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Sample records for anticoincidence

  1. Anticoincidence logic using PALs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the functioning principle of an anticoincidence logic and a design of this based on programing logic. The circuit was included in a discriminator of an equipment for single-photon absorptiometry

  2. Mercuric Iodide Anticoincidence Shield for Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to utilize a new detector material, polycrystalline mercuric iodide, for background suppression by active anticoincidence shielding in gamma-ray...

  3. Mercuric Iodide Anticoincidence Shield for Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We utilize a new detector material, polycrystalline mercuric iodide, for background suppression by active anticoincidence shielding in gamma-ray spectrometers. Two...

  4. Absolute standardization of 106Ru by anti-coincidence method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The system of absolute standardization activity of radionuclide by anti-coincidence counting and live-time techniques was implemented at LNMRI in 2008 to reduce the impacts of some influence factors in the determination of the activity with coincidence counting technique used for decades in the lab, for example, the measurement time. With the anti-coincidence system, the variety of radionuclides that can be calibrated by LNMRI was increased, in relation to the type of decay. The objective of this work is the standardization of 106Ru by the method of counting anti-coincidence and estimate its measurement uncertainties. (author)

  5. Anticoincidence and differential measuring arrangement for radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For discontinuous measurement of radioactive substances in air, water, food, soil samples, and for potash determination, anticoincidence and differential measuring arrangements with large-area counters are used. By a number of measures, the background is effectively reduced. With anticoincidence measuring arrangements, low alpha and beta activities may also be detected. With differential measurements, substances are measured whose activities are not extremely low. Further applications are simultaneous alpha and alpha/beta measurements and the specific measurement of the man-made alpha component in air. (orig.)

  6. The ZEPLIN-III Anti-Coincidence Veto Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Akimov, D Yu; Barnes, E J; Belov, V A; Burenkov, A A; Chepel, V; Currie, A; Edwards, B; Francis, V; Ghag, C; Hollingsworth, A; Horn, M; Kalmus, G E; Kobyakin, A S; Kovalenko, A G; Lebedenko, V N; Lindote, A; Lopes, M I; Lüscher, R; Lyons, K; Majewski, P; Murphy, A St J; Neves, F; Paling, S M; da Cunha, J Pinto; Preece, R; Quenby, J J; Reichhart, L; Scovell, P R; Solovov, V N; Smith, N J T; Smith, P F; Stekhanov, V N; Sumner, T J; Taylor, R; Thorne, C; Walker, R J

    2010-01-01

    The design, optimisation and construction of an anti-coincidence veto detector to complement the ZEPLIN-III direct dark matter search instrument is described. One tonne of plastic scintillator is arranged into 52 bars individually read out by photomultipliers and coupled to a gadolinium-loaded passive polypropylene shield. Particular attention has been paid to radiological content. The overall aim has been to achieve a veto detector of low threshold and high efficiency without the creation of additional background in ZEPLIN-III, all at a reasonable cost. Extensive experimental measurements of the components have been made, including radioactivity levels and performance characteristics. These have been used to inform a complete end-to-end Monte Carlo simulation that has then been used to calculate the expected performance of the new instrument, both operating alone and as an anti-coincidence detector for ZEPLIN-III. The veto device will be capable of rejecting over 65% of coincident nuclear recoil events from ...

  7. The ZEPLIN-III Anti-Coincidence Veto Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Akimov, D. Yu.; Araujo, H. M.; Barnes, E. J.; Belov, V. A.; Burenkov, A. A.; Chepel, V.; Currie, A.; B. Edwards; Francis, V.; Ghag, C.; Hollingsworth, A; M Horn; Kalmus, G. E.; Kobyakin, A. S.; Kovalenko, A. G.

    2010-01-01

    The design, optimisation and construction of an anti-coincidence veto detector to complement the ZEPLIN-III direct dark matter search instrument is described. One tonne of plastic scintillator is arranged into 52 bars individually read out by photomultipliers and coupled to a gadolinium-loaded passive polypropylene shield. Particular attention has been paid to radiological content. The overall aim has been to achieve a veto detector of low threshold and high efficiency without the creation of...

  8. Mercuric Iodide Anticoincidence Shield for Gamma-Ray Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartsough, Neal; Iwanczyk, Jan

    2009-01-01

    A film-growth process was developed for polycrystalline mercuric iodide that creates cost-effective, large-area detectors for high-energy charged-particle detection. A material, called a barrier film, is introduced onto the substrate before the normal mercuric iodide film growth process. The barrier film improves the quality of the normal film grown and enhances the adhesion between the film and the substrate. The films grown using this improved technique were found to have adequate signal-to-noise properties so that individual high-energy charged -particle interactions could be distinguished from noise, and thus, could be used to provide an anticoincidence veto function as desired.

  9. IXO-XMS LVSID Anti-Coincidence Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Scott F.; Kilbourne, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    This document describes a high-TRL backup implementation of the anti-coincidence detector for the IXO/XMS instrument. The backup detector, hereafter referred to as the low-voltage silicon ionization detector (LVSID), has been successfully flown on Astro-E2 (Suzaku)/XRS and is currently being implemented, without significant changes, on the Astro-H/SXS instrument. The LVSID anti-coincidence detector on Astro-E2/XRS operated successfully for almost 2 years, and was not affected by the loss of liquid helium in that instrument. The LVSID continues to operate after almost 5 years on-orbit (LEO, 550 km) but with slightly increased noise following the expected depletion of solid Neon after 22 months. The noise of the device is increased after the loss of sNe due to thermally induced bias and readout noise. No radiation damage, or off-nominal affects have been observed with the LVSID on-orbit during the Astro-E2/XRS program. A detector die from the same fabrication run will be used on the Astro-H/SXS mission. The LVSID technology and cryogenic JFET readout system is thus TRL 9. The technology is described in detail in section 2. The IXO/XMS "backup-up" anti-coincidence detector is a small array of LVSID detectors that are almost identical to those employed for Astro -E2/XRS as described in this document. The readout system is identical and, infact would use the same design as the Astro -E2/XRS JFET amplifier module (19 channels) essentially without changes except for its mechanical mount. The changes required for the IXO/XMS LVSID array are limited to the mounting of the LVSID detectors, and the mechanical mounting of the JFET amplifier sub-assembly. There is no technical development needed for the IXO/XMS implementation and the technology is ready for detailed design-work leading to PDR. The TRL level is thus at least 6, and possibly higher. Characteristics of an IXO/XMS LVSID anti-co detector are given in Table 1 and described in detail in section 3.

  10. Simplified slow anti-coincidence circuit for Compton suppression systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slow coincidence circuits for the anti-coincidence measurements have been considered for use in Compton suppression technique. The simplified version of the slow circuit has been found to be fast enough, satisfactory and allows an easy system setup, particularly with the advantage of the automatic threshold setting of the low-level discrimination. A well-type NaI detector as the main detector surrounded by plastic guard detector has been arranged to investigate the performance of the Compton suppression spectrometer using the simplified slow circuit. The system has been tested to observe the improvement in the energy spectra for medium to high-energy gamma-ray photons from terrestrial and environmental samples

  11. Simplified slow anti-coincidence circuit for Compton suppression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Azmi, Darwish

    2008-08-01

    Slow coincidence circuits for the anti-coincidence measurements have been considered for use in Compton suppression technique. The simplified version of the slow circuit has been found to be fast enough, satisfactory and allows an easy system setup, particularly with the advantage of the automatic threshold setting of the low-level discrimination. A well-type NaI detector as the main detector surrounded by plastic guard detector has been arranged to investigate the performance of the Compton suppression spectrometer using the simplified slow circuit. The system has been tested to observe the improvement in the energy spectra for medium to high-energy gamma-ray photons from terrestrial and environmental samples. PMID:18222698

  12. Optical optimization for anti-coincidence detectors of a Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun-Long; Zhang, Chen; Zhang, Zhao; Fu, Min-Xue; Chen, Yi-Bao; Zhao, Dong-Hua; Deng, Jing-Kang; Shang, Ren-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The anti-coincidence detectors of Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT) are designed to suppress the X-ray background induced by incident charged cosmic-ray particles. The main components of anti-coincidence detectors are thin flat plastic scintillators. In this work we apply the TracePro program to study the light transfer features in the scintillators, and we propose several optimized reflector configurations to significantly improve the light transfer efficiency. The simulation results are verified by measurements of the detector prototypes. We chose a particular optimized reflector configuration.

  13. Development of a TES-Based Anti-Coincidence Detector for Future X-ray Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Microcalorimeters onboard future x-ray observatories require an anti-coincidence detector to remove environmental backgrounds. In order to most effectively integrate this anticoincidence detector with the main microcalorimeter array, both instruments should use similar read-out technology. The detectors used in the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) use a phonon measurement technique that is well suited for an anti-coincidence detector with a microcalorimeter array using SQUID readout. This technique works by using a transition-edge sensor (TES) connected to superconducting collection fins to measure the athermal phonon signal produced when an event occurs in the substrate crystal. Energy from the event propagates through the crystal to the superconducting collection fins, creating quasiparticles, which are then trapped as they enter the TES where they produce a signal. We are currently developing a prototype anti-coincidence detector for future x-ray missions and have recently fabricated test devices with Mo/Au TESs and Al collection fins. We will present results from the first tests of these devices which indicate a proof of concept that quasiparticle trapping is occurring in these materials.

  14. Development of a TES-Based Anti-Coincidence Detector for Future X-Ray Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Catherine N.; Adams, J. S.; Bandler, S. R.; Eckart, M. E.; Ewin, A. J.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Sultana, M.

    2012-01-01

    Microcalorimeters onboard future x-ray observatories require an anticoincidence detector to remove environmental backgrounds. In order to most effectively integrate this anti-coincidence detector with the main microcalorimeter array, both instruments should use similar read-out technology. The detectors used in the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) use a phonon measurement technique that is well suited for an anti-coincidence detector with a microcalorimeter array using SQUID readout. This technique works by using a transition-edge sensor (TES) connected to superconducting collection fins to measure the athermal phonon signal produced when an event occurs in the substrate crystal. Energy from the event propagates through the crystal to the superconducting collection fins, creating quasiparticles, which are then trapped as they enter the TES where they produce a signal. We are currently developing a prototype anti-coincidence detector for future x-ray missions and have recently fabricated test devices with Mo/Au TESs and Al collection fins. We present results from the first tests of these devices which indicate a proof of concept that quasiparticle trapping is occurring in these materials.

  15. Low-level beta activity measurements by simultaneous anticoincidence and difference counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-level beta activity measurements are extensively performed for environmental radioactivity surveillance and radiation protection. The measurement is affected by a large number of external influences. The varying background due to changes in natural or man-made radiation is an important disturbing factor. In order to overcome this difficulty in a simple manner the capabilities offered by the simultaneous anticoincidence and difference counting have been investigated. A comparative study of these techniques has been developed and a measuring system has been constructed. The main components of the system are: a programmable multi-scaler which can perform a wide range of operations, an anticoincidence circuit and a sandwich of two large-area G-M detectors. The multi-scaler is endowed with an appropriate software which allows all operations to be performed via keyboard in an interactive fashion. The detectors were selected in order to have the same background (∼6 cps) and the same gamma response, within 10%, in the energy range from 60 keV to 1.3 MeV. From the theoretical and experimental results the following conclusions can be drawn: anticoincidence technique gives comparable or more accurate results than difference technique when background is stable; for varying backgrounds, difference-mode counting gives much more accurate results than anticoincidence counting, provided that the difference in response between detectors and the nonuniformity of the radiation field are small. Based on these conclusions an analysis program has been developed in order to decide on the best option. In conclusion, a software-aided counting technique has been implemented for low beta activity measurements both in normal conditions and in emergency situations. (author)

  16. Time-pickoff techniques for an extramely low-background anticoincidence spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of the time-pickoff techniques on resolving time and of the resolving time on background suppression factor have been examined for a Ge-NaI(Tl) anticoincidence spectrometer. This spectrometer was designed to measure extremely low-level radioactivity. A 14.9 %-relative-efficiency Ge crystal served as the spectroscopy detector and was operated in the slow anticoincidence with the two NaI(Tl) crystals of which sizes were 8'' diam. x 8'' long(annulus type) and 3'' diam. x 3'' long(solid type). The detector system was placed inside a shield consisted of 10 cm-thick lead plates and 5 cm-thick steel armour plates. When the spectrometer was operated in the mode of Constant Fraction-Leading Edge(CF-LE) time-pickoff, the most effective suppression of the secondary cosmic-ray background was achieved with the shortest resolving time of 0.80 μs. In the case of CF-CF time-pickoff, the resolving time of 2.5 μs was necessary to obtain the same suppression effect as in the CF-LE time-pickoff. The count-rate of background continuum of the anticoincidence spectrum was reduced to 7.5 x 10-5 counts/s.keV at 661 keV and to 2.3 x 10-5 counts/s.keV at 1332 keV. These low count-rates resulted in an average reduction of the single-spectrum background of approx. 80 %. Lower limit of detection of the spectrometer for 137Cs activity was evaluated to be 7.4 pCi +- 10 % and 1.5 pCi +- 30 % when the count-time was 40 k seconds. (author)

  17. Random vibration tests of the anticoincidence system of the PAMELA satellite experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PAMELA is a general purpose cosmic ray satellite experiment which will be launched early in 2003. An anticoincidence system surrounds the PAMELA silicon tracker to reject particles not clearly entering the acceptance of the experiment. The engineering model of the PAMELA anticounter system uses plastic scintillator which is read out by Hamamatsu R5900U photomultipliers. The anticounters have been subjected to the random vibration spectrum expected during the launch of PAMELA. The integrated amplitude experienced by the photomultipliers was O(20) g RMS. No degradation to the photomultiplier operation or mechanical assembly was observed

  18. Design and Performance of the Astro-E/XRS Microcalorimeter Array and Anti-Coincidence Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahle, C. K.; Audley, M. D.; Boyce, K. R.; Brekosky, R. P.; Fujimoto, R.; Gendreau, K. C.; Gygax, J. D.; Ishisaki, Y.; Kelley, R. L.; McClanahan, R. A.

    1999-01-01

    The XRS instrument has an array of 32 micro-calorimeters at the focal plane. These calorimeters consist of ion-implanted silicon thermistors and HgTe thermalizing x-ray absorbers. These devices have demonstrated a resolution of 9 eV at 3 keV and 11 eV at 6 keV. We will discuss the basic physical parameters of this array, including the array layout, thermal conductance of the link to the heat sink, operating temperature, thermistor size, absorber choice, and means of attaching the absorber to the thermistor bearing element. We will present representative performance data, though a more detailed presentation of the results of the instrument calibration is presented elsewhere in these proceedings. A silicon ionization detector is located behind the calorimeter array and serves to reject events due to cosmic rays. We will briefly describe this anti-coincidence detector and its performance in conjunction with the array.

  19. The Anti-Coincidence Detector for the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moiseev, A.A.; Hartman, R.C.; Ormes, J.F.; Thompson, D.J.; Amato, M.J.; Johnson, T.E.; Segal, K.N.; Sheppard, D.A.

    2007-03-23

    This paper describes the design, fabrication and testing of the Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD) for the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT). The ACD is LAT's first-level defense against the charged cosmic ray background that outnumbers the gamma rays by 3-5 orders of magnitude. The ACD covers the top and 4 sides of the LAT tracking detector, requiring a total active area of {approx}8.3 square meters. The ACD detector utilizes plastic scintillator tiles with wave-length shifting fiber readout. In order to suppress self-veto by shower particles at high gamma-ray energies, the ACD is segmented into 89 tiles of different sizes. The overall ACD efficiency for detection of singly charged relativistic particles entering the tracking detector from the top or sides of the LAT exceeds the required 0.9997.

  20. The Anticoincidence System of the PAMELA Satellite Experiment : Design of the data acquisition system and performance studies

    OpenAIRE

    Lundquist, Johan

    2005-01-01

    PAMELA is a satellite-borne cosmic ray experiment. Its primary scientific objective is to study the antiproton and positron components of the cosmic radiation. This will be done with unprecedented statistics over a wide energy range (~10MeV to ~100GeV). The PAMELA experiment consists of a permanent magnetic spectrometer, an electromagnetic calorimeter, a Time-of-Fight system, a neutron detector and a shower tail catcher. An anticoincidence (AC) system surrounds the spectrometer to detect part...

  1. A high-resolution, multi-parameter, β-γ coincidence, μ-γ anticoincidence system for radioxenon measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-resolution β-γ coincidence measurement system has been developed by combining a high-purity broad energy germanium and a silicon surface barrier detector. The system is intended for calibration of reference spikes and re-measurement of CTBT samples, by detection of coincident β-γ or conversion electron and X-ray radiation of the four radioxenon isotopes 131mXe, 133mXe, 133Xe and 135Xe. The use of a high-resolution, list-mode, multi-parameter data acquisition system allows off-line setup and optimization of the (anti)coincidence. A 166mHo β-γ source has been produced and validated for energy calibration and system check. The β-γ coincidence has been further enhanced by a cosmic muon veto based on six plastic scintillation detectors. The μ-γ anticoincidence has been implemented using a 50 ns resolution real-time clock for time spectroscopy. This method has been verified by running conventional TAC-ADC (combined time-amplitude and analog-digital converter) based time spectroscopy in parallel. The whole measurement system has been characterized, by measuring various radioxenon spikes and backgrounds with and without (anti)coincidence. Peak efficiencies and minimum detectable activities (MDA) for the main radioxenon isotopes have been determined. Application of μ-γ anticoincidence reduced the MDA by about a factor of two for all four radioxenon isotopes. Complementary adoption of β-γ coincidence further reduced the MDA for the metastable isotopes by more than an order of magnitude. The MDA for 135Xe reaches about 6 mBq after 1 day of measurement. For 131mXe, 133Xe and 133mXe a MDA of about 2 mBq is obtained after one week measurement.

  2. Analysis of FDA in-house food reference materials with anticoincidence INAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-house reference material (IRM) cocoa powder (CCP) has been in use at US Food and Drug Administration laboratories for about 15 years. A single lot of commercial material was originally characterized for 32 elements by several laboratories and five techniques. A unique approach for basis weight determination based upon ambient relative humidity was developed for CCP, eliminating the need for dry weight determinations. The CCP Reference Sheet is updated by incorporating new results approximately every 5 years. The last update occurred in 2006. As part of an effort to revalidate and update values for CCP, anticoincidence instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was used to determine mass fractions for 16 of the originally characterized elements, as well as to provide information on 16 other elements. Results were in very good agreement with 2006 Reference Sheet values. A new candidate IRM, fresh-frozen swordfish (FFSF) powder, was produced by adding inorganic As, Cd, Cr, Hg, Pb, Sb, and Se to liquid nitrogen-frozen commercial swordfish filets which were then homogenized. Portions of FFSF were analyzed by INAA to provide mass fraction and homogeneity information for As, Cd, Cr, Hg, Sb, and Se as well as for eight other elements occurring naturally in the material. Non-homogeneities were ≤2.5 % for As, Br, Cd, and Cs, and ≤1.8 % for Cr, Hg, Rb, Sb, and Se. Certified reference materials DORM-3 Fish Protein powder and fresh-frozen SRM 1947 Lake Michigan Fish Tissue were analyzed as controls. (author)

  3. Low-level beta activity measurements by simultaneous anticoincidence and difference counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The variable background is an important disturbing factor for low-level activity measurements by beta counting. In order to overcome this difficulty in a simple manner, a software-aided technique of simultaneous beta counting in anticoincidence and difference has been established. The technique is based on a programmable multichannel scaler provided with appropriate software for data analysis. Using a counting system containing a sandwich of two large area GM detectors, a Tl-204 source having the emission rate of 30.5 s-1 has been measured. A gamma background was simulated by two point gamma sources (Cs-37, Co-60). An exposure rate of 2.58x10 Ci/Kg · s (50 times higher than the natural background) was obtained at the detector walls with the sources unshielded. The variation of the gamma background was produced by shielding intermittently both sources. The counting time was 1000 s. The experimental results showed that the emission rate was accurately measured (a relative standard uncertainty of 10 was obtained) although the measurement was strongly disturbed by the variation of the gamma background. In conclusion, a software-aided counting technique has been developed for activity measurements in varying backgrounds. For routine radioactivity measurements it has the advantage of evidencing random variations of the background and seems suitable for emergency radioactivity measurements. (authors)

  4. Determination iodine in biological materials using instrumental neutron activation and anti-coincidence gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iodine is an element of interest in nutritional research. Its lower limit of safe and adequate daily dietary intake for adults varies between 150 and 200 micrograms per day. In the present study, an epithermal instrumental neutron activation analysis (EINAA) method in conjunction with anti-coincidence counting has been developed for the determination of ppb levels of iodine in individual food items. Typically 200-300 mg of a sample are irradiated for 10 or 20 minutes at the Dalhousie University SLOWPOKE-2 reactor in an epithermal flux of 1x1011 n cm-2 s-1, followed by 1 min decay and then counting for 30 min. The 443-keV gamma-ray of 128I is used for measuring iodine content by anti-coincidence counting. The anti-coincidence spectrometer consists of a 25% HPGe detector surrounded by a 10''x10'' NaI(TI) annulus and a 3''x3'' NaI(TI) plug. This system has a peak-to-Compton ratio of about 650 to 1 for the 661.6-keV photopeak of 137Cs. The Compton background resulting from the scattering of many gamma-rays of energies higher than 443 keV can be reduced by a factor of about 4 using anti-coincidence counting compared to conventional counting. The detection limit for iodine can be improved by a factor of 2 to 5 depending on the sample matrix, dead time, position of the annulus and counting geometry among several other factors.The lowest detection limit of 5 ppb can be achieved for low-salt foods. This limit is comparable to that obtained by a preconcentration NAA (PNAA) method. However, a detection limit of 20 ppb is more realistic for samples containing high amounts of Na, Cl and Al. The results obtained for many reference materials are in good agreement with the certified values and those reported by the PNAA method. Details of the methods and results will be reported

  5. Determination iodine in biological materials using instrumental neutron activation and anti-coincidence gamma-ray spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, W.H.; Chatt, A. [Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada). Radiochemistry Research Laboratory

    1997-10-01

    Iodine is an element of interest in nutritional research. Its lower limit of safe and adequate daily dietary intake for adults varies between 150 and 200 micrograms per day. In the present study, an epithermal instrumental neutron activation analysis (EINAA) method in conjunction with anti-coincidence counting has been developed for the determination of ppb levels of iodine in individual food items. Typically 200-300 mg of a sample are irradiated for 10 or 20 minutes at the Dalhousie University SLOWPOKE-2 reactor in an epithermal flux of 1x10{sup 11} n cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, followed by 1 min decay and then counting for 30 min. The 443-keV gamma-ray of {sup 128}I is used for measuring iodine content by anti-coincidence counting. The anti-coincidence spectrometer consists of a 25% HPGe detector surrounded by a 10``x10`` NaI(TI) annulus and a 3``x3`` NaI(TI) plug. This system has a peak-to-Compton ratio of about 650 to 1 for the 661.6-keV photopeak of {sup 137}Cs. The Compton background resulting from the scattering of many gamma-rays of energies higher than 443 keV can be reduced by a factor of about 4 using anti-coincidence counting compared to conventional counting. The detection limit for iodine can be improved by a factor of 2 to 5 depending on the sample matrix, dead time, position of the annulus and counting geometry among several other factors.The lowest detection limit of 5 ppb can be achieved for low-salt foods. This limit is comparable to that obtained by a preconcentration NAA (PNAA) method. However, a detection limit of 20 ppb is more realistic for samples containing high amounts of Na, Cl and Al. The results obtained for many reference materials are in good agreement with the certified values and those reported by the PNAA method. Details of the methods and results will be reported 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  6. Evaluation of INAA-anticoincidence counting for measuring nanogram levels of vanadium in relatively high-salt nutritional reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An instrumental neutron activation analysis method in conjunction with anticoincidence counting (INAA-AC) gamma-ray spectrometry was developed for the determination of ppb levels of V in biological, mostly nutritional, reference materials containing varying amounts of salt. The method involved irradiation in the Dalhousie University SLOWPOKE-2 reactor facility at a fission neutron flux of 5 × 1011 cm-2 s-1 for 1 min, decay for 1 min, and counting for 10 min. In order to fully investigate the extent of improvement that can possibly be obtained for V determination by INAA–AC, a theoretical term called the analytical figure of merit was developed and applied to 16 National Institute of Standards and Technology and International Atomic Energy Agency reference materials. The overall background around the 1,434.1-keV photopeak of 52V was reduced by a factor of 5-10 for several materials in the anticoincidence counting mode. The detection limits were lowered by factors of 3-5 in INAA-AC (0.61-9.4 μg kg-1) compared to conventional INAA (1.9-79 μg kg-1) in samples with varying ratios of Na/V (0.24-1,000), Cl/V (0.12-1,827), Al/V (7.45-115) and Mn/V (1.84-66.9) making rapid and reliable V measurements possible at sub-ppb levels without any chemical separation. (author)

  7. Design and development of the EGRET-ACS (Energetic Gamma Ray Telescope Anticoincidence Subsystem) for the GRO (Gamma Ray Observatory)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the above mentioned contract under appointment of the DFVLR and in cooperation with MPE, MBB has developed and manufactured the EGRET-ACS to guarantee the best effort of the GSFC spark-chamber. The MBB part of the ACS was the development and manufacturing of the structure and the Veto-Dome. The ACE (Anticoincidence Electronic) was DFVLR provided hardware and has been integrated and tested at MBB. The ACE will not be part of this final report. It has been demonstrated in manifold tests that the existing ACS complies with the experiment requirements and has been handed over to NASA at GSFC after a successful final acceptance test. Due to excellent cooperation with the customer (DFVLR) and the experimentator (MPE) it was obtained that delays in the project-schedule have been avoided with regard to the ACS-structure and the DFVLR provided hardware. With 2 refs., 4 tabs., 48 figs

  8. A search for double-electron capture in 74Se using coincidence/anticoincidence gamma-ray spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Jeskovsky, M; Kovacik, A; Povinec, P P; Puppe, P; Stanicek, J; Sykora, I; Simkovic, F; Thies, J H

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of single, coincidence and anticoincidence gamma-ray spectrometry methods has been carried out with the aim to search for double-electron capture in 74Se. This process is unique, because there is probability for transition to the 2+ excited state in 74Ge (1204 keV), and de-excitation through two gamma-quanta cascade with energies of 595.9 keV and 608.4 keV. Long-term measurements with anticosmic shielded HPGe spectrometer and the coincidence HPGe-NaI(Tl) spectrometer did not show any evidence for the double-electron capture in 74Se. The best limit for the half-life of the double electron capture in 74Se (both for the neutrinoless and two neutrino processes) was estimated to be >1.5x10E19 years.

  9. Monte Carlo based approach to the LS–NaI 4πβ–γ anticoincidence extrapolation and uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, R

    2016-03-01

    The 4πβ–γ anticoincidence method is used for the primary standardization of β−, β+, electron capture (EC), α, and mixed-mode radionuclides. Efficiency extrapolation using one or more γ ray coincidence gates is typically carried out by a low-order polynomial fit. The approach presented here is to use a Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulation of the detector system to analyze the efficiency extrapolation. New code was developed to account for detector resolution, direct γ ray interaction with the PMT, and implementation of experimental β-decay shape factors. The simulation was tuned to 57Co and 60Co data, then tested with 99mTc data, and used in measurements of 18F, 129I, and 124I. The analysis method described here offers a more realistic activity value and uncertainty than those indicated from a least-squares fit alone. PMID:27358944

  10. Gamma-ray bursts observed by the INTEGRAL-SPI anticoincidence shield: A study of individual pulses and temporal variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryde, F.; Borgonovo, L.; Larsson, S.;

    2003-01-01

    We study a set of 28 GRB light-curves detected between 15 December 2002 and 9 June 2003 by the anti-coincidence shield of the spectrometer (SPI) of INTEGRAL. During this period it has detected 50 bursts, that have been confirmed by other instruments, with a time resolution of 50 ms. First, we...... power-law with index of 1.60+/-0.05 and a break between 1-2 Hz. Fourth, we also discuss the background and noise levels. We found that the background noise has a Gaussian distribution and its power is independent of frequency, i.e., it is white noise. However, it does not follow a Poisson statistic...

  11. Beta dose rates derived from gamma spectroscopy and low beta anticoincident system of various environmental materials, mainly of archaeological origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beta dose-rates (BDR) have been derived from tephras, pumices and pottery of archaeological origin. The BDRs were obtained from two counting systems: (1) gamma spectrometry through appropriate conversion of gamma activity to U, Th, 40K concentration values, and (2) by counting total beta, using a gas-flow sample detector in an anticoincidence mode of counting. Assuming radioactive equilibrium in the U and Th series, the two methods of obtaining BDRs are compared. The degree of disequilibrium, the calibration, and radon escape are critically considered. The employment of either method to swift BDR measurements for the TL dating is discussed. The radioactivity measurements of tephras were used also to provenance those, as Santorini volcano might had not been the only eruption in the Aegean in the 2nd mill. B.C., it might have experienced more than one eruptive phase. BDRs in the samples ranged from 13 to about 470 mrads/year and the agreement between the two methods were in general satisfactory. 12 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  12. Characterization of a Prototype TES-Based Anti-coincidence Detector for Use with Future X-ray Calorimeter Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, S. E.; Yoon, W. S.; Adams, J. S.; Bailey, C. N.; Bandler, S. R.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckart, M. E.; Ewin, A. J.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Lee, S.-J.; Porst, J.-P.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Sultana, M.

    2016-07-01

    For future X-ray observatories utilizing transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeters, an anti-coincidence detector (anti-co) is required to discriminate X-ray (˜ 0.1-10 keV) signals from non-X-ray background events, such as ionizing particles. We have developed a prototype anti-co that utilizes TESs, which will be compatible with the TES focal-plane arrays planned for future X-ray observatories. This anti-co is based upon the cryogenic dark matter search II detector design. It is a silicon wafer covered with superconducting collection fins and TES microcalorimeters. Minimum ionizing particles deposit energy while passing through the silicon. The athermal phonons produced by these events are absorbed in the superconducting fins, breaking Cooper pairs. The resulting quasiparticles diffuse along the superconducting fin, producing a signal when they reach the TES. By determining a correlation between detections in the anti-co and the X-ray detector one can identify and flag these background events. We have fabricated and tested a single-channel prototype anti-co device on a 1.5 × 1.9 cm^2 chip. We have measured the signals in this device from photons of several energies between 1.5 and 60 keV, as well as laboratory background events, demonstrating a threshold ˜ 100 times lower than is needed to detect minimum ionizing particles.

  13. Exploring the capabilities of the Anti-Coincidence Shield of the INTEGRAL spectrometer to study solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez-Gasén, Rosa; Tatischeff, Vincent; Vilmer, Nicole; Hamadache, Clarisse; Klein, Karl-Ludwig

    2013-01-01

    INTEGRAL is a hard X-ray/gamma-ray observatory for astrophysics (ESA) covering photon energies from 15 keV to 10 MeV. It was launched in 2002 and since then the BGO detectors of the Anti-Coincidence shield (ACS) of the SPI spectrometer have detected many hard X-ray (HXR) bursts from the Sun, producing lightcurves at photon energies above ~ 100 keV. The spacecraft has a highly elliptical orbit, providing a long uninterrupted observing time (about 90% of the orbital period) with nearly constant background due to the reduction of the crossing time of the Earth's radiation belts. However, due to technical constraints, INTEGRAL cannot point to the Sun and high-energy solar photons are always detected in non-standard observation conditions. To make the data useful for solar studies, we have undertaken a major effort to specify the observing conditions through Monte-Carlo simulations of the response of ACS for several selected flares. We check the performance of the model employed for the Monte-Carlo simulations usi...

  14. Characterization of a Prototype TES-Based Anti-coincidence Detector for Use with Future X-ray Calorimeter Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, S. E.; Yoon, W. S.; Adams, J. S.; Bailey, C. N.; Bandler, S. R.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckart, M. E.; Ewin, A. J.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Lee, S.-J.; Porst, J.-P.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Sultana, M.

    2015-12-01

    For future X-ray observatories utilizing transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeters, an anti-coincidence detector (anti-co) is required to discriminate X-ray (˜ 0.1-10 keV) signals from non-X-ray background events, such as ionizing particles. We have developed a prototype anti-co that utilizes TESs, which will be compatible with the TES focal-plane arrays planned for future X-ray observatories. This anti-co is based upon the cryogenic dark matter search II detector design. It is a silicon wafer covered with superconducting collection fins and TES microcalorimeters. Minimum ionizing particles deposit energy while passing through the silicon. The athermal phonons produced by these events are absorbed in the superconducting fins, breaking Cooper pairs. The resulting quasiparticles diffuse along the superconducting fin, producing a signal when they reach the TES. By determining a correlation between detections in the anti-co and the X-ray detector one can identify and flag these background events. We have fabricated and tested a single-channel prototype anti-co device on a 1.5 × 1.9 cm^2 chip. We have measured the signals in this device from photons of several energies between 1.5 and 60 keV, as well as laboratory background events, demonstrating a threshold ˜ 100 times lower than is needed to detect minimum ionizing particles.

  15. The Design, Implementation, and Performance of the Astro-H SXS Calorimeter Array and Anti-Coincidence Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Adams, Joseph S.; Brekosky, Regis P.; Chiao, Meng P.; Chervenak, James A.; Eckart, Megan E.; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Galeazzi, Masimilliano; Grein, Christoph; Jhabvala, Christine A.; Kelley, Richard L.; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; McCammon, Dan; Porter, F. Scott; Szymkowiak, Andrew E.; Watanabe, Tomomi; Zhao, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The calorimeter array of the JAXA Astro-H (renamed Hitomi) Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) was designed to provide unprecedented spectral resolution of spatially extended cosmic x-ray sources and of all cosmic x-ray sources in the Fe-K band around 6 keV, enabling essential plasma diagnostics. The SXS has a square array of 36 microcalorimeters at the focal plane. These calorimeters consist of ion-implanted silicon thermistors and HgTe thermalizing x-ray absorbers. These devices have demonstrated a resolution of better than 4.5 eV at 6 keV when operated at a heat-sink temperature of 50 mK. We will discuss the basic physical parameters of this array, including the array layout, thermal conductance of the link to the heat sink, resistance function, absorber details, and means of attaching the absorber to the thermistor-bearing element. We will also present the thermal characterization of the whole array, including thermal conductance and crosstalk measurements and the results of pulsing the frame temperature via alpha particles, heat pulses, and the environmental background. A silicon ionization detector is located behind the calorimeter array and serves to reject events due to cosmic rays. We will briefly describe this anti-coincidence detector and its performance.

  16. Determination of selenium in foods by pseudo-cyclic neutron activation and anti-coincidence gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pseudo-cyclic instrumental neutron activation analysis method in conjunction with anti-coincidence gamma-ray spectrometry (PC-INAA-AC) has been developed for the determination of ppb levels of Se. The method consists of repetitions of the irradiation-decay-counting cycles of a sample using the rapid transfer cyclic system at the Dalhousie University SLOWPOKE-2 reactor facility. The 162-keV γ-ray of 77mSe (t1/2 = 17.4 s) has been found to be highly selective. The precision and detection limits are significantly improved and the total experimental time drastically reduced by this method. Detection limits are between 2 and 9 ng. The accuracy of the method has been evaluated by analyzing a number of nutritional reference materials. The PC-INAA-AC method has been applied for the routine determination of Se to the composites of 135 food samples with values ranging from as low as 1 ng g-1 for tea to 1,045 ng g-1 for organ meats on fresh weight basis. (author)

  17. A novel approach to the determination of iridium via Ge-coincidence/NaI(Tl)-anticoincidence gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iridium has proven to be a useful fingerprint of extraterrestrial material, and neutron activation analysis is the method of choice for its determination because of the high thermal cross section (910 b) of 191Ir (37.3% natural abundance) and the favorable decay characteristics of the product nuclide. However, radiochemical separations are frequently required for the determination of iridium at low concentrations (in the ppb range). The present work describes a precise, nondestructive neutron-activation procedure that is capable of analyzing samples of both high (ppm) and low (ppb) Ir content. Advantage is taken of the fact that the principal gamma lines of 73.8-d 192Ir are in various coincidences with one another. Instead of conventional gamma-gamma coincidence spectrometry with two Ge detectors, we utilize the 784.6- and 920.9- keV sum peaks which are generated when an iridium containing sample is placed in the well of a highly-efficient HPGe detector. The well-type detector is positioned centrally in a large annular NaI(Tl) detector which is operated in an anticoincidence mode. This improves the quality of the gamma spectra by suppressing the Compton backgrounds due to nuclides such as 60Co by a factor of 4-6 in the regions of interest without affecting the intensities of the two sum peaks. The sensitivity of this method under our experimental conditions (20-mg sample irradiated at 1.5x1014 n cm-2 s-1 for 5 min and counted 3-4 weeks after irradiation) is ≅ 5 ppb Ir in a relatively unfavorable matrix such as peridotite. (orig.)

  18. An efficient anticoincidence counter

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    This scintillation counter (about 25 cm diameter) was prepared at CERN for an experiment at the Saclay 600 MeV electron linac studying molecular processes originated in liquid hydrogen by muons. The counter is meant to surround the target and detect charged particles emerging from the hydrogen. The experiment was a CERN-Saclay collaboration which used the linac so as to take advantage of the time structure of the electron beam(see CERN Courier Sep 1977 and J. Bardin et al. Phys. Lett. B104 (1981) 320)

  19. A search for double-electron capture of {sup 74}Se to excited levels using coincidence/anticoincidence gamma-ray spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ješkovský, M. [Comenius University, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Department of Nuclear Physics and Biophysics, 84248 Bratislava (Slovakia); Frekers, D. [Institut für Kernphysik, Westfälische Wilhelms Universität, Münster (Germany); Kováčik, A. [Comenius University, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Department of Nuclear Physics and Biophysics, 84248 Bratislava (Slovakia); Povinec, P.P., E-mail: povinec@fmph.uniba.sk [Comenius University, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Department of Nuclear Physics and Biophysics, 84248 Bratislava (Slovakia); Puppe, P. [Institut für Kernphysik, Westfälische Wilhelms Universität, Münster (Germany); Staníček, J.; Sýkora, I. [Comenius University, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Department of Nuclear Physics and Biophysics, 84248 Bratislava (Slovakia); Šimkovic, F. [Comenius University, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Department of Nuclear Physics and Biophysics, 84248 Bratislava (Slovakia); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Thies, J.H. [Institut für Kernphysik, Westfälische Wilhelms Universität, Münster (Germany)

    2015-09-21

    Evaluation of single, coincidence and anticoincidence gamma-ray spectrometry methods has been carried out with the aim to search for double-electron capture of {sup 74}Se to excited states. This process is unique, because there is probability for transition to the 2{sup +} excited state in {sup 74}Ge (1204 keV), and de-excitation through two gamma-quanta cascade with energies of 595.9 keV and 608.4 keV. Long-term measurements with an anticosmic shielded HPGe (high purity Ge) spectrometer and a coincidence HPGe–NaI(Tl) spectrometer did not show any evidence for the double-electron capture in {sup 74}Se. The best limit for the half-life of the double electron capture in {sup 74}Se (both for the neutrinoless and two neutrino processes) was estimated to be >1.5×10{sup 19} yr.

  20. Optimization of the gamma spectrometry system at SAL with the use of large NaI(Tl) annulus in the anticoincidence mode for compton scattered radiation suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gamma-ray spectrometer designed for the simultaneous acquisition of normal, coincidence and anticoincidence spectra was extensively tested. The spectrometer consists of 3 detectors: a HPGe coaxial of 42% efficiency, NaI(Tl) annulus 254 mm length and 254 mm height with a 90 mm diameter hole and a NaI(Tl) plug of 76.4 x 76.4 mm. Extensive measurements were carried out with a 137Cs point source to characterize the spectrometer performance. A Compton suppression factor (SF), a Compton reduction factor (RF), and a peak-to-Compton ratio were calculated as the performance parameters. The Compton suppression factors obtained are comparable with those of similar spectrometers described in the literature

  1. A search for double-electron capture of 74Se to excited levels using coincidence/anticoincidence gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of single, coincidence and anticoincidence gamma-ray spectrometry methods has been carried out with the aim to search for double-electron capture of 74Se to excited states. This process is unique, because there is probability for transition to the 2+ excited state in 74Ge (1204 keV), and de-excitation through two gamma-quanta cascade with energies of 595.9 keV and 608.4 keV. Long-term measurements with an anticosmic shielded HPGe (high purity Ge) spectrometer and a coincidence HPGe–NaI(Tl) spectrometer did not show any evidence for the double-electron capture in 74Se. The best limit for the half-life of the double electron capture in 74Se (both for the neutrinoless and two neutrino processes) was estimated to be >1.5×1019 yr

  2. The Cryogenic AntiCoincidence Detector for the ATHENA X-IFU: Design Aspects by Geant4 Simulation and Preliminary Characterization of the New Single Pixel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macculi, C.; Argan, A.; D'Andrea, M.; Lotti, S.; Piro, L.; Biasotti, M.; Corsini, D.; Gatti, F.; Orlando, A.; Torrioli, G.

    2016-01-01

    The ATHENA observatory is the second large-class ESA mission, in the context of the Cosmic Vision 2015-2025, scheduled to be launched on 2028 at L2 orbit. One of the two planned focal plane instruments is the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU), which will be able to perform simultaneous high-grade energy spectroscopy and imaging over the 5 arcmin FoV by means of a kilo-pixel array of transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeters, coupled to a high-quality X-ray optics. The X-IFU sensitivity is degraded by the particle background, induced by primary protons of both solar and cosmic rays' origin and secondary electrons. A Cryogenic AntiCoincidence (CryoAC) TES-based detector, located < 1 mm below the TES array, will allow the mission to reach the background level that enables its scientific goals. The CryoAC is a 4-pixel detector made of Silicon absorbers sensed by Iridium TESs. We currently achieve a TRL = 3-4 at the single-pixel level. We have designed and developed two further prototypes in order to reach TRL = 4. The design of the CryoAC has been also optimized using the Geant4 simulation tool. Here we will describe some results from the Geant4 simulations performed to optimize the design and preliminary test results from the first of the two detectors, 1 cm2 area, made of 65 Ir TESs.

  3. Determination of trace elements in scallop and fish otolith by instrumental neutron activation analysis using anti-coincidence and coincidence counting methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trace element concentrations in scallop reference material and fish otolith certified reference materials prepared at the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) of Japan were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Nine aliquots of scallop sample (ca. 252∼507 mg) and five aliquots of fish otolith sample (ca. 502 ∼ 988 mg) and comparative standards were irradiated for a short time (10 s) at a thermal neutron flux of 1.5 x 1012 n cm-2s-1 (pneumatic transfer) and for a long time (6 h) at a thermal neutron flux of 3.7 x 1012n cm-2s-1 (central thimble) in the Rikkyo University Research Reactor (100 kW). The irradiated samples were measured by conventional γ-ray spectrometry using a coaxial Ge detector, and by anti-coincidence and coincidence γ-ray spectrometry with a coaxial Ge detector and a well-type NaI (Tl) detector to determine as many trace elements as possible with high sensitivity. The concentrations of 34 elements of the NIES No.15 scallop reference material and 16 elements of the NIES No.22 fish otolith CRM were determined. Using the coincidence counting method to determine Se, Ba and Hf, the lower limit of the determination was improved by 2 times compared with the conventional counting method. (author)

  4. Determination of iodine in biological materials by pseudo-cyclic epithermal INAA using anti-coincidence gamma-ray spectrometry and estimation of expanded uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epithermal instrumental neutron activation analysis (EINAA) technique in conjunction with anti-coincidence gamma-ray spectrometry (AC) has been applied for the determination of ppm to ppb levels of iodine in biological materials containing high levels of Al, Br, Cl, K, Mn, and Na. Both conventional EINAA-AC and pseudo-cyclic EINAA-AC (PC-EINAA-AC) methods using a combination of Cd and B filters have been developed using Dalhousie University SLOWPOKE-2 reactor (DUSR) facility. The expanded uncertainties (EU), at about 95% confidence level, for iodine in biological materials by EINAA-AC varied between 6 and 10%. The advantages of the non-destructive PC-EINAA-AC method has been successfully demonstrated by analyzing the NIST Pine Needles (SRM 1575) containing a low amount of iodine in presence of high quantities of Mn and other interfering elements where an iodine content of 92.8 μg kg-1 with an EU of 6.1 μg kg-1 and a detection limit of 40 μg kg-1 has been obtained at the end of fourth cycle. (author)

  5. Exploring the Capabilities of the Anti-Coincidence Shield of the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) Spectrometer to Study Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Gasén, R.; Kiener, J.; Tatischeff, V.; Vilmer, N.; Hamadache, C.; Klein, K.-L.

    2014-05-01

    The International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) is a European Space Agency hard X-ray/ γ-ray observatory for astrophysics, covering photon energies from 15 keV to 10 MeV. It was launched in 2002, and since then the Bismuth Germanate (BGO) detectors of the Anti-Coincidence Shield (ACS) of the Spectrometer on INTEGRAL (SPI) have detected many hard X-ray (HXR) bursts from the Sun, producing light curves at photon energies above ≈ 100 keV. The spacecraft has a highly elliptical orbit, providing long uninterrupted observing (about 90 % of the orbital period) with nearly constant background due to the shorter time needed to cross Earth's radiation belts. However, because of technical constraints, INTEGRAL cannot be pointed at the Sun, and high-energy solar photons are always detected in nonstandard observation conditions. To make the data useable for solar studies, we have undertaken a major effort to specify the observing conditions through Monte Carlo simulations of the response of ACS for several selected flares. We checked the performance of the model employed for the Monte Carlo simulations using the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations for the same sample of solar flares. We conclude that although INTEGRAL was not designed to perform solar observations, ACS is a useful instrument for solar-flare research. In particular, its relatively large effective area allows determining good-quality HXR/ γ-ray light curves for X- and M-class solar flares and, in some cases, probably also for C-class flares.

  6. Implementation of a anti-coincidence system of 4{pi}NaI(Tl)-Cl and primary standardization of {sup 57}Co, {sup 124}Sb and {sup 241}Am; Implementacao de um sistema de anti-coincidencia 4{pi}NaI(Tl)-Cl e padronizacao primaria do {sup 57}Co, {sup 124}Sb e {sup 241}Am

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Carlos Jose da; Iwahara, Akira; Poledna, Roberto; Oliveira, Estela Maria de; Prinzio, Maria Antonieta de, E-mail: carlos@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (LIN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear

    2009-07-01

    The Radionuclide Metrology Laboratory of the IRD-Brazil, implemented a primary standardization system which utilizes the anti-coincidence technique with live time keeping. For testing the performance of these system it was made the standardization of the {sup 57}Co, {sup 124}Sb and {sup 241}Am. Encourages results were obtained not only the standardization of {sup 241}Am but also of the {sup 124}Sb whose reference value obtained by the LNMRI was utilized for the key comparison organized by the IAEA and EURAMET. The standard uncertainties were of 0.28%, 0.22% and 0.13% for the {sup 57}Co, {sup 124}Sb and {sup 241}Am, respectively

  7. The Anticoincidence Shield of the PAMELA Satellite Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Orsi, Silvio

    2004-01-01

    The PAMELA space experiment is scheduled for launch towards the end of 2004 on-board a Russian Resurs DK1 satellite, orbiting Earth at an altitude of 300– 600 km. The main scientific goal is a study of the antimatter component of the cosmic radiation. The semipolar orbit (70.4◦) allows PAMELA to investigate a wide range of energies for antiprotons (80 MeV–190 GeV) and positrons (50 MeV– 270 GeV). Three years of data taking will provide unprecedented statistics in this energy range and will se...

  8. A high performance anticoincidence rejection system for balloon borne MWPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The supernova SN1987A have been observed in the range of hard X-rays (15 / 180 KeV) and high energy γ-rays (50 / 500 MeV) with a payload launched from the balloon facility of Alice Springs (Australia) during April 1987 and 1988. The low energy detector based on a MWPC had a sensitive area of 500 cm/sup 2/. In the second flight a complete plastic shield was added for the first time to the Multiwire Proportional Counter (MWPC). In this way, switching on the active shield, the background counting rate dropped from 4.2 to 2.8 x 10/sup -4/ ct/cm/sup 2/ s keV with no change in the dead time of the counter. This clearly demonstrates the advantage of the use of a multitechnique rejection system for this kind of gaseous detectors

  9. Improved Stability of Mercuric Iodide Detectors for Anticoincidence Shields Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to utilize guard ring electrode structures and a new film growth technique to create improved polycrystalline mercuric iodide detectors for background...

  10. Design and applications of an anticoincidence shielded low background gamma-ray spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petri, H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Zentralabteilung fuer Chemische Analysen

    1997-03-01

    A low background gamma-ray spectrometer has been constructed for measuring artificial and natural radioative isotopes. The design of the spectrometer, its properties and the application to the determination of natural radioactivity of dental ceramics are described. (orig.)

  11. Low background Ge(Li) detector with anticoincidence Nal annulus (revised)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low background gamma-ray counter intended for the assessment of environmental soil and vegetation samples is described. It can accept samples up to 350 grams and 225 cm3 volume. The primary intent of this counter is the determination of U, Th, 40K, and 137Cs in soil samples obtained routinely during ARMS surveys throughout the country. To this end, careful calibrations traceable to the ERDA New Brunswick Laboratory and to the NBS have been made. Special attention was paid to volume source techniques in addition to the usual point source methods. Detectabilities (at 3 sigma), all in a 350-gram sample, are 0.03 ppm uranium, 0.09 ppm thorium, 30 pCi of potassium-40, and 3 pCi of cesium-137

  12. Design and applications of an anticoincidence shielded low background gamma-ray spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low background gamma-ray spectrometer has been constructed for measuring artificial and natural radioative isotopes. The design of the spectrometer, its properties and the application to the determination of natural radioactivity of dental ceramics are described. (orig.)

  13. Device for measuring the beta radiation of radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The switching device for measuring radiaoactive rare gases has two large area counting tubes operated with argon methane gas. Two anti-coincidence stages are provided in the evaluation electronics to suppress the background gamma radiation. (DG)

  14. Design of a hybrid gas proportional counter with CdTe guard counters for 14C dating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays uniform, low-cost and large-size compound semiconductor detectors are available up to several square centimeters. We are trying to combine this technology with conventional gas detectors to upgrade an anticoincidence type proportional counter, Oeschger-type thin wall counter of 2.2 l, used for a 14C dating facility at the University of Tokyo. In order to increase the ratio of the signal to the background for smaller quantity of samples less than 1 g, an effective approach is to minimize the detector volume at higher gas pressure. However, the anticoincidence function suffers from such a small volume. Therefore we designed a new active wall gas counter of 0.13 l counting volume using CdTe compound semiconductor detectors as the wall of the gas proportional counter to perform anticoincidence. Simulation study showed that at noise thresholds less than 70 keV, the wall counters can reject above 99.8% of events arising from outer gamma rays. Measured noise levels of CdTe detectors were smaller than 24 keV which is low enough for 99.8% anticoincidence efficiency. The experiment showed an anticoincidence efficiency for outer gamma rays from 70% to 80%, similar to that of the old 14C counter. The lost anticoincidence efficiency results from the area of 21.74% which was not covered with CdTe due to two holes for the path of the center anode wire and slots between every two sides of CdTe detectors

  15. Design of a hybrid gas proportional counter with CdTe guard counters for {sup 14}C dating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, L. E-mail: lan@sophie.q.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Takahashi, H.; Hinamoto, N.; Nakazawa, M.; Yoshida, K

    2002-02-01

    Nowadays uniform, low-cost and large-size compound semiconductor detectors are available up to several square centimeters. We are trying to combine this technology with conventional gas detectors to upgrade an anticoincidence type proportional counter, Oeschger-type thin wall counter of 2.2 l, used for a {sup 14}C dating facility at the University of Tokyo. In order to increase the ratio of the signal to the background for smaller quantity of samples less than 1 g, an effective approach is to minimize the detector volume at higher gas pressure. However, the anticoincidence function suffers from such a small volume. Therefore we designed a new active wall gas counter of 0.13 l counting volume using CdTe compound semiconductor detectors as the wall of the gas proportional counter to perform anticoincidence. Simulation study showed that at noise thresholds less than 70 keV, the wall counters can reject above 99.8% of events arising from outer gamma rays. Measured noise levels of CdTe detectors were smaller than 24 keV which is low enough for 99.8% anticoincidence efficiency. The experiment showed an anticoincidence efficiency for outer gamma rays from 70% to 80%, similar to that of the old {sup 14}C counter. The lost anticoincidence efficiency results from the area of 21.74% which was not covered with CdTe due to two holes for the path of the center anode wire and slots between every two sides of CdTe detectors.

  16. New proportional counter for in vivo detection of traces of plutonium in the lungs; Nouveau compteur proportionnel destine a la detection in vivo de traces de plutonium dans les poumons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morucci, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1966-07-01

    Development of a multi-wire proportional counter having a uniform response over 250 cm{sup 2} thanks to corrections made for boundary effects, and having a low background per sq. cm. due to the use of two identical counters set in anti-coincidence in the same enclosure is described. (author) [French] Etude et mise au point d'un compteur proportionnel multifils de reponse utile homogene sur une surface de 250 cm{sup 2} grace a la correction des effets de bords et de faible mouvement propre par cm{sup 2} grace a deux compteurs identiques montes en anticoincidence dans la meme enceinte. (auteur)

  17. Digital system provides superregulation of nanosecond amplifier-discriminator circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forges, K. G.

    1966-01-01

    Feedback system employing a digital logic comparator to detect and correct amplifier drift provides stable gain characteristics for nanosecond amplifiers used in counting applications. Additional anticoincidence logic enables application of the regulation circuit to the amplifier and discriminator while they are mounted in an operable circuit.

  18. New proportional counter for in vivo detection of traces of plutonium in the lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of a multi-wire proportional counter having a uniform response over 250 cm2 thanks to corrections made for boundary effects, and having a low background per sq. cm. due to the use of two identical counters set in anti-coincidence in the same enclosure is described. (author)

  19. Sealed drift tube cosmic ray veto counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a simple drift tube counter that has been used as a cosmic ray veto for the UCNA experiment, a first-ever measurement of the neutron beta-asymmetry using ultra-cold neutrons. These detectors provide an inexpensive alternative to more conventional scintillation detectors for large area cosmic ray anticoincidence detectors.

  20. Measurement of low radioactivity in underground laboratories by means of many-dimensional spectrometry; Messung geringer Radioaktivitaet in Untertagelaboratorien mit Hilfe mehrdimensionaler Spektrometrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niese, Siegfried

    2008-01-15

    In this contribution beside the possibilities for the measurements in underground laboratories also the application of the many-dimensional spectrometry is considered, under which coincidence, anticoincidence, and time-resolving spectrometric are to be understood. Very extensively the interaction of cosmic radiation with matter is considered.

  1. A proportional-scintillation counter beta spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a proportional counter for coincidence gating of events in a plastic scintillator provides selective registration of beta interactions in the scintillator. This technique has been used to construct a field instrument that can selectively collect beta spectra (coincidence gating) or gamma spectra (anticoincidence gating). Associated dose rates are calculated from the spectra

  2. Electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some of the electronic equipment used in pulse counting and mean current radiation detection systems is described. This includes the high voltage supply, amplifier, amplitude discriminator, scalers or counters, ratemeters, single-channel pulse height analyser, multi-channel pulse height analyser, d.c. amplifiers, coincidence and anticoincidence units and gain stabilisers

  3. Measurement of low radioactivity in underground laboratories by means of many-dimensional spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this contribution beside the possibilities for the measurements in underground laboratories also the application of the many-dimensional spectrometry is considered, under which coincidence, anticoincidence, and time-resolving spectrometric are to be understood. Very extensively the interaction of cosmic radiation with matter is considered

  4. A Compton-suppression spectrometer for γ-γ coincidence measurements: Large solid angle and excellent suppression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, H.J.M.; Poel, C.J. van der; Scherpenzeel, D.E.C.; Arciszewski, H.F.R.; Engelbertink, G.A.P.

    1980-01-01

    For γ-γ coincidence measurements a Compton-suppression spectrometer with a large solid angle of 120 msr and excellent suppression has been designed. The dimensions of the NaI anticoincidence shield have been optimized by means of Monte Carlo calculations. The NaI shield has a length of 35 cm and a d

  5. Enhanced detection of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes by AGILE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marisaldi, M.; Argan, A.; Ursi, A.; Gjesteland, T.; Fuschino, F.; Labanti, C.; Galli, M.; Tavani, M.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; D'Amico, F.; Østgaard, N.; Mereghetti, S.; Campana, R.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Bulgarelli, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Dietrich, S.; Longo, F.; Gianotti, F.; Giommi, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Trifoglio, M.; Trois, A.

    2015-11-01

    At the end of March 2015 the onboard software configuration of the Astrorivelatore Gamma a Immagini Leggero (AGILE) satellite was modified in order to disable the veto signal of the anticoincidence shield for the minicalorimeter instrument. The motivation for such a change was the understanding that the dead time induced by the anticoincidence prevented the detection of a large fraction of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs). The configuration change was highly successful resulting in an increase of one order of magnitude in TGF detection rate. As expected, the largest fraction of the new events has short duration (World Wide Lightning Location Network. The new configuration provides the largest TGF detection rate surface density (TGFs/km2/yr) to date, opening prospects for improved correlation studies with lightning and atmospheric parameters on short spatial and temporal scales along the equatorial region.

  6. A quality assurance programme for the determination of selenium in foods by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selenium is unevenly distributed through the biosphere. The levels, species and bioavailability of selenium in foods depend greatly on the geochemical environment in which they are grown. Variation in geochemical conditions can not only lead to certain diseases in animals but also influence the selenium body burden in humans. For these reasons, there is an increasing interest in monitoring selenium levels in foods and diets. A quality assurance programme has been developed for the determination of low levels of selenium in foods and diets by cyclic and pseudo-cyclic instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) using the short-lived (half-life = 17.4 s) 77Sem nuclide. Both conventional and anti-coincidence gamma ray spectrometry techniques have been employed. Pseudo-cyclic INAA in conjunction with anti-coincidence counting has been found to provide the most reliable results. Internal and external quality assessments have been done using a number of parameters. (author)

  7. Enhanced detection of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes by AGILE

    CERN Document Server

    Marisaldi, M; Ursi, A; Gjesteland, T; Fuschino, F; Labanti, C; Galli, M; Tavani, M; Pittori, C; Verrecchia, F; D'Amico, F; Østgaard, N; Mereghetti, S; Campana, R; Cattaneo, P W; Bulgarelli, A; Colafrancesco, S; Dietrich, S; Longo, F; Gianotti, F; Giommi, P; Rappoldi, A; Trifoglio, M; Trois, A

    2016-01-01

    At the end of March 2015 the onboard software configuration of the AGILE satellite was modified in order to disable the veto signal of the anticoincidence shield for the minicalorimeter instrument. The motivation for such a change was the understanding that the dead time induced by the anticoincidence prevented the detection of a large fraction of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs). The configuration change was highly successful resulting in an increase of one order of magnitude in TGF detection rate. As expected, the largest fraction of the new events has short duration ($< 100 \\mathrm {\\mu s}$), and part of them has simultaneous association with lightning sferics detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN). The new configuration provides the largest TGF detection rate surface density (TGFs/$\\mathrm{km^2}$/year) to date, opening prospects for improved correlation studies with lightning and atmospheric parameters on short spatial and temporal scales along the equatorial region.

  8. Performance evaluation and optimization for a newly developed digital list-mode data acquisition Compton suppression spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparative study was carried out between an analog timing and a digital list-mode data acquisition system for a Compton suppression spectrometer. The performance of both Compton suppression systems has been evaluated using the conventional, coincidence and anticoincidence spectra measured by 60Co and 137Cs point sources. The present study focuses on improving and optimizing the energy peak resolution and peak-to-Compton background ratios of the digital list-mode system. - Highlights: ► A digital list-mode data acquisition Compton suppression spectrometer was developed. ► The study is conducted to assess the performance of newly-developed spectrometer. ► The digital and analog counting systems are compatible in peak-to-Compton ratio. ► The full-energy peak losses can be recovered in the reconstructed anticoincidence spectrum

  9. Calibration of a telescope for gamma spectroscopy using a new configuration of Ge (Li) diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was developed a telescope to measure gamma-rays in the energy interval 10-1500 KeV, using two Ge (Li) diodes of 40 cm3 each, coaxially mounted in the same cryostat and an anticoincidence NaI (Tl) shielding system. This new configuration allows a much better signal to noise ratio due to the lower diode operating in anticoincidence with the upper one; besides that, one has a high energy resolution ΔE241, Na22 and Eu152 are described. From the analysis of the data obtained in the sum coincidente mode, a minimum detectable flux at 511 KeV is estimated to be >or approx. 2x10-3 fotons cm-2 s-1, with a statistical significance of 3σ for 10 hours of observing time at 3mb of residual atmosfere. That is about the minimun line flux emmitted by the Galactic Center. (Author)

  10. Trace elements in suspended particulate matter and liquid fraction of the Arno River waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentrations of 46 elements along the course of the Arno River (Tuscany, Italy) have been determined by means of Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis. Both suspended particulate matter and liquid fraction have been investigated. No chemical treatment has been performed on the samples, either before or after irradiation. Anticoincidence techniques have been employed in the γ spectroscopy. Results are briefly discussed also from a methodological point of view. 4 references, 16 figures, 2 tables

  11. Front-end electronics of fast luminosity monitor system for BEPCII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The front-end electronics of fast luminosity monitor system for BEPCII (Beijing Electron-Positron Collider, Phase II) was designed, constructed and tested. It mainly includes a large dynamic range high speed pre-amplifier, programmable high speed discriminators, anti-coincidence circuit, signal shaping and transferring. The test results show that the front-end electronics satisfies the requirements of 4 ns bunch-by-bunch fast luminosity monitor system for BEPCII. (authors)

  12. A proportional counter with reduced wall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A proportional counter, using gaseous sources, in which the wall effects are considerably reduced, is described. The counter is fitted with a ring of internal shielding counters in anti-coincidence, separated from the main central counter only by a number of cathode wires. The counter can be readily assembled, giving flexibility in research investigations. Applications to a measurement of the L/K capture ratio in A37 and Fe55 are described. (author)

  13. Gamma-ray background induced in a double Ge (Li) spectrometer at ballon altitudes in the hemisphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A double coaxil Ge(li) spetrometer has been flown for the first time in December, from the Southern Hemisphere and the induced background at ceiling in the diodes was studied. During the flight, different anti-coincidence modes were operated to estimate the gamma-ray lines. The results of 511 Kev line show that the fluxes detected by the upper diode are in good agreement with previous measurements, and indicate a probable contamination of the lower diode. (Author)

  14. Covariant formulation of multiple localized quantum measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have considered the dynamics of simple measuring devices coupled to quantized relativistic Heisenberg-fields. We have defined localized observables and derived covariant equations for the joint probability distribution of the measured outcomes. The proposed formalism is based on standard field-theoretical terms. We have shown that our formalism yields the expected anti-coincidence when two devices detect two wavepackets of a single electron. Applications in the measurement theory of vacuum fluctuations have been suggested. (author). 6 refs, 1 fig

  15. Studies of nutritionally and toxicologically important elements in foods and diets by neutron activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several neutron activation analysis (NAA) methods in conjunction with conventional and anticoincidence counting have been developed in our laboratory over the years for the quantitative determination of up to 24 elements in foods and diets. Additionally, these methods have been applied to measure bioaccessible, ionic, proteomic, lipidic, and organometallic species of many elements. The overall expanded uncertainties of the methods have also been evaluated. (author)

  16. Measurement of Total Reaction Cross-sections with Heavy Ions at the SC

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is the measurement of heavy ion total reaction cross-sections in the energy range 40-86 MeV/A with the anti-coincidence beam attenuation technique. A system of 19 @DE scintillation detectors together with a time-of-flight measurement is used for detection of the residual beam. The results will complete measurements at the Grenoble cyclotron and post accelerator over the energy range 10-40 MeV/A.

  17. Performance evaluation and optimization for a newly developed digital list-mode data acquisition Compton suppression spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weihua; Keeshan, Benjamin; Mekarski, Pawel; Yi, Jing; Ungar, Kurt

    2013-11-01

    A comparative study was carried out between an analog timing and a digital list-mode data acquisition system for a Compton suppression spectrometer. The performance of both Compton suppression systems has been evaluated using the conventional, coincidence and anticoincidence spectra measured by (60)Co and (137)Cs point sources. The present study focuses on improving and optimizing the energy peak resolution and peak-to-Compton background ratios of the digital list-mode system. PMID:23497957

  18. Feasibility study of SPECT system for online dosimetry imaging in boron neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, B; Katabuchi, T; Hayashizaki, N; Terada, K; Igashira, M; Kobayashi, T

    2014-06-01

    A single collimator version of a proposed PG-SPECT system was manufactured and experimentally tested. Combining this experimental data with Monte Carlo simulation, the viability of Ge and CdTe semiconductors detectors was calculated. It was determined that the best detector of the ones compared would be a CdTe detector of 2-3mm, aided by the benefit of adding a Compton-suppression anti-coincidence timing detector. PMID:24378365

  19. Design of a hybrid gas proportional counter with CdTe guard counters for sup 1 sup 4 C dating system

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, L; Hinamoto, N; Nakazawa, M; Yoshida, K

    2002-01-01

    Nowadays uniform, low-cost and large-size compound semiconductor detectors are available up to several square centimeters. We are trying to combine this technology with conventional gas detectors to upgrade an anticoincidence type proportional counter, Oeschger-type thin wall counter of 2.2 l, used for a sup 1 sup 4 C dating facility at the University of Tokyo. In order to increase the ratio of the signal to the background for smaller quantity of samples less than 1 g, an effective approach is to minimize the detector volume at higher gas pressure. However, the anticoincidence function suffers from such a small volume. Therefore we designed a new active wall gas counter of 0.13 l counting volume using CdTe compound semiconductor detectors as the wall of the gas proportional counter to perform anticoincidence. Simulation study showed that at noise thresholds less than 70 keV, the wall counters can reject above 99.8% of events arising from outer gamma rays. Measured noise levels of CdTe detectors were smaller t...

  20. Single channel pulse height discrimination circuit implemented by dual monostable multivibrator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear radiation measurement, pulse height discriminator (PHD) and single channel analyzer (SCA) are widely used to select pulses whose amplitude is within user's interesting range. PHD is derived from universal double voltage comparators by adding additional anti-coincidence circuits. Simple anti-coincidence method will generate false result, for the leading edge of upper comparator output falls behind that of lower comparator and pulse width of upper comparator output is narrower than that of lower comparator output. Anti-coincidence circuits in a conventional PHD and SCA often contain quite a few different circuits or components, such as monostable multivibrator and/or bistable flip-flop, NOR or NOT gate, etc. Such complex structure and manifold components deteriorate PHD's and SCA's response time and reliability. Great efforts have been made to simplify its structure and improve its reliability. Based on analyzing time sequence of the outputs of upper and lower voltage comparators, a novel, simple and practical structure is presented that contains only monolithic circuit (dual monostable multivibrator). Concrete circuits are fabricated and waveforms captured from digital storage oscilloscope (DSO) prove that it works properly and reliably till the input signal frequency increases up to 1MHz, regardless of sine wave, exponent falling or impulse signal. It can be utilized in the field of nuclear radiation measurement. (author)

  1. Enhanced production possibility of the therapeutic radionuclides 64Cu, 67Cu and 89Sr via (n,p) reactions induced by fast spectral neutrons

    OpenAIRE

    Spahn, I.; Coenen, H. H.; Qaim, S. M.

    2004-01-01

    Spectrum averaged cross sections for the Zn-64(n, p)Cu-64, Zn-67(n, p)Cu-67 and Y-89(n, p)Sr-89 reactions were measured using a 14 MeV d(Be) neutron source. In each case a clean radiochemical separation was performed and the radioactivity of the product was determined via high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry or anticoincidence beta(-) counting. The cross sections are three to five times higher than with a fission neutron spectrum. It is postulated that at an intense fast spectral neutron so...

  2. Fractional counts-the simulation of low probability events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The code RobSim has been added to RobWin.1 It simulates spectra resulting from gamma rays striking an array of detectors made up of different components. These are frequently used to set coincidence and anti-coincidence windows that decide if individual events are part of the signal. The first problem addressed is the construction of the detector. Then owing to the statistical nature of the responses of these elements there is a random nature in the response that can be taken into account by including fractional counts in the output spectrum. This somewhat complicates the error analysis, as Poisson statistics are no longer applicable

  3. The Design and Performance of the Astro-E/XRS Signal Processing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, K. R.; Baker, R. G.; Dumonthier, J. J.; Kelley, R. L.; Stahle, C. K.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; Winkert, G. E.; Audley, M. D.; Gendreau, K. C.; Fujimoto R.

    1999-01-01

    We describe the signal processing system of the Astro-E XRS instrument. The Calorimeter Analog Processor (CAP) provides bias and power for the detectors and amplifies the detector signals by a factor of 20,000. The Calorimeter Digital Processor (CDP) performs the digital processing of the calorimeter signals, detecting X-ray pulses and analyzing them by optimal filtering. We describe the operation of pulse detection, pulse height analysis, and risetime determination. We also discuss performance, including the three event grades (hi-res, mid-res, and low-res), anticoincidence detection, counting rate dependence, and noise rejection.

  4. Design and Performance of the Astro-E/XRS Signal Processing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Kevin R.; Audley, M. D.; Baker, R. G.; Dumonthier, J. J.; Fujimoto, R.; Gendreau, K. C.; Ishisaki, Y.; Kelley, R. L.; Stahle, C. K.; Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1999-01-01

    We describe the signal processing system of the Astro-E XRS instrument. The Calorimeter Analog Processor (CAP) provides bias and power for the detectors and amplifies the detector signals by a factor of 20,000. The Calorimeter Digital Processor (CDP) performs the digital processing of the calorimeter signals, detecting X-ray pulses and analyzing them by optimal filtering. We describe the operation of pulse detection, Pulse height analysis. and risetime determination. We also discuss performance, including the three event grades (hi-res mid-res, and low-res). anticoincidence detection, counting rate dependence, and noise rejection.

  5. Gamma ray spectrometer for Lunar Scout 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, C. E.; Burt, W. W.; Edwards, B. C.; Martin, R. A.; Nakano, George H.; Reedy, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    We review the current status of the Los Alamos program to develop a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer for the Lunar Scout-II mission, which is the second of two Space Exploration Initiative robotic precursor missions to study the Moon. This instrument will measure gamma rays in the energy range of approximately 0.1 - 10 MeV to determine the composition of the lunar surface. The instrument is a high-purity germanium crystal surrounded by an CsI anticoincidence shield and cooled by a split Stirling cycle cryocooler. It will provide the abundance of many elements over the entire lunar surface.

  6. Gamma-quanta onboard identification in the GAMMA-400 experiment using the counting and triggers signals formation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Chasovikov, E. N.; Galper, A. M.; Kheymits, M. D.; Murchenko, A. E.; Yurkin, Y. T.

    2016-02-01

    GAMMA-400 (Gamma Astronomical Multifunctional Modular Apparatus) will be the new generation satellite gamma-observatory. Gamma-telescope GAMMA-400 consists of anticoincidence system (top and lateral sections - ACtop and AClat), the converter-tracker (C), time-of-flight system (2 sections S1 and S2), position-sensitive calorimeter CC1 makes of 2 strips layers and 2 layers of CsI(Tl) detectors, electromagnetic calorimeter CC2 composed of CsI(Tl) crystals, neutron detector ND, scintillation detectors of the calorimeter (S3 and S4) and lateral detectors of the calorimeter (LD). All detector systems ACtop, AClat, S1-S4, LD consist of two BC-408 based sensitive layers of 1 cm thickness each. Three apertures provide events registration both from upper and lateral directions. The main aperture provides the best angular (all strip layers information analysis) and energy (energy deposition in the all detectors studying) resolution. Gamma-telescope GAMMA-400 is optimized for the gamma-quanta and charged particles with energy 100 GeV detection with the best parameters in the main aperture. Triggers in the main aperture will be formed using information about particle direction provided by time of flight system and presence of charged particle or backsplash signal formed according to analysis of energy deposition in combination of both layers anticoincidence systems ACtop and AClat individual detectors. For double-layer ACtop taking into account both amplitude and temporal trigger marker onboard analysis only 2.8% photons will be wrongly recognized as electrons or protons for 100 GeV particles. The part of charged particles mistakenly identified as gammas is ∼10-5 using described algorithms. For E∼3 GeV less than 3% photons will be wrongly recognized as charged particles and fraction of wrongly identified charged particles will be also ∼10-5. In the additional aperture the particles identification is provided by analysis of signals corresponding to energy deposition in the

  7. An open multiple GM-counter for the measurement of low-energy beta samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the measurement of low-energy beta activity, an open, multiple gas flow GM-counter has been developed. The counter is espesially developed for the measurement of low-energy 63Ni samples electrolyzed on thin steel sheets. Four samples may be simultaneously measured in four counting elements integrated into the same mechnanical unit. A common guard counter reduces the background noise by the use of anticoincidence techniques. Mounted into a 100 mm thick lead screen, the GM-counter operates in a background radiation of appr. 0.2 cpm. Preliminary measurements on electrolyzed 63Ni samples, show a counting efficiency of appr. 40%

  8. The water radioactivity for the public consumption before and after Chernobyl nuclear accidents in some localities in the northern part of Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioactive quality of water tested for the public consumption corresponds to the standards for drinking water. The beta radioactivity of the residues in water was measured with anticoincidence counters connected to a pulse meter. The K-40 concentration was calculated from the concentration of the potassium element determined by flamephotometer method. At present the K-40 concentrations is determined by means of a GeLi detector connected to an ICA-80 Multichannel Analyzer. The aim of these measurements was to determine the more toxic radionuclides. The obtained results indicated that the contributions of K-40 to the overall beta radioactivity corresponds to the standards for drinking water. (author)

  9. Development of signal processing system of avalanche photo diode for space observations by Astro-H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, M., E-mail: ohno@hep01.hepl.hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Physical Sciences, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8516 (Japan); Goto, K.; Hanabata, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Fukazawa, Y. [Department of Physical Sciences, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8516 (Japan); Yoshino, M.; Saito, T.; Nakamori, T.; Kataoka, J. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Sasano, M.; Torii, S.; Uchiyama, H.; Nakazawa, K. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Watanabe, S.; Kokubun, M.; Ohta, M.; Sato, T.; Takahashi, T. [Institute of Space and Astronautial Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5120 (Japan); Tajima, H. [Cosmic-ray Research Facility, Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2013-01-21

    Astro-H is the sixth Japanese X-ray space observatory which will be launched in 2014. Two of onboard instruments of Astro-H, Hard X-ray Imager and Soft Gamma-ray Detector are surrounded by many number of large Bismuth Germanate (Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12}; BGO) scintillators. Optimum readout system of scintillation lights from these BGOs are essential to reduce the background signals and achieve high performance for main detectors because most of gamma-rays from out of field-of-view of main detectors or radio-isotopes produced inside them due to activation can be eliminated by anti-coincidence technique using BGO signals. We apply Avalanche Photo Diode (APD) for light sensor of these BGO detectors since their compactness and high quantum efficiency make it easy to design such large number of BGO detector system. For signal processing from APDs, digital filter and other trigger logics on the Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) is used instead of discrete analog circuits due to limitation of circuit implementation area on spacecraft. For efficient observations, we have to achieve as low threshold of anti-coincidence signal as possible by utilizing the digital filtering. In addition, such anti-coincident signals should be sent to the main detector within 5μs to make it in time to veto the A–D conversion. Considering this requirement and constraint from logic size of FPGA, we adopt two types of filter, 8 delay taps filter with only 2 bit precision coefficient and 16 delay taps filter with 8 bit precision coefficient. The data after former simple filter provides anti-coincidence signal quickly in orbit, and the latter filter is used for detail analysis after the data is down-linked. -- Highlights: ► We develop digital signal processing system of APD for Astro-H. ► We apply two types of digital filter instead of discrete analog circuit. ► By optimization, comparable or better energy threshold to analog shaper is archived. ► Developed digital filter works

  10. Developing a Parametric Downconversion Apparatus for Single-Photon Experiments in Quantum Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diiorio, Stephen

    2015-05-01

    We report our progress toward developing a parametric downconversion apparatus for studying single-photon quantum optics in undergraduate laboratory classes, following the model of Galvez et al.. We pump a beta barium borate (BBO) crystal with a 405 nm diode laser to produce correlated pairs of single-photons that we detect using avalanche photodiodes (APD). We can conduct coincidence and anti-coincidence counts and a measurement of the degree of second-order coherence with the apparatus, and we expect to report on single- and bi-photon interferometry experiments.

  11. Observations of low energy gamma-ray bursts with SAS-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oegelman, H.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    The present paper reports on the low-energy gamma-ray bursts observed by the plastic scintillator anticoincidence dome of the Small Astronomy Satellite-2 (SAS-2) gamma-ray telescope. SAS-2 detected two events observed by other satellites and discovered one which was subsequently confirmed by other satellite observations. Two events seen by other satellites were not detected by SAS-2, probably due to earth occultation. The event detection threshold for SAS-2 was almost two orders of magnitude lower than that of the Vela satellites.

  12. Low-background shielding of Ge detectors for the measurement of residual 152Eu radioactivity induced by neutrons from the Hiroshima atomic bomb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Fukami, Kenji; Iwatani, Kazuo; Hasai, Hiromi

    1992-05-01

    Low-background gamma-ray spectrometers were constructed for the measurement of residual 152Eu activity induced by the atomic-bomb neutrons. Optimum thickness of lead shielding, inner linings and background characteristics were investigated for an ordinary coaxial- and a well-type Ge detector. In addition, an anticoincidence shielding was installed for the well-type detector. As a result, the background counting rate due to cosmic rays was greatly reduced. It was also shown that a sample preparation to enrich the objective activity and eliminate background activities was important in the case of the 152Eu measurement.

  13. SOI Pixel Sensor for Gamma-Ray Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Shimazoe, Kenji; Yoshihara, Yuri; Koyama, Akihiko; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Orita, Tadashi; Kamada, Kei; Takeda, Ayaki; Tsuru, Takeshi; Arai, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    SOI (Silicon-On-Insulator) pixel sensor is promising technology for developing the high position resolution detector by integrating the small pixels and circuits in the monolithic way. The event driven (trigger mode) SOI based pixel sensor has also been developed for the application of X-ray astronomy with the purpose of reducing the noise using anti-coincidence event. This trigger mode SOI pixel sensor working with in the rate of kilo Hz is also a promising scatter detector for advanced Compton imaging to track the Compton recoiled electrons.

  14. A pulse-recording system for radioactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NIST Radioactivity Group is developing a computer-based pulse-recording system to use for radioactivity measurements. The system consists of a dual ADC module and a plug-in board for an industry-standard-architecture personal computer. The host computer (or another computer) can be programmed to simulate many different logic systems (coincidence, anticoincidence, selective sampling, correlation counting, etc.), so that the pulse data from a given measurement can be analyzed using a wide range of timing parameters and types of logic

  15. Strontium-90 in the western Gulf of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of measurements of 90Sr in water, coral, hermit crabs and molluscs from the western Gulf of Mexico and in fresh water molluscs from Canyon Lake, Texas are reported. Preparation of samples for measurement in the anticoincidence mode in a lead shielded flow proportional counter is described. The measured value of 0.095 +- 0.003 pCi/litre for Gulf water is in accord with literature values. Concentration factors for 90Sr are apparently 1 for coral. The activity incorporated into shells normalized to calcium content, decreases from Galveston to Campeche Bay. (U.K.)

  16. Experiment Signal for Gamma-Ray Research of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galper, Arkady; Arkhangelskaja, Irene; Arkhangelsky, Andrey; Shustov, Alexander; Ulin, Sergey; Novikov, Alexander; Grachev, Viktor; Uteshev, Ziyaetdin; Petrenko, Denis; Vlasik, Konstantin; Krivova, Kira; Dmitrenko, Valery; Chernysheva, Irina

    Description as well as physical and technical characteristics of Scientific Instrument (SI) “Signal” are presented. This equipment will be installed onboard the spacecraft (SC) “Interhelioprobe” for researching the Sun and Heliosphere at close distance. “Signal” will be developed for study cosmic gamma-rays. It consists of Xenon Gamma-Spectrometer (XeGS), the anticoincidence scintillation system and the digital electronic module. XeGS is based on cylindrical pulse ionization chamber with Frisch grid filled with high pressure xenon. Anticoincidence system will be made of polystyrene organic scintillator and silicon photomultipliers. Digital electronic module provides analyzing and data processing, collecting measured gamma-ray spectra and communication with onboard systems of SC “Interhelioprobe”. Main “Signal” scientific tasks are: begin{itemize} Research of X-ray and gamma emission in lines and continuum in energy range 30 keV - 5 MeV; begin{itemize} Study of gamma-ray bursts with Galactic and Metagalactic origin; begin{itemize} Analysis of gamma-ray lines near the Earth and Venus; begin{itemize} Charged particle fluxes registration along the spacecraft trajectory.

  17. Calibration of a telescope for gamma spectroscopy using a new configuration of two Ge(Li) diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was developed a telescope to measure gamma-rays in the energy interval 10-1500 KeV, using two Ge(Li) diodes of 40 cm3 each, coaxially mounted in the same cryostat and an anticoincidence Nal(Tl) shielding system. This new configuration allows a much better signal to noise ratio due to the lower diode operating in anticoincidence with the upper one; besides that, one has a high energy resolution (ΔE 241, Na22 and Eu152 are described. From the analysis of the data obtained in the sum coincidence mode, a minimum detectable flux at 511 KeV is estimated to be -3 fotons cm-2 s-1, with a statistical significance of 3σ for 10 hours of observing time at 3 mb of residual atmosphere. This is about the minimum line flux emitted by the Galactic Center. The measurement of the flux at this line would confirm the time variability observed by Riegler and collaborators using data obtained through HEAO-3 satellite. (Author)

  18. Large area α-thermal phonon TES detector mediated by the quasi-particle diffusion signal for space application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low temperature detectors operated at about 0.1 K have achieved excellent spectral performances in the soft X-rays, becoming appealing for new challenging measurements with space missions in Astrophysics. In order to exploit their full sensitivity, it is necessary to minimize the background signals generated by the cosmic rays, i.e., high energy protons and light nuclei, that leave sizable amounts of energy in the same spectral window of the astrophysics signals. Detectors for GeV protons and nuclei operating few millimeters from the X-ray detector at 0.1 K can act as anti-coincidence to disentangle the fake signal of cosmic. Fast and large detectors are designed and fabricated. These operate by mixing the fast α-thermal phonon signal with the slow diffusive thermal ones. A greater uniformity in the response should be obtained using large shaped superconducting aluminium films that acts as phonon collectors: the quasi-particles created by high energy phonons diffuse along the film toward a small Ir TES sensor giving out to a fast rise time. Here we present the measurement of an operating prototype of a superconducting anticoincidence detector for the proposed space mission ATHENA+.

  19. Internal gas-proportional beta-spectrometry for measurement of radioactive noble gases in reactor effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the Radiological Sciences Laboratory of the New York State Department of Health, gas fractions separated by gas chromatography are analyzed by internal gas-proportional spectrometry systems. These systems include gas-proportional detectors, plastic anticoincidence detectors, multichannel analyzers, and associated electronics. Detector systems are enclosed in 6-inch thick steel shields. Internal proportional counting with multichannel analysis offers several advantages, particularly improved sensitivity and specificity. Gas counting efficiencies are greater than 60 percent for 37Ar and 90 percent for 85Kr. Detector background with 100-ml copper proportional tubes and plastic anticoincidence guards is on the order of 0.3 cpm for 37Ar and 1.5 cpm for 85Kr. Shielded and guarded steel tubes have backgrounds approximately four times higher, but are acceptable for high-level reactor samples. By examining the spectra with a multichannel analyzer, the figure of merit for low-energy beta-emitters is greatly improved over integral bias counting. The purity of the sample following chromatographic separation can also be checked. Within certain abundance ratios, the levels of 3H and 14C in hydrocarbon fractions can be determined without combustion. Similarly, direct 37Ar and 39Ar measurements are possible. The application of spectrometric techniques for analysis of several types of reactor gas effluents is discussed

  20. Gas proportional counter with a large volume for measurement of small tritium concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of a multisection counter with a large sensitive volume (2l), which ensures operation at a voltage of 2000-4000 V, is described. The cylindrical volume of the counter is divided by earthed filaments into 55 cells; each cell has 0.74 l volume. To reduce the background, each internal section of the counter is switched into an anticoincidence circuit with respect to the others and, besides, all the external sections make up an additional ring of anticoincidence counters. For a methane-filled counter surrounded by 5 cm Pb layer from the sides and from below, the background in the energy range of 1.5-20 keV for a voltage of 2500 V is 0.34+-0.02 imp/s for a methane pressure of 0.5 kgf/cm and O.46+-0.01 imp/s on increase in pressure to 1 kgf/cm2. The counter design suggested makes it possible to detect a specific activity of tritium of the order of 1x10-13 Ci/l and higher; an activity of 1x10-13 Ci/l can be measured in 200 min with an error of 10%

  1. Simulation of background reduction and Compton depression in low-background HPGe spectrometer at a surface laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Niu, ShunLi; Wu, ZhenZhong; Xie, YuGuang; Yu, BoXiang; Wang, ZhiGang; Fang, Jian; Sun, XiLei; Sun, LiJun; Liu, YingBiao; Gao, Long; Zhang, Xuan; Zhao, Hang; Zhou, Li; Lv, JunGuang; Hu, Tao

    2014-01-01

    High-purity germanium detectors are well suited to analysis the radioactivity of samples. In order to reduce the environmental background, low-activity lead and oxygen free copper are installed outside of the probe to shield gammas, outmost is a plastic scintillator to veto the cosmic rays, and an anti-Compton detector can improve the Peak-to-Compton ratio. Using the GEANT4 tools and taking into account a detailed description of the detector, we optimize the sizes of the detectors to reach the design indexes. A group of experimental data from a HPGe spectrometer in using were used to compare with the simulation. As to new HPGe Detector simulation, considering the different thickness of BGO crystals and anti-coincidence efficiency, the simulation results show that the optimal thickness is 5.5cm, and the Peak-to-Compton ratio of 40K is raised to 1000 when the anti-coincidence efficiency is 0.85. As the background simulation, 15 cm oxygen-free copper plus 10 cm lead can reduce the environmental gamma rays to 0.0...

  2. A digital Compton suppression spectroscopy without gamma-ray coincidence-summing loss using list-mode multispectral data acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study demonstrates the advantages of an innovative list-mode multispectral data acquisition system that allows simultaneous creation of several different single, summed, coincident and anticoincident spectra with a single measurement. One of the consequences of list-mode data file offline processing is a reconstructed spectrum with Compton continuum suppression and without any full-energy peak efficiency deduction owing to true coincidence summing. The spectrometer is designed to read out analogue signal from preamplifier of gamma-ray detectors and to digitalize it using DGF/Pixie-4 software and card package (XIA LLC). This is realized by converting an Ortec Compton suppression data acquisition system into an all-digital spectrometer. Instead of using its timing electronic chain to determine the coincidence event, the analog signals from primary and guard detectors were connected directly into the Pixie-4 card for pulse height and time coincident measurement by individually logging and time stamping each electronic pulse. The data acquired in list-mode included coincidence and anticoincidence events consisting of records of energy and timestamp from primary and guard detectors. Every event was stored in a text file for offline processing and spectral reconstruction. A sophisticated computer simulation was also created with the goals of obtaining a better understanding of the experimental results and calculating efficiency. (author)

  3. Calibrating instrument of plane sources of alpha and beta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The instrument is standard instrument for measuring emissivity of plane sources of alpha and beta under 2π geometry in radionuclide metrologic technique. It is composed of box-type detector and truck-type NIM (made in China) to make up integral equipment. Its detector is composed of multivire proportion counter with electrostatic screen of zero potential and unique anticoincidence multiwire proportion counter in lead chamber. The characteristics of the instrument are as follows: Low background (α≤ 0.006 C · P · M/cm2, β≤ 0.03 C · P · M/cm2), low work voltage, low noise, high detective efficiency (>99%), large sensitive area (150 x 100 mm), less dead time, possessing micro accidental anticoincidences, better property of high voltage plateau and discriminating. It has fulfiled the requirements of standard which possesses wide rang (50 C · M · M ∼ 106 C · P · M), high precision (± 5 ∼ 6% for 50 C · P · M ∼ 220 C · P · M, ≤ ± 0.6% for 200 C · P · M ∼ 106 C · P · M); besides, have solved the problem of instability which usualy occurs in same kind of equipments for measuring a sources with less face conductivity

  4. Simulation of background reduction and Compton suppression in a low-background HPGe spectrometer at a surface laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Shun-Li; Cai, Xiao; Wu, Zhen-Zhong; Liu, Yi; Xie, Yu-Guang; Yu, Bo-Xiang; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Fang, Jian; Sun, Xi-Lei; Sun, Li-Jun; Liu, Ying-Biao; Gao, Long; Zhang, Xuan; Zhao, Hang; Zhou, Li; Lü, Jun-Guang; Hu, Tao

    2015-08-01

    High-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors are well suited to analyse the radioactivity of samples. In order to reduce the environmental background for an ultra-low background HPGe spectrometer, low-activity lead and oxygen free copper are installed outside the probe to shield from gamma radiation, with an outer plastic scintillator to veto cosmic rays, and an anti-Compton detector to improve the peak-to-Compton ratio. Using Geant4 tools and taking into account a detailed description of the detector, we optimize the sizes of these detectors to reach the design requirements. A set of experimental data from an existing HPGe spectrometer was used to compare with the simulation. For the future low-background HPGe detector simulation, considering different thicknesses of BGO crystals and anti-coincidence efficiency, the simulation results show that the optimal BGO thickness is 5.5 cm, and the peak-to-Compton ratio of 40K is raised to 1000 when the anti-coincidence efficiency is 0.85. In the background simulation, 15 cm oxygen-free copper plus 10 cm lead can reduce the environmental gamma rays to 0.0024 cps/100 cm3 Ge (50 keV-2.8 MeV), which is about 10-5 of the environmental background.

  5. The concentration of active and inactive strontium in some Danube river samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following fish species were investigated: Barbus barbus, Acipencer ruthenus, Abramis brama, Stizostedion lucioperca, Silurus glanis, Cyprinus caprio. The samples were collected during 1981. The inactive strontium in the water residue (after evaporation), sediment and fishes ewrw determined by nondestructive neutron activation analysis by using gamma couting system consisted of a 40 cm3 Ge(Li) semiconductor rystal attached to a 4096-channel pulsehight analyser. The standard solution contained 5x10-5 g of strontium per 100 lambda. Radioactive strontium was measured after several separation procedures. 90SrCO3 in equilibrium with its daughter 90Y was detected in the β-low-level counting anticoincident system with gas-flow detector. The results confirmed the literature data that the sediment concentrations of the total strontium and the active 90Sr are several times greater than those in water

  6. Radiocarbon dating programme at the Birbal Sahni Institute of Paleobotany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sample combustion is described in a pure oxygen stream to obtain CO2, and the subsequent conversion to CH4 proceeding for 8 to 12 hours. A low-background proportional counter with an in-built anticoincidence counter was used in measurement. The shielding box consisted of 10 cm lead layers and of a 2 cm mercury layer with a 10 cm paraffine wax layer in between. The circuit diagram is shown. The detector background was 1.4 imp/min. The Laboratory is involved in Quaternary research applied to paleobotany and palynology. The application is described of 14C dating in determining the vegetation, climatic and agricultural history and geomorphological future. 14C dating applications in archeology and in determining the post-growth factor are shown. (J.P.)

  7. Status of the GERDA experiment aimed to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of 76Ge

    CERN Document Server

    Smolnikov, Anatoly A

    2008-01-01

    The progress in the development of the new international Gerda (GErmanium Detector Array) experiment is presented. Main purpose of the experiment is to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 76Ge. The experimental set up is under construction in the underground laboratory of LNGS. Gerda will operate with bare germanium semiconductor detectors (enriched in 76Ge) situated in liquid argon. In the Phase I the existing enriched detectors from the previous Heidelberg-Moscow and IGEX experiments are employed, in the Phase II the new segmented detectors made from recently produced enriched material will be added. Novel concepts for background suppression including detector segmentation and anti-coincidence with LAr scintillation are developed.

  8. Background reduction in neutrinoless double beta decay experiments using segmented detectors-A Monte Carlo study for the GERDA setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The identification of gamma radiation is essential for a new generation of double beta decay experiments. The GERmanium Detector Array, GERDA, located at the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) in Italy, uses germanium, enriched in Ge76, as source and detector, and aims at a background level of less than 10-3counts/(kgkeVy) in the region of the Qββ-value. For the first time highly segmented detectors will be installed in a double beta decay experiment. A detailed GEANT4 Monte Carlo study was performed to evaluate the background reduction achievable by anti-coincidence cuts between crystals and segments. Within the overall geometry of GERDA, the segmentation scheme considered here provides around an order of magnitude of extra background reduction

  9. DSSD detectors development PACT, a new space Compton telescope at the horizon 2025

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, P.; Khalil, M.; Dolgorouki, Y.; Bertoli, W.; Oger, R.; Bréelle, E.

    2015-07-01

    PACT is a Pair and Compton telescope that aims to make a sensitive survey of the gamma-ray sky between 100 keV and 100 MeV . It will be devoted to the detection of radioactivity lines from present and past supernova explosions, the observation of thousands of new blazars, and the study of polarized radiations from gamma-ray bursts, pulsars and accreting black holes. It will reach a sensitivity of one to two orders of magnitude lower than COMPTEL/CGRO (e.g. about 50 times lower for the broad-band, survey sensitivity at 1 MeV after 5 years). The PACT telescope is based upon three main components: a silicon-based gamma-ray tracker, a crystal-based calorimeter (e.g. CeBr3), and an anticoincidence detector made of plastic scintillator panels. Prototypes of the Silicon detector planes have been optimized and are currently tested in the APC laboratory.

  10. Photoexcitation of sup 1 sup 8 sup 0 Ta by sup 6 sup 0 Co and sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs gamma rays

    CERN Document Server

    Lakosi, L

    2002-01-01

    The depopulation of the quasistable sup 1 sup 8 sup 0 Ta sup m was studied by irradiating natural Ta samples with strong sup 6 sup 0 Co and sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs sources. Decay of the ground state (t sub 1 sub / sub 2 =8.1 h) was observed by taking gamma-spectra using a large planar Ge detector in a NaI(Tl) anticoincidence shielding. Clear evidence was found for activation levels lying below 1.4 MeV, and their presence seems to be possible below 0.737 MeV as well, which couple effectively the quasistable isomer and the ground state. Integral cross sections and effective half-lives relevant in stellar environment have been inferred for depopulation of the isomer through mediating levels assumed at various energies. Implications for sup 1 sup 8 sup 0 Ta sup m production in the s-process nucleosynthesis are discussed.

  11. Ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of 'Revue Francaise de Metrologie' presents the 2006 activity report of the national laboratory of metrology and tests (LNE). This paper presents the metrology activities in the domain of ionizing radiations. These activities are shared between two laboratories: the LNE-LNHB (Henry Becquerel national laboratory), i.e. the national laboratory of metrology of CEA-Saclay, and the LMDN (laboratory of dose metrology), which belongs to IRSN-Cadarache (Institute of radioprotection and nuclear safety). The different activities reported here concern: the international comparisons and actions, the advances in the lyophilization process for the drying of radioactive solutions, the use of renewable dead-times for radionuclides activity measurement using the anticoincidence method, the establishment of dosimetry references for low- and medium-energy X-photons, the advances in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technology, and other international and national actions. (J.S.)

  12. Determination of trace elements in NIES environmental reference materials by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentrations of trace elements in environmental reference materials prepared by the National Institute for Environmental Studies of Japan (NIES) were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Mussel, Human Hair, Tea Leaves and Sargasso reference material samples (ca. 150∼1200 mg) were irradiated by thermal neutron without cadmium filter and epithermal neutron with cadmium filter at Musashi Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITRR). The activated samples were measured by three methods; conventional γ-ray spectrometry using a coaxial Ge detector, anticoincidence counting spectrometry and coincidence counting spectrometry. The γ-ray spectrometric system (GAMA system) was developed by the authors. As a result, they could determined about 30 - 50 elements by the combination of these irradiation and counting methods. The analyzed values were in good agreement with NIES certified values

  13. 7Be analyses in seawater by low background gamma-spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oceanographers use the cosmogenic radionuclide 7Be (T1/2 53 days) as a tracer for atmospheric input and a conservative tracer of mixing in the open ocean. This paper elucidates a method for improving the analysis of 7Be from seawater. The scavenging efficiency of Fe(OH)3 for each sample is measured by ICP-MS using stable 9Be as a yield monitor. Samples are gamma-counted in a large diameter (28 mm) well detector. The high purity germanium well detector is coupled with an active anti-coincidence cosmic guard to reduce the spectra background. The improved overall accuracy of the method and lower detection limit of the detector results in a lower volume of seawater needed for analyses. Results will be shown from a study of 7Be in the Sargasso Sea. (author)

  14. Background model of NaI(Tl) detectors for the ANAIS Dark Matter Project

    CERN Document Server

    Amare, J; Cuesta, C; Garcia, E; Martinez, M; Olivan, M A; Ortigoza, Y; de Solorzano, A Ortiz; Pobes, C; Puimedon, J; Sarsa, M L; Villar, J A; Villar, P

    2015-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the background sources is mandatory in any experiment searching for rare events. The ANAIS (Annual Modulation with NaI(Tl) Scintillators) experiment aims at the confirmation of the DAMA/LIBRA signal at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC). Two NaI(Tl) crystals of 12.5 kg each produced by Alpha Spectra have been taking data since December 2012. The complete background model of these detectors and more precisely in the region of interest will be described. Preliminary background analysis of a new 12.5 kg crystal received at Canfranc in March 2015 will be presented too. Finally, the power of anticoincidence rejection in the region of interest has been analyzed in a 4x 5 12.5 kg detector matrix.

  15. Analysis of Data from the Balloon Borne Gamma RAy Polarimeter Experiment (GRAPE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasti, Sambid K.; Bloser, Peter F.; Legere, Jason S.; McConnell, Mark L.; Ryan, James M.

    2016-04-01

    The Gamma Ray Polarimeter Experiment (GRAPE), a balloon borne polarimeter for 50~300 keV gamma rays, successfully flew in 2011 and 2014. The main goal of these balloon flights was to measure the gamma ray polarization of the Crab Nebula. Analysis of data from the first two balloon flights of GRAPE has been challenging due to significant changes in the background level during each flight. We have developed a technique based on the Principle Component Analysis (PCA) to estimate the background for the Crab observation. We found that the background depended mostly on the atmospheric depth, pointing zenith angle and instrument temperatures. Incorporating Anti-coincidence shield data (which served as a surrogate for the background) was also found to improve the analysis. Here, we present the calibration data and describe the analysis done on the GRAPE 2014 flight data.

  16. Feasibility of a room temperature silicon system to perform low energy lung spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is part of a project aimed at developing a new monitoring system to improve measurements of lung retention for 239Pu. To cover the thoracic volume, the proposed system uses silicon detectors operating at room temperature. This report gives the first conclusions of this feasibility study. The results were obtained using a detection module composed of silicon strip detectors. Analogue electronics were specially designed to optimise signal-to-noise ratio and to investigate background by using anticoincidence between the silicon detectors. Overall counting efficiency determination was carried out by scanning the surface of a Livermore phantom. Combining these measurements, the detection limits are discussed for the complete modular system with emphasis on the competition between efficiency and background to demonstrate the innovative feature of such a system as an alternative to germanium detectors systems. The proposed new monitoring system may enable the detection limit for 239Pu to be lowered by a factor of 2. (author)

  17. Five Years of SETI with the Allen Telescope Array: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harp, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    We discuss recent observations at the Allen Telescope Array (ATA) supporting a wide ranging Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI). The ATA supports observations over the frequency range 1-10 GHz with three simultaneous phased array beams used in an anticoincidence detector for false positive rejection. Here we summarize observational results over the years 2011-2015 covering multiple campaigns of exoplanet stars, the galactic plane, infrared excess targets, etc. Approximately 2 x 108 signals were identified and classified over more than 5000 hours of observation. From these results we consider various approaches to the rapid identification of human generated interference in the process of the search for a signal with origins outside the radius of the Moon's orbit. We conclude that the multi-beam technique is superb tool for answering the very difficult question of the direction of origin of signals. Data-based simulations of future instruments with more than 3 beams are compared.

  18. Electronics for low-level counting using a microcomputer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low-cost electronic system for low-level radioactivity measurements is described. Counts of one or more detectors are handled by integrated amplifiers/quad-discriminators and anticoincidence units, interfaced to an 8-bit microcomputer with external printer which provide a maximum of 15 recording channels. Software effects a clock and counting timers, and furthermore data manipulation such as output tabulation and testing of counting statistics. Interrupt-controlled microprocessor input is realized at 80 μs electronic dead time. This system was implemented to adopt three gas counter detectors, each equipped with its own guard counter, and with five recording channels per detector, and it has performed extremely well over more than a year of continuous operation. Its expected count rate loss of less than 0.2% has been verified by observation. (orig.)

  19. Use of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) Detectors for an Advanced X-ray Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Remillard, R A; Boughan, E A; Bradt, H V; Morgan, E H; Becker, U J; Nenonen, S; Vilhu, O R

    2000-01-01

    We describe a concept for a NASA SMEX Mission in which Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors, developed at CERN, are adapted for use in X-ray astronomy. These detectors can be used to obtain moderately large detector area and two-dimensional photon positions with sub mm accuracy in the range of 1.5 to 15 keV. We describe an application of GEMs with xenon gas, coded mask cameras, and simple circuits for measuring event positions and for anticoincidence rejection of particle events. The cameras are arranged to cover most of the celestial sphere, providing high sensitivity and throughput for a wide variety of cosmic explosions. At longer timescales, persistent X-ray sources would be monitored with unprecedented levels of coverage. The sensitivity to faint X-ray sources on a one-day timescale would be improved by a factor of 6 over the capability of the RXTE All Sky Monitor.

  20. H, He, Li and Be Isotopes in the PAMELA-Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menn, W.; Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; De Donato, C.; De Santis, C.; De Simone, N.; di Felice, V.; Formato, V.; Galper, A. M.; Karelin, A. V.; Koldashov, S. V.; Koldobskiy, S.; Krutkov, S. Y.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Leonov, A.; Malakhov, V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Mayorov, A. G.; Mergè, M.; Mikhailov, V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Palma, F.; Panico, B.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Sarkar, R.; Scotti, V.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Y. I.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G.; Voronov, S. A.; Yurkin, Y. T.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Potgieter, M. S.; Vos, E. E.

    2016-02-01

    On the 15th of June 2006, the PAMELA satellite-borne experiment was launched from the Baikonur cosmodrome and it has been collecting data since July 2006. The apparatus comprises a time-of-flight system, a silicon-microstrip magnetic spectrometer, a silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter, an anti-coincidence system, a shower tail counter scintillator and a neutron detector. The scientific objectives addressed by the mission are the measurement of the antiprotons and positrons spectra in cosmic rays, the hunt for antinuclei as well as the determination of light nuclei fluxes from hydrogen to oxygen in a wide energy range and with very high statistics. In this paper the identification capability for light nuclei isotopes using two different detector systems (Time-of-Flight and multiple dE/dx measurements in the calorimeter) and preliminary results of the isotopic ratios will be presented.

  1. Methods for solving several technical problems during designing a set of low background anti-compton high purity germanium gamma-ray spectrograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several methods are introduced for solving some technical problems of a set of high purity Germanium (HPGe) anti-Compton low background gamma ray spectrograph, including mainly the manufacturing and recreating of screened room, the design of main detector elevating device, the improvement of working stability, the alignment of anti-coincidence system, the scaling of spectrograph, and the measuring of samples, etc. The main technical indexes are: energy resolution FWHM = 1.77 keV (1332.5 keV), peak-Compton ratio 694:1 (662 keV), Compton integral suppression coefficient 3.8(137Cs 50∼595 keV), relative detecting efficiency 38.3% (1332.5 keV), system background 0.39 s-1(50∼2014 keV), and drift less than 0.07% under the gain of 1332.5 keV with stable zero point are obtained after 48 hours continuous working

  2. Estimate of the impact of background particles on the X-Ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer on IXO

    CERN Document Server

    Lotti, S; Natalucci, L; Piro, L; Mineo, T; Colasanti, L; Macculi, C

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a study on the impact of particles of galactic (GCR) and solar origin for the X-ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer (XMS) aboard an astronomical satellite flying in an orbit at the second Lagrangian point (L2). The detailed configuration presented in this paper is the one adopted for the International X-Ray Observatory (IXO) study, however the derived estimates can be considered a conservative limit for ATHENA, that is the IXO redefined mission proposed to ESA. This work is aimed at the estimate of the residual background level expected on the focal plane detector during the mission lifetime, a crucial information in the development of any instrumental configuration that optimizes the XMS scientific performances. We used the Geant4 toolkit, a Monte Carlo based simulator, to investigate the rejection efficiency of the anticoincidence system and assess the residual background on the detector.

  3. Estimate of the impact of background particles on the X-ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer on IXO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotti, S., E-mail: simone.lotti@iaps.inaf.it [INAF-IAPS Roma, Via fosso del cavaliere 100, Rome 00133 (Italy); Perinati, E. [IAAT-Institut fuer Astronomie und Astrophysik, Universitaet Tuebingen, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Natalucci, L. [INAF-IAPS Roma, Via fosso del cavaliere 100, Rome 00133 (Italy); Piro, L. [INAF-IAPS Roma, Via fosso del cavaliere 100, Rome 00133 (Italy); Astronomy Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Mineo, T. [INAF-IASF Palermo, Via Ugo la Malfa 153, Palermo 90146 (Italy); Colasanti, L.; Macculi, C. [INAF-IAPS Roma, Via fosso del cavaliere 100, Rome 00133 (Italy)

    2012-09-11

    We present the results of a study on the impact of particles of galactic (GCR) and solar origin for the X-ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer (XMS) aboard an astronomical satellite flying in an orbit at the second Lagrangian point (L2). The detailed configuration presented in this paper is the one adopted for the International X-ray Observatory (IXO) study, however the derived estimates can be considered a conservative limit for ATHENA, that is the IXO redefined mission proposed to ESA. This work is aimed at the estimate of the residual background level expected on the focal plane detector during the mission lifetime, a crucial information in the development of any instrumental configuration that optimizes the XMS scientific performances. We used the Geant4 toolkit, a Monte Carlo based simulator, to investigate the rejection efficiency of the anticoincidence system and assess the residual background on the detector.

  4. Observation of polarised hard X-ray emission from the Crab by the PoGOLite Pathfinder

    CERN Document Server

    Chauvin, M; Jackson, M; Kamae, T; Kawano, T; Kiss, M; Kole, M; Mikhalev, V; Moretti, E; Olofsson, G; Rydström, S; Takahashi, H; Iyudin, A; Arimoto, M; Fukazawa, Y; Kataoka, J; Kawai, N; Mizuno, T; Ryde, F; Tajima, H; Takahashi, T; Pearce, M

    2015-01-01

    We have measured the linear polarisation of hard X-ray emission from the Crab in a previously unexplored energy interval, 20-120 keV. The introduction of two new observational parameters, the polarisation fraction and angle stands to disentangle geometrical and physical effects, thereby providing information on the pulsar wind geometry and magnetic field environment. Measurements are conducted using the PoGOLite Pathfinder - a balloon-borne polarimeter. Polarisation is determined by measuring the azimuthal Compton scattering angle of incident X-rays in an array of plastic scintillators housed in an anticoincidence well. The polarimetric response has been characterised prior to flight using both polarised and unpolarised calibration sources. We address possible systematic effects through observations of a background field. The measured polarisation fraction for the integrated Crab light-curve is ($18.4^{+9.8}_{-10.6}$)%, corresponding to an upper limit (99% credibility) of 42.4%, for a polarisation angle of ($...

  5. DSSD detectors development PACT, a new space Compton telescope at the horizon 2025

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PACT is a Pair and Compton telescope that aims to make a sensitive survey of the gamma-ray sky between 100 keV and 100 MeV . It will be devoted to the detection of radioactivity lines from present and past supernova explosions, the observation of thousands of new blazars, and the study of polarized radiations from gamma-ray bursts, pulsars and accreting black holes. It will reach a sensitivity of one to two orders of magnitude lower than COMPTEL/CGRO (e.g. about 50 times lower for the broad-band, survey sensitivity at 1 MeV after 5 years). The PACT telescope is based upon three main components: a silicon-based gamma-ray tracker, a crystal-based calorimeter (e.g. CeBr3), and an anticoincidence detector made of plastic scintillator panels. Prototypes of the Silicon detector planes have been optimized and are currently tested in the APC laboratory

  6. A round periodization monitoring of gamma rays in the environment around Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The materials of environmental background radiations around a NPP (nuclear power Plant) to be constructed is an important part in the environment effect evaluation report before its operation. The sampling and preparation of samples of air dust and rain water, measuring equipment and analytical method of gamma radionuclides, and a discussion on obtained results in the second round investigation of the two investigations are presented. Comparing with the first round investigation, the sampling places are expanded and improved, especially, a complete and satisfactory data are obtained due to the combination of anti-coincidence shield/anti-Compton HPGe ultra-low γ spectrometer and common HPGe spectrometer. These provides more systematic material to the environmental science research

  7. Pixellated CdZnTe detector for emission/transmission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A small pixellated CdZnTe array is tested for suitability in a prototype SPECT system designed to acquire both emission and transmission data. Determining the optimum contact design and obtaining performance estimates of single photon acquisition are the primary focus. Flood field and collimated 57Co sources irradiated the 16 pixel array (5 mm thick and 1.5 mm pixels) to determine photopeak efficiencies and detector response with different event collection techniques. Intrinsic full energy peak efficiency averaged 72% for an 18 keV acceptance window. A small irradiation spot scanned an array region, revealing detector response from nearby pixels. Post processing spectra compare coincident and anti-coincident acquisition. Additionally, current mode tests compare linearity with a CdWO4/Si p-i-n detector

  8. High energy gamma-quanta according to measurements on the ''Kosmos-856'' and ''Kosmos-914'' satellites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The GG-2M spectrometer intended for studying cosmic gamma-quanta with energies above 100 MeV on the ''Kosmos-836'' and ''Kosmos-914'' is described. The spectrometer comprises fine detectors: Cherenkov counter with gamma-quanta convertor before it, scintillation counter, scintillation shower calorimeter and anticoincidence scintillation detectors. Characteristics of the equipment obtained in the course of its adjustment by means of μ mesons of cosmic rays and calibrations on electron beams from the accelerator are given. The results of calculation of physical characteristics of the device are presented. The data processing stages which permit to isolate primary gamma quanta out of a great number of their imitations by charged particles Aare described. The integral gamma quanta spectrum from the preequatorial galactic region is given

  9. Measurement of laser-induced Compton backscattered photons with anti-Compton spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on quasi-monochromatic photons of energies 1.6-8.7 MeV generated by the Compton backscattering of laser light on relativistic electrons in a storage ring TERAS installed at the Electrotechnical Laboratory. Spectra of the backscattered photons have been measured with an anti-Compton spectrometer system. The present system consists of a coaxial type pure Ge detector of 155 cm3 as a central detector and a well type NaI(Tl) scintillator of 8 in. φ x 8 in. as an outer one. With a usual anti-coincidence technique, clear photopeak spectra were obtained with the Compton suppression ration of 2-4. The maximum energy and the energy spread of photons show reasonable agreements with numerical calculations. The divergence and energy spread of the electron beam in the storage ring is estimated from the data

  10. Resolving photons from cosmic ray in DAMPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zunlei; Chang, Jin; Li, Xiang; Dong, TieKuang; Zang, Jingjing

    2016-07-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer(DAMPE), which took to the skies on 17 December, is designed for high energy cosmic ray ion detection. The proportion of photons in the cosmic ray is very small, so it's difficult to distinguish between photons and 'background', but necessary for any DAMPE gamma-ray science goals.The paper present a algorithm to identify photons from 'background' mainly by the tracker/converter, which promote pair conversion and measure the directions of incident particles, and an anticoincidence detector,featuring an array of plastic scintillator to detect the charged particles.The method has been studied by simulating using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation code and adjusted by the BeamTest at CERN in December,2014.In addition,DAMPE photon detection capabilities can be checked using the flight data.

  11. An approach to low-level H-3 and C-14 analysis at the Alberta Environmental Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A counting system of considerable flexibility in sample handling yet also capable of the low-level work required in earth sciences investigations is described. The approach taken and described in this paper is a three-tiered one employing a computer controlled Tracor Mark III Counter, the added sensitivity of a large-volume liquid scintillator system utilizing anticoincidence shielding, and the capability of enhancing tritium detection limits via enrichment using Ostlund Cells. Attention is given to the development of I/O and other software necessary to interface HP85 and HP9845T desk-top computers with both counters for control functions and data acquisition and management. Considerable counting difficulties were initially experienced due to electrical power instability and variable airborne, ground and supply side RF noise. Steps employed to minimize such power instability and induced RF noise are also detailed

  12. The absolute vertical muonic intensity on sea level at 1 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absolute differential and integral muonic intensity at 1 GeV/c was measured vertically at sea level with the aid of a range spectrometer. The spectrometer has a product of solid angle and area of 1.13 cm2sr and consists of two lead absorbers of a thickness of 60 cm and 15 cm (anticoincidence method) and 5 scintillation counters. The measured rates were corrected with regard to inefficiency of the apparatus, cosmic-ray showers, multiple scattering, muon straggling and variations of intensity (caused by atmospheric effects and solar influences). The findings of this paper as well as recent measurements of other authors show that the value of 1 GeV/c (ROSSI point) which has up to now been used as normalization point for muon spectres should be raised by 25%. (orig./AK)

  13. A Compton-suppression detection system for use in manganese bath measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghal-Eh, N.; Doostizadeh, H.; Hazami, Z.; Doust-Mohammadi, V.

    2015-07-01

    The manganese sulfate bath technique is a standard tool for neutron source strength measurement (Park et al., 2005). However, the dominate Compton continuum of most sodium iodide scintillators used in manganese bath systems (MBSs) does not allow the precise identification of induced gamma rays required for such measurements. In this research, to resolve this problem, a Compton-suppression system has been proposed which consists of a 2 in. by 2 in. NaI(Tl) right cylindrical scintillator as the main and a set of eight rectangular NE102 plastic scintillators of 12×12×15 cm3 dimensions as suppression detectors. Both detectors operate in anti-coincidence circuit to suppress the Compton continuum. The proposed system has been simulated with the MCNPX code with two different approaches and the corresponding measurements with 137Cs gamma-ray source and neutron-activated MnSO4 solution have been undertaken that give rise to a promising agreement.

  14. Design of HEPD Onboard the CSES Satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High Energy Particle Detector (HEPD) is one of the main payloads onboard China Seismo-Electromagnetic Satellite (CSES). The detector is designed to identify the electrons and protons, to measure the energy spectrum and the incident angle of the particles. HEPP is made up of a silicon tracker, a CsI (TI) mini-calorimeter, an anticoincidence system made by plastic scintillator, as well as electronics and data acquisition system (DAQ). The front-end electronics with ASIC are designed individually to process their output signals, such as two Double-sided Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSD), CsI (TI) mini-calorimeter and plastic scintillator. The DAQ is a very important part of the electronics, which used to select effective case and keep the scientific data in an appropriate size. (authors)

  15. Routine performance of a new multi-counter system for high-precision 14C dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new 14C detector system containing nine independently working CO2 proportional counters is described. The counter system provides sufficient measuring capacity at a precision level of sigma=+-1.5 permille (equivalent to +-12 years in age) requiring a counting time of about one week per sample. All counters are run with a common high voltage and stability is checked with a 226Ra γ-source. The amount of CO2 is 384 mmol (2 atmospheres pressure), chromatographically purified over charcoal. During this process radon is completely removed, the sample loss is negligible, and no detectable isotope fractionation occurs in the sample. The CO2 sample size control is checked by an analytical balance to a precision better than +-0.1 permille. The modern carbon count-rate (54 counts/min) is sensitively checked by running samples of the Heidelberg sodium carbonate standard (giving a count-rate of about 10 times modern), by which the entire chemical sample procedure is checked. The background lies between 3 and 3.6 counts/min depending on the position of the counters within the anticoincidence shield. The systematic background variation primarily due to barometric-pressure-induced fluctuations of cosmic-ray intensity, is eliminated by a regression with the coincidence counting rate of the 14C counters with the anticoincidence shield. Thus, the background does not significantly contribute to overall precision and reproducibility at the 14C activity levels met in oceanography and in tree-ring calibration for whose applications the detection system was designed. A micro-computer (DEC PDP 11/63) is used for data aquisition. Data transfer to the computer memory goes via a DMA-Interface (Software: 4K stand-alone system; functions: timer, counters, protocol and system check)

  16. Radiation measurement above the lunar surface by Kaguya gamma-ray spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasebe, Nobuyuki; Nagaoka, Hiroshi; Kusano, Hiroki; Hareyama, Matoko; Ideguchi, Yusuke; Shimizu, Sota; Shibamura, Eido

    The lunar surface is filled with various ionizing radiations such as high energy galactic particles, albedo particles and secondary radiations of neutrons, gamma rays and other elementary particles. A high-resolution Kaguya Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (KGRS) was carried on the Japan’s lunar explorer SELENE (Kaguya), the largest lunar orbiter since the Apollo missions. The KGRS instrument employed, for the first time in lunar exploration, a high-purity Ge crystal to increase the identification capability of elemental gamma-ray lines. The Ge detector is surrounded by BGO and plastic counters as for anticoincidence shields. The KGRS measured gamma rays in the energy range from 200 keV to 13 MeV with high precision to determine the chemical composition of the lunar surface. It provided data on the abundance of major elements over the entire lunar surface. In addition to the gamma-ray observation by the KGRS, it successfully measured the global distribution of fast neutrons. In the energy spectra of gamma-rays observed by the KGRS, several saw-tooth- peaks of Ge are included, which are formed by the collision interaction of lunar fast neutrons with Ge atoms in the Ge crystal. With these saw-tooth-peaks analysis, global distribution of neutrons emitted from the lunara surface was successfully created, which was compared with the previous results obtained by Lunar Prospector neutron maps. Another anticoincidence counter, the plastic counter with 5 mm thickness, was used to veto radiation events mostly generated by charged particles. A single photomultiplier serves to count scintillation light from the plastic scintillation counter. The global map of counting rates observed by the plastic counter was also created, implying that the radiation counting rate implies the geological distribution, in spite that the plastic counter mostly measures high energy charged particles and energetic neutrons. These results are presented and discussed.

  17. An in-beam Compton-suppressed Ge spectrometer for nondestructive neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-efficiency compton background suppressed gamma-ray spectrometer by anti-coincidence counting with a NaI(Tl)-shield around a central HPGe-detector for in-beam prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (AC-PGNAA) using a Cf-252 neutron source has been designed and built to provide simultaneous anti-coincidence spectrometry of natural, industrial and environmental samples. The spectrometer consists of a high-purity germanium detector as the main detector and a large volume cylindrical NaI(Tl) detector as a guard detector. The assembly has the ability to measure instantaneously, simultaneously and nondestructively bulk samples up to about 50 cm3. Major constituent elements in several rocks and minerals such as H, B, N, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Cl, K, Ca, P, S, Ti, Fe, Sm, Nd, Mn and Gd can be determined, while oxygen cannot be measured due to its small capture cross section (0.27 mb). Several important minor and trace elements such as B, Cd and Hg beside the low residual activity, rare earths and short-lived isotopes could be detected. The sensitivity of the AC-PGNAA technique is limited by the available neutron flux at the target matrix and the neutron absorption cross section of the elements of interest. PGNAA has the advantage to estimate the constituent elements which are difficult to be measured through the delayed gamm-ray measurements such as B, Bi, C, H, P, Tl, Be, Cl and S in industrial and reference materials and those elements which are transformed into other stable isotopes when undergoing neutron capture. The design of the spectrometer assembly, its properties and performance are described

  18. Study of the Residual Background Events in Ground Data from the ASTRO-HSXS Microcalorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Boyce, Kevin R.; Chiao, M. P.; Eckart, M. E.; Kelley, R. L.; Leutenegger, M. A.; Porter, F. S.; Watanabe, T.; Ishisaki, Y.; Yamada, S.; Tsujimoto, M.; Mitsuda, K.; Tashiro, M.

    2015-01-01

    The measured instrumental background of the XRS calorimeter spectrometer of Suzaku had several sources, including primary cosmic rays and secondary particles interacting with the pixels and with the silicon structure of the array. Prior to the launch of Suzaku, several data sets were taken without x-ray illumination to study the characteristics and timing of background signals produced in the array and anti-coincidence detector. Even though the source of the background in the laboratory was different from that in low-earth orbit (muons and environmental gamma-rays on the ground versus Galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) protons and alpha particles in space), the study of correlations and properties of populations of rare events was useful for establishing the preliminary screening parameters needed for selection of good science data. Sea-level muons are singly charged minimum-ionizing particles, like the GCR protons, and thus were good probes of the effectiveness of screening via the signals from the anti-coincidence detector. Here we present the first analysis of the on-ground background of the SXS calorimeter of Astro-H. On XRS, the background prior to screening was completely dominated by coincident events on many pixels resulting from the temperature pulse arising from each large energy deposition (greater than 200 keV) into the silicon frame around the array. The improved heat-sinking of the SXS array compared with XRS eliminated these thermal disturbances, greatly reducing the measured count rate in the absence of illumination. The removal of these events has made it easier to study the nature of the residual background and to look for additional event populations. We compare the SXS residual background to that measured in equivalent ground data for XRS and discuss these preliminary results.

  19. Gamma-telescopes Fermi/LAT and GAMMA-400 Trigger Systems Event Recognizing Methods Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Murchenko, A. E.; Chasovikov, E. N.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Kheymits, M. D.

    Usually instruments for high-energy γ-quanta registration consists of converter (where γ-quanta produced pairs) and calorimeter for particles energy measurements surrounded by anticoincidence shield used to events identification (whether incident particle was charged or neutral). The influence of pair formation by γ-quanta in shield and the backsplash (moved in the opposite direction particles created due high energy γ-rays interact with calorimeter) should be taken into account. It leads to decrease both effective area and registration efficiency at E>10 GeV. In the presented article the event recognizing methods used in Fermi/LAT trigger system is considered in comparison with the ones applied in counting and triggers signals formation system of gamma-telescope GAMMA-400. The GAMMA-400 (Gamma Astronomical Multifunctional Modular Apparatus) will be the new high-apogee space γ-observatory. The GAMMA-400 consist of converter-tracker based on silicon-strip coordinate detectors interleaved with tungsten foils, imaging calorimeter make of 2 layers of double (x, y) silicon strip coordinate detectors interleaved with planes of CsI(Tl) crystals and the electromagnetic calorimeter CC2 consists only of CsI(Tl) crystals. Several plastics detections systems used as anticoincidence shield, for particles energy and moving direction estimations. The main differences of GAMMA-400 constructions from Fermi/LAT one are using the time-of-flight system with base of 50 cm and double layer structure of plastic detectors provides more effective particles direction definition and backsplash rejection. Also two calorimeters in GAMMA-400 composed the total absorbtion spectrometer with total thickness ∼ 25 X0 or ∼1.2 λ0 for vertical incident particles registration and 54 X0 or 2.5 λ0 for laterally incident ones (where λ0 is nuclear interaction length). It provides energy resolution 1-2% for 10 GeV-3.0×103 GeV events while the Fermi/LAT energy resolution does not reach such a

  20. Pre-Flight Development of the PoGOLite Pathfinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Polarized Gamma-ray Observer (PoGOLite) is a balloon-borne instrument that will measure gamma-ray polarization in the energy range 25-80 keV from astronomical sources such as pulsars, accretion discs and jets from active galactic nuclei. The two additional parameters provided by such observations, polarization angle and degree, will allow these objects to be studied in a new way, providing information about their emission mechanisms and geometries. The instrument measures azimuthal scattering angles of photons within a close packed array of phoswich detector cells (PDCs) based on coincident detection of Compton scattering and photoelectric absorption. Each PDC comprises three different scintillating components and combines photon detection, active collimation and bottom anticoincidence into one single unit. The three parts are viewed by a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and pulse shape discrimination is used to identify signals from dierent parts. Surrounding the detector array is a segmented side anticoincidence shield (SAS) made of BGO crystals. The detector elements of the instrument (PDCs, SAS units, PMTs) have been characterized, resulting in a placement scheme which details where within the detector array each element should be placed in order to maximize the instrument sensitivity and response uniformity. Suitable operating parameters for flight, such as threshold settings and PMT voltages, have also been dened. Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations have shown that a polyethylene shield is needed around the detector array in order to sufficiently reduce the background from atmospheric neutrons. To validate these simulations, a simple detector array with four plastic scintillators and three BGO crystals shielded with polyethylene was irradiated with 14 MeV neutrons. Measured results were accurately recreated in simulations, demonstrating that the treatment of neutron interactions in Geant4 is reliable. A Pathnder version of the PoGOLite instrument has been

  1. A Compton-suppression detection system for use in manganese bath measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The manganese sulfate bath technique is a standard tool for neutron source strength measurement (Park et al., 2005). However, the dominate Compton continuum of most sodium iodide scintillators used in manganese bath systems (MBSs) does not allow the precise identification of induced gamma rays required for such measurements. In this research, to resolve this problem, a Compton-suppression system has been proposed which consists of a 2 in. by 2 in. NaI(Tl) right cylindrical scintillator as the main and a set of eight rectangular NE102 plastic scintillators of 12×12×15 cm3 dimensions as suppression detectors. Both detectors operate in anti-coincidence circuit to suppress the Compton continuum. The proposed system has been simulated with the MCNPX code with two different approaches and the corresponding measurements with 137Cs gamma-ray source and neutron-activated MnSO4 solution have been undertaken that give rise to a promising agreement. - Highlights: • A Compton-suppression system (CSS) consists of eight NE102 plastic and one NaI scintillators is proposed. • The motivation for the proposed CSS is to improve the minimum detectable activity in a manganese bath system (MBS). • Both MCNPX and experimental studies have been undertaken to obtain the optimum source-to-detector distance in CSS

  2. Special Cryostats for Lithium Compensated Germanium Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In many applications of Ge(Li) detectors an extreme design of the cryostat is desirable. One example is a coincidence or anticoincidence setup where the Ge(Li) detector is surrounded by one or several other detectors, usually Nal(Tl) crystals or plastic scintillators. To be usable in this arrangement the part of the cryostat containing the Ge(Li) detector should have the form of a long hood, with the detector placed at its very end. The diameter of the hood should be as small as detector dimensions permit. Excellent energy resolution and reasonably low liquid nitrogen consumption must be retained. Two cryostats fulfilling these conditions will be described. For the first cryostat emphasis lay on the reduction of the hood diameter to an absolute minimum; for the other incorporation of a device regulating the temperature of the cryostat surface was required. The difficulties encountered will be discussed; they were primarily connected with the necessity of combining minimum temperature loss at the detector position with extreme cryostat compactness and cold finger length. The incorporation of a cooled FET transistor in the cryostat will also be described. The gamma spectrometers using the cryostats gave resolutions down to 2.8 keV FWHM for the 1173 keV gamma line from Co 60 and 1.2 keV FWHM for the 122 keV line from Co 57

  3. A metastable xenon isotope detector for treaty verification

    CERN Document Server

    Lopes, J A M; Conde, C A N

    2003-01-01

    A system to selectively detect and quantify the xenon metastable isotopes sup 1 sup 3 sup 1 sup m Xe, sup 1 sup 3 sup 3 sup m Xe, sup 1 sup 3 sup 3 Xe, and sup 1 sup 3 sup 5 Xe has been designed, fabricated, and tested. The system combines high-resolution electron and gamma-ray spectrometry with coincidence/anti-coincidence timing for signal selectivity and background rejection. By utilizing X-ray-fluorescence gating, backgrounds from other sources are expected to be reduced to the sub-becquerel level. Coincidence and anti-coincidence triggers are formed from the several individual detectors that comprise the system and used to identify K-shell conversion electrons and fluorescence X-rays from a sup 1 sup 0 sup 9 Cd test source with good efficiencies and energy resolutions (20 keV for the low-energy electrons, approx 1.2 keV for the fluorescence X-rays, respectively).

  4. Techniques to distinguish between electron and photon induced events using segmented germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroeninger, K.

    2007-06-05

    Two techniques to distinguish between electron and photon induced events in germanium detectors were studied: (1) anti-coincidence requirements between the segments of segmented germanium detectors and (2) the analysis of the time structure of the detector response. An 18-fold segmented germanium prototype detector for the GERDA neutrinoless double beta-decay experiment was characterized. The rejection of photon induced events was measured for the strongest lines in {sup 60}Co, {sup 152}Eu and {sup 228}Th. An accompanying Monte Carlo simulation was performed and the results were compared to data. An overall agreement with deviations of the order of 5-10% was obtained. The expected background index of the GERDA experiment was estimated. The sensitivity of the GERDA experiment was determined. Special statistical tools were developed to correctly treat the small number of events expected. The GERDA experiment uses a cryogenic liquid as the operational medium for the germanium detectors. It was shown that germanium detectors can be reliably operated through several cooling cycles. (orig.)

  5. Observational techniques of gamma rays astronomy in low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the absorption of great part of the gamma-ray spectrum of cosmic origin, by the earth's atmosphere at heights above 20Km, gamma-ray astronomy achieved its full development only after the advent of the space age. Ballons and satellites are the space vehicles which have been used to transport gamma-ray telescopes to observational heights in the atmosphere, or out of it. The results of these experiments can determine the sources, the energy spectra and the intensities of the cosmic gamma-rays, and provide other important information of astrophysical interest. The detection of gamma-rays of cosmic origin is very difficult. The observational techniques used in gamma-ray astronomy are dependent on the energy range of the gamma-rays which one desires to detect. The most common telescopes of low energy gamma-ray astronomy (50KeV - 20MeV) use NaI(Tl) scintillators, or germanium diodes, as principal detectors, surrounded by an active shield (anticoincidence) of organic or inorganic scintillators. (Author)

  6. Determination of multielements in a typical Japanese diet certified reference material by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multielements in a typical Japanese diet certified reference material prepared at the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) of Japan, in collaboration with the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) of Japan were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Five samples (ca. 510 - 1000 mg) and comparative standards were irradiated for a short time (10 s) at a thermal neutron flux of 1.5 x 1012 n cm-2 s-1 (pneumatic transfer) and for a long time (6 h) at a thermal neutron flux of 3.7 x 1012 n cm-2 s-1 (central thimble) in the Rikkyo University Research Reactor (TRIGA Mark-II, 100 kW). The irradiated samples were measured by conventional γ-ray spectrometry using a coaxial Ge detector, and by anti-coincidence and coincidence γ-ray spectrometry with a coaxial Ge detector and a well-type NaI (Tl) detector. The concentrations of 38 elements were determined by these methods. (author)

  7. Complex experimental research on internal tooth dosimetry for the Techa River region: A model for {sup 9}Sr accumulation in human teeth formed by time of intakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tikunov, D.D. [Medical Radiological Research Center, Korolyov str., 4, Obninsk 249036 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: tikunov@mrrc.obninsk.ru; Ivannikov, A.I. [Medical Radiological Research Center, Korolyov str., 4, Obninsk 249036 (Russian Federation); Shishkina, E.A. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Medgorodok, Chelyabinsk 454076 (Russian Federation); Petin, D.V. [Medical Radiological Research Center, Korolyov str., 4, Obninsk 249036 (Russian Federation); Borysheva, N.B. [Medical Radiological Research Center, Korolyov str., 4, Obninsk 249036 (Russian Federation); Orlenko, S. [Medical Radiological Research Center, Korolyov str., 4, Obninsk 249036 (Russian Federation); Nalapko, M. [Medical Radiological Research Center, Korolyov str., 4, Obninsk 249036 (Russian Federation); Shved, V.A. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Medgorodok, Chelyabinsk 454076 (Russian Federation); Skvortsov, V.G. [Medical Radiological Research Center, Korolyov str., 4, Obninsk 249036 (Russian Federation); Stepanenko, V.F. [Medical Radiological Research Center, Korolyov str., 4, Obninsk 249036 (Russian Federation)

    2006-05-15

    Samples of calcified tooth tissues (enamel, root and crown dentine) collected from the Techa riverside population exposed to radiation caused by radioactive releases from the nuclear weapon plant in South Ural were investigated. Accumulated absorbed dose in the samples was measured using the EPR-spectroscopy method. Beta activity of the samples containing radioactive {sup 9}Sr was measured by the method of low background anti-coincidence thin scintillating detection. High correlation between absorbed dose and beta activity was observed for enamel and root dentin but not for crown dentin. Otherwise, poor correlation was observed between absorbed doses as well as between beta activities for different tooth tissues of the same tooth. The results of dose measurement by EPR spectroscopy are analysed with the use of Monte Carlo simulation of dose formation due to {sup 9}Sr incorporated in tooth tissues taking into account biological elimination of {sup 9}Sr. Influence of {sup 9}Sr distribution in the tooth body on absorbed dose is discussed.

  8. LArGe: active background suppression using argon scintillation for the GERDA 0νββ-experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini, M.; Budjas, D.; Schoenert, S. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Barnabe-Heider, M. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Cattadori, C. [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); INFN, Milan (Italy); Gangapshev, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Institut for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gusev, K. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Joint Institut for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); National Research Center Kurchatov Institut, Moscow (Russian Federation); Heisel, M.; Smolnikov, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Junker, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Klimenko, A.; Lubashevskiy, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Joint Institut for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Pelczar, K. [Jagellonian University, Cracow (Poland); Zuzel, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Jagellonian University, Cracow (Poland)

    2015-10-15

    LArGe is a GERDA low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for future application in the GERDA experiment. Similar to GERDA, LArGe operates bare germanium detectors submersed into liquid argon (1 m{sup 3}, 1.4tons), which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The scintillation signals are used in anti-coincidence with the germanium detectors to effectively suppress background events that deposit energy in the liquid argon. The background suppression efficiency was studied in combination with a pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique using a BEGe detector for various sources, which represent characteristic backgrounds to GERDA. Suppression factors of a few times 10{sup 3} have been achieved. First background data of LArGe with a coaxial HPGe detector (without PSD) yield a background index of (0.12 - 4.6) x 10{sup -2} cts/(keV kg year) (90 % C.L.), which is at the level of GERDA Phase I. Furthermore, for the first time we monitor the natural {sup 42}Ar abundance (parallel to GERDA), and have indication for the 2νββ-decay in natural germanium. These results show the effectivity of an active liquid argon veto in an ultra-low background environment. As a consequence, the implementation of a liquid argon veto in GERDA Phase II is pursued. (orig.)

  9. LArGe: active background suppression using argon scintillation for the Gerda 0ν β β -experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, M.; Barnabé-Heider, M.; Budjáš, D.; Cattadori, C.; Gangapshev, A.; Gusev, K.; Heisel, M.; Junker, M.; Klimenko, A.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Pelczar, K.; Schönert, S.; Smolnikov, A.; Zuzel, G.

    2015-10-01

    LArGe is a Gerda low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for future application in the Gerda experiment. Similar to Gerda, LArGe operates bare germanium detectors submersed into liquid argon (1 m^3, 1.4 tons), which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The scintillation signals are used in anti-coincidence with the germanium detectors to effectively suppress background events that deposit energy in the liquid argon. The background suppression efficiency was studied in combination with a pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique using a BEGe detector for various sources, which represent characteristic backgrounds to Gerda. Suppression factors of a few times 10^3 have been achieved. First background data of LArGe with a coaxial HPGe detector (without PSD) yield a background index of (0.12-4.6)× 10^{-2} cts/(keV kg year) (90 % C.L.), which is at the level of Gerda Phase I. Furthermore, for the first time we monitor the natural ^{42}Ar abundance (parallel to Gerda), and have indication for the 2ν β β -decay in natural germanium. These results show the effectivity of an active liquid argon veto in an ultra-low background environment. As a consequence, the implementation of a liquid argon veto in Gerda Phase II is pursued.

  10. LArGe R and D for active background suppression in Gerda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LArGe is a GERDA low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for future application in the GERDA experiment. Similar to GERDA, LArGe operates bare germanium detectors submersed into liquid argon (1 m3, 1.4tons), which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The light is used in anti-coincidence with the germanium detectors to effectively suppress background events that deposit energy in the liquid argon. The background suppression efficiency was studied in combination with a pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique using a BEGe detector for various sources, which represent characteristic backgrounds to GERDA. Suppression factors of a few times 103 have been achieved. First background data of LArGe with a coaxial HPGe detector (without PSD) yield a background index of the order 10−2 cts/(keV-kg-y), which is at the level of the GERDA phase I design goal. As a consequence of these results, the development of an active liquid argon veto in GERDA is pursued.

  11. LArGe R&D for active background suppression in Gerda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, M.; Barnabé-Heider, M.; Budjáš, D.; Cattadori, C.; D'Andragora, A.; Gangapshev, A.; Gusev, K.; Heisel, M.; Junker, M.; Klimenko, A.; Schönert, S.; Smolnikov, A.; Zuzel, G.

    2012-07-01

    LArGe is a GERDA low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for future application in the GERDA experiment. Similar to GERDA, LArGe operates bare germanium detectors submersed into liquid argon (1 m3, 1.4tons), which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The light is used in anti-coincidence with the germanium detectors to effectively suppress background events that deposit energy in the liquid argon. The background suppression efficiency was studied in combination with a pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique using a BEGe detector for various sources, which represent characteristic backgrounds to GERDA. Suppression factors of a few times 103 have been achieved. First background data of LArGe with a coaxial HPGe detector (without PSD) yield a background index of the order 10-2 cts/(keV-kg-y), which is at the level of the GERDA phase I design goal. As a consequence of these results, the development of an active liquid argon veto in GERDA is pursued.

  12. LArGe - Active background suppression using argon scintillation for the GERDA $0\

    CERN Document Server

    Agostini, M; Budjáš, D; Cattadori, C; Gangapshev, A; Gusev, K; Heisel, M; Junker, M; Klimenko, A; Lubashevskiy, A; Pelczar, K; Schönert, S; Smolnikov, A; Zuzel, G

    2015-01-01

    LArGe is a GERDA low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for future application in the GERDA experiment. Similar to GERDA, LArGe operates bare germanium detectors submersed into liquid argon (1 m$^3$, 1.4 tons), which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The scintillation signals are used in anti-coincidence with the germanium detectors to effectively suppress background events that deposit energy in the liquid argon. The background suppression efficiency was studied in combination with a pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique using a BEGe detector for various sources, which represent characteristic backgrounds to GERDA. Suppression factors of a few times $10^3$ have been achieved. First background data of LArGe with a coaxial HPGe detector (without PSD) yield a background index of (0.12$-$4.6)$\\cdot 10^{-2}$ cts/(keV$\\cdot$kg$\\cdot$y) (90% C.L.), which is at the level of GERDA Phase I. Fu...

  13. Development of photomultiplier light instrumentation for the GERDA experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key to the GERDA experiment is the reduction of the background in the region of interest at Qββ (2039 keV). The LArGe test facility has shown that the background is effectively suppressed when argon scintillation light is used as an anti-coincidence veto. As a result, the installation of an active liquid argon (LAr) veto in GERDA is pursued by the collaboration. This talk reports about the work in preparation for the light instrumentation of GERDA using photomultipliers. The design of such a veto follows several experimental constraints, e.g. the dimensions of the cryostat, liquid-argon and photomultiplier properties. Monte Carlo simulations are used to optimize the veto dimensions for background suppression efficiency, taking instrumentation induced background into account. First estimates for the veto efficiency of the proposed design are discussed. As the photomultipliers have to fulfill several requirements for the use inside the GERDA cryostat, a test-stand for photomultiplier characterization and their selection for stable operation in liquid argon has been built at MPIK. First results of these tests are presented.

  14. LArGe: active background suppression using argon scintillation for the GERDA 0νββ-experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LArGe is a GERDA low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for future application in the GERDA experiment. Similar to GERDA, LArGe operates bare germanium detectors submersed into liquid argon (1 m3, 1.4tons), which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The scintillation signals are used in anti-coincidence with the germanium detectors to effectively suppress background events that deposit energy in the liquid argon. The background suppression efficiency was studied in combination with a pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique using a BEGe detector for various sources, which represent characteristic backgrounds to GERDA. Suppression factors of a few times 103 have been achieved. First background data of LArGe with a coaxial HPGe detector (without PSD) yield a background index of (0.12 - 4.6) x 10-2 cts/(keV kg year) (90 % C.L.), which is at the level of GERDA Phase I. Furthermore, for the first time we monitor the natural 42Ar abundance (parallel to GERDA), and have indication for the 2νββ-decay in natural germanium. These results show the effectivity of an active liquid argon veto in an ultra-low background environment. As a consequence, the implementation of a liquid argon veto in GERDA Phase II is pursued. (orig.)

  15. Start-up of low-background test stand LArGe for GERDA at LNGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LArGe is a test facility for Phase II of the GERDA experiment. The goal of GERDA is the search for neutrinoless double beta decay of Ge-76 with a considerable reduction of background in comparison with predecessor experiments. GERDA will operate bare germanium semiconductor detectors (enriched in Ge-76) submerged in high purity liquid argon supplemented by a water shield. LArGe puts into practice the novel concept to use LAr scintillation light as anti-coincidence signal for further background suppression. In the pilot setup Mini-LArGe about 95% of the background Compton events in the Ge detector were vetoed using 19 kg of LAr as active volume. Pulse shape analysis methods were developed, which allow to perform gamma/alpha/neutron selection with a strong discrimination factor (>105) for diagnostics. LArGe intends to realize these powerful tools on a larger scale using 1.4 tons of LAr as active volume in a copper cryostat surrounded by a graded low-level shielding. This talk gives an account of the start-up phase of this setup, which is currently ongoing in the Gran Sasso underground laboratory (Italy).

  16. The first demonstration of the concept of "narrow-FOV Si/CdTe semiconductor Compton camera"

    CERN Document Server

    Ichinohe, Yuto; Watanabe, Shin; Edahiro, Ikumi; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Kawano, Takafumi; Ohno, Masanori; Ohta, Masayuki; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Katsuragawa, Miho; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Odaka, Hirokazu; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Yuasa, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD), to be deployed onboard the {\\it ASTRO-H} satellite, has been developed to provide the highest sensitivity observations of celestial sources in the energy band of 60-600~keV by employing a detector concept which uses a Compton camera whose field-of-view is restricted by a BGO shield to a few degree (narrow-FOV Compton camera). In this concept, the background from outside the FOV can be heavily suppressed by constraining the incident direction of the gamma ray reconstructed by the Compton camera to be consistent with the narrow FOV. We, for the first time, demonstrate the validity of the concept using background data taken during the thermal vacuum test and the low-temperature environment test of the flight model of SGD on ground. We show that the measured background level is suppressed to less than 10\\% by combining the event rejection using the anti-coincidence trigger of the active BGO shield and by using Compton event reconstruction techniques. More than 75\\% of the signal...

  17. Study of mixed programming gamma spectrum acquisition method based on MSP430F4618

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to reduce the hand-held gamma spectrometer measurements dead time and to complete the low-voltage and low-power design, the spectrum signal acquisition circuit is constituted by the ultra-low power microcontroller MSP430F4618 and its external signal conditioning circuit, anti-coincidence circuit interface and its on-chip sample hold and A/D converter. C language programming and assembly one have been used together. The sample hold and A/D conversion and spectrum acquisition programming is accomplished by assembly language, and the system monitoring and task scheduler designing is accomplished by C language programming. The handhold gamma spectrometer power supply, which just uses two No.5 rechargeable batteries, is designed by high-efficiency DC-DC circuit. The prototype gamma spectrometer is developed by the method, and its testing shows that the implementation of spectrum acquisition time is shorten by twice to 3 times, that is, the dead measurement can be reduced; and the machine operating current does not exceed 150 mA. By using two 2400 mAh No.5 rechargeable battery, the machine can work continuously more than 10 hours, and it can meet the application requirements. (authors)

  18. SETI Observations of Exoplanets with the Allen Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Harp, G R; Tarter, Jill C; Dreher, John; Jordan, Jane; Shostak, Seth; Smolek, Ken; Kilsdonk, Tom; Wimberly, M K R; Ross, John; Barott, W C; Ackermann, R F; Blair, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    We report radio SETI observations on a large number of known exoplanets and other nearby star systems using the Allen Telescope Array (ATA) for about 19000 hours from May 2009 to Dec 2015. This search focused on narrow-band radio signals from a set totaling 9293 stars, including 2015 exoplanet stars and Kepler objects of interest and an additional 65 whose planets may be close to their Habitable Zone. The ATA observations were made using multiple synthesized beams and an anticoincidence filter to help identify terrestrial radio interference. Stars were observed over frequencies from 1-9 GHz in multiple bands that avoid strong terrestrial communication frequencies. Data were processed in near-real time for narrow-band (0.7-100 Hz) continuous and pulsed signals with transmitter/receiver relative accelerations from -0.3 to 0.3 m/s^2. A total of 1.9 x 10^8 unique signals requiring immediate follow-up were detected in observations covering more than 8 x 10^9 star-MHz. We detected no persistent signals from extrate...

  19. LArGe. A liquid argon scintillation veto for GERDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LArGe is a GERDA low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for possible applications in the GERDA experiment. GERDA searches for the neutrinoless double-beta decay in 76Ge, by operating naked germanium detectors submersed into 65 m3 of liquid argon. Similarly, LArGe runs Ge-detectors in 1 m3 (1.4 tons) of liquid argon, which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The light is used in anti-coincidence with the germanium detectors, to effectively suppress background events that deposit energy in the liquid argon. This work adresses the design, construction, and commissioning of LArGe. The background suppression efficiency has been studied in combination with a pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique for various sources, which represent characteristic backgrounds to GERDA. Suppression factors of a few times 103 have been achieved. First background data of LArGe (without PSD) yield a background index of (0.12-4.6).10-2 cts/(keV.kg.y) (90% c.l.), which is at the level of the Gerda phase I design goal. Furthermore, for the first time we measure the natural 42Ar abundance (in parallel to Gerda), and have indication for the 2νββ-decay in natural germanium. (orig.)

  20. The design and flight performance of the PoGOLite Pathfinder balloon-borne hard X-ray polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, M.; Florén, H.-G.; Jackson, M.; Kamae, T.; Kawano, T.; Kiss, M.; Kole, M.; Mikhalev, V.; Moretti, E.; Olofsson, G.; Rydström, S.; Takahashi, H.; Lind, J.; Strömberg, J.-E.; Welin, O.; Iyudin, A.; Shifrin, D.; Pearce, M.

    2016-02-01

    In the 50 years since the advent of X-ray astronomy there have been many scientific advances due to the development of new experimental techniques for detecting and characterising X-rays. Observations of X-ray polarisation have, however, not undergone a similar development. This is a shortcoming since a plethora of open questions related to the nature of X-ray sources could be resolved through measurements of the linear polarisation of emitted X-rays. The PoGOLite Pathfinder is a balloon-borne hard X-ray polarimeter operating in the 25-240 keV energy band from a stabilised observation platform. Polarisation is determined using coincident energy deposits in a segmented array of plastic scintillators surrounded by a BGO anticoincidence system and a polyethylene neutron shield. The PoGOLite Pathfinder was launched from the SSC Esrange Space Centre in July 2013. A near-circumpolar flight was achieved with a duration of approximately two weeks. The flight performance of the Pathfinder design is discussed for the three Crab observations conducted. The signal-to-background ratio for the observations is shown to be 0.25 ±0.03 and the Minimum Detectable Polarisation (99 % C.L.) is (28.4 ±2.2) %. A strategy for the continuation of the PoGOLite programme is outlined based on experience gained during the 2013 maiden flight.

  1. Monitoring on influence of Soviet chernobyl accident on environment of some regions of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the monitoring results of some environmental samples from Gansu provinces and Qinshan aera of Zhejiang Province and the cities of Beijing, Shenyang and Baotou after the Soviet Chernobyl reactor accident. The samples collected included air, fallout, rain water, reservoir water, plants and soil and the wipping samples of international and domestic airlines were also measured. Analyese were made by using low background Ge(Li) γ spectrometer with anti-coincident shield and by radiochemical methods for 89Sr, 90Sr and Pu contents in some samples. The results indicate that the radioactive cloud released from the Chernobyl accident arrived to Beijing area on May 2, 1986. Generally speaking, the concentration of radioactive cloud in north China was greater than that in south China. Fission products were found in wipping samples taken from airplanes flying over Europe and Asia. The radioactivity level of the samples taken from European air-line was considerably higher than that from Asian airline. The main fission products found in different samples were as follows: 131I, 137Cs, 134Cs, 103Ru and 132Te, 132I. The ratio of 137Cs to 134Cs was about 2. The partial effective dose equivalent commitment of preliminary estimation to the public in Beijing area from the accident was 11.3 μSv. The contribution of the external exposure was 7.9 μSv. The contribution of the internal exposure was 3.4 μSv

  2. Integrable hydrodynamic equations for initial chiral currents and infinite hydrodynamic chains from WZNW model and string model of WZNW type with SU(2), SO(3), SP(2), SU(∞), SO(∞), SP(∞) constant torsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirilo-Lombardo, D. J.; Gershun, V. D.

    2014-09-01

    The WZNW and string models are considered in terms of the initial and invariant chiral currents assuming that the internal and external torsions coincide (anticoincide) and they are the structure constants of the SU(n), SO(n), SP(n) Lie algebras. These models are the auxiliary problems in order to construct integrable equations of hydrodynamic type. It was shown that the WZNW and string models in terms of invariant chiral currents are integrable for the constant torsion associated with the structure constants of the SU(2), SO(3), SP(2) and SU(3) algebras only. The equation of motion for the density of the first Casimir operator was obtained in the form of the inviscid Burgers equation. The solution of this equation is presented through the Lambert function. Also, a new equation of motion for the initial chiral current was found. The integrable infinite hydrodynamic chains obtained from the WZNW and string models are given in terms of invariant chiral currents with the SU(2), SO(3), SP(2) and with SU(∞), SO(∞), SP(∞) constant torsions. Also, the equations of motion for the density of any Casimir operator and new infinite-dimensional equations of hydrodynamic type for the initial chiral currents through the symmetric structure constant of SU(∞), SO(∞), SP(∞) algebras are obtained.

  3. Integrable hydrodynamic equations for initial chiral currents and infinite hydrodynamic chains from WZNW model and string model of WZNW type with SU(2), SO(3), SP(3), SU(1), SO(1), SP(inf) constant torsions

    CERN Document Server

    Cirilo-Lombardo, Diego J

    2013-01-01

    The WZNW and string models were considered in the terms of the initial and invariant chiral currents in assumption that the internal and external torsions coincide (anticoincide) and they are the structure constant of the SU(n), SO(n), SP(n) Lie algebras. It was shown that the WZNW and string models in terms of invariant chiral currents are integrable for the constant torsion associated with the structure constant of the SU(2), SO(3), SP(2) and SU(3) algebras only. The equation of motion for the density of the first Casimir operator was obtained in the form of the inviscid Burgers equation. The solution of this equation was presented through the Lambert function. Also, new equation of motion for the initial chiral current was received. The integrable in?nite dimensional hydrodynamic chains were considered for the WZNW and string models in terms of invariant chiral currents with the SU(2), SO(3), SP(2) constant torsions and for the models with the SU(1), SO(1), SP(1) constant torsions. Also the equations of mo...

  4. Exceptional flaring activity of the anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 1547.0-5408

    CERN Document Server

    Savchenko, V; Beckmann, V; Produit, N; Walter, R

    2009-01-01

    (Abridged) We studied an exceptional period of activity of the anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 1547.0-5408 in January 2009, during which about 200 bursts were detected by INTEGRAL. The major activity episode happened when the source was outside the field of view of all the INTEGRAL instruments. But we were still able to study the properties of 84 bursts detected simultaneously by the anti-coincidence shield of the spectrometer SPI and by the detector of the imager ISGRI. We find that the luminosity of the 22 January 2009 bursts of 1E 1547.0-5408 was > 1e42 erg/s. This luminosity is comparable to that of the bursts of soft gamma repeaters (SGR) and is at least two orders of magnitude larger than the luminosity of the previously reported bursts from AXPs. Similarly to the SGR bursts, the brightest bursts of 1E 1547.0-5408 consist of a short spike of ~100 ms duration with a hard spectrum, followed by a softer extended tail of 1-10 s duration, which occasionally exhibits pulsations with the source spin period of ~2 s. ...

  5. Improvement of in vivo neutron activation analysis of Mn using a 4π NaI(Tl) detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manganese contents in hand phantoms were analyzed by in vivo neutron activation analysis using a 4π NaI(Tl) detector array. Solution-type phantoms with varying amount of Mn and fixed amounts of physiological normal elements (Na, Cl, Ca) were prepared in a cylindrical shape to simulate fisted hands and were irradiated with the 7Li(p,n) neutron beam. The proton energy and polyethlyene cavity were set at optimized conditions established before. The γ-ray spectra were accumulated under the anticoincidence mode. The calibration was done both for the 847 keV full-energy peak area and for the total area of 56Mn, which is defined as the total number of counts anywhere in the γ-ray spectrum from 56Mn. From the analysis of the 847 keV peak, the Mn detection limit has been improved by a factor of 1.6 compared to the previous feasibility test thanks to a significant gain in the γ-ray detection efficiency. Further improvement by a factor of 1.2 was identified when the total area of 56Mn was used for the calibration. The final sensitivity and detection limit for a 20 mSv hand dose reached 12,050 counts/mg Mn, and 86 μg, respectively. The overall improvement achieved in this study will be a considerable contribution toward realization of the clinical application. (author)

  6. The AGILE silicon tracker: Pre-launch and in-flight configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AGILE is an ASI (Italian Space Agency) Small Scientific Mission dedicated to high-energy astrophysics which was successfully launched on April 23, 2007. The AGILE instrument is composed of three main detectors: a Tungsten-Silicon Tracker designed to detect and image photons in the 30 MeV-50 GeV energy band, an X-ray imager called Super-AGILE operating in the 18-60 keV energy band, and a Mini-Calorimeter that detects gamma-rays and charged particles energy deposits between 300 keV and 100 MeV. The instrument is surrounded by an anti-coincidence (AC) system. In this paper, we present the noise characterization and the front-end configuration of the Silicon Tracker. Two crucial (and unique, among gamma-ray astrophysics missions) characteristic of the AGILE Silicon Tracker are the analog signal acquisition (aimed at obtaining an optimal angular resolution for gamma-ray imaging) and the very small dimension of the instrument (the total height including the active elements is ∼21cm and therefore the Silicon Tracker is the lightest and most compact γ-ray imager sent in orbit). The results presented in this paper were obtained during the AIV (Assembly, Integration and Verification) pre-launch testing phase and during the post-launch commissioning phase. The AGILE Silicon Tracker has been optimally configured with a very good response of the frontend system and of the data acquisition units.

  7. Gamma scanner conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) will include several stations for the nondestructive examination of irradiated fuels. One of these stations will be the gamma scanner which will be employed to detect gamma radiation from the irradiated fuel pins. The conceptual design of the gamma scan station is described. The gamma scanner will use a Standard Exam Stage (SES) as a positioner and transport mechanism for the fuel pins which it will obtain from a magazine. A pin guide mechanism mounted on the face of the collimator will assure that the fuel pins remain in front of the collimator during scanning. The collimator has remotely adjustable tungsten slits and can be manually rotated to align the slit at various angles. A shielded detector cart located in the operating corridor holds an intrinsic germanium detector and associated sodium-iodide anticoincidence detector. The electronics associated with the counting system consist of standard NIM modules to process the detector signals and a stand-alone multichannel analyzer (MCA) for counting data accumulation. Data from the MCA are bussed to the station computer for analysis and storage on magnetic tape. The station computer controls the collimator, the MCA, a source positioner and the SES through CAMAC-based interface hardware. Most of the electronic hardware is commercially available but some interfaces will require development. Conceptual drawings are included for mechanical hardware that must be designed and fabricated

  8. Development of an experimental set-up for the measurement of neutron-induced fission and capture cross sections of highly radioactive fissile nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Companis Iulia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of neutron-capture cross sections of many actinides is complicated by the difficulty in separating capture γ-rays from the large fission-fragment prompt γ-ray background. For example, current estimates of the capture cross section of 233U show large discrepancies, with differences of more than 20%. To improve the accuracy of data, a new experimental set-up for the simultaneous measurement of the neutron-induced capture and fission cross sections was designed, assembled and optimized. The measurements will be performed at the GEel LINear Accelerator (GELINA neutron time-of-flight facility in Belgium, where neutron cross sections can be measured over a wide energy range with high energy resolution. The fission detector consists of a dedicated multi-plate high-efficiency ionization chamber (IC. The γ-rays produced in capture reaction are detected by an array of C6D6 scintillators. Fission γ–rays are distinguished from capture γ–rays by the anticoincidence signals from the IC and the C6D6 detectors. For the undetected fission events a correction has to be applied based on the efficiency of the IC that should be high and known with a high accuracy. The performance of the IC during dedicated test experiments is presented, focusing on the determination of the detection efficiency.

  9. Development of an experimental set-up for the measurement of neutron-induced fission and capture cross sections of radioactive fissile nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Companis I.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A new experimental set-up for a simultaneous measurement of neutron induced capture and fission cross sections was designed, assembled and optimized. The measurements will be performed at GEel LINear Accelerator (GELINA neutron time-of-flight facility in Belgium, where neutron cross sections can be measured over a wide energy range with high energy resolution. The fission events detector consists of a dedicated multi-plate high efficiency fission ionization chamber (IC. The γ-rays produced in capture reaction are detected by an efficient array of C6D6 scintillators. Fission γ-rays events are distinguished from capture events by the anticoincidence signals from the IC and the C6D6 detectors. For the undetected fission events a correction has to be applied with respect to the efficiency of the IC that should be high and known with a high precision. Another important issue is the good separation between fission-fragment (FF and the high alpha pile-up. The performances of the IC during test experiments are presented, focusing in particular on the detection efficiency.

  10. Assessment of backgrounds of the ANAIS experiment for dark matter direct detection

    CERN Document Server

    Amare, J; Cuesta, C; Garcia, E; Martinez, M; Olivan, M A; Ortigoza, Y; de Solorzano, A Ortiz; Puimedon, J; Sarsa, M L; Villar, J A; Villar, P

    2016-01-01

    A large effort has been carried out to characterize the background of sodium iodide crystals within the ANAIS (Annual modulation with NaI Scintillators) project. In this paper, the background models developed for three 12.5-kg NaI(Tl) detectors produced by Alpha Spectra Inc. and operated at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory are presented together with an evaluation of the background prospects for the full experiment. Measured spectra from threshold to high energy in different conditions are well described by the models based on quantified activities. At the region of interest, crystal bulk contamination is the dominant background source. Contributions from 210Pb, 40K, 22Na and 3H are the most relevant. Those from 40K and 22Na could be efficiently suppressed thanks to anticoincidence operation in a crystals matrix or inside a Liquid Scintillator Veto (LSV), while that from 210Pb has been reduced by improving crystal production methods and 3H production could be reduced by shielding against cosmic rays during...

  11. Hard X-ray Detector (HXD) on Board Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, T; Endo, M; Endo, Y; Ezoe, Y; Fukazawa, Y; Hamaya, M; Hirakuri, S; Hong, S; Horii, M; Inoue, H; Isobe, N; Itoh, T; Iyomoto, N; Kamae, T; Kasama, D; Kataoka, J; Kato, H; Kawaharada, M; Kawano, N; Kawashima, K; Kawasoe, S; Kishishita, T; Kitaguchi, T; Kobayashi, Y; Kokubun, M; Kotoku, J; Kouda, M; Kubota, A; Kuroda, Y; Madejski, G; Makishima, K; Masukawa, K; Matsumoto, Y; Mitani, T; Miyawaki, R; Mizuno, T; Mori, K; Mori, M; Murashima, M; Murakami, T; Nakazawa, K; Niko, H; Nomachi, M; Okada, Y; Ohno, M; Oonuki, K; Ota, N; Ozawa, H; Sato, G; Shinoda, S; Sugiho, M; Suzuki, M; Taguchi, K; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, I; Takeda, S; Tamura, K; Tamura, T; Tanaka, T; Tanihata, C; Tashiro, M; Terada, Y; Tominaga, S; Uchiyama, Y; Watanabe, S; Yamaoka, K; Yanagida, T; Yonetoku, D

    2006-01-01

    The Hard X-ray Detector (HXD) on board Suzaku covers a wide energy range from 10 keV to 600 keV by combination of silicon PIN diodes and GSO scintillators. The HXD is designed to achieve an extremely low in-orbit back ground based on a combination of new techniques, including the concept of well-type active shield counter. With an effective area of 142 cm^2 at 20 keV and 273 cm2 at 150 keV, the background level at the sea level reached ~1x10^{-5} cts s^{-1} cm^{-2} keV^{-1} at 30 keV for the PI N diodes, and ~2x10^{-5} cts s^{-1} cm^{-2} keV^{-1} at 100 keV, and ~7x10^{-6} cts s^{-1} cm^{-2} keV^{-1} at 200 keV for the phoswich counter. Tight active shielding of the HXD results in a large array of guard counters surrounding the main detector parts. These anti-coincidence counters, made of ~4 cm thick BGO crystals, have a large effective area for sub-MeV to MeV gamma-rays. They work as an excellent gamma-ray burst monitor with limited angular resolution (~5 degree). The on-board signal-processing system and th...

  12. New Proportional Counter Suited to the In Vivo Detection of Plutonium Traces in the Lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors explain the construction of a gas proportional counter with an effective detecting surface of 250 cm2 and a sensitivity approximately equal to that obtainable with a scintillating crystal. In simplified terms, it consists of two superposed multi-wire counters within the same chamber, one serving as detector and the other to reduce background by anti-coincidence. The window is of beryllium 1 mm thick and the instrument is filled with xenon at a pressure of 2 atm. An important feature of this counter is the excellent uniformity of detection over the entire window surface. This uniformity is obtained by means of corrections for the edge effects, these corrections being very easy to apply. The wires are 25 μm diam. and 3 cm apart, so that it is possible to use much lower voltages than are customary in this type of detector and to suppress parasitic pulses due to spurious emissions. The authors discuss the data obtained from a contaminated animal. (author)

  13. Determination of trace elements in certified river water reference materials by instrumental NAA using a freeze-dried preconcentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trace elements in JAC 0031 and JAC 0032 certified river water reference materials prepared by the Japan Society for Analytical Chemistry (JAC) were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). A JAC 0031 nonadditional sample (450 ml) and an additional JAC 0032 sample (450 ml) were freeze-dried at -50degC. The dry residues were irradiated for 10 sec at a thermal neutron flux of 1.5x1012 n cm-2s-1 and 6 h at a thermal neutron flux of 3.7x1012 n cm-2s-1 at the Rikkyo University Research Reactor. The irradiated samples were measured by conventional γ-ray spectrometry using a coaxial Ge detector, and by anti-coincidence and coincidence γ-ray spectrometry with a coaxial Ge detector and a well-type NaI(Tl) detector. The concentrations of 27 elements in the JAC 0031 and 29 elements in the JAC 0032 were determined by these methods. The determined values were in good agreement with the certified values of 9-14 elements. (author)

  14. A NIM (Nuclear Instrumentation Module) system conjugated with optional input for pHEMT amplifier for beta and gamma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents a high speed NIM module (Nuclear Instrumentation Module) to detect radiation, gamma and muons, as part of a system for natural radiation monitoring and of extraterrestrial origin. The subsystem developed consists of a preamplifier and an integrated SCA (Single Channel Analyzer), including power supplies of ± 12 and ± 24V with derivations of +3.6 and ± 5V. The single channel analyzer board, consisting of discrete logic components, operating in window modes, normal and integral. The pulse shaping block is made up of two voltage comparators working at 120 MHz with a response time > 60 ns and a logic anticoincidence system. The preamplifier promotes a noise reduction and introduces the impedance matching between the output of anode / diode photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) and subsequent equipment, providing an input impedance of 1MΩ and output impedance of 40 to 140Ω. The shaper amplifier is non-inverting and has variable input capacitance of 1000 pF. The upper and lower thresholds of the SCA are adjustable from 0 to ± 10V, and the equipment is compatible with various types of detectors, like PMTs coupled to sodium iodide crystals. For use with liquid scintillators and photodiodes with crystals (CsI: Tl) is proposed to include a preamplifier circuit pHEMT (pseudomorphic High Electron Mobility Transistor) integrated. Yet, the system presents the possibility of applications for various purposes of gamma spectroscopy and automatic detection of events producing of beta particles

  15. Evaluation of a low background proportional counter for detection of high energy beta particles with application to {sup 90}Sr surface contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, K.T.S.; Johnson, L.; Brey, R.R.; Gesell, T.F. [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); McIsaac, C. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Conventional radiochemical methods used to quantify {sup 90}Sr are complicated and time-consuming. A relatively simple, inexpensive instrument has been developed for analysis of high energy beta surface contamination in the presence of lower energy beta emitters. The instrument detects beta particles from {sup 90}Y, which is in secular equilibrium with {sup 90}Sr. The device consists of three stacked gas-flow proportional detectors. The bottom two are operated in coincidence mode and the top detector is operated in anti-coincidence to the others for reducing cosmic-ray background. Shielding is used to reduce the background from terrestrial sources. The thickness of the bottom two counters eliminates beta particles with energies below 660 keV from the second detector. The end-point energy of the {sup 90}Sr beta is 546 KeV, while that for {sup 90}Y is 2.28 MeV. Greater than 69% of the particles emitted during the decay of {sup 90}Y have energies above the endpoint energy of {sup 90}Sr. Because of these conditions, this instrument, which has an efficiency of about 10%, is practical for measurements near environmental magnitudes. The instrument is expected to have application in decontamination and decommissioning, decisions concerning release of materials, and waste management.

  16. Evaluation of a low background proportional counter for detection of high energy beta particles with application to 90Sr surface contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional radiochemical methods used to quantify 90Sr are complicated and time-consuming. A relatively simple, inexpensive instrument has been developed for analysis of high energy beta surface contamination in the presence of lower energy beta emitters. The instrument detects beta particles from 90Y, which is in secular equilibrium with 90Sr. The device consists of three stacked gas-flow proportional detectors. The bottom two are operated in coincidence mode and the top detector is operated in anti-coincidence to the others for reducing cosmic-ray background. Shielding is used to reduce the background from terrestrial sources. The thickness of the bottom two counters eliminates beta particles with energies below 660 keV from the second detector. The end-point energy of the 90Sr beta is 546 KeV, while that for 90Y is 2.28 MeV. Greater than 69% of the particles emitted during the decay of 90Y have energies above the endpoint energy of 90Sr. Because of these conditions, this instrument, which has an efficiency of about 10%, is practical for measurements near environmental magnitudes. The instrument is expected to have application in decontamination and decommissioning, decisions concerning release of materials, and waste management

  17. Radioactivity Backgrounds in ZEPLIN-III

    CERN Document Server

    Araujo, H M; Barnes, E J; Belov, V A; Bewick, A; Burenkov, A A; Currie, V Chepel A; DeViveiros, L; Edwards, B; Ghag, C; Hollingsworth, A; Horn, M; Kalmus, G E; Kobyakin, A S; Kovalenko, A G; Lebedenko, V N; Lindote, A; Lopes, M I; Luscher, R; Majewski, P; Neves, A StJ Murphy F; Paling, S M; da Cunha, J Pinto; Preece, R; Quenby, J J; Reichhart, L; Scovell, P R; Silva, C; Solovov, V N; Smith, N J T; Smith, P F; Stekhanov, V N; Sumner, T J; Thorne, C; Walker, R J

    2011-01-01

    We examine electron and nuclear recoil backgrounds from radioactivity in the ZEPLIN-III dark matter experiment at Boulby. The rate of electron recoils in the liquid xenon WIMP target is 0.75$\\pm$0.05 events/kg/day/keV at low energy, which represents a 20-fold improvement over the rate observed in the first run of the experiment. Energy and spatial distributions agree with those predicted by component-level Monte Carlo simulations based on measured radiological contamination. Neutron elastic scattering is predicted to yield 3.05$\\pm$0.5 nuclear recoils with energy 5-50 keV per year, which translates to an expectation of 0.4 events in a 1-year dataset in anti-coincidence with the veto detector for realistic signal acceptance. Less obvious background sources are discussed, especially in the context of future experiments. These include contamination of scintillation pulses with Cherenkov light from $\\beta$ activity internal to photomultipliers, which can increase the size and lower the apparent time constant of t...

  18. The PAMELA experiment on satellite and its capability in cosmic rays measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Adriani, O; Barbarino, G C; Barbier, L M; Bartalucci, S; Bazilevskaja, G; Bellotti, R; Bertazzoni, S; Bidoli, V; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, L; Bonvicini, V; Boscherini, M; Bravar, U; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carlson, Per J; Casolino, M; Castellano, M; Castellini, G; Christian, E R; Ciacio, F; Circella, M; D'Alessandro, R; De Marzo, C N; De Pascale, M P; Finetti, N; Furano, G; Gabbanini, A; Galper, A M; Giglietto, N; Grandi, M; Grigorieva, A; Guarino, F; Hof, M; Koldashov, S V; Korotkov, M G; Krizmanic, J F; Krutkov, S; Lund, J; Marangelli, B; Marino, L; Menn, W; Mikhailov, V V; Mirizzi, N; Mitchell, J W; Mocchiutti, E; Moiseev, A A; Morselli, A; Mukhametshin, R; Ormes, J F; Osteria, G; Ozerov, J V; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Perego, A; Piccardi, S; Picozza, P; Ricci, M; Salsano, A; Schiavon, Paolo; Scian, G; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spataro, B; Spillantini, P; Spinelli, P; Stephens, S A; Stochaj, S J; Stozhkov, Yu I; Straulino, S; Streitmatter, R E; Taccetti, F; Tesi, M; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasiljev, G; Vignoli, V; Voronov, S A; Yurkin, Y; Zampa, G; Zampa, N

    2002-01-01

    The PAMELA equipment will be assembled in 2001 and installed on board the Russian satellite Resurs. PAMELA is conceived mainly to study the antiproton and positron fluxes in cosmic rays up to high energy (190 GeV for p-bar and 270 GeV for e sup +) and to search antinuclei, up to 30 GeV/n, with a sensitivity of 10 sup - sup 7 in the He-bar/He ratio. The PAMELA telescope consists of: a magnetic spectrometer made up of a permanent magnet system equipped with double sided microstrip silicon detectors; a transition radiation detector made up of active layers of proportional straw tubes interleaved with carbon fibre radiators; and a silicon-tungsten imaging calorimeter made up of layers of tungsten absorbers and silicon detector planes. A time-of-flight system and anti-coincidence counters complete the PAMELA equipment. In the past years, tests have been done on each subdetector of PAMELA; the main results are presented and their implications on the anti-particles identification capability in cosmic rays are discus...

  19. Present status and prospects of ultralow level radioactivity measurements (2). Underground laboratory and recent topics emerged from ultralow level radioactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present status of ultralow level radioactivity measurements in underground laboratories in Japan and Europe, and some researches using ultralow level radioactivity measurement technologies are stated. The background radiation originating cosmic ray is not excluded on the ground, but it decreased in the underground laboratory. Anticoincidence of underground measurement, countermeasure of radon, shielding materials, background of Ge measurement in Ogoya and other underground laboratories in Japan are reported. There are many underground laboratories for ultralow level radioactivity measurements in Europe, and a group of Collaboration of European Low-level underground LAboRatories (CELLAR) was organized. Some examples of ultralow level background of gamma ray measurements such as 152Eu, atomic bomb induced nuclide, natural induced radioactive nuclide by environmental neutron, measurement of 22Na, 108mAg and 110mAg, new evaluation method using 108mAg, high resolution analysis of change of 7Be and 210Pb in air, and nuclide in meteorite are reported. The sensitivity increasing method of low level radioactivity measurement and radioactive contamination of reagents are described. (S.Y.)

  20. Design and performance study of the LEPD silicon tracker onboard the CSES satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low energy particle detector (LEPD) is one of the main payloads onboard the China seismic electromagnetic satellite (CSES). The detector is designed to ascertain space electrons (0.1-10 MeV) and protons (2-50 MeV). It has the capability of identifying the electrons and protons, to measure the energy spectrum and the incident angle of the particles. The LEPD is made up of a silicon tracker system, a CsI (Tl) mini-calorimeter, an anti-coincidence system made by plastic scintillator, as well as electronics and a data acquisition system (DAQ). The tracker is also a kind of ΔE-E telescope; it consists of two layers of double-sided silicon strip detectors (DSSD). The signals emerging from the silicon tracker can be read out by two pieces of application specific integrated circuit (ASIC), which also can generate an event trigger for the LEPD. The functions of the DSSD system in the LEPD for charged particles were tested by 241Am doped 5.486 MeV α particles. The results show that the DSSD system works well, and has high performance to detect charged particles and measure the position of incident particles. (authors)

  1. SPI: A high resolution imaging spectrometer for INTEGRAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SPI (Spectrometer for INTEGRAL) is a high spectral resolution gamma-ray telescope using cooled germanium detectors that will be flown on board the INTEGRAL mission in 2001. It consists of an array of 19 closely-packed germanium detectors surrounded by an active bismuth germanate (BGO) anti-coincidence shield. The instrument operates over the energy range 20 keV to 8 MeV with an energy resolution of 1-5 keV. A tungsten coded-aperture mask located 1.7 m from the detector array provides imaging over a 15 deg. fully-coded field-of-view with an angular resolution of ∼3 deg. The point source narrow-line sensitivity is estimated to be 3-7x10-6 ph cm-2 s-1 over most of the range of the instrument (E>200 keV) for a 106 s observation. With its combination of high sensitivity, high spectral resolution and imaging, SPI will improve significantly over the performance of previous instruments such as HEAO-3, OSSE, and Comptel. It can be expected to take a major step forward in experimental studies in nuclear astrophysics. The SPI instrument is being developed under the auspices of the European Space Agency by a large international team of scientists and engineers in both Europe and the United States

  2. A Study of Active Shielding Optimized for 1-80 keV Wide-Band X-ray Detector in Space

    CERN Document Server

    Furuta, Yoshihiro; Hiraga, Junko S; Sasano, Makoto; Murakami, Hiroaki; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Active shielding is an effective technique to reduce background signals in hard X-ray detectors and to enable observing darker sources with high sensitivity in space. Usually the main detector is covered with some shield detectors made of scintillator crystals such as BGO (Bi$_4$Ge$_3$O$_{12}$), and the background signals are filtered out using anti-coincidence among them. Japanese X-ray observing satellites "Suzaku" and "ASTRO-H" employed this technique in their hard X-ray instruments observing at > 10 keV. In the next generation X-ray satellites, such as the NGHXT proposal, a single hybrid detector is expected to cover both soft (1-10 keV) and hard (> 10 keV) X-rays for effectiveness. However, present active shielding is not optimized for the soft X-ray band, 1-10 keV. For example, Bi and Ge, which are contained in BGO, have their fluorescence emission lines around 10 keV. These lines appear in the background spectra obtained by ASTRO-H Hard X-ray Imager, which are non-negligible in its observation energy b...

  3. Estimation of the Cosmic Ray Effect on the Ultra-low Background Gamma Ray Counting System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the reliable assay of extremely low activity, it is essential to reduce the system background count rates. Typical background reduction techniques, including the anticoincidence techniques with guard detectors to reject the cosmic-ray signal, were applied to set up an ultralow background system, KAERI-ULBS, for use in special purpose such as remote monitoring of undeclared nuclear activities. The effectiveness of each background reduction techniques was analysed. The KAERI-ULBS system showed the following performance : system background lower by a order of 2 in 50 keV to 2.5 MeV energy region than the partially shielded condition(sample door opened), nominal count rate of 6.8x10-4 cps for at 662 keV, and the minimum detectable count rate of 5.078x10-3 cps for 137Cs(662 keV). Additional endeavors were made to reduce the remaining cosmic-ray contributions by introducing passive neutron shield to the system. Around 10% of further background reduction appears to be achieved when the system is surrounded by neutron shield consisting of polyethylene blocks of 100 mm and a boron sheet of 3.2 mm thick

  4. A highly flexible, data intensive acquisition system for characterizing low-level decay events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the early 1970's, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has maintained a low-level decay, multi-channel counting facility for measuring environmental samples and for pulse distribution studies tied to the behavior of proportional and Geiger-Mueller detectors. Pulses have been time stamped and sorted using a hard-wired digital logic interface to discriminate coincidence, anticoincidence, guard and test pulse events; to digitize the pulse-height and rise-time; to monitor specific characteristics of intra-channel and inter-channel events; and to measure microsecond timing between any two events. To enhance event characterization, a computer-based waveform analyzer was added in 1985 to digitize individual pulses. In 2002, a next-generation low-level counting (NG-LLC) system was developed using commercial off-the-shelf electronics. The objective of this paper is to describe the key components of the NG-LLC system. Many of the event parameters previously determined by inflexible digital logic are now calculated in software. (author)

  5. A Compton-vetoed germanium detector with increased sensitivity at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The difficulty to directly detect plutonium in spent nuclear fuel due to the high Compton background of the fission products motivates the design of a gamma detector with improved sensitivity at low energies. We have built such a detector by operating a thin high-purity Ge detector with a large scintillator Compton veto directly behind it. The Ge detector is thin to absorb just the low-energy Pu radiation of interest while minimizing Compton scattering of high-energy radiation from the fission products. The subsequent scintillator is large so that forward-scattered photons from the Ge detector interact in it at least once to provide an anti-coincidence veto for the Ge detector. For highest sensitivity, additional material in the line of sight is minimized, the radioactive sample is kept thin, and its radiation is collimated. We will discuss the instrument design, and demonstrate the feasibility of the approach with a prototype that employs two large CsI scintillator vetoes. Initial spectra of a thin Cs-137 calibration source show a background suppression of a factor of ∼2.5 at ∼100 keV, limited by an unexpectedly thick 4 mm dead layer in the Ge detector. (author)

  6. A Compton-Vetoed Germanium Detector with Increased Sensitivity at Low Energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The difficulty to directly detect plutonium in spent nuclear fuel due to the high Compton background of the fission products motivates the design of a Gamma detector with improved sensitivity at low energies. We have built such a detector by operating a thin high-purity Ge detector with a large scintillator Compton veto directly behind it. The Ge detector is thin to absorb just the low-energy Pu radiation of interest while minimizing Compton scattering of high energy radiation from the fission products. The subsequent scintillator is large so that forward scattered photons from the Ge detector interact in it at least once to provide an anti-coincidence veto for the Ge detector. For highest sensitivity, additional material in the line-of-sight is minimized, the radioactive sample is kept thin, and its radiation is collimated. We will discuss the instrument design, and demonstrate the feasibility of the approach with a prototype that employs two large CsI scintillator vetoes. Initial spectra of a thin Cs-137 calibration source show a background suppression of a factor of ∼2.5 at ∼100 keV, limited by an unexpectedly thick 4 mm dead layer in the Ge detector.

  7. Development of an experimental set-up for the measurement of neutron-induced fission and capture cross sections of highly radioactive fissile nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Companis, Iulia; Mathieu, Ludovic; Aïche, Mourad; Schillebeeckx, Peter; Heyse, Jan; Barreau, Gérard; Czajkowski, Serge; Ducasse, Quentin; Gunsing, Frank; Jurado, Beatriz; Kessedjian, Gregoire; Matarranz, Julie; Tsekhanovich, Igor

    2014-04-01

    The measurement of neutron-capture cross sections of many actinides is complicated by the difficulty in separating capture γ-rays from the large fission-fragment prompt γ-ray background. For example, current estimates of the capture cross section of 233U show large discrepancies, with differences of more than 20%. To improve the accuracy of data, a new experimental set-up for the simultaneous measurement of the neutron-induced capture and fission cross sections was designed, assembled and optimized. The measurements will be performed at the GEel LINear Accelerator (GELINA) neutron time-of-flight facility in Belgium, where neutron cross sections can be measured over a wide energy range with high energy resolution. The fission detector consists of a dedicated multi-plate high-efficiency ionization chamber (IC). The γ-rays produced in capture reaction are detected by an array of C6D6 scintillators. Fission γ-rays are distinguished from capture γ-rays by the anticoincidence signals from the IC and the C6D6 detectors. For the undetected fission events a correction has to be applied based on the efficiency of the IC that should be high and known with a high accuracy. The performance of the IC during dedicated test experiments is presented, focusing on the determination of the detection efficiency.

  8. Development of an experimental set-up for the measurement of neutron-induced fission and capture cross sections of radioactive fissile nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Companis, I.; Aïche, M.; Mathieu, L.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Heyse, J.; Barreau, G.; Czajkowski, S.; Ducasse, Q.; Gunsing, F.; Jurado, B.; Kessedjian, G.; Matarranz, J.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Tsekhanovich, I.

    2013-12-01

    A new experimental set-up for a simultaneous measurement of neutron induced capture and fission cross sections was designed, assembled and optimized. The measurements will be performed at GEel LINear Accelerator (GELINA) neutron time-of-flight facility in Belgium, where neutron cross sections can be measured over a wide energy range with high energy resolution. The fission events detector consists of a dedicated multi-plate high efficiency fission ionization chamber (IC). The γ-rays produced in capture reaction are detected by an efficient array of C6D6 scintillators. Fission γ-rays events are distinguished from capture events by the anticoincidence signals from the IC and the C6D6 detectors. For the undetected fission events a correction has to be applied with respect to the efficiency of the IC that should be high and known with a high precision. Another important issue is the good separation between fission-fragment (FF) and the high alpha pile-up. The performances of the IC during test experiments are presented, focusing in particular on the detection efficiency.

  9. Characterization of a tagged $\\gamma$-ray beam line at the DA$\\Phi$NE Beam Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Cattaneo, P W; Boffelli, F; Bulgarelli, A; Buonomo, B; Chen, A W; D'Ammando, F; Froysland, T; Fuschino, F; Galli, M; Gianotti, F; Giuliani, A; Longo, F; Marisaldi, M; Mazzitelli, G; Pellizzoni, A; Prest, M; Pucella, G; Quintieri, L; Rappoldi, A; Tavani, M; Trifoglio, M; Trois, A; Valente, P; Vallazza, E; Vercellone, S; Zambra, A; Barbiellini, G; Caraveo, P; Cocco, V; Costa, E; De Paris, G; Del Monte, E; Di Cocco, G; Donnarumma, I; Evangelista, Y; Feroci, M; Ferrari, A; Fiorini, M; Labanti, C; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Lipari, P; Mastropietro, M; Mereghetti, S; Morelli, E; Moretti, E; Morselli, A; Pacciani, L; Perotti, F; Piano, G; Picozza, P; Pilia, M; Porrovecchio, G; Rapisarda, M; Rubini, A; Sabatini, S; Soffitta, P; Striani, E; Vittorini, V; Zanello, D; Colafrancesco, S; Giommi, P; Pittori, C; Santolamazza, P; Verrecchia, F; Salotti, L

    2011-01-01

    At the core of the AGILE scientific instrument, designed to operate on a satellite, there is the Gamma Ray Imaging Detector (GRID) consisting of a Silicon Tracker (ST), a Cesium Iodide Mini-Calorimeter and an Anti-Coincidence system of plastic scintillator bars. The ST needs an on-ground calibration with a $\\gamma$-ray beam to validate the simulation used to calculate the energy response function and the effective area versus the energy and the direction of the $\\gamma$ rays. A tagged $\\gamma$-ray beam line was designed at the Beam Test Facility (BTF) of the INFN Laboratori Nazionali of Frascati (LNF), based on an electron beam generating $\\gamma$ rays through Bremsstrahlung in a position-sensitive target. The $\\gamma$-ray energy is deduced by difference with the post-Bremsstrahlung electron energy \\cite{prest}-\\cite{hasan}. The electron energy is measured by a spectrometer consisting of a dipole magnet and an array of position sensitive silicon strip detectors, the Photon Tagging System (PTS). The use of the...

  10. Using the Active Collimator and Shield Assembly of an EXIST-Type Mission as a Gamma-Ray Burst Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Krawczynski, H; Fishman, G J; Wilson, C A

    2006-01-01

    The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) is a mission design concept that uses coded masks seen by Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors to register hard X-rays in the energy region from 10 keV to 600 keV. A partially active or fully active anti-coincidence shield/collimator with a total area of between 15 and 35 square meters will be used to define the field of view of the CZT detectors and to suppress the background of cosmic-ray-induced events. In this paper, we describe the use of a sodium activated cesium iodide shield/collimator to detect gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and to measure their energy spectra in the energy range from 100 keV up to 10 MeV. We use the code GEANT4 to simulate the interactions of photons and cosmic rays with the spacecraft and instrument and the code DETECT2000 to simulate the optical properties of the scintillation detectors. The shield collimator achieves a nu-F-nu sensitivity of 3 x 10^(-9) erg cm^(-2) s^(-1) and 2 x 10^(-8) erg cm^(-2) s^(-1) at 100 keV and 600 keV, re...

  11. Characterization of a tagged $\\gamma$-ray beam line at the DAFNE Beam Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Cattaneo, P W; Boffelli, F; Bulgarelli, A; Buonomo, B; Chen, A W; D’Ammando, F; FoggettA, L; Froysland, T; Fuschino, F; Galli, M; Gianotti, F; Giuliani, A; Longo, F; Marisaldi, M; Mazzitelli, G; Pellizzoni, A; Prest, M; Pucella, G; Quintieri, L; Rappoldi, A; Tavani, M; Trifoglio, M; Trois, A; Valente, P; Vallazza, E; Vercellone, S; Zambra, A; Barbiellini, G; Caraveo, P; Cocco, V; Costa, E; De Paris, G; Del Monte, E; Di Cocco, G; Donnarumma, I; Evangelista, Y; Feroci, M; Ferrari, A; Fiorini, M; Labanti, C; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Lipari, P; Mastropietro, M; Mereghetti, S; Morelli, E; Moretti, E; Morselli, A; Pacciani, L; Perotti, F; Piano, G; Picozza, P; Pilia, M; Porrovecchio, G; Rapisarda, M; Rubini, A; Sabatini, S; Soffitta, P; Striani, E; Vittorini, V; Zanello, D; Colafrancesco, S; Giommi, P; Pittori, C; Santolamazza, P; Verrecchia, F; Salotti, L

    2012-01-01

    At the core of the AGILE scientific instrument, designed to operate on a satellite, there is the Gamma Ray Imaging Detector (GRID) consisting of a Silicon Tracker (ST), a Cesium Iodide Mini-Calorimeter and an Anti-Coincidence system of plastic scintillator bars. The ST needs an on-ground calibration with a γ-ray beam to validate the simulation used to calculate the energy response function and the effective area versus the energy and the direction of the γ rays. A tagged γ-ray beam line was designed at the Beam Test Facility (BTF) of the INFN Laboratori Nazionali of Frascati (LNF), based on an electron beam generating γ-rays through bremsstrahlung in a position-sensitive target. The γ-ray energy is deduced by difference with the post-bremsstrahlung electron energy [1] and [2]. The electron energy is measured by a spectrometer consisting of a dipole magnet and an array of position sensitive silicon strip detectors, the Photon Tagging System (PTS). The use of the combined BTF-PTS system as tagged photon be...

  12. A Germanium Detector with Optimized Compton Veto for High Sensitivity at Low Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, S

    2011-11-30

    We have built a prototype germanium detector with a Compton veto that is optimized for high sensitivity in the low-energy range around {approx}100 keV. It is specifically designed to address the problem to directly detect plutonium gamma emissions in spent nuclear fuel by non-destructive assay. This is not possible with current detectors due to the large low-energy background of Compton-scattered high-energy radiation from the fission products, whose gamma flux is at least 6 to 7 orders of magnitude higher than the Pu signal. Our instrument is designed to assess the feasibility to selectively suppress the background in the low-energy region around {approx}100 keV with the strongest Pu X-ray and gamma emissions lines. It employs a thin Ge detector with a large Compton veto directly behind it to suppress the background from forward-scattered radiation by anti-coincidence vetoing. This report summarizes the design considerations and the performance of the instrument.

  13. A Compton-Vetoed Germanium Detector with Increased Sensitivity at Low Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, S; Bates, C; Drury, O B; Burks, M; DiPrete, D

    2012-03-29

    The difficulty to directly detect plutonium in spent nuclear fuel due to the high Compton background of the fission products motivates the design of a Gamma detector with improved sensitivity at low energies. We have built such a detector by operating a thin high-purity Ge detector with a large scintillator Compton veto directly behind it. The Ge detector is thin to absorb just the low-energy Pu radiation of interest while minimizing Compton scattering of high energy radiation from the fission products. The subsequent scintillator is large so that forward scattered photons from the Ge detector interact in it at least once to provide an anti-coincidence veto for the Ge detector. For highest sensitivity, additional material in the line-of-sight is minimized, the radioactive sample is kept thin, and its radiation is collimated. We will discuss the instrument design, and demonstrate the feasibility of the approach with a prototype that employs two large CsI scintillator vetoes. Initial spectra of a thin Cs-137 calibration source show a background suppression of a factor of {approx}2.5 at {approx}100 keV, limited by an unexpectedly thick 4 mm dead layer in the Ge detector.

  14. Gamma-ray observations of SN 1987A with an array of high-purity germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A balloon borne gamma-ray spectrometer comprising an array of high-purity n-type germanium (HPGe) detectors having geometric area 119 cm2, resolution 2.5 keV at 1.0 MeV, surrounded by an active NaI (Tl) collimator and Compton suppressing anticoincidence shield nominally 10 cm thick, was flown from Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia, on May 29--30, 1987, 96 days after the observed neutrino pulse. The average column depth of residual atmosphere in the direction of SN 1987A at float altitude was 6.3 g cm-2 during the observation. SN 1987A was within the 22-deg full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) field of view for about 3300 s during May 29.9--30.3 UT. No excess gamma rays were observed at energies appropriate to the Ni(56)-Co(56) decay chain or from other lines in the energy region from 0.1 to 3.0 MeV. With 80% of the data analyzed, the 3-sigma upper limit obtained for the 1238-keV line from Co(56) at the instrument resolution (about 3 keV) is 1.3 x 10-3 photons cm-2 s-1

  15. The Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Atwood, W B

    2009-01-01

    (Abridged) The Large Area Telescope (Fermi/LAT, hereafter LAT), the primary instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) mission, is an imaging, wide field-of-view, high-energy gamma-ray telescope, covering the energy range from below 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. This paper describes the LAT, its pre-flight expected performance, and summarizes the key science objectives that will be addressed. On-orbit performance will be presented in detail in a subsequent paper. The LAT is a pair-conversion telescope with a precision tracker and calorimeter, each consisting of a 4x4 array of 16 modules, a segmented anticoincidence detector that covers the tracker array, and a programmable trigger and data acquisition system. Each tracker module has a vertical stack of 18 x,y tracking planes, including two layers (x and y) of single-sided silicon strip detectors and high-Z converter material (tungsten) per tray. Every calorimeter module has 96 CsI(Tl) crystals, arranged in an 8 layer hodoscopic configuration wit...

  16. Improving Charge-Collection Efficiency of Kyoto's SOI Pixel Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumura, Hideaki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Takeda, Ayaki; Ito, Makoto; Ohmura, Syunichi; Arai, Yasuo; Mori, Koji; Nishioka, Yusuke; Takenaka, Ryota; Kohmura, Takayoshi

    2015-01-01

    We have been developing X-ray SOIPIXs for next-generation satellites for X-ray astronomy. Their high time resolution ($\\sim10~\\mu$s) and event-trigger-output function enable us to read out without pile-ups and to use anti-coincidence systems. Their performance in imaging spectroscopy is comparable to that in the CCDs. A problem in our previous model was degradation of charge-collection efficiency (CCE) at pixel borders. We measured the response in the sub-pixel scale, using finely collimated X-ray beams at $10~\\mu$m\\Phi$ at SPring-8, and investigated the non-uniformity of the CCE within a pixel. We found that the X-ray detection efficiency and CCE degrade in the sensor region under the pixel circuitry placed outside the buried p-wells (BPW). A 2D simulation of the electric fields shows that the isolated pixel-circuitry outside the BPW creates local minimums in the electric potentials at the interface between the sensor and buried oxide layers. Thus, a part of signal charge is trapped there and is not collecte...

  17. Environmental radioactivity in Slovakia/Czechoslovakia in 1961 to 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results are given of environmental monitoring of 90Sr and 137Cs in Slovakia between 1961 to 1975. Samples of radioactive fallout, milk and water were taken monthly, samples of forage, cereals and vegetables were taken in the ripening stage, and samples of foodstuffs were taken in shops. The following amounts of samples were used for the analyses: 100 g of soil, 100 g of dry forage, 100 g of dry cereals, 3 kg of fresh fruit and vegetables, 2 l of water, 1 l of milk, 2 kg of fresh meat, and flour and flour products amounting to 2 kg. The samples were dried, burned and mineralized for 24 hours with HCl. After removal of interfering elements, ie., Fe, 140Ba, 140La, rare earths, phosphates and 90Y, the 90Sr activity was determined by the yttrium method. The yttrium chemical yield was 90%. 137Cs beta activity was determined after precipitation from a solution in the form of cesium nickel ferrocyanide and after removal of oxalates, alkali elements and rare earth elements. Chemical yield was 60 to 70%. An anticoincidence low-level beta counter by Philips was used in activity measurement. The detection efficiency was 22% for 90Sr-90Y and 17% for 137Cs. The relative mean square error of the measurement was lower than 15% for 90Y and 10% for 137Cs. The measurement results are classified in five parts, viz., radioactivity in fallout, in soils, in water, in plants, and in food. (J.P.)

  18. Status of LUMINEU program to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of 100Mo with cryogenic ZnMoO4 scintillating bolometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danevich, F. A.; Bergé, L.; Boiko, R. S.; Chapellier, M.; Chernyak, D. M.; Coron, N.; Devoyon, L.; Drillien, A.-A.; Dumoulin, L.; Enss, C.; Fleischmann, A.; Gastaldo, L.; Giuliani, A.; Gray, D.; Gros, M.; Hervé, S.; Humbert, V.; Ivanov, I. M.; Juillard, A.; Kobychev, V. V.; Koskas, F.; Loidl, M.; Magnier, P.; Makarov, E. P.; Mancuso, M.; de Marcillac, P.; Marnieros, S.; Marrache-Kikuchi, C.; Navick, X.-F.; Nones, C.; Olivieri, E.; Paul, B.; Penichot, Y.; Pessina, G.; Plantevin, O.; Poda, D. V.; Redon, T.; Rodrigues, M.; Shlegel, V. N.; Strazzer, O.; Tenconi, M.; Torres, L.; Tretyak, V. I.; Vasiliev, Ya. V.; Velazquez, M.; Viraphong, O.

    2015-10-01

    The LUMTNEU program aims at performing a pilot experiment on 0ν2β decay of 100Mo using radiopure ZnMoO4 crystals enriched in 100Mo operated as cryogenic scintillating bolometers. Large volume ZnMoO4 crystal scintillators (˜ 0.3 kg) were developed and tested showing high performance in terms of radiopurity, energy resolution and α/β particle discrimination capability. Zinc molybdate crystal scintillators enriched in 100Mo were grown for the first time by the low-thermal-gradient Czochralski technique with a high crystal yield and an acceptable level of enriched molybdenum irrecoverable losses. A background level of ˜ 0.5 counts/(yr keV ton) in the region of interest can be reached in a large detector array thanks to the excellent detectors radiopurity and particle discrimination capability, suppression of randomly coinciding events by pulse-shape analysis, and anticoincidence cut. These results pave the way to future sensitive searches based on the LUMTNEU technology, capable of approachingand exploring the inverted hierarchy region of the neutrino mass pattern.

  19. Performance of an Arrangement of Several Large-Area Proportional Counters for the Assessment of Pu239 Lung Burdens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If plutonium-239 has been deposited in the human lung, some of the emitted soft X-rays can be measured from the outside by proportional counters. Efficiency of such measurements depends on sensitive area and geometrical arrangement of the counters in regard to the body, on absorption of the X-rays inside the counter, on reduction of the radiation in the wall or window of the counter, on the background of the counter and on stability of this background in spite of β- and γ- radiation coming from other nuclides than plutonium-239 in the body. Most of these parameters are optimized by using three large-area, thin-window, argon filled proportional counters mounted inside a large steel-room opposite the chest and both lung lobes of a sitting patient. These counters are anti-coincidence shielded in such a way that only soft X-rays causing the origination of photoelectrons inside the measuring counter proper are detected. The effect is enforced by passing the electrical pulses through a one-channel pulse height analyser. Construction and performance of such an arrangement are described in the paper. (author)

  20. A Reconfigurable Instrument System for Nuclear and Particle Physics Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed a reconfigurable nuclear instrument system (RNIS) that could satisfy the requirements of diverse nuclear and particle physics experiments, and the inertial confinement fusion diagnostic. Benefiting from the reconfigurable hardware structure and digital pulse processing technology, RNIS shakes off the restrictions of cumbersome crates and miscellaneous modules. It retains all the advantages of conventional nuclear instruments and is more flexible and portable. RNIS is primarily composed of a field programmable hardware board and relevant PC software. Separate analog channels are designed to provide different functions, such as amplifiers, ADC, fast discriminators and Schmitt discriminators for diverse experimental purposes. The high-performance field programmable gate array could complete high-precision time interval measurement, histogram accumulation, counting, and coincidence anticoincidence measurement. To illustrate the prospects of RNIS, a series of applications to the experiments are described in this paper. The first, for which RNIS was originally developed, involves nuclear energy spectrum measurement with a scintillation detector and photomultiplier. The second experiment applies RNIS to a G-M tube counting experiment, and in the third, it is applied to a quantum communication experiment through reconfiguration. (fusion engineering)

  1. The CALorimetric Electron Telescope, CALET, Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, Shoji

    We are developing the CALorimetric Electron Telescope, CALET, mission for the Japanese Experiment Module Exposed Facility, JEM-EF, of the International Space Station. Major scientific objectives are to search for nearby cosmic ray sources and dark matter by carrying out a precise measurement of the electrons in GeV 20 TeV and the gamma-rays in 20 MeV TeV. CALET has a unique capability to observe electrons and gamma-rays over 1 TeV since the hadron rejection power is more than 105 and the energy resolution better than a few percent over 100 GeV. The detector consists of an Imaging Calorimeter (IMC) with scintillating fiber belts and tungsten plates, a Total Absorption Calorimeter (TASC) with BGO logs, a Silicon Pixel Array (SIA) and a Scintillator Anti-Coincidence System (SACS). CALET has also a capability to measure protons and nuclei in 10 GeV 1000 TeV, and will have a function to monitor solar activity and gamma-ray bursts with additional instruments. The phase A study has started on a schedule of launch in 2013 by H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) for 5 years observation.

  2. Observation of polarized hard X-ray emission from the Crab by the PoGOLite Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, M.; Florén, H.-G.; Jackson, M.; Kamae, T.; Kawano, T.; Kiss, M.; Kole, M.; Mikhalev, V.; Moretti, E.; Olofsson, G.; Rydström, S.; Takahashi, H.; Iyudin, A.; Arimoto, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Mizuno, T.; Ryde, F.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, T.; Pearce, M.

    2016-02-01

    We have measured the linear polarization of hard X-ray emission from the Crab in a previously unexplored energy interval, 20-120 keV. The introduction of two new observational parameters, the polarization fraction and angle stands to disentangle geometrical and physical effects, thereby providing information on the pulsar wind geometry and magnetic field environment. Measurements are conducted using the PoGOLite Pathfinder - a balloon-borne polarimeter. Polarization is determined by measuring the azimuthal Compton scattering angle of incident X-rays in an array of plastic scintillators housed in an anticoincidence well. The polarimetric response has been characterized prior to flight using both polarized and unpolarized calibration sources. We address possible systematic effects through observations of a background field. The measured polarization fraction for the integrated Crab light curve is 18.4^{+9.8}_{-10.6} per cent, corresponding to an upper limit (99 per cent credibility) of 42.4 per cent, for a polarization angle of (149.2 ± 16.0)°.

  3. Status of LUMINEU program to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of 100Mo with cryogenic ZnMoO4 scintillating bolometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LUMTNEU program aims at performing a pilot experiment on 0ν2β decay of 100Mo using radiopure ZnMoO4 crystals enriched in 100Mo operated as cryogenic scintillating bolometers. Large volume ZnMoO4 crystal scintillators (∼ 0.3 kg) were developed and tested showing high performance in terms of radiopurity, energy resolution and α/β particle discrimination capability. Zinc molybdate crystal scintillators enriched in 100Mo were grown for the first time by the low-thermal-gradient Czochralski technique with a high crystal yield and an acceptable level of enriched molybdenum irrecoverable losses. A background level of ∼ 0.5 counts/(yr keV ton) in the region of interest can be reached in a large detector array thanks to the excellent detectors radiopurity and particle discrimination capability, suppression of randomly coinciding events by pulse-shape analysis, and anticoincidence cut. These results pave the way to future sensitive searches based on the LUMTNEU technology, capable of approachingand exploring the inverted hierarchy region of the neutrino mass pattern

  4. Determination of multielements in a typical Japanese diet certified reference material by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shogo; Okada, Yukiko; Hirai, Shoji

    2003-08-01

    Multielements in a typical Japanese diet certified reference material prepared at the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) of Japan, in collaboration with the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) of Japan were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Five samples (ca. 510-1000 mg) and comparative standards were irradiated for a short time (10 s) at a thermal neutron flux of 1.5 x 10(12) n cm(-2) s(-1) (pneumatic transfer) and for a long time (6 h) at a thermal neutron flux of 3.7 x 10(12) n cm(-2) s(-1) (central thimble) in the Rikkyo University Research Reactor (TRIGA Mark-II, 100 kW). The irradiated samples were measured by conventional gama-ray spectrometry using a coaxial Ge detector, and by anti-coincidence and coincidence gamma-ray spectrometry with a coaxial Ge detector and a well-type NaI(Tl) detector. The concentrations of 38 elements were determined by these methods. PMID:12945682

  5. Evidence of the radio-quiet hard X-ray precursor of the 13 December 2006 solar flare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report multi-wavelength investigation of the pre-impulsive phase of the 13 December 2006 X-class solar flare. We use hard X-ray data from the anticoincidence system of spectrometer onboard INTEGRAL (ACS) jointly with soft X-ray data from the GOES-12 and Hinode satellites. Radio data are from Nobeyama and Learmonth solar observatories and from the Culgoora Solar Radio Spectrograph. The main finding of our analysis is a spiky increase of the ACS count rate accompanied by surprisingly gradual and weak growth of microwave emission and without detectable radio emission at meter and decimeter wavelengths about 10 min prior to the impulsive phase of the solar flare. At the time of this pre-flare hard X-ray burst the onset of the GOES soft X-ray event has been reported, positive derivative of the GOES soft X-ray flux started to rise and a bright spot has appeared in the images of the Hinode X-ray telescope (XRT) between the flare ribbons near the magnetic inversion line close to the sources of thermal and non-thermal hard X-ray emission observed by Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) during the flare. These facts we consider as evidences of solar origin of the increased pre-flare ACS count rate. We briefly discuss a possible cause of the pre-flare emission peculiarities. (authors)

  6. Background reduction of a HPGe-BGO anti-Compton system and its application to soil contamination monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate gamma spectrometry is widely performed by HPGe detectors. The limit of detection of gamma spectrometry system is determined by two main factors: the detector efficiency and its background. To obtain higher efficiencies, larger detectors have to be used, but their price become forbidding, thus it is common to try to reduce their background. For static laboratory systems optimal shielding can be used, but massive shielding is not practical for mobile systems intended to be operated outdoors, as for ground contamination survey. The main contribution to the background in an HPGe gamma spectrometer (except the background radiation) is due to the Compton scattering. When photons are Compton scattered in the detector, only a part of their energy is transmitted to the detector, and the pulse will not contribute to the main photo-peak, but will appear at a lower energy, as part of the background. A lower energy gamma peak will be superposed on this background, and its limit of detection will be higher. A practical way to solve the problem is to position an additional detector around the HPGe and operate it in anti-coincidence with the HPGe detector. Coincident pulses from both detectors, mostly from Compton-scattering, will not be counted, and the background will be reduced. This setup is called anti-Compton, and the characteristic of an anti-Compton system based on a HPGe detector, surrounded by a BGO scintillator, is presented in this work. Its application to ground monitoring is also presented

  7. Steps towards a Medium-Energy Gamma-ray Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Julie

    We propose to develop, fabricate, and test a small-scale medium-energy (0.2 - 500 MeV) gamma-ray telescope, optimized for photon detection in both the Compton-scattering and pair-production regimes. The instrument will consist of a double-sided Si-strip tracking detector with energy deposition readout, a composite CdZnTe-strip (CZT) and CsI(Tl)-log calorimeter with high spatial and good energy resolution, and a highly efficient anti-coincidence detector (ACD). This instrument will be a prototype for a potential future MIDEX-scale mission (ComPair) designed to provide a more than order of magnitude increase in sensitivity to the MeV gamma-ray Universe compared to past missions. ComPair will provide a significant improvement in both angular and energy resolution over previous instruments operating in the 0.2-100 MeV range, offering a truly new window on this poorly explored energy range. In this proposal, the team proposes to develop and test the key detection elements for ComPair, integrate these elements in a prototype telescope, perform a series of beam tests to demonstrate the performance, and perform a balloon test flight to study the background rejection capability of the prototype instrument. As a result, we will establish the proof of concept for a Si-CZT Compton-Pair space telescope and elevate the TRL for the ComPair technology to 6-7.

  8. A NIM (Nuclear Instrumentation Module) system conjugated with optional input for pHEMT amplifier for beta and gamma spectroscopy; Um sistema de modulos NIM conjugados com entrada opcional por amplificador pHEMT para espectroscopia beta e gama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konrad, Barbara; Lüdke, Everton, E-mail: barbarakonradmev@gmail.com, E-mail: eludke@smail.ufsm.br [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (LAE/UFSM), RS (Brazil). Lab. de Astrofisica e Eletronica

    2014-07-01

    This work presents a high speed NIM module (Nuclear Instrumentation Module) to detect radiation, gamma and muons, as part of a system for natural radiation monitoring and of extraterrestrial origin. The subsystem developed consists of a preamplifier and an integrated SCA (Single Channel Analyzer), including power supplies of ± 12 and ± 24V with derivations of +3.6 and ± 5V. The single channel analyzer board, consisting of discrete logic components, operating in window modes, normal and integral. The pulse shaping block is made up of two voltage comparators working at 120 MHz with a response time > 60 ns and a logic anticoincidence system. The preamplifier promotes a noise reduction and introduces the impedance matching between the output of anode / diode photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) and subsequent equipment, providing an input impedance of 1MΩ and output impedance of 40 to 140Ω. The shaper amplifier is non-inverting and has variable input capacitance of 1000 pF. The upper and lower thresholds of the SCA are adjustable from 0 to ± 10V, and the equipment is compatible with various types of detectors, like PMTs coupled to sodium iodide crystals. For use with liquid scintillators and photodiodes with crystals (CsI: Tl) is proposed to include a preamplifier circuit pHEMT (pseudomorphic High Electron Mobility Transistor) integrated. Yet, the system presents the possibility of applications for various purposes of gamma spectroscopy and automatic detection of events producing of beta particles.

  9. Status of LUMINEU program to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 100}Mo with cryogenic ZnMoO{sub 4} scintillating bolometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danevich, F. A., E-mail: danevich@kinr.kiev.ua; Boiko, R. S.; Chernyak, D. M.; Kobychev, V. V. [Institute for Nuclear Research, MSP 03680 Kyiv (Ukraine); Bergé, L.; Chapellier, M.; Drillien, A.-A.; Dumoulin, L.; Humbert, V.; Marcillac, P. de; Marnieros, S.; Marrache-Kikuchi, C.; Olivieri, E.; Plantevin, O.; Tenconi, M. [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière, CNRS/IN2P3, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Coron, N.; Redon, T.; Torres, L. [IAS, CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Devoyon, L.; Koskas, F. [CEA, Centre d’Etudes Saclay, Orphée, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France); and others

    2015-10-28

    The LUMTNEU program aims at performing a pilot experiment on 0ν2β decay of {sup 100}Mo using radiopure ZnMoO{sub 4} crystals enriched in {sup 100}Mo operated as cryogenic scintillating bolometers. Large volume ZnMoO{sub 4} crystal scintillators (∼ 0.3 kg) were developed and tested showing high performance in terms of radiopurity, energy resolution and α/β particle discrimination capability. Zinc molybdate crystal scintillators enriched in {sup 100}Mo were grown for the first time by the low-thermal-gradient Czochralski technique with a high crystal yield and an acceptable level of enriched molybdenum irrecoverable losses. A background level of ∼ 0.5 counts/(yr keV ton) in the region of interest can be reached in a large detector array thanks to the excellent detectors radiopurity and particle discrimination capability, suppression of randomly coinciding events by pulse-shape analysis, and anticoincidence cut. These results pave the way to future sensitive searches based on the LUMTNEU technology, capable of approachingand exploring the inverted hierarchy region of the neutrino mass pattern.

  10. LArGe. A liquid argon scintillation veto for GERDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heisel, Mark

    2011-04-13

    LArGe is a GERDA low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for possible applications in the GERDA experiment. GERDA searches for the neutrinoless double-beta decay in {sup 76}Ge, by operating naked germanium detectors submersed into 65 m{sup 3} of liquid argon. Similarly, LArGe runs Ge-detectors in 1 m{sup 3} (1.4 tons) of liquid argon, which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The light is used in anti-coincidence with the germanium detectors, to effectively suppress background events that deposit energy in the liquid argon. This work adresses the design, construction, and commissioning of LArGe. The background suppression efficiency has been studied in combination with a pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique for various sources, which represent characteristic backgrounds to GERDA. Suppression factors of a few times 10{sup 3} have been achieved. First background data of LArGe (without PSD) yield a background index of (0.12-4.6).10{sup -2} cts/(keV.kg.y) (90% c.l.), which is at the level of the Gerda phase I design goal. Furthermore, for the first time we measure the natural {sup 42}Ar abundance (in parallel to Gerda), and have indication for the 2{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay in natural germanium. (orig.)

  11. Low-background high-efficiency Geiger-Mueller counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of measuring solid radioactive samples of low-activity with semi-portable equipment is one that is common to many branches of applied science; laboratories working in the fields of radiochemistry, agriculture, biology and oceanography are among the principal operators of, such measuring sets. This report describes a low-background, high-efficiency Geiger-Muller flow-counter which was developed by E. A. Keroe, H. C. Figdor and J. Koeck in the period 1959-61 and which has been since then in constant use at the International Atomic Energy Agency laboratory at Seibersdorf. The instrument described will measure samples, with activities of fractions of picocuries to tens of picocuries, dispersed in 30 mg of carrier substance. The high-efficiency and low-background are achieved by careful design of the G-M counter and the effective suppression of penetrating radiation by using the anticoincidence umbrella principle. The G-M umbrella tube used is small and thus it was possible to keep the weight of the measuring unit, including all iron shielding, down to only 700 kg. By publishing this report, the Agency hopes that the information given will prove useful to all those who are interested in making routine analyses on solid samples whose low activities have, in the past, rendered such assays difficult and tedious

  12. Simbol-X background simulation activities

    CERN Document Server

    Chipaux, Rémi; Bulgarelli, A; Foschini, L; Kendziorra, E; Klose, C; Kuster, M; Laurent, P; Tenzer, C

    2008-01-01

    Using the Geant4 toolkit, a Monte-Carlo code to simulate the detector background of the Simbol-X focal plane instrument has been developed with the aim to optimize the design of the instrument. Structural design models of the mirror and detector satellites have been built and used as baseline for our simulations, to evaluate the different background contributions that must be taken into account to determine the sensitivity of the Simbol-X detectors. We work towards a simulation based background and mass model which can be used before and during the mission. For different material compositions, material thicknesses, locations etc. the response of the instrument to the diffuse cosmic hard X-ray background and to the cosmic proton induced background have been calculated. As a result we present estimates of the background count rate expected in the low and high energy detector, and anti-coincidence rates. The effect of induced radioactivity in the detector and shielding materials and soft proton scattering in the...

  13. PoGOLite - A High Sensitivity Balloon-Borne Soft Gamma-ray Polarimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Arimoto, Makoto; Axelsson, Magnus; Bettolo, Cecilia Marini; Björnsson, Claes-Ingvar; Bogaert, Gilles; Carlson, Per; Craig, William; Ekeberg, Tomas; Engdegård, Olle; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Gunji, Shuichi; Hjalmarsdotter, Linnea; Iwan, Bianca; Kanai, Yoshikazu; Kataoka, Jun; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kazejev, Jaroslav; Kiss, Mózsi; Klamra, Wlodzimierz; Larsson, Stefan; Madejski, Grzegorz; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Ng, Johnny; Pearce, Mark; Ryde, Felix; Suhonen, Markus; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tanaka, Takuya; Thurston, Timothy; Ueno, Masaru; Varner, Gary; Yamamoto, Kazuhide; Yamashita, Yuichiro; Ylinen, Tomi; Yoshida, Hiroaki

    2007-01-01

    We describe a new balloon-borne instrument (PoGOLite) capable of detecting 10% polarisation from 200mCrab point-like sources between 25 and 80keV in one 6 hour flight. Polarisation measurements in the soft gamma-ray band are expected to provide a powerful probe into high-energy emission mechanisms as well as the distribution of magnetic fields, radiation fields and interstellar matter. At present, only exploratory polarisation measurements have been carried out in the soft gamma-ray band. Reduction of the large background produced by cosmic-ray particles has been the biggest challenge. PoGOLite uses Compton scattering and photo-absorption in an array of 217 well-type phoswich detector cells made of plastic and BGO scintillators surrounded by a BGO anticoincidence shield and a thick polyethylene neutron shield. The narrow FOV (1.25msr) obtained with well-type phoswich detector technology and the use of thick background shields enhance the detected S/N ratio. Event selections based on recorded phototube wavefor...

  14. Model DYS-92 low background liquid scintillation spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The model DYS-92 low background liquid scintillation spectrometer as an new innovation is developed. It is specially designed for measuring extra-low level tritium and 14C in the environment. Of course, other isotopes, such as 85Kr, 36Cl and trace isotopes in the environment can also be measured. DYS-92 is controlled by Z80 main plate in the main instrument box and a microcomputer. Nex electronics has been designed. The software includes: operation, data processing and spectrum analysis. The bismuth germanate (BGO) crystal is applied as an anticoincidence shielding with higher γ efficiency and is lighter and smaller than NaI (Tl) crystal. A lot of messages can be observed from the screen of the computer during measurement, such as counts of each channel, energy spectrum, time, parameters of the measuring process, etc. The statistical data-processing is made in the course of measurement. All of the counts and spectra for any sample can be displayed on the screen by pushing keys. The figure of merit can be calculated from the spectrum by the microcomputer. In particular, the selection of 3H, 14C measuring channel can be completed after or before the measurement. In either case, the 14C dating of the sample or the calculation of the concentration of tritium in water can be fulfilled automatically

  15. A neutrino detector: its efficiency and noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new experimental counter for the detection of reactor anti-νsub(e) by the reaction anti-νsub(e)+p→n+e+ has been studied in order to test the conservation law of separate leptonic numbers. Measurements were done with a prototype detector of smaller dimensions in order to identify the origin of background events among those of capture. The measurements of the internal activity in the part of the detector constituted by the 3He proportional counters permitted the selection of the less radioactive materials and thus to have a background as low as possible. As concerns the external backgrounds due to reactor and cosmic rays, measurements have shown that they can be reduced to an acceptable level by surrounding the detector with shields of lead and polyethylene and by the use of a 4π anti-coincidence system. An important work of neutronic simulation on a computer has permitted to foresee the detection efficiency and to estimate the neutronic properties of each part. An exploratory study has shown that with a modification of target material, it will be possible to measure neutral currents with the reactions anti-νsub(e)+d→n+p+anti-νsub(e)

  16. Nuclear and atomic data activities in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear and atomic data measurements and calculations in Malaysia are mostly done at the National University of Malaysia (UKM) and Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT). At UKM, (n,t) reactions for 6Li, 10B and reactor structural materials have been investigated using liquid scintillation counting and gas phase β- anticoincidence counting. Tritium productions via ternary fission in 235U and 232Th are measured using vacuum extraction and β- counting of accumulated tritium. In addition, γ-ray attenuation coefficients on cooking oil, petroleum products, building materials, natural rubber and tropical woods have also been measured. Calculations to determine μ-value according to Hubbel method are initiated. Some collaborative works between UKM and Juelich Research Centre of Germany have been completed while others are in progress namely; (n,t) reactions study on 9Be, 10B, 14N and also measurement of excitation functions and isomer ratios of fast neutron induced reactions on Zn, Ga and Ge. At MINT, the 1-D diffusion code TRIGAM and the 2-D EXTERMINATOR code are used for neutronic analyses of TRIGA Reactor. The radiation shielding calculation have been carried out by using ANISN, a 1-D discrete ordinates code. Some preliminary calculations for the fuel transfer cask using ORIGEN2 and MERCURE-4 have been performed. Response functions for neutrons and the associated secondary photons for neutron skyshine analyses have been generated using the MCNP code. (author)

  17. A Reconfigurable Instrument System for Nuclear and Particle Physics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Ziru; Li, Feng; Jiang, Xiao; Jin, Ge

    2014-04-01

    We developed a reconfigurable nuclear instrument system (RNIS) that could satisfy the requirements of diverse nuclear and particle physics experiments, and the inertial confinement fusion diagnostic. Benefiting from the reconfigurable hardware structure and digital pulse processing technology, RNIS shakes off the restrictions of cumbersome crates and miscellaneous modules. It retains all the advantages of conventional nuclear instruments and is more flexible and portable. RNIS is primarily composed of a field programmable hardware board and relevant PC software. Separate analog channels are designed to provide different functions, such as amplifiers, ADC, fast discriminators and Schmitt discriminators for diverse experimental purposes. The high-performance field programmable gate array could complete high-precision time interval measurement, histogram accumulation, counting, and coincidence anticoincidence measurement. To illustrate the prospects of RNIS, a series of applications to the experiments are described in this paper. The first, for which RNIS was originally developed, involves nuclear energy spectrum measurement with a scintillation detector and photomultiplier. The second experiment applies RNIS to a G-M tube counting experiment, and in the third, it is applied to a quantum communication experiment through reconfiguration.

  18. Application of Compton suppression spectrometry in the improvement of nuclear analytical techniques for biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compton Suppression Factors (SF) and Compton Reduction Factors (RF) of the UT Austin's Compton suppression spectrometer being parameters characterizing the system performance were measured using ''1''3''7Cs and ''6''0Co point sources. The system performance was evaluated as a function of energy and geometry. The (P/C), A(P/C), (P/T), Cp, and Ce were obtained for each of the parameters. The natural background reduction factor in the anticoincidence mode and that of normal mode was calculated and its effect on the detection limit of biological samples evaluated. Applicability of the spectrometer and the method for biological samples was tested in the measurement of twenty-four elements (Ba, Sr, I, Br, Cu, V, Mg, Na, Cl, Mn, Ca, Sn, In, K, Mo, Cd, Zn, As, Sb, Ni, Rb, Cs, Fe, and Co) commonly found in food, milk, tea and tobacco items. They were determined from seven National Institute for Standard and Technology (NIST) certified reference materials (rice flour, oyster tissue, non-fat powdered milk, peach leaves, tomato leaves, apple leaves, and citrus leaves). Our results shows good agreement with the NIST certified values, indicating that the method developed in the present study is suitable for the determination of aforementioned elements in biological samples without undue interference problems

  19. In-orbit background of X-ray microcalorimeters and its effects on observations

    CERN Document Server

    Lotti, S; Macculi, C; Mineo, T; Natalucci, L; Perinati, E; Piro, L; Federici, M; Martino, B

    2014-01-01

    Methods.There are no experimental data about the background experienced by microcalorimeters in the L2 orbit, and thus the particle background levels were calculated by means of Monte Carlo simulations: we considered the original design configuration and an improved configuration aimed to reduce the unrejected background, and tested them in the L2 orbit and in the low Earth orbit, comparing the results with experimental data reported by other X-ray instruments.To show the results obtainable with the improved configuration we simulated the observation of a faint, high-redshift, point source (F[0.5-10 keV]~6.4E-16 erg cm-2 s-1, z=3.7), and of a hot galaxy cluster at R200 (Sb[0.5-2 keV]=8.61E-16 erg cm-2 s-1 arcmin-2,T=6.6 keV). Results.First we confirm that implementing an active cryogenic anticoincidence reduces the particle background by an order of magnitude and brings it close to the required level.The implementation and test of several design solutions can reduce the particle background level by a further ...

  20. Preliminary results from the high resolution gamma-ray and hard x-ray spectrometer (HIREGS) '92-'93 long duration balloon flight in Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HIREGS consists of an array of twelve 6.7 cm diameter x 6.1 cm long liquid nitrogen-cooled segmented germanium detectors enclosed in a bismuth germanate (BGO) active anticoincidence shield. A CsI front collimator defines a 24 degree FWHM field-of-view. The energy resolution is one to several keV FWHM over the instrument energy range of 20 keV to 16 MeV. HIREGS was flown on a 10-day (31 Dec 92--10 Jan 93) circumpolar balloon flight from McMurdo Station, Antarctica. 30.5 hours of observation were obtained between 31 Dec 0400-2130 UT and 1 Jan 0600-1900 UT. Because the Sun was inactive during the flight, only one small flare was detected on 31 Dec 1933 UT. Excellent high resolution open-quotes quietclose quotes Sun hard X-ray and gamma-ray spectra were obtained. These provide stringent upper limits for solar gamma-ray line and hard X-ray and gamma-ray continuum emission, which in turn can constrain the storage and/or continuous acceleration of ions and electrons by the Sun

  1. New limits for the 2 νββ decay of 96Zr to excited nuclear states of 96Mo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Sean; Tornow, Werner

    2015-10-01

    The final results from our search for the 2 νββ decay of 96Zr to excited 0+ and 2+ states of 96Mo are presented. Such measurements provide valuable test cases for 2 νββ -decay nuclear matrix element calculations, which in turn are used to tune 0 νββ -decay nuclear matrix element calculations. After undergoing double- β decay to an excited state, the excited daughter nucleus decays to the ground state, emitting two coincident γ rays. These two γ rays are detected in coincidence by two HPGe detectors sandwiching the 96Zr sample, with a NaI veto in anti-coincidence. This experimental apparatus, located at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF), has previously measured the 2 νββ decay of 100Mo and 150Nd to excited nuclear states. Experimental limits on the T1 / 2 and corresponding nuclear matrix element are presented for each of these decays. As a byproduct of this experiment, limits were also set on the single- β decay of 96Zr. Supported by DOE Grant: DE-FG02-97ER41033.

  2. The design and flight performance of the PoGOLite Pathfinder balloon-borne hard X-ray polarimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Chauvin, M; Jackson, M; Kamae, T; Kawano, T; Kiss, M; Kole, M; Mikhalev, V; Moretti, E; Olofsson, G; Rydström, S; Takahashi, H; Lind, J; Strömberg, J -E; Welin, O; Iyudin, A; Shifrin, D; Pearce, M

    2015-01-01

    In the 50 years since the advent of X-ray astronomy there have been many scientific advances due to the development of new experimental techniques for detecting and characterising X-rays. Observations of X-ray polarisation have, however, not undergone a similar development. This is a shortcoming since a plethora of open questions related to the nature of X-ray sources could be resolved through measurements of the linear polarisation of emitted X-rays. The PoGOLite Pathfinder is a balloon-borne hard X-ray polarimeter operating in the 25 - 240 keV energy band from a stabilised observation platform. Polarisation is determined using coincident energy deposits in a segmented array of plastic scintillators surrounded by a BGO anticoincidence system and a polyethylene neutron shield. The PoGOLite Pathfinder was launched from the SSC Esrange Space Centre in July 2013. A near-circumpolar flight was achieved with a duration of approximately two weeks. The flight performance of the Pathfinder design is discussed for the...

  3. Balloon-borne hard X-ray polarimetry with PoGOLite

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2012-01-01

    PoGOLite is a hard X-ray polarimeter operating in the 25-100 keV energy band. The instrument design is optimised for the observation of compact astrophysical sources. Observations are conducted from a stabilised stratospheric balloon platform at an altitude of approximately 40 km. The primary targets for first balloon flights of a reduced effective area instrument are the Crab and Cygnus-X1. The polarisation of incoming photons is determined using coincident Compton scattering and photo-absorption events reconstructed in an array of plastic scintillator detector cells surrounded by a bismuth germanate oxide (BGO) side anticoincidence shield and a polyethylene neutron shield. A custom attitude control system keeps the polarimeter field-of-view aligned to targets of interest, compensating for sidereal motion and perturbations such as torsional forces in the balloon rigging. An overview of the PoGOLite project is presented and the outcome of the ill-fated maiden balloon flight is discussed.

  4. Multielement analysis of human hair reference material by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Human Hair (NIES No. 5) as an environmental reference material prepared by the National Institute for Environmental Studies of Japan (NIES) was analyzed by an instrumental neutron activation method. The human hair samples (ca. 200∼500 mg) were irradiated for 2 min or 5 h at Musashi Institute of Technology Research Reactor. The activated samples were measured by four gamma-ray spectrometories, namely a spectrometry using a coaxial Ge detector, anticoincidence and coincidence counting spectrometries using a coaxial Ge detector, and a well-type NaI (Tl) detector, and a low energy photon spectrometry (LEPS) using a planer Ge detector, to determine as many trace elements as possible with high sensitivity. Concentrations of 43 elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Cl, K, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, I, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Yb, Hf, Ta, Au, Hg, Th, U) were determined by these measurements. The analyzed values of many elements except Sr were in good agreement with NIES certified values determined by nine different analytical methods. (author)

  5. Université de Genève | Séminaire de physique corpusculaire | 8 May

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The PAMELA mission: more than six years of Cosmic Rays investigation, Dr Francesco Cafagna, Bari University and INFN.   Wednesday 8 May, 11:15 am Science III, Auditoire 1S081 30, quai Ernest-Ansermet, 1211 Genève 4 Abstract: The PAMELA mission major scientific objective is the measurements of Cosmic Rays energy spectra, with special focus on the antiparticles, i.e. antiprotons and positrons, ones. The PAMELA apparatus is a satellite borne magnetic spectrometer and comprises a time-of-flight system, a silicon-microstrip magnetic spectrometer, a silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter, an anticoincidence system, and shower tail catcher scintillator. It has been more than six years that the PAMELA mission is taking data in space, on board of the russian satellite Resurs-DK. Important results have been obtained on the positron and antiproton abundance and spectra. Moreover new results have been obtained on the composition of the charged cosmic radiation that challenge our current und...

  6. Observation of solar high energy gamma and X-ray emission and solar energetic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Struminsky, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    We considered 18 solar flares observed between June 2010 and July 2012, in which high energy >100 MeV {\\gamma}-emission was registered by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard FermiGRO. We examined for these {\\gamma}-events soft X-ray observations by GOES, hard X-ray observations by the Anti-Coincidence Shield of the SPectrometer aboard INTEGRAL (ACS SPI) and the Gamma-Ray burst Monitor (GBM) aboard FermiGRO. Hard X-ray and {\\pi}0-decay {\\gamma}-ray emissions are used as tracers of electron and proton acceleration, respectively. Bursts of hard X-ray were observed by ACS SPI during impulsive phase of 13 events. Bursts of hard X-ray >100 keV were not found during time intervals, when prolonged hard {\\gamma}-emission was registered by LAT/FermiGRO. Those events showing prolonged high-energy gamma-ray emission not accompanied by >100 keV hard X-ray emission are interpreted as an indication of either different acceleration processes for protons and electrons or as the presence of a proton population accelerated du...

  7. Study of response of 3He detectors to monoenergetic neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the search of a hybrid system (the coupling of the particle accelerator to an under-critical reactor) for radioactive waste transmutation the TARC (Transmutation by Adiabatic Resonance Crossing) program has been developed. Due to experimental limitations, the time-energy relation at higher neutron energies, particularly, around 2 MeV, which is an important domain for TARC, cannot be applied. Consequently the responses of the 3He ionization neutron detector developed for TARC experiment have been studied using a fast monoenergetic neutron source. The neutrons were produced by the interaction of the proton delivered by Van de Graaff accelerator of CENBG. The originality of the detector consists in its structure of three series of electric conductors which are mounted around the anode: a grid ensuring the detector proportionality, a cylindrical suit of alternating positive voltage and grounded wires aiming at eliminating the radial end effects, serving as veto and two cylinders serving as end plugs to eliminate the perpendicular end effects. Examples of anode spectra conditioned (in anticoincidence) by the mentioned vetoes are given. One can see the contribution of the elastic scattering from H and 3He. By collimating the neutron beam through a borated polyethylene system it was possible to obtain a mapping of the detector allowing the study of its response as a function of the irradiated zones (anode and grid)

  8. Multielement analysis of rice flour-unpolished reference material by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trace elements in NIES certified reference material No. 10-a∼10-c Rice Flour-Unpolished, prepared by the National Institute for Environmental Studies of Japan (NIES), were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). A set of three samples with different Cd concentration levels was subjected to analyses. Portions of each sample (ca. 200∼1000 mg) were irradiated, either with thermal neutrons without cadmium filter or with epithermal neutrons with cadmium filter, in the Musashi Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITRR). The activated samples were analyzed by the three methods; conventional γ-ray spectrometry using a coaxial Ge detector, anticoincidence counting spectrometry, and coincidence counting spectrometry using a coaxial Ge detector and a well type NaI(Tl) detector. Concentrations of 26∼28 elements were determined by these methods. The values obtained for many elements, except for Mg and K, were in good agreement with those of the NIES certified and reference. Concentrations of 10 elements (S, Sc, V, Ag, Sb, Cs, Ba, La, Sm, Th), whose certified or reference values are not available from NIES, were also determined in this work. (author)

  9. The BALLOON-borne and PAMELA experiments for the study of the antimatter component in cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spillantini, Piero E-mail: piero.spillantini@fi.infn.it

    2004-01-01

    The PAMELA experiment is based on a satellite-borne equipment actually in the final integration phase. It will be installed on board of the Russian satellite Resurs DK1 and launched in a quasi-polar orbit from the Baikonur cosmodrom at the beginning of next year. PAMELA will measure the antiproton and positron fluxes in cosmic rays with high statistics and in a large energy range (80 MeV-190 GeV for antiprotons and 50 MeV-270 GeV for positrons), extending to never investigated energies the measurements of several balloon borne experiments performed by the same PAMELA collaboration in last decade. This will make achievable sensitive tests of cosmic ray propagation models in the Galaxy and the search, in an energy range never investigated before, of possible structures in the fluxes. These structures, related to the presence of primary antiparticle sources, could be signals of 'new physics', connected with open problems like dark matter existence and matter/antimatter symmetry in the Universe. The detector consists of a very precise magnetic spectrometer, several scintillation counter hodoscopes to measure the energy losses and times of flight, and a high granularity and deep Si-W calorimeter, augmented by a very compact transition radiation detector and a He3 neutron detector hodoscope, and protected around and on the top by an anticoincidence system.

  10. Radiation measurements at the ''Kosmos-900'' sattelite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Described is a device for measuring protons and α-particles with the energies >1 MeV/nucleon in several energy ranges on ISZ ''Kosmos-900''. NS-1 spectrometer included two semiconductive detectors: conductive DCC-0-dE/dx type 37 μm thick and E-detector of DCC-Ps type 780 μm thick. Both detectors are placed in a plastic scintillator ACC (anticoinciding cap), with an optical contact with a photocathode with a photoelectronic miltiplier. Considered are preliminary experimental results, connected with proton and α-particle penetration in polar caps of magnetosphere during solar flash in 19th-22nd September, 1977 Increasing maximum of energy particle intensity was observed in approximately 12sup(h) UT on 20th September, proton and α-particle intensity approaching the maximum practically simultaneously. After approximately 12sup(h) UT counting rate drop was observed along all the channels. Noticeable asymmetry particle penetration in nothern and southern polar caps is not found in the given event

  11. Gamma-telescope for the ''Kosmos-461'' satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design, electronic circuit, calibration procedure, and operation of γ-telescope of the ''Kosmos-461'' satellite are described. The telescope is designed to register γ-quanta in the range of 80-1000 MeV and was used to investigate spatial, spectral, and time distributions of hard atmospheric radiation. An incident γ-quantum forms an electron-positron pair in the lead converter 80 cm in diameter and 2.5 mm in thickness. Immediately after the converter is the thin (5 cm) Cherenkov radiator of organic glass that prevents particle passage through the instrument in the opposite direction. Development of the electromagnetic cascade shower born by incident quantum occurs in a conic CsJ(Tl) crystal-calorimeter of 9 cm thick. The head part of the instrument is covered with a protective anticoincidence scintillator of 2 cm thick. The form factor of the instrument is 3.6 cm2, average total weight is 22 kg, energy consumption is 1.5 W

  12. Development of an experimental set-up for the measurement of neutron-induced fission and capture cross sections of highly radioactive fissile nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of neutron-capture cross sections of many actinides is complicated by the difficulty in separating capture γ-rays from the large fission-fragment prompt γ-ray background. For example, current estimates of the capture cross section of 233U show large discrepancies, with differences of more than 20%. To improve the accuracy of data, a new experimental set-up for the simultaneous measurement of the neutron-induced capture and fission cross sections was designed, assembled and optimized. The measurements will be performed at the GEel LINear Accelerator (GELINA) neutron time-of-flight facility in Belgium, where neutron cross sections can be measured over a wide energy range with high energy resolution. The fission detector consists of a dedicated multi-plate high-efficiency ionization chamber (IC). The γ-rays produced in capture reaction are detected by an array of C6D6 scintillators. Fission γ-rays are distinguished from capture γ-rays by the anticoincidence signals from the IC and the C6D6 detectors. For the undetected fission events a correction has to be applied based on the efficiency of the IC that should be high and known with a high accuracy. The performance of the IC during dedicated test experiments is presented, focusing on the determination of the detection efficiency. (author)

  13. Development of an experimental set-up for the measurement of neutron-induced fission and capture cross sections of radioactive fissile nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new experimental set-up for a simultaneous measurement of neutron induced capture and fission cross sections was designed, assembled and optimized. The measurements will be performed at Geel Linear Accelerator (GELINA) neutron time-of-flight facility in Belgium, where neutron cross sections can be measured over a wide energy range with high energy resolution. The fission events detector consists of a dedicated multi-plate high efficiency fission ionization chamber (IC). The γ-rays produced in capture reaction are detected by an efficient array of C6D6 scintillators. Fission γ-rays events are distinguished from capture events by the anticoincidence signals from the IC and the C6D6 detectors. For the undetected fission events a correction has to be applied with respect to the efficiency of the IC that should be high and known with a high precision. Another important issue is the good separation between fission-fragment (FF) and the high alpha pile-up. The performances of the IC during test experiments are presented, focusing in particular on the detection efficiency. (authors)

  14. Electronic system for recording proportional counter rare pulses with the pulse shape analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anutomated system for recording proportional counter rare pulses is described. The proportional counters are aimed at identification of 37Ar and H71Gr decays in chemical radiation detectors of solar neutrino. Pulse shape recording by means of a storage oscilloscope and a TV display is performed in the system considered besides two-parametric selection of events (measurement of pulse amplitude in a slow channel and the amplitude of pulse differentiated with time constant of about 10 ns in a parallel fast channel). Pulse discrimination by a front rise rate provides background decrease in the 55Fe range (5.9 keV) by 6 times; the visual analysis of pulse shapes recorded allows to decrease the background additionally by 25-30%. The background counting rate in the 55Fe range being equal to 1 pulse per 1.5 days, is obtained when using the installation described above, as well as the passive Pb shield 5 cm thick, and the active shield based on the anticoincidence NaI(Tl) detector with the cathode 5.6 mm in-diameter made of Fe fabircated by zone melting. The installation described allows to reach the background level of 0.6 pulse/day (the total coefficient of background attenuation is 400). Further background decrease is supposed to be provided by installation allocation in the low-noise underground laboratory of the Baksan Neutrino Observatory

  15. Techniques to distinguish between electron and photon induced events using segmented germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two techniques to distinguish between electron and photon induced events in germanium detectors were studied: (1) anti-coincidence requirements between the segments of segmented germanium detectors and (2) the analysis of the time structure of the detector response. An 18-fold segmented germanium prototype detector for the GERDA neutrinoless double beta-decay experiment was characterized. The rejection of photon induced events was measured for the strongest lines in 60Co, 152Eu and 228Th. An accompanying Monte Carlo simulation was performed and the results were compared to data. An overall agreement with deviations of the order of 5-10% was obtained. The expected background index of the GERDA experiment was estimated. The sensitivity of the GERDA experiment was determined. Special statistical tools were developed to correctly treat the small number of events expected. The GERDA experiment uses a cryogenic liquid as the operational medium for the germanium detectors. It was shown that germanium detectors can be reliably operated through several cooling cycles. (orig.)

  16. A preliminary investigation of radiation level and some radionuclides in imported food and food products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary study of gross beta activity and content of some long-lived radionuclides associated with fission products in various types of imported food and food-products was carried out. Food samples were purchased monthly during 1976-1977 from general well-known supermarkets and local grocery stores up to a total of 89 samples. The gamma spectrum of long-lived radionuclides was searched using a 128 channel analyzer coupled with 3'' x 3'' NaI (T1) crystal detector. Two radionuclides were frequently found to be present in these food samples, viz. potassium-40 and cesium-137 and their concentrations were subsequently determined. The limits of detection under the conditions used for potassium-40 and cesium-137 were 0.04 and 0.03 pCi/g-wet weight, respectively. Samples were dry-ashed and counted for gross beta activity utilizing a low background anti-coincidence G.M. counter. The content of strontium-90 was also investigated concurrently by solvent extraction technique employing tri-n-butyl phosphate as an extractant. Results of the study are tabulated. (author)

  17. Qualification tests of the space telescope PAMELA

    Science.gov (United States)

    PAMELA Collaboration

    2004-09-01

    PAMELA is a satellite-borne experiment which will investigate the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the universe and other cosmological problems through precise cosmic-ray measurements. The apparatus is built around a permanent magnetic spectrometer equipped with a double-sided silicon microstrip tracking system and surrounded by a scintillator anticoincidence system. Several detectors are used in parallel for particle identification: a silicon-tungsten imaging calorimeter, followed by a scintillator shower tail catcher, and a transition radiation detector made up of carbon fibre radiators and proportional straw tubes. Fast scintillators are used for Time-Of-Flight measurements and to provide the primary trigger. A neutron detector is finally provided to extend the range of particle measurements to very high energies. PAMELA will be operated on-board of the Resurs-DK1 satellite, which will be put into a semi-polar orbit in 2004 by a Soyuz rocket. Purpose of this paper is to report about the mechanical, thermal and electro-diagnostic tests aimed to space qualify the PAMELA telescope before the launch.

  18. A large Cerenkov detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several problems, e.g. a test of nucleon conservation and high-energy neutrino detection of interest to us at Case Institute, have led to the construction of a large Cerenkov detector. This device consists of a tank 2.4 m in diameter and 2.1 m high which is painted with a white reflecting coat. The 7400-l water-volume used as the filling at present is viewed from above by 52 type-6364 Dumont multiplier phototubes. Internal to the detector as it is being currently used is a 200-l liquid scintillation-counter enclosed in an 8000-kg Fe shield. In this paper we describe constructional details and the response of the detector using cosmic-ray muons as a probe. We also present results on the effectiveness of the detector as an anti-coincidence blanket and will discuss the relevance of these numbers to the question of detecting high-energy neutrinos-both cosmic and man-made. (author)

  19. Fission-product energy release for times following thermal-neutron fission of 235U between 2 and 14000 seconds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fission-product decay energy-releases rates were measured for thermal-neutron fission of 235U. Samples of mass 1 to 10 μg were irradiated for 1 to 100 sec by use of the fast pneumatic-tube facility at the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The resulting beta- and gamma-ray emissions were counted for times-after-fission between 2 and 14,000 seconds. The data were obtained for beta and gamma rays separately as spectral distributions, N(E/sub γ/) vs E/sub γ/ and N(E/sub beta/) vs E/sub β/. For the gamma-ray data the spectra were obtained by using a NaI detector, while for the beta-ray data the spectra were obtained by using an NE-110 detector with an anticoincidence mantle. The raw data were unfolded to provide spectral distributions of modest resolution. These were integrated over E/sub γ/ and E/sub β/ to provide total yield and energy integrals as a function of time after fission. Results are low compared to the present 1973 ANS Decay-heat standard. A complete description of the experimental apparatus and data-reduction techniques is presented. The final integral data are given in tabular and graphical form and are compared with published data. 41 figures, 13 tables

  20. Analysis of chemical samples for environmental levels of radioactivity using a massively shielded 18% Ge(Li) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An environmental level gamma radioactivity analysis system has been assembled from a commercially available, high sensitivity, high resolution, low background Ge(Li) detector with associated electronics (without coincidence or anticoincidence) and massive shielding with old iron. A variety of chemicals have been examined as part of a background baseline survey using quantitative peak or gross gamma analysis of the Ge(Li) gamma ray spectrum from a two liter sample in a Marinelli beaker. Gamma peak analysis had a calculated sensitivity (for a 30 min count) of 0.01 to 0.21 pCi/g, depending on sample bulk density, for an isotope such as 137Cs. A similar sensitivity (0.1 pCi/g) was obtained by gross gamma analysis for any mixture of isotopes. A method for estimating the necessary integral background value for samples of different bulk densities was developed. The methods are capable of demonstrating existing natural radioactivity as shown by the 40K and uranium, thorium and their daughters observed in about 16% of the chemicals tested. Especially noticeable were 40K, 228Ac, 212Pb, 208Tl, 214Pb, and 214Bi. The levels and isotopes were similar to those found in soils and common salts. (orig.)

  1. Analysis of chemical samples for environmental levels of radioactivity using a massively shielded 18% Ge(Li) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Fred A.; Lickly, Tim D.

    1984-01-01

    An environmental level gamma radioactivity analysis system has been assembled from a commercially available, high sensitivity, high resolution, low background Ge(Li) detector with associated electronics (without coincidence or anticoincidence) and massive shielding with old iron. A variety of chemicals have been examined as part of a background baseline survey using quantitative peak or gross gamma analysis of the Ge(Li) gamma ray spectrum from a two liter sample in a Marinelli beaker. Gamma peak analysis had a calculated sensitivity (for a 30 min count) of 0.01 to 0.21 pCi/g, depending on sample bulk density, for an isotope such as 137Cs. A similar sensitivity (0.1 pCi/g) was obtained by gross gamma analysis for any mixture of isotopes. A method for estimating the necessary integral background value for samples of different bulk densities was developed. The methods are capable of demonstrating existing natural radioactivity as shown by the 40K and uranium, thorium and their daughters observed in about 16% of the chemicals tested. Especially noticeable were 40K, 228Ac, 212Pb, 208Tl, 214Pb, and 214Bi. The levels and isotopes were similar to those found in soils and common salts.

  2. Chang’E-1 gamma ray spectrometer and preliminary radioactive results on the lunar surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Meng-Hua; Ma, Tao; Chang, Jin

    2010-10-01

    The Chang'E-1(CE-1) spacecraft took a gamma-ray spectrometer (hereafter, CGRS) to detect the element distributions on the lunar surface in a circular, 200 km altitude, polar orbit with approximately 2 h periodicity. CGRS consists of two large CsI(Tl) crystals as the main and anticoincidence detectors. The large CsI crystal of CGRS has a higher detector effective area than other lunar gamma ray spectrometers. For its 1-year mission, gamma ray spectra including many peaks of major elements and trace elements on the lunar surface have been measured by CGRS. Global measurement within 0.55-0.75 MeV is given here to describe the distribution of radioactive composition (e.g., uranium and thorium) on the lunar surface. Although CGRS has a lower energy resolution that cannot separate the uranium peak from others in this energy region, 609 keV uranium gamma ray line dominates the shape of the spectrum in this energy region. Therefore, the radioactive map can indirectly describe the uranium distribution on the lunar surface. The radioactive map shows that the higher radiation is concentrated in the Procellarum KREEP Terrene (PKT) on the nearside with an oval shape. The secondary high-radiation is located in South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin. Lunar highlands have lower concentration. The relationship between radiation and topography displays different linear correlations for lunar highlands and SPA basin, which imply the different processes for these two regions.

  3. Electron capture Q value of 179Ta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a discrepancy in the measured electron capture Q value of 179Ta; from the EC(L)/EC(K) capture ratio of Bisi et al.one obtains Q = 103±6 keV, while the ratio measured by Jopson et al. gives Q = 121 ± 7 keV. To resolve this discrepancy we have remeasured the L to K capture ratio. A 179Ta source was produced by bombarding a natural Hf target with 20-MeV protons from LBL's 88-inch cyclotron, and, after a suitable delay, extracted radiochemically from the Hf. The L x rays were counted in a planar Ge detector (FWHM = 280 eV at 8 keV) and the K x rays in a well-type NaI detector. From the ratio of L x rays in anti-coincidence with K x rays to those in coincidence with them we deduce a Q value of 111.2 ± 1.9 keV. This value is in agreement with the recommended value of 110 ± 5 keV found in the latest Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File

  4. UNIVERSITE DE GENEVE

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Ecole de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet
1211 GENEVE 4
Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 3rd October 2007 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 - Stückelberg Auditorium The first year in orbit of the PAMELA space experiment by Dr Silvio Orsi, INFN Roma Tor Vergata The satellite-borne PAMELA experiment is designed to study charged particles in the cosmic radiation with a particular focus on antiparticles. PAMELA is mounted on the Resurs DK1 satellite that was launched from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on June 15th 2006 and has a lifetime of at least 3 years. The PAMELA apparatus comprises a time-of-flight system, a magnetic spectrometer, a silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter, an anticoincidence system, a shower tail catcher scintillator and a neutron detector. PAMELA is performing indirect dark matter search through a detailed study of the positron and antiproton spectra (50Me...

  5. The first demonstration of the concept of "narrow-FOV Si/CdTe semiconductor Compton camera"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinohe, Yuto; Uchida, Yuusuke; Watanabe, Shin; Edahiro, Ikumi; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Kawano, Takafumi; Ohno, Masanori; Ohta, Masayuki; Takeda, Shin`ichiro; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Katsuragawa, Miho; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Odaka, Hirokazu; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Yuasa, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD), to be deployed on board the ASTRO-H satellite, has been developed to provide the highest sensitivity observations of celestial sources in the energy band of 60-600 keV by employing a detector concept which uses a Compton camera whose field-of-view is restricted by a BGO shield to a few degree (narrow-FOV Compton camera). In this concept, the background from outside the FOV can be heavily suppressed by constraining the incident direction of the gamma ray reconstructed by the Compton camera to be consistent with the narrow FOV. We, for the first time, demonstrate the validity of the concept using background data taken during the thermal vacuum test and the low-temperature environment test of the flight model of SGD on ground. We show that the measured background level is suppressed to less than 10% by combining the event rejection using the anti-coincidence trigger of the active BGO shield and by using Compton event reconstruction techniques. More than 75% of the signals from the field-of-view are retained against the background rejection, which clearly demonstrates the improvement of signal-to-noise ratio. The estimated effective area of 22.8 cm2 meets the mission requirement even though not all of the operational parameters of the instrument have been fully optimized yet.

  6. A dual purpose Compton suppression spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Parus, J; Raab, W; Donohue, D

    2003-01-01

    A gamma-ray spectrometer with a passive and an active shield is described. It consists of a HPGe coaxial detector of 42% efficiency and 4 NaI(Tl) detectors. The energy output pulses of the Ge detector are delivered into the 3 spectrometry chains giving the normal, anti- and coincidence spectra. From the spectra of a number of sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs and sup 6 sup 0 Co sources a Compton suppression factor, SF and a Compton reduction factor, RF, as the parameters characterizing the system performance, were calculated as a function of energy and source activity and compared with those given in literature. The natural background is reduced about 8 times in the anticoincidence mode of operation, compared to the normal spectrum which results in decreasing the detection limits for non-coincident gamma-rays up to a factor of 3. In the presence of other gamma-ray activities, in the range from 5 to 11 kBq, non- and coincident, the detection limits can be decreased for some nuclides by a factor of 3 to 5.7.

  7. Compton suppression gamma-counting: The effect of count rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, H.T., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Past research has shown that anti-coincidence shielded Ge(Li) spectrometers enhanced the signal-to-background ratios for gamma-photopeaks, which are situated on high Compton backgrounds. Ordinarily, an anti- or non-coincidence spectrum (A) and a coincidence spectrum (C) are collected simultaneously with these systems. To be useful in neutron activation analysis (NAA), the fractions of the photopeak counts routed to the two spectra must be constant from sample to sample to variations must be corrected quantitatively. Most Compton suppression counting has been done at low count rate, but in NAA applications, count rates may be much higher. To operate over the wider dynamic range, the effect of count rate on the ratio of the photopeak counts in the two spectra (A/C) was studied. It was found that as the count rate increases, A/C decreases for gammas not coincident with other gammas from the same decay. For gammas coincident with other gammas, A/C increases to a maximum and then decreases. These results suggest that calibration curves are required to correct photopeak areas so quantitative data can be obtained at higher count rates. ?? 1984.

  8. Epithermal instrumental neutron activation analysis with Compton suppression spectrometry for the determination of iodine in food samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epithermal instrumental neutron activation analysis (EINAA) together with Compton suppression system were optimized and used to analyze several food samples for the determination of low levels of iodine. The method involved the irradiation of samples in the outer epi-cadmium site of the Dalhousie University Slowpoke-2 reactor facility. The samples were then counted directly without any chemical treatment on an anticoincidence counting system. This system comprised a 25 cm3 hyperpure Ge detector, a guard detector consisting of a 10'' x 10'' NaI(Tl) annulus with five photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) and a 3' x 3' NaI(Tl) plug with one PMT. Iodine was quantitatively analyzed using the 443 keV photopeak of 128I. The precision and accuracy of the method were evaluated using real samples and biological reference materials, respectively. The precision of the method was calculated as percent relative standard deviation and in all cases was within ±5%. The agreement between our iodine values and those of the certified values was generally within ±10%, suggesting an excellent accuracy of the method. The detection limits of the various samples calculated, with the lowest value of 20 ppb. The values of iodine determined ranged between 24 to 3080 ppb. The methods and results are presented. (author)

  9. About the distribution of delays in G.M counters; Sur la distribution des retards dans les compteurs G.M

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picard, E.; Rogozinski, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay(France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1954-07-01

    We measure, with an oscillograph method the global time that pass between the time that a particle in a determined region of the studied counter and the answer of the amplifier associated to the counter. This delay is composed of the latency time T{sub l} and the T{sub q} delay, that result from the rise time finished of the impulse and whose value depends of the sensitivity threshold of the amplifier. The selection of (cosmic) particles generating discharge in the studied counter is obtained thanks to a telescope of two meters in coincidence whose opening is limited by a group of four counters in anti-coincidence with the first. The meter is arranged so that the median plan of the telescope crosses to a variable distance d of his axial thread. The measures have been done for different securities of the distance d and of the over-voltage V{sub s} applied to the counter. The results show that the statistical distribution of the delays is more spread especially when d is bigger and V{sub s} more reduced. The average values of the observed delays vary of 7.10{sup -8} s for d = 0 and V{sub s}es = 200 V, to 90.10{sup -8} s for d = 1,9 cm and V{sub s} = 50 V. The mobility of an free electron within the gaseous mixture filling the counter under a pressure of 10 cm.Hg was found equal: (2,1 {+-}0,2).10{sup 4} cm{sup 2}.s{sup -1}.V{sup -1}. (author) [French] On mesure, par une methode oscillographique le temps global qui s'ecoule entre le passage de la particule dans une region determinee du compteur etudie et la reponse de l'amplificateur associe au compteur. Ce retard se compose du temps de latence T{sub l} proprement dit et du retard T{sub q}, qui resulte du temps de montee fini de l'impulsion et dont la valeur depend du seuil de sensibilite de l'amplificateur. La selection des particules (cosmiques) generatrices de la decharge dans le compteur etudie est obtenue grace a un telescope de deux compteurs en coincidence dont l'ouverture est limitee

  10. Design, characterization and optimization of various β γ measurement systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    at varying transit speed. The detector-characterization results are used to simulate the signal for various speed and off axis distance. The simulation has been used to develop and test new algorithms for speed dependent data processing of the count rate signal. The SNR and the minimum detectable activity (MDA) have been calculated as function of the integration time to obtain their optima. The algorithms are experimentally validated by using a high speed source transport system to simulate a passing source. The third paper 'Long term comparison of methods to sustain energy calibration in low level gamma-ray spectroscopy and investigation of possible sources for drift' (Schroettner and Kindl, 2010) investigates various sources for drift of energy calibration of HPGe detectors. A long term comparison of different methods for energy calibration (source injection method and pulser method) shows pros and cons and presents a new concept to monitor and sustain energy calibration of gamma spectroscopic measurement systems. The fourth paper 'A high resolution, multi parameter, β-γ coincidence μ-γ anticoincidence system for radioxenon measurement' (Schroettner at al., submitted on 30.1. 2010 to NIM A) describes a novel high resolution multi parameter measurement system combining β-γ coincidence and μ-γ anticoincidence. The system is indented for measurement of radioxenon samples and calibration of radioxenon spikes. A HPGe detector for photons and a silicon surface barrier (SSB) detector for electrons are combined to measure coincident γ/x-ray and β/conversion electron radiation. The data acquisition in list mode allows changing, checking and optimizing all time windows for (anti-) coincidence off line during data processing and analysis. The system has been designed to be operated also in α-γ coincidence mode which can be applied to nuclear safeguard (forensics). (author)

  11. Low-Level β and γ Counting in the Region 0-10 Disintegrations Per Minute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of levels of radioactivity in the region of 0-1.0 disintegrations per minute are becoming increasingly useful in the standardization of radionuclides as well as in other branches of science such as geology and medicine. For example, there is frequent need for low-level counting in the field of biological and tracer applications, particularly, in those cases in which the use of a higher level of radiation would alter the course of the mechanism or process under study. Frequently such measurements must be made under conditions in which the sample possesses an activity of only 1% of the normal, unshielded background radiation. At other times, an additional requirement is imposed because the radionuclide may have a very short half-life. There are three general ways in which the reliability of low-level measurements can be increased: more efficient counters, smaller background corrections and more stable, noise-free electronic systems. In this paper, comparative tests are described of the relative merits of hree different types of guard (anti-coincidence) counters in reducing the background. Measurements were made of: (a) umbrella, (b) annular, and (c) scintillating plastic igloo. The increasing difficulty of obtaining activity-free materials for construction of counters is a matter of some concern. Data are presented for the range of activities of materials available commercially. Stockpiling of such materials, preferably of pre-War II origin is rapidly becoming a necessity. The stability of the electronic system is a prime requisite for low level counting, particularly to avoid the counting of spurious pulses. A system is described in which a slow, measured rate of pulses is fed into the electronics, passed through the amplifier and deducted from the gross output of the register. In general, transistorized circuitry including pre-amplifiers and power supplies are more satisfactory than conventional vacuum tube devices. (author)

  12. The plastic scintillator detector calibration circuit for DAMPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haibo; Kong, Jie; Zhao, Hongyun; Su, Hong

    2016-07-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is being constructed as a scientific satellite to observe high energy cosmic rays in space. Plastic scintillator detector array (PSD), developed by Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IMPCAS), is one of the most important parts in the payload of DAMPE which is mainly used for the study of dark matter. As an anti-coincidence detector, and a charged-particle identification detector, the PSD has a total of 360 electronic readout channels, which are distributed at four sides of PSD using four identical front end electronics (FEE). Each FEE reads out 90 charge signals output by the detector. A special calibration circuit is designed in FEE. FPGA is used for on-line control, enabling the calibration circuit to generate the pulse signal with known charge. The generated signal is then sent to the FEE for calibration and self-test. This circuit mainly consists of DAC, operation amplifier, analog switch, capacitance and resistance. By using controllable step pulse, the charge can be coupled to the charge measuring chip using the small capacitance. In order to fulfill the system's objective of large dynamic range, the FEE is required to have good linearity. Thus, the charge-controllable signal is needed to do sweep test on all channels in order to obtain the non-linear parameters for off-line correction. On the other hand, the FEE will run on the satellite for three years. The changes of the operational environment and the aging of devices will lead to parameter variation of the FEE, highlighting the need for regular calibration. The calibration signal generation circuit also has a compact structure and the ability to work normally, with the PSD system's voltage resolution being higher than 0.6%.

  13. The GERDA muon veto Cherenkov detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The GERmanium Detector Array, GERDA, is a new experiment designed to examine the neutrinoless double beta decay 0νββ of 76Ge which has a lifetime of at least 1026 years and a single energy deposition of 2039 keV. To reach the goal of 10-3 background events/(keVkgy), several background reduction techniques like anti-coincidence and pulse shape analysis will be used. Cosmic muons can produce background in form of particles and radioactivity. To reject them, two independent detector systems will be integrated in GERDA. One of these is a Cherenkov muon veto detector, that uses the water tank around the cryostat in which the crystals will be operated. It is equipped with 66 photomultipliers (PMTs) with 8 in. diameter. The PMT distribution was found via extensive Monte Carlo studies to reach the highest efficiencies for dangerous muons (these are muons that cause an energy deposition of around 2 MeV in the germanium detectors), even though the PMTs cover less than 0.1% of the water tank surface. High efficiencies depend strongly on the amount of detected photons. For this, as many surfaces as possible will be covered with 'VM2000', a highly reflective foil from 3 M. This foil has a high reflectivity in a wide range of wavelength and it also shifts photons from the UV into the optical range. It, more or less, doubles the amount of detectable photons, because the photomultipliers used, have an detection maximum between 370 and 400 nm. Thus, a detection efficiency of 98% should be easily achieved.

  14. Pulse shapes and surface effects in segmented germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenz, Daniel

    2010-03-24

    It is well established that at least two neutrinos are massive. The absolute neutrino mass scale and the neutrino hierarchy are still unknown. In addition, it is not known whether the neutrino is a Dirac or a Majorana particle. The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) will be used to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge. The discovery of this decay could help to answer the open questions. In the GERDA experiment, germanium detectors enriched in the isotope {sup 76}Ge are used as source and detector at the same time. The experiment is planned in two phases. In the first, phase existing detectors are deployed. In the second phase, additional detectors will be added. These detectors can be segmented. A low background index around the Q value of the decay is important to maximize the sensitivity of the experiment. This can be achieved through anti-coincidences between segments and through pulse shape analysis. The background index due to radioactive decays in the detector strings and the detectors themselves was estimated, using Monte Carlo simulations for a nominal GERDA Phase II array with 18-fold segmented germanium detectors. A pulse shape simulation package was developed for segmented high-purity germanium detectors. The pulse shape simulation was validated with data taken with an 19-fold segmented high-purity germanium detector. The main part of the detector is 18-fold segmented, 6-fold in the azimuthal angle and 3-fold in the height. A 19th segment of 5mm thickness was created on the top surface of the detector. The detector was characterized and events with energy deposited in the top segment were studied in detail. It was found that the metalization close to the end of the detector is very important with respect to the length of the of the pulses observed. In addition indications for n-type and p-type surface channels were found. (orig.)

  15. Inversion of neutron/gamma spectra from scintillator measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, J., E-mail: koehler@physik.uni-kiel.de [IEAP, Christian Albrechts University, Kiel (Germany); Ehresmann, B.; Martin, C.; Boehm, E.; Kharytonov, A. [IEAP, Christian Albrechts University, Kiel (Germany); Kortmann, O. [IEAP, Christian Albrechts University, Kiel (Germany); Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkley, CA (United States); Zeitlin, C.; Hassler, D.M. [Southwest Research Institute, Department of Space Studies, Boulder, CO (United States); Wimmer-Schweingruber, R.F. [IEAP, Christian Albrechts University, Kiel (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on-board NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover will measure charged particles as well as neutron and gamma radiation on the Martian surface. Neutral particles are an important contribution to this radiation environment. RAD measures them with a CsI (Tl) and a plastic scintillator, which are both surrounded by an anticoincidence. The incident neutron/gamma spectrum is obtained from the measurements using inversion methods which often fit a functional behavior, e.g., a power law, to the measured data applying the instrument response function and, e.g., a least-squares method. In situations where count rates are small, i.e., where the stochastic nature of the measurement is evident, maximum likelihood estimates with underlying Poissonian statistics improve the resulting spectra. We demonstrate the measurement and inversion of gamma/neutron spectra for a detector concept featuring one high-density scintillator and one high-proton-content scintillator. The applied inversion methods derive the original spectra without any strong assumptions of the functional behavior. Instrument response functions are obtained from Monte-Carlo simulations in matrix form with which the instrument response is treated as a set of linear equations. Using the response matrices we compare a constrained least-squares minimization, a chi-squared minimization and a maximum likelihood method with underlying Poissonian statistics. We make no assumptions about the incident particle spectrum and the methods intrinsically satisfy the constraint of non-negative counts. We analyzed neutron beam measurements made at the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) and inverted the measurement data for both neutron and gamma spectra. Monte-Carlo-generated measurements of the expected Martian neutron/gamma spectra were inverted as well, here the maximum likelihood method with underlying Poissonian statistics produces significantly better results.

  16. 90-Sr in Milk in the North-Western Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The program of radioactivity measurements and monitoring of the human environment in Croatia, carried out by the Radiation Protection Unit of the Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Heath in Zagreb, involve also investigations of radiostrontium in milk and milk products. Milk is a very important foodstuff and a critical food in respect to the presence and persistence of nuclides in the body. Because of its high calcium content, milk is used as a sensitive indicator for the presence of fission products in foods and in the environment. It is also an important route of entry of radiostrontium from fallout to man. Radiostrontium, a highly toxic radionuclide, is similar to calcium in its chemical behaviour, including its deposition in human bone. The paper describes investigation of 90Sr activity in milk collected over the period of six year at two locations in the north-western part of the Republic of Croatia. 90Sr was determined by extraction with tributyl phosphate. 90Sr was measured on basis of radioactive balance with its decay product 90Y, counted by low background level anti-coincidence shielded GM counter. In the Republic of Croatia, milk consumption of approximately 100 L per year/person can potentially lead to the accumulation of significant radiation dose. The doses received from milk consumption are small, but owing to the long retention time of 90Sr in bone which can be the basis for its potential hazard, 90Sr level require continuous control and monitoring. Special emphasis should be given to children as the most vulnerable part of population. (author)

  17. Detection of the weak neutral current using fission anti ν/sub e/ on deuterons with concurrent measurement of the charged current branch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The target consists of 268 kg of extremely pure (99.85%) heavy water (D2O), contained in a cylindrical stainless steel tank 122 cm in height and 54 cm in diameter. This target is surrounded by a lead and cadmium shield and immersed in a 2200 liter liquid scintillator anticoincidence detector. This system is a well-shielded environment. The center of the detector is located 11 meters from the center of the reactor core in an electron antineutrino flux of 2.5 x 1013 anti ν/sub e//cm2-s. Immersed in the target are ten 5.08-cm-diameter 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which detect the neutron via the reaction 3He + n → p + 3H + 773 keV. The system has been determined to have an overall neutron detection efficiency of 0.32 +- 0.02. The data are taken with a combination of scalers, a pulse height analyzer, and oscilloscope traces. Single, double, and triple neutron capture events are recorded with the reactor on and off. Data have been accumulated for 104 live days reactor on, and 72 live days reactor off for the charged-current reaction and 52 live days reactor on and 34 live days reactor off for the neutral-current reaction. The measured neutral-current cross section is (5.0 +- 0.8) x 10-45cm2/anti ν/sub e/, consistent with the Weinberg-Salam model. The charged-current reaction cross section is (1.5 +- 0.4) x 10-45 cm2/ν/sub e/, in fair agreement with expectation. From the N.C. cross section a value of the square of the isovector axial-vector coupling constant is deduced to be β2 = 1.0 +- 0.15

  18. Design and construction of 5 kV HV and TAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy spectroscopy system and Time spectroscopy one are the typical systems that used generally in nuclear physics. The measurement of time intervals plays an important role in basic nuclear physics research as well as in applications that involve the timing of events. Decay scheme and lifetime studies, coincidence experiments, single-photon counting, and positron annihilation studies are some of the experimental areas that require good timing capabilities. Most timing experiments involve either a precision measurement of the elapsed time between two events or the isolation of true coincidence events from a background of noncoincident data. The basic unit of most elapsed time measurement system is a time-to-amplitude converter (TAC). The instrument convert the time interval between a start pulse and a stop pulse into an output pulse with an amplitude precisely proportional to the time interval. Besides, an energy spectroscopy system can be either one detector or two detectors. The basic unit of the system furnishes an output high voltage for detector is the bias voltage unit (BV). Advancement in functional electronics design is a continuing study at NRI, Dalat. Obviously, the design and construction of the two aforementioned instruments is needed in the sub-project. Specifications of HV unit: Output high voltage range: 0-5 kV, Polarity: positive or negative, Output current: 1 mA, Linearity at output: ±1.2% for full range, Voltage stability < ±0.2%/h variation in output voltage with constant temperature and load and constant input voltages, Noise < 20 mV peak-peak from 50 Hz to 50 MHz. Basic characteristics of TAC unit: Single start-stop operation, time range is from 100 ns to 2 μs, DC-coupled to prevent counrate distortion, Coincidence or anti-coincidence gating, Biased amplifier to expand a region of interest, Output with variable delay and positive polarity for MCA compatibility. (author)

  19. Study of an Oil Field (Hassi Messaoud) by Injection of Tritiated Methane, Ethane, Propane and Butane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas is injected into a deposit to increase the yield of oil contained in the rock and to maintain the pressure of the fluids at a value sufficient for the wells to remain naturally eruptive. The efficiency of this technique depends mainly on establishing a uniform displacement front in spite of heterogeneities. When the gas is injected simultaneously into several wells, the gas-oil displacement can be checked only if the origin of the gas reaching the producer wells is known with certainty. This is achieved by mixing with the gas from each of the injection wells a radioactive tracer whose path in the oil-bearing rock faithfully reproduces the movement of the gas-oil front. The tracers used are tritiated methane, ethane, propane and butane, which are injected respectively into four wells in amounts of up to 200 Ci. The distance separating each injection well from a producer well is considerable (1-6 km) and the oil volume is great, so that the radioactive tracer undergoes very marked dilution during its displacement. For industrial-scale detection of the arrival of the different tracers at the producers, it is therefore necessary to use very sensitive methods. Samples of oil are taken at the head of the producers at a pressure of approx. 50 kg/cm2. The gas in solution in the oil is separated into four fractions, which are respectively rich in C1, C2, C3 and C4 with a degree of purity better than 90%. The beta radiation of each of the fractions is then measured using a double-envelope proportional counter placed in a lead container and connected to an anti-coincidence counting system. The long-term possibility of isotopic exchange between the different tracers and the hydrocarbons present in the rock were studied experimentally under the conditions of pressure and temperature at the deposit. (author)

  20. Results of a neutrino oscillation experiment performed at a meson factory beam-stop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes a neutrino oscillation experiment performed at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. The oscillation mode searched for is /bar /nu///sub μ/ → /bar /nu///sub e/. The first chapter is a review of the known properties of the neutrino and a description of the phenomenon of neutrino oscillation. Previous experimental limits on this unobserved phenomenon are also given. The second chapter describes the experimental apparatus used by the E645 experiment to detect neutrinos produced in the LAMPF beam stop. The salient features of the detector are its large mass (20 tons of CH2), its fine segmentation (to allow good particle tracking), good energy resolution, its recording of the history both before and after tracks appear in the detector, an active cosmic-ray anticoincidence shield, and 2000 gm/cm2 of passive cosmic-ray shielding. It is located 26.8 m from the neutrino source, which has a mean neutrino energy of 40 MeV. The third chapter details the reduction of the 1.3 million event data sample to a 49 event sample of neutrino candidates. Principle backgrounds are Michel electrons from stopping cosmic-ray muons and protons from np elastic scattering by cosmic-ray neutrons. The fourth chapter explains how background levels from neutrino-nuclear scattering are predicted. The result of a maximum-likelihood analysis reveals no evidence for oscillation. 90% confidence levels are set at δm2 = .10 eV2 for large mixing and sin2(2θ) = .014 for large δm2. 82 refs., 18 figs., 55 tabs

  1. Study of the cross-section of the reaction D + D → 4He + γ with incident energies below 6 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of the cross-section of the reaction D(d,γ)4He has been made for getting some information concerning the nuclear structure of 4He and the existence of the d+d final state in the photo-decay of 4He. The E1 transition is forbidden because of the selection rules of the isobaric spin which makes this reaction a useful tool for looking for a 2+, T=0 state. In the reaction D(d,γ)4He, the photon is produced in an electrical quadrupolar transition which makes us expect a very low value for the cross-section, certainly in the magnitude order of 0.01 micro-barn (10-32 cm2) and a very important background noise (chiefly from cosmic origin). The measurement of this cross-section requires a dedicated efficient equipment. The incident deuteron beam is produced by a 5.5 MeV Van de Graaff accelerator, the beam intensity is about 1 μA and we use a gaseous deuterium target. The gamma detector is based on NaI(Tl) crystal combined with an XP-1031 photomultiplier. The NaI(Tl) crystal is surrounded by a scintillating plastic allowing the detection of anti-coincidence events and as a consequence the reduction of the cosmic background. We have measured the value of the differential cross-section at different angles: 0, 45, 90 and 135 degrees (Center of mass frame) for an incident energy of 3.64 MeV. We have added our results to others previously published in the literature, we see that they are complementary and as a whole show the non-existence of fine structure in the excitation curve

  2. Assessment of exposure of uranium miners to radon progeny using in vivo measurement of 210Pb in bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidemiological studies of lung cancer incidence among uranium miners from various populations around the world have shown a significant variability in the relative risk per unit exposure - a range of a factor of 30. A significant fraction of the uncertainty associated with these risk coefficients may be due to differences in the methods and quality of data used in calculating cumulative exposures, in Working Level Months (WLM), for the various miner populations. We hypothesize that in vivo measurement of 210Pb, a long-lived radon decay product, retained in bone will provide a better measure of the exposure of individual miners to radon and progeny during their mining careers. To accomplish these in vivo measurements, the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute (LRRI) In Vivo Bioassay Facility (IVBF) was modified to optimize a counting geometry for measuring 210Pb in the skull. Six phoswich detectors (12.7 cm diameter) were positioned about the head of a reclining subject (one posterior, one anterior, and four on the sides of the head), and photon emission from the skull was measured using anticoincidence multichannel analysis electronics. To date, we have analyzed the in vivo measurement data from about 90 former uranium miners from the Grants, New Mexico (NM), mining district. The recorded WLM exposures for each uranium miner (data from the UNM epidemiological data base) were compared with a WLM exposure calculated using a Pb biokinetic model coupled to the ICRP Publication 66 respiratory tract dosimetry model. The analyses show that the independent measures of exposure are statistically correlated but vary greatly among individual values. (author)

  3. INAA study of Hg, Se, As, and Br irradiation losses from l-cysteine treated and untreated reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    U. S. Food and Drug Administration in-house reference material (RM) Cocoa Powder and National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard RMs (SRMs) 1515 apple leaves, 1547 peach leaves, 1571 orchard leaves, 1566a oyster tissue, and 1568a rice flour were co-irradiated together with polyethylene blanks and analyzed for Hg and Se by anticoincidence instrumental neutron activation analysis. The three botanical SRM portions showed a combined Hg recovery of 70 % while the other portions showed a combined Hg recovery of 169 %, indicating that volatile Hg was lost from botanical SRMs and absorbed by the other irradiated portions. Total Hg recovery for all portions was 82 %. Se results showed no evidence of cross-contamination and all results agreed with certified and known values. National Research Council of Canada Certified RMs DOLT-3 dogfish liver, TORT-2 lobster hepatopancreas, and DORM-3 fish protein were separately analyzed either with no treatment or after treatment with l-cysteine solutions followed by drying over magnesium perchlorate. Each set of portions was co-irradiated with polyethylene and treated filter blanks. Analysis of all components of each treated portion irradiation package showed that essentially all Hg was retained within the package. Treated DOLT-3 portions (inorganic Hg content 53 %) showed a tenfold improvement with 99 % Hg retention. Hg retention for DORM-3 (7 % inorganic Hg) was 85 % (a twofold improvement) while retention for TORT-2 (44 % inorganic Hg), was 94 %, similar to that for untreated portions (96 %). Small irradiation losses (≤0.5 %) of volatile species of Se, As, and Br were observed. (author)

  4. The design of shielding material for ultra low-background gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of gamma and neutron backgrounds has been performed, based on Monte Carlo simulations combined with radio purity data. With reference to other papers and reports, materials of radiation shielding structure was determined. Then, the thickness of each material is determined by the GEANT4 simulation. In the future the gamma and neutron background radiation will be measured with shielded detector and non-shielded detector to calculate the actual TR. It will be compared with the results of the GEANT4 simulation. Also it is planned an active shielding to reduce cosmic muons with an anti-coincidence of a pair of plastic scintillators and a passive shielding with nitrogen gas. Development and performance of an ultra low-background γ-ray spectrometer will be performed at Dongnam Inst. of Radiological and Medical Sciences (DIRAMS) as basic tool for various radioactivity measurements. Gamma-ray spectrometry with a HPGe detector is widely used for the identification and activity measurements of radionuclides in a sample, impurity checks of a standard source, determination of emission probabilities in radioactive decay, and low level counting's. In low-level counting's, a variety of techniques to reduce the background have been employed and makes it possible to radio assay an environmental sample containing a trace of γ-emitting radio nuclides. The application of γ-spectrometry for environmental monitoring of radioactivity requires as low detection limits as practically achievable due to the limited amount of sample provided for measurement and the relatively low concentrations. We present in this paper a study of shielding materials for ultra low-background shielding structure and a calculation of transmission rate (TR) of the shielded structure using the GEANT4 simulation code

  5. Pulse shapes and surface effects in segmented germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well established that at least two neutrinos are massive. The absolute neutrino mass scale and the neutrino hierarchy are still unknown. In addition, it is not known whether the neutrino is a Dirac or a Majorana particle. The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) will be used to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of 76Ge. The discovery of this decay could help to answer the open questions. In the GERDA experiment, germanium detectors enriched in the isotope 76Ge are used as source and detector at the same time. The experiment is planned in two phases. In the first, phase existing detectors are deployed. In the second phase, additional detectors will be added. These detectors can be segmented. A low background index around the Q value of the decay is important to maximize the sensitivity of the experiment. This can be achieved through anti-coincidences between segments and through pulse shape analysis. The background index due to radioactive decays in the detector strings and the detectors themselves was estimated, using Monte Carlo simulations for a nominal GERDA Phase II array with 18-fold segmented germanium detectors. A pulse shape simulation package was developed for segmented high-purity germanium detectors. The pulse shape simulation was validated with data taken with an 19-fold segmented high-purity germanium detector. The main part of the detector is 18-fold segmented, 6-fold in the azimuthal angle and 3-fold in the height. A 19th segment of 5mm thickness was created on the top surface of the detector. The detector was characterized and events with energy deposited in the top segment were studied in detail. It was found that the metalization close to the end of the detector is very important with respect to the length of the of the pulses observed. In addition indications for n-type and p-type surface channels were found. (orig.)

  6. Definition of a Twelve-Point Polygonal SAA Boundaryfor the GLAST Mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djomehri, Sabra I.; /UC, Santa Cruz /SLAC

    2007-08-29

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), set to launch in early 2008, detects gamma rays within a huge energy range of 100 MeV - 300 GeV. Background cosmic radiation interferes with such detection resulting in confusion over distinguishing cosmic from gamma rays encountered. This quandary is resolved by encasing GLAST's Large Area Telescope (LAT) with an Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD), a device which identifies and vetoes charged particles. The ACD accomplishes this through plastic scintillator tiles; when cosmic rays strike, photons produced induce currents in Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs) attached to these tiles. However, as GLAST orbits Earth at altitudes {approx}550km and latitudes between -26 degree and 26 degree, it will confront the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA), a region of high particle flux caused by trapped radiation in the geomagnetic field. Since the SAA flux would degrade the sensitivity of the ACD's PMTs over time, a determined boundary enclosing this region need be attained, signaling when to lower the voltage on the PMTs as a protective measure. The operational constraints on such a boundary require a convex SAA polygon with twelve edges, whose area is minimal ensuring GLAST has maximum observation time. The AP8 and PSB97 models describing the behavior of trapped radiation were used in analyzing the SAA and defining a convex SAA boundary of twelve sides. The smallest possible boundary was found to cover 14.58% of GLAST's observation time. Further analysis of defining a boundary safety margin to account for inaccuracies in the models reveals if the total SAA hull area is increased by {approx}20%, the loss of total observational area is < 5%. These twelve coordinates defining the SAA flux region are ready for implementation by the GLAST satellite.

  7. Compton suppression system at Penn State Radiation Science and Engineering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Compton suppression system is used to reduce the contribution of scattered gamma-rays that originate within the HPGe detector to the gamma ray spectrum. The HPGe detector is surrounded by an assembly of guard detectors, usually NaI(Tl). The HPGe and NaI(Tl) detectors are operated in anti-coincidence mode. The NaI(Tl) guard detector detects the photons that Compton scatter within, and subsequently escape from the HPGe detector. Since these photons are correlated with the partial energy deposition within the detector, much of the resulting Compton continuum can be subtracted from the spectrum reducing the unwanted background in gamma-ray spectra. A commercially available Compton suppression spectrometer (CSS) was purchased from Canberra Industries and tested at the Radiation Science and Engineering Center at Penn State University. The PSU-CSS includes a reverse bias HPGe detector, four annulus NaI(Tl) detectors, a NaI(Tl) plug detector, detector shields, data acquisition electronics, and a data processing computer. The HPGe detector is n-type with 54% relative efficiency. The guard detectors form an annulus with 9-inch diameter and 9-inch height, and have a plug detector that goes into/out of the annulus with the help of a special lift apparatus to raise/lower. The detector assembly is placed in a shielding cave. State-of-the-art electronics and software are used. The system was tested using standard sources, neutron activated NIST SRM sample and Dendrochronologically Dated Tree Ring samples. The PSU-CSS dramatically improved the peak-to-Compton ratio, up to 1000 : 1 for the 137Cs source. (author)

  8. Properties of terrestrial gamma ray flashes detected by AGILE MCAL below 30 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marisaldi, M.; Fuschino, F.; Tavani, M.; Dietrich, S.; Price, C.; Galli, M.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Mereghetti, S.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Colafrancesco, S.; Argan, A.; Labanti, C.; Longo, F.; Del Monte, E.; Barbiellini, G.; Giuliani, A.; Bulgarelli, A.; Campana, R.; Chen, A.; Gianotti, F.; Giommi, P.; Lazzarotto, F.; Morselli, A.; Rapisarda, M.; Rappoldi, A.; Trifoglio, M.; Trois, A.; Vercellone, S.

    2014-02-01

    We present the characteristics of 308 terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) detected by the Minicalorimeter (MCAL) instrument on board the AGILE satellite during the period March 2009-July 2012 in the ±2.5° latitude band and selected to have the maximum photon energy up to 30 MeV. The characteristics of the AGILE events are analyzed and compared to the observational framework established by the two other currently active missions capable of detecting TGFs from space, RHESSI and Fermi. A detailed model of the MCAL dead time is presented, which is fundamental to properly interpret our observations. The most significant contribution to dead time is due to the anticoincidence shield in its current configuration and not to the MCAL detector itself. Longitude and local time distributions are compatible with previous observations, while the duration distribution is biased toward longer values because of dead time. The intensity distribution is compatible with previous observations, when dead time is taken into account. The TGFs cumulative spectrum supports a low production altitude, in agreement with previous measurements. We also compare our sample to lightning sferics detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network and suggest a new method to assess quantitatively the consistency of two TGF populations based on the comparison of the associated lightning activity. According to this method, AGILE and RHESSI samples are compatible with the same parent population. The AGILE TGF catalog below 30 MeV is accessible online at the website of the ASI Science Data Center http://www.asdc.asi.it/mcaltgfcat/.

  9. A study of {sup 11} Be an {sup 11} Li halo nuclei by core breakup reactions; Etude des noyaux a halo de {sup 11} Be et {sup 11} Li par reactions de cassure du coeur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grevy, S. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS - IN2P3 Universite Paris Sud, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France)

    1997-12-31

    The study of light nuclei with large neutron excess are very useful for the understanding of nuclear matter far from stability. The nuclear halo phenomenon has been observed for the first time for Z < 10 nuclei in 80`s: halo nuclei consist of a `stable` core (neutron separation energy of about a few MeV) and one or two neutrons with a very low separation energy of about a few hundred keV. Their wave functions can extent from the core at distances larger than the main range of nuclear force. These halo nuclei have been studied by dissociation reactions in which the neutron from the halo is detected in coincidence with the core. It has been shown that the extraction of the halo wave function is strongly influenced by (i) the reaction mechanism itself (ii) final state interactions. In the present work core breakup reactions are used in which the halo neutron is detected in anticoincidence with the core to study the {sup 11} Be and {sup 11} Li halo nuclei. In this channel, the neutron is supposed not to participate to the reaction and then, when detected, to carry out the same properties as in the halo nucleus. The deduced widths of the neutron momentum distributions are different from the one extracted from the core distributions and with the more recent theoretical models. From these studies, it is also stressed that the properties of the core are essential to understand the halo phenomenon. In particular, the correlation between the core vibrations and the halo neutron are able to explain the emergence of the halo in {sup 11} Be. (author). 78 refs.

  10. Definition of a Twelve-Point Polygonal SAA Boundary for the GLAST Mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), set to launch in early 2008, detects gamma rays within a huge energy range of 100 MeV - 300 GeV. Background cosmic radiation interferes with such detection resulting in confusion over distinguishing cosmic from gamma rays encountered. This quandary is resolved by encasing GLAST's Large Area Telescope (LAT) with an Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD), a device which identifies and vetoes charged particles. The ACD accomplishes this through plastic scintillator tiles; when cosmic rays strike, photons produced induce currents in Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs) attached to these tiles. However, as GLAST orbits Earth at altitudes ∼550km and latitudes between -26 degree and 26 degree, it will confront the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA), a region of high particle flux caused by trapped radiation in the geomagnetic field. Since the SAA flux would degrade the sensitivity of the ACD's PMTs over time, a determined boundary enclosing this region need be attained, signaling when to lower the voltage on the PMTs as a protective measure. The operational constraints on such a boundary require a convex SAA polygon with twelve edges, whose area is minimal ensuring GLAST has maximum observation time. The AP8 and PSB97 models describing the behavior of trapped radiation were used in analyzing the SAA and defining a convex SAA boundary of twelve sides. The smallest possible boundary was found to cover 14.58% of GLAST's observation time. Further analysis of defining a boundary safety margin to account for inaccuracies in the models reveals if the total SAA hull area is increased by ∼20%, the loss of total observational area is < 5%. These twelve coordinates defining the SAA flux region are ready for implementation by the GLAST satellite

  11. Shallow-underground accelerator sites for nuclear astrophysics: Is the background low enough?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szuecs, Tamas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Dresden (Germany); Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Bemmerer, Daniel; Junghans, Arnd; Marta, Michele; Schwengner, Ronald; Wagner, Andreas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Dresden (Germany); Cowan, Thomas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Dresden (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Degering, Detlev; Koehler, Matthias [Verein fuer Kernverfahrenstechnik und Analytik Rossendorf (VKTA), Dresden (Germany); Elekes, Zoltan [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Dresden (Germany); Fueloep, Zsolt; Gyuerky, Gyoergy [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Zuber, Kai [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Dresden (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    In order to reliably estimate the rate of a charged particle induced nuclear reaction in a non-explosive astrophysical scenario, its cross-section must be measured far below the Coulomb barrier. However, at the corresponding energies the cross-section values are very low, so that the experimental counting rate is dominated by cosmic-ray induced background, even if a suitable anticoincidence shield is applied. This problem can be overcome by performing an accelerator-based experiment in a deep underground site, as has been done with great success at the LUNA 0.4MV accelerator in Gran Sasso, Italy. Several underground accelerators with higher beam energy are in the planning phase worldwide. All of them are shielded by over 1000m of rock, a depth at which cosmic-ray effects are negligible for the purposes of nuclear astrophysics experiments. It is shown here that a combined approach, using a shallow-underground laboratory below 47m of rock and an active shield to veto surviving muons in simple detectors, results in a background level that is not far from that of deep underground sites. Data have been obtained using two ''traveling'' {gamma}-detectors. They have been transported both shallow underground, to the Dresden Felsenkeller in Germany, and deep underground, to the Gran Sasso laboratory in Italy. As shallow-underground facilities are more easily accessible than deep-underground ones, the present finding holds the promise of greatly accelerated progress in the field of cross-section measurements for nuclear astrophysics. (orig.)

  12. Atmospheric deposition of 210Po and 210Pb in Malaysian waters during haze events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biogenic burning as forest fire phenomena occurring from April to August each year in the Sumatra and Borneo islands are major sources of biogenic uranium–thorium decay series in marine systems. 30 samples were collected during the Ekspedisi Pelayaran Saintifik Perdana 2009 cruise (EPSP 2009 cruise) between 12th June and 1st August 2009 from the Straits of Malacca to the Sulu and Sulawesi Seas to study the effect of haze and the monsoon season on the deposition rate of 210Po and 210Pb in Malaysian waters. All samples were spiked with 1 ml of lead [Pb(NO3)2; 25 mg ml-1] and 0.05 ml of Polonium-209 tracer (26.08 dpm ml-1). 210Po activity was determined by auto plating onto silver foil and counting using an alpha spectrometry system (Canberra model Alpha Analyst with a silicon-surface barrier detector). Lead that was collected via electrodeposition, formed lead sulphate (PbSO4) precipitation. This precipitate was wrapped onto plastic discs and counted for 210Pb beta activity using a gross alpha-beta counting system (Tennelec model LB-5100 low background gas-flowing anti-coincidence alpha/beta counter) after 1 month to allow bismuth ingrowths. The range of 210Po activities varied between 51.08 ± 15.1 and 742.08 ± 220.34 Bq/kg, whereas the activity of 210Pb ranged from 31.10 ± 4.20 to 880.23 ± 123.86 Bq/kg and 210Po/210Pb ratio value varied between sampling stations from 0.19 to 13.77. The contents of 210Po were also statistically positively correlated with the amount of total suspended particulate especially those recorded during heavy haze period events. (author)

  13. The Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Large Area Telescope (Fermi/LAT, hereafter LAT), the primary instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) mission, is an imaging, wide field-of-view (FoV), high-energy γ-ray telescope, covering the energy range from below 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. The LAT was built by an international collaboration with contributions from space agencies, high-energy particle physics institutes, and universities in France, Italy, Japan, Sweden, and the United States. This paper describes the LAT, its preflight expected performance, and summarizes the key science objectives that will be addressed. On-orbit performance will be presented in detail in a subsequent paper. The LAT is a pair-conversion telescope with a precision tracker and calorimeter, each consisting of a 4 x 4 array of 16 modules, a segmented anticoincidence detector that covers the tracker array, and a programmable trigger and data acquisition system. Each tracker module has a vertical stack of 18 (x, y) tracking planes, including two layers (x and y) of single-sided silicon strip detectors and high-Z converter material (tungsten) per tray. Every calorimeter module has 96 CsI(Tl) crystals, arranged in an eight-layer hodoscopic configuration with a total depth of 8.6 radiation lengths, giving both longitudinal and transverse information about the energy deposition pattern. The calorimeter's depth and segmentation enable the high-energy reach of the LAT and contribute significantly to background rejection. The aspect ratio of the tracker (height/width) is 0.4, allowing a large FoV (2.4 sr) and ensuring that most pair-conversion showers initiated in the tracker will pass into the calorimeter for energy measurement. Data obtained with the LAT are intended to (1) permit rapid notification of high-energy γ-ray bursts and transients and facilitate monitoring of variable sources, (2) yield an extensive catalog of several thousand high-energy sources obtained from an all-sky survey, (3) measure spectra

  14. Automatic Sample and Data Processing in Studies of Calcium Metabolism in Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of calcium metabolism in rats as a function of age or various forms of treatment entails experiments on large numbers of animals. These investigations involve: (i) studying the way in which the serum concentration of a tracer dose of 45Ca injected intravenously varies as a function of time, and (ii) carrying out measurements of chemical and radiochemical balance. By combining these two types of information and subjecting them to mathematical analysis it is possible to evolve a general model of calcium metabolism. This model can then be used to deduce the size of the exchangeable compartments and the relative importance of the different metabolic paths, such as intestinal absorption, renal and intestinal excretion, and deposition and elimination of bone calcium. The authors' work on these subjects was facilitated by the development of automatic methods for measuring the samples and processing the data, and these methods are the subject of their paper. Processing of samples: the radioactivity measurements are carried out on small samples (20-40 λ) of plasma, removed at repeated intervals, and on total quantities of faeces and urine excreted in a given period. The measuring apparatus used comprises a feed, a low-background anti-coincidence counter and a digital computer; the measurements obtained from the computer are then recorded on a printer. The novel features of the sample preparation techniques used and the performance achieved by the measuring apparatus, are discussed, with special reference to the (statistical) counting conditions, which are checked by the computer each time new measurements have to be calculated. Processing of data: this is done by an IBM-7040 digital computer, into which are fed the programme for the calculation and all the un-corrected experimental data in the form of punched cards, separately for each animal. There are three stages to the data-processing operation, namely: (1) converting the raw data and calculating the standard

  15. Progress report on the Astro-H Soft X-Ray Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Richard L.; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa

    2016-04-01

    We describe the initial in-orbit operations and performance of the Astro-H Soft X-Ray Spectrometer (SXS). Astro-H, JAXA's sixth X-ray observatory, is scheduled for launch on February 12, 2016, from the Tanegashima Space Center in Japan abord an H-IIA rocket. The instrument is based on a 36-pixel array of microcalorimeters designed for high resolution over the 0.3-12 keV energy band at the focus of a high throughput, grazing-incidence x-ray mirror. The instrument is the result of a joint collaboration between the JAXA Institute of Space and Astronautical Science and many partners in Japan, and the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and collaborators in the US. The principal components of the spectrometer are the microcalorimeter detector system, a low-temperature anticoincidence detector, a 3-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to maintain 50 mK operation under both cryogen and cryogen-free operation, a hybrid liquid helium/cryogen-free dewar with both Stirling and Joule-Thomson coolers, electronics for reading out the array, processing the x-ray data for spectroscopy, and operating the ADR and cryocoolers. The dewar is closed out by an aperture system with five thin-film filters designed to provide high x-ray transmission with low heat loads to the dewar and detector system, and prevent contamination from condensing on the filters. The instrument was designed to have better than 7 eV energy resolution, and was demonstrated to achieve 4-5 eV resolution across the array at the full spacecraft level of integration during extensive ground testing prior to launch. The overall cooling chain has been designed to provide a lifetime of at least 3 years in orbit, and continue to operate without liquid helium to provide redundancy and the longest operational lifetime for the instrument. In this presentation, we will describe the early phases of the SXS instrument in orbit and provide a sense of the astronomical results that can be expected. This presentation is

  16. The Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Abdo, Aous A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Anderson, B. /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U.; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Band, D.L.; /NASA, Goddard /NASA, Goddard; Barbiellini, Guido; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bartelt, J.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bastieri, Denis; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bederede, D.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Bellardi, F.; /INFN, Pisa; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bignami, G.F.; /Pavia U.; Bisello, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Bissaldi, E.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE; Blandford, R.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Washington U., Seattle /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /Kalmar U. /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /DAPNIA, Saclay /ASI, Rome /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /George Mason U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /DAPNIA, Saclay /NASA, Goddard /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; /more authors..

    2009-05-15

    The Large Area Telescope (Fermi/LAT, hereafter LAT), the primary instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) mission, is an imaging, wide field-of-view (FoV), high-energy {gamma}-ray telescope, covering the energy range from below 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. The LAT was built by an international collaboration with contributions from space agencies, high-energy particle physics institutes, and universities in France, Italy, Japan, Sweden, and the United States. This paper describes the LAT, its preflight expected performance, and summarizes the key science objectives that will be addressed. On-orbit performance will be presented in detail in a subsequent paper. The LAT is a pair-conversion telescope with a precision tracker and calorimeter, each consisting of a 4 x 4 array of 16 modules, a segmented anticoincidence detector that covers the tracker array, and a programmable trigger and data acquisition system. Each tracker module has a vertical stack of 18 (x, y) tracking planes, including two layers (x and y) of single-sided silicon strip detectors and high-Z converter material (tungsten) per tray. Every calorimeter module has 96 CsI(Tl) crystals, arranged in an eight-layer hodoscopic configuration with a total depth of 8.6 radiation lengths, giving both longitudinal and transverse information about the energy deposition pattern. The calorimeter's depth and segmentation enable the high-energy reach of the LAT and contribute significantly to background rejection. The aspect ratio of the tracker (height/width) is 0.4, allowing a large FoV (2.4 sr) and ensuring that most pair-conversion showers initiated in the tracker will pass into the calorimeter for energy measurement. Data obtained with the LAT are intended to (1) permit rapid notification of high-energy {gamma}-ray bursts and transients and facilitate monitoring of variable sources, (2) yield an extensive catalog of several thousand high-energy sources obtained from an all-sky survey, (3

  17. Division of Mechanical Construction - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    . Finalizing of design and manufacturing of magnetic channel I; Design and manufacturing of magnetic channel II. Design and manufacturing of a device for magnetic field measurements in the region of magnetic channel I inside the cyclotron chamber; Design of a device for measurements magnetic field in the region of magnetic channel II inside the cyclotron chamber; Design of deflector II for extraction cyclotron beam outside the cyclotron chamber. 2. Manufacturing of mechanical elements of gradient coils. 3. Manufacturing of Anti-coincidence Shielding for Low-Background Measurements of Radioactive Contaminations of the Environment. 4. The upgrade of Luminosity Monitor for ZEUS Experiment at DESY. 5. Manufacturing of experimental chamber frames for SHOWER Detector at HADES Experiment at GSI in Darmstadt. 6. Experimental Chamber for Free Electron Laser Project on Tesla Test Facility at DESY. 7. Supports for diagnostic equipment of TTF FEL Project at DESY. (author)

  18. Liquid argon as active shielding and coolant for bare germanium detectors. A novel background suppression method for the GERDA 0νββ experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two of the most important open questions in particle physics are whether neutrinos are their own anti-particles (Majorana particles) as required by most extensions of the StandardModel and the absolute values of the neutrino masses. The neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay, which can be investigated using 76Ge (a double beta isotope), is the most sensitive probe for these properties. There is a claim for an evidence for the 0νββ decay in the Heidelberg-Moscow (HdM) 76Ge experiment by a part of the HdM collaboration. The new 76Ge experiment Gerda aims to check this claim within one year with 15 kg.y of statistics in Phase I at a background level of ≤10-2 events/(kg.keV.y) and to go to higher sensitivity with 100 kg.y of statistics in Phase II at a background level of ≤10-3 events/(kg.keV.y). In Gerda bare germanium semiconductor detectors (enriched in 76Ge) will be operated in liquid argon (LAr). LAr serves as cryogenic coolant and as high purity shielding against external background. To reach the background level for Phase II, new methods are required to suppress the cosmogenic background of the diodes. The background from cosmogenically produced 60Co is expected to be ∝2.5.10-3 events/(kg.keV.y). LAr scintillates in UV (λ=128 nm) and a novel concept is to use this scintillation light as anti-coincidence signal for background suppression. In this work the efficiency of such a LAr scintillation veto was investigated for the first time. In a setup with 19 kg active LAr mass a suppression of a factor 3 has been achieved for 60Co and a factor 17 for 232Th around Qββ = 2039 keV. This suppression will further increase for a one ton active volume (factor O(100) for 232Th and 60Co). LAr scintillation can also be used as a powerful tool for background diagnostics. For this purpose a new, very stable and robust wavelength shifter/reflector combination for the light detection has been developed, leading to a photo electron (pe) yield of as much as 1.2 pe

  19. Compton suppression naa in the analysis of food and beverages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Applicability and performance of Compton suppression method in the analysis of food and beverages was re-established in this study. Using ''1''3''7Cs and ''6''0Co point sources Compton Suppression Factors (SF), Compton Reduction Factors (RF), Peak-to-Compton ratio (P/C), Compton Plateau (Cpl), and Compton Edge (Ce) were determined for each of the two sources. The natural background reduction factors in the anticoincidence mode compared to the normal mode were evaluated. The reported R.F. values of the various Compton spectrometers for ''6''0Co source at energy 50-210 keV (backscattering region), 600 keV (Compton edge corresponding to 1173.2 keV gamma-ray) and 1110 keV (Compton edge corresponding to 1332.5 keV gamma-ray) were compared with that of the present work. Similarly the S.F. values of the spectrometers for ''1''3''7Cs source were compared at the backscattered energy region (S.F.b = 191-210 keV), Compton Plateau (S.F.pl = 350-370 keV), and Compton Edge (S.F.e = 471-470 keV) and all were found to follow a similar trend. We also compared peak reduction ratios for the two cobalt energies (1173.2 and 1332.5) with the ones reported in literature and two results agree well. Applicability of the method to food and beverages was put to test for twenty one major, minor, and trace elements (Ba, Sr, I, Br, Cu, V, Mg, Na, Cl, Mn, Ca, Sn,K, Cd, Zn, As, Sb, Ni, Cs, Fe, and Co) commonly found in food, milk, tea and tobacco. The elements were assayed using five National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) certified reference materials (Non-fat powdered milk, Apple leaves, Tomato leaves, and Citrus leaves). The results obtained shows good agreement with NIST certified values, indicating that the method is suitable for simultaneous determination of micro-nutrients, macro-nutrients and heavy elements in food and beverages without undue interference problems

  20. Liquid argon as active shielding and coolant for bare germanium detectors. A novel background suppression method for the GERDA 0{nu}{beta}{beta} experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peiffer, J.P.

    2007-07-25

    Two of the most important open questions in particle physics are whether neutrinos are their own anti-particles (Majorana particles) as required by most extensions of the StandardModel and the absolute values of the neutrino masses. The neutrinoless double beta (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) decay, which can be investigated using {sup 76}Ge (a double beta isotope), is the most sensitive probe for these properties. There is a claim for an evidence for the 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay in the Heidelberg-Moscow (HdM) {sup 76}Ge experiment by a part of the HdM collaboration. The new {sup 76}Ge experiment Gerda aims to check this claim within one year with 15 kg.y of statistics in Phase I at a background level of {<=}10{sup -2} events/(kg.keV.y) and to go to higher sensitivity with 100 kg.y of statistics in Phase II at a background level of {<=}10{sup -3} events/(kg.keV.y). In Gerda bare germanium semiconductor detectors (enriched in {sup 76}Ge) will be operated in liquid argon (LAr). LAr serves as cryogenic coolant and as high purity shielding against external background. To reach the background level for Phase II, new methods are required to suppress the cosmogenic background of the diodes. The background from cosmogenically produced {sup 60}Co is expected to be {proportional_to}2.5.10{sup -3} events/(kg.keV.y). LAr scintillates in UV ({lambda}=128 nm) and a novel concept is to use this scintillation light as anti-coincidence signal for background suppression. In this work the efficiency of such a LAr scintillation veto was investigated for the first time. In a setup with 19 kg active LAr mass a suppression of a factor 3 has been achieved for {sup 60}Co and a factor 17 for {sup 232}Th around Q{sub {beta}}{sub {beta}} = 2039 keV. This suppression will further increase for a one ton active volume (factor O(100) for {sup 232}Th and {sup 60}Co). LAr scintillation can also be used as a powerful tool for background diagnostics. For this purpose a new, very stable and robust wavelength

  1. Studies of seaweeds as indicators of toxic element pollution in Ghana using neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentrations of 25 elements namely: AI, As, Br, Ca, Cd, CI, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hf, Hg, I, K, La, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Sb, Sc, Sm, Sr, V and Zn in seven Rhodophyta (red), three Phaeophyta (brown) and five Chlorophyta (green) seaweed species from different areas along the coast of Ghana were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and preconcentration NAA (PNAA). These species potentially could be used as biomonitors and bioremoval agents. The irradiations using thermal and epithermal neutrons were done using the Ghana Research Reactor-I (GHARR-I) facility at Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, Kwabenya and the Dalhousie University SLOWPOKE-2 Reactor (DUSR) facilities. Counting was done using both the conventional and anti-coincidence γ ray spectrometry. The PNAA method was developed for the simultaneous extraction of Cd, Cr, Hg, and Zn, as well as Sb and V individually from the seaweed samples. The PNAA method involved the use of a mixture of PAN and TAN chelating agents and PONPE-20 surfactant in cloud point extraction (CPE). The parameters affecting the CPE have been optimized. The recoveries under the optimum conditions of pH 3.7 for V, 6.4 for Sb, 8.6 for Cd, Cr, Hg, and Zn, [PAN/TAN] of 1x10-4M, [PONPE-20] of 0.1% (m/v), ionic strength 0.05 M KN03, and a temperature of 410C were generally >96%. The mean detection limits for Cd, Cr, Hg, Sb, V and Zn were 6.0, 3.6, 1.2, 2.8, 1.51 and 2.6 ng/g respectively. The CPE method developed was also used successfully to speciate As(III) and As(V) from the Sargassum vulgare, the seaweed. The maximum extraction of As(III) occurred at a pH of 6.7 and that of As(V) at pH of 3.8. The results indicated that As(III) and As(V) formed only 6.27% of the total arsenic concentration, while the other species of arsenic constitute 93.73%. The precision and accuracy of the INAA and PNAA methods developed were evaluated. Schewart control charts were constructed for internal quality assessment purposes. The results were

  2. internal radiation dose assessment due to ionizing radio contaminants in some local foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last 30 years, radioactivity has been monitored in foodstuffs in Egypt. The present work deals with the radioactivity monitored during two years (1990 - 1992) at eight major Egyptian governorates. Sampled food items were selected to cover most foodstuffs eaten by egyptian population according to their habits. The daily food consumption by egyptian population and the constituents of such consumption were estimated according to published international data and knowledge of the different feeding habits of the egyptians. About 1200 samples were collected from the markets of the main city of each governorate and prepared for counting according to the egyptian kitchen habits. The counting systems used in determination and indentification of radionuclides were : a 3 inch HPGe detector attached to 800 channel MCA and PC and a 3 inch phoswich detector attached to an anticoincidence circuit for low beta / gamma counting. The gamma spectroscopy system was calibrated using isotopic solution mixture while the low beta counting system was calibrated using H CI. Counting time for the first system was 20 - 72 hours and for the second system was half to one hour. The main radionuclides identified in foodstuffs were Cs - 137 and K - 40 . The radioactivity concentration of Cs - 137 was found to be in the range between 1.0 Bq / Kg for macaroni and 3.5 Bq / Kg for nile beans. The K - 40 concentration range between 19 Bq / Kg for macaroni to 363 Bq / Kg for nile beans. The population weighted values in case of Cs - 137 was found as 3.56 Bq /d and for K - 40 was 188 Bq /d. The resulted effective dose due to food intake was found be 16 . 4 U Sv /a for Cs-137 and 354 μSv / a for K -40 . This value for Cs - 137 is found in the exemption limit while that of K -40 is twice the published value. This may depend on the egyptian feeding habit which depends mainly on wheat (bread) and nile beans which are very rich in potassium.The resulted collective dose was found to be : 21323 person

  3. Work in Greece on Delayed Neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, two programmes on delayed neutron research are in progress in Greece. Delayed Neutron Energy Spectrum Measurements. In an experiment at the 1 MW Democritus reactor, the energy of the delayed neutrons from 235U fission is measured by the time-of-flight technique and β-n-coincidence using a special fast system for irradiation of the sample. The beta particle preceding the emission of the delayed neutron is used as a start pulse while the delayed neutron provides a stop signal. A maximum flight time of approximately 100 nsec is allowed over a flight distance of approximately 30 cm (longer flight paths could be used for better energy resolution, but this would decrease the efficiency of detecting the delayed neutron). To avoid false measurements due to other beta particles which do not correspond to delayed neutrons, an anti-coincidence system is used to cancel the measurement whenever two beta particles come in a time interval shorter than 100 nsec. Coincidences due to delayed neutrons are relatively rare in comparison with chance coincidences or β-γ-coincidences. The spectrum obtained in a first run of measurements is discussed. An attempt will be made to measure the spectrum of each individual group by varying the irradiation time and the measuring time. Various irradiation, transfer and measuring times can be obtained with the existing experimental set-up. A minimum transfer time of 300 msec can be achieved. Very thin foils (a few mg/cm2) are used to minimize the beta-particle absorption in the sample. Delayed Neutron Group Relative Abundances And Periods. In a second experiment, measurements to determine the relative abundances and periods of the delayed neutrons for various fissile materials are now under way. The arrangement for delayed neutron group measurement allows the sample to be transferred in a minimum time of approximately 800 msec. Accordingly, delayed neutrons of quite short half-lives can be detected. The experimental facility permits

  4. Work in Greece on delayed neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, two programmes on delayed neutron research are in progress in Greece. DELAYED NEUTRON ENERGY SPECTRUM MEASUREMENTS. In an experiment at the 1 MW Democritus reactor, the energy of the delayed neutrons from 235U fission is measured by the time-of-flight technique and β-n-coincidence using a special fast system for irradiation of the sample. The beta particle preceding the emission of the delayed neutron is used as a start pulse while the delayed neutron provides a stop signal. A maximum flight time of approximately 100 nsec is allowed over a flight distance of approximately 30 cm (longer flight paths could be used for better energy resolution, but this would decrease the efficiency of detecting the delayed neutron). To avoid false measurements due to other beta particles which do not correspond to delayed neutrons, an anti-coincidence system is used to cancel the measurement whenever two beta particles come in a time interval shorter than 100 nsec. Coincidences due to delayed neutrons are relatively rare in comparison with chance coincidences or β-γ-coincidences. The spectrum obtained in a first run of measurements is discussed. An attempt will be made to measure the spectrum of each individual group by varying the irradiation time and the measuring time. Various irradiation, transfer and measuring times can be obtained with the existing experimental set-up. A minimum transfer time of 300 msec can be achieved. Very thin foils (a few mg/cm2) are used to minimize the beta-particle absorption in the sample. DELAYED NEUTRON GROUP RELATIVE ABUNDANCES AND PERIODS. In a second experiment, measurements to determine the relative abundances and periods of the delayed neutrons for various fissile materials are now under way. The arrangement for delayed neutron group measurement allows the sample to be transferred in a minimum time of approximately 800 msec. Accordingly, delayed neutrons of quite short half-lives can be detected. The experimental facility permits

  5. Biogeochemical behaviour of 137Cs and 90Sr in the artificial reservoirs of Mayak PA, Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strand, P.; Brown, J.E.; Amundsen, I. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Grini naeringspark 13, P.O. Box 55, N-1332 Oesteraas (Norway); Drozhko, E.; Mokrov, Y. [Mayak Production Association, 31, Lenin St, 45065 Chelyabinsk-65 (Russian Federation); Salbu, B.; Oughton, D. [Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry, Agricultural University of Norway, N-1432 Aas (Norway); Christensen, G.C. [Institute for Energy Technology, Health and Safety Department, Institute for Energy Technology, P.O. Box 40, N-2007 Kjeller (Norway)

    1999-10-29

    The Mayak Production Association (PA) in the southern Urals, Russia was the site of the first weapons-grade plutonium production reactor complex in Russia. The site and surrounding area have been significantly contaminated by direct discharges of radionuclides for over 40 years, the Techa River alone having received more than 100 PBq of waste in the period 1949-1956. The aim of this study was to consider the levels of 90Sr and 137Cs in water, sediment and biota samples for two industrial reservoirs in the Mayak PA area, thus allowing a biogeochemical assessment of the behaviour of radionuclides in the system. Four sediment cores were collected and sectioned along with four water samples and seven fish samples (pike, perch and roach). Samples were analysed using (1) standard gamma-spectrometric techniques (HPGe and NaI(Tl) detectors) for 137Cs determination; and (2) radiochemical separation and beta-counting (low-background, anti-coincidence and Geiger-Muller counters) for 90Sr determination. Maximum specific activities (dry weight) of 3350 kBq kg{sup -1} {sup 137}Cs and 720 kBq kg{sup -1} {sup 90}Sr were measured in sediments from Reservoir 10. Activity levels of sediment-bound radionuclides in Reservoir 11 were 403 kBq kg{sup -1} {sup 137}Cs and 670 kBq kg{sup -1} {sup 90}Sr. Water concentrations in Reservoir 10 were as high as 100 Bq l{sup -1} {sup 137}Cs and 8.4-14 kBq l{sup -1} {sup 90}Sr. A dramatic decrease in 137Cs concentrations was observed in Reservoir 11, i.e. 1.1-1.5 Bq l{sup -1}, but 90Sr levels fell to a lesser extent, i.e. 1.9-2.4 kBq l{sup -1}. Sediment and water activity data allowed the calculation of distribution coefficients (K{sub d} values). This parameter fluctuated for both radionuclides reflecting the heterogeneous nature of the sediment deposits in the reservoirs. Caesium-137 Concentration Factors (CFs) as high as 1400 l kg{sup -1} were calculated for pike from Reservoir 10. A pronounced 'trophic level' effect was evident in

  6. Determination of iodine species in cow milk by preconcentration epithermal neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Iodine is an essential trace element for human beings. The main source of iodine is generally food items such as fish and milk. Either the lack or the excess of iodine can cause health problems. Iodine deficiency disorder is fairly common in many countries of Africa and Asia. There exists an increasing interest in the determination of total iodine as well as various species of iodine in milk. One of the problems in the analysis of iodine is the lack of highly sensitive methods. Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) is one of the techniques, particularly when the irradiation is done using epithermal neutrons which is called ENAA, that can provide low detection limits. These limits can be further improved when ENAA is used in conjunction with an anti-coincidence (ENAA-AC) counting system. We have developed an ENAA-AC method for the determination of ppb levels of iodine. We have also employed chemical separation methods prior to ENAA-AC to measure the species-specific concentrations of iodine in cow milk. We have separated lipid-bound iodine using solvent extraction followed by further fractionation using a silica gel column. We have used ammonium sulfate precipitation to separate protein-bound iodine. We precipitated whole casein-bound iodine at pH=4.6. We separated the inorganic species, such as iodide and iodate, using ion exchange chromatography. We have measured the following iodine concentrations in homogenized milk (milk fat 3.25%): 0.475±0.005 μg mL-1 of total iodine, 0.432 ±0.003 μg mL-1 iodide, 0.016±0.005 μg mL-1 iodate, 0.013±0.003 μg mL-1 of lipid-bound iodine, 0.032±0.002 μg mL-1 protein-bound iodine, and 0.026±0.001 μg mL-1 casein-bound iodine. We have observed that ENAA-AC is a powerful technique for the determination of iodine and its species when used in conjunction with chemical separation methods. The detection limits are low and the precision and accuracy are high. (author)

  7. Improvements in an in vivo neutron activation analysis (NAA) method for the measurement of fluorine in human bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously published a method for the in vivo measurement of bone fluoride using neutron activation analysis (NAA) and demonstrated the utility of the technique in a pilot study of environmentally exposed people. The method involved activation of the hand in an irradiation cavity at the McMaster University Accelerator Laboratory and acquisition of the resultant γ-ray signals in a ‘4π’ NaI(Tl) detector array of nine detectors. In this paper we describe a series of improvements to the method. This was investigated via measurement of hand simulating phantoms doped with varying levels of fluorine and fixed amounts of sodium, chlorine and calcium. Four improvements to the technique were tested since our first publication. The previously published detection limit for phantom measurements using this system was 0.66 mg F/g Ca. The accelerator irradiation and detection facilities were relocated to a new section of the laboratory and one more detector was added to the detection system. This was found to reduce the detection limit (possibly because of better detection shielding and additional detector) to 0.59 mg F/g Ca, a factor of 1.12. A new set of phantoms was developed and in this work we show that they improved the minimum detectable limit for fluoride in phantoms irradiated using neutrons produced by 2.15 MeV protons on lithium by a factor of 1.55. We compared the detection limits previously obtained using a summed signal from the nine detectors with the detection limit obtained by acquiring the spectra in anticoincidence mode for reduction of the disturbing signal from chlorine in bone. This was found to improve the ratio of the detection of fluorine to chlorine (an interfering signal) by a factor of 2.8 and the resultant minimum detection limit was found to be reduced by a factor of 1.2. We studied the effects of changing the timing of γ-ray acquisition. Our previously published data used a series of three 10 s acquisitions followed by a 300 s count

  8. Instrumental neutron activation analysis with Compton suppression for the evaluation of foodstuff composition;Supressao Compton na analise por ativacao neutronica instrumental de produtos agricolas destinados a alimentacao humana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Luis Gustavo Cofani dos

    2004-07-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) is a good option for studying chemical composition of food, allowing the simultaneous determination of several elements. However, the incomplete deposition of gamma-ray energies in the detector crystal due to Compton scatter can elevate the spectrum baseline making difficult the determination of some elements. The problem is particularly important for samples having high activities of radionuclides emitting gamma-rays with energies higher than those to be measured. For such cases, the use of a Compton suppression system can improve the detection limits. Here, the application of a suppression system for the analysis of foodstuff is evaluated. Measurements were carried out with a hyper pure germanium detector with 55 % relative efficiency for the photopeak 1332 keV of {sup 60}Co, working in anti-coincidence with two sodium iodine guard detectors (annulus and plug). Suppressed and unsuppressed spectra were simultaneously acquired. Initially, the overall system performance on the reduction of the Compton region was tested using {sup 137}Cs. Measuring between 358 and 382 keV, the higher suppression factor was 5.97, being observed a large variation according to the energy region selected for the determination. Reductions were noticed for the suppression factor resulting from increases on counting rate and source-detector distance. The suppression system showed to be stable during twenty weeks of periodic verifications. To evaluate the system performance on real sample analysis, several types and commercial brands of rice, potatoes, beans, peas, chickpeas and lentil were taken. After drying and grinding, samples were irradiated at a thermal neutron flux of 1x10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for 8 hours, in the nuclear research reactor IEA-R1 from IPEN/CNEN (Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares). Each sample was measured after decay periods of about 3, 7, 15 and 40 days. Analysis was conducted by the k{sub 0} method

  9. Instrumental neutron activation analysis with Compton suppression for the evaluation of foodstuff composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) is a good option for studying chemical composition of food, allowing the simultaneous determination of several elements. However, the incomplete deposition of gamma-ray energies in the detector crystal due to Compton scatter can elevate the spectrum baseline making difficult the determination of some elements. The problem is particularly important for samples having high activities of radionuclides emitting gamma-rays with energies higher than those to be measured. For such cases, the use of a Compton suppression system can improve the detection limits. Here, the application of a suppression system for the analysis of foodstuff is evaluated. Measurements were carried out with a hyper pure germanium detector with 55 % relative efficiency for the photopeak 1332 keV of 60Co, working in anti-coincidence with two sodium iodine guard detectors (annulus and plug). Suppressed and unsuppressed spectra were simultaneously acquired. Initially, the overall system performance on the reduction of the Compton region was tested using 137Cs. Measuring between 358 and 382 keV, the higher suppression factor was 5.97, being observed a large variation according to the energy region selected for the determination. Reductions were noticed for the suppression factor resulting from increases on counting rate and source-detector distance. The suppression system showed to be stable during twenty weeks of periodic verifications. To evaluate the system performance on real sample analysis, several types and commercial brands of rice, potatoes, beans, peas, chickpeas and lentil were taken. After drying and grinding, samples were irradiated at a thermal neutron flux of 1x1013 cm-2 s-1 for 8 hours, in the nuclear research reactor IEA-R1 from IPEN/CNEN (Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares). Each sample was measured after decay periods of about 3, 7, 15 and 40 days. Analysis was conducted by the k0 method using the software package Quantu

  10. Division of Mechanical Construction - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    workshop posses CNC milling machine which can be used for machining of work-pieces up to 500 kg. The machine allows the following tool movements in particular axes: X -1000 mm, Y - 500 mm, Z - 500 mm; it is controlled by HEIDENHAIN 407 Control System, and ensures the accuracy and reproducibility of machining of 0.01 mm in each of the axis. In 1999 the Department of Mechanical Construction designed, manufactured and assembled an equipment for the following foreign laboratories: - Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron, Hamburg, FRG; - Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Science, Warszawa, Poland; - Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland; - Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA; - University of Rochester. Rochester, NY, USA; - Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, USA. Besides the large designs and systems described below, some interesting works have been made for the departments of our Institute and other institutions: 1.Mechanical Structure for Time of Flight Wall for PHOBOS Experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory. 2. The works for Cyclotron Section: In 1999 the following units of beam extraction channel of cyclotron AIC-144: - Magnetic channel I; - Magnetic channel II; - Magnetic channel III; - Devices for measurements magnetic field in the region of magnetic channels I, II and III, inside the cyclotron chamber; - Deflector I; - Deflector II; - Deflector III for extraction cyclotron beam outside the cyclotron chamber. 3. Manufacturing of mechanical elements of gradient coils. 4.Manufacturing of Anticoincidence Shielding for Low-Background Measurements of Radioactive Contamination of the Environment. 5. The upgrade of Luminosity Monitor for ZEUS Experiment at DESY. (author)

  11. The prompt gamma neutron activation analysis facility at the RA-6 reactor of the Bariloche Atomic Center, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    the second collimator and composed by the same materials. The beam is trapped in a 'beam catcher' at 1.25 m of the sample position. The beam catcher was designed in such a way to minimize the background at the detection system and the surroundings areas. The gamma detection system consists of a 50% HPGe detector and a NaI(Tl) annulus for Compton suppression. It is at 40 cm from the sample inside a low background lead shielding. The spectrum is analyzed by two digital spectrometers, one in coincidences and the other in anticoincidences modes in order to discriminate the escape lines. Preliminary measurements of PGNAA over different samples are also presented

  12. Radioactivity control of the Danube ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    measurement, the sample stands for a while in the counter for thermostasis. Radiochemical method of 90Sr separation is based on oxalate isolation of Ca and Sr, ignition to oxides and usage of aluminum as 90Y carrier. The equilibrium is achieved in 18 days, and after that time 90Y is isolated on Al(OH)3 carrier, which is then ignited to oxide that is subsequently measured by α-β anti-coincidence counter. The size of planchet is 2.3 cm in diameter. The performance of counter is 24% and is determined by 90Sr standard. Gammaspectrometry is carried out on pure germanium detector manufactured by EG and G 'ORTEC', which is connected with multichannel analyzer (8192 channels) produced by the same manufacturer and with adequate computer facilities. Energetic calibration, as well as calibration of detector efficiency is performed by means of Amersham radioactive standard. The time of measurement for a single sample is 60000 to 100000 s, while it is 250000 s for basic radiation. The results of radioactivity measurements in samples of the Danube river, from 1997 to 2003, were compared to the measurements carried out for determination of the 'initial state' (before the Paks Nuclear Power Plant started running). The results of measurements of gross beta activity (water, sediment, algae and fish), 3H activity (water), 90Sr activity (water, sediment and fish) and gammaspectrometry (water, sediment, algae and fish) reveal that the values are at the same level as they were before the Paks Nuclear Power Plant started running. The measurements of 137Cs activity in sediment samples, from 1997 to 2003, show some increase of activity in relation to the 'initial state', what could be assigned to contamination caused by Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident in 1986. Our results of measurements correlate well with the results of Hungarian part

  13. In-orbit background of X-ray microcalorimeters and its effects on observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotti, S.; Cea, D.; Macculi, C.; Mineo, T.; Natalucci, L.; Perinati, E.; Piro, L.; Federici, M.; Martino, B.

    2014-09-01

    microcalorimeters in the L2 orbit, and thus the particle background levels were calculated by means of Monte Carlo simulations: we considered the original design configuration and an improved configuration aimed to reduce the unrejected background, and tested them in the L2 orbit and in the low Earth orbit, comparing the results with experimental data reported by other X-ray instruments. For the diffuse component, we used the background levels measured from a 1 sr region representative of typical high galactic latitude pointings and analyzed the variations expected with the different orbital conditions. To show the results obtainable with the improved configuration we simulated the observation of a faint, high-redshift, point source (F[ 0.5 - 10 keV ] ~ 6.4 × 10-16 erg cm-2 s-1, z = 3.7), and of a hot galaxy cluster at R200 (Sb [ 0.5-2 keV ] = 8.61 × 10-16 erg cm-2 s-1 arcmin-2, T = 6.6 keV). Results: First we confirm that implementing an active cryogenic anticoincidence reduces the particle background by an order of magnitude and brings it close to the required level. The implementation and test of several design solutions can reduce the particle background level by a further factor of 6 with respect to the original configuration. The residual background is dominated by secondary particles, and this component can be decreased by design solutions such as passive shielding with appropriate materials. The best background level achievable in the L2 orbit with the implementation of ad-hoc passive shielding for secondary particles is similar to that measured in the more favorable LEO environment without the passive shielding, allowing us to exploit the advantages of the L2 orbit. We define a reference model for the diffuse background and collect all the available information on its variation with epoch and pointing direction. With this background level the ATHENA mission with the X-IFU instrument is able to detect ~4100 new obscured AGNs with F> 6.4 × 10-16 erg cm-2 s-1 during three

  14. Radioactivity control of the Danube ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    , the sample stands for a while in the counter for thermostasis. Radiochemical method of 90Sr separation is based on oxalate isolation of Ca and Sr, ignition to oxides and usage of aluminum as 90Y carrier. The equilibrium is achieved in 18 days, and after that time 90Y is isolated on Al(OH)3 carrier, which is then ignited to oxide that is subsequently measured by α-β anti-coincidence counter. The size of planchet is 2.3 cm in diameter. The performance of counter is 24% and is determined by 90Sr standard. Gamma-spectrometry is carried out on pure germanium detector manufactured by EG and G 'ORTEC', which is connected with multichannel analyzer (8192 channels) produced by the same manufacturer and with adequate computer facilities. Energetic calibration, as well as calibration of detector efficiency is performed by means of Amersham radioactive standard. The time of measurement for a single sample is 60,000 to 100,000 s, while it is 250,000 s for basic radiation. The results of radioactivity measurements in samples of the Danube river, from 1997 to 2003, were compared to the measurements carried out for determination of the 'initial state' (before the Paks Nuclear Power Plant started running). The results of measurements of gross beta activity (water, sediment, algae and fish), 3H activity (water), 90Sr activity (water, sediment and fish) and gamma-spectrometry (water, sediment, algae and fish) reveal that the values are at the same level as they were before the Paks Nuclear Power Plant started running. The measurements of 137Cs activity in sediment samples, from 1997 to 2003, show some increase of activity in relation to the 'initial state', what could be assigned to contamination caused by Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident in 1986. Our results of measurements correlate well with the results of Hungarian part