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Sample records for anticoagulation eaa multicentre

  1. Anticoagulant rodenticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Barbara E; Proudfoot, Alex T; Bradberry, Sally M; Vale, J Allister

    2005-01-01

    Anticoagulant pesticides are used widely in agricultural and urban rodent control. The emergence of warfarin-resistant strains of rats led to the introduction of a new group of anticoagulant rodenticides variously referred to as 'superwarfarins', 'single dose' or 'long-acting'. This group includes the second generation 4-hydroxycoumarins brodifacoum, bromadiolone, difenacoum, flocoumafen and the indanedione derivatives chlorophacinone and diphacinone. Most cases of anticoagulant rodenticide exposure involve young children and, as a consequence, the amounts ingested are almost invariably small. In contrast, intentional ingestion of large quantities of long-acting anticoagulant rodenticides may cause anticoagulation for several weeks or months. Occupational exposure has also been reported. Anticoagulant rodenticides inhibit vitamin K(1)-2,3 epoxide reductase and thus the synthesis of vitamin K and subsequently clotting factors II, VII, IX and X. The greater potency and duration of action of long-acting anticoagulant rodenticides is attributed to their: (i) greater affinity for vitamin K(1)-2,3-epoxide reductase; (ii) ability to disrupt the vitamin K(1)-epoxide cycle at more than one point; (iii) hepatic accumulation; and (iv) unusually long biological half-lives due to high lipid solubility and enterohepatic circulation. Substantial ingestion produces epistaxis, gingival bleeding, widespread bruising, haematomas, haematuria with flank pain, menorrhagia, gastrointestinal bleeding, rectal bleeding and haemorrhage into any internal organ; anaemia may result. Spontaneous haemoperitoneum has been described. Severe blood loss may result in hypovolaemic shock, coma and death. The first clinical signs of bleeding may be delayed and patients may remain anticoagulated for several days (warfarin) or days, weeks or months (long-acting anticoagulants) after ingestion of large amounts. There are now sufficient data in young children exposed to anticoagulant rodenticides to

  2. Multicentric reticulohistiocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multicentric reticulohistiocytosis (MRH) is a disease of unknown etiology that affects primarily women in the fourth decade of Life. Articular involvement is characterized by the presence of symmetric synovitis of the upper extremities, particularly of the hands, and compromise of the skin with lesions of different morphology, more commonly nodules and papules localized mainly on the face and upper extremities. There can also be involvement of internal organs such as lung, heart, gastrointestinal tract and salivary glands. This disease has been linked to malignant neoplasm of different organs like breast, ovary, uterine cervix and lymphomas, leading some authors to consider this disease a manifestation of a paraneoplastic syndrome. Laboratory testing in these patients show abnormalities of the complete blood count, liver function tests as well as markers of auto immunity. Histological studies confirm the diagnosis by demonstrating giant multi nucleated histiocytic cells (mononuclear histiocytes-diameter of 50 to 100 μm) with an eosinophilic cytoplasm and fine granules that give the cells a ground glass appearance. Multiple medications have been used to treat this; disease including cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, methotrexate, chlorambucil and combined regimens. We document the case-of a 51 year old Caucasian female patient that was evaluated because of a 4 month history of subjective fever, weakness, fatigue, weight loss, inflammatory bilateral polyarthritis of the wrists, elbows and knees as well as the appearance of painful vioIaceous papules on the surface of the face, elbows, hands and flanks

  3. Pharmacologic Therapies in Anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Joana Lima; Wipf, Joyce E

    2016-07-01

    Anticoagulants are beneficial for prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. The development of target-specific oral anticoagulants is changing the landscape of anticoagulation therapy and created growing interest on this subject. Understanding the pharmacology of different anticoagulants is the first step to adequately treat patients with best available therapy while avoiding serious bleeding complications. This article reviews the pharmacology of the main anticoagulant classes (vitamin K antagonists, direct oral anticoagulants, and heparins) and their clinical indications based on evidence-based data currently available in the literature. PMID:27235611

  4. Venous Thromboembolism Anticoagulation Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘泽霖

    2009-01-01

    @@ VTE of the main treatment for anticoagulant thera-py, anticoagulant therapy drug of choice for low molecu-lar weight heparin (LMWH) for the overwhelming major-ity of clinicians agree that long-term oral anticoagulant therapy is still Vit. K antagonist (mainly warfarin).

  5. Screening computer-assisted dosage programs for anticoagulation with warfarin and other vitamin K antagonists: minimum safety requirements for individual programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poller, L; Roberts, C; Ibrahim, S;

    2009-01-01

    Based on the results of the previous European Action on Anticoagulation (EAA) multicenter study, a simplified minimum procedure is described for screening the safety and effectiveness of marketed programs for dosage of oral anticoagulant drugs (vitamin K antagonists). The aim was to demonstrate non......-inferiority to the manual dosage at the experienced centers in the EAA study. With the use of a cluster sampling procedure, a minimum number of centers and a minimum total of patients required to establish non-inferiority were determined. At least four centers, each recruiting 50 patients over a period of 6...... months, were shown to be required (excluding the results from the first 3 weeks of treatment). To achieve non-inferiority, the lower 95% confidence interval of the 'time in target International Normalized Ratio range' (TIR) of a marketed program must be above the TIR limit set by the manual dosage group...

  6. Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000547.htm Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lupus anticoagulants are antibodies against substances in the lining ...

  7. Atypical multicentric reticulohistiocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittal R

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A 38-year-old male had arthritis since 8 years and erythematous papules, plaques, cutaneous and subcutaneous nodules over face, ears, trunk, and extensors of arms since 2 years, Histopathologically, presence of multiple foreign body giant cells confirmed the clinical diagnosis of multicentric reticulohistiocytosis. Unusual associations were: tapered fingers with depressed scars on their tips, low ESR - (5mm 1st hour. Raynaud′s phenomenon and exaggeration of lesions after methotrexate.

  8. Anticoagulants in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howie, P W

    1986-06-01

    Thromboembolic disorders are still a serious problem in pregnancy and anticoagulants have an important part to play in both treatment and prevention. Warfarin is the most convenient drug to give but can cause maternal and fetal bleeding problems, especially during late pregnancy and delivery. There are also small risks of embryopathy from warfarin in early pregnancy but these may have been overstated. Heparin, which has to be given parenterally, does not cross the placental barrier but can still cause bleeding problems in pregnancy. Full intravenous heparin is only suitable for short-term use, and subcutaneous heparin has been introduced for long-term therapy. This regimen is a useful advance but long-term use still has problems of bruising and maternal bone demineralization. The standard treatment of acute thromboembolic events in pregnancy is continuous intravenous heparin followed by either subcutaneous heparin or warfarin, the latter being changed at 36 weeks gestation. In the prophylaxis of thromboembolism, the trend is towards a more selective approach, anticoagulants being given during pregnancy to those at highest risk and during labour and the puerperium to all with a previous history of thromboembolism. Anticoagulants during pregnancy are necessary in patients with artificial heart valves and, because subcutaneous heparin is not sufficient, warfarin should be used until 36 weeks followed by continuous intravenous heparin until delivery. No method of anticoagulation during pregnancy is entirely free of risk and all management policies must be based on an estimate of risk-benefit ratio in individual patients. PMID:2426029

  9. Cataract surgery and anticoagulants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, SA; VanRij, G

    1996-01-01

    A questionnaire was sent to 240 members of the Netherlands Intraocular implant Club (NIOIC) to register their policy followed in 1993 with regard to anticoagulant therapy (ACT) and the use of aspirin in patients having cataract surgery. Ninety-one (32%) forms were suitable for analysis. Most eye sur

  10. Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Benjamin A; Piccini, Jonathan P

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke, which is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The use of oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation at moderate or high risk of stroke, estimated by established criteria, improves outcomes. However, to ensure that the benefits exceed the risks of bleeding, appropriate patient selection is essential. Vitamin K antagonism has been the mainstay of treatment; however, newer drugs with novel mechanisms are also available. These novel oral anticoagulants (direct thrombin inhibitors and factor Xa inhibitors) obviate many of warfarin's shortcomings, and they have demonstrated safety and efficacy in large randomized trials of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. However, the management of patients taking warfarin or novel agents remains a clinical challenge. There are several important considerations when selecting anticoagulant therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation. This review will discuss the rationale for anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation; risk stratification for treatment; available agents; the appropriate implementation of these agents; and additional, specific clinical considerations for treatment. PMID:24733535

  11. Anticoagulation in Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Yousif; YH Lip, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) are at increased thromboembolic risk, and they suffer more severe strokes with worse outcomes. Most thromboembolic complications of AF are eminently preventable with oral anticoagulation, and the increasing numbers of AF patients mean antithrombotic therapy is the most crucial management aspect of this common arrhythmia. Despite the proven efficacy of warfarin, a string of limitations have meant that it is underused by physicians and patients alike. This...

  12. Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Steinberg, Benjamin A; Piccini, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke, which is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The use of oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation at moderate or high risk of stroke, estimated by established criteria, improves outcomes. However, to ensure that the benefits exceed the risks of bleeding, appropriate patient selection is essential. Vitamin K antagonism has been the mainstay of treatment; however, newer drugs with novel mechanisms are also availabl...

  13. The inhibition of substance P-induced histamine release from mast cells by 6, 7-dihydro-6, 8, 8, 10-tetramethyl-8H-pyrano-[3, 2-g] chromone-2-carboxylic acid (EAA).

    OpenAIRE

    Tsutsumi, Koji; Nishibori, Masahiro; Saeki, Kiyomi

    1984-01-01

    In the presence of extracellular Ca2+, 6,7-dihydro-6,8,8, 10-tetramethyl-8H-pyrano [3, 2-g] chromone-2-carboxylic acid (EAA) had an inhibitory effect on the substance P-induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells. Not only Ca2+ but also Mg2+, Sr2+ and Ba2+ were effective in enhancing the activity of EAA. Marked tachyphylaxis to EAA developed irrespective of the presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+. Cross-tachyphylaxis was observed between EAA and disodium cromoglycate (DSCG)...

  14. EAA/EMQN best practice guidelines for molecular diagnosis of Y-chromosomal microdeletions: state-of-the-art 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krausz, C; Hoefsloot, L; Simoni, M; Tüttelmann, F

    2014-01-01

    The molecular diagnosis of Y-chromosomal microdeletions is a common routine genetic test which is part of the diagnostic workup of azoospermic and severe oligozoospermic men. Since 1999, the European Academy of Andrology (EAA) and the European Molecular Genetics Quality Network (EMQN) have been actively involved in supporting the improvement of the quality of the diagnostic assays by publication of the laboratory guidelines for molecular diagnosis of Y-chromosomal microdeletions and by offering external quality assessment trials. The present revision of the 2004 laboratory guidelines summarizes all the clinical novelties related to the Y chromosome (classic, partial and gene-specific deletions, genotype–phenotype correlations, methodological issues) and provides an update on the results of the quality control programme. These aspects also reflect the consensus of a large group of specialists present at a round table session during the recent Florence-Utah-Symposium on ‘Genetics of male infertility’ (Florence, 19–21 September, 2013). During the last 10 years the gr/gr deletion has been demonstrated as a significant risk factor for impaired sperm production. However, the screening for this deletion type in the routine diagnostic setting is still a debated issue among experts. The original basic protocol based on two multiplex polymerase chain reactions remains fully valid and appropriate for accurate diagnosis of complete AZF deletions and it requires only a minor modification in populations with a specific Y chromosome background. However, in light of novel data on genotype–phenotype correlations, the extension analysis for the AZFa and AZFb deletions is now routinely recommended. Novel methods and kits with excessively high number of markers do not improve the sensitivity of the test, may even complicate the interpretation of the results and are not recommended. Annual participation in an external quality control programme is strongly encouraged. The 12

  15. The inhibition of substance P-induced histamine release from mast cells by 6, 7-dihydro-6, 8, 8, 10-tetramethyl-8H-pyrano-[3, 2-g] chromone-2-carboxylic acid (EAA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutsumi,Koji

    1984-08-01

    Full Text Available In the presence of extracellular Ca2+, 6,7-dihydro-6,8,8, 10-tetramethyl-8H-pyrano [3, 2-g] chromone-2-carboxylic acid (EAA had an inhibitory effect on the substance P-induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells. Not only Ca2+ but also Mg2+, Sr2+ and Ba2+ were effective in enhancing the activity of EAA. Marked tachyphylaxis to EAA developed irrespective of the presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+. Cross-tachyphylaxis was observed between EAA and disodium cromoglycate (DSCG. These results indicate that the mode of action of EAA is similar, but not identical, with that of DSCG.

  16. Comparing new anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, James M

    2012-12-01

    For years, the pharmaceutical industry has been trying to find a safe and effective drug to replace warfarin. Although warfarin is an effective anticoagulant, its pharmacology, adverse effects, and risk profiles dictate that patients taking this medication must be monitored judiciously. The US Food and Drug Administration has approved two drugs for commercial use, dabigatran and rivaroxaban, that will compete directly with warfarin for use in specific indications. Because of direct marketing to patients, physicians are being asked to comment on these new medications. This brief review illustrates the data available for the two new drugs when compared to warfarin for the specified indications. For some patients, these drugs may be highly beneficial and offer an excellent alternative to warfarin. For others, warfarin may still be the preferred drug. PMID:23211502

  17. Anticoagulant induced leukoagglutination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low leukocyte count secondary to leukocyte aggregation caused by an ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) occur in both benign and malignant disorders. We report a 71-year-old male patient who was admitted to the hospital with acute chest infection. Complete blood count (CBC) collected in ETDA tube and analyzed by sysmex instrument (SE/9500) revealed low hemoglobin level of 9.4g/dl, white blood cell (WBC) count of 8.2x109/L. Peripheral blood smear review shows multiple leukocyte aggregation (one clump in each field). When we asked for another blood sample in citrate anticoagulant, the CBC showed WBC count of 11.8x109/L and neutrophils of 6.26x109/L. This is a case of low leukocyte count secondary to leukocyte aggregation induced by EDTA. (author)

  18. Anticoagulation Considerations for Travel to High Altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2015-09-01

    DeLoughery, Thomas G. Anticoagulation considerations for travel to high altitude. High Alt Med Biol 16:181-185, 2015.-An increasing percentage of the population are on anticoagulation medicine for clinical reasons ranging from stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation to long term prevention of deep venous thrombosis. In recent years, several new direct oral anticoagulants have entered the market. The key questions that should be kept in mind when approaching a potential traveler on anticoagulation are: 1) why is the patient on anticoagulation? 2) do they need to stay on anticoagulation? 3) what are the choices for their anticoagulation? 4) will there be any drug interactions with medications needed for travel? and 5) how will they monitor their anticoagulation while traveling? Knowing the answers to these questions then can allow for proper counseling and planning for the anticoagulated traveler's trip. PMID:26186419

  19. Anticoagulation in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jeffrey C; Pugliese, Steven C; Fox, Daniel L; Badesch, David B

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by molecular and pathologic alteration to the pulmonary circulation, resulting in increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular failure, and eventual death. Pharmacologic treatment of PAH consists of use of a multitude of pulmonary vasodilators, sometimes in combination. PAH has been associated with increased thrombosis and disrupted coagulation and fibrinolysis, making anticoagulation an attractive and frequently employed therapeutic modality. Observational studies have provided some insight into the therapeutic potential of anticoagulation in idiopathic PAH, but there is a distinct lack of well-controlled prospective trials. Due to the conflicting evidence, there is a large amount of heterogeneity in the application of therapeutic anticoagulation in PAH and further well-controlled prospective trials are needed to clarify its role in treating PAH. PMID:27137522

  20. Local hemostatic measures in anticoagulated patients undergoing oral surgery: a systematized literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Wildson Gurgel Costa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To conduct a systematized review of the literature about the main local hemostatic measures to control postoperative bleeding in anticoagulated patients. METHODS: A systematized review of literature was performed in the electronic database Medline (PubMed without restriction of the publication date. The eligibility criteria were studies involving maintenance of the anticoagulant therapy, prospective studies, retrospective studies, randomized clinical trials, controlled clinical studies, comparative studies, multicentric studies or case-control studies. Studies discontinuing anticoagulant therapy, case reports, literature reviews, in vitro studies, animal experiments and articles written in language not compatible with the search strategy adopted in this work were excluded. RESULTS: Twenty-four articles that met the adopted eligibility criteria were selected, enrolling 3891 subjects under anticoagulant therapy. A total of 171 cases of hemorrhage was observed. Tranexamic acid was the main local hemostatic measure used to controlling of postoperative bleeding. CONCLUSION: The local hemostatic measures proved to be effective according to previously published studies. Nevertheless, further clinical studies should be conducted to confirm this effectiveness.

  1. Multicentric Castleman's disease & HIV infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cotter, A

    2009-10-01

    We report the case of a 35 year patient from Nigeria who presented with fever and splenomegaly. The initial diagnosis was Salmonellosis. However, relapsing symptoms lead to a re-evaluation and ultimately a diagnosis of Multicentric Castleman\\'s Disease (MCD). There is no gold standard treatment but our patient responded to Rituximab and Highly active anti-retroviral therapy. MCD is a rare, aggressive disease that should be considered in a HIV positive patient presenting with fever and significant lymphadenopathy.

  2. Anticoagulation in Older Adults with Multimorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Anna L; Fang, Margaret C

    2016-05-01

    The number of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) who are of advanced age or have multiple comorbidities is expected to increase substantially. Older patients with AF generally gain a net benefit from anticoagulation. Guidelines typically recommend anticoagulation. There are multiple challenges in the safe use of anticoagulation in frail patients, including bleeding risk, monitoring and adherence, and polypharmacy. Although there are options for chronic oral anticoagulation, clinicians must understand the unique advantages and disadvantages of these medications when developing a management plan. This article reviews issues surrounding the appropriate use and selection of anticoagulants in complex older patients with AF. PMID:27113150

  3. Lupus anticoagulant is the main predictor of adverse pregnancy outcomes in aPL-positive patients: validation of PROMISSE study results

    OpenAIRE

    Yelnik, Cecile M; Laskin, Carl A.; Porter, T. Flint; Branch, D Ware; Buyon, Jill P.; Guerra, Marta M; Lockshin, Michael D; Petri, Michelle; Merrill, Joan T; Sammaritano, Lisa R; Kim, Mimi Y; Salmon, Jane E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective We previously reported that lupus anticoagulant (LAC) is the main predictor of poor pregnancy outcome in antiphospholipid antibody (aPL)-positive patients. We sought to confirm this finding in an independent group of patients who were subsequently recruited into the PROMISSE study. Methods The PROMISSE study is a multicentre, prospective, observational study of pregnancy outcomes in women with aPL and/or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) that enrolled patients from 2003 to 2015. Al...

  4. Evaluation of anticoagulant control in a pharmacist operated anticoagulant clinic.

    OpenAIRE

    Radley, A S; Hall, J; Farrow, M.; Carey, P J

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To compare the quality of outpatient anticoagulant control before and after the transfer of dosing responsibility to designated trained pharmacists from rotating junior medical staff. METHODS--All International Normalised Ratio (INR) values for an eight month period either side of the staff changeover were assessed for precision of therapeutic control according to described standards. Allowing for patient associated effects, observed and expected frequencies of "successful" control for ...

  5. The challenges of lupus anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chighizola, Cecilia Beatrice; Raschi, Elena; Banzato, Alessandra; Borghi, Maria Orietta; Pengo, Vittorio; Meroni, Pier Luigi

    2016-01-01

    The term "lupus anticoagulant" (LA) refers to a heterogeneous group of immunoglobulins behaving as acquired in vitro inhibitors of coagulation. These antibodies, namely anti-β2GPI and anti-prothrombin antibodies, induce the in vitro elongation of clotting time interfering with phospholipid-dependent coagulation cofactors. Positive LA is associated with thrombosis and pregnancy complications, providing one of the three laboratory criteria for the classification of the anti-phospholipid syndrome. LA is the strongest predictor of clinical events, especially when associated with other anti-phospholipid antibodies. Much more controversial is the risk conveyed by isolated and weak LA. LA detection is technically laborious, envisaging screening, mixing and confirming tests. Hopefully critical issues in LA detection, such as the interference of anticoagulants, will be overcome, in the next future. PMID:26789237

  6. Anticoagulant Medicine: Potential for Drug-Food Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AerobiKa® Cardiology Medications Anticoagulant Medicine Anticoagulants and Drug-Food Interactions COPD Medications Bronchodilators Anti-Inflammatories Antibiotics Managing Your Medications Devices ...

  7. To anticoagulate or not to anticoagulate patients with cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, S P

    2001-11-01

    The current published literature does not indicate whether the long-term effect of anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy contributes to mortality reduction in patients with LV dysfunction. Evaluating patients for personal risk for emboli or for ischemic coronary artery events may influence the choice of therapies. As more is learned about the mechanisms of drug effects in different populations, physicians may be better able to direct appropriate therapies. Until that time, one must weigh the risks and benefits of each drug alone and in combination. In NYHA class IV patients, the risk for thrombosis owing to spontaneous clotting increases as does the adverse potential of warfarin and the adverse effects of inhibiting prostaglandin mediated vasodilation by aspirin. In NYHA class I and II patients, the quality of life and convenience of multidrug therapy is weighed against the devastating effect of a major stroke. In less symptomatic patients, the long-term risk for acute coronary events may be higher than previously identified. This would suggest that all patients with depressed LV function should be on some type of antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy. The current WATCH study will provide much needed information about the outcome differences between these agents. Conclusions based on available data include the following: Heart failure is increasing in incidence and prevalence. Atherosclerotic disease is an important causative factor for the development of heart failure or may be a comorbid condition in these patients. There is a measurable rate of stroke in patients with heart failure, although the cause of death in large studies is more often owing to sudden death or progressive heart failure. Sudden death may be from new ischemic events, asystole, or from ventricular tachyarrhythmias. In patients with heart failure, not all strokes are cardioembolic in origin. The benefits and risks of warfarin may be increased as the EF worsens or heart failure functional class

  8. Anticoagulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... even if it is not listed below. Aspirin Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol, Excedrin) Ibuprofen (e.g., Motrin, ... skin or eyes (jaundice) Rare side effects: Headache Dizziness Shortness of breath Mouth sores or bleeding gums ...

  9. Optical profiling of anticoagulation status (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tshikudi, Diane M.; Tripathi, Markandey M.; Hajjarian, Zeinab; Nadkarni, Seemantini K.

    2016-02-01

    Defective blood coagulation resulting from excessive procoagulant activity often leads to thrombotic disorders such as stroke and myocardial infarction. A variety of oral and injectable anticoagulant drugs are prescribed to prevent or treat life-threatening thrombosis. However, due to bleeding complications often associated with anticoagulant treatment, routine monitoring and accurate dosing of anticoagulant therapy is imperative. We have developed Optical thromboelastography (OTEG), a non-contact approach that utilizes a drop of whole blood to measure blood coagulation status in patients. Here, we demonstrate the capability of OTEG for rapidly monitoring anticoagulation in whole blood samples. OTEG monitors coagulation status by assessing changes in blood viscosity from temporal intensity fluctuations of laser speckle patterns during clotting. In OTEG a blood drop is illuminated with coherent light and the blood viscosity is measured from the speckle intensity autocorrelation curve, g2 (t). The metrics, clotting time (R+k), clot progression (angle) and maximum clot stiffness (MA) are then extracted. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the accuracy of OTEG in assessing anticoagulation status of common anticoagulants including heparin, argatroban and rivaroxaban status. A dose-dependent prolongation of R+k was observed in anticoagulated blood, which closely corresponded with standard-reference Thromboelastography (TEG) (r 0.87-0.99, P>0.01 for all cases). OTEG angle was unaltered by anticoagulation whereas TEG angle presented a dose-dependent diminution probably linked to clot rupture. In both OTEG and TEG, MA was unaffected by heparin, argatroban or rivaroxaban. We conclude that OTEG can accurately monitor anticoagulation status following treatment, potentially providing a powerful tool for routine monitoring of patients in the doctor's office or in the home setting.

  10. [Direct oral anticoagulant associated bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godier, A; Martin, A-C; Rosencher, N; Susen, S

    2016-07-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) are recommended for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. However, they are associated with hemorrhagic complications. Management of DOAC-induced bleeding remains challenging. Activated or non-activated prothrombin concentrates are proposed, although their efficacy to reverse DOAC is uncertain. Therapeutic options also include antidotes: idarucizumab, antidote for dabigatran, has been approved for use whereas andexanet alpha, antidote for anti-Xa agents, and aripazine, antidote for all DOAC, are under development. Other options include hemodialysis for the treatment of dabigatran-associated bleeding and administration of oral charcoal if recent DOAC ingestion. DOAC plasma concentration measurement is necessary to guide DOAC reversal. We propose an update on DOAC-associated bleeding, integrating the availability of dabigatran antidote and the critical place of DOAC concentration measurements. PMID:27297642

  11. Relationship between protein C antigen and anticoagulant activity during oral anticoagulation and in selected disease states.

    OpenAIRE

    Vigano D'Angelo, S; Comp, P C; Esmon, C T; D'Angelo, A.

    1986-01-01

    Protein C is a natural vitamin K-dependent plasma anticoagulant, deficiencies of which have been found in patients with recurrent thrombosis and warfarin-induced skin necrosis. To appreciate more fully the role of protein C in disease states and during oral anticoagulation, a new functional assay for protein C involving adsorption of plasma protein C on a Ca+2-dependent monoclonal antibody, elution, quantitative activation, and assessment of plasma anticoagulant activity, has been developed. ...

  12. Multicentric malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a rare type of sarcoma that is found in the digestive system, most often in the wall of the stomach. Multiple GISTs are extremely rare and usually associated with type 1 neurofibromatosis and familial GIST. We report here a case of a 70-year-old woman who reported pain in the abdomen, loss of appetite, and weight loss for six months. Ultrasound examination showed a small bowel mass along with multiple peritoneal deposits and a mass within the liver. Barium studies were suggestive of a neoplastic pathology of the distal ileum. A differential diagnosis of adenocarcinoma/lymphoma with metastases was entertained. Perioperative findings showed two large growths arising from the jejunum and the distal ileum, along with multiple smaller nodules on the serosal surface and adjoining mesentery of the involved bowel segments. Segmental resection of the involved portions of the intestine was performed. Histopathological features were consistent with those of multicentric malignant GIST-not otherwise specified (GIST-NOS). Follow-up examination three months after surgery showed no evidence of recurrence. (author)

  13. Multicentric malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Shailaja; Singh, Sanjeet K; Pujani, Mukta

    2009-01-01

    Malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a rare type of sarcoma that is found in the digestive system, most often in the wall of the stomach. Multiple GISTs are extremely rare and usually associated with type 1 neurofibromatosis and familial GIST.We report here a case of a 70-year-old woman who reported pain in the abdomen, loss of appetite, and weight loss for six months. Ultrasound examination showed a small bowel mass along with multiple peritoneal deposits and a mass within the liver. Barium studies were suggestive of a neoplastic pathology of the distal ileum. A differential diagnosis of adenocarcinoma/lymphoma with metastases was entertained. Perioperative findings showed two large growths arising from the jejunum and the distal ileum, along with multiple smaller nodules on the serosal surface and adjoining mesentery of the involved bowel segments. Segmental resection of the involved portions of the intestine was performed. Histopathological features were consistent with those of multicentric malignant GIST-not otherwise specified (GIST-NOS). Follow-up examination three months after surgery showed no evidence of recurrence. PMID:19568556

  14. Multicentric malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukla Shailaja

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST is a rare type of sarcoma that is found in the digestive system, most often in the wall of the stomach. Multiple GISTs are extremely rare and usually associated with type 1 neurofibromatosis and familial GIST. We report here a case of a 70-year-old woman who reported pain in the abdomen, loss of appetite, and weight loss for six months. Ultrasound examination showed a small bowel mass along with multiple peritoneal deposits and a mass within the liver. Barium studies were suggestive of a neoplastic pathology of the distal ileum. A differential diagnosis of adenocarcinoma/lymphoma with metastases was entertained. Perioperative findings showed two large growths arising from the jejunum and the distal ileum, along with multiple smaller nodules on the serosal surface and adjoining mesentery of the involved bowel segments. Segmental resection of the involved portions of the intestine was performed. Histopathological features were consistent with those of multicentric malignant GIST-not otherwise specified (GIST-NOS. Follow-up examination three months after surgery showed no evidence of recurrence.

  15. Primary multicentric cutaneous epithelioid angiosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murugan Sundaram

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous epithelioid angiosarcoma is a rare malignant vascular tumor, most commonly affecting elderly men, and is usually located on the extremities. We report a case of an 81-year-old lady who presented with two ulcerated plaques over the right temporal and parietal scalp of 1 year duration. The right submaxillary and submandibular lymph nodes were enlarged and tender. Computed tomography (CT scan of the head showed soft tissue swelling over parietal and temporal areas and there was no intracranial extension. Ultrasonogram of the abdomen showed hyperechoic areas in liver suggestive of secondaries. Histopathology of the skin lesion showed the dermis and subcutis composed of clusters of atypical epithelioid cells with vesicular nuclei, prominent nucleoli and eosinophilic cytoplasm with increased mitotic figures. Immunohistochemical staining revealed CD-31, 33, 34 and vimentin positivity, while cytokeratin was negative confirming the diagnosis of epitheloid angiosarcoma. This case report highlights the unusual occurrence of multicentric epitheloid angiosarcoma on the scalp with secondaries in the liver.

  16. Parenteral anticoagulation in patients with cancer who have no therapeutic or prophylactic indication for anticoagulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A. Akl; S. Gunukula; M. Barba; V.E.D. Yosuico; F.F. van Doormaal; S. Kuipers; S. Middeldorp; H.O. Dickinson; A. Bryant; H. Schuenemann

    2011-01-01

    Background Anticoagulation may improve survival in patients with cancer through an antitumor effect in addition to the perceived antithrombotic effect. Objectives To evaluate the efficacy and safety of parenteral anticoagulants in patients with cancer with no therapeutic or prophylactic indication f

  17. Anticoagulation control in atrial fibrillation patients present to outpatient clinic of cardiology versus anticoagulant clinics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Xin; MA Chang-sheng; LIU Xiao-hui; DONG Jian-zeng; WANG Jun-nan; CHENG Xiao-jing

    2005-01-01

    @@ Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia in clinical practice, which if untreated results in a doubling of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. AF is an independent predictor of stroke, with an annual risk 5 to 6 times higher than patients in sinus rhythm.1 During recent years, several randomised clinical trials conducted by investigators around the world involving 13 843 participants with NVAF have demonstrated convincingly the value of warfarin therapies for stroke prevention in high risk patients.2-8 However, the dose response of warfarin is complex and its activity is easily altered by concurrent medications, food interactions, alcohol and illnesses. Adherence to medical advice and routine monitoring of the international normalized ratio (INR) is important, because low anticoagulant intensity predisposes the patients to thromboembolic complications and high intensity to haemorrhage. Studies suggested that anticoagulant clinics could improve the quality of anticoagulation control,9 and anticoagulant clinics are common in western countries. However, in China, most AF patients taking warfarin usually attend the outpatient clinic of cardiology, while the quality of anticoagulation control is never investigated. We therefore assessed anticoagulation control in the outpatient clinic of cardiology, and the quality of anticoagulation control since the establishment of anticoagulant clinics.

  18. Treating KSHV-Associated Multicentric Castleman Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, patients with KSHV-associated multicentric Castleman disease will receive IV tocilizumab every other week for up to 12 weeks. Patients who do not benefit may go on to receive high-dose AZT and valganciclovir as well.

  19. Corticosteroid contact allergy: an EECDRG multicentre study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dooms-Goossens, A; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Brandäo, F M; Bruynzeel, D; Burrows, D; Camarasa, J; Ducombs, G; Frosch, P; Hannuksela, M; Lachapelle, J M; Lahti, A; Menné, T; Wahlberg, J E; Wilkinson, J D

    1996-01-01

    This article describes the results of an EECDRG multicentre study on contact allergy to corticosteroids. A total of 7238 patients were investigated: 6238 in 13 centres in the course of 1993, and 1000 patients in 1 centre in 1993 and 1994. The 5 corticosteroids tested were budesonide 0.1% pet., be...

  20. Excessive anticoagulation with warfarin or phenprocoumon may have multiple causes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meegaard, Peter Martin; Holck, Line H V; Pottegård, Anton;

    2012-01-01

    Excessive anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists is a serious condition with a substantial risk of an adverse outcome. We thus found it of interest to review a large case series to characterize the underlying causes of excessive anticoagulation....

  1. Interrupting Anticoagulation in Patients With Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Yates, Scott W

    2014-01-01

    No agents are approved to reverse the effects of newer anticoagulants used to reduce the risk of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. This review focuses on ways to monitor, interrupt, and reverse such anticoagulation.

  2. Anticoagulant conversion in the elderly: pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nasser, Bassam

    2016-05-01

    The prevalence of medical conditions representing a risk for thromboembolic complications and requiring antithrombotic therapy increases gradually with age. Two cases of fatal noncritical organ bleeding complication that occurred during the conversion period from initial fondaparinux to vitamin K antagonist are presented. An 81-year-old obese female patient (body mass index 43 kg/m(2)) with previous postoperative thrombosis underwent uneventful total knee replacement under spinal anesthesia. She presented with popliteal hematoma during conversion to oral anticoagulant. A 92-year-old female patient (body mass index 33 kg/m(2)) with left lower limb thrombosis was referred to our orthopedics department from her senior citizens' home for right lower limb hematoma and ischemia that occurred during conversion to oral anticoagulant. Thromboembolic and bleeding events in the elderly are real public health problems. Specific guidelines dedicated to this particular population are needed, which will improve the management of anticoagulation and decrease risk of complications. PMID:26547115

  3. Pharmacology of anticoagulants used in the treatment of venous thromboembolism

    OpenAIRE

    Nutescu, Edith A.; Burnett, Allison; Fanikos, John; Spinler, Sarah; Wittkowsky, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Anticoagulant drugs are the foundation of therapy for patients with VTE. While effective therapeutic agents, anticoagulants can also result in hemorrhage and other side effects. Thus, anticoagulant therapy selection should be guided by the risks, benefits and pharmacologic characteristics of each agent for each patient. Safe use of anticoagulants requires not only an in-depth knowledge of their pharmacologic properties but also a comprehensive approach to patient management and education. Thi...

  4. Hematometra secondary to anticoagulant rodenticide toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An adult, intact female Australian shepherd presented for frank vaginal bleeding of unknown duration. The only coagulation profile abnormality upon presentation was mild prolongation of the partial thromboplastin time (PTT). The uterus was removed at surgery and contained a large amount of coagulated blood. Clotting profiles were markedly abnormal48 hours postoperatively. Serum analysis was positive for brodifacoum, an anticoagulant rodenticide. Preoperative coagulation was most likely normalized by vitamin K-1 therapy administered prior to presentation. The only manifestation of anticoagulant rodenticide was hematometra. Rodenticide intoxication should be considered in the differential diagnosis list of hematometra or metrorrhagia

  5. Fatal pulmonary hemorrhage after taking anticoagulation medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel P. Hammar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 64-year-old man with extensive diffuse acute lung hemorrhage, presumably as a result of anticoagulation therapy. We evaluated reports in the literature concerning acute exacerbation (acute lung injury of unknown cause in UIP and other forms of fibrotic interstitial pneumonias. We also evaluated autopsy tissue in this case in order to determine the cause of death in this 64-year-old man, who was initially thought to have an asbestos-related disease. Based on the autopsy findings, this man died as a result of anticoagulation therapy; specifically, the use of Xarelto® (rivaroxaban.

  6. [Pharmacologic heterogeneity of new anticoagulants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samamaa, M-M; Conard, J; Flaujac, C; Combe, S; Horellou, M-H

    2011-12-01

    Amongst numerous promising anticoagulant molecules, rivaroxaban (Xarelto(®)), dabigatran (Pradaxa(®)) and apixaban (Eliquis(®)) have been registered outside the USA in the prevention of thromboembolic events in patients undergoing total hip or knee prosthetic replacement. Rivaroxaban however has been granted authorisation by the FDA for the thromboprophylaxis after surgery for total hip or knee surgery. Dabigatran has been granted authorisation by the FDA in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (RE-LY trial) while rivaroxaban is expecting approval in this same indication (ROCKET trial). Phase III results in the treatment and in the secondary prevention of established venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism are encouraging. These small molecules are obtained by chemical synthesis, their molecular weight is lower than 500 daltons. Many coagulation tests may be affected by these molecules. Those modifications should be known in order to avoid misinterpretation of the tests but could also be used to measure plasma concentrations of these products. The choice of a non specific global and readily available test has been documented (Quick time for rivaroxaban and aPTT for dabigatran). Anti-Xa (for rivaroxaban) and anti-IIa (for dabigatran) activities should however be preferred, expressed in ng/ml with calibrated plasmas (containing predetermined concentration of the tested drug). The half-life is around 8 to 12 hours, with a peak activity 2 to 4 hours after ingestion. Dabigatran is mainly eliminated via the kidney, hence requiring dose-adjustment in case of moderate renal insufficiency, and contra-indicated in case of severe renal insufficiency. Rivaroxaban being excreted via kidney and liver, some precautions should apply in case of liver insufficiency. No data are available in pregnancy or pediatrics, clinical trials are ongoing. There are few interactions with concomitant drugs, which should not be ignored. The short half-life of these new agents compensates for the

  7. The Clinicopathological Factors Associated with Multicentricity in Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Murat Kilic

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Multicentricity is a frequent feature of papillary thyroid cancer, and is generally associated with advanced stage, increased risk of regional and distant metastasis. In this study, we aimed to determine the associated clinicopathological factors on multicentricity in papillary thyroid cancer. Material and Method: One hundred and thirty patients with papillary thyroid cancer were included in this retrospective study. The affecting clinical and histopathological factors on multicentricity...

  8. Intradural Involvement of Multicentric Myxoid Liposarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Su-Hee; Rhim, Seung-Chul; Hyun, Seung-Jae; Bae, Chae Wan; Khang, Shin-Kwang

    2010-01-01

    Liposarcomas are malignant tumors of the soft tissue, with myxoid liposarcoma being the second most common subtype, tending to occur in the limbs, particularly in the thighs. Myxoid liposarcomas have an intermediate prognosis between well-differentiated and pleomorphic tumors. Spinal metastasis is usual but intradural involvement is extremely rare. We present an unusual case of a multicentric myxoid liposarcoma with intradural involvement. A 41-year-old woman complained of tingling sensation ...

  9. Pharmacology of anticoagulants used in the treatment of venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutescu, Edith A; Burnett, Allison; Fanikos, John; Spinler, Sarah; Wittkowsky, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Anticoagulant drugs are the foundation of therapy for patients with VTE. While effective therapeutic agents, anticoagulants can also result in hemorrhage and other side effects. Thus, anticoagulant therapy selection should be guided by the risks, benefits and pharmacologic characteristics of each agent for each patient. Safe use of anticoagulants requires not only an in-depth knowledge of their pharmacologic properties but also a comprehensive approach to patient management and education. This paper will summarize the key pharmacologic properties of the anticoagulant agents used in the treatment of patients with VTE. PMID:26780737

  10. Anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A S; Idorn, L; Nørager, B;

    2015-01-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease are a growing population. One of the major challenges in the care of these patients is to prevent thromboembolic episodes. Despite relative young age and no typical cardiovascular risk factors, this cohort has a high prevalence of thrombotic events. It is....... Furthermore, there is a lack of scientific evidence regarding how to prevent thromboembolic events with anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature pertaining to anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease and hence enable...... difficult to use treatment algorithms from the general adult population with acquired heart disease in this heterogeneous population due to special conditions such as myocardial scarring after previous surgery, atypical atrial flutter, prothrombotic conditions and the presence of interatrial shunts...

  11. Lupus anticoagulants: pathogenesis and laboratory diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, E L

    1997-12-01

    The pathogenesis of the lupus anticoagulant (LA) has been the focus of much research over the past decade, and a plethora of laboratory tests have been developed to detect it. This essay reviews the nature of LA and its pathogenesis, and a number of approaches employed in its diagnosis. These range from well established tests such as the kaolin clotting time (KCT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and tissue thromboplastin inhibition test (TTI), to the 'newer' tests such as the dilute Russell's viper venom time (DRVVT) and more recent snake venom tests such as the textarin/ecarin ratio and Taipan snake venom time (TSVT). The criteria for diagnosis are discussed, including pre-analytical variables such as sample preparation, and the effects of therapeutic anticoagulants used to treat thrombotic manifestations of the syndrome or an underlying disease process. PMID:9624740

  12. [Therapeutic equivalence of the new oral anticoagulants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Villar, A; Nacle López, I; Barbero Hernández, M J; Lizan Tudela, L

    2015-10-01

    In an attempt to minimize the economic impact due to the incorporation of innovative drugs, health authorities have promoted and supported the evaluation and market positioning of drugs, as equivalent therapeutic alternatives. This issue has recently gained importance, possibly due to the current economic crisis. The equivalent therapeutic alternatives are justified by the need to compete on price, and by the authorities recommendation to establish therapeutic equivalence, price and financing of medicinal products at the same time. The establishment of the new oral anticoagulants and the equivalent therapeutic alternatives is a problematic issue if it is based on the absence of direct comparisons between different drugs and the questionable methodology used in the current indirect comparisons. Currently, it is difficult to determine when a new oral anticoagulant is more recommendable than others, but efforts are being made in order to propose alternatives for the decision based on patient characteristics. PMID:26146035

  13. Heterofucans from Dictyota menstrualis have anticoagulant activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.R.L. Albuquerque

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Fucan is a term used to denote a family of sulfated L-fucose-rich polysaccharides which are present in the extracellular matrix of brown seaweed and in the egg jelly coat of sea urchins. Plant fucans have several biological activities, including anticoagulant and antithrombotic, related to the structural and chemical composition of polysaccharides. We have extracted sulfated polysaccharides from the brown seaweed Dictyota menstrualis by proteolytic digestion, followed by separation into 5 fractions by sequential acetone precipitation. Gel electrophoresis using 0.05 M 1,3-diaminopropane-acetate buffer, pH 9.0, stained with 0.1% toluidine blue, showed the presence of sulfated polysaccharides in all fractions. The chemical analyses demonstrated that all fractions are composed mainly of fucose, xylose, galactose, uronic acid, and sulfate. The anticoagulant activity of these heterofucans was determined by activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT using citrate normal human plasma. Only the fucans F1.0v and F1.5v showed anticoagulant activity. To prolong the coagulation time to double the baseline value in the APTT, the required concentration of fucan F1.0v (20 µg/ml was only 4.88-fold higher than that of the low molecular weight heparin Clexane® (4.1 µg/ml, whereas 80 µg/ml fucan 1.5 was needed to obtain the same effect. For both fucans this effect was abolished by desulfation. These polymers are composed of fucose, xylose, uronic acid, galactose, and sulfate at molar ratios of 1.0:0.8:0.7:0.8:0.4 and 1.0:0.3:0.4:1.5:1.3, respectively. This is the fist report indicating the presence of a heterofucan with higher anticoagulant activity from brown seaweed.

  14. [New orally anticoagulants and brain stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczorowska, Beata; Pawełczyk, Małgorzata; Przybyła, Monika

    2016-05-26

    Brain stroke is a grave society problem. About 20% ischemic strokes are cardiac related problems. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cause of ischemic strokes. Decision to deploy anticoagulant treatment with AF patient depends on bleeding and thrombo-embolic risk which summerise scale CHA2DS2VASc and HAS-BLED. Past recent years in AF treatment anticoagulants from the group of vitamin K antagonist were used. At present in brain stroke prevention and systemic emboilment, new oral anticoagulants (NOA) which weren't worst than vitamin K antagonists, and they are recomendet in most cases of AF unrelated with heart valve defets. Useing NOA causes lower risk of bleeding, including intracranial heamorrhage. It is believed that this is related to the selective inhibition of specific coagulation factors, and respect other hemostatic mechanisms. Results from clinical studies NOA are encouraging, but still lacks clear answers regarding, among other things: long-term safety of treatment and economically viable in everyday clinical practice. In addition, to date there is no specific antidote for this group of drugs. PMID:27234866

  15. Novel oral anticoagulants in plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, C F; Reid, A J

    2016-05-01

    Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have emerged as a good alternative to warfarin in the prevention of stroke for patients with atrial fibrillation. NOAC use is increasing rapidly; therefore, greater understanding of their use in the perioperative period is important for optimal care. Studies and reviews that reported on the use of NOACs were identified, with particular focus on the perioperative period. PubMed was searched for relevant articles published between January 2000 and August 2015. The inevitable rise in the use of NOACs such as rivaroxaban (Xarelto™), apixaban (Eliquis™), edoxaban (Lixiana™) and dabigatran (Pradaxa™) may present a simplified approach to perioperative anticoagulant management due to fewer drug interactions, rapidity of onset of action and relatively short half-lives. Coagulation status, however, cannot reliably be monitored and no antidotes are currently available. When planning for discontinuation of NOACs, special consideration of renal function is required. Advice regarding the management of bleeding complications is provided for consideration in emergency surgery. In extreme circumstances, haemodialysis may be considered for bleeding with the use of dabigatran. NOACs will increasingly affect operative planning in plastic surgery. In order to reduce the incidence of complications associated with anticoagulation, the management of NOACs in the perioperative period requires knowledge of the time of last dose, renal function and the bleeding risk of the planned procedure. Consideration of these factors will allow appropriate interpretation of the current guidelines. PMID:27013144

  16. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulation agents in anticoagulant naive atrial fibrillation patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Sørensen, Rikke; Hansen, Morten Lock;

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulation (NOAC) agents have been approved for stroke prophylaxis in atrial fibrillation (AF). We investigated 'real-world' information on how these drugs are being adopted. METHODS AND RESULTS: Using Danish nationwide administrative registers, we...... the drug came on market. By October, 2013, 40% were being started on warfarin and dabigatran, respectively, and another 20% were started on either rivaroxaban or apixaban. Rivaroxaban and apixaban users generally had a higher predicted risk of stroke and bleeding compared with warfarin and dabigatran users....... Older age, female gender, and prior stroke were some of the factors associated with NOAC use vs. warfarin, whereas chronic kidney disease, myocardial infarction, and heart failure showed the opposite association. CONCLUSION: Among oral anticoagulation-naïve AF patients initiated on oral anticoagulation...

  17. Pharmacist-managed oral anticoagulation therapy in the community setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwmeester, Carla; Chim, Christine

    2013-05-01

    Pharmacists are at the forefront when caring for patients requiring anticoagulation resulting from chronic conditions, complex medications therapy, or at risk for drug interactions. As a consequence, there is a greater need for pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinics in the community setting. This article will review special considerations for oral anticoagulant therapy in the elderly, collaborative therapy management, establishment of policies and procedures, documentation of patient visits, patient counseling, and barriers to successful anticoagulation management. It will also discuss evidence-based guidelines for the use of oral anticoagulants and compare the agents currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Finally, barriers to anticoagulation management will be examined, including issues with adherence and communication with patients and health care providers. PMID:23649677

  18. An audit of anticoagulant management to assess anticoagulant control using decision support software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Paul; Harper, Joe; Hill, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of a computerised self-adjusting anticoagulant algorithm to predict appropriate warfarin dosing and to assess its use in clinical practice. Design A 3-year audit of anticoagulant control in patients managed by doctors and pharmacists using computer decision support and an evaluation of the impact of dose adjustments made by the users. Participants 3660 patients on oral anticoagulants; one-third of patients managed by doctors and two-thirds by pharmacists. Setting Anticoagulant supervision in primary care and pharmacies at 60 sites in New Zealand. Main outcome measures The time in the therapeutic range (TTR), the outcome of adherence to the computer dosing algorithm, the percentage of time the clinicians over-ride the algorithm and the impact of their intervention on anticoagulant control. Results A TTR of 72.9% was achieved for all patients. The TTR was significantly better in patients managed by pharmacists than doctors (75.1% versus 67.4%, ppharmacists. Conclusions The clinicians predominantly change the dose when the INR is below the therapeutic range. The changes are not necessary to correct for inaccuracies in the algorithm. The most likely explanation is the clinician's belief that their own dose adjustment would achieve better control; however, in practice, their changes tend to underdose patients. The doctors achieved poorer control than the pharmacists; this is in part due to the action of the doctors over-riding the algorithm. Our results imply that clinicians could achieve better anticoagulant control if they more closely followed the computer algorithm. PMID:25183709

  19. Use of anticoagulants in elderly patients: practical recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helia Robert-Ebadi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Helia Robert-Ebadi, Grégoire Le Gal, Marc RighiniDivision of Angiology and Hemostasis (HRE, MR, Department of Internal Medicine, Geneva University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland, and Department of Internal Medicine and Chest Diseases, EA 3878 (GETBO, Brest University Hospital, Brest, France (GLGAbstract: Elderly people represent a patient population at high thromboembolic risk, but also at high hemorrhagic risk. There is a general tendency among physicians to underuse anticoagulants in the elderly, probably both because of underestimation of thromboembolic risk and overestimation of bleeding risk. The main indications for anticoagulation are venous thromboembolism (VTE prophylaxis in medical and surgical settings, VTE treatment, atrial fibrillation (AF and valvular heart disease. Available anticoagulants for VTE prophylaxis and initial treatment of VTE are low molecular weight heparins (LMWH, unfractionated heparin (UFH or synthetic anti-factor Xa pentasaccharide fondaparinux. For long-term anticoagulation vitamin K antagonists (VKA are the first choice and only available oral anticoagulants nowadays. Assessing the benefit-risk ratio of anticoagulation is one of the most challenging issues in the individual elderly patient, patients at highest hemorrhagic risk often being those who would have the greatest benefit from anticoagulants. Some specific considerations are of utmost importance when using anticoagulants in the elderly to maximize safety of these treatments, including decreased renal function, co-morbidities and risk of falls, altered pharmacodynamics of anticoagulants especially VKAs, association with antiplatelet agents, patient education. Newer anticoagulants that are currently under study could simplify the management and increase the safety of anticoagulation in the future.Keywords: anticoagulation, elderly patients, venous thromboembolism, hemorrhagic risk, atrial fibrillation, thrombin inhibitors, factor Xa

  20. New anticoagulants for the prevention of venous thromboembolism

    OpenAIRE

    Becattini, Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    Cecilia Becattini, Alessandra Lignani, Giancarlo AgnelliInternal and Cardiovascular Medicine and Stroke Unit, University of Perugia, ItalyAbstract: Anticoagulant drugs have an essential role in the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic diseases. Currently available anticoagulants substantially reduce the incidence of thromboembolic events in a number of clinical conditions. However, these agents have limitations that strengthen the case for the development of new anticoagulants. An ideal...

  1. Anticoagulation for the Acute Management of Ischemic Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Austin A.; Ikuta, Kevin; Soverow, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Few prospective studies support the use of anticoagulation during the acute phase of ischemic stroke, though observational data suggest a role in certain populations. Depending on the mechanism of stroke, systemic anticoagulation may prevent recurrent cerebral infarction, but concomitantly carries a risk of hemorrhagic transformation. In this article, we describe a case where anticoagulation shows promise for ischemic stroke and review the evidence that has discredited its use in some circums...

  2. Secretion of a proteolytic anticoagulant by Ancylostoma hookworms

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    Hookworms of the genus Ancylostoma secrete an anticoagulant that both inhibits the clotting of human plasma and promotes fibrin clot dissolution. This anticoagulant activity is attributable to a 36,000 dalton proteolytic enzyme. The protease can degrade fibrinogen into five smaller polypeptides that intrinsically have anticoagulating properties, covert plasminogen to a mini-plasminogen-like molecule, and hydrolyze a synthetic peptide substrate with specificity for elastolytic enzymes. It is h...

  3. Efficacy and Safety of Novel Anticoagulants Compared with Established Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Rybak, Iwona; Ehle, Michael; Buckley, Leo; Fanikos, John

    2011-01-01

    Dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban are novel oral anticoagulants that offer major advantages over existing agents. The onset of the anticoagulant effect of these agents is rapid. Each agent has a predictable anticoagulant response that eliminates the need for monitoring. Clinical trials have been completed with all three agents in the prevention and treatment of the three leading causes of cardiovascular death: myocardial infarction, stroke, and venous thromboembolism (VTE). Novel agents h...

  4. The Kaiser Permanente Colorado Clinical Pharmacy Anticoagulation Service as a model of modern anticoagulant care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Daniel M

    2008-01-01

    The Clinical Pharmacy Anticoagulation Service (CPAS) at Kaiser Permanente Colorado grew from a single pharmacist assisting a single physician to a comprehensive service staffed by over 20 employees. CPAS provides care for over 7200 patients with each CPAS pharmacist managing all aspects of anticoagulation therapy for 150 to 500 patients. Unique aspects of CPAS include its centralized organization structure, the use of telepharmacy, collaboration drug therapy management agreement with referring physicians and a robust research agenda. Results of various CPAS research projects have been published in the peer-reviewed medical literature. PMID:18804262

  5. Regional Anticoagulation with Citrate is Superior to Systemic Anticoagulation with Heparin in Critically Ill Patients Undergoing Continuous Venovenous Hemodiafiltration

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Joon-Sung; Kim, Gheun-Ho; Kang, Chong Myung; Lee, Chang Hwa

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Short hemofilter survival and anticoagulation-related life-threatening complications are major problems in systemic anticoagulation with heparin (SAH) for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). The present study examined if regional anticoagulation with citrate (RAC) using commercially available solutions can overcome the associated problems of SAH to produce economical benefits. Methods Forty-six patients were assigned to receive SAH or RAC. We assessed the coagulation ...

  6. Anticoagulation therapy in intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation: Does IABP really need anti-coagulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋晨阳; 赵莉莉; 王建安; 单江; MOHAMMODBalgaith

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate if intra-aortic balloon pump(IABP) is contraindicated without anticoag-ulation therapy. Methods: Some 153 IABP patients in the King Abdulaziz Cardiac Center(KSA) were random-ly assigned into two groups. Anticoagulation group( Group A) consisted of 71 patients who were given heparin intravenously with target aPTT 50 - 70 seconds. Non-anticoagulation group( Group B) consisted of 82 patients without intravenous heparin during balloon pumping. Hematological parameters including platelet count, D-dimer, Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and fibrinogen degradation products(FDP) were checked respectively at the point of baseline, 24 hours, 48 hours and 24 hours post IABP counterpulsation. Clot deposits on balloon surface, vascular complications from IABP including bleeding and limb ischemia were recorded.Results: Platelet count and PAI-1 level decreased at 24 hours and 48 hours in both groups ( P 0.05) . Three patients in Group A and 2 patients in Group B developed minor limb ischemia( P > 0.05). No major limb ischemia in either group. Two patients in Group A suffered major bleeding and required blood transfusion or surgical intervention, whereas no patient had major bleeding in Group B. Eight patients had minor bleeding in Group A, but only 2 patients in Group B ( P <0.05). No clot deposit developed on IABP surface in either group. Conclusion: IABP is safe without routine anticoagulation therapy. Selecting appropriate artery approach and early detection intervention are key methods for preventing complications.

  7. Anticoagulation therapy in intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation:Does IABP really need anti-coagulation?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Chen-yang(蒋晨阳); ZHAO Li-li(赵莉莉); WANG Jian-an(王建安); SAN Jiang(单江); MOHAMMOD Balgaith

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate if intra-aortic balloon pump(IABP) is contraindicated without anticoagulation therapy. Methods: Some 153 IABP patients in the King Abdulaziz Cardiac Center(KSA) were randomly assigned into two groups. Anticoagulation group(Group A) consisted of 71 patients who were given heparin intravenously with target aPTT 50-70 seconds. Non-anticoagulation group(Group B) consisted of 82 patients without intravenous heparin during balloon pumping. Hematological parameters including platelet count, D-dimer, Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1(PAI-1) and fibrinogen degradation products(FDP) were checked respectively at the point of baseline, 24 hours, 48 hours and 24 hours post IABP counterpulsation. Clot deposits on balloon surface, vascular complications from IABP including bleeding and limb ischemia were recorded. Results: Platelet count and PAI-1 level decreased at 24 hours and 48 hours in both groups (P0.05). Three patients in Group A and 2 patients in Group B developed minor limb ischemia(P>0.05). No major limb ischemia in either group. Two patients in Group A suffered major bleeding and required blood transfusion or surgical intervention, whereas no patient had major bleeding in Group B. Eight patients had minor bleeding in Group A, but only 2 patients in Group B(P<0.05). No clot deposit developed on IABP surface in either group. Conclusion: IABP is safe without routine anticoagulation therapy. Selecting appropriate artery approach and early detection intervention are key methods for preventing complications.

  8. The Role of Anticoagulation Clinics in the Era of New Oral Anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Testa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anticoagulation Clinics (ACs are services specialized in management of patients on anticoagulant treatment. At present, ACs manage patients chiefly on antivitamin K antagonists (AVKs, but patient population has already changed in the last few years, because of an increase of treatments with other anticoagulant drugs, which require different management systems. The strong increase in the number of patients at AC, mainly on long-term treatment, has determined the development of web management, through telemedicine systems, improving the quality of life and maintaining the same clinical quality levels. New oral anticoagulants (NOAs have shown to be as effective as AVK antagonists in stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and for treatment of venous thromboembolism in addition to VTE prophylaxis in orthopaedic surgery, when administered at a fixed dose, but patient adherence and compliance are crucial for good quality treatment. At present, lacking data from the real world, an oversimplification of treatment with NOAs could cause unjustified risks for patients and also a possible future underuse of good drugs. For these reasons the vigilance must be high and ACs can have a crucial role in defining which is the best management for NOA patients and how to do it, as it happened for AVKs.

  9. Vitamin K requirement in Danish anticoagulant-resistant Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette D.; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Nielsen, Robert;

    2003-01-01

    Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus, Denmark, anticoagulant rodenticide resistance, vitamin K requirement......Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus, Denmark, anticoagulant rodenticide resistance, vitamin K requirement...

  10. Antibodies for detecting and quantifying anticoagulant agents

    OpenAIRE

    Salvador, Juan Pablo; Marco, María Pilar

    2012-01-01

    [EN] The present invention relates to the design of haptens that are structurally related to coumarin oral anticoagulant compounds (COAC), to be used for the production of specific antibodies against said type of substances and the subsequent use thereof for the development of diagnosis tools for use in laboratories or in point-of-care (PoC) devices. In particular, the produced antibodies have been used to develop a diagnosis tool that enables the plasma levels of COAC to be quantified in pat...

  11. Anticoagulant activity of original synthetic peptide derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozd, N N; Tolstenkov, A S; Makarov, V A; Miphtakhova, N T; Voyushina, T L; Sergeev, M E

    2008-01-01

    Original synthetic peptide derivatives exhibit anticoagulant activity in vitro and in vivo. They delayed fibrin clot formation from human blood plasma in tests for the intrinsic coagulation pathway (activated partial thromboplastin time) and final stage of plasma coagulation (thrombin time) and inhibited amidolytic activity of thrombin. We determined the minimum effective dose of the most active compound providing a 2-fold lengthening of blood clotting time (activated partial thromboplastin time test and thrombin time test), which persisted for 2-3 h. PMID:19024001

  12. Shortfalls using second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borst, G H A; Counotte, G H M

    2002-03-01

    Second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides can give rise to unexpected casualties in nontarget species in zoos. The first two offspring of a pair of turkey vultures (Cathartes aura) died of brodifacoum toxicosis. The adult birds fed rodenticide-killed mice to their offspring. There are previous case reports of small carnivorous birds (Dacelo novae-guinae and Tockus deckeni) killed eating poisoned (difenacoum and brodifacoum) mice. Even a granivorous species (Rollulus roulroul) died, probably by contamination of its food by cockroaches that transported the rodenticide. PMID:12216801

  13. New anticoagulants for the prevention of venous thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Becattini

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Cecilia Becattini, Alessandra Lignani, Giancarlo AgnelliInternal and Cardiovascular Medicine and Stroke Unit, University of Perugia, ItalyAbstract: Anticoagulant drugs have an essential role in the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic diseases. Currently available anticoagulants substantially reduce the incidence of thromboembolic events in a number of clinical conditions. However, these agents have limitations that strengthen the case for the development of new anticoagulants. An ideal anticoagulant should be at least as effective as those currently in use, as well as safe, simple to use, and widely applicable. The majority of new anticoagulants currently under investigation are small molecules with a selective and direct anti-Xa or antithrombin action, allowing oral administration in fixed doses. These new agents are in different phases of clinical development. The anti-Xa agent rivaroxaban and the antithrombin agent dabigatran are already available for the prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism in some countries. Apixaban is in an advanced phase of clinical development and several anti-Xa agents are currently approaching phase III clinical trials. Promising results in terms of efficacy and safety profiles have been obtained with these agents in different clinical conditions. Differences in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics could offer the potential for individualized anticoagulant therapies in the near future.Keywords: anticoagulant therapy, antithrombotic therapy, anticoagulants, direct thrombin inhibitors, factor Xa inhibitors

  14. Clinical considerations of anticoagulation therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu ZHANG

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) increases the risk of stroke.New anticoagulation agents have recently provided alternative and promising approaches.This paper reviews the current state of anticoagulation therapy in AF patients,focusing on various clinical scenarios and on comparisons,where possible,between western and eastern populations.

  15. Effects of computer-assisted oral anticoagulant therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Corell, Pernille; Madsen, Poul;

    2012-01-01

    UNLABELLED: BACKGROUND: Computer-assistance and self-monitoring lower the cost and may improve the quality of anticoagulation therapy. The main purpose of this clinical investigation was to use computer-assisted oral anticoagulant therapy to improve the time to reach and the time spent within the...

  16. Genetic investigation of multicentric glioblastoma multiforme: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Brett; Shah, Nameeta; Rostad, Steve; McCullough, Brendan; Aguedan, Brian; Foltz, Greg; Cobbs, Charles

    2016-05-01

    The authors report a case of multicentric glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in which all 4 tumor foci were resected and evaluated using both comparative genomic hybridization array and RNA sequencing. Genetic analysis showed that the tumors shared a common origin, although each had its own unique set of genetic aberrations. The authors note that the genetic heterogeneity of multicentric GBM likely contributes to the failures of current treatments. The case underscores the necessity of increased genetic investigation. PMID:26473785

  17. Novel oral anticoagulants in the management of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Sean R; Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen; Schneider, David J

    2016-08-01

    Despite advances in interventional and pharmacologic therapy, survivors of myocardial infarction remain at an increased risk of subsequent cardiovascular events. Initial pharmacological management includes both platelet inhibition and parenteral anticoagulation, whereas long-term pharmacological therapy relies on antiplatelet therapy for prevention of thrombotic complications. Biomarkers showing ongoing thrombin generation after acute coronary syndromes suggest that anticoagulants may provide additional benefit in reducing cardiovascular events. We review the pharmacokinetics of novel anticoagulants, clinical trial results, the role of monitoring, and future directions for the use of novel oral anticoagulants in the treatment of coronary artery disease. Clinical trials have shown that long-term use of oral anticoagulants decreases the risk of cardiovascular events, but they do so at a cost of an increased risk of bleeding. Future studies will need to identify optimal treatment combinations for selected patients and conditions that address both the appropriate combination of therapy and the appropriate dosage of each agent when used in combination. PMID:27228186

  18. Intracranial hemorrhage in cancer patients treated with anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Matthew J; Uhlmann, Erik J; Zwicker, Jeffrey I

    2016-04-01

    Both venous thromboembolism and intracranial metastases are common complications in the setting of primary brain tumors and metastatic malignancies. Anticoagulation is indicated in the presence of cancer-associated thrombosis in order to limit the risk of pulmonary embolism; however, there is reluctance to initiate anticoagulation in the setting of intracranial metastatic disease due to potential for intracranial hemorrhage. Recent evidence suggests that therapeutic anticoagulation can be safely administered in the setting of metastatic brain tumors. This review examines the current understanding of the pathophysiology of intracranial hemorrhage in malignancy, describes the incidence of intracranial hemorrhage in the setting of brain tumors with therapeutic anticoagulation, and outlines management strategies relevant to the treatment of intracranial hemorrhage in the setting of anticoagulation. PMID:27067980

  19. New anticoagulants for the treatment of venous thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio Julio Cesar dos Santos Fernandes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, venous thromboembolism (VTE is among the leading causes of death from cardiovascular disease, surpassed only by acute myocardial infarction and stroke. The spectrum of VTE presentations ranges, by degree of severity, from deep vein thrombosis to acute pulmonary thromboembolism. Treatment is based on full anticoagulation of the patients. For many decades, it has been known that anticoagulation directly affects the mortality associated with VTE. Until the beginning of this century, anticoagulant therapy was based on the use of unfractionated or low-molecular-weight heparin and vitamin K antagonists, warfarin in particular. Over the past decades, new classes of anticoagulants have been developed, such as factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors, which significantly changed the therapeutic arsenal against VTE, due to their efficacy and safety when compared with the conventional treatment. The focus of this review was on evaluating the role of these new anticoagulants in this clinical context.

  20. [New anticoagulants in the treatment of venous thromboembolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bura-Rivière, Alessandra

    2013-09-01

    Anticoagulant therapy is the cornerstone of treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE). The treatment needs rapid initial anticoagulaton to minimize the risk of thrombus extension and fata pulmonary embolism, followed by an extended anticoagulation, aimed at preventing recurrent VTE. Till very recently, immediate anticoagulation can only be achieved with parenteral agents, such as heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin, or fondaparinux. Extended treatment usually involves the administration of vitamin K antagonists, such as warfarin. Emerging direct oral anticoagulants have the potential to streamline VTE treatment. These agents include oral anticoagulants that target thrombin or factor Xa. This article reviews the characteristics of these agents, describes the results of clinical trials in venous thromboembolic disease and outlines their strengths and weakness. PMID:24167902

  1. The treatment of venous thromboembolism with new oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Imberti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditional anticoagulants, such as low molecular weight heparin, unfractionated heparin, fondaparinux and vitamin K antagonists, have been the mainstay of treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE in the clinical hospital setting and after discharge. These anticoagulants are effective, but are associated with some limitations that may lead to their underuse in many settings. Based on the results of large, randomized clinical trials, new oral anticoagulants have been validated for the treatment of acute deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, and for the prevention of recurrent VTE. These drugs represent a landmark shift in anticoagulation care and may overcome some of the limitations of traditional agents, with the potential of improving adherence to anticoagulation therapy.

  2. [The practice guideline 'Neuraxis blockade and anticoagulation'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lange, J J; Van Kleef, J W; Van Everdingen, J J E

    2004-07-31

    In a patient with a coagulation disorder, the administration of a local anaesthetic by means of a needle or via the insertion of a catheter into the epidural space or spinal cavity may lead to bleeding and haematoma formation, with a danger of pressure on the spinal cord or nerve roots. Employing the method of the Dutch Institute for Healthcare (CBO) for the development of practice guidelines, a working group of anaesthesiologists, a haematologist and a hospital chemist have drawn up recommendations for neuraxis blockade in combination with anticoagulant therapy. In patients with a clinically acquired tendency toward increased bleeding, the management is highly dependent on the cause of the bleeding tendency. If the patient uses acetylsalicylic acid or clopidogrel, the medication must be withdrawn at least 10 days before neuraxis blockade is started. Therapy with glycoprotein-IIb/IIIa-receptor antagonists is an absolute contra-indication for neuraxis blockade. In patients who are using coumarin derivatives, neuraxis blockade results in an increased risk of a neuraxial haematoma. The coumarin derivative should then be withdrawn and replaced by a different form of anticoagulation. The use of low-molecular-weight heparin at the usual prophylactic dosage is not a contra-indication for neuraxis blockade and the risk of a neuraxial haematoma following neuraxis blockade is also not increased significantly by the subcutaneous administration of unfractionated heparin. PMID:15366721

  3. New oral anticoagulants – a practical guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciurus, Tomasz; Sobczak, Sebastian; Cichocka-Radwan, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Oral direct inhibitors of thrombin and activated factor Xa are approved as new anticoagulant drugs. In contrast to vitamin K antagonists (VKA) and heparins, the new agents have single targets in the coagulation cascade and more predictable pharmacokinetics, but they lack validated and available antidotes. Unlike VKA, they do not require routine monitoring of coagulation. However, the measurement of their pharmacologic effects might be of value in selected patients. They interfere with the routine coagulation tests, which should be interpreted with caution. Specific tests exist and can be used in case of emergencies. Adequate supportive care and temporary removal of all antithrombotic agents constitute the basis for management of serious bleeding complications. The administration of coagulation factors, such as fresh frozen plasma, prothrombin complex concentrates or recombinant activated FVII, can benefit in life-threatening bleeding or emergency surgery. Specific antidotes for non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants are in clinical development. This review aims at answering in a brief and simplified manner some clinical questions. PMID:26336492

  4. In vivo measurement of the EAA neurotransmitter in billirubin-induc ed encephalopathy%胆红素脑病模型豚鼠EAA神经递质的检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贲晓明; 陈舜年; 秦玉明; 孙安阳; 吴圣楣

    2000-01-01

    目的探讨胆红素神经毒性脑组织兴奋性氨基酸(EAA)神经递质变化.方法制作胆红素脑病动物模型基础上在体脑内微透析,提取神经突触间细胞外液,HPLC检测分析天门冬氨酸(Asp)、谷氨酸(Glu)、甘氨酸(Gly).结果胆红素毒性脑组织细胞外Gly较对照组明显升高,而Asp、Glu与对照组差异不显著.结论胆红素神经毒性NMDA受体活性变化机制涉及Gly细胞外堆积,提高NM DA受体对NAA神经递质Asp、Glu敏感性.

  5. Morbidade hospitalar por ingestão de esteroides anabólico-androgênicos (EAA no Brasil Hospital morbidity due to anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS consumption in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Henrique Almeida da Silva Junior

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Os esteroides anabólico-androgênicos (EAA são hormônios sexuais masculinos, promotores e mantenedores das características sexuais associadas à masculinidade e do status anabólico dos tecidos somáticos. Os efeitos físicos e mentais do uso abusivo de EAA são raros e é praticamente impossível afirmar com certeza quais os efeitos adversos que poderão tornar-se evidentes após a autoadministração, mas os mesmos constituem risco de morte para os indivíduos. OBJETIVO: O objetivo do presente estudo foi descrever as principais características da morbidade por ingestão de EAA no Brasil, no período de 2000/2010. MÉTODOS: As informações sobre as internações hospitalares foram obtidas dos bancos de dados informatizados do Ministério da Saúde. Na análise da ingestão de EAA como diagnóstico principal e secundário de hospitalização, partiu-se das causas de internação sob os códigos E28.1 (excesso de andrógenos, E34.5 (síndrome de resistência a andrógenos, T38.7 (intoxicação por andrógenos e anabolizantes congêneres e Y42.7 (efeitos adversos de andrógenos e anabolizantes congêneres do CID-10. RESULTADOS: As hospitalizações por EAA foram responsáveis por 0,001% do total de internações do País. Foram contabilizadas 1.319 internações (média = 119,9, DP = 99,01. A síndrome de resistência a andrógenos foi a principal causa, correspondendo a 55,8% do total de internações. Do total de internações, 1% dos pacientes evoluiu para óbito e o tempo máximo de permanência foi de 47 dias (média = 3,8 e DP = 4,7. Minas Gerais, Maranhão e Espírito Santo possuíram as maiores taxas de internações por 1.000.000 de habitantes, nos anos de 2002 a 2007. As mulheres e a faixa etária de 15-29 tiveram maiores taxas, 82,5% e 37,7%, respectivamente. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados do presente estudo mostraram uma hospitalização por ingestão de EAA relativamente baixa, as mulheres e indivíduos na faixa et

  6. Management of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy for endoscopic procedures: introduction to novel oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha L. González-Bárcenas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The development of novel antithrombotic therapy in the past few years and its prescription in patients with cardiovascular and circulatory disease has widened the spectrum of drugs that need to be considered when performing an endoscopic procedure. The balance between the thrombotic risk patients carry due to their medical history and the bleeding risk involved in endoscopic procedures should be thoroughly analyzed by Gastroenterologists. New oral anticoagulants (NOACs impose an additional task. These agents, that specifically target factor IIa or Xa, do not dispose of an anticoagulation monitoring method nor have an antidote to revert their effect, just as with antiplatelet agents. Understanding the fundamental aspects of these drugs provides the necessary knowledge to determine the ideal period the antithrombotic therapy should be interrupted in order to perform the endoscopic procedure, offering maximum safety for patients and optimal results.

  7. New oral anticoagulants: key messages for clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Giorgi-Pierfranceschi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available New oral anticoagulants are an effective and safe alternative to vitamin K antagonists in many fields of clinical practice. The use of the direct inhibitors of activated Factor II (dabigatran and activated Factor X (apixaban and rivaroxaban, both in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF and those with acute venous thromboembolism (VTE, is of great interest for internal medicine physicians. This paper aims to give practical guidance on management (starting therapy, follow up and bleeding complications of patients treated with dabigatran, rivaroxaban or apixaban for NVAF or acute VTE providing practical tables concerning the phases of therapy, management of complications, drug interaction and dose adjustment if renal impairment occurs.

  8. Thromboembolism and anticoagulation after Fontan surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Sangeetha

    2016-01-01

    This review attempts to answer the common questions faced by a clinician regarding thromboembolism and thromboprophylaxis in patients following Fontan surgery. The review is in an easy to understand question and answer format and discusses the currently available literature on the subject in an attempt to arrive at practical clinically relevant solutions. Patients who have undergone the Fontan operation are at a high risk for thromboembolism. Based on available evidence, there is a strong rationale for thromboprophylaxis. However, it is not clear as to which agent should be administered to prevent thromboembolic events. While the available evidence suggests that antiplatelet agents alone may be as good as oral anticoagulants, there is a need for a large multicenter randomized control trial comparing these two common strategies to deliver a clear verdict. PMID:27625521

  9. Synthetic oligosaccharides as heparin-mimetics displaying anticoagulant properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avci, Fikri Y; Karst, Nathalie A; Linhardt, Robert J

    2003-01-01

    Heparin and low molecular weight heparins are major clinical anticoagulants and the drugs of choice for the treatment of deep venous thrombosis. The discovery of an antithrombin binding domain in heparin focused interest on understanding the mechanism of heparin's antithrombotic/ anticoagulant activity. Various heparin-mimetic oligosaccharides have been prepared in an effort to replace polydisperse heparin and low molecular weight heparins with a structurally-defined anticoagulant. The goal of attaining a heparin-mimetic with no unwanted side-effects has also provided motivation for these efforts. This article reviews structure-activity relationship (SAR) of structurally-defined heparin-mimetic oligosaccharides. PMID:14529394

  10. Periablative Anticoagulation Strategies in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo B. Saad

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is associated with thromboembolic events that may cause important impairment on quality of life. Pulmonary vein isolation is the treatment of choice in cases that are refractory to medical therapy. Once sheaths and catheters are manipulated inside the left atrium, anticoagulation with heparin must be used during the procedure to protect patients from thromboembolic phenomena. Different strategies of anticoagulation are used at different centers. This review summarizes the pathophysiology of thrombus formation in the left atrium, defines which patients are under high risk and describes the main strategies used for anticoagulation.

  11. Patient survey of a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, S M; Kroner, B A

    1997-11-01

    The literature describing pharmacy involvement with anticoagulation services primarily does not include information about patients' perceptions of this involvement. A 22-question survey was developed and administered to 296 patients enrolled in the anticoagulation clinic at the VA Pittsburgh Health Care System. Excluded patients had fewer than four clinic visits or were followed outside of the anticoagulation clinic. The study period was nine weeks and any missed patients were telephoned. The median response to each question was determined. Similar questions were analyzed for acquiescent trends. Results indicate that, overall, patients are comfortable with pharmacists providing warfarin monitoring and dose adjustments. PMID:10174757

  12. Emergency management of patients being treated with oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Manzato

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin K antagonists (VKA are among the most widely prescribed drugs in the industrialized world. In fact, for decades, VKA have been the only orally available anticoagulant for the primary and secondary prevention of venous and arterial thrombotic events. Their efficacy has been widely demonstrated in a series of studies carried out in the 1990s. Since the incidences of atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism increase exponentially with age, the number of anticoagulated patients is destined to increase. This paper examines anticoagulation therapy management with particular attention to the use of VKA.

  13. Evaluation of a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic: Improving patient care

    OpenAIRE

    Bungard, Tammy J; Gardner, Leslie; Archer, Stephen L.; Hamilton, Peter; Ritchie, Bruce; Tymchak, Wayne; Tsuyuki, Ross T.

    2009-01-01

    Background Anticoagulation management services (AMSs) are widely used for anticoagulation management in many countries. Our AMS is a pharmacist-run ambulatory clinic with a physician advisory committee that manages patients referred with complicated anticoagulation histories. This paper assesses the adequacy of anticoagulation, rates of anticoagulant-related events and associated health care resource utilization for patients before and after referral to our AMS. Methods Consecutive patients r...

  14. Thrombolytic-plus-Anticoagulant Therapy versus Anticoagulant-Alone Therapy in Submassive Pulmonary Thromboembolism (TVASPE Study: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Taherkhani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of thrombolytic agents in the treatment of hemodynamically stable patients with acute submassive pulmonary embolism (PTE remains controversial. We, therefore, conducted this study to compare the effect of thrombolytic plus anticoagulation versus anticoagulation alone on early death and adverse outcome following submassive PTE.Methods: We conducted a study of patients with acute pulmonary embolism and pulmonary hypertension or right ventricular dilatation/dysfunction but without arterial hypotension or shock. The patients were randomly assigned in a single-blind fashion to receive an anticoagulant [Enoxaparin (1 mg/kg twice a day] plus a thrombolytic [Alteplase (100 mg or Streptokinase (1500000 u/2 hours] or an anticoagulant [Enoxaparin (1 mg/kg twice a day] alone. The primary endpoint was in-hospital death or clinical deterioration requiring an escalation of treatment. The secondary endpoints of the study were major bleeding, pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular dilatation at the end of the first week, and exertional dyspnea at the end of the first month.Results: Of 50 patients enrolled, 25 patients were randomly assigned to receive an anticoagulant plus a thrombolytic and the other 25 patients were given an anticoagulant alone. The incidence of the primary endpoints was significantly higher in the anticoagulant-alone group than in the thrombolytic-plus-anticoagulant group (p value = 0.022. At the time of discharge, pulmonary artery pressure was significantly higher in the anticoagulant-alone group than in the thrombolytic- plus-anticoagulant group (p value = 0.018; however, reduction in the right ventricular size or normalization of the right ventricle showed non-significant differences between the two groups. There was no significant difference regarding the New York Heat Association (NYHA functional class between the two groups at the end of the first month (p value = 0.213. No fatal bleeding or cerebral bleeding

  15. Recent developments in the use of oral anticoagulants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Michael R

    2009-01-01

    For many years, vitamin K antagonists, unfractionated heparins, low-molecular-weight heparins and a pentasaccharide were the only anticoagulant drugs available for the prevention of venous thromboembolism after surgery. However, their benefits were associated with disadvantages, such as their...

  16. Update of oral surgery management in orally anticoagulated patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Evrosimovska, Biljana; Pandilova, Maja; Kovacevska, Ivona; Zabokova-Bilbilova, Efka

    2013-01-01

    Aim of this study is to review the evidence of different therapy approach, to highlight the areas of major concern and to suggest specific oral surgery treatment for patients on oral anticoagulants. The aim of operative treatment is to minimize the risk of hemorrhage while continuing to protect the patient against thromboembolism formation. The ordinary treatment includes the interruption of anticoagulant therapy for oral surgery interventions to prevent hemorrhage. However, this practice may...

  17. Use of tranexamic acid in anticoagulated oral surgery patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Papakoca, Kiro; Kovacevska, Ivona; Kamceva, Gordana

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTIONS: The oral surgeons are frequently asked to manage patients who are receiving oral anticoagulants. The goal of treatment is to minimize the risk of hemorrhage while continuing to protect the patient against thromboembolism formation. The ordinary treatment includes the interruption of anticoagulant therapy for oral surgery interventions to prevent hemorrhage. AIM:However, this practice may logically increase the risk of a potentially life-threatening thromboembolism. Thus, thi...

  18. Management of oral surgery procedures in orally anticoagulated patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena

    2010-01-01

    The oral and maxillofacial surgeons are frequently asked to manage patients who are receiving oral anticoagulants. The goal of treatment is to minimize the risk of hemorrhage while continuing to protect the patient against thromboembolism formation. The ordinary treatment includes the interruption of anticoagulant therapy for oral surgery interventions to prevent hemorrhage. However, this practice may logically increase the risk of a potentially life-threatening thromboembolism. Thus, this is...

  19. Management of oral surgery procedures in oral anticoagulated patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena

    2010-01-01

    The oral and maxillofacial surgeons are frequently asked to manage patients who are receiving oral anticoagulants. The goal of treatment is to minimize the risk of hemorrhage while continuing to protect the patient against thromboembolism formation. The ordinary treatment includes the interruption of anticoagulant therapy for oral surgery interventions to prevent hemorrhage. However, this practice may logically increase the risk of a potentially life-threatening thromboembolism. Thus, this is...

  20. New perspectives and recommendations for anticoagulant therapy post orthopedic surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelo Kropf; Cleidson Alves Bergami; Felipe Dias Leal; Claudia Oliveira Dias Passos; Zilda de Santana Gonsalves; Isabela Laudares Marques; Isabela Azevedo Mota; Marcele Lima Monte Gonçalves

    2011-01-01

    Anticoagulant therapy is essential for the prevention of risks associated with the formation of thrombus in patients after surgery, especially in orthopedics. Recently, new oral anticoagulants were introduced in the therapeutic arsenal. This fact is important, because the current drug of choice in clinical practice is enoxaparin, a low molecular weight heparin. As all injecting drugs, enoxaparin may reduce patients' adherence to treatment by dissatisfaction with and resistance to the administ...

  1. Use of antifibrinolytic mouthwash solution in anticoagulated oral surgery patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Evrosimovska, Biljana; Papakoca, Kiro; Georgiev, Zlatko; Angelovska, Bistra; Ristoska, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Introduction:The ordinary treatment of anticoagulated patients includes the interruption of anticoagulant therapy for oral surgery interventions to prevent hemorrhage. However, this practice may logically increase the risk of a potentially life-threatening thromboembolism, so this issue is still controversial. The aim of the study was to evaluate the antifibrinolitic mouthwash solution (tranexamic acid) as a local haemostatic modality after oral surgery interventions. Methods:To realize the a...

  2. The Comprehensive Management of Anticoagulation: Ochsner Coumadin Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Barrios, Annette C.; Ventura, Hector O.; Milani, Richard V.

    2002-01-01

    Clinical privileging of pharmacists and the effective use of support staff and information technology have helped create an efficient pharmacist-operated anticoagulation clinic at Ochsner Clinic Foundation that will support future growth efforts for improved patient care. Developed by Ochsner's Department of Cardiology, the pharmacist-operated anticoagulation clinic cares for 2000 patients with a clinical pharmacist, staff pharmacist, registered nurse, and medical assistants. Patients are man...

  3. Anticoagulant Rodenticide Intoxication in Animals – A Review

    OpenAIRE

    VALCHEV, Ivan; Binev, Rumen; YORDANOVA, Veska; Nikolov, Yordan

    2008-01-01

    The newest measures for the control of harmful rodent populations are from the anticoagulant rodenticide group, which are divided into 2 subgroups: first and second generations, and indandione derivatives. Non-target organisms are potentially at risk of direct consumption of baits (primary hazard) and of eating poisoned rodents (secondary hazard). Anticoagulant rodenticides inhibit the enzyme vitamin K-dependent carboxylase and thus impair the reactivation of vitamin K1, indirectly affecting ...

  4. Mechanical Prosthetic Valves and Pregnancy: A therapeutic dilemma of anticoagulation

    OpenAIRE

    Prashanth Panduranga; Mohammed El-Deeb; Chitra Jha

    2014-01-01

    Choosing the best anticoagulant therapy for a pregnant patient with a mechanical prosthetic valve is controversial and the published international guidelines contain no clear-cut consensus on the best approach. This is due to the fact that there is presently no anticoagulant which can reliably decrease thromboembolic events while avoiding damage to the fetus. Current treatments include either continuing oral warfarin or substituting warfarin for subcutaneous unfractionated heparin or low-mole...

  5. Novel Anticoagulants in Atrial Fibrillation: Monitoring, Reversal and Perioperative Management

    OpenAIRE

    Fadi Shamoun; Hiba Obeid; Harish Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation continues to be a significant source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Effective anticoagulation remains the cornerstone of outpatient and inpatient treatment. The use of the new generation of anticoagulants (NOACs) continues to grow. Recently published data indicate their cost-effectiveness and overall safety in stroke prevention; compared to vitamin K antagonists, they can be prescribed in fixed doses for long-term therapy without the need for coagulation monitoring....

  6. Multicentric Giant Cell Tumor of Bone: Synchronous and Metachronous Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiner Wirbel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 27-year-old man treated 2.5 years ago for synchronous multicentric giant cell tumor of bone located at the right proximal humerus and the right 5th finger presented now with complaints of pain in his right hip and wrist of two-month duration. Radiology and magnetic resonance revealed multicentric giant cell tumor lesions of the right proximal femur, the left ileum, the right distal radius, and the left distal tibia. The patient has an eighteen-year history of a healed osteosarcoma of the right tibia that was treated with chemotherapy, resection, and allograft reconstruction. A literature review establishes this as the first reported case of a patient with synchronous and metachronous multicentric giant cell tumor who also has a history of osteosarcoma.

  7. Adherence to a new oral anticoagulant treatment prescription: dabigatran etexilate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Bellamy

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available L Bellamy1, N Rosencher1, BI Eriksson21Anaesthesiology Department, Hôpital Cochin (AP-HP, René Descartes University, Paris 75014 France; 2Orthopaedic Department, University Hospital Sahlgrenska/Ostra, Gothenburg, SwedenAbstract: The recent development of new oral anticoagulants, of which dabigatran etexilate is currently at the most advanced stage of development, is the greatest advance in the provision of convenient anticoagulation therapy for many years. A new oral anticoagulation treatment, dabigatran etexilate, is already on the market in Europe. The main interest probably will be to improve the prescription and the adherence to an effective thromboprophylaxis in medical conditions such as atrial fibrillation without bleeding side effects, without the need for monitoring coagulation, and without drug and food interactions such as vitamin K anticoagulant (VKA treatment. Dabigatran is particularly interesting for extended thromboprophylaxis after major orthopedic surgery in order to avoid daily injection for a month. However, oral long-term treatments such as VKA are not systematically associated with a higher compliance level than injected treatments such as low-molecular-weight heparins. Indeed, adherence to an oral treatment, instead of the usual daily injection in major orthopedic surgery, is complex, and based not only on the frequency of dosing but also on patient motivation, understanding, and socio-economic status. New oral anticoagulants may be useful in this way but education and detection of risk factors of nonadherence to treatment are still essential.Keywords: oral anticoagulant, adherence, compliance, education, dabigatran

  8. New anticoagulants for the prevention of venous thromboembolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becattini, Cecilia; Lignani, Alessandra; Agnelli, Giancarlo

    2010-01-01

    Anticoagulant drugs have an essential role in the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic diseases. Currently available anticoagulants substantially reduce the incidence of thromboembolic events in a number of clinical conditions. However, these agents have limitations that strengthen the case for the development of new anticoagulants. An ideal anticoagulant should be at least as effective as those currently in use, as well as safe, simple to use, and widely applicable. The majority of new anticoagulants currently under investigation are small molecules with a selective and direct anti-Xa or antithrombin action, allowing oral administration in fixed doses. These new agents are in different phases of clinical development. The anti-Xa agent rivaroxaban and the antithrombin agent dabigatran are already available for the prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism in some countries. Apixaban is in an advanced phase of clinical development and several anti-Xa agents are currently approaching phase III clinical trials. Promising results in terms of efficacy and safety profiles have been obtained with these agents in different clinical conditions. Differences in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics could offer the potential for individualized anticoagulant therapies in the near future. PMID:20531960

  9. [Duration of anticoagulant therapy in venous thromboembolic complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, M R; Leontyev, S G; Neskhodimov, L A; Tolstikhin, V Yu; Khotinskiy, A A

    2016-01-01

    Adequate anticoagulant therapy is a general approach to treatment of deep vein thrombosis. However, the duration of anticoagulant therapy is not strictly specified in everyday clinical practice. The present article deals with various approaches to selecting the duration of therapy with anticoagulants based on the findings of studies, national and foreign clinical guidelines. The minimal duration of therapy for deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism amounts to 3 months in accordance with the national and American recommendations. For some cohorts of patients, continuation of therapy above 3 months is considered: patients with idiopathic thrombosis (the recommended duration of therapy of not less than 6 months), patients having persisting risk factor for relapse of thrombosis on termination of the main therapeutic course, oncological patients (6 month therapy followed by assessing the risk and benefit of continuing therapy with anticoagulants). Prolonged therapy of venous thromboembolism using unfractionated heparin or low-molecular-weight heparin followed by changing over to vitamin K antagonists is associated with decreased risk for thrombosis relapse approximately by 90%, however increasing the risk of haemorrhage. Currently, as an alternative, it is possible to consider administration of novel oral anticoagulants (rivaroxaban, dabigatran, apixaban) which beside high efficacy are associated with less risk of bleeding. The route of administration, no necessity to control the INR, and the minimal number of drug and food interactions make administration of new oral anticoagulants an attractive alternative to therapy with heparins and vitamin K antagonists. PMID:27100556

  10. Establishing an outpatient anticoagulation clinic in a community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, J L; Gibson, D L

    1996-05-15

    The establishment of a pharmacist-managed out-patient anticoagulation clinic in a private community hospital is described. Discussions by pharmacy with office-based physicians at a 187-bed, private, nonprofit community medical center indicated that the traditional system of anticoagulation management was not ideal for the physicians or their patients. Development of a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic began in fall 1993; operations began in spring 1994. Planning included analyzing existing practices, reviewing the relevant literature, obtaining physician input, visiting an established anticoagulation clinic, formulating a business plan, and developing clinical protocols. Collaborative relationships were established with the hospital laboratory, business office, and risk management, information services, and medical records departments. Two pharmacists were trained to work in the clinic and provide coverage 24 hours a day. Services include patient assessment, monitoring of anticoagulation, warfarin dosage adjustment, medication management, patient education, follow-up care, and providing feedback to referring and attending physicians. The clinic has met with physician and patient satisfaction, has reduced the number of admissions to treat warfarin-related bleeding, and has been able to cover its direct costs. A pharmacist-managed anti-coagulation clinic was successfully established in a private community hospital. PMID:8734675

  11. Authorship issues in multi-centre clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Jacob; Burcharth, Jakob; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Vinther, Siri

    2015-01-01

    Discussions about authorship often arise in multi-centre clinical trials. Such trials may involve up to hundreds of contributors of whom some will eventually co-author the final publication. It is, however, often impossible to involve all contributors in the manuscript process sufficiently for them...... to qualify for authorship as defined by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors. Therefore, rules for authorship in multi-centre trials are strongly recommended. We propose two contracts to prevent conflicts regarding authorship; both are freely available for use without pay but with...

  12. Thrombolytic-plus-Anticoagulant Therapy versus Anticoagulant-Alone Therapy in Submassive Pulmonary Thromboembolism (TVASPE Study): A Randomized Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Taherkhani; Adineh Taherkhani; SeyedReza Hashemi; Taraneh Faghihi-Langroodi; Roxana Sadeghi; Mohammadreza Beyranvand

    2014-01-01

    Background: The use of thrombolytic agents in the treatment of hemodynamically stable patients with acute submassive pulmonary embolism (PTE) remains controversial. We, therefore, conducted this study to compare the effect of thrombolytic plus anticoagulation versus anticoagulation alone on early death and adverse outcome following submassive PTE.Methods: We conducted a study of patients with acute pulmonary embolism and pulmonary hypertension or right ventricular dilatation/dysfunction but w...

  13. Anticoagulation reversal in the era of the non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enriquez, Andres; Lip, Gregory Y H; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have emerged as an alternative to warfarin for the prevention and treatment of thrombo-embolic disease. Large randomized trials have demonstrated that these agents, which act by directly targeting thrombin (dabigatran) and factor Xa....... New specific antidotes (e.g. idarucizumab, andexanet alfa, and ciraparantag) show promising data, and may soon become available for clinical use. In this article, we review the pharmacology of these agents, the incidence and outcomes of haemorrhagic complications, the available strategies for...

  14. Major cerebral events in Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis: is anticoagulant therapy safe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus V; Snygg-Martin, Ulrika; Olaison, Lars;

    2009-01-01

    -hospital mortality was 23% (95% CI: 17-29%), and there was no significant difference between those with or without anticoagulation. CONCLUSIONS: We found no increased risk of cerebral haemorrhage in S. aureus IE patients receiving anticoagulation. Anticoagulation was associated with a reduced risk of cerebral events...... before initiation of antibiotics. Data support the continuance of anticoagulation in S. aureus IE patients when indicated.......OBJECTIVES: To study the impact of anticoagulation on major cerebral events in patients with left-sided Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis (IE). METHODS: A prospective cohort study; the use of anticoagulation and the relation to major cerebral events was evaluated separately at onset...

  15. Survey of Botulinum Toxin Injections in Anticoagulated Patients: Korean Physiatrists' Preference in Controlling Anticoagulation Profile Prior to Intramuscular Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yongjun; Park, Geun-Young; Park, Jihye; Choi, Asayeon; Kim, Soo Yeon; Boulias, Chris; Phadke, Chetan P.; Ismail, Farooq

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate Korean physiatrists' practice of performing intramuscular botulinum toxin injection in anticoagulated patients and to assess their preference in controlling the bleeding risk before injection. Methods As part of an international collaboration survey study, a questionnaire survey was administered to 100 Korean physiatrists. Physiatrists were asked about their level of experience with botulinum toxin injection, the safe international normalized ratio range in anticoagulated patients undergoing injection, their tendency for injecting into deep muscles, and their experience of bleeding complications. Results International normalized ratio <2.0 was perceived as an ideal range for performing Botulinum toxin injection by 41% of the respondents. Thirty-six respondents replied that the international normalized ratio should be lowered to sub-therapeutic levels before injection, and 18% of the respondents reported that anticoagulants should be intentionally withheld and discontinued prior to injection. In addition, 20%–30% of the respondents answered that they were uncertain whether they should perform the injection regardless of the international normalized ratio values. About 69% of the respondents replied that they did have any standardized protocols for performing botulinum toxin injection in patients using anticoagulants. Only 1 physiatrist replied that he had encountered a case of compartment syndrome. Conclusion In accordance with the lack of consensus in performing intramuscular botulinum toxin injection in anticoagulated patients, our survey shows a wide range of practices among many Korean physiatrists; they tend to avoid botulinum toxin injection in anticoagulated patients and are uncertain about how to approach these patients. The results of this study emphasize the need for formulating a proper international consensus on botulinum toxin injection management in anticoagulated patients. PMID:27152278

  16. Anticoagulant rodenticide poisoning in animals of Apulia and Basilicata, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscarella, Marilena; Armentano, Antonio; Iammarino, Marco; Palermo, Carmen; Amorena, Michele

    2016-06-30

    This study evaluates the presence of anticoagulant rodenticides in animals with a diagnosis of suspected poisoning and in bait samples. The survey was carried out from 2010 to 2012, in 2 regions of South Italy (Puglia and Basilicata) on 300 organs of animals and 90 suspected bait samples. The qualitative and quantitative analyses were conducted using an analytical method based on high‑performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorimetric detection (FLD) for the simultaneous determination of 8 anticoagulant rodenticides (bromadiolone, brodifacoum, coumachlor, coumafuryl, coumatetralyl, difenacoum, flocoumafen, and warfarin). The presence of anticoagulant rodenticides was detected in 33 organs of animals (11% of the total) and 6 bait samples (7% of the total). The most commonly detected compound was coumachlor (47% of 39 positive samples) followed by bromadiolone (24%), and brodifacoum (11%). The species mostly involved in anticoagulant rodenticide poisoning were dogs and cats. This study emphasizes the relevance of the determinations of anticoagulant rodenticides in cases of suspected poisoning in veterinary practice. PMID:27393877

  17. Retrospective evaluation of a pharmacist-managed warfarin anticoagulation clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garabedian-Ruffalo, S M; Gray, D R; Sax, M J; Ruffalo, R L

    1985-02-01

    The effectiveness of a pharmacist-managed warfarin anticoagulation clinic in maintaining therapeutic prothrombin times and preventing hospitalizations secondary to inadequate control of anticoagulation was evaluated. Patients who had received warfarin sodium for at least one year before being referred to the anticoagulation clinic were studied using retrospective chart reviews. Clinical pharmacists provided patient education, monitored patients for hemorrhagic and thromboembolic complications, and adjusted warfarin sodium dosage to maintain therapeutic prothrombin times. The patients' primary physicians retained responsibility for overall care and were consulted by pharmacists regarding complications of anticoagulation and patient unreliability. The percentage of patients requiring hospitalization (39% versus 4%) and the percentage of prothrombin times outside the therapeutic range (35.8% versus 14.4%) were significantly higher during the preclinic phase (before referral to the clinic) than during the clinic phase. Eight patients were hospitalized for hemorrhagic complications and four for thromboembolism during the preclinic phase; only one hospitalization for hemorrhage occurred during the clinic phase. The warfarin anticoagulation clinic staffed by specially trained pharmacists provided improved therapy compared with treatment received by patients before their referral to the clinic. PMID:3976675

  18. Pharmacology of new oral anticoagulants: mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Masotti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to their mechanism of action, the new oral anticoagulants are named direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs. Dabigatran is a selective, competitive, direct inhibitor of thrombin (Factor IIa while rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban act by directly inhibiting the activated Factor X (FXa in a selective and competitive manner. DOACs have a relatively short half-life and almost immediate anticoagulant activity, and rapidly reach the plasma peak concentration. Therefore, they do not need a phase of overlapping with parenteral anticoagulants. After their withdrawal, their removal is sufficiently rapid, although influenced by renal function. Dabigatran is the only DOACs to be administered as a pro-drug and becomes active after drug metabolization. The route of elimination of dabigatran is primarily renal, whereas FXa inhibitors are mainly eliminated by the biliary-fecal route. The drug interactions of DOACs are mainly limited to drugs that act on P-glycoprotein for dabigatran and on P-glycoprotein and/or cytochrome P3A4 for anti-Xa. DOACs have no interactions with food. Given their linear pharmacodynamics, with a predictable dose/response relationship and anticoagulant effect, DOACs are administered at a fixed dose and do not require routine laboratory monitoring.

  19. Adherence to oral anticoagulant therapy in secondary stroke prevention – impact of the novel oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luger S

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sebastian Luger,1 Carina Hohmann,2 Daniela Niemann,1 Peter Kraft,3 Ignaz Gunreben,3 Tobias Neumann-Haefelin,2 Christoph Kleinschnitz,3 Helmuth Steinmetz,1 Christian Foerch,1 Waltraud Pfeilschifter1 1Department of Neurology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, 2Department of Neurology, Klinikum Fulda gAG, Fulda, 3Department of Neurology, University Hospital Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany Background: Oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT potently prevents strokes in patients with atrial fibrillation. Vitamin K antagonists (VKA have been the standard of care for long-term OAT for decades, but non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOAC have recently been approved for this indication, and raised many questions, among them their influence on medication adherence. We assessed adherence to VKA and NOAC in secondary stroke prevention. Methods: All patients treated from October 2011 to September 2012 for ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack with a subsequent indication for OAT, at three academic hospitals were entered into a prospective registry, and baseline data and antithrombotic treatment at discharge were recorded. At the 1-year follow-up, we assessed the adherence to different OAT strategies and patients’ adherence to their respective OAT. We noted OAT changes, reasons to change treatment, and factors that influence persistence to the prescribed OAT. Results: In patients discharged on OAT, we achieved a fatality corrected response rate of 73.3% (n=209. A total of 92% of these patients received OAT at the 1-year follow-up. We observed good adherence to both VKA and NOAC (VKA, 80.9%; NOAC, 74.8%; P=0.243 with a statistically nonsignificant tendency toward a weaker adherence to dabigatran. Disability at 1-year follow-up was an independent predictor of lower adherence to any OAT after multivariate analysis, whereas the choice of OAT did not have a relevant influence. Conclusion: One-year adherence to OAT after stroke is strong (>90% and patients

  20. Effect of high or low protamine dosing on postoperative bleeding following heparin anticoagulation in cardiac surgery. A randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesters, Michael I; Veerhoek, Dennis; de Lange, Fellery; de Vries, Jacob-Willem; de Jong, Jan R; Romijn, Johannes W A; Kelchtermans, Hilde; Huskens, Dana; van der Steeg, Robin; Thomas, Pepijn W A; Burtman, David T M; van Barneveld, Laurentius J M; Vonk, Alexander B A; Boer, Christa

    2016-08-01

    While experimental data state that protamine exerts intrinsic anticoagulation effects, protamine is still frequently overdosed for heparin neutralisation during cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Since comparative studies are lacking, we assessed the influence of two protamine-to-heparin dosing ratios on perioperative haemostasis and bleeding, and hypothesised that protamine overdosing impairs the coagulation status following cardiac surgery. In this open-label, multicentre, single-blinded, randomised controlled trial, patients undergoing on-pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery were assigned to a low (0.8; n=49) or high (1.3; n=47) protamine-to-heparin dosing group. The primary outcome was 24-hour blood loss. Patient haemostasis was monitored using rotational thromboelastometry and a thrombin generation assay. The low protamine-to-heparin dosing ratio group received less protamine (329 ± 95 vs 539 ± 117 mg; pblood loss was increased in the high dosing ratio group (615 ml; 95 % CI 500-830 ml vs 470 ml; 95 % CI 420-530 ml; p=0.021) when compared to the low dosing group, respectively. More patients in the high dosing group received fresh frozen plasma (11 % vs 0 %; p=0.02) and platelet concentrate (21 % vs 6 %; p=0.04) compared to the low dosing group. Our study confirms in vitro data that abundant protamine dosing is associated with increased postoperative blood loss and higher transfusion rates in cardiac surgery. PMID:27277211

  1. Dilute Russell's viper venom and activated partial thromboplastin time in lupus anticoagulant diagnosis: is mixing essential?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrashekar, Vani

    2016-06-01

    Dilute Russell's viper venom (DRVV) testing and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) have been effectively used in combination for lupus anticoagulant testing. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the role of mixing in activated partial thromboplastin and dilute Russell's viper venom testing for evaluation of lupus anticoagulants. Citrated blood from patients who were not on oral anticoagulant therapy was studied. Mixing study with 1 : 1 normal plasma for elevated APTT and also few samples with elevated screen time was carried out. Elevated APTT was seen in only 48.1% of patients with lupus anticoagulant. Correction of APTT was seen in 27.8% of lupus anticoagulant-positive patients. DRVV test on mixing resulted in 83.8% false-negative values. Integrated DRVV test could be a standalone test for testing lupus anticoagulant. Mixing study may be restricted for patients on oral anticoagulants or patients with strong lupus anticoagulant. PMID:26626041

  2. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of oral anticoagulants, especially phenprocoumon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haustein, K O

    1999-01-01

    Anticoagulants of the cumarin-type (warfarin, phenprocoumon, and acenocoumarol) are drugs for the long-term treatment and prevention of thromboembolic disorders. Because of their narrow therapeutic range, many patients have bleedings of variable severity or have recurrent thrombotic events. For this reason, the study of the pharmacokinetic parameters of phenprocoumon (PPC), considering its influence on blood clotting factors, is of high interest. The elimination kinetics of PPC, its interaction with phytomenadion (vitamin K), and the pharmacokinetic behavior of the anticoagulant under steady-state conditions have been investigated in studies with healthy volunteers and patients taking anticoagulants. The maintenance dose and the plasma levels of PPC were correlated with prothrombin time (PT) in 89 patients treated with PPC. Varying parameters in each patient (e.g., elimination kinetics of PPC, activity of the cumarin-dependent blood-clotting factors, endogenous phytomenadion stores), render it impossible to use a different means of monitoring than that of PT determination. PMID:10327214

  3. A pharmacologic overview of current and emerging anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutescu, Edith A; Shapiro, Nancy L; Chevalier, Aimee; Amin, Alpesh N

    2005-04-01

    For over 50 years, anticoagulant options for the treatment and prevention of thrombosis have been limited mainly to traditional agents such as unfractionated heparin and oral vitamin K antagonists such as warfarin. These traditional agents are fraught with limitations that complicate their clinical use. A variety of novel anticoagulants with improved pharmacologic and clinical profiles have recently been introduced or are in development, offering benefits over traditional therapies. Specifically, progress has been made in the development of low-molecular-weight heparins, factor Xa inhibitors, and direct thrombin inhibitors. Because of their convenience and ease of use, some of these novel compounds are competing with the traditional anticoagulants and are needed additions to the antithrombotic arsenal. PMID:15853173

  4. Personalized antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy: applications and significance of pharmacogenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beitelshees AL

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Amber L Beitelshees,1,* Deepak Voora,2,* Joshua P Lewis,1,* 1Program for Personalized and Genomic Medicine and Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Nutrition, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Center for Applied Genomics & Precision Medicine, Department of Medicine, Duke School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA*All authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: In recent years, substantial effort has been made to better understand the influence of genetic factors on the efficacy and safety of numerous medications. These investigations suggest that the use of pharmacogenetic data to inform physician decision-making has great potential to enhance patient care by reducing on-treatment clinical events, adverse drug reactions, and health care-related costs. In fact, integration of such information into the clinical setting may be particularly applicable for antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapeutics, given the increasing body of evidence implicating genetic variation in variable drug response. In this review, we summarize currently available pharmacogenetic information for the most commonly used antiplatelet (ie, clopidogrel and aspirin and anticoagulation (ie, warfarin medications. Furthermore, we highlight the currently known role of genetic variability in response to next-generation antiplatelet (prasugrel and ticagrelor and anticoagulant (dabigatran agents. While compelling evidence suggests that genetic variants are important determinants of antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy response, significant barriers to clinical implementation of pharmacogenetic testing exist and are described herein. In addition, we briefly discuss development of new diagnostic targets and therapeutic strategies as well as implications for enhanced patient care. In conclusion, pharmacogenetic testing can provide important information to assist clinicians with prescribing the most personalized and effective antiplatelet and

  5. Evaluating the impact of new anticoagulants in the hospital setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braidy N

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The short-comings of current anticoagulants have led to the development of newer, albeit more expensive, oral alternatives.Objective: To explore the potential impact the new anticoagulants dabigatran and rivaroxaban in the local hospital setting, in terms of utilisation and subsequent costing.Method: A preliminary costing analysis was performed based on a prospective 2-week clinical audit (29th June - 13th July 2009. Data regarding current anticoagulation management were extracted from the medical files of patients admitted to Ryde Hospital. To model potential costing implications of using the newer agents, the reported incidence of VTE/stroke and bleeding events were obtained from key clinical trials.Results: Data were collected for 67 patients treated with either warfarin (n=46 or enoxaparin (n=21 for prophylaxis of VTE/stroke. At least two-thirds of all patients were deemed suitable candidates for the use of newer oral anticoagulants (by current therapy: warfarin: 65.2% (AF, 34.8% (VTE; enoxaparin: 100%, (VTE. The use of dabigatran in VTE/stroke prevention was found to be more cost-effective than warfarin and enoxaparin due to significantly lower costs of therapeutic monitoring and reduced administration costs. Rivaroxaban was more cost-effective than warfarin and enoxaparin for VTE/stroke prevention when supplier-rebates (33% were factored into costing.Conclusion: This study highlights the potential cost-effectiveness of newer anticoagulants, dabigatran and rivaroxaban, compared to warfarin and enoxaparin. These agents may offer economic advantages, as well as clinical benefits, in the hospital-based management of anticoagulated patients.

  6. Comparison of pharmacist managed anticoagulation with usual medical care in a family medicine clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Dillon Carla; Twells Laurie; Bishop Lisa; Young Stephanie; Hawboldt John; O'Shea Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The beneficial outcomes of oral anticoagulation therapy are dependent upon achieving and maintaining an optimal INR therapeutic range. There is growing evidence that better outcomes are achieved when anticoagulation is managed by a pharmacist with expertise in anticoagulation management rather than usual care by family physicians. This study compared a pharmacist managed anticoagulation program (PC) to usual physician care (UC) in a family medicine clinic. Methods A retros...

  7. Novel oral anticoagulants in the treatment of cerebral venous thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feher, G; Illes, Z; Komoly, S; Hargroves, D

    2015-01-01

    (NOACs) have been extensively studied in patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE) and non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). The aim of our work to review the available evidence for NOACs in the treatment of CVT. Based on our literature search there is insufficient evidence to......Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is an uncommon cause of stroke with extremely diverse clinical features, predisposing factors, brain imaging findings, and outcome. Anticoagulation is the cornerstone of CVT management, however, it is not supported by high-quality evicence. Novel oral anticoagulants...

  8. Novel oral anticoagulants in the treatment of cerebral venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feher, Gergely; Illes, Zsolt; Komoly, Samuel; Hargroves, David

    2016-08-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is an uncommon cause of stroke with extremely diverse clinical features, predisposing factors, brain imaging findings, and outcome. Anticoagulation is the cornerstone of CVT management, however, it is not supported by high-quality evicence. Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been extensively studied in patients with deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and non-valvular atrial fibrillation. The aim of our work was to review the available evidence for NOACs in the treatment of CVT. Based on our literature search there is insufficient evidence to support the use of NOACs in CVT, although case series with rivaroxaban and dabigatran have showed promising results. PMID:25994451

  9. Management of acute stroke in patients taking novel oral anticoagulants

    OpenAIRE

    Hankey, Graeme J; Norrving, Bo; Hacke, Werner; Steiner, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Each year, 1·0–2·0% of individuals with atrial fibrillation and 0·1–0·2% of those with venous thromboembolism who are receiving one of the novel oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, or apixaban) can be expected to experience an acute ischemic stroke. Additionally, 0·2–0·5% of individuals with atrial fibrillation who are receiving one of the novel oral anticoagulants can be expected to experience an intracranial hemorrhage. This opinion piece addresses the current literature and offer...

  10. Citrate anticoagulation for continuous renal replacement therapy in small children

    OpenAIRE

    Soltysiak, Jolanta; Warzywoda, Alfred; Kociński, Bartłomiej; Ostalska-Nowicka, Danuta; Benedyk, Anna; Silska-Dittmar, Magdalena; Zachwieja, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Background Regional citrate anticoagulation (RCA) is one of the methods used to prevent clotting in continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). The aim of this study was to describe the outcomes and complications of RCA-CRRT in comparison to heparin anticoagulation (HA)-CRRT in critically ill children. Methods This study was a retrospective review of 30 critically ill children (16 on RCA- and 14 on HA-CRRT) who underwent at least 24 h of CRRT. The mean body weight of the children was 8.69 ± ...

  11. [Serious surgical complications associated with chronic anticoagulant therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitrák, V; Hadacová, I; Hochová, I; Hoch, J

    2001-06-01

    Chronic anticoagulant treatment is administered mostly for cardiological reasons. Cumarin derivatires are used in the majority of cases (Warfarin, Pelentan). It is necessary to monitor this treatment regularly and to control the dose according to the INR value. Different complications can occur; the haemorrhage represents a serious one. The authors discuss several aspects of anticoagulant therapy and possible prevention of the complications. The importance of the problems is demonstrated on the authors' clinical experience--two cases of haemorrhage after Warfarin administration simulating an acute surgical event. PMID:11482149

  12. Análise do potencial mutagênico dos esteroides anabólicos androgênicos (EAA e da l-carnitina mediante o teste do micronúcleo em eritrócitos policromáticos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Pinheiro Araldi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Os esteroides anabólicos androgênicos são usados por pessoas que desejam aumentar sua massa muscular para obter um melhor desempenho nos esportes ou melhorar a aparência física. Os EAA são derivados sintéticos da testosterona, capazes de promover a hipertrofia das fibras musculares, aumentando a síntese proteica intracelular. A L-carnitina é um suplemento alimentar empregado para aumentar a produção energética por meio da oxidação de ácidos graxos. Embora haja trabalhos mostrando as propriedades fisiológicas dessas drogas, há poucos estudos sobre o potencial mutagênico das mesmas. OBJETIVOS: Este trabalho avaliou a clastogenicidade e genotoxicidade do decanoato de nandrolona, decanoato de testosterona e da L-carnitina, em diferentes tratamentos, através do teste do micronúcleo em eritrócitos policromáticos de ratos Wistar. MÉTODOS: Os animais foram submetidos a diferentes concentrações e associações de EAA. O controle positivo recebeu ciclofosfamida 50 mg/kg através de injeção intraperitoneal e o controle negativo, 1 ml de soro fisiológico por gavagem. Os ratos foram sacrificados após 36 horas da última aplicação, tendo seus fêmures removidos e a medula óssea extraída. O material foi homogeneizado e centrifugado. O botão de células foi pipetado e transferido para as lâminas, que foram coradas com Giemsa. Foram contados 1.000 eritrócitos policromáticos por animal, observando a frequência de micronúcleos. RESULTADOS: Foi realizado o teste de Kruskal-Wallis, com nível de significância de 5%, que demostrou que o decanoato de nandrolona - três doses de 0,2 mg/kg e 0,6 mg/kg, oito doses de 7,5 mg/kg, L-carnitina - sete doses de 0,4 ml/250g e 1,5 ml/250g, decanoato de testosterona - 28 doses de 0,075 mg/kg, decanoato de nandrolona - oito doses de 7,5 mg/kg associado a L-carnitina 1 ml e decanoato de nandrolona - oito doses de 7,5 mg/kg associado à decanoato de testosterona - oito doses de 7

  13. APPLICATIONS OF PHARMACOGENETIC TESTING FOR PERSONALIZATION OF THERAPY WITH ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS IN RUSSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Sychev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The clinical significance of the patient genetic characteristics in the individual pharmacological response to oral anticoagulants is considered. Possible tactics of warfarin dosing and new oral anticoagulants choice on the basis of pharmacogenetic testing as well as indications for this approach in clinical practice are discussed. It should increase efficacy and safety of anticoagulant therapy.

  14. Lupus anticoagulant: a unique case with lupus anticoagulant and habitual abortion together with antifactor II antibody and bleeding tendency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stormorken, H; Gjemdal, T; Bjøro, K

    1988-01-01

    Lupus anticoagulants (LA) are associated with various forms of thrombotic events. Of particular interest to obstetrics is the association with placental infarcts and habitual abortion. In the case described a near full-term viable infant was delivered subsequent to four early miscarriages. However, the mother had then developed an antifactor II antibody leading to grave hypoprothrombinemia with bleeding tendency, indicating efficient autoanticoagulation. This natural experiment indicates that these patients should receive anticoagulation during pregnancy, possibly in combination with steroids to depress the LA level. PMID:3139508

  15. Multicentric calcified trichilemmal cysts with alopecia universalis affecting siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haneef N Sadath

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Trichilemmal cyst, also known as "pilar cyst," is a benign cyst containing keratin and its breakdown products with a wall resembling external root sheath of hair. It occurs mostly in females as a solitary firm nodule over scalp. Occurrence of multiple trichilemmal cysts in areas other than scalp is extremely rare. We are reporting a case of a 40-years-old female who presented with multiple calcified trichilemmal cysts in multicentric distribution associated with alopecia universalis. Similar complaints were present in elder sister of the patient, indicating a genetic background. Multicentric distribution of trichilemmal cysts, calcification, familial occurrence, and association with alopecia universalis seen in our case are all rare and intriguing features.

  16. Perioperative anticoagulation for children with prosthetic mechanical valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, P; Grech, V

    2000-04-01

    The insertion of a mechanical heart valve predisposes to thrombosis and embolism, and for this reason, individuals with mechanical valves who undergo dental/surgical procedures must take special precautions. In this article, we illustrate a protocol for anticoagulation during such procedures in individuals with mechanical valves. PMID:22368581

  17. Do we have to anticoagulated patients with cerebral venous thrombosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feher, G; Illes, Z; Hargroves, D; Komoly, S

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare form of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Although anticoagulation is recommended for the initial and long term treatment with regards to thrombotic risks for patients with CVT, the role of anticogalution has not been fully elucidated. The aim of...

  18. Anticoagulants used in plasma collection affect adipokine multiplexed measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allione, Alessandra; Di Gaetano, Cornelia; Dani, Nadia; Barberio, Davide; Sieri, Sabina; Krogh, Vittorio; Matullo, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Obesity is an important health problem worldwide. Adipose tissue acts as an endocrine organ that secretes various bioactive substances, called adipokines, including pro-inflammatory biomarkers such as TNF-α, IL-6, leptin and C-reactive protein (CRP) and anti-inflammatory molecules such as adiponectin. The deregulated production of adipokines in obesity is linked to the pathogenesis of various disease processes and monitoring their variation is critical to understand metabolic diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the plasma concentration of adipokines in healthy subjects by multiplexed measurements and the effect of anticoagulants on their levels. Plasma samples from 10 healthy donors were collected in two different anticoagulants (sodium citrate or heparin). All markers, excluding TNF-α, showed significantly higher concentrations in heparinized compared to citrate plasma. However, levels of adipokines in different plasma samples were highly correlated for most of these markers. We reported that different anticoagulants used in the preparation of the plasma samples affected the measurements of some adipokines. The importance of the present results in epidemiology is relevant when comparing different studies in which blood samples were collected with different anticoagulants. PMID:26945995

  19. Anticoagulant drugs increase natural killer cell activity in lung cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bobek, M.; Boubelík, Michael; Fišerová, Anna; Luptovcová, Martina; Vannucci, Luca; Kacprzak, G.; Kolodzej, J.; Majewski, A.M.; Hoffman, R. M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 2 (2005), s. 215-223. ISSN 0169-5002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : anticoagulant drugs * lung cancer * NK cells Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.172, year: 2005

  20. Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism With New Anticoagulant Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becattini, Cecilia; Agnelli, Giancarlo

    2016-04-26

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common disease associated with high risk for recurrences, death, and late sequelae, accounting for substantial health care costs. Anticoagulant agents are the mainstay of treatment for deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. The recent availability of oral anticoagulant agents that can be administered in fixed doses, without laboratory monitoring and dose adjustment, is a landmark change in the treatment of VTE. In Phase III trials, rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban (antifactor Xa agents), and dabigatran (an antithrombin agent) were noninferior and probably safer than conventional anticoagulation therapy (low-molecular-weight heparin followed by vitamin K antagonists). These favorable results were confirmed in specific patient subgroups, such as the elderly and fragile. However, some patients, such as those with cancer or with intermediate- to high-risk pulmonary embolism, were underrepresented in the Phase III trials. Further clinical research is required before new oral anticoagulant agents can be considered standard of care for the full spectrum of patients with VTE. PMID:27102510

  1. Haemorrhage in the labyrinth caused by anticoagulant therapy: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a patient who experienced a severe vertiginous episode with bilateral tinnitus and progressive right-sided hearing loss. She had Marfan's disease and was on anticoagulant treatment. The fluid in the labyrinth gave higher signal than cerebrospinal fluid on T1-weighted images, suggesting haemorrhage. The radiological follow-up is discussed. (orig.)

  2. Structure and anticoagulant properties of sulfated glycosaminoglycans from primitive Chordates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAVÃO MAURO S. G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatan sulfates and heparin, similar to the mammalian glycosaminoglycans, but with differences in the degree and position of sulfation were previously isolated from the body of the ascidian Styela plicata and Ascidia nigra. These differences produce profound effects on their anticoagulant properties. S. plicata dermatan sulfate composed by 2-O-sulfatedalpha-L-iduronic acid and 4-O-sulfated N-acetyl-beta-D-galactosamine residues is a potent anticoagulant due to a high heparin cofactor II activity. Surprisingly, it has a lower potency to prevent thrombus formation on an experimental model and a lower bleeding effect in rats than the mammalian dermatan sulfate. In contrast, A. nigra dermatan sulfate, also enriched in 2-O-sulfated alpha-L-iduronic acid, but in this case sulfated at O-6 of the N-acetyl-beta-D-galactosamine units, has no in vitro or in vivo anticoagulant activity, does not prevent thrombus formation but shows a bleeding effect similar to the mammalian glycosaminoglycan. Ascidian heparin, composed by 2-O-sulfated alpha-L-iduronic acid, N- and 6-O-sulfated glucosamine (75% and alpha-L-iduronic acid, N- and 6-O-sulfated glucosamine (25% disaccharide units has an anticoagulant activity 10 times lower than the mammalian heparin, is about 20 times less potent in the inhibition of thrombin by antithrombin, but has the same heparin cofactor II activity as mammalian heparin.

  3. Citrate Anticoagulation for CRRT in Children: Comparison with Heparin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Nicole Fernández

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regional anticoagulation with citrate is an alternative to heparin in continuous renal replacement therapies, which may prolong circuit lifetime and decrease hemorrhagic complications. A retrospective comparative cohort study based on a prospective observational registry was conducted including critically ill children undergoing CRRT. Efficacy, measured as circuit survival, and secondary effects of heparin and citrate were compared. 12 patients on CRRT with citrate anticoagulation and 24 patients with heparin anticoagulation were analyzed. Median citrate dose was 2.6 mmol/L. Median calcium dose was 0.16 mEq/kg/h. Median heparin dose was 15 UI/kg/h. Median circuit survival was 48 hours with citrate and 31 hours with heparin (P=0.028. 66.6% of patients treated with citrate developed mild metabolic alkalosis, which was directly related to citrate dose. There were no cases of citrate intoxication: median total calcium/ionic calcium index (CaT/I of 2.16 and a maximum CaT/I of 2.33, without metabolic acidosis. In the citrate group, 45.5% of patients developed hypochloremia and 27.3% hypomagnesemia. In the heparin group, 27.8% developed hypophosphatemia. Three patients were moved from heparin to citrate to control postoperatory bleeding. In conclusion citrate is a safe and effective anticoagulation method for CRRT in children and it achieves longer circuit survival than heparin.

  4. Citrate Anticoagulation for CRRT in Children: Comparison with Heparin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Sara Nicole; Santiago, Maria José; López-Herce, Jesús; García, Miriam; Del Castillo, Jimena; Alcaraz, Andrés José; Bellón, Jose María

    2014-01-01

    Regional anticoagulation with citrate is an alternative to heparin in continuous renal replacement therapies, which may prolong circuit lifetime and decrease hemorrhagic complications. A retrospective comparative cohort study based on a prospective observational registry was conducted including critically ill children undergoing CRRT. Efficacy, measured as circuit survival, and secondary effects of heparin and citrate were compared. 12 patients on CRRT with citrate anticoagulation and 24 patients with heparin anticoagulation were analyzed. Median citrate dose was 2.6 mmol/L. Median calcium dose was 0.16 mEq/kg/h. Median heparin dose was 15 UI/kg/h. Median circuit survival was 48 hours with citrate and 31 hours with heparin (P = 0.028). 66.6% of patients treated with citrate developed mild metabolic alkalosis, which was directly related to citrate dose. There were no cases of citrate intoxication: median total calcium/ionic calcium index (CaT/I) of 2.16 and a maximum CaT/I of 2.33, without metabolic acidosis. In the citrate group, 45.5% of patients developed hypochloremia and 27.3% hypomagnesemia. In the heparin group, 27.8% developed hypophosphatemia. Three patients were moved from heparin to citrate to control postoperatory bleeding. In conclusion citrate is a safe and effective anticoagulation method for CRRT in children and it achieves longer circuit survival than heparin. PMID:25157369

  5. Vitamin K and stability of oral anticoagulant therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rombouts, Eva Karolien

    2011-01-01

    One of the causes of unstable anticoagulation is a variable vitamin K intake. The main objective of this thesis was to test the hypothesis that the INR is particularly sensitive to changes in vitamin K intake when vitamin K status is low, and that patients with a low vitamin K intake would therefore

  6. Haemorrhage in the labyrinth caused by anticoagulant therapy: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callonnec, F.; Gerardin, E.; Thiebot, J. [Department of Radiology, Rouen University Hospital, 1 rue de Germont, F-76031 Rouen cedex (France); Marie, J.P.; Andrieu Guitrancourt, J. [Department of Otolaryngology, Rouen University Hospital (France); Marsot-Dupuch, K. [Department of Radiology, St. Antoine, Paris University Hospital (France)

    1999-06-01

    We report a patient who experienced a severe vertiginous episode with bilateral tinnitus and progressive right-sided hearing loss. She had Marfan`s disease and was on anticoagulant treatment. The fluid in the labyrinth gave higher signal than cerebrospinal fluid on T1-weighted images, suggesting haemorrhage. The radiological follow-up is discussed. (orig.) With 2 figs., 11 refs.

  7. Antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy in elective percutaneous coronary intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verheugt Freek WA

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thrombosis plays a major role in acute vessel closure both after coronary balloon angioplasty and after stenting. This review will address the role of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy in preventing early thrombotic complications after percutaneous coronary intervention. The focus will be on agents that are routinely available and commonly used.

  8. Laboratory monitoring of novel oral anticoagulants rivaroxaban and dabigatran

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerenberg, E.S.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Sijpkens, M.K.; Meijers, J.C.; Büller, H.R.; Levi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Rivaroxaban and dabigatran are new oral anticoagulants that both have been licensed worldwide for the treatment of atrial fibrillation and rivaroxaban also for venous thrombosis. Both drugs specifically inhibit one coagulation factor, factor Xa and thrombin, respectively, and both compou

  9. Perioperative anticoagulation for children with prosthetic mechanical valves

    OpenAIRE

    Grech, Victor E.; Rees, P.

    2000-01-01

    The insertion of a mechanical heart valve predisposes to thrombosis and embolism, and for this reason, individuals with mechanical valves who undergo dental/surgical procedures must take special precautions. In this article, we illustrate a protocol for anticoagulation during such procedures in individuals with mechanical valves.

  10. Qualitative identification of rodenticide anticoagulants by LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleberg, Robert A; Homan, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Rodenticide anticoagulants are used in the control of rodent populations. In addition to accidental ingestions in humans, such agents have also been used for homicidal and suicidal purposes. There are two major groups of rodenticide anticoagulants - hydroxycoumarins and indanediones. Before the advent of LC-MS/MS, analysis for such agents was relegated to such techniques as TLC and HPLC with nonspecific modes of detection. LC-MS/MS has been used to determine any given number of rodenticide anticoagulants in animal tissues, foods, plasma, etc. Use of this technique allows for the simultaneous identification of individual compounds within both classes of rodenticide anticoagulants. The LC-MS/MS method presented allows for simultaneous qualitative identification of brodifacoum, bromadiolone, chlorphacinone, dicumarol, difenacoum, diphacinone, and warfarin in blood, serum, and plasma using ESI in the negative mode. Two transitions are monitored for each analyte after a simple sample preparation. Chromatographic separation is accomplished using a gradient of ammonium hydroxide in water and ammonium hydroxide in methanol. Chloro-warfarin is used as internal standard. PMID:22767114

  11. Use of Oral Anticoagulation Therapy in Atrial Fibrillation after Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Stine Funder; Christensen, Louisa M; Christensen, Anders;

    2013-01-01

    Background. The knowledge is still sparse about patient related factors, influencing oral anticoagulation therapy (OAC) rates, in stroke patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Aims. To assess the use of OAC in ischemic stroke patients diagnosed with AF and to identify patient related factors...

  12. Personalised treatment with oral anticoagulant drugs : clinical and economic issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, T.I.

    2013-01-01

    Coumarin derivatives such as acenocoumarol, phenprocoumon and warfarin are frequently used for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with atrial fibrillation or for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. These oral anticoagulants have a narrow therapeutic range and a large var

  13. SURF1 deficiency: a multi-centre natural history study

    OpenAIRE

    Wedatilake, Y; Brown, R; Mcfarland, R.; Yaplito-Lee, J.; Morris, A.A.; Champion, M; Jardine, P E; Clarke, A.; Thorburn, D R; Taylor, R. W.; Land, J M; Forrest, K.; Dobbie, A.; Simmons, L; Aasheim, E. T.

    2013-01-01

    Background SURF1 deficiency, a monogenic mitochondrial disorder, is the most frequent cause of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficient Leigh syndrome (LS). We report the first natural history study of SURF1 deficiency. Methods We conducted a multi-centre case notes review of 44 SURF1-deficient patients from ten different UK centres and two Australian centres. Survival data for LRPPRC-deficient LS and nuclear-encoded complex I-deficient LS patients were obtained from previous publications. The su...

  14. Characteristics of ambulatory anticoagulant adverse drug events: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eckstrand Julie

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the high frequency with which adverse drug events (ADEs occur in outpatient settings, detailed information regarding these events remains limited. Anticoagulant drugs are associated with increased safety concerns and are commonly involved in outpatient ADEs. We therefore sought to evaluate ambulatory anticoagulation ADEs and the patient population in which they occurred within the Duke University Health System (Durham, NC, USA. Methods A retrospective chart review of ambulatory warfarin-related ADEs was conducted. An automated trigger surveillance system identified eligible events in ambulatory patients admitted with an International Normalized Ratio (INR >3 and administration of vitamin K. Event and patient characteristics were evaluated, and quality/process improvement strategies for ambulatory anticoagulation management are described. Results A total of 169 events in 167 patients were identified from December 1, 2006-June 30, 2008 and included in the study. A median supratherapeutic INR of 6.1 was noted, and roughly half of all events (52.1% were associated with a bleed. Nearly 74% of events resulted in a need for fresh frozen plasma; 64.8% of bleeds were classified as major. A total of 59.2% of events were at least partially responsible for hospital admission. Median patient age was 68 y (range 36-95 y with 24.9% initiating therapy within 3 months prior to the event. Of events with a prior documented patient visit (n = 157, 73.2% were seen at a Duke clinic or hospital within the previous month. Almost 80% of these patients had anticoagulation therapy addressed, but only 60.0% had a follow-up plan documented in the electronic note. Conclusions Ambulatory warfarin-related ADEs have significant patient and healthcare utilization consequences in the form of bleeding events and associated hospital admissions. Recommendations for improvement in anticoagulation management include use of information technology to assist

  15. Modeling intracerebral hemorrhage growth and response to anticoagulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles H Greenberg

    Full Text Available The mechanism for hemorrhage enlargement in the brain, a key determinant of patient outcome following hemorrhagic stroke, is unknown. We performed computer-based stochastic simulation of one proposed mechanism, in which hemorrhages grow in "domino" fashion via secondary shearing of neighboring vessel segments. Hemorrhages were simulated by creating an initial site of primary bleeding and an associated risk of secondary rupture at adjacent sites that decayed over time. Under particular combinations of parameters for likelihood of secondary rupture and time-dependent decay, a subset of lesions expanded, creating a bimodal distribution of microbleeds and macrobleeds. Systematic variation of the model to simulate anticoagulation yielded increases in both macrobleed occurrence (26.9%, 53.2%, and 70.0% of all hemorrhagic events under conditions simulating no, low-level, and high-level anticoagulation and final hemorrhage size (median volumes 111, 276, and 412 under the same three conditions, consistent with data from patients with anticoagulant-related brain hemorrhages. Reversal from simulated high-level anticoagulation to normal coagulation was able to reduce final hemorrhage size only if applied relatively early in the course of hemorrhage expansion. These findings suggest that a model based on a secondary shearing mechanism can account for some of the clinically observed properties of intracerebral hemorrhage, including the bimodal distribution of volumes and the enhanced hemorrhage growth seen with anticoagulation. Future iterations of this model may be useful for elucidating the effects of hemorrhage growth of factors related to secondary shearing (such as small vessel pathology or time-dependent decay (such as hemostatic agents.

  16. Worldwide management of oral anticoagulant therapy: the ISAM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pengo, Vittorio; Pegoraro, Cinzia; Cucchini, Umberto; Iliceto, Sabino

    2006-02-01

    A multicenter, observational, retrospective, cross-sectional study of patients, receiving oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT) for stroke prophylaxis in chronic non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) was conducted in the US, Canada, France, Italy and Spain according to their predominant model of care [routine medical care (RMC) or Anticoagulation Clinic care (ACC)]. The study objectives were to assess anticoagulation control (time in target range), and to describe the features of the local model of care. Consecutive patients were recruited on the basis of a minimum of 60 days of oral anticoagulant treatment over a 12 month period, and clinic and physician details were captured by means of a structured face-to-face or telephone interview. Time in therapeutic range (TTR) was calculated by using linear interpolation between INR values. A total of 1511 patients were recruited, of whom 1445 were included in the analysis of TTR. TTR was higher in ACC (69.5% and 64.9% for Italy and Spain, respectively) with respect to RMC (58.1%, 62.8% and 59.3% for the US, Canada and France, respectively). Mean intervals between INR determinations were between 3 and 4 weeks. Dose changes in case of INR outside therapeutic range were more frequent in Spain and less frequent in France. Striking differences were observed in type of VKA used, specialists involved in patient management, and dosage instructions. Studying of anticoagulation management based on local models of care highlights important discrepancies among countries and suggests further standardization of the management of this important therapy is necessary. PMID:16475046

  17. ラット腹腔肥満細胞からのアナフィラキシー性histamine遊離に対するdisodium cromoglycate, 6, 7-dihydro-6, 8, 8, 10-tetramethyl-8H-pyrano[3, 2-G]chromon-2-carboxylic acid(EAA)およびtranilastの抑制効果 -細胞外Ca(2+)の影響および交叉タキフィラキシーの成立-

    OpenAIRE

    池田, 滋樹

    1987-01-01

    To clarify the modes of the inhibitory action of DSCG, EAA and tranilast on histamine release, the effects of these drugs were studied on anaphylactic histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells passively sensitized with mouse anti-ovalbumin serum. DSCG had a potent and dose-dependent inhibitory effect on the release in ordinary Hanks' medium, whereas its activity was far weaker in the absence of Ca(2+). No marked differences were observed in the inhibitory activities of EAA and tranilas...

  18. Multicentric extra-abdominal desmoid tumors arising in bilateral lower limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuhiro Fukushima

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Extra-abdominal desmoid tumors preferentially affect the shoulders, arms, backs, buttocks, and thighs of young adults. Multicentric occurrence is rather rare but seems to be another distinctive feature of extra-abdominal desmoid tumors. In this article we report a rare case of multicentric extra-abdominal desmoid tumors arising in bilateral lower limbs.

  19. In-vitro anticoagulant activity of fucoidan derivatives from brown seaweed Laminaria japonica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jing; ZHANG Quanbin; ZHANG Zhongshan; HOU Yun; ZHANG Hong

    2011-01-01

    Fucoidan, a group of sulfated heteropolysaccharides, was extracted from Laminariajaponica,an important economic alga species in China. The anticoagulant activity of fucoidan and its derivatives (including sulfated, phosphorylated, and aminated fucoidan) was examined using in-vitro anticoagulant systems. The correlation between chemical variations within the fucoidan group and anticoagulant activity was determined. The in-vitro anticoagulant properties of fucoidan and its derivatives were determined by measuring activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT), and thrombin time (TT).The results indicate anticoagulant activity in all samples using APTT and TT assays; however, only the fucoidan derivatives affected the PT assay. Thus, the fucoidan derivatives were able to inhibit both intrinsic and extrinsic blood coagulants. Fucoidan (FPS) and its derivatives presented better anticoagulant activity than low molecular weight fucoidan (DFPS) and its derivatives, suggesting that molecular weight and proper conformation are contributing factors for anticoagulant activity of polysaccharides. Amino groups have a positive charge and can thus change the charge density of fucoidan. Accordingly, among the tested samples, aminated fucoidan (NF) was the most active reflecting the importance of charge density for anticoagulant activity. Available data obtained using in-vitro models suggest that the sulfate content,sulfate/total-sugar ratio, molecular weight, and the substituted group of fucoidan are important factors for anticoagulant activity but that the influence of sulfate, phosphate and amino groups on anticoagulant activity was different.

  20. In-vitro anticoagulant activity of fucoidan derivatives from brown seaweed Laminaria japonica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Quanbin; Zhang, Zhongshan; Hou, Yun; Zhang, Hong

    2011-05-01

    Fucoidan, a group of sulfated heteropolysaccharides, was extracted from Laminaria japonica, an important economic alga species in China. The anticoagulant activity of fucoidan and its derivatives (including sulfated, phosphorylated, and aminated fucoidan) was examined using in-vitro anticoagulant systems. The correlation between chemical variations within the fucoidan group and anticoagulant activity was determined. The in-vitro anticoagulant properties of fucoidan and its derivatives were determined by measuring activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT), and thrombin time (TT). The results indicate anticoagulant activity in all samples using APTT and TT assays; however, only the fucoidan derivatives affected the PT assay. Thus, the fucoidan derivatives were able to inhibit both intrinsic and extrinsic blood coagulants. Fucoidan (FPS) and its derivatives presented better anticoagulant activity than low molecular weight fucoidan (DFPS) and its derivatives, suggesting that molecular weight and proper conformation are contributing factors for anticoagulant activity of polysaccharides. Amino groups have a positive charge and can thus change the charge density of fucoidan. Accordingly, among the tested samples, aminated fucoidan (NF) was the most active reflecting the importance of charge density for anticoagulant activity. Available data obtained using in-vitro models suggest that the sulfate content, sulfate/total-sugar ratio, molecular weight, and the substituted group of fucoidan are important factors for anticoagulant activity but that the influence of sulfate, phosphate and amino groups on anticoagulant activity was different.

  1. [Use of direct oral anticoagulants in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickley, Frank; Geigenmüller, Grit; Schinköthe, Claudia

    2015-12-01

    Equal safety and efficacy of direct oral anticoagulants as compared to vitamin K antagonists have been shown in elderly and very old patients. The use of these seem to have certain advantages in this special patient cohort: higher drug safety, no need for lab monitoring, less drug-drug interactions and a lower rate of intracranial hemorrhages. However, more data is needed to quantify the exact bleeding risk for geriatric patients. Elderly patients suffer quite frequently from significant comorbidities, such as renal failure, dementia, vision loss etc., which might put them at higher risk to suffer from medication side effects, especially bleeding complications. Routine clinical examinations combined with monitoring of renal function are therefore of paramount importance. Regarding these precautions the use of the new oral anticoagulants in the elderly is hence quite justified and rising. PMID:26625228

  2. Emergent Bleeding in Patients Receiving Direct Oral Anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Richard L; Sterling, Sarah A

    2016-01-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) offer clinical advantages over warfarin, such as minimal medication and food interactions and fixed dosing without the need for routine monitoring of coagulation status. As with all anticoagulants, bleeding, either spontaneous or provoked, is the most common complication. The long-term use of these drugs is increasing, and there is a crucial need for emergency medicine service professionals to understand the optimal management of associated bleeding. This review aims to describe the indications and pharmacokinetics of available DOACs; to discuss the risk of bleeding; to provide a treatment algorithm to manage DOAC-associated emergency bleeding; and to discuss future directions in bleeding management, including the role of specific reversal agents, such as the recently approved idarucizumab for reversal of the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran. Because air medical personnel are increasingly likely to encounter patients receiving DOACs, it is important that they have an understanding of how to manage patients with emergent bleeding. PMID:27255877

  3. Patients' attitude and knowledge about oral anticoagulation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amara, Walid; Larsen, Torben B; Sciaraffia, Elena; Hernández Madrid, Antonio; Chen, Jian; Estner, Heidi; Todd, Derick; Bongiorni, Maria G; Potpara, Tatjana S; Dagres, Nikolaos; Sagnol, Pascal; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this European Heart Rhythm Association survey was to assess the attitude, level of education, and knowledge concerning oral anticoagulants (OACs) among patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) taking vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs) or antiplatelets. A...... total of 1147 patients with AF [mean age 66 ± 13 years, 529 (45%) women] from 8 selected European countries responded to this survey. The overall use of OACs and antiplatelets was 77 and 15.3%, respectively. Of the patients taking OACs, 67% were on VKAs, 33% on NOACs, and 17.9% on a combination of OACs...... and antiplatelets. Among patients on VKAs, 91% correctly stated the target international normalized ratio (INR) level. The proportion of patients on VKA medication who were aware that monthly INR monitoring was required for this treatment and the proportion of patients on NOAC who knew that renal...

  4. Predictors of recurrent venous thromboembolism and bleeding on anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menapace, Laurel A; McCrae, Keith R; Khorana, Alok A

    2016-04-01

    The impact of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in the cancer population remains substantial despite significant advances in detecting and treating thrombotic events. While there is extensive literature regarding predictors of first VTE event in cancer patients as well as a validated predictive score, less data exist regarding recurrent VTE in cancer cohorts and associated predictive variables. A similar paucity of data in regard to bleeding events in cancer patients receiving anticoagulation has been observed. This review article will highlight clinical risk factors as well as predictive biomarkers associated with recurrent VTE and bleeding in cancer patients receiving therapeutic anticoagulation. Predictive risk assessment models for cancer-associated recurrent VTE and bleeding are also discussed. PMID:27067987

  5. Self-management of oral anticoagulant therapy in two centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Hanna; Grove, E; Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard;

    endpoints: all-cause mortality, major thromboembolism and bleeding events, percentage of time within therapeutic International Normalized Ratio (INR) target range (TTR) and variance of the INR value. Patient data was obtained from two databases in the two centers, where all data had been prospectively......Self-management of oral anticoagulant therapy in two centers: 11.000 patient-years of follow-up H Nilsson1,2,3, EL Grove2, TB Larsen3, M Maegaard1, TD Christensen1 1Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery & Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus; 2Department of...... registered. Results: Results are pending but baseline characteristics (age, gender, indication for anticoagulant therapy) and data on all-cause mortality, major thromboembolism and bleeding events, TTR, INR-variance will be presented at the meeting. Conclusions: We hope to find a good quality of treatment...

  6. Difficulties in anticoagulation management during coadministration of warfarin and rifampin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C R; Thrasher, K A

    2001-10-01

    The clinical significance of rifampin's induction of warfarin metabolism is well documented, but no published studies or case reports have quantified this interaction with respect to the international normalized ratio (INR). A patient receiving concomitant rifampin and warfarin to treat a mycobacterial infection and intraventricular thrombus, respectively, underwent routine INR testing at a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic to assess his anticoagulation regimen. A 233% increase in warfarin dosage over 4 months proved insufficient to attain a therapeutic INR during long-term rifampin therapy More aggressive titration of the warfarin dosage was needed. In addition, a gradual 70% reduction in warfarin dosage over 4-5 weeks was necessary to maintain a therapeutic INR after rifampin discontinuation, demonstrating the clinically significant offset of this drug interaction. Extensive changes in warfarin dosage are required to attain and maintain a therapeutic INR during the initiation, maintenance, and discontinuation of rifampin. PMID:11601670

  7. Evaluation of a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, I A; Hutchison, T A; Kirking, D M; Shue, M E

    1985-06-01

    Medical records were retrospectively analyzed to evaluate the success of a pharmacist-managed Anticoagulation Surveillance Clinic (ASC). The 78 patients in group I were followed by the ASC. The 17 patients in Group II were followed by other Veterans Administration Medical Center clinics. Demographic characteristics, warfarin indication and potentially complicating conditions were comparable between the groups. Group I patients had shorter intervals between visits to the clinic than Group II patients. Although not statistically different compared to Group II, Group I patients had better prothrombin time control. Group I patients also had fewer complications per treatment year (6.9% vs 9.0%) and received fewer potentially interacting drugs. The ASC was at least as successful as the other clinics in managing patients on warfarin, and results compared very favorably to those reported in the literature for other anticoagulation clinics. PMID:4019790

  8. AParadigm Shift: The New Novel Oral Anticoagulation Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Wajeeha; Burke, James F; Mirrani, Ghazi; Sirinivasa, Minisha; Nabi, Usman; Hayat, Umar; Khan, Zubair; Sardar, Muhammad Rizwan

    2016-07-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia and represents one-third of the arrhythmia-related hospital admissions in the developed countries. Embolic strokes associated with AF are more severe and disabling. Thromboembolic stroke prevention is a major goal in treatment of AF and Warfarin has successfully served this purpose for many years. Drug-drug interaction and regular monitoring with Warfarin pose a significant challenge where health care system has limited resources; and lack of a well-structured health system, hinders regular International Normalized Ratio (INR) monitoring. Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have opened up a new exciting chapter in the field of anticoagulation in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). This review discussed the landmark trials that led to the development of NOACs and explored the potentials of these new agents with simultaneous comparison of Warfarin. PMID:27504556

  9. New oral anticoagulants – the newest update in dental surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Kovacevska, Ivona; Angelovska, Bistra

    2013-01-01

    Aim of this study is to review the evidence of different therapy approach, to highlight the areas of major concern, and to suggest specific oral surgery treatment for patients on new oral anticoagulants. A Medline and an extensive hand search were performed on English-language publications beginning in 1971 till now. The pertinent literature and clinical protocols of hospital dentistry departments have been extensively reviewed, presented and discussed. Several evolving clinical practic...

  10. Direct oral anticoagulants: a guide for daily practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Pierre; Robert-Ebadi, Helia; Bounameaux, Henri; Boehlen, Françoise; Righini, Marc

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, small oral compounds that specifically block activated coagulation factor X (FXa) or thrombin (FIIa) have become alternatives to the anticoagulants that had been used for several decades. As of today, these direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) include dabigatran etexilate (thrombin inhibitor) and apixaban, edoxaban and rivaroxaban (inhibitors of FXa). While there is no doubt that DOACs represent a major step forward in the management of patients with venous thromboembolic disease and atrial fibrillation, new challenges have arisen. They need to be addressed with the necessary pragmatism on the basis of evidence. Indeed, a better understanding of the management of these last-generation antithrombotics will favour safer use and increase confidence of the practitioner for the prescription of these drugs. The aim of this article is to present practical suggestions for the prescription and use of these drugs in everyday clinical practice, based on clinical experience and recently updated recommendations of the European Heart Rhythm Association and the American College of Chest Physicians among other scientific organisations. We address issues such as pharmacokinetics, dosing, side effects, limitations of use, drug interactions, switching from and to other anticoagulants, renal function, concomitant administration of antiplatelet agents and perioperative use. We also address the issue of monitoring and reversal, taking advantage of the most recent development in this latter area. Rather than being one additional set of recommendations, our narrative review aims at assisting the practicing physician in his or her daily handling of these novel anticoagulant compounds, based on frequently asked questions to the authors, a group of experienced specialists in the field who have, however, no commitment to issue guidelines. PMID:26964028

  11. Colorimetric measurement of iron in plasma samples anticoagulated with EDTA.

    OpenAIRE

    Walmsley, T. A.; George, P M; Fowler, R. T.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To determine if the iron in EDTA anticoagulated plasma samples can be measured by colorimetric assays using Ferrozine. METHODS: Paired samples of serum and EDTA plasma were obtained from 24 patients and analysed by three commercial iron methods. The EDTA plasmas were also analysed using methods modified by the addition of zinc sulphate or with different concentrations of Ferrozine. The iron contamination of EDTA sample tubes was measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy. RESULTS: Two c...

  12. Anticoagulation in chronic kidney disease patients—the practical aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Stephen; Szeki, Iren; Nash, Michael J; Thachil, Jecko

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness about the risks of arterial and venous thromboembolism (TE) in hospital patients and general public which has led to consideration of thrombosis prevention measures in earnest. Early recognition of the symptoms of TE disease has led to timely administration of antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs, translating to better outcome in many of these patients. In this respect, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) represent a special group. They indeed represent...

  13. New oral anticoagulants in the prevention of stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Konrad Jarząbek; Dawid Bąkowski; Beata Wożakowska-Kapłon

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is associated with a few folds higher risk of stroke. Traditional vitamin K antagonists used in the prevention of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation are often not efficient enough due to their interactions with a broad range of substances including medicines or food ingridients and problems with monitoring the treatment. New oral anticoagulants pose an alternative for the vitamin K antagonists. They are equally efficient in the prevention of stroke, ...

  14. Coagulation assessment with the new generation of oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Charles V

    2016-06-01

    Long-term oral anticoagulant (OAC) therapy is used for the treatment and prevention of thrombosis and thromboembolism. As OAC use is so widespread, emergency physicians are likely to encounter patients on anticoagulant therapy in the emergency department (ED) on a regular basis, either for the same reasons as the population in general or as a result of the increased bleeding risk that OAC use entails.The vitamin K antagonist warfarin has been the standard OAC for several decades, but recently, the newer agents dabigatran etexilate, rivaroxaban and apixaban (collectively, novel OACs, non-vitamin K OACs, or simply 'NOACs') have become available for long-term use. Protocols for assessing and managing warfarin-treated patients in the ED are well established and include international normalised ratio (INR) testing, which helps guide patient management. However, the INR does not give an accurate evaluation of coagulation status with NOACs, and alternative tests are therefore needed for use in emergency settings. This paper discusses what information the INR provides for a patient taking warfarin and which coagulation tests can guide the physician when treating patients on one of the NOACs, as well as other differences in emergency anticoagulation management. PMID:25987596

  15. Improvements of anticoagulant activities of silk fibroin films with fucoidan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Fucoidan (FC),an effective anticoagulant constituent extracted from brown algae,was introduced into silk fibroin (SF) for improving its blood compatibility.The SF and SF/FC blend films were characterized by attenuated total reflectance Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR),X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS),scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and dynamic contact angle determinator (CA).The in vitro anticoagulant activities of the films were evaluated by activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT),thrombin time (TT) and prothrombin time (PT) measurements.The endothelial cell attachment and proliferation viability on the film were assessed by micropipette aspiration technique and MTT assay,respectively.The testing results indicated that the introduction of FC increased the roughness,hydrophilicity and sulfate component of the film surface without impeding the formation of β-sheet conformation in SF.More important,FC brought excellent anticoagulant activity and better endothelial cell affinity to SF.The SF/FC blend film was hopeful to be used as blood-contacting biomaterials.

  16. Novel oral anticoagulants for heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelley, Jessica W; Kyle, Jeffrey A; Roberts, Rachel A

    2016-08-01

    To review the use of the novel oral anticoagulant (NOAC) agents for the treatment of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) from relevant clinical trial data. A MEDLINE, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, ClinicalTrials.gov, and Google-Scholar searches (1966-March 2016) were conducted using the keywords: thrombocytopenia, NOACs, dabigatran, apixaban, rivaroxaban, edoxaban, Xa inhibitor, direct thrombin inhibitor. Articles evaluating the new oral anticoagulants for thrombocytopenia published in English and using human subjects were selected. Eight clinical trials were identified. References cited in identified articles were used for additional citations. Approximately 12 million hospitalized patients each year are exposed to heparin for thromboprophylaxis. HIT, an immune-mediated, prothrombotic adverse reaction is a potential complication of heparin therapy. As a result, heparin products must be immediately withdrawn and replaced by alternative anticoagulants to compensate for the thrombotic risk associated with HIT. Limitations exist with the only currently FDA approved heparin alternative, argatroban. NOACs have been considered as potential alternatives to traditional agents based on their pharmacologic activity. Case reports have indicated positive results in patients, with clinical outcomes and tolerability supporting the use of the NOACs as alternative agents in the treatment of HIT. Positive results have been reported for the use of NOACs in the treatment of HIT. Further robust studies are needed for definitive decision making by clinicians. PMID:27102287

  17. Selection of an aptamer antidote to the anticoagulant drug bivalirudin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Martin

    Full Text Available Adverse drug reactions, including severe patient bleeding, may occur following the administration of anticoagulant drugs. Bivalirudin is a synthetic anticoagulant drug sometimes employed as a substitute for heparin, a commonly used anticoagulant that can cause a condition called heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT. Although bivalrudin has the advantage of not causing HIT, a major concern is lack of an antidote for this drug. In contrast, medical professionals can quickly reverse the effects of heparin using protamine. This report details the selection of an aptamer to bivalirudin that functions as an antidote in buffer. This was accomplished by immobilizing the drug on a monolithic column to partition binding sequences from nonbinding sequences using a low-pressure chromatography system and salt gradient elution. The elution profile of binding sequences was compared to that of a blank column (no drug, and fractions with a chromatographic difference were analyzed via real-time PCR (polymerase chain reaction and used for further selection. Sequences were identified by 454 sequencing and demonstrated low micromolar dissociation constants through fluorescence anisotropy after only two rounds of selection. One aptamer, JPB5, displayed a dose-dependent reduction of the clotting time in buffer, with a 20 µM aptamer achieving a nearly complete antidote effect. This work is expected to result in a superior safety profile for bivalirudin, resulting in enhanced patient care.

  18. [Influence of anticoagulants on the appearance of chronic subdural hematoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupa, Mariusz; Moskała, Marek; Składzień, Tomasz; Grzywna, Ewelina

    2009-01-01

    In recent years in the Department of Neurotraumatology in Cracow it has been noticed the frequent connection between appearance of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) and treatment by anticoagulant medications. The aim of this study is to draw attention to the problem of insufficient control of anticoagulants consumption, especially by patients treated for cardiovascular system diseases that increases the risk of bleeding and CSDH development. The paper is based on data from questionnaires that was sent to patients with CSDH, cured in the Department of Neurotraumatology form 2004 to 2005. Analyzed was the group of 51 patients with chronic subdural hematoma; 37 individuals (72.5%) confirmed taking acetylsalicylic acid in the period of 3 months before admission to the Department, 9 (17.6%) patients answered that they were taking low-molecular weight heparin. One patient (1.9%) was taking chronically derivative of cumarin. The authors would inform that anticoagulant treatment might favour increase of chronic subdural hematoma incidence. It's especially important, because the average life expectancy has been prolonged in Poland and there are more people taking acetylsalicylic acid. This can be an epidemiological problem in future. PMID:20043584

  19. New anticoagulants in the treatment of stroke:future promise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emre Kumral; Tuba Cerraho(g)lu (S)irin

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence is leading to the replacement of vitamin K antagonists,the efficacy of which in preventing stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) is well established,with better tolerated and more manageable new anticoagulant drugs,with a lower risk of intracranial bleeding,no clear interactions with food,fewer interactions with medications,and no need for frequent laboratory monitoring and dose adjustments.Among new anticoagulants,dabigatran etexilate is a direct,competitive inhibitor of thrombin.It was evaluated for patients with AF in the RE-LY trial,showing lower rates of stroke and systemic embolism at a dose of 150 mg twice daily with similar rates of major hemorrhage compared with warfarin; and non-inferiority compared with warfarin for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism at a dose of 110 mg twice daily,with lower rates of major bleeding.Beside dabigatran,oral factor X a inhibitors are also emerging for the prevention of thromboembolic events in AF.Despite the obvious advantages of these new oral anticoagulants over vitamin K antagonists,further information is still needed on how to prioritize the patients deriving the greatest benefit from these novel agents on the basis of patient characteristics or drug pharmacokinetics.There is also a need for assessing their long-term efficacy and safety over decades in the real-world setting.

  20. Electroconvulsive therapy and anticoagulation after pulmonary embolism: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cesar Lazaro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is considered the most effective treatment for catatonia regardless its underlying condition. The rigid fixed posture and immobility observed in catatonia may lead to several clinical complications, of which, pulmonary embolism (PE is one of the most severe. The rapid improvement of the psychiatric condition in catatonia-related PE is essential, since immobility favors the occurrence of new thromboembolic events and further complications. In that scenario, ECT should be considered, based on a risk-benefit analysis, aiming at the faster resolution of the catatonia. Methods Case report and literature review. Results A 66-years-old woman admitted to the psychiatric ward with catatonia due to a depressive episode presented bilateral PE. Clinically stable, but still severely depressed after a trial of antidepressants, she was treated with ECT in the course of full anticoagulation with enoxaparin. After five ECT sessions, her mood was significantly better and she was walking and eating spontaneously. She did not present complications related either to PE or to anticoagulation. After the eighth ECT session, she evolved with hypomania, which was managed with oral medication adjustments. The patient was completely euthymic at discharge. Conclusion The case we presented provides further evidence to the anecdotal case reports on the safety of ECT in the course of concomitant full anticoagulant therapy after PE, and illustrates how, with the proper precautions, the benefits of ECT in such condition might outweigh its risks.

  1. Multicentric osteoid osteoma with a nidus located in the epiphysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamam, Cueneyt [Kasimpasa Military Hospital, Kasimpasa Asker Hastanesi, Orthopedics and Traumatology, Istanbul (Turkey); Yildirim, Duezguen [Kasimpasa Military Hospital, Department of Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey); Tamam, Muge [Okmeydani Training and Research Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2009-11-15

    We present a 13-year-old girl who was referred to our clinic with a 5-month history of right leg pain relieved by salicylates. Initial CT examination demonstrated a lesion in the posterior tibial cortex in keeping with an osteoid osteoma. This was resected and the diagnosis confirmed by histology. However, her pain recurred 2 weeks after the operation and further imaging identified a further nidus in the epiphysis. We present the imaging findings in this unique case of multicentric osteoid osteoma with one nidus located in the epiphysis. (orig.)

  2. Hypercalcaemic multicentric lymphoma in a dog presenting as clitoromegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony B. Zambelli

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Clitoromegaly is a clinical manifestation of various local and systemic conditions in all species. The external genitalia are a very rare site of primary or metastatic lymphoma in canines, with only one previously-reported case in a dog and only sparse reports in the medical literature. Lymphoma is also very rare in dogs less than four years of age. This account reports on a T-cell multicentric lymphoma in a 16-month-old Basset hound presented primarily for clitoromegaly. The patient survived for 68 days with cyclophosphamide-vincristine-prednisolone therapy. The causes of clitoromegaly in all species, including humans, are tabulated with references.

  3. Masquerade Syndrome of Multicentre Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Guerriero

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In Italy we say that the most unlucky things can happen to physicians when they get sick, despite the attention of colleagues. To confirm this rumor, we report the sad story of a surgeon with bilateral vitreitis and glaucoma unresponsive to traditional therapies. Methods/Design. Case report. Results. After one year of steroidal and immunosuppressive therapy, a vitrectomy, and a trabeculectomy for unresponsive bilateral vitreitis and glaucoma, MRI showed a multicentre primary central nervous system lymphoma, which was the underlying cause of the masquerade syndrome. Conclusions. All ophthalmologists and clinicians must be aware of masquerade syndromes, in order to avoid delays in diagnosis.

  4. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: established oral anticoagulants versus novel anticoagulants-translating clinical trial data into practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezekowitz, Michael D; Spahr, Judy; Ghosh, Pradeepto; Corelli, Kathryn

    2014-09-01

    Anticoagulation for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) is effective. Pivotal trials RE-LY, ROCKET AF, ARISTOTLE, and ENGAGE-AF TIMI 48 tested novel agents against warfarin (W). In RE-LY, an open-label trial, dabigatran 150 mg BID (D150) was superior (35%) and 110 mg BID (D110) was noninferior to W. D150 reduced ischemic strokes by 25% and intracerebral bleeds by 74%, but increased major GI bleeds by 0.5 % per year. In ROCKET AF, a double-blind study, rivaroxaban 20 mg daily, downtitrated to 15 mg daily (if CrCl was 80; weight, 1.5 mg) was superior for safety (31%), efficacy (21%), and all-cause mortality (11%). In ENGAGE-AF TIMI 48, edoxaban 60 mg once daily (30 mg once daily if CrCl 30-50 ml/min, weight <60 kg, or concomitant verapamil or quinidine) was noninferior to W for efficacy, but reduced major bleeding (20%). To translate clinical trials to practice, understanding the disease and each anticoagulant is essential. For all novel agents, rapid anticoagulation, absence of monitoring, and a short half-life differentiate them from W. Bleed rates were either noninferior or lower than for W, without an antidote. Patient compliance is critical. Knowledge of renal function is essential and maintaining patients on therapy is key. PMID:24880227

  5. Patient costs in anticoagulation management: a comparison of primary and secondary care.

    OpenAIRE

    Parry, D; Bryan, S; Gee, K; Murray, E.; Fitzmaurice, D

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The demand for anticoagulation management is increasing. This has led to care being provided in non-hospital settings. While clinical studies have similarly demonstrated good clinical care in these settings, it is still unclear as to which alternative is the most efficient. AIM: To determine the costs borne by patients when attending an anticoagulation management clinic in either primary or secondary care and to use this information to consider the cost-effectiveness of anticoagul...

  6. Citrate pharmacokinetics and calcium levels during high-flux dialysis with regional citrate anticoagulation

    OpenAIRE

    Kozik-Jaromin, Justyna; Nier, Volker; Heemann, Uwe; Kreymann, Bernhard; Böhler, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Background. Regional citrate anticoagulation is a very effective anticoagulation method for haemodialysis. However, it is not widely used, primarily due to the risk of hypocalcaemia. We studied citrate and calcium kinetics to better understand safety aspects of this anticoagulation method. Methods. During 15 haemodialysis treatments with a calcium-free dialysis solution, citrate was infused pre-dialyser and calcium was substituted post-dialyser. Systemic and extracorporeal citrate and calcium...

  7. MODERN APPROACHES TO ANTICOAGULANT THERAPY DURING CATHETER ABLATION TREATMENT OF NON-VALVULAR ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

    OpenAIRE

    E. A. Belikov; K. V. Davtyan; O. N. Tkacheva

    2015-01-01

    Prevention of thromboembolic complications in patients with atrial fibrillation during catheter pulmonary veins isolation is discussed. This subject review is presented with special consideration to new anticoagulants.

  8. Anticoagulation to prevent stroke in atrial fibrillation and its implications for managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, D E

    1998-03-12

    Nonrheumatic atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most potent common risk factor for stroke, raising the risk of stroke 5-fold. Six randomized trials of anticoagulation in AFib consistently demonstrated a reduction in the risk of stroke by about two-thirds. In these trials, anticoagulation in AFib was quite safe. In contrast, randomized trials indicate that aspirin confers only a small reduction in risk of stroke, at best. Pooled data from the first set of randomized trials indicate that prior stroke, hypertension, diabetes, and increasing age are independent risk factors for future stroke with AFib. Individuals AFib increases greatly at INR levels AFib depend on maintaining the INR between 2.0-3.0. Cost-effectiveness studies indicate that anticoagulation for AFib is among the most efficient preventive interventions in adults. Importantly, the benefits of anticoagulation in AFib accrue immediately. The implications for managed care organizations are that anticoagulation for AFib should be encouraged in their covered populations, and that dedicated anticoagulation services should be developed to promote system-wide control of anticoagulation intensity. Quality measures would include the proportion of patients with AFib who are anticoagulated, and the percentage of time patients' INR levels are between 2.0-3.0. Managed care organizations can benefit from recent research on anticoagulation for AFib; they have a responsibility to support future research and development efforts. PMID:9525571

  9. Synchronous multicentric glioblastoma with PNET and O subtypes: Possible pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Rui Wan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glioblastomas (GBM are highly infiltrative, cellular and mitotically active tumors with large histologic variations within and between tumours. Several subtypes have been described including the GBM with oligodendroglial differentiation (GBM-O and primitive neuroectodermal tumour components (GBM-PNET. We report the first described case of a patient with synchronous multi-centric GBM-O and GBM-PNET components. Case Description: A patient, who presented with a short history of progressive headache and difficulty with memory recall, was found on MRI imaging to have two intracranial lesions. These showed heterogeneous enhancement and were found in the left frontal and left temporal regions. The patient underwent gross total resection of these two lesions which were found to show GBM-O and GBM-PNET differentiations. Conclusion: Although tumour cell migration in the context of GBM is a well-recognized phenomenon, the traditional hypothesis is not able to satisfactorily explain this case of multicentric GBM whereby the two lesions demonstrate different cell origins. More current understanding of the migratory pathways from the subventricular zone provide an alternate and plausible pathway that fits our patient′s unusual diagnosis.

  10. Imaging features of multicentric Castleman's disease in HIV infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AIM: To describe the computed tomography (CT) features of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated Castleman's disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Nine HIV-positive patients with biopsy-proven Castleman's disease were studied. Clinical and demographic data, CD4 count, histological diagnosis and human herpes type 8 (HHV8) serology or immunostaining results were recorded. CT images were reviewed independently by two radiologists. RESULTS: CT findings included splenomegaly (n=7) and peripheral lymph node enlargement (axillary n=8, inguinal n=4). All nodes displayed mild to avid enhancement after intravenous administration of contrast material. Hepatomegaly was evident in seven patients. Other features included abdominal (n=6) and mediastinal (n=5) lymph node enlargement and pulmonary abnormalities (n=4). Patterns of parenchymal abnormality included bronchovascular nodularity (n=2), consolidation (n=1) and pleural effusion (n=2). On histological examination eight patients (spleen n=3, lymph node n=9, lung n=1 bone marrow n=1) had the plasma cell variant and one had mixed hyaline-vascular/plasma cell variant. The majority had either positive immunostaining for HHV8 or positive serology (n=8). CONCLUSION: Common imaging features of multicentric Castleman's disease in HIV infection are hepatosplenomegaly and peripheral lymph node enlargement. Although these imaging features may suggest the diagnosis in the appropriate clinical context, they lack specificity and so biopsy is needed for diagnosis. In distinction from multicentric Castleman's disease in other populations the plasma cell variant is most commonly encountered, splenomegaly is a universal feature and there is a strong association with Kaposi's sarcoma

  11. Report on the Evaluation-as-a-Service (EaaS) expert workshop

    OpenAIRE

    Hopfgartner, Frank; Hanbury, Allan; Mueller, Henning; Kando, Noriko; Mercer, Simon; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Potthast, Martin; Gollup, Martin; Krithara, Anastasia; Lin, Jimmy; Balog, Krisztian; Eggel, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    In this report, we summarize the outcome of the "Evaluation-as-a-Service" workshop that was held on the 5th and 6th March 2015 in Sierre, Switzerland. The objective of the meeting was to bring together initiatives that use cloud infrastructures, virtual machines, APIs (Application Programming Interface) and related projects that provide evaluation of information retrieval or machine learning tools as a service.

  12. Results from the Registry of Atrial Fibrillation (AFABE: Gap between Undiagnosed and Registered Atrial Fibrillation in Adults—Ineffectiveness of Oral Anticoagulation Treatment with VKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Panisello-Tafalla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of the use of oral anticoagulation (OAC medication, recommended by national guidelines for stroke prevention but reportedly underused in AF patients with moderate to high stroke risk. Method. A multicentre and cross-sectional study of undiagnosed AF among out-of-hospital patients over 60 years old was carried out, visiting 3,638 patients at primary health centres or at home for AF diagnosis using the IDC-10 classification. The main outcome measures were CHA2DS2VASC, HAS-BLED scores, cardiovascular comorbidity, pharmacological information, TTR, and SAMe-TT2R2 scores. Results. The main findings were undiagnosed AF in 26.44% of cases; 31.04% registered with AF but not using OAC despite 95.6% having a CHA2DS2VASC≥2 score; a risk of bleeding in important subgroups using OAC without indication (37.50% CHA2DS2VASC 60%.

  13. Anticoagulation after anterior myocardial infarction and the risk of stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob A Udell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Survivors of anterior MI are at increased risk for stroke with predilection to form ventricular thrombus. Commonly patients are discharged on dual antiplatelet therapy. Given the frequency of early coronary reperfusion and risk of bleeding, it remains uncertain whether anticoagulation offers additional utility. We examined the effectiveness of anticoagulation therapy for the prevention of stroke after anterior MI. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We performed a population-based cohort analysis of 10,383 patients who survived hospitalization for an acute MI in Ontario, Canada from April 1, 1999 to March 31, 2001. The primary outcome was four-year ischemic stroke rates compared between anterior and non-anterior MI patients. Risk factors for stroke were assessed by multivariate Cox proportional-hazards analysis. Warfarin use was determined at discharge and followed for 90 days among a subset of patients aged 66 and older (n = 1483. Among the 10,383 patients studied, 2,942 patients survived hospitalization for an anterior MI and 20% were discharged on anticoagulation therapy. Within 4 years, 169 patients (5.7% were admitted with an ischemic stroke, half of which occurred within 1-year post-MI. There was no significant difference in stroke rate between anterior and non-anterior MI patients. The use of warfarin up to 90 days was not associated with stroke protection after anterior MI (hazard ratio [HR], 0.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.37-1.26. The use of angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (HR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.44-0.95 and beta-blockers (HR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.41-0.87 were associated with a significant decrease in stroke risk. There was no significant difference in bleeding-related hospitalizations in patients who used warfarin for up to 90 days post-MI. CONCLUSION: Many practitioners still consider a large anterior-wall MI as high risk for potential LV thrombus formation and stroke. Among a cohort of elderly patients who survived an anterior

  14. Conservatively managed pineal apoplexy in an anticoagulated patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werder, Gabriel M. [William Beaumont Hospital, Department of Radiology, 3600 West Thirteen Mile Road, Royal Oak, MI 48073 (United States); St Christopher Iba Mar Diop College of Medicine, Luton (United Kingdom)], E-mail: gabriel_werder@yahoo.com; Razdan, Rahul S.; Gagliardi, Joseph A.; Chaddha, Shashi K.B. [St Vincent' s Medical Center, Bridgeport, CT (United States)

    2008-02-15

    We present a case of pineal apoplexy in an anticoagulated and hypertensive 56-year-old Hispanic male. At presentation, the patient's international normalized ratio (INR) was 10.51 and his blood pressure was 200/130 mmHg. His presenting symptoms included acute onset of headache, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, vertigo, and visual disturbance. Neuroimaging demonstrated hemorrhage into a morphologically normal pineal gland. Under conservative management, the patient experienced gradual resolution of all symptoms excluding the disturbance of upward gaze.

  15. Inflammation is strongly associated with lupus anticoagulant positivity, indepentent of know autoimmune disease and recent venous or arterial thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Just, Søren Andreas; Nybo, Mads; Laustrup, Helle;

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is strongly associated with lupus anticoagulant positivity, indepentent of know autoimmune disease and recent venous or arterial thrombosis......Inflammation is strongly associated with lupus anticoagulant positivity, indepentent of know autoimmune disease and recent venous or arterial thrombosis...

  16. Relationship between diet and anticoagulant response to warfarin – A factor analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet composition is one of the factors that may contribute to intraindividual variability in the anticoagulant response to warfarin. The aim of this study was to determine the associations between food pattern and anticoagulant response to warfarin in a group of Brazilian patients with vascular dis...

  17. Multicentric Cancer Detected at Breast MR Imaging and Not at Mammography: Important or Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacconi, Chiara; Galman, Lanie; Zheng, Junting; Sacchini, Virgilio; Sutton, Elizabeth J; Dershaw, David; Morris, Elizabeth A

    2016-05-01

    Purpose To review the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and pathologic features of multicentric cancer detected only at MR imaging and to evaluate its potential biologic value. Materials and Methods This retrospective study was institutional review board approved and HIPAA compliant; informed consent was waived. A review of records from 2001 to 2011 yielded 2021 patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer who underwent biopsy after preoperative MR imaging, 285 (14%) of whom had additional cancer detected at MR imaging that was occult at mammography. In 73 patients (3.6%), MR imaging identified 87 cancers in different quadrants than the known index cancer, constituting the basis of this report. In 62 of 73 patients (85%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 75, 92), one additional cancer was found, and in 11 of 73 (15%; 95% CI: 8, 25), multiple additional cancers were found. A χ(2) test with adjustment for multiple lesions was used to examine whether MR imaging and pathologic features differ between the index lesion and additional multicentric lesions seen only at MR imaging. Results Known index cancers were more likely to be invasive than MR imaging-detected multicentric cancers (88% vs 76%, P = .023). Ductal carcinoma in situ (21 of 87 lesions [24%]; 95% CI: 15, 36) represented a minority of additional MR imaging-detected multicentric cancers. Overall, the size of MR imaging-detected multicentric invasive cancers (median, 0.6 cm; range, 0.1-6.3 cm) was smaller than that of the index cancer (median, 1.2 cm; range, 0.05-7.0 cm; P = .023), although 17 of 73 (23%) (95% CI: 14, 35) patients had larger MR imaging-detected multicentric cancers than the known index lesion, and 18 of 73 (25%) (95% CI: 15, 36) had MR imaging-detected multicentric cancers larger than 1 cm. MR imaging-detected multicentric cancers and index cancers differed in histologic characteristics, invasiveness, and grade in 27 of 73 (37%) patients (95% CI: 26, 49). In four of 73 (5%) patients (95% CI: 2, 13

  18. Proposal for the standardisation of multi-centre trials in nuclear medicine imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dickson, John Caddell; Tossici-Bolt, Livia; Sera, Terez;

    2012-01-01

    Multi-centre trials are an important part of proving the efficacy of procedures, drugs and interventions. Imaging components in such trials are becoming increasingly common; however, without sufficient control measures the usefulness of these data can be compromised. This paper describes a...... framework for performing high-quality multi-centre trials with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), using a pan-European initiative to acquire a normal control dopamine transporter brain scan database as an example....

  19. Multicentric pigmented Bowen's disease of the genitalia associated with carcinoma in situ of the cervix.

    OpenAIRE

    King, C. M.; Yates, V. M.; Dave, V K

    1984-01-01

    A case of multicentric pigmented Bowen's disease in a 45 year old woman with a previous history of carcinoma of the cervix is described. The two conditions may have a common pathogenesis, and a preceding viral infection with herpes simplex or human papillomavirus could be of aetiological relevance. Patients with multicentric pigmented Bowen's disease may be at risk of developing other tumours of the genital tract. Treatment with carbon dioxide laser proved effective.

  20. Irreversible Kidney Damage due to Multicentric Castleman’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mårten Segelmark

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Castleman’s Disease (CD is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder accompanied by marked systemic inflammatory response. Morphological diagnosis of CD requires biopsy of the whole of the involved lymph node tissue. Three histologic variants have already been described in CD morphology (hyaline vascular, plasma-cell, and mixed. In this study, we report a case of a multicentric Castleman’s disease of the plasma cell variant type with negative Herpes Virus 8. The clinical presentation of this patient was of systemic amyloidosis as a result of both a delayed diagnosis and medical management. Previously described cases of CD with secondary amyloidosis have been of the localized type. Regardless, long-standing clinical remission of CD by cytotoxic drugs and anti-CD20 antibody therapy was achieved, but the nephrotic syndrome remained irreversible.

  1. Multicentric Spinal Tuberculosis with Sternoclavicular Joint Involvement: A Rare Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Saibaba

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Tuberculosis is a chronic disease which may have varied presentations. Though pulmonary tuberculosis is the commonest, extrapulmonary tuberculosis involving skeletal system is often seen. Individuals with poor nourishment and immunological status are especially susceptible for disseminated and multicentric tuberculosis. Case Report. We here present a case of tuberculosis involving multiple anatomical locations in an immune-competent patient which was diagnosed with radiological studies and confirmed with histological examination. Patient was put on multidrug antitubercular therapy and responded well to the treatment with improvement in clinical and radiological picture. Clinical Relevance. This report of a rare case makes us aware of the varied presentations which tuberculosis can present with. It should be kept as a differential diagnosis in patients with cough and fever but not responding to conventional treatment. This is even more important in countries with poor socioeconomic conditions.

  2. Use of direct oral anticoagulants with regional anesthesia in orthopedic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelleri, Gianluca; Fanelli, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    The use of direct oral anticoagulants including apixaban, rivaroxaban, and dabigatran, which are approved for several therapeutic indications, can simplify perioperative and postoperative management of anticoagulation. Utilization of regional neuraxial anesthesia in patients receiving anticoagulants carries a relatively small risk of hematoma, the serious complications of which must be acknowledged. Given the extensive use of regional anesthesia in surgery and the increasing number of patients receiving direct oral anticoagulants, it is crucial to understand the current clinical data on the risk of hemorrhagic complications in this setting, particularly for anesthesiologists. We discuss current data, guideline recommendations, and best practice advice on effective management of the direct oral anticoagulants and regional anesthesia, including in specific clinical situations, such as patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery at high risk of a thromboembolic event, or patients with renal impairment at an increased risk of bleeding. PMID:27290980

  3. Interference from lupus anticoagulant on von Willebrand factor measurement in splenic marginal zone lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinholt, Pernille J; Nybo, Mads

    2015-01-01

    We present a case concerning a patient with splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) and isolated prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) caused by lupus anticoagulant. Von Willebrand factor (VWF) activity and antigen were immeasurable by latex particle immunoturbidimetric assays, and...... several coagulation factor levels were decreased. However, VWF activity and antigen were normal when analyzed by other methods. Also, coagulation factor levels were normal if an aPTT reagent with low lupus anticoagulant sensitivity or a chromogenic method was applied. Altogether, the initial findings were...... because of lupus anticoagulant interference and in fact, the patient had normal VWF activity and coagulation status. Interference of lupus anticoagulant in clot-based assays is well known but has not previously been described in VWF assays. This is furthermore the first report in which lupus anticoagulant...

  4. Anticoagulation, ferrotoxicity and the future of translational lung cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharski, Leo R

    2016-06-01

    Numerous studies have shown that elements of coagulation reactions mediate tumor cell proliferation, motility (invasiveness), tissue remodeling and metastasis. Coagulation activation is virtually a universal feature of human malignancy that differs from the clotting response to injury in that it is self-perpetuating rather than self-attenuating. Coagulation activation participates in tumor matrix deposition and local inflammation, and predicts subsequent cancer risk and adverse cancer outcomes. Several clinical trials of anticoagulants have shown improved outcomes in small cell carcinoma of the lung (SCCL) that have been correlated with assembly on the tumor cells of an intact coagulation pathway. However, variable efficacy of anticoagulant therapy has raised doubts about the coagulation hypothesis. Recently, initiators of coagulation and fibrinolytic pathways have been identified that mediate tumor inception and progression. Notable among these is oxidative stress driven by iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen species that may be the basis for local coagulation activation, tumor matrix deposition, inflammation and aberrant properties characteristic of the malignant phenotype. Recognition of important biological characteristics of individual tumor types, disease stage, choice of standard therapy including chemotherapy and the iron status of the host may clarify mechanisms. All of these are subject to modification based on controlled clinical trial design. Further tests of the coagulation hypothesis may lead to novel, low cost and relatively non-toxic approaches to treatment of malignancy including lung cancer that contrast with certain current cancer treatment paradigms. PMID:27413710

  5. Procoagulants and anticoagulants in fetal blood. A literature survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Uszyński

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In intrauterine life, hemostasis is maintained by the same components as in extrauterine life (blood platelets, coagulation and fibrinolysis systems, involvement of the vascular wall; in the fetus, however, these components show significant differences of a quantitative/qualitative nature. In the present study, we surveyed the literature on the coagulation system in the fetus. We focused on the velocity of development of the coagulation system, being reflected in the increased concentration of all procoagulants and anticoagulants (a rise from approximately 20% in the middle of pregnancy to about 60% or more in the period of labor; exceptions: factors V, VIII and XIII which in the labor period reach the adult level and screening test results (prothrombin time, aPTT - activated prothrombin time, and thrombin time. Reference values were given for the 19-38 weeks of pregnancy and the labor term. Biochemical features of fetal fibrinogen and PIVKA factors were also discussed. The role of activated protein C (APC in the maintenance of balance between procoagulants and anticoagulants was postulated as well as the role of APC in the formation of thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI.

  6. Anticoagulation, ferrotoxicity and the future of translational lung cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that elements of coagulation reactions mediate tumor cell proliferation, motility (invasiveness), tissue remodeling and metastasis. Coagulation activation is virtually a universal feature of human malignancy that differs from the clotting response to injury in that it is self-perpetuating rather than self-attenuating. Coagulation activation participates in tumor matrix deposition and local inflammation, and predicts subsequent cancer risk and adverse cancer outcomes. Several clinical trials of anticoagulants have shown improved outcomes in small cell carcinoma of the lung (SCCL) that have been correlated with assembly on the tumor cells of an intact coagulation pathway. However, variable efficacy of anticoagulant therapy has raised doubts about the coagulation hypothesis. Recently, initiators of coagulation and fibrinolytic pathways have been identified that mediate tumor inception and progression. Notable among these is oxidative stress driven by iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen species that may be the basis for local coagulation activation, tumor matrix deposition, inflammation and aberrant properties characteristic of the malignant phenotype. Recognition of important biological characteristics of individual tumor types, disease stage, choice of standard therapy including chemotherapy and the iron status of the host may clarify mechanisms. All of these are subject to modification based on controlled clinical trial design. Further tests of the coagulation hypothesis may lead to novel, low cost and relatively non-toxic approaches to treatment of malignancy including lung cancer that contrast with certain current cancer treatment paradigms.

  7. Reservations against new oral anticoagulants after stroke and cerebral bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöllberger, Claudia; Finsterer, Josef

    2013-07-15

    Dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban are the new oral anticoagulants (NOAC) which have been investigated in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) for primary and secondary prevention of stroke and thromboembolism. In these trials NOAC had a similar efficacy and safety profile compared to traditional vitamin-K-antagonists such as warfarin. We advise caution in the use of NOAC in patients with stroke or cerebral hemorrhage because of the following reasons: 1) Patients with cerebral bleeding were excluded from the trials. 2) Stroke within 14 days and severe stroke within 6 months before screening were exclusion criteria in the trials investigating dabigatran and rivaroxaban. 3) There is no antidote for reversal and no reliable laboratory monitoring of the anticoagulant effect for emergency situations. 4) NOAC are either substrates of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) or are metabolized by the cytochrome P450 (CYP) system, or both. Drug-drug interactions between NOAC and P-gp and CYP-affecting drugs are largely unknown. 5) Long-term effects of thrombin generation inhibition on the occurrence of infections, malignancies, dementia, and other diseases are unknown. Based on these considerations it is our opinion that studies of NOAC in patients with stroke compared with other prevention strategies, as well as more post marketing surveillance data, are required. PMID:23628464

  8. [Anticoagulant rodenticide poisoning in dogs in The Netherlands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robben, J H; Mout, H C; Kuijpers, E A

    1997-09-01

    The occurrence, the diagnosis, and the treatment of anticoagulant rodenticide poisoning in dogs in the Netherlands was evaluated by a survey among Dutch veterinarians carried out by the National Poisons Control Center (NPCC). The survey included information on 54 dogs, 32 being treated by veterinarians who consulted the NPCC and 22 that were admitted to the Utrecht University Clinic for Companion Animals (UUCCA). The poisons that were suspected were brodifacoum (n = 19), bromadiolone (n = 14), difenacoum (n = 8), difethialone (n = 6) and chlorophacinone (n = 1). In 6 dogs the identity of the poison was unknown. Of 31 dogs with hemorrhages, 2 died shortly after presentation to practitioners and 2 died shortly after admission to the UUCCA. Signs of bleeding occurred especially in poisoning by brodifacoum (n = 16). In all but one of the dogs without hemorrhages, the intake of poison had taken place within 24 hours before presentation. The method of treatment varied, with the induction of vomiting and the use of vitamin K mentioned most. The choice of therapy was determined by the length of time after intake of the poison, the clinical signs and whether or not an anticoagulant toxicosis was suspected at the time of the initial examination. These findings provide the basis for discussion of several aspects of diagnosis and treatment. PMID:9534772

  9. The comprehensive management of anticoagulation: ochsner coumadin clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Annette C; Ventura, Hector O; Milani, Richard V

    2002-01-01

    Clinical privileging of pharmacists and the effective use of support staff and information technology have helped create an efficient pharmacist-operated anticoagulation clinic at Ochsner Clinic Foundation that will support future growth efforts for improved patient care. Developed by Ochsner's Department of Cardiology, the pharmacist-operated anticoagulation clinic cares for 2000 patients with a clinical pharmacist, staff pharmacist, registered nurse, and medical assistants. Patients are managed by face-to-face and telephone encounters. The pharmacists are privileged by medical staff to write prescriptions for warfarin, adjust warfarin doses, and conduct appropriate laboratory monitoring. Patients attend a mandatory initial visit where they are given medication instructions and educational materials. The pharmacist determines the treatment dose and schedules follow-up appointments. A software system developed by Ochsner's Information Services Department imports patient data from the institution's central computer system, allowing for a limited electronic patient record. Once fully implemented, this program will allow for more specific patient tracking and assist with quality improvement efforts. At present, approximately 68% of our patient population is within therapeutic range. PMID:22822313

  10. Factors affecting the quality of anticoagulation with warfarin: experience of one cardiac centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciurus, Tomasz; Cichocka-Radwan, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The risk of complications in anticoagulation therapy can be reduced by maximising the percentage of time spent by the patient in the optimal therapeutic range (TTR). However, little is known about the predictors of anticoagulation control. The aim of this paper was to assess the quality of anticoagulant therapy in patients on warfarin and to identify the factors affecting its deterioration. Material and methods We studied 149 patients who required anticoagulant therapy with warfarin due to non-valvular atrial fibrillation and/or venous thromboembolism. Each patient underwent proper training regarding the implemented treatment and remained under constant medical care. Results The mean age of the patients was 68.8 ± 12.6 years, and 59% were male. A total of 2460 international normalised ratio (INR) measurements were collected during the 18-month period. The mean TTR in the studied cohort was 76 ± 21%, and the median was 80%. The level at which high-quality anticoagulation was recorded for this study was based on TTR values above 80%. Seventy-five patients with TTR ≥ 80% were included in the stable anticoagulation group (TTR ≥ 80%); the remaining 74 patients constituted the unstable anticoagulation group (TTR < 80%). According to multivariate stepwise regression analysis, the independent variables increasing the risk of deterioration of anticoagulation quality were: arterial hypertension (OR 2.74 [CI 95%: 1.06-7.10]; p = 0.038), amiodarone therapy (OR 4.22 [CI 95%: 1.30-13.70]; p = 0.017), and obesity (OR 1.11 [CI 95%: 1.02-1.21]; p = 0.013). Conclusions The presence of obesity, hypertension, or amiodarone therapy decreases the quality of anticoagulation with warfarin. High quality of anticoagulation can be achieved through proper monitoring and education of patients. PMID:26855650

  11. Concentrations of anticoagulant rodenticides in stoats Mustela erminea and weasels Mustela nivalis from Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmeros, Morten; Christensen, Thomas Kjær; Lassen, Pia

    2011-05-15

    Anticoagulant rodenticides are widely used to control rodent populations but they also pose a risk of secondary poisoning in non-target predators. Studies on anticoagulant rodenticide exposure of non-target species have mainly reported on frequency of occurrence. They have rarely analyzed variations in residue concentrations. We examine the occurrence and concentrations of five anticoagulant rodenticides in liver tissue from 61 stoats (Mustela erminea) and 69 weasels (Mustela nivalis) from Denmark. Anticoagulant rodenticides were detected in 97% of stoats and 95% of weasels. 79% of the animals had detectable levels of more than one substance. Difenacoum had the highest prevalence (82% in stoats and 88% in weasels) but bromadiolone was detected in the highest concentrations in both stoat (1.290 μg/g ww) and weasel (1.610 μg/g ww). Anticoagulant rodenticide concentrations were highest during autumn and winter and varied with sampling method. Anticoagulant rodenticide concentrations were higher in stoats and weasels with unknown cause of death than in specimens killed by physical trauma. There was a negative correlation between anticoagulant rodenticide concentrations and body condition. Our results suggest that chemical rodent control in Denmark results in an extensive exposure of non-target species and may adversely affect the fitness of some stoats and weasels. PMID:21477845

  12. Differentiation of parenteral anticoagulants in the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adiguzel Cafer

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevention of venous thromboembolism has been identified as a leading priority in hospital safety. Recommended parenteral anticoagulant agents with different indications for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism include unfractionated heparin, low-molecular-weight heparins and fondaparinux. Prescribing decisions in venous thromboembolism management may seem complex due to the large range of clinical indications and patient types, and the range of anticoagulants available. Methods MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched to identify relevant original articles. Results Low-molecular-weight heparins have nearly replaced unfractionated heparin as the gold standard antithrombotic agent. Low-molecular-weight heparins currently available in the US are enoxaparin, dalteparin, and tinzaparin. Each low-molecular-weight heparin is a distinct pharmacological entity with different licensed indications and available clinical evidence. Enoxaparin is the only low-molecular-weight heparin that is licensed for both venous thromboembolism prophylaxis and treatment. Enoxaparin also has the largest body of clinical evidence supporting its use across the spectrum of venous thromboembolism management and has been used as the reference standard comparator anticoagulant in trials of new anticoagulants. As well as novel oral anticoagulant agents, biosimilar and/or generic low-molecular-weight heparins are now commercially available. Despite similar anticoagulant properties, studies report differences between the branded and biosimilar and/or generic agents and further clinical studies are required to support the use of biosimilar low-molecular-weight heparins. The newer parenteral anticoagulant, fondaparinux, is now also licensed for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in surgical patients and the treatment of acute deep-vein thrombosis; clinical experience with this anticoagulant is expanding. Conclusions Parenteral

  13. Cerebrovascular Accident due to Thyroid Storm: Should We Anticoagulate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Gonzalez-Bossolo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid storm is a life-threatening condition that occurs secondary to an uncontrolled hyperthyroid state. Atrial fibrillation is a cardiovascular complication occurring in up to 15% of patients experiencing thyroid storm, and if left untreated this condition could have up to a 25% mortality rate. Thyroid storm with stroke is a rare presentation. This case report details a left middle cerebral artery (MCA stroke with global aphasia and thyroid storm in a 53-year-old Hispanic male patient. Although uncommon, this combination has been reported in multiple case series. Although it is well documented that dysfunctional thyroid levels promote a hypercoagulable state, available guidelines from multiple entities are unclear on whether anticoagulation therapy is appropriate in this situation.

  14. Role of Antiplatelet Therapy and Anticoagulation in Nonischemic Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carazo, Matthew; Berger, Jeffrey S; Reyentovich, Alex; Katz, Stuart D

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the United States. The pathophysiology of heart failure involves the activation of complex neurohormonal pathways, many of which mediate not only hypertrophy and fibrosis within ventricular myocardium and interstitium, but also activation of platelets and alteration of vascular endothelium. Platelet activation and vascular endothelial dysfunction may contribute to the observed increased risk of thromboembolic events in patients with chronic heart failure. However, current data from clinical trials do not support the routine use of chronic antiplatelet or oral anticoagulation therapy for ambulatory heart failure patients without other indications (atrial fibrillation and/or coronary artery disease) as the risk of bleeding seems to outweigh the potential benefit related to reduction in thromboembolic events. In this review, we consider the potential clinical utility of targeting specific pathophysiological mechanisms of platelet and vascular endothelial activation to guide clinical decision making in heart failure patients. PMID:26501990

  15. Clinical and economic effectiveness of an inpatient anticoagulation service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamdani, M M; Racine, E; McCreadie, S; Zimmerman, C; O'Sullivan, T L; Jensen, G; Ragatzki, P; Stevenson, J G

    1999-09-01

    We conducted a prospective cohort study to evaluate clinical and economic end points achieved by a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation service compared with usual care (50 patients/group). The primary therapeutic end point was the time between starting heparin therapy and surpassing the activated partial thromboplastin time therapeutic threshold. The primary economic end point was the direct variable cost of hospitalization from admission to discharge. No significant differences between groups were noted for the primary therapeutic end point. Total hospital costs were significantly lower for patients receiving pharmacist-managed care than for those receiving usual care ($1594 and $2014, respectively, 1997 dollars, p=0.04). Earlier start of warfarin (p=0.05) and shorter hospital stay (5 and 7 days, p=0.05) were associated with the pharmacist-managed group. PMID:10610013

  16. Chemically sulfated natural galactomannans with specific antiviral and anticoagulant activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschin, Tegshi; Budragchaa, Davaanyam; Kanamoto, Taisei; Nakashima, Hideki; Ichiyama, Koji; Yamamoto, Naoki; Shuqin, Han; Yoshida, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    Naturally occurring galactomannans were sulfated to give sulfated galactomannans with degrees of substitution of 0.7-1.4 per sugar unit and molecular weights of M¯n=0.6×10(4)-2.4×10(4). Sulfated galactomannans were found to have specific biological activities in vitro such as anticoagulant, anti-HIV and anti-Dengue virus activities. The biological activities were compared with those of standard dextran and curdlan sulfates, which are polysaccharides with potent antiviral activity and low cytotoxicity. It was found that sulfated galactomannans had moderate to high anticoagulant activity, 13.4-36.6unit/mg, compared to that of dextran and curdlan sulfates, 22.7 and 10.0unit/mg, and high anti-HIV and anti-Dengue virus activities, 0.04-0.8μg/mL and 0.2-1.1μg/mL, compared to those curdlan sulfates, 0.1μg/mL, respectively. The cytotoxicity on MT-4 and LCC-MK2 cells was low. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of sulfated galactomannans revealed strong interaction with poly-l-lysine as a model compound of virus proteins, and suggested that the specific biological activities might originate in the electrostatic interaction of negatively charged sulfate groups of sulfated galactomannans and positively charged amino groups of surface proteins of viruses. These results suggest that sulfated galactomannans effectively prevented the infection of cells by viruses and the degree of substitution and molecular weights played important roles in the biological activities. PMID:27154517

  17. In vitro anticoagulation monitoring of low-molecular-weight heparin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian-qi; SHI Xu-bo; YANG Jin-gang; HU Da-yi

    2009-01-01

    Background Although low-molecular-weight heparin has replaced unfractionated heparin to become the primary anticoagulation drug for treatment of acute coronary syndrome, there is no convenient bedside monitoring method. We explored the best laboratory monitoring method of low-molecular-weight heparins (enoxapadn, dalteparin, and nadroparin) by use of the Sonoclot coagulation analyzer to monitor the activated clotting time.Methods Atotal of 20 healthy volunteers were selected and 15 ml of fasting venous blood samples were collected and incubated. Four coagulants, kaolin, diatomite, glass bead, and magnetic stick, were used to determine the activated clotting time of the low-molecular-weight heparins at different in vitro anti-Xa factor concentrations. A correlation analysis was made to obtain the regression equation. The activated clotting time of the different low-molecular-weight heparins with the same anti-Xa factor concentration was monitored when the coagulant glass beads were applied. Results The activated clotting time measured using the glass beads, diatomite, kaolin, and magnetic stick showed a linear correlation with the concentration of nadroparin (r= 0.964, 0.966, 0.970, and 0.947, respectively). The regression equation showed that the linear slopes of different coagulants were significantly different (glass beads 230.03 s/IU,diatomite 89.91 s/IU, kaolin 50.87 s/IU, magnetic stick could not be calculated). When the concentration of the anti-Xa factor was the same for different low-molecular-weight heparins, the measured activated clotting time was different after the application of the glass bead coagulant.Conclusions The glass bead coagulant is most feasible for monitoring the in vitro anticoagulation activity of nadroparin.The different effects of different low-molecular-weight heparins on the activated clotting time may be related to the different anti-Ila activities.

  18. Real life anticoagulation treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation in Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilke, Thomas; Groth, Antje; Pfannkuche, Matthias;

    2015-01-01

    Oral anticoagulation (OAC) with either new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) or Vitamin-K antagonists (VKAs) is recommended by guidelines for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and a moderate to high risk of stroke. Based on a claims-based data set the aim of this study was to quantify the stroke...... have been recommended for 56.1/62.9 % of the patients (regarding factors disfavouring VKA/NOAC use). For 38.88/39.20 % of the patient-days in 2010 we could not observe any coverage by anticoagulants. Dementia of patients (OR 2.656) and general prescription patterns of the treating physician (OR 1...

  19. Monitoring the Effects and Antidotes of the Non-vitamin K Oral Anticoagulants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahmat, Nur A; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, we have witnessed the emergence of the oral non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs), which have numerous advantages compared with the vitamin K antagonists, particularly their lack of need for monitoring; as a result their use is increasing. Nonetheless, the NOACs face two...... major challenges: the need for reliable laboratory assays to assess their anticoagulation effect, and the lack of approved antidotes to reverse their action. This article provides an overview of monitoring the anticoagulant effect of NOACs and their potential specific antidotes in development....

  20. Emergency Management of Major Bleeding in a Case of Maxillofacial Trauma and Anticoagulation: Utility of Prothrombin Complex Concentrates in the Shock Room

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandro Morotti; Mauro Felice Frascisco

    2015-01-01

    Life-threatening bleeding in anticoagulation with Warfarin is an emergency challenging issue. Several approaches are available to treat bleeding in either over-anticoagulation or proper-anticoagulation, including vitamin K, fresh frozen plasma and prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC) administration. In coexisting trauma-induced bleeding and anticoagulation, reversal of anticoagulation must be a rapid and highly effective procedure. Furthermore the appropriate treatment must be directly avai...

  1. Helical CT of the breast. Detection of intraductal spread and multicentricity of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed to evaluate the clinical utility of postcontrast helical CT (HCT) scan for the detection of intraductal spread (DS) and multicentricity of breast cancer. DS and multicentricity in 84 patients with invasive ductal carcinoma were evaluated by preoperative postcontrast HCT. The HCT protocol of 3-mm section width and 3 mm/sec table speed was used with the patients in a supine position. Scanning started 70 sec after beginning the intravenous injection of 90 ml (27gI) of contrast material at the rate of 1.5 ml/sec. The three-dimensional images were displayed. Eighty-four of 84 main tumors (100%) were shown as enhanced masses by postcontrast HCT. The sensitivity and specificity of HCT for the detection of DS and multicentricity were 60.0% (18/30) and 88.9% (48/54), and 88.9% (16/18) and 90.9% (60/66), respectively. When DS and multicentric lesions were combined, the sensitivity and the specificity were 76.3% (29/38) and 89.1% (41/46), respectively. HCT of the breast is effective in detecting DS and multicentric lesions of breast cancer and might be useful in helping surgeons to successfully perform breast-conserving surgery. (author)

  2. Herpes simplex virus encephalitis in Peru: a multicentre prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, S M; Mori, N; Nelson, C A; Ton, T G N; Celis, V; Ticona, E; Sihuincha, M; Tilley, D H; Kochel, T; Zunt, J R

    2016-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is one of the most commonly identified infectious aetiologies of encephalitis in North America and Europe. The epidemiology of encephalitis beyond these regions, however, is poorly defined. During 2009-2012 we enrolled 313 patients in a multicentre prospective study of encephalitis in Peru, 45 (14·4%) of whom had confirmed HSV infection. Of 38 patients with known HSV type, 84% had HSV-1 and 16% had HSV-2. Patients with HSV infection were significantly more likely to present in the summer months (44·4% vs. 20·0%, P = 0·003) and have nausea (60·0% vs. 39·8%, P = 0·01) and rash (15·6% vs. 5·3%, P = 0·01) compared to patients without HSV infection. These findings highlight differences in the epidemiology and clinical presentation of HSV encephalitis outside of the Northern Hemisphere that warrant further investigation. Furthermore, there is an urgent need for improved HSV diagnostic capacity and availability of intravenous acyclovir in Peru. PMID:26733400

  3. Self-Inflicted Intraoral Hematoma in a Cardiac Patient Receiving Oral Anticoagulant Therapy- A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantala Arunkumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraoral hematoma secondary to systemic anticoagulant therapy is rare, but it is a potentially fatal condition requiring immediate medical management. Case report: Here we report a case of self-inflicted hematoma in the anterior maxillary gingival region in a 65year old female cardiac patient who was on systemic anticoagulant therapy with a poor periodontal condition, manifesting as a periodontal swelling for a period of one week. Oral anticoagulant therapy is considerably imperative to prevent thromboembolic complications in various medical conditions, in such patients there are chances for spontaneous bleeding or hematoma by means of minor trauma due to sharp teeth or dental prosthesis in the mouth leading to life threatening complications such as partial or complete airway blockage. Therefore,directives about possible bleeding complications secondary to anticoagulant drugs in the oral cavity and the importance of maintaining oral health hygiene are necessary for the patient.

  4. Reproductive success of bromadiolone-resistant rats in absence of anticoagulant pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Leirs, Herwig; Siegismund, Hans Redlef

    2006-01-01

    Resistance to anticoagulant rodenticides in brown rats (Rattus norvegicus Berk.) is associated with pleiotropic effects, notably with an increased dietary vitamin K requirement. Owing to this disadvantage, resistance is believed to be selected against if anticoagulant selection is absent. In small...... experimental populations of wild brown rats, an investigation was carried out to establish whether tolerance to anticoagulant exposure changed over a period of 2 years. In the same populations, DNA microsatellite markers were used to infer parentage, and this made it possible to estimate reproductive success...... of sensitive and resistant rats and estimate effective population size, Ne. Even though there was evidence for a selection against resistant rats with high vitamin K requirement, anticoagulant tolerance was not seen to be significantly influenced in the absence of bromadiolone selection. As the...

  5. Prognostic impact of anticardiolipin antibodies in women with recurrent miscarriage negative for the lupus anticoagulant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henriette Svarre; Christiansen, Ole Bjarne

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA) are found with increased prevalence in women with unexplained recurrent miscarriage (RM) but their impact on future pregnancy outcome in lupus anticoagulant (LAC) negative patients needs better quantification. METHODS: The impact of a repeatedly positive...

  6. Bleeding Risk, Management and Outcome in Patients Receiving Non-VKA Oral Anticoagulants (NOACs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werth, Sebastian; Breslin, Tomás; NiAinle, Fionnuala; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan

    2015-08-01

    Modern direct-acting anticoagulants are rapidly replacing vitamin K antagonists (VKA) in the management of millions of patients worldwide who require anticoagulation. These drugs include agents that inhibit activated factor X (FXa) (such as apixaban and rivaroxaban) or thrombin (such as dabigatran), and are collectively known today as non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs). Since bleeding is the most common and most dangerous side effect of long-term anticoagulation, and because NOACs have very different mechanisms of action and pharmacokinetics compared with VKA, physicians are naturally concerned about the lack of experience regarding frequency, management and outcome of NOAC-associated bleeding in daily care. This review appraises trial and registry (or "real-world") data pertaining to bleeding complications in patients taking NOACs and VKA and provides practical recommendations for the management of acute bleeding situations. PMID:25940651

  7. Oral Anticoagulants and Atrial Fibrillation: An Update for the Clinical Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, Inna E

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulation is an important strategy for the prevention of stroke associated with atrial fibrillation. Development of new oral agents has created a need to educate nurses to administer these medications and provide patient education. PMID:26306367

  8. Multicomponent determination of 4-hydroxycoumarin anticoagulant rodenticides in blood serum by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felice, L J; Chalermchaikit, T; Murphy, M J

    1991-01-01

    A sensitive liquid chromatographic method was developed for the analysis of 4-hydroxycoumarin anticoagulant rodenticides in blood serum. The method can simultaneously measure the serum levels of five anticoagulant rodenticides: brodifacoum, bromadiolone, coumatetralyl, difenacoum, and warfarin. Serum proteins are precipitated with acetonitrile and the supernatant is mixed with ethyl ether. The organic phase is separated, evaporated to dryness, and the residue subjected to chromatographic analysis. The anticoagulants are separated by reversed-phase gradient chromatography with fluorescence detection at an excitation wavelength of 318 nm and emission wavelength of 390 nm. Extraction efficiencies of 68.1 to 98.2% were obtained. The within-run precision (CV) ranged from 2.19 to 3.79% and the between-run precision (CV) from 3.72 to 9.57%. The anticoagulants can be quantitated at serum levels of 10 to 20 ng/mL. PMID:1943055

  9. Reversed-phase HPLC determination of eight anticoagulant rodenticides in animal liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauconnet, V; Pouliquen, H; Pinault, L

    1997-01-01

    A reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic method was developed for the analysis of eight anticoagulant rodenticides in animal liver. Coumarinic anticoagulant rodenticides (brodifacoum, bromadiolone, coumachlor, coumatetralyl, difenacoum, and warfarin) were detected by using a gradient elution and a fluorimetric detection. Indanedione anticoagulant rodenticides (chlorophacinone and diphacinone) were detected by using an isocratic elution and an UV detection. Anticoagulants were extracted from liver with mixtures of acetone/diethylether and acetone/chloroform. Extracts were applied to solid-phase extraction cartridges. Linearity was checked over the concentration range 0.1-0.6 microgram/g. Relative standard deviations of within-run and between-run variability were all between 5.7 and 10.3%. Recoveries from spiked liver samples were between 51.7 (difenacoum) and 78.2% (warfarin). Limits of detection were between 0.01 (difenacoum and warfarin) and 0.11 microgram/g (chlorophacinone). PMID:9399124

  10. Pros and cons of vitamin K antagonists and non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Nicoletta; Ageno, Walter

    2015-03-01

    Anticoagulant treatment can be currently instituted with two different classes of drugs: the vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) and the newer, "novel" or non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant drugs (NOACs). The NOACs have several practical advantages over VKAs, such as the rapid onset/offset of action, the lower potential for food and drug interactions, and the predictable anticoagulant response. However, the VKAs currently have a broader spectrum of indications, a standardized monitoring test, and established reversal strategies. The NOACs emerged as alternative options for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Nevertheless, there remain some populations for whom the VKAs remain the most appropriate anticoagulant drug. This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of VKAs and NOACs. PMID:25703519

  11. Improved late survival and disability after stroke with therapeutic anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation: a population study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, Niamh

    2011-09-01

    Although therapeutic anticoagulation improves early (within 1 month) outcomes after ischemic stroke in hospital-admitted patients with atrial fibrillation, no information exists on late outcomes in unselected population-based studies, including patients with all stroke (ischemic and hemorrhagic).

  12. Old and new oral anticoagulants for secondary stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Sacquegna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin K antagonists, such as warfarin, used in oral anticoagulation therapy currently represent the standard drugs for the primary and secondary prevention of stroke in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF, with a relative risk reduction close to 70%. Newer oral anticoagulants, such as direct thrombin inhibitors (i.e., dabigatran and direct factor Xa inhibitors (i.e., apixaban and rivaroxaban have been recently compared with warfarin in large randomized trials for stroke prevention in AF. The new oral anticoagulants showed, compared with warfarin, no statistically significant difference in the rate of stroke or systemic embolism in secondary prevention (patients with previous transient ischemic attack or stroke subgroups. With regard to safety, the risk of intracranial bleeding was reduced with new anticoagulants compared with warfarin. Indirect treatment comparisons of clinical trials on secondary prevention cohorts showed no significant difference in efficacy among apixaban, rivaroxaban, and dabigatran; but dabigatran 110 mg was associated with less intracranial bleedings than rivaroxaban.

  13. Dental Procedures in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and New Oral Anticoagulants

    OpenAIRE

    Tsolka, Pepie

    2014-01-01

    This review discusses the basic pharmacology of new oral anticoagulants that are used for prevention of thromboembolism in patients with atrial fibrillation. It presents available evidence, and provides recommendations for the management of patients requiring invasive procedures in dental practice.

  14. Anticoagulation dilemma in a high-risk patient with On-X valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ami M Karkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thromboembolism continues to be a major concern in patients with mechanical heart valves, especially in those with unsatisfactory anticoagulation levels. The new On-X valve (On-X Life Technologies, Austin, TX, USA has been reported as having unique structural characteristics that offer lower thrombogenicity to the valve. We report a case where the patient received no or minimal systemic anticoagulation after placement of On-X mitral and aortic valves due to development of severe mucosal arterio-venous malformations yet did not show any evidence of thromboembolism. This case report reinforces the findings of recent studies that lower anticoagulation levels may be acceptable in patients with On-X valves and suggests this valve may be particularly useful in those in whom therapeutic levels of anticoagulation cannot be achieved due to increased risk of bleeding.

  15. Inpatient Oral Anticoagulation Management by Clinical Pharmacists: Safety and Cost effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Hosmane, Sharath R.; Tucker, Johanna; Osman, Dave; Williams, Steve; Waterworth, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Background Warfarin prescription for anticoagulation after cardiac surgery has always been a challenge for junior medical staff. Methods A prospective study was carried out to assess the quality of anticoagulation control by junior doctors compared with clinical pharmacists at South Manchester University hospitals NHS Trust. The junior medical staff prescribed warfarin for 50 consecutive patients from April to September 2006 (group A, n = 50) and experienced clinical pharmacists dosed 46 cons...

  16. New oral anticoagulants -the newest update in patients undergo oral surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Kovacevska, Ivona; Angelovska, Bistra

    2013-01-01

    During the past 20 years, the approval of anticoagulants such as low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs), indirect factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors has signaled a growing interest in antithrombotic compounds that have relatively discrete targets within the coagulation pathway. Aim of this study is to review the evidence of different therapy approach, to highlight the areas of major concern, and to suggest specific oral surgery treatment for patients on new oral anticoagul...

  17. Direct oral anticoagulants for secondary prevention in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Luca Masotti; Mario Di Napoli; Walter Ageno; Davide Imberti; Cecilia Becattini; Maurizio Paciaroni; Daniel Augustin Godoy; Roberto Cappelli; Giancarlo Landini; Grazia Panigada; Ido Iori; Domenico Prisco; Giancarlo Agnelli

    2013-01-01

    The patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), both permanent and paroxysmal, and history of previous transient ischemic attack (TIA) or stroke represent a category of patients at high risk of new embolic events, independently of the presence of other risk factors. In these patients, national and international guidelines recommend oral anticoagulants as first choice for antithrombotic prevention. Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have been demonstrated to be not inferior to warfa...

  18. Extensive Thrombosis Following Lead Extraction: Further Justification for Routine Post-operative Anticoagulation

    OpenAIRE

    Hanninen, Mikael; Cassagneau, Romain; Manlucu, Jaimie; Yee, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Lead extraction is becoming increasingly common as indications for pacing and ICD insertion expand. Periop management varies between extraction centers, and no clinical guidelines have addressed the need for perioperative anticoagulation. We report a case of massive thrombosis which occurred shortly after laser lead extraction and is undoubtedly related to the trauma of the extraction and ensuing hypercoagulabiilty. Routine post-operative anticoagulation has been advocated as a means to preve...

  19. Efficacy of long-term anticoagulant treatment in subgroups of patients after myocardial infarction.

    OpenAIRE

    Bergen, P. F. van; Deckers, J.W.; Jonker, J. J.; van Domburg, R. T.; Azar, A J; Hofman, A.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the efficacy of long term oral anticoagulant treatment in subgroups of patients after myocardial infarction. DESIGN--Analysis of the effect of anticoagulant treatment in subgroups of hospital survivors of myocardial infarction based upon age, gender, history of hypertension, previous myocardial infarction, smoking habits, diabetes mellitus, Killip class, anterior location of infarction, thrombolytic therapy, and use of beta blockers. SUBJECTS--Participants of a multi...

  20. Lupus anticoagulant, disease activity and low complement in the first trimester are predictive of pregnancy loss

    OpenAIRE

    Mankee, Anil; Petri, Michelle; Magder, Laurence S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Multiple factors, including proteinuria, antiphospholipid syndrome, thrombocytopenia and hypertension, are predictive of pregnancy loss in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In the PROMISSE study of predictors of pregnancy loss, only a battery of lupus anticoagulant tests was predictive of a composite of adverse pregnancy outcomes. We examined the predictive value of one baseline lupus anticoagulant test (dilute Russell viper venom time) with pregnancy loss in women with SLE. Me...

  1. Ancylostoma caninum anticoagulant peptide: a hookworm-derived inhibitor of human coagulation factor Xa.

    OpenAIRE

    Cappello, M; Vlasuk, G P; Bergum, P W; Huang, S.; Hotez, P. J.

    1995-01-01

    Human hookworm infection is a major cause of gastrointestinal blood loss and iron deficiency anemia, affecting up to one billion people in the developing world. These soil-transmitted helminths cause blood loss during attachment to the intestinal mucosa by lacerating capillaries and ingesting extravasated blood. We have isolated the major anticoagulant used by adult worms to facilitate feeding and exacerbate intestinal blood loss. This 8.7-kDa peptide, named the Ancylostoma caninum anticoagul...

  2. THE PROBLEM OF THE USE OF NEW ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS IN CANCER PATIENTS RECEIVING CHEMOTHERAPY

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Rumyantsev; I. A. Pokataev; T.V. Kozlov; N.A. Rumyantsev

    2015-01-01

    Despite large number of known risk factors of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in cancer patients existing prediction models do not allow definite identification of cancer patients that have indications for anticoagulant prevention. Besides, heparin and warfarin use for VTE prevention in cancer is accompanied by some problems. New oral anticoagulants (NOAC) are promising drugs for use in oncology practice; however their use is complicated by the lack of data on efficacy and safety in these patien...

  3. Effective management of venous thromboembolism in the community: non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    OpenAIRE

    Patel R

    2016-01-01

    Raj Patel Department of Haematological Medicine, King's Thrombosis Centre, King's College Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Anticoagulation therapy is essential for the effective treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE). For many years, anticoagulation for acute VTE was limited to the use of initial parenteral heparin, overlapping with and followed by a vitamin K antagonist. Although highly effective, this regimen has several limitations and is particularly cha...

  4. Effective management of venous thromboembolism in the community: non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Raj Patel Department of Haematological Medicine, King's Thrombosis Centre, King's College Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Anticoagulation therapy is essential for the effective treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE). For many years, anticoagulation for acute VTE was limited to the use of initial parenteral heparin, overlapping with and followed by a vitamin K antagonist. Although highly effective, this regimen has several limitations and is particul...

  5. D-dimer: a useful tool in gauging optimal duration of oral anticoagulant therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Silingardi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY Optimal duration of oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT in idiopathic venous thromboembolism (VTE is unknown. Indefinite OAT carries an unacceptable risk of major bleeding and prospective studies have demonstrated that OAT is no longer protective after its withdrawal. How to identify the patients at risk for recurrence? D-dimer is a marker of thrombin activity. Early prospective studies showed that elevated D-dimer levels after anticoagulation had a highly predictive value for a recurrent episode. Does D-dimer assay have a role in gauging the appropriate duration of anticoagulant therapy? The PROLONG study tries to answer this question. METHOD D-dimer assay was performed one month after stopping anticoagulation. Patiens with normal D-dimer levels did not resume anticoagulation while patients with elevated D-dimer levels were randomized to discontinue or resume anticoagulation. Study end-points was the composite of recurrent VTE and major bleeding during an average follow-up of 1.4 years. RESULTS The rate of recurrence is significantly higher in patients with elevated D-dimer levels who discontinued anticoagulation. Resuming anticoagulation in this cohort of patients markedly reduces recurrent events without increasing major bleeding. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS PROLONG study is provocative, because D-dimer assay is simple, thus not requiring dedicated laboratory facilities. D-dimer test has otherwise high sensitivity but low specificity in VTE diagnosis. Aspecifically elevated D-dimer levels are available in the elderly and the majority of patients included in the study were > 65 years old, thus introducing a possible selection bias. Nonetheless the results of the study are useful for the clinician. Prolongation of vitamin K antagonists in patients with elevated D-dimer levels one month after discontinuation of OAT for a first unprovoked episode of VTE results in a favourable risk-benefit relationship. Probably this

  6. Anticoagulation and delayed bowel resection in the management of mesenteric venous thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Acute mesenteric venous thrombosis is potentially lethal because it can result in mesenteric ischemia and, ultimately, bowel infarction requiring surgical intervention. Systemic anticoagulation for the prevention of thrombus propagation is a well-recognized treatment modality and the current mainstay therapy for patients with acute mesenteric venous thrombosis. However, the decision between prompt surgical exploration vs conservative treatment with anticoagulation is somewhat difficult in pat...

  7. Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation. Is there a gap in care for ambulatory patients?

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Atrial fibrillation (AF) substantially increases risk of stroke. Evidence suggests that anticoagulation to reduce risk is underused (a "care gap"). Our objectives were to clarify measures of this gap in care by including data from family physicians and to determine why eligible patients were not receiving anticoagulation therapy. DESIGN: Telephone survey of family physicians regarding specific patients in their practices. SETTING: Nova Scotia. PARTICIPANTS: Ambulatory AF patients n...

  8. Dose Dependence of the Anticoagulant Effect of Intravenously Administered Cellulose Sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozd, N N; Kuznetsova, S A; Kalinina, T B; Vasilieva, N Yu

    2016-04-01

    Experiments on rabbits showed that increasing the dose of intravenously administered cellulose sulfate from wheat straw (dynamic viscosity 3.4 cP, sulfur content 14.1%) increased plasma clotting time in some coagulation tests and plasma anticoagulant activity. When cellulose sulfate was administered in the dose of 1 mg/kg, plasma clotting time in the presence of the anticoagulant (5 min after administration) was ~3-fold higher than after saline administration. PMID:27165079

  9. Anticoagulant treatment for acute pulmonary embolism: a pathophysiology-based clinical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnelli, Giancarlo; Becattini, Cecilia

    2015-04-01

    The management of patients with acute pulmonary embolism is made challenging by its wide spectrum of clinical presentation and outcome, which is mainly related to patient haemodynamic status and right ventricular overload. Mechanical embolic obstruction and neurohumorally mediated pulmonary vasoconstriction are responsible for right ventricular overload. The pathophysiology of acute pulmonary embolism is the basis for risk stratification of patients as being at high, intermediate and low risk of adverse outcomes. This risk stratification has been advocated to tailor clinical management according to the severity of pulmonary embolism. Anticoagulation is the mainstay of the treatment of acute pulmonary embolism. New direct oral anticoagulants, which are easier to use than conventional anticoagulants, have been compared with conventional anticoagulation in five randomised clinical trials including >11 000 patients with pulmonary embolism. Patients at high risk of pulmonary embolism (those with haemodynamic compromise) were excluded from these studies. Direct oral anticoagulants have been shown to be as effective and at least as safe as conventional anticoagulation in patients with pulmonary embolism without haemodynamic compromise, who are the majority of patients with this disease. Whether these agents are appropriate for the acute-phase treatment of patients at intermediate-high risk pulmonary embolism (those with both right ventricle dysfunction and injury) regardless of any risk stratification remains undefined. PMID:25700388

  10. Could Some Geriatric Characteristics Hinder the Prescription of Anticoagulants in Atrial Fibrillation in the Elderly?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paule Denoël

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have reported underprescription of anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation (AF. We conducted an observational study on 142 out of a total of 995 consecutive ≥75 years old patients presenting AF (14% when admitted in an emergency unit of a general hospital, in search of geriatric characteristics that might be associated with the underprescription of anticoagulation therapy (mostly antivitamin K at the time of the study. The following data was collected from patients presenting AF: medical history including treatment and comorbidities, CHADS2 score, ISAR scale (frailty, Lawton’s scale (ADL, GDS scale (mood status, MUST (nutrition, and blood analysis (INR, kidney function, and albumin. Among those patients for who anticoagulation treatment was recommended (73%, only 61% were treated with it. In the group with anticoagulation therapy, the following characteristics were observed more often than in the group without such therapy: a recent (≤6 months hospitalization and medical treatment including digoxin or based on >3 different drugs. Neither the value of the CHADS2 score, nor the geriatric characteristics could be correlated with the presence or the absence of an anticoagulation therapy. More research is thus required to identify and clarify the relative importance of patient-, physician-, and health care system-related hurdles for the prescription of oral anticoagulation therapy in older patients with AF.

  11. Increased sulphation improves the anticoagulant activities of heparan sulphate and dermatan sulphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofosu, F A; Modi, G J; Blajchman, M A; Buchanan, M R; Johnson, E A

    1987-01-01

    Heparan sulphate and dermatan sulphate have both antithrombotic and anticoagulant properties. These are, however, significantly weaker than those of a comparable amount of standard pig mucosal heparin. Antithrombotic and anticoagulant effects of glycosaminoglycans depend on their ability to catalyse the inhibition of thrombin and/or to inhibit the activation of prothrombin. Since heparan sulphate and dermatan sulphate are less sulphated than unfractionated heparin, we investigated whether the decreased sulphation contributes to the lower antithrombotic and anticoagulant activities compared with standard heparin. To do this, we compared the anticoagulant activities of heparan sulphate and dermatan sulphate with those of their derivatives resulphated in vitro. The ratio of sulphate to carboxylate in these resulphated heparan sulphate and dermatan sulphate derivatives was approximately twice that of the parent compounds and similar to that of standard heparin. Anticoagulant effects were assessed by determining (a) the catalytic effects of each glycosaminoglycan on the inhibition of thrombin added to plasma, and (b) the ability of each glycosaminoglycan to inhibit the activation of 125I-prothrombin in plasma. The least sulphated glycosaminoglycans were least able to catalyse the inhibition of thrombin added to plasma and to inhibit the activation of prothrombin. Furthermore, increasing the degree of sulphation improved the catalytic effects of glycosaminoglycans on the inhibition of thrombin by heparin cofactor II in plasma. The degree of sulphation therefore appears to be an important functional property that contributes significantly to the anticoagulant effects of the two glycosaminoglycans. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:2963622

  12. Occurrence, elimination, and risk of anticoagulant rodenticides and drugs during wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Canela, Cristian; Barata, Carlos; Lacorte, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Anticoagulants are biocides widely used as pest control agents in agriculture, urban infrastructures, and domestic applications for the control of rodents. Other anticoagulants such as warfarin and acenocoumarol are also used as drugs against thrombosis. After use, anticoagulants are discharged to sewage grids and enter wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Our hypothesis is that WWTP effluents can be a source of anticoagulants to receiving waters and that these can affect aquatic organisms and other nontarget species. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to determine the occurrence of 11 anticoagulants in WWTPs receiving urban and agricultural wastewaters. Warfarin was the most ubiquitous compound detected in influent waters and was partially eliminated during the activated sludge treatment, and low nanograms per liter concentration were found in the effluents. Other detected compounds were coumatetralyl, ferulenol, acenocoumarol, flocoumafen, brodifacoum, bromadiolone, and difenacoum at concentrations of 0.86-87.0 ng L(-1). Considering water volumes of each WWTP, daily emissions were estimated to be 0.02 to 21.8 g day(-1), and thus, WWTPs contribute to the loads of anticoagulants to receiving waters. However, low aquatic toxicity was observed using Daphnia magna as a model aquatic organism. PMID:24622989

  13. National survey of training and credentialing methods in pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlberg, J; Wittkowsky, A K; Possidente, C

    1998-05-15

    A national survey of pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinics was conducted to determine how pharmacists are trained to provide care in such clinics. In June 1996 a survey was mailed to 177 pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinics in the United States. A total of 128 surveys were returned (response rate, 72%). One hundred ten surveys representing 42 states and a variety of institutions were usable. Twenty-five (23%) of the 110 clinics offered an anticoagulation training program for their pharmacists. Most training programs had both didactic and experiential components and had been in existence for one to five years. Thirty-two (29%) of the 110 responding clinics had at least one pharmacist who had completed the ASHP Research and Education Foundation's Anticoagulation Service Traineeship. Twenty-three of the 25 clinics with a training program required successful completion of the program before a pharmacist could practice in the clinic. The overall quality of pharmacists' performance was regularly assessed by 22 of the 25 clinics. Most pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinics in the United States do not offer formal training in anticoagulation therapy to pharmacists who practice in that setting. PMID:9606455

  14. New perspectives and recommendations for anticoagulant therapy post orthopedic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Kropf

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Anticoagulant therapy is essential for the prevention of risks associated with the formation of thrombus in patients after surgery, especially in orthopedics. Recently, new oral anticoagulants were introduced in the therapeutic arsenal. This fact is important, because the current drug of choice in clinical practice is enoxaparin, a low molecular weight heparin. As all injecting drugs, enoxaparin may reduce patients' adherence to treatment by dissatisfaction with and resistance to the administration. This article reviews the available literature on the overall utility of these innovative medicines, approaching the pharmacology, the compared efficacy in relation to current agents, and the potential targets for new agents, as well as points to new trends in research and development. The article also contributes with a practical guide for use and recommendations to health professionals, especially focusing on the reversibility of hemorrhagic events, and discusses the importance of convenience/satisfaction of use, the cost of treatment, and the risk-benefit profile for patients.A terapia anticoagulante é fundamental para a prevenção de riscos associados à formação de trombos em pacientes pós-cirúrgicos, principalmente em ortopedia. Recentemente, novos anticoagulantes orais foram introduzidos no arsenal terapêutico. Tal fato é importantíssimo, visto que o atual medicamento de primeira escolha na prática clínica é a enoxaparina, uma heparina de baixo peso molecular. Por ser de uso injetável, a enoxaparina pode diminuir a adesão do paciente ao tratamento, devido à insatisfação e à resistência quanto à via de administração. Este artigo revisa a literatura disponível sobre a utilidade total desses medicamentos inovadores ao abordar a farmacologia, a eficácia em comparação com os agentes atuais e os alvos potenciais para novos agentes, bem como aponta as novas tendências em pesquisa e desenvolvimento. O artigo também contribui

  15. Synchronous Multicentric Giant Cell Tumour of Distal Radius and Sacrum with Pulmonary Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandra, Varun Sharma; Kotha, Krishna Mohan Reddy; Satyanarayana, Moorthy Gadisetti Venkata; Vadlamani, Kali Varaprasad; Yerravalli, Vyjayanthi

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell tumour (GCT) is an uncommon primary bone tumour, and its multicentric presentation is exceedingly rare. We report a case of a 45-year-old female who presented to us with GCT of left distal radius. On the skeletal survey, osteolytic lesion was noted in her right sacral ala. Biopsy confirmed both lesions as GCT. Pulmonary metastasis was also present. Resection-reconstruction arthroplasty for distal radius and thorough curettage and bone grafting of the sacral lesion were done. Multicentric GCT involving distal radius and sacrum with primary sacral involvement is not reported so far to our knowledge. PMID:26106496

  16. Synchronous Multicentric Giant Cell Tumour of Distal Radius and Sacrum with Pulmonary Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun Sharma Tandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumour (GCT is an uncommon primary bone tumour, and its multicentric presentation is exceedingly rare. We report a case of a 45-year-old female who presented to us with GCT of left distal radius. On the skeletal survey, osteolytic lesion was noted in her right sacral ala. Biopsy confirmed both lesions as GCT. Pulmonary metastasis was also present. Resection-reconstruction arthroplasty for distal radius and thorough curettage and bone grafting of the sacral lesion were done. Multicentric GCT involving distal radius and sacrum with primary sacral involvement is not reported so far to our knowledge.

  17. Multicentric Gliomas Misdiagnosed as Metastatic Tumors: One Case Report and Literature Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng WANG; Ming-can WU; Shi-jie CHEN; Yong YANG; Guang-rui ZHAO

    2010-01-01

    @@ Introduction Multicentric gliomas are considered to be well recognized but uncommon; often scatter widely in different lobes or hemispheres; and cannot be attributed to a definite pathway[1]. A patient diagnosed as multicentric gliomas is presented in this paper. He was fi rstly misdiagnosed as cerebral metastatic tumors, but later the histopathological examination revealed them to be glioblastoma (WHO grade IV). Additionally, the aim of the paper was to describe the case history of the patient and the problems encountered in the pathogenesis, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment.

  18. Sensitivity of imaging for multifocal-multicentric breast carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viale Giuseppe

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This retrospective study aims to determine: 1 the sensitivity of preoperative mammography (Mx and ultrasound (US, and re-reviewed Mx to detect multifocal multicentric breast carcinoma (MMBC, defined by pathology on surgical specimens, and 2 to analyze the characteristics of both detected and undetected foci on Mx and US. Methods Three experienced breast radiologists re-reviewed, independently, digital mammography of 97 women with MMBC pathologically diagnosed on surgical specimens. The radiologists were informed of all neoplastic foci, and blinded to the original mammograms and US reports. With regards to Mx, they considered the breast density, number of foci, the Mx characteristics of the lesions and their BI-RADS classification. For US, they considered size of the lesions, BI-RADS classification and US pattern and lesion characteristics. According to the histological size, the lesions were classified as: index cancer, 2nd lesion, 3rd lesion, and 4th lesion. Any pathologically identified malignant foci not previously described in the original imaging reports, were defined as undetected or missed lesions. Sensitivity was calculated for Mx, US and re-reviewed Mx for detecting the presence of the index cancer as well as additional satellite lesions. Results Pathological examination revealed 13 multifocal and 84 multicentric cancers with a total of 303 malignant foci (282 invasive and 21 non invasive. Original Mx and US reports had an overall sensitivity of 45.5% and 52.9%, respectively. Mx detected 83/97 index cancers with a sensitivity of 85.6%. The number of lesions undetected by original Mx was 165/303. The Mx pattern of breasts with undetected lesions were: fatty in 3 (1.8%; scattered fibroglandular density in 40 (24.3%, heterogeneously dense in 91 (55.1% and dense in 31 (18.8% cases. In breasts with an almost entirely fatty pattern, Mx sensitivity was 100%, while in fibroglandular or dense pattern it was reduced to 45

  19. Dasatinib first-line: Multicentric Italian experience outside clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breccia, Massimo; Stagno, Fabio; Luciano, Luigiana; Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Annunziata, Mario; D'Adda, Mariella; Maggi, Alessandro; Sgherza, Nicola; Russo-Rossi, Antonella; Pregno, Patrizia; Castagnetti, Fausto; Iurlo, Alessandra; Latagliata, Roberto; Cedrone, Michele; Di Renzo, Nicola; Sorà, Federica; Rege-Cambrin, Giovanna; La Nasa, Giorgio; Scortechini, Anna Rita; Greco, Giovanna; Franceschini, Luca; Sica, Simona; Bocchia, Monica; Crugnola, Monica; Orlandi, Esther; Guarini, Attilio; Specchia, Giorgina; Rosti, Gianantonio; Saglio, Giuseppe; Alimena, Giuliana

    2016-01-01

    Dasatinib was approved for the treatment of chronic phase (CP) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients in first line therapy based on the demonstration of efficacy and safety reported in patients enrolled in clinical trials. We describe a multicentric Italian "real-life" experience of dasatinib used as frontline treatment outside clinical trials. One hundred and nine patients (median age 54 years) were treated from January 2012 to December 2013. Increased incidence of high risk patients were detected according to stratification (26% according to Sokal score, 19% according to Euro score and 16% according to EUTOS) when compared to company sponsored studies. Median time from diagnosis to start of dasatinib was 18 days. Ten patients received unscheduled starting dose (6 patients 50mg and 4 patients 80 mg QD), whereas 99 patients started with 100mg QD. At 3 months, 92% of patients achieved a BCR-ABL ratio less than 10%. At 6 months, the rate of CCyR was 91% and the rate of MR3 was 40%, with 8% of the patients reaching MR4.5. Ninety-three patients were evaluable at 12 months: the rate of MR3 was 62%, with MR4.5 being achieved by 19% of the patients. At a median follow-up of 12 months, 27 patients (24.7%) were receiving the drug at reduced dose. Two patients (1.8%) experienced a lymphoid blast crisis and the overall incidence of resistance was 8%. As regards safety, the major side effects recorded were thrombocytopenia, neutropenia and pleural effusions, which occurred in 22%, 10% and 8% of patients, respectively. Present results, achieved in a large cohort of patients treated outside clinical trials, further confirm the efficacy and safety of dasatinib as firstline treatment in CML. PMID:26643920

  20. Multicentric occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Kawai, Minoru Nomoto, Takeshi Suda, Kenya Kamimura, Atsunori Tsuchiya, Yasushi Tamura, Masahiko Yano, Masaaki Takamura, Masato Igarashi, Toshifumi Wakai, Satoshi Yamagiwa, Yasunobu Matsuda, Shogo Ohkoshi, Isao Kurosaki, Yoshio Shirai, Masahiko Ok

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To reveal the manner of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC development in patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH focusing on multicentric occurrence (MO of HCC.METHODS: We compared clinicopathological characteristics between patients with and without MO of HCC arising from NASH background. The clinical features were implicated with reference to the literature available.RESULTS: MO of HCC was identified with histological proof in 4 out of 12 patients with NASH-related HCC (2 males and 2 females. One patient had synchronous MO; an advanced HCC, two well-differentiated HCCs and a dysplastic nodule, followed by the development of metachronous MO of HCC. The other three patients had multiple advanced HCCs accompanied by a well-differentiated HCC or a dysplastic nodule. Of these three patients, one had synchronous MO, one had metachronous MO and the other had both synchronous and metachronous MO. There were no obvious differences between the patients with or without MO in terms of liver function tests, tumor markers and anatomical extent of HCC. On the other hand, all four patients with MO of HCC were older than 70 years old and had the comorbidities of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, hypertension and cirrhosis. Although these conditions were not limited to MO of HCC, all the conditions were met in only one of eight patients without MO of HCC. Thus, concurrence of these conditions may be a predisposing situation to synchronous MO of HCC. In particular, old age, T2DM and cirrhosis were suggested to be prerequisite for MO because these factors were depicted in common among two other cases with MO of HCC under NASH in the literature.CONCLUSION: The putative predisposing factors and necessary preconditions for synchronous MO of HCC in NASH were suggested in this study. Further investigations are required to clarify the accurate prevalence and predictors of MO to establish better strategies for treatment and prevention leading to the

  1. : Emergency Physician Patterns Related to Anticoagulation of Patients with Recent-Onset Atrial Fibrillation and Flutter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paraish Misra, MD

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Guidelines strongly recommend long-term anticoagulation with warfarin for patients with newly recognized AF who have high embolic risk by virtue of a CHADS2 (Congestive Heart Failure, Hypertension, Age >65, Diabetes, History of Stroke score ≥ 2. The goal of this study was to determine patterns of emergency department-initiated anticoagulation among eligible patients discharged from Canadian centers with an episode of recent-onset atrial fibrillation and flutter (RAFF and determine if decision-making is driven by the CHADS2 score or other factors. This was accomplished by examining health records using uniform case identification and data abstraction as well as centralized quality control; it was conducted in 8 Canadian university emergency departments over a 12-month period. Eligible patients for this analysis demonstrated RAFF requiring emergency management, were not already taking warfarin and were not admitted to hospital. Univariate analyses were conducted using T-test or Chi-square to select factors associated with anticoagulation initiation at a significance level of p < 0.15 and multiple logistic regression was employed to evaluate independent predictors after adjustment for confounders. Among 633 eligible patients, only 21 out of 120 patients (18% with a CHADS2 score ≥ 2 received anticoagulation and among 70 patients who were given anticoagulation only 21 (30% had a CHADS2 score ≥ 2. Independent predictors of anticoagulation included age by 10-year strata: (OR = 1.7; 95% CI 1.3 – 2.1, heparin use in the anticoagulation (OR = 9.6; 95% CI 4.9 – 18.9, a new prescription for metoprolol (OR = 9.6; 95% CI 4.9 – 18.9 and being referred to cardiology for follow-up (OR = 5.6; 95% CI 2.6 – 12.0. CHADS2 ≥ 2 doubled the likelihood of being prescribed anticoagulation (OR= 2.0; 95% CI 1.5 – 3.5 but was not an independent predictor. It was thus determined that patients discharged from the emergency department in this study were not

  2. Anticoagulant activities of piperlonguminine in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonhwa Lee

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Piperlonguminine (PL, an important component of Piperlongum fruits, is known to exhibit anti-hyperlipidemic, antiplateletand anti-melanogenic activities. Here, the anticoagulantactivities of PL were examined by monitoring activatedpartial-thromboplastin-time (aPTT, prothrombin-time (PT, andthe activities of thrombin and activated factor X (FXa. Theeffects of PL on the expressions of plasminogen activatorinhibitor type 1 (PAI-1 and tissue-type plasminogen activator(t-PA were also tested in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-αactivated HUVECs. The results showed that PL prolonged aPTTand PT significantly and inhibited the activities of thrombin andFXa. PL inhibited the generation of thrombin and FXa inHUVECs. In accordance with these anticoagulant activities, PLprolonged in vivo bleeding time and inhibited TNF-α inducedPAI-1 production. Furthermore, PAI-1/t-PA ratio was significantlydecreased by PL. Collectively, our results suggest that PLpossesses antithrombotic activities and that the current studycould provide bases for the development of new anticoagulantagents. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(10: 484-489

  3. Anticoagulation Management in Patients with Pacemaker-Detected Atrial Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poposka, Lidija; Boskov, Vladimir; Risteski, Dejan; Taleski, Jane; Georgievska-Ismail, Ljubica

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In patients with an implanted pacemaker, asymptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with an increased risk of thrombo-embolic complications. There is still no consensus which duration of episodes of atrial fibrillation should be taken as an indicator for inclusion of oral anticoagulation therapy (OAC). MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 104 patients who had no AF episodes in the past and have an indication for permanent pacing were included in the study. RESULTS: During an average follow-up of 18 months, 33 of the patients developed episodes of AF. Inclusion of OAC was performed in 17 patients, in whom AF was recorded, although in all patients CHA2DS2-VASc score was ≥ 1. The inclusion of OAC showed a statistically significant correlation with increasing duration of episodes of AF (r = 0.502, p = 0.003). During the follow-up period none of the patients developed thrombo-embolic complication. CONCLUSION: Considering that our group of patients had no thrombo-embolic events, we could conclude that dividing the AF episodes in less than 1% in 24 hours and longer than 1% within 24 hours could be an indicator for decision-making to include OAK if the CHA2DS2-VASc score is ≥ 1. PMID:27335594

  4. Left Atrial Thrombus Despite Anticoagulation: The Importance Of Homocystein

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    Dr. J. David Spence

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Patients in atrial fibrillation may have left atrial thrombi or strokes despite adequate anticoagulation. It is important to consider elevated plasma total homocysteine (tHcy as a treatable clotting factor that may explain such cases. Metabolic B12 deficiency is common even in patients with a “normal” serum B12. Measurement of holotranscobalamin, methylmalonic acid or, in folate-replete patients, tHcy are necessary to diagnose metabolic B12 deficiency when the serum B12 is below 400 pmol/L. Elevated tHcy quadruples the risk of stroke in atrial fibrillation, and is far more common than the usual clotting factors for which testing is commonly performed: among patients attending a secondary stroke prevention clinic, tHcy > 14 mmol/L is present in 20% at age 40, and in 40% at age 80. B vitamin therapy does reduce the risk of stroke; key issues are renal impairment and adequacy of vitamin B12. This intervention should be considered routinely in patients with AF.

  5. Structure versus anticoagulant and antithrombotic actions of marine sulfated polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Hugo Pomin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Marine sulfated polysaccharides (MSP, such as sulfated fucans (SF, sulfated galactans (SG and glycosaminoglycans (GAG isolated from either algae or invertebrate animals, are highly anionic polysaccharides capable of interacting with certain cationic proteins, such as (co-factors of the coagulation cascade during clotting-inhibition processes. These molecular complexes between MSP and coagulation-related proteins might, at first glance, be assumed to be driven mostly by electrostatic interactions. However, a systematic comparison using several novel sulfated polysaccharides composed of repetitive oligosaccharides with clear sulfation patterns has shown that these molecular interactions are regulated essentially by the stereochemistry of the glycans (which depends on a conjunction of anomericity, monosaccharide, conformational preference, and glycosylation and sulfation sites, rather than just a simple consequence of their negative charge density (mainly the number of sulfate groups. Here, we present an overview of the structure-function relationships of MSP, correlating their structures with their potential anticoagulant and antithrombotic actions, since pathologies related to the cardiovascular system are one of the major causes of illness and mortality in the world.

  6. Anticoagulation in pregnant females with mechanical heart valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the complications and outcome of anticoagulation therapy in pregnant females with valvular heart diseases. All pregnant females with prosthetic heart valves admitted in Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology from Jan 2004 to Dec 2004 were included in this study Basic demographic data including age, duration of pregnancy and complications observed were recorded. Warfarin was replaced with un-fractionated heparin (UFH) in first trimester and after that warfarin was continued with a targeted INR between 2.0-3.0. At 36 weeks warfarin was stopped and UFH was added; however, if patient went into spontaneous labour before this then immediate caesarian section was performed and UFH was restarted 4-6 hours after delivery along with oral warfarin. Out of 21 patients, sixteen (76.1%) had mitral valve diseases and five (23.9%) had both mitral and atrial. Majority (42.3%)of patients were in age group 26-30 years. Eleven (52.2%) reported in 9th month of gestation. Complications observed were hypertension (1), transient ischaemic attacks (1), pulmonary embolism (1), haemoptysis (1) and abortion (1). All patients, except one had successful completion of pregnancy. No case of foetal abnormality was seen. In 76% patients, daily dose of warfarin was <5 mg. Thrombo-prophylaxis in pregnancy with warfarin and UFH with an INR of 2.0-3.0 is effective in preventing thrombotic complications in females with mechanical valves without resulting in increase hemorrhagic complications. (author)

  7. Value of trans-oesophageal echocardiography as a method of encouraging patients with chronic atrial fibrillation to use anticoagulation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Bakalli, Aurora; Kamberi, Lulzim; Dragusha, Gani; Zeqiri, Nexhmi; Gashi, Fitim; Prekpalaj, Lazer

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite the indisputable role of anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation (AF) patients at risk for stroke, anticoagulants remain under-used in everyday clinical practice. We assumed that by performing trans-oesophageal echocardiography (TEE) on patients with AF who were not on anticoagulation treatment prior to the procedure, and by explaining to them the TEE images obtained, as well as the possible consequences of these findings, we could convince patients to start anticoa...

  8. Specific antidotes against direct oral anticoagulants: A comprehensive review of clinical trials data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummala, Ramyashree; Kavtaradze, Ana; Gupta, Anjan; Ghosh, Raktim Kumar

    2016-07-01

    The Vitamin K antagonist warfarin was the only oral anticoagulant available for decades for the treatment of thrombosis and prevention of thromboembolism until Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOACs); a group of new oral anticoagulants got approved in the last few years. Direct thrombin inhibitor: dabigatran and factor Xa inhibitors: apixaban, rivaroxaban, and edoxaban directly inhibit the coagulation cascade. DOACs have many advantages over warfarin. However, the biggest drawback of DOACs has been the lack of specific antidotes to reverse the anticoagulant effect in emergency situations. Activated charcoal, hemodialysis, and activated Prothrombin Complex Concentrate (PCC) were amongst the nonspecific agents used in a DOAC associated bleeding but with limited success. Idarucizumab, the first novel antidote against direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran was approved by US FDA in October 2015. It comprehensively reversed dabigatran-induced anticoagulation in a phase I study. A phase III trial on Idarucizumab also complete reversal of anticoagulant effect of dabigatran. Andexanet alfa (PRT064445), a specific reversal agent against factor Xa inhibitors, showed a complete reversal of anticoagulant activity of apixaban and rivaroxaban within minutes after administration without adverse effects in two recently completed parallel phase III trials ANNEXA-A and ANNEXA-R respectively. It is currently being studied in ANNEXA-4, a phase IV study. Aripazine (PER-977), the third reversal agent, has shown promising activity against dabigatran, apixaban, rivaroxaban, as well as subcutaneous fondaparinux and LMWH. This review article summarizes pharmacological characteristics of these novel antidotes, coagulation's tests affected, available clinical and preclinical data, and the need for phase III and IV studies. PMID:27082776

  9. Anticoagulation therapy prevents portal-splenic vein thrombosis after splenectomy with gastroesophageal devascularization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Lai; Shi-Chun Lu; Guan-Yin Li; Chuan-Yun Li; Ju-Shan Wu; Qing-Liang Guo; Meng-Long Wang; Ning Li

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To compare the incidence of early portal or splenic vein thrombosis (PSVT) in patients treated with irregular and regular anticoagulantion alter splenectomy with gastroesophageal devascularization.METHODS:We retrospectively analyzed 301 patients who underwent splenectomy with gastroesophageal devascularization for portal hypertension due to cirrhosis between April 2004 and July 2010.Patients were categorized into group A with irregular anticoagulation and group B with regular anticoagulation,respectively.Group A (153 patients) received anticoagulant monotherapy for an undesignated time period or with aspirin or warfarin without low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) irregularly.Group B (148 patients) received subcutaneous injection of LMWH routinely within the first 5 d after surgery,followed by oral warfarin and aspirin for one month regularly.The target prothrombin time/international normalized ratio (PT/INR) was 1.25-1.50.Platelet and PT/INR were monitored.Color Doppler imaging was performed to monitor PSVT as well as the effectiveness of thrombolytic therapy.RESULTS:The patients' data were collected and analyzed retrospectively.Among the patients,94 developed early postoperative mural PSVT,including 63patients in group A (63/153,41.17%) and 31 patients in group B (31/148,20.94%).There were 50 (32.67%)patients in group A and 27 (18.24%) in group B with mural PSVT in the main trunk of portal vein.After the administration of thrombolytic,anticoagulant and antiaggregation therapy,complete or partial thrombus dissolution achieved in 50 (79.37%) in group A and 26 (83.87%) in group B.CONCLUSION:Regular anticoagulation therapy can reduce the incidence of PSVT in patients who undergo splenectomy with gastroesophageal devascularization,and regular anticoagulant therapy is safer and more effective than irregular anticoagulant therapy.Early and timely thrombolytic therapy is imperative and feasible for the prevention of PSVT.

  10. Comparison of pharmacist managed anticoagulation with usual medical care in a family medicine clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dillon Carla

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The beneficial outcomes of oral anticoagulation therapy are dependent upon achieving and maintaining an optimal INR therapeutic range. There is growing evidence that better outcomes are achieved when anticoagulation is managed by a pharmacist with expertise in anticoagulation management rather than usual care by family physicians. This study compared a pharmacist managed anticoagulation program (PC to usual physician care (UC in a family medicine clinic. Methods A retrospective cohort study was carried out in a family medicine clinic which included a clinical pharmacist. In 2006, the pharmacist assumed anticoagulation management. For a 17-month period, the PC group (n = 112 of patients on warfarin were compared to the UC patients (n = 81 for a similar period prior to 2006. The primary outcome was the percentage of time patients' INR was in the therapeutic range (TTR. Secondary outcomes were the percentage of time in therapeutic range within ± 0.3 units of the recommended range (expanded TTR and percentage of time the INR was >5.0 or Results The baseline characteristics were similar between the groups. Fifty-five percent of the PC group was male with a mean age of 67 years; 51% of the UC group was male with a mean age of 71 years. The most common indications for warfarin in both groups were atrial fibrillation, mechanical heart valves and deep vein thrombosis. The TTR was 73% for PC and 65% for UC (p 5 were 0.3% for PC patients and 0.1% for UC (p Conclusion The pharmacist-managed anticoagulation program within a family practice clinic compared to usual care by the physicians achieved significantly better INR control as measured by the percentage of time patients' INR values were kept in both the therapeutic and expanded range. Based on the results of this study, a collaborative family practice clinic using pharmacists and physicians may be an effective model for anticoagulation management with these results verified in future

  11. Psychometric Properties of the Manchester Child Attachment Story Task: An Italian Multicentre Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Lavinia; Del Giudice, Marco; Fossati, Andrea; Manaresi, Francesca; Perinetti, Barbara Actis; Colle, Livia; Veglia, Fabio

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes a multicentre study of the psychometric properties of the Manchester Child Attachment Story Task in a sample of 230 Italian children aged 4 to 8 years. The task's internal consistency and inter-rater reliability were investigated; in addition, multiple discriminant analysis was used to explore the contribution of individual…

  12. Prophylactic antibiotic regimens in tumour surgery (PARITY) A PILOT MULTICENTRE RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghert, M.; Bhandari, M.; Deheshi, B.; Guyatt, G.; Holt, G.; O'Shea, T.; Randall, R. L.; Thabane, L.; Wunder, J.; Evaniew, N.; McKay, P.; Schneider, P.; Turcotte, R.; Madden, K.; Scott, T.; Sprague, S.; Simunovic, N.; Swinton, M.; Racano, A.; Heels-Ansdell, D.; Buckingham, L.; Rose, P.; Brigman, B.; Pullenayegum, E.; Ghert, M.; Evaniew, N.; Mckay, P.; Schneider, P.; Sobhi, G.; Chan, R.; Biljan, M.; Ferguson, P.; Wunder, J.; Griffin, A.; Mantas, I.; Wylie, A.; Han, A.; Grewal, G.; Turcotte, R.; Goulding, K.; Dandachli, F.; Matte, G.; Werier, J.; Abdelbary, H.; Paquin, K.; Cosgrove, H.; Dugal, A-M.; Fetzer, S.; Aikens, W.; Clarkson, P.; Wang, B.; Kondo, L.; Yip, J.; Isler, M.; Mottard, S.; Barry, J.; St Yves, H.; Quach, M.; Assayag, H.; Daoust, K.; Goyette, K.; Projean, D.; Dion, N.; Arteau, A.; Turmel, S.; Bertrand, A.; Gagnon, N.; Labbe, V.; Holt, G.; Halpern, J.; Schwartz, H.; Atkinson, A.; Daniels, J.; Moore, M. S.; Anderson, M.; Gebhardt, M.; Wagner, K.; Patel, H.; Jolin, H.; Anderson, M.; Gebhardt, M.; Allar, B.; Naqvi, M.; Bennett, J.; Albuquerque, S.; Randall, R. L.; Jones, K.; Crabtree, S.; Davis, R.; Sorenson, S.; Healey, J. H.; Galle, J.; O'Neill, G.; Del Corral, B.; Lopez, S.; Galli Serra, M.; Parizzia, W.; Podrzaj, A.; Foa Torres, M.; Clayer, M.; Chai, Y.; Slobodian, P.; Balach, T.; Coyle, K.; LaCasse, R.; Abraham, J.; Morrison, T.; Angelos, M.; Sailor, L.; Sadaka, R.; Miller, B.; Milhem, M.; McCurdy, N.; Kain, J.; Nohr, J.; Johnson, K.; Merriss, A.; Cheng, E.; Luke, D. G.; Scharschmidt, T. J.; Crist, M. K.; Dimeo, A.; Marmon, L.; Reimer, N.; Monson, D.; Oskouei, S.; Lomba, C.; Rogers, S.; Avedian, R.; Jordan, L.; Chinn, S.; Hamilton, M.; Ghert, M.; Evaniew, N.; McKay, P.; Schneider, P.; Sobhi, G.; Chan, R.; Bil-Jan, M.; Ferguson, P.; Wunder, J.; Griffin, A.; Mantas, I.; Wylie, A.; Han, A.; Grewal, G.; Turcotte, R.; Goulding, K.; Dandachli, F.; Matte, G.; Werier, J.; Abdelbary, H.; Paquin, K.; Cosgrove, H.; Dugal, A-M.; Fetzer, S.; Aikens, W.; Clarkson, P.; Wang, B.; Kondo, L.; Yip, J.; Isler, M.; Mottard, S.; Barry, J.; Yves, H. St.; Quach, M.; Assayag, H.; Daoust, K.; Goyette, Kristine; Projean, D.; Dion, N.; Arteau, A.; Turmel, S.; Bertrand, A.; Gagnon, N.; Labbe, V.; Holt, G.; Halpern, J.; Schwartz, H.; Atkinson, A.; Daniels, J.; Moore, M. S.; Anderson, M.; Gebhardt, M.; Wagner, K.; Patel, H.; Jolin, H.; Anderson, M.; Gebhardt, M.; Allar, B.; Naqvi, M.; Bennett, J.; Albuquerque, S.; Randall, R. L.; Jones, K.; Crabtree, S.; Davis, R.; Sorenson, S.; Healey, J. H.; Galle, J.; O'Neill, G.; Del Corral, B.; Lopez, S.; Galli Serra, M.; Parizzia, W.; Podrzaj, A.; Foa Torres, M.; Clayer, M.; Tran, N.; Slobodian, P.; Balach, T.; Coyle, K.; LaCasse, R.; Abraham, J.; Morrison, T.; Angelos, M.; Sailor, L.; Sadaka, R.; Miller, B.; Milhem, M.; McCurdy, N.; Kain, J.; Nohr, J.; Johnson, K.; Merriss, A.; Cheng, E.; Luke, D. G.; Scharschmidt, T. J.; Crist, M. K.; Dimeo, A.; Marmon, L.; Reimer, N.; Monson, D.; Oskouei, S.; Lomba, C.; Rogers, S.; Geller, D.; Hoang, B.; Tingling, J.; Solorzano, C.; Avedian, R.; Jordan, L.; Chinn, S.; Hamilton, M.; Puloski, S.; Monument, M.; Carcary, K.; Cameron, C.; Aboulafia, A.; Loo-Mis, M.; Bosley, J.; Bonvegna, R.; Kassa, M.; Damron, T.; Craig, T.; Reale, M.; Goodman, H. J.; Culbertson, M. Deza; Caruso, P.; Garling, E.; Schwab, J.; Fiore, A.; Phukan, R.; Park, C.; Joshi, L.; Aboulafia, A.; Wallace, M.; Flack, J.; Vaughan, K.; Avergas, A.; Brady, M.; Brown, S.; Schadie, N.; Battersby, R.; Weiss, K.; Goodman, M.; Heyl, A.; Yeschke, C. A.; Sumic, P.; Dudgeon, M.; Prosser, R.; Korenoski, C.; DiCaprio, M.; Palmer, B.; Cioppa, E.; Schaeffer, T. M.; Paul, P.; Toreson, J.; Cummings, J.; Schwartz, L.; Zahner, B.; Morris, C.; Laljani, V.; Mesko, N.; Joyce, M.; Lietman, S.; Wustrack, R.; O'Donnell, R.; Stevenson, C.; Carmody, E.; Tyler, W.; McIntyre, A.; Spiguel, A.; Scarborough, M.; Gibbs, C. P.; Steshyn, J.; Nunn, B.; Rosenthal, H.; Haynes, K.; Leddy, L.; Walton, Z.; Doung, Y-C.; Hayden, J.; Velez, R.; Aguirre, M.; Perez, M.; Barrera, S.; Garca Lopez, A.; Grimer, R.; Dunn, K.; Virdee, H.; Rankin, K.; Beckingsale, T.; Gerrand, C.; Campbell, I.; Allen, M.; Khan, S. Alam; Bakshi, S.; Rastogi, S.; Poudel, R.; Kumar, V. Sampath; Rai, A.; Baptista, A. M.; de Camargo, O. P.; Marais, L.; Rodseth, R.; Ferreira, N.; Rajah, C.; Gumede, S.; Gortzak, Y.; Sternheim, A.; Bickels, J.; Kolander, Y.; Lev, S.; Hettwer, W.; Petersen, M. M.; Grum-Schwensen, T.; Jutte, P.; Ploegmakers, J. J. W.; Stevens, M.; Mahendra, A.; Gupta, S.; Bergovec, M.; Leithner, A.; Funovics, P.; Dijkstra, P. D. S.; Van De Sande, M.; Hoogenstraaten, A.; Leijerzapf, N.; Steadman, P.; Steadman, P.; Boffano, M.; Piana, R.; Marone, S.; Albertini, U.; Boux, E.; Maiello, A.; Repsa, L.; Zile, S.; Aston, W.; Pollock, R.; Cool, P.; Gibbons, M.; Whit-Well, D.; Cosker, T.; Hemingway, J.; Porter, D.; Patton, S.; Navia, J.; Betancur, A. F.; Laitenen, M.; Pakarinen, K.; Nieminen, J.; Yla-Mononen, S.; Rautiainen, S.; Fiorenza, F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Clinical studies of patients with bone sarcomas have been challenged by insufficient numbers at individual centres to draw valid conclusions. Our objective was to assess the feasibility of conducting a definitive multi-centre randomised controlled trial (RCT) to determine whether a five-da

  13. Het sluitstuk van de laparotomie : een prospectief, gerandomiseerd, multicentre onderzoek naar de resultaten van fasciesluiting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Wissing

    1988-01-01

    textabstractDit proefschrift beschrijft de resultaten van een perspectief gerandcmiseerd multicentre onderzoek bij 1539 patienten naar de wondgenezing na een mediane laparotamie en dan met nane de genezing van de fascie, waarbij de invloed van diverse hechtmaterialen en van twee verschillende hechtt

  14. Case report 558: Multicentric Klebsiella pneumoniae (Friedlaenders bacillus) osteomyelitis in sickle cell anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patient represents a unique combination of multicentric osteomyelitis due to Klebsiella pneumoniae, lesions in the skull, pathological fracture of a long bone and no evidence of pulmonary disease. That Klebsiella pneumoniae osteomyelitis can occur in sickle cell anemia should be considered when such bone changes are seen. The remarkable resolution on conservative management also needs to be noted. (orig./GDG)

  15. Definitions of Suicidal Behaviour:Lessons learned from the WHO/EURO Multicentre Study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leo, D. De; Burgis, S.; Bertolote, J.; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.; Bille Brahe, U.

    2006-01-01

    Based on the experience matured during the 15 years of the WHO/EURO Multicentre Study on Suicidal Behavior, this paper provides an excursus on main elements that characterize components for definitional needs. It describes the rationale for choosing the initial set of definitions within the study an

  16. Definitions of suicidal behavior: lessons learned from the WHo/EURO multicentre Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leo, D; Burgis, S; Bertolote, J M; Kerkhof, A J F M; Bille-Brahe, U

    2006-01-01

    Based on the experience matured during the 15 years of the WHO/EURO Multicentre Study on Suicidal Behavior, this paper provides an excursus on main elements that characterize components for definitional needs. It describes the rationale for choosing the initial set of definitions within the study and the subsequent problems and developments. As a result, unifying terminologies are proposed. PMID:16642910

  17. An international multicentre study on the allergenic activity of air-oxidized R-limonene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bråred Christensson, Johanna; Andersen, Klaus; Bruze, Magnus;

    2013-01-01

    Limonene is a common fragrance terpene that, in its pure form, is not allergenic or is a very weak allergen. However, limonene autoxidizes on air exposure, and the oxidation products can cause contact allergy. Oxidized R-limonene has previously been patch tested in multicentre studies, giving 2-3...

  18. Lung volume reduction coil treatment for patients with severe emphysema : a European multicentre trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deslee, Gaetan; Klooster, Karin; Hetzel, Martin; Stanzel, Franz; Kessler, Romain; Marquette, Charles-Hugo; Witt, Christian; Blaas, Stefan; Gesierich, Wolfgang; Herth, Felix J. F.; Hetzel, Juergen; van Rikxoort, Eva M.; Slebos, Dirk-Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background The lung volume reduction (LVR) coil is a minimally invasive bronchoscopic nitinol device designed to reduce hyperinflation and improve elastic recoil in severe emphysema. We investigated the feasibility, safety and efficacy of LVR coil treatment in a prospective multicentre cohort trial

  19. Incidence of nutritional support complications in patient hospitalized in wards. multicentric study

    OpenAIRE

    Gloria María Agudelo Ochoa; Nubia Amparo Giraldo Giraldo; Nora Luz Aguilar; Beatriz Elena Restrepo; Marcela Vanegas; Sandra Alzate; Mónica Martínez; Sonia Patriacia Gamboa; Eliana Castaño; Janeth Barbosa; Juliana Román; Angela María Serna; Gloria Marcela Hoyos

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Nutritional support generates complications that must be detected and treated on time. Objective: To estimate the incidence of some complications of nutritional support in patients admitted to general hospital wards who received nutritional support in six high-complexity institutions. Methods: Prospective, descriptive and multicentric study in patients with nutritional support; the variables studied were medical diagnosis, nutritional condition, nutritional support duration, app...

  20. Dislocation of the Elbow: A Retrospective Multicentre Study of 86 Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. de Haan (Jeroen); J.F. Zengerink; D. den Hartog (Dennis); W.E. Tuinebreijer (Wim); J. Buijtenen (Jesse van); N.W.L. Schep (Niels)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe objective of this retrospective multicentre cohort study was to prospectively assess the long-term functional outcomes of simple and complex elbow dislocations.We analysed the hospital and outpatient records of 86 patients between 01.03.1999 and 25.02.2009 with an elbow dislocation.

  1. Thoracic radiographic features of anticoagulant rodenticide toxicity in fourteen dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoracic radiographs and clinical records from 14 dogs with confirmed anticoagulant rodenticide toxicity were reviewed. Twelve of the 14 dogs were presented with a chief complaint of respiratory distress, and 12 had elevated prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin times consistent with a coagulopathy secondary to a clotting factor deficiency. Thoracic radiographs of the 14 dogs were reviewed and abnomalities included increased mediastinal soft tissue opacity with extra and intrathoracic tracheal narrowing (4/14), increased mediastinal soft tissue opacity without tracheal narrowing (8/14), variable degrees of pleural effusion (13/14) and generalized, patchy interstitial/alveolar pulmonary infiltrates (8/14). Radiographic evidence of cardiomegaly and pulmonary artery abnormalities consistent with concurrent heartworm infestation were detected in one dog. In four dogs, dramatic tracheal narrowing was identified on the lateral thoracic radiograph caused by either mediastinal hemorrhage compressing the trachea or submucosal hemorrhage within the tracheal lumen. The trachea was displaced in a ventral direction in two dogs, and extra and intrathoracic luminal diameter narrowing was evident cranially in all four dogs. Two of these four dogs had soft tissue opacity within the dorsal trachea that extended from the larynx to the intrathoracic trachea. Twelve of the 14 dogs survived with standard treatment protocols utilizing injectable and oral vitamin K1. One dog died from pancreatitis and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. The other dog died soon after presentation due to severe, disseminated hemorrhage. Follow-up thoracic radiographs were made in four dogs that survived and showed resolution of the mediastinal, pleural and pulmonary changes within one to five days after the initiation of vitamin K1 therapy

  2. Suboptimal use of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başaran, Özcan; Dogan, Volkan; Beton, Osman; Tekinalp, Mehmet; Aykan, Ahmet Cağri; Kalaycioğlu, Ezgi; Bolat, Ismail; Taşar, Onur; Şafak, Özgen; Kalcik, Macit; Yaman, Mehmet; İnci, Sinan; Altintaş, Bernas; Kalkan, Sedat; Kirma, Cevat; Biteker, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to investigate the potential misuse of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) and the physicians’ adherence to current European guideline recommendations in real-world using a large dataset from Real-life Multicenter Survey Evaluating Stroke Prevention Strategies in Turkey (RAMSES Study). RAMSES study is a prospective, multicenter, nationwide registry (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02344901). In this subgroup analysis of RAMSES study, patients who were on NOACs were classified as appropriately treated (AT), undertreated (UT), and overtreated (OT) according to the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines. The independent predictors of UT and OT were determined by multivariate logistic regression. Of the 2086 eligible patients, 1247 (59.8%) received adequate treatment. However, off-label use was detected in 839 (40.2%) patients; 634 (30.4%) patients received UT and 205 (9.8%) received OT. Independent predictors of UT included >65 years of age, creatinine clearance ≥50 mL/min, urban living, existing dabigatran treatment, and HAS-BLED score of <3, whereas that of OT were creatinine clearance <50 mL/min, ongoing rivaroxaban treatment, and HAS-BLED score of ≥3. The suboptimal use of NOACs is common because of physicians’ poor compliance to the guideline recommendations in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Older patients who were on dabigatran treatment with good renal functions and low risk of bleeding were at risk of UT, whereas patients who were on rivaroxaban treatment with renal impairment and high risk of bleeding were at risk of OT. Therefore, a greater emphasis should be given to prescribe the recommended dose for the specified patients. PMID:27583892

  3. Anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing coronary stent implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, A; Fauchier, L; Pellegrin, C; Clementy, N; Saint Etienne, C; Banerjee, A; Naudin, D; Angoulvant, D

    2013-09-01

    In patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) undergoing coronary stent implantation, the optimal antithrombotic strategy is unclear. We evaluated whether use of oral anticoagulation (OAC) was associated with any benefit in morbidity or mortality in patients with AF, high risk of thromboembolism (TE) (CHA2DS2-VASC score ≥ 2) and coronary stent implantation. Among 8,962 unselected patients with AF seen between 2000 and 2010, a total of 2,709 (30%) had coronary artery disease and 417/2,709 (15%) underwent stent implantation while having CHA2DS2-VASC score ≥ 2. During follow-up (median=650 days), all TE, bleeding episodes, and major adverse cardiac events (i.e. death, acute myocardial infarction, target lesion revascularisation) were recorded. At discharge, 97/417 patients (23%) received OAC, which was more likely to be prescribed in patients with permanent AF and in those treated for elective stent implantation. The incidence of outcome event rates was not significantly different in patients treated and those not treated with OAC. However, in multivariate analysis, the lack of OAC at discharge was independently associated with increased risk of death/stroke/systemic TE (relative risk [RR] =2.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-4.67, p=0.04), with older age (RR =1.12, 1.04-1.20, p=0.003), heart failure (RR =3.26, 1.18-9.01, p=0.02), and history of stroke (RR =18.87, 3.11-111.11, p=0.001). In conclusion, in patients with AF and high thromboembolic risk after stent implantation, use of OAC was independently associated with decreased risk of subsequent death/stroke/systemic TE, suggesting that OAC should be systematically used in this patient population. PMID:23846210

  4. Successful management of anticoagulation therapy during international travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Teresa; Armor, Becky L

    2012-03-01

    Warfarin is considered a high-risk drug because of its narrow therapeutic window, variability in dose response, and multitude of drug and food interactions. Although travel advice is available for patients who are taking warfarin, it is geared toward patients who are traveling to developed countries and tends to be lacking in detail. We describe a 53-year-old woman with two mechanical heart valves and chronic atrial fibrillation who was taking warfarin for thromboembolism prophylaxis and had plans to travel to Vietnam for 10 weeks. Three days before her departure, she was prescribed amiodarone for long-term use. As a result of the extended duration of her travel and the complexities of warfarin use, the pharmacists who managed the patient's anticoagulation reviewed several aspects of a comprehensive management approach with the patient for a safe international trip. They assessed the patient's thromboembolic and hemorrhagic risks, and determined which other drugs (e.g., enoxaparin, phytonadione), dosages, and adequate supplies would be required along with warfarin, as well as how to safely transport these drugs during travel. In addition, the logistics of effectively monitoring international normalized ratio (INR) levels were evaluated, and methods of managing multiple potential scenarios were carefully planned out. Contact with the patient was made through pharmacist-directed telephone visits throughout the travel period. A total of 12 telephone visits were conducted with the patient during the 10 weeks of travel. Her INR was supratherapeutic on three occasions and was subtherapeutic once; however, neither enoxaparin nor phytonadione were needed during the travel period, and the patient returned safely to the United States. Effective and safe use of high-risk drugs for patients leaving the United States requires extensive pretravel planning, and pharmacists can play a central role in optimizing therapeutic outcomes for these patients during international travel

  5. Outcome analysis of a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilt, V M; Gums, J G; Ahmed, O I; Moore, L M

    1995-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine if a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation monitoring service (AMS) improved the outcomes of patients receiving warfarin in a family practice setting and was cost effective in treating and preventing thromboembolic disorders. A retrospective chart review was performed on all patients at the University of Florida's Family Practice Residency Program who received warfarin pharmacotherapy between October 1, 1988, and December 15, 1993. The outcomes of patients followed by AMS were compared with those of a control group consisting of patients receiving warfarin but followed only by their physician. Outcomes were evaluated based on the number of thromboembolic and hemorrhagic events, as well as unplanned clinic visits, emergency room visits, and hospital admissions. Cost of hospital admissions, emergency room visits, and participation in the AMS were analyzed. During 28 person-years of treatment, control subjects sustained 12 thromboembolic events (2 pulmonary embolisms, 1 cerebrovascular accident, and 9 deep venous thromboses) and 2 minor and 5 major hemorrhagic events. The study group reported two minor hemorrhagic events during a total of 60 person-years. The control group was 20 times more likely than the study group to experience any event (rate ratio 20, 95% CI 5-87). In addition, hospitalization and emergency room charges indicated an actual cost of $119,074.95 for the control group's events. The cost to this group for 28 person-years of participation in the AMS would have been $5040.00. A potential cost avoidance of $4072.68 per person-year of follow-up may have been possible if these patients had been followed by the AMS. A pharmacist-managed AMS in a family practice setting can result in improved outcomes for patients receiving warfarin and is cost effective. PMID:8602380

  6. Preferences for anticoagulation therapy in atrial fibrillation: the patients' view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, Björn; Thate-Waschke, Inga-Marion; Bauersachs, Rupert; Kohlmann, Thomas; Wilke, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Since the introduction of new oral anticoagulants (NOACs), besides vitamin-K antagonists, an additional option for stroke prevention of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) is available. The objective of this study was to assess AF patients' preferences with regard to the attributes of these different treatment options. We conducted a multicenter study among randomly selected physicians. Preferences were assessed by computer-assisted telephone interviews. We used a discrete-choice-experiment (DCE) with four convenience-related treatment dependent attributes (need of bridging: yes/no, interactions with food/nutrition: yes/no, need of INR controls/dose adjustment: yes/no; frequency of intake: once/twice daily) and one comparator attribute (distance to practitioner: 15 km). Preferences measured in the interviews were analyzed descriptively and based on a conditional logit regression model. A total of 486 AF patients (age: 73.9 ± 8.2 years; 43.2 % female; mean CHA2DS2-VASc: 3.7 ± 1.6; current medication: 48.1 % rivaroxaban, 51.9 % VKA) could be interviewed. Regardless of type of medication, patients significantly preferred the attribute levels (in order of patients' importance) "once daily intake" (Level: once = 1 vs. twice = 0; Coefficient = 0.615; p 15 km = 0 vs. ≤1 km = 1; 0.494; p important OAC-attribute for patients' choice followed by "no bridging necessary" and "no interactions with food/nutrition". Thus, patients with AF seem to prefer treatment options which are easier to administer. PMID:26260625

  7. Multicentre consensus recommendations for skin care in inherited epidermolysis bullosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Inherited epidermolysis bullosa (EB) comprises a highly heterogeneous group of rare diseases characterized by fragility and blistering of skin and mucous membranes. Clinical features combined with immunofluorescence antigen mapping and/or electron microscopy examination of a skin biopsy allow to define the EB type and subtype. Molecular diagnosis is nowadays feasible in all EB subtypes and required for prenatal diagnosis. The extent of skin and mucosal lesions varies greatly depending on EB subtype and patient age. In the more severe EB subtypes lifelong generalized blistering, chronic ulcerations and scarring sequelae lead to multiorgan involvement, major morbidity and life-threatening complications. In the absence of a cure, patient management remains based on preventive measures, together with symptomatic treatment of cutaneous and extracutaneous manifestations and complications. The rarity and complexity of EB challenge its appropriate care. Thus, the aim of the present study has been to generate multicentre, multidisciplinary recommendations on global skin care addressed to physicians, nurses and other health professionals dealing with EB, both in centres of expertise and primary care setting. Methods Almost no controlled trials for EB treatment have been performed to date. For this reason, recommendations were prepared by a multidisciplinary team of experts from different European EB centres based on available literature and expert opinion. They have been subsequently revised by a panel of external experts, using an online-modified Delphi method to generate consensus. Results Recommendations are reported according to the age of the patients. The major topics treated comprise the multidisciplinary approach to EB patients, global skin care including wound care, management of itching and pain, and early diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma. Aspects of therapeutic patient education, care of disease burden and continuity of care are also developed

  8. The latest recommendations on the use of new oral anticoagulants in routine practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Witkowski

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs has become a breakthrough in anticoagulant treatment and it is expected to rise significantly in upcoming years. The use of conventional anticoagulants have several limitations: subcutaneous administration of heparin, or close monitoring of INR during application of vitamin K antagonists. In the last decade, target-specific oral anticoagulants (TSOAC including dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban have been marketed for prophylaxis and treatment. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the potential uses, side effects, and management of these agents in routine practice. NOACs have major pharmacologic advantages, including a rapid onset and offset of action, fewer drug interactions than conventional anticoagulants, and predictable pharmacokinetics. These agents are gaining popularity among both physicians and patients because of their easiness of administration and the eliminating the requirement for regular coagulation monitoring. In this review, we focus on discussing practical recommendations for the use of NOACs and the risks and benefits of incorporating them into routine practice.

  9. Comparison of Physicochemical Characteristics and Anticoagulant Activities of Polysaccharides from Three Sea Cucumbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengmin Wang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to search for sulfated polysaccharides in different invertebrate connective tissues and to examine their biological activities, we have isolated three types of polysaccharides from the body wall of the three sea cucumbers Holothuria edulis, Apostichopus japonicas and Holothuria nobilis. The physicochemical properties and anticoagulant activities of these polysaccharides were examined and compared. The chemical composition analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR analysis indicate that two types of polysaccharides, sulfated fucan and fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (FuCS, were found in all of the three species and in addition a neutral glycan was observed in H. edulis. The neutral α-glucan was firstly obtained from sea cucumber. The same type of polysaccharides from different species of sea cucumbers have similar physicochemical properties and anticoagulant activities, but those of different types of glycans are significantly different, possibly due to their different monosaccharide compositions, electric charges and average molecular weights. The FuCSs have stronger anticoagulant activities than the sulfated fucans, although the molecular sizes of the FuCSs are lower than those of the sulfated fucans, whereas the neutral glucan has no activity, as expected from the absence of sulfate. Thus, anticoagulant activities of the different type of polysaccharides are likely to relate to monosaccharide composition and sulfate content. Preliminary analysis suggests that the sulfation patterns of the FuCSs may result in the difference in anticoagulant activities. Our data could help elucidate the structure-activity relationship of the sea cucumber polysaccharides.

  10. The use of hirudin as universal anticoagulant in haematology, clinical chemistry and blood grouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menssen, H D; Melber, K; Brandt, N; Thiel, E

    2001-12-01

    Undesirable interactions between anticoagulants and diagnostic test kit procedures so far have prevented the development of a single uniform blood sampling tube. Contrary to K2-EDTA, heparin and other anticoagulants, hirudin only minimally alters blood cells and dissolved blood constituents, thus qualifying as a universal anticoagulant for diagnostic purposes. Automated complete blood counts, automated analyses of clinical chemistry analytes and immunohaematology were performed from hirudinised and routinely processed blood obtained from healthy volunteers (n=35) and hospitalised patients (n=45). Hirudin (400 ATU/ml blood) sufficiently anticoagulated blood for diagnostic purposes. The measurements of automated complete blood counts obtained from K2-EDTA-anticoagulated and hirudinised blood correlated significantly as did the measurements of 24 clinical chemistry analytes from hirudinised plasma and serum. Regression analysis revealed that the results of complete blood counts and clinical chemistry tests were predictable from the respective measurements from hirudinised blood (p=0.001). Immunohaematological tests and cross-matching from hirudinised and native blood of the same donors gave identical results. Single clotting factors, but not global coagulation analytes, could be measured from hirudinised blood. Therefore, a universal hirudin-containing blood sampling tube could be designed for automated analysis of haematological, serological and clinical chemistry analytes. PMID:11798089

  11. [An outpatient clinic measure and control system for anticoagulation levels, CoaguChek XS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Guardeño, Araceli; Pérez Lucena, Dolores Amalia

    2009-03-01

    A significant increase during recent years in the number of patients who need Oral Anticoagulant Treatment has meant a greater role for nurses, especially in Primary Health Care Centers, since nurses, along with doctors, are the professionals responsible for treating those patients. This control is carried out by measuring the levels of anticoagulants in the blood, regulating the anticoagulant medicine doses, and providing patients with the essential health education so patients participate in the treatment of their illness. To a large degree, the preponderance of Primary Health Care Centers in the aforementioned control has developed hand-in-hand with the availability of portable, simple and low cost coagulation measuring systems which permit a direct reading of a patient's anticoagulation level with one drop of capillary blood. The objective of this article is introduce the reader to a measuring system appropriate for outpatient clinic control of anticoagulant levels in blood by mans of the CoaguChek XS System, which is described. The authors specify the sample extraction procedure, how to measure coagulant levels, and recommendations to keep in mind while carrying out this procedure. The authors sketch the importance of health education and finally, they describe some advantages and inconveniences this system has. PMID:19462604

  12. Adherence to long-term anticoagulation treatment, what is known and what the future might hold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdou, John K; Auyeung, Vivian; Patel, Jignesh P; Arya, Roopen

    2016-07-01

    Adherence to medication, commonly reported as being 50% in chronic diseases, is of great concern in healthcare. Medication non-adherence is particularly apparent in chronic diseases, where treatment is often preventative and may provide little or no symptomatic relief or feedback for the patient. A lot of research has been undertaken to describe the extent of non-adherence to long-term anticoagulation therapy, particularly with vitamin K antagonists and more recently with direct oral anticoagulants. However, the literature is scarce with respect to describing adherence to anticoagulation in terms of the behavioural aspects that influence medicine use. Utilizing the COM-B (capability, opportunity, motivation and behaviour) psychological model of non-adherence, we present the available evidence, not only in terms of describing the extent of the non-adherence problem, but also describing why patients do not adhere, offering theory-driven and evidence-based solutions to improve long-term adherence to chronic anticoagulation therapy. Lessons learned are not only applicable within the field of anticoagulation but throughout haematology. PMID:27173746

  13. A Summary of the Literature Evaluating Adherence and Persistence with Oral Anticoagulants in Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obamiro, Kehinde O; Chalmers, Leanne; Bereznicki, Luke R E

    2016-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a growing public health concern and remains an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke. Warfarin, a commonly used oral anticoagulant, is associated with a 60-70 % relative reduction in stroke risk and a reduction in mortality of 26 %. However, warfarin has several limitations, including a narrow therapeutic window, variable dose response, multiple interactions with other drugs and concurrent illnesses, and the need for frequent laboratory monitoring. In recent years, the direct acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs), including dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban, have been developed to overcome the limitations of warfarin therapy. These treatment strategies are either comparable or superior to warfarin in stroke prevention in AF. Despite the documented effectiveness of oral anticoagulants in AF, patients may not derive optimal benefit if they fail to adhere or fail to continue with their medication. This may lead to treatment failure, increased hospitalization and mortality. This review summarizes the literature regarding adherence and persistence (or discontinuation) rates with oral anticoagulants in the management of AF; the impact of non-adherence and non-persistence on treatment outcomes; and the effectiveness of strategies to improve adherence and persistence with oral anticoagulant therapy. PMID:27262433

  14. Development and implementation of a pharmacist-managed inpatient anticoagulation monitoring program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellman, Jessica C; Kraus, Peggy S; Burton, Bradley L; Ensor, Christopher R; Nesbit, Todd W; Ross, Patricia A; Thomas, Michelle L; Streiff, Michael B

    2011-05-15

    PURPOSE. A stepwise approach to development and implementation of a program to standardize and increase pharmacists' involvement in anticoagulation therapy at a large academic medical center is described. SUMMARY. In response to the Joint Commission's national goal of improved patient safety in anticoagulation therapy, a work group of pharmacy administrators, educators, clinical specialists, and decentralized pharmacists at the hospital developed the structure for a comprehensive inpatient anticoagulation program (IAP); the work group also developed a list of required competencies, educational materials, assessment methods, and mechanisms for eliciting feedback from IAP pharmacists and other patient care staff. After completion of training that included structured case-review sessions, a one-on-one shadowing experience, and competency assessment, IAP pharmacists began reviewing clinical and laboratory data on patients receiving warfarin and low-molecular-weight heparins and providing recommendations to physicians, nurse practitioners, and other health care team members. Feedback from other clinicians was generally positive, with a majority of those surveyed indicating that increased pharmacist involvement in anticoagulation monitoring and dosage adjustment resulted in improved patient care; about 80% indicated that they concurred with pharmacists' recommendations at least 75% of the time. Results of a survey of IAP pharmacists indicated increased satisfaction with their daily duties but also a need for improved pharmacist-to-pharmacist communication. CONCLUSION. Case-based advanced training and implementation of an IAP in a tertiary care hospital increased pharmacists' involvement in the management of inpatients receiving anticoagulants. PMID:21546645

  15. Anticoagulation inhibits tumor cell-mediated release of platelet angiogenic proteins and diminishes platelet angiogenic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battinelli, Elisabeth M; Markens, Beth A; Kulenthirarajan, Rajesh A; Machlus, Kellie R; Flaumenhaft, Robert; Italiano, Joseph E

    2014-01-01

    Platelets are a reservoir for angiogenic proteins that are secreted in a differentially regulated process. Because of the propensity for clotting, patients with malignancy are often anticoagulated with heparin products, which paradoxically offer a survival benefit by an unknown mechanism. We hypothesized that antithrombotic agents alter the release of angiogenesis regulatory proteins from platelets. Our data revealed that platelets exposed to heparins released significantly decreased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in response to adenosine 5'-diphosphate or tumor cells (MCF-7 cells) and exhibited a decreased angiogenic potential. The releasate from these platelets contained decreased proangiogenic proteins. The novel anticoagulant fondaparinux (Xa inhibitor) demonstrated a similar impact on the platelet angiogenic potential. Because these anticoagulants decrease thrombin generation, we hypothesized that they disrupt signaling through the platelet protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) receptor. Addition of PAR1 antagonists to platelets decreased VEGF release and angiogenic potential. Exposure to a PAR1 agonist in the presence of anticoagulants rescued the angiogenic potential. In vivo studies demonstrated that platelets from anticoagulated patients had decreased VEGF release and angiogenic potential. Our data suggest that the mechanism by which antithrombotic agents increase survival and decrease metastasis in cancer patients is through attenuation of platelet angiogenic potential. PMID:24065244

  16. EFFICACY OF THERAPY WITH INDIRECT ANTICOAGULANTS: ROLE OF THE FOODSTUFF VITAMIN K CONTENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Momot

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The anticoagulants of indirect action during many years serve drugs of basic prophylaxis and therapy of thromboembolic episodes at cardiovascular , neurological, oncology, orthopaedic and other diseases, after surgical interventions and traumas, and also large bunch of the generically caused and acquired (secondary thrombophilie. The contents of vitamin К1 in nutrition depend on a method of product preparation. The highest concentrations are found in dark green vegetables and grass: parsley, spinach, green turnip, and also in cabbage and lettuce. For achievement stable hypocoagulation at assignment of anticoagulants of indirect action the daily entering with nutrition of constant amounts of vitamin K (at a level 65-80 mkg/day is necessary. Thus, a doctor at assignment of anticoagulants, is obliged to pay attention to character of a food and to inform patient about possible undesirable consequences at the use of products keeping high levels of vitamin К1.

  17. Self management of oral anticoagulant therapy in children with congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas D; Attermann, Jørn; Hjortdal, Vibeke E.;

    2001-01-01

    complications requiring doctoral intervention. All the patients and their parents expressed full satisfaction with the treatment. Conclusion: Selfmanagement of oral anticoagulation provides a good quality of treatment, which is feasible and safe in selected children with congenital cardiac disease.......Objective: The concept of self – management of oral anticoagulation has been shown to entail better quality of treatment than conventional management when assessed in selected adults. We have extended the concept of self – management to include children with congenital cardiac disease......, hypothesizing self-management of oral anticoagulation is also possible in this subset of patients. Our aim was to assess the quality of self-management. Methods: We trained 14 children aged from 2.2 to 15.6 years, with a mean age of 9.7 years, and their parents, in domiciliary analysis of the International...

  18. Bromadiolone resistance does not respond to absence of anticoagulants in experimental populations of Norway rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, A.C.; Leirs, H.; Siegismund, Hans Redlef

    how bromadiolone-resistant phenotypes are manifested when bromadiolone selection is absent. Experimental populations were established under semi-natural conditions with wild rats trapped at two Danish farms. The individuals caught on each of the two farms were divided into two experimental groups. One......Resistance to anticoagulant rodenticides in Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) is documented to be associated with pleiotropic effects, notably with an increased dietary vitamin K requirement. The aim of this study was to quantify these effects in small populations of Norway rat in Denmark and to see...... against resistance in the two non-treatment populations was found to be insignificant. Thus, absence of anticoagulant, under the environmental conditions provided, did not lead to a selection favouring anticoagulant-sensitive rats. However, we found some evidence of selection against presumed homozygous...

  19. Real Data on Effectiveness, Tolerability and Safety of New Oral Anticoagulant Agents: Focus on Dabigatran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabile, Eugenio; Izzo, Raffaele; Rozza, Francesco; Losi, Maria Angela; Coscioni, Enrico; Trimarco, Bruno

    2016-06-01

    Vitamin K-dependent antagonists (VKAs) are the most commonly used oral anticoagulants. Non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs), directly target factor IIa (dabigatran) or Xa (rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban) have predictable pharmacological effects and relatively few drug and food interactions compared with VKA. Among NOACs, dabigatran has been extensively tested for stroke prevention in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation eligible for oral anticoagulation with VKA. Dabigatran is at least as effective as warfarin at preventing stroke with advantages of less serious bleeding except for gastrointestinal bleeding, which occurs more often than with warfarin. The findings of dabigatran use in randomized trials, post market registries and specific clinical settings are discussed in this article. PMID:27207360

  20. Practice points in gynecardiology: Abnormal uterine bleeding in premenopausal women taking oral anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Angela H E M; Euler, Mia von; Bongers, Marlies Y; Rolden, Herbert J A; Grutters, Janneke P C; Ulrich, Lian; Schenck-Gustafsson, Karin

    2015-12-01

    A growing number of premenopausal women are currently using antithrombotic and/or (dual) antiplatelet therapy for various cardiovascular indications. These may induce or exacerbate abnormal uterine bleeding and more awareness and knowledge among prescribers is required. Heavy and irregular menstrual bleeding is common in women in their forties and may have a variety of underlying causes that require different treatment options. Thus using anticoagulants in premenopausal women demands specific expertise and close collaboration between cardiovascular physicians and gynecologists. In this article we summarize the scope of the problem and provide practical recommendations for the care for young women taking anticoagulants and/or (dual) antiplatelet therapy. We also recommend that more safety data on uterine bleeding with novel anticoagulants in premenopausal women should be obtained. PMID:26358933

  1. Statement on the safety of glucosamine for patients receiving coumarin anticoagulants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    2011-01-01

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) asked the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies to provide a scientific statement on the safety of glucosamine for patients receiving coumarin anticoagulants. More than 40 case reports have been collected by drug-monitoring agencies that...... showed in some patients being prescribed coumarin anticoagulants, especially warfarin, that the International Normalised Ratio (INR) increased after they began taking glucosamine, which indicated an increase in the coagulation time. In most cases the increased INR values were symptomless but in some...... cases haemorrhage occurred in a variety of organs, and in one case this resulted in a persistent vegetative state. The evidence for an interaction between glucosamine and coumarin anticoagulants is strengthened by the observation that in the majority of cases the INR began to fall to normal values when...

  2. The susceptibility of Tatera indica, Nesokia indica and Bandicota bengalensis to three anticoagulant rodenticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, J H; Rehman, A B

    1977-02-01

    Three South-Asian rodent past species were tested for susceptibility to anticoagulant rodenticides. Wheat fluor containing 0-025% warfarin 0-0375% coumatetralyl or 0-005% difenacoum was fed to 260 Tatera indica, 140 Nesokia indica and 81 Bandicota bengalensis for 1-56 days. Tatera was about as susceptible to anticoagulants as Rattus has been reported to be. Nesokia and Bandicota were extremely variable: though the majority were highly susceptible, the slopes of the dose-mortality curves were close to zero. The difenacoum diet appeared to be more toxic than the warfarin diet to all three species, but less toxic than the coumatetralyl diet to Tatera and Nesokia. All of the anticoagulants were eventually lethal to all of the animals tested. PMID:264500

  3. My Patient Taking A Novel Oral Anticoagulant Presents With Major GI Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amartya Kundu; Partha Sardar; Jessica Huston; Parijat Sen; Saurav Chatterjee; Ramez Nairooz; John J. Ryan; Wilbert S. Aronow

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Novel Oral Anticoagulants (NOACs such as Dabigatran, Rivaroxaban, Apixaban and Edoxaban are becoming increasingly popular choices for anticoagulation in place of oral Vitamin K Antagonists in various clinical settings. However, they are thought to be associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. Moreover, no specific antidote is available which can rapidly reverse the anti-coagulant action of NOACs raising concern that gastrointestinal bleeding with NOACs could carry a worse prognosis than that associated with conventional agents. In this review, we describe a case of gastrointestinal bleeding in the setting of NOAC use, followed by a brief overview of the pivotal trials involving NOACs. Clinical issues such as pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of NOAC induced GI bleeding have been described. Future trials will help elucidate the true incidence, risk factors and preventive strategies for NOAC associated gastrointestinal bleeding.

  4. How I treat patients with inherited bleeding disorders who need anticoagulant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Karlyn; Key, Nigel S

    2016-07-14

    Situations that ordinarily necessitate consideration of anticoagulation, such as arterial and venous thrombotic events and prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation, become challenging in patients with inherited bleeding disorders such as hemophilia A, hemophilia B, and von Willebrand disease. There are no evidence-based guidelines to direct therapy in these patients, and management strategies that incorporate anticoagulation must weigh a treatment that carries a risk of hemorrhage in a patient who is already at heightened risk against the potential consequences of not treating the thrombotic event. In this paper, we review atherothrombotic disease, venous thrombotic disease, and atrial fibrillation in patients with inherited bleeding disorders, and discuss strategies for using anticoagulants in this population using cases to illustrate these considerations. PMID:27106121

  5. Use of novel oral anticoagulants for patients with atrial fibrillation: systematic review and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Nancy M

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF), a common arrhythmia, increases the risk of ischemic stroke. Stroke and bleeding scores for patients with AF can help to stratify risk and determine the need for antithrombotic therapy, for which warfarin has been the gold standard. Although highly effective, warfarin has several limitations that can lead to its underuse. Data from randomized, Phase III clinical trials of the novel oral anticoagulants, dabigatran, a direct thrombin inhibitor, and rivaroxaban and apixaban, both factor Xa inhibitors, indicate these drugs are at least noninferior to warfarin for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism. They are easier to administer, and have an equivalent or lower risk of bleeding versus warfarin. A better understanding of the risks and benefits of the novel oral anticoagulants, and their use in clinical practice, will prepare clinicians to anticipate and address educational and clinical needs of AF patients and their families, and promote evidence-based prescription of appropriate and safe anticoagulation therapy. PMID:24373340

  6. Differential expression of cytochrome P450 genes between bromadiolone-resistant and anticoagulant-susceptible Norway rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette Drude Kjær; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Fredholm, Merete;

    2008-01-01

    Background: Anticoagulant resistance in Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus (Berk.), has been suggested to be conferred by mutations in the VKORC1 gene, encoding the target protein of anticoagulant rodenticides. Other factors, e.g. pharmacokinetics, may also contribute to resistance, however. To examine...

  7. The response of the Egyptian spiny mouse (Acomys cahirinus) and two other species of commensal rodents to anticoagulant rodenticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, W; Redfern, R

    1981-06-01

    The response of Acomys cahirinus to three anticoagulant rodenticides was investigated in the laboratory. In contrast to the other commensal rodents Rattus rattus and R. norvegicus, this species appears to be naturally very resistant to warfarin, difenacoum and brodifacoum. It is considered unlikely that anticoagulant poisons would be effective in the field for the control of A. cahirinus. PMID:7240734

  8. The New Oral Anticoagulants for the Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism: A New Paradigm Shift in Antithrombotic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taki Galanis, MD

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: These novel, oral anticoagulant agents are legitimate options for the treatment of VTE. A careful assessment of a patient׳s comorbidities, medication use, and laboratory results should be undertaken before prescribing the new oral anticoagulant agents for patients with VTE.

  9. Differential expression of cytochrome P450 genes between bromadiolone-resistant and anticoagulant-susceptible Norway rats:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette Drude; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Fredholm, Merete;

    2008-01-01

    Anticoagulant resistance in Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) has been suggested to be due to mutations in the VKORC1 gene, encoding the target protein of anticoagulant rodenticides such as warfarin and bromadiolone. Other factors, e.g. pharmacokinetics, may however also contribute to resistance. W...

  10. Use of aminocaproic acid (ACA in extra-amniotic MTP in patients on anti-coagulant therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kale P

    1992-10-01

    Full Text Available A case of rheumatic heart disease (RHD with prosthetic mitral valve endocarditis receiving anticoagulation with heparin, underwent medical termination of pregnancy in a second trimester. The following report entails the use of aminocaproic acid (ACA in preventing excessive bleeding during and after the procedure, while the patient continued to receive anticoagulant therapy.

  11. Periprocedural anticoagulation of patients undergoing pericardiocentesis for cardiac tamponade complicating catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tao; Bai, Rong; Chen, Ying-wei; Yu, Rong-hui; Tang, Ri-bo; Sang, Cai-hua; Li, Song-nan; Ma, Chang-sheng; Dong, Jian-zeng

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulation of patients with cardiac tamponade (CT) complicating catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) is an ongoing problem. The aim of this study was to survey the clinical practice of periprocedural anticoagulation in such patients. This study analyzed the periprocedural anticoagulation of 17 patients with CT complicating AF ablation. Emergent pericardiocentesis was performed once CT was confirmed. The mean drained volume was 410.0 ± 194.1 mL. Protamine sulfate was administered to neutralize heparin (1 mg neutralizes 100 units heparin) in 11 patients with persistent pericardial bleeding and vitamin K1 (10 mg) was given to reverse warfarin in 3 patients with supratherapeutic INR (INR > 2.1). Drainage catheters were removed 12 hours after echocardiography confirmed absence of intrapericardial bleeding and anticoagulation therapy was restored 12 hours after removing the catheter. Fifteen patients took oral warfarin and 10 of them were given subcutaneous injection of LMWH (1 mg/kg, twice daily) as a bridge to resumption of systemic anticoagulation with warfarin. Two patients with a small amount of persistent pericardial effusion were given LMWH on days 5 and 13, and warfarin on days 6 and 24. The dosage of warfarin was adjusted to keep the INR within 2-3 in all patients. After 12 months of follow-up, all patients had no neurological events and no occurrence of delayed CT. The results showed that it was effective and safe to resume anticoagulation therapy 12 hours after removal of the drainage catheter. This may help to prevent thromboembolic events following catheter ablation of AF. PMID:25503659

  12. Taipan snake venom time coupled with ecarin time enhances lupus anticoagulant detection in nonanticoagulated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Gary W; Culhane, Aidan P; Maloney, James C; Archer, Robert A; Breen, Karen A; Hunt, Beverley J

    2016-06-01

    A study is presented which assesses the diagnostic impact of incorporating Taipan snake venom time (TSVT) with ecarin time confirmatory test into an existing dilute Russell's viper venom time (dRVVT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) repertoire when testing nonanticoagulated patients for lupus anticoagulants. A total of 387 plasma samples from nonanticoagulated patients being investigated for antiphospholipid antibodies were tested for lupus anticoagulant by dRVVT and dilute APTT with confirmatory and mixing tests, and TSVT with ecarin time, with commercially available reagents. All were analyzed on a Sysmex CS2000i automated analyzer. Lupus anticoagulant was not detected by dRVVT, dilute APTT or TSVT screening in 265 of 387 (68.5%) samples. A lupus anticoagulant was detected in 60 (15.5%) samples in dRVVT and/or dilute APTT analysis, but gave normal TSVT ratios. Thirty-nine (10.1%) were positive by TSVT and ecarin time and one or both of dRVVT and dilute APTT testing, whereas a further 23 (5.9%) were only positive in TSVT/ecarin time testing. Most of the lupus anticoagulants manifested in dRVVT and/or APTT analysis, as might be anticipated for this reagent pairing. The samples positive by TSVT/ecarin time only, as has been previously demonstrated, emphasize that the many variables that impact lupus anticoagulant testing mean that even a well established dRVVT and APTT pairing cannot deliver diagnostic certainty. Interference by direct factor Xa inhibitors in dRVVT testing could pave the way for wider adoption of TSVT screening as we gain more evidence of its diagnostic performance. PMID:26656903

  13. Honey Bee Venom (Apis mellifera Contains Anticoagulation Factors and Increases the Blood-clotting Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Zolfagharian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Bee venom (BV is a complex mixture of proteins and contains proteins such as phospholipase and melittin, which have an effect on blood clotting and blood clots. The mechanism of action of honey bee venom (HBV, Apis mellifera on human plasma proteins and its anti-thrombotic effect were studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-coagulation effect of BV and its effects on blood coagulation and purification. Methods: Crude venom obtained from Apis mellifera was selected. The anti-coagulation factor of the crude venom from this species was purified by using gel filtration chromatography (sephadex G-50, and the molecular weights of the anti-coagulants in this venom estimated by using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE. Blood samples were obtained from 10 rabbits, and the prothrombin time (PT and the partial thromboplastin time (PTT tests were conducted. The approximate lethal dose (LD values of BV were determined. Results: Crude BV increased the blood clotting time. For BV concentrations from 1 to 4 mg/mL, clotting was not observed even at more than 300 seconds, standard deviations (SDs = ± 0.71; however, clotting was observed in the control group 13.8 s, SDs = ± 0.52. Thus, BV can be considered as containing anti-coagulation factors. Crude BV is composed 4 protein bands with molecular weights of 3, 15, 20 and 41 kilodalton (kDa, respectively. The LD50 of the crude BV was found to be 177.8 μg/mouse. Conclusion: BV contains anti-coagulation factors. The fraction extracted from the Iranian bees contains proteins that are similar to anti-coagulation proteins, such as phospholipase A2 (PLA2 and melittin, and that can increase the blood clotting times in vitro.

  14. Effective management of venous thromboembolism in the community: non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel R

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Raj Patel Department of Haematological Medicine, King's Thrombosis Centre, King's College Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Anticoagulation therapy is essential for the effective treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE. For many years, anticoagulation for acute VTE was limited to the use of initial parenteral heparin, overlapping with and followed by a vitamin K antagonist. Although highly effective, this regimen has several limitations and is particularly challenging when given in an ambulatory setting. Current treatment pathways for most patients with deep-vein thrombosis typically involve initial hospital or community-based ambulatory care with subsequent follow-up in a secondary care setting. With the introduction of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs into routine clinical practice, it is now possible for the initial acute management of patients with deep-vein thrombosis to be undertaken by primary care. As hospital admissions associated with VTE become shorter, primary care will play an increasingly important role in the long-term management of these patients. Although the NOACs can potentially simplify patient management and improve clinical outcomes, primary care physicians may be less familiar with these new treatments compared with traditional therapy. To assist primary care physicians in further understanding the role of the NOACs, this article outlines the main differences between NOACs and traditional anticoagulation therapy and discusses the benefit–risk profile of the different NOACs in the treatment and secondary prevention of recurrent VTE. Key considerations for the use of NOACs in the primary care setting are highlighted, including dose transition, risk assessment and follow-up, duration of anticoagulant therapy, how to minimize bleeding risks, and the importance of patient education and counseling. Keywords: venous thromboembolism, oral anticoagulant, prevention, treatment, primary

  15. Influence of preceding length of anticoagulant treatment and initial presentation of venous thromboembolism on risk of recurrence after stopping treatment: analysis of individual participants’ data from seven trials

    OpenAIRE

    Boutitie, Florent; Pinede, Laurent; Schulman, Sam; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Raskob, Gary; Julian, Jim; Hirsh, Jack; Kearon, Clive

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine how length of anticoagulation and clinical presentation of venous thromboembolism influence the risk of recurrence after anticoagulant treatment is stopped and to identify the shortest length of anticoagulation that reduces the risk of recurrence to its lowest level. Design Pooled analysis of individual participants’ data from seven randomised trials. Setting Outpatient anticoagulant clinics in academic centres. Population 2925 men or women with a first venous thromboem...

  16. MITRAL MECHANICAL PROSTHETIC VALVE THROMBOSIS FOUR YEARS AFTER DISCONTINUING ANTICOAGULATION: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Venkatachelam

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A 40 year s lady who underwent a mitral valve replacement with a mechancial prosthesis nine years ago, stopped oral anticoagulants totally. She was asymptomatic and doing her field job with good exercise tolerance for 4 years without any anticoagulation or follow - up and presented now with acute pulmonary edema due to prosthetic valve thrombosis. Echocardiography revealed a large clot on the mitral valve and increased Doppler gradients across the valve. She was given intravenous streptokinase for 28 hours with relief o f symptoms, re - appearance of prosthetic valve click and normalisation of flow velocities. She was prescribed oral acenocoumarol and discharged in a stable condition.

  17. Quality of Life analysis of patients in chronic use of oral anticoagulant: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Geisa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment with oral anticoagulant may influence the quality of life perception as it promotes changes in the patient's life, not offering an evident symptomatic relief and presenting well defined risks, such as bleeding. In this trial, the influence of chronic use of anticoagulants on the quality of life perception has been analyzed in patients assisted at the anticoagulation outpatient unit. Methods The health related quality of life was evaluated through a cross-section study with a sample composed of 72 patients seen from July 23, 2009 to September 2, 2010 at the Anticoagulation Outpatient Unit of the Federal University of Bahia's University Hospital. The study's population was composed by patients with atrial fibrillation and mechanical heart valve. The patients were submitted to two quality of life evaluation questionnaires: a generic questionnaire - the Medical Outcomes Study SF-36 Health Survey (SF36 - and a specific questionnaire - the Duke Anticoagulation Satisfaction Scale (DASS. Results The quality of life perception of the patients studied, based on both the DASS and the SF36, was positive regarding the treatment with oral anticoagulant. The SF36 presented an average score of 62.2 (± 20.0. Among the SF36 evaluated domains, the physical-emotional aspect was the most compromised one regarding life quality perception. The DASS presented an average score of 67.1 (± 18.2 and the domain presenting a greater compromise was the one related to the treatment inconveniences (annoyances, burdens and obligations. Previous hemorrhagic event, comorbidities, drug interactions with medicines that increase the anticoagulant effect, lower education level in the SF36 and younger age group influence a more negative perception of the quality of life, whereas lower education level in the DASS and the duration of treatment for more than 1 year offer a more positive perception. Conclusion Patients seen at the anticoagulation outpatient

  18. Cost-justification of a clinical pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, David R; Garabedian-Ruffalo, Susan M; Chretien, Steven D

    2007-03-01

    A cost-benefit evaluation of a clinical pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic (AC) was performed. Outpatient and hospital records were examined for 26 patients in the treatment group with an AC clinic and 26 patients in the control group. Therapeutic prothrombin times were maintained within the treatment group to a significantly greater extent than within the control group (ppharmacist-managed AC was effective in maintaining therapeutic prothrombin times, and reducing the incidence of hospitalizations resulting from anticoagulation complications, and can be cost-justified based on a cost-benefit analysis. PMID:17341522

  19. [The preparation of a patient with long-term anticoagulant cumarin treatment for invasive surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penka, M; Buliková, A; Gumulec, J; Matýsková, M; Smejkal, P; Kissová, J; Slechtová, M; Chlupová, G

    2006-03-01

    Coumarins belong to drugs widely used and the spectrum of their use is going to grow. From this point of view and/or because the coumarins are adminstrated in patients who are treated for the other diseases--medical or surgical--at the same time, it is necessary to modify, interrupt or replace peroral anticoagulant treatment in the dependence on various aspects. It requires to compound different algorithms for given situations solution. It is always to decide, if the situation is imperative from the view of solution planed, what risk brings proposed treatment and what is the risk of anticoagulant treatment modification. PMID:16637448

  20. Concurrent use of tramadol and oral vitamin K antagonists and the risk of excessive anticoagulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Meegaard, P. M.; Holck, L. H.;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective was to assess whether the concurrent use of tramadol and vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) leads to an increased risk of excessive anticoagulation. DESIGN: The study was designed as a case-control study, nested within users of VKA and with tramadol use as our main exposure. We......). SUBJECTS: Both cases and controls were selected from users of VKA. Cases were defined by being hospitalised with a main diagnosis indicating excessive anticoagulation. For each case, we selected 15 controls among VKA users, matched by age and sex. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Odds ratio for experiencing excessive...

  1. Total thyroidectomy with ultrasonic dissector for cancer: multicentric experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cirocchi Roberto

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We conducted an observational multicentric clinical study on a cohort of patients undergoing thyroidectomy for thyroid carcinoma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the benefits of the use of ultrasonic dissector (UAS vs. the use of a conventional technique (vessel clamp and tie in patients undergoing thyroid surgery for cancer. Methods From June 2009 to May 2010 we evaluated 321 consecutive patients electively admitted to undergo total thyroidectomy for thyroid carcinoma. The first 201 patients (89 males, 112 females presenting to our Department underwent thyroidectomy with the use of UAS while the following 120 patients (54 males, 66 females underwent thyroidectomy performed with a conventional technique (CT: vessel clamp and tie. Results The operative time (mean: 75 min in UAS vs. 113 min in CT, range: 54 to 120 min in UAS vs. 68 to 173 min in CT was much shorter in the group of thyroidectomies performed with UAS. The incidence of transient laryngeal nerve palsy (UAS 3/201 patients (1.49%; CT 1/120 patients (0.83% was higher in the group of UAS; the incidence of permanent laryngeal nerve palsy was similar in the two groups (UAS 2/201 patients (0.99% vs. CT 2/120 patients (1.66%. The incidence of transient hypocalcaemia (UAS 17/201 patients (8.4% vs. CT 9/120 patients (7.5% was higher in the UAS group; no relevant differences were reported in the incidence of permanent hypocalcaemia in the two groups (UAS 5/201 patients (2.48% vs. 2/120 patients (1.66%. Also the average postoperative length of stay was similar in two groups (2 days. Conclusion The only significant advantage proved by this study is represented by the cost-effectiveness (reduction of the usage of operating room for patients treated with UAS, secondary to the significant reduction of the operative time. The analysis failed to show any advantages in terms of postoperative transient complications in the group of patients treated with ultrasonic

  2. E-learning in radiology: An Italian multicentre experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    the band speed and technology of the Internet connection. Conclusions: Technological evolution is overcoming all barriers, and technology is also having a positive impact on the approach to teaching. Our multicentre teaching experience merits the following considerations: the quality of the teaching product was certified by the students’ judgements of its didactic content and the quality of reception; the economic cost of the teaching had a minimal impact on the post-graduate schools (€ 18 per lesson). In terms of breaking down national barriers, it is to be hoped that the coordination and integration of diagnostic imaging e-learning projects, with the participation of post-graduate schools in different European countries, can be developed not only in a spirit of “cultural sharing” and the exchange of teaching experiences.

  3. E-learning in radiology: An Italian multicentre experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carriero, A., E-mail: profcarriero@virgilio.it [Istituto di Radiologia Diagnostica ed Interventistica, AOU Maggiore della Carità, Corso Mazzini 18, 28100 Novara (Italy); Bonomo, L., E-mail: lbonomo@rm.unicatt.it [Istituto di Radiologia, Università Cattolica del S.Cuore, Largo Gemelli 8, 00168 Roma (Italy); Calliada, F., E-mail: f.calliada@smatteo.pv.it [Istituto di Radiologia c/o IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Ospedale Generale Regionale, Piazzale Golgi 27100, Pavia (Italy); Campioni, P., E-mail: paolo.campioni@unife.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Chirurgiche, Radiologiche e Anestesiologiche, Sezione di Diagnostica per Immagini, Università di Ferrara Corso della Giovecca No. 203, 44100, Ferrara (Italy); Colosimo, C., E-mail: colosimo@rm.unicatt.it [Istituto di Radiologia, Università Cattolica del S.Cuore, Largo Gemelli 8, 00168 Roma (Italy); Cotroneo, A., E-mail: ar.cotroneo@rad.unich.it [Istituto di Radiologia, Università degli Studi Di Chieti (Italy); Cova, M., E-mail: cova@gnbts.univ.trieste.it [UCO di Radiologia, Ospedale di Cattinara, Strada di Fiume 447, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Ettorre, G.C., E-mail: g.ettorre@unict.it [Dip. Materno-Infantile e Scienze Radiologiche, Az. Ospedaliero-Universitaria Policlinico, Via S. Sofia 86, 95123 Catania (Italy); Fugazzola, C., E-mail: carlo.fugazzola@uninsubria.it [Dipartimento di Radiologia Ospedale Di Circolo, Viale Borri, No. 57, 21100, Varese (Italy); Garlaschi, G., E-mail: giacomog@unige.it [Dipartimento di Medicina interna e Specialità mediche (DIMI) Via L.B. Alberti, 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Macarini, L., E-mail: l.macarini@unifg.it [Radiologia Universitaria Ospedali Riuniti di Foggia, Viale Pinto, No. 1, 71100, Foggia (Italy); and others

    2012-12-15

    the band speed and technology of the Internet connection. Conclusions: Technological evolution is overcoming all barriers, and technology is also having a positive impact on the approach to teaching. Our multicentre teaching experience merits the following considerations: the quality of the teaching product was certified by the students’ judgements of its didactic content and the quality of reception; the economic cost of the teaching had a minimal impact on the post-graduate schools (€ 18 per lesson). In terms of breaking down national barriers, it is to be hoped that the coordination and integration of diagnostic imaging e-learning projects, with the participation of post-graduate schools in different European countries, can be developed not only in a spirit of “cultural sharing” and the exchange of teaching experiences.

  4. Primary multicentric angiosarcoma of bone: true entity or metastases from an unknown primary? Value of comparative genomic hybridization on paraffin embedded tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Juliette Thariat; Isabelle Peyrottes; Frédéric Chibon; Maxime Benchetrit; Esma Saada; Lauris Gastaud; Olivier Dassonville; Antoine Iannessi; Antione Thyss

    2013-01-01

    Multicentric primary angiosarcoma of bone has been described as a distinct entity from bone metastases from angiosarcoma. Bone angiosarcoma accounts for less than 1% of sarcomas. It has dismal prognosis overall, but the multicentric expression does not confer worse prognosis. We describe the case of an old male with bone angiosarcoma of the extremities with multicentric presentation. He soon after had soft tissue angiosarcoma of the head and neck. Histology and immunohistochemistry were consi...

  5. Anticoagulation in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension: An update on current knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldan, Tamara; Landzberg, Michael J; Deicicchi, David J; Atay, Julie K; Waxman, Aaron B

    2016-02-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a severe clinical condition characterized by molecular and anatomic changes in pulmonary circulation. It is associated with increased pulmonary vascular resistance, which leads to right-sided heart failure if left untreated and, ultimately, death. Treatment of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) involves a complex strategy that takes into consideration disease severity, general and supportive measures, and combination drug regimens. Abnormalities of blood coagulation factors, anti-thrombotic factors, and the fibrinolytic system may contribute to a prothrombotic state in patients with idiopathic PAH. These physiologic changes, in concert with the presence of non-specific risk factors for venous thromboembolism such as heart failure and immobility, are thought to be the basis for oral anticoagulation in PAH. Several observational studies provide helpful information in favor of anticoagulation use in idiopathic PAH but not in other pulmonary hypertension etiologies. Guideline recommendations are based on the lack of prospective comparative trials in this regard. For that reason, large differences exist in the use of anticoagulants in different countries and centers. More studies should be carried out to clarify the risks and the potential benefits of anticoagulant use in a heterogeneous population of patients who are already at considerable life risk. PMID:26527532

  6. Purification and characterization of an anticoagulant oligopeptide from Whitmania pigra Whitman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobei Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dried Whitmania pigra is used for the treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases in traditional Chinese medicine and hot water and alcohol extracts also have anticogulant activity. However, a lower molecular weight and more stable anticogulant is needed. Objective: The objective of the following study is to purify and characterize of an anticoagulant oligopeptide from Hirudo (Whitmania pigra Whitman. Materials and Methods: Gel filtration on Sephadex G 50, ion exchange on diethylaminoethyl cellulose, and semi prepared high performance liquid chromatography were used to purify Hirudo. Automated coagulation analyzer was used for evaluating anticoagulant activity. Molecular weight was measured by Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry. Amino acid sequence of the oligopeptide was measured by amino acid sequence analyzer. Results: A new anticoagulant, named whitide, isolated from Hirudo was purified, with a molecular weight 1997.1 Da. Amino acid sequence of the oligopeptide was identified as Gly-Pro-ALa-Gly-Hyp-Val-Gly-Ala-Hyp-Gly-Gly-Hyp-Gly-Val-Arg-Gly-Leu-Hyp-Gly-Asp-Arg-Gly. The results revealed that its amino acid sequence had strong homology to various types of collagen. Conclusion: Whitide might be an orally anticoagulant for its hot and trypsin stable.

  7. CT Findings of Acute Pulmonary Thromboembolism as a Predictor of the Response to Anticoagulant Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the CT findings of an acute pulmonary thromboembolism for the prediction of response to anticoagulant therapy. Forty-eight patients diagnosed with a pulmonary embolism underwent anticoagulant therapy, and underwent pre- and post-treatment CT scans, were selected to be part of the study. Pre-treatment CT scans were retrospectively reviewed for the number and degree of emboli, right ventricular to left ventricular (RV/LV) diameter ratio, pulmonary arterial to aorta (PA/aorta) diameter ratio, ventricular septal bowing, consolidation, mosaic perfusion, and pleural effusion. The response to anticoagulant therapy was assessed by a change in embolic burden on pre-and post-treatment CT scans. The 48 patients were divided into two groups: good responder and poor responder. The pre-treatment CT findings were compared by group to determine if there were any differences in the CT findings. Thirty patients were categorized as good responders (62.5%) and eighteen patients as poor responders (37.5%). A pleura-based wedge-shaped consolidation was observed in 9 of 18 cases (50%) from the poor responder group and one of 30 (3%) cases from the good responder group. The comparison of the finding by group was found to be significantly different (p<0.001). No other CT findings were significantly different between the good and poor responders. The pre-treatment CT scans of patients with acute pulmonary embolism indicate that pleurabased wedge-shaped consolidations can predict a poor response to anticoagulant therapy

  8. Lupus anticoagulant : performance of the tests as recommended by the latest ISTH guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swadzba, J.; Iwaniec, T.; Pulka, M.; De Laat, B.; De Groot, P. G.; Musial, J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Lupus anticoagulant (LA) is clinically the most relevant among all antiphospholipid antibody tests. Recently, new guidelines for LA detection were published. The objective of this retrospective cohort study was to compare tests recommended under these guidelines with other methods used f

  9. [Treatment standards of the oral anticoagulant in patients with idiopathic pulmonary embolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Zbigniew; Kowalski, Piotr; Grzegorek, Damian

    2016-08-01

    The optimal and the most effective treatment of pulmonary embolism is still a matter of concern and each day sees a new set of challenges for the world of medicine. The progress, has been made in recent years, improved quality of life and caused much better treatment results. This is difficult issue in patients, receiving anticoagulant therapy, because they require an individual approach and adjustability to the therapeutic possibilities. The benefits of long-term anticoagulant therapy, which decreases relapses of idiopathic venous thromboembolism and diminishes risk of thromboembolic complications, should be taking under consideration. It is still a matter of dispute the time of carrying out of treatment, especially after the first life idiopathic episode of pulmonary embolism. The purpose of this paper is an overview and a summary of the foregoing achievements concerned the standards of idiopathic pulmonary embolism treatment, expecting benefits flowing with using new oral anticoagulants, as an alternative to known for decades Vitamin K antagonist drugs. A lot of information about new oral anticoagulants speaks in favor of their use, but unknown safety of the drugs caused searching the best strategy of pulmonary embolism treatment all the time. PMID:27591448

  10. Nebulized anticoagulants limit pulmonary coagulopathy, but not inflammation, in a model of experimental lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstra, Jorrit J; Vlaar, Alexander P; Cornet, Alexander D; Dixon, Barry; Roelofs, Joris J; Choi, Goda; van der Poll, Tom; Levi, Marcel; Schultz, Marcus J

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary coagulopathy may contribute to an adverse outcome in lung injury. We assessed the effects of local anticoagulant therapy on bronchoalveolar and systemic haemostasis in a rat model of endotoxemia-induced lung injury. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were intravenously challenge

  11. Nebulized Anticoagulants Limit Pulmonary Coagulopathy, But Not Inflammation, in a Model of Experimental Lung Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Hofstra; A.P. Vlaar; A.D. Cornet; B. Dixon; J.J. Roelofs; G. Choi; T. van der Poll; M. Levi; M.J. Schultz

    2010-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary coagulopathy may contribute to an adverse outcome in lung injury. We assessed the effects of local anticoagulant therapy on bronchoalveolar and systemic haemostasis in a rat model of endotoxemia-induced lung injury. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were intravenously challenge

  12. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulation usage according to age among patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staerk, Laila; Fosbøl, Emil Loldrup; Gadsbøll, Kasper;

    2016-01-01

    Among atrial fibrillation (AF) patients, Danish nationwide registries (2011-2015) were used to examine temporal trends of initiation patterns of oral anticoagulation (OAC) treatment according to age. Overall, 43,299 AF patients initiating vitamin K antagonists (VKA) (42%), dabigatran (29%), rivar...

  13. Antimicrobial and anticoagulant activities of the spine of stingray Himantura imbricata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kaliyamoorthy Kalidasan; Velayudham Ravi; Sunil Kumar Sahu; Murugan Lakshmi Maheshwaran; Kathiresan Kandasamy

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To study the spine structure of stingray Himantura imbricata (H. imbricata) and to evaluate the anticoagulant properties of the spine extract obtained through various solvents extracts followed by antibacterial activity against human pathogens. Methods:Spines of H. imbricata were collected from Nagappattinam coast, Tamil Nadu, India and their spines were observed under the light microscope. The grounded spines were subjected to extraction of metabolites using methanol, ethanol, chloroform and acetone. Antibacterial activity was evaluated by disc diffusion technique against 10 human pathogens. Similarly, anticoagulant activity was also assessed by following United States Pharmacopeia method. Results:Light microscopic observation of spine revealed that the venom apparatus of the stingray H. imbricata consisted of two to three spines, glandular tissue and a sheath. The spine extract showed potent antibacterial activity against all tested pathogen. Maximum activity (14 mm) was found against Staphylococcus aureus. Crude extract showed 91.50 USP units/mg of anticoagulant activity. Conclusions: Microscopic observations gave new insight about the spine structure of the stingray. The spine extracts of H. imbricate showed potent activity against human pathogens revealed by the good zone of inhibition. Chloroform extracts conferred the most prominent antibacterial activity. The anticoagulant activity was also comparable with that of standard heparin.

  14. Inhibition of adhesion breast cancer cells by anticoagulant drugs and cimetidine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bobek, V.; Boubelík, Michael; Kovařík, J.; Taltynov, O.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 2 (2003), s. 148-151. ISSN 0028-2685 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : cimetidine * breast cancer * anticoagulants Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.782, year: 2003

  15. Effect of anticoagulation on cardioembolic stroke severity, outcomes and response to intravenous thrombolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illán-Gala, Ignacio; Martínez-Sánchez, Patricia; Fuentes, Blanca; Llamas-Osorio, Yudy; Díaz de Terán, Javier; Báez, Melissa; Ruiz-Ares, Gerardo; Sanz-Cuesta, Borja Enrique; Lara-Lara, Manuel; Díez-Tejedor, Exuperio

    2016-07-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the effect of anticoagulation on cardioembolic stroke (CS) severity, outcomes, and response to intravenous thrombolysis (IVT). Observational study of CS patients admitted to a Stroke Center (2010-2013). The sample was classified into three groups based on pre-stroke oral anticoagulants (OAC) treatment (all acenocumarol) and the international normalized ratio (INR) on admission: (1) non-anticoagulated or anticoagulated patients with INR mRS). Overall 475 patients were included, 47.2 % male, mean age 75.5 (SD 10.7) years old, 31.8 % were on OAC. 76 % belonged to the INR 2. 35 %of patients received IVT. Multivariate analyses showed that an INR ≥2 on admission was a factor associated with a higher probability of mild stroke (NIHSS mRS ≤2). OAC was not related to stroke outcomes in the subgroup of IVT patients. Therapeutic OAC levels are associated with lesser CS severity, and prior OAC treatment with favorable outcomes. In this study, OAC are not related with response to IVT. PMID:26860861

  16. Home management of oral anticoagulation via telemedicine versus conventional hospital-based treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henry; Lauterlein, Jens-Jacob; Sørensen, Patricia D;

    2011-01-01

    We have developed an expert computer system for the control of oral anticoagulation therapy, accessible by the patients via their own computer. To investigate if the weekly measurement and dosing of international normalized ratio (INR) at home using the online Internet-based system was superior to...

  17. Hemorrhagic complications of anticoagulant treatment: the Seventh ACCP Conference on Antithrombotic and Thrombolytic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Mark N; Raskob, Gary; Beyth, Rebecca J; Kearon, Clive; Schulman, Sam

    2004-09-01

    This chapter about hemorrhagic complications of anticoagulant treatment is part of the seventh ACCP Conference on Antithrombotic and Thrombolytic Therapy: Evidence Based Guidelines. Bleeding is the major complication of anticoagulant therapy. The criteria for defining the severity of bleeding varies considerably between studies, accounting in part for the variation in the rates of bleeding reported. The major determinants of vitamin K antagonist-induced bleeding are the intensity of the anticoagulant effect, underlying patient characteristics, and the length of therapy. There is good evidence that vitamin K antagonist therapy, targeted international normalized ratio (INR) of 2.5 (range, 2.0 to 3.0), is associated with a lower risk of bleeding than therapy targeted at an INR > 3.0. The risk of bleeding associated with IV unfractionated heparin (UFH) in patients with acute venous thromboembolism (VTE) is 70 years). Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is associated with less major bleeding compared with UFH in acute VTE. UFH and LMWH are not associated with an increase in major bleeding in ischemic coronary syndromes, but are associated with an increase in major bleeding in ischemic stroke. Information on bleeding associated with the newer generation of antithrombotic agents has begun to emerge. In terms of treatment decision making for anticoagulant therapy, bleeding risk cannot be considered alone, ie, the potential decrease in thromboembolism must be balanced against the potential increased bleeding risk. PMID:15383476

  18. Multiresidue Analysis of Seven Anticoagulant Rodenticides by high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mice and rat populations are commonly controlled by two classes of rodenticide anticoagulants, coumarins and indandiones. However, poisoning of nontarget animals also often occurs. For cases such as these, a rapid, multi-residue method, which provides positive confirmation for both classes of antico...

  19. MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS ON ANTICOAGULANT THERAPY UNDERGOING DENTAL SURGICAL PROCEDURES. Review Article.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atanaska Dinkova

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dental treatment performed in patients receiving oral anticoagulant drug therapy is becoming increasingly common in dental offices.The aim of oral anticoagulant therapy is to reduce blood coagulability to an optimal therapeutic range within which the patient is provided some degree of protection from thromboembolic events. This is achieved at the cost of a minor risk of haemorrhage. Frequently raised questions concern the safety and efficacy of the various anticoagulation regimens and their accompanying thromboembolic and bleeding risks relative to invasive dental procedures.The aim of this literature review is to evaluate the available evidence on the impact of anticoagulant medications on dental treatment and highlight certain patient management issues closely interrelated to various aspects of dental treatment. For that purpose literature search in the electronic database of Medscape, Pubmed-Medline, Science Direct, and EBSCO host, in the data base of Medical University Plovdiv and specialised published books in general medicine and dentistry was made.A total of 33 publications between 1995 and 2013 were identified: 12 review articles, 11 randomized controlled and non-randomised studies, 6 guidelines and practical guides, 1 meta-analysis and 3 specialised books.

  20. A simple method to discriminate between beta(2)-glycoprotein I- and prothrombin-dependent lupus anticoagulants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simmelink, MJA; Derksen, RHWM; Arnout, J; De Groot, PG

    2003-01-01

    Lupus anticoagulants (LAC) are a heterogeneous group of autoantibodies that prolong phospholipid-dependent clotting assays. The autoantibodies that cause LAC activity are predominantly directed against beta(2)-glycoprotein I (beta(2)GPI) or prothrombin. In the present study, we describe a method to

  1. Pleiotropic effects of factor Xa and thrombin : what to expect from novel anticoagulants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spronk, Henri M. H.; de Jong, Anne Margreet; Crijns, Harry J.; Schotten, Ulrich; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.; ten Cate, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Factor Xa and thrombin are well-known components of the coagulation cascade and have been proven to be viable targets for effective anticoagulation treatment. However, accumulating evidence suggests that these serine proteases are also crucial modulators of other cellular mechanisms through the acti

  2. The safety and efficacy of regional citrate anticoagulation in sustained low efficiency dialysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张凌

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety and efficacy of regional citrate anticoagulation in sustained low efficiency dialysis (SLED) .Methods A total of 45 patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) or end stage renal disease (ESRD) admitted in our hospital from August 2011 to

  3. Low anticoagulant heparin oligosaccharides as inhibitors of BACE-1, the Alzheimer's β-secretase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Zhao, Xiaoliang; Lang, Yinzhi; Li, Qinying; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Cai, Chao; Hao, Jiejie; Li, Guoyun; Yu, Guangli

    2016-10-20

    Heparin (HP) is a promising agent for anti-Alzheimer's disease (AD), but its anticoagulant activity limits its applications. So a low anticoagulant heparin (LAH) with anti-AD effect is needed. A novel LAH and heparan sulfate (HS) were purified from crude porcine intestinal heparin. Their structures were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. LAH had a relatively high degree of sulfation, but lower than that of HP. 3-O-Sulfated-containing glucosamine residues further confirmed the low anticoagulant activity of LAH. Sixteen oligosaccharides of LAH and HS were prepared and assigned. Evaluation of anti-BACE-1 activities suggested that their potencies were positively correlated with degree of sulfation and polymerization of oligosaccharides. Besides, LAH-derived hexa- to dodecasaccharides was promised to be administrated in vitro as BACE-1 inhibitors. This study presented ideal BACE-1 inhibitors, LAH-derived oligosaccharides, with virtually no anticoagulant activities, which were promised to be excellent leads for treatment of AD. PMID:27474542

  4. Antimicrobial and anticoagulant activities of the spine of stingray Himantura imbricata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaliyamoorthy Kalidasan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the spine structure of stingray Himantura imbricata (H. imbricata and to evaluate the anticoagulant properties of the spine extract obtained through various solvents extracts followed by antibacterial activity against human pathogens. Methods: Spines of H. imbricata were collected from Nagappattinam coast, Tamil Nadu, India and their spines were observed under the light microscope. The grounded spines were subjected to extraction of metabolites using methanol, ethanol, chloroform and acetone. Antibacterial activity was evaluated by disc diffusion technique against 10 human pathogens. Similarly, anticoagulant activity was also assessed by following United States Pharmacopeia method. Results: Light microscopic observation of spine revealed that the venom apparatus of the stingray H. imbricata consisted of two to three spines, glandular tissue and a sheath. The spine extract showed potent antibacterial activity against all tested pathogen. Maximum activity (14 mm was found against Staphylococcus aureus. Crude extract showed 91.50 USP units/mg of anticoagulant activity. Conclusions: Microscopic observations gave new insight about the spine structure of the stingray. The spine extracts of H. imbricate showed potent activity against human pathogens revealed by the good zone of inhibition. Chloroform extracts conferred the most prominent antibacterial activity. The anticoagulant activity was also comparable with that of standard heparin.

  5. Comprehensive characterization of anticoagulant rodenticides in sludge by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Canela, Cristian; Lacorte, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    The occurrence of 10 commonly used anticoagulant rodenticides in centrifuged sludge of 27 wastewater treatment plants was evaluated using solid-liquid extraction (SLE) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Activated carbon, alumina, and Florisil cartridges with methanol/dichloromethane as eluting solvents were tested in combination with primary-secondary amine (PSA) to optimize an efficient sample cleanup. PSA in combination with Florisil was the best methodology to extract anticoagulant rodenticides in sludge providing recoveries between 42 ± 0.5 and 100 ± 2 %. Warfarin, bromadiolone, ferulenol, and coumachlor were the most ubiquitous compounds in sludge at concentrations up to 84.2 ng g(-1) for the latter. Coumatetralyl, dicoumarol, and brodifacoum were detected sporadically at levels between 6.1 and 17.4 ng g(-1). On the contrary, acenocoumarol, difenacoum, and flocoumafen were not detected in any sample. Finally, we estimated the amount of anticoagulant rodenticides discharged via sludge in order to determine the potential impact to agricultural soil according to different sludge usage practices in the region investigated. This study demonstrates that anticoagulant rodenticides are accumulated in sludge during activated sludge treatment and that the application of sludge as fertilizers may pose a future environmental risk, if not controlled. PMID:27146526

  6. Accumulation of anticoagulant rodenticides in a non-target insectivore, the European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowding, Claire V., E-mail: claire.dowding@naturalengland.org.u [School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol, Woodland Road, Bristol BS8 1UG (United Kingdom); Shore, Richard F.; Worgan, Andrew [NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Baker, Philip J.; Harris, Stephen [School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol, Woodland Road, Bristol BS8 1UG (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    Studies on exposure of non-targets to anticoagulant rodenticides have largely focussed on predatory birds and mammals; insectivores have rarely been studied. We investigated the exposure of 120 European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) from throughout Britain to first- and second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides (FGARs and SGARs) using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence detection (HPLC) and liquid-chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS). The proportion of hedgehogs with liver SGAR concentrations detected by HPLC was 3-13% per compound, 23% overall. LCMS identified much higher prevalence for difenacoum and bromadiolone, mainly because of greater ability to detect low-level contamination. The overall proportion of hedgehogs with LCMS-detected residues was 57.5% (SGARs alone) and 66.7% (FGARs and SGARs combined); 27 (22.5%) hedgehogs contained >1 rodenticide. Exposure of insectivores and predators to anticoagulant rodenticides appears to be similar. The greater sensitivity of LCMS suggests that hitherto exposure of non-targets is likely to have been under-estimated using HPLC techniques. - Exposure of insectivorous hedgehogs to anticoagulant rodenticides in Britain is similar to predatory birds and mammals that specialise in eating small mammals, and hitherto exposure levels have been under-estimated using HPLC techniques.

  7. Progressive thrombosis after treatment of diffuse large cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and concomitant lupus anticoagulant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keung, Y K; Cobos, E; Meyerrose, G E; Roberson, G H

    1996-01-01

    We report a case of diffuse large cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with concomitant lupus anticoagulant at initial diagnosis. Progressive thrombosis occurred despite radiologically proven response of the lymphoma after chemotherapy treatment. Extraordinary bone scintigraphy with multiple "cold" lesions probably due to bone ischemia is described. PMID:8624478

  8. Enhancing patient care via a pharmacist-managed rural anticoagulation clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Cindy; Lacombe, Guy

    2009-01-01

    Integrating specialized pharmacist services and follow-up with the laboratory, home care nursing, retail pharmacy and physicians can ensure optimal outcomes for patients receiving anticoagulation, or "blood thinner," therapy. Improved patient education and discharge care planning can bridge disconnects, enable patients to better manage their care and ensure better patient outcomes and more effective use of health system resources. Specially trained pharmacists can provide safe and effective management of a high-alert medication to help prevent potentially life-threatening clots or bleeding. With advanced prescribing authorization, the pharmacist can seamlessly provide this service both locally in a community and via Telehealth to surrounding areas, potentially for any Albertan. Warfarin therapy may be lifelong or short-term (three to six months), but all patients require regular monitoring with blood tests. Many variables, both lifestyle and medication related, can impact therapy, and through extensive education and access via telephone to an "expert" for questions and follow-up of blood tests, patients are empowered to better regulate their anticoagulants. Anticoagulation pharmacists, as part of an AMS (anticoagulation management service), can provide a continuum of care for patients while in hospital, when discharged home, as an outpatient in the community or as a resident of a long-term care facility or seniors' home. PMID:20057253

  9. Intracerebral hemorrhage during treatment with oral anticoagulants. Risk factors, therapy and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernestus, R I; Speder, B; Pakos, P; Hildebrandt, G; Klug, N

    1994-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) during oral anticoagulation is a serious complication, which is mostly fatal for the multimorbid patient. In the present retrospective study of 53 patients with ICH during treatment with a cumarin derivative (Phenoprocoumon, Marcumar), we investigated the relationship between therapy and preexisting parameters such as age, location, level of consciousness, additional bleeding risks, and the degree of anticoagulation, which were assumed to be of prognostic relevance. The therapeutic management of ICH during treatment with anticoagulants was determined predominantly by location of the hematoma, patient's age, and additional bleeding risks, but less by level of consciousness and initial thromboplastin time (Quick's test). As a consequence of the individual analysis of these 5 parameters, age over 60 years, location of hematoma in the midline or ventricles, coma, additional bleeding risks such as arterial hypertension and trauma, and Quick's test below 15% at the time of bleeding were supposed to be responsible for poor prognosis. Mortality increased with a rising number of poor prognostic factors, independently of surgical or conservative treatment. In consequence, prognosis of ICH during oral anticoagulation is predominantly influenced by the number of such disadvantageous indicators and only little by therapy. PMID:8053274

  10. Does small mammal prey guild affect the exposure of predators to anticoagulant rodenticides?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ireland has a restricted small mammal prey guild but still includes species most likely to consume anticoagulant rodenticide (AR) baits. This may enhance secondary exposure of predators to ARs. We compared liver AR residues in foxes (Vulpes vulpes) in Northern Ireland (NI) with those in foxes from Great Britain which has a more diverse prey guild but similar agricultural use of ARs. Liver ARs were detected in 84% of NI foxes, more than in a comparable sample of foxes from Scotland and similar to that of suspected AR poisoned animals from England and Wales. High exposure in NI foxes is probably due to greater predation of commensal rodents and non-target species most likely to take AR baits, and may also partly reflect greater exposure to highly persistent brodifacoum and flocoumafen. High exposure is likely to enhance risk and Ireland may be a sentinel for potential effects on predator populations. - Highlights: → Exposure of a predator to anticoagulant rodenticides was compared in Britain and Ireland. → Exposure was higher in Ireland. → Differences driven by small mammal prey guilds. → Ireland a potential sentinel for predator exposure to anticoagulants. - Restriction of the small mammal prey guild is associated with enhanced exposure of predators to anticoagulant rodenticides.

  11. Novel Oral Anticoagulants for Stroke Prophylaxis and Venous Thromboembolism Prevention and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laith G. Alsayegh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs are becoming popular management options for stroke prophylaxis in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation as well as deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism treatment and prophylaxis. NOACs have similar efficacy to warfarin along with noninferior safety profiles. Patient comorbidities, size, renal and hepatic function, and concomitant drug regimen play a role in which NOAC a physician may choose.

  12. Novel Oral Anticoagulants for Stroke Prophylaxis and Venous Thromboembolism Prevention and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Laith G. Alsayegh

    2015-01-01

    Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are becoming popular management options for stroke prophylaxis in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation as well as deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism treatment and prophylaxis. NOACs have similar efficacy to warfarin along with noninferior safety profiles. Patient comorbidities, size, renal and hepatic function, and concomitant drug regimen play a role in which NOAC a physician may choose.

  13. Evolving Treatments for Arterial and Venous Thrombosis: Role of the Direct Oral Anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Noel C; Eikelboom, John W; Weitz, Jeffrey I

    2016-04-29

    The direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) represent a major advance in oral anticoagulant therapy and have replaced the vitamin K antagonists as the preferred treatment for many indications. By simplifying long-term anticoagulant therapy and improving its safety, the DOACs have the potential to reduce the global burden of thrombosis. Postmarketing studies suggest that the favorable results achieved with DOACs in the randomized controlled trials can be readily translated into practice, but highlight the need for appropriate patient, drug and dose selection, and careful follow-up. Leveraging on their success to date, ongoing studies are assessing the utility of DOACs for the prevention of thrombosis in patients with embolic stroke of unknown source, heart failure, coronary artery disease, peripheral artery disease, antiphospholipid syndrome, and cancer. The purpose of this article is to (1) review the pharmacology of the DOACs, (2) describe the advantages of the DOACs over vitamin K antagonists, (3) summarize the experience with the DOACs in established indications, (4) highlight current challenges and limitations, (5) highlight potential new indications; and (6) identify future directions for anticoagulant therapy. PMID:27126650

  14. Papillary tumor of the pineal region: report of a rapidly progressive tumor with possible multicentric origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Takashi S. [University of Iowa, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); Kirby, Patricia A. [University of Iowa, Department of Pathology, Iowa City, IA (United States); Buatti, John M. [University of Iowa, Department of Radiation Oncology, Iowa City, IA (United States); Moritani, Toshio [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2009-02-15

    Papillary tumor of the pineal region (PTPR) is an uncommon tumor recently added to the WHO classification of CNS tumors. We report a case of PTPR in a young boy that was noteworthy for early CSF dissemination and relentless progression. In spite of intensive chemotherapy and comprehensive radiotherapy, the boy died. The neuroimaging appearance is unique with possible multicentric origin of the tumor and intense uptake of {sup 111}In-DTPA-pentetreotide. (orig.)

  15. Generalised sensory system abnormalities in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a European multicentre study.

    OpenAIRE

    Pugdahl, K.; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, Anders; Carvalho, Mamede de; Johnsen, B.; Fawcett, Peter,; Labarre-Vila, Annick; Liguori, Rocco; Nix, W A; Schofield, I S

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is defined as a disease of the motor neurones, although several studies indicate involvement of the sensory nervous system. AIM: To evaluate the sensory nerve conduction studies (NCS) in 88 patients with ALS as part of a European multicentre study. METHODS: Seven European clinical neurophysiologists examined consecutive series of ALS patients. The examinations were peer reviewed, and the diagnosis of ALS was confirmed clinically. RESULTS: 20 (22...

  16. Prostaglandin E2 gel for cervical ripening and labour induction: a multicentre placebo-controlled trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Bernstein, P.

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of a single intracervical dose of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) gel on cervical ripening and the need for subsequent labour induction with oxytocin. DESIGN: Multicentre randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. SETTING: Tertiary care hospitals. PATIENTS: A total of 397 women met the inclusion criteria: gestational age of at least 36 weeks, parity of 3 or less, a Bishop score of 4 or less, intact membranes, an indication for induction, no contraindication...

  17. Use of a viewdata system to collect data from a multicentre clinical trial in anaesthesia.

    OpenAIRE

    Waldron, H. A.; Cookson, R F

    1984-01-01

    The interactive electronic information storage and transmission system PRESTEL was assessed as a method of recording and collecting patient record forms from a multicentre trial in anaesthesia. PRESTEL terminals were provided in anaesthetic centres around Britain and all data handled by this public viewdata service, which connects users by telephone to a central computer. The trial was of a new analgesic supplement, alfentanil, and confirmed more rapid recovery of patients as compared with th...

  18. A double blind multicentre study of OM-8980 and auranofin in rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Vischer, T L

    1988-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of the immunomodulator OM-8980 in rheumatoid arthritis was compared with that of auranofin, an oral gold salt, in a double blind, randomised multicentre study lasting six months. Seventy patients were treated with auranofin and 75 with OM-8980. The patients of both groups improved significantly at three and six months for all the clinical parameters observed: Ritchie index, number of swollen joints, morning stiffness, pain, grip strength, intake of non-steroidal anti-...

  19. Developing, delivering and documenting rehabilitation in a multi-centre randomised controlled surgical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Handoll, H. H. G.; Goodchild, L; Brealey, S. D.; Hanchard, N. C. A.; Jefferson, L.; Keding, A; Rangan, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives A rigorous approach to developing, delivering and documenting rehabilitation within randomised controlled trials of surgical interventions is required to underpin the generation of reliable and usable evidence. This article describes the key processes used to ensure provision of good quality and comparable rehabilitation to all participants of a multi-centre randomised controlled trial comparing surgery with conservative treatment of proximal humeral fractures in adults. Methods Th...

  20. The natural history of adult pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis: a prospective multicentre study

    OpenAIRE

    Tazi, Abdellatif; de Margerie, Constance; Naccache, Jean Marc; Fry, Stéphanie; Dominique, Stéphane; Jouneau, Stéphane; Lorillon, Gwenaël; Bugnet, Emmanuelle; Chiron, Raphael; Wallaert, Benoit; Valeyre, Dominique; Chevret, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Background The natural history of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) has been unclear due to the absence of prospective studies. The rate of patients who experience an early progression of their disease is unknown. Additionally, conflicting effects of smoking cessation on the outcome of PLCH have been reported. Methods In this prospective, multicentre study, 58 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed PLCH were comprehensively evaluated over a two-year period. Our objectives were...

  1. Intensive care for the adult population in Ireland: a multicentre study of intensive care population demographics

    OpenAIRE

    ,

    2008-01-01

    Introduction This prospective observational study was conducted to describe the nature of the intensive care population across Ireland, identify adherence to international benchmarks of practice, and describe patient outcomes in critically ill patients. Methods A prospective observational multicentre study of demographics and organ failure incidence was carried out over a 10-week period in 2006 across the intensive care units (ICUs) of 14 hospitals in both the Republic and Northern Ireland. R...

  2. Short-Course Itraconazole in the Treatment of Candida Vulvovaginitis: A Multicentre Canadian Study

    OpenAIRE

    Canadian Itraconazole Study Group; Austin, Thomas W; Steben, Marc; Powell, Marion; Romanowski, Barbara; Megran, David W; Garber, Gary E.; Margesson, Lynette J

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the clinical and mycological effectiveness of oral itraconazole in the treatment of acute candida vulvovaginitis.DESIGN: A prospective, randomized and single-blinded, multicentre trial of 221 women, comparing a one-day course of oral itraconazole 200 mg bid with vaginal clotrimazole 500 mg single-dose therapy.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Symptoms, signs and mycological results were assessed up to two months following treatment. Adverse events were recorded and evidence of he...

  3. Sucralfate in the treatment and prevention of gastric ulcer: multicentre double blind placebo controlled study.

    OpenAIRE

    Blum, A L; Bethge, H; Bode, J. C.; Domschke, W; Feurle, G; Hackenberg, K.; Hammer, B; Hüttemann, W; Jung, M; Kachel, G

    1990-01-01

    A randomised controlled multicentre trial was performed in 160 patients with gastric ulcer, proved by endoscopy and biopsy, to compare ulcer healing with sucralfate and ranitidine (double blind double dummy design) and to assess the effect of maintenance treatment with sucralfate on ulcer recurrence (double blind placebo controlled design). The healing rates were similar with 4 g sucralfate suspension per day and 300 mg ranitidine per day (82% and 88% after 12 weeks, respectively). Of the 109...

  4. Management of Multicentric Myopericytoma in the Maxillofacial Region: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Fanglong; Sun, Jun; Dong, Jiazeng; Wang, Xiaoyi; Gao, Qinghong

    2013-01-01

    Myopericytoma (MPC) is a rare kind of benign neoplasm, showing derivation from perivascular myoid cells. About 115 cases have been reported in the English literature; however, most of the literature focuses on the description and classification of pathology. The case presented here is that of a 42-year-old woman with a surgical management experience of multicentric MPC in the maxillofacial region. Although small MPC can be completely and easily excised, large MPC, especially in certain anatom...

  5. Patient controlled analgesia with remifentanil versus epidural analgesia in labour: randomised multicentre equivalence trial

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, Liv M; Bloemenkamp, Kitty W; Franssen, Maureen T; Papatsonis, Dimitri N; Hajenius, Petra J.; Hollmann, Markus W.; Woiski, Mallory D; Porath, Martina; Berg, Hans J. van den; van Beek, Erik; Borchert, Odette W H M; Schuitemaker, Nico; Sikkema, J Marko; Kuipers, A.H.M.; Logtenberg, Sabine L M

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine women's satisfaction with pain relief using patient controlled analgesia with remifentanil compared with epidural analgesia during labour. DESIGN: Multicentre randomised controlled equivalence trial. SETTING: 15 hospitals in the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: Women with an intermediate to high obstetric risk with an intention to deliver vaginally. To exclude a clinically relevant difference in satisfaction with pain relief of more than 10%, we needed to include 1136 women....

  6. Scoring and psychometric validation of the Perception of Anticoagulant Treatment Questionnaire (PACT-Q©

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essers B

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 'Perception of Anti-Coagulant Treatment Questionnaire' (PACT-Q was developed to assess patients' expectations of, and satisfaction with their anticoagulant treatment. This questionnaire needs to be finalised and psychometrically validated. Methods The PACT-Q was included in the United States, the Netherlands and France into three phase III multinational clinical trials conducted to evaluate efficacy and safety of a new long-acting anticoagulant drug (idraparinux compared to vitamin K antagonist (VKA. PACT-Q was administered to patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT, atrial fibrillation (AF or pulmonary embolism (PE at Day 1, to assess patients' expectations, and at 3 and 6 months to assess patients' satisfaction and treatment convenience and burden. The final structure of the PACT-Q (Principal Component Analysis – PCA – with Varimax Rotation was first determined and its psychometric properties were then measured with validity of the structure (Multitrait analysis, internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha coefficients and known-group validity. Results PCA and multitrait analyses showed the multidimensionality of the "Treatment Expectations" dimension, comprising 7 items that had to be scored independently. The "Convenience" and "Burden of Disease and Treatment" dimensions of the hypothesised original structure of the questionnaire were combined, thus resulting in 13 items grouped into the single dimension "Convenience". The "Anticoagulant Treatment Satisfaction" dimension remained unchanged and included 7 items. All items of the "Convenience" and "Anticoagulant Treatment Satisfaction" dimensions displayed good convergent and discriminant validity. The internal consistency reliability was good, with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.84 for the "Convenience" dimension, and 0.76 for the "Anticoagulant Treatment Satisfaction" dimension. Known-group validity was good, especially with regard to occurrence of

  7. Clinical impact of a pharmacist-led inpatient anticoagulation service: a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee T

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tiffany Lee, Erin Davis, Jason Kielly School of Pharmacy, Memorial University, St John's, NL, Canada Background: Anticoagulant therapies provide management options for potentially life-threatening thromboembolic conditions. They also carry significant safety risks, requiring careful consideration of medication dose, close monitoring, and follow-up. Inpatients are particularly at risk, considering the widespread use of anticoagulants in hospitals. This has prompted the introduction of safety goals for anticoagulants in Canada and the USA, which recommend increased pharmacist involvement to reduce patient harm. The goal of this review is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pharmacist-led inpatient anticoagulation services compared to usual or physician-managed care. Methods: This narrative review includes articles identified through a literature search of PubMed, Embase, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts databases, as well as hand searches of the references of relevant articles. Full publications of pharmacist-managed inpatient anticoagulation services were eligible if they were published in English and assessed clinical outcomes. Results: Twenty-six studies were included and further divided into two categories: 1 autonomous pharmacist-managed anticoagulation programs (PMAPs and 2 pharmacist recommendation. Pharmacist management of heparin and warfarin appears to result in improvements in some surrogate outcomes (international normalized ratio [INR] stability and time in INR goal range, while results for others are mixed (time to therapeutic INR, length of stay, and activated partial thromboplastin time [aPTT] measures. There is also some indication that PMAPs may be associated with reduced patient mortality. When direct thrombin inhibitors are managed by pharmacists, there seems to be a shorter time to therapeutic aPTT and a greater percentage of time in the therapeutic range, as well as a decrease in the frequency of medication

  8. Emergency management of major bleeding in a case of maxillofacial trauma and anticoagulation: utility of prothrombin complex concentrates in the shock room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Morotti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Life-threatening bleeding in anticoagulation with Warfarin is an emergency challenging issue. Several approaches are available to treat bleeding in either over-anticoagulation or propeanticoagulation, including vitamin K, fresh frozen plasma and prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC administration. In coexisting trauma-induced bleeding and anticoagulation, reversal of anticoagulation must be a rapid and highly effective procedure. Furthermore the appropriate treatment must be directly available in each shock rooms to guarantee the rapid management of the emergency. PCC require a simple storage, rapid accessibility, fast administration procedures and high effectiveness. Here we report the utility of PCC in management of a craniofacial trauma in proper-anticoagulation.

  9. Anticoagulation Management Practices and Outcomes in Elderly Patients with Acute Venous Thromboembolism: A Clinical Research Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlène Insam

    Full Text Available Whether anticoagulation management practices are associated with improved outcomes in elderly patients with acute venous thromboembolism (VTE is uncertain. Thus, we aimed to examine whether practices recommended by the American College of Chest Physicians guidelines are associated with outcomes in elderly patients with VTE. We studied 991 patients aged ≥65 years with acute VTE in a Swiss prospective multicenter cohort study and assessed the adherence to four management practices: parenteral anticoagulation ≥5 days, INR ≥2.0 for ≥24 hours before stopping parenteral anticoagulation, early start with vitamin K antagonists (VKA ≤24 hours of VTE diagnosis, and the use of low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH or fondaparinux. The outcomes were all-cause mortality, VTE recurrence, and major bleeding at 6 months, and the length of hospital stay (LOS. We used Cox regression and lognormal survival models, adjusting for patient characteristics. Overall, 9% of patients died, 3% had VTE recurrence, and 7% major bleeding. Early start with VKA was associated with a lower risk of major bleeding (adjusted hazard ratio 0.37, 95% CI 0.20-0.71. Early start with VKA (adjusted time ratio [TR] 0.77, 95% CI 0.69-0.86 and use of LMWH/fondaparinux (adjusted TR 0.87, 95% CI 0.78-0.97 were associated with a shorter LOS. An INR ≥2.0 for ≥24 hours before stopping parenteral anticoagulants was associated with a longer LOS (adjusted TR 1.2, 95% CI 1.08-1.33. In elderly patients with VTE, the adherence to recommended anticoagulation management practices showed mixed results. In conclusion, only early start with VKA and use of parenteral LMWH/fondaparinux were associated with better outcomes.

  10. Combined administration of antibiotics and direct oral anticoagulants: a renewed indication for laboratory monitoring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Mattiuzzi, Camilla

    2014-10-01

    The recent development and marketing of novel direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) represents a paradigm shift in the management of patients requiring long-term anticoagulation. The advantages of these compounds over traditional therapy with vitamin K antagonists include a reportedly lower risk of severe hemorrhages and the limited need for laboratory measurements. However, there are several scenarios in which testing should be applied. The potential for drug-to-drug interaction is one plausible but currently underrecognized indication for laboratory assessment of the anticoagulant effect of DOACs. In particular, substantial concern has been raised during Phase I studies regarding the potential interaction of these drugs with some antibiotics, especially those that interplay with permeability glycoprotein (P-gp) and cytochrome 3A4 (CYP3A4). A specific electronic search on clinical trials published so far confirms that clarithromycin and rifampicin significantly impair the bioavailability of dabigatran, whereas clarithromycin, erythromycin, fluconazole, and ketoconazole alter the metabolism of rivaroxaban in vivo. Because of their more recent development, no published data were found for apixaban and edoxaban, or for potential interactions of DOACs with other and widely used antibiotics. It is noteworthy, however, that an online resource based on Food and Drug Administration and social media information, reports several hemorrhagic and thrombotic events in patients simultaneously taking dabigatran and some commonly used antibiotics such as amoxicillin, cephalosporin, and metronidazole. According to these reports, the administration of antibiotics in patients undergoing therapy with DOACs would seem to require accurate evaluation as to whether dose adjustments (personalized or antibiotic class driven) of the anticoagulant drug may be advisable. This might be facilitated by direct laboratory assessments of their anticoagulant effect ex vivo. PMID:24919144

  11. [Therapy education for patients receiving oral anti-coagulants vitamin K antagonists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satger, Bernadette; Blaise, Sophie; Fontaine, Michèle; Yver, Jacqueline; Allenet, Benoît; Baudrant, Magali; Pernod, Gilles; Bosson, Jean-Luc

    2009-12-01

    The vitamin K antagonists (VKA) remain to this day the only oral form of therapeutic anticoagulation. Approximately 1% of the French population, mainly elderly, is treated with these anticoagulants. Oral anticoagulants have significant risks of iatrogenic complications; indeed they are the leading cause of such drug-induced complications, predominantly hemorrhages. AFSSAPS (French Drug and Medical Products Agency) clinical practice recommendations, repeatedly disseminated, emphasize the education of patients receiving VKAs. Managing oral anticoagulant treatment is challenging, with a significant risk of under- or overdosing and consequently, thrombosis or hemorrhage. The therapeutic window is narrow, multiple drug-interactions are possible, and the specific dose required for a particular individual to achieve appropriate International Normalized Ratio (INR) levels is unpredictable. The literature contains few randomized controlled trials about the efficacy of education for patients treated with oral anticoagulants. These education programs are not standardized and are therefore varied and difficult to compare. Nevertheless, studies demonstrate the importance of patient education programs in reducing the risk of hemorrhage and achieving better treatment stability. The Grenoble region hospital-community network for vascular diseases (GRANTED) has developed an education program for these patients, consisting of individual sessions for the patient and/or a friend or family member (either at a health care facility or at the patient's home), telephone support and group sessions, and using educational tools and supports. There is also a link with the general practitioner who receives a report. This approach makes it possible to adapt the educational message to individual patients and their daily lives, as well as directly involving them in the management of their treatment. PMID:19815369

  12. Heparin Resistance and Anticoagulation Failure in a Challenging Case of Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Adam B; O'Duffy, Anne E; Kumar, Avinash B

    2016-07-01

    We report a challenging case of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (multiple etiologic factors) that was complicated by heparin resistance secondary to suspected antithrombin III (ATIII) deficiency. A 20-year-old female previously healthy and currently 8 weeks pregnant presented with worsening headaches, nausea, and decreasing Glasgow Coma Scale/Score (GCS), necessitating mechanical ventilatory support. Imaging showed extensive clots in multiple cerebral venous sinuses including the superior sagittal sinus, transverse, sigmoid, jugular veins, and the straight sinus. She was started on systemic anticoagulation and underwent mechanical clot removal and catheter-directed endovascular thrombolysis with limited success. Complicating the intensive care unit care was the development of heparin resistance, with an inability to reach the target partial thomboplastin time (PTT) of 60 to 80 seconds. At her peak heparin dose, she was receiving >35 000 units/24 h, and her PTT was subtherapeutic at <50 seconds. Deficiency of ATIII was suspected as a possible etiology of her heparin resistance. Fresh frozen plasma was administered for ATIII level repletion. Given her high thrombogenic risk and challenges with conventional anticoagulation regimens, we transitioned to argatroban for systemic anticoagulation. Heparin produces its major anticoagulant effect by inactivating thrombin and factor X through an AT-dependent mechanism. For inhibition of thrombin, heparin must bind to both the coagulation enzyme and the AT. A deficiency of AT leads to a hypercoagulable state and decreased efficacy of heparin that places patients at high risk of thromboembolism. Heparin resistance, especially in the setting of critical illness, should raise the index of suspicion for AT deficiency. Argatroban is an alternate agent for systemic anticoagulation in the setting of heparin resistance. PMID:27366296

  13. Reduced Anticoagulant Effect of Dabigatran in a Patient Receiving Concomitant Phenytoin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Barbara S; Northup, Amanda; Johnson, Dominic; Senfield, Jeffrey

    2016-02-01

    Dabigatran, a direct thrombin inhibitor, is an oral anticoagulant indicated for the prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and for the treatment and prevention of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Dabigatran, as well as the other new anticoagulants-rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban-are substrates for P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Although the U.S. labeling for rivaroxaban and apixaban states to avoid concomitant use with phenytoin, a known P-gp inducer, the U.S. labeling for dabigatran and edoxaban are less clear. We describe the first case report, to our knowledge, documenting a drug interaction between phenytoin and dabigatran by using laboratory measurements of dabigatran serum concentrations. A 45-year-old African-American man was admitted to the inpatient cardiology service following defibrillations from his implantable cardioverter defibrillator. The patient was evaluated and received appropriate antitachycardia pacing for atrial tachyarrhythmias for an episode of ventricular tachycardia (VT), and antiarrhythmic therapy with sotalol was initiated to reduce both his AF and VT burden. On review of the patient's medications for potential interactions, it was discovered that the patient was taking both dabigatran and phenytoin. To determine the magnitude of this drug interaction prior to making a change in his anticoagulation regimen, a dabigatran serum concentration was measured. This concentration was undetectable, indicating that phenytoin had a significant influence on dabigatran's metabolism and that this patient was at high risk for stroke. Clinicians should be aware of this interaction between phenytoin and dabigatran as well as with all other new oral anticoagulants. In patients taking phenytoin who require an anticoagulant, only warfarin should be prescribed to minimize the risk of stroke. In addition, the prescribing information for dabigatran should be updated to include other medications that result in a significant

  14. Effective management of venous thromboembolism in the community: non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Anticoagulation therapy is essential for the effective treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE). For many years, anticoagulation for acute VTE was limited to the use of initial parenteral heparin, overlapping with and followed by a vitamin K antagonist. Although highly effective, this regimen has several limitations and is particularly challenging when given in an ambulatory setting. Current treatment pathways for most patients with deep-vein thrombosis typically involve initial hospital or community-based ambulatory care with subsequent follow-up in a secondary care setting. With the introduction of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) into routine clinical practice, it is now possible for the initial acute management of patients with deep-vein thrombosis to be undertaken by primary care. As hospital admissions associated with VTE become shorter, primary care will play an increasingly important role in the long-term management of these patients. Although the NOACs can potentially simplify patient management and improve clinical outcomes, primary care physicians may be less familiar with these new treatments compared with traditional therapy. To assist primary care physicians in further understanding the role of the NOACs, this article outlines the main differences between NOACs and traditional anticoagulation therapy and discusses the benefit–risk profile of the different NOACs in the treatment and secondary prevention of recurrent VTE. Key considerations for the use of NOACs in the primary care setting are highlighted, including dose transition, risk assessment and follow-up, duration of anticoagulant therapy, how to minimize bleeding risks, and the importance of patient education and counseling. PMID:27217793

  15. Atrial fibrillation and stroke prevention practices in patients with candidacy for anticoagulation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Stroke secondary to Atrial Fibrillation is usually due to thrombi formed in the left atrium and left atrial appendage embolizing to cause ischemic stroke. Therefore, in patients with Atrial Fibrillation, antithrombotic therapy is recommended to prevent stroke. Vitamin K antagonist therapy is most widely used antithrombotic therapy for patients with valvular and non valvular AF. Aspirin is recommended only in low risk patients. This study was conducted to determine the stroke prevention practices in local patients with atrial fibrillation who were candidates for anticoagulation therapy. Method: This was descriptive cross sectional study conducted at Cardiovascular Department Lady Reading Hospital Peshawar and Cardiology Department Hayatabad Medical Complex Peshawar. Sampling technique was non probability consecutive. Patients visiting OPD of respective hospitals with EKG evidence of AF and having CHADES VASC score 2 or more or having mitral stenosis and AF were included in the study. Patients with additional indications for anticoagulation were excluded from the study. Results: A total of 205 patients with atrial fibrillation were studied. Mean age was 60.7±14.7 years. Male were 55.6 percentage (n=114) while 44.4 percentage (n=91) were female. Of these 149 (72.7 percentage) were candidates for anticoagulation based on CHA2DS2 VASc score of 2 and more or mitral stenosis with AF. Only 27.5 percentage (n=41) patients were adequately treated with anticoagulant therapy using VKA or novel oral anticoagulant drugs. Majority of them were getting dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT). Conclusion: Most patients with AF and high risk characteristics for thromboembolism are not receiving proper stroke prevention therapies. (author)

  16. Põllumajandussektori tulude areng 2004. aastal (EAA alusel) / Kristel Maidre

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Maidre, Kristel, 1978-

    2005-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Agriculture and the development of rural life : overview 2004/2005. - Tallinn, 2005, lk. 87-89. Esialgsetel andmetel kujunes põllumajanduse majandusharu toodanguks koos toetustega 2004. a 7,3 mld krooni, millest tootetoetused taime- ja loomakasvatusele moodustasid 5,4% (392,9 mln krooni). Tabel

  17. Potential role of new anticoagulants for prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez-Outes A

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Antonio Gómez-Outes,1 M Luisa Suárez-Gea,1 Ramón Lecumberri,2 Ana Isabel Terleira-Fernández,3,4 Emilio Vargas-Castrillón,3,4 Eduardo Rocha51Division of Pharmacology and Clinical Evaluation, Medicines for Human Use, Spanish Agency for Medicines and Medical Devices, Madrid, 2Department of Hematology, University Clinic of Navarra, Pamplona, 3Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Hospital Clínico, Madrid, 4Department of Pharmacology, Universidad Complutense, Madrid, 5Department of Hematology, School of Medicine, University of Navarra, Pamplona, SpainAbstract: Venous thromboembolism (VTE, encompassing deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cancer. Low molecular weight heparins are the preferred option for anticoagulation in cancer patients according to current clinical practice guidelines. Fondaparinux may also have a place in prevention of VTE in hospitalized cancer patients with additional risk factors and for initial treatment of VTE. Although low molecular weight heparins and fondaparinux are effective and safe, they require daily subcutaneous administration, which may be problematic for many patients, particularly if long-term treatment is needed. Studying anticoagulant therapy in oncology patients is challenging because this patient group has an increased risk of VTE and bleeding during anticoagulant therapy compared with the population without cancer. Risk factors for increased VTE and bleeding risk in these patients include concomitant treatments (surgery, chemotherapy, placement of central venous catheters, radiotherapy, hormonal therapy, angiogenesis inhibitors, antiplatelet drugs, supportive therapies (ie, steroids, blood transfusion, white blood cell growth factors, and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, and tumor-related factors (local vessel damage and invasion, abnormalities in platelet function, and number. New anticoagulants in development for prophylaxis

  18. Long-Term Population-Based Cerebral Ischemic Event and Cognitive Outcomes of Direct Oral Anticoagulants Compared With Warfarin Among Long-term Anticoagulated Patients for Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Victoria; May, Heidi T; Bair, Tami L; Crandall, Brian G; Cutler, Michael J; Day, John D; Mallender, Charles; Osborn, Jeffrey S; Stevens, Scott M; Weiss, J Peter; Woller, Scott C; Bunch, T Jared

    2016-07-15

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have been used in clinical practice in the United States for the last 4 to 6 years. Although DOACs may be an attractive alternative to warfarin in many patients, long-term outcomes of use of these medications are unknown. We performed a propensity-matched analysis to report patient important outcomes of death, stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA), bleeding, major bleeding, and dementia in patients taking a DOAC or warfarin. Patients receiving long-term anticoagulation from June 2010 to December 2014 for thromboembolism prevention with either warfarin or a DOAC were matched 1:1 by index date and propensity score. Multivariable Cox hazard regression was performed to determine the risk of death, stroke/TIA, major bleed, and dementia by the anticoagulant therapy received. A total of 5,254 patients were studied (2,627 per group). Average age was 72.4 ± 10.9 years, and 59.0% were men. Most patients were receiving long-term anticoagulation for AF management (warfarin: 96.5% vs DOAC: 92.7%, p <0.0001). Rivaroxaban (55.3%) was the most commonly used DOAC, followed by apixaban (22.5%) and dabigatran (22.2%). The use of DOACs compared with warfarin was associated with a reduced risk of long-term adverse outcomes: death (p = 0.09), stroke/TIA (p <0.0001), major bleed (p <0.0001), and bleed (p = 0.14). No significant outcome variance was noted in DOAC-type comparison. In the AF multivariable model patients taking DOAC were 43% less likely to develop stroke/TIA/dementia (hazard ratio 0.57 [CI 0.17, 1.97], p = 0.38) than those taking warfarin. Our community-based results suggest better long-term efficacy and safety of DOACs compared with warfarin. DOAC use was associated with a lower risk of cerebral ischemic events and new-onset dementia. PMID:27236255

  19. Bivalirudin as an adjunctive anticoagulant to heparin in the treatment of heparin resistance during cardiopulmonary bypass-assisted cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNair, E; Marcoux, J-A; Bally, C; Gamble, J; Thomson, D

    2016-04-01

    Heparin resistance (unresponsiveness to heparin) is characterized by the inability to reach acceptable activated clotting time values following a calculated dose of heparin. Up to 20% of the patients undergoing cardiothoracic surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass using unfractionated heparin (UFH) for anticoagulation experience heparin resistance. Although UFH has been the "gold standard" for anticoagulation, it is not without its limitations. It is contraindicated in patients with confirmed heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) and heparin or protamine allergy. The safety and efficacy of the use of the direct thrombin inhibitor bivalirudin for anticoagulation during cardiac surgery has been reported. However, there have been no reports on the treatment of heparin resistance with bivalirudin during CPB. In this review, we report the favorable outcome of our single-center experience with the alternative use of bivalirudin in the management of anticoagulation of heparin unresponsive patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. PMID:25934498

  20. Medium intensity oral anticoagulants versus aspirin after cerebral ischaemia of arterial origin (ESPRIT) : a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halkes, P H A; van Gijn, J; Kappelle, L J; Koudstaal, P J; Algra, A

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oral anticoagulants are better than aspirin for secondary prevention after myocardial infarction and after cerebral ischaemia in combination with non-rheumatic atrial fibrillation. The European/Australasian Stroke Prevention in Reversible Ischaemia Trial (ESPRIT) aimed to determine wheth

  1. Psychological effects of treatment with new oral anticoagulants in elderly patients with atrial fibrillation: a preliminary report

    OpenAIRE

    Fumagalli, Stefano; Cardini, Francesca; Roberts, Anna T.; Boni, Serena; Gabbai, Debbie; Calvani, Silvia; Casalone Rinaldi, Marta; Manetti, Stefania; Tarantini, Francesca; Marchionni, Niccolò

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia in elderly people, yet oral anticoagulation is underused in the aged. We tried to determine whether new oral anticoagulants (NOA) have greater psychological tolerability than warfarin. Methods: Age-, gender-matched groups of AF patients receiving NOA (N = 15) or warfarin (N = 15) were assessed with the Anti-Clot Treatment Scale (ACTS) and the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). Results: Patients were old (81 ...

  2. Meta-Analysis of Anticoagulation Use, Stroke, Thromboembolism, Bleeding, and Mortality in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation on Dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Christopher X; Odutayo, Ayodele; Emdin, Connor A; Kinnear, Ned J; Sun, Michelle T

    2016-06-15

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is common in patients on dialysis. Although randomized trials of anticoagulation for AF have demonstrated striking reductions in stroke, these trials did not recruit patients on dialysis. We thus undertook this systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies including patients with AF on dialysis that reported associations of anticoagulation use. Twenty studies involving 529,741 subjects and 31,321 patients with AF on dialysis were identified. Anticoagulation was associated with a 45% (95% CI 13% to 88%) increased risk of any stroke, reflecting a nonsignificant 13% (95% CI -4% to 34%) increased ischemic stroke risk and 38% (95% CI 3% to 85%) increased hemorrhagic stroke risk. There was also a 44% (95% CI 38% to 56%) lower risk of any thromboembolism, and a 31% (95% CI 12% to 53%) increased risk of any bleeding but no clear association with cardiovascular death (relative risk 0.99, 95% CI 0.86 to 1.15) or all-cause mortality (relative risk 0.97, 95% CI 0.90 to 1.04). Incident event rates were similar or worse in patients on anticoagulation. In conclusion, these observational analyses provide little supporting evidence of benefit, and instead suggest harm, from anticoagulation in patients on dialysis with AF. These results raise the possibility that the effects of anticoagulation in patients with AF on dialysis may not be similar to the clear benefit of anticoagulation seen in patients with AF without end-stage renal disease. Randomized trials are required to definitively evaluate the safety and efficacy of anticoagulation for AF in the dialysis setting. PMID:27237624

  3. International Normalized Ratio, a Useful Tool in Oral Anticoagulant Therapy Coeficiente internacional normalizado, útil herramienta en la terapia anticoagulante oral

    OpenAIRE

    Dinorah Herenia Mulet Batista; Carlos Ramírez Pérez; Gladis Abreu Sera; Juan Pérez Mir; Jesús Alberto Pérez González

    2012-01-01

    The international normalized ratio (INR) is the primary tool for assessing patients undergoing oral anticoagulant therapy. It was created from the need of standardizing the different types of thromboplastins, regardless of their origin, from which the figures of the true anticoagulation state desired by the physician depend, mainly in patients at risk of thromboembolic events. The objective of this work is to show the simple technique of determining this ratio so that it can be extended to an...

  4. Fatal bleeding due to a heparin-like anticoagulant in a 37-year-old woman suffering from systemic mastocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucker, Christoph; Mansmann, Georg; Steiner, Stefan; Gattermann, Norbert; Schmitt-Graeff, Anette; Loncar, Robert; Scharf, Rudiger E; Stockschlader, Marcus

    2008-07-01

    A 37-year-old female patient with systemic mastocytosis who was admitted with severe unexplained bleeding symptoms is studied. Laboratory procedures established the diagnosis of a patient-derived-heparin-like anticoagulant as a very rare hemostatic abnormality predisposing to bleeding. The patient died from refractory disease despite therapy with protamine, initiation of chemotherapy, and supportive measures. The case illustrates the clinical presentation and diagnosis of heparin-like anticoagulants. Etiology, pathophysiology, and therapeutic options are discussed. PMID:18160568

  5. New Oral Anticoagulants vs Vitamin K Antagonists: Benefits for Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Alegret, Josep M; Viñolas, Xavier; Arias, Miguel A.; Martínez-Rubio, Antoni; Rebollo, Pablo; Ràfols, Carles; Martínez-Sande, José L.

    2014-01-01

    New oral anticoagulants (NOAC) have demonstrated their efficacy as an alternative to vitamin K antagonists (VKA) in the prophylaxis of cardioembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, evidence on the benefits of NOAC in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is lacking.We evaluated changes in HRQoL related to oral anticoagulation therapy employing a specific questionnaire in a cohort of 416 patients with AF undergoing electrical cardioversion. In terms of HRQoL, we obs...

  6. Subcutaneous enoxaparin for outpatient anticoagulation therapy in a patient with an aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, H J; Smith, J A; Garris, R E

    1998-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight heparins have been administered for a variety of clinical conditions. A patient with a mechanical aortic valve replacement patient underwent elective transurethral prostatectomy. Anticoagulation was managed with unfractionated heparin immediately preoperatively and postoperatively. Warfarin was begun on postoperative day 1. The patient had a prolonged hospitalization due to subtherapeutic international normalized ratios (INR) despite warfarin administration. Because he intended to leave the hospital against medical advice before therapeutic INR was achieved, enoxaparin 1 mg/kg subcutaneously every 12 hours was prescribed to provide anticoagulation, facilitating discharge and improving the patient's quality of life. Enoxaparin was associated with an approximate saving of $4500 over warfarin. The only adverse event reported was bruising at the injection site. PMID:9545164

  7. [Anticoagulant activity of low-molecular-weight heparins obtained using a hydrolase complex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozd, N N; Tolstenkov, A S; Bannikova, G E; Miftakhova, N T; Lapikova, E S; Makarov, V A; Varlamov, V P

    2007-01-01

    The anticoagulant activity of low-molecular weight heparins (LMWH-PC) with average distribution of molecular weights within 3.4-5.8 kD was investigated. The samples of LMWH-PC were obtained from unfractionated heparin using immobilized enzyme complex of protease C. The LMWH-PC derivatives inhibited the activity of blood coagulation factors IIa (thrombin) and Xa. The LMWH-PC derivatives had an anti-factor-Xa activity up to 131-208 IU/mg and anti-factor-IIa activity up to 81-175 IU/mg. All LMWH-PC derivatives form complexes with protamine sulfate during electrophoresis in agarose gel. The anticoagulant activity of rabbit plasma exhibits a doze-dependent increase upon the intravenous or subcutaneous injection of LMWH-PC with a molecular weight of 5.4 kD. PMID:18318190

  8. THE PROBLEM OF THE USE OF NEW ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS IN CANCER PATIENTS RECEIVING CHEMOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Rumyantsev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite large number of known risk factors of venous thromboembolism (VTE in cancer patients existing prediction models do not allow definite identification of cancer patients that have indications for anticoagulant prevention. Besides, heparin and warfarin use for VTE prevention in cancer is accompanied by some problems. New oral anticoagulants (NOAC are promising drugs for use in oncology practice; however their use is complicated by the lack of data on efficacy and safety in these patients, potential drug interactions and the possibility of unpredictable changes in effect during chemotherapy. Widespread use of NOAC for the prevention and treatment of tumor-associated VTE prior to phase III trials is not recommended. However, the criteria for selection of patients for whom the study of the efficacy and safety of NOAC is a priority can now be developed.

  9. Management of Anticoagulation for Portal Vein Thrombosis in Individuals with Cirrhosis: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geneviève Huard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-neoplastic portal vein thrombosis (PVT is an increasingly recognized complication of liver cirrhosis. It is often diagnosed fortuitously and can be either partial or complete. The clinical significance of PVT is not obvious except in some situations such as when patients are on the waiting list for liver transplantation. The only known therapy is anticoagulation which has been shown to permit the disappearance of thrombosis and to prevent further extension. Anticoagulation is a challenging therapy in individuals with liver cirrhosis because of the well-recognized coagulation abnormalities observed in that setting and because of the increased risk of bleeding, especially from gastrointestinal tract caused by portal hypertension. We herein review the current knowledge on that topic in order to highlight the advantages and disadvantages of the currently proposed therapeutic attitudes in face of the diagnosis of PVT in individuals with cirrhosis.

  10. Anticoagulant surface of 316 L stainless steel modified by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Weihua; Zhu, Jian; Cheng, Zhenping; Zhang, Zhengbiao; Zhu, Xiulin

    2011-05-01

    Polished 316 L stainless steel (SS) was first treated with air plasma to enhance surface hydrophilicity and was subsequently allowed to react with 2-(4-chlorosulfonylphenyl)ethyltrimethoxysilane to introduce an atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiator. Accordingly, the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization of polyethylene glycol methacrylate (PEGMA) was carried out on the surface of the modified SS. The grafting progress was monitored by water contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The polymer thickness as a function different polymerization times was characterized using a step profiler. The anticoagulative properties of the PEGMA modified SS surface were investigated. The results showed enhanced anticoagulative to acid-citrate-dextrose (ACD) blood after grafting PEGMA on the SS surface. PMID:21528878

  11. Evaluation of the Effect of Lime Fruit Juice on the Anticoagulant Effect of Warfarin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adepoju, GKA; Adeyemi, T

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Citrus aurantifolia (Family Rutaceae) is commonly known as a familiar food and medicine, and s therapeutic effectiveness in a variety of diseases has been suggested in traditional medicine. Various complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) have been shown to interact with orthodox medicines. Hence, the aim of this study is to investigate such a phenomenon particularly the interaction of lime fruit juice with warfarin. Materials and Method: Wistar strain albino rats of both sexes weighing between 190 and 230g were administered with oral doses of the respective drugs used depending on the groups of animals. Effects on the anticoagulant activity of warfarin were determined by standard laboratory methods. Result: Lime fruit juice caused a reduction in the anticoagulant activity of warfarin. Conclusion: This finding has shown that CAM can interact with orthodox medicines hence, warfarin prescribers need to be aware of the usage of CAM and monitor the international normalized ratio (INR) of their patients more frequently. PMID:21042484

  12. The prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism with LMWHs and new anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D Blann

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Andrew D Blann, Chee W KhooUniversity Department of Medicine, City Hospital, Birmingham, UKAbstract: As the risk factors for thrombosis are becoming better understood, so is the need for anticoagulation. The inherent difficulties with warfarin are such that a low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH is often the key therapeutic. However, there are several different species of LMWH available to the practitioner, which leads to the need for an objective guide. New agents are coming onto the marketplace, and these may supersede both warfarin and the heparins. The current report will review the biochemistry and pharmacology of different LWMHs and identify which are more suitable for the different presentations of venous thromboembolism. It will conclude with a brief synopsis of new agents which may supersede warfarin and heparin.Keywords: thrombosis, warfarin, heparin, anticoagulation

  13. Honey Bee Venom (Apis mellifera) Contains Anticoagulation Factors and Increases the Blood-clotting Time

    OpenAIRE

    Hossein Zolfagharian; Mohammad Mohajeri; Mahdi Babaie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Bee venom (BV) is a complex mixture of proteins and contains proteins such as phospholipase and melittin, which have an effect on blood clotting and blood clots. The mechanism of action of honey bee venom (HBV, Apis mellifera) on human plasma proteins and its anti-thrombotic effect were studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-coagulation effect of BV and its effects on blood coagulation and purification. Methods: Crude venom obtained from Apis mellifera was ...

  14. Anti-inflammatory, anticoagulant and antioxidant effects of aqueous extracts from Moroccan thyme varieties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tarik; Khouya; Mhamed; Ramchoun; Abdelbassat; Hmidani; Souliman; Amrani; Hicham; Harnafi; Mohamed; Benlyas; Younes; Filali; Zegzouti; Chakib; Alem

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the anti-inflammatory, anticoagulant and antioxidant effects of aqueous extracts of thyme varieties from Moroccan.Methods: The aqueous extracts of tree medicinal plants [Thymus atlanticus(T. atlanticus), Thymus satureioides and Thymus zygis(T. zygis)] were screened for their antioxidant activity using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical-scavenging, ferric reducing antioxidant power assay, radical scavenging activity method, the inhibition of 2,2’-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride that induces oxidative erythrocyte hemolysis and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances assay. The anti-inflammatory activity of aqueous extracts was evaluated in vivo using croton oil-induced ear edema and carrageenan-induced paw edema in mice and rats, respectively. This extracts were evaluated in vitro for their anticoagulant activity at the different concentrations by partial thromboplastin time and prothrombin time activated. Results: All thyme varieties were found to possess considerable antioxidant activity and potent anti-inflammatory activity in the croton oil-induced edema. Administration of aqueous extracts of two varieties(50 mg/kg)(T. zygis and T. atlanticus) reduced significantly the carrageenaninduced paw edema similar to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug(indomethacin, 10 mg/kg). In partial thromboplastin time and prothrombin time tests, T. atlanticus and T. zygis extracts showed the strongest anticoagulant activity. In contrast, Thymus satureioides did not show the anticoagulant activity in these tests. Conclusions: All aqueous extracts possess considerable antioxidant activity and are rich in total polyphenol and flavonoid but they act differently in the process of inflammatory and coagulation studied. This study shows great variability of biological activities in thyme varieties.

  15. Increased anticoagulant activity of thrombin-binding DNA aptamers by nanoscale organization on DNA nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Rangnekar, Abhijit; Zhang, Alex M.; Shiyuan Li, Susan; M. Bompiani, Kristin; Hansen, Majken Nørgaard; Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager; Sullenger, Bruce A; LaBean, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    Control over thrombin activity is much desired to regulate blood clotting in surgical and therapeutic situations. Thrombin-binding RNA and DNA aptamers have been used to inhibit thrombin activity and thus the coagulation cascade. Soluble DNA aptamers, as well as two different aptamers tethered by a flexible single-strand linker, have been shown to possess anticoagulant activity. Here, we link multiple aptamers at programmed positions on DNA nanostructures to optimize spacing and orientation o...

  16. Preadmission oral anticoagulant treatment and clinical outcome among patients hospitalized with acute stroke and atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Svendsen, Marie Louise; Hansen, Morten Lock;

    2014-01-01

    Preadmission oral anticoagulant treatment (OAT) has been linked with less severe stroke and a better outcome in patients with atrial fibrillation. However, the existing studies have methodological limitations and have, with one exception, not included hemorrhagic strokes. We performed a nationwid...... historic follow-up study using data from population-based healthcare registries to assess the effect of preadmission OAT on stroke outcomes further....

  17. Anticoagulation in the treatment of portovenous emboli after cyanoacrylate injection for a bleeding gastric varix

    OpenAIRE

    Kwa, Charlene Xian Wen; Tan, Veronique Kiak Mien; Ong, Hock Soo

    2015-01-01

    We herein report the use of endoscopic n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate injections to obliterate a gastric varix, which led to cyanoacrylate embolisation in the splenic and portal veins in a single patient. Cyanoacrylate embolisation is a known but uncommonly reported complication of endoscopic sclerotherapy. This case report illustrates the successful management of this complication (i.e. cyanoacrylate embolisation in the splenic and portal veins) with anticoagulation and analyses the presentation an...

  18. Efficacy and safety of new oral anticoagulants in prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism

    OpenAIRE

    Luca Masotti; Cecilia Becattini; Roberto Cappelli; Giancarlo Landini; Alessandro Pampana; Domenico Prisco; Giancarlo Agnelli

    2011-01-01

    One of the main innovation emerged in recent years in the field of venous thromboembolism (VTE) has been represented by the clinical development and marketing of new oral anticoagulant agents used for prophylaxis and acute treatment. These drugs are represented by direct thrombin inhibitors (anti-factor IIa) and the direct inhibitors of activated factor X (anti-Xa). The main achievement of these new agents is represented by their ease of use without laboratory monitoring or dose adjustment. D...

  19. Photoselective vaporization of the prostate in men with a history of chronic oral anti-coagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer F. Karatas

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: A considerable percentage of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH also have additional cardiac pathologies, which often require anticoagulant therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP for BPH in cardiac patients receiving anticoagulant therapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 67 patients suffering from BPH and high risk cardiac pathologies were operated on using laser prostatectomy. All patients had cardiac pathologies with bleeding disorders requiring anticoagulant use, and underwent standard urologic evaluation for BPH. Patients were treated with laser prostatectomy for relief of the obstruction using the KTP/532 laser energy at 80 W. RESULTS: The mean patient age was 71.4 years (range 55-80. Mean prostate volume on transrectal ultrasonography was 73.2 mL (range 44-120. Operation time ranged from 40 to 90 min, with an average value of 55 min. The average hospital stay was 48 hours (range 12-72 and the Foley catheters were removed within 48 hours, with a mean catheterization time of 34.2 ± 5.9 hours (0-48. No patient required an additional procedure due to severe bleeding necessitating intervention during the early postoperative phase. Mean International symptoms scoring system (IPSS values and post voiding residual volume decreased and peak urinary flow rate increased (p < 0.001. Our results showed that the mean prostate volume had decreased by 53% at 6 months. CONCLUSIONS: High-power photo selective laser vaporization prostatectomy is a feasible, safe, and effective alternative for the minimal invasive management of BPH, particularly in cardiac patients receiving anticoagulant therapy.

  20. High exposure rates of anticoagulant rodenticides in carnivorous birds and mammals in Danish landscapes

    OpenAIRE

    Elmeros, M.; Christensen, T. K.; Lassen, P.

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) in birds of prey, owls and small mustelids to assess exposure rates and levels in Denmark. ARs were detected in 84-97% of individuals in all species. High AR prevalences and concentrations were recorded in all seasons in both birds and mammals. Prevalence of ARs was considerably higher than reported elsewhere with similar exposure scenarios. Further research on the potential effects of these high AR exposure levels on population levels of non-targe...

  1. Oral surgery use of tachocomb in anticoagulated prosthetic heart valves patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Papakoca, Kiro; Kocev, Pavle; Milosev, Vladimir; Evrosimovska, Biljana

    2014-01-01

    The individuals with implanted prosthetic heart valves (PHV) belong in the group of patients with high risk from several aspects. Medical risk assessment of these patients consists of three segments: 1. cardiac function and safe dental and oral surgery treatment, 2. existing risk of potential development and prevention from infective endocarditis, and 3. the potential for altered hemostasis in patients prescribed anticoagulant medications. The aim of this study was to show the specific or...

  2. Novel anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: a systematic review of cost-effectiveness models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan L Limone

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review of economic models of newer anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (SPAF. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We searched Medline, Embase, NHSEED and HTA databases and the Tuft's Registry from January 1, 2008 through October 10, 2012 to identify economic (Markov or discrete event simulation models of newer agents for SPAF. RESULTS: Eighteen models were identified. Each was based on a lone randomized trial/new agent, and these trials were clinically and methodologically heterogeneous. Dabigatran 150 mg, 110 mg and sequentially-dosed were assessed in 9, 8, and 9 models, rivaroxaban in 4 and apixaban in 4. Warfarin was a first-line comparator in 94% of models. Models were conducted from United States (44%, European (39% and Canadian (17% perspectives. Models typically assumed patients between 65-73 years old at moderate-risk of stroke initiated anticoagulation for/near a lifetime. All models reported cost/quality-adjusted life-year, 22% reported using a societal perspective, but none included indirect costs. Four models reported an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER for a newer anticoagulant (dabigatran 110 mg (n = 4/150 mg (n = 2; rivaroxaban (n = 1 vs. warfarin above commonly reported willingness-to-pay thresholds. ICERs vs. warfarin ranged from $3,547-$86,000 for dabigatran 150 mg, $20,713-$150,000 for dabigatran 110 mg, $4,084-$21,466 for sequentially-dosed dabigatran and $23,065-$57,470 for rivaroxaban. Apixaban was found economically-dominant to aspirin, and dominant or cost-effective ($11,400-$25,059 vs. warfarin. Indirect comparisons from 3 models suggested conflicting comparative cost-effectiveness results. CONCLUSIONS: Cost-effectiveness models frequently found newer anticoagulants cost-effective, but the lack of head-to-head trials and the heterogeneous characteristics of underlying trials and modeling methods make it difficult to determine the most cost-effective agent.

  3. Analysis of Clinical Record Data for Anticoagulation Management within an EHR System

    OpenAIRE

    Austin, T.; Kalra, D.; Lea, N C; Patterson, D. L.; Ingram, D.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This paper reports an evaluation of the properties of a generic electronic health record information model that were actually required and used when importing an existing clinical application into a generic EHR repository. METHOD: A generic EHR repository and system were developed as part of the EU Projects Synapses and SynEx. A Web application to support the management of anticoagulation therapy was developed to interface to the EHR system, and deployed within a north London hosp...

  4. Relation between Intensity of Biocide Practice and Residues of Anticoagulant Rodenticides in Red Foxes (Vulpes vulpes)

    OpenAIRE

    Geduhn, Anke; Jacob, Jens; Schenke, Detlef; Keller, Barbara; Kleinschmidt, Sven; Esther, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) are commonly used to control rodent infestations for biocidal and plant protection purposes. This can lead to AR exposure of non-target small mammals and their predators, which is known from several regions of the world. However, drivers of exposure variation are usually not known. To identify environmental drivers of AR exposure in non-targets we analyzed 331 liver samples of red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) for residues of eight ARs and used local parameters (perce...

  5. Influence of some anticoagulants on dynamics of sugar concentration in the goats’ blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Zapryanova

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of the content in the goats’ blood (at the instant the sample was taken, and then after 3, 6 and 24 hours under influence of 4 anticoagulants (sodium fluoride, sodium citrate, heparin and complexon III were studied. Long term storage of the blood samples resulted in the glucose level decrease. It was mostly pronounced under the sodium citrate treatment.

  6. Pharmacodynamic parameters of anticoagulants based on sulfated polysaccharides from marine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozd, N N; Tolstenkov, A S; Makarov, V A; Kuznetsova, T A; Besednova, N N; Shevchenko, N M; Zvyagintseva, T N

    2006-11-01

    Fucoidans isolated from Fucus evanescens and Laminaria cichorioides kelp can inhibit thrombin and factor Xa of the blood coagulation system. In rats, intravenous injection of fucoidans dose-dependently increased anticoagulant activity of the plasma. Fucoidans can form complexes with protamine sulfate. The observed quantitative differences in the action of fucoidans can result from different sulfation degree and the presence of various types of glycoside bonds in polysaccharide molecules. PMID:17415470

  7. Antiplatelets versus anticoagulants for the treatment of cervical artery dissection: Bayesian meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Sarikaya

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of antiplatelets and anticoagulants on stroke and death in patients with acute cervical artery dissection. DESIGN: Systematic review with Bayesian meta-analysis. DATA SOURCES: The reviewers searched MEDLINE and EMBASE from inception to November 2012, checked reference lists, and contacted authors. STUDY SELECTION: Studies were eligible if they were randomised, quasi-randomised or observational comparisons of antiplatelets and anticoagulants in patients with cervical artery dissection. DATA EXTRACTION: Data were extracted by one reviewer and checked by another. Bayesian techniques were used to appropriately account for studies with scarce event data and imbalances in the size of comparison groups. DATA SYNTHESIS: Thirty-seven studies (1991 patients were included. We found no randomised trial. The primary analysis revealed a large treatment effect in favour of antiplatelets for preventing the primary composite outcome of ischaemic stroke, intracranial haemorrhage or death within the first 3 months after treatment initiation (relative risk 0.32, 95% credibility interval 0.12 to 0.63, while the degree of between-study heterogeneity was moderate (τ(2 = 0.18. In an analysis restricted to studies of higher methodological quality, the possible advantage of antiplatelets over anticoagulants was less obvious than in the main analysis (relative risk 0.73, 95% credibility interval 0.17 to 2.30. CONCLUSION: In view of these results and the safety advantages, easier usage and lower cost of antiplatelets, we conclude that antiplatelets should be given precedence over anticoagulants as a first line treatment in patients with cervical artery dissection unless results of an adequately powered randomised trial suggest the opposite.

  8. Antimicrobial and anticoagulant activities of the spine of stingray Himantura imbricata

    OpenAIRE

    Kaliyamoorthy Kalidasan; Velayudham Ravi; Sunil Kumar Sahu; Murugan Lakshmi Maheshwaran; Kathiresan Kandasamy

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the spine structure of stingray Himantura imbricata (H. imbricata) and to evaluate the anticoagulant properties of the spine extract obtained through various solvents extracts followed by antibacterial activity against human pathogens. Methods: Spines of H. imbricata were collected from Nagappattinam coast, Tamil Nadu, India and their spines were observed under the light microscope. The grounded spines were subjected to extraction of metabolites using m...

  9. Second generation anticoagulant rodenticides in tawny owls (Strix aluco) from Great Britain

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Lee A.; Anthony TURK; Long, Sara M.; Wienburg, Claire L.; Best, Jennifer; Shore, Richard F.

    2008-01-01

    Secondary exposure of vertebrate predators to second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides (SGARs) is widespread in Britain. Tawny owl (Strix aluco) populations in the UK have declined since the 1970s, when SGARs were first introduced, and these compounds may have contributed to the decline in owl numbers. Our aims were to conduct the first systematic survey of SGAR exposure in tawny owls and ascertain whether there had been a change in the proportion of exposed birds that was concurrent wi...

  10. Effect of atenolol and metoprolol on the anticoagulant activity of acenocoumarin

    OpenAIRE

    Mantero, F; Procidano, M.; Vicariotto, M. A.; Girolami, A.

    1984-01-01

    In patients receiving long-term acenocoumarin treatment, the effect on anticoagulant activity of atenolol (100 mg once-daily) and metoprolol (100 mg twice daily) was compared in a randomised within-patient open trial. No significant differences were demonstrated between mean prothrombin time and Thrombotest during treatment with atenolol, metoprolol or placebo. These data do not suggest the existence of an interaction between acenocoumarin and the moderately lipophilic β-adrenoceptor blocker ...

  11. Estimating the cost-effectiveness of quality improving interventions in oral anticoagulation management within general practice.

    OpenAIRE

    Claes, Neree; Moeremans, K; Buntinx, F.; Arnout, J; Vermylen, J.; H. van Loon; Annemans, L.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A clinical trial, "Belgian Improvement Study on Oral Anticoagulation Therapy (BISOAT)," significantly improved the quality after implementing four different quality-improving interventions in four randomly divided groups of general practitioners (GPs). The quality-improving interventions consisted of multifaceted education with or without feedback reports on their performance, international normalized ratio (INR) testing by the GP with a CoaguChek device or computer-assisted advic...

  12. The susceptibility of Bandicota bengalensis from Rangoon, Burma to several anticoagulant rodenticides.

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, J. E.; Htun, P. T.; Naing, H.

    1980-01-01

    The baseline susceptibility of the lesser bandicoot rat, Bandicota bengalensis, from Rangoon, Burma, to five anticoagulant rodenticides was established with no-choice feeding in the laboratory. The susceptibility of lesser bandicoots to the several poisons (brodifacoum, difenacoum, diphacinone, coumatetralyl, and warfarin) was such that they were offered at a 0.001% concentration. B. bengalensis was most susceptible to brodifacoum, and in descending order, difenacoum, coumatetralyl, diphacino...

  13. Trials of the anticoagulant rodenticides bromadiolone and difenacoum against the house mouse (Mus musculus L.).

    OpenAIRE

    Rowe, F. P.; Plant, C. J.; Bradfield, A.

    1981-01-01

    Laboratory and field trials were conducted to determine the efficacy of the anticoagulant rodenticide bromadiolone against the house mouse (Mus musculus). In laboratory feeding tests, family groups of warfarin-resistant mice maintained in pens and conditioned to feeding on plain foods were offered pinhead oatmeal bait containing bromadiolone at 0.005%. Overall mortality in replicated 21-day poison treatments was 55/58 or 94.8%. Six field trials were carried out, using the same poison bait, ag...

  14. Disodium EDTA used as anticoagulant causes hemolysis in common carp blood

    OpenAIRE

    Witeska, Malgorzata; WARGOCKA, Wioleta

    2011-01-01

    Disodium EDTA used as anticoagulant for common carp blood caused a significant increase and high variability in hematocrit readings comparing to the heparinized samples. Na2EDTA induced erythrocyte swelling, causing cell membrane disruption (hemolysis). The nuclei released from destroyed cells changed shape from oval to round, and underwent gradual swelling and vacuolation, followed by karyolysis. The degree of observed changes was similar at all Na2EDTA concentrations (0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 mg/m...

  15. An Antithrombin-Heparin Complex Increases the Anticoagulant Activity of Fibrin Clots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley J. Smith

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Clotting blood contains fibrin-bound thrombin, which is a major source of procoagulant activity leading to clot extension and further activation of coagulation. When bound to fibrin, thrombin is protected from inhibition by antithrombin (AT + heparin but is neutralized when AT and heparin are covalently linked (ATH. Here, we report the surprising observation that, rather than yielding an inert complex, thrombin-ATH formation converts clots into anticoagulant surfaces that effectively catalyze inhibition of thrombin in the surrounding environment.

  16. Platelet factor 4 impairs the anticoagulant activity of activated protein C.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Preston, Roger J S

    2012-02-01

    Platelet factor 4 (PF4) is an abundant platelet alpha-granule chemokine released following platelet activation. PF4 interacts with thrombomodulin and the gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain of protein C, thereby enhancing activated protein C (APC) generation by the thrombin-thrombomodulin complex. However, the protein C Gla domain not only mediates protein C activation in vivo, but also plays a critical role in modulating the diverse functional properties of APC once generated. In this study we demonstrate that PF4 significantly inhibits APC anti-coagulant activity. PF4 inhibited both protein S-dependent APC anticoagulant function in plasma and protein S-dependent factor Va (FVa) proteolysis 3- to 5-fold, demonstrating that PF4 impairs protein S cofactor enhancement of APC anticoagulant function. Using recombinant factor Va variants FVa-R506Q\\/R679Q and FVa-R306Q\\/R679Q, PF4 was shown to impair APC proteolysis of FVa at position Arg(306) by 3-fold both in the presence and absence of protein S. These data suggest that PF4 contributes to the poorly understood APC resistance phenotype associated with activated platelets. Finally, despite PF4 binding to the APC Gla domain, we show that APC in the presence of PF4 retains its ability to initiate PAR-1-mediated cytoprotective signaling. In summary, we propose that PF4 acts as a critical regulator of APC generation, but also differentially targets APC toward cytoprotective, rather than anticoagulant function at sites of vascular injury with concurrent platelet activation.

  17. Platelet factor 4 impairs the anticoagulant activity of activated protein C.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Preston, Roger J S

    2009-02-27

    Platelet factor 4 (PF4) is an abundant platelet alpha-granule chemokine released following platelet activation. PF4 interacts with thrombomodulin and the gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain of protein C, thereby enhancing activated protein C (APC) generation by the thrombin-thrombomodulin complex. However, the protein C Gla domain not only mediates protein C activation in vivo, but also plays a critical role in modulating the diverse functional properties of APC once generated. In this study we demonstrate that PF4 significantly inhibits APC anti-coagulant activity. PF4 inhibited both protein S-dependent APC anticoagulant function in plasma and protein S-dependent factor Va (FVa) proteolysis 3- to 5-fold, demonstrating that PF4 impairs protein S cofactor enhancement of APC anticoagulant function. Using recombinant factor Va variants FVa-R506Q\\/R679Q and FVa-R306Q\\/R679Q, PF4 was shown to impair APC proteolysis of FVa at position Arg(306) by 3-fold both in the presence and absence of protein S. These data suggest that PF4 contributes to the poorly understood APC resistance phenotype associated with activated platelets. Finally, despite PF4 binding to the APC Gla domain, we show that APC in the presence of PF4 retains its ability to initiate PAR-1-mediated cytoprotective signaling. In summary, we propose that PF4 acts as a critical regulator of APC generation, but also differentially targets APC toward cytoprotective, rather than anticoagulant function at sites of vascular injury with concurrent platelet activation.

  18. The prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism with LMWHs and new anticoagulants

    OpenAIRE

    Blann, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Andrew D Blann, Chee W KhooUniversity Department of Medicine, City Hospital, Birmingham, UKAbstract: As the risk factors for thrombosis are becoming better understood, so is the need for anticoagulation. The inherent difficulties with warfarin are such that a low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) is often the key therapeutic. However, there are several different species of LMWH available to the practitioner, which leads to the need for an objective guide. New agents are coming onto the...

  19. Differentiation of parenteral anticoagulants in the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism

    OpenAIRE

    Adiguzel Cafer; Fareed Jawed; Thethi Indermohan

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The prevention of venous thromboembolism has been identified as a leading priority in hospital safety. Recommended parenteral anticoagulant agents with different indications for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism include unfractionated heparin, low-molecular-weight heparins and fondaparinux. Prescribing decisions in venous thromboembolism management may seem complex due to the large range of clinical indications and patient types, and the range of antic...

  20. Patients’ and physicians’ satisfaction with a pharmacist managed anticoagulation program in a family medicine clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Bishop, Lisa; Young, Stephanie; Twells, Laurie; Dillon, Carla; Hawboldt, John

    2015-01-01

    Background A pharmacist managed anticoagulation service was initiated in a multi-physician family medicine clinic in December 2006. In order to determine the patient and physician satisfaction with the service, a study was designed to describe the patients’ satisfaction with the warfarin education and management they received from the pharmacist, and to describe the physicians’ satisfaction with the level of care provided by the pharmacist for patients taking warfarin. A self-administered sur...

  1. Safety and Efficacy Outcomes of Home and Hospital Warfarin Management Within a Pediatric Anticoagulation Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sophie; McLoughlin, Siobhan; Piovesan, Dana; Savoia, Helen; Monagle, Paul; Newall, Fiona

    2016-04-01

    The complexity of managing children with chronic disease has led to an increase in the use of long-term warfarin therapy. Time in therapeutic range (TTR) is the preferred method for determining efficacy and stability of warfarin management. This study aimed to determine the TTR achievement and incidence of adverse events among pediatric warfarin patients managed by an anticoagulation clinic over 12 months and to compare TTR achievement between patients self-testing (PST) at home and those monitored using routine methods. International normalized ratio (INR) results reported for 2012 for children currently having their warfarin therapy managed by a dedicated pediatric anticoagulation clinic were analyzed. Warfarin-related adverse events were recorded. A total of 164 patients were included. In total, 93 children performed PST and 71 children tested their INR at a hospital or pathology service. TTR achievement for the cohort was 67.1% (95% confidence interval, 64.4-69.7). A total of 69.2% of INR tests conducted at home were within the TTR compared with 64.3% of INR tests conducted at a hospital or pathology service (P=0.07). One major bleeding event occurred and there was 1 thrombotic episode. PST demonstrated noninferior warfarin stability compared with routine methods. Routine outcome evaluation of pediatric anticoagulation management within single institutions is necessary to confirm the success of such programs. PMID:26808370

  2. Depolymerized glycosaminoglycan and its anticoagulant activities from sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Wang, Yuanhong; Jiang, Tingfu; Lv, Lv; Zhang, Boyuan; Lv, Zhihua

    2015-01-01

    A controlled Cu(2+) catalytic free-radical depolymerization process of fucosylated chondroitin sulfate from sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus was established. The results showed a good linear relationship between 1/Mw and time during the depolymerization. A series of fractions with different molecular weight were obtained, and the physicochemical properties of them were investigated and compared utilizing the chemical method, IR spectra and NMR spectra. The results showed no significant variations of the backbone and branches structures during the depolymerization. Furthermore, the anticoagulant activities of the depolymerized fractions were evaluated by the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The APTT decreases in proportion to the molecular weight following a linear relationship and the prolongation of APTT activity requires at least oligosaccharide of 4 trisaccharide units (about 4000 Da). Their anticoagulant activity of low molecular weight fraction (Mw = 24,755 Da) is similar to LMWH with significantly less bleeding risk. The results suggest that the low molecular weight fraction could be used as a novel anticoagulant with less undesired side effects. PMID:25260572

  3. Purification, characterization and in vitro anticoagulant activity of polysaccharides from Gentiana scabra Bunge roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Weirong; Xu, Huiling; Xie, Liangliang; Sun, Jian; Sun, Taotao; Wu, Xiaoyan; Fu, Qinbao

    2016-04-20

    Three water-soluble polysaccharide fractions (GSP-1, GSP-2 and GSP-3) were obtained from Gentiana scabra Bunge roots by DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B and Sepharose CL-6B column chromatography. Their chemical characterizations were determined by high performance gel permeation chromatography (HPGPC), high performance anion exchange chromatography coupled with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer. Moreover, their in vitro anticoagulant activities were evaluated by activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT) and prothrombin time (PT) assays. GSP-1 and GSP-2 were composed of rhamnose, arabinose, galactose, glucose and galacturonic acid, while GSP-3 consisted of rhamnose, arabinose, galactose and galacturonic acid with a weight-average molecular weight of 5.8×10(4)Da. In comparison with the control group (saline), GSP, GSP-1, GSP-2 and GSP-3 could prolong APTT and TT, but not PT. Overall, GSP-3 exhibited potent anticoagulant activity and would be expected to be a potential source of anticoagulant. PMID:26876858

  4. Neuraxial and peripheral nerve blocks in patients taking anticoagulant or thromboprophylactic drugs: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li J

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Jinlei Li, Thomas Halaszynski Department of Anesthesiology, Yale University, Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT, USA Abstract: Incidence of hemorrhagic complications from neuraxial blockade is unknown, but classically cited as 1 in 150,000 epidurals and 1 in 220,000 spinals. However, recent literature and epidemiologic data suggest that for certain patient populations the frequency is higher (1 in 3,000. Due to safety concerns of bleeding risk, guidelines and recommendations have been designed to reduce patient morbidity/mortality during regional anesthesia. Data from evidence-based reviews, clinical series and case reports, collaborative experience of experts, and pharmacology used in developing consensus statements are unable to address all patient comorbidities and are not able to guarantee specific outcomes. No laboratory model identifies patients at risk, and rarity of neuraxial hematoma defies prospective randomized study so “patient-specific” factors and “surgery-related” issues should be considered to improve patient-oriented outcomes. Details of advanced age, older females, trauma patients, spinal cord and vertebral column abnormalities, organ function compromise, presence of underlying coagulopathy, traumatic or difficult needle placement, as well as indwelling catheter(s during anticoagulation pose risks for significant bleeding. Therefore, balancing between thromboembolism, bleeding risk, and introduction of more potent antithrombotic medications in combination with regional anesthesia has resulted in a need for more than “consensus statements” to safely manage regional interventions during anticoagulant/thromboprophylactic therapy. Keywords: antithrombotics, novel oral anticoagulant, regional, neurologic dysfunction, hematoma, peripheral nerve blockade

  5. Different Finite Durations of Anticoagulation and Outcomes following Idiopathic Venous Thromboembolism: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron B. Holley

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Controversy remains over the optimal length of anticoagulation following idiopathic venous thromboembolism. We sought to determine if a longer, finite course of anticoagulation offered additional benefit over a short course in the initial treatment of the first episode of idiopathic venous thromboembolism. Data Extraction. Rates of deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, combined venous thromboembolism, major bleeding, and mortality were extracted from prospective trials enrolling patients with first time, idiopathic venous thromboembolism. Data was pooled using random effects meta-regression. Results. Ten trials, with a total of 3225 patients, met inclusion criteria. For each additional month of initial anticoagulation, once therapy was stopped, recurrent venous thromboembolism (0.03 (95% CI: −0.28 to 0.35; =.24, mortality (−0.10 (95% CI: −0.24 to 0.04; =.15, and major bleeding (−0.01 (95% CI: −0.05 to 0.02; =.44 rates measured in percent per patient years, did not significantly change. Conclusions: Patients with an initial idiopathic venous thromboembolism should be treated with 3 to 6 months of secondary prophylaxis with vitamin K antagonists. At that time, a decision between continuing with indefinite therapy can be made, but there is no benefit to a longer (but finite course of therapy.

  6. Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation: Patient Selection, Periprocedural Anticoagulation, Techniques, and Preventive Measures After Ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Mark S; Haïssaguerre, Michel; Natale, Andrea

    2016-07-26

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia encountered by cardiologists and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Risk factors for AF include age, male sex, genetic predisposition, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, sleep apnea, obesity, excessive alcohol, smoking, hyperthyroidism, pulmonary disease, air pollution, heart failure, and possibly excessive exercise. The management of AF involves decisions about rate versus rhythm control. Asymptomatic patients are generally managed with rate control and anticoagulation. Symptomatic patients will desire rhythm control. Rhythm control options are either antiarrhythmic agents or ablation, with each having its own risks and benefits. Ablation of AF has evolved from a rare and complex procedure to a common electrophysiological technique. Selection of patients to undergo ablation is an important aspect of AF care. Patients with the highest success rates of ablation are those with normal structural hearts and paroxysmal AF, although those with congestive heart failure have the greatest potential benefit of the procedure. Although pulmonary vein isolation of any means/energy source is the approach generally agreed on for those with paroxysmal AF, optimal techniques for the ablation of nonparoxysmal AF are not yet clear. Anticoagulation reduces thromboembolic complications; the newer anticoagulants have eased management for both the patient and the cardiologist. Aggressive management of modifiable risk factors (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, sleep apnea, obesity, excessive alcohol, smoking, hyperthyroidism, pulmonary disease, air pollution, and possibly excessive exercise) after ablation reduces the odds of recurrent AF and is an important element of care. PMID:27462054

  7. New direct oral anticoagulants--current therapeutic options and treatment recommendations for bleeding complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miesbach, Wolfgang; Seifried, Erhard

    2012-10-01

    To date, clinical studies show that the incidence of spontaneous bleeding with new direct oral anticoagulants (DOAs) is comparable to that of established anticoagulants. However, unlike vitamin K antagonists, there are currently no clinically available antidotes or approved reversal agents for new DOAs. Restoring normal coagulation is important in many cases, such as emergency surgeries, serious bleedings, or anticoagulant overdosing. Attempts have been made to restore normal coagulation after treatment with new DOAs using compounds such as recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa), prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC), or FEIBA (factor eight inhibitor bypassing activity). Limited pre-clinical data and even less clinical evidence are available on the usefulness of these methods in restoring normal coagulation for the emergency management of critical bleeding episodes. Evaluating the utility of DOAs is further complicated by the fact that it is unknown how predictive established test systems are of the bleeding risks. Clinical practice requires further evaluation of the emergency management options for the new DOAs to define the agents and the doses that are most useful. Furthermore, patients receiving long-term treatment with a DOA are likely to undergo elective surgery at some point, and there is lack of evidence regarding perioperative treatment regimens under such conditions. This review summarises potential bleeding management options and available data on the new DOAs. PMID:22782297

  8. Anticoagulation in combination with antiangiogenesis and chemotherapy for cancer patients: evidence and hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang J

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ji Wang, Chengchu Zhu Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical University, Linhai, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Hypercoagulable state and disorganized angiogenesis are two conspicuous characteristics during tumor progression. There are a considerable number of clinical trials focusing on the effects of anticoagulant and antiangiogenic drugs on the survival of cancer patients. Favorable outcomes have been observed. Excessive blood coagulation not only causes cancer-associated thrombosis, which is a common complication and is the second leading cause of death in patients, but also decreases intratumoral perfusion rates and drug delivery by reducing the effective cross-sectional area of blood vessels. Meanwhile, structural and functional abnormalities of the tumor microvasculature also compromise convective drug transport and create a hypoxic and acidic microenvironment. Vascular normalization strategy can temporarily recover the abnormal state of tumor vasculature by improving blood density, dilation, and leakiness, resulting in enhanced penetration of chemotherapies and oxygen within a short time window. In this article, we first review the evidence to support the opinion that anticoagulant and antiangiogenic therapy can improve cancer survival through several underlying mechanisms. Next, we speculate on the feasibility and value of the combined strategy and discuss whether such a combination has a synergistic antineoplastic effect in cancer patients by way of increasing blood vessel perfusion and drug distribution. Keywords: tumor microenvironment, anticoagulation, antiangiogenesis, vascular normalization, tumor perfusion

  9. Simultaneous comparison of thrombogenic reactions to different combinations of anticoagulants, activated clotting times, and materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Mirei; Iwasaki, Kiyotaka; Umezu, Mitsuo; Ozaki, Makoto

    2014-11-01

    Thrombogenic reactions under multiple interactions of pharmacological agents, doses, and materials have not been well understood yet. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability to simultaneously compare thrombogenic reactions to different combinations of anticoagulants, doses, and blood-contacting materials, in a single human blood using an in vitro test method. Four venous blood samples were drawn from each of six healthy volunteers into syringes that contained two different amounts of heparin and argatroban to set the activated clotting time (ACT) to approximately 200 or 500 s, respectively. The four blood samples from each volunteer were immediately poured into two clinical-grade extracorporeal circulation tubes: a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tube and a poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate)-coated (PMEA) PVC tube. These tubes with an inner diameter of 12.7 mm were rotated at 183 rpm in a 37°C chamber for 10 min. The results indicated that the in vitro thrombogenicity test method was capable of assessing differences in platelet factor 4 and β-thromboglobulin increases among different combinations of the two materials, two anticoagulants, and two ACTs. Higher amounts of total plasma proteins were absorbed on PVC tubes than on PMEA-coated tubes when using the same anticoagulant and dose. These data elucidate that the in vitro thrombogenicity test method is useful for the simultaneous quantitative evaluation of the influences of various combinations of materials, pharmacological agents, and doses on thrombogenicity in a single human blood. PMID:24652689

  10. Pharmacokinetics of eight anticoagulant rodenticides in mice after single oral administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbroucke, V; Bousquet-Melou, A; De Backer, P; Croubels, S

    2008-10-01

    The first aim of the study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of eight anticoagulant rodenticides (brodifacoum, bromadiolone, chlorophacinone, coumatetralyl, difenacoum, difethialone, flocoumafen and warfarin) in plasma and liver of the mouse after single oral administration. Eight groups of mice dosed orally with a different anticoagulant rodenticide in a dose equal to one-half the lethal dose 50 (LD(50)), were killed at various times up to 21 days after administration. The eight anticoagulant rodenticides were assayed in plasma and liver by an LC-ESI-MS/MS method. Depending on the compound, the limit of quantification was set at 1 or 5 ng/mL in plasma. In liver, the limit of quantification was set at 250 ng/g for coumatetralyl and warfarin and at 100 ng/g for the other compounds. The elimination half-lives in plasma for first-generation rodenticides were shorter than those for second-generation rodenticides. Coumatetralyl, a first-generation product, had a plasma elimination half-life of 0.52 days. Brodifacoum, a second-generation product, showed a plasma elimination half-life of 91.7 days. The elimination half-lives in liver varied from 15.8 days for coumatetralyl to 307.4 days for brodifacoum. The second aim of the study was to illustrate the applicability of the developed method in a clinical case of a dog suspected of rodenticide poisoning. PMID:19000263

  11. Simultaneous determination of eight anticoagulant rodenticides in blood serum and liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalermchaikit, T; Felice, L J; Murphy, M J

    1993-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic method was developed for the analysis of indandione and 4-hydroxycoumarin anticoagulant rodenticides in blood serum and liver. The method enabled the measurement of serum and liver concentrations of eight anticoagulant rodenticides: brodifacoum, bromadiolone, chlorophacinone, coumafuryl, coumatetralyl, diphacinone, difenacoum, and warfarin. Anticoagulants were extracted from serum and liver with acetonitrile. Extracts were applied to solid-phase extraction columns, which contained mixed packings. Column eluates were evaporated to dryness, reconstituted, and subjected to reversed-phase liquid chromatography. Hydroxycoumarins were detected by fluorescence at an excitation wavelength of 318 nm and an emission wavelength of 390 nm. Indandiones were detected by UV absorption at 285 nm. Extraction efficiencies of greater than 75% for serum and greater than 69% for liver were obtained. The within-run precision (CV) ranged from 2.4 to 8.6% for serum and 2.6 to 8.7% for liver. The between-run precision (CV) ranged from 1.5 to 12.2% for serum and from 2.1 to 11.8% for liver. Hydroxycoumarin rodenticides were detected at 1 ng/mL of serum and 1 ng/g of liver. Indandiones were detected at 10 ng/mL of serum and 10 ng/g of liver. PMID:8429630

  12. Plasma superwarfarin levels and vitamin K1 treatment in dogs with anticoagulant rodenticide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robben, J H; Kuijpers, E A; Mout, H C

    1998-01-01

    The plasma concentration, plasma half-life (t1/2), and mean residence time (MRT) of rodenticide anticoagulants were determined in 21 dogs in which a preliminary diagnosis of anticoagulant rodenticide poisoning had been made. Brodifacoum, difethialone, and difenacoum were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in the plasma of 13, 3, and 2 dogs, respectively. At presentation the plasma concentration ranged from below the detection limit (10 ng/L) to 851 ng/L. Toxin could not be detected in 3 dogs, despite these animals showing characteristic coagulation disturbances and a positive response to therapy with vitamin K1. In 7 dogs the estimated t1/2 of brodifacoum ranged from 0.9 to 4.7 (median 2.4) days with a MRT of 1.9 to 3.7 (median 2.8) days. In 2 dogs the individual t1/2 of difethialone was 2.2 and 3.2 days and the MRT was 2.3 and 2.8 days, respectively. Two dogs died during emergency treatment. Treatment in the remaining 19 dogs consisted of the administration of vitamin K1 and supportive therapy. The dose of vitamin K1 was reduced in a stepwise manner as long as the prothrombin time remained within physiological limits. The variation in initial plasma concentrations of the anticoagulants combined with the results of treatment support the idea that an individual therapeutic approach is warranted. PMID:9477532

  13. Relation between Intensity of Biocide Practice and Residues of Anticoagulant Rodenticides in Red Foxes (Vulpes vulpes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geduhn, Anke; Jacob, Jens; Schenke, Detlef; Keller, Barbara; Kleinschmidt, Sven; Esther, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) are commonly used to control rodent infestations for biocidal and plant protection purposes. This can lead to AR exposure of non-target small mammals and their predators, which is known from several regions of the world. However, drivers of exposure variation are usually not known. To identify environmental drivers of AR exposure in non-targets we analyzed 331 liver samples of red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) for residues of eight ARs and used local parameters (percentage of urban area and livestock density) to test for associations to residue occurrence. 59.8% of samples collected across Germany contained at least one rodenticide, in 20.2% of cases at levels at which biological effects are suspected. Second generation anticoagulants (mainly brodifacoum and bromadiolone) occurred more often than first generation anticoagulants. Local livestock density and the percentage of urban area were good indicators for AR residue occurrence. There was a positive association between pooled ARs and brodifacoum occurrence with livestock density as well as of pooled ARs, brodifacoum and difenacoum occurrence with the percentage of urban area on administrative district level. Pig holding drove associations of livestock density to AR residue occurrence in foxes. Therefore, risk mitigation strategies should focus on areas of high pig density and on highly urbanized areas to minimize non-target risk. PMID:26418154

  14. Trials of the anticoagulant rodenticides bromadiolone and difenacoum against the house mouse (Mus musculus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, F P; Plant, C J; Bradfield, A

    1981-10-01

    Laboratory and field trials were conducted to determine the efficacy of the anticoagulant rodenticide bromadiolone against the house mouse (Mus musculus). In laboratory feeding tests, family groups of warfarin-resistant mice maintained in pens and conditioned to feeding on plain foods were offered pinhead oatmeal bait containing bromadiolone at 0.005%. Overall mortality in replicated 21-day poison treatments was 55/58 or 94.8%. Six field trials were carried out, using the same poison bait, against mice infesting farm buildings. Treatment success, estimated from the results of census baitings conducted before and after treatment, ranged between 60.4% and 100%, mean 92.4%. In equivalent field trials using difenacoum, another newly developed anticoagulant rodenticide, the control achieved ranged between 70.2% and 100%, mean 96.0%. Five field trials, three involving bromadiolone and two difenacoum, were not completely successful and the surviving mice were removed for laboratory examination. In 21-day toxicity tests, each animal was fed the poison bait offered to it earlier in the field. Bromadiolone and difenacoum gave kills of 12/21 (57.1%) and 9/11 (81.8%) respectively. The possible emergence of mouse populations resistant to these anticoagulants is considered. PMID:7288171

  15. Accumulation of anticoagulant rodenticides in a non-target insectivore, the European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowding, Claire V; Shore, Richard F; Worgan, Andrew; Baker, Philip J; Harris, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Studies on exposure of non-targets to anticoagulant rodenticides have largely focussed on predatory birds and mammals; insectivores have rarely been studied. We investigated the exposure of 120 European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) from throughout Britain to first- and second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides (FGARs and SGARs) using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence detection (HPLC) and liquid-chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS). The proportion of hedgehogs with liver SGAR concentrations detected by HPLC was 3-13% per compound, 23% overall. LCMS identified much higher prevalence for difenacoum and bromadiolone, mainly because of greater ability to detect low-level contamination. The overall proportion of hedgehogs with LCMS-detected residues was 57.5% (SGARs alone) and 66.7% (FGARs and SGARs combined); 27 (22.5%) hedgehogs contained >1 rodenticide. Exposure of insectivores and predators to anticoagulant rodenticides appears to be similar. The greater sensitivity of LCMS suggests that hitherto exposure of non-targets is likely to have been under-estimated using HPLC techniques. PMID:19674821

  16. The susceptibility of Bandicota bengalensis from Rangoon, Burma to several anticoagulant rodenticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, J E; Htun, P T; Naing, H

    1980-02-01

    The baseline susceptibility of the lesser bandicoot rat, Bandicota bengalensis, from Rangoon, Burma, to five anticoagulant rodenticides was established with no-choice feeding in the laboratory. The susceptibility of lesser bandicoots to the several poisons (brodifacoum, difenacoum, diphacinone, coumatetralyl, and warfarin) was such that they were offered at a 0.001% concentration. B. bengalensis was most susceptible to brodifacoum, and in descending order, difenacoum, coumatetralyl, diphacinone and warfarin. In comparison with Rattus norvegicus on warfarin at 0.005%, B. bengalensis proved more susceptible. Feeding tests at 0.005% concentration indicated that a 1-day feeding on brodifacoum and difenacoum would result in complete mortality, whereas coumatetralyl and warfarin would require 4 days feeding to a 100% kill. Brodifacoum and difenacoum are recommended at 0.002-0.005% bait concentrations and coumatetralyl at 0.005--0.01% concentrations for the control of B. bengalensis in the field in Rangoon. The use of any anticoagulant material in rat control should be alternated with acute toxicants to retard the possible development of anticoagulant resistance. PMID:6444311

  17. Relation between Intensity of Biocide Practice and Residues of Anticoagulant Rodenticides in Red Foxes (Vulpes vulpes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Geduhn

    Full Text Available Anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs are commonly used to control rodent infestations for biocidal and plant protection purposes. This can lead to AR exposure of non-target small mammals and their predators, which is known from several regions of the world. However, drivers of exposure variation are usually not known. To identify environmental drivers of AR exposure in non-targets we analyzed 331 liver samples of red foxes (Vulpes vulpes for residues of eight ARs and used local parameters (percentage of urban area and livestock density to test for associations to residue occurrence. 59.8% of samples collected across Germany contained at least one rodenticide, in 20.2% of cases at levels at which biological effects are suspected. Second generation anticoagulants (mainly brodifacoum and bromadiolone occurred more often than first generation anticoagulants. Local livestock density and the percentage of urban area were good indicators for AR residue occurrence. There was a positive association between pooled ARs and brodifacoum occurrence with livestock density as well as of pooled ARs, brodifacoum and difenacoum occurrence with the percentage of urban area on administrative district level. Pig holding drove associations of livestock density to AR residue occurrence in foxes. Therefore, risk mitigation strategies should focus on areas of high pig density and on highly urbanized areas to minimize non-target risk.

  18. Clinical impact of temporary therapy interruptions on anticoagulation control in patients treated with warfarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boros, Melanie L; Rybarczyk, Amy M; Gallegos, Patrick J; Zimmerman, Jacob P

    2013-01-01

    This retrospective cohort study was completed to describe the impact of short-term therapy interruptions on anticoagulation control in patients receiving warfarin. Patients seen in a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic were included if they were on a stable warfarin dose and then underwent a planned interruption in therapy. Patients were excluded if phytonadione was administered before the interruption or if medications known to interact with warfarin were altered during the interruption. Data were analyzed for 2 groups: (1) patients with a single interruption in therapy (group 1) and (2) patients with a single interruption in therapy plus patients with an extended interruption in therapy (group 2). The primary endpoint was the change in weekly maintenance warfarin dose from preinterruption to postinterruption. Evaluation of 199 patients resulted in 31 interruptions in group 1 and 34 interruptions in group 2. A change in dose was required in 58% of patients in group 1 and 56% of patients in group 2. The mean absolute change in dose was 2.03 ± 2.79 mg (P anticoagulation control and the direction of this dose change cannot be predicted. PMID:23011173

  19. Coagulant and anticoagulant activities of Bothrops lanceolatus (Fer de lance) venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lôbo de Araújo, A; Kamiguti, A; Bon, C

    2001-01-01

    Bothrops lanceolatus venom contains caseinolytic, phospholipase, esterase and haemorrhagic activities. We have investigated the coagulant and anticoagulant actions of B. lanceolatus venom on human citrated plasma and on purified plasma components. Although B. lanceolatus venom up to 50 microg/ml was unable to clot citrated plasma, at concentrations > or = 5 microg/ml the venom dose-dependently clotted purified human fibrinogen, indicating the presence of a thrombin-like enzyme. Human plasma (final concentration > or = 12.5%) dose-dependently inhibited the venom-induced fibrinogen clotting. This finding suggested that endogenous plasma protease inhibitors can affect the venom's action on fibrinogen. To investigate this possibility, B. lanceolatus venom was incubated with different plasma protease inhibitors and the activity on fibrinogen tested. alpha(2)-Macroglobulin and alpha(1)-antitrypsin did not interfere with the coagulant activity of the venom whereas the antithrombin-III/heparin complex partially inhibited this activity. A non-toxic, acidic phospholipase A(2) purified from B. lanceolatus venom prolonged the activated partial thromboplastin time in human plasma from 39.7+/-0.5 s (control with saline) to 60.2+/-0.9 s with 50 microg of PLA(2) (p<0.001), suggesting an anticoagulant activity associated with this enzyme. This anticoagulant activity may account for some of the effects of the venom on blood coagulation. PMID:10978756

  20. The practical management of bleedings during treatment with direct oral anticoagulants: the emergency reversal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Masotti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bleeding represents the most feared complication of the new oral anticoagulants, direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs, as well as all the antithrombotic therapies. During the acute phase of bleeding in patients taking anticoagulants, restoration of an effective hemostasis represents the cornerstone of practical management. While vitamin K antagonists are effectively and promptly reversed by specific antidotes such as prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs, fresh frozen plasma or vitamin K, it is still not clear how to manage the urgent reversal of DOACs during life-threatening or major bleedings due to the lack of specific antidotes. However, in vitro and ex vivo studies have suggested some potential strategies to reverse DOACs in clinical practice, other than general support measures that are always recommended. Activated charcoal could be used in subjects with DOAC-related bleedings presenting to the emergency department within two hours of the last oral intake. Non-activated or activated PCCs (FEIBA and recombinant activated Factor VII (raFVII seem to be the optimal strategy for urgent reversal of dabigatran, while non-activated PCCs seem to have efficacy in reversing rivaroxaban. Due to its low plasma protein binding, dabigatran could be also dialyzed in urgent cases. Clinically relevant non-major bleedings and minor bleedings should be treated with general and local measures, respectively, and, when necessary, with dose delay or drug withdrawal. In this article, the Authors describe the practical approach to bleedings occurring during DOACs treatment.

  1. [Non-VKA oral anticoagulants: an update for the clinical biologists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullier, François; Douxfils, Jonathan; Tamigniau, Anne; Dogné, Jean-Michel; Horellou, Marie-Hélène; Flaujac, Claire; Chatelain, Bernard; Goffinet, Catherine; Samama, Meyer-Michel; Gouin-Thibault, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs), thanks to their ease of use and their similar or superior safety/efficacy profiles versus warfarin, have now widely reached the lucrative market of anticoagulation. However, while the marketing authorization holders always claim, in a quite unclear way that no monitoring is required, accumulative evidence and cases of major bleeding have been described in the literature and reported by spontaneous reporting systems at the regulator's level. These compounds are usually given at fixed doses without routine coagulation monitoring. However, new data suggests that an assessment of the response at the individual level could improve the benefit-risk ratio of, at least dabigatran. Therefore, in certain patient populations, i.e. acute or chronic renal impairment or multiple drug interactions, measurement of drug exposure may be useful to ensure an optimal treatment response. More specific circumstances such as patients experiencing a haemorrhagic or thromboembolic event during the treatment duration, patients who require urgent surgery or an invasive procedure, or patient with a suspected overdose could benefit from such a measurement. This article aims at providing guidance on how to best estimate the intensity of anticoagulation using laboratory assays in daily practice. PMID:25857818

  2. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants for the prevention of recurrent venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauersachs, Rupert

    2016-08-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is associated with a risk of recurrence that depends on factors specific to index event and patient. A first unprovoked VTE increases the risk of a recurrent event, particularly during the first year after anticoagulation cessation. Determining a strategy for the long-term prevention of recurrent VTE poses challenges that stem from a lack of agreement on recommended therapy duration and varying treatment burden for the patient. Oral anticoagulants, including vitamin K antagonists and non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs), are the main treatment options for the long-term prevention of recurrent VTE. However, the risk of VTE recurrence must be balanced against the risk of bleeding in each patient. Phase III clinical trials have evaluated rivaroxaban, apixaban and dabigatran for extended treatment and prevention of VTE versus placebo, and versus warfarin in the case of dabigatran. Compared with placebo treatment, each NOAC showed superior efficacy together with an acceptable safety profile during extended treatment periods of 6-18months. Patients receiving long-term NOAC therapy will still require regular risk factor assessment, but these agents may permit longer treatment duration with an improved benefit-risk profile. PMID:27263046

  3. Quality control of radiotherapeutic treatment of medulloblastoma in a multicentric study; The contribution of radiotherapy technique to tumour relapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrie, C.; Lacroze, M.; Ginestet, C. (Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Leon-Berard, 69 - Lyon (France)); Alapetite, C.; Pontvert, D. (Institut Curie, Paris (France). Radiotherapy Unit); Mere, P. (Hopital Bellevue, Saint-Etienne (France). Radiotherapy Unit); Aimard, L.; Pignon, T. (Hopital de la Timone, 13 - Marseille (France)); Pons, A. (Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Claudius-Regaud, 31 - Toulouse (France)); Kolodie, H. (Hopital A. Michallon, Grenoble (France). Radiotherapy Unit); Seng, S. (Hopital Charles-Nicolle, Germont (France). Radiotherapy Unit); Lagrange, J.L. (Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Antoine Lacassagne, 06 - Nice (France)); Bernard, J.L. (Hopital Nord Ch. Dr. Bourrely, Marseille (France). Radiotherapy Unit); the French Medulloblastoma Group (Center of Pediatric Oncology of Grenoble, Lyon, Marseille, Nice, Paris, Rouen, Saint-Etienne, Toulouse (France))

    1992-06-01

    Between June 1986 and November 1989, 88 medulloblastoma or primitive neuroectodermic tumour localised in the posterior fossa have been included in the M7 multicentric protocol, 82 received the totality of the radio- therapy treatment and were evaluable for this study. Of 82 patients, 22 relapsed: their radiotherapy treatment is analysed in this study. In 10/22 relapse cases treatment failure was probably due to radiotherapeutic imperfection. This study confirms the necessity of a strict radiotherapy control, particularly in multicentric study. (author). 7 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab.

  4. Epoetin alfa in platinum-treated ovarian cancer patients: results of a multinational, multicentre, randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkinson, P. M.; Antonopoulos, M; Lahousen, M; Lind, M.; Kosmidis, P

    2006-01-01

    This multicentre, open-label, controlled clinical trial assessed the effects of epoetin alfa treatment on haematologic and quality of life (QOL) parameters in 182 anaemic (Hb⩽12 g dl−1) ovarian cancer patients receiving platinum chemotherapy. Patients were randomised 2 : 1 to receive epoetin alfa 10 000–20 000 IU three times weekly plus best standard treatment (BST) or BST only. Main study end points were changes from baseline in haemoglobin (Hb) level, transfusion requirements, and QOL. For ...

  5. Prophylactic efficacy of lithium administered every second day: a WHO multicentre study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plenge, P; Amin, M; Agarwal, A K; Greil, W; Kim, M J; Panteleyeva, G; Park, J M; Prilipko, L; Rayushkin, V; Sharma, M; Mellerup, E

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the prophylactic efficacy of lithium administered every second day to patients with bipolar disorder or recurrent unipolar depressive disorder. METHODS: The study was carried out as a WHO multicentre study in five different psychiatric clinics: Russia (Moscow), Canada (Montreal...... recurrences. The mean 12-h standard serum lithium concentration was lower in the patients who had recurrences than in those who stayed euthymic. The results suggest that to be effective when administered every second day, lithium must be given in a dose leading to a 12-h standard serum lithium concentration...

  6. L-Carnitine-supplementation in advanced pancreatic cancer (CARPAN) - a randomized multicentre trial

    OpenAIRE

    Kraft Matthias; Kraft Kathleen; Gärtner Simone; Mayerle Julia; Simon Peter; Weber Eckhard; Schütte Kerstin; Stieler Jens; Koula-Jenik Heide; Holzhauer Peter; Gröber Uwe; Engel Georg; Müller Cornelia; Feng You-Shan; Aghdassi Ali

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Cachexia, a >10% loss of body-weight, is one factor determining the poor prognosis of pancreatic cancer. Deficiency of L-Carnitine has been proposed to cause cancer cachexia. Findings We screened 152 and enrolled 72 patients suffering from advanced pancreatic cancer in a prospective, multi-centre, placebo-controlled, randomized and double-blinded trial to receive oral L-Carnitine (4 g) or placebo for 12 weeks. At entry patients reported a mean weight loss of 12 ± 2,5 (SEM)...

  7. Obstetric risk indicators for labour dystocia in nulliparous women: a multi-centre cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, H.; Olsen, J.; Ottesen, Bent Smedegaard;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In nulliparous women dystocia is the most common obstetric problem and its etiology is largely unknown. The frequency of augmentation and cesarean delivery related to dystocia is high although it is not clear if a slow progress justifies the interventions. Studies of risk factors for...... dystocia often do not provide diagnostic criteria for the diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to identify obstetric and clinical risk indicators of dystocia defined by strict and explicit criteria. METHODS: A multi-centre population based cohort study with prospectively collected data from 2810...

  8. Clinical and echocardiographic assessment of the Medtronic Advantage aortic valve prosthesis: the Scandinavian multicentre, prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaverstad, Rune; Vitale, Nicola; Karevold, Asbjørn;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this report is the prospective, multicentre evaluation of clinical results and haemodynamic performance of the Medtronic Advantage aortic valve prosthesis. METHODS: From April 2001 to June 2003, 166 patients (male:female 125:41; mean (SD) age 61.8 (11.8) years) received an...... aortic advantage valve prosthesis. Complete cumulative follow-up was 242.7 patient-years (maximum 3.2; mean 1.6 years). Postoperatively, patients underwent early (within 30 days) and 1 year transthoracic echocardiography. RESULTS: 30 day mortality was 2.4% (n = 4). Kaplan-Meier estimates of freedom from...

  9. Four Thrombotic Events Over 5 Years, Two Pulmonary Emboli and Two Deep Venous Thrombosis, When Testosterone-HCG Therapy Was Continued Despite Concurrent Anticoagulation in a 55-Year-Old Man With Lupus Anticoagulant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glueck, Charles J.; Lee, Kevin; Prince, Marloe; Jetty, Vybhav; Shah, Parth; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background: When exogenous testosterone or treatments to elevate testosterone (human chorionic gonadotropin [HCG] or Clomid) are prescribed for men who have antecedent thrombophilia, deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism often occur and may recur despite adequate anticoagulation if testosterone therapy is continued. Case Presentation: A 55-year-old white male was referred to us because of 4 thrombotic events, 3 despite adequate anticoagulation over a 5-year period. We assessed interactions between thrombophilia, exogenous testosterone therapy, and recurrent thrombosis. In 2009, despite low-normal serum testosterone 334 ng/dL (lower normal limit [LNL] 300 ng/dL), he was given testosterone (TT) cypionate (50 mg/week) and human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG; 500 units/week) for presumed hypogonadism. Ten months later, with supranormal serum T (1385 ng/dL, upper normal limit [UNL] 827 ng/dL) and estradiol (E2) 45 pg/mL (UNL 41 pg/mL), he had a pulmonary embolus (PE) and was then anticoagulated for 2 years (enoxaparin, then warfarin). Four years later, on TT-HCG, he had his first deep venous thrombosis (DVT). TT was stopped and HCG continued; he was anticoagulated (enoxaparin, then warfarin, then apixaban, then fondaparinux). One year after his first DVT, on HCG, still on fondaparinux, he had a second DVT (5/315), was anticoagulated (enoxaparin + warfarin), with a Greenfield filter placed, but 8 days later had a second PE. Thrombophilia testing revealed the lupus anticoagulant. After stopping HCG, and maintained on warfarin, he has been free of further DVT-PE for 9 months. Conclusion: When DVT-PE occur on TT or HCG, in the presence of thrombophilia, TT-HCG should be stopped, lest DVT-PE reoccur despite concurrent anticoagulation. PMID:27536705

  10. No influence of dabigatran anticoagulation on hemorrhagic transformation in an experimental model of ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinand Bohmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dabigatran etexilate (DE is a new oral direct thrombin inhibitor. Clinical trials point towards a favourable risk-to-benefit profile of DE compared to warfarin. In this study, we evaluated whether hemorrhagic transformation (HT occurs after experimental stroke under DE treatment as we have shown for warfarin. METHODS: 44 male C57BL/6 mice were pretreated orally with 37.5 mg/kg DE, 75 mg/kg DE or saline and diluted thrombin time (dTT and DE plasma concentrations were monitored. Ischemic stroke was induced by transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO for 1 h or 3 h. We assessed functional outcome and HT blood volume 24 h and 72 h after tMCAO. RESULTS: After 1 h tMCAO, HT blood volume did not differ significantly between mice pretreated with DE 37.5 mg/kg and controls (1.5±0.5 µl vs. 1.8±0.5 µl, p>0.05. After 3 h tMCAO, DE-anticoagulated mice did also not show an increase in HT, neither at the dose of 37.5 mg/kg equivalent to anticoagulant treatment in the therapeutic range (1.3±0.9 µl vs. control 2.3±0.5 µl, p>0.05 nor at 75 mg/kg, clearly representing supratherapeutic anticoagulation (1.8±0.8 µl, p>0.05. Furthermore, no significant increase in HT under continued anticoagulation with DE 75 mg/kg could be found at 72 h after tMCAO for 1 h (1.7±0.9 µl vs. control 1.6±0.4 µl, p>0.05. CONCLUSION: Our experimental data suggest that DE does not significantly increase hemorrhagic transformation after transient focal cerebral ischemia in mice. From a translational viewpoint, this indicates that a continuation of DE anticoagulation in case of an ischemic stroke might be safe, but clearly, clinical data on this question are warranted.

  11. Safety Assessment of Anticoagulation therapy in Patients with Hemorrhagic Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavian Ghandehari

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anticoagulation therapy is a routine treatment in patients with hemorrhagic cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT. However, fear of hemorrhagic complications and deterioration course following anticoagulation often disturbs the responsible physician.Methods: This was a Prospective observational study on consecutive CVT patients with hemorrhagic venous infarction or subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH admitted in Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad, Iran, during 2006-2012. The diagnosis of CVT in suspected cases was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging/magnetic resonance venography (MRI/MRV, and computerized tomography (CT angiography following established diagnostic criteria. Demographic data, clinical manifestations from onset to end of the observation period, location of thrombus, location and size of infarction and hemorrhage, and clinical course during treatment were recorded. Choice of the treatment was left to the opinion of the treating physician. Clinical course during 1 week of treatment was assessed based on the baseline modified National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score. Three or more points decrease or increase of modified NIHSS after 1 week of treatment was considered as improvement or deterioration courses, respectively. Other clinical courses were categorized as stabilization course.Results: 102 hemorrhagic CVT patients (80 females,22 males with mean age of 38.6 ± 8 years were prospectively investigated. Of the 102 hemorrhagic CVT patients in the acute phase, 52 patients (50.9% were anticoagulated with adjusted dose intravenous heparin infusion and 50 cases (49.1% received subcutaneous enoxaparin 1mg/Kg twice daily. Decreased consciousness had a significant effect on the clinical course of the patients (X2 = 9.493, df = 2, P = 0.009. Presence of SAH had no significant effect on the clinical course of our anticoagulated hemorrhagic CVT cases (X2 = 0.304, df = 2,P = 0.914. Extension of Infarction in more than two thirds of a

  12. Continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration with a low citrate dose regional anticoagulation protocol and a phosphate-containing solution: effects on acid–base status and phosphate supplementation needs

    OpenAIRE

    Morabito, Santo; Pistolesi, Valentina; Tritapepe, Luigi; Vitaliano, Elio; Zeppilli, Laura; Polistena, Francesca; Fiaccadori, Enrico; Pierucci, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent guidelines suggest the adoption of regional citrate anticoagulation (RCA) as first choice CRRT anticoagulation modality in patients without contraindications for citrate. Regardless of the anticoagulation protocol, hypophosphatemia represents a potential drawback of CRRT which could be prevented by the adoption of phosphate-containing CRRT solutions. The aim was to evaluate the effects on acid–base status and phosphate supplementation needs of a new RCA protocol for Continuo...

  13. Implementation of continuous renal replacement therapy with regional citrate anticoagulation on a surgical and trauma intensive care unit: impact on clinical and economic aspects—an observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Hafner, Sebastian; Stahl, Wolfgang; Fels, Theresa; Träger, Karl; Georgieff, Michael; Wepler, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background Regional citrate anticoagulation (RCA) is being increasingly used during continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) in intensive care units as an alternative to systemic heparin anticoagulation. However, due to its availability in a variety of solutions and dialysis systems, RCA is still considered a complex intervention, possibly leading to confusion and pitfalls in everyday practice. We therefore tested retrospectively if the introduction of RCA as a new anticoagulation strategy...

  14. Prospective cohort study of a pharmacological follow-up program of anticoagulated patients admitted to nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís Cuixart Costa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Anticoagulant treatment, despite providing a clear benefit to prevent and treat thrombo-embolic disease, is difficult to manage in routine practice. This is due to individual variability of dosing, narrow therapeutic margin, drug interactions, and side effects. An increasing number of patients admitted to nursing homes are under oral anticoagulant therapy because of deep venous thrombosis and, especially, atrial fibrillation. These are patients with a profile that makes prescription of anticoagulant treatment more difficult - elderly, taking multiple concomitant medications and with multiple ailments. Objetive. We hypothesized that the implementation of a primary care pharmacological follow-up program of oral anticoagulant therapy in patients admitted to nursing homes, with the purpose of coordinating the different professionals and care levels, would lead to greater benefit and reduction of side effects. Methods. A one-year descriptive prospective cohort study was conducted of 27 patients admitted to nursing homes who are under anticoagulation therapy followed by the primary care team. We analyzed different variables obtained from computerized medical records, from which indicators on the program were established (coverage and registration as well as outcome indicators (as defined by the British Committee for Standards in Haematology. Results. The profile of patients under anticoagulation and admitted to nursing homes is elderly (84 years, with a predominance of women (70%, atrial fibrillation as most frequent indication (70.4%, hypertension as major cardiovascular risk factor (92% and most of them on multiple drugs (92%. The analysis of the program results showed excellent coverage and registration indicators (100%. Outcome indicators also showed good results, with percentages of optimal international normalized ratio of 78% (exceeding the defined minimum standard and very low rates of complications (3%. Conclusions. The

  15. Clinical Outcomes of Anticoagulation Therapy in Patients With Symptomatic Spontaneous Isolated Dissection of the Superior Mesenteric Artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Youngjin; Cho, Yong-Pil; Ko, Gi-Young; Seo, Dong Wan; Kim, Min-Ju; Kwon, Hyunwook; Kim, Hyangkyoung; Kwon, Tae-Won

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the clinical outcomes of long-term anticoagulation therapy in patients with symptomatic spontaneous isolated dissection of the superior mesenteric artery (SIDSMA) and to evaluate whether conservative treatment with anticoagulation therapy is a safe and effective treatment modality for these patients.In this single center, observational cohort study, data from a prospectively recruiting symptomatic SIDSMA registry, including demographics, risk factors of interest, clinical characteristics and outcomes, and initial and follow-up computed tomography angiography (CTA) findings, were analyzed retrospectively.During an 8-year period, a total of 52 consecutive patients who underwent conservative treatment with the use of long-term anticoagulation were included in this study. Clinical symptoms resolved within 11 days in all except 4 patients (7.7%); 3 received endovascular treatment for persistent symptoms and 1 received surgical repair. The mean duration of anticoagulation therapy was 9 (range: 3-60) months. A follow-up CTA showed complete remodeling in 20 (41.7%) patients, and the mean diameter and the incidence of false lumen thrombosis were also decreased significantly. There was no anticoagulation therapy-related mortality or morbidity except 2 (4.2%) minor bleeding complications, and no symptomatic recurrence or aggravation of the dissection occurred during the mean follow-up period of 47.5 (range: 10-97) months.The present study showed that long-term anticoagulation therapy could result in a high rate of complete remodeling during the natural course of symptomatic SIDSMA. Conservative treatment with long-term anticoagulation therapy could be an optimal treatment strategy for symptomatic SIDSMA. PMID:27100453

  16. A multicentre ‘end to end’ dosimetry audit for cervix HDR brachytherapy treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To undertake the first multicentre fully ‘end to end’ dosimetry audit for HDR cervix brachytherapy, comparing planned and delivered dose distributions around clinical treatment applicators, with review of local procedures. Materials and methods: A film-dosimetry audit was performed at 46 centres, including imaging, applicator reconstruction, treatment planning and delivery. Film dose maps were calculated using triple-channel dosimetry and compared to RTDose data from treatment planning systems. Deviations between plan and measurement were quantified at prescription Point A and using gamma analysis. Local procedures were also discussed. Results: The mean difference between planned and measured dose at Point A was −0.6% for plastic applicators and −3.0% for metal applicators, at standard uncertainty 3.0% (k = 1). Isodose distributions agreed within 1 mm over a dose range 2–16 Gy. Mean gamma passing rates exceeded 97% for plastic and metal applicators at 3% (local) 2 mm criteria. Two errors were found: one dose normalisation error and one applicator library misaligned with the imaged applicator. Suggestions for quality improvement were also made. Conclusions: The concept of ‘end to end’ dosimetry audit for HDR brachytherapy has been successfully implemented in a multicentre environment, providing evidence that a high level of accuracy in brachytherapy dosimetry can be achieved

  17. Harmonization process and reliability assessment of anthropometric measurements in the elderly EXERNET multi-centre study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Gómez-Cabello

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The elderly EXERNET multi-centre study aims to collect normative anthropometric data for old functionally independent adults living in Spain. PURPOSE: To describe the standardization process and reliability of the anthropometric measurements carried out in the pilot study and during the final workshop, examining both intra- and inter-rater errors for measurements. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 98 elderly from five different regions participated in the intra-rater error assessment, and 10 different seniors living in the city of Toledo (Spain participated in the inter-rater assessment. We examined both intra- and inter-rater errors for heights and circumferences. RESULTS: For height, intra-rater technical errors of measurement (TEMs were smaller than 0.25 cm. For circumferences and knee height, TEMs were smaller than 1 cm, except for waist circumference in the city of Cáceres. Reliability for heights and circumferences was greater than 98% in all cases. Inter-rater TEMs were 0.61 cm for height, 0.75 cm for knee-height and ranged between 2.70 and 3.09 cm for the circumferences measured. Inter-rater reliabilities for anthropometric measurements were always higher than 90%. CONCLUSION: The harmonization process, including the workshop and pilot study, guarantee the quality of the anthropometric measurements in the elderly EXERNET multi-centre study. High reliability and low TEM may be expected when assessing anthropometry in elderly population.

  18. Dosimetry audit for a multi-centre IMRT head and neck trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: PARSPORT was a multi-centre randomised trial in the UK which compared Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy (CRT) for patients with head and neck cancer. The dosimetry audit goals were to verify the plan delivery in participating centres, ascertain what tolerances were suitable for head and neck IMRT trials and develop an IMRT credentialing program. Materials and methods: Centres enrolling patients underwent rigorous quality assurance before joining the trial. Following this each centre was visited for a dosimetry audit, which consisted of treatment planning system tests, fluence verification films, combined field films and dose point measurements. Results: Mean dose point measurements were made at six centres. For the primary planning target volume (PTV) the differences with the planned values for the IMRT and CRT arms were -0.6% (1.8% to -2.4%) and 0.7% (2.0% to -0.9%), respectively. Ninety-four percent of the IMRT fluence films for individual fields passed gamma criterion of 3%/3 mm and 75% of the films for combined fields passed gamma criterion 4%/3 mm (no significant difference between dynamic delivery and step and shoot delivery). Conclusions: This audit suggests that a 3% tolerance could be applied for PTV point doses. For dose distributions tolerances of 3%/3 mm on individual fields and 4%/3 mm for combined fields are proposed for multi-centre head and neck IMRT trials.

  19. Experiences with an Interoperable Data Acquisition Platform for Multi-Centric Research Networks Based on HL7 CDA

    OpenAIRE

    De Klein, A.; T, T. Ganslandt; Brinkmann, L.; Spitzer, M; Ueckert, F.; Prokosch, H. U.

    2006-01-01

    A remote data entry (RDE) module was successfully integrated within a Web-based telemedicine system1 in a German multi-centric research network for a rare disease called Epidermolysis Bullosa. The use of standards like XML and HL7 CDA (Clinical Document Architecture) for structured data storage, guarantees long-term accessibility and high level interoperability.

  20. Efficacy and safety of cerivastatin in the treatment of primary hypercholesterolemia: a multicentre, randomized, double-blind study.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy and safety of cerivastatin in Chinese with primary hypercholesterolemia. Methods: The multicentre, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group trial was conducted in 3 hospitals. After a 5-week single-blind run-in period (period A), 470 patients were randomized to receive cerivastatin 0.1mg (n=119), 0.2mg (n=

  1. Complete en bloc urinary exenteration for synchronous multicentric transitional cell carcinoma with sarcomatoid features in a hemodialysis patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiberio M. Siqueira Jr

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC in patients submitted to hemodialysis is low. The presence of TCC with sarcomatoid features in this cohort is even scarcer. Herein, we describe a very rare case of synchronous multicentric muscle invasive bladder carcinoma with prostate invasion in a hemodialysis patient, submitted to complete en bloc urinary exenteration.

  2. Coronary CT angiography using 64 detector rows: methods and design of the multi-centre trial CORE-64

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multislice computed tomography (MSCT) for the noninvasive detection of coronary artery stenoses is a promising candidate for widespread clinical application because of its non-invasive nature and high sensitivity and negative predictive value as found in several previous studies using 16 to 64 simultaneous detector rows. A multi-centre study of CT coronary angiography using 16 simultaneous detector rows has shown that 16-slice CT is limited by a high number of nondiagnostic cases and a high false-positive rate. A recent meta-analysis indicated a significant interaction between the size of the study sample and the diagnostic odds ratios suggestive of small study bias, highlighting the importance of evaluating MSCT using 64 simultaneous detector rows in a multi-centre approach with a larger sample size. In this manuscript we detail the objectives and methods of the prospective ''CORE-64'' trial (''Coronary Evaluation Using Multidetector Spiral Computed Tomography Angiography using 64 Detectors''). This multi-centre trial was unique in that it assessed the diagnostic performance of 64-slice CT coronary angiography in nine centres worldwide in comparison to conventional coronary angiography. In conclusion, the multi-centre, multi-institutional and multi-continental trial CORE-64 has great potential to ultimately assess the per-patient diagnostic performance of coronary CT angiography using 64 simultaneous detector rows. (orig.)

  3. Coronary CT angiography using 64 detector rows: methods and design of the multi-centre trial CORE-64

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Julie M.; Vavere, Andrea L.; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Bush, David E.; Lardo, Albert C.; Texter, John; Brinker, Jeffery; Lima, Joao A.C. [Johns Hopkins Hospital, Johns Hopkins University, Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Dewey, Marc [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Medical School, Humboldt-Universitaet und Freie Universitaet zu Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin, PO Box 10098 (Germany); Rochitte, Carlos E.; Lemos, Pedro A. [University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Heart Institute (InCor), Sao Paulo (Brazil); Niinuma, Hiroyuki [Iwate Medical University, Department of Cardiology, Morioka (Japan); Paul, Narinder [Toronto General Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Hoe, John [Medi-Rad Associates Ltd, CT Centre, Mt Elizabeth Hospital, Singapore (Singapore); Roos, Albert de [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Yoshioka, Kunihiro [Iwate Medical University, Department of Radiology, Morioka (Japan); Cox, Christopher [Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Clouse, Melvin E. [Harvard University, Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess, Boston, MA (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Multislice computed tomography (MSCT) for the noninvasive detection of coronary artery stenoses is a promising candidate for widespread clinical application because of its non-invasive nature and high sensitivity and negative predictive value as found in several previous studies using 16 to 64 simultaneous detector rows. A multi-centre study of CT coronary angiography using 16 simultaneous detector rows has shown that 16-slice CT is limited by a high number of nondiagnostic cases and a high false-positive rate. A recent meta-analysis indicated a significant interaction between the size of the study sample and the diagnostic odds ratios suggestive of small study bias, highlighting the importance of evaluating MSCT using 64 simultaneous detector rows in a multi-centre approach with a larger sample size. In this manuscript we detail the objectives and methods of the prospective ''CORE-64'' trial (''Coronary Evaluation Using Multidetector Spiral Computed Tomography Angiography using 64 Detectors''). This multi-centre trial was unique in that it assessed the diagnostic performance of 64-slice CT coronary angiography in nine centres worldwide in comparison to conventional coronary angiography. In conclusion, the multi-centre, multi-institutional and multi-continental trial CORE-64 has great potential to ultimately assess the per-patient diagnostic performance of coronary CT angiography using 64 simultaneous detector rows. (orig.)

  4. A multicentre study of 513 Danish patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. I. Disease manifestations and analyses of clinical subsets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Petersen, J; Ullman, S;

    1998-01-01

    A Danish multicentre study was undertaken of the manifestations, infections, thrombotic events, survival and predictive factors of survival in 513 Danish patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) according to the 1982 classification criteria of the American College of Rheumatology. The mean...

  5. Oral anticoagulants in coronary heart disease (Section IV). Position paper of the ESC Working Group on Thrombosis - Task Force on Anticoagulants in Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Caterina, Raffaele; Husted, Steen; Wallentin, Lars; Andreotti, Felicita; Arnesen, Harald; Bachmann, Fedor; Baigent, Colin; Collet, Jean-Philippe; Halvorsen, Sigrun; Huber, Kurt; Jespersen, Jørgen; Kristensen, Steen Dalby; Lip, Gregory Y H; Morais, João; Rasmussen, Lars Hvilsted; Ricci, Fabrizio; Sibbing, Dirk; Siegbahn, Agneta; Storey, Robert F; Ten Berg, Jurriën; Verheugt, Freek W A; Weitz, Jeffrey I

    2016-04-01

    Until recently, vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) were the only available oral anticoagulants evaluated for long-term treatment of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), particularly after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Despite efficacy in this setting, VKAs are rarely used because they are cumbersome to administer. Instead, the more readily manageable antiplatelet agents are the mainstay of prevention in ACS patients. This situation has the potential to change with the introduction of non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs), which are easier to administer than VKAs because they can be given in fixed doses without routine coagulation monitoring. The NOACs include dabigatran, which inhibits thrombin, and apixaban, rivaroxaban and edoxaban, which inhibit factor Xa. Apixaban and rivaroxaban were evaluated in phase III trials for prevention of recurrent ischaemia in ACS patients, most of whom were also receiving dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel. Although at the doses tested rivaroxaban was effective and apixaban was not, both agents increased major bleeding. The role for the NOACs in ACS management, although promising, is therefore complicated, because it is uncertain how they compare with newer antiplatelet agents, such as prasugrel, ticagrelor or vorapaxar, and because their safety in combination with these other drugs is unknown. Ongoing studies are also now evaluating the use of NOACs in non-valvular atrial fibrillation patients, where their role is established, with coexistent ACS or coronary stenting. Focusing on CHD, we review the results of clinical trials with the NOACs and provide a perspective on their future incorporation into clinical practice. PMID:26952877

  6. The protein C omega-loop substitution Asn2Ile is associated with reduced protein C anticoagulant activity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Preston, Roger J S

    2012-02-01

    We report a kindred with heritable protein C (PC) deficiency in which two siblings with severe thrombosis showed a composite type I and IIb PC deficiency phenotype, identified using commercial PC assays (proband: PC antigen 42 u\\/dl, amidolytic activity 40 u\\/dl, anticoagulant activity 9 u\\/dl). The independent PROC nucleotide variations c.669C>A (predictive of Ser181Arg) and c.131C>T (predictive of Asn2Ile) segregated with the type I and type IIb PC deficiency phenotypes respectively, but co-segregated in the siblings with severe thrombosis. Soluble thrombomodulin (sTM)-mediated inhibition of plasma thrombin generation from an individual with PC-Asn2Ile was lower (endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) 56 +\\/- 1% that of ETP determined without sTM) than control plasma (ETP 15 +\\/- 2%) indicating reduced PC anticoagulant activity. Recombinant APC-Asn2Ile exhibited normal amidolytic activity but impaired anticoagulant activity. Protein S (PS)-dependent anticoagulant activity of recombinant APC-Asn2Ile and binding of recombinant APC-Asn2Ile to endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) were reduced compared to recombinant wild-type APC. Asn2 lies within the omega-loop of the PC\\/APC Gla domain and this region is critical for calcium-induced folding and subsequent interactions with anionic phospholipids, EPCR and PS. The disruption of these interactions in this naturally-occurring PC variant highlights their collective importance in mediating APC anticoagulant activity in vivo.

  7. Localization of anticoagulantly active heparan sulfate proteoglycans in vascular endothelium: Antithrombin binding on cultured endothelial cells and perfused rat aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the interaction of 125I-antithrombin (125I-AT) with microvascular endothelial cells (RFPEC) to localize the cellular site of anticoagulantly active heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG). The radiolabeled protease inhibitor bound specifically to the above HSPG with a Kd of approximately 50 nM. Confluent monolayer RFPEC cultures exhibited a linear increase in the amount of AT bound per cell for up to 16 d, whereas suspension RFPEC cultures possessed a constant number of protease inhibitor binding sites per cell for up to 5 d. These results suggest that monolayer RFPEC cultures secrete anticoagulantly active HSPG, which then accumulate in the extracellular matrix. This hypothesis was confirmed by quantitative light and EM level autoradiography which demonstrated that the AT binding sites are predominantly located in the extracellular matrix with only small quantities of protease inhibitor complexed to the cell surface. We have also pinpointed the in vivo position of anticoagulantly active HSPG within the blood vessel wall. Rat aortas were perfused, in situ, with 125I-AT, and bound labeled protease inhibitor was localized by light and EM autoradiography. The anticoagulantly active HSPG were concentrated immediately beneath the aortic and vasa vasorum endothelium with only a very small extent of labeling noted on the luminal surface of the endothelial cells. Based upon the above data, we propose a model whereby luminal and abluminal anticoagulantly active HSPG regulate coagulation mechanism activity

  8. Enhancing anticoagulation and endothelial cell proliferation of titanium surface by sequential immobilization of poly(ethylene glycol) and collagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Chang-Jiang, E-mail: swjtupcj@163.com; Hou, Yan-Hua; Ding, Hong-Yan; Dong, Yun-Xiao

    2013-12-15

    In the present study, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and collagen I were sequentially immobilized on the titanium surface to simultaneously improve the anticoagulation and endothelial cell proliferation. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirmed that PEG and collagen I were successfully immobilized on the titanium surface. Water contact angle results suggested the excellent hydrophilic surface after the immobilization. The anticoagulation experiments demonstrated that the immobilized PEG and collagen I on the titanium surface could not only obviously prevent platelet adhesion and aggregation but also prolong activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), leading to the improved blood compatibility. Furthermore, immobilization of collagen to the end of PEG chain did not abate the anticoagulation. As compared to those on the pristine and PEG-modified titanium surfaces, endothelial cells exhibited improved proliferative profiles on the surface modified by the sequential immobilization of PEG and collagen in terms of CCK-8 assay, implying that the modified titanium may promote endothelialization without abating the blood compatibility. Our method may be used to modify the surface of blood-contacting biomaterials such as titanium to promote endothelialization and improve the anticoagulation, it may be helpful for development of the biomedical devices such as coronary stents, where endothelializaton and excellent anticoagulation are required.

  9. The recent clinical trials on use of the novel direct oral anticoagulants in patients with venous thromboembolism: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gualtiero Palareti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism (VTE, encompassing deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, requires an immediate anticoagulation, that has been carried out so far by administering a parenteral anticoagulant drug (heparin or derivatives overlapped with an oral vitamin K antagonist (VKA, more often warfarin. Several new direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs, with a mechanism of action completely different than VKA, have been developed in recent years. Recent clinical trials have investigated their use in VTE patients showing results at least equal for efficacy and safety, and sometime even better, as the standard anticoagulant treatment. There are differences in the design of the trials. In two cases the involved DOAC was administered immediately after VTE diagnosis as a single drug treatment (rivaroxaban and apixaban, whereas in the other trials (involving dabigatran and edoxaban the DOAC was administered after an initial course of approximately 7 days with heparin or derivatives. Some clinical trials have also investigated the use of DOACs for extended anticoagulant treatment after the acute phase. Aim of this article is to review the results of the currently available clinical trials that have compared the use of DOACs versus the standard of care in patients with VTE.

  10. Systematic review of observational studies assessing bleeding risk in patients with atrial fibrillation not using anticoagulants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Cruz Lopes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients with atrial fibrillation considering use of anticoagulants must balance stroke reduction against bleeding risk. Knowledge of bleeding risk without the use of anticoagulants may help inform this decision. PURPOSE: To determine the rate of major bleeding reported in observational studies of atrial fibrillation patients not receiving Vitamin K antagonists (VKA. DATA SOURCES: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL to October 2011 and examined reference lists of eligible studies and related reviews. STUDY SELECTION: All longitudinal cohort studies that included over 100 adult patients with atrial fibrillation not receiving VKA. DATA EXTRACTION: Teams of two reviewers independently and in duplicate adjudicated eligibility, assessed risk of bias and abstracted study characteristics and outcomes. DATA SYNTHESIS: Twenty-one eligible studies included 96,448 patients. Major bleeding rates varied widely, from 0 to 4.69 events per 100 patient-years. The pooled estimate in 13 studies with 78839 patients was 1.59 with a 99% confidence interval of 1.10 to 2.3 and median 1.42 (interquartile range 0.62-2.70. Pooled estimates for fatal bleeding and non-fatal bleeding from 4 studies that reported these outcomes were, respectively, 0.40 (0.34 to 0.46 and 1.18 (0.30 to 4.56 per 100 patient-years. In 9 randomized controlled trials (RCTs the median rate of major bleeding in patients not receiving either anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy was 0.6 (interquartile 0.2 to 0.90, and in 12 RCTs the median rate of major bleeding in patients receiving a single antiplatelet agent was 0.75 (interquartile 0.4 to 1.4. CONCLUSION: Results suggest that patients with atrial fibrillation not receiving VKA enrolled in observational studies represent a population on average at higher risk of bleeding.

  11. Regional citrate anticoagulation in critically ill patients during continuous blood purification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚德华; 季大玺; 徐斌; 谢红浪; 刘云; 黎磊石

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the safety and define the contraindication of regional citrate anticoagulation treatment on various critically ill patients being treated by continuous blood purification, who also had bleeding tendencies. Methods Forty critically ill patients being treated by continuous blood purification (CBP) were involved in this study. Due to their bleeding tendencies, regional citrate anticoagulation treatment was given to all of them. Those with hepatic function impairment (n=10) were classified as Group A, those with hypoxemia were classified as Group B (n=10), and the others as Group C (n=20). Blood samples were collected before treatment, and at 4, 12, 24, 36, and 48 hour intervals during CBP. These samples then were used arterial blood gas analysis, whole blood activated clotting time (WBACT) pre- and post-filter, and serum ionized calcium examination. Results WBACT pre-filter showed little fluctuant through the 48hr period of CBP, and WBACT post-filter showed obvious prolongation than that of the pre-filter (P<0.05) at all time points. Metabolic acidosis was found in Group A patients before CBP, and improved during CBP. Normal acid-base conditions of patients were disturbed and deteriorated in Group B during CBP, but not in Group C. Serum ionized calcium was maintained at a normal range during CBP in Group A and C patients, but declined significantly in Group B patients (vs. pre-treatment, P<0.05). Conclusions Regional citrate anticoagulation can be safely used in conjunction with CBP treatment for patients with hepatic function impairment , but may induce acidosis and a decline in serum ionized calcium when used with hypoxemic patients.

  12. Efficacy and safety of new oral anticoagulants in prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Masotti

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the main innovation emerged in recent years in the field of venous thromboembolism (VTE has been represented by the clinical development and marketing of new oral anticoagulant agents used for prophylaxis and acute treatment. These drugs are represented by direct thrombin inhibitors (anti-factor IIa and the direct inhibitors of activated factor X (anti-Xa. The main achievement of these new agents is represented by their ease of use without laboratory monitoring or dose adjustment. Dabigatran (anti-factor IIa, rivaroxaban, and apixaban (anti-Xa are in advanced phase of clinical development with concluded phase III trials. Up to now the results of efficacy and safety of phase III clinical trials are available, while phase IV studies are currently ongoing. Overall, the phase III clinical trials showed the non inferiority of new oral anticoagulants in VTE prophylaxis of patients undergone to major orthopedic surgery, such as hip and knee arthroplasty, compared to conventional prophylaxis represented by subcutaneous low molecular weight heparin with similar safety. Moreover dabigatran has shown to be not inferior when compared to warfarin for the prevention of six months VTE recurrences, with a significative lower incidence of bleedings. Awaiting the results of many other ongoing phase III trials, since now it is possible to think that, in the next future, new oral anticoagulants will be widely diffused in clinical practice for their ease of use and feasibility. In this review the Authors analyse the available results of phase III clinical trials for dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban, focusing on the antithrombotic endpoints for prevention and treatment of VTE and the bleeding risk. Moreover synthesis of ongoing trials will be displayed.

  13. Effect of vitamin E coated dialyzers on anticoagulation requirement in hemodialyzed children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoun Bilal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available As hemodialysis (HD requires extra corporal blood flow and the need for anti-coagulation, we evaluated the effect of vitamin E coated membranes (VIE on the requirement of low molecular weight heparin (LMWH in pediatric HD patients. Patients and methods: seven children and adolescents on regular hemodialysis were started on VIE and their LMWH dose was decreased every week. In order to monitor the requirement of LMWH we used a coagulation score to evaluate coagulation in the dialyzer, air trap and blood line. Other classical parameters (hemoglobin, erythropoietin dose, inflammatory markers were monitored weekly while the pa-tients were on VIE dialyzers. LMWH dose during the 1st week was 110 IU/kg ± 18 (defined as 100%, in the 2nd week the dose was 77 IU/kg ± 12 (70%, in the 3 rd week the dose was 33 IU/kg ± 5 (30%, and in the 4 th week anticoagulation could be stopped in one patient, in the other six pa-tients further decrease was impossible given the increase of the clotting score. There was no in-crease in clotting score during week one and two. During week three (while on 30% of the initial LMWH dose six patients showed mild to moderate clotting phenomena: mild coagulation phe-nomena in three patients and moderate clotting phenomena in three others. One patient did not show any clotting phenomena in week three and LMWH was totally stopped. In conclusion, use of VIE dialyzers may help to reduce the requirement of anticoagulation in pediatric HD patients reducing bleeding problems and simplify hemostasis after HD sessions.

  14. New validated multiresidue analysis of six 4-hydroxy-coumarin anticoagulant rodenticides in hen eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimshoni, Jakob Avi; Soback, Stefan; Cuneah, Olga; Shlosberg, Alan; Britzi, Malka

    2013-11-01

    Anticoagulant rodenticides are frequently a cause of poisoning of domestic animals, wildlife, and human beings. A toxicosis in 6,000 laying hens caused by the malicious addition of unknown amounts of coumatetralyl bait as well as the insecticides aldicarb, methomyl, and imidacloprid in the drinking water, was investigated in the current study. In order to determine a possible carryover of coumatetralyl into eggs, a rapid and reliable analytical method was developed and fully validated for the simultaneous detection of 6 anticoagulant rodenticides (warfarin, coumatetralyl, coumachlor, bromadiolone, difenacoum, and brodifacoum) in yolk and albumen using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection. The method developed was reproducible, sensitive, accurate, and linear within the range of 0.01-1 mg/kg, which is the concentration range of bromadiolone and warfarin found in yolk in previously reported studies. The coefficient of variations of within and between days was 1.0-8.5% for yolk and 0.6-3.8% for albumen, while recoveries from spiked albumen and yolk samples were all in the range of 79-99% and 51-95%, respectively. Limits of detection in yolk were 0.01 mg/kg for warfarin and 0.003 mg/kg for the remaining compounds; in albumen, the limit of detection was 0.003 mg/kg for warfarin, coumatetralyl, and coumachlor, and 0.0015 mg/kg for difenacoum and brodifacoum. The application of the validated method revealed the presence of coumatetralyl in the yolk only at levels of 0.0057 mg/kg and 0.0052 mg/kg on the second and fourth day of the poisoning. In conclusion, the HPLC method demonstrated suitability for application in official analysis of anticoagulants in hen eggs. PMID:24081927

  15. Nine-year experience with a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, R R; Kehoe, W A; Nielson, N; Lodhia, H

    1986-10-01

    A pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic is described, and information on patient outcome during a nine-year period is presented. Since 1974, a pharmacist has managed an anticoagulation clinic for ambulatory patients and inpatients at San Francisco General Hospital Medical Center. The pharmacist's primary responsibilities include the following: educating patients about their diseases and the importance of drug therapy, monitoring patients' vital signs, performing physical examinations, and adjusting warfarin dosage to maintain prothrombin times within the therapeutic range (1.7-2.5 times normal using control values of 1.0-1.2). These patients are also under the care of their primary physicians. The pharmacist's work is checked by the chief of the cardiac clinic at the end of each clinic session. The effectiveness of the pharmacist in managing clinic patients is reviewed periodically; from January 1975 through June 1984, the pharmacist had treated 140 patients (141 courses of therapy). Of 1792 prothrombin times taken during this time, 1060 (59.2%) were within the therapeutic range of 17-25 seconds, 510 (28.5%) were less than 17 seconds, and 222 (12.4%) were greater than 25 seconds. Only four major hemorrhagic events (0.002 hemorrhages per patient-treatment month) and 89 minor events (0.05 hemorrhages per patient-treatment month) occurred. The recurrence rate of thromboembolic events was 0.007 per patient-treatment month. Pharmacist-managed warfarin therapy in these clinic patients resulted in a level of anticoagulation control and morbidity that was acceptable to physicians. PMID:3788996

  16. Rivaroxaban as an oral anticoagulant for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turpie AGG

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Alexander GG Turpie Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ONT, Canada Abstract: Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common cardiac arrhythmia in the developed world and is associated with a fivefold increase in the risk of stroke, accounting for up to 15% of strokes in the general population. The European Society of Cardiology now recommends direct oral anticoagulants, such as rivaroxaban, apixaban, and dabigatran, in preference to vitamin K antagonist therapy for the prevention of stroke in patients with AF. This review focuses on the direct Factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban, summarizing the properties that make rivaroxaban appropriate for anticoagulant therapy in this indication (including its predictable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile and once-daily dosing regimen and describing data from the Phase III ROCKET AF trial, which showed once-daily rivaroxaban to be noninferior to warfarin for the prevention of stroke in patients with nonvalvular AF. In this trial, similar rates of major and nonmajor clinically relevant bleeding were observed; however, when compared with warfarin, rivaroxaban was associated with clinically significant reductions in intracranial and fatal bleeding. On the basis of these results, rivaroxaban was approved in both the United States and the European Union for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular AF. Subanalyses of ROCKET AF data showed rivaroxaban to have consistent efficacy and safety across a wide range of patients, and studies to confirm these results in real-world settings are underway. This review also describes practical considerations for treatment with rivaroxaban in clinical practice (including dose reductions in specific high-risk patients, eg, those with renal impairment, recommendations for the transition from vitamin K antagonists to rivaroxaban, the management of bleeding events, and the measurement of rivaroxaban exposure. Keywords: atrial

  17. Deficiency of the natural anticoagulant proteins in women with pregnancy related venous thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitić Gorana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Inherited thrombophilia can be defined as a predisposition to thrombosis caused by heritable defects, such as mutations in genes encoding the natural anticoagulants or clotting factors. Pregnancy related risk of VTE is sixfold increased comparing to non pregnant age matched women. Pregnancy is an independent risk factor for the development of venous thromboembolism and this risk is further increased by the presence of thrombophilia. Aim of the study: The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between deficiency of natural anticoagulants: antithrombin, protein C and protein S and pregnancy related thromboembolism. We have determined the activities of antithrombin, proten C and protein S in 74 women with pregnancy related thrombosis and in 45 healthy women who had at least two uncomplicated pregnancies. Among the women with the history of venous thromboembolism antithrombin deficiency was found in 4 (5.4%, protein C deficiency in 2 (2.7% and protein S deficiency in 5 (6.76%. The total of 11 (14.6% women was found to be deficient. Not a single woman in the control group was found to be deficient in natural anticoagulants. Deficiencies of coagulation inhibitors are associated with an increased risk of venous thrombosis during pregnancy and puerperium (p= 0.006. Antithrombin, protein C and protein S deficient women are at higher risk of developing venous thromboembolism during antepartal period (p= 0.0097. Prophylactic treatment with heparin should be recommended from the very beginning of the following pregnancy in women with antithrombin, protein C or protein S deficiency.

  18. Exploring barriers to optimal anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation: interviews with clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decker C

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Carole Decker,1 Linda Garavalia,2 Brian Garavalia,1 Teresa Simon,3 Matthew Loeb,4 John Spertus6, William Daniel51Mid America Heart Institute at Saint Luke's Hospital in Kansas City Missouri, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Nursing, 2University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Pharmacy, Kansas City, MO, 3Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ, 4Plaza Primary Care and Geriatrics, 5Saint Luke's Cardiovascular Consultants, Kansas City, MO, 6Mid America Heart Institute at Saint Luke's Hospital in Kansas City Missouri, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO, USABackground: Warfarin, the most commonly used antithrombotic agent for stroke prophylaxis in atrial fibrillation (AF, requires regular monitoring, frequent dosage adjustments, and dietary restrictions. Clinicians' perceptions of barriers to optimal AF management are an important factor in treatment. Anticoagulation management for AF is overseen by both cardiology and internal medicine (IM practices. Thus, gaining the perspective of specialists and generalists is essential in understanding barriers to treatment. We used qualitative research methods to define key issues in the prescription of warfarin therapy for AF by cardiology specialists and IM physicians.Methods and results: Clinicians were interviewed to identify barriers to warfarin treatment in a large Midwestern city. Interviews were conducted until thematic saturation occurred. Content analysis yielded several themes. The most salient theme that emerged from clinician interviews was use of characteristics other than the patient's CHADS2 score to enact a treatment plan, such as the patient's social situation and past medication-taking behavior. Other themes included patient knowledge, real-world problems, breakdown in communication, and clinician reluctance.Conclusion: Warfarin treatment is associated with many challenges. The barriers identified by clinicians highlight the unmet need associated

  19. Human Monoclonal Antiphospholipid Antibodies Disrupt the Annexin A5 Anticoagulant Crystal Shield on Phospholipid Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Jacob H.; Wu, Xiao-Xuan; Quinn, Anthony S.; Chen, Pojen P.; McCrae, Keith R.; Bovill, Edwin G.; Taatjes, Douglas J.

    2003-01-01

    The antiphospholipid (aPL) syndrome is an autoimmune condition that is marked by recurrent pregnancy losses and/or systemic vascular thrombosis in patients who have antibodies against phospholipid/co-factor complexes. The mechanism(s) for pregnancy losses and thrombosis in this condition is (are) not known. Annexin A5 is a potent anticoagulantprotein, expressed by placental trophoblasts and endothelial cells, that crystallizes over anionic phospholipids, shielding them from availability for coagulation reactions. We previously presented data supporting the hypothesis that aPL antibody-mediated disruption of the anticoagulant annexin A5 shield could be a thrombogenic mechanism in the aPL syndrome. However, this has remained a subject of controversy. We therefore used atomic force microscopy, a method previously used to study the crystallization of annexin A5, to image the effects of monoclonal human aPL antibodies on the crystal structure of the protein over phospholipid bilayers. In the presence of the aPL monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and β2-GPI, the major aPL co-factor, structures presumed to be aPL mAb-antigen complexes were associated with varying degrees of disruption to the annexin A5 crystallization pattern over the bilayer. In addition, measurements of prothrombinase activity on the phospholipid bilayers showed that the aPL mAbs reduced the anti-coagulant effect of annexin A5 and promoted thrombin generation. These data provide morphological evidence that support the hypothesis that aPL antibodies can disrupt annexin A5 binding to phospholipid membranes and permit increased generation of thrombin. The aPL antibody-mediated disruption of the annexin A5 anticoagulant shield may be an important prothrombotic mechanism in the aPL syndrome. PMID:12937161

  20. Monitoring of anticoagulant therapy in heart disease: considerations for the current assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroumand, Mohammadali; Goodarzynejad, Hamidreza

    2010-01-01

    Clinicians should be aware of new developments to familiarize themselves with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of new anticoagulant agents to appropriately and safely use them. For the moment, cardiologists and other clinicians also require to master currently available drugs, realizing the mechanism of action, side effects, and laboratory monitoring to measure their anticoagulant effects. Warfarin and heparin have narrow therapeutic window with high inter- and intra-patient variability, thereby the use of either drug needs careful laboratory monitoring and dose adjustment to ensure proper antithrombotic protection while minimizing the bleeding risk. The prothrombin time (PT) and the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) are laboratory tests commonly used to monitor warfarin and heparin, respectively. These two tests depend highly on the combination of reagent and instrument utilized. Results for a single specimen tested in different laboratories are variable; this is mostly attributable to the specific reagents and to a much lesser degree to the instrument used. The PT stands alone as the single coagulation test that has undergone the most extensive attempt at assay standardization. The international normalized ratio (INR) was introduced to "normalize" all PT reagents to a World Health Organization (WHO) reference thromboplastin preparation standard, such that a PT measured anywhere in the world would result in an INR value similar to that which would have been achieved had the WHO reference thromboplastin been utilized. However, INRs are reproducible between laboratories for only those patients who are stably anticoagulated with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) (i.e., at least 6 weeks of VKA therapy), and are not reliable or reproducible between laboratories for patients for whom VKA therapy has recently been started or any other clinical conditions associated with a prolonged PT such as liver disease, disseminated intravascular coagulation

  1. Monitoring of Anticoagulant Therapy in Heart Disease: Considerations for the Current Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Goodarzynejad

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Clinicians should be aware of new developments to familiarize themselves with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of new anticoagulant agents to appropriately and safely use them. For the moment, cardiologists and other clinicians also require to master currently available drugs, realizing the mechanism of action, side effects, and laboratory monitoring to measure their anticoagulant effects. Warfarin and heparin have narrow therapeutic window with high inter- and intra-patient variability, thereby the use of either drug needs careful laboratory monitoring and dose adjustment to ensure proper antithrombotic protection while minimizing the bleeding risk. The prothrombin time (PT and the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT are laboratory tests commonly used to monitor warfarin and heparin, respectively. These two tests depend highly on the combination of reagent and instrument utilized. Results for a single specimen tested in different laboratories are variable; this is mostly attributable to the specific reagents and to a much lesser degree to the instrument used. The PT stands alone as the single coagulation test that has undergone the most extensive attempt at assay standardization. The international normalized ratio (INR was introduced to ‘‘normalize’’ all PT reagents to a World Health Organization (WHO reference thromboplastin preparation standard, such that a PT measured anywhere in the world would result in an INR value similar to that which would have been achieved had the WHO reference thromboplastin been utilized. However, INRs are reproducible between laboratories for only those patients who are stably anticoagulated with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs (i.e., at least 6 weeks of VKA therapy, and are not reliable or reproducible between laboratories for patients for whom VKA therapy has recently been started or any other clinical conditions associated with a prolonged PT such as liver disease, disseminated

  2. Protein source and choice of anticoagulant decisively affect nanoparticle protein corona and cellular uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöttler, S.; Klein, Katja; Landfester, K.; Mailänder, V.

    2016-03-01

    Protein adsorption on nanoparticles has been a focus of the field of nanocarrier research in the past few years and more and more papers are dealing with increasingly detailed lists of proteins adsorbed to a plethora of nanocarriers. While there is an urgent need to understand the influence of this protein corona on nanocarriers' interactions with cells the strong impact of the protein source on corona formation and the consequence for interaction with different cell types are factors that are regularly neglected, but should be taken into account for a meaningful analysis. In this study, the importance of the choice of protein source used for in vitro protein corona analysis is concisely investigated. Major and decisive differences in cellular uptake of a polystyrene nanoparticle incubated in fetal bovine serum, human serum, human citrate and heparin plasma are reported. Furthermore, the protein compositions are determined for coronas formed in the respective incubation media. A strong influence of heparin, which is used as an anticoagulant for plasma generation, on cell interaction is demonstrated. While heparin enhances the uptake into macrophages, it prevents internalization into HeLa cells. Taken together we can give the recommendation that human plasma anticoagulated with citrate seems to give the most relevant results for in vitro studies of nanoparticle uptake.Protein adsorption on nanoparticles has been a focus of the field of nanocarrier research in the past few years and more and more papers are dealing with increasingly detailed lists of proteins adsorbed to a plethora of nanocarriers. While there is an urgent need to understand the influence of this protein corona on nanocarriers' interactions with cells the strong impact of the protein source on corona formation and the consequence for interaction with different cell types are factors that are regularly neglected, but should be taken into account for a meaningful analysis. In this study, the importance

  3. A review of potential harmful interactions between anticoagulant/antiplatelet agents and Chinese herbal medicines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Hui Tsai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The risks attributed to drug-herb interactions, even when known, are often ignored or underestimated, especially for those involving anti-clotting drugs and Chinese medicines. The aim of this study was to structurally search and evaluate the existing evidence-based data associated with potential drug interactions between anticoagulant/antiplatelet drugs and Chinese herbal medicines (CHMs and evaluate the documented mechanisms, consequences, and/or severity of interactions. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: Information related to anticoagulant/antiplatelet drug-CHM interactions was retrieved from eight interaction-based textbooks, four web resources and available primary biomedical literature. The primary literature searches were conducted in English and/or Chinese from January 2000 through December 2011 using the secondary databases (e.g., PubMed, Airiti Library, China Journal full-text database. The search terms included the corresponding medical subject headings and key words. Herbs or natural products not used as a single entity CHM or in Chinese Medicinal Prescriptions were excluded from further review. The corresponding mechanisms and severity ratings of interactions were retrieved using MicroMedex®, Lexicomp® and Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database®. Finally, we found 90 single entity CHMs contributed to 306 documented drug-CHM interactions. A total of 194 (63.4% interactions were verified for its evidence describing possible mechanisms and severity. Of them, 155 interactions (79.9% were attributable to pharmacodynamic interactions, and almost all were rated as moderate to severe interactions. The major consequences of these interactions were increased bleeding risks due to the additive anticoagulant or antiplatelet effects of the CHMs, specifically danshen, dong quai, ginger, ginkgo, licorice, and turmeric. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Conventional anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs were documented to have harmful interactions

  4. Preadmission oral anticoagulant therapy and clinical outcome in patients hospitalised with acute stroke and atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Tobias Pilgaard; Svendsen, Marie Louise; Hansen, Morten Lock; Brandes, Axel; Andersen, Grethe; Husted, Steen Elkjær; Johnsen, Søren Paaske

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Information about the effect of preadmission oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) on stroke outcome in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) is scarce. A systematic review was done of the existing data on the association between preadmission OAT and stroke outcome in patients with AF...... haemorrhagic stroke. The proportion of patients in preadmission OAT varied from 5 to 37%, and the proportion who did not receive any antithrombotic therapy (AT) varied from 22 to 75%. The risk of having a severe stroke for patients with an international normalised ratio (INR) < 2 ranged from 26 to 43% compared...

  5. Evaluation of an electronic warfarin nomogram for anticoagulation of hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacKay Elizabeth

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Warfarin nomograms to guide dosing have been shown to improve control of the international normalized ratio (INR in the general outpatient setting. However, the effectiveness of these nomograms in hemodialysis patients is unknown. We evaluated the effectiveness of anticoagulation using an electronic warfarin nomogram administered by nurses in outpatient hemodialysis patients, compared to physician directed therapy. Methods Hemodialysis patients at any of the six outpatient clinics in Calgary, Alberta, treated with warfarin anticoagulation were included. Two five-month time periods were compared: prior to and post implementation of the nomogram. The primary endpoint was adequacy of anticoagulation (proportion of INR measurements within range ± 0.5 units. Results Overall, 67 patients were included in the pre- and 55 in the post-period (with 40 patients in both periods. Using generalized linear mixed models, the adequacy of INR control was similar in both periods for all range INR levels: in detail, range INR 1.5 to 2.5 (pre 93.6% (95% CI: 88.6% - 96.5%; post 95.6% (95% CI: 89.4% - 98.3%; p = 0.95; INR 2.0 to 3.0 (pre 82.2% (95% CI: 77.9% - 85.8%; post 77.4% (95% CI: 72.0% - 82.0%; p = 0.20; and, INR 2.5 to 3.5 (pre 84.3% (95% CI: 59.4% - 95.1%; post 66.8% (95% CI: 39.9% - 86.0%; p = 0.29. The mean number of INR measurements per patient decreased significantly between the pre- (30.5, 95% CI: 27.0 - 34.0 and post- (22.3, 95% CI: 18.4 - 26.1 (p = 0.003 period. There were 3 bleeding events in each of the periods. Conclusions An electronic warfarin anticoagulation nomogram administered by nurses achieved INR control similar to that of physician directed therapy among hemodialysis patients in an outpatient setting, with a significant reduction in frequency of testing. Future controlled trials are required to confirm the efficacy of this nomogram.

  6. Adverse events in patients initiated on dabigatran etexilate therapy in a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donaldson M

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitamin K antagonists have been the treatment of choice in preventing thromboembolic events, but problems such as frequent dose adjustment and monitoring of coagulation status, including multiple drug and food interactions, make their use difficult. Dabigatran etexilate is a new oral direct thrombin inhibitor not requiring routine monitoring and since its approval in the United States, many clinicians have been interested in utilizing this new therapy. Objective: This study documented adverse drug events (ADEs recorded in patients started on dabigatran therapy, including those who were previously controlled on warfarin and those who were anticoagulant naïve. Methods: In an outpatient pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic, a total of 221 patients were initiated on dabigatran therapy over an 18-month period. 43.0% of these patients were previously controlled on warfarin.Results: 54 of the 221 patients (24.4% developed an ADE while on dabigatran. The average time to event was 48.4 days. Nine of the fifty-four patients experienced a major bleeding ADE; six patients developed a serious non-bleeding ADE. Five of these fifteen patients died; one death was directly related to dabigatran therapy. The remaining thirty-nine of the fifty-four patients experienced a clinically relevant non-major ADE. Of the fifty-four patients who experienced an ADE, thirty were male. The average age was 73.8 years and the average weight was 92.8kg. Fifty-four percent of those who experienced an ADE were previously anticoagulant naïve.Conclusions: While many clinicians have been interested in utilizing the new direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran etexilate, this new therapy is not without risks. This study documented adverse drug events in 24.4% of patients who were initiated on dabigatran etexilate therapy over an eighteen month period. ADEs were more common in patients who were anticoagulant naïve prior to dabigatran etexilate therapy and not those who

  7. Influence of the sample anticoagulant on the measurements of impedance aggregometry in cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Solomon

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Cristina Solomon1, Michael Winterhalter1, Isabel Gilde1, Ludwig Hoy2, Andreas Calatzis3, Niels Rahe-Meyer11Department of Anesthesiology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany; 2Institute for Biometry, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany; 3Department Hemostasis Transfusion Medicine, University Hospital Munich, Munich, GermanyBackground: The standard method of assessment of platelet function is represented by light transmission aggregometry (LTA, performed in citrated platelet-rich plasma (PRP. With LTA, decrease and subsequent post-cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB recovery of platelet function have been reported during cardiac surgery. Multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA may be used as point-of-care method to monitor perioperative changes in platelet function. Since MEA assesses macroaggregation which is influenced by the plasmatic levels of unbound calcium, citrate may be inadequate as anticoagulant for MEA. We used citrate and heparin for MEA samples, to see with which anticoagulant the intraoperative decrease and postoperative recovery in platelet function previously described with other aggregometric methods in cardiac surgery may be observed with MEA.Methods: Blood was obtained from 60 patients undergoing routine cardiac surgery and the samples were collected in standard tubes containing unfractionated heparin (50 U/mL or trisodium citrate (3.2%. The samples were obtained before CPB, at 30 minutes on CPB, end of CPB and on the first postoperative day. MEA was performed using the Multiplate® analyzer. Collagen (COLtest, 100 μg/mL and TRAP-6 (thrombin receptor activating peptide, TRAPtest, 1mM/mL were used as aggregation agonists.Results: Platelet aggregometric response decreased significantly during CPB. Platelet aggregation assessed using TRAP-6 as agonist on heparinized blood significantly correlated with the duration of CPB (r = −0.41, p = 0.001, 2-tailed Pearson test. The aggregometric analysis performed on the first

  8. Differences in attitude, education, and knowledge about oral anticoagulation therapy among patients with atrial fibrillation in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernández Madrid, Antonio; Potpara, Tatjana S; Dagres, Nikolaos; Chen, Jian; Larsen, Torben B; Estner, Heidi; Todd, Derick; Bongiorni, Maria G; Sciaraffia, Elena; Proclemer, Alessandro; Cheggour, Saida; Amara, Walid; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this patient survey was to analyse the knowledge about blood thinning medications relative to gender, age, education, and region of residence in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). A total of 1147 patients with AF [mean age 66 ± 13 years, 529 (45%) women] from eight European...... target INR range compared with those without schooling (2.8% vs. 5.1%, P < 0.05). The awareness of anticoagulation-related risk of bleedings was lowest in patients without schooling (38.5%) and highest in those with college and university education (57.0%), P < 0.05. The same pattern was also observed...... regarding patient's awareness of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs): 56.5% of the patients with university education and only 20.5% of those without schooling (P < 0.05) knew about NOACs, indicating that information about new anticoagulation therapies remains well below the target...

  9. Fulminant phlegmasia cerulea dolens with concurrent cholangiocarcinoma and a lupus anticoagulant: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Grace; Yeh, James J

    2014-07-01

    Phlegmasia cerulea dolens (PCD) is an aggressive and life-threatening form of venous thrombosis complicated by ischemic necrosis. Massive thrombosis extends to collateral veins resulting in venous congestion with fluid sequestration in the interstitium causing collapse of arterioles, which progresses to ischemia and, if severe, circulatory collapse and shock. The mortality rate for PCD is as high as 40%, especially when gangrene develops. PCD has been associated with acquired thrombophilias, including malignancy and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). We present a unique case of a patient with PCD refractory to anticoagulant and thrombolytic therapy, whose fulminant course was attributed to concurrent cholangiocarcinoma and antiphospholipid antibodies identified by a positive lupus anticoagulant assay. This case highlights the importance of uncovering precipitating causes of thromboembolism, which may offer prognostic information and may necessitate therapy beyond anticoagulation and thrombolysis to reduce the morbidity of PCD. The current literature on PCD and APS, along with their associations with malignancy, is reviewed. PMID:24553060

  10. Choosing a particular oral anticoagulant and dose for stroke prevention in individual patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Aisenberg, James; Ansell, Jack;

    2016-01-01

    The choice of oral anticoagulant (OAC) for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) may be influenced by individual clinical features or by patterns of risk factors and comorbidities. We reviewed analyses of subgroups of patients from trials of vitamin K antagonists vs. non-vitamin K oral...... anticoagulants (NOACs) for stroke prevention in AF with the aim to identify patient groups who might benefit from a particular OAC more than from another. In addition, we discuss the timing of initiation of anticoagulation. In the second of a two-part review, we discuss the use of NOAC for stroke prevention in...... the following subgroups of patients with AF: (vii) secondary stroke prevention in patients after stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA), (viii) patients with acute stroke requiring thrombolysis or thrombectomy, (ix) those initiating or restarting OAC treatment after stroke or TIA, (x) those with...

  11. Home versus outpatient ultraviolet B phototherapy for mild to severe psoriasis : pragmatic multicentre randomised controlled non-inferiority trial (PLUTO study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek, Mayke B. G.; Buskens, Erik; van Weelden, Huib; Steegmans, Paul H. A.; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla A. F. M.; Sigurdsson, Vigfus

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine whether ultraviolet B phototherapy at home is equally safe and equally effective as ultraviolet B phototherapy in an outpatient setting for patients with psoriasis. Design Pragmatic multicentre single blind randomised clinical trial (PLUTO study). Setting Dermatology departmen

  12. The feasibility of wireless capsule endoscopy in detecting small intestinal pathology in children under the age of 8 years: a multicentre European study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Fritscher-Ravens; P. Scherbakov; P. Bufler; F. Torroni; T. Ruuska; H. Nuutinen; M. Thomson; M. Tabbers; P. Milla

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To systematically evaluate the feasibility and methodology to carry out wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) in children,8 years to define small intestinal pathology. Design: Prospective European multicentre study with negative prior investigation. Patients and interventions: 83 children aged

  13. The Impact of Suboptimal Anticoagulation Treatment with Antiplatelet Therapy and Warfarin on Clinical Outcomes among Patients with Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Esther W; Lau, Wallis Cy; Siu, Chung Wah; Lip, Gregory Yh; Leung, Wai K; Anand, Shweta; Man, Kenneth Kc; Wong, Ian Ck

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The actual consequence of suboptimal anticoagulation management in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation(NVAF) is unclear in the real-life practice. OBJECTIVE: To identify the prevalence of suboptimally anticoagulated patients with NVAF, and compare the effectiveness and safe...

  14. New oral anticoagulants vs vitamin K antagonists: benefits for health-related quality of life in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegret, Josep M; Viñolas, Xavier; Arias, Miguel A; Martínez-Rubio, Antoni; Rebollo, Pablo; Ràfols, Carles; Martínez-Sande, José L

    2014-01-01

    New oral anticoagulants (NOAC) have demonstrated their efficacy as an alternative to vitamin K antagonists (VKA) in the prophylaxis of cardioembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, evidence on the benefits of NOAC in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is lacking.We evaluated changes in HRQoL related to oral anticoagulation therapy employing a specific questionnaire in a cohort of 416 patients with AF undergoing electrical cardioversion. In terms of HRQoL, we observed a progressive adaptation to treatment with VKA; satisfaction with NOAC remained constant. Older age, higher left ventricular ejection fraction and NOAC were associated with better HRQoL. PMID:24843316

  15. Efficacy and safety of acupuncture for chronic pain caused by gonarthrosis: A study protocol of an ongoing multi-centre randomised controlled clinical trial [ISRCTN27450856

    OpenAIRE

    Krämer Jürgen; Knauer Christine; Mansmann Ulrich; Witte Steffen; Streitberger Konrad; Scharf Hanns-Peter; Victor Norbert

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Controlled clinical trials produced contradictory results with respect to a specific analgesic effect of acupuncture. There is a lack of large multi-centre acupuncture trials. The German Acupuncture Trial represents the largest multi-centre study of acupuncture in the treatment of chronic pain caused by gonarthrosis up to now. Methods 900 patients will be randomised to three treatment arms. One group receives verum acupuncture, the second sham acupuncture, and the third co...

  16. Cost-efficiency of specialist inpatient rehabilitation for working-aged adults with complex neurological disabilities: A multicentre cohort analysis of a national clinical dataset

    OpenAIRE

    Turner-Stokes, Lynne Frances; Williams, Heather; Bill, Alan; Bassett, Paul; Sephton, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate functional outcomes, care needs and cost-efficiency of specialist rehabilitation for a multicentre cohort of inpatients with complex neurological disability, comparing different diagnostic groups across 3 levels of dependency. Design A multicentre cohort analysis of prospectively collected clinical data from the UK Rehabilitation Outcomes Collaborative (UKROC) national clinical database, 2010–2015. Setting All 62 specialist (levels 1 and 2) rehabilitation services in En...

  17. A pragmatic multi-centre randomised controlled trial of fluid loading and level of dependency in high-risk surgical patients undergoing major elective surgery: trial protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Norrie John; Vale Luke; Stott Stephen A; Campbell Marion K; Cuthbertson Brian H; Kinsella John; Cook Jonathan; Brittenden Julie; Grant Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Patients undergoing major elective or urgent surgery are at high risk of death or significant morbidity. Measures to reduce this morbidity and mortality include pre-operative optimisation and use of higher levels of dependency care after surgery. We propose a pragmatic multi-centre randomised controlled trial of level of dependency and pre-operative fluid therapy in high-risk surgical patients undergoing major elective surgery. Methods/Design A multi-centre randomised cont...

  18. Chest-CT protocol standardization for multicentre trial in cystic fibrosis (CF) infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciet, P.; Graniel, K. Gonzalez; Stick, S.;

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To standardise the scan protocol for CT scanners of participating centres in a multi-centre study (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01270074) for the prevention of radiologically defined bronchiectasis in CF infants by ensuring the maximum image quality at the minimum radiation dose. Methods and...... Materials: Three different sized phantoms (QRM, Germany) were used to assess scanners’ performance of automatic exposure control (AEC). CTDI and DLP were recorded. The phantoms contained various inserts to assess slice-sensitivity-profile, in-plane spatial resolution, noise and the Hounsfield Unit (HU......) scale. Scans were made for several dose levels and reconstruction kernels. Images were analysed with custom-made software (MatLab, USA) to obtain the standard deviation of the noise, point-spread-function (PSF) and slice thickness. Results: Eight different scanners with 64 slices or more from 4...

  19. Treatment of chronic idiopathic urticaria with levamisole: a multicentre, randomized, double-blind, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H; Shan, C; Hua, Z; Zhao, P; Zhang, H

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of treating chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) with levamisole in combination with levocetirizine. This was a multicentre, randomized, double-blind, controlled trial that included 132 patients with active CIU who were treated for 6 weeks with either levocetirizine alone (control group; n = 65) or levamisole plus levocetirizine (treatment group; n = 67). Response to therapy was evaluated by measuring the efficacy rate. After 2 weeks of treatment, there was no significant difference in the efficacy rate between the treatment and control groups (54.84% and 42.37%, respectively). After 6 weeks of treatment, a statistically significant difference in the efficacy rate was observed between the groups (76.27% and 54.39% for the treatment and control groups, respectively). This study demonstrated that a combination of levamisole plus levocetirizine is more effective than levocetirizine alone and potentially provides a new, promising approach to the treatment of CIU. PMID:19761700

  20. Radio-isotopic assays of vitamin B12: interest of Kappa index in a multicentric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owing to the lack of a reference technique and of an international cobalamin (vitamin B12) standard, and the large discrepancy between laboratory norms, the authors performed a multicentric study to compare five RIA kits usually used. First, classical tests were used to evaluate the analytical performances of each kit. Results did not demonstrate any superiority of one kit over another. Secondly, B12 values were classified among three categories (low, normal and high) characterized by laboratory and then manufacturer norms. The concordance between these two ''judgments'' was evaluated with the Kappa coefficient. In addition, the Kappa index proved that the norms supplied by the manufacturer were better than those of laboratories. But mean Kappa coefficient established for each norm gave us an insatisfactory result. Third, clinical informations allowed to improve the classification of the patients. New limits were defined for each technique and should be tested further, routinely in each laboratory. (author)