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Sample records for anticoagulant control results

  1. INR targets and site-level anticoagulation control: results from the Veterans AffaiRs Study to Improve Anticoagulation (VARIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, A J; Berlowitz, D R; Miller, D R; Hylek, E M; Ozonoff, A; Zhao, S; Reisman, J I; Ash, A S

    2012-04-01

    Not all clinicians target the same International Normalized Ratio (INR) for patients with a guideline-recommended target range of 2-3. A patient's mean INR value suggests the INR that was actually targeted. We hypothesized that sites would vary by mean INR, and that sites of care with mean values nearest to 2.5 would achieve better anticoagulation control, as measured by per cent time in therapeutic range (TTR). To examine variations among sites in mean INR and the relationship with anticoagulation control in an integrated system of care. We studied 103,897 patients receiving oral anticoagulation with an expected INR target between 2 and 3 at 100 Veterans Health Administration (VA) sites from 1 October 2006 to 30 September 2008. Key site-level variables were: proportion near 2.5 (that is, percentage of patients with mean INR between 2.3 and 2.7) and mean risk-adjusted TTR. Site mean INR ranged from 2.22 to 2.89; proportion near 2.5, from 30 to 64%. Sites' proportions of patients near 2.5, below 2.3 and above 2.7 were consistent from year to year. A 10 percentage point increase in the proportion near 2.5 predicted a 3.8 percentage point increase in risk-adjusted TTR (P < 0.001). Proportion of patients with mean INR near 2.5 is a site-level 'signature' of care and an implicit measure of targeted INR. This proportion varies by site and is strongly associated with site-level TTR. Our study suggests that sites wishing to improve TTR, and thereby improve patient outcomes, should avoid the explicit or implicit pursuit of non-standard INR targets. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  2. Survey of Botulinum Toxin Injections in Anticoagulated Patients: Korean Physiatrists' Preference in Controlling Anticoagulation Profile Prior to Intramuscular Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yongjun; Park, Geun-Young; Park, Jihye; Choi, Asayeon; Kim, Soo Yeon; Boulias, Chris; Phadke, Chetan P; Ismail, Farooq; Im, Sun

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate Korean physiatrists' practice of performing intramuscular botulinum toxin injection in anticoagulated patients and to assess their preference in controlling the bleeding risk before injection. As part of an international collaboration survey study, a questionnaire survey was administered to 100 Korean physiatrists. Physiatrists were asked about their level of experience with botulinum toxin injection, the safe international normalized ratio range in anticoagulated patients undergoing injection, their tendency for injecting into deep muscles, and their experience of bleeding complications. International normalized ratio injection by 41% of the respondents. Thirty-six respondents replied that the international normalized ratio should be lowered to sub-therapeutic levels before injection, and 18% of the respondents reported that anticoagulants should be intentionally withheld and discontinued prior to injection. In addition, 20%-30% of the respondents answered that they were uncertain whether they should perform the injection regardless of the international normalized ratio values. About 69% of the respondents replied that they did have any standardized protocols for performing botulinum toxin injection in patients using anticoagulants. Only 1 physiatrist replied that he had encountered a case of compartment syndrome. In accordance with the lack of consensus in performing intramuscular botulinum toxin injection in anticoagulated patients, our survey shows a wide range of practices among many Korean physiatrists; they tend to avoid botulinum toxin injection in anticoagulated patients and are uncertain about how to approach these patients. The results of this study emphasize the need for formulating a proper international consensus on botulinum toxin injection management in anticoagulated patients.

  3. Comparison of outcomes among patients randomized to warfarin therapy according to anticoagulant control: results from SPORTIF III and V

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    White, Harvey D; Gruber, Michael; Feyzi, Jan

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Warfarin sodium reduces stroke risk in patients with atrial fibrillation, but international normalized ratio (INR) monitoring is required. Target INRs are frequently not achieved, and the risk of death, bleeding, myocardial infarction (MI), and stroke or systemic embolism event (SEE......) may be related to INR control. METHODS: We analyzed the relationship between INR control and the rates of death, bleeding, MI, and stroke or SEE among 3587 patients with atrial fibrillation randomized to receive warfarin treatment in the SPORTIF (Stroke Prevention Using an Oral Thrombin Inhibitor...... control group (1.69% and 1.58%, respectively) (Pwarfarin, the risks of death...

  4. Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials and adjusted observational results of use of clopidogrel, aspirin, and oral anticoagulants in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Taha, Salma; Moretti, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    The optimal antiaggregant therapy after coronary stenting in patients receiving oral anticoagulants (OACs) is currently debated. MEDLINE and Cochrane Library were searched for studies reporting outcomes of patients who underwent PCI and who were on triple therapy (TT) or dual-antiplatelet therapy...

  5. Standardisation of the Laboratory Control of Anticoagulant Therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-09-11

    Sep 11, 1974 ... Anticoagulant therapy with the coumarin group of drugs has been used in clinical practice for more than a quarter of a century. The most widely used form of laboratory control of the treatment is the Quick one-stage prothrom·- bin time. I. This simple test proved to be satisfactory in most cases, but discrepant ...

  6. Cost effectiveness of novel oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation depending on the quality of warfarin anticoagulation control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzic, Andrej; Kos, Mitja

    2015-04-01

    Vitamin K antagonists, such as warfarin, are standard treatments for stroke prophylaxis in patients with atrial fibrillation. Patient outcomes depend on quality of warfarin management, which includes regular monitoring and dose adjustments. Recently, novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) that do not require regular monitoring offer an alternative to warfarin. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether cost effectiveness of NOACs for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation depends on the quality of warfarin control. We developed a Markov decision model to simulate warfarin treatment outcomes in relation to the quality of anticoagulation control, expressed as percentage of time in the therapeutic range (TTR). Standard treatment with adjusted-dose warfarin and improved anticoagulation control by genotype-guided dosing were compared with dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban. The analysis was performed from the Slovenian healthcare payer perspective using 2014 costs. In the base case, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for apixaban, dabigatran and edoxaban was below the threshold of €25,000 per quality-adjusted life-years compared with adjusted-dose warfarin with a TTR of 60%. The probability that warfarin was a cost-effective option was around 1%. This percentage rises as the quality of anticoagulation control improves. At a TTR of 70%, warfarin was the preferred treatment in half the iterations. The cost effectiveness of NOACs for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation who are at increased risk for stroke is highly sensitive to warfarin anticoagulation control. NOACs are more likely to be cost-effective options in settings with poor warfarin management than in settings with better anticoagulation control, where they may not represent good value for money.

  7. Association between Oral Anticoagulation Knowledge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Association between Oral Anticoagulation Knowledge, Anticoagulation Control, and Demographic Characteristics of Patients Attending an Anticoagulation Clinic in Saudi Arabia: A Cross-Sectional Prospective Evaluation.

  8. Anticoagulant resistance: a relevant issue in sewer rat (Rattus norvegicus) control?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    the resistant rats, had resistance-related mutations in the VKORC1 gene. CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that the genetic background of anticoagulant resistance may have to be redefined in respect of resistance-related changes in the VKORC1 gene. Copyright © 2009 Society of Chemical Industry......BACKGROUND: The majority of rat problems in cities are thought to be related to defective sewers, and the use of anticoagulant rodenticides in such places is often implemented as part of regular urban rodent control. Knowledge pertaining to the resistance status of sewer rat populations is non......-existent, which may be leading to control problems in cities. It has become crucial to provide knowledge on the prevalence of resistance and how different control strategies have affected its prevalence among sewer rat populations. The prevalence of resistance was investigated in six sewer locations in Copenhagen...

  9. Vitamin K for improved anticoagulation control in patients receiving warfarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahtani, Kamal R; Heneghan, Carl J; Nunan, David; Roberts, Nia W

    2014-05-15

    Effective use of warfarin involves keeping the international normalised ratio (INR) within a relatively narrow therapeutic range. However, patients respond widely to their dose of warfarin. Overcoagulation can lead to an increased risk of excessive bleeding, while undercoagulation can lead to increased clot formation. There is some evidence that patients with a variable response to warfarin may benefit from a concomitant low dose of vitamin K. To assess the effects of concomitant supplementation of low-dose oral vitamin K for anticoagulation control in patients being initiated on or taking a maintenance dose of warfarin. To identify previous reviews, we searched the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE via The Cochrane Library, Wiley) (Issue 2, 2011). To identify primary studies, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL via The Cochrane Library, Wiley) (Issue 2, 2014), Ovid MEDLINE (R) In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations database and Ovid MEDLINE (R) (OvidSP) (1946 to 25 February 2014), Embase (OvidSP) (1974 to week 8 of 2014), Science Citation Index Expanded™ & Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science (Web of Science™) (1945 to 27 February 2014), and the NHS Economics Evaluations Database (NHS EED) (via The Cochrane Library, Wiley) (Issue 2, 2014). We did not apply any language or date restrictions. We used additional methods to identify grey literature and ongoing studies. Randomised controlled trials comparing the addition of vitamin K versus placebo in patients initiating warfarin or already taking warfarin. Two review authors independently selected and extracted data from included studies. When disagreement arose, a third author helped reached a consensus. We also assessed risk of bias. We identified two studies with a total of 100 participants for inclusion in the review. We found the overall risk of bias to be unclear in a number of domains. Neither study reported the time taken to the first INR in

  10. The Anticoagulation of Calf Thrombosis (ACT project: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horner Daniel

    2012-04-01

    will explore the feasibility of comparing therapeutic anticoagulation to conservative management in acute distal DVT, within a modern cohort. We also aim to provide contemporary data on clot propagation, bleeding rates and long-term outcomes within both groups. These results will inform the conduct of a definitive study if feasibility is established. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN75175695

  11. Anticoagulant Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte

    Although sewer rat control is carried out in more than 80 % of all Danish municipalities, with usage of large amounts of anticoagulant rodenticides, knowledge on anticoagulant resistance among rats living in the sewers is limited. As rat problems in urban areas are believed to be related to sewer...... problems (70-90 % in UK and DK) unawareness of resistance amongst these populations of Brown rats may constitute a future control problem and knowledge on this issue has become crucial. Rats were captured in sewers from seven different locations in the suburban area of Copenhagen. Locations was chosen...... to represent different sewer rat management strategies i) no anticoagulants for approx. 20 years ii) no anticoagulants for the last 5 years and iii) continuous control for many years. Animals were tested for resistance to bromadiolone by Blood-Clotting Response test, as bromadiolone is the most frequently used...

  12. Quality of Vitamin K Antagonist Anticoagulation in Spain: Prevalence of Poor Control and Associated Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguita Sánchez, Manuel; Bertomeu Martínez, Vicente; Cequier Fillat, Ángel

    2015-09-01

    To study the prevalence of poorly controlled vitamin K antagonist anticoagulation in Spain in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, and to identify associated factors. We studied 1056 consecutive patients seen at 120 cardiology clinics in Spain between November 2013 and March 2014. We analyzed the international normalized ratio from the 6 months prior to the patient's visit, calculating the prevalence of poorly controlled anticoagulation, defined as < 65% time in therapeutic range using the Rosendaal method. Mean age was 73.6 years (standard deviation, 9.8 years); women accounted for 42% of patients. The prevalence of poorly controlled anticoagulation was 47.3%. Mean time in therapeutic range was 63.8% (25.9%). The following factors were independently associated with poorly controlled anticoagulation: kidney disease (odds ratio = 1.53; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-2.18; P = .018), routine nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (odds ratio = 1.79; 95% confidence interval, 1.20-2.79; P = .004), antiplatelet therapy (odds ratio = 2.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.49-3.12; P < .0001) and absence of angiotensin receptor blockers (odds ratio = 1.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.79; P = .011). There is a high prevalence of poorly controlled vitamin K antagonist anticoagulation in Spain. Factors associated with poor control are kidney disease, routine nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiplatelet use, and absence of angiotensin receptor blockers. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Secondary poisoning of owls by anticoagulant rodenticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendenhall, Vivian M.; Pank, L.F.

    1980-01-01

    Anticoagulants-compounds that prevent clotting of the blood-are extensively used for control of small mammal pests. The potential secondary hazards of 6 anticoagulant rodenticides to birds of prey were examined in this study. Whole rats or mice were killed with each anticoagulant and were fed to 1-3 species of owls. Owls died of hemorrhaging after feeding on rats killed with bromadiolone, brodifacoum, or diphacinone; sublethal hemorrhaging occurred in owls fed rats killed with difenacoum. These results demonstrate potential secondary hazards of 4 anticoagulants to avian predators. No abnormalities were observed in owls fed rats killed with fumarin and chlorophacinone

  14. Changes in oral anticoagulation for elective cardioversion: results from a European cardioversion registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Judit; Zima, Endre; Bover, Ramon; Karaliute, Rasa; Rossi, Andrea; Szymanski, Catherine; Troccoli, Rossella; Schneider, Jonas; Fagerland, Morten Wang; Camm, A John; Atar, Dan

    2017-07-01

    In patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) pharmacological or electrical cardioversion may be performed to restore sinus rhythm. The procedure is associated with an increased risk of thromboembolic events, which can be significantly reduced by adequate anticoagulation (OAC). Our aim was to create a partly prospective, partly retrospective cardioversion registry, particularly focusing on OAC strategies in different European countries, and on emerging choice of OAC over time. From September 2014 to October 2015, cardioversions due to AF performed in six European city hospitals in five European countries (Hungary: Budapest-1 and -2; Italy: Bari and Pisa; France: Amiens; Spain: Madrid; and Lithuania: Kaunas) were recorded in the registry. A total of 1101 patients (retrospective/prospective: 679/422, male/female: 742/359, mean age: 67.3 years ± 11.2) were registered. Most of the cardioversions were electrical (97%). Oral anticoagulants were administered in 87% of the patient, the usage of non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs) vs Vitamin K antagonists (VKA) was 31.5% vs 68.5%, respectively. Seventy seven percent of the patients were given oral anticoagulants more than 3 weeks prior to the procedure, and 86% more than 4 weeks after the procedure. When using VKA, international normalized ratio (INR) at cardioversion was above 2.0 in 76% of the cases. A decline in VKA usage (P = 0.033) in elective cardioversion over approximately 1 year was observed. During the observation period, there was an increase in apixaban (P < 0.001), a slight increase in rivaroxaban (P = 0.028) and no changes in dabigatran (P = 0.34) usage for elective cardioversion. There were differences in use of OAC between the countries: Spain used most VKA (89%), while France used least VKA (39%, P < 0.001). According to current AF guidelines, NOACs are adequate alternatives to VKA for thromboembolic prevention in AF patients undergoing elective cardioversion. Our results indicate that

  15. Anticoagulant rodenticide toxicity to non-target wildlife under controlled exposure conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattner, Barnett A.; Mastrota, F. Nicholas; van den Brink, Nico; Elliott, J.; Shore, R.; Rattner, B.

    2018-01-01

    Much of our understanding of anticoagulant rodenticide toxicity to non-target wildlife has been derived from molecular through whole animal research and registration studies in domesticated birds and mammals, and to a lesser degree from trials with captive wildlife. Using these data, an adverse outcome pathway identifying molecular initiating and anchoring events (inhibition of vitamin K epoxide reductase, failure to activate clotting factors), and established and plausible linkages (coagulopathy, hemorrhage, anemia, reduced fitness) associated with toxicity, is presented. Controlled exposure studies have demonstrated that second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides (e.g., brodifacoum) are more toxic than first- and intermediate-generation compounds (e.g., warfarin, diphacinone), however the difference in potency is diminished when first- and intermediate-generation compounds are administered on multiple days. Differences in species sensitivity are inconsistent among compounds. Numerous studies have compared mortality rate of predators fed prey or tissue containing anticoagulant rodenticides. In secondary exposure studies in birds, brodifacoum appears to pose the greatest risk, with bromadiolone, difenacoum, flocoumafen and difethialone being less hazardous than brodifacoum, and warfarin, coumatetralyl, coumafuryl, chlorophacinone and diphacinone being even less hazardous. In contrast, substantial mortality was noted in secondary exposure studies in mammals ingesting prey or tissue diets containing either second- or intermediate-generation compounds. Sublethal responses (e.g., prolonged clotting time, reduced hematocrit and anemia) have been used to study the sequelae of anticoagulant intoxication, and to some degree in the establishment of toxicity thresholds or toxicity reference values. Surprisingly few studies have undertaken histopathological evaluations to identify cellular lesions and hemorrhage associated with anticoagulant rodenticide exposure in non

  16. Net clinical benefit of combination anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy versus anticoagulation alone in atrial fibrillation patients: Results from the amadeus trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lane, Deirdre; Kamphuisen, Pieter; Minini, Pascal; De Peuter, Olaf R.; Buller, Harry R.; Lip, Gregory Y. H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: To compare the effect of combination anticoagulant and antiplatelet (AP) therapy with anticoagulation alone on stroke and bleeding risk in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients and examine predictors of clinically relevant bleeding. Methods: Post-hoc analysis of 4576 AF patients [mean (SD)

  17. Poor anticoagulation control in patients taking warfarin at a tertiary and districtlevel prothrombin clinic in Cape Town South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Ebrahim

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Warfarin is the most commonly used anticoagulant for both primary and secondary prevention of thromboembolism. For anticoagulation efficacy, the international normalised ratio (INR needs to be within the therapeutic range for at least 65% of time on warfarin.Objectives. To describe INR control in patients on long-term warfarin and identified predictors of good INR control at two dedicated warfarin follow-up clinics in Cape Town, South Africa (SA.Methods. We reviewed clinical records of patients in care at the INR clinics at Mitchell’s Plain Community Health Centre and Groote Schuur Hospital. We included patients who had been on warfarin therapy for at least 27 months and excluded patients with <6 months of INR monitoring data or a >70-day gap between INR tests in the calculation period, and if >25% of follow-up time was at an alternative site. The time in therapeutic range (TTR over 180 days using the Rosendaal method was calculated, and we categorised INR control as good if the TTR was ≥65%. We constructed a multivariate logistic regression model to identify associations with good INR control.Results. We included 363 patients, with a median age of 55 years (interquartile range (IQR 44 - 64, of whom 65.6% were women. The most common indications for warfarin were valvular heart disease (45.7% and atrial fibrillation (25.1%. The mean TTR was 47%, with only 91/363 patients having good INR control. In a multivariate model adjusted for age, sex, clinic and target INR, patients aged ≥55 years were more likely to have good INR control than younger patients (adjusted odds ratio 1.69, 95% confidence interval 1.03 - 2.79. Poorly controlled patients had more frequent INR monitoring than those with good INR control, with a median of 8 INRs (IQR 6 - 10 v. 6 INRs (IQR 5 - 8 in the 180-day period (p<0.0001.Conclusions. Only 25.1% of patients in our study achieved good INR control, despite regular INR monitoring. There is an

  18. Control of anticoagulant therapy and quality of life of patients with atrial fibrillation (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shvarts Y.G.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The review presents the published data on the relevance of the problem of thromboembolic complications in atrial fibrillation, the peculiarities of anticoagulant therapy for this disease. The relationship of clinical characteristics of patients with anticoagulant dose adjustment algorithms has been described. The problem of ethical issues of out of clinical trials patients and the dynamics of their quality of life against the background of long-term use of anticoagulant have been considered.

  19. Anticoagulation Control in Patients With Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation Attended at Primary Care Centers in Spain: The PAULA Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Vivencio; Escobar, Carlos; Prieto, Luis; Osorio, Genoveva; Polo, José; Lobos, José María; Vargas, Diego; García, Nicolás

    2015-09-01

    To determine the current status of anticoagulation control in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation treated with vitamin K antagonists in the primary care setting in Spain. The PAULA study was a multicenter cross-sectional/retrospective observational study conducted throughout Spain. The study included patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation who had been receiving vitamin K antagonist therapy during the past year and were attended at primary care centers. International normalized ratio (INR) values over the past 12 months were recorded. The degree of anticoagulation control was defined as the time the patient had remained within the therapeutic range and was determined by both the direct method (poor control < 60%) and by the Rosendaal method (poor control < 65%). The study assessed 1524 patients (mean age, 77.4 ± 8.7 years; 48.6% women; 64.2% in permanent atrial fibrillation; CHADS2 mean, 2.3 ± 1.2; CHA2DS2-VASc, 3.9 ± 1.5, and HAS-BLED, 1.6 ± 0.9). The mean number of INR readings recorded per patient was 14.4 ± 3.8. A total of 56.9% of patients had adequate INR control according to the direct method and 60.6% according to the Rosendaal method. The multivariate analysis identified the following predictors for poor INR control: female sex, dietary habits potentially affecting anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists, multidrug therapy, and a history of labile INR. Approximately 40% of patients (43.1% by the direct method and 39.4% by the Rosendaal method) with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation who were receiving anticoagulation therapy with vitamin K antagonists in primary care in Spain had poor anticoagulation control during the previous 12 months. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Medium intensity oral anticoagulants versus aspirin after cerebral ischaemia of arterial origin (ESPRIT): a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkes, P H A; van Gijn, J; Kappelle, L J; Koudstaal, P J; Algra, A

    2007-02-01

    Oral anticoagulants are better than aspirin for secondary prevention after myocardial infarction and after cerebral ischaemia in combination with non-rheumatic atrial fibrillation. The European/Australasian Stroke Prevention in Reversible Ischaemia Trial (ESPRIT) aimed to determine whether oral anticoagulation with medium intensity is more effective than aspirin in preventing future vascular events in patients with transient ischaemic attack or minor stroke of presumed arterial origin. In this international, multicentre trial, patients were randomly assigned within 6 months after a transient ischaemic attack or minor stroke of presumed arterial origin either anticoagulants (target INR range 2.0-3.0; n=536) or aspirin (30-325 mg daily; n=532). The primary outcome was the composite of death from all vascular causes, non-fatal stroke, non-fatal myocardial infarction, or major bleeding complication, whichever occurred first. In a post hoc analysis anticoagulants were compared with the combination of aspirin and dipyridamole (200 mg twice daily). Treatment was open, but auditing of outcome events was blinded. Primary analysis was by intention to treat. This study is registered as an International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial (number ISRCTN73824458) and with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00161070). The anticoagulants versus aspirin comparison of ESPRIT was prematurely ended because ESPRIT reported previously that the combination of aspirin and dipyridamole was more effective than aspirin alone. Mean follow-up was 4.6 years (SD 2.2). The mean achieved INR was 2.57 (SD 0.86). A primary outcome event occurred in 99 (19%) patients on anticoagulants and in 98 (18%) patients on aspirin (hazard ratio [HR] 1.02, 95% CI 0.77-1.35). The HR for ischaemic events was 0.73 (0.52-1.01) and for major bleeding complications 2.56 (1.48-4.43). The HR for the primary outcome event comparing anticoagulants with the combination treatment of aspirin and dipyridamole was 1.31 (0.98-1.75). Oral

  1. Bridging Anticoagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... clinical centers in the United States, Canada, and Brazil. A more detailed description of the study is ... Your Personal Message Send Message Share on Social Media Bridging Anticoagulation The BRIDGE Study Investigators Circulation. 2012; ...

  2. The ACT Alert: preliminary results of a novel protocol to assess geriatric head trauma patients on anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittenhouse, Katelyn; Rogers, Amelia; Clark, Elizabeth; Horst, Michael; Adams, William; Bupp, Katherine; Shertzer, Weston; Miller, Jo Ann; Chandler, Roxanne; Rogers, Frederick B

    2015-04-01

    In busy emergency departments (EDs), elderly patients on anticoagulation (AC) sustaining minor injuries who are triaged to a lower priority for evaluation are at risk for potentially serious consequences. We sought to determine if a novel ED protocol prioritizes workup and improves outcome. In a Pennsylvania-verified Level II trauma center, the ACT (AntiCoagulation and Trauma) Alert was implemented in March 2012. Triage parameters include: age 65 years or older, AC agents, Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) 13 or greater, and head trauma 24 hours or less. ACT Alerts are announced overhead in the ED and require assessment by an ED physician, nurse, and phlebotomist in 15 minutes or less. Furthermore, they necessitate Point of Care international normalized ratio (INR) 20 minutes or less and head computed tomography (CT) scan 30 minutes or less. Positive CT findings mandate trauma service consultation. ACT Alert patients from March to December 2012 were compared with ED patients 65 years or older, GCS 13 or greater, on AC with the same chief complaints as ACT Alerts from June 2011 to February 2012 (control). A P value ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. Of 752 study patients, 415 were ACT and 337 were controls. There were no significant differences between groups in age, elevated INR, or head bleeds. ACT patients had significantly shorter median times from ED arrival to INR (ACT 13 minutes vs control 80 minutes; P ACT 35 minutes vs control 65 minutes; P ACT had a significantly shorter median length of stay (LOS) (ACT 3.7 days vs control 5.0 days; P ACT Alert improves ED throughput and reduces hospital LOS while effectively identifying at-risk, mildly head injured geriatric patients on AC.

  3. Clinical characteristics and management of patients with atrial fibrillation treated with direct oral anticoagulants according to blood pressure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Figuera, M; Cinza, S; Egocheaga, I; Marín, N; Prieto, M A

    2018-02-14

    To determine the clinical characteristics and management of hypertensive patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF) treated with direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) according to blood pressure (BP) control. For this purpose, data from two observational, cross-sectional and multicenter studies were combined. In both studies, patients on chronic treatment with anticoagulants and that were on current treatment with DOACs at least for 3 months were included. Adequate BP was defined as a systolic BP<140mmHg and a diastolic BP<90mmHg (<140/85mmHg if diabetes). Overall, 1036 patients were included. Of these, 881 (85%) had hypertension that were finally analyzed. The presence of other risk factors and cardiovascular disease was common. Mean BP was 132.6±14.3/75.2±9.2mmHg and 70.5% of patients achieved BP goals. Those patients with a poor BP control had more frequently diabetes, and a history of prior labile INR. Patients had a high thromboembolic risk, but without significant differences according to BP control. By contrast, more patients with a poor BP control had a higher bleeding risk (HAS-BLED ≥3: 24.0% vs 35.4%; P<0.001). HAS-BLED score was an independent predictor of poor BP control (odds ratio 1.435; 95% confidence interval 1.216-1.693; P<0.001). Satisfaction with anticoagulant treatment was independent of BP control. More than two thirds of our patients with hypertension and AF anticoagulated with DOACs achieve BP targets, what is clearly superior to that reported in the general hypertensive population. Copyright © 2018 SEH-LELHA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessment of the Quality of Chronic Anticoagulation Control With Time in Therapeutic Range in Atrial Fibrillation Patients Treated With Vitamin K Antagonists by Hemostasis Specialists: The TERRA Registry: Tiempo en rango en la República Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajer, Carlos; Ceresetto, José; Bottaro, Federico Jorge; Martí, Alejandra; Casey, Marcelo

    2017-07-01

    Oral anticoagulation therapy with vitamin K antagonists (VKA) such as warfarin and acenocoumarol is recommended in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and risk factors for embolism. The quality of anticoagulation control with VKA may be assessed by the time in therapeutic range (TTR). In our country, there are no data available about the quality of anticoagulation in patients with AF. The primary goal of our study was to assess the level of effective anticoagulation in a multicenter network of anticoagulation clinics in Argentina, which included patients with nonvalvular AF (NVAF) treated with VKA oral anticoagulants. The TERRA trial is a multicenter, cross-sectional study involving 14 anticoagulation clinics that were invited to participate and recruit 100 consecutive patients with NVAF treated with VKA for more than 1 year. The international normalized ratio (INR) values were retrospectively obtained from patient charts, and TTR was calculated using the Rosendaal method. A total of 1190 patients were included in the analysis. Mean age was 74.9 ± 9.9 years, and 52.5% of the patients were male. Median TTR was 67.5% (interquartile interval 54-80). During 55% of the TTR, INR was >3. Interinstitution variability was substantial, with a range of 57.7% ± 17% to 87.7% ± 17%, P < .001. The 10th percentile of TTR was 41%, the 20th percentile was 50%, the 30th was 58%, and the 35th percentile was 60%. In 40% of patients, TTR was <70%. In this multicenter study, mean TTR values in patients with AF under VKA were similar to those in international therapeutic clinical trials (55%-65%). Marked variations among institutions were observed and, although average results obtained were high, one third of the patients exhibited a TTR below 60%. This cutoff value is conservative according to current recommendations, and guidelines suggest that when management with VKA cannot be improved, patients should be switched to direct oral anticoagulants. The addition of TTR calculation to

  5. [Update on the control of patients on treatment with vitaminK antagonist oral anticoagulants in Primary Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández López, P; López Ramiro, M I; Merino de Haro, I; Cedeño Manzano, G; Díaz Siles, F J; Hermoso Sabio, A

    In Spain, more than 80% of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) receive oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT), and 72% of these patients are followed up in the Primary Care (PC) setting. Recent studies have shown that there is insufficient control of patients on OAT. The objective of the present study was to obtain more detailed information on the state of control of patients on treatment with vitaminK antagonist (VKA) oral anticoagulants (OAC), on the diseases for which the therapy was indicated and on concomitant diseases. This was a retrospective, cross-sectional, observational study with the participation of patients from a single health area included in an OAT programme throughout 2014. In patients on treatment with OAC, International Normalised Ratio (INR) control was considered insufficient when the percentage time in therapeutic range (TTR) was below 65% during an evaluation period of at least 6months. A total of 368 patients were included in the study, where the most frequent indication for oral anticoagulation was non-valvular AF. A total of 5,128 INR controls were performed, of which 2,359 (46%) were outside the therapeutic range, and 2,769 (54%) were within range. The risk of thromboembolism was very high in 91% of patients on treatment with VKA OAC. The indication for anticoagulation is correct in our population, assuming a low-intermediate risk of haemorrhage in the majority of patients. Measurement of the TTR using the Rosendaal method shows that the control of patients on treatment with VKA OAC is insufficient. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Multicentre randomised placebo-controlled trial of oral anticoagulation with apixaban in systemic sclerosis-related pulmonary arterial hypertension: the SPHInX study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderone, Alicia; Stevens, Wendy; Prior, David; Nandurkar, Harshal; Gabbay, Eli; Proudman, Susanna M; Williams, Trevor; Celermajer, David; Sahhar, Joanne; Wong, Peter K K; Thakkar, Vivek; Dwyer, Nathan; Wrobel, Jeremy; Chin, Weng; Liew, Danny; Staples, Margaret; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Nikpour, Mandana

    2016-12-08

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a severe and costly multiorgan autoimmune connective tissue disease characterised by vasculopathy and fibrosis. One of the major causes of SSc-related death is pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), which develops in 12-15% of patients with SSc and accounts for 30-40% of deaths. In situ thrombosis in the small calibre peripheral pulmonary vessels resulting from endothelial dysfunction and an imbalance of anticoagulant and prothrombotic mediators has been implicated in the complex pathophysiology of SSc-related PAH (SSc-PAH), with international clinical guidelines recommending the use of anticoagulants for some types of PAH, such as idiopathic PAH. However, anticoagulation has not become part of standard clinical care for patients with SSc-PAH as only observational evidence exists to support its use. Therefore, we present the rationale and methodology of a phase III randomised controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate the efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness of anticoagulation in SSc-PAH. This Australian multicentre RCT will compare 2.5 mg apixaban with placebo, in parallel treatment groups randomised in a 1:1 ratio, both administered twice daily for 3 years as adjunct therapy to stable oral PAH therapy. The composite primary outcome measure will be the time to death or clinical worsening of PAH. Secondary outcomes will include functional capacity, health-related quality of life measures and adverse events. A cost-effectiveness analysis of anticoagulation versus placebo will also be undertaken. Ethical approval for this RCT has been granted by the Human Research Ethics Committees of all participating centres. An independent data safety monitoring board will review safety and tolerability data for the duration of the trial. The findings of this RCT are to be published in open access journals. ACTRN12614000418673, Pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  7. Management strategies for optimal control of anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levi, Marcel; De Peuter, Olaf R.; Kamphuisen, Pieter W.

    2009-01-01

    Most patients with atrial fibrillation need anticoagulant treatment with vitamin K antagonists for prevention of thromboembolism, in particular ischemic stroke. Many studies show the efficacy of this treatment but also that it is difficult to keep patients who use vitamin K antagonists in the proper

  8. Direct oral anticoagulants: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco Moreno, Ana Isabel; Martín Díaz, Rosa María; García Navarro, María José

    2017-12-30

    Vitamin K antagonists were the only choice for chronic oral anticoagulation for more than half a century. Over the past few years, direct oral anticoagulants have emerged, including one direct thrombin inhibitor (dabigatran etexilate) and three factor Xa inhibitors (apixaban, edoxaban and rivaroxaban). In randomised controlled trials comparing direct oral anticoagulants with traditional vitamin K antagonists, the direct oral anticoagulants all showed a favourable benefit-risk balance in their safety and efficacy profile, in prevention of thromboembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillation and in the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and acute coronary syndrome. In 2008, dabigatran was the first direct oral anticoagulant approved by the European Medicine Agency. Subsequently, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban were also authorised. This article reviews the evidence related to the use of these drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. D-dimer to guide the intensity of anticoagulation in Chinese patients after mechanical heart valve replacement: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Zheng, X; Long, Y; Wu, M; Chen, Y; Yang, J; Liu, Z; Zhang, Z

    2017-10-01

    Essentials Low anticoagulation intensity reduces bleeding but increases thrombosis during warfarin therapy. Elevated D-dimer level is associated with increased thrombosis events. D-dimer can be used to find potential thrombosis in those receiving low intensity therapy. D-dimer-guided therapy may be the optimal strategy for those with mechanical heart valve replacement. Background Controversies remain regarding the optimal anticoagulation intensity for Chinese patients after mechanical heart valve replacement despite guidelines having recommended a standard anticoagulation intensity. Objectives To investigate whether D-dimer could be used to determine the optimal anticoagulation intensity in Chinese patients after mechanical heart valve replacement. Patients/Methods This was a prospective, randomized controlled clinical study. A total of 748 patients following mechanical heart valve replacement in Wuhan Asia Heart Hospital were randomized to three groups at a ratio of 1 : 1 : 1. Patients in two control groups received warfarin therapy based on constant standard intensity (international normalized ratio [INR], 2.5-3.5; n = 250) and low intensity (INR, 1.8-2.6; n = 248), respectively. In the experimental group (n = 250), warfarin therapy was initiated at low intensity, then those with elevated D-dimer levels were adjusted to standard intensity. All patients were followed-up for 24 months until the occurrence of endpoints, including bleeding events, thrombotic events and all-cause mortality. Results A total of 718 patients were included in the analysis. Fifty-three events occurred during follow-up. There was less hemorrhage (3/240 vs. 16/241; hazard ratio [HR], 0.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.07-0.45) and all-cause mortality (4/240 vs. 12/241; HR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.12-0.87) observed in the D-dimer-guided group than in the standard-intensity group. A lower incidence of thrombotic events was also observed in the D-dimer-guided group when compared with the

  10. Anticoagulants Influence the Performance of In Vitro Assays Intended for Characterization of Nanotechnology-Based Formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Cedrone

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The preclinical safety assessment of novel nanotechnology-based drug products frequently relies on in vitro assays, especially during the early stages of product development, due to the limited quantities of nanomaterials available for such studies. The majority of immunological tests require donor blood. To enable such tests one has to prevent the blood from coagulating, which is usually achieved by the addition of an anticoagulant into blood collection tubes. Heparin, ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA, and citrate are the most commonly used anticoagulants. Novel anticoagulants such as hirudin are also available but are not broadly used. Despite the notion that certain anticoagulants may influence assay performance, a systematic comparison between traditional and novel anticoagulants in the in vitro assays intended for immunological characterization of nanotechnology-based formulations is currently not available. We compared hirudin-anticoagulated blood with its traditional counterparts in the standardized immunological assay cascade, and found that the type of anticoagulant did not influence the performance of the hemolysis assay. However, hirudin was more optimal for the complement activation and leukocyte proliferation assays, while traditional anticoagulants citrate and heparin were more appropriate for the coagulation and cytokine secretion assays. The results also suggest that traditional immunological controls such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS are not reliable for understanding the role of anticoagulant in the assay performance. We observed differences in the test results between hirudin and traditional anticoagulant-prepared blood for nanomaterials at the time when no such effects were seen with traditional controls. It is, therefore, important to recognize the advantages and limitations of each anticoagulant and consider individual nanoparticles on a case-by-case basis.

  11. Fatal consequences of synergistic anticoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen P

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs are increasingly being preferred by clinicians (and patients because they have a wide therapeutic window and therefore do not require monitoring of anticoagulant effect. Herein, we describe the unfortunate case of a patient who had fatal consequences as a result of switching from warfarin to rivaroxaban. Case Summary: A 90-year-old Caucasian woman, with atrial fibrillation on chronic anticoagulation with warfarin, was admitted to the hospital for pneumonia. She was treated with levofloxacin. In the same admission, her warfarin was switched to rivaroxaban. On Day 3 after the switch, her INR was found to be 6, and she developed a cervical epidural hematoma from C2 to C7. She ultimately developed respiratory arrest, was put on comfort care and died. Discussion: Rivaroxaban and warfarin are known to have a synergistic anticoagulant effect, usually seen shortly after switching. Antibiotics also increase the effects of warfarin by the inhibition of metabolizing isoenzymes. It is hypothesized that these two effects led to the fatal cervical spinal hematoma. Conclusion: The convenience of a wide therapeutic window and no requirement of laboratory monitoring makes the NOACs a desirable option for anticoagulation. However, there is lack of data and recommendations on how to transition patients from Warfarin to NOACs or even how to transition from one NOAC to another. Care should be taken to ensure continuous monitoring of anticoagulation when stopping, interrupting or switching between NOACS to avoid the possibility of fatal bleeding and strokes.

  12. Pharmacogenetics-based warfarin dosing algorithm decreases time to stable anticoagulation and the risk of major hemorrhage: an updated meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Quan; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Peng-Pai; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Sun, Jian; Wang, Jun; Feng, Xiang-Fei; Lu, Qiu-Fen; Li, Yi-Gang

    2015-04-01

    Warfarin is yet the most widely used oral anticoagulant for thromboembolic diseases, despite the recently emerged novel anticoagulants. However, difficulty in maintaining stable dose within the therapeutic range and subsequent serious adverse effects markedly limited its use in clinical practice. Pharmacogenetics-based warfarin dosing algorithm is a recently emerged strategy to predict the initial and maintaining dose of warfarin. However, whether this algorithm is superior over conventional clinically guided dosing algorithm remains controversial. We made a comparison of pharmacogenetics-based versus clinically guided dosing algorithm by an updated meta-analysis. We searched OVID MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library for relevant citations. The primary outcome was the percentage of time in therapeutic range. The secondary outcomes were time to stable therapeutic dose and the risks of adverse events including all-cause mortality, thromboembolic events, total bleedings, and major bleedings. Eleven randomized controlled trials with 2639 participants were included. Our pooled estimates indicated that pharmacogenetics-based dosing algorithm did not improve percentage of time in therapeutic range [weighted mean difference, 4.26; 95% confidence interval (CI), -0.50 to 9.01; P = 0.08], but it significantly shortened the time to stable therapeutic dose (weighted mean difference, -8.67; 95% CI, -11.86 to -5.49; P pharmacogenetics-based algorithm significantly reduced the risk of major bleedings (odds ratio, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.23 to 0.98; P = 0.04), but it did not reduce the risks of all-cause mortality, total bleedings, or thromboembolic events. Our results suggest that pharmacogenetics-based warfarin dosing algorithm significantly improves the efficiency of International Normalized Ratio correction and reduces the risk of major hemorrhage.

  13. Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood clots - lupus anticoagulants; DVT - anticoagulants ... Most often, lupus anticoagulants and aPL are found in people with diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Lupus anticoagulants and ...

  14. Impact of valvular heart disease on oral anticoagulant therapy in non-valvular atrial fibrillation: results from the RAMSES study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başaran, Özcan; Dogan, Volkan; Beton, Osman; Tekinalp, Mehmet; Aykan, Ahmet Çağrı; Kalaycıoğlu, Ezgi; Bolat, Ismail; Taşar, Onur; Şafak, Özgen; Kalçık, Macit; Yaman, Mehmet; İnci, Sinan; Altıntaş, Bernas; Kalkan, Sedat; Kırma, Cevat; Biteker, Murat

    2017-02-01

    The definition of non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) is controversial. We aimed to assess the impact of valvular heart disease on stroke prevention strategies in NVAF patients. The RAMSES study was a multicenter and cross-sectional study conducted on NVAF patients (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02344901). The study population was divided into patients with significant valvular disease (SVD) and non-significant valvular disease (NSVD), whether they had at least one moderate valvular disease or not. Patients with a mechanical prosthetic valve and mitral stenosis were excluded. Baseline characteristics and oral anticoagulant (OAC) therapies were compared. In 5987 patients with NVAF, there were 3929 (66%) NSVD and 2058 (34%) SVD patients. The predominant valvular disease was mitral regurgitation (58.1%), followed by aortic regurgitation (24.1%) and aortic stenosis (17.8%). Patients with SVD had higher CHA 2 DS 2 VASc [3.0 (2.0; 4.0) vs. 4.0 (2.0; 5.0), p valvular heart disease with the predominance of mitral regurgitation. Patients with SVD were at greater risk of stroke and bleeding compared to patients with NSVD. Although patients with mitral regurgitation should be given more aggressive anticoagulant therapy due to their higher risk of stroke, they are undertreated compared to patients with aortic valve diseases.

  15. Medium intensity oral anticoagulants versus aspirin after cerebral ischaemia of arterial origin (ESPRIT) : a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halkes, P H A; van Gijn, J; Kappelle, L J; Algra, A; Koudstaal, P J

    BACKGROUND: Oral anticoagulants are better than aspirin for secondary prevention after myocardial infarction and after cerebral ischaemia in combination with non-rheumatic atrial fibrillation. The European/Australasian Stroke Prevention in Reversible Ischaemia Trial (ESPRIT) aimed to determine

  16. Medium intensity oral anticoagulants versus aspirin after cerebral ischaemia of arterial origin (ESPRIT): a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halkes, P. H. A.; van Gijn, J.; Kappelle, L. J.; Koudstaal, P. J.; Algra, A.; Banga, J. D.; Boiten, J.; van der Bom, J. G.; Boon, A. E.; Dippel, D. W. J.; Donders, R. C. J. M.; Eefting, F. D.; Franke, C. L.; Frenken, C. W. G. M.; Frijns, C. J. M.; van Gemert, H. M. A.; de Jaegere, P. P. Th; Kamp, O.; Kwa, V. I. H.; de Leeuw, F.-E.; Linn, F. H. H.; van der Meer, W. K.; Mosterd, A.; Pop, G. A. M.; Raaymakers, T. W. M.; van Schooneveld, M. J.; Stam, J.; Verheugt, F. W. A.; van der Worp, H. B.; Zijlstra, F.; Boekweit, M. P.; van Buuren, M.; Greebe, P.; Mooibroek, G. E.; Slabbers, D. C. V.; Beijer, I. S.; van den Bergh, W. M.; Biessels, G. J.; de Schryver, E. L. L. M.; van Dijk, G. W.; Dorhout-Mees, S. M.; Ferrier, C. H.; Gorter, J. W.; Hofmeijer, J.; Hop, J. W.; Klijn, C. J. M.; Manschot, S. M.; Vermeulen, M.; Foncke, E.; Lucas, C.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oral anticoagulants are better than aspirin for secondary prevention after myocardial infarction and after cerebral ischaemia in combination with non-rheumatic atrial fibrillation. The European/Australasian Stroke Prevention in Reversible Ischaemia Trial (ESPRIT) aimed to determine

  17. Direct oral anticoagulants and venous thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Franchini

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism (VTE, consisting of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a major clinical concern associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The cornerstone of management of VTE is anticoagulation, and traditional anticoagulants include parenteral heparins and oral vitamin K antagonists. Recently, new oral anticoagulant drugs have been developed and licensed, including direct factor Xa inhibitors (e.g. rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban and thrombin inhibitors (e.g. dabigatran etexilate. This narrative review focusses on the characteristics of these direct anticoagulants and the main results of published clinical studies on their use in the prevention and treatment of VTE.

  18. Use of Percutaneous Aspiration Thrombectomy vs. Anticoagulation Therapy to Treat Acute Iliofemoral Venous Thrombosis: 1-year Follow-up Results of a Randomised, Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cakir, Volkan, E-mail: drvolkancakir@gmail.com [Katip Celebi University, Ataturk Training and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology, Division of İnterventional Radiology (Turkey); Gulcu, Aytac, E-mail: aytac.gulcu@deu.edu.tr [Dokuz Eylul University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Akay, Emrah, E-mail: emrahakay@hotmail.com [Sakarya University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Capar, Ahmet E., E-mail: ahmetergina@gmail.com [Dokuz Eylul University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Gencpinar, Tugra, E-mail: tugra01@hotmail.com [Dokuz Eylul University Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery (Turkey); Kucuk, Banu, E-mail: banu.kucuk@deu.edu.tr [Dokuz Eylul University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Karabay, Ozalp, E-mail: ozalp.karabay@deu.edu.tr [Dokuz Eylul University Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery (Turkey); Goktay, A. Yigit, E-mail: yigit.goktay@deu.edu.tr [Dokuz Eylul University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Turkey)

    2014-08-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of percutaneous aspiration thrombectomy (PAT) followed by standard anticoagulant therapy, with anticoagulation therapy alone, for the treatment of acute proximal lower extremity deep vein thrombosis.MethodsIn this randomised, prospective study, 42 patients with acute proximal iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis documented via Doppler ultrasound examination, were separated into an interventional treatment group (16 males, 5 females, average age 51 years) and a medical treatment group (13 males, 8 females, average age 59 years). In the interventional group, PAT with large-lumen 9-F diameter catheterisation was applied, after initiation of standard anticoagulant therapy. Balloon angioplasty (n 19) and stent implementation (n: 14) were used to treat patients with residual stenosis (>50 %) after PAT. Prophylactic IVC filters were placed in two patients. The thrombus clearance status of the venous system was evaluated by venography. In both the medical and interventional groups, venous patency rates and clinical symptom scores were evaluated at months 1, 3, and 12 after treatment.ResultsDeep venous systems became totally cleared of thrombi in 12 patients treated with PAT. The venous patency rates in month 12 were 57.1 and 4.76 % in the interventional and medical treatment groups, respectively. A statistically significant improvement was observed in clinical symptom scores of the interventional group (PAT) with or without stenting (4.23 ± 0.51 before treatment; 0.81 ± 0.92 at month 12) compared with the medical treatment group (4.00 ± 0.63 before treatment; 2.43 ± 0.67 at month 12). During follow-up, four patients in the medical treatment and one in the interventional group developed pulmonary embolisms.ConclusionsFor treatment of acute deep vein thrombosis, PAT with or without stenting is superior to anticoagulant therapy alone in terms of both ensuring venous patency and improving clinical

  19. Does plasmin have anticoagulant activity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Hoover-Plow

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Jane Hoover-PlowJoseph J Jacobs Center for Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, Departments of Cardiovascular Medicine and Molecular Cardiology, Lerner Research Institute Cleveland Clinic, Ohio, USAAbstract: The coagulation and fibrinolytic pathways regulate hemostasis and thrombosis, and an imbalance in these pathways may result in pathologic hemophilia or thrombosis. The plasminogen system is the primary proteolytic pathway for fibrinolysis, but also has important proteolytic functions in cell migration, extracellular matrix degradation, metalloproteinase activation, and hormone processing. Several studies have demonstrated plasmin cleavage and inactivation of several coagulation factors, suggesting plasmin may be not only be the primary fibrinolytic enzyme, but may have anticoagulant properties as well. The objective of this review is to examine both in vitro and in vivo evidence for plasmin inactivation of coagulation, and to consider whether plasmin may act as a physiological regulator of coagulation. While several studies have demonstrated strong evidence for plasmin cleavage and inactivation of coagulation factors FV, FVIII, FIX, and FX in vitro, in vivo evidence is lacking for a physiologic role for plasmin as an anticoagulant. However, inactivation of coagulation factors by plasmin may be useful as a localized anticoagulant therapy or as a combined thrombolytic and anticoagulant therapy.Keywords: thrombosis, anticoagulant, cardiovascular disease, plasminogen’s protease, blood

  20. Nonvitamin-K-antagonist oral anticoagulants versus warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation and previous stroke or transient ischemic attack: An updated systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntaios, George; Papavasileiou, Vasileios; Diener, Hans-Chris; Makaritsis, Konstantinos; Michel, Patrik

    2017-08-01

    Background In a previous systematic review and meta-analysis, we assessed the efficacy and safety of nonvitamin-K antagonist oral anticoagulants versus warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation and stroke or transient ischemic attack. Since then, new information became available. Aim The aim of the present work was to update the results of the previous systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods We searched PubMed until 24 August 2016 for randomized controlled trials using the following search items: "atrial fibrillation" and "anticoagulation" and "warfarin" and "previous stroke or transient ischemic attack." Eligible studies had to be phase III trials in patients with atrial fibrillation comparing warfarin with nonvitamin-K antagonist oral anticoagulants currently on the market or with the intention to be brought to the market in North America or Europe. The outcomes assessed in the efficacy analysis included stroke or systemic embolism, stroke, ischemic or unknown stroke, disabling or fatal stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, cardiovascular death, death from any cause, and myocardial infarction. The outcomes assessed in the safety analysis included major bleeding, intracranial bleeding, and major gastrointestinal bleeding. We performed fixed effects analyses on intention-to-treat basis. Results Among 183 potentially eligible articles, four were included in the meta-analysis. In 20,500 patients, compared to warfarin, nonvitamin-K antagonist oral anticoagulants were associated with a significant reduction of stroke/systemic embolism (relative risk reduction: 13.7%, absolute risk reduction: 0.78%, number needed to treat to prevent one event: 127), hemorrhagic stroke (relative risk reduction: 50.0%, absolute risk reduction: 0.63%, number needed to treat: 157), any stroke (relative risk reduction: 13.1%, absolute risk reduction: 0.7%, number needed to treat: 142), and intracranial hemorrhage (relative risk reduction: 46.1%, absolute risk reduction: 0.88%, number needed

  1. Symptoms of depression and anxiety predict mortality in patients undergoing oral anticoagulation: Results from the thrombEVAL study program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michal, Matthias; Prochaska, Jürgen H; Keller, Karsten; Göbel, Sebastian; Coldewey, Meike; Ullmann, Alexander; Schulz, Andreas; Lamparter, Heidrun; Münzel, Thomas; Reiner, Iris; Beutel, Manfred E; Wild, Philipp S

    2015-01-01

    Depression and anxiety are highly prevalent in cardiovascular patients. Therefore, we examined whether the 4-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-4, measuring symptoms of depression and anxiety) predicts all-cause mortality in outpatients with long-term oral anticoagulation (OAC). The sample comprised n=1384 outpatients from a regular medical care setting receiving long-term OAC with vitamin K antagonists. At baseline, symptoms of anxiety and depression were assessed with the PHQ-4 and the past medical history was taken. The outcome was all-cause mortality in the 24 month observation period. The median follow-up time was 13.3 months. N=191 patients from n=1384 died (death rate 13.8%). Each point increase in the PHQ-4 score was associated with a 10% increase in mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 1.10, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.05-1.16) after adjustment for age, sex, high school graduation, partnership, smoking, obesity, frailty according to the Barthel Index, Charlson Comorbidity Index and CHA2DS2-VASc score. The depression component (PHQ-2) increased mortality by 22% and anxiety (GAD-2) by 11% respectively. Neither medical history of any mental disorder, nor intake of antidepressants, anxiolytics or hypnotics predicted excess mortality. Elevated symptoms of depression and, to a lesser degree, symptoms of anxiety are independently associated with all-cause mortality in OAC outpatients. The PHQ-4 questionnaire provides valuable prognostic information. These findings emphasize the need for implementing regular screening procedures and the development and evaluation of appropriate psychosocial treatment approaches for OAC patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Anticoagulant rodenticides and wildlife: Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brink, Nico W.; Elliott, John E.; Shore, Richard F.; Rattner, Barnett A.; van den Brink, Nico W.; Elliott, John E.; Shore, Richard F.; Rattner, Barnett A.

    2018-01-01

    Rodents have interacted with people since the beginning of systematic food storage by humans in the early Neolithic era. Such interactions have had adverse outcomes such as threats to human health, spoiling and consumption of food sources, damage to human infrastructure and detrimental effects on indigenous island wildlife (through inadvertent anthropogenic assisted introductions). These socio/economic and environmental impacts illustrate the clear need to control populations of commensal rodents. Different methods have been applied historically but the main means of control in the last decades is through the application of rodenticides, mainly anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) that inhibit blood clotting. The so-called First Generation Anticoagulant Rodenticides (FGARs) proved highly effective but rodents increasingly developed resistance. This led to a demand for more effective alternative compounds and paved the way to the development of Second Generation Anticoagulant Rodenticides (SGARs). These were more acutely toxic and persistent, making them more effective but also increasing the risks of exposure of non-target species and secondary poisoning of predatory species. SGARs often fail the environmental thresholds of different regulatory frameworks because of these negative side-effects, but their use is still permitted because of the overwhelming societal needs for rodent control and the lack of effective alternatives. This book provides a state-of-the-art overview of the scientific advancements in assessment of environmental exposure, effects and risks of currently used ARs. This is discussed in relation to the societal needs for rodent control, including risk mitigation and development of alternatives.

  3. [New oral anticoagulant drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovits, Alejandro; Aizman, Andrés; Zúñiga, Pamela; Pereira, Jaime; Mezzano, Diego

    2011-10-01

    Thromboembolic disease (TED) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The hallmark of oral long-term anticoagulant therapy has been the use of vitamin K antagonists, whose anticoagulant effect is exerted inhibiting vitamin K epoxide reductase. Warfarin and acenocoumarol are the most commonly used. In the last five years several new drugs for long term anticoagulation have been developed, which can inhibit single clotting factors with the purpose of improving drug therapeutic range and, ideally, minimizing bleeding risks. This review addresses the state of the art on the clinical use of inhibitors of activated factor X and thrombin.

  4. Anticoagulation period in idiopathic venous thromboembolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farraj, Rami S.

    2004-01-01

    The period of anticoagulation of a first episode of idiopathic venous thromboembolism has been 6 months. It is unclear if such patients would benefit from longer treatment, as there appears to be an increased risk of recurrence after anticoagulation is stopped. In a randomized prospective study of 64 patients admitted to King Hussein Medical city, Amman, Jordan, who developed a first episode of venous thromboembolism, 32 patients were given warfarin for 24-months, while 32 patients stopped anticoagulation after completion of 6-months of therapy. Our goal was to determine the effects of extended anticoagulation on rates of recurrence of symptomatic venous thromboembolism and bleeding. The patients were followed for 12-months after stopping anticoagulation. After 24-months, 7 of the 32 patients (21%) who had standard anticoagulation for 6-months had a recurrent episode of thromboembolism compared to one of the 32 patients who received anticoagulation for 24 months (3%). Extended warfarin therapy for 24-months has resulted in an absolute risk reduction of 0.1% (p<0.05). This translates into 8 patients having to be treated for 24-months to avoid one recurrence without increasing the risk of major bleeding. Two patients in each group (6%) had major nonfatal bleeding, all 4 bleeding episodes occurring within the first 3-months of anticoagulation. After 36-months of follow up, the recurrence rate of extended warfarin therapy was only 3 patients (9%), which is a 43% relative reduction in recurrence of thromboembolism compared to standard therapy for 6-months. Patients with first episodes of idiopathic venous thromboembolism have an increased risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism and should be treated with oral anticoagulants for longer than 6-months, probably 24-months. (author)

  5. [Control of anticoagulation in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation in a primary care clinical practice setting in the different autonomous communities. PAULA study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo García, J; Barrios Alonso, V; Escobar Cervantes, C; Prieto Valiente, L; Lobos Bejarano, J M; Vargas Ortega, D; Prieto Díaz, M Á; Alonso Moreno, F J; Barquilla García, A

    2017-04-01

    To determine the differences between regions in the level of control of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation treated with vitamin K antagonists, included in the PAULA study. Observational, and coss-sectional/retrospective study, including 139 Primary Care physicians from 99 Health Care centres in all autonomous communities (except La Rioja). Anticoagulation control was defined as the time in therapeutic range assessed by either the direct method (poor control <60%), or the Rosendaal method (poor control <65%). A total of 1,524 patients were included. Small differences in baseline characteristics of the patients were observed. Differences in the percentage of time in therapeutic range were observed, according to the Rosendaal method (mean 69.0±17.7%), from 78.1%±16.6 (Basque Country) to 61.5±14% (Balearic Islands), by the direct method (mean 63.2±17.9%) from 73.6%±16.6 (Basque Country) to 57.5±15.7% (Extremadura). When comparing regions, in those where the Primary Care physicians assumed full control without restrictions on prescription, the percentage of time in therapeutic range by the direct method was 63.89 vs. 60.95% in those with restrictions (p=.006), by Rosendaal method, 69.39% compared with 67.68% (p=.1036). There are significant differences in the level of control between some regions are still inadequate. Regions in which the Primary Care physicians assumed the management of anticoagulation and without restrictions, time in therapeutic range was somewhat higher, and showed a favourable trend for better control. These findings may have clinical implications, and deserve consideration and specific analysis. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Results from the Registry of Atrial Fibrillation (AFABE: Gap between Undiagnosed and Registered Atrial Fibrillation in Adults—Ineffectiveness of Oral Anticoagulation Treatment with VKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Panisello-Tafalla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of the use of oral anticoagulation (OAC medication, recommended by national guidelines for stroke prevention but reportedly underused in AF patients with moderate to high stroke risk. Method. A multicentre and cross-sectional study of undiagnosed AF among out-of-hospital patients over 60 years old was carried out, visiting 3,638 patients at primary health centres or at home for AF diagnosis using the IDC-10 classification. The main outcome measures were CHA2DS2VASC, HAS-BLED scores, cardiovascular comorbidity, pharmacological information, TTR, and SAMe-TT2R2 scores. Results. The main findings were undiagnosed AF in 26.44% of cases; 31.04% registered with AF but not using OAC despite 95.6% having a CHA2DS2VASC≥2 score; a risk of bleeding in important subgroups using OAC without indication (37.50% CHA2DS2VASC 60%.

  7. [Secondary osteoporosis induced by anticoagulants?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riess, H; Loew, A; Himmelreich, G

    2001-07-01

    Generalized osteoporosis is a result of different causes and pathogenic mechanisms, which often combine forces to become clinically relevant. Among the different exogenic factors, drugs play an important role, frequently in connection with other factors such as immobilization or pregnancy. It has been suggested that anticoagulation therapy with heparins or coumarins may induce osteoporotic changes or enhance the development of osteoporosis for other reasons. According to in vitro experiments, preclinical trials, and clinical investigations, it seems reasonable to assume that heparins induce increased bone loss in a time- and dose-related manner. Low-molecular-weight heparins most likely have less effect on bone turnover when compared to unfractionated heparin. Oral anticoagulation therapy with vitamin K-antagonists is believed to have a weak effect on induction of osteoporosis, but clinical studies are contradictory. In spite of the fact that a relevant effect of these drugs on the induction of osteoporosis is questionable, it must be taken into consideration that anticoagulant drugs may enhance the negative effects on bone density of other risk factors capable of inducing osteoporosis such as immobilization, pregnancy, or endocrinological disorders.

  8. [Use of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants in Primary Care: ACTUA study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, V; Escobar, C; Lobos, J M; Polo, J; Vargas, D

    2017-10-01

    Approximately 40% of patients with non-valvular auricular fibrillation (NVAF) who receive vitamin K antagonists (VKA) in Primary Care in Spain have poor anticoagulation control. The objective of the study Actuación en antiCoagulación, Tratamiento y Uso de anticoagulantes orales de acción directa (ACOD) en Atención primaria (ACTUA) (Action in Coagulation, Treatment and Use of direct oral anticoagulants [DOACs]) in Primary Care) was to analyse the current situation regarding the use of VKA and non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in patients with NVAF in Primary Care in Spain and the possible issues arising from it. An online survey was created covering various aspects of the use of oral anticoagulants in NAFV. A two-round modified Delphi approach was used. Results were compiled as a set of practical guidelines. Forty-four experts responded to the survey. Consensus was reached in 62% (37/60) of the items. Experts concluded that a considerable number of patients with NVAF who receive VKA do not have a well-controlled INR and that a substantial group of patients who could benefit from being treated with NOACs do not receive them. The use of NOACs increases the probability of having good anticoagulation control and decreases the risk of severe and intracranial haemorrhage. Current limitations to the use of NOACs include administrative barriers, insufficient knowledge about the benefits and risks of NOACs, limited experience of doctors in using them, and their price. Renal insufficiency influences the choice of a particular anticoagulant. The ACTUA study highlights the existing controversies about the use of oral anticoagulants for the treatment of NVAF in Primary Care in Spain, and provides consensus recommendations that may help to improve the use of these medications. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. An evaluation of patient self-testing competency of prothrombin time for managing anticoagulation: pre-randomization results of VA Cooperative Study #481--The Home INR Study (THINRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolor, Rowena J; Ruybalid, R Lynne; Uyeda, Lauren; Edson, Robert G; Phibbs, Ciaran; Vertrees, Julia E; Shih, Mei-Chiung; Jacobson, Alan K; Matchar, David B

    2010-10-01

    Prior studies suggest patient self-testing (PST) of prothrombin time (PT) can improve the quality of anticoagulation (AC) and reduce complications (e.g., bleeding and thromboembolic events). "The Home INR Study" (THINRS) compared AC management with frequent PST using a home monitoring device to high-quality AC management (HQACM) with clinic-based monitoring on major health outcomes. A key clinical and policy question is whether and which patients can successfully use such devices. We report the results of Part 1 of THINRS in which patients and caregivers were evaluated for their ability to perform PST. Study-eligible patients (n = 3643) were trained to use the home monitoring device and evaluated after 2-4 weeks for PST competency. Information about demographics, medical history, warfarin use, medications, plus measures of numeracy, literacy, cognition, dexterity, and satisfaction with AC were collected. Approximately 80% (2931 of 3643) of patients trained on PST demonstrated competency; of these, 8% (238) required caregiver assistance. Testers who were not competent to perform PST had higher numbers of practice attempts, higher cuvette wastage, and were less able to perform a fingerstick or obtain blood for the cuvette in a timely fashion. Factors associated with failure to pass PST training included increased age, previous stroke history, poor cognition, and poor manual dexterity. A majority of patients were able to perform PST. Successful home monitoring of PT with a PST device required adequate levels of cognition and manual dexterity. Training a caregiver modestly increased the proportion of patients who can perform PST.

  10. Timing of oral anticoagulant therapy in acute ischemic stroke with atrial fibrillation: study protocol for a registry-based randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åsberg, Signild; Hijazi, Ziad; Norrving, Bo; Terént, Andreas; Öhagen, Patrik; Oldgren, Jonas

    2017-12-02

    Oral anticoagulation therapy is recommended for the prevention of recurrent ischemic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Current guidelines do not provide evidence-based recommendations on optimal time-point to start anticoagulation therapy after an acute ischemic stroke. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) may offer advantages compared to warfarin because of faster and more predictable onset of action and potentially a lower risk of intracerebral haemorrhage also in the acute phase after an ischemic stroke. The TIMING study aims to establish the efficacy and safety of early vs delayed initiation of NOACs in patients with acute ischemic stroke and AF. The TIMING study is a national, investigator-led, registry-based, multicentre, open-label, randomised controlled study. The Swedish Stroke Register is used for enrolment, randomisation and follow-up of 3000 patients, who are randomised (1:1) within 72 h from ischemic stroke onset to either early (≤ 4 days) or delayed (≥ 5-10 days) start of NOAC therapy. The primary outcome is the composite of recurrent ischemic stroke, symptomatic intracerebral haemorrhage, or all-cause mortality within 90 days after randomisation. Secondary outcomes include: individual components of the primary outcome at 90 and 365 days; major haemorrhagic events; functional outcome by the modified Rankin Scale at 90 days; and health economics. In an optional biomarker sub-study, blood samples will be collected after randomisation from approximately half of the patients for central analysis of cardiovascular biomarkers after study completion. The study is funded by the Swedish Medical Research Council. Enrolment of patients started in April 2017. The TIMING study addresses the ongoing clinical dilemma of when to start NOAC after an acute ischemic stroke in patients with AF. By the inclusion of a randomisation module within the Swedish Stroke Register, the advantages of a prospective randomised study design

  11. Concurrent use of tramadol and oral vitamin K antagonists and the risk of excessive anticoagulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Meegaard, P. M.; Holck, L. H.

    2013-01-01

    .9-5.2). This corresponds to, on average, one excess case per 250 treatment years (CI 125-584). The result is potentially confounded by concomitant paracetamol use and the presence of acute illness. CONCLUSION: Caution is advised when using tramadol in patients using VKA, and if possible, an alternative pain......OBJECTIVES: The objective was to assess whether the concurrent use of tramadol and vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) leads to an increased risk of excessive anticoagulation. DESIGN: The study was designed as a case-control study, nested within users of VKA and with tramadol use as our main exposure. We...... anticoagulation attributable to the use of tramadol. RESULTS: A total of 178 patients were included, 30 of which were exposed to tramadol, along with 2643 controls, 114 of which were exposed to tramadol. The adjusted odds-ratio for experiencing excessive anticoagulation during use of tramadol was 3.1 (1...

  12. Influence of novel oral anticoagulants on anticoagulation care management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzic, Andrej; Kos, Mitja

    2017-09-01

    Anticoagulation treatment was recently improved by the introduction of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs). Using a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods, this study explores the effects of the introduction of NOACs on anticoagulation care in Slovenia. Face-to-face interviews with key stakeholders revealed evolvement and challenges of anticoagulation care from different perspectives. Obtained information was further explored through the analysis of nationwide data of drug prescriptions and realization of health care services. Simplified management of anticoagulation treatment with NOACs and their high penetration expanded the capacity of anticoagulation clinics, and consequentially the treated population increased by more than 50 % in the last 5 years. The main challenge concerned the expenditures for medicines, which increased approximately 10 times in just a few years. At the same time, the anticoagulation clinics and their core organisation were not affected, which is not expected to change, since they are vital in delivering high-quality care.

  13. Risk of gastrointestinal bleeding during anticoagulant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanas-Gimeno, Aitor; Lanas, Angel

    2017-06-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) is a major problem in patients on oral anticoagulation therapy. This issue has become even more pressing since the introduction of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) in 2009. Areas covered: Here we review current evidence related to GIB associated with oral anticoagulants, focusing on randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, and post-marketing observational studies. Dabigatran 150 mg twice daily and rivaroxaban 20 mg once daily increase the risk of GIB compared to warfarin. The risk increase with edoxaban is dose-dependent, while apixaban shows apparently, no increased risk. We summarize what is known about GIB risk factors for individual anticoagulants, the location of GIB in patients taking these compounds, and prevention strategies that lower the risk of GIB. Expert opinion: Recently there has been an important shift in the clinical presentation of GIB. Specifically, upper GIB has decreased with the decreased incidence of peptic ulcers due to the broad use of proton pump inhibitors and the decreased prevalence of H. pylori infections. In contrast, the incidence of lower GIB has increased, due in part to colonic diverticular bleeding and angiodysplasia in the elderly. In this population, the addition of oral anticoagulation therapy, especially DOACs, seems to increase the risk of lower GIB.

  14. The mythology of anticoagulation therapy interruption for dental surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Michael J

    2018-01-01

    Continuous anticoagulation therapy is used to prevent heart attacks, strokes, and other embolic complications. When patients receiving anticoagulation therapy undergo dental surgery, a decision must be made about whether to continue anticoagulation therapy and risk bleeding complications or briefly interrupt anticoagulation therapy and increase the risk of developing embolic complications. Results from decades of studies of thousands of dental patients receiving anticoagulation therapy reveal that bleeding complications requiring more than local measures for hemostasis have been rare and never fatal. However, embolic complications (some of which were fatal and others possibly permanently debilitating) sometimes have occurred in patients whose anticoagulation therapy was interrupted for dental procedures. Although there is now virtually universal consensus among national medical and dental groups and other experts that anticoagulation therapy should not be interrupted for most dental surgery, there are still some arguments made supporting anticoagulation therapy interruption. An analysis of these arguments shows them to be based on a collection of myths and half-truths rather than on logical scientific conclusions. The time has come to stop anticoagulation therapy interruption for dental procedures. Copyright © 2018 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. TRial of an Educational intervention on patients' knowledge of Atrial fibrillation and anticoagulant therapy, INR control, and outcome of Treatment with warfarin (TREAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pattison Helen M

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atrial fibrillation (AF patients with a high risk of stroke are recommended anticoagulation with warfarin. However, the benefit of warfarin is dependent upon time spent within the target therapeutic range (TTR of their international normalised ratio (INR (2.0 to 3.0. AF patients possess limited knowledge of their disease and warfarin treatment and this can impact on INR control. Education can improve patients' understanding of warfarin therapy and factors which affect INR control. Methods/Design Randomised controlled trial of an intensive educational intervention will consist of group sessions (between 2-8 patients containing standardised information about the risks and benefits associated with OAC therapy, lifestyle interactions and the importance of monitoring and control of their International Normalised Ratio (INR. Information will be presented within an 'expert-patient' focussed DVD, revised educational booklet and patient worksheets. 200 warfarin-naïve patients who are eligible for warfarin will be randomised to either the intervention or usual care groups. All patients must have ECG-documented AF and be eligible for warfarin (according to the NICE AF guidelines. Exclusion criteria include: aged Discussion More data is needed on the clinical benefit of educational intervention with AF patients receiving warfarin. Trial registration ISRCTN93952605

  16. Cost comparison of continued anticoagulation with rivaroxaban versus placebo based on the 1-year EINSTEIN-Extension trial efficacy and safety results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Philip S; Lensing, Anthonie W A; Haskell, Lloyd; Levitan, Bennett; Laliberté, François; Durkin, Michael; Ashton, Veronica; Xiao, Yongling; Crivera, Concetta; Lejeune, Dominique; Schein, Jeff; Lefebvre, Patrick

    2018-06-01

    The EINSTEIN-Extension trial (EINSTEIN-EXT) found that continued treatment with rivaroxaban for an additional 6 or 12 months (vs placebo) after 6-12 months of initial anticoagulation significantly reduced the risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) with a small non-significant increased risk of major bleeding (none fatal or in critical site). This study aimed to compare total healthcare cost between rivaroxaban and placebo, based on the EINSTEIN-EXT event rates. Total healthcare cost was calculated as the sum of treatment and clinical event costs from a US managed care perspective. Treatment duration and event rates were obtained from the EINSTEIN-EXT study. Adjustment on treatment duration was made by assuming a 10% non-adherence rate. Drug costs were based on wholesale acquisition costs. Cost estimates for clinical events (i.e. recurrent deep vein thrombosis [DVT], recurrent pulmonary embolism, major bleeding, clinically relevant non-major bleeding) were determined from the literature. Results were examined over a ±20% range of each cost component and over 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of event rate differences in deterministic (one-way) and probabilistic sensitivity analyses (PSA). Total healthcare cost was $1,454 lower for rivaroxaban-treated (vs placebo-treated) patients in the base-case, with a lower clinical event cost fully offsetting drug cost. The cost savings of recurrent DVT alone (-$3,102) was greater than drug cost ($2,723). Total healthcare cost remained lower for rivaroxaban in the majority (73%) of PSA (cost difference [95% CI] = -$1,454 [-$2,396, $1,231]). This study was conducted over the 1-year observation period of the EINSTEIN-EXT trial, which limited "real-world" applicability and examination of long-term economic impact. Assumptions on drug and clinical event costs were US-based and, thus, not applicable to other healthcare systems. Total healthcare costs were estimated to be lower for patients continuing rivaroxaban therapy

  17. Evidence-Based Management of Anticoagulant Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Sam; Witt, Daniel M.; Vandvik, Per Olav; Fish, Jason; Kovacs, Michael J.; Svensson, Peter J.; Veenstra, David L.; Crowther, Mark; Guyatt, Gordon H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: High-quality anticoagulation management is required to keep these narrow therapeutic index medications as effective and safe as possible. This article focuses on the common important management questions for which, at a minimum, low-quality published evidence is available to guide best practices. Methods: The methods of this guideline follow those described in Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines in this supplement. Results: Most practical clinical questions regarding the management of anticoagulation, both oral and parenteral, have not been adequately addressed by randomized trials. We found sufficient evidence for summaries of recommendations for 23 questions, of which only two are strong rather than weak recommendations. Strong recommendations include targeting an international normalized ratio of 2.0 to 3.0 for patients on vitamin K antagonist therapy (Grade 1B) and not routinely using pharmacogenetic testing for guiding doses of vitamin K antagonist (Grade 1B). Weak recommendations deal with such issues as loading doses, initiation overlap, monitoring frequency, vitamin K supplementation, patient self-management, weight and renal function adjustment of doses, dosing decision support, drug interactions to avoid, and prevention and management of bleeding complications. We also address anticoagulation management services and intensive patient education. Conclusions: We offer guidance for many common anticoagulation-related management problems. Most anticoagulation management questions have not been adequately studied. PMID:22315259

  18. Atrial Fibrillation in Embolic Stroke: Anticoagulant Therapy at UNTH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The decision to commence anticoagulation in a patient with embolic stroke and atrial fibrillation (AF) is often a difficult one for many clinicians. The result can have significant impact on the patient. This study was therefore undertaken to review the use of anticoagulation in embolic stroke in the setting of atrial ...

  19. Citrate Anticoagulation during Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Davide; Panicali, Laura; Facchini, Maria Grazia; Mancini, Elena

    2017-01-01

    During extracorporeal dialysis, some anticoagulation strategy is necessary to prevent the coagulation of blood. Heparin has historically been used as an anticoagulant because of its efficacy combined with low cost. However, a variable incidence of hemorrhagic complications (5-30%) has been documented in patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) with heparin as an anticoagulant. Citrate has anticoagulation properties secondary to its ability to chelate calcium, which is necessary for the coagulation cascade. Citrate may thus be used in a regional anticoagulation (RCA), limited to the extracorporeal circuit of CRRT, to avoid systemic anticoagulation. Recent meta-analysis confirmed the advantage of RCA over heparin in terms of incidence of bleeding during CRRT. Moreover, an increase in filter lifespan is documented, with a secondary advantage in reaching the prescribed dialysis dose. In our experience, we could confirm this positive effect. In fact, with a progressive increase in the proportion of CRRT with citrate as RCA, we obtained a reduction in the number of filters used for every 72 h of treatment (from 2.4 in 2011 to 1.3 in 2015), and most importantly, a reduction in the difference between the prescribed and delivered dialysis doses (from 22 to 7%). Citrate has an intense effect on the acid-base balance as well, if fully metabolized through the Krebs cycle, due to the production of bicarbonate. Even more severely ill patients, such as those with liver dysfunction, may be treated with RCA without severe complications, because modern machines for CRRT are equipped with simple systems that are able to manage the citrate infusion and control the calcium levels, with minimal risks of metabolic derangements. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Hematology of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus subjected to anesthesia and anticoagulation protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Cristine Weinert

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinical hematology facilitates the diagnosis of disease and can act as a prognostic indicator of pathological conditions in fish. The aim of the present study was to evaluate hematological parameters of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus subjected to different anesthetics and anticoagulants. Thirty apparently healthy fishes (average weight of 473 ± 35. 50 g and mean total length of 29. 33 ± 0. 37 cm, were selected from the local commercial fish farm in the Lages municipality (Santa Catarina, Brazil. The animals were randomly divided into three groups of 10. In two groups, anesthesia was induced with eugenol (70 mg·L- 1 (EG and Benzocaine hydrochloride (100 mg·L-1 (BG, respectively. Anesthesia was not administered to fish of the third group (CG/control group. Blood samples were obtained by venipuncture of the caudal vessels and placed into microtubes containing sodium heparin or Na2EDTA for further analysis. The results were analyzed by Sigma Stat for Windows, the paired t-test for significant differences between anticoagulants of the same group, and analysis of variance followed by the Tukey test for comparison of means between groups (p ? 0. 05. Most of the observed changes in the erythrogram were significantly higher for the anticoagulant heparin and benzocaine group in comparison to the control group. However, the values obtained for the leukogram were significantly higher for all groups subjected to the Na2EDTA anticoagulant, suggesting that heparin may cause cell clumping. The results suggest that the anesthetics under investigation effectively minimizes the effects of stress caused by handling and invasive procedures, and that the anticoagulant heparin causes less hemolysis in comparison to Na2EDTA for Nile tilapia. Thus, the hematological variations attributed to different anesthetic protocols and/or different anticoagulants should be considered for the species Oreochromis niloticus.

  1. Quality of oral anticoagulation with phenprocoumon in regular medical care and its potential for improvement in a telemedicine-based coagulation service--results from the prospective, multi-center, observational cohort study thrombEVAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, Jürgen H; Göbel, Sebastian; Keller, Karsten; Coldewey, Meike; Ullmann, Alexander; Lamparter, Heidrun; Jünger, Claus; Al-Bayati, Zaid; Baer, Christina; Walter, Ulrich; Bickel, Christoph; ten Cate, Hugo; Münzel, Thomas; Wild, Philipp S

    2015-01-23

    The majority of studies on quality of oral anticoagulation (OAC) therapy with vitamin K-antagonists are performed with short-acting warfarin. Data on long-acting phenprocoumon, which is frequently used in Europe for OAC therapy and is considered to enable more stable therapy adjustment, are scarce. In this study, we aimed to assess quality of OAC therapy with phenprocoumon in regular medical care and to evaluate its potential for optimization in a telemedicine-based coagulation service. In the prospective observational cohort study program thrombEVAL we investigated 2,011 patients from regular medical care in a multi-center cohort study and 760 patients from a telemedicine-based coagulation service in a single-center cohort study. Data were obtained from self-reported data, computer-assisted personal interviews, and laboratory measurements according to standard operating procedures with detailed quality control. Time in therapeutic range (TTR) was calculated by linear interpolation method to assess quality of OAC therapy. Study monitoring was carried out by an independent institution. Overall, 15,377 treatment years and 48,955 international normalized ratio (INR) measurements were analyzed. Quality of anticoagulation, as measured by median TTR, was 66.3% (interquartile range (IQR) 47.8/81.9) in regular medical care and 75.5% (IQR 64.2/84.4) in the coagulation service (P service with TTR at 76.2% [(IQR 65.6/84.7); P = 0.001)]. Prospective follow-up of coagulation service patients with pretreatment in regular medical care showed an improvement of the TTR from 66.2% (IQR 49.0/83.6) to 74.5% (IQR 62.9/84.2; P service. Treatment in the coagulation service contributed to an optimization of the profile of time outside therapeutic range, a 2.2-fold increase of stabile INR adjustment and a significant decrease in TTR variability by 36% (P Quality of anticoagulation with phenprocoumon was comparably high in this real-world sample of regular medical care. Treatment in a

  2. Chronic kidney disease and anticoagulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sciascia, Savino; Radin, Massimo; Schreiber, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Anticoagulation in patients with impaired kidney function can be challenging since drugs' pharmacokinetics and bioavailability are altered in this setting. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) treated with conventional anticoagulant agents [vitamin K antagonist (VKA), low-molecular weight...... are eliminated via the kidneys pose additional challenges. More recently, two classes of direct oral anticoagulant agents (DOACs) have been investigated for the prevention and management of venous thromboembolic events: the direct factor Xa inhibitors rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban, and the direct thrombin...

  3. Anticoagulation knowledge in patients with atrial fibrillation: An Australian survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obamiro, Kehinde O; Chalmers, Leanne; Lee, Kenneth; Bereznicki, Bonnie J; Bereznicki, Luke R E

    2018-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most commonly diagnosed arrhythmia in clinical practice, and is associated with a significant medical and economic burden. Anticoagulants reduce the risk of stroke and systemic embolism by approximately two-thirds compared with no therapy. Knowledge regarding anticoagulant therapy can influence treatment outcomes in patients with AF. To measure the level of anticoagulation knowledge in patients with AF taking oral anticoagulants (OACs), investigate the association between patient-related factors and anticoagulation knowledge, and compare these results in patients taking warfarin and direct-acting oral anticoagulant (DOACs). Participants were recruited for an online survey via Facebook. Survey components included the Anticoagulation Knowledge Tool, the Perception of Anticoagulant Treatment Questionnaires (assessing treatment expectations, convenience and satisfaction), a modified Cancer Information Overload scale and the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. Treatment groups were compared and predictors of OAC knowledge were identified. Participants taking warfarin had a higher knowledge score compared with those taking DOACs (n = 386, 73% ± 13% vs 66% ± 14%, Pcounselling sessions to help identify and resolve knowledge deficits. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The future of anticoagulation clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macik, B Gail

    2003-01-01

    Anticoagulation therapy is the foundation of treatment for thromboembolic disorders; and coumarin derivatives (warfarin in the United States) are the only orally administered anticoagulant medications currently available. Due to the expense and relative difficulties associated with this route of administration, parenteral drugs are not used routinely for long-term therapy, leaving warfarin as the anticoagulant of choice in the outpatient setting. The management of warfarin is problematic, however, due the nuances of its pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profile and the requirement for frequent monitoring of blood levels. Although management by anticoagulation clinics is considered the gold standard for warfarin therapy, management by an anticoagulation clinic may not be the optimal option from a clinician's view and, in many cases, may not be an option at all. Anticoagulation clinics may impinge on the doctor-patient relationship. Difficulties of communication and reimbursement are not ameliorated by a specialty clinic. Innovations in warfarin management, including patient self-management and computerized dosing programs, are alternatives for improved care that are available with or without input by an anticoagulation service. New oral drugs on the horizon do not require the same intensity of monitoring and do not present the same pharmacodynamic problems associated with warfarin. Warfarin will become obsolete in the foreseeable future. If anticoagulation clinics continue, they must re-define their role as the major part of the workload, warfarin management, disappears. To adapt, clinics must strengthen and enhance their role as coordinators and educators, and less so, managers of anticoagulation therapy.

  5. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants compared with warfarin at different levels of INR control in atrial fibrillation: A meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmo, João; Ferreira, Jorge; Costa, Francisco; Carmo, Pedro; Cavaco, Diogo; Carvalho, Salomé; Morgado, Francisco; Adragão, Pedro; Mendes, Miguel

    2017-10-01

    The efficacy and safety of warfarin for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) depend on the time in the therapeutic range (TTR) with an international normalised ratio (INR) of 2.0-3.0. This meta-analysis focused the relative efficacy and safety of non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOAC) compared with warfarin at different thresholds of centre's TTR (cTTR). We searched PubMed, Embase, CENTRAL and websites of regulatory agencies, limiting searches to randomized phase 3 trials. Primary outcomes were stroke or systemic embolism (SSE) and major or non-major clinically relevant (NMCR) bleeding. We used a random-effects model to pool effect on outcomes according to different thresholds of cTTR. Four TTR sub-studies with a total of 71,222 patients were included. The benefit of NOAC in reducing SSE compared with warfarin was significantly higher in patients at cTTRwarfarin in patients at all sub-groups (0.67, 0.54-0.83 for patients at cTTRwarfarin for stroke prevention is lost above a cTTR threshold of approximately 70%, but the relative safety appears to be less modified by the centre-based quality of INR control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Local hemostatic measures in anticoagulated patients undergoing oral surgery: a systematized literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Wildson Gurgel Costa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To conduct a systematized review of the literature about the main local hemostatic measures to control postoperative bleeding in anticoagulated patients. METHODS: A systematized review of literature was performed in the electronic database Medline (PubMed without restriction of the publication date. The eligibility criteria were studies involving maintenance of the anticoagulant therapy, prospective studies, retrospective studies, randomized clinical trials, controlled clinical studies, comparative studies, multicentric studies or case-control studies. Studies discontinuing anticoagulant therapy, case reports, literature reviews, in vitro studies, animal experiments and articles written in language not compatible with the search strategy adopted in this work were excluded. RESULTS: Twenty-four articles that met the adopted eligibility criteria were selected, enrolling 3891 subjects under anticoagulant therapy. A total of 171 cases of hemorrhage was observed. Tranexamic acid was the main local hemostatic measure used to controlling of postoperative bleeding. CONCLUSION: The local hemostatic measures proved to be effective according to previously published studies. Nevertheless, further clinical studies should be conducted to confirm this effectiveness.

  7. Effect of an interactive voice response system on oral anticoagulant management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oake, Natalie; van Walraven, Carl; Rodger, Marc A; Forster, Alan J

    2009-04-28

    Monitoring oral anticoagulants is logistically challenging for both patients and medical staff. We evaluated the effect of adding an interactive voice response system to computerized decision support for oral anticoagulant management. We developed an interactive voice response system to communicate to patients the results of international normalized ratio testing and their dosage schedules for anticoagulation therapy. The system also reminded patients of upcoming and missed appointments for blood tests. We recruited patients whose anticoagulation control was stable after at least 3 months of warfarin therapy. We prospectively examined clinical data and outcomes for these patients for an intervention period of at least 3 months. We also collected retrospective data for each patient for the 3 months before study enrolment. We recruited 226 patients between Nov. 23, 2006, and Aug. 1, 2007. The mean duration of the intervention period (prospective data collection) was 4.2 months. Anticoagulation control was similar for the periods during and preceding the intervention (mean time within the therapeutic range 80.3%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 77.5% to 83.1% v. 79.9%, 95% CI 77.3% to 82.6%). The interactive voice response system delivered 1211 (77.8%) of 1557 scheduled dosage messages, with no further input required from clinic staff. The most common reason for clinic staff having to deliver the remaining messages (accounting for 143 [9.2%] of all messages) was an international normalized ratio that was excessively high or low, (i.e., 0.5 or more outside the therapeutic range). When given the option, 76.6% of patients (164/214) chose to continue with the interactive voice response system for management of their anticoagulation after the study was completed. The system reduced staff workload for monitoring anticoagulation therapy by 48 min/wk, a 33% reduction from the baseline of 2.4 hours. Interactive voice response systems have a potential role in improving the

  8. Honey Bee Venom (Apis mellifera Contains Anticoagulation Factors and Increases the Blood-clotting Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Zolfagharian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Bee venom (BV is a complex mixture of proteins and contains proteins such as phospholipase and melittin, which have an effect on blood clotting and blood clots. The mechanism of action of honey bee venom (HBV, Apis mellifera on human plasma proteins and its anti-thrombotic effect were studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-coagulation effect of BV and its effects on blood coagulation and purification. Methods: Crude venom obtained from Apis mellifera was selected. The anti-coagulation factor of the crude venom from this species was purified by using gel filtration chromatography (sephadex G-50, and the molecular weights of the anti-coagulants in this venom estimated by using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE. Blood samples were obtained from 10 rabbits, and the prothrombin time (PT and the partial thromboplastin time (PTT tests were conducted. The approximate lethal dose (LD values of BV were determined. Results: Crude BV increased the blood clotting time. For BV concentrations from 1 to 4 mg/mL, clotting was not observed even at more than 300 seconds, standard deviations (SDs = ± 0.71; however, clotting was observed in the control group 13.8 s, SDs = ± 0.52. Thus, BV can be considered as containing anti-coagulation factors. Crude BV is composed 4 protein bands with molecular weights of 3, 15, 20 and 41 kilodalton (kDa, respectively. The LD50 of the crude BV was found to be 177.8 μg/mouse. Conclusion: BV contains anti-coagulation factors. The fraction extracted from the Iranian bees contains proteins that are similar to anti-coagulation proteins, such as phospholipase A2 (PLA2 and melittin, and that can increase the blood clotting times in vitro.

  9. Efficacy and safety of a pharmacist-managed inpatient anticoagulation service for warfarin initiation and titration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Y M; Quek, Y-N; Tay, J C; Chadachan, V; Lee, H K

    2011-10-01

    Anticoagulation consultations provided by a pharmacist-staffed inpatient service, similar to the experience reported in outpatient anticoagulation clinics, can potentially improve anticoagulation control and outcomes. At Tan Tock Seng Hospital, a 1200-bed acute care teaching hospital in Singapore, pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinics have been in place since 1997. Pharmacist-managed services were extended to inpatient consultations in anticoagulation management from April 2006. Our objective was to assess the effect of implementing a pharmacist-managed inpatient anticoagulation service. This was a single-centre cohort study. Baseline data from 1 January 2006 to 31 March 2006 were collected and compared with post-implementation data from 1 April 2006 to 31 March 2007. Patients newly started on warfarin for deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism or atrial fibrillation in general medicine and surgery departments were included. The three endpoints were as follows: (i) percentage of international normalized ratios (INRs) achieving therapeutic range within 5 days, (ii) INRs more than 4 during titration and (iii) subtherapeutic INRs on discharge. A total of 26 patients in the control period were compared with 144 patients who had received dosing consultations by a pharmacist during the initiation of warfarin. The provision of pharmacist consult resulted in 88% compared to 38% (P < 0·001) of INR values achieving therapeutic range within 5 days. There was a reduction in INR values of more than 4 during titration from 27% to 2% (P < 0·001), and subtherapeutic INR values on discharge without low molecular weight heparin from 15% to 0% (P < 0·001). The mean time to therapeutic INR was reduced from 6·5 to 3·9 days (P < 0·001) and mean length of stay after initiation of warfarin from 11 to 7·7 days (P = 0·004). Inpatient anticoagulation care and outcomes were significantly improved by a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation service. The time to therapeutic INR was

  10. [Drug compliance of patients on anticoagulant treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadó, Klára; Kocsis, Eszter; Zelkó, Romána; Hankó, Balázs; Kovácsné Balogh, Judit; Forczig, Mónika; Domján, Gyula

    2015-08-09

    Despite several therapeutic possibilities the morbidity and mortality of thromboembolic disorders remain high. Improving drug compliance - i. e. keeping up the doctor's prescriptions - may be an effective tool to reach better results. To improve patients' compliance, the risk factors of non-compliance should be recognized. Among these patients' fear of adverse effects of drugs, their lack of knowledge about their illness and medication, forgetfulness, and other social, economic factors may be the most important. Furthermore, adherence may be worsened when the patient feels that the decision has been made over his/her head. Sustained medical adherence is important because anticoagulation may be a life-long treatment. The new oral anticoagulants make the matter of compliance to be current. These new type of drugs do not need regular laboratory monitoring and, therefore, compliance cannot be strictly followed. There are several studies concerning drug compliance to anticoagulant medications. Improvement of adherence is based on regular patient education after reviewing the factors of non-compliance, which needs teamwork with important roles of doctors, pharmacists, dietetics and nurses. Careful and accurate work of the participants of primary care might be complemented by the activity of anticoagulant clinics.

  11. Comparison of treatment effect estimates of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants versus warfarin between observational studies using propensity score methods and randomized controlled trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Guowei; Holbrook, Anne; Jin, Yanling; Zhang, Yonghong; Levine, Mitchell A. H.; Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Witt, Daniel M.; Crowther, Mark; Connolly, Stuart; Chai-Adisaksopha, Chatree; Wan, Zhongxiao; Cheng, Ji; Thabane, Lehana

    2016-01-01

    Emerging observational studies using propensity score (PS) methods assessed real-world comparative effectiveness of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) versus warfarin in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF). We aimed to compare treatment effect estimates of NOACs between PS studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Electronic databases and conference proceedings were searched systematically. Primary outcomes included stroke or systemic embolism (SE) and major bleeding. A random-effects meta-analysis was performed to synthesize the data by pooling the PS- and RCT-derived hazard ratios (HRs) separately. The ratio of HRs (RHR) from the ratio of PS-derived HRs relative to RCT-derived HRs was used to determine whether there was a difference between estimates from PS studies and RCTs. There were 10 PS studies and 5 RCTs included for analysis. No significant difference of treatment effect estimates between the PS studies and RCTs was observed: RHR 1.11, 95 % CI 0.98–1.23 for stroke or SE; RHR 1.07, 95 % CI 0.87–1.34 for major bleeding. A significant association between NOACs and risk of stroke or SE was observed: HR 0.88, 95 % CI 0.83–0.94 for the PS studies; HR 0.79, 95 % CI 0.72–0.87 for the RCTs. However, no relationship between NOACs and risk of major bleeding was found: HR 0.91, 95 % CI 0.79–1.05 for the PS studies; HR 0.85, 95 % CI 0.73–1.00 for the RCTs. In this study, treatment effect estimates of NOACs versus warfarin in patients with non-valvular AF from PS studies are found to be in agreement with those from RCTs.

  12. Use of clopidogrel with or without aspirin in patients taking oral anticoagulant therapy and undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: an open-label, randomised, controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewilde, Willem J. M.; Oirbans, Tom; Verheugt, Freek W. A.; Kelder, Johannes C.; de Smet, Bart J. G. L.; Herrman, Jean-Paul; Adriaenssens, Tom; Vrolix, Mathias; Heestermans, Antonius A. C. M.; Vis, Marije M.; Tijsen, Jan G. P.; van 't Hof, Arnoud W.; ten Berg, Jurriën M.; Schölzel, B. E.; van den Branden, B. J.; Plokker, H. W. M.; Bosschaert, M. A.; Slagboom, T.; Vos, J.; Brueren, B. R. G.; Breet, N. J.; Sheikjoesoef, K.; Aarnoudse, W.; Rasoul, S.; van Mieghem, C.; Vandendriessche, T.; Cornelis, K.

    2013-01-01

    If percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is required in patients taking oral anticoagulants, antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel is indicated, but such triple therapy increases the risk of serious bleeding. We investigated the safety and efficacy of clopidogrel alone compared with

  13. Comparing new anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, James M

    2012-12-01

    For years, the pharmaceutical industry has been trying to find a safe and effective drug to replace warfarin. Although warfarin is an effective anticoagulant, its pharmacology, adverse effects, and risk profiles dictate that patients taking this medication must be monitored judiciously. The US Food and Drug Administration has approved two drugs for commercial use, dabigatran and rivaroxaban, that will compete directly with warfarin for use in specific indications. Because of direct marketing to patients, physicians are being asked to comment on these new medications. This brief review illustrates the data available for the two new drugs when compared to warfarin for the specified indications. For some patients, these drugs may be highly beneficial and offer an excellent alternative to warfarin. For others, warfarin may still be the preferred drug.

  14. Oral Anticoagulant Use After Bariatric Surgery: A Literature Review and Clinical Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Karlyn A; Lee, Craig R; Farrell, Timothy M; Moll, Stephan

    2017-05-01

    Bariatric surgery may alter the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or elimination (disposition) of orally administered drugs via changes to the gastrointestinal tract anatomy, body weight, and adipose tissue composition. As some patients who have undergone bariatric surgery will need therapeutic anticoagulation for various indications, appropriate knowledge is needed regarding anticoagulant drug disposition and resulting efficacy and safety in this population. We review general considerations about oral drug disposition in patients after bariatric surgery, as well as existing literature on oral anticoagulation after bariatric surgery. Overall, available evidence on therapeutic anticoagulation is very limited, and individual drug studies are necessary to learn how to safely and effectively use the direct oral anticoagulants. Given the sparsity of currently available data, it appears most prudent to use warfarin with international normalized ratio monitoring, and not direct oral anticoagulants, when full-dose anticoagulation is needed after bariatric surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Laboratory Assessment of the Anticoagulant Activity of Direct Oral Anticoagulants: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelson, Bethany T; Cuker, Adam; Siegal, Deborah M; Crowther, Mark; Garcia, David A

    2017-01-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are the treatment of choice for most patients with atrial fibrillation and/or noncancer-associated venous thromboembolic disease. Although routine monitoring of these agents is not required, assessment of anticoagulant effect may be desirable in special situations. The objective of this review was to summarize systematically evidence regarding laboratory assessment of the anticoagulant effects of dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban. PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science were searched for studies reporting relationships between drug levels and coagulation assay results. We identified 109 eligible studies: 35 for dabigatran, 50 for rivaroxaban, 11 for apixaban, and 13 for edoxaban. The performance of standard anticoagulation tests varied across DOACs and reagents; most assays, showed insufficient correlation to provide a reliable assessment of DOAC effects. Dilute thrombin time (TT) assays demonstrated linear correlation (r 2  = 0.67-0.99) across a range of expected concentrations of dabigatran, as did ecarin-based assays. Calibrated anti-Xa assays demonstrated linear correlation (r 2  = 0.78-1.00) across a wide range of concentrations for rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban. An ideal test, offering both accuracy and precision for measurement of any DOAC is not widely available. We recommend a dilute TT or ecarin-based assay for assessment of the anticoagulant effect of dabigatran and anti-Xa assays with drug-specific calibrators for direct Xa inhibitors. In the absence of these tests, TT or APTT is recommended over PT/INR for assessment of dabigatran, and PT/INR is recommended over APTT for detection of factor Xa inhibitors. Time since last dose, the presence or absence of drug interactions, and renal and hepatic function should impact clinical estimates of anticoagulant effect in a patient for whom laboratory test results are not available. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier

  16. Effect of a combined education and eHealth programme on the control of oral anticoagulation patients (PORTALS study): a parallel cohort design in Dutch primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talboom-Kamp, Esther P W A; Verdijk, Noortje A; Kasteleyn, Marise J; Harmans, Lara M; Talboom, Irvin J S H; Numans, Mattijs E; Chavannes, Niels H

    2017-09-27

    To analyse the effect on therapeutic control and self-management skills of the implementation of self-management programmes, including eHealth by e-learning versus group training. Primary Care Thrombosis Service Center. Of the 247 oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT) patients, 63 started self-management by e-learning, 74 self-management by group training and 110 received usual care. Parallel cohort design with two randomised self-management groups (e-learning and group training) and a group receiving usual care. The effect of implementation of self-management on time in therapeutic range (TTR) was analysed with multilevel linear regression modelling. Usage of a supporting eHealth platform and the impact on self-efficacy (Generalised Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES)) and education level were analysed with linear regression analysis. After intervention, TTR was measured in three time periods of 6 months. (1) TTR, severe complications,(2) usage of an eHealth platform,(3) GSES, education level. Analysis showed no significant differences in TTR between the three time periods (p=0.520), the three groups (p=0.460) or the groups over time (p=0.263). Comparison of e-learning and group training showed no significant differences in TTR between the time periods (p=0.614), the groups (p=0.460) or the groups over time (p=0.263). No association was found between GSES and TTR (p=0.717) or education level and TTR (p=0.107). No significant difference was found between the self-management groups in usage of the platform (0-6 months p=0.571; 6-12 months p=0.866; 12-18 months p=0.260). The percentage of complications was low in all groups (3.2%; 1.4%; 0%). No differences were found between OAT patients trained by e-learning or by a group course regarding therapeutic control (TTR) and usage of a supporting eHealth platform. The TTR was similar in self-management and regular care patients. With adequate e-learning or group training, self-management seems safe and reliable for a selected

  17. Uso crônico de anticoagulante oral: implicações para o controle de níveis adequados Uso crónico de anticoagulante oral implicaciones para el control de niveles adecuados Constant use of oral anticoagulants: implications in the control of their adequate levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francieli Giachini Esmerio

    2009-11-01

    ólicas. El uso de esta terapéutica requiere especial atención y precisa un seguimiento clínico y analítico riguroso. OBJETIVO: Identificar factores asociados al control adecuado de los niveles de anticoagulación oral, verificando el conocimiento y la percepción de los pacientes relacionados a la terapéutica empleada. MÉTODOS: Estudio transversal que incluyó a 140 pacientes seguidos en el ambulatorio de anticoagulación oral, desde noviembre de 2005 a junio de 2006. Se elaboró y se aplicó un cuestionario estructurado para la obtención de características clínicas, conocimiento sobre la terapéutica, adhesión al tratamiento (test de Morisky y percepción del paciente. RESULTADOS: Las principales indicaciones para uso de anticoagulación oral fueron fibrilación atrial (61,4% y prótesis metálica (55%. El tiempo de uso varió entre 24 y 72 meses, y el fenprocumona (58% fue el más empleado. Con relación a la percepción de la terapéutica, el 95% de los pacientes mencionaron preocupación con el uso diario de esta medicación. La realización periódica de análisis de sangre (21,4% y el tomar anticoagulación oral rigurosamente (12,8% fueron comprendidos como limitantes. Se observó conocimiento adecuado entre los pacientes con international normalized ratio (INR fuera del intervalo (64% y en la adhesión entre los pacientes con INR dentro del intervalo terapéutico (54%, aunque sin significancia estadística. CONCLUSIÓN: Los resultados de este estudio mostraron una prevalencia de pacientes en uso de anticoagulación oral con el INR dentro de los valores ideales, aunque haya sido grande el porcentaje de pacientes no adheridos a la terapéutica. El conocimiento insatisfactorio con relación a la terapéutica empleada y al autocuidado se vuelve evidente en esa población.BACKGROUND: Inappropriate and subtherapeutic anticoagulants dosages may result in severe thromboembolic and bleeding complications. The use of this treatment requires special attention and

  18. RESULTS, RESPONSIBILITY, FAULT AND CONTROL

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    Evgeniy Stoyanov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the responsibility arising from the registered financial results. The analysis of this responsibility presupposes its evaluation and determination of the role of fault in the formation of negative results. The search for efficiency in this whole process is justified by the understanding of the mechanisms that regulate the behavior of economic actors.

  19. Clinical outcomes in patients with atrial fibrillation according to sex during anticoagulation with apixaban or warfarin: a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinereanu, Dragos; Stevens, Susanna R; Alexander, John H; Al-Khatib, Sana M; Avezum, Alvaro; Bahit, Marıa Cecilia; Granger, Christopher B; Lopes, Renato D; Halvorsen, Sigrun; Hanna, Michael; Husted, Steen; Hylek, Elaine M; Mărgulescu, Andrei D; Wallentin, Lars; Atar, Dan

    2015-12-07

    To assess clinical outcomes, efficacy, and safety according to sex during anticoagulation with apixaban compared with warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation. Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE) was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre trial that included 11 785 (64.7%) men and 6416 (35.3%) women with atrial fibrillation or flutter randomized to receive either warfarin or apixaban. The primary efficacy endpoint was stroke or systemic embolism; secondary efficacy endpoints were death from any cause and cardiovascular death. The primary safety endpoint was major bleeding; secondary safety endpoints were a composite of major bleeding and non-major clinically relevant bleeding. The risk of stroke or systemic embolism was similar in women vs. men [adjusted hazard ratio (adjHR): 0.91; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.74-1.12; P = 0.38]. However, among patients with history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack, women had a lower risk of recurrent stroke compared with men (adjHR: 0.70; 95% CI: 0.50-0.97; P = 0.036). Women also had a lower risk of all-cause death (adjHR: 0.63; 95% CI: 0.55-0.73; P < 0.0001) and cardiovascular death (adjHR: 0.62; 95% CI: 0.51-0.75; P < 0.0001), and a trend towards less major bleeding (adjHR: 0.86; 95% CI: 0.74-1.01; P = 0.066) and major or non-major clinically relevant bleeding (adjHR: 0.89; 95% CI: 0.80-1.00; P = 0.049). The efficacy and safety benefits of apixaban compared with warfarin were consistent regardless of sex. In the ARISTOTLE trial, women had a similar rate of stroke or systemic embolism but a lower risk of mortality and less clinically relevant bleeding than men. The efficacy and safety benefits of apixaban compared with warfarin were consistent in men and women. ARISTOTLE ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00412984. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please

  20. Andexanet alfa effectively reverses edoxaban anticoagulation effects and associated bleeding in a rabbit acute hemorrhage model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Genmin; Pine, Polly; Leeds, Janet M.; DeGuzman, Francis; Pratikhya, Pratikhya; Lin, Joyce; Malinowski, John; Hollenbach, Stanley J.; Curnutte, John T.

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Increasing use of factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors necessitates effective reversal agents to manage bleeding. Andexanet alfa, a novel modified recombinant human FXa, rapidly reverses the anticoagulation effects of direct and indirect FXa inhibitors. Objective To evaluate the ability of andexanet to reverse anticoagulation in vitro and reduce bleeding in rabbits administered edoxaban. Materials and methods In vitro studies characterized the interaction of andexanet with edoxaban and its ability to reverse edoxaban-mediated anti-FXa activity. In a rabbit model of surgically induced, acute hemorrhage, animals received edoxaban vehicle+andexanet vehicle (control), edoxaban (1 mg/kg)+andexanet vehicle, edoxaban+andexanet (75 mg, 5-minute infusion, 20 minutes after edoxaban), or edoxaban vehicle+andexanet prior to injury. Results Andexanet bound edoxaban with high affinity similar to FXa. Andexanet rapidly and dose-dependently reversed the effects of edoxaban on FXa activity and coagulation pharmacodynamic parameters in vitro. In edoxaban-anticoagulated rabbits, andexanet reduced anti-FXa activity by 82% (from 548±87 to 100±41 ng/ml; P<0.0001), mean unbound edoxaban plasma concentration by ~80% (from 100±10 to 21±6 ng/ml; P<0.0001), and blood loss by 80% vs. vehicle (adjusted for control, 2.6 vs. 12.9 g; P = 0.003). The reduction in blood loss correlated with the decrease in anti-FXa activity (r = 0.6993, P<0.0001) and unbound edoxaban (r = 0.5951, P = 0.0035). Conclusion These data demonstrate that andexanet rapidly reversed the anticoagulant effects of edoxaban, suggesting it could be clinically valuable for the management of acute and surgery-related bleeding. Correlation of blood loss with anti-FXa activity supports the use of anti-FXa activity as a biomarker for assessing anticoagulation reversal in clinical trials. PMID:29590221

  1. Efficiency and effectiveness of the use of an acenocoumarol pharmacogenetic dosing algorithm versus usual care in patients with venous thromboembolic disease initiating oral anticoagulation: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carcas Antonio J

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemorrhagic events are frequent in patients on treatment with antivitamin-K oral anticoagulants due to their narrow therapeutic margin. Studies performed with acenocoumarol have shown the relationship between demographic, clinical and genotypic variants and the response to these drugs. Once the influence of these genetic and clinical factors on the dose of acenocoumarol needed to maintain a stable international normalized ratio (INR has been demonstrated, new strategies need to be developed to predict the appropriate doses of this drug. Several pharmacogenetic algorithms have been developed for warfarin, but only three have been developed for acenocoumarol. After the development of a pharmacogenetic algorithm, the obvious next step is to demonstrate its effectiveness and utility by means of a randomized controlled trial. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of an acenocoumarol dosing algorithm developed by our group which includes demographic, clinical and pharmacogenetic variables (VKORC1, CYP2C9, CYP4F2 and ApoE in patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE. Methods and design This is a multicenter, single blind, randomized controlled clinical trial. The protocol has been approved by La Paz University Hospital Research Ethics Committee and by the Spanish Drug Agency. Two hundred and forty patients with VTE in which oral anticoagulant therapy is indicated will be included. Randomization (case/control 1:1 will be stratified by center. Acenocoumarol dose in the control group will be scheduled and adjusted following common clinical practice; in the experimental arm dosing will be following an individualized algorithm developed and validated by our group. Patients will be followed for three months. The main endpoints are: 1 Percentage of patients with INR within the therapeutic range on day seven after initiation of oral anticoagulant therapy; 2 Time from the start of oral anticoagulant treatment

  2. Efficiency and effectiveness of the use of an acenocoumarol pharmacogenetic dosing algorithm versus usual care in patients with venous thromboembolic disease initiating oral anticoagulation: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcas, Antonio J; Borobia, Alberto M; Velasco, Marta; Abad-Santos, Francisco; Díaz, Manuel Quintana; Fernández-Capitán, Carmen; Ruiz-Giménez, Nuria; Madridano, Olga; Sillero, Pilar Llamas

    2012-12-13

    Hemorrhagic events are frequent in patients on treatment with antivitamin-K oral anticoagulants due to their narrow therapeutic margin. Studies performed with acenocoumarol have shown the relationship between demographic, clinical and genotypic variants and the response to these drugs. Once the influence of these genetic and clinical factors on the dose of acenocoumarol needed to maintain a stable international normalized ratio (INR) has been demonstrated, new strategies need to be developed to predict the appropriate doses of this drug. Several pharmacogenetic algorithms have been developed for warfarin, but only three have been developed for acenocoumarol. After the development of a pharmacogenetic algorithm, the obvious next step is to demonstrate its effectiveness and utility by means of a randomized controlled trial. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of an acenocoumarol dosing algorithm developed by our group which includes demographic, clinical and pharmacogenetic variables (VKORC1, CYP2C9, CYP4F2 and ApoE) in patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE). This is a multicenter, single blind, randomized controlled clinical trial. The protocol has been approved by La Paz University Hospital Research Ethics Committee and by the Spanish Drug Agency. Two hundred and forty patients with VTE in which oral anticoagulant therapy is indicated will be included. Randomization (case/control 1:1) will be stratified by center. Acenocoumarol dose in the control group will be scheduled and adjusted following common clinical practice; in the experimental arm dosing will be following an individualized algorithm developed and validated by our group. Patients will be followed for three months. The main endpoints are: 1) Percentage of patients with INR within the therapeutic range on day seven after initiation of oral anticoagulant therapy; 2) Time from the start of oral anticoagulant treatment to achievement of a stable INR within the therapeutic

  3. Antiplatelet and Anticoagulant Drugs in Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altenburg, Alexander; Haage, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    In treating peripheral arterial disease, a profound knowledge of antiplatelet and anticoagulative drug therapy is helpful to assure a positive clinical outcome and to anticipate and avoid complications. Side effects and drug interactions may have fatal consequences for the patient, so interventionalists should be aware of these risks and able to control them. Aspirin remains the first-line agent for antiplatelet monotherapy, with clopidogrel added where dual antiplatelet therapy is required. In case of suspected antiplatelet drug resistance, the dose of clopidogrel may be doubled; prasugrel or ticagrelor may be used alternatively. Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors (abciximab or eptifibatide) may help in cases of hypercoagulability or acute embolic complications. Desmopressin, tranexamic acid, or platelet infusions may be used to decrease antiplatelet drug effects in case of bleeding. Intraprocedurally, anticoagulant therapy treatment with unfractionated heparin (UFH) still is the means of choice, although low molecular-weight heparins (LMWH) are suitable, particularly for postinterventional treatment. Adaption of LMWH dose is often required in renal insufficiency, which is frequently found in elderly patients. Protamine sulphate is an effective antagonist for UFH; however, this effect is less for LMWH. Newer antithrombotic drugs, such as direct thrombin inhibitors or factor X inhibitors, have limited importance in periprocedural treatment, with the exception of treating patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). Nevertheless, knowing pharmacologic properties of the newer drugs facilitate correct bridging of patients treated with such drugs. This article provides a comprehensive overview of antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs for use before, during, and after interventional radiological procedures.

  4. Test results of HTTR control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motegi, Toshihiro; Iigaki, Kazuhiko; Saito, Kenji; Sawahata, Hiroaki; Hirato, Yoji; Kondo, Makoto; Shibutani, Hideki; Ogawa, Satoru; Shinozaki, Masayuki; Mizushima, Toshihiko; Kawasaki, Kozo

    2006-06-01

    The plant control performance of the IHX helium flow rate control system, the PPWC helium flow rate control system, the secondary helium flow rate control system, the inlet temperature control system, the reactor power control system and the outlet temperature control system of the HTTR are obtained through function tests and power-up tests. As the test results, the control systems show stable control response under transient condition. Both of inlet temperature control system and reactor power control system shows stable operation from 30% to 100%, respectively. This report describes the outline of control systems and test results. (author)

  5. Reversing anticoagulant effects of novel oral anticoagulants: role of ciraparantag, andexanet alfa, and idarucizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu TY

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Tiffany Y Hu,1 Vaibhav R Vaidya,2 Samuel J Asirvatham2,31Mayo Medical School, 2Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, 3Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs are increasingly used in clinical practice, but lack of commercially available reversal agents is a major barrier for mainstream use of these therapies. Specific antidotes to NOACs are under development. Idarucizumab (aDabi-Fab, BI 655075 is a novel humanized mouse monoclonal antibody that binds dabigatran and reverses its anticoagulant effect. In a recent Phase III study (Reversal Effects of Idarucizumab on Active Dabigatran, a 5 g intravenous infusion of idarucizumab resulted in the normalization of dilute thrombin time in 98% and 93% of the two groups studied, with normalization of ecarin-clotting time in 89% and 88% patients. Two other antidotes, andexanet alfa (PRT064445 and ciraparantag (PER977 are also under development for reversal of NOACs. In this review, we discuss commonly encountered management issues with NOACs such as periprocedural management, laboratory monitoring of anticoagulation, and management of bleeding. We review currently available data regarding specific antidotes to NOACs with respect to pharmacology and clinical trials.Keywords: novel oral anticoagulant, dabigatran, idarucizumab, reversal

  6. Lupus anticoagulants: first French interlaboratory Etalonorme survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussi, J; Roisin, J P; Goguel, A

    1996-06-01

    In 1994, the, French National Quality Control Group for Hematology, Etalonorme, conducted a large-scale interlaboratory survey concerning the detection of lupus anticoagulants (LA) involving all the 4,500 French laboratories. Each laboratory received the same batch of a lyophilized citrated plasma (94B3) prepared from a patient with LA that had been confirmed by all the techniques used in the intralaboratory study. In the interlaboratory survey, the screening test was activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT); mean APTT calculated from the results reported by 4,029 labs was prolonged (clotting ratio = 1.44) with a large dispersion (coefficients of variation = 18.8%). APTT of the mixture 94B3 + normal plasma were performed by 2,698 laboratories. No correction of APTT was obtained (R = 1.36, Rosner index = 24) with a wide variation between reagents (17 kaolin. This survey allowed Etalonorme to inform French biologists and draft an educational program for the biologic detection of LA and the identification of its mechanism of action.

  7. Anticoagulant rodenticides and wildlife: Concluding remarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brink, Nico W.; Elliott, John E.; Shore, Richard F.; Rattner, Barnett A.

    2018-01-01

    Rodents are known to affect human society globally in various adverse ways, resulting in a widespread demand for their continuous control. Anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) have been, and currently remain, the cornerstone of rodent control throughout the world. Although alternative control methods exist, they are generally less effective. ARs work by affecting vitamin K metabolism, thereby preventing the activation of blood clotting factors and eventual coagulopathy. Since ARs are non-selective, their undoubted benefits for rodent control have to be balanced against the environmental risks that these compounds pose. Although they have been used for decades, pharmacokinetic and toxicokinetic data are mainly available for laboratory mammals and have concentrated on acute effects. Limited information is available on chronic exposure scenarios and for wildlife species. Important gaps exist in our understanding of the large inter- and intra-species differences in sensitivity to ARs, especially for non-target species, and in our knowledge about the occurrence and importance of sub-lethal effects in wildlife. It is clear that mere presence of AR residues in the body tissues may not indicate the occurrence of effects, although unequivocal assessment of effects under field conditions is difficult. Ante-mortem symptoms, like lethargy, subdued behaviour and unresponsiveness are generally not very specific as is true for more generic post-mortem observations (e.g. pallor of the mucous membranes or occurrence of haemorrhages). It is only by combining ante or post-mortem data with information on exposure that effects in the field may be confirmed. We do know however that a wide variety of non-target species are directly exposed to ARs. Secondary exposure in predators is also widespread although there is limited information on whether this exposure causes actual effects. Exposure is driven by ecological factors and is context specific with respect to spatial habitat configuration

  8. Anticoagulated patient's perception of their illness, their beliefs about the anticoagulant therapy prescribed and the relationship with adherence: impact of novel oral anticoagulant therapy - study protocol for The Switching Study: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auyeung, Vivian; Patel, Jignesh P; Abdou, John K; Vadher, Bipin; Bonner, Lynda; Brown, Alison; Roberts, Lara N; Patel, Raj K; Arya, Roopen

    2016-01-01

    Anticoagulant therapy is prescribed for millions of patients worldwide for the prevention and treatment of both arterial and venous thrombosis. Historically, only vitamin K antagonists have been available for clinicians to prescribe. The anticoagulation landscape is changing. The recent availability of the novel oral anticoagulants overcome many of the disadvantages associated with vitamin K antagonists. However the lack of formal monitoring and clinic follow-up is a concern for clinicians, as medication adherence is being assumed, which is known to decline in patients prescribed medications for chronic conditions. The switching study is a programme of work investigating the association between medication adherence and patient's beliefs about anticoagulation therapy (warfarin and subsequently novel oral anticoagulants), together with beliefs about their illness and anticoagulation related quality of life. The anticoagulation database at King's College Hospital will be interrogated and two groups of patients will be identified; those with a time in therapeutic range on warfarin of ≥75 % and those beliefs about medications compared. Those patients in the time in therapeutic range beliefs about medications, re-evaluated on the novel agent. The results from these sub-studies, will inform a clinical pathway to support patients on these novel agents, which will be evaluated in an independent group of patients. The results from the switching study will be used to develop a clinical pathway to support patient's prescribed novel oral anticoagulant therapy long-term.

  9. Postpartum wound and bleeding complications in women who received peripartum anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Jane S; Grotegut, Chad A; Thames, Elizabeth; Dotters-Katz, Sarah K; Brancazio, Leo R; James, Andra H

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare wound and bleeding complications between women who received anticoagulation after cesarean delivery due to history of prior venous thromboembolic disease, arterial disease, or being a thrombophilia carrier with adverse pregnancy outcome, to women not receiving anticoagulation. Women in the Duke Thrombosis Center Registry who underwent cesarean delivery during 2003-2011 and received postpartum anticoagulation (anticoagulation group, n=77), were compared with a subset of women who delivered during the same time period, but did not receive anticoagulation (no anticoagulation group, n=77). The no anticoagulation group comprised women who were matched to the anticoagulation group by age, body mass index, type of cesarean (no labor vs. labor), and date of delivery. Bleeding and wound complications were compared between the two groups. A multivariable logistic regression model was constructed to determine if anticoagulation was an independent predictor of wound complication. Women who received anticoagulation during pregnancy had a greater incidence of wound complications compared to those who did not (30% vs. 8%, p<0.001). Using multivariable logistic regression, while controlling for race, diabetes, chorioamnionitis, and aspirin use, anticoagulation predicted the development of any wound complication (OR 5.8, 95% CI 2.2, 17.6), but there were no differences in the mean estimated blood loss at delivery (782 vs. 778 ml, p=0.91), change in postpartum hematocrit (5.4 vs. 5.2%, p=0.772), or percent of women receiving blood products (6.5 vs. 1.3%, p=0.209) between the two groups. Anticoagulation following cesarean delivery is associated with an increased risk of post-cesarean wound complications, but not other postpartum bleeding complications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Direct Oral Anticoagulants and Women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, Hannah; Arachchillage, Deepa R. J.; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; Middeldorp, Saskia; Kadir, Rezan A.

    2016-01-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) provide an effective, safe, and convenient therapeutic alternative to warfarin and other vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), and are now established for a wide range of indications. The use of DOACs in women merits special consideration due to two main situations: first,

  11. Evaluation of computerized decision support for oral anticoagulation management based in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzmaurice, D A; Hobbs, F D; Murray, E T; Bradley, C P; Holder, R

    1996-09-01

    Increasing indications for oral anticoagulation has led to pressure on general practices to undertake therapeutic monitoring. Computerized decision support (DSS) has been shown to be effective in hospitals for improving clinical management. Its usefulness in primary care has previously not been investigated. To test the effectiveness of using DSS for oral anticoagulation monitoring in primary care by measuring the proportions of patients adequately controlled, defined as within the appropriate therapeutic range of International Normalised Ratio (INR). All patients receiving warfarin from two Birmingham inner city general practices were invited to attend a practice-based anticoagulation clinic. In practice A all patients were managed using DSS. In practice B patients were randomized to receive dosing advice either through DSS or through the local hospital laboratory. Clinical outcomes, adverse events and patient acceptability were recorded. Forty-nine patients were seen in total. There were significant improvements in INR control from 23% to 86% (P > 0.001) in the practice where all patients received dosing through DSS. In the practice where patients were randomized to either DSS or hospital dosing, logistic regression showed a significant trend for improvement in intervention patients which was not apparent in the hospital-dosed patients (P DSS through the full 12 months (24 days to 36 days) (P = 0.033). Adverse events were comparable between hospital and practice-dosed patients, although a number of esoteric events occurred. Patient satisfaction with the practice clinics was high. Computerized DSS enables the safe and effective transfer of anticoagulation management from hospital to primary care and may result in improved patient outcome in terms of the level of control, frequency of review and general acceptability.

  12. Self-monitoring and self-management of oral anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneghan, Carl J; Garcia-Alamino, Josep M; Spencer, Elizabeth A; Ward, Alison M; Perera, Rafael; Bankhead, Clare; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Fitzmaurice, David; Mahtani, Kamal R; Onakpoya, Igho J

    2016-07-05

    The introduction of point-of-care devices for the management of patients on oral anticoagulation allows self-testing by the patient at home. Patients who self-test can either adjust their medication according to a pre-determined dose-INR (international normalized ratio) schedule (self-management), or they can call a clinic to be told the appropriate dose adjustment (self-monitoring). Increasing evidence suggests self-testing of oral anticoagulant therapy is equal to or better than standard monitoring. This is an updated version of the original review published in 2010. To evaluate the effects on thrombotic events, major haemorrhages, and all-cause mortality of self-monitoring or self-management of oral anticoagulant therapy compared to standard monitoring. For this review update, we re-ran the searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), 2015, Issue 6, the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to June week 4 2015), Embase (Ovid, 1980 to 2015 week 27) on 1 July 2015. We checked bibliographies and contacted manufacturers and authors of relevant studies. We did not apply any language restrictions . Outcomes analysed were thromboembolic events, mortality, major haemorrhage, minor haemorrhage, tests in therapeutic range, frequency of testing, and feasibility of self-monitoring and self-management. Review authors independently extracted data and we used a fixed-effect model with the Mantzel-Haenzel method to calculate the pooled risk ratio (RR) and Peto's method to verify the results for uncommon outcomes. We examined heterogeneity amongst studies with the Chi(2) and I(2) statistics and used GRADE methodology to assess the quality of evidence. We identified 28 randomised trials including 8950 participants (newly incorporated in this update: 10 trials including 4227 participants). The overall quality of the evidence was generally low to moderate. Pooled estimates showed a reduction in thromboembolic events (RR 0.58, 95% CI 0.45 to 0

  13. Monitoring of argatroban and lepirudin anticoagulation in critically ill patients by conventional laboratory parameters and rotational thromboelastometry - a prospectively controlled randomized double-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiderlinden, Martin; Werner, Patrick; Bahlmann, Astrid; Kemper, Johann; Brezina, Tobias; Schäfer, Maximilian; Görlinger, Klaus; Seidel, Holger; Kienbaum, Peter; Treschan, Tanja A

    2018-02-09

    Argatroban or lepirudin anticoagulation therapy in patients with heparin induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) or HIT suspect is typically monitored using the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT). Although aPTT correlates well with plasma levels of argatroban and lepirudin in healthy volunteers, it might not be the method of choice in critically ill patients. However, in-vivo data is lacking for this patient population. Therefore, we studied in vivo whether ROTEM or global clotting times would provide an alternative for monitoring the anticoagulant intensity effects in critically ill patients. This study was part of the double-blind randomized trial "Argatroban versus Lepirudin in critically ill patients (ALicia)", which compared critically ill patients treated with argatroban or lepirudin. Following institutional review board approval and written informed consent, for this sub-study blood of 35 critically ill patients was analysed. Before as well as 12, 24, 48 and 72 h after initiation of argatroban or lepirudin infusion, blood was analysed for aPTT, aPTT ratios, thrombin time (TT), INTEM CT,INTEM CT ratios, EXTEM CT, EXTEM CT ratios and maximum clot firmness (MCF) and correlated with the corresponding plasma concentrations of the direct thrombin inhibitor. To reach a target aPTT of 1.5 to 2 times baseline, median [IQR] plasma concentrations of 0.35 [0.01-1.2] μg/ml argatroban and 0.17 [0.1-0.32] μg/ml lepirudin were required. For both drugs, there was no significant correlation between aPTT and aPTT ratios and plasma concentrations. INTEM CT, INTEM CT ratios, EXTEM CT, EXTEM CT ratios, TT and TT ratios correlated significantly with plasma concentrations of both drugs. Additionally, agreement between argatroban plasma levels and EXTEM CT and EXTEM CT ratios were superior to agreement between argatroban plasma levels and aPTT in the Bland Altman analysis. MCF remained unchanged during therapy with both drugs. In critically ill patients, TT and ROTEM parameters

  14. Pulsed electric field extraction enhanced anti-coagulant effect of fungal polysaccharide from Jew's ear (Auricularia auricula).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changtian; Mao, Xinxin; Xu, Baojun

    2013-01-01

    As a Chinese herbal medicine, Jew's ear has been known for its anti-coagulant effects. Hence it is worthwhile developing an effective technique to extract active components. To find the optimal extraction condition and to identify the best strain to yield fungal polysaccharide with anti-coagulant activity. Three strains of Jew's ear from Jilin Province, named as 988, DY 18 and FS 02, and three extraction techniques, namely, high intensity pulsed electric fields (HIPEF), microwave-assisted extraction method (MAEM) and ultrasonic-assisted extraction method (UAEM), were applied to optimise the extraction conditions. The crude extracts and polysaccharides were further determined for anti-coagulant activities. All extracts prolonged blood clotting time as compared to reagent control. The HIPEF exhibited the most remarkable effect among the three extraction techniques. The anti-coagulant activities of extracts were enhanced with increasing electric field strength when the field strength reached 24 kV/cm. Current results suggest that the HIPEF technique will be an effective method in the manufacture of bioactive natural polysaccharide. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Anticoagulation Quality and Complications of using Vitamin K Antagonists in the Cardiac Surgery Outpatient Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Augusto Cray da Costa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: In patients with mechanical prosthetic heart valves or atrial fibrillation requiring anticoagulation to prevent thromboembolic events, several factors influence adherence and anticoagulation complications. Objective: To evaluate the factors that interfere with the quality and complications of anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of 100 patients, in the period from 2011 to 2014, was performed. Anticoagulation conditions in the last year, regarding the presence of complications (embolisms/bleeding and inadequate treatment were assessed: achievement of less than 8 annual prothrombin times and International Normalized Ratio outside therapeutic target in more than 40% of prothrombin times. Results: There were 31 complications (22 minor bleeding without hospitalization and 9 major complications: 7 bleeding with hospitalization and two emboli; 70 were with International Normalized Ratio outside the target in more than 40% of the tests and 36 with insufficient number of prothrombin times. Socioeconomic factors, anticoagulant type and anticoagulation reason had no relationship with complications or with inadequate treatment. There were more complications in patients with longer duration of anticoagulation (P=0.001. Women had more International Normalized Ratio outside the target range (OR 2.61, CI:1.0-6.5; P=0.04. Patients with lower number of annual prothrombin times had longer times of anticoagulation (P=0.03, less annual consultations (P=0.02 and less dose adjustments (P=0.003. Patients with longer duration of anticoagulation have more complications (P=0.001. Conclusion: There was a high rate of major complications and International Normalized Ratio was outside the goal. Less annual prothrombin times was related to longer duration of anticoagulation, less annual consultations and less dose adjustments. More major complications occurred in patients with longer duration of

  16. Management of Periprocedural Anticoagulation: A Survey of Contemporary Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaker, Greg C; Theriot, Paul; Binder, Lea G; Dobesh, Paul P; Cuker, Adam; Doherty, John U

    2016-07-12

    Interruption of oral anticoagulation (AC) for surgery or an invasive procedure is a complicated process. Practice guidelines provide only general recommendations, and care of such patients occurs across multiple specialties. The availability of direct oral anticoagulants further complicates decision making and guidance here is limited. To evaluate current practice patterns in the United States for bridging AC, a survey was developed by the American College of Cardiology Anticoagulation Work Group. The goal of the survey was to assess how general and subspecialty cardiologists, internists, gastroenterologists, and orthopedic surgeons currently manage patients who receive AC and undergo surgery or an invasive procedure. The survey was completed by 945 physicians involved in the periprocedural management of AC. The results provide a template for educational and research projects geared toward the development of clinical pathways and point-of-care tools to improve this area of health care. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A comparative assessment of efficacy of three anticoagulant rodenticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renapurkar, D M

    1982-01-01

    Results are presented of feeding tests carried out with three common anticoagulant rodenticides viz., coumatetralyl, fumarin and warfarin on three common species of commensal rodents i.e., Rattus rattus, Rattus norvegicus and Bandicota bengalensis. All three species of rodents were susceptible to anticoagulant rodenticides. However, the action of these compounds in B. bengalensis was comparatively slow. Coumatetralyl was found to be the most effective rodenticide followed by fumarin and warfarin. Liquid baits of these compounds are more effective in comparison to food baits.

  18. Anticoagulant Activity and Structural Characterization of Polysaccharide from Abalone (Haliotis discus hannai Ino Gonad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed at characterizing the structure and the anticoagulant activity of a polysaccharide fraction (AGP33 isolated from the gonads of Haliotis discus hannai Ino. AGP33 was extracted by enzymatic hydrolysis and purified by ion-exchange and gel-filtration chromatography. The backbone fraction of AGP33 (BAGP33, which appeared to contain of mannose, glucose and galactose, was prepared by partial acid hydrolysis. According to methylation and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy, the backbone of AGP33 was identified as mainly consisting of 1→3-linked, 1→4-linked, and 1→6-linked monosaccharides. AGP33 is a sulfated polysaccharide with sulfates occur at 3-O- and 4-O-positions. It prolonged thromboplastin time (APTT, thrombin time (TT and prothrombin time (PT compared to a saline control solution in a dosage-dependent manner. AGP33 exhibited an extension (p < 0.01 of APTT compared to the saline group at concentrations higher than 5 μg/mL. AGP33 exhibited higher anticoagulant activity than its desulfated product (AGP33-des and BAGP33. The results showed that polysaccharide with higher molecular weight and sulfate content demonstrated greater anticoagulant activity.

  19. Managing reversal of direct oral anticoagulants in emergency situations Anticoagulation Education Task Force White Paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ageno, Walter; Büller, Harry R.; Falanga, Anna; Hacke, Werner; Hendriks, Jeroen; Lobban, Trudie; Merino, Jose; Milojevic, Ivan S.; Moya, Francisco; van der Worp, H. Bart; Randall, Gary; Tsioufis, Konstantinos; Verhamme, Peter; Camm, A. John

    2016-01-01

    Anticoagulation is the cornerstone of prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the mechanisms by which anticoagulants confer therapeutic benefit also increase the risk of bleeding. As such, reversal strategies

  20. Modeling Exposure of Mammalian Predatorsto Anticoagulant Rodenticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topping, Christopher John; Elmeros, Morten

    2016-01-01

    as vectors of AR, and was used to evaluate likely impacts of restrictions imposed on AR use in Denmark banning the use of rodenticides for plant protection in woodlands and tree-crops. The model uses input based on frequencies and timings of baiting for rodent control for urban, rural and woodland locations......Anticoagulant rodenticides (AR) are a widespread and effective method of rodent control but there is concern about the impact these may have on non-target organisms, in particular secondary poisoning of rodent predators. Incidence and concentration of AR in free-living predators in Denmark is very...... high. We postulate that this is caused by widespread exposure due to widespread use of AR in Denmark in and around buildings. To investigate this theory a spatio-temporal model of AR use and mammalian predator distribution was created. This model was supported by data from an experimental study of mice...

  1. Synthesis and biological activity of the novel indanedione anticoagulant rodenticides containing fluorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Liu, Liping; Bai, Zengguo; Zhang, Tianhua; Zhao, Keke

    2017-01-02

    Here, 3 fluorinated intermediates of drug were synthesized: (M1), (M2), (M3). Three new anticoagulant rodenticides were designed which were based on 4-hydroxycoumarin or 1,3-indandione, added acute toxicity groups containing fluorine. The structures of synthesized compounds were analyzed and proved by FT-IR spectroscopy and 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1 H-NMR). The compounds were also evaluated for their anticoagulant and acute biologic activity. In addition, both the acute orally toxicity and the feeding indexes of R 1 and R 2 were tested. The result of the experiment proved that the new synthesis of 1, 3 - indan diketone for maternal new anticoagulant rodenticide can replace the current 4 - hydroxyl coumarin as the mother of the second generation anticoagulant rodenticide and 1, 3 - indan diketone for maternal new anticoagulant rodenticides will have a good development prospect.

  2. Safety, efficacy, and response predictors of anticoagulation for the treatment of nonmalignant portal-vein thrombosis in patients with cirrhosis: a propensity score matching analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Wha Chung

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/AimsPortal-vein thrombosis (PVT develops in 10-25% of cirrhotic patients and may aggravate portal hypertension. There are few data regarding the effects of anticoagulation on nonmalignant PVT in liver cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to elucidate the safety, efficacy, and predictors of response to anticoagulation therapy in cirrhotic patients.MethodsPatients with liver cirrhosis and nonmalignant PVT were identified by a hospital electronic medical record system (called BESTCARE. Patients with malignant PVT, Budd-Chiari syndrome, underlying primary hematologic disorders, or preexisting extrahepatic thrombosis were excluded from the analysis. Patients were divided into two groups (treatment and nontreatment, and propensity score matching analysis was performed to identify control patients. The sizes of the thrombus and spleen were evaluated using multidetector computed tomography.ResultsTwenty-eight patients were enrolled in this study between 2003 and 2014: 14 patients who received warfarin for nonmalignant PVT and 14 patients who received no anticoagulation. After 112 days of treatment, 11 patients exhibited significantly higher response rates (complete in 6 and partial in 5 compared to the control patients, with decreases in thrombus size of >30%. Compared to nonresponders, the 11 responders were older, and had a thinner spleen and fewer episodes of previous endoscopic variceal ligations, whereas pretreatment liver function and changes in prothrombin time after anticoagulation did not differ significantly between the two groups. Two patients died after warfarin therapy, but the causes of death were not related to anticoagulation.ConclusionsWarfarin can be safely administered to cirrhotic patients with nonmalignant PVT. The presence of preexisting portal hypertension is a predictor of nonresponse to anticoagulation.

  3. Citrate Anticoagulation for CRRT in Children: Comparison with Heparin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Nicole Fernández

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regional anticoagulation with citrate is an alternative to heparin in continuous renal replacement therapies, which may prolong circuit lifetime and decrease hemorrhagic complications. A retrospective comparative cohort study based on a prospective observational registry was conducted including critically ill children undergoing CRRT. Efficacy, measured as circuit survival, and secondary effects of heparin and citrate were compared. 12 patients on CRRT with citrate anticoagulation and 24 patients with heparin anticoagulation were analyzed. Median citrate dose was 2.6 mmol/L. Median calcium dose was 0.16 mEq/kg/h. Median heparin dose was 15 UI/kg/h. Median circuit survival was 48 hours with citrate and 31 hours with heparin (P=0.028. 66.6% of patients treated with citrate developed mild metabolic alkalosis, which was directly related to citrate dose. There were no cases of citrate intoxication: median total calcium/ionic calcium index (CaT/I of 2.16 and a maximum CaT/I of 2.33, without metabolic acidosis. In the citrate group, 45.5% of patients developed hypochloremia and 27.3% hypomagnesemia. In the heparin group, 27.8% developed hypophosphatemia. Three patients were moved from heparin to citrate to control postoperatory bleeding. In conclusion citrate is a safe and effective anticoagulation method for CRRT in children and it achieves longer circuit survival than heparin.

  4. Optical sensing of anticoagulation status: Towards point-of-care coagulation testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane M Tshikudi

    Full Text Available Anticoagulant overdose is associated with major bleeding complications. Rapid coagulation sensing may ensure safe and accurate anticoagulant dosing and reduce bleeding risk. Here, we report the novel use of Laser Speckle Rheology (LSR for measuring anticoagulation and haemodilution status in whole blood. In the LSR approach, blood from 12 patients and 4 swine was placed in disposable cartridges and time-varying intensity fluctuations of laser speckle patterns were measured to quantify the viscoelastic modulus during clotting. Coagulation parameters, mainly clotting time, clot progression rate (α-angle and maximum clot stiffness (MA were derived from the clot viscoelasticity trace and compared with standard Thromboelastography (TEG. To demonstrate the capability for anticoagulation sensing in patients, blood samples from 12 patients treated with warfarin anticoagulant were analyzed. LSR clotting time correlated with prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin time (r = 0.57-0.77, p<0.04 and all LSR parameters demonstrated good correlation with TEG (r = 0.61-0.87, p<0.04. To further evaluate the dose-dependent sensitivity of LSR parameters, swine blood was spiked with varying concentrations of heparin, argatroban and rivaroxaban or serially diluted with saline. We observed that anticoagulant treatments prolonged LSR clotting time in a dose-dependent manner that correlated closely with TEG (r = 0.99, p<0.01. LSR angle was unaltered by anticoagulation whereas TEG angle presented dose-dependent diminution likely linked to the mechanical manipulation of the clot. In both LSR and TEG, MA was largely unaffected by anticoagulation, and LSR presented a higher sensitivity to increased haemodilution in comparison to TEG (p<0.01. Our results establish that LSR rapidly and accurately measures the response of various anticoagulants, opening the opportunity for routine anticoagulation monitoring at the point-of-care or for patient self-testing.

  5. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulation agents in anticoagulant naïve atrial fibrillation patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Sørensen, Rikke; Hansen, Morten Lock

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulation (NOAC) agents have been approved for stroke prophylaxis in atrial fibrillation (AF). We investigated 'real-world' information on how these drugs are being adopted. METHODS AND RESULTS: Using Danish nationwide administrative registers, we identif...

  6. Anticoagulant activity of ginger ( Zingiber officinale Rosc ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Herbal medicines with anticoagulant therapeutic claims could serve as veritable sources of new oral anticoagulant drugs with possible wider safety margins than the currently available ones. Objectives: This work was aimed at evaluating a Ginger Rhizome Methanolic Extract in vivo in rats for its potential ...

  7. Anticoagulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rounds Seminar Series & Daily Conferences Fellowships and Residencies School of Perfusion Technology Education Resources Library & Learning Resource Center CME Resources THI Journal THI Cardiac Society Register for the Cardiac Society ...

  8. Is stopping of anticoagulant therapy really required in a minor dental surgery? - How about in an endodontic microsurgery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Wook Cho

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, oral anticoagulants are commonly prescribed to numerous patients for preventing cardiovascular accident such as thromboembolism. An important side effect of anticoagulant is anti-hemostasis. In a major surgery, the oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT regimen must be changed before the surgery for proper post-operative bleeding control. However, in a minor dental surgery and endodontic surgery, the necessity for changing or discontinuing the OAT is open to debate. In this study, risks of the consequences were weighed and analyzed. In patients who stop the OAT, the occurrence of thromboembolic complication is rare but the result is fatal. In patients who continuing the OAT, post-operative bleeding can be controlled well with the local hemostatic measures. In the endodontic surgery, there are almost no studies about this issue. The intra-operative bleeding control is particularly important in the endodontic surgery because of its delicate and sensitive procedures such as inspection of resected root surface using dental microscope and retrograde filling. Further studies are necessary about this issue in the viewpoint of endodontic surgery.

  9. Evaluation of computerized decision support for oral anticoagulation management based in primary care.

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzmaurice, D A; Hobbs, F D; Murray, E T; Bradley, C P; Holder, R

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increasing indications for oral anticoagulation has led to pressure on general practices to undertake therapeutic monitoring. Computerized decision support (DSS) has been shown to be effective in hospitals for improving clinical management. Its usefulness in primary care has previously not been investigated. AIM: To test the effectiveness of using DSS for oral anticoagulation monitoring in primary care by measuring the proportions of patients adequately controlled, defined as with...

  10. Adverse effects of anticoagulation treatment: clinically significant upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Skok

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the last years, the use of oral anticoagulant treatment has increased dramatically, principally for the prevention of venous thrombosis and thrombembolic events. This treatment is demanding, especially among the elderly with concommitant diseases and different medication. Aim of the study to evaluate the rate of serious complications, clinically significant hemorrhage from upper gastointestinal tract in patients treated with oral antiocoagulants in a prospective cohort study.Patients and methods: Included were patients admitted to our institution between January 1, 1994 and December 31, 2003 due to gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Emergency endoscopy and laboratory testing was performed in all patients.Results: 6416 patients were investigated: 2452 women (38.2 % and 3964 men (61.8 %, mean age 59.1 years, SD 17.2. Among our patients, 55 % were aged over 60 years. In 86.4 % of patients the source of bleeding was confirmed in the upper gastrointestinal tract. In the last week prior to bleeding, 20.4 % (1309/6416 of all patients were regularly taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anticoagulant therapy or antiplatelet agents in single daily doses at least. 6.3 % of patients (82/1309 with abundant hemorrhage from upper gastrointestinal tract were using oral anticoagulant therapy and had INR > 5 at admission, 25.6 % of them had INR > 10. The mortality of patients using oral anticoagulants and INR > 5 was 17.1 %.Conclusions: Upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage is a serious complication of different medications, particularly in elderly patients. Safe use of anticoagulant therapy is based on careful selection of patients and correct intake of the prescribed drugs.

  11. Review of economics and cost-effectiveness analyses of anticoagulant therapy for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Schéele, Birgitta; Fernandez, Maria; Hogue, Susan Lynn; Kwong, Winghan Jacqueline

    2013-05-01

    To summarize the available evidence on the issues in health economics related to oral anticoagulation for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) in the US. A literature review was performed using PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, as well as the websites of professional organizations. The search was conducted according to a prespecified protocol, limiting articles to those published in English from 2001 to October 2012 and focused on the economics associated with AF and AF-related stroke in the US. Data from 27 studies were extracted and included in the review. Strokes in patients with AF are more debilitating and have higher recurrence rates and mortality compared with strokes unrelated to AF. However, data describing the long-term cost of AF-related stroke and stroke subtypes remain limited. The costs of major gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and intracranial bleeding related to warfarin are significant, whereas the costs of the more frequent minor GI bleeding are relatively low. Overall, the cost-effectiveness of warfarin versus aspirin or no treatment in patients with at least 1 risk factor for stroke is well established. Economic evaluations based on results from randomized controlled clinical trials generally found that new anticoagulants were a cost-effective alternative to warfarin for stroke prevention in AF. However, these cost-effectiveness results are highly sensitive to how well optimal international normalized ratio control is maintained (within target of 2.0-3.0) for warfarin and the time horizon used for analysis. Time in therapeutic range for warfarin in routine clinical practice was lower than in clinical trials, as shown by previous studies. This review identified several areas of uncertainty regarding the economic benefit of anticoagulants. The generalizability of cost-effectiveness results of anticoagulant therapy in AF based on clinical trial data must be confirmed by comparative effectiveness

  12. Aspirin or anticoagulants for treating recurrent miscarriage in women without antiphospholipid syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaandorp, Stef; Di Nisio, Marcello; Goddijn, Mariette; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2009-01-01

    Background Since hypercoagulability might result in recurrent miscarriage, anticoagulant agents could potentially increase the live-birth rate in subsequent pregnancies in women with either inherited thrombophilia or unexplained recurrent miscarriage. Objectives To evaluate the efficacy and safety

  13. Anticoagulants for the treatment of recurrent pregnancy loss in women without antiphospholipid syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Nisio, M.; Peters, L. W.; Middeldorp, S.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since hypercoagulability might result in recurrent pregnancy loss, anticoagulant agents could potentially increase the live-birth rate in subsequent pregnancies in women with either inherited thrombophilia or unexplained pregnancy loss. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of

  14. ASSESSMENT OF RESULTS IN THE FINANCIAL CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniy Stoyanov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the evaluation of the results of the search of accountability in the process of financial control. The analysis of the recorded performance is made on the basis of the opportunities that are created and provided by the Bulgarian legislation. Violations are dealt with in principle, to make a felicitous qualification, providing an opportunity for seeking accountability and the preservation of the patrimony of the property and interests of the society. The essence of power is considered in this context, because through the use of its resources the management based on critical and objective overview of achievements assessment forms and imposes its will on liability.

  15. Interpreting the quality of health care database studies on the comparative effectiveness of oral anticoagulants in routine care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneeweiss S

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sebastian Schneeweiss, Krista F Huybrechts, Joshua J Gagne Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Background: Dabigatran, an oral direct thrombin inhibitor, has now been available for 2 years in the US for the prevention of stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, and direct Xa inhibitors are also starting to enter the market. Studies examining the effects of new oral anticoagulants in health care databases are beginning to emerge. The purpose of this study was to describe the validity of early published observational studies on the comparative safety and effectiveness of new oral anticoagulants in patients with atrial fibrillation. Methods: We identified published nonrandomized post-marketing studies (articles or conference abstracts or posters and critically appraised their internal validity, with a particular focus on their ability to control confounding and other biases. Results: Two full-length journal articles, three conference posters, two conference presentation abstracts, and a US Food and Drug Administration analysis form the basis of the early comparative effectiveness and safety experience with new oral anticoagulants. Some published studies exhibit substantial biases and have insufficient precision for several important endpoints. Several studies suffer from biases arising from comparing ongoing users of the older drug, warfarin, who seem to tolerate it, to initiators of the new treatment who may have switched from warfarin or have had no prior experience with anticoagulants. Analyses tended to not adjust or not adjust adequately for confounding, and unsound propensity score application was also observed. Several studies introduced selection bias by excluding patients who died during follow-up and by restricting the study population to those with continuous database enrollment following cohort entry. We

  16. Standards of care issues with anticoagulation in real-world populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Current guidelines recommend anticoagulants for reducing the risk of stroke in appropriate patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) and for the acute treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and the prevention of recurrent VTE. Warfarin is the standard of care for both NVAF and VTE, yet International Normalized Ratio (INR) control remains suboptimal, even in the clinical trial setting. Maintaining INR within the recommended therapeutic range is associated with better outcomes in these distinct populations. In VTE, high rates of recurrence have been reported during the first few weeks of treatment, emphasizing the importance of surveillance during this time and of early optimization of anticoagulation therapy. The NVAF population tends to have more comorbidities and requires longer-term therapy. It is important to keep in mind that real-world patient populations are more complex than those in controlled studies. Patients with multiple comorbidities are particularly challenging, and physicians may focus on clinically urgent issues rather than anticoagulation optimization. Despite the many complexities associated with the use of warfarin, it remains a mainstay of anticoagulation therapy. Aligning financial incentives and improving care coordination are important factors in moving toward better outcomes for patients who need anticoagulation therapy. The increased focus on value-based care and evolving approaches to patient treatment could lead more physicians and payers to consider alternatives to warfarin, including the use of novel oral anticoagulants.

  17. Isolation and characterization of anticoagulant compound from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GIS

    2013-10-02

    Oct 2, 2013 ... The structural characterization of anticoagulant GAG was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared ... for pharmaceutical use are currently not available. However ... methods and sold live in the market for human consump- tion.

  18. Efficacy of protocol-based pharmacotherapy management on anticoagulation with warfarin for patients with cardiovascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katada, Y; Nakagawa, S; Minakata, K; Odaka, M; Taue, H; Sato, Y; Yonezawa, A; Kayano, Y; Yano, I; Nakatsu, T; Sakamoto, K; Uehara, K; Sakaguchi, H; Yamazaki, K; Minatoya, K; Sakata, R; Matsubara, K

    2017-10-01

    Anticoagulation therapy with warfarin requires periodic monitoring of prothrombin time-international normalized ratio (PT-INR) and adequate dose adjustments based on the data to minimize the risk of bleeding and thromboembolic events. In our hospital, we have developed protocol-based pharmaceutical care, which we called protocol-based pharmacotherapy management (PBPM), for warfarin therapy. The protocol requires pharmacists to manage timing of blood sampling for measuring PT-INR and warfarin dosage determination based on an algorithm. This study evaluated the efficacy of PBPM in warfarin therapy by comparing to conventional pharmaceutical care. From October 2013 to June 2015, a total of 134 hospitalized patients who underwent cardiovascular surgeries received post-operative warfarin therapy. The early series of patients received warfarin therapy as the conventional care (control group, n=77), whereas the latter received warfarin therapy based on the PBPM (PBPM group, n=68). These patients formed the cohort of the present study and were retrospectively analysed. The indications for warfarin included aortic valve replacement (n=56), mitral valve replacement (n=4), mitral valve plasty (n=22) and atrial fibrillation (n=29). There were no differences in patients' characteristics between both groups. The percentage time in therapeutic range in the first 10 days was significantly higher in the PBPM group (47.1%) than that in the control group (34.4%, PWarfarin therapy based on our novel PBPM was clinically safe and resulted in significantly better anticoagulation control compared to conventional care. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOAC) in the treatment of venous thromboembolism

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastian Werth; Jan Beyer-Westendorf

    2015-01-01

    In case of venous thromboembolism (VTE) e ective anticoagulation is needed. The introduction of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) for VTE therapy o ers new treatment options and, in general, simpli es VTE therapy compared to the concept of LMWH/ VKA. At the same time, NOACs may help to improve the clinical outcome of patients with VTE as trial results consistently indicated the reduction in major bleeding complications. There are several reasons to use NOAC in special p...

  20. Healthcare resources and needs in anticoagulant therapy for patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. SAMOA Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, V; Egocheaga-Cabello, M I; Gállego-Culleré, J; Ignacio-García, E; Manzano-Espinosa, L; Martín-Martínez, A; Mateo-Arranz, J; Polo-García, J; Vargas-Ortega, D

    2017-05-01

    To determine, in the various medical specialties, the healthcare process for anticoagulated patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, to determine the available and necessary resources and to identify potential areas of improvement in the care of these patients. We performed a cross-sectional survey of primary care and specialised physicians involved in the care of anticoagulated patients. The questionnaires referred to the healthcare process, the indication and prescription of anticoagulant therapy and the barriers and deficiencies present for these patients. A total of 893 physicians participated in the study, 437 of whom worked in primary care and 456 of whom were specialists (mostly cardiologists). Forty-two percent of the family doctors indicated that they assessed and prescribed anticoagulant therapy, and 66% performed the regular follow-up of these patients. In both healthcare settings, the physicians noted the lack of standardised protocols. There was also a lack of quality control in the treatment. The role of primary care in managing anticoagulated patients has grown compared with previous reports. The responses of the participating physicians suggest marked gaps in the standardisation of the healthcare process and several areas for improvement in these patients' follow-up. The promotion of training in direct-acting anticoagulant drugs remains pivotal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  1. Self-management of oral anticoagulant therapy for mechanical heart valve patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas D; Attermann, Jørn; Pilegaard, Hans K

    2001-01-01

    .4%–2.9%) for the control group. Conclusion: Self-management of OAT is a feasible and safe concept for selected patients with mechanical heart valve prostheses also on a long-term basis. It provides at least as good and most likely better quality of anticoagulant therapy than conventional management assessed by time within......Objective: Self-management of oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) has shown good results on a short-term basis. We hypothesize that self-management of OAT provides a better quality of treatment than conventional management also on a long-term basis. The aim of this study was to assess the quality...... of conventionally managed heart valve patients (control group) was used as reference. Results: The median observation time was 1175 days (range: 174–1428 days). The self-managed patients were within therapeutic INR target range for a mean of 78.0% (range: 36.1%–93.9%) of the time compared with 61.0% (range 37...

  2. D-dimer: a useful tool in gauging optimal duration of oral anticoagulant therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Silingardi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY Optimal duration of oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT in idiopathic venous thromboembolism (VTE is unknown. Indefinite OAT carries an unacceptable risk of major bleeding and prospective studies have demonstrated that OAT is no longer protective after its withdrawal. How to identify the patients at risk for recurrence? D-dimer is a marker of thrombin activity. Early prospective studies showed that elevated D-dimer levels after anticoagulation had a highly predictive value for a recurrent episode. Does D-dimer assay have a role in gauging the appropriate duration of anticoagulant therapy? The PROLONG study tries to answer this question. METHOD D-dimer assay was performed one month after stopping anticoagulation. Patiens with normal D-dimer levels did not resume anticoagulation while patients with elevated D-dimer levels were randomized to discontinue or resume anticoagulation. Study end-points was the composite of recurrent VTE and major bleeding during an average follow-up of 1.4 years. RESULTS The rate of recurrence is significantly higher in patients with elevated D-dimer levels who discontinued anticoagulation. Resuming anticoagulation in this cohort of patients markedly reduces recurrent events without increasing major bleeding. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS PROLONG study is provocative, because D-dimer assay is simple, thus not requiring dedicated laboratory facilities. D-dimer test has otherwise high sensitivity but low specificity in VTE diagnosis. Aspecifically elevated D-dimer levels are available in the elderly and the majority of patients included in the study were > 65 years old, thus introducing a possible selection bias. Nonetheless the results of the study are useful for the clinician. Prolongation of vitamin K antagonists in patients with elevated D-dimer levels one month after discontinuation of OAT for a first unprovoked episode of VTE results in a favourable risk-benefit relationship. Probably this

  3. Anticoagulation Bridge Therapy in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation: Recent Updates Providing a Rebalance of Risk and Benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garwood, Candice L; Korkis, Bianca; Grande, Domenico; Hanni, Claudia; Morin, Amy; Moser, Lynette R

    2017-06-01

    In 2011 we reviewed clinical updates and controversies surrounding anticoagulation bridge therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Since then, options for oral anticoagulation have expanded with the addition of four direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC) agents available in the United States. Nonetheless, vitamin K antagonist (VKA) therapy continues to be the treatment of choice for patients who are poor candidates for a DOAC and for whom bridge therapy remains a therapeutic dilemma. This literature review identifies evidence and guideline and consensus statements from the last 5 years to provide updated recommendations and insight into bridge therapy for patients using a VKA for AF. Since our last review, at least four major international guidelines have been updated plus a new consensus document addressing bridge therapy was released. Prospective trials and one randomized controlled trial have provided guidance for perioperative bridge therapy. The clinical trial data showed that bridging with heparin is associated with a significant bleeding risk compared with not bridging; furthermore, data suggested that actual perioperative thromboembolic risk may be lower than previously estimated. Notably, patients at high risk for stroke have not been adequately represented. These findings highlight the importance of assessing thrombosis and bleeding risk before making bridging decisions. Thrombosis and bleeding risk tools have emerged to facilitate this assessment and have been incorporated into guideline recommendations. Results from ongoing trials are expected to provide more guidance on safe and effective perioperative management approaches for patients at high risk for stroke. © 2017 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  4. Anticoagulation and high dose liver radiation. A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lightdale, C.J.; Wasser, J.; Coleman, M.; Brower, M.; Tefft, M.; Pasmantier, M.

    1979-01-01

    Two groups of patients were observed for evidence of acute radiation hepatitis during high dose radiation to the liver. The first group of 18 patients with metastatic liver disease received an average of 4,050 rad to the whole liver. Half received anticoagulation with warfarin. One patient on anticoagulation developed evidence of acute radiation hepatitis while 2 patients did so without anticoagulation. Eleven patients with Hodgkin's disease received 4,000 rad to the left lobe of the liver during extended field radiation. Four of these 11 patients were anticoagulated to therapeutic range. Only one of the fully anticoagulated patients showed changes on liver scan consistent with radiation hepatitis whereas three did so without anticoagulation. No serious sequelae from anticoagulation occurred in either group. These preliminary data suggest that anticoagulation may be safely administered with high dose hepatic radiation and that further trials with anticoagulation are warranted

  5. Generic switching of warfarin and risk of excessive anticoagulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellfritzsch, Maja; Rathe, Jette; Stage, Tore Bjerregaard

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Generic switching of warfarin was recently repealed in Denmark, as adverse drug reaction (ADR) reports suggested risk of excessive anticoagulation following switches from branded to generic warfarin. We investigated this putative association in a formalized pharmacoepidemiological analysis....... METHODS: We conducted a nationwide cohort study based on Danish healthcare registries, including data from the introduction of generic warfarin until the repeal (January 2011-April 2015). We followed Danish warfarin users over time and compared the rate of incident hospitalizations due to excessive...... anticoagulation (i.e. increased INR or any bleeding requiring hospitalization) in periods following a recent switch to generic warfarin to the rate in periods without a recent switch. RESULTS: We included 105,751 warfarin users, filling a total of 1,539,640 prescriptions for warfarin (2.5% for generic warfarin...

  6. Dermatotoxicity of epicutaneously applied anticoagulant warfarin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataranovski, Milena; Prokic, Vera; Kataranovski, Dragan; Zolotarevski, Lidija; Majstorovic, Ivana

    2005-01-01

    Dermatotoxic effects of epicutaneous application of a first-generation anticoagulant, warfarin (WF) were examined in rats. Selected parameters of skin activity were determined 24 h following warfarin application, including metabolic viability of skin explants, some aspects of oxidative activity in skin tissue homogenates and inflammatory/immune relevant activity of epidermal cells from warfarin-treated skin. No changes in skin metabolic viability (MTT reduction) were noted ex vivo following WF application, suggesting the absence of immediate toxicity for skin. In contrast, increased formation of malondialdehyde (MDA), with a decrease in protein and non-protein thiols in homogenates of warfarin-treated skin was demonstrated, pointing to prooxidant activity in warfarin-treated skin. Increased costimulatory activity of epidermal cells isolated from warfarin-exposed skin in Con-A-stimulated T-cell activation/proliferation assay was noted, reflecting proinflammatory and immune-modulating capacity of warfarin for epidermis. No evident differences in skin histology between control and warfarin-treated skin were found at that time point, while striking changes in tissue integrity, cellularity and appearance 72 h following WF application were noted. The observed histological picture probably reflects a regenerative/inflammatory program related to oxidant/inflammation-type warfarin-evoked injury to the skin. Presented data demonstrate the potential of epicutaneously applied warfarin to modulate local skin activity in rats

  7. Effect of regional citrate anticoagulation on critical patients with continuous renal replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Li You

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the efficacy and safety of regional citrate anticoagulation (RCA in continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT for critical patients. Methods: A total of 83 critical patients need CRRT in the intensive care units of our hospital from July 2012 to June 2016 were recruited in the study, and the patients were divided into two groups randomly, the patients in observation group received the RCA treatment, and the patients in control group received traditional low molecular heparin anticoagulation. The difference of safety indicators, biochemical indicators, extracorporeal circulation blood coagulation condition and complications in patients were determined between two groups. Results: Compared with control group, the patients in observation group had an elevated level of iCa2+, the level of chloride ion reduced, the use time of filter increased, the bleeding cases reduced, the concentrations of urea nitrogen, creatinine TNF-α , IL-1β, IL-8 and NO were all significantly downregulated, the data have a significant difference (P < 0.05. Conclusions: RCA is a safe and effective method for CRRT in patients with a high risk of bleeding.

  8. Assessing Bleeding Risk in Patients Taking Anticoagulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoeb, Marwa; Fang, Margaret C.

    2013-01-01

    Anticoagulant medications are commonly used for the prevention and treatment of thromboembolism. Although highly effective, they are also associated with significant bleeding risks. Numerous individual clinical factors have been linked to an increased risk of hemorrhage, including older age, anemia, and renal disease. To help quantify hemorrhage risk for individual patients, a number of clinical risk prediction tools have been developed. These risk prediction tools differ in how they were derived and how they identify and weight individual risk factors. At present, their ability to effective predict anticoagulant-associated hemorrhage remains modest. Use of risk prediction tools to estimate bleeding in clinical practice is most influential when applied to patients at the lower spectrum of thromboembolic risk, when the risk of hemorrhage will more strongly affect clinical decisions about anticoagulation. Using risk tools may also help counsel and inform patients about their potential risk for hemorrhage while on anticoagulants, and can identify patients who might benefit from more careful management of anticoagulation. PMID:23479259

  9. Non arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy; does anticoagulation help?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aftab, A.M.; Iqbal, M.; Ali, A.; Rauf, A.

    2017-01-01

    Non Arteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy (NAION) is the most common acute optic neuropathy in patients over 50 years of age. This study was conducted to determine the beneficial effects of anticoagulation with Heparin and Warfarin in patients with NAION presenting within 4 weeks of onset of symptoms Methods: A prospective, interventional, pilot study was conducted in Eye- A unit of Khyber Teaching Hospital from July 2010 onwards on patients with NAION presenting within 4 weeks of onset of symptoms. Patients underwent complete ophthalmological examination including Snellen's visual acuity (latter converted to Log MAR), pupil examination, fundus examination and automated Humphrey visual field analysis. Hematologic tests, Thrombophilia screening, Echocardiography and carotid Doppler ultrasound were carried on patients. All patients were anticoagulated with Heparin and Warfarin after obtaining informed written consent. Patients were examined at 1 Month, 3 months and 6 months' time period. Primary parameter measured was improvement in visual acuity. Results: Total number of patients in our study was 24. Regarding visual outcome total number of patients having significant improvement of visual acuity in our study was 16 (66.6 percent), while 4 (16.7 percent) patients had marginal improvement of visual acuity. Three (12.5 percent) patients maintained stable visual acuity of 6/6 throughout the study period in presence of thrombophilic disorders. One patient (4.1 percent) suffered a decline in visual acuity compared to VA at baseline presentation. Conclusions: Anticoagulation using heparin and warfarin does benefit patients with NAION presenting within 4 weeks of onset of symptoms. In our study a higher proportion of patients experienced significant improvement of visual acuity following anticoagulation as compared to the highest reported spontaneous improvement in such patients. (author)

  10. Adherence to oral anticoagulant therapy in secondary stroke prevention – impact of the novel oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luger S

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sebastian Luger,1 Carina Hohmann,2 Daniela Niemann,1 Peter Kraft,3 Ignaz Gunreben,3 Tobias Neumann-Haefelin,2 Christoph Kleinschnitz,3 Helmuth Steinmetz,1 Christian Foerch,1 Waltraud Pfeilschifter1 1Department of Neurology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, 2Department of Neurology, Klinikum Fulda gAG, Fulda, 3Department of Neurology, University Hospital Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany Background: Oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT potently prevents strokes in patients with atrial fibrillation. Vitamin K antagonists (VKA have been the standard of care for long-term OAT for decades, but non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOAC have recently been approved for this indication, and raised many questions, among them their influence on medication adherence. We assessed adherence to VKA and NOAC in secondary stroke prevention. Methods: All patients treated from October 2011 to September 2012 for ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack with a subsequent indication for OAT, at three academic hospitals were entered into a prospective registry, and baseline data and antithrombotic treatment at discharge were recorded. At the 1-year follow-up, we assessed the adherence to different OAT strategies and patients’ adherence to their respective OAT. We noted OAT changes, reasons to change treatment, and factors that influence persistence to the prescribed OAT. Results: In patients discharged on OAT, we achieved a fatality corrected response rate of 73.3% (n=209. A total of 92% of these patients received OAT at the 1-year follow-up. We observed good adherence to both VKA and NOAC (VKA, 80.9%; NOAC, 74.8%; P=0.243 with a statistically nonsignificant tendency toward a weaker adherence to dabigatran. Disability at 1-year follow-up was an independent predictor of lower adherence to any OAT after multivariate analysis, whereas the choice of OAT did not have a relevant influence. Conclusion: One-year adherence to OAT after stroke is strong (>90% and patients

  11. Trends in oral anticoagulant choice for acute stroke patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation in Japan: The SAMURAI‐NVAF Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arihiro, Shoji; Todo, Kenichi; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Kimura, Kazumi; Furui, Eisuke; Terasaki, Tadashi; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki; Kamiyama, Kenji; Takizawa, Shunya; Okuda, Satoshi; Okada, Yasushi; Kameda, Tomoaki; Nagakane, Yoshinari; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Mochizuki, Hiroshi; Ito, Yasuhiro; Nakashima, Takahiro; Takamatsu, Kazuhiro; Nishiyama, Kazutoshi; Kario, Kazuomi; Sato, Shoichiro; Koga, Masatoshi; Nagatsuka, K; Minematsu, K; Nakagawara, J; Akiyama, H; Shibazaki, K; Maeda, K; Shibuya, S; Yoshimura, S; Endo, K; Miyagi, T; Osaki, M; Kobayashi, J; Okata, T; Tanaka, E; Sakamoto, Y; Takizawa, H; Takasugi, J; Tokunaga, K; Homma, K; Kinoshita, N; Matsuki, T; Higashida, K; Shiozawa, M; Kanai, H; Uehara, S

    2015-01-01

    Background Large clinical trials are lack of data on non‐vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants for acute stroke patients. Aim To evaluate the choice of oral anticoagulants at acute hospital discharge in stroke patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and clarify the underlying characteristics potentially affecting that choice using the multicenter Stroke Acute Management with Urgent Risk‐factor Assessment and Improvement‐NVAF registry (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01581502). Method The study included 1192 acute ischemic stroke/transient ischemic attack patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (527 women, 77·7 ± 9·9 years old) between September 2011 and March 2014, during which three nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant oral anticoagulants were approved for clinical use. Oral anticoagulant choice at hospital discharge (median 23‐day stay) was assessed. Results Warfarin was chosen for 650 patients, dabigatran for 203, rivaroxaban for 238, and apixaban for 25. Over the three 10‐month observation periods, patients taking warfarin gradually decreased to 46·5% and those taking nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants increased to 48·0%. As compared with warfarin users, patients taking nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants included more men, were younger, more frequently had small infarcts, and had lower scores for poststroke CHADS 2, CHA 2 DS 2‐VASc, and HAS‐BLED, admission National Institutes of Health stroke scale, and discharge modified Rankin Scale. Nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants were started at a median of four‐days after stroke onset without early intracranial hemorrhage. Patients starting nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants earlier had smaller infarcts and lower scores for the admission National Institutes of Health stroke scale and the discharge modified Rankin Scale than those starting later. Choice of nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants was independently associated with 20‐day or

  12. Impact of INR monitoring, reversal agent use, heparin bridging, and anticoagulant interruption on rebleeding and thromboembolism in acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyoshi Nagata

    Full Text Available Anticoagulant management of acute gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB during the pre-endoscopic period has not been fully addressed in American, European, or Asian guidelines. This study sought to evaluate the risks of rebleeding and thromboembolism in anticoagulated patients with acute GIB.Baseline, endoscopy, and outcome data were reviewed for 314 patients with acute GIB: 157 anticoagulant users and 157 age-, sex-, and important risk-matched non-users. Data were also compared between direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs and warfarin users.Between anticoagulant users and non-users, of whom 70% underwent early endoscopy, no endoscopy-related adverse events or significant differences were found in the rate of endoscopic therapy need, transfusion need, rebleeding, or thromboembolism. Rebleeding was associated with shock, comorbidities, low platelet count and albumin level, and low-dose aspirin use but not HAS-BLED score, any endoscopic results, heparin bridge, or international normalized ratio (INR ≥ 2.5. Risks for thromboembolism were INR ≥ 2.5, difference in onset and pre-endoscopic INR, reversal agent use, and anticoagulant interruption but not CHA2DS2-VASc score, any endoscopic results, or heparin bridge. In patients without reversal agent use, heparin bridge, or anticoagulant interruption, there was only one rebleeding event and no thromboembolic events. Warfarin users had a significantly higher transfusion need than DOACs users.Endoscopy appears to be safe for anticoagulant users with acute GIB compared with non-users. Patient background factors were associated with rebleeding, whereas anticoagulant management factors (e.g. INR correction, reversal agent use, and drug interruption were associated with thromboembolism. Early intervention without reversal agent use, heparin bridge, or anticoagulant interruption may be warranted for acute GIB.

  13. Electroconvulsive therapy and anticoagulation after pulmonary embolism: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cesar Lazaro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is considered the most effective treatment for catatonia regardless its underlying condition. The rigid fixed posture and immobility observed in catatonia may lead to several clinical complications, of which, pulmonary embolism (PE is one of the most severe. The rapid improvement of the psychiatric condition in catatonia-related PE is essential, since immobility favors the occurrence of new thromboembolic events and further complications. In that scenario, ECT should be considered, based on a risk-benefit analysis, aiming at the faster resolution of the catatonia. Methods Case report and literature review. Results A 66-years-old woman admitted to the psychiatric ward with catatonia due to a depressive episode presented bilateral PE. Clinically stable, but still severely depressed after a trial of antidepressants, she was treated with ECT in the course of full anticoagulation with enoxaparin. After five ECT sessions, her mood was significantly better and she was walking and eating spontaneously. She did not present complications related either to PE or to anticoagulation. After the eighth ECT session, she evolved with hypomania, which was managed with oral medication adjustments. The patient was completely euthymic at discharge. Conclusion The case we presented provides further evidence to the anecdotal case reports on the safety of ECT in the course of concomitant full anticoagulant therapy after PE, and illustrates how, with the proper precautions, the benefits of ECT in such condition might outweigh its risks.

  14. Renal Infarction during Anticoagulant Therapy after Living Donor Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Onda

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Liver transplant recipients are at risk for complications of vascular thrombosis. The reconstructed hepatic artery and portal vein thrombosis potentially result in hepatic failure and graft loss. Renal infarction is a rare clinical condition, but in severe cases, it may lead to renal failure. We herein report a case of renal infarction after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT during anticoagulant therapy. Case Presentation: A 60-year-old woman with end-stage liver disease due to primary biliary cholangitis underwent LDLT with splenectomy. Postoperatively, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and steroid were used for initial immunosuppression therapy. On postoperative day (POD 5, enhanced computed tomography (CT revealed splenic vein thrombosis, and anticoagulant therapy with heparin followed by warfarin was given. Follow-up enhanced CT on POD 20 incidentally demonstrated right renal infarction. The patient’s renal function was unchanged and the arterial flow was good, and the splenic vein thrombosis resolved. At 4 months postoperatively, warfarin was discontinued, but she developed recurrent splenic vein thrombosis 11 months later, and warfarin was resumed. As of 40 months after transplantation, she discontinued warfarin and remains well without recurrence of splenic vein thrombosis or renal infarction. Conclusion: Renal infarction is a rare complication of LDLT. In this case, renal infarction was incidentally diagnosed during anticoagulant therapy and was successfully treated.

  15. Effect of anticoagulant administration on blood clotting and some hormones related to rat-fertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Khalek, L.G.

    2009-01-01

    This study was performed using 30 mature male albino rats divided into 3 equal groups; control and two treated groups to assess the effect of anticoagulant (warfarin) administration on the level of some hormones related to fertility. The two treated groups were injected intraperitoneally every other day with 1 ml (0.03 mg)and 2 ml (0.06 mg)warfarin/ 100 g body weight respectively where, two specimens were taken from each group after two and four weeks. Clotting time (CT), prothrombin time (PT), partial prothrombin time (PTT) platelets count, fasting blood sugar (F.B.S), calcium levels in addition to triiodothyronine (T 3 ), thyroxin (T 4 ), insulin, corticosterone, and testosterone hormones were determined. The results showed that the intraperitoneal injection of warfarin caused significant increase in clotting time, prothrombin time , partial prothrombin time, platelets count and glucose level, while serum calcium level showed significant decrease. Intraperitoneal injection of warfarin caused significant decrease of insulin and significant increase of corticosterone, T 3 showed significant decrease in high dose group while T 4 showed significant decrease in small dose group. The high dose was associated with the highest level of testosterone hormone. these results denoted that warfarin anticoagulant had no negative effect on gonadal sex hormone and hence on male fertility

  16. Gaps in monitoring during oral anticoagulation: insights into care transitions, monitoring barriers, and medication nonadherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Adam J; Miller, Donald R; Ozonoff, Al; Berlowitz, Dan R; Ash, Arlene S; Zhao, Shibei; Reisman, Joel I; Hylek, Elaine M

    2013-03-01

    Among patients receiving oral anticoagulation, a gap of > 56 days between international normalized ratio tests suggests loss to follow-up that could lead to poor anticoagulation control and serious adverse events. We studied long-term oral anticoagulation care for 56,490 patients aged 65 years and older at 100 sites of care in the Veterans Health Administration. We used the rate of gaps in monitoring per patient-year to predict percentage time in therapeutic range (TTR) at the 100 sites. Many patients (45%) had at least one gap in monitoring during an average of 1.6 years of observation; 5% had two or more gaps per year. The median gap duration was 74 days (interquartile range, 62-107). The average TTR for patients with two or more gaps per year was 10 percentage points lower than for patients without gaps (P < .001). Patient-level predictors of gaps included nonwhite race, area poverty, greater distance from care, dementia, and major depression. Site-level gaps per patient-year varied from 0.19 to 1.78; each one-unit increase was associated with a 9.2 percentage point decrease in site-level TTR (P < .001). Site-level gap rates varied widely within an integrated care system. Sites with more gaps per patient-year had worse anticoagulation control. Strategies to address and reduce gaps in monitoring may improve anticoagulation control.

  17. Reversal of target-specific oral anticoagulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, D.M.; Cuker, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Target-specific oral anticoagulants (TSOACs) provide safe and effective anticoagulation for the prevention and treatment of thrombosis in a variety of clinical settings by interfering with the activity of thrombin (dabigatran) or factor Xa (rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban, betrixaban). Although TSOACs have practical advantages over vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), there are currently no antidotes to reverse their anticoagulant effect. Herein we summarize the available evidence for TSOAC reversal using nonspecific and specific reversal agents. We discuss important limitations of existing evidence, which is derived from studies in human volunteers, animal models and in vitro experiments. Studies evaluating the safety and efficacy of reversal agents on clinical outcomes such as bleeding and mortality in patients with TSOAC-associated bleeding are needed. PMID:24880102

  18. Evaluation of hematuria in anticoagulated patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuttino, J.T.; Clark, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of investigating hematuria in anticoagulated patients the authors examined records of 25 consecutive patients with hematuria who were on an anticoagulation regimen with sodium warfarin (Coumadin) for various thromboembolic disorders. All had undergone intravenous urography (IVU) and 12 had undergone cystoscopy. Potential bleeding sources were discovered in 14 patients by IVU and in seven patients by cystoscopy. Disorders found were renal stones (4), transitional carcinoma (1), lymphoma (1), retroperitoneal hematoma (1), bladder tumors (2), calcified renal mass (1), hemorrhagic cystitis (2), and enlarged prostate (7). In 18 (72%) patients, the findings on IVU and/or cystoscopy were abnormal. Hematuria is a serious symptom that warrants investigation in anticoagulated as well as nonanticoagulated patients

  19. The effect of the amiodarone-warfarin interaction on anticoagulation quality in a single, high-quality anticoagulation center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ryan D; Riggs, Kyle W; Ege, Ed J; Petroski, Gregory F; Koerber, Scott M; Flaker, Greg

    2016-03-01

    Clinical trials have reported a low time in therapeutic range (TTR) in patients with atrial fibrillation treated with both warfarin andamiodarone. These trials included centers and countries with both high and low TTRs. What is the impact of amiodarone on the TTR in a single, high-quality anticoagulation clinic? TTR was assessed in amiodarone and nonamiodarone-treated patients from a University anticoagulation clinic. Baseline characteristics between patients ever-taking or never-taking amiodarone were similar, except more amiodarone patients were smokers (19.5 vs. 6.1%, P = 0.0031). The TTR calculated from 8901international normalized ratios (INRs) in 249 nonamiodarone patients with a mean follow-up of 34 ± 20 months (mean INR 36 ± 18) was 66 ± 16.6% compared with 61.3 ± 16.2% (P = 0.111) from 1455 INRs in 41 amiodarone-treated patients with a mean follow-up of 28 ± 20 months (mean INR 35 ± 22). Factors associated with a low TTR were male sex (P = 0.0013), smoker (P = 0.0048), and amiodarone use (P = 0.0374). A second on-treatment analysis, in which the TTR was calculated only during amiodarone therapy, resulted in similar findings; however, amiodarone did not emerge as a predictor of a low TTR. In 11 patients, the TTR prior to amiodarone (54.5 ± 22.2%) was not significantly different in the first 3 months (54.6 ± 33.4%) or after 3 months (67.2 ± 33.7%) of amiodarone. In a single high-quality anticoagulation center, anticoagulation quality, as measured by the TTR, can be comparable in amiodarone and nonamiodarone-treated patients.

  20. MARINE LEECH ANTICOAGULANT DIVERSITY AND EVOLUTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessler, Michael; Marancik, David; Champagne, Donald; Dove, Alistair; Camus, Alvin; Siddall, Mark E; Kvist, Sebastian

    2018-03-16

    Leeches (Annelida: Hirudinea) possess powerful salivary anticoagulants and, accordingly, are frequently employed in modern, authoritative medicine. Members of the almost exclusively marine family Piscicolidae account for 20% of leech species diversity, and feed on host groups (e.g., sharks) not encountered by their freshwater and terrestrial counterparts. Moreover, some species of Ozobranchidae feed on endangered marine turtles and have been implicated as potential vectors for the tumor-associated turtle herpesvirus. In spite of their ecological importance and unique host associations, there is a distinct paucity of data regarding the salivary transcriptomes of either of these families. Using next generation sequencing, we profiled transcribed, putative anticoagulants and other salivary bioactive compounds that have previously been linked to bloodfeeding from 7 piscicolid species (3 elasmobranch-feeders; 4 non-cartilaginous fish-feeders) and 1 ozobranchid species (2 samples). In total, 149 putative anticoagulants and bioactive loci were discovered in varying constellations throughout the different samples. The putative anticoagulants showed a broad spectrum of described antagonistic pathways, such as inhibition of factor Xa and platelet aggregation, that likely have similar bioactive roles in marine fish and turtles. A transcript with homology to ohanin, originally isolated from king cobras, was found in Cystobranchus vividus but is otherwise unknown from leeches. Estimation of selection pressures for the putative anticoagulants recovered evidence for both positive and purifying selection along several isolated branches in the gene trees and positive selection was also estimated for a few select codons in a variety of marine species. Similarly, phylogenetic analyses of the amino acid sequences for several anticoagulants indicated divergent evolution.

  1. Hematometra secondary to anticoagulant rodenticide toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padgett, S.L.; Stokes, J.E.; Tucker, R.L.; Wheaton, L.G.

    1998-01-01

    An adult, intact female Australian shepherd presented for frank vaginal bleeding of unknown duration. The only coagulation profile abnormality upon presentation was mild prolongation of the partial thromboplastin time (PTT). The uterus was removed at surgery and contained a large amount of coagulated blood. Clotting profiles were markedly abnormal48 hours postoperatively. Serum analysis was positive for brodifacoum, an anticoagulant rodenticide. Preoperative coagulation was most likely normalized by vitamin K-1 therapy administered prior to presentation. The only manifestation of anticoagulant rodenticide was hematometra. Rodenticide intoxication should be considered in the differential diagnosis list of hematometra or metrorrhagia

  2. An Uncommon Severe Case of Pulmonary Hypertension - From Genetic Testing to Benefits of Home Anticoagulation Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varga Andreea

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A 62 year-old caucasian male was admitted in our pulmonary hypertension expert center with initial diagnosis of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease for validation and specific treatment approach. Routine examinations revealed no apparent cause of pulmonary hypertension. Patient was referred for a thorax contrast enhanced multi-slice computed tomography which revealed extensive bilateral thrombi in pulmonary lower lobe arteries, pleading for chronic post embolic lesions. A right heart catheterization and pulmonary angiography confirmed the diagnosis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH. Following the local regulations, the patient underwent thrombophilia screening including molecular genetic testing, with positive findings for heterozygous for VCORK1 -1639G>A gene single nucleotide polymorphism, PAI-1 4G/5G and factor II G20210A gene. With heterozygous genetic profile of 3 mutations he has a genetic predisposition for developing a thrombophilic disease which could be involved in the etiology of CTEPH. Familial screening was extended to descendants; the unique son was tested with positive results for the same three genes. Supportive pulmonary hypertension drug therapy was initiated together with patient self-monitoring management of oral anticoagulation therapy. For optimal control of targeted anticoagulation due to a very high risk of thrombotic state the patient used a point-of-care device (CoaguChek®XS System, Roche Diagnostics for coagulation self-monitoring.

  3. Comparative risk assessment of the first-generation anticoagulant rodenticide diphacinone to raptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattner, Barnett A.; Lazarus, Rebecca S.; Eisenreich, Karen M.; Horak, Katherine E.; Volker, Steven F.; Campton, Christopher M.; Eisemann, John D.; Meteyer, Carol U.; Johnson, John J.

    2012-01-01

    New regulatory restrictions have been placed on the use of some second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides in the United States, and in some situations this action may be offset by expanded use of first-generation compounds. We have recently conducted several studies with captive adult American kestrels and eastern screech-owls examining the toxicity of diphacinone (DPN) using both acute oral and short-term dietary exposure regimens. Diphacinone evoked overt signs of intoxication and lethality in these raptors at exposure doses that were 20 to 30 times lower than reported for traditionally used wildlife test species (mallard and northern bobwhite). Sublethal exposure of kestrels and owls resulted in prolonged clotting time, reduced hematocrit, and/or gross and histological evidence of hemorrhage at daily doses as low as 0.16 mg DPN/kg body weight. Findings also demonstrated that DPN was far more potent in short-term 7-day dietary studies than in single-day acute oral exposure studies. Incorporating these kestrel and owl data into deterministic and probabilistic risk assessments indicated that the risks associated with DPN exposure for raptors are far greater than predicted in analyses using data from mallards and bobwhite. These findings can assist natural resource managers in weighing the costs and benefits of anticoagulant rodenticide use in pest control and eradication programs.

  4. Excessive anticoagulation with warfarin or phenprocoumon may have multiple causes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meegaard, Peter Martin; Holck, Line H V; Pottegård, Anton

    2012-01-01

    Excessive anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists is a serious condition with a substantial risk of an adverse outcome. We thus found it of interest to review a large case series to characterize the underlying causes of excessive anticoagulation.......Excessive anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists is a serious condition with a substantial risk of an adverse outcome. We thus found it of interest to review a large case series to characterize the underlying causes of excessive anticoagulation....

  5. Safety of greenlight photoselective vaporisation of prostate in lower urinary tract symptoms due to benign prostatic hyperplasia in patients using anticoagulants due to cardiovascular comorbidities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basri Cakiroglu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lasers have been used in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia for the last two decades. To be comparable, they should reduce or avoid the immediate and long-term complications of transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP or open prostatectomy (OP, especially bleeding and need for blood transfusion. Although Holmium laser treatment of the prostate was compared frequently in terms of cardiovascular safety with TURP or OP, photoselective vaporisation of the prostate (PVP was not largely evaluated. In this article we analyzed the current literature to see if there is convincing data to support the observation of some authors that use of PVP is associated with increased safety in patients on anticoagulants with cardiovascular comorbidities. With this purpose a Medline search between January 2004 to March 2013 was performed using evidence obtained from randomised trials, well-designed controlled studies without randomisation, individual cohort studies, individual case control studies and case reports Results: In the last 10 years, several case-control and cohort studies have demonstrated the efficacy of PVP as well as its safety in patients with cardiovascular comorbidities using anticoagulants. The results confirmed the overall lower perioperative and postoperative morbidity of PVP, whereas the efficacy was comparable to TURP in the short term, despite a higher reoperation rate. Conclusion: Although it is still developing, PVP with KTP or LBO seems to be a promising alternative to both TURP and OP in terms of cardiovascular safety and in patients using anticoagulants.

  6. Anticoagulant Medicine: Potential for Drug-Food Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medications Anticoagulants and Drug-Food Interactions Anticoagulants and Drug-Food Interactions Make an Appointment Ask a Question Refer Patient ... Jewish Health wants you to be aware these drug-food interactions when taking anticoagulant medicine. Ask your health care ...

  7. The pharmacology of recombinant hirudin, a new anticoagulant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A new anticoagulant, recombinant hirudin, was given to healthy volunteers (5 per test dose) in single .intravenous doses of 0,01, 0,02, 0,04, 0,07 and 0,1 mg/kg to study its anticoagulant effects, how it was tolerated and its pharmacokinetics. Hirudin proved to be a potent anticoagulant with important effects on thrombin ...

  8. Fault Tolerant Control: A Simultaneous Stabilization Result

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Blondel, V.D.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the problem of designing fault tolerant compensators that stabilize a given system both in the nominal situation, as well as in the situation where one of the sensors or one of the actuators has failed. It is shown that such compensators always exist, provided that the system...... is detectable from each output and that it is stabilizable. The proof of this result is constructive, and a worked example shows how to design a fault tolerant compensator for a simple, yet challeging system. A family of second order systems is described that requires fault tolerant compensators of arbitrarily...

  9. Subdural hematoma and oral anticoagulant therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wintzen, A. R.; Tijssen, J. G.

    1982-01-01

    In a retrospective study of the period 1959 to 1978, the role of anticoagulant therapy (ACT) in the development of subdural hematoma (SH) was investigated. Of 212 cases, 46 were receiving ACT, a proportion highly in excess of the frequency of ACT in the general population of the Leiden area. In this

  10. Hemorrhagic transformation in patients with acute ischaemic stroke and an indication for anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, E B; Llinas, R H; Hillis, A E; Gottesman, R F

    2013-06-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) can occur in patients following acute ischaemic stroke in the form of hemorrhagic transformation, and results in significant long-term morbidity and mortality. Anticoagulation theoretically increases risk. We evaluated stroke patients with an indication for anticoagulation to determine the factors associated with hemorrhagic transformation. Three-hundred and forty-five patients with ICD-9 codes indicating: (i) acute ischaemic stroke; and (ii) an indication for anticoagulation were screened. One-hundred and twenty-three met inclusion criteria. Data were collected retrospectively. Neuroimaging was reviewed for infarct volume and evidence of ICH. Hemorrhages were classified as: hemorrhagic conversion (petechiae) versus intracerebral hematoma (a space occupying lesion); symptomatic versus asymptomatic. Using multivariable logistic regression, we determined the hypothesized factors associated with intracerebral bleeding. Age [odds ratio (OR) = 1.50 per 10-year increment, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-2.08], infarct volume (OR = 1.10 per 10 ccs, 95% CI 1.06-1.18) and worsening category of renal impairment by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR; OR = 1.95, 95% CI 1.04-3.66) were predictors of hemorrhagic transformation. Ninety- nine out of 123 patients were anticoagulated. Hemorrhage rates of patients on and off anticoagulation did not differ (25.3% vs. 20.8%; P = 0.79); however, all intracerebral hematomas (n = 7) and symptomatic bleeds (n = 8) occurred in the anticoagulated group. The risk of hemorrhagic transformation in patients with acute ischaemic stroke and an indication for anticoagulation is multifactorial, and most closely associated with an individual's age, infarct volume and eGFR. © 2013 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2013 EFNS.

  11. Quality of management of oral anticoagulation as assessed by time in therapeutic INR range in elderly and younger patients with low mean years of formal education: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Gustavo Lamego de Barros; Ferreira, Diana Carvalho; Valacio, Reginaldo Aparecido; Vieira Moreira, Maria da Consolação

    2011-05-01

    despite the overwhelming evidence of its effectiveness, oral anticoagulation continues to be underused in the elderly, presumably due to physicians' misconceptions when estimating bleeding risk and ability to comply with treatment. to investigate the quality of anticoagulation control among deprived elderly and younger patients. prospective observational study. a public anticoagulation clinic in a developing country. all adult patients on intended long-term (>90 days) oral anticoagulation. We studied 171 patients (79 elderly and 92 non-elderly) with a mean follow-up of 273 ± 84.9 days. the main outcome measure was the quality of anticoagulation management as measured by the time in therapeutic (TTR) international normalised ratio (INR) range. Elderly patients (≥60 years) were compared with younger patients with respect to the educational level and co-morbidities. the mean number of years of formal education was 4.37 ± 3.2 years. The mean TTR was 62.50 ± 17.9% in non-elderly and 62.10 ± 16.6% in elderly (P = 0.862) subjects, despite the higher prevalence of co-morbidities in the latter group: heart failure (46.3 versus 28.6%, P = 0.042), diabetes mellitus (22.8 versus 8.7%, P = 0.011), renal failure (estimated glomerular filtration rate educational levels (3.42 ± 2.5 versus 5.55 ± 3.4 years of formal education, P < 0.001) and higher rates of cognitive impairment (34.0 versus 13.1%, P = 0.004), but a similar mean TTR (62.46 ± 16.1 versus 63.02 ± 17.8%, P = 0.856). The oldest (≥75 years) patients did as well as those aged ≤50 years (mean TTR: 62.54 ± 16.0 versus 62.23 ± 16.4%, respectively, P = 0.98). good-quality management of oral anticoagulation is achievable in deprived populations attending an anticoagulation clinic. Elderly patients may experience similar quality of anticoagulation despite having higher levels of co-morbidities and polypharmacy. These results add evidence to the safety of such therapeutic interventions in the elderly.

  12. Differential expression of cytochrome P450 genes between bromadiolone-resistant and anticoagulant-susceptible Norway rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette Drude Kjær; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Fredholm, Merete

    2008-01-01

    Background: Anticoagulant resistance in Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus (Berk.), has been suggested to be conferred by mutations in the VKORC1 gene, encoding the target protein of anticoagulant rodenticides. Other factors, e.g. pharmacokinetics, may also contribute to resistance, however. To examine......, Cyp3a2 and Cyp3a3 genes. On exposure to bromadiolone, females had higher Cyp2e1 expression than males, which possibly explains why female rats are generally more tolerant to anticoagulants than male rats. Conclusion: results suggest that bromadiolone resistance in a Danish strain of Norway rats...

  13. Scoring Systems for Estimating the Risk of Anticoagulant-Associated Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Anna L; Fang, Margaret C

    2017-07-01

    Anticoagulant medications are frequently used to prevent and treat thromboembolic disease. However, the benefits of anticoagulants must be balanced with a careful assessment of the risk of bleeding complications that can ensue from their use. Several bleeding risk scores are available, including the Outpatient Bleeding Risk Index, HAS-BLED, ATRIA, and HEMORR 2 HAGES risk assessment tools, and can be used to help estimate patients' risk for bleeding on anticoagulants. These tools vary by their individual risk components and in how they define and weigh clinical factors. However, it is not yet clear how best to integrate bleeding risk tools into clinical practice. Current bleeding risk scores generally have modest predictive ability and limited ability to predict the most devastating complication of anticoagulation, intracranial hemorrhage. In clinical practice, bleeding risk tools should be paired with a formal determination of thrombosis risk, as their results may be most influential for patients at the lower end of thrombosis risk, as well as for highlighting potentially modifiable risk factors for bleeding. Use of bleeding risk scores may assist clinicians and patients in making informed and individualized anticoagulation decisions. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  14. Effects of oversulfated and fucosylated chondroitin sulfates on coagulation. Challenges for the study of anticoagulant polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Roberto J C; Oliveira, Stephan-Nicollas M C G; Pomin, Vitor H; Mecawi, André S; Araujo, Iracema G; Mourão, Paulo A S

    2010-05-01

    We report the effects of a chemically oversulfated chondroitin sulfate and a naturally fucosylated chondroitin sulfate on the coagulation system. The former has been recently identified as a contaminant of heparin preparations and the latter has been proposed as an alternative anticoagulant. The mechanism of action of these polymers on coagulation is complex and target different components of the coagulation system. They have serpin-independent anticoagulant activity, which preponderates in plasma. They also have serpin-dependent anticoagulant activity but differ significantly in the target coagulation protease and preferential serpin. Their anticoagulant effects differ even more markedly when tested as inhibitors of coagulation proteases using plasma as a source of serpins. It is possible that the difference is due to the high availability of fucosylated chondroitin sulfate whereas oversulfated chondroitin sulfate has strong unspecific binding to plasma protein and low availability for the binding to serpins. When tested using a venous thrombosis experimental model, oversulfated chondroitin sulfate is less potent as an antithrombotic agent than fucosylated chondroitin sulfate. These highly sulfated chondroitin sulfates activate factor XII in in vitro assays, based on kallikrein release. However, only fucosylated chondroitin sulfate induces hypotension when intravenously injected into rats. In conclusion, the complexity of the regulatory mechanisms involved in the action of highly sulfated polysaccharides in coagulation requires their analysis by a combination of in vitro and in vivo assays. Our results are relevant due to the urgent need for new anticoagulant drugs or alternative sources of heparin.

  15. Use of oral anticoagulants in patients with atrial fibrillation and renal dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Potpara, Tatjana S; Ferro, Charles J; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2018-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are increasingly prevalent in the general population and share common risk factors such as older age, hypertension and diabetes mellitus. The presence of CKD increases the risk of incident AF, and, likewise, AF increases the risk of CKD de......, where appropriate, use of warfarin with good-quality anticoagulation control....

  16. Home management of oral anticoagulation via telemedicine versus conventional hospital-based treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henry; Lauterlein, Jens-Jacob; Sørensen, Patricia D

    2011-01-01

    We have developed an expert computer system for the control of oral anticoagulation therapy, accessible by the patients via their own computer. To investigate if the weekly measurement and dosing of international normalized ratio (INR) at home using the online Internet-based system was superior t...

  17. Anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A S; Idorn, L; Nørager, B

    2015-01-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease are a growing population. One of the major challenges in the care of these patients is to prevent thromboembolic episodes. Despite relative young age and no typical cardiovascular risk factors, this cohort has a high prevalence of thrombotic events....... Furthermore, there is a lack of scientific evidence regarding how to prevent thromboembolic events with anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature pertaining to anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease and hence enable....... It is difficult to use treatment algorithms from the general adult population with acquired heart disease in this heterogeneous population due to special conditions such as myocardial scarring after previous surgery, atypical atrial flutter, prothrombotic conditions and the presence of interatrial shunts...

  18. Traumatic events involving elderly patients treated with anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation: the downside of stroke prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Riccardi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A group of oral anticoagulant-treated patients affected by permanent atrial fibrillation was evaluated after their access to the emergency room as a result of a traumatic accident. In these patients, the re-evaluation of their risk of thromboembolism and bleeding was performed together with the evaluation of their risk of falling and institutionalization. Results show that the emergency department identifies a cohort of very elderly frail patients, who should be carefully reconsidered for anticoagulant therapy after a traumatic event.

  19. Screening computer-assisted dosage programs for anticoagulation with warfarin and other vitamin K antagonists: minimum safety requirements for individual programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poller, L; Roberts, C; Ibrahim, S

    2009-01-01

    Based on the results of the previous European Action on Anticoagulation (EAA) multicenter study, a simplified minimum procedure is described for screening the safety and effectiveness of marketed programs for dosage of oral anticoagulant drugs (vitamin K antagonists). The aim was to demonstrate non...

  20. Monitoring the effectiveness of the natural anticoagulant sulodexide in pregnant women with autoimmune hyperthyroidism on the background of hyperhomocysteinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Yu. Scherbakov

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available According to modern concepts, the occurrence of complications in utero-placental pool during pregnancy is a common cause of primary placental insufficiency, severe forms of late gestosis, recurrent miscarriage. It is obvious that the study of the nature of violations in the hemostatic system during pregnancy and the development of methods for timely correction will be the prevention of many obstetric diseases. Among the factors that affect hemostasis, thyroid hormones occupy a special place, they are able to influence not only the functional activity of platelets, but also adjust the intensity of the plasma and tissue fibrinolysis. Oppression of fibrinolytic activity is one of the pathogenetic factors of thrombosis development. The aim – to study the efficacy of natural anticoagulant sulodexide in pregnant women with autoimmune hyperthyroidism on the background of hyperhomocysteinemia. Materials and methods. The study involved 34 pregnant women with autoimmune hyperthyroidism complicated by hyperhomocysteinemia. A control group comprised 29 somatically healthy pregnant women. General clinical examination was carried out, the main indicators of all the links of the hemostatic system and the level of homocysteine were determined. Results. We determined that the main group of pregnant is characterized with chronometric and structural hypercoagulation, which manifests itself in the form of subclinical syndrome of disseminated intravascular coagulation, leading to complications of pregnancy, childbirth and the pathological condition of the fetus. Addition of anticoagulant sulodexide to the standard treatment led to the significant change in indices of all the components of hemostasis in pregnant women of the main group, in particular normalization of the total capacity of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems. Decrease in activity of intravascular coagulation and platelet aggregation, the level of homocysteine was marked. Clinical indicators of

  1. Heterofucans from Dictyota menstrualis have anticoagulant activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.R.L. Albuquerque

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Fucan is a term used to denote a family of sulfated L-fucose-rich polysaccharides which are present in the extracellular matrix of brown seaweed and in the egg jelly coat of sea urchins. Plant fucans have several biological activities, including anticoagulant and antithrombotic, related to the structural and chemical composition of polysaccharides. We have extracted sulfated polysaccharides from the brown seaweed Dictyota menstrualis by proteolytic digestion, followed by separation into 5 fractions by sequential acetone precipitation. Gel electrophoresis using 0.05 M 1,3-diaminopropane-acetate buffer, pH 9.0, stained with 0.1% toluidine blue, showed the presence of sulfated polysaccharides in all fractions. The chemical analyses demonstrated that all fractions are composed mainly of fucose, xylose, galactose, uronic acid, and sulfate. The anticoagulant activity of these heterofucans was determined by activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT using citrate normal human plasma. Only the fucans F1.0v and F1.5v showed anticoagulant activity. To prolong the coagulation time to double the baseline value in the APTT, the required concentration of fucan F1.0v (20 µg/ml was only 4.88-fold higher than that of the low molecular weight heparin Clexane® (4.1 µg/ml, whereas 80 µg/ml fucan 1.5 was needed to obtain the same effect. For both fucans this effect was abolished by desulfation. These polymers are composed of fucose, xylose, uronic acid, galactose, and sulfate at molar ratios of 1.0:0.8:0.7:0.8:0.4 and 1.0:0.3:0.4:1.5:1.3, respectively. This is the fist report indicating the presence of a heterofucan with higher anticoagulant activity from brown seaweed.

  2. Honey Bee Venom (Apis mellifera) Contains Anticoagulation Factors and Increases the Blood-clotting Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolfagharian, Hossein; Mohajeri, Mohammad; Babaie, Mahdi

    2015-12-01

    Bee venom (BV) is a complex mixture of proteins and contains proteins such as phospholipase and melittin, which have an effect on blood clotting and blood clots. The mechanism of action of honey bee venom (HBV, Apis mellifera) on human plasma proteins and its anti-thrombotic effect were studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-coagulation effect of BV and its effects on blood coagulation and purification. Crude venom obtained from Apis mellifera was selected. The anti-coagulation factor of the crude venom from this species was purified by using gel filtration chromatography (sephadex G-50), and the molecular weights of the anti-coagulants in this venom estimated by using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Blood samples were obtained from 10 rabbits, and the prothrombin time (PT) and the partial thromboplastin time (PTT) tests were conducted. The approximate lethal dose (LD) values of BV were determined. Crude BV increased the blood clotting time. For BV concentrations from 1 to 4 mg/mL, clotting was not observed even at more than 300 seconds, standard deviations (SDs) = ± 0.71; however, clotting was observed in the control group 13.8 s, SDs = ± 0.52. Thus, BV can be considered as containing anti-coagulation factors. Crude BV is composed 4 protein bands with molecular weights of 3, 15, 20 and 41 kilodalton (kDa), respectively. The LD50 of the crude BV was found to be 177.8 μg/mouse. BV contains anti-coagulation factors. The fraction extracted from the Iranian bees contains proteins that are similar to anti-coagulation proteins, such as phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and melittin, and that can increase the blood clotting times in vitro.

  3. The risk of venous thromboembolism with aspirin compared to anticoagulants after hip and knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Janet N; Maselli, Judith; Auerbach, Andrew D; Fang, Margaret C

    2017-07-01

    Recent guidelines include aspirin as an option to prevent venous thromboembolism (VTE) in selected patients undergoing hip or knee replacement surgery. However, the efficacy of aspirin after arthroplasty has not been well-defined, particularly in more contemporary patient populations. We compared rates of post-operative VTE between patients who received aspirin-only versus anticoagulants after hip or knee arthroplasty, using data from a large US-based administrative database. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 231,780 adults who underwent total knee arthroplasty and 110,621 who underwent total hip arthroplasty in 2009-2012 and who received pharmacologic VTE prophylaxis (aspirin or anticoagulant) within the first 7days after surgery. We compared the risk of post-operative VTE between patients receiving aspirin-only vs. anticoagulants, controlling for clinical and hospital characteristics using multivariable logistic regression with propensity score adjustment. Aspirin-only prophylaxis was administered to 7.5% of patients after knee arthroplasty and 8.0% after hip arthroplasty. Post-operative VTE was diagnosed in 2217 (0.96%) patients after knee arthroplasty and 454 (0.41%) after hip arthroplasty. Compared to anticoagulants, aspirin was not associated with a higher risk for post-operative VTE either after knee arthroplasty (adjusted odds ratio and 95% confidence interval [OR] 0.34 [0.24-0.48]) or hip arthroplasty (OR 0.82 [0.45-1.51]). Aspirin was uncommonly administered as the sole prophylactic agent after hip or knee arthroplasty in this study. However, patients who received aspirin-only had similar rates of post-operative VTE compared to patients who received anticoagulants. Further research should focus on distinguishing which patients benefit more from anticoagulants versus aspirin after arthroplasty. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Direct oral anticoagulants: what can we learn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marongiu, Francesco; Barcellona, Doris

    2018-03-02

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) represent an innovation because they avoid periodic laboratory monitoring, and also reduce cerebral bleeding. An examination of the performance of DOACs versus warfarin in randomized clinical trials dedicated to atrial fibrillation would reveal the poor performance of warfarin because the percentage of major bleeding is always above 3%; however, the percentage of major bleeding is less than half of that when the management is done in anticoagulation clinics (ACs). Several years ago, a common opinion was that ACs would disappear as soon as DOACs enter the market. We proposed then that ACs could be transformed into thrombosis centres (TCs) because we envisaged many new activities in terms of diagnostic tools and therapeutic choices. After the introduction of DOACs, the role of the ACs has been re-evaluated because their role may be crucial in selecting both the most appropriate diagnostic approach and the best therapeutic option (including anti-vitamin K drugs) for the single patient. TCs can organize a regular follow-up to improve patient adherence to DOACs. Marketing might have a role in the decision making of the single doctor. Efforts should be made for limiting the relationships between doctors and pharmaceutical companies. It seems reasonable to better prepare doctors, during their university courses, for them to develop a greater scientific culture that would enable them to critically read clinical studies and acquire an independent opinion. Ideally, an expert in haemostasis and thrombosis should handle new and old anticoagulants.

  5. Statement on the safety of glucosamine for patients receiving coumarin anticoagulants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    2011-01-01

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) asked the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies to provide a scientific statement on the safety of glucosamine for patients receiving coumarin anticoagulants. More than 40 case reports have been collected by drug-monitoring agencies...... cases haemorrhage occurred in a variety of organs, and in one case this resulted in a persistent vegetative state. The evidence for an interaction between glucosamine and coumarin anticoagulants is strengthened by the observation that in the majority of cases the INR began to fall to normal values when...... glucosamine intake was discontinued. There is insufficient information to conclude on a mechanism for an interaction between glucosamine and coumarin anticoagulants. There are also insufficient data in the case reports to derive a dose-response relationship for glucosamine and to assess the level of risk...

  6. Sulfated modification and anticoagulant activity of pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo, Lady Godiva) polysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Li; Ao, Le; Ma, Tao; Ni, Yuanying; Liao, Xiaojun; Hu, Xiaosong; Song, Yi

    2018-01-01

    Sulfated modification of pumpkin polysaccharide using CAS with pyridines as catalysts under different conditions was conducted to obtain different degrees of sulfation on a laboratory scale. Anticoagulant activities of pumpkin polysaccharide and its sulfated derivatives were also investigated employing various established in vitro systems. Results showed that addition of high ratio of CAS/pyridine under constant conditions could increase the degree of substitution. Sulfate substitution was further confirmed by the FT-IR and 13 C NMR analysis. The d f values between 2.11-2.73 indicated the relatively expanded conformation of the sulfated derivatives. The sulfated polysaccharides showed higher anticoagulant activities through activated partial thrombosis time (aPTT), thrombin time (TT), prothrombin time (PT) and anti-Xa activity assay, which revealed that better anticoagulant activities could be obtained when DS remained higher and M w maintained in a moderate range. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Fabrication of anticoagulation layer on titanium surface by sequential immobilization of poly (ethylene glycol) and albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chang-Jiang; Hou, Yan-Hua; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Zhang, Lin-Cai

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a simple method to sequentially immobilize poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) and albumin on titanium surface to enhance the blood compatibility. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) analysis indicated that PEG and albumin were successfully immobilized on the titanium surface. Water contact angle results showed a better hydrophilic surface after the immobilization. The immobilized PEG or albumin can not only obviously prevent platelet adhesion and activation but also prolong activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), leading to the improved anticoagulation. Moreover, immobilization of albumin on PEG-modified surface can further improve the anticoagulation. The approach in the present study provides an effective and efficient method to improve the anticoagulation of blood-contact biomedical devices such as coronary stents.

  8. Long-term fate of left atrial thrombi and incidence of cerebral embolism under continuous anticoagulation therapy; MR-tomographische Evaluation der Inzidenz zerebraler Embolien bei Patienten mit Vorhofflimmern und linksatrialen Thromben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strach, K.; Meyer, C.; Hackenbroch, M.; Schild, H.; Sommer, T. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Bonn (Germany); Tiemann, K. [Medizinische Universitaetsklinik und Poliklinik II, Bonn (Germany); Haase, J. [Klinik Rotes Kreuz, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Pizulli, L. [Petruskrankenhaus, Bonn (Germany); Omran, H. [St. Marien-Hospital, Bonn (Germany)

    2005-12-15

    Purpose: Patients (pts.) with atrial fibrillation (AF) and atrial thrombi are known to have an increased risk for cerebral embolism. However, little is known about the clinical course of atrial thrombi and the incidence of cerebral embolism in those patients during anticoagulation therapy. The high sensitivity of MR imaging (MRI) including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) suggests that this technique could provide an improved estimate of cerebral embolism associated with the presence of left atrial thrombi. The aims of this prospective study were to evaluate (1) the prevalence of clinically silent and apparent cerebral embolism in pts. with newly diagnosed AF and atrial thrombi using MRI/DWI, (2) the long-term fate of atrial thrombi under continued anticoagulation therapy and (3) the incidence of cerebral embolism during a follow-up period of 12 months with continuous anticoagulation therapy. Materials and methods: The study group consisted of 32 pts. with (1) newly diagnosed AF and evidence of left atrial (LA) thrombi detected by TEE and (2) a new start of anticoagulation therapy [International Normalized Ratio (INR) 2.0-3.0]. 19 pts. with (1) newly diagnosed AF and no evidence of atrial thrombi and (2) an equivalent anticoagulation regimen served as the control group. In both groups (a) MRI/DWI studies of the brain (weeks 0, 4, 8, 12, 20, 28, 36, 44, and 52), (b) transesophageal echocardiographic studies (TEE) for assessment of LA-Thrombi (weeks 0 and 52) and (c) clinical neurological assessments (weeks 0, 20 and 52) were performed. Results: In the study group (AF and LA-Thrombi) 11 out of 32 pts. (34%) displayed signs of acute (n=8) or chronic (n=3) cerebral embolism in the initial MRI studies. In 4 out of 32 pts.(13%), MRI/DWI depicted new or additional cerebral emboli (n=12) during the follow-up period despite continuous anticoagulation therapy. 2 (n=2/4; 50%) of these patients had clinically apparent neurological deficits. In the control group 1 out of 19 pts

  9. Characterization and structural analysis of a potent anticoagulant phospholipase A2 from Pseudechis australis snake venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qianyun Sharon; Trabi, Manuela; Richards, Renée Stirling; Mirtschin, Peter; Madaras, Frank; Nouwens, Amanda; Zhao, Kong-Nan; de Jersey, John; Lavin, Martin F; Guddat, Luke W; Masci, Paul P

    2016-03-01

    Pseudechis australis is one of the most venomous and lethal snakes in Australia. Numerous phospholipase A2 (PLA2) isoforms constitute a major portion of its venom, some of which have previously been shown to exhibit not only enzymatic, but also haemolytic, neurotoxic and anticoagulant activities. Here, we have purified a potent anticoagulant PLA2 (identified as PA11) from P. australis venom to investigate its phospholipase, anticoagulant, haemolytic and cytotoxic activities and shown that addition of 11 nM PA11 resulted in a doubling of the clotting time of recalcified whole blood. We have also demonstrated that PA11 has high PLA2 enzymatic activity (10.9 × 10(4) Units/mg), but low haemolytic activity (0.6% of red blood cells hydrolysed in the presence of 1 nM PA11). PA11 at a concentration lower than 600 nM is not cytotoxic towards human cultured cells. Chemical modification experiments using p-bromophenacyl bromide have provided evidence that the catalytic histidine of PA11 is critical for the anticoagulant activity of this PLA2. PA11 that was subjected to trypsin digestion without previous reduction and alkylation of the disulfide bonds maintained enzymatic and anticoagulant activity, suggesting that proteolysis alone cannot abolish these properties. Consistent with these results, administration of PA11 by gavage in a rabbit stasis thrombosis model increased the clotting time of recalcified citrated whole blood by a factor of four. These data suggest that PA11 has potential to be developed as an anticoagulant in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Major cerebral events in Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis: is anticoagulant therapy safe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus V; Snygg-Martin, Ulrika; Olaison, Lars

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the impact of anticoagulation on major cerebral events in patients with left-sided Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis (IE). METHODS: A prospective cohort study; the use of anticoagulation and the relation to major cerebral events was evaluated separately at onset...... of admission and during hospitalization. RESULTS: Overall, 70 out of 175 patients (40%; 95% CI: 33-47%) experienced major cerebral events during the course of the disease, cerebral ischaemic stroke occured in 59 patients (34%; 95% CI: 27-41%), cerebral infection in 23 patients (14%; 95% CI: 9...

  11. Does novel oral anticoagulant improve anticoagulation for non-valvular atrial fibrillation associated stroke: An inpatient registration study in Shanghai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Di Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstracts: Objective: To summarize the use rate, safety, efficacy of antithrombotics in stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA prevention, and reasons for not using dabigatran etexilate (DE in Shanghai, China. Methods: Non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF-associated stroke patients were prospectively registered as an electronic database. Use rate of antithrombotics and reasons for not using DE were extracted during follow-up. Patients' baseline characteristics, recurrent ischemic stroke/TIA events and bleeding complications were analyzed. Patients: From April 2012 to August 2014, 110 inpatients with NVAF-associated stroke were studied in our hospital. NVAF was diagnosed by 12-lead electrocardiogram, 24 h Holter and echocardiography. Results: Before introduction of DE (April 2013, use rates of warfarin and antiplatelets were 28.9% (11/38 and 60.5% (23/38 respectively; after that, use rates of warfarin, DE, and antiplatelets were 20.8% (15/72, 12.5% (9/72, and 43.1% (31/72. The DE did not improve use of anticoagulants (P = 0.639. There were 19 (17.3% recurrent ischemic stroke events up to October 2015; two (9.5% in the non-user group, 10 (18.5% in the antiplatelet group, and seven (20.0% in the anticoagulants group (P = 0.570. Furthermore, recurrence rates were similar between the DE group (20.0% and the Warfarin group (20.0%, P = 1.000. The most common reason for not using DE was financial concerns (61.0%, followed by inconvenience to purchase (14.0% and hemorrhage concerns (11.0%. Two patients using warfarin found fecal occult blood so they stopped warfarin and began to use antiplatelet drugs. No bleeding event occurred in the other groups. Only one patient had side effects (dyspepsia and gastroesophageal reflux from DE. Conclusion: The use rate of either DE or warfarin in Shanghai was low; DE had not improved anticoagulation therapy for NVAF patients in Shanghai mainly because DE had not been covered by health insurance. Keywords

  12. Use of anticoagulants in elderly patients: practical recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helia Robert-Ebadi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Helia Robert-Ebadi, Grégoire Le Gal, Marc RighiniDivision of Angiology and Hemostasis (HRE, MR, Department of Internal Medicine, Geneva University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland, and Department of Internal Medicine and Chest Diseases, EA 3878 (GETBO, Brest University Hospital, Brest, France (GLGAbstract: Elderly people represent a patient population at high thromboembolic risk, but also at high hemorrhagic risk. There is a general tendency among physicians to underuse anticoagulants in the elderly, probably both because of underestimation of thromboembolic risk and overestimation of bleeding risk. The main indications for anticoagulation are venous thromboembolism (VTE prophylaxis in medical and surgical settings, VTE treatment, atrial fibrillation (AF and valvular heart disease. Available anticoagulants for VTE prophylaxis and initial treatment of VTE are low molecular weight heparins (LMWH, unfractionated heparin (UFH or synthetic anti-factor Xa pentasaccharide fondaparinux. For long-term anticoagulation vitamin K antagonists (VKA are the first choice and only available oral anticoagulants nowadays. Assessing the benefit-risk ratio of anticoagulation is one of the most challenging issues in the individual elderly patient, patients at highest hemorrhagic risk often being those who would have the greatest benefit from anticoagulants. Some specific considerations are of utmost importance when using anticoagulants in the elderly to maximize safety of these treatments, including decreased renal function, co-morbidities and risk of falls, altered pharmacodynamics of anticoagulants especially VKAs, association with antiplatelet agents, patient education. Newer anticoagulants that are currently under study could simplify the management and increase the safety of anticoagulation in the future.Keywords: anticoagulation, elderly patients, venous thromboembolism, hemorrhagic risk, atrial fibrillation, thrombin inhibitors, factor Xa

  13. Improved anticoagulant effect of fucosylated chondroitin sulfate orally administered as gastro-resistant tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Roberto J C; Sucupira, Isabela D; Oliveira, Stephan Nicollas M C G; Santos, Gustavo R C; Mourão, Paulo A S

    2017-04-03

    Fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (FucCS) is a potent anticoagulant polysaccharide extracted from sea cucumber. Its anticoagulant activity is attributed to the presence of unique branches of sulfated fucose. Although this glycosaminoglycan exerts an antithrombotic effect following oral administration, high doses are necessary to achieve the maximum effect. The diminished activity of FucCS following oral administration is likely due to its degradation in the gastrointestinal tract and its limited ability to cross the intestinal cell membranes. The latter aspect is particularly difficult to overcome. However, gastro-resistant tablet formulation may help limit the degradation of FucCS in the gastrointestinal tract. In the present work, we found that the oral administration of FucCS as gastro-resistant tablets produces a more potent and prolonged anticoagulant effect compared with its administration as an aqueous solution, with no significant changes in the bleeding tendency or arterial blood pressure. Experiments using animal models of arterial thrombosis initiated by endothelial injury demonstrated that FucCS delivered as gastro-protective tablets produced a potent antithrombotic effect, whereas its aqueous solution was ineffective. However, there was no significant difference between the effects of FucCS delivered as gastro-resistant tablets or as aqueous solution in a venous thrombosis model, likely due to the high dose of thromboplastin used. New oral anticoagulants tested in these experimental models for comparison showed significantly increased bleeding tendencies. Our study provides a framework for developing effective oral anticoagulants based on sulfated polysaccharides from marine organisms. The present results suggest that FucCS is a promising oral anticoagulant.

  14. Optimal duration of anticoagulation in patients with venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prandoni, Paolo; Piovella, Chiara; Spiezia, Luca; Dalla Valle, Fabio; Pesavento, Raffaele

    2011-07-01

    The risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) approaches 40 per cent of all patients after 10 yr of follow up. This risk is higher in patients with permanent risk factors of thrombosis such as active cancer, prolonged immobilization from medical diseases, and antiphospholipid syndrome; in carriers of several thrombophilic abnormalities, including deficiencies of natural anticoagulants; and in patients with unprovoked presentation. Patients with permanent risk factors of thrombosis should receive indefinite anticoagulation, consisting of subtherapeutic doses of low molecular weight heparin in cancer patients, and oral anticoagulants in all other conditions. Patients whose VTE is triggered by major surgery or trauma should be offered three months of anticoagulation. Patients with unprovoked VTE, including carriers of thrombophilia, and those whose thrombotic event is associated with minor risk factors (such as hormonal treatment, minor injuries, long travel) should receive at least three months of anticoagulation. The decision as to go on or discontinue anticoagulation after this period should be individually tailored and balanced against the haemorrhagic risk. Post-baseline variables, such as the D-dimer determination and the ultrasound assessment of residual thrombosis can help identify those patients in whom anticoagulation can be safely discontinued. As a few emerging anti-Xa and anti-IIa compounds seem to induce fewer haemorrhagic complications than conventional anticoagulation, while preserving at least the same effectiveness, these have the potential to open new scenarios for decisions regarding the duration of anticoagulation in patients with VTE.

  15. Optimizing the use of oral anticoagulant therapy for atrial fibrilation in primary care: a pharmacist-led intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virdee, Mandeep S; Stewart, Derek

    2017-02-01

    Background Updated evidence-based guidelines for the management of atrial fibrillation (AF) necessitate patient review, particularly with respect to oral anticoagulants, to ensure maximum health gain around stroke prophylaxis. Objective To quantify the level of anticoagulation utilisation in patients with a CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc ≥1/≥2 (male/female) according to evidence-based guidelines and to assess the impact of a pharmacist-led intervention to optimise therapy. Setting Fifteen general medical practices in Liverpool, North-West England with a practice population of 99,129. Method GRASP-AF software was employed to interrogate patient electronic medical records to identify and risk stratify AF patients (using CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc). A pharmacist then reviewed the medical records of those of patients not anticoagulated and with a CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc ≥1/≥2 (male/female). Recommendations were discussed with a general practitioner (GP) and those patients in whom the need for anticoagulation was agreed were invited for a consultation with either the pharmacist or GP and therapy optimised where appropriate. The GPs were responsible for managing those patients referred for diagnosis confirmation or further specialist opinion. Main outcome measure Proportion of patients eligible/not eligible for anticoagulation; proportions in whom anticoagulants initiated, refused, antiplatelets discontinued. Results Five hundred and twenty-three patients (31% of patients identified with AF and a CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc ≥1/≥2 (male/female)) were not receiving an anticoagulant (26 subsequently died or left the practice leaving 497). Three hundred and eighty-two (77%) pharmacist recommendations to a GP were agreed without modification. Following outcomes of diagnostic investigations and specialist referrals, 202 (41%) patients were candidates for anticoagulation, 251 (51%) were not eligible for anticoagulation, 103 (21%) were anticoagulated (56 warfarin, 47 DOAC). Conclusion A pharmacist

  16. POST-NOAC: Portuguese observational study of intracranial hemorrhage on non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques-Matos, Cláudia; Alves, José Nuno; Marto, João Pedro; Ribeiro, Joana Afonso; Monteiro, Ana; Araújo, José; Silva, Fernando; Grenho, Fátima; Viana-Baptista, Miguel; Sargento-Freitas, João; Pinho, João; Azevedo, Elsa

    2017-08-01

    Background There is a lower reported incidence of intracranial hemorrhage with non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants compared with vitamin K antagonist. However, the functional outcome and mortality of intracranial hemorrhage patients were not assessed. Aims To compare the outcome of vitamin K antagonists- and non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants-related intracranial hemorrhage. Methods We included consecutive patients with acute non-traumatic intracranial hemorrhage on oral anticoagulation therapy admitted between January 2013 and June 2015 at four university hospitals. Clinical and demographic data were obtained from individual medical records. Intracranial hemorrhage was classified as intracerebral, extra-axial, or multifocal using brain computed tomography. Three-month functional outcome was assessed using the modified Rankin Scale. Results Among 246 patients included, 24 (9.8%) were anticoagulated with a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants and 222 (90.2%) with a vitamin K antagonists. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants patients were older (81.5 vs. 76 years, p = 0.048) and had intracerebral hemorrhage more often (83.3% vs. 63.1%, p = 0.048). We detected a non-significant trend for larger intracerebral hemorrhage volumes in vitamin K antagonists patients ( p = 0.368). Survival analysis adjusted for age, CHA 2 DS 2 VASc, HAS-BLED, and anticoagulation reversal revealed that non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants did not influence three-month mortality (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.83, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.39-1.80, p = 0.638). Multivariable ordinal regression for three-month functional outcome did not show a significant shift of modified Rankin Scale scores in non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants patients (odds ratio (OR) 1.26, 95%CI 0.55-2.87, p = 0.585). Conclusions We detected no significant differences in the three-month outcome between non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

  17. Comparing intracerebral hemorrhages associated with direct oral anticoagulants or warfarin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurogi, Ryota; Nishimura, Kunihiro; Nakai, Michikazu; Kada, Akiko; Kamitani, Satoru; Nakagawara, Jyoji; Toyoda, Kazunori; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Ono, Junichi; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki; Aruga, Toru; Miyachi, Shigeru; Nagata, Izumi; Matsuda, Shinya; Yoshimura, Shinichi; Okuchi, Kazuo; Suzuki, Akifumi; Nakamura, Fumiaki; Onozuka, Daisuke; Ido, Keisuke; Kurogi, Ai; Mukae, Nobutaka; Nishimura, Ataru; Arimura, Koichi; Kitazono, Takanari; Hagihara, Akihito

    2018-01-01

    Objectives This cross-sectional survey explored the characteristics and outcomes of direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC)–associated nontraumatic intracerebral hemorrhages (ICHs) by analyzing a large nationwide Japanese discharge database. Methods We analyzed data from 2,245 patients who experienced ICHs while taking anticoagulants (DOAC: 227; warfarin: 2,018) and were urgently hospitalized at 621 institutions in Japan between April 2010 and March 2015. We compared the DOAC- and warfarin-treated patients based on their backgrounds, ICH severities, antiplatelet therapies at admission, hematoma removal surgeries, reversal agents, mortality rates, and modified Rankin Scale scores at discharge. Results DOAC-associated ICHs were less likely to cause moderately or severely impaired consciousness (DOAC-associated ICHs: 31.3%; warfarin-associated ICHs: 39.4%; p = 0.002) or require surgical removal (DOAC-associated ICHs: 5.3%; warfarin-associated ICHs: 9.9%; p = 0.024) in the univariate analysis. Propensity score analysis revealed that patients with DOAC-associated ICHs also exhibited lower mortality rates within 1 day (odds ratio [OR] 4.96, p = 0.005), within 7 days (OR 2.29, p = 0.037), and during hospitalization (OR 1.96, p = 0.039). Conclusions This nationwide study revealed that DOAC-treated patients had less severe ICHs and lower mortality rates than did warfarin-treated patients, probably due to milder hemorrhages at admission and lower hematoma expansion frequencies. PMID:29490916

  18. Quality of Life analysis of patients in chronic use of oral anticoagulant: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Geisa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment with oral anticoagulant may influence the quality of life perception as it promotes changes in the patient's life, not offering an evident symptomatic relief and presenting well defined risks, such as bleeding. In this trial, the influence of chronic use of anticoagulants on the quality of life perception has been analyzed in patients assisted at the anticoagulation outpatient unit. Methods The health related quality of life was evaluated through a cross-section study with a sample composed of 72 patients seen from July 23, 2009 to September 2, 2010 at the Anticoagulation Outpatient Unit of the Federal University of Bahia's University Hospital. The study's population was composed by patients with atrial fibrillation and mechanical heart valve. The patients were submitted to two quality of life evaluation questionnaires: a generic questionnaire - the Medical Outcomes Study SF-36 Health Survey (SF36 - and a specific questionnaire - the Duke Anticoagulation Satisfaction Scale (DASS. Results The quality of life perception of the patients studied, based on both the DASS and the SF36, was positive regarding the treatment with oral anticoagulant. The SF36 presented an average score of 62.2 (± 20.0. Among the SF36 evaluated domains, the physical-emotional aspect was the most compromised one regarding life quality perception. The DASS presented an average score of 67.1 (± 18.2 and the domain presenting a greater compromise was the one related to the treatment inconveniences (annoyances, burdens and obligations. Previous hemorrhagic event, comorbidities, drug interactions with medicines that increase the anticoagulant effect, lower education level in the SF36 and younger age group influence a more negative perception of the quality of life, whereas lower education level in the DASS and the duration of treatment for more than 1 year offer a more positive perception. Conclusion Patients seen at the anticoagulation outpatient

  19. [Retrospective analysis of correlative factors between digestive system injury and anticoagulant or antiplatelet-agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ning; Luo, Hesheng

    2014-05-27

    To explore the correlative factors and clinical characteristics of digestive system injury during the treatment of anticoagulant and (or) antiplatelet-agents. A total of 1 443 hospitalized patients on anticoagulant and (or) antiplatelet-agents from January 2010 to December 2013 at Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University were analyzed retrospectively. Their length of hospital stay was from 5 to 27 days. Most of them were elderly males (n = 880, 61.0%) with an average age of (62 ± 6) years. 1 138 patients (78.9%) were farmers, workers or someone without a specific occupation. During the treatment of anticoagulant/antiplatelet-agents, statistical difference existed (P = 0.01) between positively and negatively previous digestive disease groups for actively newly occurring digestive system injury (16.0% (41/256) vs 15.9% (189/1 187)). After the dosing of anticoagulant and (or) antiplatelet-agents, 57 (66.3%, 57/86) patients were complicated by hemorrhage of digestive tract, taking 62.9% (61/97) of all positive result patients for Helicobacter pylori test. Comparing preventive PPI group with no PPI group, there was no marked statistical differences (P = 2.67) for digestive system complication (including hemorrhage of digestive tract) while receiving anticoagulant and (or) antiplatelet-agents (13.9% (74/533) vs 17.1% (156/910)). During anticoagulant and/or antiplatelet-agent therapy, 185 patients (12.8%) were complicated by peptic ulcer or peptic ulcer with bleeding, 40 patients (2.8%) had erosive gastritis and 5 (0.3%) developed acute gastric mucosal lesions. And 42 of 76 patients complicated by hemorrhage of digestive tract underwent endoscopic hemostasis while 2 patients were operated. Ninety-seven patients (6.7%) died, including 61 (62.9%, 61/97) from hemorrhage of digestive tract. The remainder became cured, improved and discharged. Moreover, no significant statistical differences existed (P = 2.29) among three combination group (aspirin, clopidogrel, warfarin), two

  20. Anticoagulant use for prevention of stroke in a commercial population with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Aarti A; Lennert, Barb; Macomson, Brian; Nelson, Winnie W; Owens, Gary M; Mody, Samir H; Schein, Jeff

    2012-07-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia, and patients with AF are at an increased risk for stroke. Thromboprophylaxis with vitamin K antagonists reduces the annual incidence of stroke by approximately 60%, but appropriate thromboprophylaxis is prescribed for only approximately 50% of eligible patients. Health plans may help to improve quality of care for patients with AF by analyzing claims data for care improvement opportunities. To analyze pharmacy and medical claims data from a large integrated commercial database to determine the risk for stroke and the appropriateness of anticoagulant use based on guideline recommendations for patients with AF. This descriptive, retrospective claims data analysis used the Anticoagulant Quality Improvement Analyzer software, which was designed to analyze health plan data. The data for this study were obtained from a 10% randomly selected sample from the PharMetrics Integrated Database. This 10% sample resulted in almost 26,000 patients with AF who met the inclusion criteria for this study. Patients with a new or existing diagnosis of AF between July 2008 and June 2010 who were aged ≥18 years were included in this analysis. The follow-up period was 1 year. Demographics, stroke risk level (CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc scores), anticoagulant use, and inpatient stroke hospitalizations were analyzed through the analyzer software. Of the 25,710 patients with AF (CHADS2 score 0-6) who were eligible to be included in this study, 9093 (35%) received vitamin K antagonists and 16,617 (65%) did not receive any anticoagulant. Of the patients at high risk for stroke, as predicted by CHADS2, 39% received an anticoagulant medication. The rates of patients receiving anticoagulant medication varied by age-group-16% of patients aged <65 years, 22% of those aged 65 to 74 years, and 61% of elderly ≥75 years. Among patients hospitalized for stroke, only 28% were treated with an anticoagulant agent in the outpatient

  1. Monitoring the Effects and Antidotes of the Non-vitamin K Oral Anticoagulants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahmat, Nur A; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, we have witnessed the emergence of the oral non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs), which have numerous advantages compared with the vitamin K antagonists, particularly their lack of need for monitoring; as a result their use is increasing. Nonetheless, the NOACs face two...

  2. Initiation of anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundlund, A.; Staerk, L.; Fosbøl, E. L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The use of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) for stroke prophylaxis in atrial fibrillation (AF) is increasing rapidly. We compared characteristics of AF patients initiated on NOACs versus vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). Methods: Using Danish nationwide registry data, we...... compared with a VKA [odds ratio (OR) 1.35, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28–1.43]. By contrast, patients with a history of myocardial infarction were less likely to be initiated on a NOAC compared with a VKA (OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.67–0.77). Conclusions: Atrial fibrillation patients who were initiated...

  3. Synthesis of Fucosylated Chondroitin Sulfate Glycoclusters: A Robust Route to New Anticoagulant Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Yao, Wang; Xu, Xiaojiang; Sun, Huifang; Zhao, Jinhua; Meng, Xiangbao; Wu, Mingyi; Li, Zhongjun

    2018-02-01

    Fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (FuCS) is a structurally distinct glycosaminoglycan with excellent anticoagulant activity. Studies show that FuCS and its depolymerized fragments exhibit a different anticoagulant mechanism from that of heparin derivatives, with decreased risks of adverse effects and bleeding. However, further exploitation has been hindered by the scarcity of structurally defined oligosaccharides. Herein, facile method is reported for the synthesis of the repeating trisaccharide unit of FuCS based on the degradation of chondroitin sulfate polymers. A series of simplified FuCS glycomimetics that have highly tunable structures, controllable branches, and defined sulfation motifs were generated by copper-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition. Remarkable improvement in activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) assay activities was observed as the branches increased, but no significant influences were observed for prothrombin time (PT) and thrombin time (TT) assay activities. Further FXase inhibition tests suggested that glycoclusters 33 b-40 b selectively inhibited intrinsic anticoagulant activities, but had little effect on the extrinsic and common coagulation pathways. Notably, glycoclusters with the 2,4-di-O-sulfated fucosyl residue displayed the most potency, which was in consistent with that of natural polysaccharides. These FuCS clusters demonstrated potency to mimic linear glycosaminoglycans and offer a new framework for the development of novel anticoagulant agents. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. The results of a quality-control programme in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsdale, M.L.; Hiles, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    A quality-control programme at a breast screening clinic is described. Daily checks include film sensitometry for X-ray processor control and radiography of a lucite phantom to monitor the consistency of the X-ray machine automatic exposure control. Weekly checks include additional measurements on the performance of the automatic exposure control for different breast thickness and an overall assessment of image quality using a prototype mammography test phantom. The test phantom measures low-contrast sensitivity, high-control resolution and small-detail visibility. The results of the quality-control programme are presented with particular attention paid to tolerances and limiting values. (author)

  5. Modelling exposure of mammalian predators to anticoagulant rodenticide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher John Topping

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Anticoagulant rodenticides (AR are a widespread and effective method of rodent control but there is concern about the impact these may have on non-target organisms, in particular secondary poisoning of rodent predators. Incidence and concentration of AR in free-living predators in Denmark is very high. We postulate that this is caused by widespread exposure due to widespread use of AR in Denmark in and around buildings. To investigate this theory a spatio-temporal model of AR use and mammalian predator distribution was created. This model was supported by data from an experimental study of mice as vectors of AR, and was used to evaluate likely impacts of restrictions imposed on AR use in Denmark banning the use of rodenticides for plant protection in woodlands and tree-crops. The model uses input based on frequencies and timings of baiting for rodent control for urban, rural and woodland locations and creates an exposure map based on spatio-temporal modelling of movement of mice-vectored AR (based on Apodemus flavicollis. Simulated predator territories are super-imposed over this exposure map to create an exposure index. Predictions from the model concur with field studies of AR prevalence both before and after the change in AR use. In most cases incidence of exposure to AR is predicted to be greater than 90%, although cessation of use in woodlots and Christmas tree plantations should reduce mean exposure concentrations. Model results suggest that the driver of high AR incidence in non-target small mammal predators is likely to be the pattern of use and not the distance AR is vectored. Reducing baiting frequency by 75% had different effects depending on the landscape simulated, but having a maximum of 12% reduction in exposure incidence, and in one landscape a maximum reduction of <2%. We discuss sources of uncertainty in the model and directions for future development of predictive models for environmental impact assessment of rodenticides. The

  6. Using Artificial Intelligence to Reduce the Risk of Nonadherence in Patients on Anticoagulation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labovitz, Daniel L; Shafner, Laura; Reyes Gil, Morayma; Virmani, Deepti; Hanina, Adam

    2017-05-01

    This study evaluated the use of an artificial intelligence platform on mobile devices in measuring and increasing medication adherence in stroke patients on anticoagulation therapy. The introduction of direct oral anticoagulants, while reducing the need for monitoring, have also placed pressure on patients to self-manage. Suboptimal adherence goes undetected as routine laboratory tests are not reliable indicators of adherence, placing patients at increased risk of stroke and bleeding. A randomized, parallel-group, 12-week study was conducted in adults (n=28) with recently diagnosed ischemic stroke receiving any anticoagulation. Patients were randomized to daily monitoring by the artificial intelligence platform (intervention) or to no daily monitoring (control). The artificial intelligence application visually identified the patient, the medication, and the confirmed ingestion. Adherence was measured by pill counts and plasma sampling in both groups. For all patients (n=28), mean (SD) age was 57 years (13.2 years) and 53.6% were women. Mean (SD) cumulative adherence based on the artificial intelligence platform was 90.5% (7.5%). Plasma drug concentration levels indicated that adherence was 100% (15 of 15) and 50% (6 of 12) in the intervention and control groups, respectively. Patients, some with little experience using a smartphone, successfully used the technology and demonstrated a 50% improvement in adherence based on plasma drug concentration levels. For patients receiving direct oral anticoagulants, absolute improvement increased to 67%. Real-time monitoring has the potential to increase adherence and change behavior, particularly in patients on direct oral anticoagulant therapy. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02599259. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Cost Effectiveness of Implantable Cardiac Monitor-Guided Intermittent Anticoagulation for Atrial Fibrillation: An Analysis of the REACT.COM Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, Daniel A; Zimetbaum, Peter J; Passman, Rod S; Leong-Sit, Peter; Reynolds, Matthew R

    2016-08-30

    Anticoagulation guidelines for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) disregard AF burden. A strategy of targeted anticoagulation with novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) based on continuous rhythm assessment with an implantable cardiac monitor (ICM) has recently been explored. We evaluated the potential cost-effectiveness of this strategy versus projected outcomes with continuous anticoagulation. We developed a Markov model using data from the Rhythm Evaluation for AntiCoagulaTion With COntinuous Monitoring (REACT.COM) pilot study (N = 59) and prior NOAC trials to calculate the costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) associated with ICM-guided intermittent anticoagulation for AF versus standard care during a 3-year time horizon. Health state utilities were estimated from the pilot study population using the SF-12. Costs were based on current Medicare reimbursement. Over 14 ± 4 months of follow-up, 18 of 59 patients had 35 AF episodes. The ICM-guided strategy resulted in a 94% reduction in anticoagulant use relative to continuous treatment. There were no strokes, 3 (5.1%) TIAs, 2 major bleeding events (on aspirin) and 3 minor bleeding events with the ICM-guided strategy. The projected total 3-year costs were $12,535 for the ICM-guided strategy versus $13,340 for continuous anticoagulation. Projected QALYs were 2.45 for both groups. Based on a pilot study, a strategy of ICM-guided anticoagulation with NOACs may be cost-saving relative to expected outcomes with continuous anticoagulation, with similar quality-adjusted survival. This strategy could be attractive from a health economic perspective if shown to be safe and effective in a rigorous clinical trial. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Lumbar puncture in patients using anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renan Domingues

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents has largely increased. Diagnostic lumbar puncture in patients taking these drugs represents a challenge considering the opposing risks of bleeding and thrombotic complications. To date there are no controlled trials, specific guidelines, nor clear recommendations in this area. In the present review we make some recommendations about lumbar puncture in patients using these drugs. Our recommendations take into consideration the pharmacology of these drugs, the thrombotic risk according to the underlying disease, and the urgency in cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Evaluating such information and a rigorous monitoring of neurological symptoms after lumbar puncture are crucial to minimize the risk of hemorrhage associated neurological deficits. An individualized patient decision-making and an effective communication between the assistant physician and the responsible for conducting the lumbar puncture are essential to minimize potential risks.

  9. Vitamin K requirement in Danish anticoagulant-resistant Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette D.; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Nielsen, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus, Denmark, anticoagulant rodenticide resistance, vitamin K requirement......Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus, Denmark, anticoagulant rodenticide resistance, vitamin K requirement...

  10. Utilization of oral anticoagulation in a teaching hospital in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mean age of the patients was 53.4 years and more females than males were on anticoagulation and monitoring (F14:M12). The most common indications for anticoagulation include deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolism, congestive heart failure with atrial fibrillation and mitral valve disease with atrial fibrillation.

  11. Antithrombotic/anticoagulant and anticancer activities of selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antithrombotic/anticoagulant and anticancer activities of selected medicinal plants from South Africa. NLA Kee, N Mnonopi, H Davids, RJ Naudé, CL Frost. Abstract. Nine plants available in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa were tested for antithrombotic and/or anticoagulant activity. Organic (methanol) and aqueous ...

  12. New oral anticoagulant-induced bleeding: clinical presentation and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levy, Jerrold H.; Levi, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Bleeding is a significant complication of anticoagulant therapy. With the emergence of new oral anticoagulants (NOACs; ie, direct factor IIa or Xa inhibitors), this risk is further compounded by the lack of validated reversal strategies for these agents. Emerging postmarketing evidence suggests that

  13. Clinical impact of a pharmacist-led inpatient anticoagulation service: a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee T

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tiffany Lee, Erin Davis, Jason Kielly School of Pharmacy, Memorial University, St John's, NL, Canada Background: Anticoagulant therapies provide management options for potentially life-threatening thromboembolic conditions. They also carry significant safety risks, requiring careful consideration of medication dose, close monitoring, and follow-up. Inpatients are particularly at risk, considering the widespread use of anticoagulants in hospitals. This has prompted the introduction of safety goals for anticoagulants in Canada and the USA, which recommend increased pharmacist involvement to reduce patient harm. The goal of this review is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pharmacist-led inpatient anticoagulation services compared to usual or physician-managed care. Methods: This narrative review includes articles identified through a literature search of PubMed, Embase, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts databases, as well as hand searches of the references of relevant articles. Full publications of pharmacist-managed inpatient anticoagulation services were eligible if they were published in English and assessed clinical outcomes. Results: Twenty-six studies were included and further divided into two categories: 1 autonomous pharmacist-managed anticoagulation programs (PMAPs and 2 pharmacist recommendation. Pharmacist management of heparin and warfarin appears to result in improvements in some surrogate outcomes (international normalized ratio [INR] stability and time in INR goal range, while results for others are mixed (time to therapeutic INR, length of stay, and activated partial thromboplastin time [aPTT] measures. There is also some indication that PMAPs may be associated with reduced patient mortality. When direct thrombin inhibitors are managed by pharmacists, there seems to be a shorter time to therapeutic aPTT and a greater percentage of time in the therapeutic range, as well as a decrease in the frequency of medication

  14. Partial Purification and Characterization of Anticoagulant Factor from the Snake (Echis Carinatus) Venom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrollahi Byoki, Elham; Zare Mirakabadi, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Snake venoms contain complex mixture of proteins with biological activities. Some of these proteins affect blood coagulation and platelet function in different ways. Snake venom toxin may serve as a starting material for drug design to combat several pathophysiological problems such as cardiovascular disorders. In the present study, purification of anticoagulation factor from venom of snake (Echis carinatus) was studied. Materials and Methods: Anticoagulation activity of crude venom, fractions and purified peptide were determined by using prothrombin time (PT) and thrombin time (TT). Three fractions were partially purified from the venom of E. Carinatus by gel filtration on sephadex G-75 and final purification was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with C18 column. A purified anticoagulant factor was derived which showed a single protein band in SDS-PAGE electrophoresis under reducing condition. Results: Results of PT and TT tests for purified peptide (EC217) were found to be 102±4.242 and < 5 min. respectively. Determination of molecular weight revealed that the active purified peptide (EC217) was about 30 KD. Conclusion: The present study showed that the venom of E. carinatus contains at least one anticoagulant factor. PMID:24494065

  15. Assessment of toxicity and potential risk of the anticoagulant rodenticide diphacinone using Eastern screech-owls (Megascops asio)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattner, Barnett A.; Horak, Katherine E.; Lazarus, Rebecca S.; Eisenreich, Karen M.; Meteyer, Carol U.; Volker, Steven F.; Campton, Christopher M.; Eisemann, John D.; Johnston, John J.

    2012-01-01

    In the United States, new regulatory restrictions have been placed on the use of some second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides. This action may be offset by expanded use of first-generation compounds (e.g., diphacinone; DPN). Single-day acute oral exposure of adult Eastern screech-owls (Megascops asio) to DPN evoked overt signs of intoxication, coagulopathy, histopathological lesions (e.g., hemorrhage, hepatocellular vacuolation), and/ or lethality at doses as low as 130 mg/kg body weight, although there was no dose-response relation. However, this single-day exposure protocol does not mimic the multiple-day field exposures required to cause mortality in rodent pest species and non-target birds and mammals. In 7-day feeding trials, similar toxic effects were observed in owls fed diets containing 2.15, 9.55 or 22.6 ppm DPN, but at a small fraction (hawk (Buteo solitarius), and daily exposure to greater quantities (9-13 g of liver) could result in low-level mortality. These findings can assist natural resource managers in weighing the costs and benefits of anticoagulant rodenticide use in pest control and eradication programs.

  16. Effects of computer-assisted oral anticoagulant therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Corell, Pernille; Madsen, Poul

    2012-01-01

    : Patients randomized to computer-assisted anticoagulation and the CoaguChek® system reached the therapeutic target range after 8 days compared to 14 days by prescriptions from physicians (p = 0.04). Time spent in the therapeutic target range did not differ between groups. The median INR value measured...... prescribed by physicians, and the total time spent within the therapeutic target range was similar. Thus computer-assisted oral anticoagulant therapy may reduce the cost of anticoagulation therapy without lowering the quality. INR values measured by CoaguChek® were reliable compared to measurements......UNLABELLED: BACKGROUND: Computer-assistance and self-monitoring lower the cost and may improve the quality of anticoagulation therapy. The main purpose of this clinical investigation was to use computer-assisted oral anticoagulant therapy to improve the time to reach and the time spent within...

  17. Anticoagulant therapy and its impact on dental patients: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thean, D; Alberghini, M

    2016-06-01

    Several new oral anticoagulants have been studied in the past decade, and have now started to enter the market. These drugs are reported to be as effective as, or more effective than, warfarin. In Australia, the Therapeutic Goods Administration has approved dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban. The use of these newer anticoagulants is likely to increase in time, and it is important for dentists to have a sound understanding of the mechanisms of action, reversal strategies, and management guidelines for patients taking oral anticoagulants. This article discusses the process of coagulation, available anticoagulants and their monitoring and reversal, and provides clinical advice on the management of patients on anticoagulants who require dental treatment. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  18. Anticoagulant treatment in patients with atrial fibrillation and ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner-Frandsen, Nicole; Dammann Andersen, Andreas; Ashournia, Hamoun

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac dysrhythmia, with a lifetime risk of 25%, and it is a well-known independent risk factor for ischemic stroke. Over the last 15 years, efforts have been made to initiate relevant treatment in patients with AF. A retrospective study...... was set up to clarify whether this effort has resulted in a decreased proportion of patients with known AF experiencing an ischemic stroke. METHODS: Patients admitted to the Department of Neurology, Vejle Hospital, Denmark, with ischemic stroke from January 1997 to December 2012 were included in the study....... RESULTS: A total of 4134 patients were included in the study. Overall, the yearly proportion of patients with known AF varied between 9% and 18%. No significant change was observed (P = .511). The proportion of patients with known AF treated with anticoagulants at the time of the stroke and the proportion...

  19. Scoring and psychometric validation of the Perception of Anticoagulant Treatment Questionnaire (PACT-Q©

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essers B

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 'Perception of Anti-Coagulant Treatment Questionnaire' (PACT-Q was developed to assess patients' expectations of, and satisfaction with their anticoagulant treatment. This questionnaire needs to be finalised and psychometrically validated. Methods The PACT-Q was included in the United States, the Netherlands and France into three phase III multinational clinical trials conducted to evaluate efficacy and safety of a new long-acting anticoagulant drug (idraparinux compared to vitamin K antagonist (VKA. PACT-Q was administered to patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT, atrial fibrillation (AF or pulmonary embolism (PE at Day 1, to assess patients' expectations, and at 3 and 6 months to assess patients' satisfaction and treatment convenience and burden. The final structure of the PACT-Q (Principal Component Analysis – PCA – with Varimax Rotation was first determined and its psychometric properties were then measured with validity of the structure (Multitrait analysis, internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha coefficients and known-group validity. Results PCA and multitrait analyses showed the multidimensionality of the "Treatment Expectations" dimension, comprising 7 items that had to be scored independently. The "Convenience" and "Burden of Disease and Treatment" dimensions of the hypothesised original structure of the questionnaire were combined, thus resulting in 13 items grouped into the single dimension "Convenience". The "Anticoagulant Treatment Satisfaction" dimension remained unchanged and included 7 items. All items of the "Convenience" and "Anticoagulant Treatment Satisfaction" dimensions displayed good convergent and discriminant validity. The internal consistency reliability was good, with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.84 for the "Convenience" dimension, and 0.76 for the "Anticoagulant Treatment Satisfaction" dimension. Known-group validity was good, especially with regard to occurrence of

  20. Feedback control of a cupola - concepts and experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, K.L. [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Abdelrahman, M.A. [Tenn. Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States); Larsen, E.; Clark, D. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); King, P. [US Dept. of Energy Albany Research Center, Albany, OR (United States)

    1998-10-01

    In this paper we present some final results from a research project focused on introducing automatic control to the operation of cupola iron furnaces. The main aim of this research is to improve the operational efficiency and performance of the cupola furnace, an important foundry process used to melt iron. Previous papers have described the development of appropriate control system architectures for the cupola. These results are summarized. Then we describe the experimental results obtained with the U.S. Department of Energy Albany Research Center`s research cupola. First, experimental data is used to calibrate the model, which is taken as a first-order multivariable system with time delay. Then relative gain analysis is used to select loop pairings to be used in a multi-loop controller. The resulting controller pairs meltrate with blast volume, iron temperature with oxygen addition, and carbon composition with percent coke. Special (nonlinear) filters are used to compute meltrate from actual scale readings of the amount of iron produced and to smooth the temperature measurement. The temperature and meltrate loops use single-loop PI control. The composition loop uses a Smith predictor to discount the deadtime associated with mass transport through the furnace. Experimental results validate the conceptual controller design and provide proof-of-concept of the idea of controlling a foundry cupola. Future research directions are discussed, including the concept of an integrated, intelligent industrial process controller, or I{sup 3}PC.

  1. Partial Purification and Characterization of Anticoagulant Factor from the Snake (Echis carinatus Venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Amrollahi Byoki

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: Snake venoms contain complex mixture of proteins with biological activities. Some of these proteins affect blood coagulation and platelet function in different ways. Snake venom toxin may serve as a starting material for drug design to combat several pathophysiological problems such as cardiovascular disorders. In the present study, purification of anticoagulation factor from venom of snake (Echis carinatus was studied. Anticoagulation activity of crude venom, fractions and purified peptide were determined by using prothrombin time (PT and thrombin time (TT. Three fractions were partially purified from the venom of E. Carinatus by gel filtration on sephadex G-75 and final purification was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC with C18 column. A purified anticoagulant factor was derived which showed a single protein band in SDS-PAGE electrophoresis under reducing condition. Results of PT and TT tests for purified peptide (EC217 were found to be 102±4.242 and < 5 min. respectively. Determination of molecular weight revealed that the active purified peptide (EC217 was about 30 KD. In conclusion, the present study showed that the venom of E. carinatus contains at least one anticoagulant factor.

  2. The Need for Anticoagulation Following Inferior Vena Cava Filter Placement: Systematic Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, Charles E.; Prochazka, Allan

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. To perform a systemic review to determine the effect of anticoagulation on the rates of venous thromboembolism (pulmonary embolus, deep venous thrombosis, inferior vena cava (IVC) filter thrombosis) following placement of an IVC filter. Methods. A comprehensive computerized literature search was performed to identify relevant articles. Data were abstracted by two reviewers. Studies were included if it could be determined whether or not subjects received anticoagulation following filter placement, and if follow-up data were presented. A meta-analysis of patients from all included studies was performed. A total of 14 articles were included in the final analysis, but the data from only nine articles could be used in the meta-analysis; five studies were excluded because they did not present raw data which could be analyzed in the meta-analysis. A total of 1,369 subjects were included in the final meta-analysis. Results. The summary odds ratio for the effect of anticoagulation on venous thromboembolism rates following filter deployment was 0.639 (95% CI 0.351 to 1.159, p = 0.141). There was significant heterogeneity in the results from different studies [Q statistic of 15.95 (p = 0.043)]. Following the meta-analysis, there was a trend toward decreased venous thromboembolism rates in patients with post-filter anticoagulation (12.3% vs. 15.8%), but the result failed to reach statistical significance. Conclusion. Inferior vena cava filters can be placed in patients who cannot receive concomitant anticoagulation without placing them at significantly higher risk of development of venous thromboembolism

  3. Economic evaluation of strategies for restarting anticoagulation therapy after a first event of unprovoked venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, M; Ensor, J; Moore, D; Fitzmaurice, D; Jowett, S

    2017-08-01

    Essentials Correct duration of treatment after a first unprovoked venous thromboembolism (VTE) is unknown. We assessed when restarting anticoagulation was worthwhile based on patient risk of recurrent VTE. When the risk over a one-year period is 17.5%, restarting is cost-effective. However, sensitivity analyses indicate large uncertainty in the estimates. Background Following at least 3 months of anticoagulation therapy after a first unprovoked venous thromboembolism (VTE), there is uncertainty about the duration of therapy. Further anticoagulation therapy reduces the risk of having a potentially fatal recurrent VTE but at the expense of a higher risk of bleeding, which can also be fatal. Objective An economic evaluation sought to estimate the long-term cost-effectiveness of using a decision rule for restarting anticoagulation therapy vs. no extension of therapy in patients based on their risk of a further unprovoked VTE. Methods A Markov patient-level simulation model was developed, which adopted a lifetime time horizon with monthly time cycles and was from a UK National Health Service (NHS)/Personal Social Services (PSS) perspective. Results Base-case model results suggest that treating patients with a predicted 1 year VTE risk of 17.5% or higher may be cost-effective if decision makers are willing to pay up to £20 000 per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained. However, probabilistic sensitivity analysis shows that the model was highly sensitive to overall parameter uncertainty and caution is warranted in selecting the optimal decision rule on cost-effectiveness grounds. Univariate sensitivity analyses indicate variables such as anticoagulation therapy disutility and mortality risks were very influential in driving model results. Conclusion This represents the first economic model to consider the use of a decision rule for restarting therapy for unprovoked VTE patients. Better data are required to predict long-term bleeding risks during therapy in this

  4. Factors Affecting Outcome in Treatment of Chronic Subdural Hematoma in ICU Patients: Impact of Anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczygielski, Jacek; Gund, Sina-Maria; Schwerdtfeger, Karsten; Steudel, Wolf-Ingo; Oertel, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    The use of anticoagulants and older age are the main risk factors for chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Because the age of the population and use of anticoagulants are increasing, a growing number of CSDH cases is expected. To address this issue, we analyzed the impact of anticoagulants on postsurgical outcome in patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). Demographic data, coagulation parameters, surgical details, radiologic appearance of hematoma, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score on admission, and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score on discharge were retrieved and retrospectively analyzed in 98 patients with CSDH treated in the neurosurgical ICU using correlation coefficient tests and multivariate analysis test. Overall outcome was good (GOS score 4 and 5) in 55.1% of patients. Overall mortality was 9.1%. There was a correlation between GCS score on admission and GOS score. There was no correlation between hematoma thickness/radiologic appearance and impaired coagulation. Disturbance in thrombocyte function (usually resulting from aspirin intake) correlated with improved outcome, whereas warfarin-related coagulopathy correlated with poor recovery. Nevertheless, patients with thrombocytopathy presented with better initial GCS scores. Neither hematoma size nor recurrence rate affected the outcome. The size of CSDH was not associated with poor outcome and is not necessarily determined by the use of anticoagulants. Coagulopathy does not rule out a good outcome, but the impact of anticoagulation on treatment results in CSDH varies between the main groups of drugs (warfarin vs. antiplatelet drugs). Patients in good neurologic condition on ICU admission have better chances of recovery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. ANTICOAGULANT TREATMENT OF AF: FOCUS ON THE WARFARIN DOSAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kovbasniuk

    2015-10-01

      Summary Authors analyzed the results of some studies of AF and warfarin dosing. Than investigation of 75 patient with AF (permanent type was performed. According to demographic, anthropometric data and related conditions (diabetes mellitus type 2, myocardial infarction, acute cerebrovascular ischemia, pulmonary embolism, alcohol abuse - drinking more than one ounce of ≥3 weekly predictive model of warfarin dosing was developed: warfarin dose = 0.097 * BMI - 0.03 * AGE + 0.30 *ASS.Status+ 0.02 *WC+ 1, 88. After testing of final model authors concluded what derived formula was representative, to determine the optimal dose of warfarin given to patient based on demographic characteristics. Considering all of the abovementioned, this model can be recommended for use determining the treatment strategy in patients with AF. Keywords: anticoagulant treatment, warfarin, atrial fibrillation.

  6. The results of a quality-control programme in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsdale, M.L.; Hiles, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    With the introduction of a breast screening programme in the UK, quality assurance in mammography is of paramount importance in assuring optimum imaging performance with low dose. Quality control checks are an essential part of the quality-assurance system. A quality-control programme at a breast screening clinic is described. Daily checks include film sensitometry for X-ray processor control and radiography of a lucite phantom to monitor the consistency of the X-ray machine automatic exposure control. Weekly checks include additional measurements on the performance of the automatic exposure control for different breast thickness and an overall assessment of image quality using a prototype mammography test phantom. The test phantom measures low-contrast sensitivity, high-contrast resolution and small-detail visibility. The results of the quality-control programme are presented with particular attention paid to tolerances and limiting values. (author)

  7. The "Janus face" of the thrombin binding aptamer: Investigating the anticoagulant and antiproliferative properties through straightforward chemical modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Veronica; Russo, Annapina; Amato, Teresa; Vellecco, Valentina; Bucci, Mariarosaria; Mayol, Luciano; Russo, Giulia; Virgilio, Antonella; Galeone, Aldo

    2018-02-01

    The thrombin binding aptamer (TBA) is endowed with both anticoagulant and antiproliferative activities. Its chemico-physical and/or biological properties can be tuned by the site-specific replacement of selected residues. Four oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) based on the TBA sequence (5'-GGTTGGTGTGGTTGG-3') and containing 2'-deoxyuridine (U) or 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (B) residues at positions 4 or 13 have been investigated by NMR and CD techniques. Furthermore, their anticoagulant (PT assay) and antiproliferative properties (MTT assay) have been tested and compared with two further ODNs containing 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine (H) residues in the same positions, previously investigated. The CD and NMR data suggest that all the investigated ODNs are able to form G-quadruplexes strictly resembling that of TBA. The introduction of B residues in positions 4 or 13 increases the melting temperature of the modified aptamers by 7 °C. The replacement of thymidines with U in the same positions results in an enhanced anticoagulant activity compared to TBA, also at low ODN concentration. Although all ODNs show antiproliferative properties, only TBA derivatives containing H in the positions 4 and 13 lose the anticoagulant activity and remarkably preserve the antiproliferative one. All ODNs have shown antiproliferative activities against two cancer cell lines but only those with U and B are endowed with anticoagulant activities similar or improved compared to TBA. The appropriate site-specific replacement of the residues in the TT loops of TBA with commercially available thymine analogues is a useful strategy either to improve the anticoagulant activity or to preserve the antiproliferative properties by quenching the anticoagulant ones. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The protein C omega-loop substitution Asn2Ile is associated with reduced protein C anticoagulant activity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Preston, Roger J S

    2012-02-01

    We report a kindred with heritable protein C (PC) deficiency in which two siblings with severe thrombosis showed a composite type I and IIb PC deficiency phenotype, identified using commercial PC assays (proband: PC antigen 42 u\\/dl, amidolytic activity 40 u\\/dl, anticoagulant activity 9 u\\/dl). The independent PROC nucleotide variations c.669C>A (predictive of Ser181Arg) and c.131C>T (predictive of Asn2Ile) segregated with the type I and type IIb PC deficiency phenotypes respectively, but co-segregated in the siblings with severe thrombosis. Soluble thrombomodulin (sTM)-mediated inhibition of plasma thrombin generation from an individual with PC-Asn2Ile was lower (endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) 56 +\\/- 1% that of ETP determined without sTM) than control plasma (ETP 15 +\\/- 2%) indicating reduced PC anticoagulant activity. Recombinant APC-Asn2Ile exhibited normal amidolytic activity but impaired anticoagulant activity. Protein S (PS)-dependent anticoagulant activity of recombinant APC-Asn2Ile and binding of recombinant APC-Asn2Ile to endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) were reduced compared to recombinant wild-type APC. Asn2 lies within the omega-loop of the PC\\/APC Gla domain and this region is critical for calcium-induced folding and subsequent interactions with anionic phospholipids, EPCR and PS. The disruption of these interactions in this naturally-occurring PC variant highlights their collective importance in mediating APC anticoagulant activity in vivo.

  9. New oral anticoagulants: key messages for clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Giorgi-Pierfranceschi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available New oral anticoagulants are an effective and safe alternative to vitamin K antagonists in many fields of clinical practice. The use of the direct inhibitors of activated Factor II (dabigatran and activated Factor X (apixaban and rivaroxaban, both in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF and those with acute venous thromboembolism (VTE, is of great interest for internal medicine physicians. This paper aims to give practical guidance on management (starting therapy, follow up and bleeding complications of patients treated with dabigatran, rivaroxaban or apixaban for NVAF or acute VTE providing practical tables concerning the phases of therapy, management of complications, drug interaction and dose adjustment if renal impairment occurs.

  10. Atrial fibrillation and stroke prevention practices in patients with candidacy for anticoagulation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullah, I.; Ahmad, S.; Hayat, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stroke secondary to Atrial Fibrillation is usually due to thrombi formed in the left atrium and left atrial appendage embolizing to cause ischemic stroke. Therefore, in patients with Atrial Fibrillation, antithrombotic therapy is recommended to prevent stroke. Vitamin K antagonist therapy is most widely used antithrombotic therapy for patients with valvular and non valvular AF. Aspirin is recommended only in low risk patients. This study was conducted to determine the stroke prevention practices in local patients with atrial fibrillation who were candidates for anticoagulation therapy. Method: This was descriptive cross sectional study conducted at Cardiovascular Department Lady Reading Hospital Peshawar and Cardiology Department Hayatabad Medical Complex Peshawar. Sampling technique was non probability consecutive. Patients visiting OPD of respective hospitals with EKG evidence of AF and having CHADES VASC score 2 or more or having mitral stenosis and AF were included in the study. Patients with additional indications for anticoagulation were excluded from the study. Results: A total of 205 patients with atrial fibrillation were studied. Mean age was 60.7±14.7 years. Male were 55.6 percentage (n=114) while 44.4 percentage (n=91) were female. Of these 149 (72.7 percentage) were candidates for anticoagulation based on CHA2DS2 VASc score of 2 and more or mitral stenosis with AF. Only 27.5 percentage (n=41) patients were adequately treated with anticoagulant therapy using VKA or novel oral anticoagulant drugs. Majority of them were getting dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT). Conclusion: Most patients with AF and high risk characteristics for thromboembolism are not receiving proper stroke prevention therapies. (author)

  11. A cost-analysis model for anticoagulant treatment in the hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Samir H; Huynh, Lynn; Zhuo, Daisy Y; Tran, Kevin N; Lefebvre, Patrick; Bookhart, Brahim

    2014-07-01

    Rivaroxaban is the first oral factor Xa inhibitor approved in the US to reduce the risk of stroke and blood clots among people with non-valvular atrial fibrillation, treat deep vein thrombosis (DVT), treat pulmonary embolism (PE), reduce the risk of recurrence of DVT and PE, and prevent DVT and PE after knee or hip replacement surgery. The objective of this study was to evaluate the costs from a hospital perspective of treating patients with rivaroxaban vs other anticoagulant agents across these five populations. An economic model was developed using treatment regimens from the ROCKET-AF, EINSTEIN-DVT and PE, and RECORD1-3 randomized clinical trials. The distribution of hospital admissions used in the model across the different populations was derived from the 2010 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project database. The model compared total costs of anticoagulant treatment, monitoring, inpatient stay, and administration for patients receiving rivaroxaban vs other anticoagulant agents. The length of inpatient stay (LOS) was determined from the literature. Across all populations, rivaroxaban was associated with an overall mean cost savings of $1520 per patient. The largest cost savings associated with rivaroxaban was observed in patients with DVT or PE ($6205 and $2742 per patient, respectively). The main driver of the cost savings resulted from the reduction in LOS associated with rivaroxaban, contributing to ∼90% of the total savings. Furthermore, the overall mean anticoagulant treatment cost was lower for rivaroxaban vs the reference groups. The distribution of patients across indications used in the model may not be generalizable to all hospitals, where practice patterns may vary, and average LOS cost may not reflect the actual reimbursements that hospitals received. From a hospital perspective, the use of rivaroxaban may be associated with cost savings when compared to other anticoagulant treatments due to lower drug cost and shorter LOS associated with

  12. In vitro anticoagulation monitoring of low-molecular-weight heparin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian-qi; SHI Xu-bo; YANG Jin-gang; HU Da-yi

    2009-01-01

    Background Although low-molecular-weight heparin has replaced unfractionated heparin to become the primary anticoagulation drug for treatment of acute coronary syndrome, there is no convenient bedside monitoring method. We explored the best laboratory monitoring method of low-molecular-weight heparins (enoxapadn, dalteparin, and nadroparin) by use of the Sonoclot coagulation analyzer to monitor the activated clotting time.Methods Atotal of 20 healthy volunteers were selected and 15 ml of fasting venous blood samples were collected and incubated. Four coagulants, kaolin, diatomite, glass bead, and magnetic stick, were used to determine the activated clotting time of the low-molecular-weight heparins at different in vitro anti-Xa factor concentrations. A correlation analysis was made to obtain the regression equation. The activated clotting time of the different low-molecular-weight heparins with the same anti-Xa factor concentration was monitored when the coagulant glass beads were applied. Results The activated clotting time measured using the glass beads, diatomite, kaolin, and magnetic stick showed a linear correlation with the concentration of nadroparin (r= 0.964, 0.966, 0.970, and 0.947, respectively). The regression equation showed that the linear slopes of different coagulants were significantly different (glass beads 230.03 s/IU,diatomite 89.91 s/IU, kaolin 50.87 s/IU, magnetic stick could not be calculated). When the concentration of the anti-Xa factor was the same for different low-molecular-weight heparins, the measured activated clotting time was different after the application of the glass bead coagulant.Conclusions The glass bead coagulant is most feasible for monitoring the in vitro anticoagulation activity of nadroparin.The different effects of different low-molecular-weight heparins on the activated clotting time may be related to the different anti-Ila activities.

  13. Disadvantages of VKA and requirements for novel anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shameem, Raji; Ansell, Jack

    2013-06-01

    Vitamin K antagonists have been in wide use for over 70 years. Warfarin, the most commonly used vitamin K antagonist, has been shown to be highly effective in treating and preventing thrombosis. Despite this, warfarin has many disadvantages, which has led to the development of a new class of oral anticoagulants targeted to specific coagulation factors designated as target-specific oral anticoagulants (TSOAs). TSOAs include the thrombin inhibitors (dabigatran) and factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban). This chapter reviews the disadvantages of warfarin and evaluates both the advantages and disadvantages of the new oral anticoagulants. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hemorrhagic stroke and oral anticoagulants: What is to be done?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Domashenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic stroke (HS is associated with high mortality and disability rates. Due to the introduction of the current guidelines for the prevention of systemic thromboembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillations and to an increase in the number of older patients, there has been a rise in the incidence of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH associated with the use of oral anticoagulants. The paper discusses medical treatment in patients with HS during therapy with vitamin K antagonists (warfarin and novel oral anticoagulants (dabigatran. rivaroxaban, apixaban, as well as an anticoagulant resumption policy after prior ICH in patients at high risk for thromboembolic events.

  15. The recent clinical trials on use of the novel direct oral anticoagulants in patients with venous thromboembolism: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gualtiero Palareti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism (VTE, encompassing deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, requires an immediate anticoagulation, that has been carried out so far by administering a parenteral anticoagulant drug (heparin or derivatives overlapped with an oral vitamin K antagonist (VKA, more often warfarin. Several new direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs, with a mechanism of action completely different than VKA, have been developed in recent years. Recent clinical trials have investigated their use in VTE patients showing results at least equal for efficacy and safety, and sometime even better, as the standard anticoagulant treatment. There are differences in the design of the trials. In two cases the involved DOAC was administered immediately after VTE diagnosis as a single drug treatment (rivaroxaban and apixaban, whereas in the other trials (involving dabigatran and edoxaban the DOAC was administered after an initial course of approximately 7 days with heparin or derivatives. Some clinical trials have also investigated the use of DOACs for extended anticoagulant treatment after the acute phase. Aim of this article is to review the results of the currently available clinical trials that have compared the use of DOACs versus the standard of care in patients with VTE.

  16. Fondaparinux for intra and perioperative anticoagulation in patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia candidates for peripheral vascular surgery: Report of 4 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Illuminati, MD

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: These preliminary results seem to justify the off-label use of fondaparinux for intra and perioperative anticoagulation in patients with HIT, candidates for peripheral vascular surgery interventions.

  17. SMART: self-management of anticoagulation, a randomised trial [ISRCTN19313375].

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCahon, Deborah; Fitzmaurice, David A; Murray, Ellen T; Fuller, Christopher J; Hobbs, Richard F D; Allan, Teresa F; Raftery, James P

    2003-09-18

    Oral anticoagulation monitoring has traditionally taken place in secondary care because of the need for a laboratory blood test, the international normalised ratio (INR). The development of reliable near patient testing (NPT) systems for INR estimation has facilitated devolution of testing to primary care. Patient self-management is a logical progression from the primary care model. This study will be the first to randomise non-selected patients in primary care, to either self-management or standard care. The study was a multi-centred randomised controlled trial with patients from 49 general practices recruited. Those suitable for inclusion were aged 18 or over, with a long term indication for oral anticoagulation, who had taken warfarin for at least six months. Patients randomised to the intervention arm attended at least two training sessions which were practice-based, 1 week apart. Each patient was assessed on their capability to undertake self management. If considered capable, they were given a near patient INR testing monitor, test strips and quality control material for home testing. Patients managed their own anticoagulation for a period of 12 months and performed their INR test every 2 weeks. Control patients continued with their pre-study care either attending hospital or practice based anticoagulant clinics. The methodology used in this trial will overcome concerns from previous trials of selection bias and relevance to the UK health service. The study will give a clearer understanding of the benefits of self-management in terms of clinical and cost effectiveness and patient preference.

  18. SMART: Self-Management of Anticoagulation, a Randomised Trial [ISRCTN19313375

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Ellen T

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral anticoagulation monitoring has traditionally taken place in secondary care because of the need for a laboratory blood test, the international normalised ratio (INR. The development of reliable near patient testing (NPT systems for INR estimation has facilitated devolution of testing to primary care. Patient self-management is a logical progression from the primary care model. This study will be the first to randomise non-selected patients in primary care, to either self-management or standard care. Method The study was a multi-centred randomised controlled trial with patients from 49 general practices recruited. Those suitable for inclusion were aged 18 or over, with a long term indication for oral anticoagulation, who had taken warfarin for at least six months. Patients randomised to the intervention arm attended at least two training sessions which were practice-based, 1 week apart. Each patient was assessed on their capability to undertake self management. If considered capable, they were given a near patient INR testing monitor, test strips and quality control material for home testing. Patients managed their own anticoagulation for a period of 12 months and performed their INR test every 2 weeks. Control patients continued with their pre-study care either attending hospital or practice based anticoagulant clinics. Discussion The methodology used in this trial will overcome concerns from previous trials of selection bias and relevance to the UK health service. The study will give a clearer understanding of the benefits of self-management in terms of clinical and cost effectiveness and patient preference.

  19. The CANopen Controller IP Core: Implementation, Synthesis and Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramia, Maurizio; Bolognino, Luca; Montagna, Mario; Tosi, Pietro; Errico, Walter; Bigongiari, Franco; Furano, Gianluca

    2011-08-01

    This paper will describe the implementation and test results of the CANopen Controller IP Core (CCIPC) implemented by Thales Alenia Space and SITAEL Aerospace with the support of ESA in the frame of the EXOMARS Project. The CCIPC is a configurable VHDL implementation of the CANOPEN protocol [1]; it is foreseen to be used as CAN bus slave controller within the EXOMARS Entry Descending and Landing Demonstrato Module (EDM) and Rover Module. The CCIPC features, configuration capability, synthesis and test results will be described and the evidence of the state of maturity of this innovative IP core will be demonstrated.

  20. Enhancing anticoagulation and endothelial cell proliferation of titanium surface by sequential immobilization of poly(ethylene glycol) and collagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Chang-Jiang; Hou, Yan-Hua; Ding, Hong-Yan; Dong, Yun-Xiao

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and collagen I were sequentially immobilized on the titanium surface to simultaneously improve the anticoagulation and endothelial cell proliferation. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirmed that PEG and collagen I were successfully immobilized on the titanium surface. Water contact angle results suggested the excellent hydrophilic surface after the immobilization. The anticoagulation experiments demonstrated that the immobilized PEG and collagen I on the titanium surface could not only obviously prevent platelet adhesion and aggregation but also prolong activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), leading to the improved blood compatibility. Furthermore, immobilization of collagen to the end of PEG chain did not abate the anticoagulation. As compared to those on the pristine and PEG-modified titanium surfaces, endothelial cells exhibited improved proliferative profiles on the surface modified by the sequential immobilization of PEG and collagen in terms of CCK-8 assay, implying that the modified titanium may promote endothelialization without abating the blood compatibility. Our method may be used to modify the surface of blood-contacting biomaterials such as titanium to promote endothelialization and improve the anticoagulation, it may be helpful for development of the biomedical devices such as coronary stents, where endothelializaton and excellent anticoagulation are required.

  1. New anticoagulants for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon J McRae

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Simon J McRae, Jeffrey S GinsbergDepartment of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, CanadaAbstract: Anticoagulant therapy is effective at preventing the development of venous thromboembolism in high-risk patients, and reduces morbidity and mortality in individuals with established thromboembolic disease. Vitamin K antagonists and heparins are currently the most commonly used anticoagulant drugs, but they have practical limitations. Therefore, new antithrombotic agents with predictable dose-responses (thereby decreasing the need for monitoring without compromising efficacy or safety, ideally available in an oral formulation and with a rapidly reversible anticoagulant effect, are needed. New drugs fulfilling some of the above criteria have been developed and have proven to be effective agents for the treatment and prevention of venous thromboembolism.Keywords: venous thromboembolism, anticoagulants, antithrombotic

  2. Prevalence of Lupus Anticoagulant in Women with Spontaneous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-10-26

    Oct 26, 2017 ... ... pregnancy. Presence of lupus anticoagulant (LA), one of the antiphospholipid antibodies, ... pregnancy outcomes such as preeclampsia/eclampsia and small for date deliveries. ... changes in a background of APL syndrome.

  3. Preventive Strategies against Bleeding due to Nonvitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lessire Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dabigatran etexilate (DE, rivaroxaban, and apixaban are nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs that have been compared in clinical trials with existing anticoagulants (warfarin and enoxaparin in several indications for the prevention and treatment of thrombotic events. All NOACs presented bleeding events despite a careful selection and control of patients. Compared with warfarin, NOACs had a decreased risk of intracranial hemorrhage, and apixaban and DE (110 mg BID had a decreased risk of major bleeding from any site. Rivaroxaban and DE showed an increased risk of major gastrointestinal bleeding compared with warfarin. Developing strategies to minimize the risk of bleeding is essential, as major bleedings are reported in clinical practice and specific antidotes are currently not available. In this paper, the following preventive approaches are reviewed: improvement of appropriate prescription, identification of modifiable bleeding risk factors, tailoring NOAC’s dose, dealing with a missed dose as well as adhesion to switching, bridging and anesthetic procedures.

  4. Retroperitoneal Bleeding: An Experience During Prophylactic Anticoagulation in a Patient With Nephrotic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Okada

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The association between nephrotic syndrome (NS and a hypercoagulable state has been demonstrated. Controlling the blood clotting activity may therefore be attractive for patients with nephrosis in terms of thromboembolism prophylaxis. We herein report a 75-year-old woman with minimal change disease who developed pains in the right back, groin, and thigh because of retroperitoneal bleeding during prophylactic anticoagulation with unfractionated heparin. Although this procedure has not been accepted as the standard of care for patients with nephrosis, pharmacologic prophylaxis may already be practiced empirically, as in the present patient. We believe that our experience highlights the pitfalls of such a management in patients with nephrosis, implying the need for a diagnostic strategy for identifying those patients with NS who can benefit from prophylactic anticoagulation. Several concerns that emerged in this case are also discussed.

  5. How to Invest in Getting Cost-effective Technologies into Practice? A Framework for Value of Implementation Analysis Applied to Novel Oral Anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Rita; Walker, Simon; Whyte, Sophie; Dixon, Simon; Palmer, Stephen; Sculpher, Mark

    2017-02-01

    Cost-effective interventions are often implemented slowly and suboptimally in clinical practice. In such situations, a range of implementation activities may be considered to increase uptake. A framework is proposed to use cost-effectiveness analysis to inform decisions on how best to invest in implementation activities. This framework addresses 2 key issues: 1) how to account for changes in utilization in the future in the absence of implementation activities; and 2) how to prioritize implementation efforts between subgroups. A case study demonstrates the framework's application: novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) for the prevention of stroke in the National Health Service in England and Wales. The results suggest that there is value in additional implementation activities to improve uptake of NOACs, particularly in targeting patients with average or poor warfarin control. At a cost-effectiveness threshold of £20,000 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained, additional investment in an educational activity that increases the utilization of NOACs by 5% in all patients currently taking warfarin generates an additional 254 QALYs, compared with 973 QALYs in the subgroup with average to poor warfarin control. However, greater value could be achieved with higher uptake of anticoagulation more generally: switching 5% of patients who are potentially eligible for anticoagulation but are currently receiving no treatment or are using aspirin would generate an additional 4990 QALYs. This work can help health services make decisions on investment at different points of the care pathway or across disease areas in a manner consistent with the value assessment of new interventions.

  6. Integrated alarm annunciation and entry control systems -- Survey results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clever, J.J.; Arakaki, L.H.; Monaco, F.M.; Juarros, L.E.; Quintana, G.R.

    1993-10-01

    This report provides the results and analyses of a detailed survey undertaken in Summer 1993 to address integrated intrusion detection alarm annunciation and entry control system issues. This survey was undertaken as a first attempt toward beginning to answer questions about integrated systems and commercial capabilities to meet or partially meet US Department of Energy (DOE) site needs

  7. Use of antifibrinolytic mouthwash solution in anticoagulated oral surgery patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Evrosimovska, Biljana; Papakoca, Kiro; Georgiev, Zlatko; Angelovska, Bistra; Ristoska, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Introduction:The ordinary treatment of anticoagulated patients includes the interruption of anticoagulant therapy for oral surgery interventions to prevent hemorrhage. However, this practice may logically increase the risk of a potentially life-threatening thromboembolism, so this issue is still controversial. The aim of the study was to evaluate the antifibrinolitic mouthwash solution (tranexamic acid) as a local haemostatic modality after oral surgery interventions. Methods:To realize the a...

  8. Hematin-derived anticoagulant. Generation in vitro and in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Prolongation of clotting times produced by hematin was investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Hematin-derived anticoagulant (HDA) was found to be due to a degradative product or derivative of hematin, and was generated in vitro in standing (aging) aqueous solutions of the parent compound. Generation of HDA in vitro was inhibited by antioxidants. The anticoagulant effect of HDA was inhibited by freshly prepared hematin, fresh Sn-protoporphyrin, imidazole, or the iron chelator desferrioxamine....

  9. Evaluation of pro-c global for identification of defects in protein c/s anticoagulant pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanif, T.B.; Anwar, J.; Idrees, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Detection of protein C and S deficiency forms a major investigation in the laboratory evaluation of thrombophilia screening. It has key role in the diagnosis of protein C and S deficiency. The objective of this study is to determine the utility of ProC Global as a screening test for identifying the defects of protein C and S anticoagulant pathways. Methods: Two Hundred patients with venous thromboembolism were studied at the Department of Haematology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi, from October 2004 to March 2006. ProC Global test (Dade Behring Diagnostics) was performed and was followed up by protein C and S assays. ProC Global is an activated partial thromboplastin time based assay in which Protac (snake venom from Aghistroden contortrix) is used for activation of the endogenous protein C of the plasma sample. The protein C activation time in the presence of the activator was set in relation to a parallel determination of PCAT/O with addition of a buffer instead of activator reagent. The ratio PCAT: PCAT/O was transformed in normalized ratio by relating them to a calibrator. Control plasma for normal range and ProC control plasma for pathological range (Dade Behring Diagnostics) were assayed in each run for quality control. Results: A total of 200 patients, 132 (66%) males and 68 (34%) females with age ranging from 1 to 68 years were studied. ProC Global was positive in 29/200 (14.5%) patients. ProC Global was found to be 86% sensitive, 94% specific and its overall efficiency turned out to be 94%. Conclusion: Pro-C Global can be used effectively as a screening test to detect abnormalities in protein C and S anticoagulant pathways. (author)

  10. Direct Oral Anticoagulants in Emergency Trauma Admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maegele, Marc; Grottke, Oliver; Schöchl, Herbert; Sakowitz, Oliver A; Spannagl, Michael; Koscielny, Jürgen

    2016-09-05

    Direct (non-vitamin-K-dependent) oral anticoagulants (DOAC) are given as an alternative to vitamin K antagonists (VKA) to prevent stroke and embolic disease in patients with atrial fibrillation that is not due to pathology of the heart valves. Fatal hemorrhage is rarer when DOACs are given (nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: odds ratio [OR] 0.68; 95% confidence interval [95% CI: 0.48; 0.96], and venous thromboembolism: OR 0.54; [0.22; 1.32]). 48% of emergency trauma patients need an emergency operation or early surgery. Clotting disturbances elevate the mortality of such patients to 43%, compared to 17% in patients without a clotting disturbance. This underscores the impor tance of the proper, targeted treatment of trauma patients who are aking DOAC. This review is based on articles retrieved by a selective search in PubMed and on a summary of expert opinion and the recommendations of the relevant medical specialty societies. Peak DOAC levels are reached 2-4 hours after the drug is taken. In patients with normal renal and hepatic function, no drug accumulation, and no drug interactions, the plasma level of DOAC 24 hours after administration is generally too low to cause any clinically relevant risk of bleeding. The risk of drug accumulation is higher in patients with renal dysfunction (creatinine clearance [CrCl] of 30 mL/min or less). Dabigatran levels can be estimated from the thrombin time, ecarin clotting time, and diluted thrombin time, while levels of factor Xa inhibitors can be estimated by means of calibrated chromogenic anti-factor Xa activity tests. Routine clotting studies do not reliably reflect the anticoagulant activity of DOAC. Surgery should be postponed, if possible, until at least 24-48 hours after the last dose of DOAC. For patients with mild, non-life threatening hemorrhage, it suffices to discontinue DOAC; for patients with severe hemorrhage, there are special treatment algorithms that should be followed. DOACs in the setting of hemorrhage are a

  11. Pathology consultation on anticoagulation monitoring: factor X-related assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wool, Geoffrey D; Lu, Chuanyi M

    2013-11-01

    To review various anticoagulation therapies and related laboratory monitoring issues, with a focus on factor X-related chromogenic assays. A case-based approach is used to review pertinent published literatures and product inserts of anticoagulation drugs and to look back on clinical use of factor X-related chromogenic assays. The number of anticoagulants available to clinicians has increased greatly in the past decade. Whether and how these anticoagulants should be monitored are areas of uncertainty for clinicians, which can lead to misuse of laboratory assays and suboptimal patient management. Factor X-related assays are of particular concern because of the similar and often confusing test names. Based on a common clinical case scenario and literature review regarding anticoagulant monitoring, an up-to-date discussion and review of the various factor X-related assays are provided, focusing on the differences in test designs and clinical utilities between the chromogenic anti-Xa and chromogenic factor X activity assays. Anticoagulation therapy and related laboratory monitoring are rapidly evolving areas of clinical practices. A good knowledge of relevant laboratory assays and their clinical applications is necessary to help optimize patient care.

  12. Adherence to a new oral anticoagulant treatment prescription: dabigatran etexilate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Bellamy

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available L Bellamy1, N Rosencher1, BI Eriksson21Anaesthesiology Department, Hôpital Cochin (AP-HP, René Descartes University, Paris 75014 France; 2Orthopaedic Department, University Hospital Sahlgrenska/Ostra, Gothenburg, SwedenAbstract: The recent development of new oral anticoagulants, of which dabigatran etexilate is currently at the most advanced stage of development, is the greatest advance in the provision of convenient anticoagulation therapy for many years. A new oral anticoagulation treatment, dabigatran etexilate, is already on the market in Europe. The main interest probably will be to improve the prescription and the adherence to an effective thromboprophylaxis in medical conditions such as atrial fibrillation without bleeding side effects, without the need for monitoring coagulation, and without drug and food interactions such as vitamin K anticoagulant (VKA treatment. Dabigatran is particularly interesting for extended thromboprophylaxis after major orthopedic surgery in order to avoid daily injection for a month. However, oral long-term treatments such as VKA are not systematically associated with a higher compliance level than injected treatments such as low-molecular-weight heparins. Indeed, adherence to an oral treatment, instead of the usual daily injection in major orthopedic surgery, is complex, and based not only on the frequency of dosing but also on patient motivation, understanding, and socio-economic status. New oral anticoagulants may be useful in this way but education and detection of risk factors of nonadherence to treatment are still essential.Keywords: oral anticoagulant, adherence, compliance, education, dabigatran

  13. A single center retrospective cohort study comparing low-molecular-weight heparins to direct oral anticoagulants for the treatment of venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer - A real world experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Megan K; Wiczer, Tracy E; Erdeljac, H Paige; Van Deusen, Kelsey R; Porter, Kyle; Philips, Gary; Wang, Tzu-Fei

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Low-molecular-weight heparins are the standard treatment for cancer-associated thrombosis. Recently, direct oral anticoagulants are a new option for thrombosis treatment; however, data supporting the use of direct oral anticoagulants for cancer-associated thrombosis are limited. Objectives The primary objective of this study was to determine the rate of recurrent cancer-associated thrombosis and major bleeding within 6 months of starting either low-molecular-weight heparin or direct oral anticoagulant for treatment of cancer-associated thrombosis. Secondary objectives were to determine the rates of clinically relevant-non-major bleeding and all-cause mortality. Patients/methods This is a retrospective cohort study including adults with cancer-associated thrombosis treated with low-molecular-weight heparin or direct oral anticoagulant between 2010 and 2016 at the Ohio State University. Medical records were reviewed for 6 months after initiation of anticoagulation or until the occurrence of recurrent cancer-associated thrombosis, major bleeding, cessation of anticoagulation of interest, or death, whichever occurred first. Results Four hundred and eighty patients were included (290 low-molecular-weight heparin and 190 direct oral anticoagulant). Patients treated with direct oral anticoagulant were found to carry "lower risk" features including cancer with lower VTE risk and lower rate of metastatic disease. After adjustment for baseline differences, there was no significant difference in the rate of recurrent cancer-associated thrombosis (7.2% low-molecular-weight heparin vs 6.3% direct oral anticoagulant, p = 0.71) or major bleeding (7.6% low-molecular-weight heparin vs 2.6% direct oral anticoagulant, p = 0.08). Conclusions Our study demonstrates that in a select population of cancer patients with VTE, direct oral anticoagulant use can be as effective and safe compared to the standard therapy with low-molecular-weight heparin.

  14. [Non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis on the bicuspid aortic valve in a 25-year-old male with lupus anticoagulant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elikowski, Waldemar; Jarząbek, Radosław; Małek, Małgorzata; Witczak, Włodzimierz; Łazowski, Stanisław; Psuja, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    Non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis (NBTE) is characterized by presence of sterile vegetations that develop from fibrin and platelets on heart valves. The main conditions predisposing to NBTE are malignancy, autoimmune diseases and other hypercoagulable states. The authors describe a case of a 25-year-old male, in whom NBTE was diagnosed on the bicuspid aortic valve. The presence of significant aortic regurgitation and dental caries were initially suggestive of infective endocarditis; although, serial blood culture were negative and procalcytonin concentration was within normal ranges. Empiric antibiotic therapy did not result in diminishing of vegetations, similarly to the anticoagulation treatment initiated when strongly positive lupus anticoagulant was detected in laboratory findings. Aortic valve replacement was necessary. Bacteriologic examination of the excised valve was negative. Widespread fibrin masses at different stages of organization on the leaflets confirmed NBTE in histopathologic assessment. Lupus anticoagulant was probably secondary to thyroid autoimmune disease. © 2016 MEDPRESS.

  15. Thromboembolic risk in 16 274 atrial fibrillation patients undergoing direct current cardioversion with and without oral anticoagulant therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Lock; Jepsen, Rikke Malene H G; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring

    2015-01-01

    -time DC cardioversion for atrial fibrillation between 2000 and 2008. Use of oral anticoagulant therapy within 90 days prior and 360 days after DC cardioversion was obtained from the Danish Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. The risk of thromboembolism was estimated by calculating incidence rates......AIMS: To study the risk of thromboembolism in a nationwide cohort of atrial fibrillation patients undergoing direct current (DC) cardioversion with or without oral anticoagulant coverage. METHODS AND RESULTS: A retrospective study of 16 274 patients in Denmark discharged from hospital after a first...... and by multivariable adjusted Cox proportional-hazard models. During the initial 30 days following discharge, the thromboembolic incidence rate was 10.33 per 100 patient-years for the no prior oral anticoagulant therapy group [n = 5084 (31.2%)], as compared with 4.00 per 100 patient-years for the prior oral...

  16. Toxicity reference values for chlorophacinone and their application for assessing anticoagulant rodenticide risk to raptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattner, Barnett A; Horak, Katherine E; Lazarus, Rebecca S; Schultz, Sandra L; Knowles, Susan; Abbo, Benjamin G; Volker, Steven F

    2015-05-01

    Despite widespread use and benefit, there are growing concerns regarding hazards of second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides to non-target wildlife which may result in expanded use of first-generation compounds, including chlorophacinone (CPN). The toxicity of CPN over a 7-day exposure period was investigated in American kestrels (Falco sparverius) fed either rat tissue mechanically-amended with CPN, tissue from rats fed Rozol(®) bait (biologically-incorporated CPN), or control diets (tissue from untreated rats or commercial bird of prey diet) ad libitum. Nominal CPN concentrations in the formulated diets were 0.15, 0.75 and 1.5 µg/g food wet weight, and measured concentrations averaged 94 % of target values. Kestrel food consumption was similar among groups and body weight varied by less than 6 %. Overt signs of intoxication, liver CPN residues, and changes in prothrombin time (PT), Russell's viper venom time (RVVT) and hematocrit, were generally dose-dependent. Histological evidence of hemorrhage was present at all CPN dose levels, and most frequently observed in pectoral muscle and heart. There were no apparent differences in toxicity between mechanically-amended and biologically-incorporated CPN diet formulations. Dietary-based toxicity reference values at which clotting times were prolonged in 50 % of the kestrels were 79.2 µg CPN consumed/kg body weight-day for PT and 39.1 µg/kg body weight-day for RVVT. Based upon daily food consumption of kestrels and previously reported CPN concentrations found in small mammals following field baiting trials, these toxicity reference values might be exceeded by free-ranging raptors consuming such exposed prey. Tissue-based toxicity reference values for coagulopathy in 50 % of exposed birds were 0.107 µg CPN/g liver wet weight for PT and 0.076 µg/g liver for RVVT, and are below the range of residue levels reported in raptor mortality incidents attributed to CPN exposure. Sublethal responses associated

  17. Toxicity reference values for chlorophacinone and their application for assessing anticoagulant rodenticide risk to raptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattner, Barnett A.; Horak, Katherine E.; Lazarus, Rebecca S.; Schultz, Sandra; Knowles, Susan N.; Abbo, Benjamin G.; Volker, Steven F.

    2015-01-01

    Despite widespread use and benefit, there are growing concerns regarding hazards of second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides to non-target wildlife which may result in expanded use of first-generation compounds, including chlorophacinone (CPN). The toxicity of CPN over a 7-day exposure period was investigated in American kestrels (Falco sparverius) fed either rat tissue mechanically-amended with CPN, tissue from rats fed Rozol® bait (biologically-incorporated CPN), or control diets (tissue from untreated rats or commercial bird of prey diet) ad libitum. Nominal CPN concentrations in the formulated diets were 0.15, 0.75 and 1.5 µg/g food wet weight, and measured concentrations averaged 94 % of target values. Kestrel food consumption was similar among groups and body weight varied by less than 6 %. Overt signs of intoxication, liver CPN residues, and changes in prothrombin time (PT), Russell’s viper venom time (RVVT) and hematocrit, were generally dose-dependent. Histological evidence of hemorrhage was present at all CPN dose levels, and most frequently observed in pectoral muscle and heart. There were no apparent differences in toxicity between mechanically-amended and biologically-incorporated CPN diet formulations. Dietary-based toxicity reference values at which clotting times were prolonged in 50 % of the kestrels were 79.2 µg CPN consumed/kg body weight-day for PT and 39.1 µg/kg body weight-day for RVVT. Based upon daily food consumption of kestrels and previously reported CPN concentrations found in small mammals following field baiting trials, these toxicity reference values might be exceeded by free-ranging raptors consuming such exposed prey. Tissue-based toxicity reference values for coagulopathy in 50 % of exposed birds were 0.107 µg CPN/g liver wet weight for PT and 0.076 µg/g liver for RVVT, and are below the range of residue levels reported in raptor mortality incidents attributed to CPN exposure. Sublethal responses associated

  18. Evaluation of analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-depressant and anti-coagulant properties of Lactuca sativa (CV. Grand Rapids) plant tissues and cell suspension in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Hammad; Mirza, Bushra

    2015-06-27

    Lactuca sativa (lettuce) has been traditionally used for relieving pain, inflammation, stomach problems including indigestion and lack of appetite. Moreover, the therapeutic significance of L. sativa includes its anticonvulsant, sedative-hypnotic and antioxidant properties. In the present study, the MC (methanol and chloroform; 1:1) and aqueous extracts of seed and leaf along with cell suspension exudate were prepared. These extracts were explored for their analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antidepressant and anticoagulant effects by hot plate analgesic assay; carrageenan induced hind paw edema test, forced swimming test and capillary method for blood clotting respectively in a rat model. The results were analyzed using one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) followed by Turkey multiple comparison test. Interestingly, the extracts and the cell suspension exudate showed dual inhibition by reducing pain and inflammation. The results indicated that the aqueous extracts of leaf exhibited highest analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities followed by leaf MC, cell suspension exudate, seed aqueous and seed MC extracts. The current findings show that aqueous and MC extracts of seed have the least immobility time in the forced swimming test, which could act as an anti-depressant on the central nervous system. The leaf extracts and cell suspension exudate also expressed moderate anti-depressant activities. In anticoagulant assay, the coagulation time of aspirin (positive control) and MC extract of leaf was comparable, suggesting strong anti-coagulant effect. Additionally, no abnormal behavior or lethality was observed in any animal tested. Taken together, L. sativa can potentially act as a strong herbal drug due to its multiple pharmaceutical effects and is therefore of interest in drug discovery and development of formulations.

  19. An Easy Method to Eliminate the Effect of Lupus Anticoagulants in the Coagulation Factor Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ning; Yin, Shiyu

    2016-07-01

    To build and evaluate intrinsic coagulation factor assays which can eliminate the effect of lupus anticoagulants (LAC). Commercial silica clotting time confirmatory (SCT-C) reagent containing sufficient synthetic phospholipid and routine activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) reagent were each used for one-stage detection of FVIII, FIX, and FXI activities, in samples with or without LAC, and the results were compared. For samples without LAC, consistent results of FVIII, FIX, and FXI using both SCT-C reagent and APTT reagent were obtained. For samples with LAC, the assays with SCT-C reagent not only could eliminate the effect of strong lupus anticoagulants but also needed fewer dilutions than that with routine APTT reagent. The intrinsic factor detections by SCT-C reagent are credible and convenient to be used for samples with LAC.

  20. Results from active spacecraft potential control on the Geotail spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, R.; Arends, H.; Pedersen, A.

    1995-01-01

    A low and actively controlled electrostatic potential on the outer surfaces of a scientific spacecraft is very important for accurate measurements of cold plasma electrons and ions and the DC to low-frequency electric field. The Japanese/NASA Geotail spacecraft carriers as part of its scientific payload a novel ion emitter for active control of the electrostatic potential on the surface of the spacecraft. The aim of the ion emitter is to reduce the positive surface potential which is normally encountered in the outer magnetosphere when the spacecraft is sunlit. Ion emission clamps the surface potential to near the ambient plasma potential. Without emission control, Geotail has encountered plasma conditions in the lobes of the magnetotail which resulted in surface potentials of up to about +70 V. The ion emitter proves to be able to discharge the outer surfaces of the spacecraft and is capable of keeping the surface potential stable at about +2 V. This potential is measured with respect to one of the electric field probes which are current biased and thus kept at a potential slightly above the ambient plasma potential. The instrument uses the liquid metal field ion emission principle to emit indium ions. The ion beam energy is about 6 keV and the typical total emission current amounts to about 15 μA. Neither variations in the ambient plasma conditions nor operation of two electron emitters on Geotail produce significant variations of the controlled surface potential as long as the resulting electron emission currents remain much smaller than the ion emission current. Typical results of the active potential control are shown, demonstrating the surface potential reduction and its stability over time. 25 refs., 5 figs

  1. Best strategies for patient education about anticoagulation with warfarin: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Sonal

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient education is an essential component in quality management of the anticoagulated patient. Because it is time consuming for clinicians and overwhelming for patients, education of the anticoagulated patient is often neglected. We surveyed the medical literature in order to identify the best patient education strategies. Methods Study Selection: Two reviewers independently searched the MEDLINE and Google Scholar databases (last search March 2007 using the terms "warfarin" or "anticoagulation", and "patient education". The initial search identified 206 citations, A total of 166 citations were excluded because patients were of pediatric age (4, the article was not related to patient education (48, did not contain original data or inadequate program description (141, was focused solely on patient self-testing (1, was a duplicate citation (3, the article was judged otherwise irrelevant (44, or no abstract was available (25. Data Extraction: Clinical setting, study design, group size, content source, time and personnel involved, educational strategy and domains, measures of knowledge retention. Results Data Synthesis: A total of 32 articles were ultimately used for data extraction. Thirteen articles adequately described features of the educational strategy. Five programs used a nurse or pharmacist, 4 used a physician, and 2 studies used other personnel/vehicles (lay educators (1, videotapes (1. The duration of the educational intervention ranged from 1 to 10 sessions. Patient group size most often averaged 3 to 5 patients but ranged from as low as 1 patient to as much as 11 patients. Although 12 articles offered information about education content, the wording and lack of detail in the description made it too difficult to accurately assign categories of education topics and to compare articles with one another. For the 17 articles that reported measures of patient knowledge, 5 of the 17 sites where the surveys were

  2. Influence of some anticoagulants on dynamics of sugar concentration in the goats’ blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Zapryanova

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of the content in the goats’ blood (at the instant the sample was taken, and then after 3, 6 and 24 hours under influence of 4 anticoagulants (sodium fluoride, sodium citrate, heparin and complexon III were studied. Long term storage of the blood samples resulted in the glucose level decrease. It was mostly pronounced under the sodium citrate treatment.

  3. A survey of anticoagulation practice among German speaking microsurgeons – Perioperative management of anticoagulant therapy in free flap surgery [Erhebung über die antikoagulatorische Praxis unter deutschsprachigen Mikrochirurgen – Perioperatives Management der antikoagulatorischen Therapie bei freien Lappentransplantaten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jokuszies, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available [english] Background: Anticoagulation is a crucial element in microsurgery. Although various clinical studies and international surveys have revealed that anticoagulation strategies can vary and result in similar outcomes, anticoagulative regimen are far away from standardization. In Germany and german speaking countries standardized anticoagulation protocols concerning free flap surgery do not exist so far. Methods: To evaluate the current practice of clinics in Germany, Austria and Switzerland with specialization in microsurgery we performed a questionnaire surveying the perioperative regimen of anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy in free flap surgery. The microsurgeons were interrogated on several anticoagulant, rheologic and antiplatelet medications, their dosage and perioperative frequency of application pre-, intra- and postoperative.Results: The questionnaire revealed that the used antithrombotic and perioperative regimens varied from department to department presumably based on the personal experience of the surgeon. Multiple approaches are used with a wide range of anticoagulants used either alone or in combination, with different intervals of application and different dosages. Conclusion: Therefore consensus meetings should be held in future leading to conduct prospective multicenter studies with formulation of standardized anticoagulative and perioperative protocols in microsurgery reducing flap failure to other than pharmacologic reasons.[german] Hintergrund: Die Antikoagulation stellt ein zentrales Element in der Mikrochirurgie dar. Zahlreiche klinische Studien und internationale Erhebungen zu antikoagulatorischen Strategien weisen eine grosse Varianz bei vergleichbaren Resultaten nach, entbehren jedoch einer Standardisierung. Auch in Deutschland und deutschsprachigen Ländern fehlen bislang standardisierte Regime zur Antikoagulation in der Mikrochirurgie.Methodik: Zur Erhebung der antikoagulatorischen Praxis unter

  4. [Comparison of quality and hemorragic risk of oral anticoagulant therapy using acenocoumarol versus warfarin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva Berini, Elvira; Galán Alvarez, Pilar; Pacheco Onrubia, Ana María

    2008-06-21

    Long half life oral anticoagulants have shown a higher anticoagulation stability and a lower hemorragic risk than those of a short half life. We have compared therapeutic stability and hemorragic risk of acenocoumarol versus warfarin in 2 groups of patients on preventive anticoagulation because of atrial fibrilation (international normalised ratio [INR]: 2-3). Data on 120 patients treated with acenocoumarol and 120 on warfarin treatment who had started and continued treatment in our hospital for a minimum of a year was collected. The percentage of visits within the intended range of INR (2 to 3) was 65.5% with warfarin and 63.4% with acenocoumarol. Thirty percent of patients on warfarin had 75% or more of their controls within range, while for those treated with acenocoumarol this percentage was 22.5%. In the acenocoumarol group, 0.3 visits/patient/year presented an INR > or = 6 versus 0.07 in the warfarin group (p = 0.003). Patients treated with acenocoumarol show a higher risk of presenting with an INR > or = 6, but no statistically significant differences are observed in therapeutic stability.

  5. Is Endoscopic Therapy Safe for Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Anticoagulated Patients With Supratherapeutic International Normalized Ratios?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Choong Nam; Chung, Hyun Soo; Park, Jun Chul; Shin, Sung Kwan; Lee, Sang Kil; Lee, Yong Chan; Kim, Ha Yan; Kim, Dong Wook; Lee, Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    The management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in anticoagulated patients with supratherapeutic international normalized ratios (INRs) presents a challenge. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the safety of endoscopic therapy for UGIB in anticoagulated patients with supratherapeutic INR in terms of rebleeding and therapeutic outcomes. One hundred ninety-two anticoagulated patients who underwent endoscopic treatment for UGIB were enrolled in the study. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on the occurrence of rebleeding within 30 days of the initial therapeutic endoscopy: no-rebleeding group (n = 168) and rebleeding group (n = 24). The overall rebleeding rate was 12.5%. Bleeding from gastric cancer and bleeding at the duodenum were significantly related to rebleeding in a univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis determined that presenting symptoms other than melena (hematemesis, hematochezia, or others) (odds ratio, 3.93; 95% confidence interval, 1.44-10.76) and bleeding from gastric cancer (odds ratio, 6.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-29.25) were significant factors predictive of rebleeding. Supratherapeutic INR at the time of endoscopic therapy was not significantly associated with rebleeding in either univariate or multivariate analysis. Significant differences in bleeding-related mortality, additional intervention to control bleeding, length of hospital stay, and transfusion requirements were revealed between the rebleeding and no-rebleeding groups. There were no significant differences in therapeutic outcomes between patients with INR within the therapeutic range and those with supratherapeutic INR. Supratherapeutic INR at the time of endoscopic therapy did not change rebleeding and therapeutic outcomes. Thus, we should consider endoscopic therapy for UGIB in anticoagulated patients, irrespective of INR at the time of endoscopic therapy.

  6. Physicochemical properties and anticoagulant activity of polyphenols derived from Lachnum singerianum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Zong

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, polyphenols (LSP were obtained from the fermentation broth of Lachnum singerianum. Two fractions were isolated by Sephadex LH-20 chromatographic column, and the primary fraction (LSP-1 was collected. The comprehensive physicochemical properties of phenolic acids and polyhydroxy phenolic compounds of LSP-1 were determined by UV-visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Results of anticoagulant activity assay in vitro showed that LSP-1 could lengthen prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and thrombin time of mouse plasma. In addition, anticoagulant activity results in vivo showed that high dose of LSP-1 could significantly prolong bleeding time, coagulation time, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and thrombin time of hypercoagulable mice induced by adrenaline, reduce the content of fibrinogen and enhance antithrombin III activity. All results indicated that the LSP-1 could serve well as an anticoagulant, and might be used as a potential natural drug candidate for thrombosis.

  7. Acute kidney injury aggravated by treatment initiation with apixaban: Another twist of anticoagulant-related nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Brodsky

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Anticoagulant-related nephropathy (ARN was initially described in patients on warfarin (as warfarin-related nephropathy and recently in those using dabigatran. Herein, we report clinical history and kidney biopsy findings in a patient on apixaban (Eliquis. Initiation of treatment with apixaban resulted in aggravation of preexisting mild acute kidney injury (AKI. A few days after apixaban therapy, the patient became oligoanuric, and kidney biopsy showed severe acute tubular necrosis with numerous occlusive red blood cell casts. Only one out of 68 glomeruli with open capillary loops had small segmental cellular crescent. Therefore, there was major discrepancy between the degree of glomerular injury and the glomerular hematuria. Considering that the onset of this AKI was associated with apixaban treatment initiation, we propose that this patient had ARN associated with factor Xa inhibitor (apixaban, which has not previously been described. Monitoring of kidney function is recommended after initiation of anticoagulant therapy.

  8. Controlled study of child health supervision: behavioral results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guteilus, M F; Kirsch, A D; MacDonald, S; Brooks, M R; McErlean, T

    1977-09-01

    Extensive child health supervision, with emphasis on counseling and anticipatory guidance, was provided for the first three years of life to an experimental series of 47 normal first-born black infants from low-income families living in the environs of Children's Hospital in Washington, D.C. The mothers were unmarried schoolgirls in normal physical and mental health. A control series consisted of 48 similar mother-child dyads from the same area. Data were collected, in part by an outside evaluator, at yearly intervals on both experimental and control series in a form suitable for coding on computer cards. Comparison of differences in behavioral results between the two series showed statistically significant findings in favor of the experimental children, as well as numerous favorable trends during the first six years of life. Positive effects became evident in diet and eating, habits, in some developmental problems of growing up (such as toilet training), and in certain abstract qualities including self-confidence. Significant differences were also noted between the experimental and control mothers for various child rearing practices and personality characteristics. No significant difference or trend favored the control series. We believe that a causal relationship existed between the intervention and at least some of the significant findings.

  9. Anticoagulant use for the prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation: findings from a multi-payer analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Kathleen; Bozkaya, Duygu; Patel, Aarti A; Macomson, Brian; Nelson, Winnie; Owens, Gary; Mody, Samir; Schein, Jeff; Menzin, Joseph

    2014-07-28

    Oral anticoagulation is recommended for stroke prevention in intermediate/high stroke risk atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the usefulness of analytic software tools for descriptive analyses of disease management in atrial AF; a secondary objective is to demonstrate patterns of potential anticoagulant undertreatment in AF. Retrospective data analyses were performed using the Anticoagulant Quality Improvement Analyzer (AQuIA), a software tool designed to analyze health plan data. Two-year data from five databases were analyzed: IMS LifeLink (IMS), MarketScan Commercial (MarketScanCommercial), MarketScan Medicare Supplemental (MarketScanMedicare), Clinformatics™ DataMart, a product of OptumInsight Life Sciences (Optum), and a Medicaid Database (Medicaid). Included patients were ≥ 18 years old with a new or existing diagnosis of AF. The first observed AF diagnosis constituted the index date, with patient outcomes assessed over a one year period. Key study measures included stroke risk level, anticoagulant use, and frequency of International Normalized Ratio (INR) monitoring. High stroke risk (CHADS2 ≥ 2 points) was estimated in 54% (IMS), 22% (MarketScanCommercial), 64% (MarketscanMedicare), 42% (Optum) and 62% (Medicaid) of the total eligible population. Overall, 35%, 29%, 38%, 39% and 16% of all AF patients received an anticoagulant medication in IMS, MarketScanCommercial, MarketScanMedicare, Optum and Medicaid, respectively. Among patients at high risk for stroke, 19% to 51% received any anticoagulant. The AQuIA provided a consistent platform for analysis across multiple AF populations with varying baseline characteristics. Analyzer results show that many high-risk AF patients in selected commercial, Medicare-eligible, and Medicaid populations do not receive appropriate thromboprophylaxis, as recommended by treatment guidelines.

  10. Idarucizumab for Reversing Dabigatran-Induced Anticoagulation: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Nathan; Morrill, Amanda M; Willett, Kristine C

    The approval of the oral direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate, gave patients an alternative to oral anticoagulation with warfarin. Like all anticoagulants, the primary adverse event (AE) associated with dabigatran is bleeding. Until the FDA approval of idarucizumab, there had been no reversal agent for dabigatran-induced anticoagulation in patients with life-threatening or uncontrollable bleeding, or those requiring emergent procedures. The primary purpose of this review is to summarize the safety and efficacy of idarucizumab, a monoclonal antibody fragment, and its use as a reversal agent for dabigatran. A literature search was conducted through MEDLINE (1946 to November week 1 2015) and Embase (1980-2015 week 46) using the search term idarucizumab. Clinicaltrials.gov was consulted for a comprehensive list of ongoing and completed studies. Additional studies were identified through bibliographical citations. Clinical trials in animals and humans published in English evaluating the safety and efficacy of idarucizumab for reversal of anticoagulant treatment with dabigatran were included for review. Idarucizumab has been shown to significantly reverse the anticoagulant effects of dabigatran in both healthy volunteers and patients requiring a reversal agent because of either overt bleeding or an emergency surgery or invasive procedure. The most common AEs were headache, nasopharyngitis, back pain, skin irritation, hypokalemia, delirium, constipation, pyrexia, and pneumonia. Deaths reported in idarucizumab studies were attributed to either the index event or a preexisting comorbidity. Most adverse effects were minor, but 21 serious AEs have been reported in the published data including thrombotic events. Given the increased use of direct oral anticoagulants, such as dabigatran, a need for specific reversal agents exists. Idarucizumab has been shown to be safe and effective in the reversal of dabigatran-induced anticoagulation in patients requiring emergent

  11. The influence of using anticoagulants (EDTA and citrate acid 3.8% toward the quantity of Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP

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    Lilies Anggarwati Astuti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP is a blood concentrate that has a thrombocytes concentration several time higher than normal concentration of thrombocytes in normal human blood. PRP is a promising alternative to surgery with a safe and natural healing. The standard protocol for PRP preparation must be determined to get the right quantity and quality of the matrix of fibrin, leukocytes, platelets and growth factors. It could not be separated from the number of PRP produced. The use of PRP in the success of periodontal treatment would not be separated from methods to obtain it. To detect the influence of using anticoagulants (EDTA and citrate acid 3.8% toward the quantity of PRP. There are 41 subjects studied by taking 21 ml of venous blood in each of the seven tubes. Centrifugation performed twice with different speed, duration, use of anticoagulants then analyzed. This quantity between the two groups differed significantly between the PRP in EDTA group is higher 322.2 ml rather than citrate acid 3.8% group, then control group is higher 329.5 ml rather than citrate acid 3.8% group, while there is no difference between EDTA and control group. There is effect of the use of anticoagulants EDTA compared with citrate acid 3.8% in the quantity of PRP, and there was no effect using citrate acid 3.8% as anticoagulants in quantity of PRP.

  12. [Real-world data on novel oral anticoagulants: the added value of registries and observational studies. Focus on apixaban].

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    Pelliccia, Francesco; Tanzilli, Gaetano; Schiariti, Michele; Viceconte, Nicola; Greco, Cesare; Gaudio, Carlo

    2016-12-01

    Anticoagulant therapy has been used with great effect for decades for the prevention of stroke among patients with atrial fibrillation. In recent years, the therapeutic armamentarium has been strengthened considerably, with the addition of anticoagulants acting through novel pathways. The currently available novel agents are apixaban, rivaroxaban and dabigatran. These novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) were approved for use on the basis of major clinical trials clearly demonstrating improved risk reductions compared to warfarin for stroke and/or major bleeding events. In these studies, apixaban and dabigatran 150 mg each significantly reduced the risk of stroke, while apixaban and dabigatran 110 mg reduced the risk of major bleeding compared to warfarin. Extrapolating the results of the randomized clinical trials on NOACs to all patients is not possible, as the strict design of clinical trials yields information that is directly applicable to a relatively narrow spectrum of patients. To control for confounding variables, randomized studies restrict enrolment to a prespecified set of criteria that do not necessarily reflect the profiles of all those who could potentially benefit from these agents. Research continues using the trial databases, in an attempt to better identify patient subgroups who do or do not benefit from each of the agents. At the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) annual meetings in London in 2015 and in Rome in 2016, there were several presentations and posters providing this type of evidence. Perhaps more important, as real-world experience with these agents grows, we are beginning to obtain meaningful new information about the NOACs in everyday use. This has involved the study of large databases including patients receiving these medications in clinical situations less stringently defined than in the randomized clinical trials. These include purpose-built registries, observational studies, and analyses of healthcare administrative databases

  13. Feasibility Study of a Mobile Health Intervention for Older Adults on Oral Anticoagulation Therapy

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    Jung-Ah Lee PhD, RN

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral anticoagulation treatment (OAT such as warfarin therapy is recommended for older adults with atrial fibrillation, heart failure, or who are at risk for venous thromboembolism. Despite its proven benefits, older adults report both dissatisfaction with OAT and reduced quality of life that can potentially lead to low adherence to OAT and decreased treatment efficacy. Objective: To test the feasibility of Mobile Applications for Seniors to enhance Safe anticoagulation therapy (MASS, a mobile-based health technology intervention designed to promote independence and self-care. Method s: This pilot study used a single-arm experimental pre–post design to test the feasibility of a 3-month intervention using MASS in 18 older adults (male: n = 14; White: n = 9; Hispanic: n = 7; Other: n = 2; M age = 67. MASS was available in English or Spanish. Participants completed surveys about their OAT knowledge, attitudes, quality of life with OAT, and adherence at baseline and at a 3-month follow-up. Satisfaction with the MASS intervention was also assessed at follow-up. Results: Anticoagulation knowledge significantly improved from baseline to follow-up ( M base = 12.5 ± 5.51, M follow-up = 14.78 ± 3.93, p = .007. Other outcomes were not different, pre- and post-tests. Participants reported they were generally satisfied with MASS, its ease of use and its usefulness. Conclusion: The results showed use of MASS improved older adults’ knowledge of OAT. Using mHealth apps may enhance self-care among older adults with chronic conditions who are also taking oral anticoagulants.

  14. Photoselective vaporization of the prostate in men with a history of chronic oral anti-coagulation

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    Omer F. Karatas

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: A considerable percentage of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH also have additional cardiac pathologies, which often require anticoagulant therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP for BPH in cardiac patients receiving anticoagulant therapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 67 patients suffering from BPH and high risk cardiac pathologies were operated on using laser prostatectomy. All patients had cardiac pathologies with bleeding disorders requiring anticoagulant use, and underwent standard urologic evaluation for BPH. Patients were treated with laser prostatectomy for relief of the obstruction using the KTP/532 laser energy at 80 W. RESULTS: The mean patient age was 71.4 years (range 55-80. Mean prostate volume on transrectal ultrasonography was 73.2 mL (range 44-120. Operation time ranged from 40 to 90 min, with an average value of 55 min. The average hospital stay was 48 hours (range 12-72 and the Foley catheters were removed within 48 hours, with a mean catheterization time of 34.2 ± 5.9 hours (0-48. No patient required an additional procedure due to severe bleeding necessitating intervention during the early postoperative phase. Mean International symptoms scoring system (IPSS values and post voiding residual volume decreased and peak urinary flow rate increased (p < 0.001. Our results showed that the mean prostate volume had decreased by 53% at 6 months. CONCLUSIONS: High-power photo selective laser vaporization prostatectomy is a feasible, safe, and effective alternative for the minimal invasive management of BPH, particularly in cardiac patients receiving anticoagulant therapy.

  15. Cost of vitamin K antagonist anticoagulant treatment in patients with metallic prosthetic valve in mitral position

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    Gabriela Ene

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The initiation of oral anticoagulation therapy after valve replacement surgery requires strict monitoring because these patients are at high risk for the development of thrombotic complications and present an increased risk of bleeding. Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine the total healthcare costs of oral anticoagulant treatment with vitamin K antagonists in patients with metallic prosthetic valves in the mitral position. Methods: Data from clinical records were used in the study including international normalized ratio results, number of medical visits, type of anticoagulant, use of rescue medication and hospital admissions from related complications. The drug cost was calculated based on the official Spanish Ministry of Health price list. Monitoring expenses were included in the cost of the medical supplies used in the procedures. Hospitalization costs were calculated using the diagnosis-related group price for each case. Results: We collected data from 151 patients receiving oral anticoagulation therapy with vitamin K antagonist who were diagnosed with mitral prosthesis (n = 90, mitro-aortic prosthesis (n = 57, and mitral and tricuspid prosthesis (n = 4. The total direct healthcare cost was €15302.59, with a mean total cost per patient per year of €1558.15 (±2774.58 consisting of 44.38 (±42.30 for drug cost, €71.41 (±21.43 for international normalized ratio monitoring, €429.52 (±126.87 for medical visits, €26.31 (±28.38 for rescue medication and €986.53 (±2735.68 for related complications. Conclusion: Most direct healthcare costs associated with the sampled patients arose from the specialist-care monitoring required for treatment. Good monitoring is inversely related to direct healthcare costs.

  16. Tailoring of TiO2 films by H2SO4 treatment and UV irradiation to improve anticoagulant ability and endothelial cell compatibility.

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    Liao, Yuzhen; Li, Linhua; Chen, Jiang; Yang, Ping; Zhao, Ansha; Sun, Hong; Huang, Nan

    2017-07-01

    Surfaces with dual functions that simultaneously exhibit good anticoagulant ability and endothelial cell (EC) compatibility are desirable for blood contact materials. However, these dual functions have rarely been achieved by inorganic materials. In this study, titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) films were treated by sulphuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ) and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation successively (TiO 2 H 2 SO 4 -UV), resulting in good anticoagulant ability and EC compatibility simultaneously. We found that UV irradiation improved the anticoagulant ability of TiO 2 films significantly while enhancing EC compatibility, though not significantly. The enhanced anticoagulant ability could be related to the oxidation of surface-adsorbed hydrocarbons and increased hydrophilicity. The H 2 SO 4 treatment improved the anticoagulant ability of TiO 2 films slightly, while UV irradiation improved the anticoagulant ability strongly. The enhanced EC compatibility could be related to the increased surface roughness and positive charges on the surface of the TiO 2 films. Furthermore, the time-dependent degradation of the enhanced EC compatibility and anticoagulant ability of TiO 2 H 2 SO 4 -UV was observed. In summary, TiO 2 H 2 SO 4 -UV expressed both excellent anticoagulant ability and good EC compatibility at the same time, which could be desirable for blood contact materials. However, the compatibility of TiO 2 H 2 SO 4 -UV with smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and macrophages was also improved. More effort is still needed to selectively improve EC compatibility on TiO 2 films for better re-endothelialization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Biobarcode assay for the oral anticoagulant acenocoumarol.

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    Broto, Marta; Salvador, J Pablo; Galve, Roger; Marco, M Pilar

    2018-02-01

    A novel approach for therapeutic drug monitoring of oral anticoagulants (OA) in clinical samples is reported, based on a NP-based biobarcode assay. The proposed strategy uses specific antibodies for acenocumarol (ACL) covalently bound to magnetic particles (pAb236-MP) and a bioconjugate competitor (hACL-BSA) linked to encoded polystyrene probes (hACL-BSA-ePSP) on a classical competitive immunochemical format. By using this scheme ACL can be detected in low nM range (LOD, 0.96 ± 0.26, N = 3, in buffer) even in complex samples such as serum or plasma (LOD 4 ± 1). The assay shows a high reproducibility (%CV 1.1 day-to-day) and is robust, as it is demonstrated by the fact that ACL can be quantified in complex biological samples with a very good accuracy (slope = 0.97 and R 2 = 0.91, of the linear regression obtained when analyzing spiked vs measured values). Moreover, we have demonstrated that the biobarcode approach has the potential to overcome one of the main challenges of the multiplexed diagnostic, which is the possibility to measure in a single run biomarker targets present at different concentration ranges. Thus, it has been proven that the signal and the detectability can be modulated by just modifying the oligonucleotide load of the encoded probes. This fact opens the door for combining in the same assay encoded probes with the necessary oligonucleotide load to achieve the detectability required for each biomarker target. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A single-dose of oral nattokinase potentiates thrombolysis and anti-coagulation profiles.

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    Kurosawa, Yuko; Nirengi, Shinsuke; Homma, Toshiyuki; Esaki, Kazuki; Ohta, Mitsuhiro; Clark, Joseph F; Hamaoka, Takafumi

    2015-06-25

    Our aim was to determine the quantitative effects of a single-dose of Nattokinase (NK) administration on coagulation/fibrinolysis parameters comprehensively in healthy male subjects. A double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over NK intervention study was carried out in 12 healthy young males. Following the baseline blood draw, each subject was randomized to receive either a single-dose of 2,000 FU NK (NSK-SD, Japan Bio Science Laboratory Co., Ltd) or placebo with subsequent cross-over of the groups. Subjects donated blood samples at 2, 4, 6 and 8 hours following administration for analysis of coagulation/fibrinolysis parameters. As a result, D-dimer concentrations at 6, and 8 hours, and blood fibrin/fibrinogen degradation products at 4 hours after NK administration elevated significantly (p < 0.05, respectively). Factor VIII activity declined at 4 and 6 hours (p < 0.05, respectively), blood antithrombin concentration was higher at 2 and 4 hours (p < 0.05, respectively), and the activated partial thromboplastin time prolonged significantly at 2 and 4 hours following NK administration (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). All the changes, however, were within the normal range. In conclusion, thus, a single-dose of NK administration appears enhancing fibrinolysis and anti-coagulation via several different pathways simultaneously.

  19. Pharmacology of new oral anticoagulants: mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics

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    Luca Masotti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to their mechanism of action, the new oral anticoagulants are named direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs. Dabigatran is a selective, competitive, direct inhibitor of thrombin (Factor IIa while rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban act by directly inhibiting the activated Factor X (FXa in a selective and competitive manner. DOACs have a relatively short half-life and almost immediate anticoagulant activity, and rapidly reach the plasma peak concentration. Therefore, they do not need a phase of overlapping with parenteral anticoagulants. After their withdrawal, their removal is sufficiently rapid, although influenced by renal function. Dabigatran is the only DOACs to be administered as a pro-drug and becomes active after drug metabolization. The route of elimination of dabigatran is primarily renal, whereas FXa inhibitors are mainly eliminated by the biliary-fecal route. The drug interactions of DOACs are mainly limited to drugs that act on P-glycoprotein for dabigatran and on P-glycoprotein and/or cytochrome P3A4 for anti-Xa. DOACs have no interactions with food. Given their linear pharmacodynamics, with a predictable dose/response relationship and anticoagulant effect, DOACs are administered at a fixed dose and do not require routine laboratory monitoring.

  20. Cost of vitamin K antagonist anticoagulant treatment in patients with metallic prosthetic valve in mitral position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ene, Gabriela; Garcia Raso, Aránzazu; Gonzalez-Dominguez Weber, Almudena; Hidalgo-Vega, Álvaro; Llamas, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    The initiation of oral anticoagulation therapy after valve replacement surgery requires strict monitoring because these patients are at high risk for the development of thrombotic complications and present an increased risk of bleeding. The aim of this study was to examine the total healthcare costs of oral anticoagulant treatment with vitamin K antagonists in patients with metallic prosthetic valves in the mitral position. Data from clinical records were used in the study including international normalized ratio results, number of medical visits, type of anticoagulant, use of rescue medication and hospital admissions from related complications. The drug cost was calculated based on the official Spanish Ministry of Health price list. Monitoring expenses were included in the cost of the medical supplies used in the procedures. Hospitalization costs were calculated using the diagnosis-related group price for each case. We collected data from 151 patients receiving oral anticoagulation therapy with vitamin K antagonist who were diagnosed with mitral prosthesis (n = 90), mitro-aortic prosthesis (n = 57), and mitral and tricuspid prosthesis (n = 4). The total direct healthcare cost was €15302.59, with a mean total cost per patient per year of €1558.15 (±2774.58) consisting of 44.38 (±42.30) for drug cost, €71.41 (±21.43) for international normalized ratio monitoring, €429.52 (±126.87) for medical visits, €26.31 (±28.38) for rescue medication and €986.53 (±2735.68) for related complications. Most direct healthcare costs associated with the sampled patients arose from the specialist-care monitoring required for treatment. Good monitoring is inversely related to direct healthcare costs.

  1. Current guidelines and prospects for using novel oral anticoagulants for nonvalvular atrial fibrillation

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    A. V. Fonyakin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The capabilities of antithrombotic therapy to prevent systemic thromboembolic events in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF are substantially extended after clinically introducing novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs, such as dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban. World clinical experience with NOACs in AF has confirmed their efficacy and safety in both primary and secondary stroke prevention. At the same time, apixaban additionally reduces the risk of fatal outcomes and it is the safest among the NOACs against hemorrhagic events. The low risks of intracranial hemorrhage typical of NOACs should be taken into account when choosing oral anticoagulant therapy after hemorrhagic stroke in patients athigh risk for thromboembolic events due to AF. Whether NOACs may be used in acute myocardial infarction and during coronary stenting in the presence of nonvalvular AF, left ventricular thromboses, and cardiomyopathies is considered. In real clinical practice, nonvalvular AF may be accompanied by different cardiovascular diseases, by creating the situations where there are no specific guidelines for the use of NOACs. The results of comparing the clinical efficiency of different antithrombotic therapy regimens, the subanalysis of randomized trials, and experts’ opinions may assist a physician to substantiate their decisions. Thus, just a few NOACs that are similar and/or superior to warfarin in efficacy and safety have emerged to date. There are grounds to believe that many physicians will prefer direct anticoagulants to warfarin not only because of their proven efficacy, but also the rapid onset of their anticoagulant effect, neither interaction with a number of foods or drugs, and above all, nor need for regular laboratory blood testing. World post-marketingsurveillance and new clinical tests will be helpful in better estimating the benefits and risks of treatment with NOACs and in expanding indications for their use, which will considerably

  2. Patients' and physicians' satisfaction with a pharmacist managed anticoagulation program in a family medicine clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Lisa; Young, Stephanie; Twells, Laurie; Dillon, Carla; Hawboldt, John

    2015-06-09

    A pharmacist managed anticoagulation service was initiated in a multi-physician family medicine clinic in December 2006. In order to determine the patient and physician satisfaction with the service, a study was designed to describe the patients' satisfaction with the warfarin education and management they received from the pharmacist, and to describe the physicians' satisfaction with the level of care provided by the pharmacist for patients taking warfarin. A self-administered survey was completed by both eligible patients receiving warfarin and physicians prescribing warfarin between December 2006 and May 2008. The patient survey collected information on patient demographics, satisfaction with warfarin education and daily warfarin management. The physician survey collected data about the satisfaction with patient education and daily anticoagulation management by the pharmacist. Seventy-six of 94 (81%) patients completed the survey. Fifty-nine percent were male with a mean age of 65 years (range 24-90). Ninety-six percent agreed/strongly agreed the pharmacist did a good job teaching the importance of warfarin adherence, the necessity of INR testing and the risks of bleeding. Eighty-five percent agreed/strongly agreed the risk of blood clots was well explained, 79% felt the pharmacist did a good job teaching about dietary considerations and 77% agreed/strongly agreed the pharmacist explained when to see a doctor. All patients felt the pharmacist gave clear instructions on warfarin dosing and INR testing. Four of nine physicians (44%) completed the survey. All agreed/strongly agreed the pharmacist was competent in the care provided, were confident in the care their patients received, would like the pharmacist to continue the service, and would recommend this program to other clinics. Patients and family physicians were satisfied with the pharmacist managed anticoagulation program and recommended continuation of the program. These results support the role of the

  3. A network-based multi-target computational estimation scheme for anticoagulant activities of compounds.

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    Qian Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Traditional virtual screening method pays more attention on predicted binding affinity between drug molecule and target related to a certain disease instead of phenotypic data of drug molecule against disease system, as is often less effective on discovery of the drug which is used to treat many types of complex diseases. Virtual screening against a complex disease by general network estimation has become feasible with the development of network biology and system biology. More effective methods of computational estimation for the whole efficacy of a compound in a complex disease system are needed, given the distinct weightiness of the different target in a biological process and the standpoint that partial inhibition of several targets can be more efficient than the complete inhibition of a single target. METHODOLOGY: We developed a novel approach by integrating the affinity predictions from multi-target docking studies with biological network efficiency analysis to estimate the anticoagulant activities of compounds. From results of network efficiency calculation for human clotting cascade, factor Xa and thrombin were identified as the two most fragile enzymes, while the catalytic reaction mediated by complex IXa:VIIIa and the formation of the complex VIIIa:IXa were recognized as the two most fragile biological matter in the human clotting cascade system. Furthermore, the method which combined network efficiency with molecular docking scores was applied to estimate the anticoagulant activities of a serial of argatroban intermediates and eight natural products respectively. The better correlation (r = 0.671 between the experimental data and the decrease of the network deficiency suggests that the approach could be a promising computational systems biology tool to aid identification of anticoagulant activities of compounds in drug discovery. CONCLUSIONS: This article proposes a network-based multi-target computational estimation

  4. A network-based multi-target computational estimation scheme for anticoagulant activities of compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Li, Xudong; Li, Canghai; Chen, Lirong; Song, Jun; Tang, Yalin; Xu, Xiaojie

    2011-03-22

    Traditional virtual screening method pays more attention on predicted binding affinity between drug molecule and target related to a certain disease instead of phenotypic data of drug molecule against disease system, as is often less effective on discovery of the drug which is used to treat many types of complex diseases. Virtual screening against a complex disease by general network estimation has become feasible with the development of network biology and system biology. More effective methods of computational estimation for the whole efficacy of a compound in a complex disease system are needed, given the distinct weightiness of the different target in a biological process and the standpoint that partial inhibition of several targets can be more efficient than the complete inhibition of a single target. We developed a novel approach by integrating the affinity predictions from multi-target docking studies with biological network efficiency analysis to estimate the anticoagulant activities of compounds. From results of network efficiency calculation for human clotting cascade, factor Xa and thrombin were identified as the two most fragile enzymes, while the catalytic reaction mediated by complex IXa:VIIIa and the formation of the complex VIIIa:IXa were recognized as the two most fragile biological matter in the human clotting cascade system. Furthermore, the method which combined network efficiency with molecular docking scores was applied to estimate the anticoagulant activities of a serial of argatroban intermediates and eight natural products respectively. The better correlation (r = 0.671) between the experimental data and the decrease of the network deficiency suggests that the approach could be a promising computational systems biology tool to aid identification of anticoagulant activities of compounds in drug discovery. This article proposes a network-based multi-target computational estimation method for anticoagulant activities of compounds by

  5. Na2EDTA anticoagulant impaired blood samples from the teleost Piaractus mesopotamicus

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    Thaís Heloisa Vaz Farias

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of Na heparin and Na2EDTA on blood of Piaractus mesopotamicus (360.7±42.4g, 26.4±1.0cm. Twenty fishes were sampled in two experiment trials, ten for erythrocyte fragility analysis and ten for hematologic and plasma biochemical study. The blood collected by venous-caudal puncture was fractioned and stored in anticoagulants solution: Na2EDTA 10%, Na2EDTA 3%, Na heparin 5000 IU and Na heparin 100 IU. Plasmatic levels of calcium presented in the Na2EDTA stored samples were about 80% lower than both heparin groups. Blood samples of P. mesopotamicus stored with Na2EDTA demonstrated increase in the hematocrit and MCV, and decrease in MCHC. The dose-response effect was observed in this study. The results are reinforced by the higher levels of plasmatic protein and hemolysis presented in the Na2EDTA 10% stored blood, confirming the deleterious effect of this anticoagulant treatment on the quality of blood samples. Na2EDTA is not indicated to store P. mesopotamicus blood samples, but sodium heparin at 100 IU is the most recommended anticoagulant, since this treatment presented the lower rate of alterations in the stored blood.

  6. Purification, structural characterization and anticoagulant properties of fucosylated chondroitin sulfate isolated from Holothuria mexicana.

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    Mou, Jiaojiao; Wang, Cong; Li, Wenjing; Yang, Jie

    2017-05-01

    A novel fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (HmG) was isolated from sea cucumber Holothuria mexicana, the structure of which was characterized by monosaccharide composition, disaccharide composition, IR, 1 H and 13 C NMR spectrum, additionally with two dimensional NMR spectrum of degraded HmG (DHmG). The backbone of HmG was identified as chondroitin 6-O sulfate, while the major O-4 sulfated fucose branches linked to O-3 position of glucuronic acid in almost every disaccharide unit. The anticoagulant activities of HmG and DHmG were assessed and compared with heparin and low molecular weight heparin. The results indicated that HmG and DHmG both could significantly prolong the activated partial thrombo-plastin time, and the properties were well related to its molecular weight. DHmG showed similar anticoagulant properties to low molecular weight heparin with less bleeding risks, making it a safer anticoagulant drug. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessment of bleeding during minor oral surgical procedures and extraction in patients on anticoagulant therapy

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    S Jimson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The risk of postoperative hemorrhage from oral surgical procedures has been a concern in the treatment of patients who are receiving long-term anticoagulation therapy. A study undertaken in our institution to address questions about the amount and severity of bleeding associated with minor outpatient oral surgery procedures by assessing bleeding in patients who did not alter their anticoagulant regimen. Subjects and Methods: Eighty-three patients receiving long-term anticoagulant therapy visited Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery from May 2010 to October 2011 for extractions and minor oral surgical procedures. Each patient was required to undergo preoperative assessment of prothrombin time (PT and measurement of the international normalized ratio. Fifty-six patients with preoperative PT values within the therapeutic range 3-4 were included in the study. The patients′ age ranged between 30 and 75 years. Application of surgispon was done following the procedure. Extraction of teeth performed with minimal trauma to the surrounding tissues, the socket margins sutured, and sutures removed after 5 days. Results: There was no significant incidence of prolonged or excessive hemorrhage and wound infection and the healing process was normal.

  8. Neuraxial and peripheral nerve blocks in patients taking anticoagulant or thromboprophylactic drugs: challenges and solutions

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    Li J

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Jinlei Li, Thomas Halaszynski Department of Anesthesiology, Yale University, Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT, USA Abstract: Incidence of hemorrhagic complications from neuraxial blockade is unknown, but classically cited as 1 in 150,000 epidurals and 1 in 220,000 spinals. However, recent literature and epidemiologic data suggest that for certain patient populations the frequency is higher (1 in 3,000. Due to safety concerns of bleeding risk, guidelines and recommendations have been designed to reduce patient morbidity/mortality during regional anesthesia. Data from evidence-based reviews, clinical series and case reports, collaborative experience of experts, and pharmacology used in developing consensus statements are unable to address all patient comorbidities and are not able to guarantee specific outcomes. No laboratory model identifies patients at risk, and rarity of neuraxial hematoma defies prospective randomized study so “patient-specific” factors and “surgery-related” issues should be considered to improve patient-oriented outcomes. Details of advanced age, older females, trauma patients, spinal cord and vertebral column abnormalities, organ function compromise, presence of underlying coagulopathy, traumatic or difficult needle placement, as well as indwelling catheter(s during anticoagulation pose risks for significant bleeding. Therefore, balancing between thromboembolism, bleeding risk, and introduction of more potent antithrombotic medications in combination with regional anesthesia has resulted in a need for more than “consensus statements” to safely manage regional interventions during anticoagulant/thromboprophylactic therapy. Keywords: antithrombotics, novel oral anticoagulant, regional, neurologic dysfunction, hematoma, peripheral nerve blockade

  9. Technology-assisted self-testing and management of oral anticoagulation therapy: a qualitative patient-focused study.

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    Kuljis, Jasna; Money, Arthur G; Perry, Mark; Barnett, Julie; Young, Terry

    2017-09-01

    Oral anticoagulation therapy requires regular blood testing to ensure therapeutic levels are maintained and excessive bleeding/clotting is avoided. Technology-assisted self-testing and management is seen as one of the key areas in which quality of care can be improved whilst reducing costs. Nevertheless, levels of patient engagement in self-testing and management remain low. To date, little research emphasis has been placed on understanding the patients' perspectives for low engagement. The typical approach adopted by healthcare providers is to provide patient education programmes, with the expectation that individual patients will change their behaviour and adopt new self-care strategies. However, if levels of patient engagement are to be increased, healthcare providers must also develop a better understanding of how their clinical service provision is perceived by patients and make adaptations. To explore patient views, needs and expectations of an anticoagulation service and the self-testing and management services provided. Interviews were conducted with 17 patients who currently engage in international normalised ratio (INR) self-testing and management. Thematic coding and analysis were carried out on the interview transcripts. Four high-level themes emerged from interviews: (i) role of clinic, (ii) motivations for self-testing, (iii) managing INR and (iv) trust. The clinic was seen as adding value in terms of specifying testing frequency, dosage profiles and calibrating equipment. Prompt communication from clinic to patient was also valued, although more personalised/real-time communication would help avoid feelings of isolation. Patients felt more in control as self-tester/managers and often took decisions about treatment adjustments themselves. However, some also manipulated their own test results to avoid 'unnecessary' interventions. More personalised/real-time communication, pragmatic and collaborative patient-clinician partnerships and recognition of

  10. Current issues in patient adherence and persistence: focus on anticoagulants for the treatment and prevention of thromboembolism

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    Patrick P Kneeland

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Patrick P Kneeland, Margaret C FangThe University of California, San Francisco Division of Hospital Medicine, San Francisco, CA, USAAbstract: Warfarin therapy reduces morbidity and mortality related to thromboembolism. Yet adherence to long-term warfarin therapy remains challenging due to the risks of anticoagulantassociated complications and the burden of monitoring. The aim of this paper is to review determinants of adherence and persistence on long-term anticoagulant therapy for atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism. We evaluate what the current literature reveals about the impact of warfarin on quality of life, examine warfarin trial data for patterns of adherence, and summarize known risk factors for warfarin discontinuation. Studies suggest only modest adverse effects of warfarin on quality of life, but highlight the variability of individual lifestyle experiences of patients on warfarin. Interestingly, clinical trials comparing anticoagulant adherence to alternatives (such as aspirin show that discontinuation rates on warfarin are not consistently higher than in control arms. Observational studies link a number of risk factors to warfarin non-adherence including younger age, male sex, lower stroke risk, poor cognitive function, poverty, and higher educational attainment. In addition to differentiating the relative impact of warfarin-associated complications (such as bleeding versus the lifestyle burdens of warfarin monitoring on adherence, future investigation should focus on optimizing patient education and enhancing models of physician–patient shared-decision making around anticoagulation.Keywords: anticoagulation, warfarin, adherence, persistence, thromboembolism

  11. Recent developments in separation of low molecular weight heparin anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Radosław; Gadzała-Kopciuch, Renata; Buszewski, Bogusław

    2017-10-05

    The general function of anticoagulants is to prevent blood clotting and growing of the existing clots in blood vessels. In recent years, there has been a significant improvement in developing methods of prevention as well as pharmacologic and surgical treatment of thrombosis. For over the last two decades, low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) have found their application in the antithrombotic diseases treatment. These types of drugs are widely used in clinical therapy. Despite the biological and medical importance of LMWHs, they have not been completely characterized in terms of their chemical structure. Due to both, the structural complexity of these anticoagulants and the presence of impurities, their structural characterization requires the employment of advanced analytical techniques. Since separation techniques play the key role in these endeavors, this review will focus on the presentation of recent developments in the separation of LMWH anticoagulants. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Bleeding events associated with novel anticoagulants: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaee, Sam; Tran, Tara Thi Thien; Amerena, John

    2013-12-01

    Until lately warfarin was the only valuable oral anticoagulant in stroke reduction in high risk cases with non valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Although with warfarin the rate of stroke reduced notably, the major concern is the risk of serious bleeding and difficulty of establishing and maintaining the international normalised ratio (INR) within the therapeutic range. With the development of the novel anticoagulants we now have for the first time since the innovation of Warfarin feasible alternatives to it to decrease stroke rates in high risk patients with NVAF. To diminish adverse bleeding events with the novel anticoagulant proper selection of patients prior starting treatment is essential. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Anticoagulation in pregnant females with mechanical heart valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafique, H.; Chaudhry, A.; Ayyub, M.

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the complications and outcome of anticoagulation therapy in pregnant females with valvular heart diseases. All pregnant females with prosthetic heart valves admitted in Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology from Jan 2004 to Dec 2004 were included in this study Basic demographic data including age, duration of pregnancy and complications observed were recorded. Warfarin was replaced with un-fractionated heparin (UFH) in first trimester and after that warfarin was continued with a targeted INR between 2.0-3.0. At 36 weeks warfarin was stopped and UFH was added; however, if patient went into spontaneous labour before this then immediate caesarian section was performed and UFH was restarted 4-6 hours after delivery along with oral warfarin. Out of 21 patients, sixteen (76.1%) had mitral valve diseases and five (23.9%) had both mitral and atrial. Majority (42.3%)of patients were in age group 26-30 years. Eleven (52.2%) reported in 9th month of gestation. Complications observed were hypertension (1), transient ischaemic attacks (1), pulmonary embolism (1), haemoptysis (1) and abortion (1). All patients, except one had successful completion of pregnancy. No case of foetal abnormality was seen. In 76% patients, daily dose of warfarin was <5 mg. Thrombo-prophylaxis in pregnancy with warfarin and UFH with an INR of 2.0-3.0 is effective in preventing thrombotic complications in females with mechanical valves without resulting in increase hemorrhagic complications. (author)

  14. Simple Motor Control Concept Results High Efficiency at High Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starin, Scott; Engel, Chris

    2013-09-01

    The need for high velocity motors in space applications for reaction wheels and detectors has stressed the limits of Brushless Permanent Magnet Motors (BPMM). Due to inherent hysteresis core losses, conventional BPMMs try to balance the need for torque verses hysteresis losses. Cong-less motors have significantly less hysteresis losses but suffer from lower efficiencies. Additionally, the inherent low inductance in cog-less motors result in high ripple currents or high switching frequencies, which lowers overall efficiency and increases performance demands on the control electronics.However, using a somewhat forgotten but fully qualified technology of Isotropic Magnet Motors (IMM), extremely high velocities may be achieved at low power input using conventional drive electronics. This paper will discuss the trade study efforts and empirical test data on a 34,000 RPM IMM.

  15. On reporting results from randomized controlled trials with recurrent events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobolev Boris G

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence-based medicine has been advanced by the use of standards for reporting the design and methodology of randomized controlled trials (RCT. Indeed, without this information it is difficult to assess the quality of evidence from an RCT. Although a variety of statistical methods are available for the analysis of recurrent events, reporting the effect of an intervention on outcomes that recur is an area that remains poorly understood in clinical research. The purpose of this paper is to outline guidelines for reporting results from RCTs where the outcome of interest is a recurrent event. Methods We used a simulation study to relate an event process and results from analyses of the gamma-Poisson, independent-increment, conditional, and marginal Cox models. We reviewed the utility of regression models for the rate of a recurrent event by articulating the associated study questions, preenting the risk sets, and interpreting the regression coefficients. Results Based on a single data set produced by simulation, we reported and contrasted results from statistical methods for evaluating treatment effect from an RCT with a recurrent outcome. We showed that each model has different study questions, assumptions, risk sets, and rate ratio interpretation, and so inferences should consider the appropriateness of the model for the RCT. Conclusion Our guidelines for reporting results from an RCT involving a recurrent event suggest that the study question and the objectives of the trial, such as assessing comparable groups and estimating effect size, should determine the statistical methods. The guidelines should allow clinical researchers to report appropriate measures from an RCT for understanding the effect of intervention on the occurrence of a recurrent event.

  16. Anticoagulant Preferences and Concerns among Venous Thromboembolism Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutsey, Pamela L; Horvath, Keith J; Fullam, Lisa; Moll, Stephan; Rooney, Mary R; Cushman, Mary; Zakai, Neil A

    2018-03-01

     Warfarin and direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are used for the initial treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE), and have similar efficacy. Patient concerns and preferences are important considerations when selecting an anticoagulant, yet these are not well studied.  VTE patients ( n  = 519) were surveyed from online sources (clotconnect.org, stoptheclot.org and National Blood Clot Alliance Facebook followers [ n  = 495]) and a haematology clinic in Vermont ( n  = 24).  Patients were 83% females and on average (±standard deviation [SD]) 45.7 ± 13.1 years; 65% self-reported warfarin as their initial VTE treatment and 35% a DOAC. Proportions reporting being extremely concerned about the following outcomes were as follows: recurrent VTE 33%, major bleeding 21%, moderate bleeding 16% and all-cause death 29%. When asked about oral anticoagulant characteristics, patients strongly preferred anticoagulants that are reversible (53%), and for which blood drug levels can be monitored (30%). Lower proportions agreed with statements that regular blood testing is inconvenient (18%), that they are comfortable using the newest drug versus an established drug (15%) and that it is difficult to change their diet to accommodate their anticoagulant (17%). In multivariable-adjusted models, patients tended to have had as their initial treatment, and to currently be taking, the oral anticoagulant option they personally preferred.  Patients held the greatest concern for recurrent VTE and mortality, regardless of which treatment they were prescribed. Potential weaknesses of warfarin (e.g., dietary restrictions, regular monitoring) were generally not considered onerous, while warfarin's advantages (e.g., ability to monitor) were viewed favourably. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  17. Direct anticoagulants and nursing: an approach from patient's safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Ruiz, Adolfo; Romero-Arana, Adolfo; Gómez-Salgado, Juan

    In recent years, a new line of treatment for the prevention of stroke in non-valvular atrial fibrillation, the so-called direct anticoagulants or new anticoagulants has appeared. The proper management and follow-up of these patients is essential to minimize their side effects and ensure patient safety. In this article, a description of these drugs is given, analyzing their characteristics, functioning and interactions together with the most habitual nursing interventions, as well as a reflection on the implications for the practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Unexpected disappearance of portal cavernoma on long-term anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Junior, Gilberto; Turon, Fanny; Hernandez-Gea, Virginia; Darnell, Anna; García-Criado, Ángeles; García-Pagán, Juan Carlos

    2014-08-01

    Idiopathic non-cirrhotic portal hypertension is a rare disease of unknown etiology. Patients with idiopathic non-cirrhotic portal hypertension have an increased risk of developing portal vein thrombosis and this is especially prevalent when HIV is also present. We describe a unique case of a patient with idiopathic non-cirrhotic portal hypertension associated to HIV, who developed acute portal vein thrombosis that despite anticoagulation transformed in portal cavernoma and disappeared completely after five years of follow-up on continuous anticoagulation. Copyright © 2014 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Safety of atrial fibrillation ablation with novel multi-electrode array catheters on uninterrupted anticoagulation-a single-center experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hayes, Christopher Ruslan

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: A recent single-center report indicated that the performance of atrial fibrillation ablation in patients on uninterrupted warfarin using a conventional deflectable tip electrode ablation catheter may be as safe as periprocedural discontinuation of warfarin and bridging with heparin. Novel multi-electrode array catheters for atrial fibrillation ablation are currently undergoing clinical evaluation. While offering the possibility of more rapid atrial fibrillation ablation, they are stiffer and necessitate the deployment of larger deflectable transseptal sheaths, and it remains to be determined if they increase the risk of cardiac perforation and vascular injury. Such potential risks would have implications for a strategy of uninterrupted periprocedural anticoagulation. METHOD AND RESULTS: We audited the safety outcomes of our atrial fibrillation ablation procedures using multi-electrode array ablation catheters in patients on uninterrupted warfarin (CHADS2 score>or=2) and in patients not on warfarin (uninterrupted aspirin). Two bleeding complications occurred in 49 patients on uninterrupted warfarin, both of which were managed successfully without longterm sequelae, and no bleeding complication occurred in 32 patients not on warfarin (uninterrupted aspirin). There were no thromboembolic events or other complication with either anticoagulant regimen. CONCLUSION: Despite the larger diameter and increased stiffness of multi-electrode array catheters and their deflectable transseptal sheaths, their use for catheter ablation in patients with atrial fibrillation on uninterrupted warfarin in this single-center experience does not appear to be unsafe, and thus, an adequately powered multicenter prospective randomized controlled trial should be considered.

  20. Measurement model choice influenced randomized controlled trial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorter, Rosalie; Fox, Jean-Paul; Apeldoorn, Adri; Twisk, Jos

    2016-11-01

    In randomized controlled trials (RCTs), outcome variables are often patient-reported outcomes measured with questionnaires. Ideally, all available item information is used for score construction, which requires an item response theory (IRT) measurement model. However, in practice, the classical test theory measurement model (sum scores) is mostly used, and differences between response patterns leading to the same sum score are ignored. The enhanced differentiation between scores with IRT enables more precise estimation of individual trajectories over time and group effects. The objective of this study was to show the advantages of using IRT scores instead of sum scores when analyzing RCTs. Two studies are presented, a real-life RCT, and a simulation study. Both IRT and sum scores are used to measure the construct and are subsequently used as outcomes for effect calculation. The bias in RCT results is conditional on the measurement model that was used to construct the scores. A bias in estimated trend of around one standard deviation was found when sum scores were used, where IRT showed negligible bias. Accurate statistical inferences are made from an RCT study when using IRT to estimate construct measurements. The use of sum scores leads to incorrect RCT results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Digital Fractional Order Controllers Realized by PIC Microprocessor: Experimental Results

    OpenAIRE

    Petras, I.; Grega, S.; Dorcak, L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with the fractional-order controllers and their possible hardware realization based on PIC microprocessor and numerical algorithm coded in PIC Basic. The mathematical description of the digital fractional -order controllers and approximation in the discrete domain are presented. An example of realization of the particular case of digital fractional-order PID controller is shown and described.

  2. Stratifying the risks of oral anticoagulation in patients with liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efird, Lydia M; Mishkin, Daniel S; Berlowitz, Dan R; Ash, Arlene S; Hylek, Elaine M; Ozonoff, Al; Reisman, Joel I; Zhao, Shibei; Jasuja, Guneet K; Rose, Adam J

    2014-05-01

    Chronic liver disease presents a relative contraindication to warfarin therapy, but some patients with liver disease nevertheless require long-term anticoagulation. The goal is to identify which patients with liver disease might safely receive warfarin. Among 102 134 patients who received warfarin from the Veterans Affairs from 2007 to 2008, International Classification of Diseases-Ninth Revision codes identified 1763 patients with chronic liver disease. Specific diagnoses and laboratory values (albumin, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, creatinine, and cholesterol) were examined to identify risk of adverse outcomes, while controlling for available bleeding risk factors. Outcomes included percent time in therapeutic range, a measure of anticoagulation control, and major hemorrhagic events, by International Classification of Diseases-Ninth Revision codes. Patients with liver disease had lower mean time in therapeutic range (53.5%) when compared with patients without (61.7%; P<0.001) and more hemorrhages (hazard ratio, 2.02; P<0.001). Among patients with liver disease, serum albumin and creatinine levels were the strongest predictors of both outcomes. We created a 4-point score system: patients received 1 point each for albumin (2.5-3.49 g/dL) or creatinine (1.01-1.99 mg/dL), and 2 points each for albumin (<2.5 g/dL) or creatinine (≥2 mg/dL). This score predicted both anticoagulation control and hemorrhage. When compared with patients without liver disease, those with a score of zero had modestly lower time in therapeutic range (56.7%) and no increase in hemorrhages (hazard ratio, 1.16; P=0.59), whereas those with the worst score (4) had poor control (29.4%) and high hazard of hemorrhage (hazard ratio, 8.53; P<0.001). Patients with liver disease receiving warfarin have poorer anticoagulation control and more hemorrhages. A simple 4-point scoring system using albumin and creatinine identifies those at risk for poor outcomes. © 2014 American

  3. Bleeding in patients using new anticoagulants or antiplatelet agents: Risk factors and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levi, M.M.; Eerenberg, E.; Löwenberg, E.; Kamphuisen, P.W.

    2010-01-01

    The most important adverse effect of antithrombotic treatment is the occurrence of bleeding. in case of serious or even life-threatening bleeding in a patient who uses anticoagulant agents or when patient on anticoagulants needs to undergo an urgent invasive procedure, anticoagulant treatment can be

  4. Evaluating the efficacy of citrate anticoagulation during CRRT in cardiac patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Караськов

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Systemic anticoagulation during renal replacement therapy in cardiac patients increases the risk of postoperative complications. Citrate anticoagulation is a promising alternative. The objective of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of citrate anticoagulation and its influence on the parameters of hemostasis and complications.

  5. APPLICATIONS OF PHARMACOGENETIC TESTING FOR PERSONALIZATION OF THERAPY WITH ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS IN RUSSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Sychev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical significance of the patient genetic characteristics in the individual pharmacological response to oral anticoagulants is considered. Possible tactics of warfarin dosing and new oral anticoagulants choice on the basis of pharmacogenetic testing as well as indications for this approach in clinical practice are discussed. It should increase efficacy and safety of anticoagulant therapy.

  6. Two Mechanisms to Avoid Control Conflicts Resulting from Uncoordinated Intent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishkin, Andrew H.; Dvorak, Daniel L.; Wagner, David A.; Bennett, Matthew B.

    2013-01-01

    This software implements a real-time access control protocol that is intended to make all connected users aware of the presence of other connected users, and which of them is currently in control of the system. Here, "in control" means that a single user is authorized and enabled to issue instructions to the system. The software The software also implements a goal scheduling mechanism that can detect situations where plans for the operation of a target system proposed by different users overlap and interact in conflicting ways. In such situations, the system can either simply report the conflict (rejecting one goal or the entire plan), or reschedule the goals in a way that does not conflict. The access control mechanism (and associated control protocol) is unique. Other access control mechanisms are generally intended to authenticate users, or exclude unauthorized access. This software does neither, and would likely depend on having some other mechanism to support those requirements.

  7. Prevention of thromboembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillation - new anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Alexandre Holthausen; Cirenza, Cláudio

    2011-09-01

    The authors present alternatives for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. Its detection is based on the use of different methods that record the cardiac electrical activity. The treatment involves intervening in the underlying disorder, antiarrhythmic drugs, stimulation and cardiac defibrillation devices, and, less often, surgery. The technological advances in the last two decades have provided greater efficiency in diagnoses and therapy. Atrial fibrilation patients will benefit from a new set of anticoagulant drugs tested in the past three years. The potential advantages include greater safety and efficacy, as well as convenience for not requiring frequent laboratory controls.

  8. Prevention of thromboembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillation – new anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Holthausen Campos

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors present alternatives for the treatment of cardiacarrhythmias. Its detection is based on the use of different methods that record the cardiac electrical activity. The treatment involves intervening in the underlying disorder, antiarrhythmic drugs, stimulation and cardiac defibrillation devices, and, less often, surgery. The technological advances in the last two decades have provided greater efficiency in diagnoses and therapy. Atrial fibrilation patients will benefit from a new set of anticoagulant drugs tested in the past three years. The potential advantages include greater safety and efficacy, as well as conveniencefor not requiring frequent laboratory controls.

  9. Results from an in-plant demonstration of intelligent control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, R.M.; Garcia, H.E.; Messick, N.

    1993-01-01

    A learning systems-based reconfigurable controller was demonstrated on the deaerating feedwater heater at the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) on April 1, 1993. Failures of the normal pressure regulating process were introduced by reducing the steam flow to the heater by as much as 10%. The controller maintained pressure in the heater at acceptable levels for several minutes, whereas operator intervention would have otherwise been required within a few seconds. This experiment demonstrates the potential of advanced control techniques for improving safety, reliability, and performance of power plant operations as well as the utility of EBR-II as an experimental power plant controls facility

  10. Synthesis and in Vitro and in Vivo Anticoagulant and Antiplatelet Activities of Amidino- and Non-Amidinobenzamides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Hyun Lee

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Three amidino- and ten non-amidinobenzamides were synthesized as 3-aminobenzoic acid scaffold-based anticoagulant and antiplatelet compounds. The anticoagulant activities of thirteen synthesized compounds 1–13, and 2b and 3b as prodrugs were preliminary evaluated by screening the prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT and prothrombin time (PT in vitro. From the aPTT results obtained, two amidinobenzamides, N-(3′-amidinophenyl-3-(thiophen-2′′-ylcarbonylamino benzamide (1, 33.2 ± 0.7 s and N-(4′-amidinophenyl-3-(thiophen-2′′-ylcarbonylamino benzamide (2, 43.5 ± 0.6 s were selected to investigate the further anticoagulant and antiplatelet activities. The aPTT results of 1 (33.2 ± 0.7 s and 2 (43.5 ± 0.6 s were compared with heparin (62.5 ± 0.8 s in vitro at 30 μM. We investigated the effect of 1 and 2 on blood anticoagulant activity (ex vivo and on tail bleeding time (in vivo on mice. A tail cutting/bleeding time assay revealed that both 1 and 2 prolonged bleeding time in mice at a dose of 24.1 g/mouse and above. Compounds 1 and 2 dose-dependently inhibited thrombin-catalyzed fibrin polymerization and platelet aggregation. In addition, 1 and 2 were evaluated on the inhibitory activities of thrombin and FXa as well as the generation of thrombin and FXa in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Collectively, 1 and 2 possess some antiplatelet and anticoagulant activities and offer a basis for development of a novel antithrombotic product.

  11. Anticoagulant drugs increase natural killer cell activity in lung cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bobek, M.; Boubelík, Michael; Fišerová, Anna; Luptovcová, Martina; Vannucci, Luca; Kacprzak, G.; Kolodzej, J.; Majewski, A.M.; Hoffman, R. M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 2 (2005), s. 215-223 ISSN 0169-5002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : anticoagulant drugs * lung cancer * NK cells Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.172, year: 2005

  12. Vitamin K and stability of oral anticoagulant therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rombouts, Eva Karolien

    2011-01-01

    One of the causes of unstable anticoagulation is a variable vitamin K intake. The main objective of this thesis was to test the hypothesis that the INR is particularly sensitive to changes in vitamin K intake when vitamin K status is low, and that patients with a low vitamin K intake would therefore

  13. Utilization of Oral Anticoagulation in a Teaching Hospital in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    optimal antithrombotic effect. The oral drugs ... vitamin K-dependent clotting factors, which include factors. II, VII, IX, and X, ... hyperthyroidism) and those that decrease INR (pharmacokinetic: Barbiturates ... of anticoagulation, drug dosing, treatment outcome and .... national guidelines, and performance on quality measures.

  14. Self-management of oral anticoagulant therapy in two centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Hanna; Grove, E; Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard

    of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus; 3Department of Cardiology, Aalborg Hospital & Department of Health Science and Technology, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark haana_86@hotmail.com Objectives: Patient-self-management (PSM) of oral anticoagulant therapy with vitamin K antagonists have...

  15. Bleeding complications during anticoagulant treatment in patients with cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuisen, Pieter W.; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan

    Patients with cancer have an increased risk of bleeding complications, of which some are fatal. This risk is influenced by chemotherapy, cancer type and stage, thrombocytopenia, renal function, and previous bleeding. Since many cancer patients receive anticoagulant treatment for prophylaxis or

  16. Haemorrhage in the labyrinth caused by anticoagulant therapy: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callonnec, F.; Gerardin, E.; Thiebot, J.; Marie, J.P.; Andrieu Guitrancourt, J.; Marsot-Dupuch, K.

    1999-01-01

    We report a patient who experienced a severe vertiginous episode with bilateral tinnitus and progressive right-sided hearing loss. She had Marfan's disease and was on anticoagulant treatment. The fluid in the labyrinth gave higher signal than cerebrospinal fluid on T1-weighted images, suggesting haemorrhage. The radiological follow-up is discussed. (orig.)

  17. Haemorrhage in the labyrinth caused by anticoagulant therapy: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callonnec, F; Gerardin, E; Thiebot, J [Department of Radiology, Rouen University Hospital, 1 rue de Germont, F-76031 Rouen cedex (France); Marie, J P; Andrieu Guitrancourt, J [Department of Otolaryngology, Rouen University Hospital (France); Marsot-Dupuch, K [Department of Radiology, St. Antoine, Paris University Hospital (France)

    1999-06-01

    We report a patient who experienced a severe vertiginous episode with bilateral tinnitus and progressive right-sided hearing loss. She had Marfan`s disease and was on anticoagulant treatment. The fluid in the labyrinth gave higher signal than cerebrospinal fluid on T1-weighted images, suggesting haemorrhage. The radiological follow-up is discussed. (orig.) With 2 figs., 11 refs.

  18. Construction of a WMR for Trajectory Tracking Control: Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Silva-Ortigoza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a solution for trajectory tracking control of a differential drive wheeled mobile robot (WMR based on a hierarchical approach. The general design and construction of the WMR are described. The hierarchical controller proposed has two components: a high-level control and a low-level control. The high-level control law is based on an input-output linearization scheme for the robot kinematic model, which provides the desired angular velocity profiles that the WMR has to track in order to achieve the desired position (x*,y* and orientation (φ*. Then, a low-level control law, based on a proportional integral (PI approach, is designed to control the velocity of the WMR wheels to ensure those tracking features. Regarding the trajectories, this paper provides the solution or the following cases: (1 time-varying parametric trajectories such as straight lines and parabolas and (2 smooth curves fitted by cubic splines which are generated by the desired data points x1*,y1*,…,xn*,yn*. A straightforward algorithm is developed for constructing the cubic splines. Finally, this paper includes an experimental validation of the proposed technique by employing a DS1104 dSPACE electronic board along with MATLAB/Simulink software.

  19. Cardiac arrest due to left circumflex coronary artery embolism as a complication of subtherapeutic oral anticoagulation in a patient with mitral and aortic mechanical valve prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protasiewicz, Marcin; Rojek, Aleksandra; Gajek, Jacek; Mysiak, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a 65-year-old female patient after replacement of aortic and mitral valve with mechanical prostheses and implantation of a pacemaker hospitalized in our clinic due to acute coronary syndrome complicated with cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation. The electrocardiogram performed on admission showed signs of myocardial infarction with concomitant ventricular pacing. After successful resuscitation the coronary angiography was performed, which showed occlusion of the left circumflex artery (LCx) by thrombus. On the basis of intravascular ultrasound imaging the presence of vulnerable plaque, parietal thrombus and dissection of LCx were excluded. It suggested that occlusion of the LCx resulted from its embolism by left-sided heart thrombus due to subtherapeutic oral anticoagulation. In this case suboptimal anticoagulation was partially iatrogenic. Two weeks before the patient had been given vitamin K intravenously due to indeterminable international normalized ratio (INR) level, which caused transient resistance to oral anticoagulants. This case report illustrates tragic difficulties in the treatment with vitamin K antagonists, which concern as many as 2/3 of anticoagulated patients. These troubles contributed to the search for new, more efficient and safer anticoagulants. There are two classes of new oral anticoagulant drugs, which do not require monitoring of coagulation: direct thrombin inhibitors (e.g. dabigatran) and factor Xa inhibitors (e.g. rivaroxaban). In spite of their proven efficacy in the prevention of ischaemic stroke related to atrial fibrillation and prevention or treatment of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, the use of new oral anticoagulants for the treatment of patients with mechanical valve prostheses needs further research.

  20. Resonant Frequency Control For the PIP-II Injector Test RFQ: Control Framework and Initial Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelen, A. L. [Colorado State U.; Biedron, S. G.; Milton, S. V.; Bowring, D.; Chase, B. E.; Edelen, J. P.; Nicklaus, D.; Steimel, J.

    2016-12-16

    For the PIP-II Injector Test (PI-Test) at Fermilab, a four-vane radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) is designed to accelerate a 30-keV, 1-mA to 10-mA, H- beam to 2.1 MeV under both pulsed and continuous wave (CW) RF operation. The available headroom of the RF amplifiers limits the maximum allowable detuning to 3 kHz, and the detuning is controlled entirely via thermal regulation. Fine control over the detuning, minimal manual intervention, and fast trip recovery is desired. In addition, having active control over both the walls and vanes provides a wider tuning range. For this, we intend to use model predictive control (MPC). To facilitate these objectives, we developed a dedicated control framework that handles higher-level system decisions as well as executes control calculations. It is written in Python in a modular fashion for easy adjustments, readability, and portability. Here we describe the framework and present the first control results for the PI-Test RFQ under pulsed and CW operation.

  1. The effect anticoagulation status on geriatric fall trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Julia; Baldawi, Mustafa; Heidt, David

    2016-12-01

    This research study aims to identify the effect of anticoagulation status on hospital course, complications, and outcomes among geriatric fall trauma patients. The study design is a retrospective cohort study, looking at fall trauma among patients aged 60 to 80 years from 2009 to 2013 at a university hospital in the United States. The statistical analysis, conducted with SPSS software with a threshold for statistical significance of P patients included in this study was 1,121. Compared with patients not on anticoagulation, there was a higher LOS among patients on anticoagulation (6.3 ± 6.2 vs 4.9 ± 5.2, P = .001). A higher LOS (7.2 ± 6.8 vs 5.0 ± 5.3, P = .001) and days in the ICU (2.1 ± 5.4 vs 1.1 ± 3.8, P = .010) was observed in patients on warfarin. A higher mortality (7.1% vs 2.8%, P = .013), LOS (6.3 ± 6.2 vs 5.1 ± 5.396, P = .036), and complication rate (49.1 vs 36.7, P = .010) was observed among patients on clopidogrel. In this study, a higher mortality and complication rate were seen among clopidogrel, and a greater LOS and number of days in the ICU were seen in patients on warfarin. These differences are important, as they can serve as a screening tool for triaging the severity of a geriatric trauma patient's condition and complication risk. For patients on clopidogrel, it is essential that these patients are recognized early as high-risk patients who will need to be monitored more closely. For patients on clopidogrel or warfarin, bridging a patient's anticoagulation should be initiated as soon as possible to prevent unnecessary increased LOS. At last, these data also provide support against prescribing patients clopidogrel when other anticoagulation options are available. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Quality Control, Testing, and Deployment Results in the NIF ICCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, J P; Casavant, D; Cline, B D; Gorvad, M R

    2001-01-01

    The strategy used to develop the NIF Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) calls for incremental cycles of construction and formal test to deliver a total of 1 million lines of code. Each incremental release takes four to six months to implement specific functionality and culminates when offline tests conducted in the ICCS Integration and Test Facility verify functional, performance, and interface requirements. Tests are then repeated on line to confirm integrated operation in dedicated laser laboratories or ultimately in the NIF. Test incidents along with other change requests are recorded and tracked to closure by the software change control board (SCCB). Annual independent audits advise management on software process improvements. Extensive experience has been gained by integrating controls in the prototype laser preamplifier laboratory. The control system installed in the preamplifier lab contains five of the ten planned supervisory subsystems and seven of sixteen planned front-end processors (FEPs). Beam alignment, timing, diagnosis and laser pulse amplification up to 20 joules was tested through an automated series of shots. Other laboratories have provided integrated testing of six additional FEPs. Process measurements including earned-value, product size, and defect densities provide software project controls and generate confidence that the control system will be successfully deployed

  3. Economic evaluation of the new oral anticoagulants for the prevention of thromboembolic events: a cost-minimization analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Soriano Marcolino

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Randomized clinical trials have shown that the new oral anticoagulants have at least similar impact regarding reduction of thromboembolic events, compared with warfarin, with similar or improved safety profiles. There is little data on real costs within clinical practice. Our aim here was to perform economic analysis on these strategies from the perspective of Brazilian society and the public healthcare system. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cost-minimization analysis; anticoagulation clinic of Hospital Municipal Odilon Behrens, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil. METHODS: Patients at the anticoagulation clinic were recruited between August and October 2011, with minimum follow-up of four weeks. Operational and non-operational costs were calculated and corrected to 2015. RESULTS: This study included 633 patients (59% women of median age 62 years (interquartile range 49-73. The mean length of follow-up was 64 ± 28 days. The average cost per patient per month was $ 54.26 (US dollars. Direct costs accounted for 32.5% of the total cost. Of these, 69.5% were related to healthcare professionals. With regards to indirect costs, 52.4% were related to absence from work and 47.6% to transportation. Apixaban, dabigatran and rivaroxaban were being sold to Brazilian public institutions, on average, for $ 49.87, $ 51.40 and $ 52.16 per patient per month, respectively, which was lower than the costs relating to warfarin treatment. CONCLUSION: In the Brazilian context, from the perspective of society and the public healthcare system, the cumulative costs per patient using warfarin with follow-up in anticoagulation clinics is currently higher than the strategy of prescribing the new oral anticoagulants.

  4. Effect of Statins and Anticoagulants on Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alizadeh, Moein [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Sylvestre, Marie-Pierre [Research Center, Department of Statistics, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Zilli, Thomas; Van Nguyen, Thu; Guay, Jean-Pierre; Bahary, Jean-Paul [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Taussky, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.taussky.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Statins and anticoagulants (ACs) have both been associated with a less-aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) and a better outcome after treatment of localized PCa. The results of these studies might have been confounded because patients might often take both medications. We examined their respective influence on PCa aggressiveness at initial diagnosis. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 381 patients treated with either external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy for low-risk (n = 152), intermediate-risk (n = 142), or high-risk (n = 87) localized PCa. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to investigate an association between these drug classes and prostate cancer aggressiveness. We tested whether the concomitant use of statins and ACs had a different effect than that of either AC or statin use alone. Results: Of the 381 patients, 172 (45.1%) were taking statins and 141 (37.0%) ACs; 105 patients (27.6%) used both. On univariate analysis, the statin and AC users were associated with the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level (p = .017) and National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group (p = .0022). On multivariate analysis, statin use was associated with a PSA level <10 ng/mL (odds ratio, 2.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-6.8; p = .012) and a PSA level >20 ng/mL (odds ratio, 0.29; 95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.83; p = .03). The use of ACs was associated with a PSA level >20 ng/mL (odds ratio, 0.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.02-0.59, p = .02). Conclusion: Both AC and statins have an effect on PCa aggressiveness, with statins having a more stringent relationship with the PSA level, highlighting the importance of considering statin use in studies of PCa aggressiveness.

  5. Effect of Statins and Anticoagulants on Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alizadeh, Moein; Sylvestre, Marie-Pierre; Zilli, Thomas; Van Nguyen, Thu; Guay, Jean-Pierre; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Taussky, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Statins and anticoagulants (ACs) have both been associated with a less-aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) and a better outcome after treatment of localized PCa. The results of these studies might have been confounded because patients might often take both medications. We examined their respective influence on PCa aggressiveness at initial diagnosis. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 381 patients treated with either external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy for low-risk (n = 152), intermediate-risk (n = 142), or high-risk (n = 87) localized PCa. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to investigate an association between these drug classes and prostate cancer aggressiveness. We tested whether the concomitant use of statins and ACs had a different effect than that of either AC or statin use alone. Results: Of the 381 patients, 172 (45.1%) were taking statins and 141 (37.0%) ACs; 105 patients (27.6%) used both. On univariate analysis, the statin and AC users were associated with the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level (p = .017) and National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group (p = .0022). On multivariate analysis, statin use was associated with a PSA level 20 ng/mL (odds ratio, 0.29; 95% confidence interval, 0.08–0.83; p = .03). The use of ACs was associated with a PSA level >20 ng/mL (odds ratio, 0.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.02–0.59, p = .02). Conclusion: Both AC and statins have an effect on PCa aggressiveness, with statins having a more stringent relationship with the PSA level, highlighting the importance of considering statin use in studies of PCa aggressiveness.

  6. Advanced Rooftop Control (ARC) Retrofit: Field-Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Ngo, Hung; Underhill, Ronald M.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Lutes, Robert G.

    2013-07-31

    The multi-year research study was initiated to find solutions to improve packaged equipment operating efficiency in the field. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Office (BTO) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) conducted this research, development and demonstration (RD&D) study. Packaged equipment with constant speed supply fans is designed to provide ventilation at the design rate at all times when the fan is operating as required by building code. Although there are a number of hours during the day when a building may not be fully occupied or the need for ventilation is lower than designed, the ventilation rate cannot be adjusted easily with a constant speed fan. Therefore, modulating the supply fan in conjunction with demand controlled ventilation (DCV) will not only reduce the coil energy but also reduce the fan energy. The objective of this multi-year research, development and demonstration project was to determine the magnitude of energy savings achievable by retrofitting existing packaged rooftop air conditioners with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for packaged units. First, through detailed simulation analysis, it was shown that significant energy (between 24% and 35%) and cost savings (38%) from fan, cooling and heating energy consumption could be realized when packaged air conditioning units with gas furnaces are retrofitted with advanced control packages (combining multi-speed fan control, integrated economizer controls and DCV). The simulation analysis also showed significant savings for heat pumps (between 20% and 60%). The simulation analysis was followed by an extensive field test of a retrofittable advanced rooftop unit (RTU) controller.

  7. Observer Based Sliding Mode Attitude Control: Theoretical and Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Jørgensen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the design of a sliding mode controller for attitude control of spacecraft actuated by three orthogonal reaction wheels. The equilibrium of the closed loop system is proved to be asymptotically stable in the sense of Lyapunov. Due to cases where spacecraft do not have angular velocity measurements, an estimator for the generalized velocity is derived and asymptotic stability is proven for the observer. The approach is tested on an experimental platform with a sphere shaped Autonomous Underwater Vehicle SATellite: AUVSAT, developed at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology.

  8. Notification: Controls Over Results Produced by EPA Independent Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OPE-FY16-0022, April 5, 2016. The EPA OIG plans to begin preliminary research on controls that the EPA’s Office of Land and Emergency Management’s Contract Laboratory Program (CLP) has in place to detect or prevent fraud.

  9. Encouraging results for controlling an Agricultural pest on St. Eustatius

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debrot, A.O.; Reid, A.; Leslie, T.W.; Madden, H.; Stapel, J.; Dalm, Friso; Uphoff, Lara; Zwet, van der Leonie

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, the invasive Giant African Land Snail, Achatina fulica was found in a small part of urban St. Eustatius. In collaboration with local government agencies and Dutch universities, IMARES* conducted field and laboratory pilot trials of control methods from October 2015 to June 2016.

  10. Risk of upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding in patients taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiplatelet agents, or anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanas, Ángel; Carrera-Lasfuentes, Patricia; Arguedas, Yolanda; García, Santiago; Bujanda, Luis; Calvet, Xavier; Ponce, Julio; Perez-Aísa, Ángeles; Castro, Manuel; Muñoz, Maria; Sostres, Carlos; García-Rodríguez, Luis A

    2015-05-01

    Treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or low-dose aspirin is associated with increased risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. There is little evidence on the risk of lower gastrointestinal bleeding with NSAIDs, antiplatelet agents (APAs), or anticoagulants. We aimed to quantify the relative risk (RR) of upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding associated with use of NSAIDs, APAs, or anticoagulants. We performed a case-control study that used data collected from consecutive patients hospitalized for gastrointestinal bleeding (563 upper, mean age, 63.6 ± 16.7 years and 415 lower, mean age, 70.8 ± 13.8 years), confirmed by endoscopy or other diagnostic procedures. Unhospitalized patients were used as controls (n = 1008) and matched for age, hospital, and month of admission. Drug use was considered current when taken within 7 days or less before hospitalization. RRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by unconditional logistic regression analysis. Use of anticoagulants, low-dose aspirin, and other drugs (non-aspirin-APA, 82.3% thienopiridines) was associated with upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding; the risk was 2-fold higher for anticoagulants (RR, 4.2; 95% CI, 2.9-6.2) than for low-dose aspirin (RR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.4-3.3) or other non-aspirin-APA drugs (RR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.6-2.6). NSAID use was also associated with increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding and greater for upper (RR, 2.6; 95% CI, 2.0-3.5) than lower gastrointestinal bleeding (RR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.0-1.9). Use of proton pump inhibitors was associated with reduced risk of upper, but not lower, gastrointestinal bleeding. Anticoagulants, low-dose aspirin, NSAIDs, and other non-aspirin-APA drugs are associated with increased risk of upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Use of anticoagulants appears to be the strongest risk factor for gastrointestinal bleeding. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Limited evidence on persistence with anticoagulants, and its effect on the risk of recurrence of venous thromboembolism: a systematic review of observational studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vora P

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pareen Vora, Montse Soriano-Gabarró, Kiliana Suzart, Gunnar Persson Brobert Department of Epidemiology, Bayer Pharma AG, Berlin, Germany Purpose: The risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE recurrence is high following an initial VTE event, and it persists over time. This recurrence risk decreases rapidly after starting with anticoagulation treatment and reduces by ~80%–90% with prolonged anticoagulation. Nonpersistence with anticoagulants could lead to increased risk of VTE recurrence. This systematic review aimed to estimate persistence at 3, 6, and 12 months with anticoagulants in patients with VTE, and to evaluate the risk of VTE recurrence in nonpersistent patients.Methods: PubMed and Embase® were searched up to May 3, 2014 and the search results updated to May 31, 2015. Studies involving patients with VTE aged ≥18 years, treatment with anticoagulants intended for at least 3 months or more, and reporting data for persistence were included. Proportions were transformed using Freeman–Tukey double arcsine transformation and pooled using the DerSimonian–Laird random-effects approach.Results: In total, 12 observational studies (7/12 conference abstracts were included in the review. All 12 studies either reported or provided data for persistence. The total number of patients meta-analyzed to estimate persistence at 3, 6, and 12 months was 71,969 patients, 58,940 patients, and 68,235 patients, respectively. The estimated persistence for 3, 6, and 12 months of therapy was 83% (95% confidence interval [CI], 78–87; I2=99.3%, 62% (95% CI, 58–66; I2=98.1%, and 31% (95% CI, 22–40; I2=99.8%, respectively. Only two studies reported the risk of VTE recurrence based on nonpersistence – one at 3 months and the other at 12 months.Conclusion: Limited evidence showed that persistence was suboptimal with an estimated 17% patients being nonpersistent with anticoagulants in the crucial first 3 months. Persistence declined over 6 and 12 months

  12. Simulation Results of Closed Loop Controlled Interline Power Flow Controller System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. USHA RANI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Interline Power Flow Controller (IPFC is the latest generation of Flexible AC Transmission Systems (FACTS devices which can be used to control power flows of multiple transmission lines. A dispatch strategy is proposed for an IPFC operating at rated capacity, in which the power circulation between the two series converters is used as the parameter to optimize the voltage profile and power transfer. Voltage stability curves for test system are shown to illustrate the effectiveness of this proposed strategy. In this paper, a circuit model for IPFC is developed and simulation of interline power flow controller is done using the proposed circuit model. Simulation is done using MATLAB simulink and the results are presented.

  13. Ineffectiveness of anticoagulation in experimental radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roettinger, E.M.; Sedlacek, R.; Suit, H.D.

    1975-01-01

    A spontaneous mammary carcinoma, a methylcholanthrene induced fibrosarcoma, and a methylcholanthrene induced squamous carcinoma have been examined in syngeneic C3Hsub(f)/Sed mice to assess the modification of tumour response to local radiation therapy by the administration of warfarin. For the fibrosarcoma (demonstrably antigenic in this animal system) recipient mice were noraml or previously sensitized to the tumor. The transplant take rate and the growth rate of the mammary carcinoma and the fibrosarcoma were determined following subcutaneous injections of single cell suspensions. The radiation dose required for local control of 50% of the tumors (TCD 50 ) was determined for single and ten equal radiation doses. The dosage of warfarin in the drinking water resulted in a 2 to 3-fold prolongation of the prothrombin time. Warfarin administration before and following inoculation of tumor cells did not alter the transplantability. Warfarin administration either during the course of fractionated irradiation, or at and following single doses, did not affect tumor response to irradiation. (author)

  14. Effects of different anticoagulant drugs on the prevention of complications in patients after arthroplasty: A network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ji-Hai; Chu, Xiu-Cheng; Wang, Lin-Liang; Ning, Bo; Zhao, Chuan-Xin

    2017-10-01

    After arthroplasty treatment, some complications commonly occur, such as early revision, infection/dislocation, and venous thromboembolism (VTE). This study aims to use a network meta-analysis to compare effects of 9 anticoagulant drugs (edoxaban, dabigatan, apixaban, rivaroxaban, warfarin, heparin, bemiparin, ximelagatran, and enoxaparin) in preventing postoperative complications in arthroplasty patients. After retrieving PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library database from the inception to November 2016, randomized controlled trials were enrolled. The integration of direct and indirect evidences was performed to calculate odd ratios and the surface under the cumulative ranking curves. Nineteen eligible randomized controlled trials were included. The network meta-analysis results showed that compared with warfarin, edoxaban, apixaban, and rivaroxaban had a lower incidence rate in asymptomatic deep venous thrombosis, which indicated that edoxaban, apixaban, and rivaroxaban had better effects on prevention. Similarly, in comparison to enoxaparin, edoxaban and rivaroxaban had better effect; rivaroxaban was better than ximelagatran in preventive effects. Compared with apixaban, edoxaban, dabigatan, rivaroxaban, and enoxaparin had a higher incidence rate in clinically relevant non-major bleeding, which showed that preventive effects were relatively poor. In addition, the results of the surface under the cumulative ranking curves showed that rivaroxaban and bemiparin worked best on symptomatic deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. In terms of bleeding, apixaban and warfarin had better preventive effects. Our findings suggested that rivaroxaban may work better in terms of symptomatic deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, whereas apixaban had better preventive effects in bleeding.

  15. Control of Warm Compression Stations Using Model Predictive Control: Simulation and Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonne, F.; Alamir, M.; Bonnay, P.

    2017-02-01

    This paper deals with multivariable constrained model predictive control for Warm Compression Stations (WCS). WCSs are subject to numerous constraints (limits on pressures, actuators) that need to be satisfied using appropriate algorithms. The strategy is to replace all the PID loops controlling the WCS with an optimally designed model-based multivariable loop. This new strategy leads to high stability and fast disturbance rejection such as those induced by a turbine or a compressor stop, a key-aspect in the case of large scale cryogenic refrigeration. The proposed control scheme can be used to achieve precise control of pressures in normal operation or to avoid reaching stopping criteria (such as excessive pressures) under high disturbances (such as a pulsed heat load expected to take place in future fusion reactors, expected in the cryogenic cooling systems of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ITER or the Japan Torus-60 Super Advanced fusion experiment JT-60SA). The paper details the simulator used to validate this new control scheme and the associated simulation results on the SBTs WCS. This work is partially supported through the French National Research Agency (ANR), task agreement ANR-13-SEED-0005.

  16. In vivo examination of the anticoagulant effect of the Brassica oleracea methanol extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Rafeeq Alam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The anticoagulant effect of the methanol extract of Brassica oleracea var. capitata (MEB was examined in rabbits. The animals were divided into five groups, each comprising seven animals. Three groups were administered increasing doses of MEB (200, 300, and 500 mg/kg, respectively; one group received warfarin (0.54 mg/kg; animals in the control group received saline (1 ml/day equivalent to the volume of doses applied to the treated and standard animals. Biochemical tests were performed on the 16th and 31st days of dosing. Animals that were administered MEB (500 mg MEB/kg 30 days displayed increases of 24.07 s, 28.79 s and 4.08 s in activated partial thromboplastin (aPTT, fibrinogen (Fg and thrombin time (TT. Compared to the control, the increase in aPTT and Fg was highly significant and the increase in TT was significant. The anticoagulant effect exhibited by MEB in rabbits may be due to inactivation or inhibition of factors affecting coagulation.

  17. Transportation cost of anticoagulation clinic visits in an urban setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jamie M; Clemente, Jennifer; Sharma, Krishna P; Taylor, Thomas N; Garwood, Candice L

    2011-10-01

    Patients being managed on warfarin make frequent or regular visits to anticoagulation monitoring appointments. International studies have evaluated transportation cost and associated time related to anticoagulation clinic visits. To our knowledge, no studies have evaluated the cost of transportation to such clinic visits in the United States. To describe the methods of transportation and estimate the average total cost of transportation to and from an anticoagulation clinic in an urban setting. We prospectively conducted a survey of patients treated at the Harper Anticoagulation Clinic located in Detroit, Michigan, during November 2010. The survey was given to patients while waiting at their regularly scheduled clinic appointments and included questions regarding mode of transportation, distance traveled in miles, parking payment, and time missed from work for clinic appointments. The mean distance traveled was translated into cost assuming 50 cents per mile based on 2010 estimates by the Internal Revenue Service. Sixty patients responded to the 11-item survey; response rates for individual items varied because participants were instructed to skip questions that did not pertain to them. Of the 47 participants responding to demographic questions, 70.2% were female, and 46.8% were older than 60 years. Transportation by private vehicle (80.0%), either driven by patients (41.7%) or someone else (38.3%), was the most common method reported. Use of private automobile translated into a cost of $11.19 per round trip. Other means of transportation identified include a ride from a medical transportation service (10.0%), bus (5.0%), walking (3.3%), and taxi (1.7%). The mean (SD) distance traveled to the clinic for all methods of transportation was 8.34 (7.7) miles. We estimated the average cost of round-trip transportation to be $10.78 weighted for all transportation modes. This is a direct nonmedical cost that is paid for by most patients out of pocket. However, 9 of 44 (20

  18. Severe jaundice due to intrahepatic cholestasis after initiating anticoagulation with rivaroxaban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Abdullah N; Sari, Cenk; Baştuğ, Serdal; Sari, Sevil Ö; Akçay, Murat; Durmaz, Tahir; Bozkurt, Engin

    2016-03-01

    Rivaroxaban, a highly selective direct factor Xa inhibitor, is a new oral anticoagulant approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in November 2011 for stroke prophylaxis in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Because of its efficacy and once-a-day dosing, it is commonly preferred in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and intolerance to warfarin in clinical practice. However, it can result in some adverse effects such as bleeding, rashes and liver injury. Here, we described a very rare adverse reaction of rivaroxaban, jaundice due to intrahepatic cholestasis, appeared in a 71-year-old male patient after taking rivaroxaban.

  19. Comparison of hematologic values in blood samples with lithium heparin or dipotassium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid anticoagulants in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon; Mitchell, Mark A; Gaunt, Stephen D; Beaufrère, Hugues; Tully, Thomas N

    2008-06-01

    Blood samples were collected from 20 Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis) and were divided into tubes that contained dipotassium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (K2EDTA) and lithium heparin. Complete blood cell counts were determined in each sample within 2 hours of collection. The level of agreement in results was moderate for plasma protein, packed cell volume (PCV), and leukocyte, monocyte, and lymphocyte counts between the anticoagulants. Plasma protein and PCV values were significantly lower in samples with lithium heparin than in those with K2EDTA, whereas lymphocyte numbers were significantly higher in lithium heparin samples than in K2EDTA samples. The level of agreement was good for the other cell types (heterophils, eosinophils, and basophils) when comparing the different anticoagulants. The poor level of agreement between anticoagulants with the increase in thrombocyte clumping in lithium heparin samples indicates that the use of lithium heparin as anticoagulant may affect thrombocyte count. No negative effects on morphology and staining of blood cells were apparent in smears from heparin samples compared with K2EDTA samples. Within the different values compared, the limits of agreement are small enough to be confident that lithium heparin can be used for routine CBC counts in a clinical setting. The use of the same anticoagulant should be recommended to follow trends within the same patient, especially when considering plasma protein concentration, PCV, and lymphocyte count.

  20. New Insights into the Pros and Cons of the Clinical Use of Vitamin K Antagonists (VKAs Versus Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOACs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick H. van Gorp

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin K-antagonists (VKA are the most widely used anticoagulant drugs to treat patients at risk of arterial and venous thrombosis for the past 50 years. Due to unfavorable pharmacokinetics VKA have a small therapeutic window, require frequent monitoring, and are susceptible to drug and nutritional interactions. Additionally, the effect of VKA is not limited to coagulation, but affects all vitamin K-dependent proteins. As a consequence, VKA have detrimental side effects by enhancing medial and intimal calcification. These limitations stimulated the development of alternative anticoagulant drugs, resulting in direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC drugs, which specifically target coagulation factor Xa and thrombin. DOACs also display non-hemostatic vascular effects via protease-activated receptors (PARs. As atherosclerosis is characterized by a hypercoagulable state indicating the involvement of activated coagulation factors in the genesis of atherosclerosis, anticoagulation could have beneficial effects on atherosclerosis. Additionally, accumulating evidence demonstrates vascular benefit from high vitamin K intake. This review gives an update on oral anticoagulant treatment on the vasculature with a special focus on calcification and vitamin K interaction.

  1. Injuries and outcomes associated with traumatic falls in the elderly population on oral anticoagulant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltz, Melissa M; Podany, Abigail B; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Armen, Scott B

    2015-09-01

    Fall risk for older adults is a multi-factorial public health problem as 90% of geriatric injuries are caused by traumatic falls. The CDC estimated 33% of adults >65 years incurred a fall in 2011, with 30% resulting in moderate injury. While much has been written about overall risk to trauma patients on oral anticoagulant (OAC) therapy, less has been reported on outcomes in the elderly trauma population. We used data from the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) to identify the types of injury and complications incurred, length of stay, and mortality associated with OACs in elderly patients sustaining a fall. Using standard NTDB practices, data were collected on elderly patients (≥65 years) on OACs with diagnosis of fall as the primary mechanism of injury from 2007 to 2010. Univariate analysis was used to determine patient variables influencing risk of fall on OACs. Odds ratios were calculated for types of injury sustained and post-trauma complications. Logistic regression was used to determine mortality associated with type of injury incurred. Of 118,467 elderly patients sampled, OAC use was observed in 444. Predisposing risk factors for fall on OACs were >1 comorbidity (p3 complications (p<0.0001); the most significant being ARDS and ARF (p<0.0001). The mortality rate on OACs was 16%. Injuries to the GI tract, liver, spleen, and kidney (p<0.0002) were more likely to occur. However, if patients suffered a mortality, the most significant injuries were skull fractures and intracranial haemorrhage (p<0.0001). Risks of anticoagulation in elderly trauma patients are complex. While OAC use is a predictor of 30-day mortality after fall, the injuries sustained are markedly different between the elderly who die and those who do not. As a result there is a greater need for healthcare providers to identify preventable and non-preventable risks factors indicative of falls in the anti-coagulated elderly patient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Results of control-room annunciator-systems evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banks, W.W.

    1981-01-01

    Annunciator systems in nuclear power plants tax the operator's ability to cope with large amounts of information. Conventional annunciators do not provide the information in an acceptable way for efficient response, but computer-generated CRT displays have the potential for rectifying this situation. A multidisciplinary team of human factors engineers from EG and G Idaho conducted a study to (a) identify problem areas in reactor control rooms associated with annunciator display systems, (b) provide specific and generic solutions to the problems identified, and (c) provide recommendations and direction for future improvements and research focused on the man/display interface from a human factors engineering perspective

  3. Direct oral anticoagulant use in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation with valvular heart disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Ryan E; Kabra, Rajesh; Oliphant, Carrie S

    2017-06-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are indicated for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), which, according to the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association/Heart Rhythm Society atrial fibrillation (AF) guidelines, excludes patients with rheumatic mitral stenosis, a mechanical or bioprosthetic heart valve, or mitral valve repair. However, the data regarding use of DOACs in AF patients with other types of valvular heart disease (VHD) are unclear. We aimed to summarize and evaluate the literature regarding the safety and efficacy of DOAC use in NVAF patients with other types of VHD. After an extensive literature search, a total of 1 prospective controlled trial, 4 subanalyses, and 1 abstract were identified. Efficacy of the DOAC agents in NVAF patients with VHD mirrored the overall trial results. Bleeding risk was significantly increased in VHD patients treated with rivaroxaban, but not for dabigatran or apixaban. Of the bioprosthetic valve patients enrolled in the Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE) trial, no safety or efficacy concerns were identified. In conclusion, subanalyses of DOAC landmark AF trials revealed that dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban may be safely used in AF patients with certain types of VHD: aortic stenosis, aortic regurgitation, and mitral regurgitation. More evidence is needed before routinely recommending these agents for patients with bioprosthetic valves or mild mitral stenosis. Patients with moderate to severe mitral stenosis or mechanical valves should continue to receive warfarin, as these patients were excluded from all landmark AF trials. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Normal levels of anticoagulant heparan sulfate are not essential for normal hemostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    HajMohammadi, Sassan; Enjyoji, Keiichi; Princivalle, Marc; Christi, Patricia; Lech, Miroslav; Beeler, David; Rayburn, Helen; Schwartz, John J.; Barzegar, Samad; de Agostini, Ariane I.; Post, Mark J.; Rosenberg, Robert D.; Shworak, Nicholas W.

    2003-01-01

    Endothelial cell production of anticoagulant heparan sulfate (HSact) is controlled by the Hs3st1 gene, which encodes the rate-limiting enzyme heparan sulfate 3-O-sulfotransferase-1 (3-OST-1). In vitro, HSact dramatically enhances the neutralization of coagulation proteases by antithrombin. The in vivo role of HSact was evaluated by generating Hs3st1–/– knockout mice. Hs3st1–/– animals were devoid of 3-OST-1 enzyme activity in plasma and tissue extracts. Nulls showed dramatic reductions in tissue levels of HSact but maintained wild-type levels of tissue fibrin accumulation under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Given that vascular HSact predominantly occurs in the subendothelial matrix, mice were subjected to a carotid artery injury assay in which ferric chloride administration induces de-endothelialization and occlusive thrombosis. Hs3st1–/– and Hs3st1+/+ mice yielded indistinguishable occlusion times and comparable levels of thrombin•antithrombin complexes. Thus, Hs3st1–/– mice did not show an obvious procoagulant phenotype. Instead, Hs3st1–/– mice exhibited genetic background–specific lethality and intrauterine growth retardation, without evidence of a gross coagulopathy. Our results demonstrate that the 3-OST-1 enzyme produces the majority of tissue HSact. Surprisingly, this bulk of HSact is not essential for normal hemostasis in mice. Instead, 3-OST-1–deficient mice exhibited unanticipated phenotypes suggesting that HSact or additional 3-OST-1–derived structures may serve alternate biologic roles. PMID:12671048

  5. Major bleeding complications in patients treated with direct oral anticoagulants: One-year observational study in a Paris Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville, L; Konan, M; Hij, A; Goldwirt, L; Peyrony, O; Fieux, F; Faure, P; Madelaine, I; Villiers, S; Farge-Bancel, D; Frère, C

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DAOC) are indicated for the treatment of venous thromboembolism and the prevention of stroke or systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Given their advantages and friendly use for patient, the prescription of long term DOAC therapy has rapidly increased both as first line treatment while initiating anticoagulation and as a substitute to vitamins K antagonist (VKA) in poorly controlled patients. However, DOAC therapy can also be associated with significant bleeding complications, and in the absence of specific antidote at disposal, treatment of serious hemorrhagic complications under DOAC remains complex. We report and discuss herein five cases of major hemorrhagic complications under DOAC, which were reported to the pharmacological surveillance department over one year at Saint-Louis University Hospital (Paris, France). We further discuss the need for careful assessment of the risk/benefit ratio at time of starting DOAC therapy in daily clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. The 'carry-over' effects of patient self-testing: positive effects on usual care management by an anticoagulation management service.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Fiona

    2010-11-01

    Patient self-testing (PST) of the international normalised ratio (INR) has a positive effect on anticoagulation control. This study investigated whether the benefits of PST (other than increased frequency of testing, e.g. patient education, empowerment, compliance etc.) could be \\'carried-over\\' into usual care management after a period of home-testing has ceased.

  7. Synthesis of results of randomized controlled trials of contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinnison, M.L.; Powe, N.R.; Steinberg, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    The authors review 100 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that examine the safety or efficacy of new low-osmolality contrast media (LOM) and focus on the 43 RCTs judged to be of the highest quality. These RCTs showed no consistent differences in nephrotoxicity between high- and low-osmolality contrast media. Certain cardiovascular parameters were altered less with low-osmolality agents during intracardiac injection, but the clinical significance of these differences in unclear. Heat and pain sensations occurred less often with low-osmolality contrast media. No differences were noted in the incidence of nausea, vomiting, urticaria, or bronchospasm. Even with numerous RCTs comparing these media, physicians still must make economically significant choices about contrast media without sufficient data about their relative safety

  8. Direct Oral Anticoagulants: An Overview for the Interventional Radiologist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Pradesh, E-mail: pradeshkumar@doctors.org.uk; Ravi, Rajeev, E-mail: rajeev.ravi@aintree.nhs.uk; Sundar, Gaurav, E-mail: gaurav.sundar@aintree.nhs.uk [Aintree University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Radiology Department (United Kingdom); Shiach, Caroline, E-mail: caroline.shiach@aintree.nhs.uk [Aintree University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Haematology Department (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-15

    The direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have emerged as a good alternative for the treatment of thromboembolic diseases, and their use in clinical practice is increasing rapidly. The DOACs act by blocking the activity of one single step in the coagulation cascade. These drugs act downstream in the common pathway of the coagulation cascade by directly antagonising the action of thrombin or factor Xa. The development of DOACs represents a paradigm shift from the oral vitamin K antagonists such as warfarin. This article aims to describe the properties of the currently available DOACs including pharmacology and dosing. We also address the strategies for periprocedural management and reversal of anticoagulation of patients treated with these agents.

  9. Direct Oral Anticoagulants: An Overview for the Interventional Radiologist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Pradesh; Ravi, Rajeev; Sundar, Gaurav; Shiach, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    The direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have emerged as a good alternative for the treatment of thromboembolic diseases, and their use in clinical practice is increasing rapidly. The DOACs act by blocking the activity of one single step in the coagulation cascade. These drugs act downstream in the common pathway of the coagulation cascade by directly antagonising the action of thrombin or factor Xa. The development of DOACs represents a paradigm shift from the oral vitamin K antagonists such as warfarin. This article aims to describe the properties of the currently available DOACs including pharmacology and dosing. We also address the strategies for periprocedural management and reversal of anticoagulation of patients treated with these agents.

  10. Oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senoo, Keitaro; Lane, Deirdre A; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2014-09-01

    The availability of 4 non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs), that is, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban, has changed the landscape of stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. This review article provides an overview of the 4 phase III studies that have compared these NOACs, examining major outcomes of efficacy and safety. A range of practical questions relating to the NOACs have emerged, including topics such as patient selection, treating patients with renal impairment, treating elderly patients, and combining anticoagulant therapy with antiplatelet drugs. We also address the interaction of various patient characteristics with the treatments and suggest the features can assist the physician in the choice of a particular NOAC for a particular patient(s). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Prospective evaluation of dermatologic surgery complications including patients on multiple antiplatelet and anticoagulant medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeaux, Jeremy S; Martires, Kathryn J; Goldberg, Dori; Pattee, Sean F; Fu, Pingfu; Maloney, Mary E

    2011-09-01

    Few prospective studies have evaluated the safety of dermatologic surgery. We sought to determine rates of bleeding, infection, flap and graft necrosis, and dehiscence in outpatient dermatologic surgery, and to examine their relationship to type of repair, anatomic location of repair, antibiotic use, antiplatelet use, or anticoagulant use. Patients presenting to University of Massachusetts Medical School Dermatology Clinic for surgery during a 15-month period were prospectively entered. Medications, procedures, and complications were recorded. Of the 1911 patients, 38% were on one anticoagulant or antiplatelet medication, and 8.0% were on two or more. Risk of hemorrhage was 0.89%. Complex repair (odds ratio [OR] = 5.80), graft repair (OR = 7.58), flap repair (OR = 11.93), and partial repair (OR = 43.13) were more likely to result in bleeding than intermediate repair. Patients on both clopidogrel and warfarin were 40 times more likely to have bleeding complications than all others (P = .03). Risk of infection was 1.3%, but was greater than 3% on the genitalia, scalp, back, and leg. Partial flap necrosis occurred in 1.7% of flaps, and partial graft necrosis occurred in 8.6% of grafts. Partial graft necrosis occurred in 20% of grafts on the scalp and 10% of grafts on the nose. All complications resolved without sequelae. The study was limited to one academic dermatology practice. The rate of complications in dermatologic surgery is low, even when multiple oral anticoagulant and antiplatelet medications are continued, and prophylactic antibiotics are not used. Closure type and use of warfarin or clopidogrel increase bleeding risk. However, these medications should be continued to avoid adverse thrombotic events. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Anticoagulation and endothelial cell behaviors of heparin-loaded graphene oxide coating on titanium surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Chang-Jiang, E-mail: panchangjiang@hyit.edu.cn [Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory for Interventional Medical Devices, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huai' an 223003 (China); Pang, Li-Qun [Department of General Surgery, Huai' an First People' s Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Huai' an 223300 (China); Gao, Fei [Zhejiang Zylox Medical Devices Co., Ltd., Hangzhou 310000 (China); Wang, Ya-Nan; Liu, Tao; Ye, Wei; Hou, Yan-Hua [Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory for Interventional Medical Devices, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huai' an 223003 (China)

    2016-06-01

    Owing to its unique physical and chemical properties, graphene oxide (GO) has attracted tremendous interest in many fields including biomaterials and biomedicine. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the endothelial cell behaviors and anticoagulation of heparin-loaded GO coating on the titanium surface. To this end, the titanium surface was firstly covered by the polydopamine coating followed by the deposition of the GO coating. Heparin was finally loaded on the GO coating to improve the blood compatibility. The results of attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicated that the heparin-loaded GO coating was successfully created on the titanium surface. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images indicated that a relative uniform GO coating consisting of multilayer GO sheets was formed on the substrate. The hydrophilicity of the titanium surface was enhanced after the deposition of GO and further improved significantly by the loading heparin. The GO coating can enhance the endothelial cell adhesion and proliferation as compared with polydopamine coating and the blank titanium. Loading heparin on the GO coating can significantly reduce the platelet adhesion and prolong the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) while not influence the endothelial cell adhesion and proliferation. Therefore, the heparin-loaded GO coating can simultaneously enhance the cytocompatibility to endothelial cells and blood compatibility of biomaterials. Because the polydopamine coating can be easily prepared on most of biomaterials including polymer, ceramics and metal, thus the approach of the present study may open up a new window of promising an effective and efficient way to promote endothelialization and improve the blood compatibility of blood-contact biomedical devices such as intravascular stents. - Highlights: • Heparin-loaded graphene oxide coating was

  13. Monitoring of anticoagulant therapy in heart disease: considerations for the current assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroumand, Mohammadali; Goodarzynejad, Hamidreza

    2010-01-01

    Clinicians should be aware of new developments to familiarize themselves with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of new anticoagulant agents to appropriately and safely use them. For the moment, cardiologists and other clinicians also require to master currently available drugs, realizing the mechanism of action, side effects, and laboratory monitoring to measure their anticoagulant effects. Warfarin and heparin have narrow therapeutic window with high inter- and intra-patient variability, thereby the use of either drug needs careful laboratory monitoring and dose adjustment to ensure proper antithrombotic protection while minimizing the bleeding risk. The prothrombin time (PT) and the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) are laboratory tests commonly used to monitor warfarin and heparin, respectively. These two tests depend highly on the combination of reagent and instrument utilized. Results for a single specimen tested in different laboratories are variable; this is mostly attributable to the specific reagents and to a much lesser degree to the instrument used. The PT stands alone as the single coagulation test that has undergone the most extensive attempt at assay standardization. The international normalized ratio (INR) was introduced to "normalize" all PT reagents to a World Health Organization (WHO) reference thromboplastin preparation standard, such that a PT measured anywhere in the world would result in an INR value similar to that which would have been achieved had the WHO reference thromboplastin been utilized. However, INRs are reproducible between laboratories for only those patients who are stably anticoagulated with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) (i.e., at least 6 weeks of VKA therapy), and are not reliable or reproducible between laboratories for patients for whom VKA therapy has recently been started or any other clinical conditions associated with a prolonged PT such as liver disease, disseminated intravascular coagulation

  14. Clinical analysis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis and its combined treatment of anticoagulation and endovascular thrombolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun JIANG

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the clinical and imaging manifestations of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST, and the clinical effect of combined treatment of anticoagulation and endovascular thrombolysis. Methods and Results The clinical manifestations of 22 CVST patients were highly variable. Headache (90.91%, 20/22 was the most frequent symptom, and conscious disturbance, seizure and focal neurological deficits were commonly present. Plasma D-dimer level was elevated in 12 patients (54.55%. Lumbar puncture was performed in 14 patients, in whom intracranial hypertension was present in 9 patients (9/14 with no characteristic changes in routine and biochemical examination of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. Brain CT/MRI and CTV/MRV showed direct signs of CVST in all 22 patients, involving superior sagittal sinus, transverse sinus, sigmoid sinus, straight sinus and cortex veins, parenchymal lesions (infarction, hemorrhage and white matter abnormalities in 13 patients (59.09%, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH in 2 patients (9.10% and subdural hematoma in one patient (4.55%. The involved cerebral sinuses revealed by DSA were superior sagittal sinus in 13 patients (59.09% , transverse sinus in 17 patients (77.27%, sigmoid sinus in 14 patients (63.64%, inferior sagittal sinus in 2 patients (9.10%, straight sinus in 4 patients (18.18%, vein of Galen in one patient (4.55% and jugular vein in one patient (4.55%. Two thrombosed sinuses were found in 9 patients (40.91% and 3 or more thrombosed sinuses in 8 patients (36.36% . As no clinical improvements and progressive exacerbation were observed several days after heparin sodium intravenous drip or lower molecular weight heparin (LMWH hypodermic injection with oral warfarin anticoagulant therapy, urokinase thrombolysis in venous sinus or artery was applied in 21 patients (95.45%. After (25.70 ± 12.18 d treatment with anticoagulation, the modified Rankin Scale (mRS score of 13 patients (59.09% reached 0-1, 4 patients

  15. Poor anticoagulation control in patients taking warfarin at a tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2 Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, Groote Schuur Hospital and ..... Ann Intern Med 1999;131(7):492-501. https://doi.org/10.7326/0003-4819- ... J Am Geriatr Soc 2014;62(5):857-864. https://doi.org/10.1111/jgs.12799. 10. ... BMC Health Serv Res 2015;15(219):1-7. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-015-0890-4 ...

  16. Profile control simulations and experiments on TCV: a controller test environment and results using a model-based predictive controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maljaars, E.; Felici, F.; Blanken, T. C.; Galperti, C.; Sauter, O.; de Baar, M. R.; Carpanese, F.; Goodman, T. P.; Kim, D.; Kim, S. H.; Kong, M.; Mavkov, B.; Merle, A.; Moret, J. M.; Nouailletas, R.; Scheffer, M.; Teplukhina, A. A.; Vu, N. M. T.; The EUROfusion MST1-team; The TCV-team

    2017-12-01

    The successful performance of a model predictive profile controller is demonstrated in simulations and experiments on the TCV tokamak, employing a profile controller test environment. Stable high-performance tokamak operation in hybrid and advanced plasma scenarios requires control over the safety factor profile (q-profile) and kinetic plasma parameters such as the plasma beta. This demands to establish reliable profile control routines in presently operational tokamaks. We present a model predictive profile controller that controls the q-profile and plasma beta using power requests to two clusters of gyrotrons and the plasma current request. The performance of the controller is analyzed in both simulation and TCV L-mode discharges where successful tracking of the estimated inverse q-profile as well as plasma beta is demonstrated under uncertain plasma conditions and the presence of disturbances. The controller exploits the knowledge of the time-varying actuator limits in the actuator input calculation itself such that fast transitions between targets are achieved without overshoot. A software environment is employed to prepare and test this and three other profile controllers in parallel in simulations and experiments on TCV. This set of tools includes the rapid plasma transport simulator RAPTOR and various algorithms to reconstruct the plasma equilibrium and plasma profiles by merging the available measurements with model-based predictions. In this work the estimated q-profile is merely based on RAPTOR model predictions due to the absence of internal current density measurements in TCV. These results encourage to further exploit model predictive profile control in experiments on TCV and other (future) tokamaks.

  17. Recent developments in the use of oral anticoagulants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Michael R

    2009-01-01

    , such as their subcutaneous route of administration or the need for coagulation monitoring. Research was challenged to develop new drugs that would simplify thromboprophylaxis while showing equivalent or better efficacy. Rivaroxaban and dabigatran are now available in some countries for the prevention of venous......For many years, vitamin K antagonists, unfractionated heparins, low-molecular-weight heparins and a pentasaccharide were the only anticoagulant drugs available for the prevention of venous thromboembolism after surgery. However, their benefits were associated with disadvantages...

  18. Conservatively managed pineal apoplexy in an anticoagulated patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werder, Gabriel M.; Razdan, Rahul S.; Gagliardi, Joseph A.; Chaddha, Shashi K.B.

    2008-01-01

    We present a case of pineal apoplexy in an anticoagulated and hypertensive 56-year-old Hispanic male. At presentation, the patient's international normalized ratio (INR) was 10.51 and his blood pressure was 200/130 mmHg. His presenting symptoms included acute onset of headache, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, vertigo, and visual disturbance. Neuroimaging demonstrated hemorrhage into a morphologically normal pineal gland. Under conservative management, the patient experienced gradual resolution of all symptoms excluding the disturbance of upward gaze

  19. Adherence to recommendations of the Therapeutic Positioning Report about treatment with oral anticoagulants in elderly patients with atrial fibrillation. The ESPARTA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez Fernández, Carmen; Mostaza, Jose María; Castilla Guerra, Luis; Cantero Hinojosa, Jesus; Suriñach, Josep Maria; Acosta de Bilbao, Fernando; Tamarit, Juan José; Diaz Diaz, José Luis; Hernandez, Jose Luis; Cazorla, Daniel; Ràfols, Carles

    2017-10-06

    To evaluate the adherence to the recommendations in clinical practice performed by the Therapeutic Positioning Report (TPR) of the Spanish Agency of Medicines and Sanitary Products about the treatment with oral anticoagulants in patients aged≥75 years old with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) treated in Internal Medicine departments in Spain. Observational, cross-sectional and multicenter study in which 837 patients aged≥75 years old with NVAF, with stable treatment with oral anticoagulants at least 3 months before inclusion, and that had started treatment with oral anticoagulants before the inclusion period were included. Mean age was 83.0±5.0 years old, mean CHADS 2 score 3.2±1.2, mean CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score 5.0±1.4, and mean HAS-BLED score 2.1±0.9. A percentage of 70.8 of patients were treated with vitamin K antagonists (VKA) and the rest of patients with direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs). A percentage of 65.6 of patients treated with VKA did not follow the recommendations made by the TPR compared with 43.0% of patients treated with DOACs (P<.0001). In the case of VKA, the main reason for being considered as not appropriate according to the TPR was having poor control of anticoagulation and not switching to DOACs, whereas in the case of DOACs, it was not receiving the adequate dose according to the TPR. In a high proportion of anticoagulated elderly patients with NVAF in Spain, the recommendations performed by the TPR are not followed, particularly with VKA, since patients are not switched to DOACs despite time in therapeutic range. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Geometric shape control of thin film ferroelectrics and resulting structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.

    2000-01-01

    A monolithic crystalline structure and a method of making involves a semiconductor substrate, such as silicon, and a ferroelectric film, such as BaTiO.sub.3, overlying the surface of the substrate wherein the atomic layers of the ferroelectric film directly overlie the surface of the substrate. By controlling the geometry of the ferroelectric thin film, either during build-up of the thin film or through appropriate treatment of the thin film adjacent the boundary thereof, the in-plane tensile strain within the ferroelectric film is relieved to the extent necessary to permit the ferroelectric film to be poled out-of-plane, thereby effecting in-plane switching of the polarization of the underlying substrate material. The method of the invention includes the steps involved in effecting a discontinuity of the mechanical restraint at the boundary of the ferroelectric film atop the semiconductor substrate by, for example, either removing material from a ferroelectric film which has already been built upon the substrate, building up a ferroelectric film upon the substrate in a mesa-shaped geometry or inducing the discontinuity at the boundary by ion beam deposition techniques.

  1. Personalized prophylactic anticoagulation decision analysis in patients with membranous nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taewoo; Biddle, Andrea K.; Lionaki, Sofia; Derebail, Vimal K.; Barbour, Sean J.; Tannous, Sameer; Hladunewich, Michelle A.; Hu, Yichun; Poulton, Caroline J.; Mahoney, Shannon L.; Jennette, J. Charles; Hogan, Susan L.; Falk, Ronald J.; Cattran, Daniel C.; Reich, Heather N.; Nachman, Patrick H.

    2014-01-01

    Primary membranous nephropathy is associated with increased risk of venous thromboembolic events, which are inversely correlated with serum albumin levels. To evaluate the potential benefit of prophylactic anticoagulation (venous thromboembolic events prevented) relative to the risk (major bleeds), we constructed a Markov decision model. The venous thromboembolic event risk according to serum albumin was obtained from an inception cohort of 898 patients with primary membranous nephropathy. Risk estimates of hemorrhage were obtained from a systematic literature review. Benefit-to-risk ratios were predicted according to bleeding risk and serum albumin. This ratio increased with worsening hypoalbuminemia from 4.5:1 for an albumin under 3 g/dl to 13.1:1 for an albumin under 2 g/dl in patients at low bleeding risk. Patients at intermediate bleeding risk with an albumin under 2 g/dl have a moderately favorable benefit-to-risk ratio (under 5:1). Patients at high bleeding risk are unlikely to benefit from prophylactic anticoagulation regardless of albuminemia. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis, to account for uncertainty in risk estimates, confirmed these trends. From these data, we constructed a tool to estimate the likelihood of benefit based on an individual’s bleeding risk profile, serum albumin level, and acceptable benefit-to-risk ratio (http://www.gntools.com). This tool provides an approach to the decision of prophylactic anticoagulation personalized to the individual’s needs and adaptable to dynamic changes in health status and risk profile. PMID:24336031

  2. Diagnostic imaging of severe rectus sheath hematoma complicating anticoagulant therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, A.; Bui, P.; Boccaccini, H.; Bresler, L.; Claudon, M.; Boissel, P.; Regent, D.

    1995-01-01

    CT were performed in thirteen patients (12 women, 1 man) aged from 53 to 90 (mean age, 74) with severe RSH. Five patients also underwent ultrasound examination and three MR examination. Nine patients (69%) were receiving subcutaneous injection of heparin, three (23%) oral anticoagulant therapy and one continuous IV infusion of heparin. Clinical diagnosis was reached in 6 cases. Excessive activity of anticoagulant therapy was noted in 4 cases. The location of the RSH, their densities and their signals were analysed. All the RSH were mostly developed in the lower third of the abdominal wall, had a large spreading into the Retzius space and compressed the bladder and/or the bowels. RSH were all hyperdense and in 8 cases (61%) a fluid-fluid level due to the hematocrit effect was noted. In one case, a retroperitoneal hematoma was discovered. The extension of the RSH was well delineated with MRI. The RSH showed itself with heterogeneous signal intensities with areas of high-signal-intensity on T1-weighted images. Fluid-fluid levels and a concentric ring sign were also noted. Older women with subcutaneous injection of heparin are especially prone to RSH even though there is no overall excessive activity of anticoagulant therapy. Clinical and biological diagnosis may be difficult. CT scan is the exam of choice to reach a precise and acute diagnosis of RSH. (authors). 34 refs., 8 figs

  3. Anticoagulant Effect of Sugammadex: Just an In Vitro Artifact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirkmann, Daniel; Britten, Martin W; Pauling, Henning; Weidle, Juliane; Volbracht, Lothar; Görlinger, Klaus; Peters, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    Sugammadex prolongs activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and prothrombin time (PT) suggestive of anticoagulant effects. To pinpoint its presumed anticoagulant site of action, the authors assessed Sugammadex's impact on a panel of coagulation assays. Sugammadex, Rocuronium, Sugammadex and Rocuronium combined, or saline were added to blood samples from healthy volunteers and analyzed using plasmatic (i.e., aPTT, thrombin time, and fibrinogen concentration) (n = 8 each), PT (quick), activities of plasmatic coagulation factors, and whole blood (extrinsically and intrinsically activated thromboelastometry) assays (n = 18 each). Furthermore, dose-dependent effects of Sugammadex were also assessed (n = 18 each) in diluted Russel viper venom time (DRVVT) assays with low (DRVVT1) and high (DRVVT2) phospholipid concentrations and in a highly phospholipid-sensitive aPTT assay. Sugammadex increased PT (+9.1%; P Sugammadex dose-dependently prolonged both DRVVT1 and the highly phospholipid-sensitive aPTT assays, but additional phospholipids in the DRVVT2 assay almost abolished these prolongations. Thrombin time, a thromboelastometric thrombin generation assay, clot firmness, clot lysis, fibrinogen concentration, and activities of other coagulation factors were unaltered. Rocuronium, Sugammadex and Rocuronium combined, and saline exerted no effects. Sugammadex significantly affects various coagulation assays, but this is explainable by an apparent phospholipid-binding effect, suggesting that Sugammadex`s anticoagulant effects are likely an in vitro artifact.

  4. New Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOAC and Their Use Today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Schwarb

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The ideal anticoagulant is oral, has a wide therapeutic range, predictable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, a rapid onset of action, an available antidote, minimal side effects and minimal interactions with other drugs or food. With the development of the novel direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC, we now have an alternative to the traditional vitamin K antagonists (VKA for the prevention and treatment of thrombosis. DOACs have limited monitoring requirements and very predictable pharmacokinetic profiles. They were shown to be non-inferior or superior to VKA in the prophylaxis or treatment of thromboembolic events. Particularly in terms of safety they were associated with less major bleeding, including intracranial bleeding, thus providing a superior benefit for the prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. Despite these advantages, there are remaining limitations with DOACs: their dependence on renal and hepatic function for clearance and the lack of an approved reversal agent, whereas such antidotes are successively being made available. DOACs do not need regular monitoring to assess the treatment effect but, on the other hand, they interact with other drugs and interfere with functional coagulation assays. From a practical point of view, the properties of oral administration, simple dosing without monitoring, a short half-life allowing for the possibility of uncomplicated switching or bridging, and proven safety overwhelm the disadvantages, making them an attractive option for short- or long-term anticoagulation.

  5. Spontaneous pharyngo-laryngeal hematoma and anticoagulation. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleny CASASOLA-GIRÓN

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Objective: Spontaneous pharyngeal-laryngeal hematoma shows the importance of a complete ENT examination in the face of symptoms of banal appearance and a correct history that, in the case reported, unveiled the therapeutic use of anticoagulants. Case description: A 55 year old woman comes to emergency because of unexplained dysphagia. The inspection shows the presence of a hematoma in the pharyngeal-laryngeal region that, after the anticoagulant therapy was reversed, evolved favorably with conservative treatment. Discussion: In this case, apart from medical management performed by the hematology department, we focus our therapeutic approach in the protection of the airway and the prevention of a possible massive bleeding. Determining which patients require endotracheal intubation or tracheostomy and hemostatic surgery is the key to treatment. Conclusions: The anticoagulant therapy involves several complications that ENT specialists must consider in the face of clinical symptoms of dysphagia, dysphonia, dyspnea or signs of bleeding and they must know the possibilities of performance depending on the severity of each case.

  6. Oral Anticoagulation in Patients With Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Arman; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Greenberger, Norton J; Giugliano, Robert P

    2018-05-15

    Patients with liver disease are at increased risks of both thrombotic and bleeding complications. Many have atrial fibrillation (AF) or venous thromboembolism (VTE) necessitating oral anticoagulant agents (OACs). Recent evidence has contradicted the assumption that patients with liver disease are "auto-anticoagulated" and thus protected from thrombotic events. Warfarin and non-vitamin K-antagonist OACs have been shown to reduce thrombotic events safely in patients with either AF or VTE. However, patients with liver disease have largely been excluded from trials of OACs. Because all currently approved OACs undergo metabolism in the liver, hepatic dysfunction may cause increased bleeding. Thus, the optimal anticoagulation strategy for patients with AF or VTE who have liver disease remains unclear. This review discusses pharmacokinetic and clinical studies evaluating the efficacy and safety of OACs in patients with liver disease and provides a practical, clinically oriented approach to the management of OAC therapy in this population. Copyright © 2018 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Anticoagulant and antimicrobial finishing of non-woven polypropylene textiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degoutin, S; Jimenez, M; Casetta, M; Bellayer, S; Chai, F; Blanchemain, N; Neut, C; Kacem, I; Traisnel, M; Martel, B

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to prepare non-woven polypropylene (PP) textile functionalized with bioactive molecules in order to improve its anticoagulation and antibacterial properties. This paper describes the optimization of the grafting process of acrylic acid (AA) on low-pressure cold-plasma pre-activated PP, the characterization of the modified substrates and the effect of these modifications on the in vitro biological response towards cells. Then, the immobilization of gentamicin (aminoglycoside antibiotic) and heparin (anticoagulation agent) has been carried out on the grafted samples by either ionic interactions or covalent linkages. Their bioactivity has been investigated and related to the nature of their interactions with the substrate. For gentamicin-immobilized AA-grafted samples, an inhibition radius and a reduction of 99% of the adhesion of Escherichia coli have been observed when gentamicin was linked by ionic interactions, allowing the release of the antibiotic. By contrast, for heparin-immobilized AA-grafted PP samples, a strong increase of the anticoagulant effect up to 35 min has been highlighted when heparin was covalently bonded on the substrate, by contact with the blood drop. (paper)

  8. Graves’ Disease and Treatment Effects on Warfarin Anticoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Howard-Thompson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hyperthyroidism causes an increased hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin anticoagulation. Previous studies have demonstrated that patients with hyperthyroidism require lower dosages of warfarin to achieve a therapeutic effect. As hyperthyroidism is treated and euthyroidism is approached, patients may require increasing warfarin dosages to maintain appropriate anticoagulation. We describe a patient’s varying response to warfarin during treatment of Graves’ disease. Case Presentation. A 48-year-old African American female presented to the emergency room with tachycardia, new onset bilateral lower extremity edema, gradual weight loss, palpable goiter, and generalized sweating over the prior 4 months. She was admitted with Graves’ disease and new onset atrial fibrillation. Primary stroke prophylaxis was started using warfarin; the patient developed a markedly supratherapeutic INR likely due to hyperthyroidism. After starting methimazole, her free thyroxine approached euthyroid levels and the INR became subtherapeutic. She remained subtherapeutic over several months despite steadily increasing dosages of warfarin. Immediately following thyroid radioablation and discontinuation of methimazole, the patient’s warfarin dose and INR stabilized. Conclusion. Clinicians should expect an increased response to warfarin in patients with hyperthyroidism and close monitoring of the INR is imperative to prevent adverse effects. As patients approach euthyroidism, insufficient anticoagulation is likely without vigilant follow-up, INR monitoring, and increasing warfarin dosages.

  9. Geochemical controls on shale groundwaters: Results of reaction path modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Damm, K.L.; VandenBrook, A.J.

    1989-03-01

    The EQ3NR/EQ6 geochemical modeling code was used to simulate the reaction of several shale mineralogies with different groundwater compositions in order to elucidate changes that may occur in both the groundwater compositions, and rock mineralogies and compositions under conditions which may be encountered in a high-level radioactive waste repository. Shales with primarily illitic or smectitic compositions were the focus of this study. The reactions were run at the ambient temperatures of the groundwaters and to temperatures as high as 250/degree/C, the approximate temperature maximum expected in a repository. All modeling assumed that equilibrium was achieved and treated the rock and water assemblage as a closed system. Graphite was used as a proxy mineral for organic matter in the shales. The results show that the presence of even a very small amount of reducing mineral has a large influence on the redox state of the groundwaters, and that either pyrite or graphite provides essentially the same results, with slight differences in dissolved C, Fe and S concentrations. The thermodynamic data base is inadequate at the present time to fully evaluate the speciation of dissolved carbon, due to the paucity of thermodynamic data for organic compounds. In the illitic cases the groundwaters resulting from interaction at elevated temperatures are acid, while the smectitic cases remain alkaline, although the final equilibrium mineral assemblages are quite similar. 10 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs

  10. UPLC-ESI-QTOF/MS and multivariate data analysis for blood plasma and serum metabolomics: effect of experimental artefacts and anticoagulant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barri, Thaer; Dragsted, Lars Ove

    2013-01-01

    agents, e.g. heparin, EDTA and citrate. In the present study, we looked into metabolite and other differences in matched serum and plasma samples and different plasma preparations by using untargeted UPLC-ESI-QTOF/MS profiling and multivariate data analysis (PCA and OPLS-DA). Metabolite differences......Clotting and anticoagulation of blood samples may give rise to different metabolic profiles of serum and plasma samples, respectively. The anticoagulant used for blood plasma preparation may affect the resulting metabolic profile due to different mechanisms involved in anticoagulation by various...... between serum and plasma samples were mainly related to small peptides reflecting presence or absence of coagulation. Only subtle metabolite differences between the different plasma preparations were noticed, which were primarily related to ion suppression or enhancement caused by citrate and EDTA...

  11. Creatinine Versus Cystatin C: Differing Estimates of Renal Function in Hospitalized Veterans Receiving Anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Christina Hao; Rubinsky, Anna D; Minichiello, Tracy; Shlipak, Michael G; Price, Erika Leemann

    2018-05-31

    Current practice in anticoagulation dosing relies on kidney function estimated by serum creatinine using the Cockcroft-Gault equation. However, creatinine can be unreliable in patients with low or high muscle mass. Cystatin C provides an alternative estimation of glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) that is independent of muscle. We compared cystatin C-based eGFR (eGFR cys ) with multiple creatinine-based estimates of kidney function in hospitalized patients receiving anticoagulants, to assess for discordant results that could impact medication dosing. Retrospective chart review of hospitalized patients over 1 year who received non-vitamin K antagonist anticoagulation, and who had same-day measurements of cystatin C and creatinine. Seventy-five inpatient veterans (median age 68) at the San Francisco VA Medical Center (SFVAMC). We compared the median difference between eGFR by the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) study equation using cystatin C (eGFR cys ) and eGFRs using three creatinine-based equations: CKD-EPI (eGFR EPI ), Modified Diet in Renal Disease (eGFR MDRD ), and Cockcroft-Gault (eGFR CG ). We categorized patients into standard KDIGO kidney stages and into drug-dosing categories based on each creatinine equation and calculated proportions of patients reclassified across these categories based on cystatin C. Cystatin C predicted overall lower eGFR compared to creatinine-based equations, with a median difference of - 7.1 (IQR - 17.2, 2.6) mL/min/1.73 m 2 versus eGFR EPI , - 21.2 (IQR - 43.7, - 8.1) mL/min/1.73 m 2 versus eGFR MDRD , and - 25.9 (IQR - 46.8, - 8.7) mL/min/1.73 m 2 versus eGFR CG . Thirty-one to 52% of patients were reclassified into lower drug-dosing categories using cystatin C compared to creatinine-based estimates. We found substantial discordance in eGFR comparing cystatin C with creatinine in this group of anticoagulated inpatients. Our sample size was limited and included few women. Further

  12. Influence of the sample anticoagulant on the measurements of impedance aggregometry in cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Solomon

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Cristina Solomon1, Michael Winterhalter1, Isabel Gilde1, Ludwig Hoy2, Andreas Calatzis3, Niels Rahe-Meyer11Department of Anesthesiology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany; 2Institute for Biometry, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany; 3Department Hemostasis Transfusion Medicine, University Hospital Munich, Munich, GermanyBackground: The standard method of assessment of platelet function is represented by light transmission aggregometry (LTA, performed in citrated platelet-rich plasma (PRP. With LTA, decrease and subsequent post-cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB recovery of platelet function have been reported during cardiac surgery. Multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA may be used as point-of-care method to monitor perioperative changes in platelet function. Since MEA assesses macroaggregation which is influenced by the plasmatic levels of unbound calcium, citrate may be inadequate as anticoagulant for MEA. We used citrate and heparin for MEA samples, to see with which anticoagulant the intraoperative decrease and postoperative recovery in platelet function previously described with other aggregometric methods in cardiac surgery may be observed with MEA.Methods: Blood was obtained from 60 patients undergoing routine cardiac surgery and the samples were collected in standard tubes containing unfractionated heparin (50 U/mL or trisodium citrate (3.2%. The samples were obtained before CPB, at 30 minutes on CPB, end of CPB and on the first postoperative day. MEA was performed using the Multiplate® analyzer. Collagen (COLtest, 100 μg/mL and TRAP-6 (thrombin receptor activating peptide, TRAPtest, 1mM/mL were used as aggregation agonists.Results: Platelet aggregometric response decreased significantly during CPB. Platelet aggregation assessed using TRAP-6 as agonist on heparinized blood significantly correlated with the duration of CPB (r = −0.41, p = 0.001, 2-tailed Pearson test. The aggregometric analysis performed on the first

  13. Underuse of Anticoagulation in Older Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and CHADS2 Score ≥ 2: Are We Doing Better Since the Marketing of Direct Oral Anticoagulants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrard, Séverine; Vandenabeele, Caroline; Marien, Sophie; Boland, Benoit; Dalleur, Olivia

    2017-11-01

    Our objectives were to (1) describe the evolution of the underuse of anticoagulants in older people with atrial fibrillation (AF) and a CHADS 2 score ≥ 2 since direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) were introduced to the market and (2) describe factors associated with this underuse. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study including geriatric patients admitted during the pre-DOAC (2008-2011) and post-DOAC (2013-2015) periods in an academic hospital in Belgium. Five inclusion criteria were met: age ≥ 75 years, diagnosis of AF, indication for anticoagulation (CHADS 2 score ≥ 2), risk of functional decline (Identification of Seniors At Risk [ISAR] score ≥ 2), and comprehensive geriatric assessment. The use of anticoagulants and antiplatelets at home before admission was recorded. Risks of stroke and bleeding were calculated using CHADS 2 and HEMORR 2 HAGES scores, respectively. Three different logistic regression models were performed to describe the evolution of and factors associated with the underuse of anticoagulants after DOAC marketing. Anticoagulant underuse, present in 209 of 614 (34%) geriatric patients with AF, was lower in patients with a history of stroke (28.5%) or congestive heart failure (26.9%) but higher in those receiving antiplatelets (56.2%) and in older individuals. Anticoagulant underuse decreased significantly from the pre-DOAC (37.3%) to the post-DOAC (29.7%) era, as shown by two analyses using propensity scores. In older patients with AF, anticoagulant underuse was mainly associated with antiplatelet use. Anticoagulant underuse and antiplatelet use have both decreased since DOAC marketing. Underuse of anticoagulants was still a concern for three in ten geriatric patients with AF at high risk of stroke (CHADS 2 score ≥ 2).

  14. Anticoagulant therapy for venous thromboembolism detected by Doppler ultrasound in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer receiving bevacizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suenaga M

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitsukuni Suenaga, Nobuyuki Mizunuma, Eiji Shinozaki, Satoshi Matsusaka, Masato Ozaka, Mariko Ogura, Keisho Chin, Toshiharu Yamaguchi Department of Gastroenterology, Cancer Institute Hospital of Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo, Japan Background: Doppler ultrasound imaging is useful for management of venous thromboembolism associated with a subclavicular implantable central venous access system in patients receiving bevacizumab (Bev. We investigated the efficacy and safety of our anticoagulant regimen based on Doppler findings.Methods: Patients aged ≤75 years with metastatic colorectal cancer, no history of thromboembolism, and no prior use of Bev received chemotherapy plus Bev. Doppler ultrasound imaging of the deep venous system to detect thrombosis was performed after the first course of Bev and repeated after the third course in patients with asymptomatic thrombosis. Indications for anticoagulant therapy in patients with asymptomatic thrombosis were as follows: enlarging thrombus (E, thrombus >40 mm in diameter (S, thrombus involving the superior vena cava (C, and decreased blood flow (V.Results: Among 79 patients enrolled in this study, asymptomatic thrombosis was detected in 56 patients (70.9% by Doppler ultrasound imaging after the first course of Bev and there was no thrombus in 23 patients (29.1%. Of these 56 patients, 11 (19.6% received anticoagulant therapy with warfarin, including eight after the first course and three after follow-up imaging. S + V was observed in four of 11 patients (36.4%, as well as V in two (18.2%, S + V + C in one (9.1%, E + S + V in one (9.1%, E + C in one (9.1%, E in one (9.1%, and C in one (9.1%. All patients resumed chemotherapy, including seven who resumed Bev. Improvement or stabilization of thrombi was achieved in ten patients (90.9%. Only one patient had symptomatic thromboembolism. Mild bleeding due to anticoagulant therapy occurred in six patients (54.5%, but there were no treatment

  15. THE RESULTS OF INDIVIDUAL DOSE CONTROL OF HEALTH INSTITUTIONS STAFF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Shleenkova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The  work  provides  comparative  assessment  of  the  levels  of  occupational  exposure  of  Saint-Petersburg health institutions staff. The analysis was carried out of the 891 individual doses measurement results which have  being  obtained  during  5  years  investigations  (2009-2013.  The  comparing  of  the  average  annual effective doses was carried out for 4 groups of medical specialists: x-ray laboratory assistant, radiotherapist, radiographer of dental clinics and X-ray surgery staff (surgeons, anesthesiologists and surgical nurses who are working close to irradiation source. It is shown that the annual effective dose average value is about 0.5 mSv for the first three groups of medical specialists. The same value for X-ray surgery staff is 1.6 mSv. Individual  annual  exposure  doses  have  not  exceeded  the  main  dose  limits  required  by  Radiation  Safety Standard 99/2009. The issues are considered of the estimation exactness of the effective dose basing on the results of individual dose equivalent measurement. 

  16. Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, September 1965: Review Of Experimental Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitzer, Lyman Jr. [Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1966-04-15

    To my way of thinking the most significant milestone of the present meeting is the substantial body of evidence that has been presented on the hydromagnetic stabilization of open-ended systems. The success of minimum magnetic-field ('minimum-B') configurations in stabilizing a plasma marks one more area where theory and experiment in the field of plasma physics have been brought together with gratifying results. Let me go back a little into history and discuss the gradual growth of our information on hydromagnetic instabilities generally. Many of you will remember that hydromagnetic theory was applied to the self-pinched discharge in the early years of the controUed fusion programme. The predictions of this theory were very shortly fulfilled by the observations; the effects were so unmistakable that it was not difficult to compare the theory with the observations. On the streak pictures of the linear or toroidal discharges that were obtained in those early years one saw clearly the diffuse plasma column, which first contracted to a narrow filament and then started to distort and kink until finally it hit the wall. Under some conditions the plasma was observed to break up into a series of blobs like a string of sausages. Since the behaviour was exactly what the theory had predicted, it took no very great experimental wisdom to conclude that observations had confirmed theory.

  17. The results of CT-guided periradicular pain control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlenbrock, D.; Arlinghaus, J.

    1997-01-01

    The effectiveness of CT-guided periradicular pain therapy was studied. Material and method: 55 patients with lumbar and/or radicular pain were treated by periradicular injections of 40 ml triamcinolon, in some cases combined with injection of the facets of the lumbar vertebrae. 36 patients had chronic symptoms; in 7, these were acute, and 12 patients complained of renewed disc symptoms following previous disc surgery. Approximately 4 months after the conclusion of treatment, the patients were requested to complete a questionnaire giving information on the course and after-effects of treatment. The questionnaire was repeated after 5 months. Results: 55% of patients were free of symptoms or had had some improvement at the time of the questionnaire; 30% reported temporary improvement, and in 15% there was no change compared with the pre-treatment symptoms. At the time of the second questionnaire, the proportion of patients who had derived benefit from the treatment was somewhat lower. 49% reported that they were pain-free or improved, while temporary improvement was reported by 36% of patients. Conclusion: CT-guided periradicular pain therapy is a valuable procedure in patients in whom conservative measures prove ineffective, and when surgery is not indicated. However, only about half the treated patients maintain permanent improvement. (orig.) [de

  18. Assessment of anticoagulation treatments in non-valvular atrial fibrillation patients diagnosed in a basic health area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera Alcaraz, Beatriz M; Abellán Huerta, José; Carbayo Herencia, Julio Antonio; Ariza Copado, Consuelo; Hernández Menárguez, Fernando; Abellán Alemán, José

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. To assess the need for anticoagulation is essential for its management. Our objective was to investigate whether the indication of anticoagulation was adequate in patients diagnosed with non-valvular AF, given the CHA2-DS2-VASc scale, measuring the International Normalizad Ratio range (INR) in patients treated with anti-vitamin K drugs. This is an observational and cross sectional study. 232 patients with atrial fibrillation were included. We analyzed demographic, the CHA2-DS2-VASc and HAS-BLED variables, the treatment and INR values for 6 consequentive months. The confrontation of variables was performed using chi-square and Mantel-Haenzel test. The prevalence of AF was 1.05%. The 88.4% had CHA2-DS2-VASc ≥ 2. The 71.1% were taking anticoagulants, of which 58.2% were under antivitamin k. The 46.7% of patients taking antivitamin K, presented inadequate range of INR. There was a greater prescription of antivitamin k in patients with persistent or permanent AF compared to the paroxysmal form (62.8 vs. 37.2% p<.001). The use of drugs that increase bleeding was associated with a worse control of INR after adjustment for the main variables of clinical relevance (odds ratio 2.17 [1.02-4.59], p=.043). The level of anticoagulation with antivitamin K was inadequate in our sample, despite a proper follow up and adherence to treatment. Patients with paroxysmal AF received less antivitamin K than those with persistent/permanent AF. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Fall risk and anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation in the elderly: A delicate balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagerty, Tracy; Rich, Michael W

    2017-01-01

    Guidelines for managing atrial fibrillation recommend systemic anticoagulation for almost all patients age 65 and older, but in practice up to 50% of older patients do not receive maintenance anticoagulation therapy. The most common reason physicians cite for withholding anticoagulation in older patients with atrial fibrillation is a perception of a high risk of falling and associated bleeding, especially intracranial hemorrhage. Copyright © 2017 Cleveland Clinic.

  20. Direct oral anticoagulants versus warfarin for preventing stroke and systemic embolic events among atrial fibrillation patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimachi, Miho; Furukawa, Toshi A; Kimachi, Kimihiko; Goto, Yoshihito; Fukuma, Shingo; Fukuhara, Shunichi

    2017-11-06

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an independent risk factor for atrial fibrillation (AF), which is more prevalent among CKD patients than the general population. AF causes stroke or systemic embolism, leading to increased mortality. The conventional antithrombotic prophylaxis agent warfarin is often prescribed for the prevention of stroke, but risk of bleeding necessitates regular therapeutic monitoring. Recently developed direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) are expected to be useful as alternatives to warfarin. To assess the efficacy and safety of DOAC including apixaban, dabigatran, edoxaban, and rivaroxaban versus warfarin among AF patients with CKD. We searched the Cochrane Kidney and Transplant Specialised Register (up to 1 August 2017) through contact with the Information Specialist using search terms relevant to this review. Studies in the Specialised Register are identified through searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE, conference proceedings, the International Clinical Trials Register (ICTRP) Search Portal, and ClinicalTrials.gov. We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) which directly compared the efficacy and safety of direct oral anticoagulants (direct thrombin inhibitors or factor Xa inhibitors) with dose-adjusted warfarin for preventing stroke and systemic embolic events in non-valvular AF patients with CKD, defined as creatinine clearance (CrCl) or eGFR between 15 and 60 mL/min (CKD stage G3 and G4). Two review authors independently selected studies, assessed quality, and extracted data. We calculated the risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for the association between anticoagulant therapy and all strokes and systemic embolic events as the primary efficacy outcome and major bleeding events as the primary safety outcome. Confidence in the evidence was assessing using GRADE. Our review included 12,545 AF participants with CKD from five studies. All participants were randomised to either DOAC (apixaban, dabigatran, edoxaban

  1. Proteomics Quality Control: Quality Control Software for MaxQuant Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielow, Chris; Mastrobuoni, Guido; Kempa, Stefan

    2016-03-04

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics coupled to liquid chromatography has matured into an automatized, high-throughput technology, producing data on the scale of multiple gigabytes per instrument per day. Consequently, an automated quality control (QC) and quality analysis (QA) capable of detecting measurement bias, verifying consistency, and avoiding propagation of error is paramount for instrument operators and scientists in charge of downstream analysis. We have developed an R-based QC pipeline called Proteomics Quality Control (PTXQC) for bottom-up LC-MS data generated by the MaxQuant software pipeline. PTXQC creates a QC report containing a comprehensive and powerful set of QC metrics, augmented with automated scoring functions. The automated scores are collated to create an overview heatmap at the beginning of the report, giving valuable guidance also to nonspecialists. Our software supports a wide range of experimental designs, including stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), tandem mass tags (TMT), and label-free data. Furthermore, we introduce new metrics to score MaxQuant's Match-between-runs (MBR) functionality by which peptide identifications can be transferred across Raw files based on accurate retention time and m/z. Last but not least, PTXQC is easy to install and use and represents the first QC software capable of processing MaxQuant result tables. PTXQC is freely available at https://github.com/cbielow/PTXQC .

  2. Abnormal uterine bleeding in women receiving direct oral anticoagulants for the treatment of venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Richard; Marcoux, Violaine; Tagalakis, Vicky

    2017-08-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is a common complication of anticoagulant therapy in premenopausal women affected with acute venous thromboembolism. AUB impacts quality of life, and can lead to premature cessation of anticoagulation. There is increasing data to suggest that the direct oral anticoagulants when used for the treatment of venous thromboembolism differ in their menstrual bleeding profile. This article aims to review the existing literature regarding the association between AUB and the direct oral anticoagulants and make practical recommendations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Developing an Anti-Xa-Based Anticoagulation Protocol for Patients with Percutaneous Ventricular Assist Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieg, Adam; Mardis, B Andrew; Mardis, Caitlin R; Huber, Michelle R; New, James P; Meadows, Holly B; Cook, Jennifer L; Toole, J Matthew; Uber, Walter E

    2015-01-01

    Because of the complexities associated with anticoagulation in temporary percutaneous ventricular assist device (pVAD) recipients, a lack of standardization exists in their management. This retrospective analysis evaluates current anticoagulation practices at a single center with the aim of identifying an optimal anticoagulation strategy and protocol. Patients were divided into two cohorts based on pVAD implanted (CentriMag (Thoratec; Pleasanton, CA) / TandemHeart (CardiacAssist; Pittsburgh, PA) or Impella (Abiomed, Danvers, MA)), with each group individually analyzed for bleeding and thrombotic complications. Patients in the CentriMag/TandemHeart cohort were subdivided based on the anticoagulation monitoring strategy (activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) or antifactor Xa unfractionated heparin (anti-Xa) values). In the CentriMag/TandemHeart cohort, there were five patients with anticoagulation titrated based on anti-Xa values; one patient developed a device thrombosis and a major bleed, whereas another patient experienced major bleeding. Eight patients received an Impella pVAD. Seven total major bleeds in three patients and no thrombotic events were detected. Based on distinct differences between the devices, anti-Xa values, and outcomes, two protocols were created to guide anticoagulation adjustments. However, anticoagulation in patients who require pVAD support is complex with constantly evolving anticoagulation goals. The ideal level of anticoagulation should be individually determined using several coagulation laboratory parameters in concert with hemodynamic changes in the patient's clinical status, the device, and the device cannulation.

  4. Control of xenon oscillations in large PWRs result of control in Mihama Unit No.3 Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimazu, Yoichiro; Itahara, Kuniyuki; Nishimura, Takeshi.

    1977-01-01

    Recently, constant axial offset control method for power distribution control is applied to PWRs (of Westinghouse type). In this mode of operation, Xe induced spatial oscillations which could cause the problem from the power distribution point of view hardly break out. Under special conditions such as tests, however, Xe oscillations can break out. It is required that power distribution can be controlled without any special operational actions. Several control methods for Xe oscillations have been reported through many theoretical studies and operational experiences. Among them is First Overtone Control Method. This requires quite a simple control action but can effectively control Xe oscillations. The authors have shown the effectiveness of First Overtone Control Method in Mihama Unit No. 3 Reactor. In this report the detailed procedures are described. The outline of Constant Axial Offset Control Method is described in Appendix. (auth.)

  5. Anticoagulants for secondary prevention after acute myocardial infarction: lessons from the past decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atar, Dan; Bode, Christoph; Stuerzenbecher, André; Verheugt, Freek W A

    2014-08-01

    The impact of an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) event, such as an acute myocardial infarction (MI), is not limited to the acute management phase; patients face an elevated risk of residual atherothrombotic events that commonly requires chronic management for months or even years. Significant advances have been made in both the acute and chronic management of patients with acute MI over the past decade, resulting in improved prognoses. One of the hallmarks of modern treatment strategies is more aggressive antiplatelet treatment regimens. However, the risks of further ACS events, stroke and premature death remain elevated in these patients, and addressing this residual risk is challenging owing to interpatient variability, differences in management strategies between centres and countries, incomplete understanding of the specific pathophysiology of post-ACS thrombosis and limitations of current therapeutic approaches. The recent approval in Europe of the direct oral anticoagulant rivaroxaban for use in this setting in combination with clopidogrel and acetylsalicylic acid offers another strategy to consider in the management of these patients, and clinical strategies in this area continue to evolve. In this review, we chart the progress made over the past decade in reducing the burden of secondary thromboembolic events after acute MI and discuss the current position of and future perspectives on the inclusion of oral anticoagulants into care pathways in this setting. © 2014 The Authors. Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  6. Human Protein C produces anticoagulation and increased fibrinolytic activity in the cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdick, M.D.; Schaub, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of activated human Protein C (PCa) infusion on the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems of the Nembutal anesthetized cat was assessed. Human Protein C was activated by incubation with thrombin or by passage over a column of thrombin immobilized on CNBr Sepharose 4B. Cats were given bolus i.v. injections of either vehicle or PCa in a dose range of 3-16 μg/mL of calculated whole body volume. Citrated blood samples (9:1) were taken from a femoral vein prior to and at 5, 10, 20, 30, 60, 120, and 180 min. after PCa. Activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT) euglobulin clot lysis (ECLT) and I-125 fibrin release (FR) was measured. Vehicle treated cats had no change in any parameter. PCa produced a dose and time dependent prolongation of APTT while TT was unchanged. Anticoagulation was evident immediately after PCa infusion and began to normalize within 20 min. Fibrinolytic activity measured by ECLT and FR was also stimulated by PCa but was not evident until 40-60 minutes after PCa injection. The results show that human PCa induces anticoagulation effects in the cat similar to other species. However, stimulation of fibrinolysis requires a longer period of time before expression. This delay of fibrinolytic stimulation should be considered when assessing the effects of human Protein C in other species

  7. O-sulfated bacterial polysaccharides with low anticoagulant activity inhibit metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgenström, Marjut; Wärri, Anni; Hiilesvuo, Katri; Käkönen, Rami; Käkönen, Sanna; Nissinen, Liisa; Pihlavisto, Marjo; Marjamäki, Anne; Vlodavsky, Israel; Naggi, Annamaria; Torri, Giangiacomo; Casu, Benito; Veromaa, Timo; Salmivirta, Markku; Elenius, Klaus

    2007-07-01

    Heparin-like polysaccharides possess the capacity to inhibit cancer cell proliferation, angiogenesis, heparanase-mediated cancer cell invasion, and cancer cell adhesion to vascular endothelia via adhesion receptors, such as selectins. The clinical applicability of the antitumor effect of such polysaccharides, however, is compromised by their anticoagulant activity. We have compared the potential of chemically O-sulfated and N,O-sulfated bacterial polysaccharide (capsular polysaccharide from E. COLI K5 [K5PS]) species to inhibit metastasis of mouse B16-BL6 melanoma cells and human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells in two in vivo models. We demonstrate that in both settings, O-sulfated K5PS was a potent inhibitor of metastasis. Reducing the molecular weight of the polysaccharide, however, resulted in lower antimetastatic capacity. Furthermore, we show that O-sulfated K5PS efficiently inhibited the invasion of B16-BL6 cells through Matrigel and also inhibited the in vitro activity of heparanase. Moreover, treatment with O-sulfated K5PS lowered the ability of B16-BL6 cells to adhere to endothelial cells, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and P-selectin, but not to E-selectin. Importantly, O-sulfated K5PSs were largely devoid of anticoagulant activity. These findings indicate that O-sulfated K5PS polysaccharide should be considered as a potential antimetastatic agent.

  8. Anticoagulant, antiplatelet and antianemic effects of Punica granatum (pomegranate) juice in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Azra; Khan, Rafeeq A

    2016-04-01

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L., Punicaceae) is a good source of minerals and phytochemicals with diverse pharmacological activities such as anxiolytic, antidepressant, hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic, and anti-inflammatory activities. Effects of P. granatum on blood parameters and coagulation have, however, been little studied. The aim of the study was to assess the outcome of P. granatum on coagulation and anticoagulation factors at different doses on blood samples of healthy white rabbits. Blood samples of the animals were collected twice during the study and biochemical assays were performed to assess the effect on hematological, coagulation, anticoagulation, and platelet aggregation. Significant changes were observed in erythrocytes, hemoglobin, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, while bleeding and thrombin time were also prolonged significantly. There was significant increase in protein C, thrombin antithrombin complex levels, and decrease in platelet aggregation and fibrinogen concentration, in a dose-dependent manner. The results of hematological and coagulation assays lead to the speculation about a possible antianemic and cardioprotective effect of P. granatum.

  9. Adverse outcomes of anticoagulant use among hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease: a comparison of the rates of major bleeding events between unfractionated heparin and enoxaparin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Saheb Sharif-Askari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anticoagulation therapy is usually required in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD for treatment or prevention of thromboembolic diseases. However, this benefit could easily be offset by the risk of bleeding. OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence of adverse outcomes of anticoagulants in hospitalized patients with CKD, and to compare the rates of major bleeding events between the unfractionated heparin (UFH and enoxaparin users. METHODS: One year prospective observational study was conducted in patients with CKD stages 3 to 5 (estimated GFR, 10-59 ml/min/1.73 m(2 who were admitted to the renal unit of Dubai Hospital. Propensity scores for the use of anticoagulants, estimated for each of the 488 patients, were used to identify a cohort of 117 pairs of patients. Cox regression method was used to estimate association between anticoagulant use and adverse outcomes. RESULTS: Major bleeding occurred in 1 in 3 patients who received anticoagulation during hospitalization (hazard ratio [HR], 4.61 [95% confidence interval [CI], 2.05-10.35]. Compared with enoxaparin users, patients who received anticoagulation with unfractionated heparin had a lower mean [SD] serum level of platelet counts (139.95 [113] × 10(3/µL vs 205.56 [123] × 10(3/µL; P<0.001, and had a higher risk of major bleeding (HR, 4.79 [95% CI, 1.85-12.36]. Furthermore, compared with those who did not receive anticoagulants, patients who did had a higher in-hospital mortality (HR, 2.54 [95% CI, 1.03-6.25]; longer length of hospitalization (HR, 1.04 [95% CI, 1.01-1.06]; and higher hospital readmission at 30 days (HR, 1.79 [95% CI, 1.10-2.91]. CONCLUSIONS: Anticoagulation among hospitalized patients with CKD was significantly associated with an increased risk of bleeding and in-hospital mortality. Hence, intensive monitoring and preventive measures such as laboratory monitoring and/or dose adjustment are warranted.

  10. Impact of CHA2DS2VASc Score on Candidacy for Anticoagulation in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation: A Multi-payer Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Aarti A; Nelson, Winnie W; Schein, Jeff

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to report on the effect of using CHA 2 DS 2 VASc (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥75 years [doubled], type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus, stroke or transient ischemic attack or thromboembolism [doubled], vascular disease [prior myocardial infarction, peripheral artery disease, or aortic plaque], age 65-75 years, sex category [female]) rather than CHADS 2 (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥75 years, diabetes mellitus, and prior stroke) to determine candidacy for anticoagulant prophylaxis in insured patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Six administrative claims databases that included medical and pharmacy claims for patients aged ≥18 years with a new or existing diagnosis of AF and patient outcomes assessed for 1 year after diagnosis were analyzed. Retrospective health plan data analyses were performed using a software tool (Anticoagulant Quality Improvement Analyzer). Study measures included stroke risk (identified by CHADS 2 and CHA 2 DS 2 VASc scores), bleeding risk (identified by the Anticoagulation and Risk Factors in Atrial Fibrillation score), and anticoagulant use. A total of 115,906 patients with AF (range of mean ages among the 6 databases, 56-79 years) met the inclusion criteria. All ranges reported represent the minimum and maximum values among the 6 databases. Using the CHA 2 DS 2 VASc compared with the CHADS 2 index to assess stroke risk resulted in a 23% to 32% increase in patients considered potential candidates for anticoagulant prophylaxis. This translated to a 38% to 114% increase in the number of ostensibly undertreated patients. Among patients with high stroke and low bleeding risk, 18% to 28% more patients were considered potential candidates for anticoagulation treatment using CHA 2 DS 2 VASc compared with CHADS 2 , or a 57% to 151% increase in the number of undertreated patients. Use of the CHA 2 DS 2 VASc score to determine the risk of stroke increased the number of AF patients for

  11. Interrelation between results of individual dosimetric control and regulatory control in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Bernal, E.D.; Jova Sed, L.A.; Capote Ferrera, E.; Lopez Bejerano, G.M.

    1997-01-01

    The increasing use of various applications of ionizing radiation in Cuba made it necessary to create a harmonic system of facilities that guarantees the radiological safety of radiation workers, the public and the environment. Therefore, in 1985 a Centre of Radiation Protection and Hygiene (CPHR) was created. Thereafter, in 1991, the regulatory function and the inspection of radiological and nuclear safety was assigned to the National Centre of Nuclear Safety. The introduction of this service has provided the regulatory body with a tool to control the existing situation with respect to registration and licensing. The results of the service in the period 1994-1996 and a comparison with previous years are given. The results obtained reflect that the system of supervision in general has guaranteed keeping levels of doses low. The dose values registered demonstrate the possibility to establish in the country as a does limit an annual average dose limit of 20 mSv which might rise to but shall on no account exceed 50 mSv per year without the need for costly investment and based on organizational measures

  12. A Multilevel Analysis of Real-World Variations in Oral Anticoagulation Initiation for Atrial Fibrillation in Valencia, a European Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aníbal García-Sempere

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Beyond clinical trials, clinical practice guidelines, and administrative regulation, treatment decision-making can be influenced by individual and contextual factors. Our goal was to describe variations in the patterns of initiation of anticoagulation therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation by Health Areas (HA in the region of Valencia in Spain and to quantify the influence of the HAs on variations in treatment choice.Methods: We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study of all atrial fibrillation patients who started treatment with oral anticoagulants between November 2011 and February 2014 in each of the region's 24 HAs. We described patient and utilization characteristics per HA and initiation patterns over time, and we identified contextual and individual factors associated with differences in initiation patterns.Results: 21,879 patients initiated treatment with an oral anticoagulant in the 24 HAs. Initiation with direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC in the first year was 14.6%. In November 2013 the ratio was 25.4%, with HA ratios ranging from 3.8 to 57.1%. DOAC-initiating patients had less comorbidity but were more likely to present episodes of previous ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, or TIA when compared with patients initiating with VKA treatment. Variability among HAs was statistically significant, with the majority of HAs ranking above or below the regional initiation average (ICC ≈ 8%.Conclusion: There was high variability in the percentage of DOAC initiation and in the choice of DOAC among HAs. Interventions aimed to improve DOAC initiation decision-making and to reduce variations should take into account the Health Area component.

  13. A Multilevel Analysis of Real-World Variations in Oral Anticoagulation Initiation for Atrial Fibrillation in Valencia, a European Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sempere, Aníbal; Bejarano-Quisoboni, Daniel; Librero, Julián; Rodríguez-Bernal, Clara L; Peiró, Salvador; Sanfélix-Gimeno, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Beyond clinical trials, clinical practice guidelines, and administrative regulation, treatment decision-making can be influenced by individual and contextual factors. Our goal was to describe variations in the patterns of initiation of anticoagulation therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation by Health Areas (HA) in the region of Valencia in Spain and to quantify the influence of the HAs on variations in treatment choice. Methods: We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study of all atrial fibrillation patients who started treatment with oral anticoagulants between November 2011 and February 2014 in each of the region's 24 HAs. We described patient and utilization characteristics per HA and initiation patterns over time, and we identified contextual and individual factors associated with differences in initiation patterns. Results: 21,879 patients initiated treatment with an oral anticoagulant in the 24 HAs. Initiation with direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) in the first year was 14.6%. In November 2013 the ratio was 25.4%, with HA ratios ranging from 3.8 to 57.1%. DOAC-initiating patients had less comorbidity but were more likely to present episodes of previous ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, or TIA when compared with patients initiating with VKA treatment. Variability among HAs was statistically significant, with the majority of HAs ranking above or below the regional initiation average (ICC ≈ 8%). Conclusion: There was high variability in the percentage of DOAC initiation and in the choice of DOAC among HAs. Interventions aimed to improve DOAC initiation decision-making and to reduce variations should take into account the Health Area component.

  14. Setting priorities in the health care sector - the case of oral anticoagulants in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Peter Bo; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Hansen, Morten Lock; Brandes, Axel; Husted, Steen; Harboe, Louise; Dybro, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Resources devoted to health care are limited, therefore setting priorities is required. It differs between countries whether decision-making concerning health care technologies focus on broad economic perspectives or whether focus is narrow on single budgets ("silo mentality"). The cost perspective as one part of the full health economic analysis is important for decision-making. With the case of oral anticoagulants in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), the aim is to discuss the implication of the use of different cost perspectives for decision-making and priority setting. In a cost analysis, the annual average total costs of five oral anticoagulants (warfarin and non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants [NOACs; dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban]) used in daily clinical practice in Denmark for the prevention of stroke in NVAF patients are analyzed. This is done in pairwise comparisons between warfarin and each NOAC based on five potential cost perspectives, from a "drug cost only" perspective up to a "societal" perspective. All comparisons of warfarin and NOACs show that the cost perspective based on all relevant costs, ie, total costs perspective, is essential for the choice of therapy. Focusing on the reimbursement costs of the drugs only, warfarin is the least costly option. However, with the aim of therapy to prevent strokes and limit bleedings, including the economic impact of this, all NOACs, except rivaroxaban, result in slightly lower health care costs compared with warfarin. The same picture was found applying the societal perspective. Many broad cost-effectiveness analyses of NOACs exist. However, in countries with budget focus in decision-making this information does not apply. The present study's case of oral anticoagulants has shown that decision-making should be based on health care or societal cost perspectives for optimal use of limited resources. Otherwise, the risk is that suboptimal decisions will be likely.

  15. Efficacy of metronidazole versus placebo in pain control after hemorrhoidectomy: results of a controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Solorio-López

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hemorrhoidal disease occurs in 50% of people aged > 40 years and is the most common reason for anorectal surgery. Pain is the main complication. Multiple topical and systemic drugs have been investigated for pain control, but there is no ideal treatment. Metronidazole has been shown to decrease postoperative pain but is not used widely. Objective: To evaluate the effect of oral metronidazole versus placebo and to assess postoperative pain following hemorrhoidectomy. Material and methods: Controlled clinical trial in adult patients who underwent elective hemorrhoidectomy for grade III/IV hemorrhoids. Patients were assigned to receive metronidazole (500 mg q8 h orally; study group, SG or placebo (control group, CG for 7 days after surgery. Pain was assessed using a visual analog scale after surgery. Analgesic administration (time and use of analgesics and resumption of daily life activities were also assessed. Results: Forty-four patients were included, 22 in each group. Postoperative pain differed significantly between the SG and CG at 6 h (3.86 ± 0.56, 6.64 ± 1.49, 12 h (5.59 ± 1.33, 8.82 ± 0.79, 24 h (6.86 ± 1.49, 9.73 ± 0.45, day 4 (5.32 ± 2.10, 9.50 ± 0.59, day 7 (3.14 ± 1.03, 7.36 ± 1.39, and day 14 (2.14 ± 0.46, 5.45 ± 1.29. The first analgesia dose was required at 21.27 ± 5.47 h in the CG and 7.09 ± 2.36 h in the SG (p < 0.05, the time of analgesic use was 6.86 ± 1.61 days in the CG and 13.09 ± 2.48 days in the SG (p < 0.05, and resumption of daily activities occurred at 7.59 ± 1.56 days in the CG and 14.73 ± 3.76 days in the SG (p < 0.05. Conclusion: Oral administration of metronidazole is effective in pain management after hemorrhoidectomy.

  16. Anticoagulant and anti-thrombotic treatments in the management of hematological malignancies in a home care program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Tendas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Anticoagulants (AC and anti-platelet (AP agents are widely administered to patients with hematological malignancies (HM. However, HM patients may be at high risk of bleeding and hemorrhagic complications, because of different form of coagulopathies and several degrees of thrombocytopenia. Materials and Methods: A prospective evaluation of the use of anticoagulant and anti-thrombotic agents as well as of bleeding and thrombotic complications in a consecutive cohort of patients, which were followed during the first semester of 2010 by our home care service, was performed. In this regard, three pharmacological class of agents, such as oral anticoagulants (warfarin and acenocumarine, low molecular weight heparin (LMWH and anti-platelet (AP drugs were considered. Results: Out of 129 patients, 26 (20% were treated with AC/AP drugs. Warfarin, acenocumarine, LMWH as well as AP were used in 7, 11 and 12 patients, respectively. Adverse events (bleeding were observed in 3 patients (11.5%, 2 cases being on warfarin (replaced by LMWH and 1 being AP (suspension without replacement; out of the 3 patients with bleeding, none presented thrombocytopenia. Conclusions: Despite the frequent findings of hemostatic disorders in a population of frail patients managed in a home care setting, our experience demonstrated that the use of AC/AP drugs has been very rarely responsible for significant complications.

  17. Management of anticoagulation in hip fractures: A pragmatic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassa, Rafik; Khalfaoui, Mahdi Yacine; Hujazi, Ihab; Sevenoaks, Hannah; Dunkow, Paul

    2017-09-01

    Hip fractures are common and increasing with an ageing population. In the United Kingdom, the national guidelines recommend operative intervention within 36 hours of diagnosis. However, long-term anticoagulant treatment is frequently encountered in these patients which can delay surgical intervention. Despite this, there are no set national standards for management of drug-induced coagulopathy pre-operatively in the context of hip fractures.The aim of this study was to evaluate the management protocols available in the current literature for the commonly encountered coagulopathy-inducing agents.We reviewed the current literature, identified the reversal agents used in coagulopathy management and assessed the evidence to determine the optimal timing, doses and routes of administration.Warfarin and other vitamin K antagonists (VKA) can be reversed effectively using vitamin K with a dose in the range of 2 mg to 10 mg intravenously to correct coagulopathy.The role of fresh frozen plasma is not clear from the current evidence while prothrombin complex remains a reliable and safe method for immediate reversal of VKA-induced coagulopathy in hip fracture surgery or failed vitamin K treatment reversal.The literature suggests that surgery should not be delayed in patients on classical antiplatelet medications (aspirin or clopidogrel), but spinal or regional anaesthetic methods should be avoided for the latter. However, evidence regarding the use of more novel antiplatelet medications (e.g. ticagrelor) and direct oral anticoagulants remains a largely unexplored area in the context of hip fracture surgery. We suggest treatment protocols based on best available evidence and guidance from allied specialties.Hip fracture surgery presents a common management dilemma where semi-urgent surgery is required. In this article, we advocate an evidence-based algorithm as a guide for managing these anticoagulated patients. Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2017;2:394-402. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.2.160083.

  18. Characteristics of Symptomatic Intracranial Hemorrhage in Patients Receiving Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulant Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisanao Akiyama

    Full Text Available The first non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant (NOAC introduced to the market in Japan was dabigatran in March 2011, and three more NOACs, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban, have since become available. Randomized controlled trials of NOACs have revealed that intracranial hemorrhage (ICH occurs less frequently with NOACs compared with warfarin. However, the absolute incidence of ICH associated with NOACs has increased with greater use of these anticoagulants, and we wanted to explore the incidence, clinical characteristics, and treatment course of patients with NOACs-associated ICH.We retrospectively analyzed the characteristics of symptomatic ICH patients receiving NOACs between March 2011 and September 2014.ICH occurred in 6 patients (5 men, 1 woman; mean ± SD age, 72.8 ± 3.2 years. Mean time to onset was 146.2 ± 111.5 days after starting NOACs. Five patients received rivaroxaban and 1 patient received apixaban. None received dabigatran or edoxaban. Notably, no hematoma expansion was observed within 24 h of onset in the absence of infusion of fresh frozen plasma, activated prothrombin complex concentrate, recombinant activated factor VIIa or hemodialysis. When NOAC therapy was initiated, mean HAS-BLED and PANWARDS scores were 1.5 ± 0.5 and 39.5 ± 7.7, respectively. Mean systolic blood pressure was 137.8 ± 15.9 mmHg within 1 month before spontaneous ICH onset.Six symptomatic ICHs occurred early in NOAC therapy but hematoma volume was small and did not expand in the absence of infusion of reversal agents or hemodialysis. The occurrence of ICH during NOAC therapy is possible even when there is acceptable mean systolic blood pressure control (137.8 ± 15.9 mmHg and HAS-BLED score ≤ 2. Even stricter blood pressure lowering and control within the acceptable range may be advisable to prevent ICH during NOAC therapy.

  19. Characteristics of patients with atrial fibrillation prescribed antiplatelet monotherapy compared with those on anticoagulants: insights from the GARFIELD-AF registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, F.W.A.; Gao, H.; Mahmeed, W. Al; Ambrosio, G.; Angchaisuksiri, P.; Atar, D.; Bassand, J.P.; Camm, A.J.; Cools, F.; Eikelboom, J.; Kayani, G.; Lim, T.W.; Misselwitz, F.; Pieper, K.S.; Eickels, M. van; Kakkar, A.K.

    2018-01-01

    Aims: Current atrial fibrillation (AF) guidelines discourage antiplatelet (AP) monotherapy as alternative to anticoagulants (ACs). Why AP only is still used is largely unknown. Methods and results: Factors associated with AP monotherapy prescription were analysed in GARFIELD-AF, a registry of

  20. Rationale and design of ASSAF-K (A study of the safety and efficacy of anticoagulant therapy in the treatment of atrial fibrillation in Kanagawa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Hatori, MD, PhD

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: The results of the study are expected to serve as the basis for providing clinical practice guidance to healthcare institutions in Japan, with the ultimate goals of better characterizing the appropriate use of OACs and providing clinical decision support to physicians to facilitate the design of appropriate therapeutic strategies and the selection of anticoagulants for the management of AF.

  1. Conservatively managed pineal apoplexy in an anticoagulated patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werder, Gabriel M. [William Beaumont Hospital, Department of Radiology, 3600 West Thirteen Mile Road, Royal Oak, MI 48073 (United States); St Christopher Iba Mar Diop College of Medicine, Luton (United Kingdom)], E-mail: gabriel_werder@yahoo.com; Razdan, Rahul S.; Gagliardi, Joseph A.; Chaddha, Shashi K.B. [St Vincent' s Medical Center, Bridgeport, CT (United States)

    2008-02-15

    We present a case of pineal apoplexy in an anticoagulated and hypertensive 56-year-old Hispanic male. At presentation, the patient's international normalized ratio (INR) was 10.51 and his blood pressure was 200/130 mmHg. His presenting symptoms included acute onset of headache, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, vertigo, and visual disturbance. Neuroimaging demonstrated hemorrhage into a morphologically normal pineal gland. Under conservative management, the patient experienced gradual resolution of all symptoms excluding the disturbance of upward gaze.

  2. Bivalirudin for Pediatric Procedural Anticoagulation: A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski, Katherine L; DiNardo, James A; Nasr, Viviane G

    2018-02-14

    Bivalirudin (Angiomax; The Medicines Company, Parsippany, NJ), a direct thrombin inhibitor, has found increasing utilization as a heparin alternative in the pediatric population, most commonly for the treatment of thrombosis secondary to heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. Due to the relative rarity of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia as well as the lack of Food and Drug Administration-approved indications in this age group, much of what is known regarding the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of bivalirudin in this population has been extrapolated from adult data. This narrative review will present recommendations regarding the use of bivalirudin for procedural anticoagulation in the pediatric population based on the published literature.

  3. Motivations of women in Uganda living with rheumatic heart disease: A mixed methods study of experiences in stigma, childbearing, anticoagulation, and contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Andrew Y; Nabbaale, Juliet; Nalubwama, Haddy; Okello, Emmy; Ssinabulya, Isaac; Longenecker, Christopher T; Webel, Allison R

    2018-01-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a leading cause of premature mortality in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Women of reproductive age are a unique and vulnerable group of RHD patients, due to increased risk of cardiovascular complications and death during pregnancy. Yet, less than 5% of women of childbearing age with RHD in LMICs use contraceptives, and one in five pregnant women with RHD take warfarin despite known teratogenicity. It is unclear whether this suboptimal contraception and anticoagulant use during pregnancy is due to lack of health system resources, limited health literacy, or social pressure to bear children. We conducted a mixed methods study of 75 women living with RHD in Uganda. Questionnaires were administered to 50 patients. Transcripts from three focus groups with 25 participants were analyzed using qualitative description methodology. Several themes emerged from the focus groups, including pregnancy as a calculated risk; misconceptions about side-effects of contraceptives and anticoagulation; reproductive decision-making control by male partners, in-laws, or physicians; abandonment of patients by male partners; and considerable stigma against heart disease patients for both their reproductive and financial limitations (often worse than that directed against HIV patients). All questionnaire respondents were told by physicians that their hearts were not strong enough to support a pregnancy. Only 14% used contraception while taking warfarin. All participants felt that society would look poorly on a woman who cannot have children due to a heart condition. To our knowledge, this is the first qualitative study of female RHD patients and their attitudes toward cardiovascular disorders and reproduction. Our results suggest that health programs targeting heart disease in LMICs must pay special attention to the needs of women of childbearing age. There are opportunities for improved family/societal education programs and community engagement

  4. Comparative study of anticoagulant and procoagulant properties of 28 snake venoms from families Elapidae, Viperidae, and purified Russell's viper venom-factor X activator (RVV-X).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntravat, Montamas; Nuchprayoon, Issarang; Pérez, John C

    2010-09-15

    Snake venoms consist of numerous molecules with diverse biological functions used for capturing prey. Each component of venom has a specific target, and alters the biological function of its target. Once these molecules are identified, characterized, and cloned; they could have medical applications. The activated clotting time (ACT) and clot rate were used for screening procoagulant and anticoagulant properties of 28 snake venoms. Crude venoms from Daboia russellii siamensis, Bothrops asper, Bothrops moojeni, and one Crotalus oreganus helleri from Wrightwood, CA, had procoagulant activity. These venoms induced a significant shortening of the ACT and showed a significant increase in the clot rate when compared to the negative control. Factor X activator activity was also measured in 28 venoms, and D. r. siamensis venom was 5-6 times higher than those of B. asper, B. moojeni, and C. o. helleri from Wrightwood County. Russell's viper venom-factor X activator (RVV-X) was purified from D. r. siamensis venom, and then procoagulant activity was evaluated by the ACT and clot rate. Other venoms, Crotalus atrox and two Naja pallida, had anticoagulant activity. A significant increase in the ACT and a significant decrease in the clot rate were observed after the addition of these venoms; therefore, the venoms were considered to have anticoagulant activity. Venoms from the same species did not always have the same ACT and clot rate profiles, but the profiles were an excellent way to identify procoagulant and anticoagulant activities in snake venoms.

  5. Simultaneous Determination of 13 Anticoagulant Rodenticidesin Human Blood by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry and its Application in Three Poisoning Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Zheng; Xiang, Ping; Shen, Baohua; Shen, Min; Yan, Hui

    2018-05-01

    Anticoagulant rodenticides are widely used for rodent control around the world. A rapid and sensitive method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of 13 anticoagulant rodenticides (coumafuryl, pindone, valone, warfarin, coumatetralyl, coumachlor, diphacinone, dicumarol, chlorophacinone, bromadiolone, difenacoum, flocoumafen, and brodifacoum) in human blood by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. After liquid-liquid extraction, the anticoagulant rodenticides were separated on an Eclipse Plus C18 column. Linearities were observed for each analyte in blood ranging from 0.5 to 50 ng/mL, with correlation coefficients over 0.99. The limits of detection ranged from 0.01 to 0.2 ng/mL, and the limits of quantification were 0.5 ng/mL for all analytes. The intraday and interday precisions were <15%, and accuracies ranged from 80.3% to 111.0%. This validated method with high sensitivity has been applied in three anticoagulant rodenticide poisoning cases and has been used successfully in monitoring blood concentrations for months. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  6. Quality of anticoagulation management with warfarin among outpatients in a tertiary hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a retrospective cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenta, Teferi Gedif; Assefa, Tamrat; Alemayehu, Bekele

    2017-06-06

    Warfarin is the most widely used anticoagulant in the world. The difficulty of managing warfarin contributes to great potential for patient harm, both from excessive anticoagulation and insufficient anticoagulation. This study assessed the International Normalized Ratio (INR) control outcome measures and warfarin dose adjustment practices at cardiology and hematology outpatient clinics at a teaching hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The study was based on a cross - sectional study design involving 360 retrospective patients' chart review among outpatients who received warfarin for its various indications. The mean frequency of INR monitoring per patient was 62.9 days (17.2-143.7 days). Patients spent 52.2%, 29.0% and 18.8% of the time in sub-therapeutic, therapeutic and supra-therapeutic ranges, respectively. The daily warfarin dose was increased 50.9% and 36.9% and decreased in 52.8% and 60.9% of the time for occurrences of sub-therapeutic and supra-therapeutic INRs to achieve target ranges of 2.0-3.0 and 2.5-3.5, respectively. The quality of anticoagulation management with warfarin among outpatients in Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital was sub-optimal. This was reflected by low Time in Therapeutic Range (TTR), longer than recommended INR monitoring frequency, and minimal actions taken to adjust warfarin dose after occurrences of non-therapeutic INRs.

  7. Conhecimento sobre anticoagulantes orais e seu manejo por médicos de pronto atendimento Emergency-room doctors' knowledge about oral anticoagulants and its management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Periotto Borlina

    2010-06-01

    ' level of knowledge about OA and their drug-related or non-drug-related interactions, and to verify if emergency room doctors are prepared to integrate their theoretical knowledge and the routine of the emergency room. Method: A questionnaire was administered to 100 emergency room doctors working at two public hospitals and three private hospitals in Curitiba, Brazil. The objective of the questionnaire was to find out: if emergency room doctors asked patients about the use of OA, which OA doctors were familiar with, which control exam would be appropriate, what doctors knew about the synergism with OA, how complications were managed, and if doctors were interested in knowing more about OA. Results: Sixty percent of the doctors reported to ask patients about the use of OA, 81% had insufficient knowledge regarding the synergism between some substances and OA, 15% were unaware of which exams are used to follow up anticoagulated patients, 50.7% did not know the commercial names of OA, 4% were unaware of OA antidotes, and 92% revealed interest in improving their knowledge about OA. Conclusion: The number of emergency room doctors who were familiar with OA is low, as well as the number of those who know how to manage anticoagulated patients. The percentage of doctors who did not ask patients about the use of OA and who were unaware of the principles of drug synergism is high, and most of them were interested in improving their knowledge about anticoagulants.

  8. Multiple sclerosis in the Faroe Islands. 7. Results of a case control questionnaire with multiple controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurtzke, J F; Hyllested, K; Arbuckle, J D

    1997-01-01

    Detailed questionnaires were completed in 1978-79 by 23 of the 28 then known resident Faroese multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and 127 controls. These controls were divided into 69 Group A (patient sibs and other relatives), 37 Group B (matched neighbor controls, their spouses and sibs, plus...... facilities, and nature of house construction or heating. Detailed dietary histories, available for half the subjects, revealed no differences, cases versus controls, for four age periods between age 0 and 30 years, and for 16 specified foodstuffs. Animal exposures showed overall no consistent differences...

  9. Suboptimal Anticoagulant Management in Japanese Patients with Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation Receiving Warfarin for Stroke Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Teruyuki; Kaneko, Hirokazu; Mishina, Sari; Wang, Feng; Morita, Satoshi

    2017-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, with increasing prevalence in Japan. Although prothrombin time-international normalized ratio (PT-INR) targets for monitoring warfarin therapy in patients with nonvalvular AF (NVAF) are well defined, real-world patient characteristics and PT-INR levels remain unknown among Japanese patients with NVAF who initiate and continue warfarin (warfarin maintainers) versus those who switch from warfarin to direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs; warfarin switchers). Patients with NVAF receiving oral anticoagulants between February 2013 and June 2015 were identified using a nationwide electronic medical record (EMR) database from 69 hospitals in Japan. Demographics and characteristics of patients, PT-INR, time in therapeutic range (TTR), and frequency in range (FIR) of PT-INR between warfarin maintainers and warfarin switchers were assessed. A total of 1705 patients met inclusion criteria and were examined (1501 warfarin maintainers versus 204 warfarin switchers). CHADS 2 , CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc, and HAS-BLED scores were comparable between groups. However, these scores were significantly higher among warfarin switchers at the time of switching than at the time of warfarin initiation. Furthermore, TTR and FIR of PT-INR were lower in warfarin switchers than in maintainers. Nevertheless, TTR and FIR were below 50% (PT-INR, 1.6-2.6) in both patient groups. In this EMR-based clinical study, patients who switched to DOACs had both poor or inadequate PT-INR control and higher risk factors of stroke. Many patients receiving warfarin did not achieve sufficient PT-INR therapeutic range. DOACs could be recommended in Japanese patients with NVAF with inadequate PT-INR control and increased risk of stroke. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Prediction of the risk of bleeding during anticoagulant treatment for venous thromboembolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijer, P. M.; Hutten, B. A.; Prins, M. H.; Büller, H. R.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To construct and validate the bleeding risk prediction score, which is based on variables identified in the literature that can be easily obtained before the institution of anticoagulant therapy, in a large independent cohort of patients who were treated with anticoagulant therapy for

  11. Treatment Changes among Users of Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants in Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Maja Hellfritzsch; Husted, Steen Elkjær; Grove, Erik Lerkevang

    2017-01-01

    Patients with atrial fibrillation discontinuing anticoagulant therapy are left unprotected against ischaemic stroke. Further, switching between oral anticoagulants may be associated with a transiently increased risk of bleeding or thromboembolism. However, there is a paucity of real-life data on ...

  12. Safety and efficacy of anticoagulation for secondary stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation patients: The AMADEUS trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lane, D.A.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Minini, P.; Buller, H.R.; Lip, G.Y.H.

    2010-01-01

    ackground: Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and previous ischemic stroke are at high risk of recurrent stroke, but are also perceived to be at increased bleeding risk while treated with anticoagulants. Methods: Post-hoc analyses examined the efficacy and safety of anticoagulation of 4576 AF

  13. Consistency of safety and efficacy of new oral anticoagulants across subgroups of patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Christophe Lega

    Full Text Available AIMS: The well-known limitations of vitamin K antagonists (VKA led to development of new oral anticoagulants (NOAC in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF. The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine the consistency of treatment effects of NOAC irrespective of age, comorbidities, or prior VKA exposure. METHODS AND RESULTS: All randomized, controlled phase III trials comparing NOAC to VKA up to October 2012 were eligible provided their results (stroke/systemic embolism (SSE and major bleeding (MB were reported according to age (≤ or >75 years, renal function, CHADS2 score, presence of diabetes mellitus or heart failure, prior VKA use or previous cerebrovascular events. Interactions were considered significant at p <0.05. Three studies (50,578 patients were included, respectively evaluating apixaban, rivaroxaban, and dabigatran versus warfarin. A trend towards interaction with heart failure (p = 0.08 was observed with respect to SSE reduction, this being greater in patients not presenting heart failure (RR = 0.76 [0.67-0.86] than in those with heart failure (RR = 0.90 [0.78-1.04]; Significant interaction (p = 0.01 with CHADS2 score was observed, NOAC achieving a greater reduction in bleeding risk in patients with a score of 0-1 (RR 0.67 CI 0.57-0.79 than in those with a score ≥2 (RR 0.85 CI 0.74-0.98. Comparison of MB in patients with (RR 0.97 CI 0.79-1.18 and without (RR 0.76 CI 0.65-0.88 diabetes mellitus showed a similar trend (p = 0.06. No other interactions were found. All subgroups derived benefit from NOA in terms of SSE or MB reduction. CONCLUSIONS: NOAC appeared to be more effective and safer than VKA in reducing SSE or MB irrespective of patient comorbidities. Thromboembolism risk, evaluated by CHADS2 score and, to a lesser extent, diabetes mellitus modified the treatment effects of NOAC without complete loss of benefit with respect to MB reduction.

  14. Structural Analysis and Anticoagulant Activities of the Novel Sulfated Fucan Possessing a Regular Well-Defined Repeating Unit from Sea Cucumber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyi Wu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sulfated fucans, the complex polysaccharides, exhibit various biological activities. Herein, we purified two fucans from the sea cucumbers Holothuria edulis and Ludwigothurea grisea. Their structures were verified by means of HPGPC, FT-IR, GC–MS and NMR. As a result, a novel structural motif for this type of polymers is reported. The fucans have a unique structure composed of a central core of regular (1→2 and (1→3-linked tetrasaccharide repeating units. Approximately 50% of the units from L. grisea (100% for H. edulis fucan contain sides of oligosaccharides formed by nonsulfated fucose units linked to the O-4 position of the central core. Anticoagulant activity assays indicate that the sea cucumber fucans strongly inhibit human blood clotting through the intrinsic pathways of the coagulation cascade. Moreover, the mechanism of anticoagulant action of the fucans is selective inhibition of thrombin activity by heparin cofactor II. The distinctive tetrasaccharide repeating units contribute to the anticoagulant action. Additionally, unlike the fucans from marine alga, although the sea cucumber fucans have great molecular weights and affluent sulfates, they do not induce platelet aggregation. Overall, our results may be helpful in understanding the structure-function relationships of the well-defined polysaccharides from invertebrate as new types of safer anticoagulants.

  15. Polysaccharides and their depolymerized fragments from Costaria costata: Molecular weight and sulfation-dependent anticoagulant and FGF/FGFR signal activating activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ningning; Zhang, Meng; Xu, Yingjie; Sun, Zhongmin; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Lijuan; Zhang, Quanbin

    2017-12-01

    Crude polysaccharides from Costaria costata were extracted by hot water and further fractionated by anion exchange chromatography into three polysaccharide fractions. Three low molecular weight fragments were then prepared by degradation of the polysaccharides with hydrogen peroxide and ascorbic acid. The structural features of the polysaccharides and their low molecular weight fragments were elucidated for the first time based on the HGPC, FT-IR, NMR, MS, monosaccharide composition, and other chemical analyses. Their anticoagulant and FGF-1, -2, -7, -8, -9, -10/FGFR1c signaling activation activities in BaF3 cells were also examined. Our studies showed that the polysaccharides were sulfated at different positions of galactose and fucose residues. The APTT-, PT- and TT-based anticoagulant assay results indicated that a high molecular weight and a higher degree of sulfation were essential for their anticoagulant activities. In contrast, not only the polysaccharides but also the depolymerized fragments showed significant FGF/FGFR signal activating activities in a FGF-, molecular weight-, and sulfation-dependent manner. The results presented in current study demonstrated the potential use of the polysaccharides and their fragments as anticoagulants and FGF signal regulators. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Stabilization of the E* Form Turns Thrombin into an Anticoagulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bah, Alaji; Carrell, Christopher J.; Chen, Zhiwei; Gandhi, Prafull S.; Di Cera, Enrico; (WU-MED)

    2009-07-31

    Previous studies have shown that deletion of nine residues in the autolysis loop of thrombin produces a mutant with an anticoagulant propensity of potential clinical relevance, but the molecular origin of the effect has remained unresolved. The x-ray crystal structure of this mutant solved in the free form at 1.55 {angstrom} resolution reveals an inactive conformation that is practically identical (root mean square deviation of 0.154 {angstrom}) to the recently identified E* form. The side chain of Trp215 collapses into the active site by shifting >10 {angstrom} from its position in the active E form, and the oxyanion hole is disrupted by a flip of the Glu192-Gly193 peptide bond. This finding confirms the existence of the inactive form E* in essentially the same incarnation as first identified in the structure of the thrombin mutant D102N. In addition, it demonstrates that the anticoagulant profile often caused by a mutation of the thrombin scaffold finds its likely molecular origin in the stabilization of the inactive E* form that is selectively shifted to the active E form upon thrombomodulin and protein C binding.

  17. New oral anticoagulant and antiplatelet agents for neurosurgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimpton, George; Dabbous, Bassam; Leach, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, warfarin, clopidogrel and aspirin have provided the mainstay for prevention of thrombotic disease in cardiac patients. However, new classes of drugs have recently emerged that promise better clinical outcomes and lower risks. Use of such agents has increased, but increased risk and severity of intra-cranial haemorrhage (ICH) still remain. These cases of intra-cranial bleeds present as emergencies to neurosurgical units. It is of paramount importance that neurosurgical practitioners are aware of those new drugs, useful monitoring tests and available emergency reversal options in case the patient needs emergency intervention. In this review we survey newly available agents in the U.K. at the time of publication. We look at the data provided by the manufacturers, related publications and international guidelines for their use and reversal. New anticoagulants offer a lower incidence of ICH compared with warfarin. Advanced and accurate monitoring tests are emerging, as are prospective data on reversal of anticoagulation in bleeding. Some standard coagulation tests may be of use, whilst reversal agents are available and being evaluated. The trial data shows that new antiplatelet agents have similar or increased incidence and severity of intra-cranial ICH compared with clopidogrel. There is currently limited data on monitoring or reversal. We suggest they may be managed similarly to clopidogrel by using platelet reactivity assays, optimising platelet count and using platelet transfusion with adjunctive agents.

  18. Managing direct oral anticoagulants in patients undergoing dentoalveolar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, J P; Woolcombe, S A; Patel, R K; Obisesan, O; Roberts, L N; Bryant, C; Arya, R

    2017-02-24

    Our objective was to describe our experience of managing a cohort of adult patients prescribed direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) undergoing dentoalveolar procedures between November 2012 and May 2016. Prior to conducting a procedure a formal assessment was made of each patient's anticoagulation treatment. A specific plan was then formulated, balancing the risk of bleeding with the risk of thrombosis. Patients received a telephone consultation one week following treatment to assess any post-operative bleeding. Eighty-two patients underwent 111 oral surgical procedures, the majority of which were dental extractions. In the case of 35 (32%) procedures, advice was given to omit the DOAC, either before or after treatment. There was no bleeding following the majority of procedures. Persistent bleeding followed 15 (13.5%) procedures, of which 7 (6.3%) procedures required specific intervention. The majority of patients prescribed DOACs can undergo dentoalveolar procedures safely. Important considerations when planning treatment are: (i) when the patient usually takes their dose of DOAC, (ii) the time the procedure is performed and, (iii) when the DOAC is taken post-procedure. In our experience, if these factors are considered carefully, omission of DOAC doses is unlikely to be required for most patients.

  19. The Patterns of Non-vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants (NOACs) Use in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation in Seven Balkan Countries: a Report from the BALKAN-AF Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potpara, Tatjana S; Trendafilova, Elina; Dan, Gheorghe-Andrei; Goda, Artan; Kusljugic, Zumreta; Manola, Sime; Music, Ljilja; Gjini, Viktor; Pojskic, Belma; Popescu, Mircea Ioakim; Georgescu, Catalina Arsenescu; Dimitrova, Elena S; Kamenova, Delyana; Ekmeciu, Uliks; Mrsic, Denis; Nenezic, Ana; Brusich, Sandro; Milanov, Srdjan; Zeljkovic, Ivan; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2017-08-01

    Data on management of atrial fibrillation (AF) in the Balkan Region are scarce. To capture the patterns in AF management in contemporary clinical practice in the Balkan countries a prospective survey was conducted between December 2014 and February 2015, and we report results pertinent to the use of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs). A 14-week prospective, multicenter survey of consecutive AF patients seen by cardiologists or internal medicine specialists was conducted in Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Montenegro, Romania, and Serbia (a total of about 50 million inhabitants). Of 2712 enrolled patients, 2663 (98.2%) had complete data relevant to oral anticoagulant (OAC) use (mean age 69.1 ± 10.9 years, female 44.6%). Overall, OAC was used in 1960 patients (73.6%) of whom 338 (17.2%) received NOACs. Malignancy [odds ratio (OR), 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.06, 1.20-3.56], rhythm control (OR 1.64, 1.25-2.16), and treatment by cardiologists were independent predictors of NOAC use (OR 2.32, 1.51-3.54) [all p policy). Efforts are needed to establish an evidence-based approach to OAC selection and to facilitate the optimal use of OAC, thus improving the outcomes in AF patients in this large region.

  20. Cohort study of Anticoagulation Self-Monitoring (CASM): a prospective study of its effectiveness in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Alison; Tompson, Alice; Fitzmaurice, David; Sutton, Stephen; Perera, Rafael; Heneghan, Carl

    2015-07-01

    Trials show that oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT) substantially reduces thromboembolic events without an increase in major haemorrhagic events, but it is not known whether these results translate into routine practice. To estimate the current levels of control and adverse events in patients self-monitoring OAT, explore the factors that predict success, and determine whether the level of side effects reported from randomised controlled trials are translated to a non-selected population. Prospective cohort study in the UK. Participants were aged ≥18 years and registered with a GP. Main outcomes were the proportion of participants, over 12 months, who were still self-monitoring, had not experienced adverse events, and had achieved >80% of time in therapeutic range (TTR). In total, 296 participants were recruited; their median age was 61 years and 55.1% were male. Participants were predominately professional or held a university qualification (82.7%). At 12 months, 267 (90.2%) were still self-monitoring. Mean TTR was 75.3% (standard deviation 16.9).Six serious and two minor adverse events were reported by GPs. Only 45.9% of participants received any in-person training at the outset. Increased age (P = 0.027), general wellbeing (EQ-5D visual score, P = 0.020), and lower target international normalised range (INR, P = 0.032) were all associated with high (>80% TTR) levels of control. The findings show that, even with little training, people on OAT can successfully self-monitor, and even self-manage, their INR. TTR was shown to improve with age. However, widespread use of self-monitoring of INR may be limited by the initial costs, as well as a lack of training and support at the outset. © British Journal of General Practice 2015.

  1. Ammonia concentrations in canine whole blood, EDTA-anticoagulated whole blood, and plasma measured by use of a point-of-care ammonia meter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odunayo, Adesola; Tobias, Karen M; Okafor, Chika C; Flatland, Bente

    2017-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the use of canine whole blood (WB) for measurement of ammonia concentration by use of a point-of-care ammonia meter and to compare results of measuring ammonia concentrations in WB, EDTA-anticoagulated WB, and plasma. ANIMALS 40 client-owned dogs. PROCEDURES A blood sample (2 mL) was obtained from each dog. One drop of WB was immediately applied to a test strip for evaluation with an ammonia meter. The remainder of the blood sample was placed in an EDTA-containing tube, and 1 drop of EDTA-anticoagulated WB was applied to a test strip. The remaining EDTA-anticoagulated WB sample was centrifuged, and the plasma was harvested and placed on ice. One drop of plasma was applied to a test strip; the remainder of the plasma sample was transported on ice and used for ammonia measurement with a reference laboratory instrument. All samples were tested within 1 hour after sample collection. Results were evaluated to detect significant differences in ammonia concentration. RESULTS Ammonia concentrations did not differ significantly between WB and EDTA-anticoagulated WB and between plasma samples measured with the meter and reference laboratory instrument. However, median ammonia concentration was significantly higher in plasma than in WB or EDTA-anti-coagulated WB. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Anticoagulant-free WB was a valid sample for measurement by use of the ammonia meter. Plasma samples had higher ammonia concentrations than did WB samples. Results for each sample type should be interpreted by use of specimen- and method-specific reference intervals.

  2. The impact of pre-injury anticoagulation therapy in the older adult patient experiencing a traumatic brain injury: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karen; Weeks, Susan

    2012-01-01

    than that of younger patients when taking preinjury anticoagulants. The concern about unfavourable outcomes in the anticoagulated older adult patient presenting with traumatic injury has led many healthcare systems to take action. Ivascu et al. looked at early identification in triage for at- risk patients, and implemented warfarin (coumadin) protocols to assist in promoting improved patient outcomes; however, her research did not demonstrate a positive impact. In an effort to find a relationship between preinjury anticoagulation and outcomes in the older adult trauma patient, the degree of anticoagulation rather than the anticoagulant itself was studied to assist with predicting the severity of the TBI. Pieracci et al. concluded that among older adult patients who have sustained a head injury, warfarin use with an admission International Normalized Ratio (INR) greater than or equal to two was associated with an increase severity of TBI, a trend toward an increased likelihood of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), increased overall mortality, and increased mortality after ICH.The impact of trauma- related morbidity and mortality in the elderly population is significant. Older adult patients account for 25% of trauma related hospital costs, 25% of trauma-related deaths, have the highest age-specific rate of TBI, and have worse outcomes reported. Fortuna et al. concluded that preinjury anticoagulants and antiplatelet medications used by the older adult patient were not associated with increased mortality, but age was a significant predictor of mortality. Research by Wojcik et al., concluded that preinjury anticoagulation therapy did not adversely impact mortality or length of stay (LOS) outcomes in the head injured patients.The influence of anticoagulation on outcomes in the older adult patient with a head injury has been studied, and has resulted in significant debate. Chronic use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet medications in the management of many medical conditions has

  3. Survey of the use of warfarin and the newer anticoagulant dabigatran in patients with atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi JC

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Jiyoon C Choi,1 Marco d DiBonaventura,2 Lewis Kopenhafer,2 Winnie W Nelson31LifeScan, Inc, West Chester, PA, 2Health Sciences Practice, Kantar Health, New York, NY, 3Janssen Scientific Affairs LLC, Raritan, NJ, USABackground: Oral dabigatran was recently approved as an alternative to warfarin for prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Unlike warfarin, dabigatran has a fixed dosage and few drug interactions, and does not require anticoagulation monitoring or dietary restrictions.Methods: This study aimed to describe and compare characteristics of patients with atrial fibrillation who used dabigatran or only warfarin. Patients with a self-reported diagnosis of atrial fibrillation aged ≥18 years who were receiving (or had received warfarin or dabigatran completed an online survey. Differences in characteristics of dabigatran and warfarin users were tested using chi-squared tests and analysis of variance for categorical and continuous variables, respectively.Results: Overall, 364 patients were surveyed (204 warfarin users, 160 dabigatran users. The mean age was 65.1 years, and 68.7% were male. Dabigatran users were more likely than warfarin users to be female (36.9% versus 27.0% and to have experienced adverse events, including gastrointestinal bleeding, in the 3 months before the survey (21.9% versus 6.9%; P<0.05. Both groups reported high medication adherence (dabigatran users 0.65 versus warfarin users 0.63 missed doses/month. Dabigatran users were more likely than warfarin users to discuss treatment options with their physician before beginning therapy (36.9% versus 24.5%; P<0.05 and less likely to switch anticoagulant medication (10.7% versus 31.9%; P<0.05. Although dabigatran users were more likely to experience adverse events, they reported greater satisfaction with anticoagulation treatment than warfarin users.Conclusion: The efficacy and convenience reported by dabigatran users

  4. Fondaparinux for intra and perioperative anticoagulation in patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia candidates for peripheral vascular surgery: Report of 4 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Calio', Francesco G; Pizzardi, Giulia; Amatucci, Chiara; Masci, Federica; Palumbo, Piergaspare

    2016-01-01

    Intra and perioperative anticoagulation in patients with heparin induced thrombocytopenia (HIT), candidates for peripheral vascular surgery remains a challenge, as the best alternative to heparin has not yet been established. We evaluated the off-label use of fondaparinux in four patients with HIT, undergoing peripheral vascular surgery procedures. Four patients of whom 3 men of a mean age of 66 years, with proven heparin induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) underwent two axillo-femoral bypasses, one femoro-popliteal bypass and one resection of a splenic artery aneurysm under fondaparinux. No intra or perioperative bleeding or thrombosis of new onset was observed. In the absence of a valid alternative to heparin for intra and perioperative anticoagulation in HIT, several other anticoagulants can be used in an off-label setting. However, no general consensus exist on which should be the one of choice. In this small series fondaparinux appeared to be both safe and effective. These preliminary results seem to justify the off-label use of fondaparinux for intra and perioperative anticoagulation in patients with HIT, candidates for peripheral vascular surgery interventions. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Statistical design of personalized medicine interventions: The Clarification of Optimal Anticoagulation through Genetics (COAG trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gage Brian F

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is currently much interest in pharmacogenetics: determining variation in genes that regulate drug effects, with a particular emphasis on improving drug safety and efficacy. The ability to determine such variation motivates the application of personalized drug therapies that utilize a patient's genetic makeup to determine a safe and effective drug at the correct dose. To ascertain whether a genotype-guided drug therapy improves patient care, a personalized medicine intervention may be evaluated within the framework of a randomized controlled trial. The statistical design of this type of personalized medicine intervention requires special considerations: the distribution of relevant allelic variants in the study population; and whether the pharmacogenetic intervention is equally effective across subpopulations defined by allelic variants. Methods The statistical design of the Clarification of Optimal Anticoagulation through Genetics (COAG trial serves as an illustrative example of a personalized medicine intervention that uses each subject's genotype information. The COAG trial is a multicenter, double blind, randomized clinical trial that will compare two approaches to initiation of warfarin therapy: genotype-guided dosing, the initiation of warfarin therapy based on algorithms using clinical information and genotypes for polymorphisms in CYP2C9 and VKORC1; and clinical-guided dosing, the initiation of warfarin therapy based on algorithms using only clinical information. Results We determine an absolute minimum detectable difference of 5.49% based on an assumed 60% population prevalence of zero or multiple genetic variants in either CYP2C9 or VKORC1 and an assumed 15% relative effectiveness of genotype-guided warfarin initiation for those with zero or multiple genetic variants. Thus we calculate a sample size of 1238 to achieve a power level of 80% for the primary outcome. We show that reasonable departures from these

  6. Importance of anticoagulation and postablation silent cerebral lesions: Subanalyses of REVOLUTION and reMARQable studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Massimo; Swarup, Vijay; DeVille, Brian; Sussman, Jonathan; Jaïs, Pierre; Gaita, Fiorenzo; Duytschaever, Mattias; Ng, G Andre; Daoud, Emile; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya Dj; Horton, Rodney; Wickliffe, Andrew; Ellis, Christopher; Geller, Laszlo

    2017-12-01

    Silent cerebral lesions (SCLs) are a potential complication of left atrial radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedures for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). We aimed to compare the incidence of SCLs in patients treated with irrigated RFA multielectrode catheters (nMARQ ® Catheter group) and irrigated focal RFA catheters (NAVISTAR ® THERMOCOOL ® Catheter; TC group) after PAF ablation from subpopulation neurological assessment (SNA) cohorts of the REVOLUTION and reMARQable studies. Data from SNA cohorts in the prospective, nonrandomized REVOLUTION study (March 2011-September 2013) and the prospective, randomized, controlled reMARQable study (October 2013-November 2015) were included. The incidence of SCLs was assessed pre- and postablation using magnetic resonance imaging. Neurological deficits were assessed using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, modified Rankin Scale, and Montreal Cognitive Assessment. A total of 37 patients from REVOLUTION and 76 patients from reMARQable were included in the SNA cohort of each study. In the REVOLUTION SNA cohort, the incidence of SCLs was 21.1% (4/19) in the nMARQ ® Catheter group and 5.9% (1/17) in the TC group. Findings from REVOLUTION helped inform the reMARQable study protocol's stringent anticoagulation regimen. SCL incidence was subsequently reduced in both groups (nMARQ ® Catheter, 7.9%; TC, 3.3%). No permanent neurological deficits were observed. Adherence to a stringent anticoagulation regimen prior to and during ablation procedures appears to be an important factor in minimizing the risk of SCL. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Direct oral anticoagulants and digestive bleeding: therapeutic management and preventive measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, David; Boustière, Christian; Ferrari, Emile; Albaladejo, Pierre; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Benamouzig, Robert

    2017-06-01

    The use of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) was an important step forward in the management of atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism (VTE). The DOACs, anti-IIa for dabigatran and anti-Xa for rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban, all have a rapid onset of action and a short half life. There is no need for routine hemostasis testing for treatment monitoring of a DOAC. Compared with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), DOACs may increase the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding (relative risk 1.25). Withholding the DOAC treatment, evaluating the time of the last intake and estimating the patient's renal function are the first steps in the management of gastrointestinal bleeding. For patients without impaired renal function, achieving low coagulation takes around 24 h after the last intake of a DOAC. The use of DOAC antagonists will be helpful in controlling bleeding in the most severe and urgent situations. Idarucizumab is available for clinical use for dabigatran and andexanet is currently being reviewed by drug agencies for rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban. It is important to assess the bleeding risk associated with the planned procedure, and the patient's renal function before withholding DOAC therapy for a scheduled intervention. It is mandatory to strengthen the local hemostasis strategies in DOAC-treated patients undergoing a therapeutic endoscopic procedure. Resuming or not resuming anticoagulation with a DOAC after bleeding or a risky procedure depends on the thrombotic and bleeding risk as well as the procedure involved. This discussion should always involve the cardiologist and decisions should be taken by a pluridisciplinary team.

  8. COSY Control Status. First results with rapid prototyped man-machine interface for accelerator control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacker, U [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Postfach 1913, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Haberbosch, C [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Postfach 1913, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Henn, K [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Postfach 1913, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Weinert, A [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Postfach 1913, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    1994-12-15

    The experience gained with the COSY Control System after a six month commissioning period followed by a six month production period will be presented. The COSY Control System runs approximately 300 VME and VXI target systems using a total of about 1000 CPUs, the systems are driven by the diskless operating environment RT/OS, hosted by eight workcells. Application software is implemented using Object-Orientated programming paradigms. All accelerator components become interface functions as instances of an abstract device model class. Methods defined here present an abstract picture of the accelerator giving immediate access to device states and parameters. Operator interaction is defined by building views and controllers for the model. Higher level functions, such as defining an acceleration cycle, are easily developed and modified with the accelerator connected on-line to the model. In the first year of COSY operation the object based approach for a control system, together with a rapid prototyped man-machine interface has brought to light the potential of new functions such as on-line, real time programming on a running system yielding high programming performance. The advantages of this approach have not been, until now, fully appreciated. ((orig.))

  9. Profile control simulations and experiments on TCV : A controller test environment and results using a model-based predictive controller

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maljaars, E.; Felici, F.; Blanken, T.C.; Galperti, C.; Sauter, O.; de Baar, M.R.; Carpanese, F.; Goodman, T.P.; Kim, D.; Kim, S.H.; Kong, M.G.; Mavkov, B.; Merle, A.; Moret, J.M.; Nouailletas, R.; Scheffer, M.; Teplukhina, A.A.; Vu, N.M.T.

    2017-01-01

    The successful performance of a model predictive profile controller is demonstrated in simulations and experiments on the TCV tokamak, employing a profile controller test environment. Stable high-performance tokamak operation in hybrid and advanced plasma scenarios requires control over the safety

  10. Profile control simulations and experiments on TCV: a controller test environment and results using a model-based predictive controller

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maljaars, B.; Felici, F.; Blanken, T. C.; Galperti, C.; Sauter, O.; de Baar, M. R.; Carpanese, F.; Goodman, T. P.; Kim, D.; Kim, S. H.; Kong, M.; Mavkov, B.; Merle, A.; Moret, J.; Nouailletas, R.; Scheffer, M.; Teplukhina, A.; Vu, T.

    2017-01-01

    The successful performance of a model predictive profile controller is demonstrated in simulations and experiments on the TCV tokamak, employing a profile controller test environment. Stable high-performance tokamak operation in hybrid and advanced plasma scenarios requires control over the safety

  11. Potential Use of Polysaccharides from the Brown Alga Undaria pinnatifida as Anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Faggio

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Undaria pinnatifida (U. pinnatifida is a highly invasive species and has caused concern all over the world because it has invaded coastal environments, has the potential to displace native species, significantly alters habitat for associated fauna, and disturbs navigation. Any attempt to eradicate it would be futile, owing to the elusive, microscopic gametophyte, and because the alga thrives in sites rich in anthropic activities. Venice Lagoon is the largest Mediterranean transitional environment and the spot of the highest introduction of non-indigenous species, including U. pinnatifida, which is removed as a waste. We demonstrated that polysaccharide extracts from U. pinnatifida have an anticoagulant effect on human blood in vitro and are not cytotoxic. The results obtained by PT (normal values 70-120% and APTT (normal values 28-40s assays were significantly prolonged by the polysaccharide extracts of U. pinnatifida, therefore algal extracts are ideal candidates as antithrombotic agents.

  12. Study on extraction of agaropectin from Gelidium amansii and its anticoagulant activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Huimin; Li, Daxin; Zhang, Jingjing; Liu, Li; Zhang, Quanbin

    2008-05-01

    Gelidium amansii agar was fractionated on DEAE-cellulose and four fractions were obtained sequentially. The yields of 1.0 mol/L NaCl fraction and 2.5 mol/L NaCl fraction were 2.80% and 2.03%. They are highly sulfated agar, and named as agaropectin with sulfate content being 22.8% and 32.5%, respectively. The anticoagulant experiment results show that agaropectin could effectively prolong the coagulation time in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. Agaropection could be absorbed and effectively prolong the plasma coagulation time in vivo. After intragastric administration at the doses of 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg·d in rats for 15 days, TT (thrombin time), CT (coagulation time), PT (prothrombin time), and APTT (activated partial thromboplastin time) could be effectively prolonged and the plasma Fib level could be significantly lowered.

  13. Results of verifications of the control automatic exposure in equipment of RX with CR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz Manzano, P.; Rivas Ballarin, M. A.; Ortega Pardina, P.; Villa Gazulla, D.; Calvo Carrillo, S.; Canellas Anoz, M.; Millan Cebrian, E.

    2013-01-01

    After the entry into force in 2012, the new Spanish Radiology quality control protocol lists and discusses the results obtained after verification of the automatic control of exposure in computed radiography systems. (Author)

  14. results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salabura Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available HADES experiment at GSI is the only high precision experiment probing nuclear matter in the beam energy range of a few AGeV. Pion, proton and ion beams are used to study rare dielectron and strangeness probes to diagnose properties of strongly interacting matter in this energy regime. Selected results from p + A and A + A collisions are presented and discussed.

  15. Cerebrovascular Accident due to Thyroid Storm: Should We Anticoagulate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Gonzalez-Bossolo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid storm is a life-threatening condition that occurs secondary to an uncontrolled hyperthyroid state. Atrial fibrillation is a cardiovascular complication occurring in up to 15% of patients experiencing thyroid storm, and if left untreated this condition could have up to a 25% mortality rate. Thyroid storm with stroke is a rare presentation. This case report details a left middle cerebral artery (MCA stroke with global aphasia and thyroid storm in a 53-year-old Hispanic male patient. Although uncommon, this combination has been reported in multiple case series. Although it is well documented that dysfunctional thyroid levels promote a hypercoagulable state, available guidelines from multiple entities are unclear on whether anticoagulation therapy is appropriate in this situation.

  16. [Analysis of the results of the SEIMC External Quality Control Program, 2007].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guna Serrano, María del Remedio; Orta Mira, Nieves; Ovies, María; Gimeno Cardona, Concepción; Pérez, José L

    2008-11-01

    The External Quality Control Program of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) includes controls for bacteriology, serology, mycology, parasitology, mycobacteria, virology and molecular microbiology. This article presents the most important conclusions and lessons drawn from the 2007 controls. As a whole, the results obtained in 2007 confirm the excellent skill and good technical standards found in previous years. However, erroneous results can be obtained in any laboratory and in clinically relevant determinations. A few deviations were observed in some controls, calling for critical reflection. Once again, the results of this program highlighted the need to complement internal with external controls, such as those offered by the SEIMC program.

  17. The c.-1639g>A polymorphism of the VKORC1 gene and his influence on the therapeutic response during oral anticoagulants use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovač Mirjana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. A single nucleotide polymorphism c.- 1639G>A in the promoter region of vitamin K-epoxide reductase (VKORC1 gene has been found to account for most of the variability in response to oral anticoagulants (OA. The aim of the study was to determine the incidence and the effect of c.-1639G>A polymorphism on the acenocoumarol dosage requirements in the group of patients under stable anticoagulation, and to estimate the variability in response to OA. Methods. Our study included 200 consecutive patients requiring low (n = 43, medium (n = 127 and high (n = 30 acenocoumarol dose. Results. Out of 43 low dose patients, 40 (93 % carried the A allele. The A allele was less frequent in the group of 30 patients requiring high dose: among these patients 13 (43.3% carried the A allele in the heterozygous form and none of them carried AA genotype. The patients with GG genotype required 2.6 times higher dose than the patients carriers of AA genotype (p < 0.0001. In 33 patients (16.5% the overdose occurred during the initiation of anticoagulant therapy and in 11 patients (5.5% it was associated with bleeding. Out of the group of 33 overdosed patients, 27 and 6 patients carried AA and GA genotype, respectively (p < 0.000001. Conclusion. VKORC1 significantly influenced OA dose and predicted individuals predisposed to unstable anticoagulation. The carriers of AA genotype required 2.6 time lower doses of OA than the carriares of GG genotype. Pharmacogenetic testing could predict a high risk of overdose among 28.5 % of our patients - carriers of AA genotype, before anticoagulation therapy initiation.

  18. Comparison of pre-filter and post-filter ionised calcium monitoring in continuous veno-venous hemodiafiltration (CVVHD-F with citrate anti-coagulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Brain

    Full Text Available It is widespread practice during citrate anticoagulated renal replacement therapy to monitor circuit ionised calcium (iCa2+ to evaluate the effectiveness of anticoagulation. Whether the optimal site to sample the blood path is before or after the haemofilter is a common question.Using a prospectively collected observational dataset from intensive care patients receiving pre-dilution continuous veno-venous haemodiafiltration (CVVHD-F with integrated citrate anticoagulation we compared paired samples of pre and post filter iCa2+ where the target range was 0.3-0.5 mmol.L-1 as well as concurrently collected arterial iCa2+. Two nested mixed methods linear models were fitted to the data describing post vs pre filter iCa2+, and the relationship of pre, post and arterial samples.An 11 bed general intensive care unit.450 grouped samples from 152 time periods in seven patients on CRRT with citrate anticoagulation.The relationship of post to pre-filter iCa2+ was not 1:1 with post = 0.082 + 0.751 x pre-filter iCa2+ (95% CI intercept: 0.015-0.152, slope 0.558-0.942. Variation was greatest between patients rather than between circuits within the same patient or citrate dose. Compared to arterial iCa2+ there was no significant difference between pre and post-filter sampling sites (F-value 0.047, p = 0.827.These results demonstrate that there is minimal difference between pre and post filter samples for iCa2+ monitoring of circuit anticoagulation in citrate patients relative to the arterial iCa2+ in CVVHD-F however compared to pre-filter sampling, post filter sampling has a flatter response and greater variation.

  19. Treatment Adherence as a New Choice Factor for Optimization of Oral Anticoagulation Therapy in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and Hemostatic Gene Polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Skirdenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate treatment adherence and prevalence of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 gene mutations in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF and provide rationale of choice for oral anticoagulation therapy.Material and methods. Treatment adherence was evaluated in 137 AF patients (aged 35-85 years with quantitative estimation of drug therapy adherence along with compliance to medical support and lifestyle modifications. Among them 82 patients underwent polymerase chain reaction (PCR analysis of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 gene polymorphisms.Results. Patients receiving anticoagulation therapy are characterized by lower level of adherence compared to patients without anticoagulants (65.2±19.3% vs 68.5±19.1%; Wald-Wolfowitz; p<0.05. Considering all studied parameters men are less adherent than women (54.7±18.6% vs 60.6±16.7%; Kolmogorov-Smirnov; p<0.05. Patients receiving new oral anticoagulants (NOAC have better compliance compared with patients of warfarin group. Mutations in CYP2C9 gene were detected in 32.9%, VKORC1 – in 68.3%, and their combination – in 21.9% of study participants. Warfarin therapy may be potentially dangerous in such patients due to low adherence.Conclusion. Considering high prevalence of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 gene mutations treatment adherence should be estimated to optimize choice of anticoagulation therapy. NOAC treatment should be considered in patients with low adherence for prevention of thromboembolic complications.

  20. Effect of post-filter anticoagulation on mortality in patients with cancer-associated pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jieun; Kim, Seon Ok; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang-Do; Lee, Jae Seung

    2018-05-17

    Malignancy is associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism. Inferior vena cava filters are a viable alternative when anticoagulation is infeasible because of the risk of bleeding. Although the current guidelines recommend that all patients with a vena cava filter be treated with anticoagulation treatment when the risk of bleeding is reduced, studies concerning the role of concomitant anticoagulation after vena cava filter insertion in high-risk patients are scarce. Since many cancer patients suffer from a high risk of hemorrhagic complications, we aimed to determine the effect of post-filter anticoagulation on mortality in patients with a malignant solid tumor. A retrospective cohort study of patients with pulmonary embolism was performed between January 2010 and May 2016. Patients with a solid tumor and vena cava filter inserted because of pulmonary embolism were included. Using Cox proportional hazards model, the prognostic effect of clinical variables was analyzed. A total of 180 patients were analyzed, with 143 patients receiving and 37 patients not receiving post-filter anticoagulation treatment. Mortality was not significantly different between the two groups. The presence of metastatic cancer and that of pancreatobiliary cancer were significant risk factors for mortality. However, post-filter anticoagulation did not show significant effect on mortality regardless of the stage of cancer. In patients with cancer-associated pulmonary embolism, the effect of post-filter anticoagulation on mortality may not be critical, especially in patients with a short life expectancy.

  1. Comparing intracerebral hemorrhages associated with direct oral anticoagulants or warfarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurogi, Ryota; Nishimura, Kunihiro; Nakai, Michikazu; Kada, Akiko; Kamitani, Satoru; Nakagawara, Jyoji; Toyoda, Kazunori; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Ono, Junichi; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki; Aruga, Toru; Miyachi, Shigeru; Nagata, Izumi; Matsuda, Shinya; Yoshimura, Shinichi; Okuchi, Kazuo; Suzuki, Akifumi; Nakamura, Fumiaki; Onozuka, Daisuke; Ido, Keisuke; Kurogi, Ai; Mukae, Nobutaka; Nishimura, Ataru; Arimura, Koichi; Kitazono, Takanari; Hagihara, Akihito; Iihara, Koji

    2018-03-27

    This cross-sectional survey explored the characteristics and outcomes of direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC)-associated nontraumatic intracerebral hemorrhages (ICHs) by analyzing a large nationwide Japanese discharge database. We analyzed data from 2,245 patients who experienced ICHs while taking anticoagulants (DOAC: 227; warfarin: 2,018) and were urgently hospitalized at 621 institutions in Japan between April 2010 and March 2015. We compared the DOAC- and warfarin-treated patients based on their backgrounds, ICH severities, antiplatelet therapies at admission, hematoma removal surgeries, reversal agents, mortality rates, and modified Rankin Scale scores at discharge. DOAC-associated ICHs were less likely to cause moderately or severely impaired consciousness (DOAC-associated ICHs: 31.3%; warfarin-associated ICHs: 39.4%; p = 0.002) or require surgical removal (DOAC-associated ICHs: 5.3%; warfarin-associated ICHs: 9.9%; p = 0.024) in the univariate analysis. Propensity score analysis revealed that patients with DOAC-associated ICHs also exhibited lower mortality rates within 1 day (odds ratio [OR] 4.96, p = 0.005), within 7 days (OR 2.29, p = 0.037), and during hospitalization (OR 1.96, p = 0.039). This nationwide study revealed that DOAC-treated patients had less severe ICHs and lower mortality rates than did warfarin-treated patients, probably due to milder hemorrhages at admission and lower hematoma expansion frequencies. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  2. Combined anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy for high-risk patients with atrial fibrillation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, D A; Raichand, S; Moore, D; Connock, M; Fry-Smith, A; Fitzmaurice, D A

    2013-07-01

    Previous research suggests uncertainty whether or not there is any additional benefit in adding antiplatelet therapy (APT) to anticoagulation therapy (ACT) in patients with high-risk atrial fibrillation (AF) in terms of reduction in vascular events, including stroke. The existing guidelines acknowledge an increased risk of bleeding associated with such a strategy; however, there is no consensus on the treatment pathway. To determine, by undertaking a systematic review, if the addition of APT to ACT is beneficial compared with ACT alone in patients with AF who are considered to be at high risk of thromboembolic events (TEs). Data sources included bibliographic databases {the Cochrane Library [Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL)], MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE, ClinicalTrials.gov, National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Clinical Research Network Portfolio, Current Controlled Trials (CCT) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP)}, reference lists from identified systematic reviews and relevant studies, and contact with clinical experts. Searches were from inception to September 2010 and did not use language restrictions or study design filters. Studies of any design were included to evaluate clinical effectiveness, including randomised controlled trials (RCTs), non-randomised comparisons, cohort studies, case series or registries, longitudinal studies, systematic reviews and meta-analyses, and conference abstracts published after 2008. Inclusion criteria consisted of a population with AF, at high-risk of TEs, aged ≥ 18 years, on combined ACT and APT compared with others on ACT alone or ACT plus placebo. Inclusion decisions, assessment of study quality and data extraction were undertaken using methods to minimise bias. Fifty-three publications were included, reporting five RCTs (11 publications), 18 non-randomised comparisons (24 publications) and 18

  3. Hypoxia and the anticoagulants dalteparin and acetylsalicylic acid affect human placental amino acid transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc-Jens Kleppa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anticoagulants, e.g. low-molecular weight heparins (LMWHs and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA are prescribed to women at risk for pregnancy complications that are associated with impaired placentation and placental hypoxia. Beyond their role as anticoagulants these compounds exhibit direct effects on trophoblast but their impact on placental function is unknown. The amino acid transport systems A and L, which preferably transfer essential amino acids, are well-described models to study placental nutrient transport. We aimed to examine the effect of hypoxia, LMWHs and ASA on the activity of the placental amino acid transport systems A and L and associated signalling mechanisms. METHODS: The uptake of C14-MeAIB (system A or H3-leucin (system L was investigated after incubation of primary villous fragments isolated from term placentas. Villous tissue was incubated at 2% O2 (hypoxia, 8% O2 and standard culture conditions (21% O2 or at 2% O2 and 21% O2 with dalteparin or ASA. Activation of the JAK/STAT or mTOR signalling pathways was determined by Western analysis of total and phosphorylated STAT3 or Raptor. RESULTS: Hypoxia decreased system A mediated MeAIB uptake and increased system L mediated leucine uptake compared to standard culture conditions (21% O2. This was accompanied by an impairment of STAT3 and a stimulation of Raptor signalling. System L activity increased at 8% O2. Dalteparin treatment reduced system A and system L activity under normoxic conditions and ASA (1 mM decreased system A and L transporter activity under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Our data underline the dependency of placental function on oxygen supply. LMWHs and ASA are not able to reverse the effects of hypoxia on placental amino acid transport. These findings and the uncovering of the signalling mechanisms in more detail will help to understand the impact of LMWHs and ASA on placental function and fetal growth.

  4. European external quality control study on the competence of laboratories to recognize rare sequence variants resulting in unusual genotyping results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márki-Zay, János; Klein, Christoph L; Gancberg, David; Schimmel, Heinz G; Dux, László

    2009-04-01

    Depending on the method used, rare sequence variants adjacent to the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of interest may cause unusual or erroneous genotyping results. Because such rare variants are known for many genes commonly tested in diagnostic laboratories, we organized a proficiency study to assess their influence on the accuracy of reported laboratory results. Four external quality control materials were processed and sent to 283 laboratories through 3 EQA organizers for analysis of the prothrombin 20210G>A mutation. Two of these quality control materials contained sequence variants introduced by site-directed mutagenesis. One hundred eighty-nine laboratories participated in the study. When samples gave a usual result with the method applied, the error rate was 5.1%. Detailed analysis showed that more than 70% of the failures were reported from only 9 laboratories. Allele-specific amplification-based PCR had a much higher error rate than other methods (18.3% vs 2.9%). The variants 20209C>T and [20175T>G; 20179_20180delAC] resulted in unusual genotyping results in 67 and 85 laboratories, respectively. Eighty-three (54.6%) of these unusual results were not recognized, 32 (21.1%) were attributed to technical issues, and only 37 (24.3%) were recognized as another sequence variant. Our findings revealed that some of the participating laboratories were not able to recognize and correctly interpret unusual genotyping results caused by rare SNPs. Our study indicates that the majority of the failures could be avoided by improved training and careful selection and validation of the methods applied.

  5. Will NOACs become the new standard of care in anticoagulation therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ergene Oktay

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia in the general population, with a prevalence of 1–3%, which increases with age, reaching 15% in elderly people. Prophylaxis of ischemic stroke with warfarin was the gold standard of medical management for many years. On the other hand heparin and warfarin was the main pharmacologic agents for the prophylaxis/treatment of venous thromboembolism. In the last 5 years warfarin is getting replaced by non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants at least partly. In this article it is attempted to foresee whether new oral anticoagulants will become the new standard of care in anticoagulation therapy.

  6. Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in patients taking direct oral anticoagulants: A case series and discussion of management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph H. McMordie, MD

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Direct oral anticoagulants are becoming more commonplace for the treatment of nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and deep vein thrombosis. Unfortunately, effective reversal agents are not widely available limiting options for neurosurgical intervention during active anticoagulation. We report a case series of 3 patients treated for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage while taking direct oral anticoagulants. All three underwent open surgical clipping after adequate time was allowed for drug metabolism. Decision-making must take into account timing of intervention, drug half-life, and currently available reversal agents.

  7. Fatal rebleeding following coil embolization of cerebral aneurysms: the role of long-term systemic anticoagulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinson, G.; Bagley, L.J.; Hurst, R.W.; Flamm, E.S.

    2001-01-01

    Embolization of cerebral aneurysms has become a common technique. Its impact on subsequent medical management of the patient is not well known. We report two patients who presented in a poor neurological grade after subarachnoid hemorrhage from posterior communicating artery aneurysms. Both were treated by coil embolization and both developed subclavian vein thrombosis, requiring systemic anticoagulation, initiated 11 and 21 days after embolization, respectively. Both developed a large, fatal intracranial hemorrhage adjacent to the embolized aneurysm in the fourth week of anticoagulation. Systemic anticoagulation of patients who have had a ruptured aneurysm treated by coil embolization may carry a significant risk of rebleeding. Alternate management strategies should be considered in these patients. (orig.)

  8. Fatal rebleeding following coil embolization of cerebral aneurysms: the role of long-term systemic anticoagulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinson, G. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bagley, L.J.; Hurst, R.W. [Dept. of Radiology-Neuroradiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Flamm, E.S. [Hyman-Newman Institute for Neurology and Neurosurgery, New York, NY (United States)

    2001-05-01

    Embolization of cerebral aneurysms has become a common technique. Its impact on subsequent medical management of the patient is not well known. We report two patients who presented in a poor neurological grade after subarachnoid hemorrhage from posterior communicating artery aneurysms. Both were treated by coil embolization and both developed subclavian vein thrombosis, requiring systemic anticoagulation, initiated 11 and 21 days after embolization, respectively. Both developed a large, fatal intracranial hemorrhage adjacent to the embolized aneurysm in the fourth week of anticoagulation. Systemic anticoagulation of patients who have had a ruptured aneurysm treated by coil embolization may carry a significant risk of rebleeding. Alternate management strategies should be considered in these patients. (orig.)

  9. Lupus anticoagulant-hypoprothrombinemia syndrome and catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome in a patient with antidomain I antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, Joris; Mohamed, Shirine; Revuz, Sabine; de Maistre, Emmanuel; de Laat, Bas; Marie, Pierre-Yves; Zuily, Stéphane; Lévy, Bruno; Regnault, Véronique; Wahl, Denis

    2016-07-01

    Lupus anticoagulant-hypoprothrombinemia syndrome is a rare condition characterized by the association of acquired factor II deficiency and lupus anticoagulant. Contrary to classical antiphospholipid syndrome, it may cause severe life-threatening bleeding (89% of published cases). We report a patient, positive for antidomain I antibodies, with initially primary lupus anticoagulant-hypoprothrombinemia syndrome without previous clinical manifestation or underlying systemic disease. Five years later, he experienced the first systemic lupus erythematous flare. Within a few days, catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome was diagnosed with heart, liver and kidney involvement. The patient recovered under pulse steroids, intravenous heparin and intravenous immunoglobulins.

  10. Practical considerations in emergency management of bleeding in the setting of target-specific oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michael P; Trujillo, Toby C; Nordenholz, Kristen E

    2014-04-01

    The recent arrival of the target-specific oral anticoagulants (TSOACs) offers potential advantages in the field of anticoagulation. However, there are no rapid and accurate and routinely available laboratory assays to evaluate their contribution to clinical bleeding. With the expanding clinical indications for the TSOACs, and the arrival of newer reversal agents on the market, the emergency clinician will need to be familiar with drug specifics as well as methods for anticoagulation reversal. This review offers a summary of the literature and some practical strategies for the approach to the patient taking TSOACs and the management of bleeding in these cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Effects of sodium ethamsylate on anticoagulant and anti-aggregation activity of vascular endothelium in hemorrhagic fever patients with renal syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovich, I M; Sirotin, B Z; Parshina, T A

    1999-01-01

    To elucidate effects of sodium ethamsylate (SE) on anticoagulant and antiaggregation activity of vascular endothelium in patients suffering from hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). A trial of SE enrolled 70 HFRS patients (58 males, 12 females aged under 30 years) compatible by the disease severity. They were divided into two groups. 42 patients of the control group received standard therapy, 28 patients of the study group received adjuvant 12% solution of SE in daily dose 1500-2000 mg in the course of HFRS oliguria period. Hemostatic parameters were measured before and after the cuff test to investigate the condition of vascular wall with calculation of the athrombogenicity index (the ratio of the relevant indices before and after the cuff test). SE effects on vascular endothelium was assessed by a blind method. In oliguria, both groups had baseline antiaggregation indices significantly higher than in the control. After the cuff test, control patients' indices tended to an increase while in the study group there was a marked decrease. The trend in anticoagulant activity of microvascular endothelium did not differ much with the groups. This picture persisted also in polyuria. In convalescence hemostasis was similar in both groups. SE enhances antiaggregant activity of vascular endothelium in oliguria period of HFRS without affecting its anticoagulant properties. This is explained by a direct effect of SE on vascular endothelium.

  12. Good quality of oral anticoagulation treatment in general practice using international normalised ratio point of care testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Thomas; Pedersen, Tina Heidi; Lind, Bent

    2015-01-01

    collected retrospectively for a period of six months. For each patient, time in therapeutic range (TTR) was calculated and correlated with practice and patient characteristics using multilevel linear regression models. RESULTS: We identified 447 patients in warfarin treatment in the 20 practices using POCT......INTRODUCTION: Oral anticoagulation treatment (OACT) with warfarin is common in general practice. Increasingly, international normalised ratio (INR) point of care testing (POCT) is being used to manage patients. The aim of this study was to describe and analyse the quality of OACT with warfarin...

  13. Controllability Results For First Order Impulsive Stochastic Functional Differential Systems with State-Dependent Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Parthasarathy

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the controllability results of first order impulsive stochastic differential and neutral differential systems with state-dependent delay by using semigroup theory. The controllability results are derived by the means of Leray-SchauderAlternative fixed point theorem. An example is provided to illustrate the theory.

  14. Efficacy and safety of the new oral anticoagulants in the treatment of venous thromboembolic complications: meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Petrov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Analysis of the efficacy and safety of the new oral anticoagulants (NOACs in the management of venous thromboembolism (VTE.Material and methods. This meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs was made in accordance with the instructions “Preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA”.Results. The meta-analysis included 5 RCTs. NOACs were as effective as vitamin K antagonists (VKAs in preventing recurrent symptomatic VTE (RR=0.93; 95% CI 0.77-1.12; p=0.44. The incidence of recurrent thrombosis (RR=0.82; 95% CI 0.63-1.08; p=0.16 and deep vein thrombosis ± fatal or nonfatal pulmonary embolism (RR=1.06; 95% CI 0.81-1.40; p=0.66 was comparable in the groups of comparison. Meta-analysis of the safety of the NOACs suggested significant reduction of risk of major bleeding as compared with standard therapy (RR=0.54; 95% CI 0.42-0.69; р<0.00001. The incidence of all types of bleeding was significantly lower with NOACs (RR=0.70; 95% CI 0.51-0.95; p=0.02. All-cause mortality rate was comparable between the groups (RR=0.93; 95% CI 0.76-1.13; p=0.46.Conclusions. NOACs are as effective as the standard therapy, at that they are much safer in VTE treatment.

  15. Anticoagulation: Where have we come from and where are we going ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is its predictable renal excretion, with low inter- and intra-individual variability.[11] Clinically, this ... recent meta-analysis of 50 000 patients requiring anticoagulation ... data supporting the use of NOACs in secondary stroke prevention in. NVAF.

  16. Anticoagulant Prairie Dog Bait Risk Mitigation Measures to Protect Endangered Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Web page contains information on how certified pesticide applicators can use anticoagulant prairie dog bait products such as Rozol and Kaput-D while minimizing exposure risks to listed and non-target species.

  17. Recurrent venous thromboembolism and abnormal uterine bleeding with anticoagulant and hormone therapy use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinelli, Ida; Lensing, Anthonie W. A.; Middeldorp, Saskia; Levi, Marcel; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; van Bellen, Bonno; Bounameaux, Henri; Brighton, Timothy A.; Cohen, Alexander T.; Trajanovic, Mila; Gebel, Martin; Lam, Phuong; Wells, Philip S.; Prins, Martin H.

    2016-01-01

    Women receiving vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) require adequate contraception because of the potential for fetal complications. It is unknown whether the use of hormonal therapy, especially those containing estrogens, is associated with recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) during anticoagulation.

  18. Congenital Malformations Associated with the Administration of Oral Anticoagulants During Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettifor, J. M.; Benson, R.

    1975-01-01

    Reported are case histories of three infants with congenital malformations (including defective formation of the nose and hands) associated with ingestion of oral anticoagulants during the first trimester of pregnancy. (CL)

  19. Reproductive success of bromadiolone-resistant rats in absence of anticoagulant pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Leirs, Herwig; Siegismund, Hans Redlef

    2006-01-01

    Resistance to anticoagulant rodenticides in brown rats (Rattus norvegicus Berk.) is associated with pleiotropic effects, notably with an increased dietary vitamin K requirement. Owing to this disadvantage, resistance is believed to be selected against if anticoagulant selection is absent. In small...... experimental populations of wild brown rats, an investigation was carried out to establish whether tolerance to anticoagulant exposure changed over a period of 2 years. In the same populations, DNA microsatellite markers were used to infer parentage, and this made it possible to estimate reproductive success...... of sensitive and resistant rats and estimate effective population size, Ne. Even though there was evidence for a selection against resistant rats with high vitamin K requirement, anticoagulant tolerance was not seen to be significantly influenced in the absence of bromadiolone selection. As the population size...

  20. Old and new oral anticoagulants for secondary stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Sacquegna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin K antagonists, such as warfarin, used in oral anticoagulation therapy currently represent the standard drugs for the primary and secondary prevention of stroke in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF, with a relative risk reduction close to 70%. Newer oral anticoagulants, such as direct thrombin inhibitors (i.e., dabigatran and direct factor Xa inhibitors (i.e., apixaban and rivaroxaban have been recently compared with warfarin in large randomized trials for stroke prevention in AF. The new oral anticoagulants showed, compared with warfarin, no statistically significant difference in the rate of stroke or systemic embolism in secondary prevention (patients with previous transient ischemic attack or stroke subgroups. With regard to safety, the risk of intracranial bleeding was reduced with new anticoagulants compared with warfarin. Indirect treatment comparisons of clinical trials on secondary prevention cohorts showed no significant difference in efficacy among apixaban, rivaroxaban, and dabigatran; but dabigatran 110 mg was associated with less intracranial bleedings than rivaroxaban.

  1. Improved late survival and disability after stroke with therapeutic anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation: a population study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, Niamh

    2011-09-01

    Although therapeutic anticoagulation improves early (within 1 month) outcomes after ischemic stroke in hospital-admitted patients with atrial fibrillation, no information exists on late outcomes in unselected population-based studies, including patients with all stroke (ischemic and hemorrhagic).

  2. Quality of anticoagulation therapy in neurological patients in a tertiary care hospital in north India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhat Singh

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: It may be concluded that stable therapeutic INR is difficult to maintain in neurological patients. Optimal modification of diet, drug and dose of oral anticoagulant may help in stabilization of INR.

  3. Guideline-related barriers to optimal prescription of oral anticoagulants in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukenhorst, A. L.; Arts, D. L.; Lucassen, W.; Jager, K. J.; van der Veer, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    Guidelines provide recommendations for antithrombotic treatment to prevent stroke in people with atrial fibrillation, but oral anticoagulant prescriptions in Dutch primary care are often discordant with these recommendations. Suboptimal guideline features (i.e. format and content) have been

  4. Acute management of stroke patients taking non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants Addressing Real-world Anticoagulant Management Issues in Stroke (ARAMIS) Registry: Design and rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Ying; Hernandez, Adrian F; Harding, Tina; Fonarow, Gregg C; Bhatt, Deepak L; Suter, Robert E; Khan, Yosef; Schwamm, Lee H; Peterson, Eric D

    2016-12-01

    Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban) have been increasingly used as alternatives to warfarin for stroke prophylaxis in patients with atrial fibrillation. Yet there is substantial lack of information on how patients on NOACs are currently treated when they have an acute ischemic stroke and the best strategies for treating intracerebral hemorrhage for those on chronic anticoagulation with warfarin or a NOAC. These are critical unmet needs for real world clinical decision making in these emergent patients. The ARAMIS Registry is a multicenter cohort study of acute stroke patients who were taking chronic anticoagulation therapy prior to admission and are admitted with either an acute ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage. Built upon the existing infrastructure of American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Get With the Guidelines Stroke, the ARAMIS Registry will enroll a total of approximately 10,000 patients (5000 with acute ischemic stroke who are taking a NOAC and 5000 with anticoagulation-related intracerebral hemorrhage who are on warfarin or a NOAC). The primary goals of the ARAMIS Registry are to provide a comprehensive picture of current treatment patterns and outcomes of acute ischemic stroke patients on NOACs, as well as anticoagulation-related intracerebral hemorrhage in patients on either warfarin or NOACs. Beyond characterizing the index hospitalization, up to 2500 patients (1250 ischemic stroke and 1250 intracerebral hemorrhage) who survive to discharge will be enrolled in an optional follow-up sub-study and interviewed at 3 and 6 months after discharge to assess longitudinal medication use, downstream care, functional status, and patient-reported outcomes. The ARAMIS Registry will document the current state of management of NOAC treated patients with acute ischemic stroke as well as contemporary care and outcome of anticoagulation-related intracerebral hemorrhage. These

  5. Active vibration absorber for the CSI evolutionary model - Design and experimental results. [Controls Structures Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Anne M.; Belvin, W. Keith; Horta, Lucas G.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1991-01-01

    The development of control of large flexible structures technology must include practical demonstrations to aid in the understanding and characterization of controlled structures in space. To support this effort, a testbed facility has been developed to study practical implementation of new control technologies under realistic conditions. The paper discusses the design of a second order, acceleration feedback controller which acts as an active vibration absorber. This controller provides guaranteed stability margins for collocated sensor/actuator pairs in the absence of sensor/actuator dynamics and computational time delay. Experimental results in the presence of these factors are presented and discussed. The robustness of this design under model uncertainty is demonstrated.

  6. Synthesis and biological activity of the novel indanedione anticoagulant rodenticides containing fluorine

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Feng; Liu, Liping; Bai, Zengguo; Zhang, Tianhua; Zhao, Keke

    2016-01-01

    Here, 3 fluorinated intermediates of drug were synthesized: (M1), (M2), (M3). Three new anticoagulant rodenticides were designed which were based on 4-hydroxycoumarin or 1,3-indandione, added acute toxicity groups containing fluorine. The structures of synthesized compounds were analyzed and proved by FT-IR spectroscopy and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR). The compounds were also evaluated for their anticoagulant and acute biologic activity. In addition, both the acute orally toxicity ...

  7. Anticoagulation therapy a risk factor for the development of chronic subdural hematoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aspegren, Oskar P.; Åstrand, Ramona; Lundgren, Maria I.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common disease among the elderly and with increasing incidence we have chosen to focus on associations between development and recurrence of CSDH and anticoagulation and/or antiplatelet agent therapy.......Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common disease among the elderly and with increasing incidence we have chosen to focus on associations between development and recurrence of CSDH and anticoagulation and/or antiplatelet agent therapy....

  8. Real life anticoagulation treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation in Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilke, Thomas; Groth, Antje; Pfannkuche, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Oral anticoagulation (OAC) with either new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) or Vitamin-K antagonists (VKAs) is recommended by guidelines for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and a moderate to high risk of stroke. Based on a claims-based data set the aim of this study was to quantify the stroke-r...... that both patient/disease characteristics and treatment environment/general prescribing behaviour of physicians may explain the OAC under-use in AF patients....

  9. Use of anticoagulant rodenticides in outdoor urban areas: considerations and proposals for the protection of public health and non-target species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutto, M; Di Domenico, D; Rubbiani, M

    2018-01-01

    Rodent control operations represent an important tool for the prevention and management of infestations, in outdoor environments, by synanthropic rodents (Rattus rattus and R. norvegicus), which are a source of economic and environmental damage with significant sanitary implications. Although the use of anticoagulants is safer to humans and pets compared to the use of acute poisoning substances, an intrinsic hazard of the active ingredients exists, i.e. the possible poisoning of non-target organisms (e.g., children, pets and wildlife) following exposure. The risks arising from the use of anticoagulants for rodent control operations in anthropic contexts can therefore only be mitigated by a proper selection of the active ingredient, bait formulation and administration techniques, since an active ingredient with selective action towards non-target species does not currently exist on the market. This document lists practical proposals aimed at reducing the possibility of toxic exposure to anticoagulant rodenticides and mitigate the toxicological risk of human baits and non-target species.

  10. Preliminary Experimental Results for Indirect Vector-Control of Induction Motor Drives with Forced Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Vittek

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The contribution presents an extension of indirect vector control of electric drives employing induction motors to 'Forced Dynamic Control'. This method of control offers an accurate realisation of dynamic response profiles, which can be selected by the user. The developed system can be integrated into a drive with a shaft position encoder or a shaft sensoriess drive, in which only the stator currents are measured. The applied stator voltages are determined by a computed inverter switching algorithm. Simulation results and preliminary experimental results for indirect vector control of an idle running induction motor indicate good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  11. [Analysis of the results of the SEIMC External Quality Control Program. Year 2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gopegui Bordes, Enrique Ruiz; Orta Mira, Nieves; Del Remedio Guna Serrano, M; Medina González, Rafael; Rosario Ovies, María; Poveda, Marta; Gimeno Cardona, Concepción

    2015-07-01

    The External Quality Control Program of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) include controls for bacteriology, serology, mycology, parasitology, mycobacteria, virology, molecular microbiology and HIV-1, HCV and HBV viral loads. This manuscript presents the analysis of results obtained of the participants from the 2013 SEIMC External Quality Control Programme, except viral loads controls, that they are summarized in a manuscript abroad. As a whole, the results obtained in 2013 confirm the excellent skill and good technical standards found in previous editions. However, erroneous results can be obtained in any laboratory and in clinically relevant determinations. Once again, the results of this program highlighted the need to implement both internal and external controls in order to assure the maximal quality of the microbiological tests. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Efficacy and Safety of Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants versus Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants in Patients Undergoing Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Santarpia

    Full Text Available Use of the non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs is endorsed by current guidelines for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF. However efficacy and safety of NOACs in patients undergoing catheter ablation (RFCA of AF has not been well established yet.To perform a meta-analysis of all studies comparing NOACs and vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (VKAs in patients undergoing RFCA.Studies were searched for in PubMed and Google Scholar databases.Studies were considered eligible if: they evaluated the clinical impact of NOACs versus VKAs; they specifically analyzed the use of anticoagulants during periprocedural phase of RFCA; they reported clinical outcome data.25 studies were selected, including 9881 cases. The summary measure used was the risk ratio (RR with 95% confidence interval (CI. The random-effects or the fixed effect model were used to synthesize results from the selected studies.There was no significant difference in thromboembolic complications (RR 1.39; p=0.13. Bleeding complications were significantly lower in the NOACs-treated arm as compared to VKAs (RR=0.67, p<0.001. Interestingly, a larger number of thromboembolic events was found in the VKAs-treated arm in those studies where VKAs had been interrupted during the periprocedural phase (RR=0.68; p=ns. In this same subgroup a significantly higher incidence of both minor (RR=0.54; p=0.002 and major bleeding (RR=0.41; p=0.01 events was recorded. Conversely, the incidence of thromboembolic events in the VKAs-treated arm was significantly lower in those studies with uninterrupted periprocedural anticoagulation treatment (RR=1.89; p=0.02.As with every meta-analysis, no patients-level data were available.The use of NOACs in patients undergoing RFCA is safe, given the lower incidence of bleedings observed with NOACs. On the other side, periprocedural interruption of VKAs and bridging with heparin is associated with a higher bleeding rate with no

  13. Could Some Geriatric Characteristics Hinder the Prescription of Anticoagulants in Atrial Fibrillation in the Elderly?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paule Denoël

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have reported underprescription of anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation (AF. We conducted an observational study on 142 out of a total of 995 consecutive ≥75 years old patients presenting AF (14% when admitted in an emergency unit of a general hospital, in search of geriatric characteristics that might be associated with the underprescription of anticoagulation therapy (mostly antivitamin K at the time of the study. The following data was collected from patients presenting AF: medical history including treatment and comorbidities, CHADS2 score, ISAR scale (frailty, Lawton’s scale (ADL, GDS scale (mood status, MUST (nutrition, and blood analysis (INR, kidney function, and albumin. Among those patients for who anticoagulation treatment was recommended (73%, only 61% were treated with it. In the group with anticoagulation therapy, the following characteristics were observed more often than in the group without such therapy: a recent (≤6 months hospitalization and medical treatment including digoxin or based on >3 different drugs. Neither the value of the CHADS2 score, nor the geriatric characteristics could be correlated with the presence or the absence of an anticoagulation therapy. More research is thus required to identify and clarify the relative importance of patient-, physician-, and health care system-related hurdles for the prescription of oral anticoagulation therapy in older patients with AF.

  14. Nonoclusive thrombosis of mechanical mitral valve prosthesis caused by inadequate treatment of anticoagulant therapy resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović Branislava

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Oral anticoagulants have been used in the prevention of thromboembolic complications for over six decades. A rare, but possible problem in the application of these medications could be resistance to them. Case report. We presented a patient with nonocclusive thrombosis of the mechanical mitral prosthesis due to inadequately treated resistance to peroral anticoagulant therapy. Resistance to oral anticoagulant medications was proven by an increased dosage of warfarin up to 20 mg and, after that, acenokumarol to 15 mg over ten days which did not lead to an increase in the international normalized ratio (INR value over 1.2. On the basis of information that she did not take food rich in vitamin K or medications which could reduce effects of oral anticoagulants, and that she did not have additional illnesses and conditions that could cause an inadequate response to anticoagulant therapy, it was circumstantially concluded that this was a hereditary form of resistance. Because of the existing mechanical prosthetics on the mitral position, low molecular heparin has been introduced into the therapy. The patient reduced it on her own initiative, leading to nonocclusive valvular thrombosis. Conclusion. When associated complications like absolute arrhithmia does not exist, the finding of resistance to oral anticoagulant agents is an indication for the replacement of a mechanical prosthetic with a biological one which has been done in this patients.

  15. Terapia anticoagulante en fibrilación auricular Anticoagulation and atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Prieto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available La fibrilación auricular es la taquiarritmia cardíaca más frecuente. Su incidencia aumenta con la edad, presentándose en un 1.5% entre los 50 a 59 años, y en un 8-10% entre los 80 a 89 años. Esta arritmia incrementa en cinco veces el riesgo de sufrir un evento cerebrovascular isquémico cardioembólico y causa el 15% de todos los accidentes cerebrovasculares isquémicos. Su manejo se enfoca en la prevención de los fenómenos tromboembólicos y el control de la frecuencia y ritmo cardíaco. El tratamiento anticoagulante ha demostrado ser la principal herramienta en la prevención de eventos cardioembólicos. Aunque las complicaciones hemorrágicas por el tratamiento son esperables y aumentan con la edad, el beneficio de usar anticoagulación sobrepasa por mucho al riesgo de sangrado. Precisamente debido a la heterogeneidad clínica de esta arritmia y a la dificultad de establecer un tratamiento adecuado para cada caso en particular, el American College of Cardiology, la American Heart Association, la European Society of Cardiology y el American College of Chest Physicians han establecido guías para mejorar el tratamiento de estos pacientes. La revisión de esta enfermedad y de las directrices propuestas puede facilitar y mejorar notablemente el tratamiento de los pacientes con fibrilación auricular.Atrial fibrillation is the most frequent cardiac arrhythmia in adults. Its frequency increases with age, being its incidence 1.5% in individuals 50 to 59 years old and 8-10% from 80 to 89 years. Atrial fibrillation increases 5 fold the risk of suffering stroke and actually causes 15% of all strokes. Its management focuses primary in the prevention of thromboembolic phenomena, heart rate and rhythm control. Anticoagulation, when indicated, has demonstrated to be the main tool in the prevention of these thromboembolic events. Although the bleeding complication is frequent in this population and increases with age, anticoagulation benefits are

  16. Low warfarin resistance frequency in Norway rats in two cities in China after 30 years usage of anticoagulant rodenticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaohui; Wang, Da-Wei; Li, Ning; Liu, Lan; Tian, Lin; Luo, Chan; Cong, Lin; Feng, Zhiyong; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Song, Ying

    2018-04-17

    Anticoagulant rodenticides have been widely used in rodent control in China for over 30 years and resistant Norway rats have been reported. Mutations in the vitamin K epoxide reductase complex, subunit 1 (Vkorc1) gene can cause anticoagulant resistance in rodents. In this study, we analyzed the Vkorc1 polymorphisms of 681 Norway rats collected in Zhanjiang and Harbin City in China from 2008 to 2015 and evaluated the warfarin resistance frequency. Analysis revealed 4 mutations including 3 not previously reported. Two new synonymous mutations His68His and Leu105Leu are not associated with warfarin resistance. One new nonsynonymous mutation Ala140Thr was found in Zhanjiang rat samples collected in 3 years with low frequencies (3.3%-4.0%) and is likely associated with warfarin resistance. Laboratory resistance tests suggested low warfarin resistance frequencies in rats from Zhanjiang (4.9%-17.1%) and Harbin City (0-2.5%). Both genetic analysis and laboratory resistance tests suggested low warfarin resistance frequencies in rats from Zhanjiang and Harbin City. The alternative usage of FGARs and SGARs might represent an effective strategy against the development of warfarin resistance in Norway rats in China. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Rate control is more cost-effective than rhythm control for patients with persistent atrial fibrillation - results from the RAte Control versus Electrical cardioversion (RACE) study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagens, VE; Vermeulen, KM; TenVergert, EM; Van Veldhuisen, JGP; Bosker, HA; Kamp, O; Kingma, JH; Tijssen, JGP; Crijns, HJGM; Van Gelder, IC

    Aims To evaluate costs between a rate and rhythm control strategy in persistent atrial. fibrillation. Methods and results In a prospective substudy of RACE (Rate control versus electrical cardioversion for persistent atrial. fibrillation) in 428 of the total 522 patients (206 rate control and 222

  18. Paying the pipers: Mitigating the impact of anticoagulant rodenticides on predators and scavengers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, John E.; Rattner, Barnett A.; Shore, Richard F.; van den Brink, Nico W.

    2016-01-01

    Anticoagulant rodenticides, mainly second-generation forms, or SGARs, dominate the global market for rodent control. Introduced in the 1970s to counter genetic resistance in rodent populations to first-generation compounds such as warfarin, SGARs are extremely toxic and highly effective killers. However, their tendency to persist and accumulate in the body has led to the widespread contamination of terrestrial predators and scavengers. Commercial chemicals that are classified by regulators as persistent, bio-accumulative, and toxic (PBT) chemicals and that are widely used with potential environmental release, such as dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) or polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), have been removed from commerce. However, despite consistently failing ecological risk assessments, SGARs remain in use because of the demand for effective rodent-control options and the lack of safe and humane alternatives. Although new risk-mitigation measures for rodenticides are now in effect in some countries, the contamination and poisoning of nontarget wildlife are expected to continue. Here, we suggest options to further attenuate this problem.

  19. Standardized Test Results: KEEP and Control Students. 1975-1976, Technical Report #69.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antill, Ellen; Speidel, Gisela E.

    This report presents the results of various standardized measures administered to Kamehameha Early Education Program (KEEP) students and control students in the school year 1975-1976. In contrast to previous comparisons, KEEP employed more rigorous procedures for the selection of the control students and for the conditions of test administration.…

  20. Experimental results on elongation control using dynamic input allocation at FTU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varano, G.; Boncagni, L.; Galeani, S.; Granucci, G.; Vitale, V.; Zaccarian, L.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the experimental results related to a recently proposed control scheme for the regulation of plasma elongation using the poloidal field coils available at FTU, already used for the horizontal position control. The proposed technique allows to realize elongation regulation as a secondary task using the same poloidal coils.

  1. Management of novel oral anticoagulants in emergency and trauma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho-Gomes, Ana-Catarina; Hague, Adam; Ghosh, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    The compelling safety, efficacy and predictable effect of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) is driving a rapid expansion in their therapeutic indications. Management of the increasing number of patients on those new agents in the setting of emergency or trauma surgery can be challenging and the absence of specific reversal agents has been a matter of concern. This review summarises the key principles that underpin the management of those patients with a particular emphasis on the recent development of specific antidotes. As of 2015, a new line of antidotes, specific for these drugs, are at different stages of their development with their release imminent. However, as NOACs are innately reversible due to their short half-life, the use of reversal agents will probably be restricted to a few exceptional cases. Post-marketing surveillance will be paramount to better clarify the role of these promising drugs. Management of patients on NOACs in the context of emergency or trauma surgery relies on best supportive care in combination with the blood products and/or specific antidotes as required. Familiarity with the new reversal agents is essential but further evidence on their indications, safety and efficacy as well as consensus guidelines are warranted prior to widespread adoption. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Newer Anticoagulants for Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Harburger

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-valvular atrial fibrillation is a recognized risk factor for stroke and systemic embolism. It has been clearly established that warfarin reduces the risk of stroke and systemic embolism in persons with atrial fibrillation and additional risk factors for stroke. The use of warfarin, however, requires frequent monitoring, and there is great variability in patient response to warfarin. Warfarin interacts with several medications and foods. In addition, warfarin use portends a significant risk of bleeding. For these reasons, warfarin is frequently not prescribed to persons for whom the drug would provide a clear benefit. Over the past decade, attempts have been made to develop drugs that are at least as safe and effective as warfarin for the treatment of atrial fibrillation that do not require monitoring nor have as many interactions. Initial studies of compounds in this regard ultimately failed due to safety concerns, but over the past two years two novel agents have been approved by the United States Food and Drug Association for anticoagulation in non-valvular atrial fibrillation, another drug is under review, and additional compounds are being studied. This article will review the use of warfarin and these new agents in the treatment of non-valvular atrial fibrillation.

  3. Emergency admissions for major haemorrhage associated with direct oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouget, Jacques; Oger, Emmanuel

    2015-12-01

    To describe the population admitted in an emergency department of a teaching hospital for severe bleeding associated with direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC). During a three-year period (2012-2014) patients older than 16 years were prospectively identified by haemorrhagic symptoms from computerised requests. At least one of the following criteria defined major haemorrhage: haemorrhagic shock, unstable haemodynamic, need for transfusion or haemostatic procedure, or a life threatening location. Fifty four patients, 23 receiving dabigatran, 30 rivaroxaban and one apixaban were included, 2 in 2012, 35 in 2013 and 17 in 2014. Median age was 84 years (range 63-99) with a sex ratio of 1.16. Haemorrhagic complications were gastrointestinal (n=27), intracranial (n=12) or miscellaneous (n=15). Indication of DOAC was stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation in 49 cases and deep vein thrombosis in 5 cases. Hospitalization was required for 45 patients (83%) with a mean length of stay of 8.5 days. Sixteen patients needed intensive care. Reversal therapy was prescribed in 11 patients. At 1 month, overall mortality was 24%, reaching 41.7% for intracranial haemorrhage. Among surviving patients, DOAC was stopped in 10 cases, continued in 17 patients and switched for other antithrombotic in 17 patients. Our study contributes to the post marketing surveillance of major haemorrhagic complications associated with DOAC. It takes part to the knowledge about the course of this severe event in emergencies. Careful awareness in risk benefit assessment, especially in elderly, is needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Design of analog networks in the control theory formulation. Part 2: Numerical results

    OpenAIRE

    Zemliak, A. M.

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents numerical results of design of nonlinear electronic networks based on the problem formulation in terms of the control theory. Several examples illustrate the prospects of the approach suggested in the first part of the work.

  5. Results of automatic system implementation for the friction control rods execution in Cofrentes nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curiel, M.; Palomo, M. J.; Urrea, M.; Arnaldos, A.

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show the obtained results in Cofrentes nuclear power plant (Spain) of control rods Pcc/24 friction test procedure. In order to perform this, a control rod friction test system has been developed. Principally, this system consists on software and data acquisition hardware that obtains and analyzes the control rod pressure variation on which the test is being made. The Pcc/24 procedure objective is to detect an excessive friction in the control rod movement that could cause a control rod drive movement slower than usual. This test is necessary every time that an anomalous alteration is produced in the reactor core that could affect to a fuel rod, and it is executed before the time measure of control rods rapid scram test of the affected rods. This test has to be carried out to all the reactor control rods and takes valuable time during plant refuelling. So, by means of an automatic system to perform the test, we obtain an important time saving during refuelling. On the other hand, the on-line monitoring of the control rod insertion and changes in differential pressure, permits a control rod operation fast and safe validation. Moreover, an automatic individual report of every rod is generated by the system and a final global result report of the entire test developed in refuelling is generated. The mentioned reports can be attached directly to the procedure documents obtaining an office data processing important saving time. (Author)

  6. Results of automatic system implementation for the friction control rods execution in Cofrentes nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomo, M.; Urrea, M.; Arnaldos, A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show the obtained results in Cofrentes Nuclear Power Plant (Spain) of Control Rods PCC/24 Friction Test Procedure. In order to perform this, a Control Rod Friction Test System has been developed. Principally, this system consists on software and data acquisition hardware that obtains and analyzes the control rod pressure variation on which the test is being made. The PCC/24 Procedure objective is to detect an excessive friction in the control rod movement that could cause a CRD (Control Rod Drive) movement slower than usual. This test is necessary every time that an anomalous alteration is produced in the reactor core that could affect to a fuel rod, and it is executed before the time measure of control rods rapid scram test of the affected rods. This test has to be carried out to all the reactor control rods and takes valuable time during plant refuelling. So, by means of an automatic system to perform the test, we obtain an important time saving during refuelling. On the other hand, the on-line monitoring of the control rod insertion and changes in differential pressure, permits a control rod operation fast and safe validation. Moreover, an automatic individual report of every rod is generated by the system and a final global result report of the entire test developed in refuelling is generated. The mentioned reports can be attached directly to the procedure documents obtaining an office data processing important saving time.(author)

  7. Results of automatic system implementation for the friction control rods execution in Cofrentes nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomo, M., E-mail: mpalomo@iqn.upv.es [Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (UPV) (Spain); Urrea, M., E-mail: matias.urrea@iberdrola.es [Iberdrola Generacion S.A. Valencia (Spain). C.N. Cofrentes; Curiel, M., E-mail: m.curiel@lainsa.com [Logistica y Acondicionamientos Industriales (LAINSA), Valencia (Spain); Arnaldos, A., E-mail: a.arnaldos@titaniast.com [TITANIA Servicios Teconologicos, Valencia (Spain)

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show the obtained results in Cofrentes Nuclear Power Plant (Spain) of Control Rods PCC/24 Friction Test Procedure. In order to perform this, a Control Rod Friction Test System has been developed. Principally, this system consists on software and data acquisition hardware that obtains and analyzes the control rod pressure variation on which the test is being made. The PCC/24 Procedure objective is to detect an excessive friction in the control rod movement that could cause a CRD (Control Rod Drive) movement slower than usual. This test is necessary every time that an anomalous alteration is produced in the reactor core that could affect to a fuel rod, and it is executed before the time measure of control rods rapid scram test of the affected rods. This test has to be carried out to all the reactor control rods and takes valuable time during plant refuelling. So, by means of an automatic system to perform the test, we obtain an important time saving during refuelling. On the other hand, the on-line monitoring of the control rod insertion and changes in differential pressure, permits a control rod operation fast and safe validation. Moreover, an automatic individual report of every rod is generated by the system and a final global result report of the entire test developed in refuelling is generated. The mentioned reports can be attached directly to the procedure documents obtaining an office data processing important saving time.(author)

  8. Results of automatic system implementation for the friction control rods execution in Cofrentes nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curiel, M. [Logistica y Acondicionamientos Industriales SAU, Sorolla Center, local 10, Av. de las Cortes Valencianas, 46015 Valencia (Spain); Palomo, M. J. [ISIRYM, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, Valencia (Spain); Urrea, M. [Iberdrola Generacion S. A., Central Nuclear Cofrentes, Carretera Almansa Requena s/n, 04662 Cofrentes, Valencia (Spain); Arnaldos, A., E-mail: m.curiel@lainsa.co [TITANIA Servicios Tecnologicos SL, Sorolla Center, local 10, Av. de las Cortes Valencianas No. 58, 46015 Valencia (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this presentation is to show the obtained results in Cofrentes nuclear power plant (Spain) of control rods Pcc/24 friction test procedure. In order to perform this, a control rod friction test system has been developed. Principally, this system consists on software and data acquisition hardware that obtains and analyzes the control rod pressure variation on which the test is being made. The Pcc/24 procedure objective is to detect an excessive friction in the control rod movement that could cause a control rod drive movement slower than usual. This test is necessary every time that an anomalous alteration is produced in the reactor core that could affect to a fuel rod, and it is executed before the time measure of control rods rapid scram test of the affected rods. This test has to be carried out to all the reactor control rods and takes valuable time during plant refuelling. So, by means of an automatic system to perform the test, we obtain an important time saving during refuelling. On the other hand, the on-line monitoring of the control rod insertion and changes in differential pressure, permits a control rod operation fast and safe validation. Moreover, an automatic individual report of every rod is generated by the system and a final global result report of the entire test developed in refuelling is generated. The mentioned reports can be attached directly to the procedure documents obtaining an office data processing important saving time. (Author)

  9. Controller design and test results for a four axis HTS coil based Maglev system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Tong; Xing Huawei

    2007-01-01

    Controller design and experimental results are reported in this paper for a four axis high temperature superconductivity (HTS) coil based electromagnetic levitation (Maglev) system. The HTS coils are made of Bi2223/Ag multifilamentary tapes. It has been experimentally proved that the designed controller works satisfactorily, although the physical parameters of a HTS coil based electromagnet (HTSEM) vary significantly with the frequency of the input voltage. A performance comparison has also been made between the classical lead-lag compensator and the modern H ∼ loop-shaping controller. It becomes clear that robust control theories are capable of providing a controller with better performances, which is in a good agreement with numerical simulations. Moreover, it implies that the particular parameter variation characteristics can be simply dealt with by the available robust control theories that are naturally existent in a HTSEM

  10. Controller design and test results for a four axis HTS coil based Maglev system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Tong [Department of Automation, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)]. E-mail: tzhou@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Xing Huawei [Department of Automation, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2007-04-15

    Controller design and experimental results are reported in this paper for a four axis high temperature superconductivity (HTS) coil based electromagnetic levitation (Maglev) system. The HTS coils are made of Bi2223/Ag multifilamentary tapes. It has been experimentally proved that the designed controller works satisfactorily, although the physical parameters of a HTS coil based electromagnet (HTSEM) vary significantly with the frequency of the input voltage. A performance comparison has also been made between the classical lead-lag compensator and the modern H{sub {approx}} loop-shaping controller. It becomes clear that robust control theories are capable of providing a controller with better performances, which is in a good agreement with numerical simulations. Moreover, it implies that the particular parameter variation characteristics can be simply dealt with by the available robust control theories that are naturally existent in a HTSEM.

  11. Sector-condition-based results for adaptive control and synchronization of chaotic systems under input saturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, Muhammad; Rehan, Muhammad; Hong, Keum-Shik; Khaliq, Abdul; Saeed-ur-Rehman

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the design of adaptive feedback controllers for two problems (namely, stabilization and synchronization) of chaotic systems with unknown parameters by considering input saturation constraints. A novel generalized sector condition is developed to deal with the saturation nonlinearities for synthesizing the nonlinear and the adaptive controllers for the stabilization and synchronization control objectives. By application of the proposed sector condition and rigorous regional stability analysis, control and adaptation laws are formulated to guarantee local stabilization of a nonlinear system under actuator saturation. Further, simple control and adaptation laws are developed to synchronize two chaotic systems under uncertain parameters and input saturation nonlinearity. Numerical simulation results for Rössler and FitzHugh–Nagumo models are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive stabilization and synchronization control methodologies

  12. Risk of bleeding and stroke with oral anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation in Taiwan: a nationwide cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chun Chen

    Full Text Available Data on the use of oral anticoagulation (OAC and antiplatelet therapy and the risk of bleeding and stroke amongst Asian patients with atrial fibrillation (AF are limited. We investigated the risks of bleeding and stroke with use of oral anticoagulation (OAC and antiplatelet therapy as mono- or combination therapy, in patients with AF from a Chinese nationwide cohort study.We studied a cohort of 10384 patients (57.2% men, age 67.8 ± 13.2 yrs between 1999 and 2010 from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. Records of prescriptions were obtained during follow-up. The main outcome was a recurrent stroke during the follow-up period. Time-dependent Cox proportional hazards models were used for this analysis.We documented 1009 events for bleeding, as well as 224 hemorrhagic stroke and 1642 ischemic stroke events during a median 3.2 (interquartile range, 1.05-6.54 years' follow-up. Compared with warfarin users, patients with antiplatelet therapy had a lower risk of bleeding (adjusted relative risk [RR], 0.59, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.49-0.71, p<0.001 whilst combination therapy had a non-statistically significant higher bleeding risk (RR, 1.33, 95%, 0.91-1.94, p = 0.20. Patients on antiplatelet monotherapy had a similar risk for ischemic stroke compared with OAC (RR 1.05, 95% CI, 0.89-1.25, p = 0.50, whilst those on combination therapy had a significantly higher risk (RR 1.90, 95% CI, 1.34-2.70, p<0.001.In a national representative cohort, antiplatelet therapy had no significant difference in ischemic stroke risk to warfarin. For bleeding, aspirin had a lower risk compared to warfarin. This may reflect poor anticoagulation control, highlighting important missed opportunities for improved stroke prevention, especially in countries where anticoagulation management is suboptimal.

  13. [Analysis of the results of the SEIMC External Quality Control Program. Year 2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz de Gopegui Bordes, Enrique; Guna Serrano, M del Remedio; Orta Mira, Nieves; Ovies, María Rosario; Poveda, Marta; Gimeno Cardona, Concepción

    2013-02-01

    The External Quality Control Program of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica [SEIMC]) includes controls for bacteriology, serology, mycology, parasitology, mycobacteria, virology, and molecular microbiology. This article presents the most relevant conclusions and lessons from the 2011 controls. Overall, the results obtained in 2011 confirm the excellent skill and good technical standards found in previous years. Nevertheless, erroneous results can be obtained in any laboratory and in clinically relevant determinations. The results of this program highlight the need to implement both internal and external controls, such as those offered by the SEIMC program, in order to ensure maximal quality of microbiological tests. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. [Analysis of the results of the SEIMC External Quality Control Program. Year 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gopegui Bordes, Enrique Ruiz; Guna Serrano, M del Remedio; Orta Mira, Nieves; Ovies, María Rosario; Poveda, Marta; Gimeno Cardona, Concepción

    2014-02-01

    The External Quality Control Program of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) include controls for bacteriology, serology, mycology, parasitology, mycobacteria, virology and molecular microbiology. This article presents the most relevant conclusions and lessons from the 2012 controls. As a whole, the results obtained in 2012 confirm the excellent skill and good technical standards found in previous editions. However, erroneous results can be obtained in any laboratory and in clinically relevant determinations. Once again, the results of this program highlighted the need to implement both internal and external controls in order to assure the maximal quality of the microbiological tests. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. [Analysis of