2A receptors. Furthermore, DPCPX, a selective A1 receptor antagonist, but not SCH58261, a selective A2A receptor antagonist, blocked the anticonvulsant effect of B2 on PTZ-induced seizure. c-Fos is a cellular marker for neuronal activity. Immunohistochemical and western blot analyses indicated that B2 significantly reversed PTZ-induced c-Fos expression in the hippocampus. Together, these results indicate that B2 has significant anticonvulsant effects. The anticonvulsant effects of B2 may be attributed to adenosine A1 receptor activation and reduced neuronal excitability in the hippocampus. These observations also support that the use of adenosine receptor agonist may be a promising approach for the treatment of epilepsy.

  17. Anticonvulsants for cocaine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minozzi, Silvia; Cinquini, Michela; Amato, Laura; Davoli, Marina; Farrell, Michael F; Pani, Pier Paolo; Vecchi, Simona

    2015-04-17

    Cocaine dependence is a major public health problem that is characterised by recidivism and a host of medical and psychosocial complications. Although effective pharmacotherapy is available for alcohol and heroin dependence, none is currently available for cocaine dependence, despite two decades of clinical trials primarily involving antidepressant, anticonvulsivant and dopaminergic medications. Extensive consideration has been given to optimal pharmacological approaches to the treatment of individuals with cocaine dependence, and both dopamine antagonists and agonists have been considered. Anticonvulsants have been candidates for use in the treatment of addiction based on the hypothesis that seizure kindling-like mechanisms contribute to addiction. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of anticonvulsants for individuals with cocaine dependence. We searched the Cochrane Drugs and Alcohol Group Trials Register (June 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2014, Issue 6), MEDLINE (1966 to June 2014), EMBASE (1988 to June 2014), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (1982 to June 2014), Web of Science (1991 to June 2014) and the reference lists of eligible articles. All randomised controlled trials and controlled clinical trials that focus on the use of anticonvulsant medications to treat individuals with cocaine dependence. We used the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We included a total of 20 studies with 2068 participants. We studied the anticonvulsant drugs carbamazepine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, phenytoin, tiagabine, topiramate and vigabatrin. All studies compared anticonvulsants versus placebo. Only one study had one arm by which the anticonvulsant was compared with the antidepressant desipramine. Upon comparison of anticonvulsant versus placebo, we found no significant differences for any of the efficacy and safety measures. Dropouts: risk ratio (RR) 0.95, 95

  18. Staged anticonvulsant screening for chronic epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Berdichevsky, Yevgeny; Saponjian, Yero; Park, Kyung‐Il; Roach, Bonnie; Pouliot, Wendy; Lu, Kimberly; Swiercz, Waldemar; Dudek, F. Edward; Staley, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Current anticonvulsant screening programs are based on seizures evoked in normal animals. One‐third of epileptic patients do not respond to the anticonvulsants discovered with these models. We evaluated a tiered program based on chronic epilepsy and spontaneous seizures, with compounds advancing from high‐throughput in vitro models to low‐throughput in vivo models. Methods: Epileptogenesis in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures was quantified by lactate production and l...

  19. GABA-A Receptor Modulation and Anticonvulsant, Anxiolytic, and Antidepressant Activities of Constituents from Artemisia indica Linn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Artemisia indica, also known as “Mugwort,” has been widely used in traditional medicines. However, few studies have investigated the effects of nonvolatile components of Artemisia indica on central nervous system’s function. Fractionation of Artemisia indica led to the isolation of carnosol, ursolic acid, and oleanolic acid which were evaluated for their effects on GABA-A receptors in electrophysiological studies in Xenopus oocytes and were subsequently investigated in mouse models of acute toxicity, convulsions (pentylenetetrazole induced seizures, depression (tail suspension and forced swim tests, and anxiety (elevated plus maze and light/dark box paradigms. Carnosol, ursolic acid, and oleanolic acid were found to be positive modulators of α1β2γ2L GABA-A receptors and the modulation was antagonized by flumazenil. Carnosol, ursolic acid, and oleanolic acid were found to be devoid of any signs of acute toxicity (50–200 mg/kg but elicited anticonvulsant, antidepressant, and anxiolytic activities. Thus carnosol, ursolic acid, and oleanolic acid demonstrated CNS activity in mouse models of anticonvulsant, antidepressant, and anxiolysis. The anxiolytic activity of all three compounds was ameliorated by flumazenil suggesting a mode of action via the benzodiazepine binding site of GABA-A receptors.

  20. Antinociceptive and anticonvulsant effects of the monoterpene linalool oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souto-Maior, Flávia Negromonte; Fonsêca, Diogo Vilar da; Salgado, Paula Regina Rodrigues; Monte, Lucas de Oliveira; de Sousa, Damião Pergentino; de Almeida, Reinaldo Nóbrega

    2017-12-01

    Linalool oxide (OXL) (a monoterpene) is found in the essential oils of certain aromatic plants, or it is derived from linalool. The motivation for this work is the lack of psychopharmacological studies on this substance. To evaluate OXL's acute toxicity, along with its anticonvulsant and antinociceptive activities in male Swiss mice. OXL (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg, i.p.) was investigated for acute toxicity and in the Rota-rod test. Antinociceptive activity was evaluated by the acetic acid-induced writhing test, and by formalin testing. Anticonvulsant effects were demonstrated by testing for pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures and by Maximum Electroshock headset (MES) test. OXL was administered to the animals intraperitoneally 30 min before for pharmacological tests. OXL showed an LD 50 of ∼721 (681-765) mg/kg. In the Rota-rod test, it was observed that OXL caused no damage to the animal's motor coordination. OXL significantly reduced (p monoterpene may lead to the development of a new molecule with even higher potency and selectivity.

  1. Small Molecule Anticonvulsant Agents with Potent In Vitro Neuroprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Garry R.; Zhang, Yan; Du, Yanming; Kondaveeti, Sandeep K.; Zdilla, Michael J.; Reitz, Allen B.

    2012-01-01

    Severe seizure activity is associated with recurring cycles of excitotoxicity and oxidative stress that result in progressive neuronal damage and death. Intervention to halt these pathological processes is a compelling disease-modifying strategy for the treatment of seizure disorders. In the present study, a core small molecule with anticonvulsant activity has been structurally optimized for neuroprotection. Phenotypic screening of rat hippocampal cultures with nutrient medium depleted of antioxidants was utilized as a disease model. Increased cell death and decreased neuronal viability produced by acute treatment with glutamate or hydrogen peroxide were prevented by our novel molecules. The neuroprotection associated with this chemical series has marked structure activity relationships that focus on modification of the benzylic position of a 2-phenyl-2-hydroxyethyl sulfamide core structure. Complete separation between anticonvulsant activity and neuroprotective action was dependent on substitution at the benzylic carbon. Chiral selectivity was evident in that the S-enantiomer of the benzylic hydroxy group had neither neuroprotective nor anticonvulsant activity, while the R-enantiomer of the lead compound had full neuroprotective action at ≤40 nM and antiseizure activity in three animal models. These studies indicate that potent, multifunctional neuroprotective anticonvulsants are feasible within a single molecular entity. PMID:22535312

  2. Anticonvulsants for tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Carlijn El; Rynja, Sybren P; van Zanten, Gijsbert A; Rovers, Maroeska M

    2011-07-06

    Tinnitus is the perception of sound or noise in the absence of an external or internal acoustic stimulation. It is a common and potentially distressing symptom for which no adequate therapy exists. To assess the effectiveness of anticonvulsants in patients with chronic tinnitus. We searched the Cochrane Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL (2010, Issue 2), MEDLINE, EMBASE, bibliographies and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the most recent search was 26 May 2010. We selected randomised controlled trials in patients with chronic tinnitus comparing orally administered anticonvulsants with placebo. The primary outcome was improvement in tinnitus measured with validated questionnaires. Secondary outcomes were improvement in tinnitus measured with self-assessment scores, improvement in global well-being or accompanying symptoms, and adverse drug effects. Three authors assessed risk of bias and extracted data independently. Seven trials (453 patients) were included in this review. These studies investigated four different anticonvulsants: gabapentin, carbamazepine, lamotrigine and flunarizine. The risk of bias of most studies was 'high' or 'unclear'. Three studies included a validated questionnaire (primary outcome). None of them showed a significant positive effect of anticonvulsants. One study showed a significant negative effect of gabapentin compared to placebo with an increase in Tinnitus Questionnaire (TQ) score of 18.4 points (standardised mean difference (SMD) 0.82, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.07 to 1.58). A second study showed a positive, non-significant effect of gabapentin with a difference compared to placebo of 2.4 points on the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) (SMD -0.11, 95% CI -0.48 to 0.25). When the data from these two studies are pooled no effect of gabapentin is found (SMD 0.07, 95% CI -0.26 to 0.40). A third study reported no differences on the THI after treatment with gabapentin

  3. Trends in resource utilization and prescription of anticonvulsants for patients with active epilepsy in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzelczyk, Adam; Haag, Anja; Reese, Jens P; Nickolay, Tanja; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Dodel, Richard; Knake, Susanne; Rosenow, Felix; Hamer, Hajo M

    2013-06-01

    This study evaluated trends in the resource use of patients with active epilepsy over a 5-year period at an outpatient clinic of a German epilepsy center. Two cross-sectional cohorts of consecutive adults with active epilepsy were evaluated over a 3-month period in 2003 and 2008. Data on socioeconomic status, course of epilepsy, as well as direct and indirect costs were recorded using validated patient questionnaires. We enrolled 101 patients in 2003 and 151 patients in 2008. In both cohorts, 76% of the patients suffered from focal epilepsy, and the majority was on antiepileptic drug (AED) polytherapy (mean AED number: 1.7 (2003), 1.8 (2008)). We calculated epilepsy-specific costs of € 2955 in 2003 and € 3532 in 2008 per 3 months per patient. Direct medical costs were mainly due to anticonvulsants in 2003 (59.4% of total direct costs, 34.0% in 2008) and to hospitalization in 2008 (46.9% of total direct costs, 27.7% in 2003). The proportion of enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants and 'old' AEDs decreased between 2003 and 2008. Indirect costs of € 1689 and € 1847 were mainly due to early retirement (48.4%; 46.0% of total indirect costs in 2003; 2008), unemployment (26.1%; 24.2%), and days off due to seizures (25.5%; 29.8%). This study showed a shift in distribution of direct cost components with increased hospital costs as well as a cost-neutral increase in the prescription of 'newer' AEDs. The amount and distribution of indirect cost components remained unchanged. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A new class of anticonvulsants possessing 6 Hz psychomotor seizure test activity: 2-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl)-N'-[substituted] acetohydrazides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Praveen; Tripathi, Laxmi

    2012-05-01

    A series of 2-(1H-Benzotriazol-1-yl)-N'-[substituted]acetohydrazides were designed & synthesized keeping in view the structural requirement of pharmacophore and evaluated for anticonvulsant activity and neurotoxicity. The new compounds were characterized using FT-IR, 1H NMR, mass spectral data and elemental analysis. The anticonvulsant activity of the titled compounds was assessed using the 6 Hz psychomotor seizure test. The neurotoxicity was assessed using the rotorod method. The most active compound of the series was N'-[4-(1,3-Benzodioxol-5-yloxy)benzylidene]-2-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl)acetohydrazide (BTA 9), which showed good activity with 75 % protection (3/4, 0.5 h) at a dose of 100 mg/kg in mice. All the compounds exhibited no neurotoxicity. A computational study was carried out for calculation of pharmacophore pattern and prediction of pharmacokinetic properties. Titled compounds have also exhibited good binding properties with epilepsy molecular targets such as glutamate, GABA (A) delta, GABA (A) alpha-1 receptors and Na/H exchanger, in Lamarckian genetic algorithm based flexible docking studies.

  5. The mTOR inhibitor rapamycin has limited acute anticonvulsant effects in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam L Hartman

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway integrates signals from different nutrient sources, including amino acids and glucose. Compounds that inhibit mTOR kinase activity such as rapamycin and everolimus can suppress seizures in some chronic animal models and in patients with tuberous sclerosis. However, it is not known whether mTOR inhibitors exert acute anticonvulsant effects in addition to their longer term antiepileptogenic effects. To gain insights into how rapamycin suppresses seizures, we investigated the anticonvulsant activity of rapamycin using acute seizure tests in mice.Following intraperitoneal injection of rapamycin, normal four-week-old male NIH Swiss mice were evaluated for susceptibility to a battery of acute seizure tests similar to those currently used to screen potential therapeutics by the US NIH Anticonvulsant Screening Program. To assess the short term effects of rapamycin, mice were seizure tested in ≤ 6 hours of a single dose of rapamycin, and for longer term effects of rapamycin, mice were tested after 3 or more daily doses of rapamycin.The only seizure test where short-term rapamycin treatment protected mice was against tonic hindlimb extension in the MES threshold test, though this protection waned with longer rapamycin treatment. Longer term rapamycin treatment protected against kainic acid-induced seizure activity, but only at late times after seizure onset. Rapamycin was not protective in the 6 Hz or PTZ seizure tests after short or longer rapamycin treatment times. In contrast to other metabolism-based therapies that protect in acute seizure tests, rapamycin has limited acute anticonvulsant effects in normal mice.The efficacy of rapamycin as an acute anticonvulsant agent may be limited. Furthermore, the combined pattern of acute seizure test results places rapamycin in a third category distinct from both fasting and the ketogenic diet, and which is more similar to drugs acting on sodium channels.

  6. THE APPLICATION OF PASS-COMPUTER PROGRAMME AND MOLECULAR DOCKING FOR THE SEARCH OF NEW ANTICONVULSANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perekhoda L.O.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Currently the priority goal of designing drugs is the integration of the methods of organic chemistry and pharmacology. The application of computer programmes which can predict interaction of Annals of potential drugs with molecules of biological targets makes possible to decrease the number of experiments on laboratory animals. Thereby the economic efficiency of production of new medicines increases. Models of the research the anticonvulsant activity (in particular, korazol, thiosemikarbazid, strychnine, etc. are the most rigid experimental models of pharmacological screening, which basically entails the pains of laboratory animals or their death. The application of computer programmes in the research of potential anticonvulsants has economic and social desirability and high level of importance for the pharmaceutical science and health care. The most perspective methods of research are the virtual screening, molecular docking. These methods allow to evaluate the affinity of a substance to a specific biological target, i.e. to identify an inhibitor of a particular enzyme or protein. Material and methods. We have carried out the construction of 50 groups substances (507 hypothetical structures. We have chosen the five-membered di(threeazaheterocycle as basic pharmacophores to form virtual structures because firstly their structure is similar to cyclic conformation of neurotransmitter and secondly according to the literature perspective anticonvulsants had already found among these derivatives. Computer prediction of pharmacological activity for all compounds of virtual database was performed using the PASS (Prediction of Activity Spectra for Substances computer programme. Results obtained by PASS-computer programme showed prospects of search the anticonvulsants among 10 groups of derivatives di(threeazaheterocycles (probable activity (Pa of substances of these groups are from 0.5 to 0.84. In order to determine the potential

  7. Menthone aryl acid hydrazones: a new class of anticonvulsants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Jainendra; Kumar, Y; Sinha, Reema; Kumar, Rajeev; Stables, James

    2011-01-01

    A series of ten compounds (Compounds J(1)-J(10)) of (±) 3-menthone aryl acid hydrazone was synthesized and characterized by thin layer chromatography and spectral analysis. Synthesized compounds were evaluated for anticonvulsant activity after intraperitoneal (i.p) administration to mice by maximal electroshock (MES) and subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole (scPTZ) induced seizure method and minimal clonic seizure test. Minimal motor impairment was also determined for these compounds. Results obtained showed that four compounds out of ten afforded significant protection in the minimal clonic seizure screen at 6 Hz. Compound J(6), 4-Chloro-N-(2-isopropyl-5-methylcyclohexylidene) benzohydrazide was found to be the most active compound with MES ED(50) of 16.1 mg/kg and protective index (pI) of greater than 20, indicating that (±) 3-menthone aryl acid hydrazone possesses better and safer anticonvulsant properties than other reported menthone derivatives viz. menthone Schiff bases, menthone semicarbazides and thiosemicarbazides.

  8. In vivo antinociceptive and anticonvulsant activity of extracts of Heliotropium strigosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Haroon; Khan, Murad Ali; Hussain, Sajid; Gaffar, Rukhsana; Ashraf, Nadeem

    2016-05-01

    Natural healing agents are primarily focused to overcome unwanted side effects with synthetic drugs worldwide. In the proposed study, crude extracts and subsequent solvent fractions of Heliotropium strigosum were evaluated for antinociceptive and anticonvulsant activity in animal paradigms. In post acetic acid-induced writhing test, crude extract and fractions (hexane, ethyl acetate, and aqueous) demonstrated marked attenuation of nociception at test doses (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg i.p.). When challenged against thermally induced pain model, pretreatment of extracts exhibited prominent amelioration at test dose (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg i.p.). In both tests, inhibition of noxious stimulation was in a dose-dependent manner, and ethyl acetate fraction was most dominant. However, extracts did not antagonize the seizures and mortality induced by pentylenetetrazole. In conclusion, the extracts of H. strigosum illustrated significant antinociceptive effect in both centrally and peripherally acting pain models. © The Author(s) 2013.

  9. SYNTHESIS AND STUDY OF HALOGENATED BENZYLAMIDES OF SOME ISOCYCLIC AND HETEROCYCLIC ACIDS AS POTENTIAL ANTICONVULSANTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strupińska, Marzanna; Rostafińska-Suchar, Grażyna; Pirianowicz-Chaber, Elżbieta; Grabczuk, Mateusz; Józwenko, Magdalena; Kowalczyk, Hubert; Szuba, Joanna; Wójcicka, Monika; Chen, Tracy; Mazurek, Aleksander P

    2015-01-01

    A series of potential anticonvulsants have been synthesized. There are eight fluorobenzylamides and three chlorobenzylamides of isocyclic or heterocyclic acids. Two not halogenated benzylamides were also synthesized to compare the effect of halogenation. The aim of the research performed was to evaluate whether halogenation of the mother structure is able to improve its anticonvulsant activity. The compounds were tested in Anticonvulsant Screening Project (ASP) of Antiepileptic Drug Development Program (ADDP) of NIH. Compound 1 showed MES ED50 = 80.32 mg/kg, PI = 3.16. Compound 7 showed CKM ED50 = 56.72 mg/kg. Compound 8 showed MES ED50 = 34.23 mg/kg and scPTZ ED50 > 300 mg/kg, PI = 8.53.Compound 13 showed 6Hz ED50 = 78.96, PI = 3.37. The results indicate that fluorination does not improve activity, whereas chlorination in our experiment even reduces it.

  10. Melatonin potentiates the anticonvulsant action of phenobarbital in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcelli, Patrick A; Soper, Colin; Duckles, Anne; Gale, Karen; Kondratyev, Alexei

    2013-12-01

    Phenobarbital is the most commonly utilized drug for neonatal seizures. However, questions regarding safety and efficacy of this drug make it particularly compelling to identify adjunct therapies that could boost therapeutic benefit. One potential adjunct therapy is melatonin. Melatonin is used clinically in neonatal and pediatric populations, and moreover, it exerts anticonvulsant actions in adult rats. However, it has not been previously evaluated for anticonvulsant effects in neonatal rats. Here, we tested the hypothesis that melatonin would exert anticonvulsant effects, either alone, or in combination with phenobarbital. Postnatal day (P)7 rats were treated with phenobarbital (0-40mg/kg) and/or melatonin (0-80mg/kg) prior to chemoconvulsant challenge with pentylenetetrazole (100mg/kg). We found that melatonin significantly potentiated the anticonvulsant efficacy of phenobarbital, but did not exert anticonvulsant effects on its own. These data provide additional evidence for the further examination of melatonin as an adjunct therapy in neonatal/pediatric epilepsy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome and lamotrigine-associated anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taillia, H; Alla, P; Fournier, B; Bounolleau, P; Ouologem, M; Ricard, D; Sallansonnet-Froment, M; de Greslan, T; Renard, J-L

    2009-10-01

    Anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome (AHS) is defined by the association of high fever, cutaneous rash and multiorgan-system abnormalities (incidence, one in 1000 to one in 10,000 exposures). Fatal complications are described in 10%. This reaction usually develops 1 to 12 weeks after initiation of an aromatic anticonvulsant. Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) can be discussed as differential diagnosis. Several hypotheses have been put forward to explain the pathogenesis of AHS. These include accumulation of toxic metabolites, antibody production and viral infection. The one based on toxic metabolites has found the greatest acceptance due to the fact that it can be proven by an in vitro test, the lymphocyte toxicity assay. In vivo, skin biopsies show characteristic findings of erythema multiform or typical leucocytoclastic angitis. The patch-test is positive in 80% of the cases. Lamotrigine-associated anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome (LASH) is rare and was described in 1998. We report two new cases demonstrating the two particular configurations of apparition of LASH found in the 14 cases from the review of literature (Pubmed: anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome - lamotrigine): high doses of lamotrigine (or lamotrigine in very young or old patients), and lamotrigine associated with another anti-epileptic (phenobarbital or sodium valproate). We discuss the links between DRESS after lamotrigine and LASH as illustrated in a new case.

  12. Practical synthesis, anticonvulsant, and antimicrobial activity of N-allyl and N-propargyl di(indolyl)indolin-2-ones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen, Chandrasekaran; Ayyanar, Asairajan; Perumal, Paramasivan Thirumalai

    2011-07-01

    An operation friendly protocol for the synthesis of novel di(indolyl)indolin-2-ones via Cu(OTf)(2) catalyzed bis-addition of N-allyl and N-propargyl indole with isatin was developed. This methodology allowed us to achieve the products in excellent yields without requiring purification technique like column chromatography. All the synthesized compounds were evaluated for their in vivo anticonvulsant activity against maximal electroshock test. Six compounds showed maximum activity compared to the standard drug phenytoin. The scope of the new molecules as antimicrobial agents were tested against two bacterial strains (Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli) and one fungal strain (Candida albicans). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Synthesis, potential anticonvulsant and antidepressant effects of 2-(5-methyl-2,3-dioxoindolin-1-ylacetamide derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinghua Zhen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A new series of 2-(5-methyl-2,3-dioxoindolin-1-ylacetamide derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their anticonvulsive activity in a pentylenetetrazole (PTZ-evoked convulsion model and antidepressant activity in the forced swimming test (FST model. Eleven synthesized compounds were found to be protective against PTZ-induced seizure and showed the anticonvulsant activity. In addition, four of the synthesized compounds (4l, 4m, 4p and 4q showed potent antidepressant-like activity. Among these compounds, compound 4l was found to have the most potent antidepressant-like activity, and significantly reduced the duration of immobility time at 100 mg/kg dose level when compared to the vehicle control, which is similar to the reference drug fluoxetine.

  14. Prophylactic antibiotics and anticonvulsants in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratilal, B; Sampaio, C

    2011-01-01

    The prophylactic administration of antibiotics to prevent infection and the prophylactic administration of anticonvulsants to prevent first seizure episodes are common practice in neurosurgery. If prophylactic medication therapy is not indicated, the patient not only incurs the discomfort and the inconvenience resulting from drug treatment but is also unnecessarily exposed to adverse drug reactions, and incurs extra costs. The main situations in which prophylactic anticonvulsants and antibiotics are used are described and those situations we found controversial in the literature and lack further investigation are identified: anticonvulsants for preventing seizures in patients with chronic subdural hematomas, antiepileptic drugs for preventing seizures in those suffering from brain tumors, antibiotic prophylaxis for preventing meningitis in patients with basilar skull fractures, and antibiotic prophylaxis for the surgical introduction of intracranial ventricular shunts.In the following we present systematic reviews of the literature in accordance with the standard protocol of The Cochrane Collaboration to evaluate the effectiveness of the use of these prophylactic medications in the situations mentioned. Our goal was to efficiently integrate valid information and provide a basis for rational decision-making.

  15. Design, synthesis and evaluation of dialkyl 4-(benzo[d][1,3]dioxol-6-yl)-1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-1-substituted pyridine-3,5-dicarboxylates as potential anticonvulsants and their molecular properties prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanthi, G; Prasad, K V S R G; Bharathi, K

    2013-08-01

    The present study is on the development of dialkyl 4-(benzo[d][1,3]dioxol-6-yl)-1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-1-substituted pyridine-3,5-dicarboxylate derivatives as isosteric analogues of isradipine and nifedipine, by the replacement of benzofurazanyl and 2-nitrophenyl groups respectively with benzo[d][1,3]dioxo-6-yl group, as potential anticonvulsants. Fivfteen new derivatives (8a-8o) were synthesized and tested for anticonvulsant activity using maximal electroshock and subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole induced seizure methods. Compound 8f possessing free NH group in 1,4-dihydropyridine ring, diethyl ester functionality at the positions 3 and 5 showed significant anticonvulsant and antioxidant activities. This was also supported by molecular properties prediction data. Selected compounds were evaluated for antinociceptive activity in capsaicin induced nociception assay at 10 mg/kg body weight, but displayed no significant activity at the tested dose. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Acne and anticonvulsants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, R; Fenwick, P B; Cunliffe, W J

    1983-01-01

    The severity of acne and rate of excretion of sebum were assessed in 243 patients with epilepsy taking various anticonvulsants who were in hospital long term and in matched controls derived from a normal population of 2176 people. Neither the prevalence of acne nor the sebum excretion rate significantly increased in the patients compared with the controls or in patients taking phenytoin compared with those not. It is concluded that anticonvulsant treatment does not cause acne. PMID:6227369

  17. Opioid receptor mediated anticonvulsant effect of pentazocine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, N; Khosla, R; Kohli, J

    1998-01-01

    Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of (+/-) pentazocine (10, 30 & 50 mg/kg), a Sigma opioid agonist, resulted in a dose dependent anticonvulsant action against maximal electroshock seizures in mice. This anticonvulsant effect of pentazocine was not antagonized by both the doses of naloxone (1 and 10 mg/kg) suggesting thereby that its anticonvulsant action is probably mediated by Sigma opiate binding sites. Its anticonvulsant effect was potentiated by both the anticonvulsant drugs viz. diazepam and diphenylhydantoin. Morphine, mu opioid agonist, on the other hand, failed to protect the animals against maximal electroshock seizures when it was given in doses of 10-40 mg/kg body wt.

  18. CM 40907: a structurally novel anticonvulsant in mice, rats and baboons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambon, J.P.; Brochard, J.; Hallot, A.; Heaulme, M.; Brodin, R.; Roncucci, R.; Biziere, K.

    1985-01-01

    CM 40907 [3-(4-hydroxypiperidyl)-6-(2'-chlorophenyl)-pyridazine] is a chemically original compound which possesses the pharmacological properties of a potent, p.o. active anticonvulsant. The anticonvulsant activity of CM 40907 was examined in mice, rats and photosensitive Papio-papio baboons and compared to that of phenobarbital, diphenylhydantoin, carbamazepine, sodium valproate and ethosuximide. In mice, CM 40907 antagonized electroconvulsive shock and chemically induced seizures with an overall potency comparable to that of carbamazepine and a therapeutic ratio (ED50 rotorod/ED50 electroshock) superior to that of ethosuximide, sodium valproate, phenobarbital and carbamazepine. In the rat CM 40907 suppressed completed kindled amygdaloid seizures and was approximately as active as phenobarbital. In naturally photosensitive Senegalese Papio-papio baboons CM 40907 antagonized myoclonus and cortical paroxysmal discharges. In this model CM 40907 was approximately one-fourth as potent as phenobarbital, twice as potent as carbamazepine and 6 times more potent than sodium valproate. In mice CM 40907, at anticonvulsant doses, increased the affinity of [ 3 H]flunitrazepam for its central receptor site. Based on these results it is postulated that CM 40907 is a potent and relatively nonsedative anticonvulsant and may be of therapeutic benefit in epileptic disorders

  19. Anticonvulsants for alcohol dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, Pier Paolo; Trogu, Emanuela; Pacini, Matteo; Maremmani, Icro

    2014-02-13

    Alcohol dependence is a major public health problem that is characterised by recidivism and a host of medical and psychosocial complications. Besides psychosocial interventions, different pharmacological interventions have been or currently are under investigation through Cochrane systematic reviews. The primary aim of the review is to assess the benefits/risks of anticonvulsants for the treatment of alcohol dependence. We searched the Cochrane Drugs and Alcohol Group Trials Register (October 2013), PubMed (1966 to October 2013), EMBASE (1974 to October 2013) and CINAHL (1982 to October 2013). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) comparing anticonvulsants alone or in association with other drugs and/or psychosocial interventions versus placebo, no treatment and other pharmacological or psychosocial interventions. We used standard methodological procedures as expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. A total of 25 studies were included in the review (2641 participants). Most participants were male, with an average age of 44 years. Anticonvulsants were compared with placebo (17 studies), other medications (seven studies) and no medication (two studies). The mean duration of the trials was 17 weeks (range four to 52 weeks). The studies took place in the USA, Europe, South America, India and Thailand. Variation was reported in the characteristics of the studies, including their design and the rating instruments used. For many key outcomes, the risk of bias associated with unclear or unconcealed allocation and lack of blinding affected the quality of the evidence.Anticonvulsants versus placebo: For dropouts (16 studies, 1675 participants, risk ratio (RR) 0.94, 95% confidence interval (Cl) 0.74 to 1.19, moderate-quality evidence) and continuous abstinence (eight studies, 634 participants, RR 1.21, 95% Cl 95% 0.97 to 1.52, moderate-quality evidence), results showed no evidence of differences. Moderate-quality evidence suggested that

  20. Design and synthesis of new of 3-(benzo[d]isoxazol-3-yl)-1-substituted pyrrolidine-2, 5-dione derivatives as anticonvulsants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Sachin; Ahuja, Priya; Sahu, Kapendra; Khan, Suroor Ahmad

    2014-09-12

    A series of 3-(benzo[d]isoxazol-3-yl)-N-substituted pyrrolidine-2, 5-dione (7a-7d, 8a-8d, 9a-9c) have been prepared and evaluated for their anticonvulsant activities. Preliminary anticonvulsant activity was performed using maximal electroshock (MES) and subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole (scPTZ) tests after intraperitoneal (ip) injection into mice, which are the most widely employed models for early identification of anticonvulsant candidate. The acute neurological toxicity (NT) was determined applying rotorod test. The quantitative evaluation after oral administration in rats showed that the most active was 3-(benzo[d]isoxazol-3-yl)-1-(4-fluorophenyl) pyrrolidine-2, 5-dione (8a) with ED50 values of 14.90 mg/kg. Similarly the most potent in scPTZ was 3-(benzo[d]isoxazol-3-yl)-1-cyclohexylpyrrolidine-2, 5-dione (7d) with ED50 values of 42.30 mg/kg. These molecules were more potent and less neurotoxic than phenytoin and ethosuximide which were used as reference antiepileptic drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. National trends in pediatric use of anticonvulsants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Allen R; Zito, Julie M; Safer, Daniel J; Hundley, Sarah D

    2012-11-01

    This research study aimed to assess national trends in pediatric use of anticonvulsants for seizures and psychiatric disorders. In a cross-sectional design, data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey were analyzed. Outpatient visit information for youths (ages 0-17 years) was grouped by year for 1996-1997, 2000-2001, 2004-2005, and 2008-2009. Six of the most common anticonvulsant drugs used for psychiatric conditions were examined. Psychiatric diagnoses and seizure or convulsion diagnoses were identified with ICD-9-CM codes. The primary outcome measure was percentage prevalence of visits for anticonvulsants that included a psychiatric diagnosis as a proportion of total youth visits for an anticonvulsant. Total, diagnosis-stratified, and drug-specific visits, as well as visits for concomitant anticonvulsants and psychotropics, were analyzed. As a proportion of total youth visits for anticonvulsants, visits with a psychiatric diagnosis increased 1.7 fold (panticonvulsant use significantly increased, from .33% to .68% of total youth visits in the 14-year period. There were significant increases in anticonvulsant use to treat pediatric bipolar disorder and disruptive behavior disorders. Visits noting divalproex decreased while visits noting lamotrigine increased among visits involving a psychiatric diagnosis. The concomitant use of stimulants and anticonvulsants significantly increased in visits noting a psychiatric diagnosis. Whereas anticonvulsant use for seizure disorders across the 14-year period was stable, the use of these drugs for psychiatric conditions rose to a dominant position. The growth of concomitant and off-label use to treat behavioral disorders raises questions about effectiveness and safety in community populations of youths.

  2. A systematic review on the role of anticonvulsants in the treatment of acute bipolar depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinares, María; Rosa, Adriane R; Franco, Carolina; Goikolea, José Manuel; Fountoulakis, Kostas; Siamouli, Melina; Gonda, Xenia; Frangou, Sophia; Vieta, Eduard

    2013-03-01

    Despite the high morbidity and mortality associated with bipolar depression, the optimal treatment for this phase is still a matter of debate. The aim of the current review was to provide updated evidence about the efficacy and tolerability of anticonvulsants in the treatment of acute bipolar depression. A comprehensive review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the use of anticonvulsants for the treatment of acute bipolar depression up to June 2011 was conducted by means of the PubMed-Medline database. Eligibility criteria included active comparator-controlled or placebo-controlled randomized studies involving monotherapy or combination therapy. A total of 18 RCTs fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Studies supported the efficacy of divalproex as monotherapy in acute bipolar depression but small sample size was a common methodological limitation. Findings were inconclusive for lamotrigine and carbamazepine although overall lamotrigine may have a beneficial but modest effect. Negative results were found for levetiracetam and gabapentin but the evidence base on these agents is scant. All anticonvulsants were generally well tolerated. No double-blind RCTs were found for the use of other anticonvulsants such as oxcarbazepine, licarbazepine, zonisamide, retigabine, pregabalin, tiagabine, felbamate and vigabatrine in the acute treatment of bipolar depression. To sum up, taking into consideration the efficacy and tolerability profiles of anticonvulsants, current evidence supports the use of divalproex and lamotrigine in the treatment of acute bipolar depression. However, available data for most other anticonvulsants are inconclusive and further RCTs with larger sample sizes are needed before drawing firm conclusions.

  3. Evaluation of anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects of camel milk in strychnine-induced seizure model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humera Khatoon

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To discover the use of camel milk as an alternate medicine for the treatment and prevention of convulsions using strychnine-induced seizure model. Methods: Thirty animals were divided into three equal groups. Group I was on distilled water, Group II was on camel milk for 15 days prior to experiment and Group III was on reference drug diazepam. On the day of experiment, strychnine was administered in all treatment groups after distilled water, camel milk and diazepam treatments respectively. Animals were observed for 30 min for latency of seizure onset, frequency of convulsions and duration of jerks. The mortality rate was also evaluated for each group. Results: Camel milk treatment showed significant seizure protection as observed by delayed seizure onset (P ≤ 0.001, decreased total duration of convulsions (P ≤ 0.001 and mortality rate (P ≤ 0.001 when compared with Group I. Conclusions: Anticonvulsant activity of camel milk could be due to potentiation of glycinergic and GABAergic activities both. Antioxidant activity can also amplify its antiepileptic activity. Further studies are required to confirm the exact mechanism of action.

  4. Evaluation of Anticonvulsive ٍEffect of Magnesium Oxide Nanoparticles in Comparison with Conventional MgO in Diabetic and Non-diabetic Male Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Jahangiri

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Some studies show magnesium has anticonvulsive effect in some animal models. Despite of the availability of well-studied anticonvulsant drugs, this evaluation was not carried on new kind of magnesium supplement, magnesium oxide nanoparticles (nMgO. According to the interaction between magnesium and convulsion, this study was designed to evaluate the effect of nMgO on strychnine-induced convulsive model in compared to its conventional in diabetic and normal mice. Methods: Healthy male albino mice were divided to 10 groups. Diabete mellitus was induced by streptozocin in 5 groups. Conventional and nanoparticle MgO (5&10mg/kg in presence and absence diabetes injected to mice, then strychnine injected and onset of convulsions and time of death were measured after strychnine administration. Results: Convulsive parameters did not change in normal and diabetic mice. cMgO pretreatment did not have anticonvulsant effect in strychnine-induced convulsion in normal and diabetic mice. But nMgO significantly changed convulsion onset and death time after strychnine administration in normal and diabetic status. Discussion: According to our results It seems that nMgO may be important in prevention or treatment of epilepsy and has more efficacy than its conventional form to showing anticonvulsive effect that probably is related to the physicochemical properties of nMgO, specially in diabetic subjects, a point that need to further investigation.

  5. Is bioavailability altered in generic versus brand anticonvulsants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, Slobodan M; Ignjatovic Ristic, Dragana

    2015-03-01

    Therapeutic window of anticonvulsants is not a wide one, with phenytoin being one extreme, which can be classified as a narrow therapeutic index drug, since its ratio between the least toxic and the least effective concentration is less than twofold. In order to obtain marketing authorization, a generic anticonvulsant should demonstrate relative bioequivalence with its brand-name counterpart. However, although bioequivalent, generic anticonvulsants still do not have the same bioavailability as brand-name drugs, which may lead to larger fluctuations of steady-state plasma concentrations, and sometimes to loss of seizure control if a patient is switched from brand-name to generic or from generic to generic anticonvulsant. Generic anticonvulsants are effective, safe and affordable drugs for treatment of epilepsy, and patients could be successfully treated with them from the very beginning. It is switching from brand-name to generic anticonvulsant or from one generic anticonvulsant to another that should be avoided in clinical practice, since subtle differences in bioavailability may disturb optimal degree of seizure control to which the patient was previously successfully titrated.

  6. Structural Exploration of Quinazolin-4(3H)-ones as Anticonvulsants: Rational Design, Synthesis, Pharmacological Evaluation, and Molecular Docking Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugale, Vinod G; Bari, Sanjay B

    2016-11-01

    Anticonvulsants effective against multiple seizures are of wide interest as antiepileptic drugs, especially if active against pharmaco-resistant seizures. Herein, we synthesized 16 different, rationally designed 2-((6,7-dimethoxy-4-oxo-2-phenylquinazolin-3(4H)-yl)amino)-N-(substituted phenyl)acetamides and screened for anticonvulsant activities through in vivo experiments. Compound 4d emerged as prototype with excellent anti-seizure action in mice against electroshock, chemically induced and pharmaco-resistant 6-Hz seizure models with no symptoms of neurotoxicity and hepatotoxicity (ED 50  = 23.5 mg/kg, MES, mice, i.p.; ED 50  = 32.6 mg/kg, scPTZ, mice, i.p.; ED 50  = 45.2 mg/kg, 6-Hz, mice, i.p.; TD 50  = 325.9 mg/kg, mice, i.p.). In addition, investigation of compound 4l in mice for its pharmacological profile proved it as safer anticonvulsant, devoid of the side effects such as motor dysfunction and hepatotoxicity of classical antiepileptic drugs (ED 50  = 26.1 mg/kg, MES, mice, i.p.; ED 50  = 79.4 mg/kg, scPTZ, mice, i.p.; TD 50  = 361.2 mg/kg, mice, i.p.). We also predicted physiochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of structurally optimized quinazolin-4(3H)-ones by a computational protocol. A combination of in vivo anticonvulsant profile, ex vivo toxicity, and in silico studies suggested that the synthesized compounds may be useful as broad-spectrum anti-seizure drug candidates with favorable pharmacokinetic parameters. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Evaluation of automated enzyme immunoassays for five anticonvulsants and theophylline adapted to a centrifugal analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquhart, N; Godolphin, W; Campbell, D J

    1979-05-01

    We report a clinical evaluation of the enzyme immunoassay (EMIT) performed with the GEMSAEC centrifugal analyzer as compared to gas-liquid and liquid chromatography for anticonvulsant drugs and theophylline, respectively. A good correlation was obtained for all drugs, although some difficulties were experienced with one lot of reagent for ethosuximide. The analyzer has an economic advantage if many samples are being analyzed for few drugs in each sample.

  8. Action of bicyclic isoxazole GABA analogues on GABA transporters and its relation to anticonvulsant activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolvig, T; Larsson, O M; Pickering, D S

    1999-01-01

    The inhibitory action of bicyclic isoxazole gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analogues and their 4,4-diphenyl-3-butenyl (DPB) substituted derivatives has been investigated in cortical neurones and astrocytes as well as in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) cells transiently expressing either mouse GA...... anticonvulsant activity, lack of proconvulsant activity and the ability of THPO to increase extracellular GABA concentration, indicate that these bicyclic isoxazole GABA analogues and their DPB derivatives may be useful lead structures in future search for new antiepileptic drugs....

  9. Anticonvulsant activity of the fractionated extract of Crinum jagus bulbs in experimental animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azikiwe CCA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the anticonvulsant activity of the bulbs of Crinum jagus in experimental animals. Methods: The uprooted bulbs were air dried for a week and ground into creamy-paste. 200g of paste was macerated each in 2 litres of water, ethanol and petroleum ether and filtered after 48 h. The obtained filtrates were each evaporated at the appropriate temperature to solid residue. The residues were further fractionated with successive changes of petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and n-butanol into a pooled filtrate which was further evaporated to dry solid brown-paste. Phytochemistry was carried out based on Treas and Evans method of 1987. The acute toxicity study (LD50 was carried based on Lorke ’s 1983 method. Convulsion was induced using maximum electric shock (MEST, pentylenetetrazole(PTZ, strychnine and Picrotoxin in the appropriate animal models. Seizures onset time and death time were used as successful induction of convulsion while prolongations of these features were taken as anticonvulsant activity. Results where possible, were statistically analyzed using SPSS-16.0 version. Results: The LD 50 was got at 1118.003mg/kg (IP in mice using Lorke ’s 1983 method. Fractionated extract of Crinum jagus exhibited dose dependent antiseizure against MEST induced seizure (P<0.001 and comparable to that of phenytoin, a standard anti generalized tonic-clonic seizure. There were also observable antiseizure activity of the fractionated extracts against PTZ, strychnine and Picrotoxin induced seizure and comparable to their standard corresponding antiseizures. Conclusions: We conclude that the bulbs of Crinum jagus possess proven broad spectrum antiseizure and perhaps antiepileptogenic activity thus justifies its use in traditional medicine. Clinical trial in man is recommended.

  10. Lactation studies of anticonvulsants: a quality review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Douwe H; Wieringa, Andre; Wegner, Ilse; Wilffert, Bob; Ter Horst, Peter G J

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this review was to investigate the quality of the current literature on the transfer of anticonvulsants to breast milk to provide an overview of which anticonvulsants are in need of further research. We reviewed the quality of the available lactation studies for 19 anticonvulsants against the guidelines of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the International Lactation Consultant Association (ILCA). Except for one study on lamotrigine and one case report on gabapentin, no study on anticonvulsants had both the absolute infant dose (AID) and milk to plasma ratio (M : P) correctly assessed. Only one study on carbamazepine, phenytoin and vigabatrin was found that correctly assessed the AID. The main cause for this low number is the lack of essential details in published studies, since 25 of 62 studies were case reports, letters or abstracts. Other major shortcomings were the lack of information on sampling methods, the number of samples in a particular dose interval as well as the low number of study participants. The quality of the current literature on the transfer of anticonvulsants to breast milk is low, except for lamotrigine, which makes it hard to draw conclusions about the safety of the use of anticonvulsants during the lactation period. Therefore, further research is needed. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  11. Anticonvulsant use in elderly patients in long-term care units.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Timmons, S

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Elderly patients in long-term care units are frailer than their community-dwelling peers and may be more at risk from toxic side-effects of anticonvulsant medication at standard doses. AIM: To examine the prescribing of anticonvulsants to patients in elderly care units. METHODS: Drug prescription sheets and case notes were reviewed. Serum anticonvulsant concentration, renal and liver profiles and albumin level were measured. RESULTS: Anticonvulsants were prescribed to twice as many male as female patients (32 vs 14%; p<0.03) and to 33% of those younger than 80 years of age versus 10% of those aged 80 years or older (p<0.0002). No patient had significant hypoalbuminaemia and routine measurement of serum anticonvulsant concentration did not indicate an alteration of dosage. CONCLUSIONS: Anticonvulsants appear to be well tolerated in these patients. The younger age of those receiving anticonvulsants is inadequately explained by the characteristics of the patient cohort and may reflect a shift towards a younger age in patients requiring anticonvulsants due to increased mortality in this group.

  12. Involvement of ATP-sensitive potassium channels and the opioid system in the anticonvulsive effect of zolpidem in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhi, Mehdi; Shirzadian, Armin; Dehdashtian, Amir; Amiri, Shayan; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Ghasemi, Mehdi; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2016-09-01

    Zolpidem is a hypnotic medication that mainly exerts its function through activating γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptors. There is some evidence that zolpidem may have anticonvulsive effects. However, the mechanisms underlying this effect have not been elucidated yet. In the present study, we used the pentylentetrazole (PTZ)-induced generalized seizure model in mice to investigate whether zolpidem can affect seizure threshold. We also further evaluated the roles of ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels as well as μ-opioid receptors in the effects of zolpidem on seizure threshold. Our data showed that zolpidem in a dose-dependent manner increased the PTZ-induced seizure threshold. The noneffective (i.e., did not significantly alter the PTZ-induced seizure threshold by itself) doses of KATP channel blocker (glibenclamide) and nonselective opioid receptor antagonist (naloxone) were able to inhibit the anticonvulsive effect of zolpidem. Additionally, noneffective doses of either KATP channel opener (cromakalim) or nonselective μ-opioid receptor agonist (morphine) in combination with a noneffective dose of zolpidem exerted a significant anticonvulsive effect on PTZ-induced seizures in mice. A combination of noneffective doses of naloxone and glibenclamide, which separately did not affect zolpidem effect on seizure threshold, inhibited the anticonvulsive effects of zolpidem. These results suggest a role for KATP channels and the opioid system, alone or in combination, in the anticonvulsive effects of zolpidem. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy following resective epilepsy surgery in two patients withdrawn from anticonvulsants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Alireza; Alhadid, Kenda; Valiante, Taufik A

    2015-09-01

    We report sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) following resective epilepsy surgery in two patients who had been documented as seizure free. One patient had been weaned off of anticonvulsants and was leading a normal life. The other patient had discontinued only one anticonvulsant but had recently started working night shifts. Following resective epilepsy surgery, one of the major objectives among patients, caregivers, and the healthcare team is to safely wean patients off anticonvulsant medications. The main concern regarding anticonvulsant withdrawal is seizure recurrence. While SUDEP following surgical resection has been reported, to our knowledge, there have been no confirmed cases in patients who have been seizure free. Considering the patients reported here, and given that there are no concrete guidelines for the safe withdrawal of anticonvulsants following epilepsy surgery, the discontinuation of anticonvulsants should be considered carefully and must be accompanied by close monitoring and counseling of patients regarding activities that lower seizure threshold, even after successful epilepsy surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The effectiveness of anticonvulsants in psychiatric disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunze, Heinz C. R.

    2008-01-01

    Anticonvulsant drugs are widely used in psychiatric indications. These include mainly alcohol and benzodiazepine withdrawal syndromes, panic and anxiety disorders, dementia, schizophrenia, affective disorders, bipolar affective disorders in particular, and, to some extent, personality disorders, A further area in which neurology and psychiatry overlap is pain conditions, in which some anticonvulsants, and also typical psychiatric medications such as antidepressants, are helpful. From the beginning of their psychiatric use, anticonvulsants have also been used to ameliorate specific symptoms of psychiatric disorders independently of their causality and underlying illness, eg, aggression, and, more recently, cognitive impairment, as seen in affective disorders and schizophrenia. With new anticonvulsants currently under development, it is likely that their use in psychiatry will further increase, and that psychiatrists need to learn about their differential efficacy and safety profiles to the same extent as do neurologists. PMID:18472486

  15. Triazole incorporated thiazoles as a new class of anticonvulsants: design, synthesis and in vivo screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Nadeem; Ahsan, Waquar

    2010-04-01

    Various 3-[4-(substituted phenyl)-1,3-thiazol-2-ylamino]-4-(substituted phenyl)-4,5-dihydro-1H-1,2,4-triazole-5-thiones (7a-t) were designed keeping in view the structural requirements suggested in the pharmacophore model for anticonvulsant activity. Thiazole and triazole moieties being anticonvulsants were clubbed together to get the titled compounds and their in vivo anticonvulsant screening were performed by two most adopted seizure models, maximal electroshock seizure (MES) and subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole (scPTZ). Two compounds 7d and 7f showed significant anticonvulsant activity in both the screens with ED(50) values 23.9 mg/kg and 13.4 mg/kg respectively in MES screen and 178.6 mg/kg and 81.6 mg/kg respectively in scPTZ test. They displayed a wide margin of safety with Protective index (PI), median hypnotic dose (HD(50)) and median lethal dose (LD(50)) much higher than the standard drugs. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. In silico validation and structure activity relationship study of a series of pyridine-3-carbohydrazide derivatives as potential anticonvulsants in generalized and partial seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Reema; Sara, Udai Vir Singh; Khosa, Ratan Lal; Stables, James; Jain, Jainendra

    2013-06-01

    A series of twelve compounds (Compounds RNH1-RNH12) of acid hydrazones of pyridine-3-carbohydrazide or nicotinic acid hydrazide was synthesized and evaluated for anticonvulsant activity by MES, scPTZ, minimal clonic seizure and corneal kindling seizure test. Neurotoxicity was also determined for these compounds by rotarod test. Results showed that halogen substitution at meta and para position of phenyl ring exhibited better protection than ortho substitution. Compounds RNH4 and RNH12, were found to be the active analogs displaying 6Hz ED50 of 75.4 and 14.77 mg/kg while the corresponding MES ED50 values were 113.4 and 29.3 mg/kg respectively. In addition, compound RNH12 also showed scPTZ ED50 of 54.2 mg/kg. In the series, compound RNH12 with trifluoromethoxy substituted phenyl ring was the most potent analog exhibiting protection in all four animal models of epilepsy. Molecular docking study has also shown significant binding interactions of these two compounds with 1OHV, 2A1H and 1PBQ receptors. Thus, N-[(meta or para halogen substituted) benzylidene] pyridine-3-carbohydrazides could be used as lead compounds in anticonvulsant drug design and discovery.

  17. Novel, broad-spectrum anticonvulsants containing a sulfamide group: pharmacological properties of (S)-N-[(6-chloro-2,3-dihydrobenzo[1,4]dioxin-2-yl)methyl]sulfamide (JNJ-26489112).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComsey, David F; Smith-Swintosky, Virginia L; Parker, Michael H; Brenneman, Douglas E; Malatynska, Ewa; White, H Steve; Klein, Brian D; Wilcox, Karen S; Milewski, Michael E; Herb, Mark; Finley, Michael F A; Liu, Yi; Lubin, Mary Lou; Qin, Ning; Reitz, Allen B; Maryanoff, Bruce E

    2013-11-27

    Broad-spectrum anticonvulsants are of considerable interest as antiepileptic drugs, especially because of their potential for treating refractory patients. Such "neurostabilizers" have also been used to treat other neurological disorders, including migraine, bipolar disorder, and neuropathic pain. We synthesized a series of sulfamide derivatives (4-9, 10a-i, 11a, 11b, 12) and evaluated their anticonvulsant activity. Thus, we identified promising sulfamide 4 (JNJ-26489112) and explored its pharmacological properties. Compound 4 exhibited excellent anticonvulsant activity in rodents against audiogenic, electrically induced, and chemically induced seizures. Mechanistically, 4 inhibited voltage-gated Na(+) channels and N-type Ca(2+) channels and was effective as a K(+) channel opener. The anticonvulsant profile of 4 suggests that it may be useful for treating multiple forms of epilepsy (generalized tonic-clonic, complex partial, absence seizures), including refractory (or pharmacoresistant) epilepsy, at dose levels that confer a good safety margin. On the basis of its pharmacology and other favorable characteristics, 4 was advanced into human clinical studies.

  18. Prenatal exposure to anticonvulsants and psychosexual development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dessens, A. B.; Cohen-Kettenis, P. T.; Mellenbergh, G. J.; vd Poll, N.; Koppe, J. G.; Boer, K.

    1999-01-01

    Animal studies have shown that prenatal exposure to the anticonvulsant drugs phenobarbital and phenytoin alters steroid hormone levels which consequently leads to disturbed sexual differentiation. In this study, possible sequelae of prenatal exposure to these anticonvulsants on gender development in

  19. Potential role of anticonvulsants in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive and related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hee Ryung; Woo, Young Sup; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2014-10-01

    We reviewed the extant literature to evaluate the current evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of anticonvulsants in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive and related disorders. Relevant literature was accessed using the Cochrane database, embase and PubMed on 29 October 2013. Prospective studies examining the efficacy of anticonvulsants in obsessive-compulsive and related disorders were included. Case reports, case series, and retrospective studies were excluded. A total of 10 studies were included in this review. The studies of obsessive-compulsive disorder, except for two negative studies, showed favorable efficacy results of anticonvulsants. In one study on body dysmorphic disorder, levetiracetam showed favorable efficacy. In two lamotrigine studies for pathologic skin-picking, the efficacy findings were inconsistent. In one trichotillomania study, topiramate had reduced hair-pulling symptoms. Despite limited evidence, our review suggests that anticonvulsants have a potential role in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive and related disorders. © 2014 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2014 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  20. [Ketamine--anticonvulsive and proconvulsive actions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugler, J; Doenicke, A

    1994-11-01

    Animal experimentation has revealed that ketamine has anticonvulsive properties. Changes in the EEG have also been reported in animals; these have been designated non-convulsive generalized electrographic seizures because of their similarities to epileptiform potentials, even though there are no recognizable signs of seizures. The cataleptic condition of the cats in which these changes were observed led to the conclusion that ketamine could cause petit mal seizures, which took the course of petit mal status. Ketamine was therefore also seen as a dangerous anaesthetic agent predisposing to convulsions, the use of which could lead to status epilepticus and irreversible brain damage. These conflicts of opinion should be resolved, as they are based on various misconceptions. (1) The terminology used for epilepsy by specialized clinicians is not always correctly applied in the context of animal experimentation. (2) The activation of epileptiform potentials in the EEG of animals cannot be interpreted as a reliable sign of epileptogenic efficiency in humans. (3) Too little regard is paid to the different actions of anaesthetic agents in various sites of the brain, at different doses and with different routes of administration. (4) The statistical significance and biological relevance of the study results are inadequate because the numbers of observations are too small. Epileptologists regret the insufficiency of animal models as paradigma for the study of efficiency of antiepileptic drugs in humans. The degree by which extensor spasms in the front paw of Gerbils of rats induced by pentylentetrazol or electric current are reduced after application of an anticonvulsive drug is no reliable measure of its anticonvulsive effect in humans.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Synergistic anticonvulsant effects of pregabalin and amlodipine on acute seizure model of epilepsy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Itefaq Hussain; Riaz, Azra; Khan, Rafeeq Alam; Siddiqui, Afaq Ahmed

    2017-08-01

    Status epilepticus is a life threatening neurological medical emergency. It may cause serious damage to the brain and even death in many cases if not treated properly. There is limited choice of drugs for the short term and long term management of status epilepticus and the dugs recommended for status epilepticus possess various side effects. The present study was designed to investigate synergistic anticonvulsant effects of pregabalin with amlodipine on acute seizure model of epilepsy in mice. Pentylenetetrazole was used to induce acute seizures which mimic status epilepticus. Pregabalin and amlodipine were used in combination to evaluate synergistic anti-seizure effects on acute seizure model of epilepsy in mice. Diazepam and valproate were used as reference dugs. The acute anti-convulsive activity of pregabalin with amlodipine was evaluated in vivo by the chemical induced seizures and their anti-seizure effects were compared with pentylenetetrazole, reference drugs and to their individual effects. The anti-seizure effects of tested drugs were recorded in seconds on seizure characteristics such as latency of onset of threshold seizures, rearing and fallings and Hind limbs tonic extensions. The seizure protection and mortality to the animals exhibited by the drugs were recorded in percentage. Combination regimen of pregabalin with amlodipine exhibited dose dependent significant synergistic anticonvulsant effects on acute seizures which were superior to their individual effects and equivalent to reference drugs.

  2. The efficacy of anticonvulsants on orofacial pain: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Wilhelmus J J M; Forouzanfar, Tymour

    2011-05-01

    Controversy exists about the effectiveness of anticonvulsants for the management of orofacial pain disorders. To ascertain appropriate therapies, a systematic review was conducted of existing randomized controlled trials. Trials were identified from PubMed, Cochrane, and Ovid Medline databases from 1962 through March 2010, from references in retrieved reports, and from references in review articles. Eight useful trials were identified for this review. Six studies were randomized placebo-controlled trials and 2 studies were randomized active-controlled. Two independent investigators reviewed these articles by using a 15-item checklist. Four studies were classified as "high quality." However, heterogeneity of the trials and the small sample sizes precluded the drawing of firm conclusions about the efficacy of the interventions studied on orofacial pain patients. There is limited to moderate evidence supporting the efficacy of commonly used anticonvulsants for treatment of patients with orofacial pain disorders. More randomized controlled trials are needed on the efficacy of anticonvulsants. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Age and activation determines the anticonvulsant effect of ifenprodil in rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 387, č. 8 (2014), s. 753-761 ISSN 0028-1298 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : NMDA receptors * NR2B subunit * anticonvulsant action * ontogeny * rat Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.471, year: 2014

  4. Anticonvulsant-induced rickets and nephrocalcinosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Keith K; Papneja, Koyelle

    2012-01-01

    Reported here is the case of a severely disabled young girl who developed Fanconi syndrome secondary to long-term valproic acid administration, ultimately leading to hypophosphatemic rickets. Although nephrocalcinosis is not a common feature in patients with proximal tubulopathy, the patient presented also with this condition, and the concomitant use of another anticonvulsant might have potentiated this condition. The purpose of this report is to increase awareness among healthcare providers of such rare but significant complications associated with anticonvulsants. PMID:22665570

  5. Adaptation of Lorke's method to determine and compare ED50 values: the cases of two anticonvulsants drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Acosta, Osvaldo; Meza-Toledo, Sergio Enrique; Anguiano-Robledo, Liliana; Valencia-Hernández, Ignacio; Chamorro-Cevallos, Germán

    2014-01-01

    We determined the median effective dose (ED50) values for the anticonvulsants phenobarbital and sodium valproate using a modification of Lorke's method. This modification allowed appropriate statistical analysis and the use of a smaller number of mice per compound tested. The anticonvulsant activities of phenobarbital and sodium valproate were evaluated in male CD1 mice by maximal electroshock (MES) and intraperitoneal administration of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ). The anticonvulsant ED50 values were obtained through modifications of Lorke's method that involved changes in the selection of the three first doses in the initial test and the fourth dose in the second test. Furthermore, a test was added to evaluate the ED50 calculated by the modified Lorke's method, allowing statistical analysis of the data and determination of the confidence limits for ED50. The ED50 for phenobarbital against MES- and PTZ-induced seizures was 16.3mg/kg and 12.7mg/kg, respectively. The sodium valproate values were 261.2mg/kg and 159.7mg/kg, respectively. These results are similar to those found using the traditional methods of finding ED50, suggesting that the modifications made to Lorke's method generate equal results using fewer mice while increasing confidence in the statistical analysis. This adaptation of Lorke's method can be used to determine median letal dose (LD50) or ED50 for compounds with other pharmacological activities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Lactation studies of anticonvulsants : A quality review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Douwe H.; Wieringa, Andre; Wegner, Ilse; Wilffert, Bob; Ter Horst, Peter G.J.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this review was to investigate the quality of the current literature on the transfer of anticonvulsants to breast milk to provide an overview of which anticonvulsants are in need of further research. METHODS: We reviewed the quality of the available lactation studies for 19

  7. Synthesis and anticonvulsant activity of some 2-pyrazolines derived from chalcones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagihan Beyhan

    2017-05-01

    All compounds were tested for their anticonvulsant activity using pentylenetetrazole induced seizure (PTZ and maximal electroshock seizure (MES tests in mice at a dose level of 50 mg/kg. Among the 2-pyrazoline-1-carbothioamide derivatives, 5-(2,6-dichlorophenyl-3-(thiophen-2-yl-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazole-1-carbothioamide (2e reduced grade-5 seizure activity and also increased survival rate in PTZ test. In MES test, 5-(4-methoxyphenyl-3-[4-(methylsulphonylphenyl]-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazole-1-carbothioamide(2g has not only decreased seizure severity, but also increased survival rate. Among the 2-pyrazoline-1-carboxamide derivatives, 3-(5-bromothiophen-2-yl-N-(4-chlorophenyl-5-(2,6-dichlorophenyl-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazole-1-carboxamide (3d having 5-bromothiophen and 2,6-dichlorophenyl moieties and N-(4-chlorophenyl-5-(2,6-dichlorophenyl-3-(5-chlorothiophen-2-yl-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazole-1-carboxamide (3e having 5-chlorothiophen and 2,6-dichlorophenyl moieties showed remarkable activities in PTZ test. Among all tested derivatives, compound 3d was found to be the most active one and reduced grade-5 seizure severity and also increased survival rate.

  8. Activity of the anticonvulsant lacosamide in experimental and human epilepsy via selective effects on slow Na+ channel inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtkamp, Dominik; Opitz, Thoralf; Niespodziany, Isabelle; Wolff, Christian; Beck, Heinz

    2017-01-01

    In human epilepsy, pharmacoresistance to antiepileptic drug therapy is a major problem affecting ~30% of patients with epilepsy. Many classical antiepileptic drugs target voltage-gated sodium channels, and their potent activity in inhibiting high-frequency firing has been attributed to their strong use-dependent blocking action. In chronic epilepsy, a loss of use-dependent block has emerged as a potential cellular mechanism of pharmacoresistance for anticonvulsants acting on voltage-gated sodium channels. The anticonvulsant drug lacosamide (LCM) also targets sodium channels, but has been shown to preferentially affect sodium channel slow inactivation processes, in contrast to most other anticonvulsants. We used whole-cell voltage clamp recordings in acutely isolated cells to investigate the effects of LCM on transient Na + currents. Furthermore, we used whole-cell current clamp recordings to assess effects on repetitive action potential firing in hippocampal slices. We show here that LCM exerts its effects primarily via shifting the slow inactivation voltage dependence to more hyperpolarized potentials in hippocampal dentate granule cells from control and epileptic rats, and from patients with epilepsy. It is important to note that this activity of LCM was maintained in chronic experimental and human epilepsy. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the efficacy of LCM in inhibiting high-frequency firing is undiminished in chronic experimental and human epilepsy. Taken together, these results show that LCM exhibits maintained efficacy in chronic epilepsy, in contrast to conventional use-dependent sodium channel blockers such as carbamazepine. They also establish that targeting slow inactivation may be a promising strategy for overcoming target mechanisms of pharmacoresistance. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  9. Excavating Anticonvulsant Compounds from Prescriptions of Traditional Chinese Medicine in the Treatment of Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zefeng; He, Xirui; Ma, Cuixia; Wu, Shaoping; Cuan, Ye; Sun, Ying; Bai, Yajun; Huang, Linhong; Chen, Xufei; Gao, Tian; Zheng, Xiaohui

    2018-05-08

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has a long history and been widely used in prevention and treatment of epilepsy in China. This paper is intended to review the advances in the active anticonvulsant compounds isolated from herbs in the prescription of TCM in the treatment of epilepsy. These compounds were introduced with the details including classification, CAS number specific structure and druggability data. Meanwhile, much of the research in these compounds in the last two decades has shown that they exhibited favorable pharmacological properties in treatment of epilepsy both in in vivo and in vitro models. In addition, in this present review, the evaluation of the effects of the anticonvulsant classical TCM prescriptions is discussed. According to these rewarding pharmacological effects and chemical substances, the prescription of TCM herbs could be an effective therapeutic strategy for epilepsy patients, and also could be a promising source for the development of new drugs.

  10. Group III mGlu receptor agonists potentiate the anticonvulsant effect of AMPA and NMDA receptor block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sarro, Giovambattista; Chimirri, Alba; Meldrum, Brian S

    2002-09-06

    We report the anticonvulsant action in DBA/2 mice of two mGlu Group III receptor agonists: (R,S)-4-phosphonophenylglycine, (R,S)-PPG, a compound with moderate mGlu8 selectivity, and of (1S,3R,4S)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,2,4-tricarboxylic acid, ACPT-1, a selective agonist for mGlu4alpha receptors. Both compounds, given intracerebroventricularly at doses which did not show marked anticonvulsant activity, produced a consistent shift to the left of the dose-response curves (i.e. enhanced the anticonvulsant properties) of 1-(4'-aminophenyl)-3,5-dihydro-7,8-dimethoxy-4H-2,3-benzodiazepin-4-one hydrochloride, CFM-2, a noncompetitive AMPA receptor antagonist, and 3-((+/-)-2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)-1-phosphonic acid, CPPene, a competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, in DBA/2 mice. In addition, (R,S)-PPG and ACPT-1 administered intracerebroventricularly prolonged the time course of the anticonvulsant properties of CFM-2 (33 micromol/kg, i.p.) and CPPene (3.3 micromol/kg, i.p.) administered intraperitoneally. We conclude that modest reduction of synaptic glutamate release by activation of Group III metabotropic receptors potentiates the anticonvulsant effect of AMPA and NMDA receptor blockade. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  11. Synthesis, Biological Activity, and Docking Study of Novel Isatin Coupled Thiazolidin-4-one Derivatives as Anticonvulsants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikalje, Anna P; Ansari, Altamash; Bari, Sanjay; Ugale, Vinod

    2015-06-01

    A series of 2-(substituted-phenyl)-3-(2-oxoindolin-3-ylidene)amino)-thiazolidin-4-one derivatives were designed and synthesized under microwave irradiation, using an eco-friendly, efficient, microwave-assisted synthetic protocol that involves cyclocondensation of 3-substituted benzylidine-hydrazono-indolin-2-one 3a-j with thioglycolic acid in dimethyl formamide (DMF) as solvent and anhydrous zinc chloride as a catalyst, keeping in view the structural requirement of the pharmacophore. The intermediate compounds 3a-j were obtained by condensation of the hydrazone of indoline-2,3-dione with aromatic aldehydes. The synthesized derivatives were evaluated for CNS depressant activity and anticonvulsant activity in mice using the maximal electroshock seizure (MES) and subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole (sc-PTZ) induced seizure tests. All the derivatives showed good CNS depressant activity and showed protection in the MES test, indicative of their ability to inhibit the seizure spread. A histopathological study was performed to evaluate liver toxicity caused by the synthesized compounds. The compounds were nontoxic. A computational study was performed, in which log P values were calculated experimentally. Virtual screening was performed by molecular docking of the designed compounds into the ATP binding sites of the NMDA and AMPA receptors, to predict if these compounds have analogous binding modes. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Role of nitric oxide in additive anticonvulsant effects of agmatine and morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payandemehr, Borna; Rahimian, Reza; Bahremand, Arash; Ebrahimi, Ali; Saadat, Seyedehpariya; Moghaddas, Peiman; Fadakar, Kaveh; Derakhshanian, Hoda; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2013-06-13

    The anticonvulsant effects of agmatine, an endogenous polyamine and a metabolite of l-arginine, have been shown in various experimental seizure models. Agmatine also potentiates the anti-seizure activity of morphine. The present study aimed to investigate a possible involvement of nitric oxide (NO) pathway in the protection by agmatine and morphine co-administration against pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) -induced seizure in male mice. To this end, the thresholds for the clonic seizures induced by the intravenous administration of PTZ, a GABA antagonist, were assessed. Intraperitoneal administration of morphine at lower dose (1mg/kg) increased the seizure threshold. Also intraperitoneal administration of agmatine (5 and 10mg/kg) increased the seizure threshold significantly. Combination of subeffective doses of morphine and agmatine led to potent anticonvulsant effects. Non-effective doses of morphine (0.1 and 0.5mg/kg) were able to induce anticonvulsant effects in mice pretreated with agmatine (3mg/kg). Concomitant administration of either the non-selective nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-NAME (1, 5mg/kg, i.p.) or the selective NOS inhibitor 7-NI (15, 30mg/kg, i.p.), with an ineffective combination of morphine (0.1mg/kg) plus agmatine (1mg/kg) produced significant anticonvulsant impacts. Moreover, the NO precursor, l-arginine (30, 60mg/kg, i.p.), inhibited the anticonvulsant action of agmatine (3mg/kg) plus morphine (0.5mg/kg) co-administration. Our results indicate that pretreatment of animals with agmatine enhances the anticonvulsant effects of morphine via a mechanism which may involve the NO pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The potential anticonvulsant activity of the ethanolic extracts of Achillea nobilis and Momordica charantia in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal A. Soliman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Context: Currently available antiepileptic drugs have debilitating adverse effects. Natural products and plants already used in traditional medicine can be a good place to start in the search for safer and more effective options. Aims: To investigate the anticonvulsant potential of Achillea nobilis and Momordica charantia extracts in maximal electroshock (MES, as well as pentylenetetrazole (PTZ- and strychnine nitrate (STN- induced seizure models in rats. Methods: For each model, eight groups of 21-day-old male Albino rats were used. The 1st group was kept as control, 2nd as standard (diazepam, 7.5 mg/kg; 3rd – 5th treated with A. nobilis (100, 200 and 300 mg/kg; and 6th – 8th administered M. charantia (100, 200 and 300 mg/kg. After 30 min, rats were exposed to a shock of 150 mA by a convulsiometer, via ear electrodes for 2 s (in MES test or sc injection of PTZ (85 mg/kg or STN (2.5 mg/kg. Results: A. nobilis and M. charantia extracts (200 and 300 mg/kg demonstrated dose-dependent anticonvulsant effect against MES-induced seizures. In the PTZ induced convulsion, A. nobilis and M. charantia (200 and 300 mg/kg significantly slowed the commencement of convulsions and minimized the duration of seizures. A. nobilis (300 mg/kg showed 60% protection in rats against STN induced seizures. In contrast, A. nobilis (100 and 200 mg/kg and M. charantia (100, 200 and 300 mg/kg showed no significant protection against STN-induced seizures in rats. Conclusions: The results of the present study suggest that both extracts exhibited marked anticonvulsant activities.

  14. Metabolic stability of new anticonvulsants in body fluids and organ homogenates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marszałek, Dorota; Goldnik, Anna; Pluciński, Franciszek; Mazurek, Aleksander P; Jakubiak, Anna; Lis, Ewa; Tazbir, Piotr; Koziorowska, Agnieszka

    2012-01-01

    The stability as a function of time of compounds with established anticonvulsant activity: picolinic acid benzylamide (Pic-BZA), picolinic acid 2-fluorobenzylamide (Pic-2-F-BZA), picolinic acid 3-fluorobenzylamide (Pic-3-F-BZA), picolinic acid 4-fluorobenzylamide (Pic-4-F-BZA) and picolinic acid 2-methylbenzylamide (Pic-2-Me-BZA) in body fluids and homogenates of body organs were determined after incubation. It was found that they decompose relatively rapidly in liver and kidney and are stable against enzymes present in body fluids and some organs. These results are consistent with the bond strength expressed as total energy of amide bonds (calculated by quantum chemical methods) in the studied anticonvulsants. The calculated values of the amide bond energy are: 199.4 kcal/mol, 200.2 kcal/mol, 207.5 kcal/mol, 208.4 kcal/mol and 198.2 kcal/mol, respectively. The strength of the amide bonds in the studied anticonvulsants correctly reflects their stability in liver or kidney.

  15. Effects of anticonvulsants in vivo on high affinity choline uptake in vitro in mouse hippocampal synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. A.; Richter, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of several anticonvulsant drugs on sodium-dependent high affinity choline uptake (HACU) in mouse hippocampal synaptosomes was investigated. HACU was measured in vitro after in vivo administration of the drug to mice. HACU was inhibited by drugs which have in common the ability to facilitate gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transmission, pentobarbitone, phenobarbitone, barbitone, diazepam, chloridiazepoxide, and valproic acid. Dose-response relationships were determined for these drugs and the drugs' potencies at inhibiting HACU correlated well with their anticonvulsant potencies. Clonazepam, ethosuximide, carbamazepine, and barbituric acid had no effect on HACU in the doses used while phenytoin and trimethadione stimulated HACU. These results suggest that certain anticonvulsants may elicit a part of their anticonvulsant activity by modulating cholinergic neurones. This effect may be mediated through a GABA mechanism. PMID:3978310

  16. Anticonvulsants for tinnitus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, C.E.; Rynja, S.P.; Zanten, G.A.; Rovers, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tinnitus is the perception of sound or noise in the absence of an external or internal acoustic stimulation. It is a common and potentially distressing symptom for which no adequate therapy exists. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of anticonvulsants in patients with chronic

  17. Anticonvulsant and Antioxidant Effects of Tilia americana var. mexicana and Flavonoids Constituents in the Pentylenetetrazole-Induced Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; González-Trujano, María Eva; Aguirre-Hernández, Eva; Ruíz-García, Matilde; Sampieri, Aristides; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Tilia genus is commonly used around the world for its central nervous system properties; it is prepared as tea and used as tranquilizing, anticonvulsant, and analgesic. In this study, anticonvulsant activity of the Tilia americana var. mexicana inflorescences and leaves was investigated by evaluating organic and aqueous extracts (100, 300, and 600 mg/kg, i.p.) and some flavonoids in the pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in mice. Moreover, antioxidant effect of these extracts and flavonoids was examined in an in vitro study by using spectrophotometric technique. Significant activity was observed in the methanol extract from inflorescences. An HPLC analysis of the methanol extract from inflorescences and leaves of Tilia allowed demonstrating the respective presence of some partial responsible flavonoid constituents: quercetin (20.09 ± 1.20 μg/mg and 3.39 ± 0.10 μg/mg), rutin (3.52 ± 0.21 μg/mg and 8.94 ± 0.45 μg/mg), and isoquercitrin (1.74 ± 0.01 μg/mg and 1.24 ± 0.13 μg/mg). In addition, significant but different antioxidant properties were obtained among the flavonoids and the extracts investigated. Our results provide evidence of the anticonvulsant activity of Tilia reinforcing its utility for central nervous system diseases whose mechanism of action might involve partial antioxidant effects due to the presence of flavonoids. PMID:25197430

  18. Anticonvulsant and Neuroprotective Activities of Phragmanthera austroarabica Extract in Pentylenetetrazole-Kindled Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hibah M. Aldawsari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anticonvulsant and neuroprotective activity of Phragmanthera austroarabica extract were tested in pentylenetetrazole-kindled mice. All the chemical constituents of the plant extract were identified. Additionally, the extract was standardized and proved to contain total phenolic contents equal to 379.92±1.32 mg gallic acid equivalents/g dry plant extract. Induction of kindling was achieved by repeated intraperitoneal administration of pentylenetetrazole (35 mg/kg twice weekly. Male albino mice were given P. austroarabica extract (200, 400, or 800 mg/kg. The two higher doses (400 or 800 mg/kg of the extract significantly caused notable reduction in seizure activity and hippocampal malondialdehyde level compared to pentylenetetrazole control group. The highest dose enhanced cortical GSH level and showed intact DNA in the laddering assay. Upon studying the neuroprotective effect, mice treated with the higher dose of the extract demonstrated an improvement in the percent of surviving neurons in the cortex and hippocampus. We concluded that P. austroarabica extract ameliorated seizure activity and protected cortical and hippocampal neurons against pentylenetetrazole-induced kindling in mice.

  19. Anticonvulsant potentials of ethanolic extract of Eleusine indica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ette Okon Ettebong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the anticonvulsant potentials of ethanolic extract of Eleusine indica. Methods: Albino Wistar mice were separated into five groups with six animals in each group and thereafter pretreated with distilled water, various doses of the extract (200–600 mg/kg and standard drug diazepam (0.5 mg/kg. Thirty minutes later, pentylenetetrazole (70 mg/kg, aminophylline (280 mg/kg and isoniazid (250 mg/kg were used to induce convulsions by intraperitoneal administration. These mice were then placed in plexiglas cages and monitored for the occurrence of seizures over a thirty-minute time period. The latency of convulsions, duration of tonic convulsions and mortality protection were recorded. Data obtained were analyzed using GraphPad InStat 3.10. Results: The results showed that the extract exhibited a dose-dependent increase in the latency of clonic convulsions and decrease in duration of tonic convulsions as compared to the control and these effects were statistically significant (P < 0.001. The extract also provided protection against the mortality which was similar to that produced by the standard drug diazepam. Conclusions: The significant increase in the latency of clonic convulsions and decrease in duration of tonic convulsions caused by the extract show anticonvulsant activity and corroborate with the claims of the traditional use of the plant as an anticonvulsant remedy.

  20. Anticonvulsants and thyroid function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, P P; Bates, D; Howe, J G; Ratcliffe, W A; Schardt, C W; Heath, A; Evered, D C

    1978-01-01

    Serum total and free thyroid hormone concentrations were estimated in 42 patients with epilepsy taking anticonvulsants (phenytoin, phenobarbitone, and carbamazepine either singly or in combination). There was a significant reduction in total thyroxine (TT4), free thyroxine (FT4), and free triiodothyronine (FT3) in the treated group compared with controls. Free hormone concentrations were lower than total hormone concentrations, suggesting that increased clearance of thyroid hormones occurs in patients receiving anticonvulsants. Detailed analysis indicated that phenytoin had a significant depressant effect on TT4, FT4, FT3, and reverse T3 (rT3). Phenobarbitone and carbamazepine had no significant main effects, but there were significant interactions between phenytoin and carbamazepine for TT4 and FT4. phenobarbitone and carbamazepine for FT3, and phenytoin and phenobarbitone for rT3. PMID:656820

  1. Anticonvulsants to treat post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hee Ryung; Woo, Young Sup; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2014-09-01

    We reviewed the existing literature on the efficacy of anticonvulsants in treating post-traumatic stress disorder. We performed a literature search using PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane database on 30 September 2013. Randomized,controlled studies that investigated the efficacy of anticonvulsants for post-traumatic stress disorder were included in this review. Studies with retrospective designs, case reports and case series were excluded. A total of seven studies met the inclusion criteria for this review. Three studies used topiramate with negative findings regarding its efficacy. Two studies used divalproex, both of which failed to show superiority over placebo. One study used lamotrigine, with favourable results, and one study used tiagabine, with negative results. Future long-term studies with larger sample sizes are needed to investigate the clinical utility of anticonvulsants for posttraumatic stress disorder treatment.

  2. Anticonvulsant and Anxiolytic Properties of the Roots of Grewia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and Methods: The ethanolic extract of the root of G. bicolourat (200, 400 and 800 mg/kg, i.p was studied for its anticonvulsant effect on four in vivo rat models (Maximal Electroshock Seizure (MES), Pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-, picrotoxin (PIC)- and Strychnine (STR) - induced seizures). Simple activity meter was used ...

  3. Potent analgesic effects of anticonvulsants on peripheral thermal nociception in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorovic, Slobodan M; Rastogi, A J; Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna

    2003-01-01

    Anticonvulsant agents are commonly used to treat neuropathic pain conditions because of their effects on voltage- and ligand-gated channels in central pain pathways. However, their interaction with ion channels in peripheral pain pathways is poorly understood. Therefore, we studied the potential analgesic effects of commonly used anticonvulsant agents in peripheral nociception. We injected anticonvulsants intradermally into peripheral receptive fields of sensory neurons in the hindpaws of adult rats, and studied pain perception using the model of acute thermal nociception. Commonly used anticonvulsants such as voltage-gated Na+ channel blockers, phenytoin and carbamazepine, and voltage-gated Ca2+ channel blockers, gabapentin and ethosuximide, induced dose-dependent analgesia in the injected paw, with ED50 values of 0.30, 0.32 and 8, 410 μg per 100 μl, respectively. Thermal nociceptive responses were not affected in the contralateral, noninjected paws, indicating a lack of systemic effects with doses of anticonvulsants that elicited local analgesia. Hill slope coefficients for the tested anticonvulsants indicate that the dose–response curve was less steep for gabapentin than for phenytoin, carbamazepine and ethosuximide. Our data strongly suggest that cellular targets like voltage-gated Na+ and Ca2+ channels, similar to those that mediate the effects of anticonvulsant agents in the CNS, may exist in the peripheral nerve endings of rat sensory neurons. Thus, peripherally applied anticonvulsants that block voltage-gated Na+ and Ca2+ channels may be useful analgesics. PMID:12970103

  4. ANTICONVULSANT AND ANTIEPILEPTIC ACTIONS OF 2-DEOXY-DGLUCOSE IN EPILEPSY MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafstrom, Carl E.; Ockuly, Jeffrey C.; Murphree, Lauren; Valley, Matthew T.; Roopra, Avtar; Sutula, Thomas P.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Conventional anticonvulsants reduce neuronal excitability through effects on ion channels and synaptic function. Anticonvulsant mechanisms of the ketogenic diet remain incompletely understood. Since carbohydrates are restricted in patients on the ketogenic diet, we evaluated the effects of limiting carbohydrate availability by reducing glycolysis using the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) in experimental models of seizures and epilepsy. Methods Acute anticonvulsant actions of 2DG were assessed in vitro in rat hippocampal slices perfused with 7.5mM [K+]o, 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), or bicuculline and in vivo against seizures evoked by 6 Hz stimulation in mice, audiogenic stimulation in Fring’s mice, and maximal electroshock and subcutaneous Metrazol in rats. Chronic antiepileptic effects of 2DG were evaluated in rats kindled from olfactory bulb or perforant path. Results 2DG (10mM) reduced interictal epileptiform bursts induced by high [K+]o, 4-AP and bicuculline, and electrographic seizures induced by high [K+]o in CA3 of hippocampus. 2DG reduced seizures evoked by 6 Hz stimulation in mice (ED50 = 79.7 mg/kg) and audiogenic stimulation in Fring’s mice (ED50 = 206.4 mg/kg). 2DG exerted chronic antiepileptic action by increasing afterdischarge thresholds in perforant path (but not olfactory bulb) kindling and caused a 2-fold slowing in progression of kindled seizures at both stimulation sites. 2DG did not protect against maximal electroshock or Metrazol seizures. Interpretation The glycolytic inhibitor 2DG exerts acute anticonvulsant and chronic antiepileptic actions and has a novel pattern of effectiveness in preclinical screening models. These results identify metabolic regulation as a potential therapeutic target for seizure suppression and modification of epileptogenesis. PMID:19399874

  5. Anticonvulsants for fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üçeyler, Nurcan; Sommer, Claudia; Walitt, Brian; Häuser, Winfried

    2013-10-16

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a clinically well-defined chronic condition of unknown aetiology characterised by chronic widespread pain that often co-exists with sleep problems and fatigue. People often report high disability levels and poor health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Drug therapy focuses on reducing key symptoms and disability, and improving HRQoL. Anticonvulsants (antiepileptic drugs) are drugs frequently used for the treatment of chronic pain syndromes. To assess the benefits and harms of anticonvulsants for treating FM symptoms. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 8, 2013), MEDLINE (1966 to August 2013), PsycINFO (1966 to August 2013), SCOPUS (1980 to August 2013) and the reference lists of reviewed articles for published studies and www.clinicaltrials.gov (to August 2013) for unpublished trials. We selected randomised controlled trials of any formulation of anticonvulsants used for the treatment of people with FM of any age. Two review authors independently extracted the data of all included studies and assessed the risks of bias of the studies. We resolved discrepancies by discussion. We included eight studies: five with pregabalin and one study each with gabapentin, lacosamide and levetiracetam. A total of 2480 people were included into anticonvulsants groups and 1099 people in placebo groups. The median therapy phase of the studies was 13 weeks. The amount and quality of evidence were insufficient to draw definite conclusions on the efficacy and safety of gabapentin, lacosamide and levetiracetam in FM. The amount and quality of evidence was sufficient to draw definite conclusions on the efficacy and safety of pregabalin in FM. Therefore, we focused on our interpretation of the evidence for pregabalin due to our greater certainty about its effects and its greater relevance to clinical practice. All pregabalin studies had a low risk of bias. Reporting a 50% or greater reduction in pain was more frequent with

  6. Retrospective Analysis of Nonepileptic Patients With Isolated Epileptiform Discharges Treated With Anticonvulsants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swatzyna, Ronald J; Tarnow, Jay D; Proler, Meyer L; Roark, Alexandra J; MacInerney, Erin K; Kozlowski, Gerald P

    2017-09-01

    Many antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have been tested on nonepileptic patients with a variety of diagnoses. The Food and Drug Administration has only approved certain AEDs for a small number of psychiatric conditions. There are few studies of nonepileptic patients that recommend an empirical trial of AEDs when isolated epileptiform discharges (IEDs) are identified in the electroencephalogram (EEG). However, no trials have been published. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the outcome of treating nonepileptic patients with AEDs when IEDs are present. Refractory cases were reviewed from a multidisciplinary practice whose EEG readings contained IEDs and were subsequently medicated with anticonvulsants by the clinic's psychiatrist. The psychiatrist's progress notes were assessed to determine the impact of adding anticonvulsants based on parent reports, teacher reports, and clinical observation. The final sample was composed of 76 refractory cases. Of the 76 patients treated with anticonvulsants, the majority were found to be improved in follow-up progress notes: 65 improved (85.53%), 6 unchanged (7.89%), and 5 more severe (6.58%). These observational findings suggest that further studies will be needed to show that IEDs may predict positive treatment outcome to anticonvulsant medication and act as a step toward an evidence-based treatment. Also, EEG screening may prove to be useful for refractory cases regardless of age, gender, or diagnosis.

  7. Anticonvulsant Effect of the Aqueous Extract and Essential Oil of Carum Carvi L. Seeds in a Pentylenetetrazol Model of Seizure in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showraki, Alireza; Emamghoreishi, Masoumeh; Oftadegan, Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carum carvi L. (caraway), known as black zeera in Iran, has been indicated for the treatment of epilepsy in Iranian folk medicine. This study evaluated whether the aqueous extract and essential oil of caraway seeds have anticonvulsant effects in mice. Methods: The anticonvulsant effects of the aqueous extract (200, 400, 800, 1600, and 3200 mg/kg, i.p.) and essential oil (25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, i.p.) of caraway were assessed using pentylenetetrazol (PTZ; 95 mg/kg i.p.) induced convulsions. Diazepam (3 mg/kg) was used as positive control. The latency time before the onset of myoclonic, clonic, and tonic convulsions and the percentage of mortality were recorded. In addition, the effect of caraway on neuromuscular coordination was evaluated using the rotarod performance test. Results: The extract and essential oil dose-dependently increased the latency time to the onset of myoclonic (ED50, 1257 and 62.2 mg/kg, respectively) and clonic (ED50, 929 and 42.3 mg/kg, respectively) seizures. The extract and essential oil of caraway prevented the animals from tonic seizure with ED50s of 2142.4 and 97.6 mg/kg, respectively. The extract and essential oil of caraway protected 28.6 and 71.4% of the animals from PTZ-induced death, respectively, and had no significant effect on neuromuscular coordination. Conclusion: This study showed that the aqueous extract and essential oil of caraway had anticonvulsant properties. However, the essential oil was more potent and effective than was the aqueous extract as an anticonvulsant. Additionally, the anticonvulsant effect of caraway was not due to a muscle relaxant activity. These findings support the acclaimed antiepileptic effect of caraway in folk medicine and propose its potential use in petit mal seizure in humans. PMID:27217604

  8. Suspected zonisamide-related anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinet, Audrey; Sammut, Veronique

    2017-12-15

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 2-year-old neutered male domestic shorthair cat was evaluated for sudden onset of cluster seizures. CLINICAL FINDINGS At an emergency clinic, the cat had hyperimmunoglobulinemia and thrombocytopenia. On referral, treatment with levetiracetam, zonisamide, and phenobarbital initially provided good control of cluster seizure activity (attributable to epilepsy of unknow origin). Two weeks later, assessments revealed that serum phenobarbital concentration was within the ideal range but serum zonisamide concentration exceeded the recommended therapeutic range. The dosage of zonisamide was therefore decreased. Four days after dosage reduction, the cat developed generalized lymphadenopathy. Cytologic analysis of lymph node aspirate samples revealed a heterogeneous population of well-differentiated lymphocytes, interpreted as marked reactivity. Although neoplasia could not be ruled out, hypersensitivity to phenobarbital was suspected, and this treatment was discontinued. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Despite cessation of phenobarbital administration, generalized peripheral lymphadenopathy progressed and hyperglobulinemia and cytopenias developed. These abnormalities resolved after discontinuation of zonisamide administration. The cat remained seizure free with no recurrence of the aforementioned concerns after reinstitution of phenobarbital treatment. CLINICAL RELEVANCE To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of zonisamide-related lymphadenopathy, hyperglobulinemia, and cytopenias in a cat. Anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome is well documented in human medicine, but little information has been published in the veterinary medical literature. Although the effects of anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome in this cat were serious, these effects were reversible with treatment discontinuation.

  9. Effect of enzyme inducing anticonvulsants on ethosuximide pharmacokinetics in epileptic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    GIACCONE, M.; BARTOLI, A.; GATTI, G.; MARCHISELLI, R.; PISANI, F.; LATELLA, M.A.; PERUCCA, E.

    1996-01-01

    1To assess the effect of enzyme inducing anticonvulsants on ethosuximide pharmacokinetics, plasma ethosuximide concentrations after a single oral dose (500 mg) of the drug were compared in 12 healthy control subjects and 10 epileptic patients receiving chronic therapy with phenobarbitone, phenytoin and/or carbamazepine. 2Compared with controls, epileptic patients showed markedly shorter ethosuximide half-lives (29.0±7.8 vs 53.7±14.3 h, means±s.d., Panticonvulsants, the effect probably being mediated by stimulation of cytochrome CYP3A activity. 4The enhancement of ethosuximide clearance in patients comedicated with enzyme inducing anticonvulsants is likely to be clinically relevant. Higher ethosuximide dosages will be required to achieve therapeutic drug concentrations in these patients. PMID:8799524

  10. Towards cheminformatics-based estimation of drug therapeutic index: Predicting the protective index of anticonvulsants using a new quantitative structure-index relationship approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shangying; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Xin; Qin, Chu; Tao, Lin; Zhang, Cheng; Yang, Sheng Yong; Chen, Yu Zong; Chui, Wai Keung

    2016-06-01

    The overall efficacy and safety profile of a new drug is partially evaluated by the therapeutic index in clinical studies and by the protective index (PI) in preclinical studies. In-silico predictive methods may facilitate the assessment of these indicators. Although QSAR and QSTR models can be used for predicting PI, their predictive capability has not been evaluated. To test this capability, we developed QSAR and QSTR models for predicting the activity and toxicity of anticonvulsants at accuracy levels above the literature-reported threshold (LT) of good QSAR models as tested by both the internal 5-fold cross validation and external validation method. These models showed significantly compromised PI predictive capability due to the cumulative errors of the QSAR and QSTR models. Therefore, in this investigation a new quantitative structure-index relationship (QSIR) model was devised and it showed improved PI predictive capability that superseded the LT of good QSAR models. The QSAR, QSTR and QSIR models were developed using support vector regression (SVR) method with the parameters optimized by using the greedy search method. The molecular descriptors relevant to the prediction of anticonvulsant activities, toxicities and PIs were analyzed by a recursive feature elimination method. The selected molecular descriptors are primarily associated with the drug-like, pharmacological and toxicological features and those used in the published anticonvulsant QSAR and QSTR models. This study suggested that QSIR is useful for estimating the therapeutic index of drug candidates. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Evaluation of anticonvulsant and nootropic effect of ondansetron in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, S; Agarwal, N B; Mediratta, P K; Sharma, K K

    2012-09-01

    The role of serotonin receptors have been implicated in various types of experimentally induced seizures. Ondansetron is a highly selective 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 (5-HT(3)) receptor antagonist used as antiemetic agent for chemotherapy-, and radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. The present study was carried out to examine the effect of ondansetron on electroshock, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures and cognitive functions in mice. Ondansetron was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) at doses of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg (single dose) to observe its effect on the increasing current electroshock seizure (ICES) test and PTZ-induced seizure test. In addition, a chronic study (21 days) was also performed to assess the effects of ondansetron on electroshock-induced convulsions and cognitive functions. The effect on cognition was assessed by elevated plus maze and passive avoidance paradigms. Phenytoin (25 mg/kg, i.p.) was used as a standard anticonvulsant drug and piracetam (200 mg/kg) was administered as a standard nootropic drug. The results were compared with an acute study, wherein it was found that the administration of ondansetron (1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg) significantly raised the seizure-threshold current as compared to control group in the ICES test. Similar results were observed after chronic administration of ondansetron. In PTZ test, ondansetron in all the three tested doses failed to show protective effect against PTZ-induced seizure test. Administration of ondansetron for 21 days significantly decreased the transfer latency (TL) and prolonged the step-down latency (SDL). The results of present study suggest the anticonvulsant and memory-enhancing effect of ondansetron in mice.

  12. Pixe analysis of trace elements in tissues of rats treated with anticonvulsants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, R. W.; Van Rinsvelt, H. A.; Kinyua, A. M.; O'Neill, M. P.; Wilder, B. J.; Houdayer, A.; Hinrichsen, P. F.

    1987-04-01

    Several lines of evidence implicate metals in epilepsy. Anticonvulsant drugs are noted to alter levels of metals in humans and animals. PIXE analysis was used to investigate effects of three anticonvulsant drugs on tissue and brain cortex trace elements. The content of zinc and copper was increased in liver and spleen of rats treated with anticonvulsants while selenium was decreased in cortex.

  13. PIXE analysis of trace elements in tissues of rats treated with anticonvulsants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurd, R.W.; Van Rinsvelt, H.A.; Kinyua, A.M.; O' Neill, M.P.; Wilder, B.J.; Houdayer, A.; Hinrichsen, P.F.

    1987-04-01

    Several lines of evidence implicate metals in epilepsy. Anticonvulsant drugs are noted to alter levels of metals in humans and animals. PIXE analysis was used to investigate effects of three anticonvulsant drugs on tissue and brain cortex trace elements. The content of zinc and copper was increased in liver and spleen of rats treated with anticonvulsants while selenium was decreased in cortex.

  14. PIXE analysis of trace elements in tissues of rats treated with anticonvulsants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurd, R.W.; Van Rinsvelt, H.A.; Kinyua, A.M.; O'Neill, M.P.; Wilder, B.J.; Florida Univ., Gainesville; Houdayer, A.; Hinrichsen, P.F.

    1987-01-01

    Several lines of evidence implicate metals in epilepsy. Anticonvulsant drugs are noted to alter levels of metals in humans and animals. PIXE analysis was used to investigate effects of three anticonvulsant drugs on tissue and brain cortex trace elements. The content of zinc and copper was increased in liver and spleen of rats treated with anticonvulsants while selenium was decreased in cortex. (orig.)

  15. Skeletal mass in patients receiving chronic anticonvulsant therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanzi, I.; Roginsky, M.S.; Rosen, A.; Cohn, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    The technique of in vivo total body neutron activation analysis was used to measure total body calcium (TBCa), a sensitive and precise index of skeletal mass, expressed as the Ca ratio (TBCa observed/TBCa predicted). 23 unselected, ambulatory, noninstitutionalized, adult epileptic patients under long-term anticonvulsant therapy were studied. Ca ratio was normal in 20 of the patients, low in only 2 and borderline in 1 patient. Plasma alkaline phosphatase values were elevated in half the subjects. Plasma Ca (uncorrected) was in the normal range in all. Serum 25-hydroxvitamin D (25-OHD) was low in 67% of the subjects, but only 1 patient had a value below 5 ng/ml. There was no correlation between the Ca ratio and the alkaline phosphatase or 25-OHD values. No radiographic or other evidences of osteomalacia were observed. This study does not support the notion of a prevalence of osteopenia in ambulatory, noninstitutionalized, adult epileptic patients receiving chronic anticonvulsant therapy in this geographical area despite the frequent findings of biochemical abnormalities.

  16. Evidence for use of mood stabilizers and anticonvulsants in the treatment of nonaffective disorders in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaladoss, Alfred; Roberts, Nasreen; Amaladoss, Franklin

    2010-01-01

    Mood stabilizers and anticonvulsants have been frequently used to control behaviors in children and adolescent with nonaffective disorders. The purpose of this study was to review the literature to evaluate the evidence of these agents as treatment options in this subset of patients. We reviewed all the literature between 1949 and 2009 on the use of anticonvulsants and mood stabilizers in controlling severe behavior dysregulation and aggression in child and adolescent who do not meet the criteria for any mood disorder. The review revealed a total of 19 studies. Of the different mood stabilizers/anticonvulsants, both lithium and divalproex showed some promise in treating children and adolescents with nonmood disorders. Larger studies are nevertheless needed to support the ongoing use of these current anticonvulsants and mood stabilizers in children and adolescents with nonmood disorders. Also, further investigation to the potential use in the long term would need to be established, bearing in mind the balance of side effects and treatment benefit.

  17. Anticonvulsant Efficacy in Sturge-Weber Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Emma H.; Kossoff, Eric H.; Bachur, Catherine D.; Gholston, Milton; Hahn, Jihoon; Widlus, Matthew; Comi, Anne M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We analyzed individuals with epilepsy due to Sturge-Weber syndrome to determine which anticonvulsants provided optimal seizure control and which resulted in the fewest side effects. METHODS One-hundred-eight records from a single center were retrospectively analyzed for Sturge-Weber syndrome brain involvement, epilepsy, Sturge-Weber syndrome neuroscores, and currently used anticonvulsants. RESULTS Of the fourteen anticonvulsants that had been employed, the most often used agents were oxcarbazepine or carbamazepine, and levetiracetam. Individuals whose seizures at the most recent visit were fully controlled (seizure-free) for 6 months or longer were more likely to have ever tried, or currently used, oxcarbazepine or carbamazepine than those with uncontrolled seizures. Thirty-nine of 69 individuals (56.5%) were seizure-free with oxcarbazepine or carbamazepine history versus 11 of 35 individuals (31.4%) who had not taken these agents (P anticonvulsants versus 12 of 42 (28.6%) not taking them (P < 0.01). Patients with seizure control for 6 months or longer were less likely to have ever tried, or to currently be taking, levetiracetam than those without control. Sixteen of 56 individuals (28.6%) were seizure-free with levetiracetam history versus 34 of 48 (70.8%) without it (P < 0.001); 14 of 43 individuals (32.6%) were seizure-free and currently taking levetiracetam versus 36 of 61 (59.0%) not taking it (P < 0.01). When topiramate was added as second-line medication, five of nine patients (55.6%) experienced decreased seizure severity, and worsening of glaucoma was not reported. CONCLUSIONS Carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine were associated with better seizure control than levetiracetam in this Sturge-Weber syndrome cohort and so may be preferred as the initial therapy. When used as adjunctive therapy, topiramate was effective in this limited analysis without a clear increased incidence of glaucoma. PMID:26997037

  18. Concurrent Anticonvulsant/Ketogenic Diet Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, studied retrospectively the comparative efficacy of six most frequently used anticonvulsants when employed in combination with the ketogenic diet (KD for treatment of 115 children with epilepsy.

  19. Anticonvulsant effects of Searsia dentata (Anacardiaceae) leaf extract in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mikael Egebjerg; Baldwin, Roger A; Niquet, Jerome

    2010-01-01

    Searsia species are used in South Africa to treat epilepsy. Previous studies have demonstrated an in vitro N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonistic effect of the ethanolic leaf extract. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential anticonvulsant properties of the ethanolic ext...

  20. Association between anticonvulsant drugs and teeth-grinding in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, A O L; Dos Santos, M T B R; Mendes, F M; Ciamponi, A L

    2014-09-01

    The relation between teeth-grinding and the use of drugs acting on the central nervous system of cerebral palsy (CP) patients has not yet been described. The aim of this research was to evaluate the presence or absence of teeth-grinding (sleep and/or awake periods) in normal and in CP children and adolescents, as well as the association of teeth-grinding and use of anticonvulsant drugs. The sample consisted of 207 children and adolescents, divided into three groups: G1, individuals with CP who did not take anticonvulsant drugs; G2, individuals with CP administered medications on a regular basis; and CG, normal individuals. Logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate the association of teeth-grinding with some variables. No significant statistical differences were observed regarding the presence or absence of teeth-grinding when G1 and G2 were compared. However, compared with the CG, a statistically significant difference was determined, with the CG showing fewer children presenting teeth-grinding (P grinding. CP children and adolescents show a greater and significant presence of grinding of the teeth compared with normal individuals. Subjects taking barbiturate drugs showed greater presence of teeth-grinding, than those who were taking medications from the other groups of anticonvulsant drugs. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Prophylactic Anticonvulsants in patients with brain tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsyth, P.A.; Weaver, S.; Fulton, D.

    2003-01-01

    We conducted a clinical trial to determine if prophylactic anticonvulsants in brain tumour patients (without prior seizures) reduced seizure frequency. We stopped accrual at 100 patients on the basis of the interim analysis. One hundred newly diagnosed brain tumour patients received anticonvulsants (AC Group) or not (No AC Group) in this prospective randomized unblinded study. Sixty patients had metastatic, and 40 had primary brain tumours. Forty-six (46%) patients were randomized to the AC Group and 54 (54%) to the No AC Group. Median follow-up was 5.44 months (range 0.13 -30.1 months). Seizures occurred in 26 (26%) patients, eleven in the AC Group and 15 in the No AC Group. Seizure-free survivals were not different; at three months 87% of the AC Group and 90% of the No AC Group were seizure-free (log rank test, p=0.98). Seventy patients died (unrelated to seizures) and survival rates were equivalent in both groups (median survival = 6.8 months versus 5.6 months, respectively; log rank test, p=0.50). We then terminated accrual at 100 patients because seizure and survival rates were much lower than expected; we would need ≥900 patients to have a suitably powered study. These data should be used by individuals contemplating a clinical trial to determine if prophylactic anticonvulsants are effective in subsets of brain tumour patients (e.g. only anaplastic astrocytomas). When taken together with the results of a similar randomized trial, prophylactic anticonvulsants are unlikely to be effective or useful in brain tumour patients who have not had a seizure. (author)

  2. Prophylactic Anticonvulsants in patients with brain tumour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsyth, P.A. [Depts. of Oncology and Clinical Neurosciences, Univ. of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Weaver, S. [Depts. of Neurology and Medicine, Albany Medical College, Albany, New York (United States); Fulton, D. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute and Dept. of Medicine/Neurology, Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2003-05-01

    We conducted a clinical trial to determine if prophylactic anticonvulsants in brain tumour patients (without prior seizures) reduced seizure frequency. We stopped accrual at 100 patients on the basis of the interim analysis. One hundred newly diagnosed brain tumour patients received anticonvulsants (AC Group) or not (No AC Group) in this prospective randomized unblinded study. Sixty patients had metastatic, and 40 had primary brain tumours. Forty-six (46%) patients were randomized to the AC Group and 54 (54%) to the No AC Group. Median follow-up was 5.44 months (range 0.13 -30.1 months). Seizures occurred in 26 (26%) patients, eleven in the AC Group and 15 in the No AC Group. Seizure-free survivals were not different; at three months 87% of the AC Group and 90% of the No AC Group were seizure-free (log rank test, p=0.98). Seventy patients died (unrelated to seizures) and survival rates were equivalent in both groups (median survival = 6.8 months versus 5.6 months, respectively; log rank test, p=0.50). We then terminated accrual at 100 patients because seizure and survival rates were much lower than expected; we would need {>=}900 patients to have a suitably powered study. These data should be used by individuals contemplating a clinical trial to determine if prophylactic anticonvulsants are effective in subsets of brain tumour patients (e.g. only anaplastic astrocytomas). When taken together with the results of a similar randomized trial, prophylactic anticonvulsants are unlikely to be effective or useful in brain tumour patients who have not had a seizure. (author)

  3. Synthesis, anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anticonvulsant activities of some new 4,6-dimethoxy-5-(heterocyclesbenzofuran starting from naturally occurring visnagin

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    E.R. El-Sawy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Novel 3-(4,6-dimethoxybenzofuran-5-yl-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazole-4-carboxaldehyde (3 and 3-chloro-3-(4,6-dimethoxybenzofuran-5-ylpropenal (4 were prepared via Vilsmeier–Haack reaction of 1-(4,6-dimethoxybenzofuran-5-ylethanone (1 and its hydrazone derivative 2. Reaction of compound 4 with some hydrazine derivatives, namely hydrazine hydrate, phenylhydrazine and benzylhydrazine hydrochloride led to the formation of pyrazole derivatives 5–8, respectively. On the other hand, reaction of compound 4 with thiourea, urea or guanidine gave the pyrimidine derivatives 9–11, respectively. Reaction of amino compound 11 with acetic anhydride, benzoyl chloride and benzenesulphonyl chloride yielded N-substituted pyrimidine derivatives 12–14, respectively. Reaction of diazonium salt of compound 11 with sodium azide afforded azidopyrimidine derivative 15, which upon reaction with ethyl acetoacetate gave 1,2,3-triazole derivative 16. Acid catalyzed reaction of 11 with p-nitrobenzaldehyde gave Schiff base 17, which cyclized upon reaction with thioglycolic acid or chloroacetyl chloride to give thiazolidin-4-one 18 and azetidin-2-one 19, respectively. The newly synthesized compounds were tested for their anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anticonvulsant activities. Depending on the obtained results, the newly synthesized compounds possess significant anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anticonvulsant activities.

  4. Novel Hybrid Anticonvulsants Derived from Pyrrolidine-2,5-dione Scaffold with Broad Spectrum of Activity in the Preclinical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Krzysztof

    2017-01-01

    The multifunctional ligands application is an emerging approach in drug delivery, mainly in the treatment of diseases with complex pathology, such as Alzheimer's, cancer, and epilepsy. Using this method many biomolecules with different properties are combined to form a single unit that can provide a complex broad spectrum activity. Thus, a new type of hybrid anticonvulsants based on the pyrrolidine-2,5-dione frame are detailed with the aim of acquiring more effective antiepileptic drugs (AED) that could suppress various human convulsions. These hybrid molecules attach to the chemical particles of clinically relevant AEDs such as ethosuximide, levetiracetam, and lacosamide. As a result of this hybridization process the compounds obtained were effective in three most important animal epilepsy models, namely the maximal electroshock seizure (MES) test, the subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole (scPTZ) test, and the six-Hertz (6 Hz) model in mice. These substances displayed wider spectrum of protection, more potent efficacy, and better safety profile than the aforementioned AEDs. Several compounds were also active in the formalin model of persistent pain in mice. The in vitro ligand binding studies have proved that the most conceivable molecular mechanism of anticonvulsant and antinociceptive action was the influence on the neuronal voltage-sensitive sodium and L-type calcium channels. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Anticonvulsant effect of time-restricted feeding in a pilocarpine-induced seizure model: Metabolic and epigenetic implications.

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    Jorge eLandgrave-Gómez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new generation of antiepileptic drugs has emerged; however, one-third of epilepsy patients do not properly respond to pharmacological treatments. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether time-restricted feeding has an anticonvulsant effect and whether this restrictive diet promotes changes in energy metabolism and epigenetic modifications in a pilocarpine-induced seizure model. To resolve our hypothesis, one group of rats had free access to food and water ad libitum (AL and a second group underwent a time-restricted feeding (TRF schedule. We used the lithium-pilocarpine model to induce status epilepticus (SE, and behavioral seizure monitoring was analyzed. Additionally, an electroencephalography (EEG recording was performed to verify the effect of TRF on cortical electrical activity after a pilocarpine injection. For biochemical analysis, animals were sacrificed 24 hours after SE and hippocampal homogenates were used to evaluate the proteins related to metabolism and chromatin structure. Our results showed that TRF had an anticonvulsant effect as measured by the prolonged latency of forelimb clonus seizure, a decrease in the seizure severity score and fewer animals reaching SE. Additionally, the power of the late phase EEG recordings in the AL group was significantly higher than the TRF group. Moreover, we found that TRF is capable of inducing alterations in signaling pathways that regulate energy metabolism, including an increase in the phosphorylation of AMP dependent kinase (AMPK and a decrease in the phosphorylation of Akt kinase. Furthermore, we found that TRF was able to significantly increase the beta hydroxybutyrate (β-HB concentration, an endogenous inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs. Finally, we found a significant decrease in HDAC activity as well as an increase in acetylation on histone 3 (H3 in hippocampal homogenates from the TRF group. These findings suggest that alterations in energy metabolism and the

  6. Anticonvulsants for preventing seizures in patients with chronic subdural haematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratilal, Bernardo O; Pappamikail, Lia; Costa, João; Sampaio, Cristina

    2013-06-06

    Anticonvulsant therapy is sometimes used prophylactically in patients with chronic subdural haematoma, although the benefit is unclear. To assess the effects of prophylactic anticonvulsants in patients with chronic subdural haematoma, in both the pre- and post-operative periods. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group's Specialised Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), PubMed, LILACS, and the databases clinicaltrials.gov, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, and Current Controlled Trials. The search was through 27th March 2013. Randomised controlled trials comparing any anticonvulsant versus placebo or no intervention. Three authors screened the search results to identify relevant studies. No studies met the inclusion criteria for the review. No randomised controlled trials were identified. No formal recommendations can be made about the use of prophylactic anticonvulsants in patients with chronic subdural haematoma based on the literature currently available. There are no randomised controlled trials on this topic, and non-controlled studies have conflicting results. There is an urgent need for well-designed randomised controlled trials.

  7. Characteristics of fetal anticonvulsant syndrome associated autistic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasalam, A D; Hailey, H; Williams, J H G; Moore, S J; Turnpenny, P D; Lloyd, D J; Dean, J C S

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical features and frequency of autistic disorder or Asperger syndrome (AS; according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition [DSM-IV] criteria) in children exposed to anticonvulsant medication in utero. During a 20-year study period, 626 children were born in Aberdeen to mothers taking antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). The study examined long-term effects of prenatal exposure to AEDs in 260 children (122 males, 138 females). Of these, 26 (16 males) were reported by parents to have social or behavioural difficulties. Eleven children (6 males, 5 females) fulfilled the DSM-IV criteria for autistic disorder and one (female) fulfilled the DSM-IV criteria for AS. These children comprised 4.6% of the exposed children studied, and 1.9% of all exposed children born during the study period. Mean age of these children at diagnosis was 5 years 4 months (SD 2y 11mo) and 9 years 10 months (SD 3y 10mo) at the time of this study. Other children from the group of 26 had difficulties in areas of speech and language development and social communication but did not meet the criteria for an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Sodium valproate was the drug most commonly associated with autistic disorder, five of 56 (8.9%) of the study children exposed to sodium valproate alone had either autistic disorder or AS. It was concluded that prenatal exposure to anticonvulsant medication is a risk factor for the development of an ASD. Fetal anticonvulsant syndrome associated autistic disorder is characterized by an even sex ratio, absence of regression or skill loss, and language delay in the absence of global delay.

  8. Anticonvulsants or Antidepressants in Combination Pharmacotherapy for Treatment of Neuropathic Pain in Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jia; Tanaka, Shiro; Kawakami, Koji

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the efficacy of anticonvulsants or antidepressants in combination pharmacotherapy for treatment of neuropathic pain in cancer patients. We systematically searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the metaRegister of Controlled Trials for randomized controlled trials that compared anticonvulsants or antidepressants in combination pharmacotherapy (experimental group) with treatments without anticonvulsants or antidepressants (control group) for neuropathic pain in cancer patients. Risk of bias was evaluated in accordance with the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. The primary outcome was a mean difference (MD) in change in global pain analyzed by a random-effects model. Eight trials met the inclusion criteria with a total of 1359 participants of whom 698 received an experimental intervention. The MD in change in global pain suggested a favorable association with anticonvulsants or antidepressants in combination pharmacotherapy compared with control groups (MD, -0.41; 95% confidence interval, -0.70 to -0.12) with no heterogeneity across trials (I=0%). The MD in change estimated in all sensitivity analyses ranged from -0.36 to -0.47, suggesting that these effects were consistent across different study designs and statistical assumptions. Anticonvulsants or antidepressants in combination pharmacotherapy reduce neuropathic pain in cancer patients compared with treatments without anticonvulsants or antidepressants. Limited evidence precludes a recommendation on specific adjuvants in combination pharmacotherapy.

  9. Anti-convulsant therapy in eclampsia.

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    Maheshwari J

    1989-04-01

    Full Text Available Seventy four patients presented with eclampsia at N.W.M. Hospital. Bombay. Among the patients with eclampsia, 64.9% were primis, 29.7% were gravida II-IV and 5.4% were grand multis. As many as 40.5% patients were less than 20 years of age, while 2.7% were over 30 years of age. 48.7% had antepartum convulsions, 40.5% had intrapartum convulsions, while 8 patients convulsed in the postpartum period. Besides standard management of eclamptic patients, 3 protocols of anticonvulsant therapy were utilised. 27% were managed with diphenyl hydantoin sodium, 43% with magnesium sulphate, and 30% by combination of diazepam and pentazocine. The maternal and perinatal outcome was evaluated. Control of convulsions was superior with magnesium sulphate while perinatal outcome was best with diphenyl hydantoin.

  10. Anticonvulsants and suicide attempts in bipolar I disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellivier, F; Belzeaux, R; Scott, J; Courtet, P; Golmard, J-L; Azorin, J-M

    2017-05-01

    To identify risk factors for suicide attempts (SA) in individuals commencing treatment for a manic or mixed episode. A total of 3390 manic or mixed cases with bipolar disorder (BD) type I recruited from 14 European countries were included in a prospective, 2-year observational study. Poisson regression models were used to identify individual and treatment factors associated with new SA events. Two multivariate models were built, stratified for the presence or absence of prior SA. A total of 302 SA were recorded prospectively; the peak incidence was 0-12 weeks after commencing treatment. In cases with a prior history of SA, risk of SA repetition was associated with younger age of first manic episode (P = 0.03), rapid cycling (P anticonvulsant at study entry (P anticonvulsant at study entry (P = 0.002). The introduction of anticonvulsants for a recent-onset manic or mixed episode may be associated with an increased risk of SA. Further BD studies must determine whether this link is causal. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Evaluation of anti-epileptic activity of leaf extracts of Punica granatum on experimental models of epilepsy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanatha, Gollapalle L; Venkataranganna, Marikunte V; Prasad, Nunna Bheema Lingeswara; Ashok, Godavarthi

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed to examine the anti-epileptic activity of leaf extracts of Punica granatum in experimental models of epilepsy in Swiss albino mice. Petroleum ether leaf extract of P. granatum (PLPG), methanolic LPG (MLPG), and aqueous LPG (ALPG) extracts of P. granatum leaves was initially evaluated against 6-Hz-induced seizure model; the potent extract was further evaluated against maximal electroshock (MES) and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced convulsions. Further, the potent extract was evaluated for its influence on Gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) levels in brain, to explore the possible mechanism of action. In addition, the potent extract was subjected to actophotometer test to assess its possible locomotor activity deficit inducing action. In 6-Hz seizure test, the MLPG has alleviated 6-Hz-induced seizures significantly and dose dependently at doses 50, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg. In contrast, PLPG and ALPG did not show any protection, only high dose of ALPG (400 and 800 mg/kg, p.o.) showed very slight inhibition. Based on these observations, only MLPG was tested in MES and PTZ models. Interestingly, the MLPG (50, 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) has offered significant and dose-dependent protection against MES ( P < 0.01) and PTZ-induced ( P < 0.01) seizures in mice. Further, MLPG showed a significant increase in brain GABA levels ( P < 0.01) compared to control and showed insignificant change in locomotor activity in all tested doses (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg). Interestingly, higher dose of MLPG (400 mg/kg, p.o.) and Diazepam (5 mg/mg, p.o.) have completely abolished the convulsions in all the anticonvulsant tests. These findings suggest that MLPG possesses significant anticonvulsant property, and one of the possible mechanisms behind the anticonvulsant activity of MLPG may be through enhanced GABA levels in the brain.

  12. Search for new potential anticonvulsants with anxiolytic and antidepressant properties among derivatives of 4,4-diphenylpyrrolidin-2-one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malawska, Katarzyna; Rak, Aleksandra; Gryzło, Beata; Sałat, Kinga; Michałowska, Małgorzata; Żmudzka, Elżbieta; Lodarski, Krzysztof; Malawska, Barbara; Kulig, Katarzyna

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to synthesize a series of new N-Mannich bases derived from 4,4-diphenylpyrrolidin-2-one having differently substituted 4-phenylpiperazines as potential anticonvulsant agents with additional (beneficial) pharmacological properties. The target compounds 8-12 were prepared in one step from the 4-substituted phenylpiperazines, paraformaldehyde, and synthesized 4,4-diphenylpyrrolodin-2-one (7) by a Mannich-type reaction. The obtained compounds were assessed and tested for their anticonvulsant activity in two screening mouse models of seizures, i.e., the maximal electroshock (MES) test and in the subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole (scPTZ) test. The effect of these compounds on animals' motor coordination was measured in the rotarod test. A selected 4,4-diphenyl-1-((4-phenylpiperazin-1-yl)methyl)pyrrolidin-2-one (8) was evaluated in vivo for its anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like properties. Its impact on animals' locomotor activity was also evaluated. Compound 8 showed protection (25%) in the MES and in the scPTZ tests at the dose of 100mg/kg and was not neurotoxic. In the four-plate test, compound 8 at the dose of 30mg/kg showed a statistically significant (p<0.05) anxiolytic-like activity. In the forced swim test, it reduced the immobility time by 24.3% (significant at p<0.05), which indicates its potential antidepressant-like properties. In the locomotor activity test, compound 8 significantly reduced animals' locomotor activity by 79.9%. The results obtained make a new derivative of 4,4-diphenyl-1-((4-phenylpiperazin-1-yl)methyl)pyrrolidin-2-one (8) a promising lead structure for further development. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  13. Anticonvulsant effect of minocycline on pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure in mice: involvement of nitric oxide and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini-Khoei, Hossein; Kordjazy, Nastaran; Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Amiri, Shayan; Haj-Mirzaian, Arvin; Shirzadian, Armin; Hasanvand, Amin; Balali-Dehkordi, Shima; Hassanipoor, Mahsa; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2018-03-20

    Anticonvulsant effects of minocycline have been explored recently. This study was designed to examine the anticonvulsant effect of acute administration of minocycline on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures in mouse considering the possible role of nitric oxide (NO)/NMDA pathway. We induced seizure using intravenous administration of PTZ. Our results showed that acute administration of minocycline increased the seizure threshold. Furthermore, co-administration of sub-effective doses of the non-selective nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, L-NAME (10 mg/kg) and the neuronal NOS inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole (40 mg/kg) enhanced the anticonvulsant effect of sub-effective dose of minocycline (40 mg/kg). We found that inducible NOS inhibitor, aminoguanidine (100 mg/kg), had no effect on the anti-seizure effect of minocycline. Moreover, L-arginine (60 mg/kg), as a NOS substrate, reduced the anticonvulsant effect of minocycline. We also demonstrated that pretreatment with NMDA receptor antagonists, ketamine (0.5 mg/kg) and MK-801 (0.05 mg/kg) increased the anticonvulsant effect of sub-effective dose of minocycline. Results showed that minocycline significantly decreased the hippocampal nitrite level. Furthermore, co-administration of nNOS inhibitor like NMDA receptor antagonists augmented the effect of minocycline on the hippocampal nitrite level. In conclusion, we revealed that anticonvulsant effect of minocycline might be, at least in part, due to decline in constitutive hippocampal nitric oxide activity as well as inhibition of NMDA receptors.

  14. A STUDY OF ANTICONVULSANT EFFECT OF FLUNARIZINE AND NIFEDIPINE IN COMPARISON WITH SODIUM VALPROATE ON MES AND PTZ MODELS OF EPILEPSY IN ALBINO RATS

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    Umesh G.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : CA +2 ions are involved in initiation as well as spread of seizures. Hence current study was undertaken to evaluate the anticonvulsant effect of calcium channel blockers flunarizine, nifedipine and compare their efficacy with that of sodium valproate, the broad spectrum anticonvulsant in MES and PTZ induced seizures in albino rats. MATERIALS AND METHODS : Albino rats were treated with nife dipine 2.5mg/kg, 5mg/kg, flunarizine 7.5mg/kg,15mg/kg and sodium valproate 250mg/kg bodyweight intraperitoneally and the effects were observed in MES and PTZ models of epilepsy. The parameters observed in MES model was , duration of HLTE phase . Convulsive p hase, and post ictal depressive phase. In PTZ model duration of seizure latency, duration of convulsion , and duration post ictal depression were observed. RESULTS : our study demonstrated that both calcium channel blockers afford protection against convulsi ons induced in both models, and flunarizine affords higher degree of protection than nifedipine, with its efficacy almost approaching that of sodium valproate. CONCLUSION : Flunarizine has significant, while nifedipine has moderate degree of anticonvulsant activity as compared to sodium valproate

  15. Synthesis, characterization and screening for antidepressant and anticonvulsant activity of 4,5-dihydropyrazole bearing indole derivatives

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    Pravin O. Patil

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, a series of new substituted 5-(1H-Indol-3-yl-3-(phenyl-4,5-dihydropyrazoline derivatives (2a–m have been synthesized with good yield by microwave assisted synthesis. The compounds synthesized were screened for antidepressant and anticonvulsant potentialities in mice by a forced swim test and subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole (scPTZ test, respectively. Neuro-toxicities were determined by rotarod test in albino mice. The structures of all new compounds were confirmed by IR, 1H NMR, mass spectral data, and microanalyses. The results revealed that compounds 2b, 2e and 2k were found to be potent antidepressant molecules of the series, at 20 mg/kg dose level when compared with the reference drugs imipramine and fluoxetine. Whereas, compounds 2c and 2d were found to be potent anticonvulsant molecules of this series, when compared with the reference drug diazepam. None of the synthesized compounds showed neurotoxicity.

  16. Design and synthesis of novel stiripentol analogues as potential anticonvulsants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboul-Enein, Mohamed N; El-Azzouny, Aida A; Attia, Mohamed I; Maklad, Yousreya A; Amin, Kamilia M; Abdel-Rehim, Mohamed; El-Behairy, Mohammed F

    2012-01-01

    A series of stiripentol (STP) analogues namely, 2-[(1E)-1-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-4,4-dimethylpent-1-en-3-ylidene]-N-(aryl/H)hydrazinecarboxamides 7a-h, (±)-(5RS)-N-(aryl/H)-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-3-tert-butyl-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazole-1-carboxamides (±)-8a-h, and (±)-[(5RS)-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-3-tert-butyl-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazol-1-yl](aryl)methanones (±)-13a-f was synthesized by adopting appropriate synthetic routes and was pharmacologically evaluated in the preliminary anticonvulsant screens. The selected bioactive new chemical entities were subjected to ED(50) determination and neurotoxicity evaluation. The most active congeners are 7h in MES screen and (±)-13b in scPTZ screen which displayed ED(50) values of 87 and 110 mg/kg, respectively, as compared to that of STP (ED(50) = 277.7 and 115 mg/kg in MES and scPTZ, respectively). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Anticonvulsant effects of isomeric nonimidazole histamine H3 receptor antagonists

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    Sadek B

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Bassem Sadek,1 Ali Saad,1 Johannes Stephan Schwed,2,3 Lilia Weizel,2 Miriam Walter,2 Holger Stark2,3 1Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates; 2Biocenter, Institute of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany; 3Department of Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry, Institute of Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry, Heinrich Heine University, Düsseldorf, Germany Abstract: Phenytoin (PHT, valproic acid, and modern antiepileptic drugs (AEDs, eg, remacemide, loreclezole, and safinamide, are only effective within a maximum of 70%–80% of epileptic patients, and in many cases the clinical use of AEDs is restricted by their side effects. Therefore, a continuous need remains to discover innovative chemical entities for the development of active and safer AEDs. Ligands targeting central histamine H3 receptors (H3Rs for epilepsy might be a promising therapeutic approach. To determine the potential of H3Rs ligands as new AEDs, we recently reported that no anticonvulsant effects were observed for the (S-2-(4-(3-(piperidin-1-ylpropoxybenzylaminopropanamide (1. In continuation of our research, we asked whether anticonvulsant differences in activities will be observed for its R-enantiomer, namely, (R-2-(4-(3-(piperidin-1-ylpropoxybenzylaminopropaneamide (2 and analogs thereof, in maximum electroshock (MES-, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ-, and strychnine (STR-induced convulsion models in rats having PHT and valproic acid (VPA as reference AEDs. Unlike the S-enantiomer (1, the results show that animals pretreated intraperitoneally (ip with the R-enantiomer 2 (10 mg/kg were moderately protected in MES and STR induced models, whereas proconvulsant effect was observed for the same ligand in PTZ-induced convulsion models. However, animals pretreated with intraperitoneal doses of 5, 10, or 15 mg/kg of structurally bulkier (R-enantiomer (3

  18. A Review of the Effect of Anticonvulsant Medications on Bone Mineral Density and Fracture Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Richard H.; Lyles, Kenneth W.; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen

    2011-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis and seizure disorders are common diagnoses in older adults and often occur concomitantly. Objective The goal of this review was to discuss the current hypothesis for the pathogenesis of anticonvulsant-induced bone density loss and the evidence regarding the risk for osteoporosis and fractures in older individuals. Methods A review of the literature was performed, searching in MEDLINE and CINAHL for articles published between 1990 and October 2009 with the following search terms: anticonvulsant OR antiepileptic; AND osteoporosis OR bone density OR fracture OR absorptiometry, photon. Studies within the pediatric population, cross-sectional studies, and studies whose results were published in a language other than English were excluded. Results A search of the published literature yielded >300 results, of which 24 met the inclusion and exclusion criteria and were included in this review. Hepatic enzyme induction by certain anticonvulsant medications appears to contribute to increased metabolism of 25-hydroxyvitamin D to inactive metabolites, which results in metabolic bone disease. There is increasing evidence that anticonvulsant use is associated with a higher risk of osteoporosis and clinical fractures, especially among older agents such as phenobarbital, carbamazepine, phenytoin, and valproate. Several observational studies suggest a class effect among anticonvulsant agents, associated with clinically significant reductions in bone mineral density and fracture risk. The use of anticonvulsant medications increases the odds of fracture by 1.2 to 2.4 times. However, only 2 large-scale observational studies have specifically examined the risk among those aged >65 years. This review also identified a randomized controlled trial whose results suggest that supplementation with high-dose vitamin D may be associated with increased bone mineral density in patients taking anticonvulsant medications. However, no randomized controlled trials

  19. Anticonvulsant pharmacotherapy for generalized and localized vulvodynia : a critical review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, Symen K.; Borg, Charmaine; Schultz, Willibrord C. M. Weijmar

    Anticonvulsant therapy has occasionally been recommended to treat vulvodynia. However, convincing evidence to support this therapeutic option is lacking. The goal of this study was to critically review studies published on the effectiveness of anticonvulsants for the treatment of vulvodynia.

  20. Anticonvulsant profile of a balanced ketogenic diet in acute mouse seizure models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samala, Ramakrishna; Willis, Sarah; Borges, Karin

    2008-10-01

    Anticonvulsant effects of the ketogenic diet (KD) have been reported in the mouse, although previous studies did not control for intake of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of balanced ketogenic and control diets in acute mouse seizure models. The behavior in four mouse seizure models, plasma d-beta-hydroxybutyrate (d-BHB) and glucose levels were determined after feeding control diet, 4:1 and 6:1 KDs with matched vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. Feeding 4:1 and 6:1 KDs ad lib to 3-week-old (adolescent) mice resulted in 1.2-2.2mM d-BHB in plasma, but did not consistently change glucose levels. The 6:1 KD reproducibly elevated the CC50 (current that initiates seizures in 50% mice tested) in the 6-Hz model after 14 days of feeding to adolescent CD1 mice. Higher plasma d-BHB levels correlated with anticonvulsant effects. Despite ketosis, no consistent anticonvulsant effects of KDs were found in the fluorothyl or pentylenetetrazole CD1 mouse models. The 4:1 KD was neither anticonvulsant nor neuroprotective in hippocampus in the C3H mouse kainate model. Taken together, the KD's anticonvulsant effect was limited to the 6-Hz model, required chronic feeding with 6:1 fat content, and was independent from lowering plasma glucose.

  1. The anticonvulsant action of nafimidone on kindled amygdaloid seizures in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertson, T E; Walby, W F

    1988-01-01

    The anticonvulsant effectiveness of nafimidone (1-[2-naphthoylmethyl]imidazole hydrochloride) was evaluated in the kindled amygdaloid seizure model in rats. Nafimidone (3.1-120 mg/kg i.p.) was evaluated at 30 min in previously kindled rats using both threshold (20 microA increments) and supranthreshold (400 microA) paradigms. Nafimidone (25-50 mg/kg) significantly reduced supranthreshold elicited afterdischarge length and seizure severity only at doses with some prestimulation toxicity. The maximum anticonvulsant effectiveness for the 25 mg/kg i.p. dose of nafimidone was seen between 15 and 30 min utilizing a suprathreshold kindling paradigm. Nafimidone did not significantly elevate seizure thresholds at the doses tested; however, nafimidone (3.1-50 mg/kg) reduced the severity and afterdischarge duration of threshold elicited seizures in a non-dose response manner. Drug-induced electroencephalographic spikes were seen in both cortex and amygdala in most kindled rats receiving 100-120 mg/kg i.p. within 30 min of dosing before electrical stimulation. The frequency of spike and wave complexes increased in most of these animals leading to drug-induced spontaneous seizures and death in approximately 25% before electrical stimulation. This study has demonstrated that although nafimidone can modify both threshold and suprathreshold elicited kindled amygdaloid seizures, it lacks significant specificity in this model of epilepsy.

  2. Association between consistent purchase of anticonvulsants or lithium and suicide risk: a longitudinal cohort study from Denmark, 1995-2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Eric G; Søndergård, Lars; Lopez, Ana Garcia; Andersen, Per Kragh; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2009-10-01

    Prior studies suggest anticonvulsants purchasers may be at greater risk of suicide than lithium purchasers. Longitudinal, retrospective cohort study of all individuals in Denmark purchasing anticonvulsants (valproic acid, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine or lamotrigine) (n=9952) or lithium (n=6693) from 1995-2001 who also purchased antipsychotics at least once (to select out nonpsychiatric anticonvulsant use). Poisson regression of suicides by medication purchased (anticonvulsants or lithium) was conducted, controlling for age, sex, and calendar year. Confounding by indication was addressed by restricting the comparison to individuals prescribed the same medication: individuals with minimal medication exposure (e.g., who purchased only a single prescription of anticonvulsants) were compared to those individuals with more consistent medication exposure (i.e., purchasing > or = 6 prescriptions of anticonvulsants). Demographics and frequency of anticonvulsant, lithium, or antipsychotic use were similar between lithium and anticonvulsant purchasers. Among patients who also purchased antipsychotic at least once during the study period, purchasing anticonvulsants more consistently (> or = 6 prescriptions) was associated with a substantial reduction in the risk of suicide (RR=0.22, 95% CI=0.11-0.42, panticonvulsant and consistent lithium purchasers were similar. Lack of information about diagnoses and potential confounders, as well as other covariates that may differ between minimal and consistent medication purchasers, are limitations to this study. In this longitudinal study of anticonvulsant purchasers likely to have psychiatric disorders, consistent anticonvulsant treatment was associated with decreased risk of completed suicide.

  3. The efficacy and safety of newer anticonvulsants in patients with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolder, Christian R; Nealy, Kimberly L

    2012-08-01

    Anticonvulsants are a class of medications that have received considerable interest as possible treatments in patients with behavioural disturbances in dementia. The role of these medications for such a use remains controversial. The current paper reviews the published evidence surrounding the safety and efficacy (i.e. as a behavioural and cognitive treatment) of newer anticonvulsants in patients with dementia. A MEDLINE, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, PsycINFO and clinicaltrials.gov search through to December 2011 was conducted for anticonvulsants that have received regulatory approval since 1996. Studies reporting behavioural or cognitive outcomes in patients with dementia were included. Nine trials involving only four medications met selection criteria and were included: levetiracetam (n = 4), oxcarbazepine (n = 1), topiramate (n = 2) and zonisamide (n = 2). Levetiracetam may have a role in the treatment of behavioural symptoms in dementia but study limitations substantially hinder the strength of such a recommendation. Oxcarbazepine and topiramate, based on limited data, do not appear to be effective treatments of behavioural symptoms in dementia. A lack of trials do not allow for conclusions to be made regarding zonisamide. From a cognitive standpoint, levetiracetam was the anticonvulsant most examined in patients with dementia, it appears to have less deleterious effects than some anticonvulsants. Limited data are available on the safety of these medications in elderly patients; however, studies completed thus far have demonstrated some adverse events that are more common or problematic with the use of these drugs in this patient population (i.e. somnolence, dizziness, hyponatraemia, weight loss).

  4. Activation of voltage-gated KCNQ/Kv7 channels by anticonvulsant retigabine attenuates mechanical allodynia of inflammatory temporomandibular joint in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Wen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs are characterized by persistent orofacial pain and have diverse etiologic factors that are not well understood. It is thought that central sensitization leads to neuronal hyperexcitability and contributes to hyperalgesia and spontaneous pain. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are currently the first choice of drug to relieve TMD pain. NSAIDS were shown to exhibit anticonvulsant properties and suppress cortical neuron activities by enhancing neuronal voltage-gated potassium KCNQ/Kv7 channels (M-current, suggesting that specific activation of M-current might be beneficial for TMD pain. Results In this study, we selected a new anticonvulsant drug retigabine that specifically activates M-current, and investigated the effect of retigabine on inflammation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA in rats. The results show that the head withdrawal threshold for escape from mechanical stimulation applied to facial skin over the TMJ in inflamed rats was significantly lower than that in control rats. Administration of centrally acting M-channel opener retigabine (2.5 and 7.5 mg/kg can dose-dependently raise the head withdrawal threshold of mechanical allodynia, and this analgesic effect can be reversed by the specific KCNQ channel blocker XE991 (3 mg/kg. Food intake is known to be negatively associated with TMJ inflammation. Food intake was increased significantly by the administration of retigabine (2.5 and 7.5 mg/kg, and this effect was reversed by XE991 (3 mg/kg. Furthermore, intracerebralventricular injection of retigabine further confirmed the analgesic effect of central retigabine on inflammatory TMJ. Conclusions Our findings indicate that central sensitization is involved in inflammatory TMJ pain and pharmacological intervention for controlling central hyperexcitability by activation of neuronal KCNQ/M-channels may have therapeutic potential for

  5. Amino acid neurotransmitters and new approaches to anticonvulsant drug action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meldrum, B

    1984-01-01

    Amino acids provide the most universal and important inhibitory (gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glycine) and excitatory (glutamate, aspartate, cysteic acid, cysteine sulphinic acid) neurotransmitters in the brain. An anticonvulsant action may be produced (1) by enhancing inhibitory (GABAergic) processes, and (2) by diminishing excitatory transmission. Possible pharmacological mechanisms for enhancing GABA-mediated inhibition include (1) GABA agonist action, (2) GABA prodrugs, (3) drugs facilitating GABA release from terminals, (4) inhibition of GABA-transaminase, (5) allosteric enhancement of the efficacy of GABA at the receptor complex, (6) direction action on the chloride ionophore, and (7) inhibition of GABA reuptake. Examples of these approaches include the use of irreversible GABA-transaminase inhibitors, such as gamma-vinyl GABA, and the development of anticonvulsant beta-carbolines that interact with the "benzodiazepine receptor." Pharmacological mechanisms for diminishing excitatory transmission include (1) enzyme inhibitors that decrease the maximal rate of synthesis of glutamate or aspartate, (2) drugs that decrease the synaptic release of glutamate or aspartate, and (3) drugs that block the post-synaptic action of excitatory amino acids. Compounds that selectively antagonise excitation due to dicarboxylic amino acids have recently been developed. Those that selectively block excitation produced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (and aspartate) have proved to be potent anticonvulsants in many animal models of epilepsy. This provides a novel approach to the design of anticonvulsant drugs.

  6. Anticonvulsant activity of a mGlu(4alpha) receptor selective agonist, (1S,3R,4S)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,2,4-tricarboxylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, A G; Talebi, A; Yip, P K; Meldrum, B S

    2001-07-20

    The metabotropic Group III agonist, (1S,3R,4S)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,2,4-tricarboxylic acid (ACPT-1), selective for the mGlu(4alpha) receptor, suppresses sound-induced seizures in DBA/2 mice following its intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration (ED(50) 5.6 [2.9-10.7], nmol i.c.v., 15 min, clonic phase) and in genetically epilepsy-prone (GEP) rats following focal administration into the inferior colliculus (ED(50) 0.08 [0.01-0.50], nmol, 60 min, clonic phase). ACPT-1 also protects against clonic seizures induced in DBA/2 mice by the Group I agonist, (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (3,5-DHPG) (ED(50) 0.60 [0.29-1.2], nmol i.c.v.) and by the Group III antagonist, (RS)-alpha-methylserine-O-phosphate (MSOP) (ED(50) 49.3 [37.9-64.1], nmol i.c.v.). Another Group III agonist, (RS)-4-phosphonophenyl-glycine (PPG), preferentially activating the mGlu(8) receptor, previously shown to protect against sound-induced seizures in DBA/2 mice and GEP rats, also protects against seizures induced in DBA/2 by 3,5-DHPG (ED(50) 3.7 [2.4-5.7], nmol i.c.v.) and by the Group III antagonist, MSOP (ED(50) 40.2 [21.0-77.0], nmol i.c.v.). At very high doses (500 nmol i.c.v. and above), Group III antagonists have pro-convulsant and convulsant activity. The anticonvulsant protection against sound-induced seizures in DBA/2 mice provided by a fully protective dose (20 nmol, i.c.v.) of the mGlu(4) receptor agonist ACPT-1, is partially reversed by the co-administration of the Group III antagonists, MSOP, (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG) or (S)-2-amino-2-methyl-4-phosphonobutanoic acid (MAP4), in the 20-50 nmol dose range. At doses of 50-200 nmol, MPPG and MAP4 cause further reversal of the ACPT-1 anticonvulsant protection, while the MSOP effect on ACPT-1 protection is abolished at higher doses. In contrast, the anticonvulsant protection against sound-induced seizures in DBA/2 mice provided by a fully protective dose (20 nmol, i.c.v.) of the mGlu(8) receptor agonist PPG, is not

  7. Effect of anticonvulsants on plasma testosterone and sex hormone binding globulin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barragry, J M; Makin, H L; Trafford, D J; Scott, D F

    1978-01-01

    Plasma sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) and testosterone levels were measured in 29 patients with epilepsy (16 men and 13 women), most of them on chronic therapy with anticonvulsant drugs. Sex hormone binding globulin concentrations were increased in both sexes and testosterone levels in male patients. It is postulated that anticonvulsants may induce hepatic synthesis of SHBG. PMID:569688

  8. Preclinical anticonvulsant and neuroprotective profile of 8319, a non-competitive NMDA antagonist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fielding, S.; Wilker, J.C.; Chernack, J.; Ramirez, V.; Wilmot, C.A.; Martin, L.L.; Payack, J.F.; Cornfeldt, M.L.; Rudolphi, K.A.; Rush, D.K.

    1990-01-01

    8319, ((+-)-2-Amino-N-ethyl-alpha-(3-methyl-2-thienyl)benzeneethanamine 2HCl), is a novel compound with the profile of a non-competitive NMDA antagonist. The compound displaced [3H] TCP with high affinity (IC50 = 43 nM), but was inactive at the NMDA, benzodiazepine and GABA sites; in vivo, 8319 showed good efficacy as an anticonvulsant and potential neuroprotective agent. It blocked seizures induced by NMDLA, supramaximal electroshock, pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), picrotoxin, and thiosemicarbazide with ED50's of 1-20 mg/kg ip. As a neuroprotective agent, 8319 (30-100 mg/kg sc) prevented the death of dorsal hippocampal pyramidal cells induced by direct injection of 20 nmol NMDA. At 15 mg/kg ip, the compound was also effective against hippocampal neuronal necrosis induced via bilateral occlusion of the carotid arteries in gerbils. In summary, 8319 is a noncompetitive NMDA antagonist with good anticonvulsant activity and may possess neuroprotective properties useful in the treatment of brain ischemia

  9. Mood-Stabilizing Anticonvulsants, Spina Bifida, and Folate Supplementation: Commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Neil; Viguera, Adele C; Baldessarini, Ross J

    2018-02-01

    High risks of neural tube defects and other teratogenic effects are associated with exposure in early pregnancy to some anticonvulsants, including in women with bipolar disorder. Based on a semistructured review of recent literature, we summarized findings pertaining to this topic. Valproate and carbamazepine are commonly used empirically (off-label) for putative long-term mood-stabilizing effects. Both anticonvulsants have high risks of teratogenic effects during pregnancy. Risks of neural tube defects (especially spina bifida) and other major malformations are especially great with valproate and can arise even before pregnancy is diagnosed. Standard supplementation of folic acid during pregnancy can reduce risk of spontaneous spina bifida, but not that associated with valproate or carbamazepine. In contrast, lamotrigine has regulatory approval for long-term use in bipolar disorder and appears not to have teratogenic effects in humans. Lack of protective effects against anticonvulsant-associated neural tube defects by folic acid supplements in anticipation of and during pregnancy is not widely recognized. This limitation and high risks of neural tube and other major teratogenic effects, especially of valproate, indicate the need for great caution in the use of valproate and carbamazepine to treat bipolar disorder in women of child-bearing age.

  10. Effects of anticonvulsants and inactivity on bone disease in epileptics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchison, Lilian E.; Bewsher, P. D.; Chesters, Marion; Gilbert, J.; Catto, G.; Law, Elizabeth; McKay, E.; Ross, H. S.

    1975-01-01

    No significant biochemical or radiological features of vitamin D deficiency were found in groups of juvenile and adult epileptics and control groups of non-epileptic patients in hospitals for the mentally retarded. There was evidence of hepatic enzyme induction in patients on anticonvulsants, in that urinary D-glucaric acid concentration and excretion were raised. No effect was found of prolonged anticonvulsant therapy on bone densitometry, but in children immobility was closely associated with decreased bone density. The evidence suggests that disuse osteoporosis is the major bone disease in these mentally retarded children. PMID:1161672

  11. Convulsions induced by centrally administered NMDA in mice: effects of NMDA antagonists, benzodiazepines, minor tranquilizers and anticonvulsants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, J. L.; Pieri, L.; Prud'hon, B.

    1989-01-01

    1. Convulsions were induced reproducibly by intracerebroventricular injection of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) to conscious mice. 2. Competitive (carboxypiperazine-propylphosphonic acid, CPP; 2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid, AP7) and non-competitive (MK801; phencyclidine, PCP; thienylcyclohexylpiperidine, TCP; dextrorphan; dextromethorphan) NMDA antagonists prevented NMDA-induced convulsions. 3. Benzodiazepine receptor agonists and partial agonists (triazolam, diazepam, clonazepam, Ro 16-6028), classical anticonvulsants (diphenylhydantoin, phenobarbitone, sodium valproate) and meprobamate were also found to prevent NMDA-induced convulsions. 4. Flumazenil (a benzodiazepine receptor antagonist) and the GABA agonists THIP and muscimol (up to subtoxic doses) were without effect. 5. Flumazenil reversed the anticonvulsant action of diazepam, but not that of MK801. 6. Results obtained in this model differ somewhat from those described in a seizure model with systemic administration of NMDA. An explanation for this discrepancy is offered. 7. This model is a simple test for assessing the in vivo activity of NMDA antagonists and also expands the battery of chemically-induced seizure models for characterizing anticonvulsants not acting at NMDA receptors. PMID:2574061

  12. Anticonvulsant prescription patterns in patients covered by the Colombian Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Plaza, C D; Machado-Alba, J E

    Epilepsy is a group of long-term neurological disorders characterised by seizures that may respond to pharmacological treatment. Determine the prescribing patterns of anticonvulsants for patients covered by the healthcare system in Colombia. Cross-sectional study using a database containing 6.5 million people. From among residents in 88 Colombian cities, we selected patients of both sexes and all ages who were treated continuously with anticonvulsants between June and August 2012. We designed a drug consumption database and performed multivariate analysis for combination treatment and co-medication using SPSS 20.0. A total of 13,793 patients with mean age of 48.9±22.0 years were studied; 52.9% of the participants were women. Of the patient total, 74.4% were treated in monotherapy and 25.6% received two or more anticonvulsants. Globally, 72.9% of the patients were initially treated with classic anticonvulsants and 27.1% with new drugs. The most frequently used drugs were valproic acid (33.3%), carbamazepine (30.2%), clonazepam (15.7%), pregabalin (10.3%), phenytoin (10.0%) and levetiracetam (7.9%). Most agents were used in higher doses than recommended. The most common combinations were valproic acid+clonazepam (10.9%), valproic acid+carbamazepine (10.0%), carbamazepine+clonazepam (5.6%), valproic acid+phenytoin (4.4%). The most frequently prescribed co-medications were antihypertensives (61.0%), lipid-lowering drugs (45.8%), antidepressants (36.7%), antipsychotics (20.1%), anxiolytics (7.9%), and lithium (1.8%). Doctors predominantly prescribe drugs with a high therapeutic value and favour anticonvulsant monotherapy. Most agents were used in higher doses than recommended. This underlines the need to design educational strategies addressing these prescribing habits, and to undertake research on the effectiveness of treatment. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Volume-selective proton MR spectroscopy for in-vitro quantification of anticonvulsants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, J.; Tolxdorff, T. [Inst. of Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, University Hospital Benjamin Franklin, Berlin (Germany); Seyfert, S.; Marx, P. [Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany). Abt. fuer Neurologie; Bernarding, J. [Inst. of Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, University Hospital Benjamin Franklin, Berlin (Germany); Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologie, Nuklearmedizin und Physikalische Therapie; Schilling, A. [Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologie, Nuklearmedizin und Physikalische Therapie

    2001-03-01

    Administration of anticonvulsant drugs is clinically monitored by checking seizure frequency and by determining the serum concentration of the drug. In a few reports, drug concentrations in brain parenchyma have been determined using ex vivo techniques. Little is known about the in vivo concentration in the brain parenchyma. Our goals were to characterise the NMR spectra of the anticonvulsants at therapeutic concentrations, to determine the minimum detectable concentrations, and to quantify the drugs noninvasively. Volume-selective 1H-MR spectroscopy (MRS) was performed under standard clinical conditions using a single-voxel STEAM (stimulated-echo acquisition mode) sequence at 1.5 T. Spectra of the anticonvulsants carbamazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin and valproate were acquired in vitro in hydrous solutions at increasing dilution. Phenytoin, phenobarbital and valproate were detectable below maximum therapeutic serum concentrations. Within therapeutic ranges, there was good agreement between concentrations determined by 1H-MRS and those by standard fluorescence polarisation immunoassay. Due to the absence of signals of brain metabolites, the aromatic protons of phenobarbital, phenytoin and carbamazepine, with resonance lines around 7.4 ppm, allow the drugs to be detected. Valproate, with two resonances around 1.2 ppm, should be differentiable from potential brain metabolites using nonlinear analysis of the brain spectrum. Volume-selective 1H-MRS is therefore expected to be able to monitor anticonvulsant therapy in vivo. (orig.)

  14. Volume-selective proton MR spectroscopy for in-vitro quantification of anticonvulsants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, J.; Tolxdorff, T.; Seyfert, S.; Marx, P.; Bernarding, J.; Freie Univ. Berlin; Schilling, A.

    2001-01-01

    Administration of anticonvulsant drugs is clinically monitored by checking seizure frequency and by determining the serum concentration of the drug. In a few reports, drug concentrations in brain parenchyma have been determined using ex vivo techniques. Little is known about the in vivo concentration in the brain parenchyma. Our goals were to characterise the NMR spectra of the anticonvulsants at therapeutic concentrations, to determine the minimum detectable concentrations, and to quantify the drugs noninvasively. Volume-selective 1H-MR spectroscopy (MRS) was performed under standard clinical conditions using a single-voxel STEAM (stimulated-echo acquisition mode) sequence at 1.5 T. Spectra of the anticonvulsants carbamazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin and valproate were acquired in vitro in hydrous solutions at increasing dilution. Phenytoin, phenobarbital and valproate were detectable below maximum therapeutic serum concentrations. Within therapeutic ranges, there was good agreement between concentrations determined by 1H-MRS and those by standard fluorescence polarisation immunoassay. Due to the absence of signals of brain metabolites, the aromatic protons of phenobarbital, phenytoin and carbamazepine, with resonance lines around 7.4 ppm, allow the drugs to be detected. Valproate, with two resonances around 1.2 ppm, should be differentiable from potential brain metabolites using nonlinear analysis of the brain spectrum. Volume-selective 1H-MRS is therefore expected to be able to monitor anticonvulsant therapy in vivo. (orig.)

  15. Insights from Zebrafish and Mouse Models on the Activity and Safety of Ar-Turmerone as a Potential Drug Candidate for the Treatment of Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Orellana-Paucar, Adriana Monserrath; Afrikanova, Tatiana; Thomas, Joice; Aibuldinov, Yelaman K; Dehaen, Wim; de Witte, Peter; Esguerra, Camila

    2013-01-01

    In a previous study, we uncovered the anticonvulsant properties of turmeric oil and its sesquiterpenoids (ar-turmerone, ?-, ?-turmerone and ?-atlantone) in both zebrafish and mouse models of chemically-induced seizures using pentylenetetrazole (PTZ). In this follow-up study, we aimed at evaluating the anticonvulsant activity of ar-turmerone further. A more in-depth anticonvulsant evaluation of ar-turmerone was therefore carried out in the i.v. PTZ and 6-Hz mouse models. The potential toxic ef...

  16. Quantitative determination of bone mineral concentrations using quotient densitometry in patients under long-term anticonvulsant therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, H.

    1980-01-01

    The effect on bone mineral concentration of anticonvulsive long-term therapy was investigated in order to find out if there is a relation between the occurence and extent of osteomalacial lesions on the one hand and the type and time of application of anticonvulsants. The hydroxyl apatite content was determined by X-ray densitometry. The method is considered to be suitable for yearly skeletal monitoring of epilepticians treated with anticonvulsants. (orig./HP) [de

  17. Comparative studies on the effects of clinically used anticonvulsants on the oxidative stress biomarkers in pentylenetetrazole-induced kindling model of epileptogenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazhar, Faizan; Malhi, Saima M; Simjee, Shabana U

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a key role in the pathogenesis of epilepsy and contributes in underlying epileptogenesis process. Anticonvulsant drugs targeting the oxidative stress domain of epileptogenesis may provide better control of seizure. The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of clinically used anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) on the course of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced kindling and oxidative stress markers in mice. Six mechanistically heterogeneous anticonvulsants: phenobarbital, phenytoin, levetiracetam, pregabalin, topiramate, and felbamate were selected and their redox profiles were determined. Diazepam was used as a drug control for comparison. Kindling was induced by repeated injections of a sub-convulsive dose of PTZ (50 mg/kg, s.c.) on alternate days until seizure score 5 was evoked in the control kindled group. Anticonvulsants were administered daily. Following PTZ kindling, oxidative stress biomarkers were assessed in homogenized whole brain samples and estimated for the levels of nitric oxide, peroxide, malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, reduced glutathione, and activities of nitric oxide synthase and superoxide dismutase. Biochemical analysis revealed a significant increase in the levels of reactive oxygen species with a parallel decrease in endogenous anti-oxidants in PTZ-kindled control animals. Daily treatment with levetiracetam and felbamate significantly decreased the PTZ-induced seizure score as well as the levels of nitric oxide (panticonvulsant effect by the diversified mechanism of action such as levetiracetam, felbamate, and topiramate exhibited superior anti-oxidative stress activity in addition to their anticonvulsant activity.

  18. BTS 72664-- a novel CNS drug with potential anticonvulsant, neuroprotective, and antimigraine properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S L; Thompson, K S; Sargent, B J; Heal, D J

    2001-01-01

    BTS 72664, (R)-7-[1-(4-chlorophenoxy)]ethyl]-1,2,4-triazolo(1,5-alpha)pyrimidine, was identified as a drug development candidate from a research program designed to discover novel, broad-spectrum, non-sedative anticonvulsant drugs. BTS 72664 antagonized bicuculline (BIC)- and maximal electroshock (MES)-induced convulsions with ED(50) values of 1.9 and 47.5 mg/kg p.o., respectively. In rodents, it has a wide spectrum of activity preventing seizures induced by picrotoxin, pentylenetetrazol, i.c.v. 4-aminopyridine or NMDA, and audiogenic seizures in DBA-2 mice and GEPR-9 rats. BTS 72664 was also effective in preventing convulsions in amygdala-kindled rats The lack of sedative potential was predicted on the basis of wide separation between ED(50) in anticonvulsant models and TD(50) for motor impairment in mice in rotating rod and inverted horizontal grid tests. BTS 72664 is likely to produce its anticonvulsant effect by enhancing chloride currents through picrotoxin-sensitive chloride channels, and by weak inhibition of Na(+) and NMDA channels. It does not act, however, at the benzodiazepine binding site. In addition to its potential use in the treatment of epilepsy BTS 72664 may be useful in the treatment of stroke. At 50 mg/kg p.o. x 4, given to rats at 12 hourly intervals, starting at 15 min after permanent occlusion of middle cerebral artery (MCA), it reduced cerebral infarct size by 31% (measured at 2 days after insult) and accelerated recovery in a functional behavioral model. BTS 72664 prevented increases in extraneuronal concentrations of glutamate, glycine and serine brain levels induced by a cortical insult to rats (cf. cortical spreading depression). It may, therefore, have also antimigraine activity.

  19. Increasing use of atypical antipsychotics and anticonvulsants during pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Richard A.; Bobo, William V.; Shelton, Richard C.; Arbogast, Patrick G.; Morrow, James A.; Wang, Wei; Chandrasekhar, Rameela; Cooper, William O.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To quantify maternal use of atypical antipsychotics, typical antipsychotics, anticonvulsants and lithium during pregnancy. Methods Tennessee birth and death records were linked to Tennessee Medicaid data to conduct a retrospective cohort study of 296,817 women enrolled in Tennessee Medicaid throughout pregnancy who had a live birth or fetal death from 1985 to 2005. Results During the study time period, the adjusted rate of use of any study medication during pregnancy increased from nearly 14 to 31 per 1,000 pregnancies (β = 0.08, 95% CI = 0.07, 0.09). Significant increases were reported in use of anticonvulsants alone among mothers with pain and other psychiatric disorders, atypical antipsychotics alone among mothers with bipolar disorders, schizophrenia, unipolar depressive disorders, and other psychiatric disorders, and more than one studied medication for mothers with epilepsy, pain disorders, bipolar disorders, unipolar depressive disorders, and other psychiatric disorders. Significant decreases were reported in use of lithium alone and typical antipsychotics alone for all clinically meaningful diagnosis groups. Conclusions There was a substantial increase in use of atypical antipsychotics alone, anticonvulsants alone, and medications from multiple studied categories among Tennessee Medicaid-insured pregnant women during the study period. Further examination of the maternal and fetal consequences of exposure to these medications during pregnancy is warranted. PMID:23124892

  20. Anticonvulsant effect of the ethanol extract of Caesalpiniapulcherrima (L. Sw., Fabaceae, leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Kumar

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, ethanol extract of Caesalpinia pulcherrima (L. Sw., Fabaceae, leaves (CPEE was investigated for anticonvulsant effect against maximal electroshock (MES and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ induced seizures in rats and mice at dose levels 200 and 400 mg/kg, i.p. respectively. Diazepam (3 mg/kg, i.p. was used as a standard anticonvulsant drug for comparison. CPEE was found to be safe up to the dose of 4000 mg/kg in mice, when administered intraperitoneally. The extract at 400 mg/kg dose produced significant (p<0.01 anticonvulsant effect w.r.t. control against PTZ-induced clonic seizures. In MES-induced seizure model, there were no significant alterations in the onset as well as duration of hind limb extension seizures as compared to control at a dose of 200 mg/kg when administered intraperitoneally. However, the extract (CPEE, 400 mg/kg i.p. significantly (p<0.01 delayed the onset as well as decreased the duration of hind limb extension seizures (HLES as compared to control. However, the extract, CPEE, percentage protection of the animals was increased at higher dose (200 mg/kg in both the models. The results of the study suggest that ethanol extract of Caesalpinia pulcherrima (L. Sw. leaves possess anticonvulsant effect.

  1. Imidazole incorporated semicarbazone derivatives as a new class of anticonvulsants: design, synthesis and in-vivo screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Mohammad; Ali, Israr; Hassan, Mohd Zaheen

    2013-06-01

    A series of novel imidazole incorporated semicarbazones was synthesized using an appropriate synthetic route and characterized by spectral analysis (IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and Mass). The anticonvulsant activity of the synthesized compounds was determined using doses of 30, 100, and 300 mg kg-1 against maximal electroshock seizure (MES), subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole (scPTZ) induced seizure and minimal neurotoxicity test. Six compounds exhibited protection in both models and 2-(1-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)ethylidene)-N-p-tolylsemicarbazone emerged as the most active compound of the series without any neurotoxicity and significant CNS depressant effect. Liver enzyme estimations (SGOT, SGPT, Alkaline phosphatase) of the compound also showed no significant change in the enzymes levels. Moreover, it caused 80% elevation of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) levels in the whole mice brain, thus indicating that it could be a promising candidate in designing of a potent anticonvulsant drug.

  2. Schiff Bases of Benzothiazol-2-ylamine and Thiazolo[5,4-b] pyridin-2-ylamine as Anticonvulsants: Synthesis, Characterization and Toxicity Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Rashmi; Singh, Ajeet P; Sonar, Pankaj K; Mishra, Mudita; Saraf, Shailendra K

    2016-01-01

    Schiff bases have a broad spectrum of biological activities like antiinflammatory, analgesic, antimicrobial, anticonvulsant, antitubercular, anticancer, antioxidant, anthelmintic and so forth. Thus, after a thorough perusal of literature, it was decided to conjugate benzothiazol-2-ylamine/thiazolo [5, 4-b] pyridin-2-ylamine with aromatic and heteroaromatic aldehydes to get a series of Schiff bases. Synthesis, characterization, in-silico toxicity profiling and anticonvulsant activity of the Schiff bases of Benzothiazol-2-ylamine and Thiazolo [5, 4-b] pyridin-2-ylamine. Aniline/4-aminopyridine was converted to the corresponding thiourea derivatives, which were cyclized to obtain benzothiazol-2-ylamine/thiazolo [5, 4-b] pyridin-2-ylamine. Finally, these were condensed with various aromatic and heteroaromatic aldehydes to obtain Schiff bases of benzothiazol-2-ylamine and thiazolo [5, 4-b] pyridin-2-ylamine. The synthesized compounds were characterized and screened for their anticonvulsant activity using maximal electroshock (MES) test and isoniazid (INH) induced convulsions test. In-silico toxicity profiling of all the synthesized compounds was done through "Lazar" and "Osiris" properties explorer. Majority of the compounds were more potent against MES induced convulsions than INH induced convulsions. Schiff bases of benzothiazol-2-ylamine were more effective than thiazolo [5, 4-b] pyridin-2-ylamine against MES induced convulsions. The compound benzothiazol-2-yl-(1H-indol-2-ylmethylene)-amine (VI) was the most potent member of the series against both types of convulsions. Compound VI exhibited the most significant activity profile in both the models. The compounds did not exhibit any carcinogenicity or acute toxicity in the in-silico studies. Thus, it may be concluded that the Schiff bases of benzothiazol-2-ylamine exhibit the potential to be promising and non-toxic anticonvulsant agents.

  3. Alteration of bioelectrically-controlled processes in the embryo: a teratogenic mechanism for anticonvulsants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Díaz, Sonia; Levin, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Maternal use of anticonvulsants during the first trimester of pregnancy has been associated with an elevated risk of major congenital malformations in the offspring. Whether the increased risk is caused by the specific pharmacological mechanisms of certain anticonvulsants, the underlying epilepsy, or common genetic or environmental risk factors shared by epilepsy and malformations has been controversial. We hypothesize that anticonvulsant therapies during pregnancy that attain more successful inhibition of neurotransmission might lead to both better seizure control in the mother and stronger alteration of bioelectrically-controlled processes in the embryo that result in structural malformations. We propose that development of pharmaceuticals that do not alter cell resting transmembrane voltage levels could result in safer drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Glucose utilization in the brain during acute seizure is a useful biomarker for the evaluation of anticonvulsants: effect of methyl ethyl ketone in lithium-pilocarpine status epilepticus rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Akifumi; Momosaki, Sotaro; Hosoi, Rie; Abe, Kohji; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Inoue, Osamu

    2009-01-01

    Enhancement of glucose utilization in the brain has been well known during acute seizure in various kinds of animal model of epilepsy. This enhancement of glucose utilization might be related to neural damage in these animal models. Recently, we found that methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) had both anticonvulsive and neuroprotective effects in lithium-pilocapine (Li-pilo) status epilepticus (SE) rat. In this article, we measured the uptake of [ 14 C]2-deoxyglucose ([ 14 C]DG) in the Li-pilo SE and Li-pilo SE with MEK rat brain in order to assess whether the glucose utilization was a useful biomarker for the detection of efficacy of anticonvulsive compounds. Significant increase of [ 14 C]DG uptake (45 min after the injection) in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, amygdala and thalamus during acute seizure induced by Li-pilo were observed. On the other hand, the initial uptake of [ 14 C]DG (1 min after the injection) in the Li-pilo SE rats was not different from the control rats. Therefore, the enhancement of glucose metabolism during acute seizure was due to the facilitation of the rate of phosphorylation process of [ 14 C]DG in the brain. Pretreatment with MEK (8 mmol/kg) completely abolished the enhancement of glucose utilization in the Li-pilo SE rats. The present results indicated that glucose utilization in the brain during acute seizure might be a useful biomarker for the evaluation of efficacy of anticonvulsive compounds.

  5. Glucose utilization in the brain during acute seizure is a useful biomarker for the evaluation of anticonvulsants: effect of methyl ethyl ketone in lithium-pilocarpine status epilepticus rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Akifumi [Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Momosaki, Sotaro; Hosoi, Rie [Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Abe, Kohji [Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Developmental Research Laboratories, Shionogi and Co., Ltd., Toyonaka, Osaka, 561-0825 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Masatoshi [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuoka University, Johnan, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Inoue, Osamu [Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan)

    2009-11-15

    Enhancement of glucose utilization in the brain has been well known during acute seizure in various kinds of animal model of epilepsy. This enhancement of glucose utilization might be related to neural damage in these animal models. Recently, we found that methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) had both anticonvulsive and neuroprotective effects in lithium-pilocapine (Li-pilo) status epilepticus (SE) rat. In this article, we measured the uptake of [{sup 14}C]2-deoxyglucose ([{sup 14}C]DG) in the Li-pilo SE and Li-pilo SE with MEK rat brain in order to assess whether the glucose utilization was a useful biomarker for the detection of efficacy of anticonvulsive compounds. Significant increase of [{sup 14}C]DG uptake (45 min after the injection) in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, amygdala and thalamus during acute seizure induced by Li-pilo were observed. On the other hand, the initial uptake of [{sup 14}C]DG (1 min after the injection) in the Li-pilo SE rats was not different from the control rats. Therefore, the enhancement of glucose metabolism during acute seizure was due to the facilitation of the rate of phosphorylation process of [{sup 14}C]DG in the brain. Pretreatment with MEK (8 mmol/kg) completely abolished the enhancement of glucose utilization in the Li-pilo SE rats. The present results indicated that glucose utilization in the brain during acute seizure might be a useful biomarker for the evaluation of efficacy of anticonvulsive compounds.

  6. The anticonvulsant action of AHR-11748 on kindled amygdaloid seizures in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertson, T E; Walby, W F

    1987-03-01

    The anticonvulsant effectiveness of AHR-11748 (3-[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy]-1-azetidinecarboxamide) was evaluated in the kindled amygdaloid seizure model in rats. Doses of AHR-11748 that did not cause prestimulation toxicity significantly attenuated elicited afterdischarge durations and the severity of the accompanying behavioral convulsive response in previously kindled rats. AHR-11748 (25-100 mg/kg i.p.) was evaluated at 30 min in previously kindled rats using both threshold (20 microA increments) and suprathreshold (400 microA) paradigms. AHR-11748 (50-100.mg/kg) reduced suprathreshold elicited after discharges and seizure severity. Utilizing a suprathreshold kindling paradigm, the maximum anticonvulsant effectiveness for the 100 mg/kg i.p. dose of AHR-11748 was seen at 180 min. AHR-11748 significantly elevated seizure thresholds only at the 100 mg/kg dose. AHR-11748 (25-100 mg/kg) significantly reduced the severity of threshold elicited seizures. When AHR-11748 (50 and 100 mg/kg i.p.) was administered daily during kindling acquisition, the number of daily trials necessary to complete kindling significantly increased. A reduction in both the duration and the severity of the responses induced by the daily stimulations during the acquisition period was seen with AHR-11748 treatment. This study has demonstrated that AHR-11748 significantly modifies both the acquisition of kindling and the fully kindled amygdaloid seizures at doses that do not cause behavioral toxicity.

  7. Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis: peculiarities of pain-relieving therapy and place of anticonvulsants as analgetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nefyodov O.O.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is the most common demyelinating disease affecting mainly young people of the working age (16-45 years and quickly leading to disability. Available data constitute that up to 80% of MS patients suffer from pain at different disease periods. Pain management and the analgesic drug choice in MS patients may be difficult. Anticonvulsant drugs possess an analgesic activity and are widely used in patients presenting painful neuropathic symptoms. Based on that, we aimed to investigate the nociceptive potential changes as well as the research-oriented behavior using the "open field" test in rat. An experimental animal equivalent of multiple sclerosis has been modeled, based on the methylprednisolone (M administration. Animals were also administered anticonvulsants (carbamazepine, topiramate, sodium volproat, pregabalin and gabapentin. The stu­dy showed advantages of gabapentin and pregabalin use in simulated disease treatment. This statement is based on the "open field" test results, where the motor-oriented rats’ behavior was evaluated. Administration of M+gabapentin and M+pregabalin showed positive dynamics of the motor activity: the number of squares crossed increased by 80.86% (p<0.05 and 81.73% (р<0.05 respectively. Maximum recovery of the research activity (peeking in "mink" was re­gis­tered in animals administered M+pregabalin: the increase rate was 300% (r<0.05 comparing with the 12th day of ex­periment. It was shown, that 5-days administration of M+gabapentin and M+pregabalin caused muscle tone impro­ve­ment by 190% (p<0.05 and 200% (p<0.05 respectively, comparing with animals with untreated multiple sclerosis. A sig­ni­fi­cant increase of analgesic activity of M+pregabalin and M+gabapentin combinations used together with me­thyl­pred­nisolone by 4.1 (p<0.05 and 3.6 (p<0.05 times was registered comparing with the initial methylprednisolone background.

  8. Concomitant Anticonvulsants With Bitemporal Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Trial With Clinical and Neurobiological Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakesh, Gopalkumar; Thirthalli, Jagadisha; Kumar, Channaveerachari Naveen; Muralidharan, Kesavan; Phutane, Vivek H; Gangadhar, Bangalore N

    2017-03-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective treatment for major affective disorders. The combined use of ECT and anticonvulsant mood stabilizers is a common clinical scenario. There is dearth of systematic studies on the use of this combination with regard to clinical or cognitive outcomes. We aimed to compare clinical improvement and cognitive adverse effects between patients who received only ECT versus those who received ECT and anticonvulsants. We hypothesized that improvement would be fastest in patients who received only ECT. We conducted a randomized controlled trial in which patients prescribed ECT while being treated with anticonvulsants were randomized into 3 groups: full-dose (FD), half-dose (HD), and stop anticonvulsant. A blind rater assessed clinical improvement in patients using rating scales [Young's Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) and Clinical Global Impression] for clinical improvement and cognitive adverse effects (Postgraduate Institute memory scale). Analysis was done using mixed-effects modeling to delineate differences in clinical and cognitive outcomes across the 3 arms of the study over the course of ECT. Of the 54 patients recruited, 36 patients went into treatment allocation arms per the initial randomization plan. The main anticonvulsants prescribed were sodium valproate and carbamazepine. Patients in the 3 groups were comparable on clinical features. The most common diagnosis was bipolar affective disorder-with current episode of mania. Overall, there was no difference across the 3 groups in final clinical outcome scores (YMRS and Clinical Global Impression) when analyzed as intention to treat (ITT) or "as treated." In both analyses, group × time interaction was significant when comparing trend of YMRS scores between the FD anticonvulsant group and the HD group from baseline to last ECT (P = 0.0435 in ITT and P = 0.0055 in as treated). Patients in the FD group improved faster than those in the HD group. There were no differences across

  9. Effects of the benzodiazepine antagonists RO 15-1788, CGS-8216 and PK-11195 on amygdaloid kindled seizures and the anticonvulsant efficacy of diazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertson, T E; Walby, W F

    1986-11-01

    The anticonvulsant effectiveness of the benzodiazepine antagonists RO 15-1788, CGS-8216 and PK-11195 were evaluated against threshold and suprathreshold (400 microA) stimulation in fully amygdaloid-kindled rats. Pretreatment with either RO 15-1788 (3, 10 and 30 mg/kg), CGS-8216 (3, 10 and 30 mg/kg) or PK-11195 (10 and 60 mg/kg) failed in this study to modify consistently either the afterdischarge thresholds or elicited suprathreshold seizures or duration of afterdischarge. Using a double injection paradigm, the effectiveness of these three benzodiazepine antagonists to reverse the anti-convulsant and behavioral effects of diazepam were studied. When diazepam (3 mg/kg) was injected 15 min before or after a second injection of the vehicle control DMSO (0.25 ml/kg), a significant reduction in the duration of afterdischarge and seizure rank, elicited by a suprathreshold stimulation in amygdaloid-kindled rats, occurred. When either CGS 8216 (10 mg/kg) or RO 15-1788 (10 mg/kg) were given 15 min before diazepam (3 mg/kg) prior to stimulation, the anticonvulsant properties of diazepam were blocked. When RO 15-1788 (10 mg/kg) was given 15 min after diazepam, antagonism of the anticonvulsant effects on diazepam was shown. However, when either CGS-8216 (10 mg/kg) or PK-11195 (10 and 60 mg/kg) were given 15 min after diazepam (3 mg/kg), the anticonvulsant properties of diazepam were not blocked. The anticonvulsant effects of diazepam were reversed when CGS-8216 (10 mg/kg) was given 5 min after diazepam (3 mg/kg) or when a larger dose (30 mg/kg) was given at the same 15 min interval.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Anticonvulsants Teratogenic Mechanism Involves Alteration of Bioelectrically-controlled Processes in the Embryo. A hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Díaz, Sonia; Levin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Maternal use of anticonvulsants during the first trimester of pregnancy has been associated with an elevated risk of major congenital malformations in the offspring. Whether the increased risk is caused by the specific pharmacological mechanisms of certain anticonvulsants, the underlying epilepsy, or common genetic or environmental risk factors shared by epilepsy and malformations is controversial. We hypothesize that anticonvulsant therapies during pregnancy that attain more successful inhibition of neurotransmission might lead to both better seizure control in the mother and stronger alteration of bioelectrically-controlled processes in the embryo that result in structural malformations. If our theory were correct, development of pharmaceuticals that do not alter cell resting transmembrane voltage levels could result in safer drugs. PMID:24815983

  11. Increasing use of atypical antipsychotics and anticonvulsants during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Richard A; Bobo, William V; Shelton, Richard C; Arbogast, Patrick G; Morrow, James A; Wang, Wei; Chandrasekhar, Rameela; Cooper, William O

    2013-07-01

    To quantify maternal use of atypical antipsychotics, typical antipsychotics, anticonvulsants, and lithium during pregnancy. Tennessee birth and death records were linked to Tennessee Medicaid data to conduct a retrospective cohort study of 296,817 women enrolled in Tennessee Medicaid throughout pregnancy who had a live birth or fetal death from 1985 to 2005. During the study time period, the adjusted rate of use of any study medication during pregnancy increased from nearly 14 to 31 per 1000 pregnancies (β = 0.08, 95% CI = 0.07, 0.09). Significant increases were reported in use of anticonvulsants alone among mothers with pain and other psychiatric disorders, atypical antipsychotics alone among mothers with bipolar disorders, schizophrenia, unipolar depressive disorders, and other psychiatric disorders, and more than one studied medication for mothers with epilepsy, pain disorders, bipolar disorders, unipolar depressive disorders, and other psychiatric disorders. Significant decreases were reported in use of lithium alone and typical antipsychotics alone for all clinically meaningful diagnosis groups. There was a substantial increase in use of atypical antipsychotics alone, anticonvulsants alone, and medications from multiple studied categories among Tennessee Medicaid-insured pregnant women during the study period. Further examination of the maternal and fetal consequences of exposure to these medications during pregnancy is warranted. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Comparative neurocognitive effects of lithium and anticonvulsants in long-term stable bipolar patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabater, Ana; García-Blanco, Ana C; Verdet, Hélade M; Sierra, Pilar; Ribes, Josep; Villar, Irene; Lara, Mª José; Arnal, Pilar; Rojo, Luis; Livianos, Lorenzo

    2016-01-15

    The aim of choosing a mood-stabilizing drug (lithium or anticonvulsants) or a combination of them with minimal neurocognitive effects is to stimulate the development of criteria for a therapeutic adequacy, particularly in Bipolar Disorder (BD) patients who are clinically stabilized. Three groups of BD patients were established according to their treatment: (i) lithium monotherapy (n=29); (ii) lithium together with one or more anticonvulsants (n=28); and (iii) one or more anticonvulsants (n=16). A group of healthy controls served as the control (n=25). The following tests were applied: Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Trail Making Test, Wechsler Memory Scale, Rey Complex Figure Test, Stroop color-word test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Tower of Hanoi, Frontal Assessment Battery, and Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test. Relative to healthy controls, BD patients showed the following: (i) those on lithium monotherapy, but not other BD groups, had preserved short-term auditory memory, long-term memory, and attention; (ii) those who took only anticonvulsants showed worse findings in short-term visual memory, working memory, and several executive functions; and (iii) all BD patients showed worse performance in processing speed, resistance to interference, and emotion recognition. Medication alone cannot explain why all BD patients showed common cognitive deficits despite different pharmacological treatment. The impairment on some executive functions and emotion recognition is an inherent trait in BD patients, regardless of their pharmacological treatment. However, while memory, attention, and most of the executive functions are preserved in long-term stable BD patients, these cognitive functions are impaired in those who take anticonvulsants. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Nitric oxide mediates the anticonvulsant effects of thalidomide on pentylenetetrazole-induced clonic seizures in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payandemehr, Borna; Rahimian, Reza; Gooshe, Maziar; Bahremand, Arash; Gholizadeh, Ramtin; Berijani, Sina; Ahmadi-Dastgerdi, Mohammad; Aminizade, Mehdi; Sarreshte-Dari, Ali; Dianati, Vahid; Amanlou, Massoud; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2014-05-01

    Thalidomide is an old glutamic acid derivative which was initially used as a sedative medication but withdrawn from the market due to the high incidence of teratogenicity. Recently, it has reemerged because of its potential for counteracting number of diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. Other than the antiemetic and hypnotic aspects, thalidomide exerts some anticonvulsant properties in experimental settings. However, the underlying mechanisms of thalidomide actions are not fully realized yet. Some investigations revealed that thalidomide could elicit immunomodulatory or neuromodulatory properties by affecting different targets, including cytokines (such as TNF α), neurotransmitters, and nitric oxide (NO). In this regard, we used a model of clonic seizure induced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) in male NMRI mice to investigate whether the anticonvulsant effect of thalidomide is affected through modulation of the l-arginine-nitric oxide pathway or not. Injection of a single effective dose of thalidomide (10 mg/kg, i.p. or higher) significantly increased the seizure threshold (P<0.05). On the one hand, pretreatment with low and per se noneffective dose of l-arginine [NO precursor] (10, 30 and 60 mg/kg) prevented the anticonvulsant effect of thalidomide. On the other hand, NOS inhibitors [l-NAME and 7-NI] augmented the anticonvulsant effect of a subeffective dose of thalidomide (1 and 5 mg/kg, i.p.) at relatively low doses. Meanwhile, several doses of aminoguanidine [an inducible NOS inhibitor] (20, 50 and 100 mg/kg) failed to alter the anticonvulsant effect of thalidomide significantly. In summary, our findings demonstrated that the l-arginine-nitric oxide pathway can be involved in the anticonvulsant properties of thalidomide, and the role of constitutive nNOS is prominent in the reported neuroprotective feature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Primary amino acid derivatives: substitution of the 4'-N'-benzylamide site in (R)-N'-benzyl 2-amino-3-methylbutanamide, (R)-N'-benzyl 2-amino-3,3-dimethylbutanamide, and (R)-N'-benzyl 2-amino-3-methoxypropionamide provides potent anticonvulsants with pain-attenuating properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Amber M; Salomé, Christophe; Salomé-Grosjean, Elise; De Ryck, Marc; Kaminski, Rafal; Valade, Anne; Stables, James P; Kohn, Harold

    2011-10-13

    Recently, we reported that select N'-benzyl 2-substituted 2-amino acetamides (primary amino acid derivatives (PAADs)) exhibited pronounced activities in established whole animal anticonvulsant (i.e., maximal electroshock seizure (MES)) and neuropathic pain (i.e., formalin) models. The anticonvulsant activities of C(2)-hydrocarbon N'-benzyl 2-amino acetamides (MES ED(50) = 13-21 mg/kg) exceeded those of phenobarbital (ED(50) = 22 mg/kg). Two additional studies defining the structure-activity relationship of PAADs are presented in this issue of the journal. In this study, we demonstrated that the anticonvulsant activities of (R)-N'-benzyl 2-amino-3-methylbutanamide and (R)-N'-benzyl 2-amino-3,3-dimethylbutanamide were sensitive to substituents at the 4'-N'-benzylamide site; electron-withdrawing groups retained activity, electron-donating groups led to a loss of activity, and incorporating either a 3-fluorobenzyloxy or 3-fluorophenoxymethyl group using a rationally designed multiple ligand approach improved activity. Additionally, we showed that substituents at the 4'-N'-benzylamide site of (R)-N'-benzyl 2-amino-3-methoxypropionamide also improved anticonvulsant activity, with the 3-fluorophenoxymethyl group providing the largest (∼4-fold) increase in activity (ED(50) = 8.9 mg/kg), a value that surpassed phenytoin (ED(50) = 9.5 mg/kg). Collectively, the pharmacological findings provided new information that C(2)-hydrocarbon PAADs represent a novel class of anticonvulsants.

  15. Neurosteroids exhibit anticonvulsant action in immature rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Pavel

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. S8 (2005), s. 115-116 ISSN 0013-9580. [Joint Annual Meeting of the American Epilepsy Society and American Clinical Neurophysiology Society. 02.12.2005-06.12.2005, Washington, DC] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IBS5011007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : neurosteroids * anticonvulsants * immature rats Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  16. Imidazenil, a non-sedating anticonvulsant benzodiazepine, is more potent than diazepam in protecting against DFP-induced seizures and neuronal damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadriu, Bashkim; Guidotti, Alessandro; Costa, Erminio [Psychiatric Institute, Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1601 W. Taylor St., Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Auta, James [Psychiatric Institute, Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1601 W. Taylor St., Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)

    2009-02-27

    Organophosphate (OP)-nerve agent poisoning may lead to prolonged epileptiform seizure activity, which can result in irreversible neuronal brain damage. A timely and effective control of seizures with pharmacological agents can minimize the secondary and long-term neuropathology that may result from this damage. Diazepam, the current anticonvulsant of choice in the management of OP poisoning, is associated with unwanted effects such as sedation, amnesia, cardio-respiratory depression, anticonvulsant tolerance, and dependence liabilities. In search for an efficacious and safer anticonvulsant benzodiazepine, we studied imidazenil, a potent anticonvulsant that is devoid of sedative action and has a low intrinsic efficacy at {alpha}1- but is a high efficacy positive allosteric modulator at {alpha}5-containing GABA{sub A} receptors. We compared the potency of a combination of 2 mg/kg, i.p. atropine with: (a) imidazenil 0.05-0.5 mg/kg i.p. or (b) equipotent anti-bicuculline doses of diazepam (0.5-5 mg/kg, i.p.), against diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP; 1.5 mg/kg, s.c.)-induced status epilepticus and its associated neuronal damage. The severity and frequency of seizure activities were determined by continuous radio telemetry recordings while the extent of neuronal damage and neuronal degeneration were assessed using the TUNEL-based cleaved DNA end-labeling technique or neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN)-immunolabeling and Fluoro-Jade B (FJB) staining, respectively. We report here that the combination of atropine and imidazenil is at least 10-fold more potent and longer lasting than the combination with diazepam at protecting rats from DFP-induced seizures and the associated neuronal damage or ongoing degeneration in the anterior cingulate cortex, CA1 hippocampus, and dentate gyrus. While 0.5 mg/kg imidazenil effectively attenuated DFP-induced neuronal damage and the ongoing neuronal degeneration in the anterior cingulate cortex, dentate gyrus, and CA1 hippocampus, 5

  17. Imidazenil, a non-sedating anticonvulsant benzodiazepine, is more potent than diazepam in protecting against DFP-induced seizures and neuronal damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadriu, Bashkim; Guidotti, Alessandro; Costa, Erminio; Auta, James

    2009-01-01

    Organophosphate (OP)-nerve agent poisoning may lead to prolonged epileptiform seizure activity, which can result in irreversible neuronal brain damage. A timely and effective control of seizures with pharmacological agents can minimize the secondary and long-term neuropathology that may result from this damage. Diazepam, the current anticonvulsant of choice in the management of OP poisoning, is associated with unwanted effects such as sedation, amnesia, cardio-respiratory depression, anticonvulsant tolerance, and dependence liabilities. In search for an efficacious and safer anticonvulsant benzodiazepine, we studied imidazenil, a potent anticonvulsant that is devoid of sedative action and has a low intrinsic efficacy at α1- but is a high efficacy positive allosteric modulator at α5-containing GABA A receptors. We compared the potency of a combination of 2 mg/kg, i.p. atropine with: (a) imidazenil 0.05-0.5 mg/kg i.p. or (b) equipotent anti-bicuculline doses of diazepam (0.5-5 mg/kg, i.p.), against diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP; 1.5 mg/kg, s.c.)-induced status epilepticus and its associated neuronal damage. The severity and frequency of seizure activities were determined by continuous radio telemetry recordings while the extent of neuronal damage and neuronal degeneration were assessed using the TUNEL-based cleaved DNA end-labeling technique or neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN)-immunolabeling and Fluoro-Jade B (FJB) staining, respectively. We report here that the combination of atropine and imidazenil is at least 10-fold more potent and longer lasting than the combination with diazepam at protecting rats from DFP-induced seizures and the associated neuronal damage or ongoing degeneration in the anterior cingulate cortex, CA1 hippocampus, and dentate gyrus. While 0.5 mg/kg imidazenil effectively attenuated DFP-induced neuronal damage and the ongoing neuronal degeneration in the anterior cingulate cortex, dentate gyrus, and CA1 hippocampus, 5 mg/kg or a

  18. Compliance and persistence of antidepressants versus anticonvulsants in patients with neuropathic pain during the first year of therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharibian, Derenik; Polzin, Jennifer K; Rho, Jay P

    2013-05-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) is a chronic condition that has human, social, and economic consequences. A variety of agents can be used for treatment; however, antidepressants and anticonvulsants are the 2 classes most widely studied and represent first-line agents in the management of NP. Little information is known about the adherence patterns of these medications during the first year of therapy in patients with NP. To examine the compliance and persistence of antidepressants versus anticonvulsants in patients with NP during the first year of therapy. Using electronic medical and pharmacy data for the Kaiser Permanente Southern California region, the adherence patterns for patients with a NP diagnosis prescribed an antidepressant or an anticonvulsant were studied. Compliance and persistence were measured using the medication possession ratio and the Refill-Sequence model, respectively. The study included 1817 patients with NP diagnosis taking either an antidepressant or an anticonvulsant. Within the antidepressant group, 42.9% were considered compliant, compared with 43.7% in the anticonvulsant group. Subanalysis of the 2 cohorts revealed that patients on venlafaxine were the most compliant (69.4%) compared with patients taking gabapentin (44.4%) and tricyclic antidepressants (41.8%) (Panticonvulsant group were considered persistent with their medication refills. Compliance and persistence rates were similar for patients with NP diagnosis taking antidepressants and anticonvulsants. Higher compliance was observed among patients taking venlafaxine; however, this population did have a small sample size.

  19. The anticonvulsant action of the galanin receptor agonist NAX-5055 involves modulation of both excitatory- and inhibitory neurotransmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walls, Anne B; Flynn, Sean P; West, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    -based anti-convulsant drugs was prompted. Based on this, a rationally designed GalR1 preferring galanin analogue, NAX-5055, was synthesized. This compound demonstrates anti-convulsant actions in several animal models of epilepsy. However, the alterations at the cellular level leading to this anti......-convulsant action of NAX-5055 are not known. Here we investigate the action of NAX-5055 at the cellular level by determining its effects on excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission, i.e. vesicular release of glutamate and GABA, respectively, in cerebellar, neocortical and hippocampal preparations. In addition...

  20. Anticonvulsant, anxiolytic and discriminative effects of the AMPA antagonist 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzo(f)quinoxaline (NBQX).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swedberg, M D; Jacobsen, P; Honoré, T

    1995-09-01

    The anticonvulsant effects of 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzo(f)quinoxaline (NBQX), phencyclidine (PCP) and diazepam against audiogenic seizures in DBA/2 mice and against seizures induced by methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (DMCM) in NMRI mice were compared. Motor impairment was assessed in a rotarod apparatus in DBA/2 as well as NMRI mice. At 30 min after i.p. administration, NBQX was as effective as PCP and diazepam in protecting against audiogenic seizures and had a therapeutic ratio slightly higher than diazepam's and 7-fold higher than PCP's. Whereas diazepam was fully effective, NBQX and PCP were both ineffective against seizures induced by DMCM 30 min after i.p. administration. The anticonvulsant potential and motor-impairing effects of NBQX were evaluated further by the i.p. and the i.v. routes at different time points after administration. At all pretreatment intervals, NBQX protected against audiogenic seizures more potently than it produced motor impairment. NBQX administered i.p. protected against DMCM-induced seizures when given 15 min but not 5 min before testing, whereas after i.v. administration NBQX produced anticonvulsant and motor-impairing effects in the same dose range. NBQX only slightly and non-dose-dependently attenuated the discriminative effects of pentylenetetrazole in rats, showing a limited anxiolytic potential. NBQX produced no PCP-like or morphine-like discriminative effects in rats, suggesting lack of PCP or opiate-like subjective effects. These data demonstrate that NBQX has anticonvulsant effects, has limited anxiolytic effects, and does not produce subjective effects of PCP or opiate type.

  1. The anticonvulsant gabapentin (neurontin) does not act through gamma-aminobutyric acid-B receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Mosbacher, Johannes; Elg, Susanne

    2002-01-01

    The actions of the anticonvulsant gabapentin [1-(aminomethyl)cyclohexaneacetic acid, Neurontin] have been somewhat enigmatic until recently, when it was claimed to be a gamma-aminobutyric acid-B (GABA(B)) receptor agonist acting exclusively at a heterodimeric complex containing the GABA(B(1a...... in vitro assays. In light of these results, we find it highly questionable that gabapentin is a GABA(B) receptor agonist. Hence, the anticonvulsive effects of the compound have to arise from GABA(B) receptor-independent mechanisms. This also implies that the first GABA(B) receptor splice variant...

  2. Effect of reduction of anticonvulsants on wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbacher, E

    1982-01-01

    An attempt was made over a period of a year to reduce the number of anticonvulsants used to treat epilepsy in a hospital for the mentally handicapped. At least one drug was withdrawn for each of 20 patients, without loss of seizure control. Effect on wellbeing was assessed by a behavioural scale completed before and after withdrawal, and in the 20 cases of successful withdrawal wellbeing was significantly improved. PMID:6809110

  3. The gamma-aminobutyric acid uptake inhibitor, tiagabine, is anticonvulsant in two animal models of reflex epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S E; Parvez, N S; Chapman, A G; Meldrum, B S

    1995-02-06

    The effects of i.p. administration of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) uptake inhibitors R(-)N-(4,4-di(3-methylthien-2-yl)-but-3-enyl) nipecotic acid hydrochloride (tiagabine; molecular weight 412.0), (1-(2-(((diphenylmethylene)-amino)oxy)ethyl)-1,2,5,6-tetrahydro-3- pyridinecarboxylic acid hydrochloride (NNC-711; molecular weight 386.9), and (+/-)-nipecotic acid (molecular weight 128.2) are compared with those of carbamazepine (molecular weight 236.3) on sound-induced seizures and locomotor performance in genetically epilepsy-prone (GEP) rats. The ED50 value against clonic seizures (in mumol kg-1 at the time of maximal anticonvulsant effect) for tiagabine was 23 (0.5 h), and for NNC-711 was 72 (1 h), and for carbamazepine was 98 (2 h). (+/-)-Nipecotic acid (0.4-15.6 mmol kg-1) was not anticonvulsant. High doses of NNC-711 (207-310 mumol kg-1) and of (+/-)-nipecotic acid (39-78 mmol kg-1) induced ataxia and myoclonic seizures 0.25-1 h. Tiagabine and carbamazepine did not induce myoclonic seizures and had similar therapeutic indices (locomotor deficit ED50/anticonvulsant ED50) ranging from 0.4 to 1.9. In Papio papio, we observed a reduction in photically induced myoclonic seizures with tiagabine (2.4 mumol kg-1 i.v.) accompanied with neurological impairment. Tiagabine has comparable anticonvulsant action to carbamazepine in rats and has anticonvulsant effects in non-human primates supporting the potential use of inhibitors of GABA uptake as therapy for epilepsy.

  4. The anticonvulsant retigabine suppresses neuronal Kv2-mediated currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stas, Jeroen I; Bocksteins, Elke; Jensen, Camilla S

    2016-01-01

    Enhancement of neuronal M-currents, generated through KV7.2-KV7.5 channels, has gained much interest for its potential in developing treatments for hyperexcitability-related disorders such as epilepsy. Retigabine, a KV7 channel opener, has proven to be an effective anticonvulsant and has recently...

  5. Teratogenic risk and contraceptive counselling in psychiatric practice: analysis of anticonvulsant therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Anticonvulsants have been used to manage psychiatric conditions for over 50 years. It is recognised that some, particularly valproate, carbamazepine and lamotrigine, are human teratogens, while others including topiramate require further investigation. We aimed to appraise the documentation of this risk by psychiatrists and review discussion around contraceptive issues. Methods A retrospective review of prescribing patterns of four anticonvulsants (valproate, carbamazepine, lamotrigine and topiramate) in women of child bearing age was undertaken. Documented evidence of discussion surrounding teratogenicity and contraceptive issues was sought. Results Valproate was most commonly prescribed (n=67). Evidence of teratogenic risk counselling at medication initiation was sub-optimal – 40% of individuals prescribed carbamazepine and 22% of valproate. Documentation surrounding contraceptive issues was also low- 17% of individuals prescribed carbamazepine and 13% of valproate. Conclusion We found both low rates of teratogenic risk counselling and low rates of contraception advice in our cohort. Given the high rates of unplanned pregnancies combined with the relatively high risk of major congenital malformations, it is essential that a detailed appraisal of the risks and benefits associated with anticonvulsant medication occurs and is documented within patients’ psychiatric notes. PMID:24066860

  6. Enhancement of inhibitory neurotransmission and inhibition of excitatory mechanisms underlie the anticonvulsant effects of Mallotus oppositifolius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Kwami Edem Kukuia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Mallotus oppositifolius is a shrub that is used traditionally to treat epilepsy, but its potential has not been scientifically validated. Aims: This study investigated the anticonvulsant properties and possible mechanism of action of the 70% v/v hydroalcoholic extract of the leaves of M. oppositifolius.Materials and Methods: Inprinting control region (ICR mice (25–30 g were pretreated with the M. oppositifolius leaf extract (10–100 mg/kg before administering the respective convulsants (pentylenetetrazole [PTZ], picrotoxin [PTX], strychnine [STR], 4-aminopyridine [4-AP], and pilocarpine. The effect of the extract in maximal electroshock seizure (MES model was investigated also. Statistical Analysis: Data were presented as mean ± standard error of the mean and were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA or two-way ANOVA where appropriate with Newman–Keuls or Bonferroni post hoc test respectively. P< 0.05 was considered significant. Results: In both PTX and PTZ test, extract delayed the onset of seizures and reduced the frequency and duration of seizures. In the STR-induced seizure test, the extract significantly delayed the onset of seizures and reduced the duration of seizures. The extract also delayed the onset of clonic and tonic seizures as well as increasing the survival of mice in the 4-AP-induced seizure test. It further reduced the duration of tonic limb extensions in the MES test. In the pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus, the extract significantly delayed the onset of clonic convulsions and reduced the frequency and duration of seizures. Moreover, the anticonvulsant effect of the extract was attenuated by flumazenil, a benzodiazepine/gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA receptor antagonist. Conclusion: These findings show that the extract has anticonvulsant effect possible mediated by GABAergic, glycinergic neurotransmission, and potassium channel conductions. It may also be acting by antagonizing muscarinic

  7. Progressive anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome associated with change of drug product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabroe, T.P.; Sabers, A.

    2008-01-01

    This report describes the laboratory and physical manifestations of lamotrigine-like toxicity in a young man with refractory epilepsy receiving lamotrigine presenting as anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome (AHS) associated with an abrupt change of drug product Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6...

  8. Association between consistent purchase of anticonvulsants or lithium and suicide risk: a longitudinal cohort study from Denmark, 1995-2001

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Eric G; Søndergård, Lars; Lopez, Ana Garcia

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prior studies suggest anticonvulsants purchasers may be at greater risk of suicide than lithium purchasers. METHODS: Longitudinal, retrospective cohort study of all individuals in Denmark purchasing anticonvulsants (valproic acid, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine or lamotrigine) (n=9952...

  9. The efficacy of anticonvulsants on orofacial pain: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, W.J.J.M.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Controversy exists about the effectiveness of anticonvulsants for the management of orofacial pain disorders. To ascertain appropriate therapies, a systematic review was conducted of existing randomized controlled trials. Study design. Trials were identified from PubMed, Cochrane, and

  10. Mitochondrial Profiles and the Anticonvulsant Effect of the Ketogenic Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A study of the anticonvulsant effect of the ketogenic diet (KD in adolescent rats, at Emory University and other centers, found that the hippocampus responds by inducing mitochondrial biogenesis, enhancing metabolic gene expression, and increasing energy reserves.

  11. Anticonvulsant and sedative effect of Fufang Changniu pills and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Gallic acid, liquiritin, cinnamyl alcohol, cinnamic acid and glycyrrhizic acid were detected in. FCP decoction. FCP (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg) showed significant anticonvulsant and sedative effects on epileptic mice induced by MES (p < 0.05) and PTZ (p < 0.05). Moreover, pentobarbital sodium-induced sleeping time ...

  12. Use of anticonvulsants as prophylaxis for seizures in patients on clozapine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Dorgival

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is to conduct a critical review of the literature regarding the use of anticonvulsants in the prophylaxis of clozapine-induced seizures, to examine the relationship of the latter with clozapine daily dose, serum concentration and other factors than dosage that effect clozapine blood concentration, and to make recommendations for the management of clozapine-induced seizures. A systematic review of English-language MEDLINE articles was undertaken. Clozapine-induced seizures may occur at any dose; the risk increases with dose and goes up to 4% at ≥ 600 mg/day. Some authors have advocated that patients on that dose regimen have anticonvulsant added as a primary prophylactic measure. The author discusses the pitfalls of this recommendation and highlights that seizures are better predicted from serum concentration (1300 ng/ml) rather than dose alone, and that serum concentration is strongly influenced by sex, age, smoking habit, drug-drug interactions and variations in the 1A2, 2D6 and 3A4 genotypes. Anticonvulsants are not recommended as a primary prophylaxis for clozapine-induced seizures. When deemed necessary as secondary prophylaxis, the clinician's choice should consider drug-drug interactions that may increase/decrease clozapine serum concentration and lead to more side effects, including neutropenia/agranulocytosis and seizures, or compromise therapeutic response. Recommendations for primary and secondary prophylaxis of clozapine related-seizures are provided.

  13. Do carbamazepine, gabapentin, or other anticonvulsants exert sufficient radioprotective effects to alter responses from trigeminal neuralgia radiosurgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flickinger, John C; Kim, Hyun; Kano, Hideyuki; Greenberger, Joel S; Arai, Yoshio; Niranjan, Ajay; Lunsford, L Dade; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John C

    2012-07-15

    Laboratory studies have documented radioprotective effects with carbamazepine. We sought to determine whether carbamazepine or other anticonvulsant/neuroleptic drugs would show significant radioprotective effects in patients undergoing high-dose small-volume radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia. We conducted a retrospective review of 200 patients undergoing Gamma Knife (Elekta Instrument AB, Stockholm, Sweden) stereotactic radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia between February 1995 and May 2008. We selected patients treated with a maximum dose of 80 Gy with 4-mm diameter collimators, with no previous microvascular decompression, and follow-up ≥6 months (median, 24 months; range, 6-153 months). At the time of radiosurgery, 28 patients were taking no anticonvulsants, 62 only carbamazepine, 35 only gabapentin, 21 carbamazepine plus gabapentin, 17 carbamazepine plus other anticonvulsants, and 9 gabapentin plus other anticonvulsants, and 28 were taking other anticonvulsants or combinations. Pain improvement developed post-radiosurgery in 187 of 200 patients (93.5%). Initial complete pain relief developed in 84 of 200 patients (42%). Post-radiosurgery trigeminal neuropathy developed in 27 of 200 patients (13.5%). We could not significantly correlate pain improvement or initial complete pain relief with use of carbamazepine, gabapentin, or use of any anticonvulsants/neuroleptic drugs or other factors in univariate or multivariate analysis. Post-radiosurgery numbness/paresthesias correlated with the use of gabapentin (1 of 36 patients with gabapentin vs. 7 of 28 without, p = 0.017). In multivariate analysis, decreasing age, purely typical pain, and use of gabapentin correlated (p = 0.008, p = 0.005, and p = 0.021) with lower risks of developing post-radiosurgery trigeminal neuropathy. New post-radiosurgery numbness/paresthesias developed in 3% (1 of 36), 5% (4 of 81), and 13% (23 of 187) of patients on gabapentin alone, with age ≤70 years, and Type 1 typical

  14. Do Carbamazepine, Gabapentin, or Other Anticonvulsants Exert Sufficient Radioprotective Effects to Alter Responses From Trigeminal Neuralgia Radiosurgery?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flickinger, John C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); College of Arts and Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kim, Hyun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kano, Hideyuki [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Greenberger, Joel S.; Arai, Yoshio [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Niranjan, Ajay [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Lunsford, L. Dade; Kondziolka, Douglas [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Flickinger, John C., E-mail: flickingerjc@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Laboratory studies have documented radioprotective effects with carbamazepine. We sought to determine whether carbamazepine or other anticonvulsant/neuroleptic drugs would show significant radioprotective effects in patients undergoing high-dose small-volume radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of 200 patients undergoing Gamma Knife (Elekta Instrument AB, Stockholm, Sweden) stereotactic radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia between February 1995 and May 2008. We selected patients treated with a maximum dose of 80 Gy with 4-mm diameter collimators, with no previous microvascular decompression, and follow-up {>=}6 months (median, 24 months; range, 6-153 months). At the time of radiosurgery, 28 patients were taking no anticonvulsants, 62 only carbamazepine, 35 only gabapentin, 21 carbamazepine plus gabapentin, 17 carbamazepine plus other anticonvulsants, and 9 gabapentin plus other anticonvulsants, and 28 were taking other anticonvulsants or combinations. Results: Pain improvement developed post-radiosurgery in 187 of 200 patients (93.5%). Initial complete pain relief developed in 84 of 200 patients (42%). Post-radiosurgery trigeminal neuropathy developed in 27 of 200 patients (13.5%). We could not significantly correlate pain improvement or initial complete pain relief with use of carbamazepine, gabapentin, or use of any anticonvulsants/neuroleptic drugs or other factors in univariate or multivariate analysis. Post-radiosurgery numbness/paresthesias correlated with the use of gabapentin (1 of 36 patients with gabapentin vs. 7 of 28 without, p = 0.017). In multivariate analysis, decreasing age, purely typical pain, and use of gabapentin correlated (p = 0.008, p = 0.005, and p = 0.021) with lower risks of developing post-radiosurgery trigeminal neuropathy. New post-radiosurgery numbness/paresthesias developed in 3% (1 of 36), 5% (4 of 81), and 13% (23 of 187) of patients on gabapentin alone, with age

  15. Do Carbamazepine, Gabapentin, or Other Anticonvulsants Exert Sufficient Radioprotective Effects to Alter Responses From Trigeminal Neuralgia Radiosurgery?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flickinger, John C.; Kim, Hyun; Kano, Hideyuki; Greenberger, Joel S.; Arai, Yoshio; Niranjan, Ajay; Lunsford, L. Dade; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Laboratory studies have documented radioprotective effects with carbamazepine. We sought to determine whether carbamazepine or other anticonvulsant/neuroleptic drugs would show significant radioprotective effects in patients undergoing high-dose small-volume radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of 200 patients undergoing Gamma Knife (Elekta Instrument AB, Stockholm, Sweden) stereotactic radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia between February 1995 and May 2008. We selected patients treated with a maximum dose of 80 Gy with 4-mm diameter collimators, with no previous microvascular decompression, and follow-up ≥6 months (median, 24 months; range, 6–153 months). At the time of radiosurgery, 28 patients were taking no anticonvulsants, 62 only carbamazepine, 35 only gabapentin, 21 carbamazepine plus gabapentin, 17 carbamazepine plus other anticonvulsants, and 9 gabapentin plus other anticonvulsants, and 28 were taking other anticonvulsants or combinations. Results: Pain improvement developed post-radiosurgery in 187 of 200 patients (93.5%). Initial complete pain relief developed in 84 of 200 patients (42%). Post-radiosurgery trigeminal neuropathy developed in 27 of 200 patients (13.5%). We could not significantly correlate pain improvement or initial complete pain relief with use of carbamazepine, gabapentin, or use of any anticonvulsants/neuroleptic drugs or other factors in univariate or multivariate analysis. Post-radiosurgery numbness/paresthesias correlated with the use of gabapentin (1 of 36 patients with gabapentin vs. 7 of 28 without, p = 0.017). In multivariate analysis, decreasing age, purely typical pain, and use of gabapentin correlated (p = 0.008, p = 0.005, and p = 0.021) with lower risks of developing post-radiosurgery trigeminal neuropathy. New post-radiosurgery numbness/paresthesias developed in 3% (1 of 36), 5% (4 of 81), and 13% (23 of 187) of patients on gabapentin alone, with

  16. Canine Pancreas-Specific Lipase and C-reactive Protein in Dogs Treated With Anticonvulsants (Phenobarbital and Potassium Bromide).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarracín, Viviana; Teles, Mariana; Meléndez-Lazo, Antonio; Rodón, Jaume; Pastor, Josep

    2015-06-01

    Animals treated with anticonvulsant drugs may have increased canine pancreas-specific lipase (cPLI) values. Inflammatory conditions and specifically acute pancreatitis are of major concern in these animals. Elevation in C-reactive protein is being associated with inflammatory status in dogs and it has been correlated with the clinical severity of pancreatitis. In the present study, we investigated if there is a correlation between the cPLI increase, changes in C-reactive protein and hepatic enzymes, as well as the incidence of severe acute pancreatitis (AP) in dogs with anticonvulsant treatment (phenobarbital, or potassium bromide or both). Increased values of pancreas-specific lipase were found in 6.8% of the animals in treatment with anticonvulsants, and this increase is correlated with the increase in triglycerides, alkaline phosphatase, and alanine aminotransferase but not with C-reactive protein levels, which suggests a possible induction or release phenomenon rather than a clear severe AP. C-reactive protein levels did not affect cPLI values on the population studied. Only 2 animals had clinical and analytical data suggestive of AP, indicating a low prevalence (0.6%). In conclusion, cPLI may be increased in a low percentage of animals with anticonvulsants treatment and its increase may not be associated with severe AP. It may be induced by the anticonvulsants drugs; however, further studies are advised to rule out other possible causes that increased cPLI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. GABAA Receptors, Anesthetics and Anticonvulsants in Brain Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henschel, Oliver; Gipson, Keith E.; Bordey, Angelique

    2008-01-01

    GABA, acting via GABAA receptors, is well-accepted as the main inhibitory neurotransmitter of the mature brain, where it dampens neuronal excitability. The receptor's properties have been studied extensively, yielding important information about its structure, pharmacology, and regulation that are summarized in this review. Several GABAergic drugs have been commonly used as anesthetics, sedatives, and anticonvulsants for decades. However, findings that GABA has critical functions in brain development, in particular during the late embryonic and neonatal period, raise worthwhile questions regarding the side effects of GABAergic drugs that may lead to long-term cognitive deficits. Here, we will review some of these drugs in parallel with the control of CNS development that GABA exerts via activation of GABAA receptors. This review aims to provide a basic science and clinical perspective on the function of GABA and related pharmaceuticals acting at GABAA receptors. PMID:18537647

  18. Prenatal exposure to anticonvulsant drugs and spatial ability in adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dessens, A.; Cohen-Kettenis, P.; Mellenbergh, G.; van de Poll, N.; Koppe, J.; Boer, K.

    1998-01-01

    By disturbing steroid hormone balances in the fetus, the anticonvulsant drugs phenobarbital and phenytoin may affect certain aspects of cognitive functioning. In order to test this hypothesis, we studied hormone related cognitive functioning in 72 men and 75 women who had been prenatally exposed to

  19. Association of anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome with Herpesvirus 6, 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskay, Tuğba; Karademir, Asli; Ertürk, Ozcan I

    2006-07-01

    Anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome (AHS) is one of the most severe forms of drug eruption with potentially lethal, and multiorgan involvement. Recently, it has been suggested that Human Herpesvirus (HHV) infection has been involved in this syndrome, although the pathogenesis of this syndrome remains still unclear. The objective of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics of AHS and the possible role of viral infection as a co-factor. We prospectively analyzed clinical, laboratory and virological findings for 23 cases of AHS. A viral study including viral serology and a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed. The most common anticonvulsant was carbamazepine (12) followed by phenytoin (6), phenobarbital (4) and gabapentin (1). All patients met fulfill the clinical criteria of AHS. Even though internal organ involvement such as liver (52%), kidney (34%), and lung (13%) has been observed, involvement of heart, lung, thyroid, muscle, pancreas, spleen, and brain was less frequent. We also noted two patients who died due to multiorgan failure. No association with viral infection including HSV, VZV, HHV-8, CMV, EBV, measles, rubella and parvovirus B19 was detected in the current series. Increased serum anti-HHV-6 IgG and HHV-7 titers and presence of HHV-6 and -7 DNA in serum, revealed by PCR analysis, suggested reactivation of HHV-6. In contrast to the control groups, DNA for HHV-6 was detected in serum in 5 out of the 23 patients while HHV-7 was seen in two patients. We found an evidence to link reactivation of HHV-6 or HHV-7 in the development of only carbamazepine-induced AHS. We propose that some cases of AHS are accompanied by reactivation of not only HHV-6 but also HHV-7. HHV infection may contribute to the severity, prolongation, or relapse of AHS and may possibly have fatal consequences in some susceptible individuals receiving the anticonvulsants.

  20. New benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl-aminoacetamides as potential anticonvulsants: synthesis, activity and prediction of molecular properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ruhi; Siddiqui, Nadeem

    2015-04-01

    A series of N-(substituted-2-oxo-4-phenylazetidin-1-yl)-2-((6-substitutedbenzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)amino)acetamide derivatives were synthesized using pharmacophoric features with aromatic hydrophobic aryl ring (A), NH-C=O as hydrogen bonding domain, the nitrogen atom as electron donor (D), and phenyl as distal aryl ring (C). The synthesized molecules were initially screened for anticonvulsant activity using the maximal electroshock seizure (MES) test and the subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole test in albino mice. An acute neurotoxicity study on the synthesized molecules was also carried out using the rotarod test. The results of these tests revealed that two compounds, 5b and 5q, showed promising activity with ED50 values of 15.4 and 18.6 mg/kg and protective indices of 20.7 and 34.9 in the MES test, respectively, which are found to be approximately fourfold higher than those of the standard drugs phenytoin (6.9) and carbamazepine (8.1). These molecules may act as lead of the designed scheme. The pharmacokinetic profiles of all the synthesized compounds were estimated using Molinspiration software. None of the compounds violated Lipinski's "rule of five". The possible structure-activity relationship was discussed. In conclusion, this manuscript shows that the developed model has a highly prognostic power for the further investigation of better benzothiazole derivatives for future discovery and development. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. The effect of various opiate receptor agonists on the seizure threshold in the rat. Is dynorphin an endogenous anticonvulsant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przewłocka, B; Stala, L; Lasoń, W; Przewłocki, R

    1983-01-01

    The effects of various opiate receptor agonists on the seizure threshold after an intravenous infusion of pentylenetetrazol were investigated in rats. The mu- and epsilon-receptor agonists, morphine (20-40 micrograms) and beta-endorphin (5-10 micrograms) show proconvulsant properties towards clonic and tonic seizures. The delta-receptor agonist (D-Ala2,D-Leu5-enkephalin, DADL 5-40 micrograms) and alpha-neoendorphin (20-40 micrograms) show pro- and anticonvulsant properties towards clonic and tonic seizures, respectively. Anticonvulsant properties of DADL are possibly due to its action on the spinal cord, since after the intrathecal injection this effect is still observed. Similarities between DADL and alpha-neoendorphin suggest that they may act through the same receptor. The kappa-receptor agonist dynorphin A (5-20 micrograms) and its degradation-resistant analogue D-Arg-dynorphin1-13 (10 micrograms) show significant anticonvulsant properties. Our present results suggest that the kappa-receptor agonist dynorphin may act physiologically as an endogenous anticonvulsant, in contrast to other opioid peptides.

  2. (Biphenyl-4-yl)methylammonium chlorides: potent anticonvulsants that modulate Na+ currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyosung; Park, Ki Duk; Yang, Xiao-Fang; Dustrude, Erik T; Wilson, Sarah M; Khanna, Rajesh; Kohn, Harold

    2013-07-25

    We have reported that compounds containing a biaryl linked unit (Ar-X-Ar') modulated Na(+) currents by promoting slow inactivation and fast inactivation processes and by inducing frequency (use)-dependent inhibition of Na(+) currents. These electrophysiological properties have been associated with the mode of action of several antiepileptic drugs. In this study, we demonstrate that the readily accessible (biphenyl-4-yl)methylammonium chlorides (compound class B) exhibited a broad range of anticonvulsant activities in animal models, and in the maximal electroshock seizure test the activity of (3'-trifluoromethoxybiphenyl-4-yl)methylammonium chloride (8) exceeded that of phenobarbital and phenytoin upon oral administration to rats. Electrophysiological studies of 8 using mouse catecholamine A-differentiated cells and rat embryonic cortical neurons confirmed that 8 promoted slow and fast inactivation in both cell types but did not affect the frequency (use)-dependent block of Na(+) currents.

  3. The novel anticonvulsant neuropeptide and galanin analogue, NAX-5055, does not alter energy and amino acid metabolism in cultured brain cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldana, Blanca I; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Schousboe, Arne

    2017-01-01

    A large body of evidence suggests that the neuropeptide galanin plays an important role in seizure control. In line with this, it was demonstrated that the galanin analogue, NAX-5055, exerts a potent anticonvulsant activity in animal seizure models. We recently found that the NAX-5055-mediated an...

  4. Anticonvulsant Effects of Fractions Isolated from Dinoponera quadriceps (Kempt Ant Venom (Formicidae: Ponerinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Aline Morais Ferreira Nôga

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural products, sources of new pharmacological substances, have large chemical diversity and architectural complexity. In this context, some toxins obtained from invertebrate venoms have anticonvulsant effects. Epilepsy is a neurological disorder that affects about 65 million people worldwide, and approximately 30% of cases are resistant to pharmacological treatment. Previous studies from our group show that the denatured venom of the ant Dinoponera quadriceps (Kempt protects mice against bicuculline (BIC-induced seizures and death. The aim of this study was to investigate the anticonvulsant activity of compounds isolated from D. quadriceps venom against seizures induced by BIC in mice. Crude venom was fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC resulting in six fractions referred to as DqTx1–DqTx6. A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS analysis revealed a major 431 Da compound in fractions DqTx1 and DqTx2. Fractions DqTx3 and DqTx4 showed a compound of 2451 Da and DqTx5 revealed a 2436 Da compound. Furthermore, the DqTx6 fraction exhibited a major component with a molecular weight of 13,196 Da. Each fraction (1 mg/mL was microinjected into the lateral ventricle of mice, and the animals were observed in an open field. We did not observe behavioral alterations when the fractions were given alone. Conversely, when the fractions were microinjected 20 min prior to the administration of BIC (21.6 nM, DqTx1, DqTx4, and DqTx6 fractions increased the latency for onset of tonic-clonic seizures. Moreover, all fractions, except DqTx5, increased latency to death. The more relevant result was obtained with the DqTx6 fraction, which protected 62.5% of the animals against tonic-clonic seizures. Furthermore, this fraction protected 100% of the animals from seizure episodes followed by death. Taken together, these findings indicate that compounds from ant venom might be a potential source of new anticonvulsants molecules.

  5. Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Analysis of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Analysis of the Anticonvulsant ... Two types of molecular descriptors, including the 2D autocorrelation ..... It is based on the simulation of natural .... clustering anticonvulsant, antidepressant, and.

  6. Synthesis of some new substituted quinazolin-4-3H-ones as potent anticonvulsant agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, N.; Chandra, T.; Lata, K.K.

    2009-01-01

    A new series of 3-(4-(2-(6,8-dibromo-3 (substituted phenyl)-4-oxo-3, 4-dihydroquinazolin-2-yl)methyl) hydrazinyl)thiazol-2-yl)-2-phenylthiazolidin-4-ones were synthesized and their structures were elucidated on the basis of elemental analyses and spectroscopic studies (IR, 1H-NMR). All the synthesized compounds 1-32 were screened for their anticonvulsant activity at a dose of 30 mg/kg. The compound 31 was found to be the most potent compound of this series showing 90% protection against MES. (author)

  7. An audit of therapeutic drug monitoring of anticonvulsants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, P. C.; Morrow, J.; Trimble, E. R.

    1995-01-01

    An audit of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of anticonvulsants was performed to assess both its use and misuse in the management of patients with epilepsy. Over a four week period all samples received for phenytoin, carbamazepine, sodium valproate and phenobarbitone assays were included in the audit. The aims were to establish the source of the specimens, the reasons for the requests and to ascertain what action, if any, would be taken when the result of the assay was provided. A total of 163 separate assays were performed over the four week period (43 phenytoin, 74 carbamazepine, 41 valproate, 5 phenobarbitone). Only 18.7% of all requests originated from the adult neurology department. The vast majority of tests had been ordered by junior medical staff (only 10% by consultants) and approximately 50% were 'routine' with no satisfactory clinical reason for the request offered. There was a tendency to manipulate prescribed doses on the basis of drug levels alone without taking the clinical picture into consideration. These results demonstrate a general ignorance, especially amongst junior medical staff, of the value of TDM of anticonvulsants, and reinforce the need for both an educative and interpretive service to be provided by the Chemical Pathology Department. PMID:8533181

  8. Potential Anticonvulsant Activity of Ethanol Extracts of Cichorium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the acticonvulsant activity of Cichorium intybus (C. intybus) and Taraxacum serotinum (T. ..... In addition, substances with LD50 values higher than 5000 mg/kg by ... neurotransmitter GABA in the central nervous system ...

  9. Analgesic and anticonvulsant effects of extracts from the leaves of Kalanchoe crenata (Andrews) Haworth (Crassulaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguelefack, T B; Nana, P; Atsamo, A D; Dimo, T; Watcho, P; Dongmo, A B; Tapondjou, L A; Njamen, D; Wansi, S L; Kamanyi, A

    2006-06-15

    Kalanchoe crenata Andr. (Crassulaceae) is a fleshy herbaceous plant used in the African traditional medicine as remedies against otitis, headache, inflammations, convulsions and general debility. In the present work, the analgesic effects of methylene chloride/methanol (1:1) (CH(2)Cl(2)/CH(3)OH) extract and its hexane, methylene chloride (CH(2)Cl(2)), ethyl acetate, n-butanol fractions and aqueous residue have been evaluated using acetic acid, formalin and pressure test. The anticonvulsant effects of the CH(2)Cl(2)/CH(3)OH extract were also investigated on seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ 70 mg/kg), strychnine sulphate (STN 2.5 mg/kg) and thiosemicarbazide (TSC 50 mg/kg). CH(2)Cl(2)/CH(3)OH extract and its fractions, administered orally at the doses of 150 and 300 mg/kg, exhibited protective effect of at least 30% on the pain induced by acetic acid. The CH(2)Cl(2) fraction at 300 mg/kg showed a maximal effect of 78.49%. The CH(2)Cl(2)/CH(3)OH extract and its CH(2)Cl(2) fraction at the doses of 150 and 300 mg/kg significantly reduced the first phase of pain induced by formalin while the second phase was completely inhibited. The CH(2)Cl(2) fraction produced more than 45% reduction in the sensitivity to pain induced by pressure. The CH(2)Cl(2)/CH(3)OH extract of Kalanchoe crenata significantly increased the latency period in seizures induced by PTZ and significantly reduced the duration of seizures induced by the three convulsant agents. The extract protected 20% of animals against death in seizures induced by TSC and STN. These results suggest a peripheral and central analgesic activities as well as an anticonvulsant effect of the leaves of Kalanchoe crenata.

  10. Evidence for involvement of the astrocytic benzodiazepine receptor in the mechanism of action of convulsant and anticonvulsant drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, A.S.; Hertz, L.

    1988-01-01

    The anticonvulsant drugs carbamazepine, phenobarbital, trimethadione, valproic acid and ethosuximide at pharmacologically relevant concentrations inhibit [ 3 H]diazepam binding to astrocytes in primary cultures but have much less effect on a corresponding preparation of neurons. Phenytoin as well as pentobarbital (which is not used chronically as an anticonvulsant) are equipotent in the two cell types. The convulsants picrotoxinin and pentylenetetrazol, the convulsant benzodiazepine RO 5-3663 and the two convulsant barbiturates DMBB and CHEB similarly inhibit diazepam binding to astrocytes but have little effect on neurons. On the basis of these findings it is suggested that these convulsants and anticonvulsants owe at least part of their effect to an interaction with the astrocytic benzodiazepine receptor, perhaps by interference with a calcium channel

  11. Novel, broad-spectrum anticonvulsants containing a sulfamide group: advancement of N-((benzo[b]thien-3-yl)methyl)sulfamide (JNJ-26990990) into human clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Michael H; Smith-Swintosky, Virginia L; McComsey, David F; Huang, Yifang; Brenneman, Douglas; Klein, Brian; Malatynska, Ewa; White, H Steve; Milewski, Michael E; Herb, Mark; Finley, Michael F A; Liu, Yi; Lubin, Mary Lou; Qin, Ning; Iannucci, Robert; Leclercq, Laurent; Cuyckens, Filip; Reitz, Allen B; Maryanoff, Bruce E

    2009-12-10

    In seeking broad-spectrum anticonvulsants to treat epilepsy and other neurological disorders, we synthesized and tested a group of sulfamide derivatives (4a-k, 5), which led to the clinical development of 4a (JNJ-26990990). This compound exhibited excellent anticonvulsant activity in rodents against audiogenic, electrically induced, and chemically induced seizures, with very weak inhibition of human carbonic anhydrase-II (IC(50) = 110 microM). The pharmacological profile for 4a supports its potential in the treatment of multiple forms of epilepsy, including pharmacoresistant variants. Mechanistically, 4a inhibited voltage-gated Na(+) channels and N-type Ca(2+) channels but was not effective as a K(+) channel opener. The pharmacokinetics and metabolic properties of 4a are discussed.

  12. Site of anticonvulsant action on sodium channels: autoradiographic and electrophysiological studies in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worley, P.F.; Baraban, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The anticonvulsants phenytoin and carbamazepine interact allosterically with the batrachotoxin binding site of sodium channels. In the present study, we demonstrate an autoradiographic technique to localize the batrachotoxin binding site on sodium channels in rat brain using [ 3 H]batrachotoxinin-A 20-alpha-benzoate (BTX-B). Binding of [ 3 H]BTX-B to brain sections is dependent on potentiating allosteric interactions with scorpion venom and is displaced by BTX-B (Kd approximately 200 nM), aconitine, veratridine, and phenytoin with the same rank order of potencies as described in brain synaptosomes. The maximum number of [ 3 H]BTX-B binding sites in forebrain sections also agrees with biochemical determinations. Autoradiographic localizations indicate that [ 3 H]BTX-B binding sites are not restricted to cell bodies and axons but are present in synaptic zones throughout the brain. For example, a particularly dense concentration of these sites in the substantia nigra is associated with afferent terminals of the striatonigral projection. By contrast, myelinated structures possess much lower densities of binding sites. In addition, we present electrophysiological evidence that synaptic transmission, as opposed to axonal conduction, is preferentially sensitive to the action of aconitine and veratridine. Finally, the synaptic block produced by these sodium channel activators is inhibited by phenytoin and carbamazepine at therapeutic anticonvulsant concentrations

  13. The effects of lithium and anticonvulsants on brain structure in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germaná, C; Kempton, M J; Sarnicola, A; Christodoulou, T; Haldane, M; Hadjulis, M; Girardi, P; Tatarelli, R; Frangou, S

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the effect of lithium, anticonvulsants and antipsychotics on brain structure in bipolar disorder (BD). A cross-sectional structural brain magnetic resonance imaging study of 74 remitted patients with BD, aged 18-65, who were receiving long-term prophylactic treatment with lithium or anticonvulsants or antipsychotics. Global and regional grey matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid volumes were compared between treatment groups. Grey matter in the subgenual anterior cingulate gyrus on the right (extending into the hypothalamus) and in the postcentral gyrus, the hippocampus/amygdale complex and the insula on the left was greater in BD patients on lithium treatment compared to all other treatment groups. Lithium treatment in BD has a significant effect on brain structure particularly in limbic/paralimbic regions associated with emotional processing. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Mechanisms underlying the benefits of anticonvulsants over lithium in the treatment of bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrado, Alisa C; Walsh, John P

    2016-02-10

    Close to 3% of the world's population suffers from bipolar disease (I and II). Of this 3%, bipolar disease affects largely women (∼ 3 : 2 compared with men). The median age of diagnosis is 25 in women and even lower in men. A diagnosis of bipolar disease is an expensive psychiatric diagnosis, costing patients more than twice as much money as a diagnosis of unipolar depression. Bipolar I is characterized by one or more manic or mixed episodes, with both mania and depression occurring each day for at least 1 week, whereas bipolar II is characterized by one or more major depressive episode and at least one episode of hypomania. Bipolar I is the more severe diagnosis. A wide range of medications are available to help patients maintain a healthy lifestyle, including lithium, antidepressants, and anticonvulsants. Improved methods for identifying bipolar disease, including a more structured approach and a more complete use of medical records, have increased the rate of diagnosis, especially in children, which underscores the need for innovation in development and in practice of new treatment options for treating bipolar disease. Although lithium has been the 'gold standard' for treating bipolar disorder for decades, new research into other forms of treatment has shown anticonvulsants to be a particularly useful therapy for treating bipolar disease. Anticonvulsants have remarkable mood-stabilization abilities and they do not lead to serious side effects, which increases the tolerability, and consequently, patient adherence to this form of treatment. Recent studies have shown that anticonvulsants improve behavior in bipolar disease by modulating the balance of excitatory and inhibitory synapses through a number of complementary molecular cascades that affect gene expression and cell survival.

  15. Anticonvulsant and antipunishment effects of toluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, R W; Coleman, J B; Schuler, R; Cox, C

    1984-08-01

    Toluene can have striking acute behavioral effects and is subject to abuse by inhalation. To determine if its actions resemble those of drugs used in the treatment of anxiety ("anxiolytics"), two sets of experiments were undertaken. Inasmuch as prevention of pentylenetetrazol-induced convulsions is an identifying property of this class of agents, we first demonstrated that pretreatment with injections of toluene delayed the onset of convulsive signs and prevented the tonic extension phase of the convulsant activity in a dose-related manner. Injections of another alkyl benzene, m-xylene, were of comparable potency to toluene. Inhalation of toluene delayed the time to death after pentylenetetrazol injection in a manner related to the duration and concentration of exposure; at lower convulsant doses, inhalation of moderate concentrations (EC50, 1311 ppm) prevented death. Treatment with a benzodiazepine receptor antagonist (Ro 15-1788) failed to reduce the anticonvulsant activity of inhaled toluene. Anxiolytics also attenuate the reduction in response rate produced by punishment with electric shock. Toluene increased rates of responding suppressed by punishment when responding was maintained under a multiple fixed-interval fixed-interval punishment schedule of reinforcement. Distinct antipunishment effects were observed after 2 hr of exposure to 1780 and 3000 ppm of toluene; the rate-increasing effects of toluene were related to concentration and to time after the termination of exposure. Thus, toluene and m-xylene resemble in several respects clinically useful drugs such as the benzodiazepines.

  16. Insights from zebrafish and mouse models on the activity and safety of ar-turmerone as a potential drug candidate for the treatment of epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Monserrath Orellana-Paucar

    Full Text Available In a previous study, we uncovered the anticonvulsant properties of turmeric oil and its sesquiterpenoids (ar-turmerone, α-, β-turmerone and α-atlantone in both zebrafish and mouse models of chemically-induced seizures using pentylenetetrazole (PTZ. In this follow-up study, we aimed at evaluating the anticonvulsant activity of ar-turmerone further. A more in-depth anticonvulsant evaluation of ar-turmerone was therefore carried out in the i.v. PTZ and 6-Hz mouse models. The potential toxic effects of ar-turmerone were evaluated using the beam walking test to assess mouse motor function and balance. In addition, determination of the concentration-time profile of ar-turmerone was carried out for a more extended evaluation of its bioavailability in the mouse brain. Ar-turmerone displayed anticonvulsant properties in both acute seizure models in mice and modulated the expression patterns of two seizure-related genes (c-fos and brain-derived neurotrophic factor [bdnf] in zebrafish. Importantly, no effects on motor function and balance were observed in mice after treatment with ar-turmerone even after administering a dose 500-fold higher than the effective dose in the 6-Hz model. In addition, quantification of its concentration in mouse brains revealed rapid absorption after i.p. administration, capacity to cross the BBB and long-term brain residence. Hence, our results provide additional information on the anticonvulsant properties of ar-turmerone and support further evaluation towards elucidating its mechanism of action, bioavailability, toxicity and potential clinical application.

  17. Insights from zebrafish and mouse models on the activity and safety of ar-turmerone as a potential drug candidate for the treatment of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana-Paucar, Adriana Monserrath; Afrikanova, Tatiana; Thomas, Joice; Aibuldinov, Yelaman K; Dehaen, Wim; de Witte, Peter A M; Esguerra, Camila V

    2013-01-01

    In a previous study, we uncovered the anticonvulsant properties of turmeric oil and its sesquiterpenoids (ar-turmerone, α-, β-turmerone and α-atlantone) in both zebrafish and mouse models of chemically-induced seizures using pentylenetetrazole (PTZ). In this follow-up study, we aimed at evaluating the anticonvulsant activity of ar-turmerone further. A more in-depth anticonvulsant evaluation of ar-turmerone was therefore carried out in the i.v. PTZ and 6-Hz mouse models. The potential toxic effects of ar-turmerone were evaluated using the beam walking test to assess mouse motor function and balance. In addition, determination of the concentration-time profile of ar-turmerone was carried out for a more extended evaluation of its bioavailability in the mouse brain. Ar-turmerone displayed anticonvulsant properties in both acute seizure models in mice and modulated the expression patterns of two seizure-related genes (c-fos and brain-derived neurotrophic factor [bdnf]) in zebrafish. Importantly, no effects on motor function and balance were observed in mice after treatment with ar-turmerone even after administering a dose 500-fold higher than the effective dose in the 6-Hz model. In addition, quantification of its concentration in mouse brains revealed rapid absorption after i.p. administration, capacity to cross the BBB and long-term brain residence. Hence, our results provide additional information on the anticonvulsant properties of ar-turmerone and support further evaluation towards elucidating its mechanism of action, bioavailability, toxicity and potential clinical application.

  18. Biological Activities of Hydrazone Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Güniz Küçükgüzel

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available There has been considerable interest in the development of novel compounds with anticonvulsant, antidepressant, analgesic, antiinflammatory, antiplatelet, antimalarial, antimicrobial, antimycobacterial, antitumoral, vasodilator, antiviral and antischistosomiasis activities. Hydrazones possessing an azometine -NHN=CH- proton constitute an important class of compounds for new drug development. Therefore, many researchers have synthesized these compounds as target structures and evaluated their biological activities. These observations have been guiding for the development of new hydrazones that possess varied biological activities.

  19. Agmatine reduces extracellular glutamate during pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in rat brain: A potential mechanism for the anticonvulsive effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yangzheng; LeBlanc, Michael H.; Regunathan, Soundar

    2010-01-01

    Glutamate has been implicated in the initiation and spread of seizure activity. Agmatine, an endogenous neuromodulator, is an antagonist of NMDA receptors and has anticonvulsive effects. Whether agmatine regulate glutamate release, as measured by in vivo microdialysis, is not known. In this study, we used pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizure model to determine the effect of agmatine on extracellular glutamate in rat brain. We also determined the time course and the amount of agmatine that reached brain after peripheral injection. After i.p. injection of agmatine (50 mg/kg), increase of agmatine in rat cortex and hippocampus was observed in 15 min with levels returning to baseline in one hour. Rats, naïve and implanted with microdialysis cannula into the cortex, were administered PTZ (60 mg/kg, i.p.) with prior injection of agmatine (100 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline. Seizure grades were recorded and microdialysis samples were collected every 15 min for 75 min. Agmatine pre-treatment significantly reduced the seizure grade and increased the onset time. The levels of extracellular glutamate in frontal cortex rose two- to three-fold after PTZ injection and agmatine significantly inhibited this increase. In conclusion, the present data suggest that the anticonvulsant activity of agmatine, in part, could be related to the inhibition glutamate release. PMID:16125317

  20. Agmatine reduces extracellular glutamate during pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in rat brain: A potential mechanism for the anticonvulsive effects

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Yangzheng; LeBlanc, Michael H.; Regunathan, Soundar

    2005-01-01

    Glutamate has been implicated in the initiation and spread of seizure activity. Agmatine, an endogenous neuromodulator, is an antagonist of NMDA receptors and has anticonvulsive effects. Whether agmatine regulate glutamate release, as measured by in vivo microdialysis, is not known. In this study, we used pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizure model to determine the effect of agmatine on extracellular glutamate in rat brain. We also determined the time course and the amount of agmatine that...

  1. 1-[(2-arylthiazol-4-yl)methyl]azoles as a new class of anticonvulsants: design, synthesis, in vivo screening, and in silico drug-like properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahangar, Nematollah; Ayati, Adile; Alipour, Eskandar; Pashapour, Arsalan; Foroumadi, Alireza; Emami, Saeed

    2011-11-01

    A series of novel thiazole incorporated (arylalkyl)azoles were synthesized and screened for their anticonvulsant properties using maximal electroshock and pentylenetetrazole models in mice. Among target compounds, 1-[(2-(4-chlorophenyl)thiazol-4-yl)methyl]-1H-imidazole (compound 4b), 1-[(2-phenylthiazol-4-yl)methyl]-1H-1,2,4-tria-zole (8a), and its 4-chlorophenyl analog (compound 8b) were able to display noticeable anticonvulsant activity in both pentylenetetrazole and maximal electroshock tests with percentage protection range of 33-100%. A computational study was carried out for prediction of pharmacokinetics properties and drug-likeness. The structure-activity relationship and in silico drug relevant properties (molecular weight, topological polar surface area, clog P, hydrogen bond donors, hydrogen bond acceptors, and log BB) confirmed that the compounds were within the range set by Lipinski's rule-of-five, and possessing favorable physicochemical properties for acting as CNS-drugs, making them potentially promising agents for epilepsy therapy. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Pro- and anticonvulsant actions of morphine and the endogenous opioids: involvement and interactions of multiple opiate and non-opiate systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenk, H

    1983-10-01

    The proconvulsant actions of high doses of systemic morphine are probably mediated by 3 different systems. One of them produces non-convulsant electrographic seizures and can be activated separately from the others both by intracerebroventricular injections as well as microinjections into discrete subcortical areas. The enkephalins and beta-endorphin, when administered to the same loci, produce similar effects. Pharmacological evidence suggests that specific opiate receptors of the delta-subtype mediate the epileptiform effects produced by this system. The second system mediating proconvulsant effects of systemic morphine is not mediated by stereo-specific opiate receptors. It produces behavioral convulsions, and the GABA-ergic system has been implicated in its action. A third proconvulsant action of systemic morphine can be activated separately from the other two systems by administering this compound with other convulsive agents or manipulations. Specific mu-type opiate receptors are implicated in this effect. In addition to potent proconvulsant effects, systemic morphine also has anticonvulsant properties which are mediated by specific opiate mu-receptors. The conditions under which morphine acts as a proconvulsant rather than an anticonvulsant agent are, as yet, not understood.

  3. Binding interactions of convulsant and anticonvulsant gamma-butyrolactones and gamma-thiobutyrolactones with the picrotoxin receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, K.D.; McKeon, A.C.; Covey, D.F.; Ferrendelli, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Alkyl-substituted gamma-butyrolactones (GBLs) and gamma-thiobutyrolactones (TBLs) are neuroactive chemicals. beta-Substituted compounds are convulsant, whereas alpha-alkyl substituted GBLs and TBLs are anticonvulsant. The structural similarities between beta-alkyl GBLs and the convulsant picrotoxinin suggested that alkyl substituted GBLs and TBLs act at the picrotoxin receptor. To test this hypothesis we examined the interactions of convulsant and anticonvulsant GBLs and TBLs with the picrotoxin, benzodiazepine and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) binding sites of the GABA receptor complex. All of these convulsants and anticonvulsants studied competitively displaced 35S-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (35S-TBPS), a ligand that binds to the picrotoxin receptor. This inhibition of 35S-TBPS binding was not blocked by the GABA antagonist bicuculline methobromide. The convulsant GBLs and TBLs also partially inhibited [3H]muscimol binding to the GABA site and [3H]flunitrazepam binding to the benzodiazepine site, but they did so at concentrations substantially greater than those that inhibited 35S-TBPS binding. The anticonvulsant GBLs and TBLs had no effect on either [3H]muscimol or [3H]flunitrazepam binding. In contrast to the GBLs and TBLs, pentobarbital inhibited TBPS binding in a manner that was blocked by bicuculline methobromide, and it enhanced both [3H]flunitrazepam and [3H]muscimol binding. Both ethosuximide and tetramethylsuccinimide, neuroactive compounds structurally similar to GBLs, competitively displaced 35S-TBPS from the picrotoxin receptor and both compounds were weak inhibitors of [3H] muscimol binding. In addition, ethosuximide also partially diminished [3H]flunitrazepam binding. These data demonstrate that the site of action of alkyl-substituted GBLs and TBLs is different from that of GABA, barbiturates and benzodiazepines

  4. Studies on long-lasting consequences of prenatal exposure to anticonvulsant drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dessens, A. B.; Boer, K.; Koppe, J. G.; van de Poll, N. E.; Cohen-Kettenis, P. T.

    1994-01-01

    Based on neonatal examination at birth, it has been estimated that epileptic women have a 2-3 times greater risk of giving birth to an infant with congenital anomalies. But anticonvulsant drugs may also have more subtle influences on the developing foetus which are not visible at birth but only

  5. Use of Lithium and Anticonvulsants and the Rate of Chronic Kidney Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo

    2015-01-01

    -stage CKD among individuals exposed to successive prescriptions of lithium, anticonvulsants, or other drugs used for bipolar disorder. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: This is a Danish nationwide population-based study of 2 cohorts. Cohort 1 comprised a randomly selected sample of 1.5 million individuals......IMPORTANCE: Lithium is the main mood stabilizing drug for bipolar disorder. However, it is controversial whether long-term maintenance treatment with lithium or other drugs for bipolar disorder causes chronic kidney disease (CKD). OBJECTIVE: To compare rates of CKD and in particular rates of end...... among all persons who were registered in Denmark on January 1, 1995, all patients with a diagnosis of a single manic episode or bipolar disorder between January 1, 1994, and December 31, 2012 (n =10 591), and all patients exposed to either lithium (n = 26 731) or anticonvulsants (n=420 959). Cohort 2...

  6. Studies on Synthesis of Pyrimidine Derivatives and their Pharmacological Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Naik

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available 1,3,4-Oxadiazoles were associated with broad spectrum of biological activities including antituberculosis, anticonvulsant, anti-inflammatory, insecticidal, antifungal, analgesic and antitumor properties. Morpholine derivatives find their wide spectrum of antimicrobial activity and exhibit anthelmintic, bactericidal and insecticidal activity. Pyrimidine derivatives are also reported to possess antibacterial, antimicrobial, antifungal, anticancer and anticonvulsant activities. Encouraged by this observations we decided to synthesised novel pyrimidine derivatives.

  7. Structural requirements for bioactivation of anticonvulsants to cytotoxic metabolites in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, R J; Kitteringham, N R; Park, B K

    1989-01-01

    The formation of cytotoxic metabolites from the anticonvulsants phenytoin and carbamazepine was investigated in vitro using a hepatic microsomal enzyme system and human mononuclear leucocytes as target cells. Both drugs were metabolised to cytotoxic products. In order to assess the structural requirements for this bioactivation, a series of structurally related compounds was investigated. It was found that molecules which contain either an amide function or an aryl ring may undergo activation in vitro, but only the metabolism-dependent toxicity of the latter is potentiated by pre-treatment of the target cells with an epoxide hydrolase inhibitor. Taken collectively, these data are consistent with the concept that reactive epoxide metabolites of both phenytoin and carbamazepine may produce toxicity in individuals with an inherited deficiency in epoxide hydrolase. PMID:2590607

  8. Anticonvulsant properties of methanol leaf extract of Laggera Aurita Linn. F. (Asteraceae) in laboratory animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malami, S; Kyari, H; Danjuma, N M; Ya'u, J; Hussaini, I M

    2016-09-15

    Preparation of Laggera aurita Linn. (Asteraceae) is widely used in traditional medicine to treat various kinds of diseases such as epilepsy, malaria, fever, pain and asthma. Its efficacy is widely acclaimed among communities in Northern Nigeria. The present study is aimed at establishing the possible anticonvulsant effects of the methanol leaf extract of Laggera aurita using acute and chronic anticonvulsant models. Median lethal dose (LD50) was determined in mice and rats via oral and intraperitoneal routes. Anticonvulsant screening of the extract was performed using maximal electroshock-induced seizure test in day-old chicks; pentylenetetrazole-, strychnine- and picrotoxin- induced seizure models in mice. Similarly; its effects on pentylenetetrazole-induce kindling in rats as well as when co-administered with fluphenamic and cyproheptadine in mice, were evaluated. Median lethal dose (LD50) values were found to be >5000mg/kg, p.o. and 2154mg/kg, i.p., each for both rats and mice. The extract showed dose dependent protection against tonic hind limb extension (THLE) and significantly (p<0.05) decreased the mean recovery from seizure in the maximal electroshock-induced seizure. In the pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure model, the extract offered 50% protection at 600mg/kg and also increased the mean onset of seizure at all doses with significant (p<0.05) increase at the highest dose (600mg/kg). Similarly the extract produced significant (p<0.05) increase in the onset of seizures in both strychnine- and picrotoxin- induced seizure models, at all the doses except at 150mg/kg for the picrotoxin model. Co-administration of fluphenamic acid (FFA) (5mg/kg) and the extract (600mg/kg) showed an enhanced effect with percentage protection of 70% while co-administration of FFA (5mg/kg) and phenytoin (5mg/kg) as well phenytoin (5mg/kg) and the extract (600mg/kg) produced an additive effect. Administration of the extract (600mg/kg), phenytoin (20mg/kg) and cyproheptadine (4mg

  9. Evaluation of Anticonvulsant, Sedative, Anxiolytic, and Phytochemical Profile of the Methanol Extract from the Aerial Parts of Swertia corymbosa (Griseb. Wight ex C.B. Clarke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Mahendran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate the anxiolytic, antidepressant, and anticonvulsant activity of the methanolic extract of Swertia corymbosa (SCMeOH. After acute toxicity test, oral treatment with SCMeOH at doses of 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg behavioral models of open field, elevated-plus-maze, actophotometer, rotarod, pentylenetetrazole, isoniazid, and maximal electroshock induced seizure models were utilized. In open field test, SCMeOH (125, 250, and 500 mg/kg (P<0.01, P<0.001 increased the number of rearings. However, the number of central motor and ambulation (P<0.01, P<0.001 were reduced. Likewise, the number of entries and the time spent in open arm were increased while the number of locomotion was decreased (P<0.001 in elevated-plus-maze and actophotometer test, respectively. SCMeOH (125–500 mg/kg protected the mice against the pentylenetetrazole and isoniazid induced convulsions; it causes significant (P<0.01 and P<0.001 dose dependent increase in latency of convulsion. Treatment with SCMeOH reduced the duration of the tonic hind limb extension induced by electroshock. Two major compounds such as gentiopicroside and swertianin were analyzed by HPLC system.

  10. Chronic administration of anticonvulsants but not antidepressants impairs bone strength: clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, P W; Pavlatou, M G; Michelson, D; Mouro, C M; Kling, M A; Wong, M-L; Licinio, J; Goldstein, S A

    2015-06-02

    Major depression and bipolar disorder are associated with decreased bone mineral density (BMD). Antidepressants such as imipramine (IMIP) and specific serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been implicated in reduced BMD and/or fracture in older depressed patients. Moreover, anticonvulsants such as valproate (VAL) and carbamazepine (CBZ) are also known to increase fracture rates. Although BMD is a predictor of susceptibility to fracture, bone strength is a more sensitive predictor. We measured mechanical and geometrical properties of bone in 68 male Sprague Dawley rats on IMIP, fluoxetine (FLX), VAL, CBZ, CBZ vehicle and saline (SAL), given intraperitoneally daily for 8 weeks. Distinct regions were tested to failure by four-point bending, whereas load displacement was used to determine stiffness. The left femurs were scanned in a MicroCT system to calculate mid-diaphyseal moments of inertia. None of these parameters were affected by antidepressants. However, VAL resulted in a significant decrease in stiffness and a reduction in yield, and CBZ induced a decrease in stiffness. Only CBZ induced alterations in mechanical properties that were accompanied by significant geometrical changes. These data reveal that chronic antidepressant treatment does not reduce bone strength, in contrast to chronic anticonvulsant treatment. Thus, decreased BMD and increased fracture rates in older patients on antidepressants are more likely to represent factors intrinsic to depression that weaken bone rather than antidepressants per se. Patients with affective illness on anticonvulsants may be at particularly high risk for fracture, especially as they grow older, as bone strength falls progressively with age.

  11. Anticonvulsant activity of Aloe vera leaf extract in acute and chronic models of epilepsy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathor, Naveen; Arora, Tarun; Manocha, Sachin; Patil, Amol N; Mediratta, Pramod K; Sharma, Krishna K

    2014-03-01

    The effect of Aloe vera in epilepsy has not yet been explored. This study was done to explore the effect of aqueous extract of Aloe vera leaf powder on three acute and one chronic model of epilepsy. In acute study, aqueous extract of Aloe vera leaf (extract) powder was administered in doses 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg p.o. Dose of 400 mg/kg of Aloe vera leaf extract was chosen for chronic administration. Oxidative stress parameters viz. malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were also estimated in brain of kindled animals. In acute study, Aloe vera leaf (extract) powder in a dose-dependent manner significantly decreased duration of tonic hind limb extension in maximal electroshock seizure model, increased seizure threshold current in increasing current electroshock seizure model, and increased latency to onset and decreased duration of clonic convulsion in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) model as compared with control group. In chronic study, Aloe vera leaf (extract) powder prevented progression of kindling in PTZ-kindled mice. Aloe vera leaf (extract) powder 400 mg/kg p.o. also reduced brain levels of MDA and increased GSH levels as compared to the PTZ-kindled non-treated group. The results of study showed that Aloe vera leaf (extract) powder possessed significant anticonvulsant and anti-oxidant activity. © 2013 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  12. Effects of WIN 55,212-2 mesylate on the anticonvulsant action of lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, pregabalin and topiramate against maximal electroshock-induced seizures in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Wlaz, Aleksandra; Karwan, Slawomir; Florek-Luszczki, Magdalena; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J

    2013-11-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of WIN 55,212-2 mesylate (WIN - a non-selective cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor agonist) on the protective action of four second-generation antiepileptic drugs (lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, pregabalin and topiramate) in the mouse maximal electroshock seizure model. Tonic hind limb extension (seizure activity) was evoked in adult male albino Swiss mice by a current (sine-wave, 25 mA, 500 V, 50 Hz, 0.2s stimulus duration) delivered via auricular electrodes. Drug-related adverse effects were ascertained by use of the chimney test (evaluating motor performance), the step-through passive avoidance task (assessing long-term memory) and the grip-strength test (evaluating skeletal muscular strength). Total brain concentrations of antiepileptic drugs were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography to ascertain any pharmacokinetic contribution to the observed antiseizure effect. Results indicate that WIN (5mg/kg, i.p.) significantly enhanced the anticonvulsant action of lamotrigine (Poxcarbazepine in the maximal electroshock-induced tonic seizure test in mice. Furthermore, none of the investigated combinations of WIN with antiepileptic drugs were associated with any concurrent adverse effects with regards to motor performance, long-term memory or muscular strength. Pharmacokinetic characterization revealed that WIN had no impact on total brain concentrations of lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, pregabalin and topiramate in mice. These preclinical data would suggest that WIN in combination with lamotrigine, pregabalin and topiramate is associated with beneficial anticonvulsant pharmacodynamic interactions in the maximal electroshock-induced tonic seizure test. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Anticonvulsant Effects of Memantine and MK-801 in Guinea Pig Hippocampal Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    investigation we compared the anticonvulsant properties of Mem to those of MK-801 in guinea pig hippocampal slices. Extracellular recordings were...obtained from area CA1 of guinea pig hippocampal slices in a total submersion chamber at 32 deg C in normal oxygenated artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF

  14. A review exploring biological activities of hydrazones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Verma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of novel compounds, hydrazones has shown that they possess a wide variety of biological activities viz. antimicrobial, anticonvulsant, antidepressant, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antiplatelet, antimalarial, anticancer, antifungal, antitubercular, antiviral, cardio protective etc., Hydrazones/azomethines/imines possess-NHN = CH- and constitute an important class of compounds for new drug development. A number of researchers have synthesized and evaluated the biological activities of hydrazones. This review aims at highlighting the diverse biological activities of hydrazones.

  15. Magnesium sulphate and other anticonvulsants for women with pre-eclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duley, Lelia; Gülmezoglu, A Metin; Henderson-Smart, David J; Chou, Doris

    2010-11-10

    Eclampsia, the occurrence of a seizure (fit) in association with pre-eclampsia, is rare but potentially life-threatening. Magnesium sulphate is the drug of choice for treating eclampsia. This review assesses its use for preventing eclampsia. To assess the effects of magnesium sulphate, and other anticonvulsants, for prevention of eclampsia. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (4 June 2010), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials Register (The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 3). Randomised trials comparing anticonvulsants with placebo or no anticonvulsant, or comparisons of different drugs, for pre-eclampsia. Two authors assessed trial quality and extracted data independently. We included 15 trials. Six (11,444 women) compared magnesium sulphate with placebo or no anticonvulsant: magnesium sulphate more than a halved the risk of eclampsia (risk ratio (RR) 0.41, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.29 to 0.58; number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) 100, 95% CI 50 to 100), with a non-significant reduction in maternal death (RR 0.54, 95% CI 0.26 to 1.10) but no clear difference in serious maternal morbidity (RR 1.08, 95% CI 0.89 to 1.32). It reduced the risk of placental abruption (RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.50 to 0.83; NNTB 100, 95% CI 50 to 1000), and increased caesarean section (RR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.10). There was no clear difference in stillbirth or neonatal death (RR 1.04, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.15). Side effects, primarily flushing, were more common with magnesium sulphate (24% versus 5%; RR 5.26, 95% CI 4.59 to 6.03; number need to treat for an additional harmful outcome (NNTH) 6, 95% CI 5 to 6).Follow-up was reported by one trial comparing magnesium sulphate with placebo: for 3375 women there was no clear difference in death (RR 1.79, 95% CI 0.71 to 4.53) or morbidity potentially related to pre-eclampsia (RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.55 to 1.26) (median follow-up 26 months); for 3283 children exposed in utero

  16. Anticonvulsants for Nerve Agent-Induced Seizures: The Influence of the Therapeutic Dose of Atropine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shih, Tsung-Ming; Rowland, Tami C; McDonough, John H

    2007-01-01

    Two guinea pig models were used to study the anticonvulsant potency of diazepam, midazolam, and scopolamine against seizures induced by the nerve agents tabun, sarin, soman, cyclosarin, O-ethyl S-(2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl...

  17. Anticonvulsant treatment of asphyxiated newborns under hypothermia with lidocaine : efficacy, safety and dosing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Marcel P. H.; Rademaker, Carin M. A.; van Straaten, Henrica L. M.; Huitema, Alwin D. R.; Toet, Mona C.; de Vries, Linda S.; Egberts, Antoine C. G.; Groenendaal, Floris

    BACKGROUND: Lidocaine is an antiarrythmicum used as an anticonvulsant for neonatal seizures, also during therapeutic hypothermia following (perinatal) asphyxia. Hypothermia may affect the efficacy, safety and dosing of lidocaine in these patients. OBJECTIVE: To study the efficacy and safety of

  18. Computer-Aided Identification of Anticonvulsant Effect of Natural Nonnutritive Sweeteners Stevioside and Rebaudioside A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Ianni, Mauricio E.; del Valle, Mara E.; Enrique, Andrea V.; Rosella, Mara A.; Bruno, Fiorella; Bruno-Blanch, Luis E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Steviol glycosides are natural constituents of Stevia rebaudiana (Bert.) Bert. (Asteraceae) that have recently gained worldwide approval as nonnutritive sweeteners by the Joint Food and Agriculture Organization/World Organization Expert Committee on Food Additives. Cheminformatic tools suggested that the aglycone steviol and several of its phase I metabolites were predicted as potential anticonvulsant agents effective in the seizure animal model maximal electroshock seizure (MES) test. Thus, aqueous infusion from S. rebaudiana was tested in the MES test (mice, intraperitoneal administration), confirming dose-dependent anticonvulsant effect. Afterward, isolated stevioside and rebaudioside A were tested in the MES test, with positive results. Though drug repositioning most often focuses on known therapeutics, this article illustrates the possibilities of this strategy to find new functionalities and therapeutic indications for food constituents and natural products. PMID:26258457

  19. Enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants increase plasma clearance of dexmedetomidine: a pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexman, Alana M; Wong, Harvey; Riggs, K Wayne; Shih, Tina; Garcia, Paul A; Vacas, Susana; Talke, Pekka O

    2014-05-01

    Dexmedetomidine is useful during mapping of epileptic foci as it facilitates electrocorticography unlike most other anesthetic agents. Patients with seizure disorders taking enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants appear to be resistant to its sedative effects. The objective of the study was to compare the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of dexmedetomidine in healthy volunteers with volunteers with seizure disorders receiving enzyme-inducing anticonvulsant medications. Dexmedetomidine was administered using a step-wise, computer-controlled infusion to healthy volunteers (n = 8) and volunteers with seizure disorders (n = 8) taking phenytoin or carbamazapine. Sedation and dexmedetomidine plasma levels were assessed at baseline, during the infusion steps, and after discontinuation of the infusion. Sedation was assessed by using the Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation Scale, Ramsay Sedation Scale, and Visual Analog Scale and processed electroencephalography (entropy) monitoring. Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed on both groups, and differences between groups were determined using the standard two-stage approach. A two-compartment model was fit to dexmedetomidine concentration-time data. Dexmedetomidine plasma clearance was 43% higher in the seizure group compared with the control group (42.7 vs. 29.9 l/h; P = 0.007). In contrast, distributional clearance and the volume of distribution of the central and peripheral compartments were similar between the groups. No difference in sedation was detected between the two groups during a controlled range of target plasma concentrations. This study demonstrates that subjects with seizure disorders taking enzyme-inducing anticonvulsant medications have an increased plasma clearance of dexmedetomidine as compared with healthy control subjects.

  20. Isobolographic analysis of the mechanisms of action of anticonvulsants from a combination effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Nobuko; Nakaki, Toshio

    2014-10-15

    The nature of the pharmacodynamic interactions of drugs is influenced by the drugs׳ mechanisms of action. It has been hypothesized that drugs with different mechanisms are likely to interact synergistically, whereas those with similar mechanisms seem to produce additive interactions. In this review, we describe an extensive investigation of the published literature on drug combinations of anticonvulsants, the nature of the interaction of which has been evaluated by type I and II isobolographic analyses and the subthreshold method. The molecular targets of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) include Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels, GABA type-A receptor, and glutamate receptors such as NMDA and AMPA/kainate receptors. The results of this review indicate that the nature of interactions evaluated by type I isobolographic analyses but not by the two other methods seems to be consistent with the above hypothesis. Type I isobolographic analyses may be used not only for evaluating drug combinations but also for predicting the targets of new drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [Lithium and anticonvulsants in bipolar depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samalin, L; Nourry, A; Llorca, P-M

    2011-12-01

    For decades, lithium and anticonvulsants have been widely used in the treatment of bipolar disorder. Their efficacy in the treatment of mania is recognized. These drugs have been initially evaluated in old and methodologically heterogeneous studies. Their efficacy in bipolar depression has not always been confirmed in more recent and methodologically more reliable studies. Thus, lithium's efficacy as monotherapy was challenged by the study of Young (2008) that showed a lack of efficacy compared with placebo in the treatment of bipolar depression. In two recent meta-analyses, valproate has shown a modest efficacy in the treatment of bipolar depression. As for lithium, valproate appeared to have a larger antimanic effect for acute phase and prophylaxis of bipolar disorder. In contrast, lamotrigine is more effective on the depressive pole of bipolar disorder with better evidence for the prevention of depressive recurrences. The guidelines include these recent studies and recommend lamotrigine as a first-line treatment of bipolar depression and for maintenance treatment. Because of more discordant data concerning lithium and valproate, these two drugs are placed either as first or as second line treatment of bipolar depression. The different safety/efficacy ratios of mood stabilizers underlie the complementarity and the importance of combination between them, or with some second-generation antipsychotics, in the treatment of patients with bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2011 L’Encéphale. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  2. [Lithium and anticonvulsants in the treatment of mania and in the prophylaxis of recurrences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Virginio; Cat Berro, Alberto; Bechon, Elisa; Bogetto, Filippo; Maina, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    A mood stabilizer is an agent effective in treating both poles of the illness and at the same time being able to prevent both manic and depressive episodes in bipolar disorder. According to a broader definition, a mood stabilizer should be effective in decreasing the frequency or severity of any type of episode in bipolar disorder, without worsening the frequency or severity of episodes of opposite polarity. According to this, anticonvulsants and atypical antipsychotics can be considered as mood stabilizers. In this paper we review the use of lithium and other anticonvulsants that have proved effective in randomized controlled trials of the treatment of manic episodes and prevention of recurrences of bipolar disorder. Lithium and valproate are considered as first-line treatment options for acute mania while evidence regarding carbamazepine is insufficient to consider it as a first-line agent. Patients who fail to respond to first-line treatments may benefit from the adjunct of an atypical antipsychotic such as olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone or aripiprazole. Lithium retains the strongest evidence of efficacy in the prophylaxis of manic episodes, lamotrigine in the prevention of depressive episodes. Valproate and carbamazepine have no indication for long-term treatment of bipolar disorder. Lithium can still be considered a gold standard in the treatment of manic episodes as well as in the prophylaxis of recurrences. Other anticonvulsants should be employed in particular situations, such as valproic acid in the treatment of mania and lamotrigine in the prevention of depressive recurrences.

  3. A rat model of nerve agent exposure applicable to the pediatric population: The anticonvulsant efficacies of atropine and GluK1 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Steven L; Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki; Figueiredo, Taiza H; Prager, Eric M; Almeida-Suhett, Camila P; Apland, James P; Braga, Maria F M

    2015-04-15

    Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) after nerve agent exposure induces status epilepticus (SE), which causes brain damage or death. The development of countermeasures appropriate for the pediatric population requires testing of anticonvulsant treatments in immature animals. In the present study, exposure of 21-day-old (P21) rats to different doses of soman, followed by probit analysis, produced an LD50 of 62μg/kg. The onset of behaviorally-observed SE was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in brain AChE activity; rats who did not develop SE had significantly less reduction of AChE activity in the basolateral amygdala than rats who developed SE. Atropine sulfate (ATS) at 2mg/kg, administered 20 min after soman exposure (1.2×LD50), terminated seizures. ATS at 0.5mg/kg, given along with an oxime within 1 min after exposure, allowed testing of anticonvulsants at delayed time-points. The AMPA/GluK1 receptor antagonist LY293558, or the specific GluK1 antagonist UBP302, administered 1h post-exposure, terminated SE. There were no degenerating neurons in soman-exposed P21 rats, but both the amygdala and the hippocampus were smaller than in control rats at 30 and 90days post-exposure; this pathology was not present in rats treated with LY293558. Behavioral deficits present at 30 days post-exposure, were also prevented by LY293558 treatment. Thus, in immature animals, a single injection of atropine is sufficient to halt nerve agent-induced seizures, if administered timely. Testing anticonvulsants at delayed time-points requires early administration of ATS at a low dose, sufficient to counteract only peripheral toxicity. LY293558 administered 1h post-exposure, prevents brain pathology and behavioral deficits. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Synthesis and research of benzylamides of some isocyclic and heterocyclic acids as potential anticonvulsants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strupińska, Marzanna; Rostafińska-Suchar, Grazyna; Pirianowicz-Chaber, Elzbieta; Stables, James P; Jiang, Jeff; Paruszewski, Ryszard

    2013-01-01

    A series of benzylamides of isocyclic and heterocyclic acids was synthesized and tested in Anticonvulsant Screening Project (ASP) of Antiepileptic Drug Development Program (ADDP) of NIH. Near all synthesized derivatives of heterocyclic acids showed activity. All obtained derivatives of mono- and bicyclic isocyclic acids were inactive. The power of action of heterocyclic acids derivatives seems does not depend upon kind of heteroatom (N, O or S). One of the compounds (2-furoic acid benzylamide (4)) appeared most promising. It showed in minimal clonic seizure (6Hz) test (ASP) in rats after i. p. administration: MES ED50 = 36.5 mg/kg, TOX TD50 = 269.75 mg/kg, and PI = 7.39.

  5. Synthesis, and anticonvulsant activity of new amides derived from 3-methyl- or 3-ethyl-3-methyl-2,5-dioxo-pyrrolidin-1-yl-acetic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obniska, Jolanta; Rapacz, Anna; Rybka, Sabina; Góra, Małgorzata; Kamiński, Krzysztof; Sałat, Kinga; Żmudzki, Paweł

    2016-04-15

    This paper describes the synthesis of the library of 22 new 3-methyl- and 3-ethyl-3-methyl-2,5-dioxo-pyrrolidin-1-yl-acetamides as potential anticonvulsant agents. The maximal electroshock (MES) and the subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole (scPTZ) seizure models were used for screening all the compounds. The 6 Hz model of pharmacoresistant limbic seizures was applied for studying selected derivatives. Six amides were chosen for pharmacological characterization of their antinociceptive activity in the formalin model of tonic pain as well as local anesthetic activity was assessed in mice. The pharmacological data indicate on the broad spectra of activity across the preclinical seizure models. Compounds 10 (ED50=32.08 mg/kg, MES test) and 9 (ED50=40.34 mg/kg, scPTZ test) demonstrated the highest potency. These compounds displayed considerably better safety profiles than clinically relevant antiepileptic drugs phenytoin, ethosuximide, or valproic acid. Several molecules showed antinociceptive and local anesthetic properties. The in vitro radioligand binding studies demonstrated that the influence on the sodium and calcium channels may be one of the essential mechanisms of action. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Neuroprotective effects of anticonvulsants in rat hippocampal slice cultures exposed to oxygen/glucose deprivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, Jens C

    2003-01-01

    cell death induced by OGD. The newer anticonvulsants carbamazepine, felbamate, lamotrigine, tiagabine, and oxcarbazepine also had significant neuroprotective effects, but gabapentin, valproic acid (10 mM), levetiracetam and retigabine were not neuroprotective at a concentration up to 300 micro...

  7. Ambulatory care of children treated with anticonvulsants - pitfalls after discharge from hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertsche, A; Dahse, A-J; Neininger, M P; Bernhard, M K; Syrbe, S; Frontini, R; Kiess, W; Merkenschlager, A; Bertsche, T

    2013-09-01

    Anticonvulsants require special consideration particularly at the interface from hospital to ambulatory care. Observational study for 6 months with prospectively enrolled consecutive patients in a neuropediatric ward of a university hospital (age 0-anticonvulsant. Assessment of outpatient prescriptions after discharge. Parent interviews for emergency treatment for acute seizures and safety precautions. We identified changes of the brand in 19/82 (23%) patients caused by hospital's discharge letters (4/82; 5%) or in ambulatory care (15/82; 18%). In 37/76 (49%) of patients who were deemed to require rescue medication, no recommendation for such a medication was included in the discharge letters. 17/76 (22%) of the respective parents stated that they had no immediate access to rescue medication. Safety precautions were applicable in 44 epilepsy patients. We identified knowledge deficits in 27/44 (61%) of parents. Switching of brands after discharge was frequent. In the discharge letters, rescue medications were insufficiently recommended. Additionally, parents frequently displayed knowledge deficits in risk management. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Anticonvulsant effects of a triheptanoin diet in two mouse chronic seizure models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Sarah; Stoll, James; Sweetman, Lawrence; Borges, Karin

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesized that in epileptic brains citric acid cycle intermediate levels may be deficient leading to hyperexcitability. Anaplerosis is the metabolic refilling of deficient metabolites. Our goal was to determine the anticonvulsant effects of feeding triheptanoin, the triglyceride of anaplerotic heptanoate. CF1 mice were fed 0-35% calories from triheptanoin. Body weights and dietary intake were similar in mice fed triheptanoin vs. standard diet. Triheptanoin feeding increased blood propionyl-carnitine levels, signifying its metabolism. 35%, but not 20%, triheptanoin delayed development of corneal kindled seizures. After pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE), triheptanoin feeding increased the pentylenetetrazole tonic seizure threshold during the chronically epileptic stage. Mice in the chronically epileptic stage showed various changes in brain metabolite levels, including a reduction in malate. Triheptanoin feeding largely restored a reduction in propionyl-CoA levels and increased methylmalonyl-CoA levels in SE mice. In summary, triheptanoin was anticonvulsant in two chronic mouse models and increased levels of anaplerotic precursor metabolites in epileptic mouse brains. The mechanisms of triheptanoin's effects and its efficacy in humans suffering from epilepsy remain to be determined. PMID:20691264

  9. Use of Lithium and Anticonvulsants and the Rate of Chronic Kidney Disease: A Nationwide Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo; Andersen, Per Kragh; Licht, Rasmus W

    2015-12-01

    Lithium is the main mood stabilizing drug for bipolar disorder. However, it is controversial whether long-term maintenance treatment with lithium or other drugs for bipolar disorder causes chronic kidney disease (CKD). To compare rates of CKD and in particular rates of end-stage CKD among individuals exposed to successive prescriptions of lithium, anticonvulsants, or other drugs used for bipolar disorder. This is a Danish nationwide population-based study of 2 cohorts. Cohort 1 comprised a randomly selected sample of 1.5 million individuals among all persons who were registered in Denmark on January 1, 1995, all patients with a diagnosis of a single manic episode or bipolar disorder between January 1, 1994, and December 31, 2012 (n =10,591), and all patients exposed to either lithium (n = 26,731) or anticonvulsants (n=420,959). Cohort 2 included the subgroup of 10,591 patients diagnosed as having bipolar disorder. Possible CKD, definite CKD, and end-stage CKD (defined as long-term dialysis or renal transplantation). A total of 14,727 (0.8%), 18,762 (1.0%), and 3407 (0.2%) in cohort 1 and 278 (2.6%), 319 (3.0%), and 62 (0.6%) in cohort 2 were diagnosed as having possible, definite, or end-stage CKD, respectively. Based on the total sample and not considering diagnoses, use of lithium was associated with an increased rate of definite CKD (0 prescriptions: hazard ratio [HR] = 1.09, 95% CI, 0.81-1.45; ≥60 prescriptions: HR = 3.65, 95% CI, 2.64-5.05; P for trend anticonvulsants, antipsychotics, or antidepressants was not. Neither use of lithium nor use of any other drug class was associated with increasing rates of end-stage CKD. In patients with bipolar disorder, use of lithium was associated with an increased rate of definite CKD (1-2 prescriptions: HR = 0.89, 95% CI, 0.39-2.06; ≥60 prescriptions: HR = 2.54, 95% CI, 1.81-3.57; P for trend anticonvulsants (definite CKD, 1-2 prescriptions: HR = 1.23, 95% CI, 0.76-1.99; ≥60

  10. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis due to anticonvulsants share certain clinical and laboratory features with drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome, despite differences in cutaneous presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teraki, Y; Shibuya, M; Izaki, S

    2010-10-01

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS)/drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is characterized by late disease onset, fever, rash, hepatic dysfunction, haematological abnormalities, lymphadenopathy and often, human herpesvirus (HHV) reactivation. The diagnosis of DIHS is based on the combined presence of these findings. Anticonvulsants are a major cause of DIHS and may also cause Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). We examined whether SJS/TEN due to anticonvulsants display similar clinical and laboratory features seen in DIHS. Patients diagnosed with SJS or TEN due to anticonvulsants (n = 8) were examined and their clinical features and laboratory findings were compared with patients with anticonvulsant-related DIHS (n = 6). Seven of the eight patients with SJS/TEN developed symptoms > 3 weeks after starting anticonvulsants. Hepatic dysfunction was present in six patients with SJS/TEN and five patients with DIHS. Leucocytosis and/or eosinophilia was noted in seven patients with SJS/TEN and four patients with DIHS. Only one patient in the SJS/TEN group had atypical lymphocytosis; this was present in four patients with DIHS. Reactivation of HHV-6 was detected in one of the four patients tested in the SJS/TEN group, although it was seen in five of the six patients with DIHS. TSJS/TEN due to anticonvulsants may exhibit some clinical and laboratory features of DIHS. The nature of the cutaneous involvement should be emphasized in the diagnosis of DIHS. © 2009 The Author(s). Journal compilation © 2009 British Association of Dermatologists.

  11. The psychopharmacology of aggressive behavior: a translational approach: part 2: clinical studies using atypical antipsychotics, anticonvulsants, and lithium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comai, Stefano; Tau, Michael; Pavlovic, Zoran; Gobbi, Gabriella

    2012-04-01

    Patients experiencing mental disorders are at an elevated risk for developing aggressive behavior. In the past 10 years, the psychopharmacological treatment of aggression has changed dramatically owing to the introduction of atypical antipsychotics on the market and the increased use of anticonvulsants and lithium in the treatment of aggressive patients.This review (second of 2 parts) uses a translational medicine approach to examine the neurobiology of aggression, discussing the major neurotransmitter systems implicated in its pathogenesis (serotonin, glutamate, norepinephrine, dopamine, and γ-aminobutyric acid) and the neuropharmacological rationale for using atypical antipsychotics, anticonvulsants, and lithium in the therapeutics of aggressive behavior. A critical review of all clinical trials using atypical antipsychotics (aripiprazole, clozapine, loxapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, ziprasidone, and amisulpride), anticonvulsants (topiramate, valproate, lamotrigine, and gabapentin), and lithium are presented. Given the complex, multifaceted nature of aggression, a multifunctional combined therapy, targeting different receptors, seems to be the best strategy for treating aggressive behavior. This therapeutic strategy is supported by translational studies and a few human studies, even if additional randomized, double-blind, clinical trials are needed to confirm the clinical efficacy of this framework.

  12. Effect of anticonvulsant drugs on (/sup 35/S)t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate binding in vitro and ex vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, A.; Riekkinen, P.J.; Saano, V.; Tuomisto, L.

    1987-01-01

    Using several concentrations of eight anticonvulsant drugs in clinical use (carbamazepine, clonazepam, phenytoin, phenobarbital, ethosuximide, primidone, sodium valproate, and D,L-..gamma..-vinyl GABA), we studied their abilities in vitro to displace (/sup 35/S)t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (/sup 35/S-TBPS) from its binding site in a homogenate of rat brain. Thereafter ethosuximide (150 mg/kg), phenobarbital (30 mg/kg), clonazepam (0.3 mg/kg), or phenytoin (100 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally into rats for 16-20 days; and the effect of drug administration on /sup 35/S-TBPS binding was studied in the cortex and hippocampus ex vivo. Phenobarbital (100 ..mu..M, P<0.001), ethosuximide (500 ..mu..M, P<0.001), and phenytoin (40 ..mu..M, P<0.001) decreased the specific /sup 35/S-TBPS binding in vitro by 10-16%. After drug administration of phenobarbital (concentration in plasma 168 ..mu..M), the number of binding sites decreased and the binding affinity (p<0.05) in the cortex increased. Other anticonvulsants did not modulate /sup 35/S-TBPS binding in vitro at the concentration analogous to therapeutic plasma levels or ex vivo at the dose used. These results suggest that the use of phenobarbital may modulate the TBPS binding site, but the role of the present findings in the anticonvulsant action of phenobarbital needs to be further studied.

  13. What is the role of sedating antidepressants, antipsychotics, and anticonvulsants in the management of insomnia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Catherine; McCall, W Vaughn

    2012-10-01

    Psychiatric medications such as antidepressants, antipsychotics, and anticonvulsants are commonly prescribed by physicians for the off-label use of improving sleep. Reasons for preferential prescription of these medications over FDA-approved insomnia drugs may include a desire to treat concurrent sleep problems and psychiatric illness with a single medication, and/or an attempt to avoid hypnotic drugs due to their publicized side effects. However, there have been few large studies demonstrating the efficacy and safety of most off-label medications prescribed to treat insomnia. In addition, many of these medications have significant known side effect profiles themselves. Here we review the pertinent research studies published in recent years on antidepressant, antipsychotic, and anticonvulsant medications frequently prescribed for sleep difficulties. Although there have been few large-scale studies for most of these medications, some may be appropriate in the treatment of sleep issues in specific well-defined populations.

  14. Design and synthesis of novel diphenyl oxalamide and diphenyl acetamide derivatives as anticonvulsants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikalje, Anna Pratima G; Ghodke, Mangesh; Girbane, Amol

    2012-01-01

    A series of novel N(1) -substituted-N(2) ,N(2) -diphenyl oxalamides 3a-l were synthesized in good yield by stirring diphenylcarbamoyl formyl chloride (2) and various substituted aliphatic, alicyclic, aromatic, heterocyclic amines in DMF and K(2) CO(3) . Also 2-substituted amino-N,N-diphenylacetamides 5a-m were designed by pharmacophore generation and synthesized by stirring 2-chloro-N,N-diphenylacetamide (4) and various substituted amines in acetone using triethyl amine as a catalyst. All the synthesized compounds were screened for anticonvulsant activity in Swiss albino mice by MES and ScPTZ induced seizure tests. Neurotoxicity screening and behavioral testing was also carried out. Some of the synthesized test compounds were found to be more potent than the standard drug. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Evaluation of nutritional status in children with refractory epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Bertoli, S.; Cardinali, S.; Veggiotti, P.; Trentani, C.; Testolin, G.; Tagliabue, A.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background children affected by refractory epilepsy could be at risk of malnutrition because of feeding difficulties (anorexia, chewing, swallowing difficulties or vomiting) and chronic use of anticonvulsants, which may affect food intake and energy metabolism. Moreover, their energy requirement may be changed as their disabilities would impede normal daily activities. The aim of the present study was to evaluate nutritional status, energy metabolism and food intake in children with ...

  16. CNS activity of leaves extract of Calotropis gigantea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Dattatraya Ghule

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study central nervous system activity of ethanolic extract of leaves of Calotropis gigantea (C. gigantea (Asclepiadaceae, such as anticonvulsant, sedative and muscle relaxation activity. Methods: The ethanolic extract of C. gigantea administered orally in experimental animals at different doses 100, 200 and 500 mg/kg body weight. The anticonvulsant properties were studied on maximal electroshock test and strychnine-induced convulsions model. Sedative property studied using actophotometer and skeletal muscle relaxant property studied using rota rod. Results: This extract protected rats against maximal electroshock induced seizures, but had no or a moderate effect only against strychnine-induced seizures. Locomotor activity in mice found to be decreased and motor coordination was also decreased. The acute toxicity study revealed safely of the extract up to a dose of 2 000 mg/kg. Conclusions: With these effects, the leaves of C. gigantea possess anticonvulsant sedative and muscle relaxant effect that might explain its use as a traditional medicine.

  17. Anticonvulsant properties of the total alkaloid fraction of Rauvolfia ligustrina Roem. et Schult. in male mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucindo J. Quintans-Júnior

    Full Text Available Rauvolfia ligustrina Roem et. Schult (Apocynaceae, commonly known as "paratudo" and "arrebenta-boi" is a small tree found in Brazilian Northeastern. Previous studies have demonstrated depressant and anticonvulsant properties of the ethanol extract of Rauvolfia ligustrina. The aim of the present study was the determination of the lethal dose 50% (LD50 and the effects of total alkaloid fraction (TAF of the aerial parts of R. ligustrina in animal models of convulsion. It was found that the acute toxicity of TAF was 127.8 (112.5-145.2 mg/kg (i.p. in mice. TAF (20 mg/kg, ip significantly increased (p < 0.05 the latencies of clonic seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ and picrotoxin (PIC. However, TAF did not protect the animals in maximal electroshock (MES induced seizures. These results suggest that TAF of R. ligustrina possesses anticonvulsant properties.

  18. Radiological changes in the skeleton due to anticonvulsant therapy in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritsch, R.; Heyer, R.; Freyschmidt, J.

    1981-01-01

    Anticonvulsant therapy can lead to severe rachitic changes in the skeleton which closely resemble renal osteopathy. In addition to apparent widening of the epiphyseal plate, there are changes in the cortex of the long bones. Within four to six weeks of the commencement of vitamin D therapy, recalcification of the poorly mineralised osteoid can be recognised. Since the changes are best seen in the hand, further examinations of the skeleton are only indicated if there are positive findings in the hand.

  19. Radiological changes in the skeleton due to anticonvulsant therapy in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritsch, R.; Heyer, R.; Freyschmidt, J.

    1981-01-01

    Anticonvulsant therapy can lead to severe rachitic changes in the skeleton which closely resemble renal osteopathy. In addition to apparent widening of the epiphyseal plate, there are changes in the cortex of the long bones. Within four to six weeks of the commencement of vitamin D therapy, recalcification of the poorly mineralised osteoid can be recognised. Since the changes are best seen in the hand, further examinations of the skeleton are only indicated if there are positive findings in the hand. (orig.) [de

  20. Differential effects of valproic acid and enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants on nimodipine pharmacokinetics in epileptic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartara, A.; Galimberti, C.A.; Manni, R.; Parietti, L.; Zucca, C.; Baasch, H.; Caresia, L.; Mück, W.; Barzaghi, N.; Gatti, G.; Perucca, E.

    1991-01-01

    1 The single dose pharmacokinetics of orally administered nimodipine (60 mg) were investigated in normal subjects and in two groups of epileptic patients receiving chronic treatment with hepatic microsomal enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants (carbamazepine, phenobarbitone or phenytoin) and sodium valproate, respectively. 2 Compared with the values found in the control group, mean areas under the plasma nimodipine concentration curve were lowered by about seven-fold (P anticonvulsants and increased by about 50% (P < 0.05) in patients taking sodium valproate. 3 Nimodipine half-lives were shorter in enzyme-induced patients than in controls (3.9 ± 2.0 h vs 9.1 ± 3.4 h, means ± s.d., P < 0.01), but this difference could be artifactual since in the patients drug concentrations declined rapidly below the limit of assay, thus preventing identification of a possible slower terminal phase. In valproate-treated patients, half-lives (8.2 ± 1.8 h) were similar to those found in controls. PMID:1777370

  1. Montelukast potentiates the anticonvulsant effect of phenobarbital in mice: an isobolographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Juliana; Marafiga, Joseane Righes; Jesse, Ana Cláudia; Ribeiro, Leandro Rodrigo; Rambo, Leonardo Magno; Mello, Carlos Fernando

    2015-04-01

    Although leukotrienes have been implicated in seizures, no study has systematically investigated whether the blockade of CysLT1 receptors synergistically increases the anticonvulsant action of classic antiepileptics. In this study, behavioral and electroencephalographic methods, as well as isobolographic analysis, are used to show that the CysLT1 inverse agonist montelukast synergistically increases the anticonvulsant action of phenobarbital against pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures. Moreover, it is shown that LTD4 reverses the effect of montelukast. The experimentally derived ED50mix value for a fixed-ratio combination (1:1 proportion) of montelukast plus phenobarbital was 0.06±0.02 μmol, whereas the additively calculated ED50add value was 0.49±0.03 μmol. The calculated interaction index was 0.12, indicating a synergistic interaction. The association of montelukast significantly decreased the antiseizure ED50 for phenobarbital (0.74 and 0.04 μmol in the absence and presence of montelukast, respectively) and, consequently, phenobarbital-induced sedation at equieffective doses. The demonstration of a strong synergism between montelukast and phenobarbital is particularly relevant because both drugs are already used in the clinics, foreseeing an immediate translational application for epileptic patients who have drug-resistant seizures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Influence of organic surface coatings on the sorption of anticonvulsants on mineral surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Shen; Cwiertny, David M

    2013-10-01

    Here, we explore the role that sorption to mineral surfaces plays in the fate of two commonly encountered effluent-derived pharmaceuticals, the anticonvulsants phenytoin and carbamazepine. Adsorption isotherms and pH-edge experiments are consistent with electrostatics governing anticonvulsant uptake on metal oxides typically found in soil and aquifer material (e.g., Si, Al, Fe, Mn, and Ti). Appreciable, albeit limited, adsorption was observed only for phenytoin, which is anionic above pH 8.3, on the iron oxides hematite and ferrihydrite. Adsorption increased substantially in the presence of cationic and anionic surfactants, species also commonly encountered in wastewater effluent. For carbamazepine, we propose the enhanced uptake results entirely from hydrophobic interactions with apolar tails of surfactant surface coatings. For phenytoin, adsorption also arises from the ability of surfactants to alter the net charge of the mineral surface and thereby further enhance favorable electrostatic interactions with its anionic form. Collectively, our results demonstrate that although pristine mineral surfaces are likely not major sinks for phenytoin and carbamazepine in the environment, their alteration with organic matter, particularly surfactants, can considerably increase their ability to retain these emerging pollutants in subsurface systems.

  3. Treatments for acute bipolar depression: meta-analyses of placebo-controlled, monotherapy trials of anticonvulsants, lithium and antipsychotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selle, V.; Schalkwijk, S.J.; Vazquez, G.H.; Baldessarini, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Optimal treatments for bipolar depression, and the relative value of specific drugs for that purpose, remain uncertain, including agents other than antidepressants. METHODS: We searched for reports of placebo-controlled, monotherapy trials of mood-stabilizing anticonvulsants,

  4. Synthesis and pharmacological investigation of 2-(4-dimethylaminophenyl)-3,5-disubstituted thiazolidin-4-ones as anticonvulsants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilraja, Manavalan; Alagarsamy, Veerachamy

    2012-10-01

    A new series of 2-(4-dimethylaminophenyl)-3-substituted thiazolidin-4-one-5-yl-acetyl acetamides/benzamides were synthesized by the nucleophilic substitution of 3-substituted-2-(4-dimethylaminophenyl)-thiazolidin-4-one-5-yl-acetylchloride with acetamide and benzamide. The starting material 3-substituted-2-(4-dimethylaminophenyl)-thiazolidin-4-one-5-yl-acetylchloride was synthesized from 3-substituted-2-(4-dimethylaminophenyl)-thiazolidin-4-one-5-yl-acetic acid, which in turn was prepared by one-pot reaction of amino component, p-dimethylamino benzaldehyde and mercapto succinic acid. The title compounds were investigated for their anticonvulsant activities; among the test compounds, compound 2-(4-dimethylaminophenyl)-3-phenylamino-thiazolidine-4-one-5-yl-acetylbenzamide (14) emerged as the most active compound of the series and as moderately more potent than the reference standard diazepam. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Evaluation of effects of dichloromethane fraction from Platonia insignis on pilocarpine-induced seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim S. da Costa Júnior

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of present study was to evaluate the antioxidant and anticonvulsant activities of dichloromethane fraction (DMF from Platonia insignis Mart., Clusiaceae. The DMF from P. insignis (2 mg/kg was tested by intraperitoneal (i.p. to evaluate effects on lipid peroxidation level, nitrite formation, as well as on locomotor and anticonvulsant activities. Wistar rats were treated with, (saline/Tween 80 0.5%, i.p., control group, DMF (2 mg/kg, i.p., DMF group, pilocarpine (400 mg/kg, i.p., P400 group, or the combination of DMF (2 mg/kg, i.p. and pilocarpine (400 mg/kg, i.p., DMF plus P400. After the treatments all groups were observed for 24 h. In P400 group rats there was a decrease in the motor activity when compared with control group. In DMF plus P400 co-administered rats was observed an increase in motor activity when compared with P400 group. In P400 group rats there was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation and nitrite levels. In DMF plus P400 co-administered rats, antioxidant treatment significantly reduced the lipid peroxidation level and nitrite content after seizures. Previous findings strongly support the hypothesis that oxidative stress occurs in rat striatum during pilocarpine-induced seizures, and our results imply that strong neuprotective effect on this brain region could be achieved using DMF from P. insignis.

  6. When lithium does not help: the use of anticonvulsants and calcium channel blockers in the treatment of bipolar disorder in the older person.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, J C

    1996-01-01

    Although anticonvulsant agents and calcium channel blockers do not have any clear advantages over lithium, they do offer patients who cannot (or will not) take lithium another treatment option. It is not yet clear from the literature who will respond best to which drug or combination of drugs. The nurse should be supportive to the patients and family, in what may be a drawn out process, to find the best treatment. Optimism is justified because a lack of response to one drug is not indicative of nonresponse to other drugs. It is important to actively treat bipolar disorder because each episode of mania increases the risk of progression of the illness, with increasingly severe episodes occurring closer together. Bipolar disorder has high social costs (legal, financial, and relationship problems) that make improvements in treatment important for the patient and society. Anticonvulsant agents and calcium channel blockers may also be useful in treating depression. The number of people whose depressive symptoms respond is far less (25% to 30%) than the number who respond to the anti-manic effects, but this is an option when antidepressants and electroconvulsive therapy are not effective.

  7. A rat model of nerve agent exposure applicable to the pediatric population: The anticonvulsant efficacies of atropine and GluK1 antagonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Steven L., E-mail: stevenmiller17@gmail.com [Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Genetics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Program in Neuroscience, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki, E-mail: vanderjaska@usuhs.edu [Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Genetics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Department of Psychiatry, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Program in Neuroscience, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Figueiredo, Taiza H., E-mail: taiza.figueiredo.ctr@usuhs.edu [Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Genetics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Prager, Eric M., E-mail: eric.prager683@gmail.com [Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Genetics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Program in Neuroscience, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Almeida-Suhett, Camila P., E-mail: camilapalmeida@gmail.com [Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Genetics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Program in Neuroscience, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Apland, James P., E-mail: james.p.apland.civ@mail.mil [Neurotoxicology Branch, U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010 (United States); and others

    2015-04-15

    Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) after nerve agent exposure induces status epilepticus (SE), which causes brain damage or death. The development of countermeasures appropriate for the pediatric population requires testing of anticonvulsant treatments in immature animals. In the present study, exposure of 21-day-old (P21) rats to different doses of soman, followed by probit analysis, produced an LD{sub 50} of 62 μg/kg. The onset of behaviorally-observed SE was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in brain AChE activity; rats who did not develop SE had significantly less reduction of AChE activity in the basolateral amygdala than rats who developed SE. Atropine sulfate (ATS) at 2 mg/kg, administered 20 min after soman exposure (1.2 × LD{sub 50}), terminated seizures. ATS at 0.5 mg/kg, given along with an oxime within 1 min after exposure, allowed testing of anticonvulsants at delayed time-points. The AMPA/GluK1 receptor antagonist LY293558, or the specific GluK1 antagonist UBP302, administered 1 h post-exposure, terminated SE. There were no degenerating neurons in soman-exposed P21 rats, but both the amygdala and the hippocampus were smaller than in control rats at 30 and 90 days post-exposure; this pathology was not present in rats treated with LY293558. Behavioral deficits present at 30 days post-exposure, were also prevented by LY293558 treatment. Thus, in immature animals, a single injection of atropine is sufficient to halt nerve agent-induced seizures, if administered timely. Testing anticonvulsants at delayed time-points requires early administration of ATS at a low dose, sufficient to counteract only peripheral toxicity. LY293558 administered 1 h post-exposure, prevents brain pathology and behavioral deficits. - Highlights: • The LD{sub 50} of soman was determined in postnatal-day-21 rats. • Rats with no seizures after 1.2XLD{sub 50} soman had less reduction of AChE in the amygdala. • Atropine sulfate (ATS) at 2 mg/kg, given at 20 min after

  8. Anticonvulsive and free radical scavenging actions of two herbs, Uncaria rhynchophylla (MIQ) Jack and Gastrodia elata Bl., in kainic acid-treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, C L; Tang, N Y; Chiang, S Y; Hsieh, C T; Lin, J G

    1999-01-01

    Uncaria rhynchophylla (Miq.) Jack (UR) and Gastrodia elata BI. (GE) are traditional Chinese herbs that are usually used in combination to treat convulsive disorders, such as epilepsy, in China. The aim of this study was to compare the anticonvulsive and free radical scavenging activities of UR alone and UR in combination with GE in rats. For the in vitro studies, brain tissues from 6 male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were treated with 120 microg/ml kainic acid (KA), with or without varied concentrations of UR or UR plus GE. For the in vivo studies, male SD rats (6 per group) received intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of KA 12 mg/kg to induce epileptic seizures and generation of free radicals, with or without oral administration of UR 1 g/kg alone or UR 1 g/kg plus GE 1 g/kg. Epileptic seizures were verified by behavioral observations, and electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) recordings. These results showed that UR alone decreased KA-induced lipid peroxide levels in vitro, whereas UR plus GE did not produce a greater effect than UR alone. UR significantly reduced counts of wet dog shakes (WDS), paw tremor (PT) and facial myoclonia (FM) in KA-treated rats and significantly delayed the onset time of WDS, from 27 min in the control group to 40 min in the UR group. UR plus GE did not inhibit seizures more effectively than UR alone, but did further prolong the onset time of WDS to 63 min (P < 0.05 vs. UR alone). UR alone reduced the levels of free radicals in vivo, as measured by lipid peroxidation in the brain and luminol-chemiluminescence (CL) counts and lucigenin-CL counts in the peripheral whole blood, but the combination of GE and UR did not reduce free radical levels more markedly than UR alone. In conclusion, our results indicate that UR has anticonvulsive and free radical scavenging activities, and UR combined with GE exhibit greater inhibition on the onset time of WDS than UR alone. These findings suggest that the anticonvulsive effects of UR and

  9. A rat model of nerve agent exposure applicable to the pediatric population: The anticonvulsant efficacies of atropine and GluK1 antagonists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Steven L.; Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki; Figueiredo, Taiza H.; Prager, Eric M.; Almeida-Suhett, Camila P.; Apland, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) after nerve agent exposure induces status epilepticus (SE), which causes brain damage or death. The development of countermeasures appropriate for the pediatric population requires testing of anticonvulsant treatments in immature animals. In the present study, exposure of 21-day-old (P21) rats to different doses of soman, followed by probit analysis, produced an LD 50 of 62 μg/kg. The onset of behaviorally-observed SE was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in brain AChE activity; rats who did not develop SE had significantly less reduction of AChE activity in the basolateral amygdala than rats who developed SE. Atropine sulfate (ATS) at 2 mg/kg, administered 20 min after soman exposure (1.2 × LD 50 ), terminated seizures. ATS at 0.5 mg/kg, given along with an oxime within 1 min after exposure, allowed testing of anticonvulsants at delayed time-points. The AMPA/GluK1 receptor antagonist LY293558, or the specific GluK1 antagonist UBP302, administered 1 h post-exposure, terminated SE. There were no degenerating neurons in soman-exposed P21 rats, but both the amygdala and the hippocampus were smaller than in control rats at 30 and 90 days post-exposure; this pathology was not present in rats treated with LY293558. Behavioral deficits present at 30 days post-exposure, were also prevented by LY293558 treatment. Thus, in immature animals, a single injection of atropine is sufficient to halt nerve agent-induced seizures, if administered timely. Testing anticonvulsants at delayed time-points requires early administration of ATS at a low dose, sufficient to counteract only peripheral toxicity. LY293558 administered 1 h post-exposure, prevents brain pathology and behavioral deficits. - Highlights: • The LD 50 of soman was determined in postnatal-day-21 rats. • Rats with no seizures after 1.2XLD 50 soman had less reduction of AChE in the amygdala. • Atropine sulfate (ATS) at 2 mg/kg, given at 20 min after soman, blocked

  10. Anticonvulsant and proconvulsant roles of nitric oxide in experimental epilepsy models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del-Bel E.A.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of acute (120 mg/kg and chronic (25 mg/kg, twice a day, for 4 days intraperitonial injection of the nitric oxide (NO synthase (NOS inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG was evaluated on seizure induction by drugs such as pilocarpine and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ and by sound stimulation of audiogenic seizure-resistant (R and audiogenic seizure-susceptible (S rats. Seizures were elicited by a subconvulsant dose of pilocarpine (100 mg/kg only after NOS inhibition. NOS inhibition also simultaneously potentiated the severity of PTZ-induced limbic seizures (60 mg/kg and protected against PTZ-induced tonic seizures (80 mg/kg. The audiogenic seizure susceptibility of S or R rats did not change after similar treatments. In conclusion, proconvulsant effects of NOS inhibition are suggested to occur in the pilocarpine model and in the limbic components of PTZ-induced seizures, while an anticonvulsant role is suggested for the tonic seizures induced by higher doses of PTZ, revealing inhibitor-specific interactions with convulsant dose and also confirming the hypothesis that the effects of NOS inhibitors vary with the model of seizure

  11. Changes in the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of psycholeptic drugs in radiation-sickness. Effect of X-ray radiation on pharmacodynamic activity of nitrazepam in animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szczawinska, K.; Chodera, A.; Wojciak, Z.; Kozaryn, I.

    1975-01-01

    The anticonvulsive effect of nitrazepam was determined in animals exposed to a single 600 R radiation and the exploring activity of the animals was studied after nitrazepam administered during radiation sickness caused by this exposure. On the 1st day after exposure the activity, reducing effect was slightly weaker but on days 3rd and 6th this effect was significantly stronger. The anticonvulsant effect of nitrazepam on the 3rd day after exposure was significantly greater as compared with control animals, but on the 6th day no difference in the power of anticonvulsant activity between the two groups of animals was found. (author)

  12. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of new hybrid anticonvulsants derived from N-benzyl-2-(2,5-dioxopyrrolidin-1-yl)propanamide and 2-(2,5-dioxopyrrolidin-1-yl)butanamide derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiński, Krzysztof; Rapacz, Anna; Łuszczki, Jarogniew J; Latacz, Gniewomir; Obniska, Jolanta; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna; Filipek, Barbara

    2015-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to synthesize the library of 33 new N-benzyl-2-(2,5-dioxopyrrolidin-1-yl)propanamides, 2-(3-methyl-2,5-dioxopyrrolidin-1-yl)propanamides, and 2-(2,5-dioxopyrrolidin-1-yl)butanamides as potential new hybrid anticonvulsant agents. These hybrid molecules join the chemical fragments of well-known antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) such as ethosuximide, levetiracetam, and lacosamide. The coupling reaction of the 2-(2,5-dioxopyrrolidin-1-yl)propanoic acid, 2-(3-methyl-2,5-dioxopyrrolidin-1-yl)propanoic acid, or 2-(2,5-dioxopyrrolidin-1-yl)butanoic acid with the appropriately substituted benzylamines in the presence of the coupling reagent, N,N-carbonyldiimidazole (CDI) generated the final compounds 4-36. Spectral data acquired via (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, and LC-MS confirmed the chemical structures of the newly prepared compounds. The initial anticonvulsant screening was performed in mice intraperitoneally (ip), using the maximal electroshock seizure (MES) and subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole (scPTZ) seizure tests. The rotarod test determined the acute neurological toxicity (NT). The results of preliminary pharmacological screening revealed that 25 compounds showed protection in half or more of the animals tested in the MES and/or scPTZ seizure models at the fixed dose of 100mg/kg. The broad spectra of activity across the preclinical seizure models displayed compounds 4, 7, 8, 13, 15-18, 24, and 26. The quantitative pharmacological studies in mice demonstrated the highest protection for compounds 4 (ED50 MES=67.65 mg/kg, ED50scPTZ=42.83 mg/kg); 8 (ED50 MES=54.90 mg/kg, ED50scPTZ=50.29 mg/kg); and 20 (ED50scPTZ=47.39 mg/kg). These compounds were distinctly more potent and provided better safety profiles in the rotarod test compared to valproic acid or ethosuximide, which were used as model AEDs. Compound 8 underwent only a slight metabolic change by the human liver microsomes (HLMs), and also did not affect the activity of human cytochrome P450 isoform

  13. Non-imidazole-based histamine H3 receptor antagonists with anticonvulsant activity in different seizure models in male adult rats

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    Sadek B

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Bassem Sadek,1 Ali Saad,1 Gniewomir Latacz,2 Kamil Kuder,2 Agnieszka Olejarz,2 Tadeusz Karcz,2 Holger Stark,3 Katarzyna Kieć-Kononowicz2 1Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates; 2Department of Technology and Biotechnology of Drugs, Faculty of Pharmacy, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kraków, Poland; 3Department of Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry, Institute of Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry, Heinrich Heine University, Düsseldorf, Germany Abstract: A series of twelve novel non-imidazole-based ligands (3–14 was developed and evaluated for its in vitro binding properties at the human histamine H3 receptor (hH3R. The novel ligands were investigated for their in vivo protective effects in different seizure models in male adult rats. Among the H3R ligands (3–14 tested, ligand 14 showed significant and dose-dependent reduction in the duration of tonic hind limb extension in maximal electroshock (MES-induced seizure model subsequent to acute systemic administration (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg, intraperitoneally, whereas ligands 4, 6, and 7 without appreciable protection in MES model were most promising in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ model. Moreover, the protective effect observed for ligand 14 in MES model was lower than that observed for the reference drug phenytoin and was entirely abrogated when rats were co-administered with the brain-penetrant H1R antagonist pyrilamine (PYR but not the brain-penetrant H2R antagonist zolantidine (ZOL, demonstrating that histaminergic neurotransmission by activation of postsynaptically located H1Rs seems to be involved in the protective action. On the contrary, PYR and ZOL failed to abrogate the full protection provided by 4 in PTZ model and the moderate protective effect by 14 in strychnine (STR model. Moreover, the experimental and in silico estimation of properties such as metabolism was

  14. Involvement of nitrergic system in anticonvulsant effect of zolpidem in lithium-pilocarpine induced status epilepticus: Evaluation of iNOS and COX-2 genes expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Seyyed Majid; Ghasemi, Maryam; Bahremand, Taraneh; Momeny, Majid; Gholami, Mahdi; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2017-11-15

    This study aims to investigate the role of zolpidem in lithium-pilocarpine induced status epilepticus (SE) and probable mechanisms involved in seizure threshold alteration. In the present study, lithium chloride (127mg/kg) was administered 20h prior to pilocarpine (60mg/kg) to induce SE in adult male Wistar rats. Different doses of zolpidem (0.1, 1, 2, 5, 10mg/kg) were injected 30min before pilocarpine administration. Furthermore, to find out whether nitric oxide (NO) plays a role in the observed effect, L-arginine and L-NAME were injected 15min before zolpidem. Afterward, we identified the particular NO isoform mediating the effect of zolpidem by injecting aminoguanidine (AG) and 7-Nitroindazole (7-NI) 15min prior to zolpidem. Moreover, in both 6 and 24h after pilocarpine injection, experimental groups underwent hippocampectomy to evaluate cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) genes expression by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). Pre-treatment with zolpidem significantly prevented the onset of SE in a dose-dependent manner. AG and L-NAME significantly potentiated the anticonvulsant effect of zolpidem while L-arginine inverted this effect. Our qRT-PCR exerted that there was a continuous elevation of iNOS and COX-2 genes expression over 6 and 24h after pilocarpine administration in SE and L-arginine+Zolpidem groups while in AG/L-NAME+Zolpidem and zolpidem groups this upregulation was prevented. Our study indicates that zolpidem prevents the onset of SE through inhibition of iNOS/COX-2 genes upregulation following lithium-pilocarpine administration. Consistent with our results, we suggest that iNOS activation could be probably upstream of COX-2 gene expression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Anticonvulsive effect of paeoniflorin on experimental febrile seizures in immature rats: possible application for febrile seizures in children.

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    Hitomi Hino

    Full Text Available Febrile seizures (FS is the most common convulsive disorder in children, but there have been no clinical and experimental studies of the possible treatment of FS with herbal medicines, which are widely used in Asian countries. Paeoniflorin (PF is a major bioactive component of Radix Paeoniae alba, and PF-containing herbal medicines have been used for neuromuscular, neuropsychiatric, and neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we analyzed the anticonvulsive effect of PF and Keishikashakuyaku-to (KS; a PF-containing herbal medicine for hyperthermia-induced seizures in immature rats as a model of human FS. When immature (P5 male rats were administered PF or KS for 10 days, hyperthermia-induced seizures were significantly suppressed compared to control rats. In cultured hippocampal neurons, PF suppressed glutamate-induced elevation of intracellular Ca(2+ ([Ca(2+](i, glutamate receptor-mediated membrane depolarization, and glutamate-induced neuronal death. In addition, PF partially suppressed the elevation in [Ca(2+](i induced by activation of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5, but not that mediated by α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolpropionic acid (AMPA or N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors. However, PF did not affect production or release of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA in hippocampal neurons. These results suggest that PF or PF-containing herbal medicines exert anticonvulsive effects at least in part by preventing mGluR5-dependent [Ca(2+](i elevations. Thus, it could be a possible candidate for the treatment of FS in children.

  16. Substituted N-(biphenyl-4'-yl)methyl (R)-2-acetamido-3-methoxypropionamides: potent anticonvulsants that affect frequency (use) dependence and slow inactivation of sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyosung; Park, Ki Duk; Torregrosa, Robert; Yang, Xiao-Fang; Dustrude, Erik T; Wang, Yuying; Wilson, Sarah M; Barbosa, Cindy; Xiao, Yucheng; Cummins, Theodore R; Khanna, Rajesh; Kohn, Harold

    2014-07-24

    We prepared 13 derivatives of N-(biphenyl-4'-yl)methyl (R)-2-acetamido-3-methoxypropionamide that differed in type and placement of a R-substituent in the terminal aryl unit. We demonstrated that the R-substituent impacted the compound's whole animal and cellular pharmacological activities. In rodents, select compounds exhibited excellent anticonvulsant activities and protective indices (PI=TD50/ED50) that compared favorably with clinical antiseizure drugs. Compounds with a polar, aprotic R-substituent potently promoted Na+ channel slow inactivation and displayed frequency (use) inhibition of Na+ currents at low micromolar concentrations. The possible advantage of affecting these two pathways to decrease neurological hyperexcitability is discussed.

  17. Effect of anticonvulsant drugs on (35S)t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate binding in vitro and ex vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitkaenen, A.; Riekkinen, P.J.; Saano, V.; Tuomisto, L.

    1987-01-01

    Using several concentrations of eight anticonvulsant drugs in clinical use (carbamazepine, clonazepam, phenytoin, phenobarbital, ethosuximide, primidone, sodium valproate, and D,L-γ-vinyl GABA), we studied their abilities in vitro to displace ( 35 S)t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate ( 35 S-TBPS) from its binding site in a homogenate of rat brain. Thereafter ethosuximide (150 mg/kg), phenobarbital (30 mg/kg), clonazepam (0.3 mg/kg), or phenytoin (100 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally into rats for 16-20 days; and the effect of drug administration on 35 S-TBPS binding was studied in the cortex and hippocampus ex vivo. Phenobarbital (100 μM, P 35 S-TBPS binding in vitro by 10-16%. After drug administration of phenobarbital (concentration in plasma 168 μM), the number of binding sites decreased and the binding affinity (p 35 S-TBPS binding in vitro at the concentration analogous to therapeutic plasma levels or ex vivo at the dose used. These results suggest that the use of phenobarbital may modulate the TBPS binding site, but the role of the present findings in the anticonvulsant action of phenobarbital needs to be further studied. (author)

  18. Evaluation of the antinociceptive activities of enaminone compounds on the formalin and hot plate tests in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masocha, Willias; Kombian, Samuel B.; Edafiogho, Ivan O.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, we found that methyl 4-(4‧-bromophenyl)aminocyclohex-3-en-6-methyl-2-oxo-1-oate (E139), an anticonvulsant enaminone, has antinociceptive activity in the hot plate test. In this study we evaluated the antinociceptive activity of five anilino enaminones E139, ethyl 4-(4‧-chlorophenyl)amino-6-methyl-2-oxocyclohex-3-en-1-oate (E121), ethyl 4-(4‧-bromophenyl)amino-6-methyl-2-oxocyclohex-3-en-1-oate (E122), methyl 4-(4‧-chlorophenyl)amino-6-methyl-2-oxocyclohex-3-en-1-oate (E138) and ethyl 4-(4‧-fluorophenyl)amino-6-methyl-2-oxocyclohex-3-en-1-oate (BRG 19) using the formalin and hot plate tests. E139 has been reported to exert its effects via enhancement of extracellular GABA levels, thus tiagabine, a GABA transporter inhibitor, was evaluated as a control together with indomethacin. Tiagabine had antinociceptive activity in both phase 1 (neurogenic pain) and phase 2 (inflammatory pain) of the formalin test, whereas indomethacin had activity only in phase 2. E139 and E138 had antinociceptive activity in both phases of the formalin test, whereas E121 had activity only in phase 1 and BRG 19 had activity only in phase 2. E122 had no significant activity in either phase. In the hot plate test only E139 had antinociceptive activity. Administration of either bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, or CGP 35348, a GABAB receptor antagonist, blocked the antinociceptive activity of E139. In conclusion our results indicate that E139 has antinociceptive activity in the formalin and hot plate tests that are dependent on GABA receptors.

  19. Quantitative determination of anticonvulsant-induced bone demineralization by an improved x-ray densitometry technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolschendorf, K.; Vanselow, K.; Schulz, H.; Moeller, W.D.

    1983-10-01

    Quantitative studies of the influence of anticonvulsant drugs on bone mineral content of 88 epileptics were performed by a microcomputer-aided densitometer system. The results showed that the mineral content decreases significantly with the duration of the therapy. This decrease was found to be approximately 1.2% per year for a Diphenylhydantoin (DPH) monotherapy and 1.8% per year and 2.0% per year for a DPH plus Phenobarbital and DPH plus Carbamazepin combination therapy.

  20. Quantitation of anticonvulsant drugs in serum by gas-chromatography on the stationary phase SP-2510.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godolphin, W; Thoma, J

    1978-03-01

    A new column packing, SP-2510 DA (Supelco, Inc., Bellefonte, Pa. 16823), is an excellent stationary phase for the determination of a wide variety of anticonvulsant drugs by gas--liquid chromatography without derivatization. However, when uncomplicated extraction procedures are used, serum cholesterol interferes with the determination of primidone. By the simple expedient of adding a short "pre-column" containing another phase (SP-2250 DA) the problem is overcome.

  1. Anticonvulsant treatment of sarin-induced seizures with nasal midazolam: An electrographic, behavioral, and histological study in freely moving rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilat, E.; Kadar, T.; Levy, A.; Rabinovitz, I.; Cohen, G.; Kapon, Y.; Sahar, R.; Brandeis, R.

    2005-01-01

    Centrally mediated seizures and convulsions are common consequences of exposure to organophosphates (OPs). These seizures rapidly progress to status epilepticus (SE) and contribute to profound brain injury. Effective management of these seizures is critical for minimization of brain damage. Nasal application of midazolam (1.5 mg/kg) after 5 min of sarin-induced electrographic seizure activity (EGSA) ameliorated EGSA and convulsive behavior (238 ± 90 s). Identical treatment after 30 min was not sufficient to ameliorate ECoG paradoxical activity and convulsive behavior. Nasal midazolam (1.5 mg/kg), together with scopolamine (1 mg/kg, im) after 5 min of EGSA, exerted a powerful and rapid anticonvulsant effect (53 ± 10 s). Delaying the same treatment to 30 min of EGSA leads to attenuation of paroxysmal ECoG activity in all cases but total cessation of paroxysmal activity was not observed in most animals tested. Cognitive tests utilizing the Morris Water Maze demonstrated that nasal midazolam alone or together with scopolamine (im), administered after 5 min of convulsions, abolished the effect of sarin on learning. Both these treatments, when given after 30 min of convulsions, only decreased the sarin-induced learning impairments. Whereas rats which were not subject to the anticonvulsant agents did not show any memory for the platform location, both treatments (at 5 min as well as at 30 min) completely abolished the memory deficits. Both treatments equally blocked the impairment of reversal learning when given at 5 min. However, when administered after 30 min, midazolam alone reversed the impairments in reversal learning, while midazolam with scopolamine did not. Rats exposed to sarin and treated with the therapeutic regimen with the exclusion of midazolam exhibited severe brain lesions that encountered the hippocampus, pyriform cortex, and thalamus. Nasal midazolam at 5 min prevented brain damage, while delaying the midazolam treatment to 30 min of EGSA resulted in

  2. Anticonvulsant treatment of sarin-induced seizures with nasal midazolam: An electrographic, behavioral, and histological study in freely moving rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilat, E [Department of Pharmacology, Israel Institute for Biological Research, Ness Ziona, 74100 (Israel); Kadar, T [Department of Pharmacology, Israel Institute for Biological Research, Ness Ziona, 74100 (Israel); Levy, A [Department of Pharmacology, Israel Institute for Biological Research, Ness Ziona, 74100 (Israel); Rabinovitz, I [Department of Pharmacology, Israel Institute for Biological Research, Ness Ziona, 74100 (Israel); Cohen, G [Department of Pharmacology, Israel Institute for Biological Research, Ness Ziona, 74100 (Israel); Kapon, Y [Department of Pharmacology, Israel Institute for Biological Research, Ness Ziona, 74100 (Israel); Sahar, R [Department of Pharmacology, Israel Institute for Biological Research, Ness Ziona, 74100 (Israel); Brandeis, R [Department of Pharmacology, Israel Institute for Biological Research, Ness Ziona, 74100 (Israel)

    2005-11-15

    Centrally mediated seizures and convulsions are common consequences of exposure to organophosphates (OPs). These seizures rapidly progress to status epilepticus (SE) and contribute to profound brain injury. Effective management of these seizures is critical for minimization of brain damage. Nasal application of midazolam (1.5 mg/kg) after 5 min of sarin-induced electrographic seizure activity (EGSA) ameliorated EGSA and convulsive behavior (238 {+-} 90 s). Identical treatment after 30 min was not sufficient to ameliorate ECoG paradoxical activity and convulsive behavior. Nasal midazolam (1.5 mg/kg), together with scopolamine (1 mg/kg, im) after 5 min of EGSA, exerted a powerful and rapid anticonvulsant effect (53 {+-} 10 s). Delaying the same treatment to 30 min of EGSA leads to attenuation of paroxysmal ECoG activity in all cases but total cessation of paroxysmal activity was not observed in most animals tested. Cognitive tests utilizing the Morris Water Maze demonstrated that nasal midazolam alone or together with scopolamine (im), administered after 5 min of convulsions, abolished the effect of sarin on learning. Both these treatments, when given after 30 min of convulsions, only decreased the sarin-induced learning impairments. Whereas rats which were not subject to the anticonvulsant agents did not show any memory for the platform location, both treatments (at 5 min as well as at 30 min) completely abolished the memory deficits. Both treatments equally blocked the impairment of reversal learning when given at 5 min. However, when administered after 30 min, midazolam alone reversed the impairments in reversal learning, while midazolam with scopolamine did not. Rats exposed to sarin and treated with the therapeutic regimen with the exclusion of midazolam exhibited severe brain lesions that encountered the hippocampus, pyriform cortex, and thalamus. Nasal midazolam at 5 min prevented brain damage, while delaying the midazolam treatment to 30 min of EGSA resulted

  3. Effect of caffeine on the anticonvulsant effects of oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine and tiagabine in a mouse model of generalized tonic-clonic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrościńska-Krawczyk, Magdalena; Ratnaraj, Neville; Patsalos, Philip N; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2009-01-01

    Caffeine has been reported to be proconvulsant and to reduce the anticonvulsant efficacy of a variety of antiepileptic drugs (carbamazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, valproate and topiramate) in animal models of epilepsy and to increase seizure frequency in patients with epilepsy. Using the mouse maximal electroshock model, the present study was undertaken so as to ascertain whether caffeine affects the anticonvulsant efficacy of the new antiepileptic drugs lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine and tiagabine. The results indicate that neither acute nor chronic caffeine administration (up to 46.2 mg/kg) affected the ED(50) values of oxcarbazepine or lamotrigine against maximal electroshock. Similarly, caffeine did not modify the tiagabine electroconvulsive threshold. Furthermore, caffeine had no effect on oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine and tiagabine associated adverse effects such as impairment of motor coordination (measured by the chimney test) or long-term memory (measured by the passive avoidance task). Concurrent plasma concentration measurements revealed no significant effect on lamotrigine and oxcarbazepine concentrations. For tiagabine, however, chronic caffeine (4 mg/kg) administration was associated with an increase in tiagabine concentrations. In conclusion, caffeine did not impair the anticonvulsant effects of lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, or tiagabine as assessed by electroconvulsions in mice. Also, caffeine was without effect upon the adverse potential of the studied antiepileptic drugs. Thus caffeine may not necessarily adversely affect the efficacy of all antiepileptic drugs and this is an important observation.

  4. Anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects of Rosa damascena hydro-alcoholic extract on rat hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Homayoun

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Previously, analgesic, hypnotic, and anticonvulsant effects have been suggested for Rosa damascena (R. damascena. In the present study, possible anti-seizure and neuro-protective effects of hydro-alcoholic extract of R. damascena has been investigated after inducing seizures in rats by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ. Materials and Methods: The rats were divided to five groups: (1 Control: received saline, (2 PTZ: 100 mg/kg, i.p., (3 PTZ-Extract 50 mg/kg(PTZ-Ext 50, (4 PTZ- Extract 100 mg/kg(PTZ-Ext 100, and (5 PTZ- Extract 200 mg/kg(PTZ-Ext 200 groups which were treated with 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg respectively of hydro-alcoholic extract of R. damascena for one week before PTZ injection. The animals were examined for electrocorticography (ECoG recording and finally, the brains were removed for histological study. Results: The hydro-alcoholic extract of R. damascena significantly prolonged the latency of seizure attacks and reduced the frequency and amplitude of epileptiform burst discharges induced by PTZ injection. Moreover, all three doses of the extract significantly inhibited production of dark neurons in different regions of the hippocampus in the mentioned animal model. Conclusion: The present study showed that the hydro-alcoholic extract of R. damascena has anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects. More investigations are needed to be done in order to better understand the responsible compound(s as well as the possible mechanism(s.

  5. Synthesis, characterization and biological behavior of some Schiff's and Mannich base derivatives of Lamotrigine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Kulkarni

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A series of various Schiff's and Mannich base derivatives (N1–2 & ND1–6 of Lamotrigine with isatin and substituted isatin were synthesized to get more potent anticonvulsant agents. The starting material for the synthesis of various new Schiff's and Mannich base derivatives was isatin (1H-indole- 2, 3-dione which in turn was prepared from substituted isonitrosoacetanilide using aniline. Lamotrigine reacts with isatin & substituted isatin gave Schiff's bases (N1–2 which on reaction with various secondary amines (dimethylamine, diethylamine, morpholine produced Mannich bases (ND1–6. The structures of newly synthesized compounds were characterized by using TLC, UV, FT-IR, 1HNMR and studied for their anticonvulsant activity. Anticonvulsant activity of all the derivatives was evaluated by MES method using phenobarbitone sodium & Lamotrigine as standard drugs and % reduction of time spent by animals in extension, flexion, clonus, and stupor phase were noted. Compounds ND-4 and ND-6 showed significant anticonvulsant activity when compared with that of standard drugs. The remaining all compounds show moderate activity. Biological activity data of the synthesized derivatives revealed that, the synthesized derivatives are good anticonvulsant agents as compared to Lamotrigine.

  6. Synthesis of carbon-14 and tritium labeled cis-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-[2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)cyclohexyl]benzamidehydrochloride, an anticonvulsant agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsi, R.S.P.; Stolle, W.T.; Ayer, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    The title compound, U-54494A, is an anticonvulsant agent with clinical potential for treating epilepsy and a broad spectrum of seizure disorders. Structurally it is related to kappa opiod agonists and shares their anticonvulsant properties, but appears to be devoid of analgesic, sedative, and diuretic side effects. It also has been shown to inhibit neuronal damage and seizures induced by excitatory amino acids. This report describes the synthesis of the racemic U-54494A labeled with carbon-14 at the carboxamide carbon and with tritium in the pyrrolidine ring at C-3 and C-4. These radioisotope labeled versions of U-54494A were prepared for conducting drug disposition studies of this compound in test animals and human subjects

  7. Clinical spectrum of seizures and efficacy of anticonvulsive treatment in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmud, S.; Zman, S.Q.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical spectrum of seizures and efficacy of anticonvulsive treatment in children. Study Design: A descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Military Hospital (MH) Rawalpindi from October 2011 to March 2012. Material and Methods: One hundred children of either gender aged 1 month to 12 years presenting with seizures at Military Hospital Rawalpindi were evaluated and consented to participate in the study. All children with a febrile seizures were evaluated. The seizures were classified according to international league against epilepsy guidelines. Antiepileptic treatment regimen was evaluated in terms of number of drugs, correct dosage and efficacy in control of seizures. Results: It was observed that generalized seizures were (58 percent) followed by focal seizures (32 percent) in children. Valproic acid was prescribed in (51 percent) cases. Epilepsy was diagnosed in (56 percent) followed by cerebral palsy (20 percent), post meningoencephalitis sequalae (11 percent), intracranial hemorrhage (7 percent) and leukodystrophies (3 percnet) as underlying cause of seizures. Statistically significant association was seen between age groups and diagnosis (p value=0.001); age groups and types of seizures (p value=0.046); correct dosage of antiepileptics and control of seizures (p value=0.007); compliance to treatment and control of seizures (p value=0.007). Conclusion: Generalized seizures are the commonest form followed by focal seizures. Epilepsy was the common etiology of seizures in all age groups in children. Cerebral palsy was the second leading cause of seizures in children followed by post meningoencephalitis, stroke and leukodystrophies. Valproic acid was the most commonly prescribed antiepileptic. Normal delivery with delayed cry was the major risk factor for cerebral palsy. Prescription of appropriate antiepileptics according to diagnosis in optimum dosage and compliance to treatment affect control of seizures in children. (author)

  8. Spina bifida and cleft lip among newborns of Norwegian women with epilepsy: changes related to the use of anticonvulsants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, P B; Lie, R T; Irgens, L M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the connection between the use of anticonvulsants for epilepsy during or before pregnancy and the risk of spina bifida and cleft lip in newborns. METHODS: Among mothers registered from 1967 to 1992 by the Medical Birth Registry of Norway, 7588 who had epilepsy were identified and their newborns' prevalence of spina bifida and cleft lip examined. RESULTS: The odds ratio of spina bifida in children of mothers with epilepsy compared with other children increased from 1.5 in 1967 through 1980 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.3, 4.5) to 4.4 in 1981 through 1992 (95% CI = 2.0, 8.5). The odds ratio of cleft lip, however, decreased from 3.0 before 1981 (95% CI = 1.6, 5.1) to 1.1 after 1981 (95% CI = 0.4, 2.3). CONCLUSIONS: This shift toward more serious birth defects is consistent with the different teratogenic effects of newer and older anticonvulsants. PMID:8876519

  9. Anticonvulsant mechanism of saponins fraction from adventitious roots of Ficus religiosa: possible modulation of GABAergic, calcium and sodium channel functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damanpreet Singh

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In our previous studies, quantified saponins-rich fraction from adventitious root extract of Ficus religiosa L., Moraceae, showed anticonvulsant effect in acute, as well as chronic mice models of epilepsy. The present study was designed to reveal putative anticonvulsant mechanism of quantified saponins-rich fraction using target specific animal models. The anticonvulsant effect of quantified saponins-rich fraction was initially studied in maximal electroshock and pentylenetetrazol test at 1, 2 and 4 mg/kg; i.p. doses. Based on the results of initial anticonvulsant testing, different groups of mice were injected with vehicle or quantified saponins-rich fraction (4 mg/kg; i.p., 30 min prior to an injection of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (100 mg/kg; s.c., bicuculline (5 mg/kg; i.p., strychnine hydrochloride (2 mg/kg; i.p., BAY k-8644 (37.5 µg; i.c.v., veratridine (500 µg/kg; i.p. and the convulsive episodes were studied. Treatment with the extract (1, 2 and 4 mg/kg showed significant protection in maximal electroshock and pentylenetetrazol-induced convulsion tests, in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, quantified saponins-rich fraction at 4 mg/kg dose showed significant increase in latency to clonic convulsions, decrease in seizure severity and increase in average wave amplitude in bicuculline, BAY k-8644 and veratridine tests, respectively, as compared to vehicle control. However, SRF treatment failed to abolish N-methyl-D-aspartic acid and strychnine-induced convulsions, indicated by insignificant change in the appearance of turning behavior and onset of tonic extension, respectively, as compared to vehicle control. From the results of present study, it is concluded that quantified saponins-rich fraction suppress maximal electroshock, pentylenetetrazol, bicuculline, BAY k-8644 and veratridine-induced convulsions, indicating its GABAergic, Na+ and Ca2+ channel modulatory effects. Further it can be correlated that quantified saponins

  10. Tolerance and withdrawal to anticonvulsant action of clonazepam: role of nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, N; Bhargava, V K; Pandhi, P

    2000-05-01

    The use of clonazepam in the long-term treatment of epilepsy is greatly inhibited by its capacity to induce tolerance and dependence. A means of preventing or minimizing the tolerance and dependence inducing properties is required. Here the role of nitric oxide in preventing the development of tolerance and withdrawal hyperexcitability was studied. In Wistar rats, clonazepam at a dose of 0.25 mg/kg i.p. twice daily produced tolerance to its anticonvulsant action in 28 days. After sudden cessation of therapy it produced hyperexcitability. Tolerance was shown by a decrease in seizure threshold to near control value while withdrawal hyperexcitability was evidenced by a significant decrease in seizure threshold below the control value. L-Arginine (a donor of nitric oxide) and N omega-nitro-L-arginine (an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase) were given in doses of 150 mg/kg and 8 mg/kg, respectively on day 1, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 with clonazepam. Withdrawal hyperexcitability was seen on day 1, 2 and 4 after cessation of drug therapy. Electroshock was used as a model of epilepsy and seizure thresholds were determined by an up and down method of Kimball et al. L-Arginine was found to inhibit the development tolerance as well as withdrawal hyperexcitability when administered with clonazepam while N omega-L-arginine did not prevent either the development of tolerance or withdrawal hyperexcitability in the electroshock model. In the PTZ model, however, L-arginine had no effect on the anticonvulsant action and withdrawal hyperexcitability while inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis prevented withdrawal hyperexcitability in PTZ-induced seizures.

  11. Early life status epilepticus and stress have distinct and sex-specific effects on learning, subsequent seizure outcomes, including anticonvulsant response to phenobarbital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Ozlem; Moshé, Solomon L; Galanopoulou, Aristea S

    2015-02-01

    Neonatal status epilepticus (SE) is often associated with adverse cognitive and epilepsy outcomes. We investigate the effects of three episodes of kainic acid-induced SE (3KA-SE) and maternal separation in immature rats on subsequent learning, seizure susceptibility, and consequences, and the anticonvulsant effects of phenobarbital, according to sex, type, and age at early life (EL) event. 3KA-SE or maternal separation was induced on postnatal days (PN) 4-6 or 14-16. Rats were tested on Barnes maze (PN16-19), or lithium-pilocarpine SE (PN19) or flurothyl seizures (PN32). The anticonvulsant effects of phenobarbital (20 or 40 mg/kg/rat, intraperitoneally) pretreatment were tested on flurothyl seizures. FluoroJadeB staining assessed hippocampal injury. 3KA-SE or separation on PN4-6 caused more transient learning delays in males and did not alter lithium-pilocarpine SE latencies, but aggravated its outcomes in females. Anticonvulsant effects of phenobarbital were preserved and potentiated in specific groups depending on sex, type, and age at EL event. Early life 3KA-SE and maternal separation cause more but transient cognitive deficits in males but aggravate the consequences of subsequent lithium-pilocarpine SE in females. In contrast, on flurothyl seizures, EL events showed either beneficial or no effect, depending on gender, type, and age at EL events. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Comparison of the efficacy of two anticonvulsants, phenytoin and valproate to improve PCP and d-amphetamine induced deficits in a reversal learning task in the rat

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    Nagi F Idris

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies in our laboratory have shown that PCP (phencyclidine and d-amphetamine induce a cognitive deficit in rats, in a paradigm of potential relevance for the pathology of schizophrenia. Atypical, but not classical antipsychotics and the anticonvulsant, lamotrigine have been shown to prevent a selective reversal learning deficit induced by PCP. In contrast, only haloperidol reversed the d-amphetamine-induced deficit. The present study aimed to explore the ability of two anticonvulsants with differing mechanism of action, valproate and phenytoin to attenuate the cognitive deficits induced by PCP and d-amphetamine in the reversal learning paradigm. PCP at 1.5mg/kg and d-amphetamine at 0.5mg/kg both produced a selective and significant reduction in performance of the reversal phase with no effect on the initial phase of the task in female-hooded Lister rats. Valproate (25-200mg/kg and phenytoin (25-50mg/kg had no effect on performance when administered alone. Valproate (100-200mg/kg, whose principle action is thought to be the enhancement of GABA transmission, was unable to prevent the cognitive deficit induced by either PCP or d-amphetamine. Conversely, phenytoin (50mg/kg, a use-dependent sodium channel inhibitor, significantly prevented the deficit induced by PCP, but not d-amphetamine. These results add to our earlier work with lamotrigine, and suggest that sodium channel blockade may be a mechanism by which some anticonvulsant drugs can prevent the PCP-induced deficit. These data have implications for the use of anticonvulsant drugs in the treatment of cognitive or psychotic disorders.

  13. Magnesium sulphate as an anticonvulsant in the management of eclampsia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, R.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the use of magnesium sulphate (MgSO/sub 4/) as an anticonvulsant in the management of eclamptic patients. Patients and Methods: Out of a total of 6050 pregnant women, 31 patients had eclampsia and were managed according to the set protocol. MgSO/sub 4/ 'Nas given to eclamptic patients according to protocol who had no contraindication to this agent. Recurrence of convulsion, side effects of magnesium sulphate, maternal and fetal outcome was noted. Results: Over two years' study period, out of 6050 patients, 31 were admitted with eclampsia (0.51 %). There was no maternal death. Out of 31 eclamptic patients only 5 patients were booked. Twenty-two patients (70.9%) were primigravida and 9 (29%) were multigravida. Seventeen (54%) were less than 20 years of age, 22 (79.9%) patients were admitted with antepartum and 6 (19.35%) had postpartum eclampsia. Magnesium sulphate was effective in 29 (93.54%) patients. Fifteen patients delivered by caesarean (C) section and 16 delivered vaginally. Twenty-nine (93.5%) babies were born alive. Two patients had recurrent convulsion i.e. 6.4%. Only one patient had respiratory depression after the use of magnesium sulphate. Conclusion: Eclampsia was well controlled by the use of MgSO/sub 4/. There were only 2 patients who had recurrence of convulsion. Convulsions were controlled in 29 (93.54%) patients despite lack of monitoring facilities of serum magnesium level. (author)

  14. Risk factors of vitamin D deficiency in children with epilepsy taking anticonvulsants at initial and during follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Ho Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available PurposeVitamin D status was evaluated in children with epilepsy taking anticonvulsants to determine the prevalence and risk factors of vitamin D deficiency.MethodsThis study was designed as both a cross-sectional and a retrospective cohort study. A sum of 198 children who were diagnosed with epilepsy at the Department of Pediatrics in Dankook University Hospital was included. Their serum vitamin D levels were reviewed based on clinical information, and analyzed using IBM SPSS ver. 20.0.ResultsOne hundred twenty-four children (62.6% had vitamin D deficiency. Two risk factors were associated: winter to spring season (odds ratio [OR], 3.71; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.835-7.492 and age more than 12 years (OR, 3.22; 95% CI, 1.377-7.542. Out of the 57 patients who were not vitamin D deficient at the time of initial assay, 47 patients (82.5% became vitamin D deficient during followup. The change of serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 (25(OHD levels during follow up showed a weak negative correlation with the duration of medication (r=-0.283, P=0.033. Medication duration was longer and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI abnormality, abnormal underlying conditions, and nonambulatory status were more frequently present in twenty-five patients (44% who showed a decline of more than 15 ng/mL during follow-up (P<0.05.ConclusionVitamin D deficiency is common in children with epilepsy taking anticonvulsants, especially in adolescents more than 12 years of age. This study emphasizes the regular monitoring of vitamin D level, especially in the presence of longer duration of medication, brain MRI abnormality, abnormal underlying conditions, and nonambulatory status.

  15. Use of the accelerating rotarod for assessment of motor performance decrement induced by potential anticonvulsant compounds in nerve agent poisoning. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capacio, B.R.; Harris, L.W.; Anderson, D.R.; Lennox, W.J.; Gales, V.

    1992-12-31

    The accelerating rotarod was used to assess motor performance decrement in rats after administration of candidate anticonvulsant compounds (acetazolamide, amitriptyline, chlordiazepoxide, diazepan, diazepam-lysine, lorazepam, loprazolam, midazolam, phenobarbital and scopolamine) against nerve agent poisoning. AH compounds were tested as the commercially available injectable preparation except for diazepam-lysine and loprazolam, which are not FDA approved. A peak effect time, as well as a dose to decrease performance time by 50% from control (PDD50), was determined. The calculated PDD50 (micrometer ol/kg) values and peak effect tunes were midazolam, 1.16 at 15 min; loprazolam, 1.17 at 15 min; diazepam-lysine, 4.17 at 30 min; lorazepwn, 4.98 at 15 min; diazepam, 5.27 at 15 min; phenobarbital, 101.49 at 45 min; chlordiazepoxide, 159.21 at 30 min; scopolamine, amitriptyline and acetazolamide did not demonstrate a performance decrement at any of the doses tested. The PDD50 values were compared with doses which have been utilized against nerve agent-induced convulsions or published ED50 values from standard anticonvulsant screening tests (maximal electroshock MES and subcutaneous pentylenetetrazol (scMET)). I serve agents, anticonvulsants, diazepam, accelerating rotarod, motor performance.

  16. A quantitative determination of anticonvulsant-induced bone demineralization by an improved x-ray densitometry technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolschendorf, K.; Vanselow, K.; Schulz, H.; Moeller, W.D.

    1983-01-01

    Quantitative studies of the influence of anticonvulsant drugs on bone mineral content of 88 epileptics were performed by a microcomputer-aided densitometer system. The results showed that the mineral content decreases significantly with the duration of the therapy. This decrease was found to be approximately 1.2% per year for a Diphenylhydantoin (DPH) monotherapy and 1.8% per year and 2.0% per year for a DPH plus Phenobarbital and DPH plus Carbamazepin combination therapy. (orig.)

  17. Ursodeoxycholic Acid Can Improve Liver Transaminase Quantities in Children with Anticonvulsant Drugs Hepatotoxicity: a Pilot Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Asgarshirazi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study has been directed to investigate Ursodeoxycholic Acid (UDCA effect in children, to reduce the high Liver transaminases induced by Anticonvulsant drugs (drug induced hepatitis. This idea has been driven from Cytoprotective and antioxidant properties of UDCA to be used in drug induced inflammation in Liver. Twenty two epileptic patients aged between 4 mo - 3 yr whom were under anticonvulsant therapy with drugs such as valperoic acid, primidone, levetiracetam, Phenobarbital or any combination of them and had shown Liver transaminases rise , after rule out of Viral-Autoimmune, Metabolic and Anatomic causes, have been prescribed UDCA in dose of 10-15 mg/kg/day, at least for 6 months. Any patient who have shown confusing factors such as genetic disorders with liver involvement or spontaneous decline in enzymes or had not treatment compliance has been excluded from the study. Transaminases range changes as well as Probable side effects of the drug have been monitored. The results indicated that UDCA is effective and well tolerable in the children with drug induced hyper transaminasemia. No side effect has been seen and recorded in this study. Based on this study and its results, we recommend UDCA as a safe and effective choice in drug induced hepatotoxicities.

  18. The effects of anticonvulsants on 4-aminopyridine-induced bursting: in vitro studies on rat peripheral nerve and dorsal roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, G.

    1996-01-01

    1. Aminopyridines have been used as beneficial symptomatic treatments in a variety of neurological conditions including multiple sclerosis but have been associated with considerable toxicity in the form of abdominal pain, paraesthesias and (rarely) convulsions. 2. Extracellular and intracellular recording was used to characterize action potentials in rat sciatic nerves and dorsal roots and the effects of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). 3. In sciatic nerve trunks, 1 mM 4-AP produced pronounced after potentials at room temperature secondary to regenerative firing in affected axons (5-10 spikes per stimulus). At physiological temperatures, after potentials (2-3 spikes) were greatly attenuated in peripheral axons. 4. 4-AP evoked more pronounced and prolonged after discharges in isolated dorsal roots at 37 degrees C (3-5.5 mV and 80-100 ms succeeded by a smaller inhibitory/depolarizing voltage shift) which were used to assess the effects of anticonvulsants. 5. Phenytoin, carbamazepine and lamotrigine dose-dependently reduced the area of 4-AP-induced after potentials at 100 and 320 microM but the amplitude of compound action potentials (evoked at 0.5 Hz) was depressed in parallel. 6. The tonic block of sensory action potentials by all three drugs (at 320 microM) was enhanced by high frequency stimulation (5-500 Hz). 7. The lack of selectivity of these frequency-dependent Na+ channel blockers for burst firing compared to low-frequency spikes, is discussed in contrast to their effects on 4-AP-induced seizures and paroxysmal activity in CNS tissue (which is associated with large and sustained depolarizing plateau potentials). 8. In conclusion, these in vitro results confirm the marked sensitivity of sensory axons to 4-AP (the presumptive basis for paraesthesias). Burst firing was not preferentially impaired at relatively high concentrations suggesting that anticonvulsants will not overcome the toxic peripheral actions of 4-AP in neurological patients. PMID:8821551

  19. Evaluation of central nervous system effects of Citrus limon essential oil in mice

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    Lidianne Mayra Lopes Campêlo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system (CNS depressant and anticonvulsant activities of Citrus limon (L. Osbeck, Rutaceae, essential oil (EO were investigated in animal models. The EO (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg injected by oral route (p.o. in mice caused a significant decrease in the motor activity of animals when compared with the control group, up to thirty days after the administration and the dose of 150 mg/kg significantly reduced the remaining time of the animals on the Rota-rod apparatus. Additionally, C. limon essential oil was also capable to promote an increase of latency for development of convulsions induced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ. The administration of FLU (10 mg/kg, i.p., GABA A-benzodiazepine (GABA-BZD receptor antagonist, antagonized the effect of C. limon essential oil at higher dose. This C. limon essential oil was also capable to promote an increase of latency for development of convulsions induced by picrotoxin (PIC at higher dose. In the same way, the anticonvulsant effect of the EO was affected by pretreatment with flumazenil, a selective antagonist of benzodiazepine site of GABA A receptor. These results suggest a possible CNS depressant and anticonvulsant activities in mice that needs further investigation.

  20. Influence of caffeine on the protective activity of gabapentin and topiramate in a mouse model of generalized tonic-clonic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jargiełło-Baszak, Małgorzata; Chrościńska-Krawczyk, Magdalena; Andres-Mach, Marta; Łuszczki, Jarogniew J; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2016-08-01

    Caffeine may interact with classical antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), reducing their anticonvulsant effects in basic seizure models. The aim of the present study was to ascertain whether intraperitoneal caffeine (acute or chronic for 15 days) could attenuate the anticonvulsant effect of some newer AEDs: gabapentin (GBP) and topiramate (TPM) against electroconvulsions in mice. Maximal electroshock (MES)-induced mouse seizure model was used for the estimation of the anticonvulsant activity of TPM whilst the protective activity of GBP was evaluated in the threshold test for maximal (tonic) convulsions. Adverse effects were evaluated by measurement of long-term memory (the step-through passive avoidance task) and motor coordination (chimney test). Plasma AED concentrations were also measured to determinate any pharmacokinetic contribution to the observed effects. Caffeine (both acute and chronic at 23.1 and 46.2mg/kg) significantly reduced the protective effects of TPM against MES. As regards GBP, caffeine (acutely at 46.2mg/kg and chronically at 23.1 or 46.2mg/kg) significantly diminished the GBP-induced increases in the electroconvulsive threshold. In addition, caffeine did not affect the free plasma concentrations of TPM or GBP. Acute and chronic caffeine (23.1 and 46.2mg/kg) enhanced the impairment of motor coordination in mice pretreated with GBP whilst an opposite effect was observed in TPM injected mice and pretreated with chronic caffeine at 46.2mg/kg. The results indicate that newer AEDs, GBP or TPM behave in the exactly same way as classical antiepileptics in mice challenged with caffeine. This hazardous effect of caffeine is not subject to tolerance. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  1. At clinically relevant concentrations the anaesthetic/amnesic thiopental but not the anticonvulsant phenobarbital interferes with hippocampal sharp wave-ripple complexes

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    Sotiriou Evangelos

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many sedative agents, including anesthetics, produce explicit memory impairment by largely unknown mechanisms. Sharp-wave ripple (SPW-R complexes are network activity thought to represent the neuronal substrate for information transfer from the hippocampal to neocortical circuits, contributing to the explicit memory consolidation. In this study we examined and compared the actions of two barbiturates with distinct amnesic actions, the general anesthetic thiopental and the anticonvulsant phenobarbital, on in vitro SPW-R activity. Results Using an in vitro model of SPW-R activity we found that thiopental (50–200 μM significantly and concentration-dependently reduced the incidence of SPW-R events (it increased the inter-event period by 70–430 %. At the concentration of 25 μM, which clinically produces mild sedation and explicit memory impairment, thiopental significantly reduced the quantity of ripple oscillation (it reduced the number of ripples and the duration of ripple episodes by 20 ± 5%, n = 12, P P P Conclusion We hypothesize that thiopental, by interfering with SPW-R activity, through enhancement of the GABAA receptor-mediated transmission, affects memory processes which involve hippocampal circuit activation. The quantity but not the frequency of ripple oscillation was affected by the drug.

  2. Nitric oxide (NO) is an endogenous anticonvulsant but not a mediator of the increase in cerebral blood flow accompanying bicuculline-induced seizures in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Qian; Theard, M A; Pelligrino, D A

    1994-01-01

    Neurons synthesize NO, which may act as a retrograde messenger, involved in either potentiating or depressing neuronal excitability. NO may also play a role in the cerebral vasodilatory response to increased neuronal activity (i.e., seizures). In this study, two questions were asked: (1) is NO an......Neurons synthesize NO, which may act as a retrograde messenger, involved in either potentiating or depressing neuronal excitability. NO may also play a role in the cerebral vasodilatory response to increased neuronal activity (i.e., seizures). In this study, two questions were asked: (1......) is NO an endogenous anticonvulsant or proconvulsant substance? and (2) is the cerebral blood flow (CBF) increase accompanying bicuculline (BC)-induced seizures mediated by NO? The experiments were performed in 300-400-g Wistar rats anesthetized with 0.6% halothane and 70% N2O/30% O2. CBF was measured using...

  3. Clarified Açaí (Euterpe oleracea Juice as an Anticonvulsant Agent: In Vitro Mechanistic Study of GABAergic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela P. F. Arrifano

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Seizures affect about 50 million people around the world. Approximately 30% of seizures are refractory to the current pharmacological arsenal, so, the pursuit of new therapeutic alternatives is essential. Clarified Euterpe oleracea (EO juice showed anticonvulsant properties similar to diazepam in an in vivo model with pentylenetetrazol, a GABAA receptor blocker. This study investigated the effects of EO on the main GABAergic targets for anticonvulsant drugs, analyzing the effect on the GABA receptor’s benzodiazepine and picrotoxinin binding sites and the GABA uptake. Primary cultures of cortical neurons and astrocytes were treated with EO (0–25% for up to 90 min. [3H]Flunitrazepam and [3H]TBOB binding, [3H]GABA uptake, cell viability, and morphology were assayed. Nonlethal concentrations of EO increased agonist binding and decreased antagonist binding in cortical neurons. Low concentrations significantly inhibited GABA uptake, especially in astrocytes, suggesting an accumulation of endogenous GABA in the synaptic cleft. The results demonstrate, for the first time, that EO can improve GABAergic neurotransmission via interactions with GABAA receptor and modulation of GABA uptake. Understanding these molecular mechanisms will help in the treatment of seizures and epilepsy, especially in developing countries where geographic isolation and low purchasing power are the main barriers to access to adequate treatment.

  4. Psychotropic and Anticonvulsant Drug Usage in Early Childhood Special Education Programs I. Phase One: A Preliminary Report: Prevalence, Attitude, Training, and Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadow, Kenneth D.

    As part of a three phase study designed to survey the teachers and parents of children receiving psychotropic and anticonvulsant drugs, 208 teachers of preschool special education children on medication were mailed questionnaires. The Early Childhood Medication Questionnaire used in the survey included items relating to teacher, program, and…

  5. Evaluating of the Anticonvulsant Gabapentin against Nerve Agent-Induced Seizures in a Guinea Pig Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    treating neuropathic pain. This study evaluated whether gabapentin could terminate or moderate nerve agent-induced seizures using a validated guinea ... pig model. Male Hartley guinea pigs were surgically prepared to record electroencephalographic (EEG) activity. After a week recovery, animals were

  6. Bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia associated with anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome induced by lamotrigine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandourah, Hasan; Bhandal, Samarjeet; Brundler, Marie-Anne; Noseworthy, Mary

    2016-01-29

    A 14-year-old girl who was known to have a seizure disorder and on lamotrigine treatment was admitted to the hospital, with a history of rash, fever and cough. Her condition deteriorated with clinical features suggestive of anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome (ACHS) complicated with bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia (BOOP). Her chest CT showed multifocal parenchymal opacities and lung biopsy was typical for BOOP. Initially, the lamotrigine was discontinued since the onset of the rash, then she was treated for pneumonia with antibiotics, which may have delayed the diagnosis. Eventually, BOOP was considered and she was treated with a high dose of corticosteroid. She improved clinically and her repeated chest CT showed a marked resolution of the lesions. This case illustrates the possible occurrence of BOOP as a complication of ACHS secondary to lamotrigine treatment. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  7. Serum levels of zinc and copper in epileptic children during long-term therapy with anticonvulsants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talat, Mohamed A; Ahmed, Anwar; Mohammed, Lamia

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the serum levels of zinc and copper in epileptic children during the long-term treatment of anticonvulsant drugs and correlate this with healthy subjects. A hospital-based group matched case-control study was conducted in the Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt between November 2013 and October 2014. Ninety patients aged 7.1 ± 3.6 years were diagnosed with epilepsy by a neurologist. The control group was selected from healthy individuals and matched to the case group. Serum zinc and copper were measured by the calorimetric method using a colorimetric method kit. The mean zinc level was 60.1 ± 22.6 ug/dl in the cases, and 102.1 ± 18 ug/dl in the controls (p<0.001). The mean copper level was 180.1 ± 32.4 ug/dl in cases compared with 114.5 ± 18.5 ug/dl in controls (p<0.001). Serum zinc levels in epileptic children under drug treatment are lower compared with healthy children. Also, serum copper levels in these patients are significantly higher than in healthy people. No significant difference in the levels of serum copper and zinc was observed in using one drug or multiple drugs in the treatment of epileptic patients.

  8. Bone mineral density in subjects using central nervous system-active medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinjo, Mitsuyo; Setoguchi, Soko; Schneeweiss, Sebastian; Solomon, Daniel H

    2005-12-01

    Decreased bone mineral density defines osteoporosis according to the World Health Organization and is an important predictor of future fractures. The use of several types of central nervous system-active drugs, including benzodiazepines, anticonvulsants, antidepressants, and opioids, have all been associated with increased risk of fracture. However, it is unclear whether such an increase in risk is related to an effect of bone mineral density or to other factors, such as increased risk of falls. We sought to examine the relationship between bone mineral density and the use of benzodiazepines, anticonvulsants, antidepressants, and opioids in a representative US population-based sample. We analyzed data on adults aged 17 years and older from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III, 1988-1994). Total femoral bone mineral density of 7114 male and 7532 female participants was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Multivariable linear regression models were used to quantify the relation between central nervous system medication exposure and total femoral bone mineral density. Models controlled for relevant covariates, including age, sex, and body mass index. In linear regression models, significantly reduced bone mineral density was found in subjects taking anticonvulsants (0.92 g/cm2; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.89 to 0.94) and opioids (0.92 g/cm2; 95% CI: 0.88 to 0.95) compared with nonusers (0.95 g/cm2; 95% CI: 0.95 to 0.95) after adjusting for several potential confounders. The other central nervous system-active drugs--benzodiazepines or antidepressants--were not associated with significantly reduced bone mineral density. In cross-sectional analysis of NHANES III, anticonvulsants and opioids (but not benzodiazepines or antidepressants) were associated with significantly reduced bone mineral density. These findings have implications for fracture-prevention strategies.

  9. Bioactive non-sterol triterpenoid from Streblus asper: microwave-assisted extraction, HPTLC profiling, computational studies and neuro-pharmacological evaluation in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vandana; Tripathi, Avinash C; Saraf, Shailendra K

    2016-11-01

    In folk medicine, the stem bark of Streblus asper Lour. (Moraceae) has been reported to possess anticonvulsant activity. However, no systematic/scientific validation is available. Objective This study explores the constituents in the stem bark, their biosassy-guided isolation and their efficacy in neuro-pharmacological disorders, for validating the traditional claims. Microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) technique was employed to obtain the crude extract. The n-hexane, dichloromethane and aqueous fractions were prepared and phytoconstituents were ascertained by phytochemical tests. The isolated compound, betulin, was characterized by different physicochemical and spectral methods, including HPTLC. Finally, neuro-pharmacological evaluations were conducted at 100, 200, 400 mg/kg b.w., p.o. (25, 50, 100 mg/kg b.w. for betulin) doses in BALB/c mice. The n-hexane fraction (400 mg/kg), and isolated compound betulin (100 mg/kg), showed maximum anticonvulsant activity in maximal electroshock (87.84% and 85.14% seizure inhibition), and isoniazid induced convulsion models (88.85% and 83.18% seizure inhibition), respectively. A dose-dependent attenuation of epileptic seizures was observed, probably through GABArgic mechanism of anticonvulsant action. Moreover, the antidepressant study was also conducted using behavioural models and the results expound that n-hexane and dichloromethane fractions (400 mg/kg) significantly reduced the duration of immobility, as compared to the control. This study reports some novel aspects like applying an environmentally benign/green approach of MAE, neuro-pharmacological screening and use of docking studies, for the first time, on the plant S. asper. The findings present a rational explanation for its use in traditional medicine, for the management of neuro-pharmacological disorders.

  10. Psychoneuropharmacological activities and chemical composition of essential oil of fresh fruits of Piper guineense (Piperaceae) in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyemitan, Idris Ajayi; Olayera, Omotola Aanuoluwa; Alabi, Akeeb; Abass, Luqman Adewale; Elusiyan, Christianah Abimbola; Oyedeji, Adebola Omowumi; Akanmu, Moses Atanda

    2015-05-26

    Piper guineense Schum & Thonn (Piperaceae) is a medicinal plant used in the Southern States of Nigeria to treat fever, mental disorders and febrile convulsions. This study aims at determining the chemical composition and the central nervous system (CNS) activities of the essential oil obtained from the plant׳s fresh fruits in order to rationalize its folkloric use. Essential oil of P. guineense (EOPG) obtained by hydrodistillation was analysed by GC/MS. EOPG (50-200mg/kg, i.p.) was evaluated for behavioural, hypothermic, sedative, muscle relaxant, anti-psychotic and anticonvulsant activities using standard procedures. Analysis of the oil reveals 44 compounds of which 30 compounds constituting 84.7% were identified. The oil was characterized by sesquiterpenoids (64.4%) while only four monoterpeneoids (21.3%) were found present in the oil. Major compounds identified were β-sesquiphellandrene (20.9%), linalool (6.1%), limonene (5.8%), Z-β-bisabolene (5.4%) and α-pinene (5.3%). The EOPG (50-200mg/kg, i.p.) caused significant (p<0.01) inhibition on rearing {F(4,20)=43}, locomotor {F(4,20)=22} activity and decreased head dips in hole board {F(4,20)=7} indicating CNS depressant effect; decreased rectal temperature {F(4,20)=7-16}, signifying hypothermic activity; decreased ketamine-induced sleep latency {F(4,20)=7.8} and prolonged total sleeping time {F(4,20)=8.8}, indicating sedative effect; reduced muscular tone on the hind-limb grip test {F(4,20)=22}, inclined board {F(4,20)=4-49} and rota rod {F(4,20)=13-106}, implying muscle relaxant activity; induced catalepsy {F(4,20)=47-136}, inhibited apomorphine-induced climbing behaviour {F(4,20)=9} and inhibited apomorphine-induced locomotor {F(4,20)=16}, suggesting anti-psychotic effect; and protected mice against pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions, indicating anticonvulsant potential. The most abundant component of the fresh fruits essential oil of P. guineense was β-sesquiphellandrene (20.9%); and the oil possesses

  11. Carvacrol, (-)-borneol and citral reduce convulsant activity in rodents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... compounds were efficient in preventing the tonic convulsions (p < 0.05) induced by MES. However, the GABAergic neurotransmitter system might be involved, at least in BOR effects. Henceforth, our results suggest that CARV, BOR and CIT possess anticonvulsant activity effect against PTZ-induced convulsions and MES.

  12. Malformaciones congénitas en hijos de madres epilépticas con y sin tratamiento con anticonvulsivantes Congenital malformations in the offspring of epileptic mothers with and without anticonvulsant treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jazmín Arteaga-Vázquez

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar la frecuencia y tipo de malformaciones congénitas (MC en hijos de madres epilépticas (HME tratadas y no tratadas con anticonvulsivantes, la posible correlación anticonvulsivante/MC y la asociación con otras alteraciones del desarrollo. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Estudio multicéntrico de casos y controles en 166 recién nacidos vivos HME identificados en 21 501 recién nacidos con MC y respectivos controles del Registro y Vigilancia Epidemiológica de Malformaciones Congénitas (RYVEMCE. RESULTADOS: La frecuencia de MC en HME tratadas fue mayor, (48.3% que en HME no tratadas (28.3%; (RM= 2.37 IC95% 1.08-5.40, p=0.03. Las MC más frecuentes fueron espina bífida, anomalías en reducción de miembros, labio/paladar hendido, microcefalia, anotia/microtia, hipospadias, paladar hendido, polidactilia, anoftalmia/microftalmia y onfalocele. No hubo diferencias entre uso de mono o politerapia. La difenilhidantoína, carbamazepina y ácido valproico fueron los anticonvulsivantes más utilizados. CONCLUSIONES: Los resultados confirman la teratogenicidad propia de la epilepsia y el efecto sinérgico de ciertos anticonvulsivantes, lo que evidencia la necesidad de un apropiado control periconcepcional de esta enfermedad y su tratamiento.OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence at birth and type of congenital malformations (CM in newborns of epileptic mothers (NEM treated and not treated with anticonvulsants, the correlation anticonvulsant/CM and other developmental disorders. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Multicenter case-control study, in 166 live births NEM diagnosed in 21 501 newborns with CM and respective controls from the Registro y Vigilancia Epidemiológica de Malformaciones Congénitas (RYVEMCE. RESULTS: The frequency of CM in NEM treated with anticonvulsants was higher (48.3% than in NEM of untreated mothers (28.3%, (OR= 2.37 IC95% 1.08-5.40, p=0.03. CMs most frequently found were: spina bifida, limb reduction defects, cleft lip palate

  13. African Journal of Science and Technology (AJST) REACTIONS OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    opiyo

    Acetylenic amines have been used in the synthesis of potential biologically active heterocyclic compounds. Recently the anticonvulsant activity of some acetylenic quinazolinone derivatives have been evaluated and most of them exhibited significant activity in the seizure threshold test with subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole.

  14. Causes of CNS inflammation and potential targets for anticonvulsants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falip, Mercé; Salas-Puig, Xavier; Cara, Carlos

    2013-08-01

    Inflammation is one of the most important endogenous defence mechanisms in an organism. It has been suggested that inflammation plays an important role in the pathophysiology of a number of human epilepsies and convulsive disorders, and there is clinical and experimental evidence to suggest that inflammatory processes within the CNS may either contribute to or be a consequence of epileptogenesis. This review discusses evidence from human studies on the role of inflammation in epilepsy and highlights potential new targets in the inflammatory cascade for antiepileptic drugs. A number of mechanisms have been shown to be involved in CNS inflammatory reactions. These include an inflammatory response at the level of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), immune-mediated damage to the CNS, stress-induced release of inflammatory mediators and direct neuronal dysfunction or damage as a result of inflammatory reactions. Mediators of inflammation in the CNS include interleukin (IL)-1β, tumour necrosis factor-α, nuclear factor-κB and toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4). IL-1β, BBB and high-mobility group box-1-TLR4 signalling appear to be the most promising targets for anticonvulsant agents directed at inflammation. Such agents may provide effective therapy for drug-resistant epilepsies in the future.

  15. Nitric oxide (NO) is an endogenous anticonvulsant but not a mediator of the increase in cerebral blood flow accompanying bicuculline-induced seizures in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Qian; Theard, M A; Pelligrino, D A

    1994-01-01

    ) is NO an endogenous anticonvulsant or proconvulsant substance? and (2) is the cerebral blood flow (CBF) increase accompanying bicuculline (BC)-induced seizures mediated by NO? The experiments were performed in 300-400-g Wistar rats anesthetized with 0.6% halothane and 70% N2O/30% O2. CBF was measured using...

  16. Vitamin D Levels in Children and Adolescents with Antiepileptic Drug Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jung-Hyun; Seo, Young-Ho; Kim, Gun-Ha; Kim, Mi-Kyung

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study was to evaluate the relationship of 25(OH)D3 levels with anticonvulsant use and other possible factors in epileptic children and adolescents. Materials and Methods We studied 143 patients with epilepsy (90 boys, 53 girls; 11.21±4.49 years), who had been treated with anticonvulsants for more than 1 year. Patients who had taken multiple vitamins before the blood test and those who have the limitation of physical activity (wheelchair-bound) were excluded from the study. We evaluated the difference in vitamin D status according to the type and number of anticonvulsants taken and other factors such as gender, age, intelligence and seizure variables. Results For patients with mental retardation or developmental delay, 25(OH)D3 levels were lower than the levels in patients with normal intelligence quotient levels (p=0.03). 25(OH)D3 levels were lower in patients who had taken anticonvulsants for more than 2 years as compared to those who had taken them for less than 2 years (p=0.03). Those taking oxcarbazepine had significantly lower vitamin D levels than patients taking valproic acid (p=0.01). However, no effects of number of anticonvulsants taken were detectable. More than two-thirds of the patients were diagnosed with osteopenia or osteoporosis in patients showing either vitamin D insufficiency or deficiency. Conclusion The possibility of vitamin D deficiency can be considered in pediatric patients taking anticonvulsants if they have mental retardation or developmental delay or if they have been taking anticonvulsants for more than 2 years or taking hepatic enzyme inducing drugs. PMID:24532512

  17. Anticonvulsants Based on the α-Substituted Amide Group Pharmacophore Bind to and Inhibit Function of Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivoshein, Arcadius V

    2016-03-16

    Although the antiepileptic properties of α-substituted lactams, acetamides, and cyclic imides have been known for over 60 years, the mechanism by which they act remains unclear. I report here that these compounds bind to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and inhibit its function. Using transient kinetic measurements with functionally active, nondesensitized receptors, I have discovered that (i) α-substituted lactams and cyclic imides are noncompetitive inhibitors of heteromeric subtypes (such as α4β2 and α3β4) of neuronal nAChRs and (ii) the binding affinity of these compounds toward the nAChR correlates with their potency in preventing maximal electroshock (MES)-induced convulsions in mice. Based on the hypothesis that α-substituted amide group is the essential pharmacophore of these drugs, I found and tested a simple compound, 2-phenylbutyramide. This compound indeed inhibits nAChR and shows good anticonvulsant activity in mice. Molecular docking simulations suggest that α-substituted lactams, acetamides, and cyclic imides bind to the same sites on the extracellular domain of the receptor. These new findings indicate that inhibition of brain nAChRs may play an important role in the action of these antiepileptic drugs, a role that has not been previously recognized.

  18. At clinically relevant concentrations the anaesthetic/amnesic thiopental but not the anticonvulsant phenobarbital interferes with hippocampal sharp wave-ripple complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papatheodoropoulos, Costas; Sotiriou, Evangelos; Kotzadimitriou, Dimitrios; Drimala, Panagiota

    2007-01-01

    Background Many sedative agents, including anesthetics, produce explicit memory impairment by largely unknown mechanisms. Sharp-wave ripple (SPW-R) complexes are network activity thought to represent the neuronal substrate for information transfer from the hippocampal to neocortical circuits, contributing to the explicit memory consolidation. In this study we examined and compared the actions of two barbiturates with distinct amnesic actions, the general anesthetic thiopental and the anticonvulsant phenobarbital, on in vitro SPW-R activity. Results Using an in vitro model of SPW-R activity we found that thiopental (50–200 μM) significantly and concentration-dependently reduced the incidence of SPW-R events (it increased the inter-event period by 70–430 %). At the concentration of 25 μM, which clinically produces mild sedation and explicit memory impairment, thiopental significantly reduced the quantity of ripple oscillation (it reduced the number of ripples and the duration of ripple episodes by 20 ± 5%, n = 12, P Phenobarbital significantly accelerated SPWs at 50 and 100 μM whereas it reduced their rate at 200 and 400 μM. Furthermore, it significantly prolonged SPWs, reduced their synchrony and reduced the quantity of ripples only at the clinically very high concentration of 400 μM, reported to affect memory. Conclusion We hypothesize that thiopental, by interfering with SPW-R activity, through enhancement of the GABAA receptor-mediated transmission, affects memory processes which involve hippocampal circuit activation. The quantity but not the frequency of ripple oscillation was affected by the drug. PMID:17672909

  19. Anticonvulsant effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla (Miq) Jack. in rats with kainic acid-induced epileptic seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, C L; Chen, M F; Li, T C; Li, S C; Tang, N Y; Hsieh, C T; Pon, C Z; Lin, J G

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated the anticonvulsant effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR) and the physiological mechanisms of its action in rats. A total of 70 male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were selected for study. Thirty four of these rats were divided into 5 groups as follows: 1) CONTROL GROUP (n = 6): received intraperitoneal injection (i.p.) of kainic acid (KA, 12 mg/kg); 2) UR1000 group (n = 10), 3) UR500 group (n = 6) 4) UR250 group, received UR 1000, 500, 250 mg/kg i.p. 30 min prior to KA administration, respectively; 5) Contrast group: received carbamazepine 20 mg/kg i.p. 30 min prior to KA administration. Behavior and EEG were monitored from 15 min prior to drug administration to 3 hours after KA administration. The number of wet dog shakes were counted at 10 min intervals throughout the experimental course. The remaining 36 rats were used to measure the lipid peroxide level in the cerebral cortex one hour after KA administration. These rats were divided into 6 groups of 6 rats as follows: 1) Normal group: no treatment was given; 2) CONTROL GROUP: received KA (12 mg/kg) i.p.; 3) UR1000 group, 4) UR500 group, 5) UR250 group, received UR 1000, 500, 250 mg/kg i.p. 30 min prior to KA administration, respectively; 6) Contrast group: received carbamazepine 20 mg/kg i.p. 30 min prior to KA administration. Our results indicated that both UR 1000 and 500 mg/kg decreased the incidence of KA-induced wet dog shakes, no similar effect was observed in the UR 250 mg/kg and carbamazepine 20 mg/kg group. Treatment with UR 1000 mg/kg, 500 mg/kg, or 250 mg/kg and carbamazepine 20 mg/kg decreased KA-induced lipid peroxide level in the cerebral cortex and was dose-dependent. These findings suggest that the anticonvulsant effect of UR possibly results from its suppressive effect on lipid peroxidation in the brain.

  20. Mechanism of sodium channel block by local anesthetics, antiarrhythmics, and anticonvulsants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Denis B; Zhorov, Boris S

    2017-04-03

    Local anesthetics, antiarrhythmics, and anticonvulsants include both charged and electroneutral compounds that block voltage-gated sodium channels. Prior studies have revealed a common drug-binding region within the pore, but details about the binding sites and mechanism of block remain unclear. Here, we use the x-ray structure of a prokaryotic sodium channel, NavMs, to model a eukaryotic channel and dock representative ligands. These include lidocaine, QX-314, cocaine, quinidine, lamotrigine, carbamazepine (CMZ), phenytoin, lacosamide, sipatrigine, and bisphenol A. Preliminary calculations demonstrated that a sodium ion near the selectivity filter attracts electroneutral CMZ but repels cationic lidocaine. Therefore, we further docked electroneutral and cationic drugs with and without a sodium ion, respectively. In our models, all the drugs interact with a phenylalanine in helix IVS6. Electroneutral drugs trap a sodium ion in the proximity of the selectivity filter, and this same site attracts the charged group of cationic ligands. At this position, even small drugs can block the permeation pathway by an electrostatic or steric mechanism. Our study proposes a common pharmacophore for these diverse drugs. It includes a cationic moiety and an aromatic moiety, which are usually linked by four bonds. © 2017 Tikhonov and Zhorov.

  1. [Testing the pharmacological activity of some synthetic cannabinoids in mice (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, A J; Waser, P G

    1980-01-01

    A series of synthetic cannabinoids were tested in mice for analgesic, anticonvulsant, sedative and reserpine antagonistic properties as well as for influence on body temperature and on motor coordination and compared with the natural delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC), delta 8-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 8-THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). All cannabinoids were injected s.c. or i.p. in mice as solutions in olive oil. The synthetic cannabinoids, with the exception of the lipophilic ones, were less active than the natural delta 9-THC. 1',1'-dimethyl-delta 8-tetrahydrocannabinol (DM-delta 8-THC) has an analgesic ED 50 of 16 mg/kg s.c. (writhing test) and is three times more active than delta 9-THC, but also eight times less active than morphine. The lipophilic derivatives of delta 8-THC prolonged pentobarbitone narcosis and diminished locomotor activity in mice. Anticonvulsant activities could never be detected; all cannabinoids slightly diminished body temperature and antagonized weakly the hypothermia induced by reserpine. The trained capacity of remaining on the rotating rod was severely shortened for a long time after application of all cannabinoids but mainly by the lipophilic ones. The influence of derivation on the activity of delta 9-THC is discussed.

  2. The Use of Central Nervous System Active Drugs During Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengt Källén

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available CNS-active drugs are used relatively often during pregnancy. Use during early pregnancy may increase the risk of a congenital malformation; use during the later part of pregnancy may be associated with preterm birth, intrauterine growth disturbances and neonatal morbidity. There is also a possibility that drug exposure can affect brain development with long-term neuropsychological harm as a result. This paper summarizes the literature on such drugs used during pregnancy: opioids, anticonvulsants, drugs used for Parkinson’s disease, neuroleptics, sedatives and hypnotics, antidepressants, psychostimulants, and some other CNS-active drugs. In addition to an overview of the literature, data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register (1996–2011 are presented. The exposure data are either based on midwife interviews towards the end of the first trimester or on linkage with a prescribed drug register. An association between malformations and maternal use of anticonvulsants and notably valproic acid is well known from the literature and also demonstrated in the present study. Some other associations between drug exposure and outcome were found.

  3. Experimental and Clinical Evaluation of Nootropic Activity of Bacopa monniera Linn. (Brahmi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B N Dhawan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacopa monniera Linn. (Brahmi is an annual creeper belonging to familyScrophulariaceae and growing all over the Indian sub-continent in marshy areas. It is a major Medhya Rasayana used in Ayurveda for treatment of memory disorders. Large number of saponins and glycosides has been isolated from the plant. Most of the experimental and clinical studies have been done with crude extracts or standardized preparation of the two active saponins Bacosides A and B.Extracts or saponin mixture facilitate learning, improve consolidation of learned behavior and delay extinction in several models of learnt behavior in normal rats and mice as well as in chemically induced or transgenic models of Alzheimer's disease. They also prevent or reverse amnesia produced by drugs, stress or ischemic hypoxia. Other CNS effects include anti-anxiety, anti-convulsant and analgesic activity. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the mechanism of these CNS effects.Extracts as well as the bacoside preparation have been found safe and well tolerated in healthy volunteers in single dose or chronic administration for several weeks in a number of double blind placebo controlled studies in India and abroad. Chronic administration significantly improved information processing, learning and memory consolidation. It was found more effective than caffeine in a comparative study.Double blind placebo controlled studies with bacoside preparation have demonstrated beneficial effects and safety in elderly patients with Age Related Memory Impairment and in children with Attention Deficit Memory Disorder. It has also been found useful in anxiety neurosis, epilepsy and sleep disturbances in post menopausal women.The standardized preparation is marketed as a prescription drug after having obtained the necessary regulatory approval in India, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa and as an OTC product in several other south east Asian and African countries.Bacopa monniera Linn

  4. The dextromethorphan analog dimemorfan attenuates kainate-induced seizures via σ1 receptor activation: comparison with the effects of dextromethorphan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Eun-Joo; Nah, Seung-Yeol; Kim, Won-Ki; Ko, Kwang Ho; Jhoo, Wang-Kee; Lim, Yong-Kwang; Cha, Joo Young; Chen, Chieh-Fu; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2005-01-01

    In a previous study, we demonstrated that a dextromethorphan analog, dimemorfan, has neuroprotective effects. Dextromethorphan and dimemorfan are high-affinity ligands at σ1 receptors. Dextromethorphan has moderate affinities for phencyclidine sites, while dimemorfan has very low affinities for such sites, suggesting that these sites are not essential for the anticonvulsant actions of dimemorfan. Kainate (KA) administration (10 mg kg−1, i.p.) produced robust convulsions lasting 4–6 h in rats. Pre-treatment with dimemorfan (12 or 24 mg kg−1) reduced seizures in a dose-dependent manner. Dimemorfan pre-treatment also attenuated the KA-induced increases in c-fos/c-jun expression, activator protein (AP)-1 DNA-binding activity, and loss of cells in the CA1 and CA3 fields of the hippocampus. These effects of dimemorfan were comparable to those of dextromethorphan. The anticonvulsant action of dextromethorphan or dimemorfan was significantly counteracted by a selective σ1 receptor antagonist BD 1047, suggesting that the anticonvulsant action of dextromethorphan or dimemorfan is, at least in part, related to σ1 receptor-activated modulation of AP-1 transcription factors. We asked whether dimemorfan produces the behavioral side effects seen with dextromethorphan or dextrorphan (a phencyclidine-like metabolite of dextromethorphan). Conditioned place preference and circling behaviors were significantly increased in mice treated with phencyclidine, dextrorphan or dextromethorphan, while mice treated with dimemorfan showed no behavioral side effects. Our results suggest that dimemorfan is equipotent to dextromethorphan in preventing KA-induced seizures, while it may lack behavioral effects, such as psychotomimetic reactions. PMID:15723099

  5. Clinical characteristics, risk factors and pre-surgical evaluation of post-infectious epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellner, J; Trinka, E

    2013-03-01

    Epilepsy is a frequent complication of central nervous system (CNS) infections. Post-infectious epilepsy is commonly refractory to medical treatment and plays a pivotal role for the poor long-term outcome of CNS infections. To provide an overview of clinical characteristics and risk factors of seizures associated with CNS infections. In addition, to summarize the state of the art of anticonvulsive treatment and the pre-surgical evaluation process in refractory cases. A comprehensive literature search for articles published between January 1970 and December 2011 was carried out. The occurrence of seizures during the acute course of meningitis, encephalitis and brain abscess is the main risk factor for the development of post-infectious epilepsy. There is a shortage of trials evaluating the efficacy of prophylactic and symptomatic treatment during the course of acute infection. Moreover, there are no randomized-controlled trials studying anticonvulsive drugs and their combinations for the management of post-infectious epilepsy. In a selected group of patients, however, medically refractory focal epilepsy is potentially curable by surgery. Further studies are required to improve the pathogenetic understanding of post-infectious epilepsy in order to develop preventive measures as well as to evaluate additional medical and surgical treatment strategies for the patients currently not considered for surgery. © 2012 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2012 EFNS.

  6. Aging evaluation of active components by using performance evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, S. K.; Jin, T. E.; Kim, J. S.; Jung, I. S.; Kim, T. R.

    2003-01-01

    Risk analysis and performance evaluation methodology were applied to the aging evaluation of active components in the periodic safety review of Wolsung unit 1. We conclude that evaluation of performance is more effective to discriminate the aging degradation of active component than the evaluation of aging mechanism. It is essential to analyze the common cause failures of low performance components to evaluate the properness of present maintenance system. Past 10 years failure history is used for establishing the performance criteria. Past 2 years failure history is used for the evaluating the recent performance condition. We analyze the failure mode of the components to improve the maintenance system. Performance evaluation methodology is useful for the quantitative evaluation of aging degradation of active components. Analysis on the repeated failures can be useful for the feedback to maintenance plan and interval

  7. Structural and vibrational properties of oxcarbazepine, an anticonvulsant substance by using DFT and SCRF calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladetto, María F.; Márquez, María B.; Brandán, Silvia A.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we have presented a structural and vibrational study on the properties in gas and aqueous solution phases of oxcarbazepine, a polymorphic anticonvulsant substance, combining the available IR and Raman spectra with Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. Two stable C1 and C2 forms for the title molecule were theoretically determined by using the hybrid B3LYP/6-31G* method. The integral equation formalism variant polarised continuum model (IEFPCM) was employed to study the solvent effects by means of the self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) method. The vibrational spectra for the two forms of oxcarbazepine were completely assigned together with two dimeric species also observed in the solid phase. The presences of the two C1 and C2 forms together with the two dimeric species are supported by the IR and Raman bands between 1424 and 125 cm-1. Here, the properties for both forms of oxcarbazepine are compared and discussed.

  8. Paradoxical Seizure Response to Phenytoin in an Epileptic Heroin Addict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasagar, Brintha; Verma, Beni R; Dewberry, Robert G; Pula, Thaddeus

    2015-06-01

    Phenytoin has a narrow therapeutic window and seizures can occur at both ends of the spectrum. A 41-year-old man with a history of a seizure disorder and heroin addiction presented with dizziness following 2 generalized tonic-clonic seizures that occurred earlier that day. The patient had received a loading dose of phenytoin for seizures associated with a subtherapeutic level 5 days previously. Initial evaluation revealed an elevated phenytoin level of 32.6 mcg/mL and an opiate-positive toxicology screen. Levetiracetam was started on the day of presentation and phenytoin was held until the level returned to the therapeutic range. The patient's dizziness resolved and he had no additional seizures. Evaluation for reversible causes of seizure activity along with anticonvulsant administration is generally the standard of care for breakthrough seizures. Phenytoin blood levels, if supratherapeutic, may be at least partially responsible for breakthrough seizure activity; in this circumstance, holding phenytoin and temporarily adding another anticonvulsant may be indicated.

  9. 2-Methylpyridinium/pyridinium 5-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-2,6-dioxo-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyrimidin-4-olates as potent anticonvulsant agents—synthesis and crystal structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangaiyarkarasi, G.; Kalaivani, D., E-mail: kalaivbalaj@yahoo.co.in [Affiliated to Bharathidasan University, Post Graduate and Research Department of Chemistry, Seethalakshmi Ramaswami College, Tiruchirappalli-620 002 (India)

    2013-12-15

    The molecular salt, 2-methylpyridinium 5-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-2,6-dioxo-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropy-rimidin-4-olate) (I), is prepared from the ethanolic solution of 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, pyrimidine-2,4,6-(1H,3H,5H)-trione (barbituric acid) and 2-methylpyridine at room temperature, and the molecular salt, pyridinium 5-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-2,6-dioxo-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyrimidin-4-olate (II), is prepared from the same reactants, by dissolving them in hot DMSO and ethanol mixture at 70°C. The structures of I and II are characterized by visible, IR, {sup 1}H-NMR, {sup 13}C-NMR and elemental analysis and confirmed by single crystal X-ray analysis. Both the salts crystallize in triclinic crystal system with sp. gr. P-bar1. They possess noticeable anticonvulsant activity even at low concentration (25 mg/kg). Acute toxicity studies of these complexes indicate that LD{sub 50} values are greater than 1500 mg/kg and the tested animals do not show any behavioural changes.

  10. 2-Methylpyridinium/pyridinium 5-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-2,6-dioxo-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyrimidin-4-olates as potent anticonvulsant agents—synthesis and crystal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangaiyarkarasi, G.; Kalaivani, D.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular salt, 2-methylpyridinium 5-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-2,6-dioxo-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropy-rimidin-4-olate) (I), is prepared from the ethanolic solution of 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, pyrimidine-2,4,6-(1H,3H,5H)-trione (barbituric acid) and 2-methylpyridine at room temperature, and the molecular salt, pyridinium 5-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-2,6-dioxo-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyrimidin-4-olate (II), is prepared from the same reactants, by dissolving them in hot DMSO and ethanol mixture at 70°C. The structures of I and II are characterized by visible, IR, 1 H-NMR, 13 C-NMR and elemental analysis and confirmed by single crystal X-ray analysis. Both the salts crystallize in triclinic crystal system with sp. gr. P-bar1. They possess noticeable anticonvulsant activity even at low concentration (25 mg/kg). Acute toxicity studies of these complexes indicate that LD 50 values are greater than 1500 mg/kg and the tested animals do not show any behavioural changes

  11. Treatments for acute bipolar depression: meta-analyses of placebo-controlled, monotherapy trials of anticonvulsants, lithium and antipsychotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selle, V; Schalkwijk, S; Vázquez, G H; Baldessarini, R J

    2014-03-01

    Optimal treatments for bipolar depression, and the relative value of specific drugs for that purpose, remain uncertain, including agents other than antidepressants. We searched for reports of placebo-controlled, monotherapy trials of mood-stabilizing anticonvulsants, second-generation antipsychotics, or lithium for acute major depressive episodes in patients diagnosed with type I or II bipolar disorder and applied random-effects meta-analysis to evaluate their efficacy, comparing outcomes based on standardized mean drug-placebo differences (SMD) in improvement, relative response rates (RR), and number-needed-to-treat (NNT). We identified 24 trials of 10 treatments (lasting 7.5 weeks, with ≥ 50 collaborating sites/trial) that met eligibility criteria: lamotrigine (5 trials), quetiapine (5), valproate (4), 2 each for aripiprazole, olanzapine, ziprasidone, and 1 each for carbamazepine, lithium, lurasidone, and olanzapine-fluoxetine. Overall, pooled drug-over-placebo responder-rate superiority (RR) was moderate (29% [CI: 19-40%]), and NNT was 8.2 (CI: 6.4-11). By SMD, apparent efficacy ranked: olanzapine + fluoxetine ≥ valproate > quetiapine > lurasidone > olanzapine, aripiprazole, and carbamazepine; ziprasidone was ineffective, and lithium remains inadequately studied. Notably, drugs were superior to placebo in only 11/24 trials (5/5 with quetiapine, 2/4 with valproate), and only lamotrigine, quetiapine and valproate had > 2 trials. Treatment-associated mania-like reactions were uncommon (drugs: 3.7%; placebo: 4.7%). Controlled trials of non-antidepressant treatments for bipolar depression remain scarce, but findings with olanzapine-fluoxetine, lurasidone, quetiapine, and perhaps carbamazepine and valproate were encouraging; lithium requires adequate testing. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. PI3K-Akt signaling activates mTOR-mediated epileptogenesis in organotypic hippocampal culture model of posttraumatic epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Berdichevsky, Yevgeny; Dryer, Alexandra M.; Saponjian, Yero; Mahoney, Mark M.; Pimentel, Corrin A.; Lucini, Corrina A.; Usenovic, Marija; Staley, Kevin J.

    2013-01-01

    mTOR is activated in epilepsy, but the mechanisms of mTOR activation in post-traumatic epileptogenesis are unknown. It is also not clear whether mTOR inhibition has an antiepileptogenic, or merely anti-convulsive effect. The rat hippocampal organotypic culture model of post-traumatic epilepsy was used to study the effects of long term (four weeks) inhibition of signaling pathways that interact with mTOR. Ictal activity was quantified by measurement of lactate production and electrical recordi...

  13. The anticonvulsant levetiracetam for the treatment of pain in polyneuropathy: A randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbech, Jakob Vormstrup; Otto, Marit; Bach, Flemming W

    2011-01-01

    of this study was to test the analgesic effect of levetiracetam in painful polyneuropathy. METHODS: This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial with levetiracetam 3000mg/day versus placebo (6-week treatment periods). Patients with diagnosed polyneuropathy and symptoms for more than......-three patients were screened for participation and 39 patients entered the study. Thirty-five patients were included in the data analysis. There were no differences in the ratings of pain relief (levetiracetam 2.29 versus placebo 2.28, p=0.979), total pain intensity (levetiracetam 5.5 versus placebo 5.3, p=0......Levetiracetam is an anticonvulsant which is assumed to act by modulating neurotransmitter release via binding to the vesicle protein SV2A. This could have an impact on signaling in the nociceptive system, and a pilot study indicated relief of neuropathic pain with levetiracetam. OBJECTIVES: The aim...

  14. Cav2.3 (R-Type Calcium Channels are Critical for Mediating Anticonvulsive and Neuroprotective Properties of Lamotrigine In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxine Dibué-Adjei

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Lamotrigine (LTG is a popular modern antiepileptic drug (AED, however, its mechanism of action has yet to be fully understood, as it is known to modulate many members of several ion channel families. In heterologous systems, LTG inhibits Cav2.3 (R-type calcium currents, which contribute to kainic-acid- (KA induced epilepsy in vivo. To gain insight into the role of R-type currents in LTG drug action in vivo, we compared the effects of LTG to topiramate and lacosamide in Cav2.3-deficient mice and controls on KA-induced seizures. Methods: Behavioral seizure rating and quantitative electrocorticography were performed after injection of 20 mg/kg [and 30 mg/kg] KA. One hour before KA injection, mice were pretreated with either 30 mg/kg LTG, 50 mg/kg topiramate (TPM or 30 mg/kg lacosamide (LSM. Results: Ablation of Cav2.3 reduced total seizure scores by 28.6% (p=0.0012 and pretreatment with LTG reduced seizure activity of control mice by 23.2% (p=0.02. In Cav2.3-deficient mice LTG pretreatment increased seizure activity by 22.1% (p=0.018 and increased the percentage of degenerated CA1 pyramidal neurons (p=0.02. All three tested AEDs reduced seizure activity in control mice, however only the non-calcium channel modulating AED, LSM had an anticonvulsive effect in Cav2.3-deficient mice. Furthermore LTG altered electrocorticographic parameters differently in the two genotypes, decreasing relative power of ictal spikes in control mice compared to Cav2.3-defcient mice. Conclusion: These findings give first in vivo evidence for an essential role for Cav2.3 in LTG pharmacology and shed light on a paradoxical effect of LTG in their absence. Furthermore, LTG appears to promote ictal activity in Cav2.3-deficient mice resulting in increased neurotoxicity in the CA1 region. This paradoxical mechanism, possibly reflecting rebound hyperexcitation of pyramidal CA1 neurons after increased inhibition, may be key in understanding LTG-induced seizure

  15. Anticonvulsant actions of LY 367385 ((+)-2-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine) and AIDA ((RS)-1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, A G; Yip, P K; Yap, J S; Quinn, L P; Tang, E; Harris, J R; Meldrum, B S

    1999-02-26

    We have studied the effects in three rodent models of generalised convulsive or absence epilepsy of two antagonists of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors that are selective for the mGlu1 receptor. LY 367385 ((+)-2-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine) and AIDA ((RS)-1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid) have been administered intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) to DBA/2 mice and lethargic mice (lh/lh), and focally into the inferior colliculus of genetically epilepsy prone rats (GEPR). In DBA/2 mice both compounds produce a rapid, transient suppression of sound-induced clonic seizures (LY 367385: ED50 = 12 nmol, i.c.v., 5 min; AIDA: ED50 = 79 nmol, i.c.v., 15 min). In lethargic mice both compounds significantly reduce the incidence of spontaneous spike and wave discharges on the electroencephalogram, from 150 min after the administration of AIDA, 500 nmol, i.c.v., and from 30 to >150 min after the administration of LY 367385, 250 nmol, i.c.v. LY 367385, 50 nmol, suppresses spontaneous spike and wave discharges from 30 to 60 min. In genetically epilepsy prone rats both compounds reduce sound-induced clonic seizures. LY 367385, 160 nmol bilaterally, fully suppresses clonic seizures after 2-4 h. AIDA is fully effective 30 min after 100 nmol bilaterally. It is concluded that antagonists of mGlu1 receptors are potential anticonvulsant agents and that activation of mGlu1 receptors probably contributes to a variety of epileptic syndromes.

  16. Participation of mitochondrial diazepam binding inhibitor receptors in the anticonflict, antineophobic and anticonvulsant action of 2-aryl-3-indoleacetamide and imidazopyridine derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auta, J; Romeo, E; Kozikowski, A; Ma, D; Costa, E; Guidotti, A

    1993-05-01

    The 2-hexyl-indoleacetamide derivative, FGIN-1-27 [N,N-di-n-hexyl-2- (4-fluorophenyl)indole-3-acetamide], and the imidazopyridine derivative, alpidem, both bind with high affinity to glial mitochondrial diazepam binding inhibitor receptors (MDR) and increase mitochondrial steroidogenesis. Although FGIN-1-27 is selective for the MDR, alpidem also binds to the allosteric modulatory site of the gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor where the benzodiazepines bind. FGIN-1-27 and alpidem, like the neurosteroid 3 alpha,21-dehydroxy-5 alpha-pregnane-20-one (THDOC), clonazepam and zolpidem (the direct allosteric modulators of gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptors) delay the onset of isoniazid and metrazol-induced convulsions. The anti-isoniazid convulsant action of FGIN-1-27 and alpidem, but not that of THDOC, is blocked by PK 11195. In contrast, flumazenil blocked completely the anticonvulsant action of clonazepam and zolpidem and partially blocked that of alpidem, but it did not affect the anticonvulsant action of THDOC and FGIN-1-27. Alpidem, like clonazepam, zolpidem and diazepam, but not THDOC or FGIN-1-27, delay the onset of bicuculline-induced convulsions. In two animal models of anxiety, the neophobic behavior in the elevated plus maze test and the conflict-punishment behavior in the Vogel conflict test, THDOC and FGIN-1-27 elicited anxiolytic-like effects in a manner that is flumazenil insensitive, whereas alpidem elicited a similar anxiolytic effect, but is partially blocked by flumazenil. Whereas PK 11195 blocked the effect of FGIN-1-27 and partially blocked alpidem, it did not affect THDOC in both animal models of anxiety.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Cerebroprotective activity of U-50488H: Relationship to interactions with excitatory amino acids and calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camacho Ochoa, M.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the anticonvulsant and cerebroprotective activity of U-50488H was evaluated using 45 Ca ++ uptake in rat Ficoll purified synaptosomes, ( 3 H)-2-deoxyglucose uptake in selected mouse brain regions, ( 3 H)kainic acid binding to mouse forebrain synaptic membranes and incidence of KA-induced lesions in the CA3 region of the mouse hippocampus. U-50488H causes reduction in K + -evoked 45 Ca ++ uptake. These effects are comparable to those of the calcium channel blockers verapamil and nifedipine and seem to be related to calcium dependent mechanisms. Changes in saturability, specificity and dissociation constant values of kainic acid receptor binding were demonstrated in the presence of U-50488H at concentrations similar to those used in 45 Ca ++ uptake studies and in the presence of calcium and chloride ions

  18. Zonisamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Zonisamide is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. It works by decreasing abnormal electrical activity in ... older (about 1 in 500 people) who took anticonvulsants such as zonisamide to treat various conditions during ...

  19. Lacosamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lacosamide is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. It works by decreasing abnormal electrical activity in ... older (about 1 in 500 people) who took anticonvulsants like lacosamide to treat various conditions during clinical ...

  20. Methsuximide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Methsuximide is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. It works by decreasing abnormal electrical activity in ... older (about 1 in 500 people) who took anticonvulsants such as methsuximide to treat various conditions during ...

  1. Primidone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Primidone is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. It works by decreasing abnormal electrical activity in ... older (about 1 in 500 people) who took anticonvulsants such as primidone to treat various conditions during ...

  2. Phenytoin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Phenytoin is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. It works by decreasing abnormal electrical activity in ... older (about 1 in 500 people) who took anticonvulsants such as phenytoin to treat various conditions during ...

  3. Ethosuximide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ethosuximide is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. It works by reducing abnormal electrical activity in ... older (about 1 in 500 people) who took anticonvulsants such as ethosuximide to treat various conditions during ...

  4. Cytotoxic, antitumor and leukocyte migration activities of resveratrol and sitosterol present in the hidroalcoholic extract of Cissus sicyoides L., Vitaceae, leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia R. S. Lucena

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Cissus sicyoides L. pertains to the Vitaceae family. It is popularly known as "insulina, cipo-pucá, bejuco caro, puci, anil trepador". A vasoconstrictor effect and an antibacterial activity have also been allocated to it. In Brazil, C. sicyoides was evaluated for its anticonvulsant and anti-diabetc properties. Phytochemistry studies identified and isolated sitosterol and resveratrol compounds from its aerial parts which are pointed out as having antitumor activities. The goal of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic and antitumor activities of Cissus sicyoides hydroalcoholic extract as well as its ability to repair leukocytes cells to injured tissue. Cissus sicyoides did not demonstrate cytotoxic activity but showed an inhibition of tumor growth in face of the tumors tested. The extract had a strong chemotactic effect on the twenty four hours period after treatment. The hidroalchoolic extract of Cissus sicyoides presented antitumor activity which was prompted by T lymphocytes recruitment to the local lesion and suggests a new pathway to antitumor activity by activation of lymphoid lineage.

  5. Anticonvulsant and reproductive toxicological studies of the imidazole-based histamine H3R antagonist 2-18 in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastaki SM

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Salim M Bastaki,1 Yousef M Abdulrazzaq,2 Mohamed Shafiullah,1 Małgorzata Więcek,3 Katarzyna Kieć-Kononowicz,3 Bassem Sadek1 1Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine and Health Science, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, 2Department of Medical Education, Dubai Health Authority, Dubai, UAE; 3Department of Technology and Biotechnology of Drugs, Faculty of Pharmacy, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Medyczna, Kraków, Poland Abstract: The imidazole-based H3R antagonist 2-18 with high in vitro H3R antagonist affinity, excellent in vitro selectivity profile, and high in vivo H3R antagonist potency was tested for its anticonvulsant effect in maximal electroshock (MES-induced convulsions in mice having valproic acid (VPA as a reference antiepileptic drug (AED. Additionally, H3R antagonist 2-18 was evaluated for its reproductive toxicity in the same animal species. The results show that acute systemic administration (intraperitoneal; i.p. of H3R antagonist 2-18 (7.5, 15, 30, and 60 mg/kg, i.p. significantly and dose dependently protected male as well as female mice against MES-induced convulsion. The protective action observed for H3R antagonist 2-18 in both mice sexes was comparable to that of VPA and was reversed when mice were pretreated with the selective H3R agonist (R-alpha-methylhistamine (RAMH, 10 mg/kg, i.p.. Moreover, the results show that acute systemic administration of single (7.5, 15, 30, or 60 mg/kg, i.p. or multiple doses (15×3 mg/kg, i.p. of H3R antagonist 2-18 on gestation day (GD 8 or 13 did not affect the maternal body weight of mice when compared with the control group. Furthermore, no significant differences were observed in the average number of implantations and resorptions between the control and H3R antagonist 2-18-treated group at the early stages of gestation and the organogenesis period. However, oral treatment with H3R antagonist 2-18 (15 mg/kg on GD 8 induced a reduced number of

  6. Comparison of the long-term behavioral effects of neonatal exposure to retigabine or phenobarbital in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Sari; Medvedeva, Natalia; Gutherz, Samuel; Kulick, Catherine; Kondratyev, Alexei; Forcelli, Patrick A

    2016-04-01

    Anticonvulsant drugs, when given during vulnerable periods of brain development, can have long-lasting consequences on nervous system function. In rats, the second postnatal week approximately corresponds to the late third trimester of gestation/early infancy in humans. Exposure to phenobarbital during this period has been associated with deficits in learning and memory, anxiety-like behavior, and social behavior, among other domains. Phenobarbital is the most common anticonvulsant drug used in neonatology. Several other drugs, such as lamotrigine, phenytoin, and clonazepam, have also been reported to trigger behavioral changes. A new generation anticonvulsant drug, retigabine, has not previously been evaluated for long-term effects on behavior. Retigabine acts as an activator of KCNQ channels, a mechanism that is unique among anticonvulsants. Here, we examined the effects retigabine exposure from postnatal day (P)7 to P14 on behavior in adult rats. We compared these effects with those produced by phenobarbital (as a positive control) and saline (as a negative control). Motor behavior was assessed by using the open field and rotarod, anxiety-like behavior by the open field, elevated plus maze, and light-dark transition task, and learning/memory by the passive avoidance task; social interactions were assessed in same-treatment pairs, and nociceptive sensitivity was assessed via the tail-flick assay. Motor behavior was unaltered by exposure to either drug. We found that retigabine exposure and phenobarbital exposure both induced increased anxiety-like behavior in adult animals. Phenobarbital, but not retigabine, exposure impaired learning and memory. These drugs also differed in their effects on social behavior, with retigabine-exposed animals displaying greater social interaction than phenobarbital-exposed animals. These results indicate that neonatal retigabine induces a subset of behavioral alterations previously described for other anticonvulsant drugs and extend

  7. Expeditious syntheses of stable and radioactive isotope-labeled anticonvulsant agent, JNJ-26990990, and its metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ronghui; Weaner, Larry E; Hoerr, David C; Salter, Rhys; Gong, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Syntheses of stable and radioactive isotope-labeled anticonvulsant agent, JNJ-26990990, that is, N-(benzo[b]thien-3-ylmethyl)-sulfamide and its metabolites are described. [(13)C(15)N]Benzo[b]thiophene-3-carbonitrile was first prepared by coupling of 3-bromo-benzo[b]thiophene with [(13)C(15)N]-copper cyanide. The resultant [(13)C(15)N]benzo[b]thiophene-3-carbonitrile was reduced with lithium aluminum deuteride to give [(13)CD2(15)N]benzo[b]thiophen-3-yl-methylamine; which was then coupled with sulfamide to afford [(13)CD2(15)N]-N-(benzo[b]thien-3-ylmethyl)-sulfamide, the stable isotope-labeled compound with four stable isotope atoms. Direct oxidation of [(13)CD2(15)N]-N-(benzo[b]thien-3-ylmethyl)-sulfamide with hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid gave the stable isotope-labeled sulfoxide and sulfone metabolites. On the other hand, radioactive (14)C-labeled N-(benzo[b]thien-3-ylmethyl)-sulfamide was prepared conveniently by sequential coupling of 3-bromo-benzo[b]thiophene with [(14)C]-copper cyanide, reduction of the carbonitrile to carboxaldehyde, and reductive amination with sulfamide. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Lowered quality of life in mood disorders is associated with increased neuro-oxidative stress and basal thyroid-stimulating hormone levels and use of anticonvulsant mood stabilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Caroline Sampaio; Maes, Michael; Roomruangwong, Chutima; Moraes, Juliana Brum; Bonifacio, Kamila Landucci; Vargas, Heber Odebrecht; Barbosa, Decio Sabbatini; Anderson, George; de Melo, Luiz Gustavo Piccoli; Drozdstoj, Stoyanov; Moreira, Estefania; Carvalho, André F; Nunes, Sandra Odebrecht Vargas

    2018-04-17

    Major affective disorders including bipolar disorder (BD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) are associated with impaired health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Oxidative stress and subtle thyroid abnormalities may play a pathophysiological role in both disorders. Thus, the current study was performed to examine whether neuro-oxidative biomarkers and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels could predict HRQoL in BD and MDD. This cross-sectional study enrolled 68 BD and 37 MDD patients and 66 healthy controls. The World Health Organization (WHO) QoL-BREF scale was used to assess 4 QoL subdomains. Peripheral blood malondialdehyde (MDA), advanced oxidation protein products, paraoxonaxe/CMPAase activity, a composite index of nitro-oxidative stress, and basal TSH were measured. In the total WHOQoL score, 17.3% of the variance was explained by increased advanced oxidation protein products and TSH levels and lowered CMPAase activity and male gender. Physical HRQoL (14.4%) was associated with increased MDA and TSH levels and lowered CMPAase activity. Social relations HRQoL (17.4%) was predicted by higher nitro-oxidative index and TSH values, while mental and environment HRQoL were independently predicted by CMPAase activity. Finally, 73.0% of the variance in total HRQoL was explained by severity of depressive symptoms, use of anticonvulsants, lower income, early lifetime emotional neglect, MDA levels, the presence of mood disorders, and suicidal ideation. These data show that lowered HRQoL in major affective disorders could at least in part result from the effects of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, lowered antioxidant enzyme activities, and higher levels of TSH. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Studies on neuropharmacological profile of ethanol extract of Moringa oleifera leaves in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakre, Adewale G; Aderibigbe, Adegbuyi O; Ademowo, Olusegun G

    2013-10-07

    Moringa oleifera (family Moringaceae), commonly called Horseradish or tree of life, is traditionally used for the treatment of epilepsy and neurologic conditions. The objective of this study is to investigate the neurobehavioural and anticonvulsant properties of the ethanol extract from the leaves of Moringa oleifera. Neurobehavioural properties were evaluated using the open field, hole board, Y-maze, elevated plus maze (EPM) and pentobarbitone-induced hypnosis. Pentylenetetrazole (leptazol), picrotoxin and strychnine induced convulsion tests were used to investigate the anti-convulsive actions of Moringa oleifera. The result showed that the extract (250-2000mg/kg) caused a significant dose-dependent decrease in rearing, grooming, head dips and locomotion (P6.4g/kg. The findings from this study suggest that the ethanol extract of Moringa oleifera leaves possesses CNS depressant and anticonvulsant activities possibly mediated through the enhancement of central inhibitory mechanism involving release γ-amino butyric acid (GABA). The results partially justified the traditional use of the extract for the treatment of epilepsy. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of anticonvulsant drugs on the synthesis of DNA and protein by human bone marrow cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickramasinghe, S.N.; Saunders, J.; Williams, G.

    1976-01-01

    Suspensions of human bone marrow cells were incubated with various concentrations of phenobarbitone or phenytoin sodium for 2 h, and the effects of this incubation on the subsequent incorporation of 3 H-thymidine and 3 H-leucine into DNA and protein, respectively, were studied. Both drugs caused a depression of 3 H-thymidine incorporation and this phenomenon was not prevented by the addition of 100 μg of pteroylglutamic acid, folinic acid or 5-methyltetrahydrofolate per ml of marrow culture. The lowest concentration of drug which caused a statistically significant depression of 3 H-thymidine incorporation was 200μg per ml for phenobarbitone and 50 μg per ml for phenytoin sodium. Both phenobarbitone and phenytoin sodium also caused an increase in the incorporation of 3 H-leucine at concentrations of 50 and 20 μg per ml., respectively, suggesting the possibility that a stimulation of protein synthesis within erythropoietic cells may play an important role in the development of anticonvulsant-induced macrocytosis. (authod)

  11. Neuropharmacological profile and chemical analysis of fresh rhizome essential oil of Curcuma longa (turmeric) cultivated in Southwest Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyemitan, Idris A; Elusiyan, Christianah A; Onifade, Ayoola O; Akanmu, Moses A; Oyedeji, Adebola O; McDonald, Armando G

    2017-01-01

    Curcuma longa (turmeric) is commonly used as spice and also used to treat fever, cough and febrile convulsions in Nigeria. This study determined the chemical composition of the essential oil of C. longa and evaluated its neuropharmacological activity in mice. Essential oil of C. longa (EOCL) fresh rhizome was obtained by hydrodistillation and its chemical composition determined by GC-MS. Acute toxicity (LD 50 ) profile of the essential oil was determined orally (p.o.) and intraperitoneally (i.p.); and the EOCL (50-200 mg/kg, i.p.) was evaluated for its behavioural, anxiolytic, sedative and anticonvulsant activities using appropriate models in Albino mice (Vom Strain, Jos, Nigeria). Analysis of the oil showed the presence of 23 compounds with turmerone (35.9%) being the major component. The LD 50 values obtained for the mice were 2154 mg/kg, p.o., and 693 mg/kg, i.p. The EOCL (50-200 mg/kg, i.p.) caused significant (p longa species was turmerone; the oil was slightly toxic orally but moderately toxic intraperitoneally in mice; exhibited significant anxiolytic, sedative and anticonvulsant activities in mice.

  12. Anticonvulsants for the treatment of alcohol withdrawal syndrome and alcohol use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Christopher J; Niciu, Mark J; Drew, Shannon; Arias, Albert J

    2015-04-01

    Alcoholic patients suffer from harmful allostatic neuroplastic changes in the brain causing an acute withdrawal syndrome upon cessation of drinking followed by a protracted abstinence syndrome and an increased risk of relapse to heavy drinking. Benzodiazepines have long been the treatment of choice for detoxifying patients and managing alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS). Non-benzodiazepine anticonvulsants (NBACs) are increasingly being used both for alcohol withdrawal management and for ongoing outpatient treatment of alcohol dependence, with the goal of either abstinence or harm reduction. This expert narrative review summarizes the scientific basis and clinical evidence supporting the use of NBACs in treating AWS and for reducing harmful drinking patterns. There is less evidence in support of NBAC therapy for AWS, with few placebo-controlled trials. Carbamazepine and gabapentin appear to be the most promising adjunctive treatments for AWS, and they may be useful as monotherapy in select cases, especially in outpatient settings and for the treatment of mild-to-moderate low-risk patients with the AWS. The body of evidence supporting the use of the NBACs for reducing harmful drinking in the outpatient setting is stronger. Topiramate appears to have a robust effect on reducing harmful drinking in alcoholics. Gabapentin is a potentially efficacious treatment for reducing the risk of relapse to harmful drinking patterns in outpatient management of alcoholism. Gabapentin's ease of use, rapid titration, good tolerability, and efficacy in both the withdrawal and chronic phases of treatment make it particularly appealing. In summary, several NBACs appear to be beneficial in treating AWS and alcohol use disorders.

  13. Evaluation of nutritional status in children with refractory epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoli, S; Cardinali, S; Veggiotti, P; Trentani, C; Testolin, G; Tagliabue, A

    2006-04-26

    children affected by refractory epilepsy could be at risk of malnutrition because of feeding difficulties (anorexia, chewing, swallowing difficulties or vomiting) and chronic use of anticonvulsants, which may affect food intake and energy metabolism. Moreover, their energy requirement may be changed as their disabilities would impede normal daily activities. The aim of the present study was to evaluate nutritional status, energy metabolism and food intake in children with refractory epilepsy. 17 children with refractory epilepsy (13 boys and 4 girls; mean age 9 +/- 3,2 years; Body Mass Index 15,7 +/- 3,6) underwent an anthropometric assessment, body composition evaluation by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, detailed dietetic survey and measurement of resting energy expenditure by indirect calorimetry. Weight-for-age, height-for-age (stunting) and weight-for-height (wasting) were estimated compared to those of a reference population of the same age. 40% of children were malnourished and 24% were wasted. The nutritional status was worse in the more disabled children. Dietary intake resulted unbalanced (18%, 39%, 43% of total daily energy intake derived respectively from protein, lipid and carbohydrate). Adequacy index [nutrient daily intake/recommended allowance (RDA) x 100] was nutritional assessment and management as part of their overall care.

  14. Evaluation of nutritional status in children with refractory epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoli, S; Cardinali, S; Veggiotti, P; Trentani, C; Testolin, G; Tagliabue, A

    2006-01-01

    Background children affected by refractory epilepsy could be at risk of malnutrition because of feeding difficulties (anorexia, chewing, swallowing difficulties or vomiting) and chronic use of anticonvulsants, which may affect food intake and energy metabolism. Moreover, their energy requirement may be changed as their disabilities would impede normal daily activities. The aim of the present study was to evaluate nutritional status, energy metabolism and food intake in children with refractory epilepsy. Methods 17 children with refractory epilepsy (13 boys and 4 girls; mean age 9 ± 3,2 years; Body Mass Index 15,7 ± 3,6) underwent an anthropometric assessment, body composition evaluation by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, detailed dietetic survey and measurement of resting energy expenditure by indirect calorimetry. Weight-for-age, height-for-age (stunting) and weight-for-height (wasting) were estimated compared to those of a reference population of the same age. Results 40% of children were malnourished and 24% were wasted. The nutritional status was worse in the more disabled children. Dietary intake resulted unbalanced (18%, 39%, 43% of total daily energy intake derived respectively from protein, lipid and carbohydrate). Adequacy index [nutrient daily intake/recommended allowance (RDA) × 100] was nutritional assessment and management as part of their overall care. PMID:16640779

  15. Development of methods for evaluating active faults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    The report for long-term evaluation of active faults was published by the Headquarters for Earthquake Research Promotion on Nov. 2010. After occurrence of the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake, the safety review guide with regard to geology and ground of site was revised by the Nuclear Safety Commission on Mar. 2012 with scientific knowledges of the earthquake. The Nuclear Regulation Authority established on Sep. 2012 is newly planning the New Safety Design Standard related to Earthquakes and Tsunamis of Light Water Nuclear Power Reactor Facilities. With respect to those guides and standards, our investigations for developing the methods of evaluating active faults are as follows; (1) For better evaluation on activities of offshore fault, we proposed a work flow to date marine terrace (indicator for offshore fault activity) during the last 400,000 years. We also developed the analysis of fault-related fold for evaluating of blind fault. (2) To clarify the activities of active faults without superstratum, we carried out the color analysis of fault gouge and divided the activities into thousand of years and tens of thousands. (3) To reduce uncertainties of fault activities and frequency of earthquakes, we compiled the survey data and possible errors. (4) For improving seismic hazard analysis, we compiled the fault activities of the Yunotake and Itozawa faults, induced by the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake. (author)

  16. Midazolam inhibits hippocampal long-term potentiation and learning through dual central and peripheral benzodiazepine receptor activation and neurosteroidogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Tokuda, Kazuhiro; O’Dell, Kazuko A.; Izumi, Yukitoshi; Zorumski, Charles F.

    2010-01-01

    Benzodiazepines (BDZs) enhance γ-aminobutyric acid-A (GABAA) receptor inhibition by direct actions on central BDZ receptors (CBRs). Although some BDZs also bind mitochondrial receptors (translocator protein 18kDa, TSPO) and promote the synthesis of GABA-enhancing neurosteroids, the role of neurosteroids in the clinical effects of BDZs is unknown. In rat hippocampal slices, we compared midazolam, an anesthetic BDZ with clonazepam, an anticonvulsant/anxiolytic BDZ that activates CBRs selectivel...

  17. Ketogenic diet and astrocyte/neuron metabolic interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamecq Joseph

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The ketogenic diet is an anticonvulsant diet enriched in fat. It provides the body with a minimal protein requirement and a restricted carbohydrate supply, the vast majority of calories (more than 80-90% being given by fat. Though anticonvulsant activity of ketogenic diet has been well documented by a large number of experimental and clinical studies, underlying mechanisms still remain partially unclear. Astrocyte-neuron interactions, among which metabolic shuttles, may influence synaptic activity and hence anticonvulsant protection. The astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttles may be themselves influenced by the availability in energetic substrates such as hydrates of carbon and fats. Historically, ketogenic diet had been designed to mimic changes such as ketosis occurring upon starvation, a physiological state already known to exhibit anticonvulsant protection and sometimes referred to as “water diet”. For this reason, a special attention should be paid to metabolic features shared in common by ketogenic diet and starvation and especially those features that might result in anticonvulsant protection. Compared to feeding by usual mixed diet, starvation and ketogenic diet are both characterised by increased fat, lowered glucose and aminoacid supplies to cells. The resulting impact of these changes in energetic substrates on astrocyte/neuron metabolic shuttles might have anticonvulsant and/or neuroprotective properties. This is the aim of this communication to review some important astrocyte/neuron metabolic interactions (astrocyte/neuron lactate shuttle, glutamateinduced astrocytic glycolysis activation, glutamate/glutamine cycle along with the neurovascular coupling and the extent to which the way of their alteration by starvation and/or ketogenic diet might result in seizure and/or brain protection.

  18. Synthesis of 1-(4-methylsulfone-phenyl)-5-(4-fluoro-phenyl)-5-[14C]-1,2,3- triazole and 1-(4-sulfonamide-phenyl)-5-(4-fluoro-phenyl)-5-[14C]-1,2,3- triazole as novel carbon-14 anticonvulsant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saemian, N.; Shirvani, G.; Matloubi, H.

    2006-01-01

    Two 1,2,3-triazole anticonvulsants, 1-(4-methylsulfone-phenyl)-5-(4-fluoro-phenyl)-5-[ 14 C]-1,2,3-triazole and 1-(4-sulfonamide-phenyl)-5-(4- fluoro-phenyl)-5-[ 14 C]-1,2,3-triazole, both labeled with carbon-14 in the 5-position were prepared from para-fluoro-benzonitrile-[cyano- 14 C]. (author)

  19. Effect of hydroalcoholic extract of Lavandula officinalis on nicotine-induced convulsion in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzi, A; Ahamehe, M; Sarahroodi, S

    2011-06-01

    Epilepsy an important CNS (central nervous system) problem that about 1% of world's population suffer of it. The aim of study was to evaluate of anticonvulsant effect of hydroalcoholic extract of Lavandula officinalis. In this study, anticonvulsant activity of the hydroalcoholic extract of Lavandula officinalis (L. officinalis) was studied against chemoconvulsant-induced seizures in male mice. Lavandula officinalis (100, 200, 400, 600 and 800 mg kg(-1)), diazepam (0.15 mg kg(-1)) and normal saline (10 mL kg(-1)) were injected intraperitoneally, respectively in different groups of mice, 30 min before nicotine (5 mg kg(-) i.p.). The onset time intensity and duration of convulsions and the percentage of death were recorded. Also the time-response (0, 15, 30, 45, 60 min before nicotine injection) for most effective dose of plant extract (600 mg kg(-1)) was investigated. The results showed that hydroalcoholic extract of Lavandula officinalis had anticonvulsant effect. The most effective dose of plant extract was 600 mg kg(-1). In time-response study for the most effective dose of extract (600 mg kg(-1)), the onset, duration and intensity of convulsion significantly (p Lavandula.

  20. Neuropharmacological screening of essential oil from oleo gum resin of Gardenia lucida Roxb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shareef, Mohammad Zubair; Yellu, Narsimha Reddy; Achanta, Venkata Narsimha Appa Rao

    2013-10-07

    The oleo gum resin of Gardenia lucida is commonly employed in traditional medicine to treat multiple ailments, including epilepsy and mania. The essential oil isolated from it was screened for CNS activities to check if it is responsible for the claims made regarding the traditional use of the oleo gum resin. The hypnotic and anticonvulsant activity was assessed by pentobarbitone induced hypnosis and convulsant models-Maximum electroshock (MES) and Pentylene tetrazole (PTZ) respectively. Effect on motor activity was evaluated using an actophotometer, rotarod and grip strength methods. The oil significantly potentiated the barbitone induced hypnosis and offered significant protection against the intensity and frequency of convulsions and mortality rate in both the convulsant models. A significant decrease in locomotion, motor impairment and loss of gripping reflex was also observed. The essential oil of the oleo gum resin of Gardenia lucida is a CNS depressant and anticonvulsant with central muscle relaxant properties. This justifies the claims made regarding the use of the oleo gum resin of Gardenia lucida in CNS disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Study on the evaluation index of active power reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaorui; Liu, Jiantao; Wang, Ke; Min, Lu

    2018-01-01

    Based on the role of active reserve at different time scales, divides the evaluation dimension of active reserve. Analysis the calculation principle of traditional reliability index such as probability of system safety, lack of power shortage and electricity shortage expectancy, and studies the applicability of these indicators to evaluate the reserve capacity on different dimensions. Resolves the evaluation index of active reserve capacity from the dimensions of time dimension, spatial dimension, system state, risk degree and economy, then construct evaluation index of active reserve capacity.

  2. Increased Prevalence of Intermittent Rhythmic Delta or Theta Activity (IRDA/IRTA) in the Electroencephalograms (EEGs) of Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Tebartz van Elst, Ludger; Fleck, Max; Bartels, Susanne; Altenm?ller, Dirk-Matthias; Riedel, Andreas; Bubl, Emanuel; Matthies, Swantje; Feige, Bernd; Perlov, Evgeniy; Endres, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: An increased prevalence of pathological electroencephalography (EEG) signals has been reported in patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD). In an elaborative case description of such a patient with intermittent rhythmic delta and theta activity (IRDA/IRTA), the BPD symptoms where linked to the frequency of the IRDAs/IRTAs and vanished with the IRDAs/IRTAs following anticonvulsive therapy. This observation raised a question regarding the prevalence of such EEG abnormal...

  3. Evaluation of nutritional status in children with refractory epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Testolin G

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background children affected by refractory epilepsy could be at risk of malnutrition because of feeding difficulties (anorexia, chewing, swallowing difficulties or vomiting and chronic use of anticonvulsants, which may affect food intake and energy metabolism. Moreover, their energy requirement may be changed as their disabilities would impede normal daily activities. The aim of the present study was to evaluate nutritional status, energy metabolism and food intake in children with refractory epilepsy. Methods 17 children with refractory epilepsy (13 boys and 4 girls; mean age 9 ± 3,2 years; Body Mass Index 15,7 ± 3,6 underwent an anthropometric assessment, body composition evaluation by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, detailed dietetic survey and measurement of resting energy expenditure by indirect calorimetry. Weight-for-age, height-for-age (stunting and weight-for-height (wasting were estimated compared to those of a reference population of the same age. Results 40% of children were malnourished and 24% were wasted. The nutritional status was worse in the more disabled children. Dietary intake resulted unbalanced (18%, 39%, 43% of total daily energy intake derived respectively from protein, lipid and carbohydrate. Adequacy index [nutrient daily intake/recommended allowance (RDA × 100] was Conclusion many children with refractory epilepsy would benefit from individual nutritional assessment and management as part of their overall care.

  4. Active spectral imaging nondestructive evaluation (SINDE) camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simova, E.; Rochefort, P.A., E-mail: eli.simova@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    A proof-of-concept video camera for active spectral imaging nondestructive evaluation has been demonstrated. An active multispectral imaging technique has been implemented in the visible and near infrared by using light emitting diodes with wavelengths spanning from 400 to 970 nm. This shows how the camera can be used in nondestructive evaluation to inspect surfaces and spectrally identify materials and corrosion. (author)

  5. Nutritional evaluation of the patient with phenylketonuria (PKU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Guillén-López

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to diagnose the nutritional status and to provide a personalized treatment in PKU patients, an evaluation of nutritional status should be conducted. Several components are involved in the nutritional assessment; among the parameters there are anthropometric evaluation: weight, height, head circumference; biochemical: proteins, amino acids, vitamins, inorganic nutrients, essential fatty acids; clinical: deficiencies in hair, skin, oral cavity , eyes, etc.; dietary assessment: quantification of energy intake, macronutrients and micronutrients through several tools such as the 24-hour recall; finally it must be taken into account the interaction of nutrients such as carnitine, fatty acids, vitamin B complex, among others, with drugs, which are often anticonvulsants, in order to plan the diet and prevent a future nutritional deficiency. It is important to perform the nutritional status assessment frequently in patients with PKU because the dietary management is essential to prevent neurological problems.

  6. Development of methods for evaluating active faults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-08-15

    The HERP report for long-term evaluation of active faults and the NSC safety review guide with regard to geology and ground of site were published on Nov. 2010 and on Dec. 2010, respectively. With respect to those reports, our investigation is as follows; (1) For assessment of seismic hazard, we estimated seismic sources around NPPs based on information of tectonic geomorphology, earthquake distribution and subsurface geology. (2) For evaluation on the activity of blind fault, we calculated the slip rate on the 2008 Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku Earthquake fault, using information on late Quaternary fluvial terraces. (3) To evaluate the magnitude of earthquakes whose sources are difficult to identify, we proposed a new method for calculation of the seismogenic layer thickness. (4) To clarify the activities of active faults without superstratum, we carried out the color analysis of fault gouge and divided the activities into thousand of years and tens of thousands. (5) For improving chronology of sediments, we detected new widespread cryptotephras using mineral chemistry and developed late Quaternary cryptotephrostratigraphy around NPPs. (author)

  7. Evaluation of nuclear reactor based activation analysis techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obrusnik, I.; Kucera, J.

    1977-09-01

    A survey is presented of the basic types of activation analysis applied in environmental control. Reactor neutron activation analysis is described (including the reactor as a neutron source, sample activation in the reactor, methodology of neutron activation analysis, sample transport into the reactor and sample packaging after irradiation, instrumental activation analysis with radiochemical separation, data measurement and evaluation, sampling and sample preparation). Sources of environmental contamination with trace elements, sampling and sample analysis by neutron activation are described. The analysis is described of soils, waters and biological materials. Methods are shown of evaluating neutron activation analysis results and of their interpretation for purposes of environmental control. (J.B.)

  8. Naloxone fails to prolong seizure length in ECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, K G; Pandurangi, A K

    1999-12-01

    Electroconvulsive shock (ECS) in animals has been shown to enhance endogenous opiate systems. The anticonvulsant effects of ECS are also partially blocked by the opiate receptor antagonist naloxone, leading some investigators to postulate that the anticonvulsant effects of ECS are mediated by activation of endogenous opiates. If such a phenomenon occurs in humans, then naloxone might prolong seizure length in electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). In the present study, nine patients were given 2.0 mg intravenous (i.v.) naloxone 2 minutes prior to one-half of their ECT treatments. Motor seizure length was measured via the cuff technique. EEG tracings were read by an investigator blind to naloxone status. There was no difference between the two groups in either EEG or nonblindly evaluated motor seizure length. It is concluded that a dose of 2 mg naloxone does not effectively increase seizure length in ECT.

  9. Curcumin-loaded chitosan-alginate-STPP nanoparticles ameliorate memory deficits and reduce glial activation in pentylenetetrazol-induced kindling model of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemian, Mona; Anissian, Diana; Ghasemi-Kasman, Maryam; Akbari, Atefeh; Khalili-Fomeshi, Mohsen; Ghasemi, Shahram; Ahmadi, Fatemeh; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar; Ebrahimpour, Anahita

    2017-10-03

    Despite several beneficial effects of curcumin, its medical application has been hampered due to low water solubility. To improve the aqueous solubility of curcumin, it has been loaded on chitosan (CS)-alginate (ALG) - sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP) nanoparticles (NPs). Then, the effect of curcumin NPs on memory improvement and glial activation was investigated in pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced kindling model. Male NMRI mice have received the daily injection of curcumin NPs at dose of 12.5 or 25mg/kg. All interventions were injected intraperitoneally (i.p), 10days before PTZ administration and the injections were continued until 1h before each PTZ injection. Spatial learning and memory was evaluated using Morris water maze test after the 7th PTZ injection. Animals have received 10 injections of PTZ and then, brain tissues were removed for histological evaluation. Nissl staining was used to determine the level of cell death in hippocampus and immunostaining method was performed against NeuN and GFAP/Iba1 for assessment of neuronal density and glial activation respectively. Behavioral results showed that curcumin NPs exhibit anticonvulsant activity and prevent cognitive impairment in fully kindled animals. The level of cell death and glial activation reduced in animals which have received curcumin NPs compared to those received free curcumin. To conclude, these findings suggest that curcumin NPs effectively ameliorate memory impairment and attenuate the level of activated glial cells in a mice model of chronic epilepsy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Anticonvulsant, neuroprotective and behavioral effects of organic and conventional yerba mate (Ilex paraguariensis St. Hil.) on pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Cátia Dos Santos; Scola, Gustavo; Rodrigues, Adriana Dalpicolli; Cesio, Verónica; Laprovitera, Mariajosé; Heinzen, Horacio; Dos Santos, Maitê Telles; Fank, Bruna; de Freitas, Suzana Cesa Vieira; Coitinho, Adriana Simon; Salvador, Mirian

    2013-03-01

    Epilepsy, which is one of the most common neurological disorders, involves the occurrence of spontaneous and recurrent seizures that alter the performance of the brain and affect several sensory and behavioral functions. Oxidative damage has been associated with post-seizure neuronal injury, thereby increasing an individual's susceptibility to the occurrence of neurodegenerative disorders. The present study investigated the possible anticonvulsive and neuroprotective effects of organic and conventional yerba mate (Ilex paraguariensis), a plant rich in polyphenols, on pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures in Wistar rats. The behavioral and polyphenolic profiles of the yerba mate samples were also evaluated. Infusions of yerba mate (50mg/kg) or distilled water were given to rats for fifteen days by oral gavage. On the 15th day the animals were subjected to open field test, and exploratory behavior was assessed. Subsequently, 60mg/kg PTZ (i.p.) was administered, and animals were observed for the appearance of convulsions for 30min. Latency for the first seizure, tonic-clonic and generalized seizures time, frequency of seizures and mortality induced by PTZ were recorded. The animals were then sacrificed, and the cerebellum, cerebral cortex and hippocampus were quickly removed and frozen to study the neuroprotective effects of yerba mate. The oxidative damage in lipids and proteins, nitric oxide levels, the activities of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (Sod) and catalase (Cat) and non-enzymatic cellular defense (sulfhydryl protein) were quantified in all the tissues. The results showed that organic and conventional yerba mate infusions were able to reduce the frequency of seizures when compared to the PTZ group. Besides, organic yerba mate infusion decreases the tonic-clonic seizures time in relation to the PTZ group. It was also shown that organic and conventional yerba mate infusions reduced the oxidative damage in lipids and proteins and nitric oxide

  11. Secondary hypogammaglobilinemia after use of carbamazepine: case report and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castro Ana Paula B Moschione

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunologic disorders related to anticonvulsant therapy have been described in the last three decades, including cellular and humoral alterations that result in recurrent infections; however, the physiopathologic mechanisms are not completely understood. This report describes a patient with complex partial epilepsy and hypogammaglobulinemia while in treatment with carbamazepine, with significant improvement in clinical signs and laboratory tests after substitution to sodium valproate. The authors stress the importance of clinical and laboratory evaluation of patients in continuous anticonvulsant therapy, including immunoglobulins levels and peripheral blood evaluations.

  12. Acute administration of ginger (Zingiber officinale rhizomes) extract on timed intravenous pentylenetetrazol infusion seizure model in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Abdolkarim; Mirazi, Naser

    2014-03-01

    Zingiber officinale (Zingiberaceae) or ginger, which is used in traditional medicine has antioxidant activity and neuroprotective effects. The effects of this plant on clonic seizure have not yet been studied. The present study evaluated the anticonvulsant effect of ginger in a model of clonic seizures induced with pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) in male mice. The anticonvulsant effect of Z. officinale was investigated using i.v. PTZ-induced seizure models in mice. Different doses of the hydroethanolic extract of Z. officinale (25, 50, and 100mg/kg) were administered intraperitonal (i.p.), 2 and 24h before induction of PTZ. Phenobarbital sodium (30mg/kg), a reference standard, was also tested for comparison. The effect of ginger on to the appearance of three separate seizure endpoints (myoclonic, generalized clonus and forelimb tonic extension phase) was recorded. The results showed that the ginger extract has anticonvulsant effects in all the experimental treatment groups of seizure tested as it significantly increased the seizure threshold. Hydroethanolic extract of Z. officinale significantly increased the onset time of myoclonic seizure at doses of 25-100mg/kg (p<0.001) and significantly prevented generalized clonic (p<0.001) and increased the threshold for the forelimb tonic extension (p<0.01) seizure 2 and 24h before induction of PTZ compared with control group. Based on the results the hydroethanolic extract of ginger has anticonvulsant effects, possibly through an interaction with inhibitory and excitatory system, antioxidant mechanisms, oxidative stress and calcium channel inhibition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. An RNAi-mediated screen identifies novel targets for next-generation antiepileptic drugs based on increased expression of the homeostatic regulator pumilio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Hsiang; He, Miaomiao; Fan, Yuen Ngan; Baines, Richard A

    2018-05-02

    Despite availability of a diverse range of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs), only about two-thirds of epilepsy patients respond well to drug treatment. Thus, novel targets are required to catalyse the design of next-generation AEDs. Manipulation of neuron firing-rate homoeostasis, through enhancing Pumilio (Pum) activity, has been shown to be potently anticonvulsant in Drosophila. In this study, we performed a genome-wide RNAi screen in S2R + cells, using a luciferase-based dPum activity reporter and identified 1166 genes involved in dPum regulation. Of these genes, we focused on 699 genes that, on knock-down, potentiate dPum activity/expression. Of this subgroup, 101 genes are activity-dependent based on comparison with genes previously identified as activity-dependent by RNA-sequencing. Functional cluster analysis shows these genes are enriched in pathways involved in DNA damage, regulation of cell cycle and proteasomal protein catabolism. To test for anticonvulsant activity, we utilised an RNA-interference approach in vivo. RNAi-mediated knockdown showed that 57/101 genes (61%) are sufficient to significantly reduce seizure duration in the characterized seizure mutant, para bss . We further show that chemical inhibitors of protein products of some of the genes targeted are similarly anticonvulsant. Finally, to establish whether the anticonvulsant activity of identified compounds results from increased dpum transcription, we performed a luciferase-based assay to monitor dpum promoter activity. Third instar larvae exposed to sodium fluoride, gemcitabine, metformin, bestatin, WP1066 or valproic acid all showed increased dpum promoter activity. Thus, this study validates Pum as a favourable target for AED design and, moreover, identifies a number of lead compounds capable of increasing the expression of this homeostatic regulator.

  14. OGSA Globus Toolkits evaluation activity at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, D; Foster, D; Kalyaev, V; Kryukov, A; Lamanna, M; Pose, V; Rocha, R; Wang, C

    2004-01-01

    An Open Grid Service Architecture (OGSA) Globus Toolkit 3 (GT3) evaluation group is active at CERN since GT3 was available in early beta version (Spring 2003). This activity focuses on the evaluation of the technology as promised by the OGSA/OGSI paradigm and on GT3 in particular. The goal is to study this new technology and its implications with the goal to provide useful input for the large grid initiatives active in the LHC Computing Grid (LCG) project. A particular effort has been devoted to investigate performance and deployment issues, having in mind the LCG requirements, in particular scalability and robustness.

  15. Applications of genetic algorithms on the structure-activity relationship analysis of some cinnamamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, T J; Wang, J M; Liao, N; Xu, X J

    1999-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for 35 cinnamamides were studied. By using a genetic algorithm (GA), a group of multiple regression models with high fitness scores was generated. From the statistical analyses of the descriptors used in the evolution procedure, the principal features affecting the anticonvulsant activity were found. The significant descriptors include the partition coefficient, the molar refraction, the Hammet sigma constant of the substituents on the benzene ring, and the formation energy of the molecules. It could be found that the steric complementarity and the hydrophobic interaction between the inhibitors and the receptor were very important to the biological activity, while the contribution of the electronic effect was not so obvious. Moreover, by construction of the spline models for these four principal descriptors, the effective range for each descriptor was identified.

  16. Effect of the new antiepileptic drug retigabine in a rodent model of mania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Ditte; Dias, Rebecca; Pedersen, Mette Lund

    2008-01-01

    Bipolar spectrum disorders are severe chronic mood disorders that are characterized by episodes of mania or hypomania and depression. Because patients with manic symptoms often experience clinical benefit from treatment with anticonvulsant drugs, it was hypothesized that retigabine, a novel...... compound with anticonvulsant efficacy, may also possess antimanic activity. The amphetamine (AMPH)+chlordiazepoxide (CDP)-induced hyperactivity model has been proposed as a suitable model for studying antimanic-like activity of novel compounds in mice and rats. The aims of the present study in rats were...

  17. Functional drug screening reveals anticonvulsants as enhancers of mTOR-independent autophagic killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis through inositol depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiebler, Mark; Brown, Karen; Hegyi, Krisztina; Newton, Sandra M; Renna, Maurizio; Hepburn, Lucy; Klapholz, Catherine; Coulter, Sarah; Obregón-Henao, Andres; Henao Tamayo, Marcela; Basaraba, Randall; Kampmann, Beate; Henry, Katherine M; Burgon, Joseph; Renshaw, Stephen A; Fleming, Angeleen; Kay, Robert R; Anderson, Karen E; Hawkins, Phillip T; Ordway, Diane J; Rubinsztein, David C; Floto, Rodrigo Andres

    2015-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) remains a major challenge to global health made worse by the spread of multidrug resistance. We therefore examined whether stimulating intracellular killing of mycobacteria through pharmacological enhancement of macroautophagy might provide a novel therapeutic strategy. Despite the resistance of MTB to killing by basal autophagy, cell-based screening of FDA-approved drugs revealed two anticonvulsants, carbamazepine and valproic acid, that were able to stimulate autophagic killing of intracellular M. tuberculosis within primary human macrophages at concentrations achievable in humans. Using a zebrafish model, we show that carbamazepine can stimulate autophagy in vivo and enhance clearance of M. marinum, while in mice infected with a highly virulent multidrug-resistant MTB strain, carbamazepine treatment reduced bacterial burden, improved lung pathology and stimulated adaptive immunity. We show that carbamazepine induces antimicrobial autophagy through a novel, evolutionarily conserved, mTOR-independent pathway controlled by cellular depletion of myo-inositol. While strain-specific differences in susceptibility to in vivo carbamazepine treatment may exist, autophagy enhancement by repurposed drugs provides an easily implementable potential therapy for the treatment of multidrug-resistant mycobacterial infection. © 2014 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  18. Anticonvulsant effects of gamma surgery in a model of chronic spontaneous limbic epilepsy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z F; Kamiryo, T; Henson, S L; Yamamoto, H; Bertram, E H; Schottler, F; Patel, F; Steiner, L; Prasad, D; Kassell, N F; Shareghis, S; Lee, K S

    2001-02-01

    electrographically recognized seizures. Significant reductions in both the frequency and duration of spontaneous seizures were observed during a follow-up period of up to 10 months postradiation. Histological examination of the targeted region did not reveal signs of necrosis. These findings indicate that single-dose focal ionizing beam irradiation at subnecrotic dosages reduces or eliminates repetitive spontaneous seizures in a rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy. In the second experiment, synaptically driven neuronal firing was shown to be intact in hippocampal neurons subjected to 40-Gy doses. However, the susceptibility to penicillin-induced epileptiform activity was reduced in the brain slices of animals receiving 40-Gy doses, compared with those from control rats that were not irradiated. The results provide rational support for the utility of subnecrotic gamma irradiation as a therapeutic strategy for treating epilepsy. These findings also provide evidence that a functional increase in the seizure threshold of hippocampal neurons contributes to the anticonvulsant influence of subnecrotic gamma irradiation.

  19. Evaluation of a simplified modified Atkins diet for use by parents with low levels of literacy in children with refractory epilepsy: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Suvasini; Goel, Shaiphali; Jain, Puneet; Agarwala, Anuja; Aneja, Satinder

    2016-11-01

    This study was planned to develop and evaluate a simple, easy-to-understand variation of the modified Atkins diet, for use by parents with low levels of literacy in children with refractory epilepsy. This study was conducted in two phases. In the first phase, a simplified version of the modified Atkins diet was developed. In the second phase this was evaluated in children aged 2-14 years who had daily seizures despite the appropriate use of at least two anticonvulsant drugs, in an open-label randomized-controlled-trial. Children were randomized to receive either the simplified modified Atkins diet or no dietary intervention for a period of 3 months with the ongoing anticonvulsant medications being continued unchanged in both the groups. Reduction in seizure frequency was the primary outcome-measure. Data was analyzed using intention to treat approach. Adverse effects were also studied. (Clinical trial identifier NCT0189989). Forty-one children were randomly assigned to the diet-group, and 40 were assigned to the control-group. Two patients discontinued the diet during the study period. The proportion of children with>50% seizure reduction was significantly higher in the diet group as compared to the control group (56.1% vs 7.5%, pliteracy. This diet was found to be feasible, efficacious and well tolerated in children with refractory epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Combining users' activity survey and simulators to evaluate human activity recognition systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azkune, Gorka; Almeida, Aitor; López-de-Ipiña, Diego; Chen, Liming

    2015-04-08

    Evaluating human activity recognition systems usually implies following expensive and time-consuming methodologies, where experiments with humans are run with the consequent ethical and legal issues. We propose a novel evaluation methodology to overcome the enumerated problems, which is based on surveys for users and a synthetic dataset generator tool. Surveys allow capturing how different users perform activities of daily living, while the synthetic dataset generator is used to create properly labelled activity datasets modelled with the information extracted from surveys. Important aspects, such as sensor noise, varying time lapses and user erratic behaviour, can also be simulated using the tool. The proposed methodology is shown to have very important advantages that allow researchers to carry out their work more efficiently. To evaluate the approach, a synthetic dataset generated following the proposed methodology is compared to a real dataset computing the similarity between sensor occurrence frequencies. It is concluded that the similarity between both datasets is more than significant.

  1. Combining Users’ Activity Survey and Simulators to Evaluate Human Activity Recognition Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorka Azkune

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating human activity recognition systems usually implies following expensive and time-consuming methodologies, where experiments with humans are run with the consequent ethical and legal issues. We propose a novel evaluation methodology to overcome the enumerated problems, which is based on surveys for users and a synthetic dataset generator tool. Surveys allow capturing how different users perform activities of daily living, while the synthetic dataset generator is used to create properly labelled activity datasets modelled with the information extracted from surveys. Important aspects, such as sensor noise, varying time lapses and user erratic behaviour, can also be simulated using the tool. The proposed methodology is shown to have very important advantages that allow researchers to carry out their work more efficiently. To evaluate the approach, a synthetic dataset generated following the proposed methodology is compared to a real dataset computing the similarity between sensor occurrence frequencies. It is concluded that the similarity between both datasets is more than significant.

  2. Combining Users' Activity Survey and Simulators to Evaluate Human Activity Recognition Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azkune, Gorka; Almeida, Aitor; López-de-Ipiña, Diego; Chen, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating human activity recognition systems usually implies following expensive and time-consuming methodologies, where experiments with humans are run with the consequent ethical and legal issues. We propose a novel evaluation methodology to overcome the enumerated problems, which is based on surveys for users and a synthetic dataset generator tool. Surveys allow capturing how different users perform activities of daily living, while the synthetic dataset generator is used to create properly labelled activity datasets modelled with the information extracted from surveys. Important aspects, such as sensor noise, varying time lapses and user erratic behaviour, can also be simulated using the tool. The proposed methodology is shown to have very important advantages that allow researchers to carry out their work more efficiently. To evaluate the approach, a synthetic dataset generated following the proposed methodology is compared to a real dataset computing the similarity between sensor occurrence frequencies. It is concluded that the similarity between both datasets is more than significant. PMID:25856329

  3. Evaluation of Two Commercially Available Cannabidiol Formulations for Use in Electronic Cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peace, Michelle R; Butler, Karen E; Wolf, Carl E; Poklis, Justin L; Poklis, Alphonse

    2016-01-01

    Since 24 states and the District of Columbia have legalized marijuana in some form, suppliers of legal marijuana have developed Cannabis sativa products for use in electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes). Personal battery powered vaporizers, or e-cigarettes, were developed to deliver a nicotine vapor such that smokers could simulate smoking tobacco without the inherent pathology of inhaled tobacco smoke. The liquid formulations used in these devices are comprised of an active ingredient such as nicotine mixed with vegetable glycerin (VG) and/or propylene glycol (PG) and flavorings. A significant active ingredient of C. sativa, cannabidiol (CBD), has been purported to have anti-convulsant, anti-nociceptive, and anti-psychotic properties. These properties have potential medical therapies such as intervention of addictive behaviors, treatments for epilepsy, management of pain for cancer patients, and treatments for schizophrenia. However, CBD extracted from C. sativa remains a DEA Schedule I drug since it has not been approved by the FDA for medical purposes. Two commercially available e-cigarette liquid formulations reported to contain 3.3 mg/mL of CBD as the active ingredient were evaluated. These products are not regulated by the FDA in manufacturing or in labeling of the products and were found to contain 6.5 and 7.6 mg/mL of CBD in VG and PG with a variety of flavoring agents. Presently, while labeled as to content, the quality control of manufacturers and the relative safety of these products is uncertain.

  4. Evaluation of Two Commercially Available Cannabidiol Formulations for use in Electronic Cigarettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle R Peace

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available With 24 states and the District of Columbia with laws legalizing marijuana in some form, suppliers of legal marijuana have developed Cannabis sativa products for use in electronic cigarettes. Personal battery powered vaporizers or electronic cigarettes were developed to deliver a nicotine vapor such that smokers could simulate smoking tobacco without the inherent pathology of inhaled tobacco smoke. The liquid formulations used in these devices are comprised of an active ingredient such as nicotine mixed with glycerin and/or propylene glycol and flavorings. A significant active ingredient of Cannabis sativa, cannabidiol, has been purported to have anti-convulsant, anti-nociceptive, and anti-psychotic properties. These properties have potential medical therapies such as intervention of addictive behaviors, treatments for epilepsy, management of pain for cancer patients, and treatments for schizophrenia. However, cannabidiol extracted from Cannabis sativa remains a DEA Schedule I drug since it has not been approved by the FDA for medical purposes. Two commercially available e-cigarette liquid formulations reported to contain 3.3 mg/mL of cannabidiol as the active ingredient were evaluated. These products are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration in manufacturing or in labeling of the products and were found to contain 6.5 mg/mL and 7.6 mg/mL of cannabidiol in propylene glycol with a variety of flavoring agents. Presently, while labeled as to content, the quality control of manufacturers and the relative safety of these products is uncertain.

  5. The effect of regular medication on the outcome of paracetamol poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, L E; Dalhoff, K

    2002-01-01

    hepatocellular injury was evaluated by multivariate analysis. RESULTS: Regular medication was received by 332 patients (45%). Medication with benzodiazepines (105 cases), antidepressants (100 cases), neuroleptics (75 cases), paracetamol (58 cases), oral contraceptives (51 cases), beta-agonists (40 cases), opioid......, neuroleptics, paracetamol, oral contraceptives, beta-agonists or anticonvulsants in the multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Regular medication with psychotropic medication, analgesics, oral contraceptives, beta-agonists or anticonvulsants was frequent in patients admitted with paracetamol poisoning. Medication...

  6. Evaluation of Results from Sales Promotion Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olimpia Ban

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available An essential element of the sales promotion strategy and not only is the evaluation of the results obtained from the activities performed. Due to their nature and applicability, the evaluation of the sales promotion is much easier to be achieved, but it raises some problems. Using a hypothetical example, we have tried to develop a "classic" evaluation model of the specialty literature.

  7. Effect of traditional medicine brahmi vati and bacoside A-rich fraction of Bacopa monnieri on acute pentylenetetrzole-induced seizures, amphetamine-induced model of schizophrenia, and scopolamine-induced memory loss in laboratory animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Amrita; Mishra, Arun K; Jha, Shivesh

    2018-03-01

    Brahmi vati (BV) is an Ayurvedic polyherbal formulation used since ancient times and has been prescribed in seizures associated with schizophrenia and related memory loss by Ayurvedic practitioners in India. The aim of the study was to investigate these claims by evaluation of anticonvulsant, antischizophreniac, and memory-enhancing activities. Antioxidant condition of brain was determined by malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels estimations. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was quantitatively estimated in the brain tissue. Brahmi vati was prepared in-house by strictly following the traditional Ayurvedic formula. Bacoside A rich fraction (BA) of Bacopa monnieri was prepared by extraction and fractionation. It was than standardized by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) and given in the dose of 32.5mg/kg body weight to the different groups of animals for 7days. On the seventh day, activities were performed adopting standard procedures. Brahmi vati showed significant anticonvulsant, memory-enhancing and antischizophrenia activities, when compared with the control groups and BA. It cause significantly higher brain glutathione levels. Acetylcholinesterase activity was found to be significantly low in BV-treated group. The finding of the present study suggests that BV may be used to treat seizures associated with schizophrenia and related memory loss. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Research into the evaluation of PR activities in companies from Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Nikolic

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a research into the volume, type and quality of the evaluation of public relations activities in companies in Serbia. The survey was conducted via a web survey. The responses were collected from 50 PR service managers from 50 companies in Serbia. The results are presented through descriptive statistics and correlation analysis where some of the observed sizes of the connection were analyzed. The main conclusions can be summarized as follows: PR functions are often not assigned sufficient importance in companies in Serbia; the evaluation of PR activity is slightly neglected compared to other PR activities; intensive and continuous evaluation of the performances of PR activities increases the likelihood of the complete PR function of the company being successful; companies that are not so successful use evaluation less than successful companies; the evaluation of PR activities is mostly done through a method for measuring quantity; the main problems in the evaluation of PR activities are lack of time and money. The evaluation of PR activities in companies in Serbia can be improved through a greater understanding on the part of top managers, and also by hiring additional PR practitioners.

  9. Consumers' evaluations of socially responsible activities in retailing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herpen, van E.; Pennings, J.M.E.; Meulenberg, M.T.G.

    2003-01-01

    The authors approached Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as a process in which particular CSR activities impact on consumers’ store evaluation and trust. They hypothesized that consumers classify CSR activities along two dimensions: (1) the beneficiary of the activity and (2) the intrinsic

  10. Comparative efficacy and safety of six antidepressants and anticonvulsants in painful diabetic neuropathy: a network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudroju, Neelima; Bansal, Dipika; Talakokkula, Shiva Teja; Gudala, Kapil; Hota, Debasish; Bhansali, Anil; Ghai, Babita

    2013-01-01

    Anticonvulsants and antidepressants are mostly used in management of painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN). However there are few direct comparisons between drugs of these classes, making evidence-based decision-making in the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy difficult. This study aimed to perform a network meta-analysis and benefit-risk analysis to evaluate the comparative efficacy and safety of these drugs in PDN treatment. Comparative effectiveness study. Medical Education and Research facility in India. A comprehensive data search was done in PubMed, Cochrane, and Embase up to August 2012. We then systematically reviewed the studies which compared any of 6 drugs for the management of PDN: amitriptyline, duloxetine, gabapentin, pregabalin, valproate, and venlafaxine or any of their combinations. We performed a random-effects network meta-analysis to rank treatments in terms of efficacy and safety. We chose the number of patients experiencing = 50% reduction in pain and number of patient withdrawals due to adverse events (AE) as primary outcomes for efficacy and safety, respectively. We also performed benefit-risk analysis, taking efficacy outcome as benefit and safety outcome as risk. Analysis was intention-to-treat. We included 21 published trials in the analysis. Duloxetine, gabapentin, pregabalin, and venlafaxine were shown to be significantly efficacious compared to placebo with odds ratios (OR) of 2.12, 3.98, 2.78, and 4.43, respectively. Amitriptyline (OR: 7.03, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.87, 29.05) and duloxetine (OR: 3.26, 95% CI: 1.04, 9.97) caused more withdrawals than gabapentin. The ranking order of efficacy was gabapentin, venlafaxine, pregabalin, duloxetine/gabapentin, duloxetine, amitriptyline, and placebo and the ranking order of safety was placebo, gabapentin, pregabalin, venlafaxine, duloxetine/gabapentin combination, duloxetine, and amitriptyline. Benefit-risk balance favored the order: gabapentin, venlafaxine, pregabalin, duloxetine

  11. Evaluation Of Analgesic And Anti-Inflammatory Activity Of Diospyros ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation Of Analgesic And Anti-Inflammatory Activity Of Diospyros Cordifolia Extract. S Das, PK Haldar, G Pramanik, SP Panda, S Bera. Abstract. In this study we evaluated the analgesic and anti- inflammatory activities of the methanol extract of stem bark of Diospyros cordifolia (MEDC) Roxb. The analgesic effects of the ...

  12. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Keywords: Solanum nigrum;anti-seizure activity; chicks; mice; rats ... from minimal impairment of the central nervous system .... At higher doses, seizure activity was abolished completely. Amphetamine potentiated the anticonvulsant activity of.

  13. Ketogenic diet and astrocyte/neuron metabolic interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Vamecq Joseph; Maurois Pierre; Bac Pierre; Delplanque Bernadette; Pages Nicole

    2007-01-01

    The ketogenic diet is an anticonvulsant diet enriched in fat. It provides the body with a minimal protein requirement and a restricted carbohydrate supply, the vast majority of calories (more than 80-90%) being given by fat. Though anticonvulsant activity of ketogenic diet has been well documented by a large number of experimental and clinical studies, underlying mechanisms still remain partially unclear. Astrocyte-neuron interactions, among which metabolic shuttles, may influence synaptic ac...

  14. 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility closure activities evaluation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, J.G.

    1996-01-01

    This report evaluates the closure activities at the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility. The closure activities discussed include: the closure activities for the structures, equipment, soil, and gravel scrubber; decontamination methods; materials made available for recycling or reuse; and waste management. The evaluation compares these activities to the regulatory requirements and closure plan requirements. The report concludes that the areas identified in the closure plan can be clean closed

  15. The Absence of CYP3A5*3 Is a Protective Factor to Anticonvulsants Hypersensitivity Reactions: A Case-Control Study in Brazilian Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanno, Luciana Kase; Kerr, Daniel Shikanai; dos Santos, Bernardo; Talib, Leda Leme; Yamaguti, Célia; Rodrigues, Helcio; Gattaz, Wagner Farid; Kalil, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Although aromatic anticonvulsants are usually well tolerated, they can cause cutaneous adverse drug reactions in up to 10% of patients. The clinical manifestations of the antiepileptics-induced hypersensitivity reactions (AHR) vary from mild skin rashes to severe cutaneous drug adverse reactions which are related to high mortality and significant morbidity. Genetic polymorphisms in cytochrome P450 genes are associated with altered enzymatic activity and may contribute to the risk of AHR. Here we present a case-control study in which we genotyped SNPs of CYP2C19, 2C9 and 3A5 of 55 individuals with varying severities of AHR, 83 tolerant, and 366 healthy control subjects from São Paulo, Brazil. Clinical characterization was based on standardized scoring systems and drug patch test. All in vivo investigation followed the ENDA (European Network of Drug Allergy) recommendations. Genotype was determined by real time PCR using peripheral blood DNA as a template. Of all 504 subjects, 65% were females, 45% self-identified as Afro-American, 38% as Caucasian and 17% as having non-African mixed ascendancy. Amongst 55 subjects with AHR, 44 had severe cutaneous drug adverse reactions. Of the 46 drug patch tests performed, 29 (63%) were positive. We found a strong association between the absence of CYP3A5*3 and tolerant subjects when compared to AHR (p = 0.0002, OR = 5.28 [CI95% 2.09-14.84]). None of our groups presented positive association with CYP2C19 and 2C9 polymorphisms, however, both SNPs contributed to separation of cases and tolerants in a Classification and Regression Tree. Our findings indicate that drug metabolism genes can contribute in the tolerability of antiepileptics. CYP3A5*3 is the most prevalent CYP3A5 allele associated with reduced enzymatic function. The current study provides evidence that normal CYP3A5 activity might be a protective factor to aromatic antiepileptics-induced hypersensitivity reactions in Brazilian subjects.

  16. Sex Differences in the Anticonvulsant Activity of Neurosteroids

    OpenAIRE

    Samba Reddy, Doodipala

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the leading causes of chronic neurological morbidity worldwide. Acquired epilepsy may result from a number of conditions such brain injury, anoxia, tumors, stroke, neurotoxicity, and prolonged seizures. Sex differences have been observed in many seizures types; however there are sex-specific seizure disorders that are much more prevalent in women. Despite some inconsistencies, there is a substantial amount of data which indicates that sensitivity to seizure stimuli differs ...

  17. Evaluation on activation activity of reactor in JRR-2 applied 3 dimensional model to neutron flux calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Katsumi; Arigane, Kenji

    2005-03-01

    Revaluation to activation activity of reactor evaluated at the notification of dismantling submitted in 1997 was carried out in JRR-2 where decommissioning was advanced now. In the revaluation, estimation accuracy on neutron streaming at various horizontal experimental tubes was improved by applying 3 dimensional model to neutron transport calculation that had been carried out by 2 dimensional model, and calculating with TORT. As the result, excessive overestimations on horizontal experimental tubes and biological shield that had greatly contributed to total activation activity in evaluation at the notification of dismantling was revised, sum of their activation activities in the revaluation decreased to 1/18 (case after 1 year from the permanent shutdown of reactor) of evaluation at the notification of dismantling, and the structural materials that had large activation activity were changed. By the above, it was shown that introducing 3 dimensional model was effective in evaluation on activation activity of the research reactor that had a lot of various experimental tubes. Total activation activity of reactor by the revaluation depended on control rods, thermal shield plates and horizontal experimental tubes, and the value after 1 year from the permanent shutdown of reactor was 1.9x10 14 Bq. (author)

  18. Atomic basis for therapeutic activation of neuronal potassium channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Robin Y; Yau, Michael C; Galpin, Jason D

    2015-01-01

    Retigabine is a recently approved anticonvulsant that acts by potentiating neuronal M-current generated by KCNQ2-5 channels, interacting with a conserved Trp residue in the channel pore domain. Using unnatural amino-acid mutagenesis, we subtly altered the properties of this Trp to reveal specific...

  19. Preliminary pharmacological screening of Bixa orellana L. leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilpi, Jamil Ahmad; Taufiq-Ur-Rahman, Md; Uddin, Shaikh Jamal; Alam, Md Shahanur; Sadhu, Samir Kumar; Seidel, Véronique

    2006-11-24

    Preliminary pharmacological studies were performed on the methanol extract of Bixa orellana L. (Bixaceae) leaves to investigate neuropharmacological, anticonvulsant, analgesic, antidiarrhoeal activity and effect on gastrointestinal motility. All studies were conducted in mice using doses of 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg of body weight. In the pentobarbitone-induced hypnosis test, the extract statistically reduced the time for the onset of sleep at 500 mg/kg dose and (dose-dependently) increased the total sleeping time at 250 and 500 mg/kg dose. A statistically significant decrease in locomotor activity was observed at all doses in the open-field and hole-cross tests. In the strychnine-induced anticonvulsant test, the extract increased the average survival time of the test animals (statistically significant at 250 and 500 mg/kg). The extract significantly and dose-dependently reduced the writhing reflex in the acetic acid-induced writhing test. Antidiarrhoeal activity was supported by a statistically significant decrease in the total number of stools (including wet stools) in castor oil-induced diarrhoea model. A statistically significant delay in the passage of charcoal meal was observed at 500 mg/kg in the gastrointestinal motility test. The extract was further evaluated in vitro for antioxidant and antibacterial activity. It revealed radical scavenging properties in the DPPH assay (IC(50)=22.36 microg/ml) and antibacterial activity against selected causative agents of diarrhoea and dysentery, including Shigella dysenteriae.

  20. Interactions and incompatibilities of pharmaceutical excipients with active pharmaceutical ingredients: a comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonali S. Bharate

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies of active drug/excipient compatibility represent an important phase in the preformulation stage of the development of all dosage forms. The potential physical and chemical interactions between drugs and excipients can affect the chemical nature, the stability and bioavailability of drugs and, consequently, their therapeutic efficacy and safety. The present review covers the literature reports of interaction and incompatibilities of commonly used pharmaceutical excipients with different active pharmaceutical ingredients in solid dosage forms. Examples of active drug/excipient interactions, such as transacylation, the Maillard browning reaction, acid base reactions and physical changes are discussed for different active pharmaceutical ingredients belonging to different therapeutic categories viz antiviral, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, antihypertensive, anti-convulsant, antibiotic, bronchodialator, antimalarial, antiemetic, antiamoebic, antipsychotic, antidepressant, anticancer, anticoagulant and sedative/hypnotic drugs and vitamins. Once the solid-state reactions of a pharmaceutical system are understood, the necessary steps can be taken to avoid reactivity and improve the stability of drug substances and products.

  1. BAD and KATP channels regulate neuron excitability and epileptiform activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-François, Juan Ramón; Fernández-Agüera, María Carmen; Nathwani, Nidhi; Lahmann, Carolina; Burnham, Veronica L; Danial, Nika N; Yellen, Gary

    2018-01-25

    Brain metabolism can profoundly influence neuronal excitability. Mice with genetic deletion or alteration of Bad ( B CL-2 a gonist of cell d eath) exhibit altered brain-cell fuel metabolism, accompanied by resistance to acutely induced epileptic seizures; this seizure protection is mediated by ATP-sensitive potassium (K ATP ) channels. Here we investigated the effect of BAD manipulation on K ATP channel activity and excitability in acute brain slices. We found that BAD's influence on neuronal K ATP channels was cell-autonomous and directly affected dentate granule neuron (DGN) excitability. To investigate the role of neuronal K ATP channels in the anticonvulsant effects of BAD, we imaged calcium during picrotoxin-induced epileptiform activity in entorhinal-hippocampal slices. BAD knockout reduced epileptiform activity, and this effect was lost upon knockout or pharmacological inhibition of K ATP channels. Targeted BAD knockout in DGNs alone was sufficient for the antiseizure effect in slices, consistent with a 'dentate gate' function that is reinforced by increased K ATP channel activity. © 2018, Martínez-François et al.

  2. Uncaria rhynchophylla inhibits the production of nitric oxide and interleukin-1β through blocking nuclear factor κB, Akt, and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Hee; Bae, Chang Hwan; Park, Sun Young; Lee, Sang Joon; Kim, YoungHee

    2010-10-01

    The stems with hook of Uncaria rhynchophylla have been used in traditional medicine as an antipyretic, antihypertensive, and anticonvulsant in China and Korea. In this study, we investigated the mechanism responsible for anti-inflammatory effects of U. rhynchophylla in RAW 264.7 macrophages. The aqueous extract of U. rhynchophylla inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) and interleukin (IL)-1β secretion as well as inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression, without affecting cell viability. Furthermore, U. rhynchophylla suppressed LPS-induced nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation, phosphorylation, and degradation of inhibitory protein IκB (IκB)-α, phosphorylation of Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, p38 kinase, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. These results suggest that U. rhynchophylla has the inhibitory effects on LPS-induced NO and IL-1β production in macrophages through blockade in the phosphorylation of Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinases, following IκB-α degradation and NF-κB activation.

  3. Drug Interactions between some antiepileptic and certain hypocholesterolaemic drugs in irradiated animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaaban, D.M.L.

    2015-01-01

    Drug Interactions between antiepileptic drug such as phenytoin and certain hypercholesterolaemia drug namely rosuvastatin were investigated on several biological parameters. Phenytoin (60 mg/kg i.p) and rosuvastatin (1.25 mg/kg i.p) were given either alone and in combination to normal and irradiated animals to investigate drug interactions between the test drugs. Anticonvulsant activity was evaluated using pentylenetetrazole in a dose (80 mg/kg i.p) in normal and irradiated mice. Brain neurotransmitters (glutamate and GABA) were investigated. Lipid profile (total cholesterol (TC), Triacylglycerol (TG), High density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and low density lipoprotein- cholesterol (LDL-C) were determined. Liver functions such as serum Aspartate amino transferase (AST) and serum alanine amino transferase (ALT) were also estimated. Oxidative stress bio markers namely serum malondialdehyde (MDA), serum nitric oxide (NO) and blood superoxide dismutase activity (SOD) were studied. Histopathological examinations of brain and liver tissues were performed. Administration of phenytoin concurrently with rosuvastatin is not recommended in patients receiving radiotherapy as dangerous side effects on liver functions and lipid profile may occur. The interactions between the two drugs in normal rats improve liver functions and lipid peroxidation. Apart from the action of the combination on total cholesterol, it improves lipid profile pattern. Rosuvastatin administration in combination with phenytoin may have additive anticonvulsant activity.

  4. Performance in physiology evaluation: possible improvement by active learning strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montrezor, Luís H

    2016-12-01

    The evaluation process is complex and extremely important in the teaching/learning process. Evaluations are constantly employed in the classroom to assist students in the learning process and to help teachers improve the teaching process. The use of active methodologies encourages students to participate in the learning process, encourages interaction with their peers, and stimulates thinking about physiological mechanisms. This study examined the performance of medical students on physiology over four semesters with and without active engagement methodologies. Four activities were used: a puzzle, a board game, a debate, and a video. The results show that engaging in activities with active methodologies before a physiology cognitive monitoring test significantly improved student performance compared with not performing the activities. We integrate the use of these methodologies with classic lectures, and this integration appears to improve the teaching/learning process in the discipline of physiology and improves the integration of physiology with cardiology and neurology. In addition, students enjoy the activities and perform better on their evaluations when they use them. Copyright © 2016 The American Physiological Society.

  5. Annona muricata (Annonaceae): A Review of Its Traditional Uses, Isolated Acetogenins and Biological Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadamtousi, Soheil Zorofchian; Fadaeinasab, Mehran; Nikzad, Sonia; Mohan, Gokula; Ali, Hapipah Mohd; Kadir, Habsah Abdul

    2015-07-10

    Annona muricata is a member of the Annonaceae family and is a fruit tree with a long history of traditional use. A. muricata, also known as soursop, graviola and guanabana, is an evergreen plant that is mostly distributed in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. The fruits of A. muricata are extensively used to prepare syrups, candies, beverages, ice creams and shakes. A wide array of ethnomedicinal activities is contributed to different parts of A. muricata, and indigenous communities in Africa and South America extensively use this plant in their folk medicine. Numerous investigations have substantiated these activities, including anticancer, anticonvulsant, anti-arthritic, antiparasitic, antimalarial, hepatoprotective and antidiabetic activities. Phytochemical studies reveal that annonaceous acetogenins are the major constituents of A. muricata. More than 100 annonaceous acetogenins have been isolated from leaves, barks, seeds, roots and fruits of A. muricata. In view of the immense studies on A. muricata, this review strives to unite available information regarding its phytochemistry, traditional uses and biological activities.

  6. Modulation of seizure activity in mice by metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalby, Nils Ole; Thomsen, C

    1996-01-01

    The anticonvulsant properties of ligands at metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) were examined in different seizure models by use of intracerebroventricular infusion. The mGluR1a antagonist/mGluR2 agonist, (S)-4-carboxy-3-hydroxyphenylglycine [(S)-4C3HPG] dose-dependently antagonized...... pentylenetetrazol- and methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-2-carboxylate (DMCM)-induced clonic convulsions in mice with ED50 values of 400 and 180 nmol/mice, respectively. A modest increase in electrical seizure threshold was observed in mice injected with (S)-4C3HPG. No effect on seizures induced...... by systemic administration of N-methyl-D-aspartate was observed by prior intracerebroventricular infusion of (S)-4C3HPG. The more selective (but less potent) mGluR1a antagonist, (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine, was a weak anticonvulsant in similar seizure models with the exception of convulsions induced...

  7. Effect of combined treatment with diuretics and gabapentin on convulsive threshold in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łukawski, Krzysztof; Swiderska, Grajyna; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2013-01-01

    Research data show that diuretics can have anticonvulsant properties. This study examined effects of ethacrynic acid, a loop diuretic, and hydrochlorothiazide, a thiazide-type diuretic, on the anticonvulsant activity of gabapentin, a newer antiepileptic drug, in the maximal electroshock seizure threshold test in mice. Diuretics were administered intraperitoneally (ip.) both acutely (single dose) and chronically (once daily for seven days). Electroconvulsions were produced by an alternating current (50 Hz, 500 V, 0.2 s stimulus duration) delivered via ear-clip electrodes by a generator. Additionally, the influence of combined treatment with the diuretics and gabapentin on motor performance in the chimney test has been assessed. In the current study, ethacrynic acid at the chronic dose of 12.5 mg/kg and the single dose of 100 mg/kg did not affect the anticonvulsant activity of gabapentin. Similarly, hydrochlorothiazide (100 mg/kg), both in acute and chronic experiments, had no effect on the gabapentin action. On the other hand, in the chimney test, the combined treatment with ethacrynic acid (100 mg/kg) and gabapentin (50 mg/kg) significantly impaired motor performance in mice. Based on the current preclinical findings, it can be suggested that the diuretics should not affect the anticonvulsant action of gabapentin in epileptic patients. However, the combination of ethacrynic acid with gabapentin may cause neurotoxicity.

  8. Evaluation of the activity of rheumatoid arthritis in clinical practice. Agreement between self-rated clinimetric evaluation and clinical evaluation with activity indexes: DAS28, CDAI and SDAI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta-Baas, Gabriel; Pérez Bolde-Hernández, Arturo; Hernández-Cabrera, María Fernanda; Vergara-Sánchez, Imelda; Romero-Figueroa, María Del Socorro

    2017-10-11

    To achieve control of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) it is necessary to be able to evaluate its activity. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) recommends for this purpose indexes of activity that can be performed by the patient (PAS-II and RAPID-3) and IA including medical evaluation with laboratory studies (DAS28 and SDAI) or without them (CDAI). The objective was to analyze the concordance between self-rated clinimetric evaluation and clinimetric evaluation performed by the physician. Analytical cross-sectional study in 126 patients with RA. The agreement was evaluated through the weighted κ coefficient and the Krippendorff's α coefficient. The PAS-II and RAPID-3 significantly correlated with all variables included in the core set of measures recommended by the ACR/EULAR. The agreement between PAS-II and CDAI-SDAI was good (κ: 0.6, α: 0.61-0.62), and moderate with DAS28-ESR (κ: 0.53, α: 0.56). The concordance between RAPID-3 and CDAI-SDAI was moderate (κ: 0.55-0.57, α: 0.50-0.51), and moderate with DAS28-ESR (κ: 0.55, α: 0.53). When categorizing the activity in remission/low activity vs. moderate/severe activity, the agreement was greater with the PAS-II (0.59 vs. 0.34; P=.012). The good concordance between PAS-II and SDAI supports their use in clinical practice, especially if biomarkers of inflammation or the possibility of joint count are not available. However, in order to recommend its routine application in clinical practice, it is necessary to perform longitudinal studies that assess its responsiveness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluating Maximum Wind Energy Exploitation in Active Distribution Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siano, Pierluigi; Chen, Peiyuan; Chen, Zhe

    2010-01-01

    The increased spreading of distributed and renewable generation requires moving towards active management of distribution networks. In this paper, in order to evaluate maximum wind energy exploitation in active distribution networks, a method based on a multi-period optimal power flow (OPF......) analysis is proposed. Active network management schemes such as coordinated voltage control, energy curtailment and power factor control are integrated in the method in order to investigate their impacts on the maximization of wind energy exploitation. Some case studies, using real data from a Danish...... distribution system, confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed method in evaluating the optimal applications of active management schemes to increase wind energy harvesting without costly network reinforcement for the connection of wind generation....

  10. Evaluation of Emotional Literacy Activities: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksuz, Yucel

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate impact of the emotional literacy activities through participant student's experiences. Emotional literacy activities, including social-emotional skills Goleman's emotional intelligence and Fapuel's emotional literacy model designed and conducted for 2 months on primary school students, who study in 4th grade. The…

  11. Antioxidant mechanisms of iso-6-cassine in suppressing seizures induced by pilocarpine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivelilson Mendes de Freitas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro antioxidant effects of 12-[(2R,5R,6R-5-hydroxy-6-methylpiperidin-2-yl]dodecan-2-one (iso-6-cassine; ISO and the anticonvulsant effects of ISO on pilocarpine-induced seizures in rats. Wistar rats were treated with 0.9% saline (i.p., control group, pilocarpine (400 mg/kg, i.p., pilocarpine group, and the association of ISO (1.0 mg/kg, i.p. plus pilocarpine (400 mg/kg, i.p., 30 min after administration of ISO (ISO plus pilocarpine group. After the treatments all groups were observed for 1h. The antioxidant effect of ISO on the pilocarpine model was assessed by determining the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx, glutathione-S-transferase (GST and catalase (CAT as well as the levels of reactive species (RS and lipid peroxidation (LP. In vitro, ISO (5 μM reduced RS and LP. ISO (1.0 mg/kg and abolished seizures and death induced by pilocarpine in rats. ISO protected against the increase in the RS and LP levels, GST activity as well as the inhibition of GPx activity caused by pilocarpine. In addition, ISO increased the catalase activity in hippocampus of seized rats. In conclusion, the dta suggest that ISO can present anticonvulsant and antioxidant properties in the pilocarpine model of seizures in rats.

  12. In vitro evaluation of antioxidant activity of Cordia dichotoma (Forst f.) bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nariya, Pankaj B; Bhalodia, Nayan R; Shukla, Vinay J; Acharya, Rabinarayan; Nariya, Mukesh B

    2013-01-01

    Cordia dichotoma Forst. f. bark, identified as botanical source of Shleshmataka in Ayurvedic pharmacopoeia. Present investigation was undertaken to evaluate possible antioxidant potential of methanolic and butanol extract of C. dichotoma bark. In vitro antioxidant activity of methanolic and butanol extract was determined by 1,1, diphenyl-2, picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging assay. The extracts were also evaluated for their phenolic contents and antioxidant activity. Phenolic content was measured using Folin-Ciocalteu reagent and was calculated as Gallic acid equivalents. Antiradical activity of methanolic extract was measured by DPPH assay and was compared to ascorbic acid and ferric reducing power of the extract was evaluated by Oyaizu method. In the present study three in vitro models were used to evaluate antioxidant activity. The first two methods were for direct measurement of radical scavenging activity and remaining one method evaluated the reducing power. The present study revealed that the C. dichotoma bark has significant radical scavenging activity.

  13. Excitatory amino acids in epilepsy and potential novel therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meldrum, B S

    1992-07-01

    Evidence that an abnormality of excitatory neurotransmission may contribute to the epileptic phenomena in various animal and human syndromes is reviewed. Altered glutamate transport or metabolism may be a contributory factor in some genetic syndromes and enhanced responsiveness to activation of NMDA receptors may be significant in various acquired forms of epilepsy. Decreasing glutamatergic neurotransmission provides a rational therapeutic approach to epilepsy. Potent anticonvulsant effects are seen with the acute administration of NMDA antagonists in a wide range of animal models. Some competitive antagonists acting at the NMDA/glutamate site show prolonged anticonvulsant activity following oral administration at doses free of motor side effects and appear suitable for clinical trial.

  14. Preregistered Replication of "Affective Flexibility: Evaluative Processing Goals Shape Amygdala Activity".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumian, Daniel S; McRae, Kateri

    2017-09-01

    The human amygdala is sensitive to stimulus characteristics, and growing evidence suggests that it is also responsive to cognitive framing in the form of evaluative goals. To examine whether different evaluations of stimulus characteristics shape amygdala activation, we conducted a preregistered replication of Cunningham, Van Bavel, and Johnsen's (2008) study demonstrating flexible mapping of amygdala activation to stimulus characteristics, depending on evaluative goals. Participants underwent functional MRI scanning while viewing famous names under three conditions: They were asked to report their overall attitude toward each name, their positive associations only, or their negative associations only. We observed an interaction between condition and rating type, identified as the effect of interest in Cunningham et al. (2008). Specifically, postscan positivity, but not negativity, ratings predicted left amygdala activation when participants were asked to evaluate positive, but not negative, associations with the names. These results provide convergent evidence that cognitive framing, in the form of evaluative goals, can significantly alter whether amygdala activation indexes positivity or negativity.

  15. THE CONTROL AND EVALUATION OF PROMOTIONAL ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicia Sabou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focused on importance and benefits of control and evaluation of marketing activities. The control of efficiency review the assessment of the resources for marketing activity, checking also the efficiency of the human resources, advertising, promotion activities and distribution activities. In the analyse of human resources the most important ratio are: the average of costumers visits on a day, the number of custom order received from 100 visits, the number of new customers from a period, the number of lost customers from a period, the marketing human expenditures from all the sales.The strategic control is made to check if the objectives and the company strategy are adapted to the marketing environment.

  16. 20 CFR 404.1584 - Evaluation of work activity of blind people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evaluation of work activity of blind people... Evaluation of work activity of blind people. (a) General. If you are blind (as explained in § 404.1581), we... gainful activity are the same for blind people as for others. See § 404.1574(b)(2) for the earnings...

  17. Treatment Strategies for the NMDA Component of Organophosphorus Convulsions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peterson, Steven

    2003-01-01

    .... The strychnine-insensitive glycine site partial agonists 1-aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid (ACPC) and D-cycloserine had no anticonvulsant activity but ACPC induced significant neuroprotection...

  18. Evaluation of the Effects of Novel Nafimidone Derivatives on Thermal Hypoalgesia in Mice with Diabetic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suat Kamışlı

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Diabetic neuropathy (DN is a common complication in Diabetes Mellitus. The streptozotocin-induced diabetic rodent is the most commonly used animal model of diabetes and increased sodium channel expression and activity were revealed in this model. At this study, we evaluated the effect of three different nafimidone derivatives which have possible anticonvulsant activity on disorders of thermal pain sensation in diabetic mice. Study Design: Randomized animal experiment. Material and Methods: Mice were divided randomly into five groups (5 mice per group: Control, Diabetes, Dibetes+C1, Diabetes+C2, Diabetes+C3. We used hot and cold plate, and tail-immersion tests for assessment of thermal nociceptive responses. Results: Compared with the control group, the hot-plate response time and the number of paw liftings on cold plate as important indicators of loss of sensation increased, but no significant difference (p>0.05 was found in tail-immersion response time test in diabetes group. C3 compound moved it back to control group levels in the all of three tests. C1 and C2 compounds were effective only in cold-plate test. Conclusion: Nafimidone derivatives may be effective in the cases where epilepsy and diabetes occur together since it has shown efficacy against “loss of sensation” which evolves in diabetic neuropathy over time as well as its antiepileptic effect.

  19. [Computer evaluation of hidden potential of phytochemicals of medicinal plants of the traditional Indian ayurvedic medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagunin, A A; Druzhilovsky, D S; Rudik, A V; Filimonov, D A; Gawande, D; Suresh, K; Goel, R; Poroikov, V V

    2015-01-01

    Applicability of our computer programs PASS and PharmaExpert to prediction of biological activity spectra of rather complex and structurally diverse phytocomponents of medicinal plants, both separately and in combinations has been evaluated. The web-resource on phytochemicals of 50 medicinal plants used in Ayurveda was created for the study of hidden therapeutic potential of Traditional Indian Medicine (TIM) (http://ayurveda.pharmaexpert.ru). It contains information on 50 medicinal plants, their using in TIM and their pharmacology activities, also as 1906 phytocomponents. PASS training set was updated by addition of information about 946 natural compounds; then the training procedure and validation were performed, to estimate the quality of PASS prediction. It was shown that the difference between the average accuracy of prediction obtained in leave-5%-out cross-validation (94,467%) and in leave-one-out cross-validation (94,605%) is very small. These results showed high predictive ability of the program. Results of biological activity spectra prediction for all phytocomponents included in our database are in good correspondence with the experimental data. Additional kinds of biological activity predicted with high probability provide the information about most promising directions of further studies. The analysis of prediction results of sets of phytocomponents in each of 50 medicinal plants was made by PharmaExpert software. Based on this analysis, we found that the combination of phytocomponents from Passiflora incarnata may exhibit nootropic, anticonvulsant and antidepressant effects. Experiments carried out in mice models confirmed the predicted effects of Passiflora incarnata extracts.

  20. Active film of poly(vinyl chloride)/silver: synthesis, characterization and evaluation as antimicrobial active packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braga, Lilian R.; Rangel, Ellen T.; Machado, Fabricio

    2015-01-01

    The antimicrobial films based on poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) mediated silver (1, 2, 4 and 8 wt%) were evaluated as antimicrobial active packaging using the casting method. The structure of the active films was characterized by SEM, EDX-XRF, XRD, FTIR and TG. FTIR spectra confirmed the PVC-Ag interaction due to the presence of new bands at 1745 cm"-"1 and 1165 cm"-"1 bands, which are absent in the PVC control. The FRX-EDX spectrum confirmed the presence of silver ions in all the films. TG and SEM results showed that the increased concentration of silver provided an improved thermal stability and presence of pores in the active films, respectively. Antimicrobial activity was evaluated by disk diffusion method for Bacillus subtilis, Fusarium solani and Apergillus niger, which proved the efficiency of the films active. (author)

  1. Evaluation of Activity Recognition Algorithms for Employee Performance Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Mehreen Mumtaz; Hafiz Adnan Habib

    2012-01-01

    Successful Human Resource Management plays a key role in success of any organization. Traditionally, human resource managers rely on various information technology solutions such as Payroll and Work Time Systems incorporating RFID and biometric technologies. This research evaluates activity recognition algorithms for employee performance monitoring. An activity recognition algorithm has been implemented that categorized the activity of employee into following in to classes: job activities and...

  2. Using Ecological Momentary Assessment to Evaluate Current Physical Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Marszalek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to assess the value of ecological momentary assessment in evaluating physical activity among children, adolescents, and adults. It also determines whether ecological momentary assessment fulfills the criteria of validity, reliability, objectivity, norms, and standardization applied to the tools used for the evaluation of physical activity. Methods. The EBSCO-CINHAL, Medline, PsycINFO, PubMed, and SPORTDiscuss databases were reviewed in December 2012 for articles associated with EMA. Results. Of the 20 articles examined, half (10 used electronic methods for data collection, although various methods were used, ranging from pen and paper to smartphone applications. Ten studies used objective monitoring equipment. Nineteen studies were performed over 4 days. While the validity of the EMA method was discussed in 18 studies, only four found it to be objective. In all cases, the EMA procedures were precisely documented and confirmed to be feasible. Conclusions. Ecological momentary assessment is a valid, reliable, and feasible approach to evaluate activity and sedentary behavior. Researchers should be aware that while ecological momentary assessment offers many benefits, it simultaneously imposes many limitations which should be considered when studying physical activity.

  3. Evaluation of hepatoprotective and antioxidant activity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of hepatoprotective and antioxidant activity of Ichnocarpus frutescens (Linn.) R.Br. on paracetamol-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. D K Dash, V C Yeligar, S S Nayak, T Ghosh, R Rajalingam, P Sengupta, B C Maiti, T K Maity ...

  4. Polanyi Evaluation of Adsorptive Capacities of Commercial Activated Carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, Oscar; Surma, Jan M.

    2017-01-01

    Commercial activated carbons from Calgon (207C and OVC) and Cabot Norit (RB2 and GCA 48) were evaluated for use in spacecraft trace contaminant control filters. The Polanyi potential plots of the activated carbons were compared using to those of Barnebey-Cheney Type BD, an untreated activated carbon with similar properties as the acid-treated Barnebey-Sutcliffe Type 3032 utilized in the TCCS. Their adsorptive capacities under dry conditions were measured in a closed loop system and the sorbents were ranked for their ability to remove common VOCs found in spacecraft cabin air. This comparison suggests that these sorbents can be ranked as GCA 48 207C, OVC RB2 for the compounds evaluated.

  5. Learning Activity Predictors from Sensor Data: Algorithms, Evaluation, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Bryan; Doppa, Janardhan Rao; Cook, Diane J

    2017-12-01

    Recent progress in Internet of Things (IoT) platforms has allowed us to collect large amounts of sensing data. However, there are significant challenges in converting this large-scale sensing data into decisions for real-world applications. Motivated by applications like health monitoring and intervention and home automation we consider a novel problem called Activity Prediction , where the goal is to predict future activity occurrence times from sensor data. In this paper, we make three main contributions. First, we formulate and solve the activity prediction problem in the framework of imitation learning and reduce it to a simple regression learning problem. This approach allows us to leverage powerful regression learners that can reason about the relational structure of the problem with negligible computational overhead. Second, we present several metrics to evaluate activity predictors in the context of real-world applications. Third, we evaluate our approach using real sensor data collected from 24 smart home testbeds. We also embed the learned predictor into a mobile-device-based activity prompter and evaluate the app for 9 participants living in smart homes. Our results indicate that our activity predictor performs better than the baseline methods, and offers a simple approach for predicting activities from sensor data.

  6. Self-Evaluation of the Scientific Activity of a Higher Educational Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayevnyeva Olena V.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the problem of self-evaluation of the scientific activity of a higher educational institution (HEI as a component of its overall ranking evaluation. On the basis of a potentially effective approach to studying this problem, there proposed a system of indicators for evaluating the scientific activity of a HEI, which makes it possible to determine the potential of its scientific activity in terms of staff and resource provision, and the efficiency — in terms of quality of the training of scientific staff (students, graduate students, young scientists, etc., financial results of scientific activity and publication activity. To obtain an integral ranking score of the scientific activity of a HEI, the use of the taxonomic method is justified, the necessity of applying weight coefficients of the significance of primary indicators is determined. The approbation of the approach was carried out on the basis of the data of S. Kuznets KhNEU for the period of 2013-2016, which made it possible to obtain not only point estimates of the integral indicator of the scientific activity of an HEI but also determine the trends in its changes and identify their reasons. The proposed approach to the self-evaluation of the scientific activity of a HEI allows its administration to develop effective management solutions to increase the level of scientific activity of its scientific and pedagogical, and scientific staff, which will provide additional competitive advantages in the national and world educational space.

  7. Synergistic antiallodynic interaction between gabapentin or carbamazepine and either benfotiamine or cyanocobalamin in neuropathic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixcoatl-Zecuatl, Teresa; Quinonez-Bastidas, Geovanna N; Caram-Salas, Nadia L; Ambriz-Tututi, Monica; Araiza-Saldana, Claudia I; Rocha-Gonzalez, Hector I; Medina-Santillan, Roberto; Reyes-Garcia, Gerardo; Granados-Soto, Vinicio

    2008-01-01

    Anticonvulsants, including gabapentin and carbamazepine, have shown activity against several types of neuropathic pain; however, they have limiting side effects that may minimize their use. In this study the possible synergistic interaction between anticonvulsants and benfotiamine or cyanocobalamin on spinal nerve ligation-induced tactile allodynia was assessed. Oral administration of gabapentin (15-300 mg/kg), carbamazepine (10-300 mg/kg), benfotiamine (30-600 mg/kg) or cyanocobalamin (0.3-6.0 mg/kg) significantly reduced tactile allodynia in rats. Maximal antiallodynic effects were reached with gabapentin 300 mg/kg (approximately 70%), carbamazepine 300 mg/kg (approximately 66%), benfotiamine 600 mg/kg (approximately 51%) and cyanocobalamin 6 mg/kg (approximately 59%). At the highest tested doses, gabapentin, but not carbamazepine, benfotiamine or cyanocobalamin, significantly reduced motor coordination. Coadministration of gabapentin or carbamazepine with benfotiamine or cyanocobalamin in a fixed ratio markedly reduced spinal nerve ligation-induced tactile allodynia, showing a synergistic interaction between anticonvulsants and B vitamins. Data indicate that combinations of anticonvulsants with benfotiamine or cyanocobalamin are able to reduce tactile allodynia without affecting motor coordination in rats, and suggest the possible clinical use of these combinations in the treatment of neuropathic pain in humans.

  8. Determination of Importance Evaluation for Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Subsurface Testing Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodin, S.

    2002-01-01

    This Determination of Importance Evaluation (DIE) applies to the Subsurface Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), encompassing the Topopah Spring (TS) Loop from Station 0+00 meters (m) at the North Portal to breakthrough at the South Portal (approximately 78+77 m), and ancillary test and operation support areas including the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift. This evaluation applies specifically to site characterization testing activities ongoing and planned in the Subsurface ESF. ESF site characterization activities are being performed to obtain the information necessary to determine whether the Yucca Mountain Site is suitable as a geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. A more detailed description of these testing activities is provided in Section 6 of this DIE. Generally, the construction and operation of excavations associated with these testing activities are evaluated in the DIE for the Subsurface ESF (CRWMS M andO 1999a) and the DIE for the ESF ECRB Cross Drift (CRWMS M andO 2000a). The scope of this DIE also entails the proposed Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Transport Test at Busted Butte. Although, not a part of the TS Loop or ECRB Cross Drift, the associated testing activities are Subsurface testing activities. Busted Butte is located to the south south-east of the TS Loop and is outside the Conceptual Controlled Area Boundary (CCAB). These activities provide access to the Calico Hills (CH) geologic structure. In the case of Busted Butte, construction and operation of excavations are evaluated herein (since this activity was not previously evaluated in CRWMS M andO 1999a). The objectives of this DIE are to determine whether Subsurface ESF testing, and associated activities, could potentially impact site characterization testing and/or the waste isolation capabilities of the site. Controls needed to limit any potential impacts are identified in Section 13. The validity and veracity of the

  9. Assessment report of research and development activities in FY2014. Activity: 'Quantum beam science research' (Result evaluation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-09-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (hereafter referred to as 'JAEA') consulted an assessment committee, 'Evaluation Committee of Research Activities for Quantum Beam Science' (hereafter referred to as 'Committee') for result evaluation of 'Quantum Beam Science', in accordance with 'General Guideline for the Evaluation of Government Research and Development (R and D) Activities' by Cabinet Office, Government of Japan, 'Guideline for Evaluation of R and D in Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology' and 'Regulation on Conduct for Evaluation of R and D Activities' by JAEA. In response to the JAEA's request, the Committee assessed the research program of the Quantum Beam Science Center (hereafter referred to as 'QuBS') during the period from April 2010 to September 2014. The Committee evaluated the management and research activities of QuBS based on the explanatory documents and oral presentations. (author)

  10. Santa Sabina House, Navan Road, Cabra, Dublin 7.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Timmons, S

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Elderly patients in long-term care units are frailer than their community-dwelling peers and may be more at risk from toxic side-effects of anticonvulsant medication at standard doses. AIM: To examine the prescribing of anticonvulsants to patients in elderly care units. METHODS: Drug prescription sheets and case notes were reviewed. Serum anticonvulsant concentration, renal and liver profiles and albumin level were measured. RESULTS: Anticonvulsants were prescribed to twice as many male as female patients (32 vs 14%; p<0.03) and to 33% of those younger than 80 years of age versus 10% of those aged 80 years or older (p<0.0002). No patient had significant hypoalbuminaemia and routine measurement of serum anticonvulsant concentration did not indicate an alteration of dosage. CONCLUSIONS: Anticonvulsants appear to be well tolerated in these patients. The younger age of those receiving anticonvulsants is inadequately explained by the characteristics of the patient cohort and may reflect a shift towards a younger age in patients requiring anticonvulsants due to increased mortality in this group.

  11. Mouse models: the ketogenic diet and polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Karin

    2008-11-01

    Literature on the anticonvulsant effects of the ketogenic diet (KD) in mouse seizure models is summarized. Recent data show that a KD balanced in vitamin, mineral, and antioxidant content is anticonvulsant in mice, confirming that the KD's effect in mice can be attributed to the composition of the diet and not other dietary factors. Given that the anticonvulsant mechanism of the KD is still unknown, the anticonvulsant profile of the diet in different seizure models may help to decipher this mechanism. The implications of the findings that the KD is anticonvulsant in electrical seizure models are indicated. Further, the potential involvement of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in the KD's anticonvulsant mechanism is discussed.

  12. Determination of Importance Evaluation for Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Subsurface Testing Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C.J. Byrne

    2001-01-01

    This Determination of Importance Evaluation (DIE) applies to the Subsurface Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), encompassing the Topopah Spring (TS) Loop from Station 0+00 meters (m) at the North Portal to breakthrough at the South Portal (approximately 78+77 m), and ancillary test and operation support areas including the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift. This evaluation applies specifically to site characterization testing activities ongoing and planned in the Subsurface ESF. ESF site characterization activities are being performed to obtain the information necessary to determine whether the Yucca Mountain Site is suitable as a geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. A more detailed description of these testing activities is provided in Section 6 of this DIE. Generally, the construction and operation of excavations associated with these testing activities are evaluated in the DIE for the Subsurface ESF (CRWMS M and O 1999a) and the DIE for the ESF ECRB Cross Drift (CRWMS M and O 2000a). The scope of this DIE also entails the proposed Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Transport Test at Busted Butte. Although, not a part of the TS Loop or ECRB Cross Drift, the associated testing activities are Subsurface testing activities. Busted Butte is located to the south south-east of the TS Loop and is outside the Conceptual Controlled Area Boundary (CCAB). These activities provide access to the Calico Hills (CH) geologic structure. In the case of Busted Butte, construction and operation of excavations are evaluated herein (since this activity was not previously evaluated in CRWMS M and O 1999a). The objectives of this DIE are to determine whether Subsurface ESF testing, and associated activities, could potentially impact site characterization testing and/or the waste isolation capabilities of the site. Controls needed to limit any potential impacts are identified in Section 13. The validity and veracity of the

  13. Determination of Importance Evaluation for Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Subsurface Testing Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.J. Byrne

    2001-02-20

    This Determination of Importance Evaluation (DIE) applies to the Subsurface Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), encompassing the Topopah Spring (TS) Loop from Station 0+00 meters (m) at the North Portal to breakthrough at the South Portal (approximately 78+77 m), and ancillary test and operation support areas including the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift. This evaluation applies specifically to site characterization testing activities ongoing and planned in the Subsurface ESF. ESF site characterization activities are being performed to obtain the information necessary to determine whether the Yucca Mountain Site is suitable as a geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. A more detailed description of these testing activities is provided in Section 6 of this DIE. Generally, the construction and operation of excavations associated with these testing activities are evaluated in the DIE for the Subsurface ESF (CRWMS M&O 1999a) and the DIE for the ESF ECRB Cross Drift (CRWMS M&O 2000a). The scope of this DIE also entails the proposed Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Transport Test at Busted Butte. Although, not a part of the TS Loop or ECRB Cross Drift, the associated testing activities are Subsurface testing activities. Busted Butte is located to the south south-east of the TS Loop and is outside the Conceptual Controlled Area Boundary (CCAB). These activities provide access to the Calico Hills (CH) geologic structure. In the case of Busted Butte, construction and operation of excavations are evaluated herein (since this activity was not previously evaluated in CRWMS M&O 1999a). The objectives of this DIE are to determine whether Subsurface ESF testing, and associated activities, could potentially impact site characterization testing and/or the waste isolation capabilities of the site. Controls needed to limit any potential impacts are identified in Section 13. The validity and veracity of the individual

  14. Evaluation of Anticaries Activity of Selected Mouthwash Marketed in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anticaries evaluation revealed that 0.047 % thymol in ethanol displayed the highest degree of anticaries activity against all the Streptococcal species tested. Incorporation of preservatives in mouthwashes may adversely affect their anticaries activity as indicated by the fact that the preserved mouthwash exhibited lower ...

  15. A Second Year Evaluation Study of Promethean ActivClassroom. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzano Research Laboratory, 2010

    2010-01-01

    During the 2009-2010 school year, Marzano Research Laboratory (MRL) was commissioned by Promethean Ltd. to conduct a second year evaluation study of the effects of Promethean ActivClassroom on student academic achievement. This executive summary highlights the key findings. [For "A Second Year Evaluation Study of Promethean ActivClassroom. Final…

  16. Prevention of disorders of behavioral reactions in rats using nootropics with sodium valproate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanov A.V.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Using of anticonvulsants can trigger a number of side effects, such as possible changes in behavior and emotional state of people with epilepsy, risk of unwarranted aggression, nervousness, discoordination, sleepiness, encephalopathies. However, the epilepsy itself as a chronic neurological pathology causes cognitive and "epileptic" deficiency, in patients general retardation, sluggishness of mental activity, decreased cognitive abilities de¬velop. Therefore it is advisable to combine anticonvulsants with nootropics with their ability to protect the brain and increase body's resistance to extreme stress, reduce neurological deficits, restore damaged mnestic and mental functions. The author considered the use of nootropics on the background of anticonvulsant sodium valproate (80 mg/kg. Behavioral reactions of white rats in the test "Open field" and muscle tone of white mice in the test "muscle relaxation" were performed on the day 4 nootropics introduction in 1 hour after a single sodium valproate application. It’s shown experimentally that sodium valproate provided systemic depriming action on orientation and exploratory activity of rats: locomotor activity reduced in the number of squares strolled by 62.8% and in the number of vertical uprights by 80%, the amount of peeping into the burrows decreased by 58.7% as compared with the control. In the test "muscle relaxation" sodium valproate reduced muscle strength of mice by 38.6%. Against the background of anticonvulsant application piracetam (500 mg/kg had no effect on the behavioral responses of rats and muscle tone of mice. Citicoline (500 mg/kg increased locomotor activity in the number of squares crossed by 29.7%, in the number of vertical racks – by 20%, and the endurance of mice by 18.6%. Memantine (10 mg/kg in combination with sodium valproate insignificantly decreased (by 8.4% locomotor activity of rats, but increased exploratory activity by 30.5%; withholding of mice on the wire

  17. Evaluation of local anesthetic and antipyretic activities of Cinchona ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the local anesthetic and antipyretic activities of an aqueous extract of Cinchona officinalis (C. officinalis) in experimental animal models. Methods: Various doses of the aqueous extract was tested for its local anesthetic activity in guinea pigs and frogs using intracutaneous and plexus anesthesia, ...

  18. Glutamate metabotropic receptors as targets for drug therapy in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldrich, Randal X; Chapman, Astrid G; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Meldrum, Brian S

    2003-08-22

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors have multiple actions on neuronal excitability through G-protein-linked modifications of enzymes and ion channels. They act presynaptically to modify glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic transmission and can contribute to long-term changes in synaptic function. The recent identification of subtype-selective agonists and antagonists has permitted evaluation of mGlu receptors as potential targets in the treatment of epilepsy. Agonists acting on group I mGlu receptors (mGlu1 and mGlu5) are convulsant. Antagonists acting on mGlu1 or mGlu5 receptors are anticonvulsant against 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG)-induced seizures and in mouse models of generalized motor seizures and absence seizures. The competitive, phenylglycine mGlu1/5 receptor antagonists generally require intracerebroventricular administration for potent anticonvulsant efficacy but noncompetitive antagonists, e.g., (3aS,6aS)-6a-naphthalen-2-ylmethyl-5-methyliden-hexahydrocyclopenta[c]furan-1-on (BAY36-7620), 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine hydrochloride (MPEP), and 2-methyl-6-(2-phenylethenyl)pyridine (SIB-1893) block generalized seizures with systemic administration. Agonists acting on group II mGlu receptors (mGlu2, mGlu3) to reduce glutamate release are anticonvulsant, e.g., 2R,4R-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate [(2R,4R)-APDC], (+)-2-aminobicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (LY354740), and (-)-2-oxa-4-aminobicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-4,6-dicarboxylate (LY379268). The classical agonists acting on group III mGlu receptors such as L-(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid, and L-serine-O-phosphate are acutely proconvulsant with some anticonvulsant activity. The more recently identified agonists (R,S)-4-phosphonophenylglycine [(R,S)-PPG] and (S)-3,4-dicarboxyphenylglycine [(S)-3,4-DCPG] and (1S,3R,4S)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,2,4-tricarboxylic acid [ACPT-1] are all anticonvulsant without proconvulsant effects. Studies in animal models of kindling

  19. Evaluation of behavioral states among morning and evening active healthy individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Hidalgo

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The Horne-Östberg questionnaire partly covers some factors that may be important determinants of peak time and characterize patterns of behavior. We conducted a study for the evaluation of self-reported behavioral states (hunger sensation, availability for study, physical exercise, solving daily problems, and time preferences as expressions of underlying cyclic activity. Three hundred and eighteen community subjects without history of medical, psychiatric, or sleep disorders were evaluated in a cross-sectional design. A self-report about daily highest level of activity was used to categorize individuals into morning, evening, and indifferently active. Time-related behavioral states were evaluated with 23 visual analog questions. The responses to most analogic questions were significantly different between morning and evening active subjects. Logistic regression analysis identified a group of behaviors more strongly associated with the self-reported activity pattern (common wake up time, highest subjective fatigue, as well as wake up, bedtime, exercise and study preferences. These findings suggested that the patterns of activity presented by normal adults were related to specific common behavioral characteristics that may contribute to peak time.

  20. AHR-11797: a novel benzodiazepine antagonist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.N.; Kilpatrick, B.F.; Hannaman, P.K.

    1986-01-01

    AHR-11797(5,6-dihydro-6-methyl-1-phenyl- 3 H-pyrrolo[3,2,1-ij]quinazolin-3-one) displaced 3 H-flunitrazepam (IC 50 = 82 nM) and 3 H-Ro 15-1877 (IC 50 = 104 nM) from rat brain synaptosomes. AHR-11797 did not protect mice from seizures induced by maximal electroshock or subcutaneous Metrazol (scMET), nor did it induce seizures in doses up to the lethal dose. However, at 31.6 mg/kg, IP, it significantly increased the anticonvulsant ED 50 of chlordiazepoxide (CDPX) from 1.9 to 31.6 mg/kg, IP. With 56.7 mg/kg, IP, of AHR-11797, CDPX was inactive in doses up to 100 mg/kg, IP. AHR-11797 did not significantly increase punished responding in the Geller and Seifter conflict procedure, but it did attenuate the effects of diazepam. Although the compound is without anticonvulsant or anxiolytic activity, it did have muscle relaxant properties. AHR-11797 blocked morphine-induced Straub tail in mice (ED 50 = 31 mg/kg, IP) and it selectively suppressed the polysnaptic linguomandibular reflex in barbiturate-anesthetized cats. The apparent muscle relaxant activity of AHR-11797 suggests that different receptor sites are involved for muscle relaxant vs. anxiolytic/anticonvulsant activities of the benzodiazepines

  1. Antidepressant activity of standardised extract of Marsilea minuta Linn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattamisra, Subrat Kumar; Khanna, Vinay Kumar; Agrawal, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Paras Nath; Singh, Sushil Kumar

    2008-04-17

    Marsilea minuta Linn. (Marsileaceae) has been referred in Indian traditional medicine system (Ayurveda) for the treatment of insomnia and other mental disorders. Marsiline isolated from Marsilea minuta was reported to have sedative and anticonvulsant property. The ethanol extract of Marsilea minuta was standardised for marsiline (1.15%, w/w) and studied for its antidepressant activity. Antidepressant activity was studied using forced swimming test (FST), tail suspension test (TST), learned helplessness test (LHT) and 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) induced head twitches response in rodents. Standardised extract of Marsilea minuta in doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg/day were administered orally for three consecutive days and evaluated on day 3, 1h after the last dose treatment. Imipramine (15 mg/kg/day, i.p.) was used as the standard drug. Neurochemical mechanism of antidepressant activity was elucidated by using radioligand receptor binding assays for 5-HT2A and benzodiazepine receptors in rat frontal cortex. Immobility time in FST and TST was significantly (P<0.05) reduced by ethanol extract of Marsilea minuta treated animals. A decrease in number of escape failures in LHT was also observed in Marsilea minuta treated rats. Head twitch response induced by 5-HTP was significantly attenuated by Marsilea minuta (400 mg/kg, p.o.) and imipramine showing the involvement of serotonergic system. This effect was corroborated with radioligand receptor binding study where Marsilea minuta (400 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly (P<0.05) down regulated 5-HT2A receptor in frontal cortex, whereas, no marked effect was observed for benzodiazepine receptor. The antidepressant effect exhibited by Marsilea minuta extract may be due to its effect on 5-HT2A density in rat frontal cortex.

  2. Evaluation of Antioxidant and Antifungal Activities of Polyphenol-rich ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the antioxidant and antifungal activities of polyphenol-rich extracts of the dried fruit pulp of Garcinia pedunculata (GP) and Garcinia morella (GM) to determine their traditional claims of therapeutic activity against certain diseases. Methods: Analysis of total phenolic (TP) and flavonoid (TF) contents of the ...

  3. Annona muricata (Annonaceae: A Review of Its Traditional Uses, Isolated Acetogenins and Biological Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheil Zorofchian Moghadamtousi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Annona muricata is a member of the Annonaceae family and is a fruit tree with a long history of traditional use. A. muricata, also known as soursop, graviola and guanabana, is an evergreen plant that is mostly distributed in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. The fruits of A. muricata are extensively used to prepare syrups, candies, beverages, ice creams and shakes. A wide array of ethnomedicinal activities is contributed to different parts of A. muricata, and indigenous communities in Africa and South America extensively use this plant in their folk medicine. Numerous investigations have substantiated these activities, including anticancer, anticonvulsant, anti-arthritic, antiparasitic, antimalarial, hepatoprotective and antidiabetic activities. Phytochemical studies reveal that annonaceous acetogenins are the major constituents of A. muricata. More than 100 annonaceous acetogenins have been isolated from leaves, barks, seeds, roots and fruits of A. muricata. In view of the immense studies on A. muricata, this review strives to unite available information regarding its phytochemistry, traditional uses and biological activities.

  4. Seizures induced in immature rats by homocysteic acid and the associated brain damage are prevented by group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist (2R,4R)-4-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folbergrová, Jaroslava; Druga, Rastislav; Otáhal, Jakub; Haugvicová, Renata; Mares, Pavel; Kubová, Hana

    2005-04-01

    The present study has examined the anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effect of group II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonist (2R,4R)-4-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate (2R,4R-APDC) in the model of seizures induced in immature 12-day-old rats by bilateral intracerebroventricular infusion of dl-homocysteic acid (DL-HCA, 600 nmol/side). For biochemical analyses, rat pups were sacrificed during generalized clonic-tonic seizures, approximately 45-50 min after infusion. Comparable time intervals were used for sacrificing the pups which had received 2R,4R-APDC. Low doses of 2R,4R-APDC (0.05 nmol/side) provided a pronounced anticonvulsant effect which was abolished by pretreatment with a selective group II mGluR antagonist LY341495. Generalized clonic-tonic seizures were completely suppressed and cortical energy metabolite changes which normally accompany these seizures were either normalized (decrease of glucose and glycogen) or markedly reduced (an accumulation of lactate). EEG recordings support the marked anticonvulsant effect of 2R,4R-APDC, nevertheless, this was only partial. In spite of the absence of obvious motor phenomena, isolated spikes or even short periods of partial ictal activity could be observed. Isolated spikes could also be seen in some animals after application of 2R,4R-APDC alone, reflecting most likely subclinical proconvulsant activity of this agonist. The neuroprotective effect of 2R,4R-APDC was evaluated after 24 h and 6 days of survival following DL-HCA-induced seizures. Massive neuronal degeneration, as revealed by Fluoro-Jade B staining, was observed in a number of brain regions following infusion of DL-HCA alone (seizure group), whereas 2R,4R-APDC pretreatment provided substantial neuroprotection. The present findings support the possibility that group II mGluRs are a promising target for a novel approach to treating epilepsy.

  5. Synthesis, Anticonvulsant Activity and In silco Studies of Schiff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Georgette M, Castanedo, Daniel PS. Synthesis of tetrasubstituted thiophenes on solid support using the Gewald reaction.Tetrahedron lett 2001; 42: 7181-7184. 11. Pushyamitra M, Hardesh K, Maurya, Brijesh K, Vishnu. K, Tandon, Vishnu JR. synthesis of thiophenes and pyranone fused thiophenes by base induced inter.

  6. Evaluation of the activated carbon prepared from the algae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of the activated carbon prepared from the algae Gracilaria for the biosorption of Cu(II) from aqueous solutions. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... This study shows the benefit of using activated carbon from marine red algae as a low cost sorbent for the removal of copper from aqueous solution wastewater.

  7. An Evaluation Method for Activation Analysis using Pre-evaluated Contribution of Nuclides with Impurity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Myeong Hyeon; Kim, Song Hyun; Kim, Do Hyun; Shin, Chang Ho [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gee Suck [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Nuclides in radiation facilities become unstable from nuclear reaction. It emits residual radiation to be stable. Some unstable nuclides remain after operation in the material. It continuously emits the radiation, which has a harmful effect to worker when they try maintenance and plant decommissioning. It is known that residual radiation from impurity occupies a large portion of the radiation dose. If impurity concentration is higher than expectation, the effects of residual radiation could be underestimated. Therefore, estimation of residual radiation is repeatedly calculated according to impurity concentration. In this study, an approach estimating the activation was proposed using pre-evaluated nuclide's contribution to reduce the calculation time and effort of worker. In this study, in order to reduce the calculation time and effort of worker, activation analysis method based on pre-evaluated nuclide contribution was proposed. This method was verified using concreate activation problem, which is located in nuclear power plant. The results show that our proposed method has good agreement with Bateman equation.

  8. Evaluation of physical activity measures used in middle-aged women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettee Gabriel, Kelley; McClain, James J; Lee, Chong D; Swan, Pamela D; Alvar, Brent A; Mitros, Melanie R; Ainsworth, Barbara E

    2009-07-01

    To evaluate the reliability and validity of five commonly used physical activity questionnaires (PAQ) in women aged 45-65 yr with varying physical activity (PA) levels. Data were obtained from the Evaluation of Physical Activity Measures in Middle-aged Women (PAW) Study and included 66 women (aged 52.6 +/- 5.4 yr). PAQ evaluated include Modifiable Activity Questionnaire (past week and past month version), Nurses' Health Study PAQ, Active Australia Survey, and Women's Health Initiative PAQ. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) between administrations of the PAQ were used to assess test-retest reliability. Spearman rank-order correlation coefficients were used to examine the associations of PA and physical fitness data with PAQ summary estimates. Accelerometer-determined median (25th, 75th percentiles) times (min.d) spent in moderate-lifestyle [760-1951 counts (ct)], moderate-walk (1952-5724 ct), vigorous (> or =5725 ct), and combined moderate and vigorous PA (MVPA > or = 1952 ct) during the 35 d of observation were 66.0 (51.2, 81.3), 23.1 (14.1, 34.6), 0.4 (0.0, 2.3), and 24.3 (15.9, 41.6) min, respectively. The PAQ were shown to be reproducible and relatively stable over time (ICC = 0.32 to 0.91) and were associated with total counts per day (ct.d, 0.46 to 0.60, all P PAQ evaluated in this study were shown to be reliable and associated with PA and physical fitness measures. Current findings support the utility of these PAQ for PA assessment in research studies of middle-aged women.

  9. Assessment report of research and development activities in FY2014. Activity: 'Quantum beam science research' (In-advance evaluation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-09-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (hereafter referred to as 'JAEA') consulted an assessment committee, 'Evaluation Committee of Research Activities for Quantum Beam Science' (hereafter referred to as 'Committee') for result evaluation of 'Quantum Beam Science', in accordance with 'General Guideline for the Evaluation of Government Research and Development (R and D) Activities' by Cabinet Office, Government of Japan, 'Guideline for Evaluation of R and D in Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology' and 'Regulation on Conduct for Evaluation of R and D Activities' by JAEA. In response to the JAEA's request, the Committee assessed the research program of the Quantum Beam Science Center (hereafter referred to as 'QuBS') during the period from April 2015 to March 2022. The Committee evaluated the management and research activities of QuBS based on the explanatory documents and oral presentations. (author)

  10. Evaluation of an Internet, Stage-Based Physical Activity Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Ronald L.; Hardy, Aaron; Aldana, Steven G.; George, James D.

    2002-01-01

    Evaluated the impact of online, stage-based materials on exercise behavior and stage of readiness to change. College faculty participated in stage-based, action-message, or control groups. Occupational and leisure activity, 7-day physical activity, exercise self-efficacy, and stage of readiness to change were assessed at baseline and 6 weeks.…

  11. EVALUATION OF HUMAN RELIABILITY IN SELECTED ACTIVITIES IN THE RAILWAY INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika SUJOVÁ

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on evaluation of human reliability in the human – machine system in the railway industry. Based on a survey of a train dispatcher and of selected activities, we have identified risk factors affecting the dispatcher‘s work and the evaluated risk level of their influence on the reliability and safety of preformed activities. The research took place at the authors‘ work place between 2012-2013. A survey method was used. With its help, authors were able to identify selected work activities of train dispatcher’s risk factors that affect his/her work and the evaluated seriousness of its in-fluence on the reliability and safety of performed activities. Amongst the most important finding fall expressions of un-clear and complicated internal regulations and work processes, a feeling of being overworked, fear for one’s safety at small, insufficiently protected stations.

  12. Readiness evaluation report -- High-exposure rate hardware removal resumption of activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkman, C.L.

    1996-11-01

    In August 1996, N Basin Project Management proactively ceased activities in the N Basin after noting several radiological control anomalies occurring during the performance of the high exposure rate hardware removal activity. The HERH is one of several activities that will be accomplished to complete deactivation of N Basin. Three project critiques were performed to identify causes and several corrective actions were identified. To ensure the true causes of the events were identified the N Basin Project Manager requested that a root cause analysis be performed for the events covered by the three critiques. The intent was to identify recurring events and evaluate the effectiveness of corrective action implementation. These three review elements were used by the project to develop a corrective action plan (CAP) which consisted of both project unique and programmatic items. The N Basin Project is using this BHI Readiness Evaluation (RE) process as a mechanism to independently verify that corrective actions identified from the CAP have been completed and that no changes have been made during the stand down that affect the resumption of the HERH activities. A readiness evaluation (RE) plan (Attachment 3) was prepared. The completed Readiness Evaluation Records which documents the results of the team member evaluations are in attachment 1. The independent readiness evaluation team identified 5 deficiencies of which two are post startup and three are pre startup. All deficiencies are in the area of training. These findings are explained in detail in Attachment 2

  13. THE EVALUATION OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladan Jovanović

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available It is already known that physical activity is very important measure in treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, but in spite of that, in our country, there is neither its adequate use in therapy, nor the evaluation of its level in type 2 diabetics.The aim of this study is to evaluate the level of physical activity in patients with type 2 diabetes, by using the questionnaire for evaluation of physical activity, based on the International Physical Activity Questionnaire used in the Framingham Heart Study.The level of physical activity is evaluated by the Physical Activity Index (PAI, which is calculated by summing the number of hours spent in each activity intensity level (vigorous, moderate, light physical activity, sedentary behavior and sleep and multiplying by a respective weight factor, derived from the estimated oxygen consumption requirement for each intensity level (Metabolic Equivalent, MET. The results were compared to the results of healthy control subjects.The estimated value of PAI in patients with type 2 diabetes was 34.1 ± 6.4 and in controls 37.6 ± 6.4. The energy expenditure in the subgroup of patients with type 2 diabetes with predominantly sedentary behavior was 852 kcal minor than in the control group.The results of this investigation show very low level of physical activity in patients with type 2 diabetes and its correlation with coronary risk factors

  14. Physical activity across the curriculum: year one process evaluation results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sullivan Debra K

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical Activity Across the Curriculum (PAAC is a 3-year elementary school-based intervention to determine if increased amounts of moderate intensity physical activity performed in the classroom will diminish gains in body mass index (BMI. It is a cluster-randomized, controlled trial, involving 4905 children (2505 intervention, 2400 control. Methods We collected both qualitative and quantitative process evaluation data from 24 schools (14 intervention and 10 control, which included tracking teacher training issues, challenges and barriers to effective implementation of PAAC lessons, initial and continual use of program specified activities, and potential competing factors, which might contaminate or lessen program effects. Results Overall teacher attendance at training sessions showed exceptional reach. Teachers incorporated active lessons on most days, resulting in significantly greater student physical activity levels compared to controls (p Conclusion In the first year of the PAAC intervention, process evaluation results were instrumental in identifying successes and challenges faced by teachers when trying to modify existing academic lessons to incorporate physical activity.

  15. Automatic evaluation stimuli – The most frequently used words to describe physical activity and the pleasantness of physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Lea Rebar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity is partially regulated by non-conscious processes including automatic evaluations – the spontaneous affective reactions we have to physical activity that lead us to approach or avoid physical activity opportunities. A sound understanding of which words best represent the concepts of physical activity and pleasantness (as associated with physical activity is needed to improve the measurement of automatic evaluations and related constructs (e.g., automatic self-schemas, attentional biases. The first aim of this study was to establish population-level evidence of the most common word stimuli for physical activity and pleasantness. Given that response latency measures have been applied to assess automatic evaluations of physical activity and exercise, the second aim was to determine whether people use the same behavior and pleasant descriptors for physical activity and exercise. Australian adults (N = 1,318; 54.3% women; 48.9% aged 55 years or older were randomly assigned to one of two groups, through a computer-generated 1:1 ratio allocation, to be asked to list either five behaviors and pleasant descriptors of physical activity (n = 686 or of exercise (n = 632. The words were independently coded twice as to whether they were novel words or the same as another (i.e., same stem or same meaning. Intercoder reliability varied between moderate and strong (agreement = 50.1% to 97.8%; κ = 0.48 to 0.82. A list of the 20 most common behavior and pleasantness words were established based on how many people reported them, weighted by the ranking (1-5 people gave them. The words people described as physical activity were mostly the same as those people used to describe exercise. The most common behavior words were ‘walking,’ ‘running,’ ‘swimming,’ ‘bike riding,’ and ‘gardening’; and the most common pleasant descriptor words were ‘relaxing,’ ‘happiness,’ ‘enjoyment,’ ‘exhilarating,’ ‘exhausting,’ and

  16. Anticonvulsivantes e antipsicóticos no tratamento do transtorno bipolar Anticonvulsants and antipsychotics in the treatment of Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Alberto Moreno

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available O transtorno bipolar é uma condição médica complexa e até o momento não há um tratamento único comprovadamente eficaz no controle de todos aspectos da doença. Foram revisadas a literatura disponível sobre o uso de anticonvulsivantes (valproato, carbamazepina, oxcarbazepina, lamotrigina, gabapentina, topiramato, clonazepam e antipsicóticos atípicos (clozapina, risperidona, olanzapina, quetiapina, ziprasidona e aripiprazole no tratamento agudo e profilático do transtorno bipolar. Existe um acúmulo de evidências acerca da eficácia do lítio na profilaxia e de ser melhor no tratamento da mania aguda do que nos episódios depressivos. Outros dados indicam que a carbamazepina e o valproato são eficazes na mania aguda. A lamotrigina parece reduzir ciclagem e ser eficaz em episódios depressivos. Baseado nas informações disponíveis, as evidências apontam a olanzapina como o antipsicótico atípico mais apropriado no tratamento de pacientes bipolares em mania, embora existam estudos sugerindo a eficácia da risperidona, aripiprazol e da clozapina. Resultados preliminares avaliando a eficácia de ziprasidona e quetiapina no transtorno bipolar ainda são bastante limitadas. Não há dados consistentes apoiando o uso profilático dos novos antipsicóticos.Bipolar disorder is a complex medical condition, and up to the date there is no single treatment with proven efficacy in the control of all aspects of the illness. The available literature on the use of anticonvulsants (valproate, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine, gabapentin, topiramate, clonazepam and atypical antipsychotics (clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone, and aripiprazole for acute and prophylactic treatment of bipolar disorder was reviewed. There is a large amount of evidence that lithium is efficacious in the prophylaxis of episodes and better for acute mania than for depressive episodes. Other data show that carbamazepine and valproate are

  17. Evaluation of Creatine Kinase Activity and Inorganic Phosphate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Biochemical parameters vary in subjects with different hemoglobin phenotypes, compared with normal controls. Aim: The aim was to evaluate serum creatine kinase (CK) activity and inorganic phosphate concentrations in Nigerian adults with homozygous and heterozygous hemoglobin phenotypes. Subjects ...

  18. Alteration of pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure threshold by chronic administration of ginger (Zingiber officinale) extract in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Abdolkarim; Mirazi, Naser

    2015-05-01

    Zingiber officinale Roscoe (Zingiberaceae), or ginger, used in traditional Chinese medicine, has antioxidant activity and neuroprotective effects. The effects of this plant on clonic seizure have not yet been studied. The present study evaluated the anticonvulsant effect of ginger in a model of clonic seizures induced with pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) in male mice. The anticonvulsant effect of Z. officinale was investigated using i.v. PTZ-induced seizure models in mice. Different doses of the hydroethanolic extract of Z. officinale (25, 50, and 100 mg/kg) were administered intraperitonal (i.p.), daily for 1 week before induction of PTZ. Phenobarbital sodium (30 mg/kg), a reference standard, was also tested for comparison. The effect of ginger on to the appearance of three separate seizure endpoints, e.g., myoclonic, generalized clonic, and tonic extension phase, was recorded. Hydroethanolic extract of Z. officinale significantly increased the onset time of myoclonic seizure at doses of 25-100 mg/kg (55.33 ± 1.91 versus 24.47 ± 1.33 mg/kg, p < 0.001) and significantly prevented generalized clonic (74.64 ± 3.52 versus 47.72 ± 2.31 mg/kg, p < 0.001) and increased the threshold for the forelimb tonic extension (102.6 ± 5.39 versus 71.82 ± 7.82 mg/kg, p < 0.01) seizure induced by PTZ compared with the control group. Based on the results, the hydroethanolic extract of ginger has anticonvulsant effects, possibly through an interaction with inhibitory and excitatory systems, antioxidant mechanisms, and oxidative stress inhibition.

  19. Evaluation of the antiulcerogenic and analgesic activities of Cordia verbenacea DC. (Boraginaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldão, Erika de Freitas; Witaicenis, Aline; Seito, Leonardo Noboru; Hiruma-Lima, Clélia Akiko; Di Stasi, Luiz Claudio

    2008-09-02

    Cordia verbenacea is a medicinal plant popularly used in Brazil as anti-inflammatory, antiulcer and anti-rheumatic agent without detailed pharmacological and toxicological studies. The study was aimed to investigate the effects of Cordia verbenacea in antiulcer, analgesic and antioxidant assays, as well as to evaluate its toxic effects and phytochemical profile. Antiulcer activity of plant extract was evaluated using ethanol/HCl, ethanol and piroxican-induced gastric lesions methods. The pH, volume and total acid of gastric juice were determined by pylorus-ligated assay. Analgesic activity was evaluated by writhing, tail-flick and hot-plate tests. Antioxidant activity was determined by in vitro lipoperoxidation assay. Acute toxicity and number of deaths were evaluated by Hippocratic screening. The ethanol leaf extract shows a potent antiulcer activity in the ethanol/HCl and absolute ethanol-induced gastric lesions. The IC(50) value of plant extract on the lipid peroxidation was 76.11mug/ml. Preliminary phytochemical tests were positive for flavonoids, steroids, saponins, fixed acids, alkaloids and phenols. In the analgesic models the extract did not present any activity. Cordial verbenaceae showed a potent antiulcer activity at the dose of 125mg/kg and this effect may be associated with an improvement in stomach antioxidant mechanisms.

  20. Development and oversight of ethical health promotion quality assurance and evaluation activities involving human participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainsbury, Peter

    2015-12-01

    This paper considers the role of ethics and ethics review processes in the development of health promotion quality assurance and evaluation activities involving human participants. The Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research and associated documents provide the framework for the ethical conduct and independent review of research (including quality assurance and evaluation) involving humans in Australia. Identifying the level of risk to which participants may be exposed by participation in quality assurance and evaluation activities is essential for health promotion workers undertaking such activities. Organisations can establish processes other than review by a Human Research Ethics Committee for negligible and low risk research activities. Health promotion quality assurance and evaluation activities often involve negligible and low risk to participants. Seven triggers that indicate the need for ethics review of quality assurance and evaluation activities and a procedural checklist for developing ethical quality assurance and evaluation activities are provided. Health promotion workers should be familiar with the NHMRC's National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research. When ethical considerations underpin the planning and conduct of all quality assurance and evaluation from the very beginning, the activity is the better for it, independent 'ethics approval' can mostly be secured without much trouble and workers' frustration levels are reduced. So what? Health promotion quality assurance and evaluation activities must be ethically justified. Health promotion workers should be familiar with the NHMRC's National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research and should use it when developing health promotion quality assurance and evaluation activities.

  1. Physio-chemical evaluation and biological activity of Ajuga ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physio-chemical evaluation and biological activity of Ajuga bracteosa wall and Viola odoroto Linn. Anwar Ali Shad, M. Zeeshan, Hina Fazal, Hamid Ullah Shah, Shabir Ahmed, Hasem Abeer, E. F. Abd_Allah, Riaz Ullah, Hamid Afridi, Akash tariq, Muhammad Adnan Asma ...

  2. Actively Secure Two-Party Evaluation of Any Quantum Operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupuis, Frédéric; Nielsen, Jesper Buus; Salvail, Louis

    2012-01-01

    We provide the first two-party protocol allowing Alice and Bob to evaluate privately even against active adversaries any completely positive, trace-preserving map , given as a quantum circuit, upon their joint quantum input state . Our protocol leaks no more to any active adversary than an ideal ...... functionality for provided Alice and Bob have the cryptographic resources for active secure two-party classical computation. Our protocol is constructed from the protocol for the same task secure against specious adversaries presented in [4]....

  3. Cardiovascular effects of saffron and its active constituents: A review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Marjan Razavi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available (Crocus sativus L. Commonly known as saffron, is a perennial stem less herb of the iridaceae family, widely cultivated in Iran and other countries. It is used as a flavoring and coloring agent for many thousands of years. In traditional medicine, saffron has been used for various purposes including abortion, as a fever reducer, an analgesic, expectorant, antispasmodic, aphrodisiac, sedative, digestive and a carminative. Various pharmacological studies have been described that saffron and its constituents exhibit different beneficial properties, including antioxidant, anticancer, anticonvulsant, antiischemic, antigenotoxic, antidote, antiapoptotic, antitussive, antidepressive, sedative and hypnotic, hypolipidemic, antinociceptive and antiinflammatory effects. Research projects have also revealed that saffron also exhibits protective effects against cardiovascular diseases including cardiac ischemia, arrhythmia, hypertension and atherosclerosis. In this review article, the effects of saffron and its active constituents on cardiovascular system were introduced.

  4. Evaluation of Specific Activity in the Primary Coolant of PWRs by using SAEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ha Yong; Song, Jae Seung; Kim, Keung Ku; Kim, Kyo Youn

    2008-07-01

    SAEP(Specific Activity Evaluation Program) to evaluate specific activities in the primary coolant of reactors due to fission products has been developed, which can be applied to the new concept nuclear reactor such as SMART as well as commercial PWRs in existence. Specific activities in the primary coolant were evaluated by using SAEP against reactor plants which are being operated currently in South Korea, respectively. We study the possibility of being applied to the developing commercial PWRs and the new concept reactors through the comparison the results by using SAEP with the results mentioned in the FSARs. We also verify SAEP itself through this evaluation. From the evaluation results, we know that the general trend is agreed with each other from the viewpoint of order of magnitude and that SAEP correctly executes the evaluation of specific activities in the primary coolant of reactor due to fission products for several reactor types, regardless of a reactor type. Therefore, SAEP can widely be applied to the new concept nuclear reactor development phase as well as already developed PWRs

  5. Presentation of the decay data group activities at LPRI. (Links with international evaluation works)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Be, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    The activities of the Primary Ionizing Radiation Laboratory (LPRI) which is affiliated with the French National Bureau of Metrology (BNM), include evaluation of decay data, absolute activity measurements, X- and gamma-ray spectrometry, development of new measuring techniques, etc. The following three activities in the field of decay data evaluation are briefly presented: NUCLEIDE software, internal conversion coefficients, and nuclide evaluations

  6. Kolaviron and vitamin E ameliorate hematotoxicity and oxidative stress in brains of prepubertal rats treated with an anticonvulsant phenytoin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owoeye, Olatunde; Adedara, Isaac A; Bakare, Oluwafemi S; Adeyemo, Oluwatobi A; Egun, Christa; Farombi, Ebenezer O

    2014-06-01

    Phenytoin (PHT), an anticonvulsant agent, widely used for the treatment of epilepsy has been reported to exhibit toxic side effects. The present study investigated the protective effects of kolaviron and vitamin E on hematotoxicity and neurotoxicity induced by phenytoin, in prepubertal male rats. The animals were treated with PHT (75 mg/kg) separately or in combination with either kolaviron (200 mg/kg) or vitamin E (500 mg/kg) for 14 days. Phenytoin treatment significantly decreased the hemoglobin, white blood cells, lymphocytes and mean corpuscular volume levels without affecting red blood cell, packed cell volume, neutrophils, mean corpuscular hemoglobin and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration when compared with the control rats. There was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation and hydrogen peroxide levels with marked depletion in antioxidant status in brains of PHT-treated rats when compared with the control. Although PHT treatment had no effect on the granular layer, widest diameter of Purkinje cells and Purkinje layer of the cerebellum, it significantly reduced its molecular layer and the density of Purkinje cell. Administration of PHT significantly reduced the densities of the granule cells of the dentate gyrus and the pyramidal neurons of the cornu ammonis of hippocampus proper. Co-treatment with kolaviron and vitamin E effectively reversed the PHT-mediated alterations in the hematology, brain antioxidant status and histomorphometry when compared to PHT only. Taken together, the present data indicate the abilities of kolaviron and vitamin E to ameliorate phenytoin-induced hematotoxicity and oxidative stress in brains of rats.

  7. Synthesis and evaluation of antioxidant and antimicrobial activities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To synthesize and evaluate Schiff base Tin (II) complexes for antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. Methods: The complexes of Tin (II) chloride with various Schiff base derivative of 2-Hydroxy-1- naphthaldehyde (HN) were synthesized and characterized by various physiochemical techniques, including elemental ...

  8. Evaluation of Prompted Annotation of Activity Data Recorded from a Smart Phone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Cleland

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss the design and evaluation of a mobile based tool to collect activity data on a large scale. The current approach, based on an existing activity recognition module, recognizes class transitions from a set of specific activities (for example walking and running to the standing still activity. Once this transition is detected the system prompts the user to provide a label for their previous activity. This label, along with the raw sensor data, is then stored locally prior to being uploaded to cloud storage. The system was evaluated by ten users. Three evaluation protocols were used, including a structured, semi-structured and free living protocol. Results indicate that the mobile application could be used to allow the user to provide accurate ground truth labels for their activity data. Similarities of up to 100% where observed when comparing the user prompted labels and those from an observer during structured lab based experiments. Further work will examine data segmentation and personalization issues in order to refine the system.

  9. A framework for evaluating community-based physical activity promotion programmes in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Thomas L; Librett, John; Neiman, Andrea; Pratt, Michael; Salmon, Art

    2006-01-01

    A growing interest in promoting physical activity through multi-sectoral community-based programmes has highlighted the need for effective programme evaluation. Meeting in Rio de Janeiro, an international workgroup of behavioural, medical, public health and other scientists and practitioners endorsed the principle of careful evaluation of all programmes and in a consensus process developed the Rio de Janeiro Recommendations for Evaluation of Physical Activity Interventions". Among these recommendations and principles were that when possible, evaluation should 'built into' the programme from the beginning. The workgroup also called for adequate funding for evaluation, setting a goal of about 10% of programme resources for evaluation. The group also determined that evaluations should be developed in conjunction with and the results shared with all appropriate stakeholders in the programme; evaluations should be guided by ethical standards such as those proposed by the American Evaluation Association and should assess programme processes as well as outcomes; evaluation outcomes should be used to revise and refine ongoing programmes and guide decisions about programme continuation or expansion. It was also recognised that additional training in programme evaluation is needed and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Physical Activity Evaluation Handbook could be easily adapted for use in culturally diverse communities, especially in Latin America. This paper describes a 6-step evaluation process and provides the full set of recommendations from the Rio de Janeiro Workgroup. The handbook has been translated and additional case studies from Colombia and Brazil have been added. Spanish and Portuguese language editions of the Evaluation Handbook are available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Physical Activity and Health Branch.

  10. Performance in Physiology Evaluation: Possible Improvement by Active Learning Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montrezor, Luís H.

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation process is complex and extremely important in the teaching/learning process. Evaluations are constantly employed in the classroom to assist students in the learning process and to help teachers improve the teaching process. The use of active methodologies encourages students to participate in the learning process, encourages…

  11. Evaluation methods for physical activity-promoting mobile technologies: an interdisciplinary scoping review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire McCallum

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available There are many thousands of mobile apps, wearables and other technologies available to support and promote physical activity. However, the rapidly evolving nature of these technologies means that the methodologies traditionally used to evaluate the effectiveness of behaviour change interventions (such as the randomised controlled trial may not be appropriate to evaluate their effectiveness. A scoping review was conducted to identify the methods currently being used to evaluate physical activity-promoting mobile technologies across health and computing science disciplines. In addition to the range of methods used, the review explored their strengths and weaknesses. The results improve understandings of when and why to use existing methods from health and computing science. Opportunities for combining and hybridising methods across the two disciplines are also identified. The review will be used to inform the development and piloting of novel, ‘fit-for-purpose’ research designs that will allow rigorous evaluation of the effectiveness of rapidly-evolving physical activity-promoting mobile technologies and their ‘active ingredients’ to build an evidence base of what works, why and for whom.

  12. Safety and efficacy of levetiracetam for the treatment of partial onset seizures in children from one month of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cormier J

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Justine Cormier, Catherine J ChuMassachusetts General Hospital, Department of Neurology, Programs in Child Neurology and Neurophysiology, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder in the pediatric population, affecting up to one percent of children, and for which the mainstay of treatment is anticonvulsant medication. Despite the frequent use of anticonvulsant drugs, remarkably little is known about the safety and efficacy of most of these medications in the pediatric epilepsy population. Of 34 anticonvulsants currently approved for use by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA, only 13 have been approved for use in children. Although infants and young children are disproportionately affected by epilepsy, there are currently only three anticonvulsant medications that have been specifically evaluated and approved for use in children younger than 2 years of age. In 2012, the FDA approved levetiracetam as an adjunctive treatment for partial onset seizures in infants and children from one month of age. Here we review the available data on levetiracetam in the pediatric epilepsy population. We first discuss the pharmacological profile of levetiracetam, including its mechanism of action, formulations and dosing, and pharmacokinetics in children. We then review the available efficacy, safety, and tolerability data in children from one month of age with partial onset seizures. We conclude that the current data leading to the approval of levetiracetam for use in infants and children with partial onset seizures is encouraging, although more work needs to be done before definitive conclusions can be drawn about the efficacy of levetiracetam across different pediatric age groups.Keywords: levetiracetam, anticonvulsant drug, partial seizures, pediatric epilepsy

  13. T cell-dependent B-cell proliferation and activation induced by administration of the drug diphenylhydantoin to mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gleichmann, H