WorldWideScience

Sample records for anticoagulant citrate phosphate

  1. Continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration with a low citrate dose regional anticoagulation protocol and a phosphate-containing solution: effects on acid–base status and phosphate supplementation needs

    OpenAIRE

    Morabito, Santo; Pistolesi, Valentina; Tritapepe, Luigi; Vitaliano, Elio; Zeppilli, Laura; Polistena, Francesca; Fiaccadori, Enrico; Pierucci, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent guidelines suggest the adoption of regional citrate anticoagulation (RCA) as first choice CRRT anticoagulation modality in patients without contraindications for citrate. Regardless of the anticoagulation protocol, hypophosphatemia represents a potential drawback of CRRT which could be prevented by the adoption of phosphate-containing CRRT solutions. The aim was to evaluate the effects on acid–base status and phosphate supplementation needs of a new RCA protocol for Continuo...

  2. Citrate pharmacokinetics and calcium levels during high-flux dialysis with regional citrate anticoagulation

    OpenAIRE

    Kozik-Jaromin, Justyna; Nier, Volker; Heemann, Uwe; Kreymann, Bernhard; Böhler, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Background. Regional citrate anticoagulation is a very effective anticoagulation method for haemodialysis. However, it is not widely used, primarily due to the risk of hypocalcaemia. We studied citrate and calcium kinetics to better understand safety aspects of this anticoagulation method. Methods. During 15 haemodialysis treatments with a calcium-free dialysis solution, citrate was infused pre-dialyser and calcium was substituted post-dialyser. Systemic and extracorporeal citrate and calcium...

  3. Citrate Anticoagulation for CRRT in Children: Comparison with Heparin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Nicole Fernández

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regional anticoagulation with citrate is an alternative to heparin in continuous renal replacement therapies, which may prolong circuit lifetime and decrease hemorrhagic complications. A retrospective comparative cohort study based on a prospective observational registry was conducted including critically ill children undergoing CRRT. Efficacy, measured as circuit survival, and secondary effects of heparin and citrate were compared. 12 patients on CRRT with citrate anticoagulation and 24 patients with heparin anticoagulation were analyzed. Median citrate dose was 2.6 mmol/L. Median calcium dose was 0.16 mEq/kg/h. Median heparin dose was 15 UI/kg/h. Median circuit survival was 48 hours with citrate and 31 hours with heparin (P=0.028. 66.6% of patients treated with citrate developed mild metabolic alkalosis, which was directly related to citrate dose. There were no cases of citrate intoxication: median total calcium/ionic calcium index (CaT/I of 2.16 and a maximum CaT/I of 2.33, without metabolic acidosis. In the citrate group, 45.5% of patients developed hypochloremia and 27.3% hypomagnesemia. In the heparin group, 27.8% developed hypophosphatemia. Three patients were moved from heparin to citrate to control postoperatory bleeding. In conclusion citrate is a safe and effective anticoagulation method for CRRT in children and it achieves longer circuit survival than heparin.

  4. Citrate Anticoagulation for CRRT in Children: Comparison with Heparin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Sara Nicole; Santiago, Maria José; López-Herce, Jesús; García, Miriam; Del Castillo, Jimena; Alcaraz, Andrés José; Bellón, Jose María

    2014-01-01

    Regional anticoagulation with citrate is an alternative to heparin in continuous renal replacement therapies, which may prolong circuit lifetime and decrease hemorrhagic complications. A retrospective comparative cohort study based on a prospective observational registry was conducted including critically ill children undergoing CRRT. Efficacy, measured as circuit survival, and secondary effects of heparin and citrate were compared. 12 patients on CRRT with citrate anticoagulation and 24 patients with heparin anticoagulation were analyzed. Median citrate dose was 2.6 mmol/L. Median calcium dose was 0.16 mEq/kg/h. Median heparin dose was 15 UI/kg/h. Median circuit survival was 48 hours with citrate and 31 hours with heparin (P = 0.028). 66.6% of patients treated with citrate developed mild metabolic alkalosis, which was directly related to citrate dose. There were no cases of citrate intoxication: median total calcium/ionic calcium index (CaT/I) of 2.16 and a maximum CaT/I of 2.33, without metabolic acidosis. In the citrate group, 45.5% of patients developed hypochloremia and 27.3% hypomagnesemia. In the heparin group, 27.8% developed hypophosphatemia. Three patients were moved from heparin to citrate to control postoperatory bleeding. In conclusion citrate is a safe and effective anticoagulation method for CRRT in children and it achieves longer circuit survival than heparin. PMID:25157369

  5. Citrate anticoagulation for continuous renal replacement therapy in small children

    OpenAIRE

    Soltysiak, Jolanta; Warzywoda, Alfred; Kociński, Bartłomiej; Ostalska-Nowicka, Danuta; Benedyk, Anna; Silska-Dittmar, Magdalena; Zachwieja, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Background Regional citrate anticoagulation (RCA) is one of the methods used to prevent clotting in continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). The aim of this study was to describe the outcomes and complications of RCA-CRRT in comparison to heparin anticoagulation (HA)-CRRT in critically ill children. Methods This study was a retrospective review of 30 critically ill children (16 on RCA- and 14 on HA-CRRT) who underwent at least 24 h of CRRT. The mean body weight of the children was 8.69 ± ...

  6. Regional Anticoagulation with Citrate is Superior to Systemic Anticoagulation with Heparin in Critically Ill Patients Undergoing Continuous Venovenous Hemodiafiltration

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Joon-Sung; Kim, Gheun-Ho; Kang, Chong Myung; Lee, Chang Hwa

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Short hemofilter survival and anticoagulation-related life-threatening complications are major problems in systemic anticoagulation with heparin (SAH) for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). The present study examined if regional anticoagulation with citrate (RAC) using commercially available solutions can overcome the associated problems of SAH to produce economical benefits. Methods Forty-six patients were assigned to receive SAH or RAC. We assessed the coagulation ...

  7. Hemodiafiltration using pre-dilutional on-line citrate dialysate: A new technique for regional citrate anticoagulation: A feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhouane Bousselmi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A prospective, observational, feasibility study was carried out on four patients with end-stage renal failure undergoing bicarbonate hemodialysis to study the feasibility of an on-line hemodiafiltration technique using a citrate dialysate with pre-dilutional infusion of citrate as a technique for regional citrate anticoagulation. All patients had contraindication to systemic heparin anticoagulation. The dialysis technique consisted of an on-line hemodiafiltration with a citrate dialysate without calcium using a Fresenius 4008S dialysis machine and Fresenius Polysulfone F60 dialyzers. The infusion solution was procured directly from the dialysate and was infused into the arterial line. To avoid the risk of hypocalcemia, calcium gluconate was infused to the venous return line. The study was carried out in two stages. During the first stage, the citrate infusion rate was 80 mL/min and the calcium infusion rate was 9 mmol/h. At the second stage, the rates were 100 mL/min and 11 mmol/h, respectively. The primary endpoint of this study was the incidence of thrombosis in the extracorporeal blood circuit and/or the dialyzer. A total of 78 sessions were conducted. All the sessions were well tolerated clinically and there were no major incidents in any of the four patients. At the first stage of the study, there were five incidences of small clots in the venous blood chamber, an incidence of extracorporeal blood circuit thrombosis of 12.5%. At the second stage of the study, no cases of extracorporeal blood circuit or dialyzer thrombosis were noted. Hemodiafiltration with on-line citrate dialysate infusion to the arterial line is safe and allows an effective regional anticoagulation of the extracorporeal blood circuit without the need for systemic anticoagulation.

  8. The safety and efficacy of regional citrate anticoagulation in sustained low efficiency dialysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张凌

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety and efficacy of regional citrate anticoagulation in sustained low efficiency dialysis (SLED) .Methods A total of 45 patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) or end stage renal disease (ESRD) admitted in our hospital from August 2011 to

  9. Differences between the effects of EDTA and citrate anticoagulants on platelet count and mean platelet volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McShine, R L; Sibinga, S; Brozovic, B

    1990-01-01

    Platelet counts on whole blood samples collected into tripotassium salt of EDTA, trisodium citrate (Na3 citr), citrate phosphate dextrose adenine formula 1 (CPDA-1) and acid citrate dextrose formula A (ACD-A), all showed a statistically significant drop (P less than 0.01) after 1 h standing at room temperature (RT) as compared with the immediate (within 30 min) counts. After 1 h the enumeration became stable in the EDTA samples but the drop continued up to 4-6 h in those samples taken into citrate. The decreases in citrate were significant (18-30%, P less than 0.001). The addition of EDTA (1.5 mg/ml) to the citrated samples after the sixth hour count created a significant rise (6-22%, P less than 0.01) in the counts between the sixth and the seventh hour. Our observations show that platelet counts in citrated blood samples are lower than those in EDTA and highlight the necessity to present citrated samples mixed wtih dried EDTA when characterization or quality control of blood and blood components is required. Analysis of the mean platelet volume (MPV) showed significantly lower values (6-13%, P less than 0.05) in the citrated samples as compared to the same samples in EDTA, and a significant increase (4-6%, P less than 0.01) on the addition of EDTA to the citrated samples after the sixth hour analysis. PMID:2125542

  10. Regional citrate anticoagulation in critically ill patients during continuous blood purification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚德华; 季大玺; 徐斌; 谢红浪; 刘云; 黎磊石

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the safety and define the contraindication of regional citrate anticoagulation treatment on various critically ill patients being treated by continuous blood purification, who also had bleeding tendencies. Methods Forty critically ill patients being treated by continuous blood purification (CBP) were involved in this study. Due to their bleeding tendencies, regional citrate anticoagulation treatment was given to all of them. Those with hepatic function impairment (n=10) were classified as Group A, those with hypoxemia were classified as Group B (n=10), and the others as Group C (n=20). Blood samples were collected before treatment, and at 4, 12, 24, 36, and 48 hour intervals during CBP. These samples then were used arterial blood gas analysis, whole blood activated clotting time (WBACT) pre- and post-filter, and serum ionized calcium examination. Results WBACT pre-filter showed little fluctuant through the 48hr period of CBP, and WBACT post-filter showed obvious prolongation than that of the pre-filter (P<0.05) at all time points. Metabolic acidosis was found in Group A patients before CBP, and improved during CBP. Normal acid-base conditions of patients were disturbed and deteriorated in Group B during CBP, but not in Group C. Serum ionized calcium was maintained at a normal range during CBP in Group A and C patients, but declined significantly in Group B patients (vs. pre-treatment, P<0.05). Conclusions Regional citrate anticoagulation can be safely used in conjunction with CBP treatment for patients with hepatic function impairment , but may induce acidosis and a decline in serum ionized calcium when used with hypoxemic patients.

  11. Citrate confers less filter-induced complement activation and neutrophil degranulation than heparin when used for anticoagulation during continuous venovenous haemofiltration in critically ill patients

    OpenAIRE

    Schilder, Louise; Nurmohamed, Shaikh Azam; Wee, Piet; Paauw, Nanne; Girbes, Armand; Beishuizen, Albertus; Beelen, Robert; Groeneveld, Johan

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: During continuous venovenous haemofiltration (CVVH), regional anticoagulation with citrate may be superior to heparin in terms of biocompatibility, since heparin as opposed to citrate may activate complement (reflected by circulating C5a) and induce neutrophil degranulation in the filter and myeloperoxidase (MPO) release from endothelium. Methods. No anticoagulation (n = 13), unfractionated heparin (n = 8) and trisodium citrate (n = 17) regimens during CVVH were compar...

  12. Citrate confers less filter-induced complement activation and neutrophil degranulation than heparin when used for anticoagulation during continuous venovenous haemofiltration in critically ill patients

    OpenAIRE

    Schilder, Louise; Nurmohamed, S Azam; ter Wee, Pieter M.; Paauw, Nanne J.; Girbes, Armand RJ; Beishuizen, Albertus; Beelen, Robert HJ; Groeneveld, AB Johan

    2014-01-01

    Background During continuous venovenous haemofiltration (CVVH), regional anticoagulation with citrate may be superior to heparin in terms of biocompatibility, since heparin as opposed to citrate may activate complement (reflected by circulating C5a) and induce neutrophil degranulation in the filter and myeloperoxidase (MPO) release from endothelium. Methods No anticoagulation (n = 13), unfractionated heparin (n = 8) and trisodium citrate (n = 17) regimens during CVVH were compared. Blood samp...

  13. Implementation of continuous renal replacement therapy with regional citrate anticoagulation on a surgical and trauma intensive care unit: impact on clinical and economic aspects—an observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Hafner, Sebastian; Stahl, Wolfgang; Fels, Theresa; Träger, Karl; Georgieff, Michael; Wepler, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background Regional citrate anticoagulation (RCA) is being increasingly used during continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) in intensive care units as an alternative to systemic heparin anticoagulation. However, due to its availability in a variety of solutions and dialysis systems, RCA is still considered a complex intervention, possibly leading to confusion and pitfalls in everyday practice. We therefore tested retrospectively if the introduction of RCA as a new anticoagulation strategy...

  14. Ferric Citrate Hydrate as a Phosphate Binder and Risk of Aluminum Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Ajay Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Ferric citrate hydrate was recently approved in Japan as an oral phosphate binder to be taken with food for the control of hyperphosphatemia in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The daily therapeutic dose is about 3 to 6 g, which comprises about 2 to 4 g of citrate. Oral citrate solubilizes aluminum that is present in food and drinking water, and opens the tight junctions in the intestinal epithelium, thereby increasing aluminum absorption and urinary excretion. In healthy animals d...

  15. Artificial citrate operon confers mineral phosphate solubilization ability to diverse fluorescent pseudomonads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Hemanta; Sanghavi, Paulomi B; Macwan, Silviya R; Archana, Gattupalli; Naresh Kumar, G

    2014-01-01

    Citric acid is a strong acid with good cation chelating ability and can be very efficient in solubilizing mineral phosphates. Only a few phosphate solubilizing bacteria and fungi are known to secrete citric acids. In this work, we incorporated artificial citrate operon containing NADH insensitive citrate synthase (gltA1) and citrate transporter (citC) genes into the genome of six-plant growth promoting P. fluorescens strains viz., PfO-1, Pf5, CHAO1, P109, ATCC13525 and Fp315 using MiniTn7 transposon gene delivery system. Comprehensive biochemical characterization of the genomic integrants and their comparison with plasmid transformants of the same operon in M9 minimal medium reveals the highest amount of ∼7.6±0.41 mM citric and 29.95±2.8 mM gluconic acid secretion along with ∼43.2±3.24 mM intracellular citrate without affecting the growth of these P. fluorescens strains. All genomic integrants showed enhanced citric and gluconic acid secretion on Tris-Cl rock phosphate (TRP) buffered medium, which was sufficient to release 200-1000 µM Pi in TRP medium. This study demonstrates that MPS ability could be achieved in natural fluorescent pseudomonads by incorporation of artificial citrate operon not only as plasmid but also by genomic integration. PMID:25259527

  16. Artificial citrate operon confers mineral phosphate solubilization ability to diverse fluorescent pseudomonads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemanta Adhikary

    Full Text Available Citric acid is a strong acid with good cation chelating ability and can be very efficient in solubilizing mineral phosphates. Only a few phosphate solubilizing bacteria and fungi are known to secrete citric acids. In this work, we incorporated artificial citrate operon containing NADH insensitive citrate synthase (gltA1 and citrate transporter (citC genes into the genome of six-plant growth promoting P. fluorescens strains viz., PfO-1, Pf5, CHAO1, P109, ATCC13525 and Fp315 using MiniTn7 transposon gene delivery system. Comprehensive biochemical characterization of the genomic integrants and their comparison with plasmid transformants of the same operon in M9 minimal medium reveals the highest amount of ∼7.6±0.41 mM citric and 29.95±2.8 mM gluconic acid secretion along with ∼43.2±3.24 mM intracellular citrate without affecting the growth of these P. fluorescens strains. All genomic integrants showed enhanced citric and gluconic acid secretion on Tris-Cl rock phosphate (TRP buffered medium, which was sufficient to release 200-1000 µM Pi in TRP medium. This study demonstrates that MPS ability could be achieved in natural fluorescent pseudomonads by incorporation of artificial citrate operon not only as plasmid but also by genomic integration.

  17. The Effects of High Level Magnesium Dialysis/Substitution Fluid on Magnesium Homeostasis under Regional Citrate Anticoagulation in Critically Ill.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mychajlo Zakharchenko

    Full Text Available The requirements for magnesium (Mg supplementation increase under regional citrate anticoagulation (RCA because citrate acts by chelation of bivalent cations within the blood circuit. The level of magnesium in commercially available fluids for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT may not be sufficient to prevent hypomagnesemia.Patients (n = 45 on CRRT (2,000 ml/h, blood flow (Qb 100 ml/min with RCA modality (4% trisodium citrate using calcium free fluid with 0.75 mmol/l of Mg with additional magnesium substitution were observed after switch to the calcium-free fluid with magnesium concentration of 1.50 mmol/l (n = 42 and no extra magnesium replenishment. All patients had renal indications for CRRT, were treated with the same devices, filters and the same postfilter ionized calcium endpoint (<0.4 mmol/l of prefilter citrate dosage. Under the high level Mg fluid the Qb, dosages of citrate and CRRT were consequently escalated in 9h steps to test various settings.Median balance of Mg was -0.91 (-1.18 to -0.53 mmol/h with Mg 0.75 mmol/l and 0.2 (0.06-0.35 mmol/h when fluid with Mg 1.50 mmol/l was used. It was close to zero (0.02 (-0.12-0.18 mmol/h with higher blood flow and dosage of citrate, increased again to 0.15 (-0.11-0.25 mmol/h with 3,000 ml/h of high magnesium containing fluid (p<0.001. The arterial levels of Mg were mildly increased after the change for high level magnesium containing fluid (p<0.01.Compared to ordinary dialysis fluid the mildly hypermagnesemic fluid provided even balances and adequate levels within ordinary configurations of CRRT with RCA and without a need for extra magnesium replenishment.ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01361581.

  18. Adsorption of Acid Phosphatase on Minerals and Soil Colloids in Presence of Citrate and Phosphate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the influence of phosphate and citrate, which are common inorganic andorganic anions in soils, on the adsorption of acid phosphatase by kaolin, goethite and the colloids separatedfrom yellow-brown soil (YBS) and latosol (LS) in central-south China. The YBS colloid has the major claymineral composition of 1.4 nm mineral, illite and kaolinite while the LS colloid mainly contains kaolinite andoxides. The adsorption isotherm of acid phosphatase on the examined soil colloids and minerals fitted tothe Langmuir model. The amount of enzyme adsorbed in the absence of ligands was in the order of YBScolloid >LS colloid>kaolin≈goethite. In the presence of phosphate or citrate, the amounts of the enzymeadsorbed followed the sequence YBS colloid>kaolin>LS colloid>goethite. The presence of ligands alsodecreased the binding energy between the enzyme and soil colloids or minerals. With the increase of ligandconcentration from 10 mmol L-1 to 400 m mol L-1, different behaviors for the adsorption of enzyme werefound in the colloid and mineral systems studied. A sharp decrease in enzyme adsorption was observed ongoethite while gradual decreases of enzyme adsorption were recorded in the two soil colloid systems. However,no any decrease was found for the amount of enzyme adsorbed on kaolin at higher ligand concentrations.When phosphate or citrate was introduced to the system before the addition of enzyme, the ligands usuallyenhanced the adsorption of enzyme. The results obtained in this study suggested the important role ofkaolinite mineral in the adsorption of enzyme molecules in acidic soils in the presence of various ligands.

  19. Delay in onset of metabolic alkalosis during regional citrate anti-coagulation in continous renal replacement therapy with calcium-free replacement solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    See Kay

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Regional citrate anti-coagulation for continuous renal replacement therapy chelates calcium to produce the anti- coagulation effect. We hypothesise that a calcium-free replacement solution will require less citrate and produce fewer metabolic side effects. Fifty patients, in a Medical Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary teaching hospital (25 in each group, received continuous venovenous hemofiltration using either calcium-containing or calcium-free replacement solutions. Both groups had no significant differences in filter life, metabolic alkalosis, hypernatremia, hypocalcemia, and hypercalcemia. However, patients using calcium-containing solution developed metabolic alkalosis earlier, compared to patients using calcium-free solution (mean 24.6 hours,CI 0.8-48.4 vs. 37.2 hours, CI 9.4-65, P = 0.020. When calcium-containing replacement solution was used, more citrate was required (mean 280ml/h, CI 227.2-332.8 vs. 265ml/h, CI 203.4-326.6, P = 0.069, but less calcium was infused (mean 21.2 ml/h, CI 1.2-21.2 vs 51.6ml/h, CI 26.8-76.4, P ≤ 0.0001.

  20. A Retrospective Review of the Use of Regional Citrate Anticoagulation in Continuous Venovenous Hemofiltration for Critically Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Kit-Hung Leung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The emergence of a commercially prepared citrate solution has revolutionized the use of RCA in the intensive care unit (ICU. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety profile of a commercially prepared citrate solution. Method. Predilution continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH was performed using Prismocitrate 10/2 at 2500 mL/h and a blood flow rate of 150 mL/min. Calcium chloride solution was infused to maintain ionized calcium within 1.0–1.2 mmol/L. An 8.4% sodium bicarbonate solution was infused separately. Treatment was stopped when the predefined clinical target was reached or the filter clotted. Result. 58 sessions of citrate RCA were analyzed. The median circuit lifetime was 26.0 h (interquartile range IQR 21.2–44.3. The percentage of circuits lasting more than 12 h, 24 h, and 48 h was 94.6%, 58.9%, and 16.1%, respectively. There was no incidence of hypernatremia and median pH was 2.5, only four patients had evidence of citrate accumulation. Conclusion. The commercially prepared citrate solution could be used safely in critically ill patients who required CVVH with no major adverse events.

  1. Rationale and study design of a three-period, 58-week trial of ferric citrate as a phosphate binder in patients with ESRD on dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umanath, Kausik; Sika, Mohammed; Niecestro, Robert; Connelly, Carolyn; Schulman, Gerald; Koury, Mark J; Lewis, Julia B; Dwyer, Jamie P

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease associated mineral and bone disorders arise as a result of aberrant bone mineral metabolism in patients with advancing levels of renal dysfunction and end-stage renal disease. One of the cornerstones of treatment is the use of phosphate-binding agents. We describe the rationale and study design for a clinical trial to assess the safety and efficacy of ferric citrate as a phosphate binder. This trial is a three-period, international, multicenter, randomized, controlled clinical trial to assess the safety and efficacy of ferric citrate as a phosphate binder, consisting of a 2-week washout period, a 52-week safety assessment period in which subjects are randomized to ferric citrate or active control, and a 4-week efficacy assessment period in which subjects randomized to ferric citrate in the safety assessment period are randomized to ferric citrate or placebo. Eligible subjects include end-stage renal disease patients who have been treated with thrice-weekly hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis for at least 3 months in dialysis clinics in the United States and Israel. Primary outcome measure will be the effect of ferric citrate vs. placebo on the change in serum phosphorus. Safety assessments will be performed by monitoring adverse events, concomitant medication use, and sequential blood chemistries (including iron parameters, phosphorus, and calcium). This three-period trial will assess the efficacy of ferric citrate as a phosphate binder. If proven safe and efficacious, ferric citrate will likely provide an additional phosphate binder to treat chronic kidney disease associated mineral and bone disorders. PMID:22702490

  2. Uranium recovery from a citric-citrate leach liquor of rock phosphate using an ion-exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous work has indicated that uranium could be selectively leached from rock phosphates by a proper mixture of citric acid-calcium citrate. Uranium was recovered from the obtained leach liquor via methylation after its evaporation. However, in order to minimize the cost of uranium recovery by such a process, an anion exchange resin (Amberlite IRA-400) is suggested to be applied for uranium recovery from the liquors in concern. The achieved saturation capacity of 220 gu/l W SR represented only about 60% of the theoretical capacity of the resin (371 gu/i). This relatively low resin capacity might be due to excessively high citric-citric concentration or due to sluggish working flow rate, . Comparing the theoretical resin capacity of 371 gu/l W SR for a monovalent uranyl citrate complexes to that of only 92.8 in case of the tetravalent tri sulphate tri carbonate uranyl complexes, it would be greatly beneficial to apply the citrate for uranium adsorption upon anion exchange resins.3 figs

  3. Ferric Citrate, an Iron-Based Phosphate Binder, Reduces Health Care Costs in Patients on Dialysis Based on Randomized Clinical Trial Data

    OpenAIRE

    Rodby, Roger A.; Umanath, Kausik; Niecestro, Robert; Christopher Bond, T.; Sika, Mohammed; Lewis, Julia; Dwyer, Jamie P.; . .

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) require phosphate binders for hyperphosphatemia and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) and intravenous (IV) iron for anemia. Ferric citrate (FC) is a novel, iron-based phosphate binder that increases iron stores and decreases IV iron and ESA usage while maintaining hemoglobin levels, and may decrease the cost of ESRD care. The study objectives were to (1) quantify differences in ESA and IV iron usage among ESRD patients receiving F...

  4. Effect of the Food Additives Sodium Citrate and Disodium Phosphate on Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli and Production of stx-Phages and Shiga toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzi, Lucas J; Lucchesi, Paula M A; Medico, Lucía; Burgán, Julia; Krüger, Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    Induction and propagation of bacteriophages along the food production chain can represent a significant risk when bacteriophages carry genes for potent toxins. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different compounds used in the food industry on the growth of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and the production of stx-phage particles and Shiga toxin. We tested the in vitro effect of lactic acid, acetic acid, citric acid, disodium phosphate, and sodium citrate on STEC growth. A bacteriostatic effect was observed in most of treated cultures. The exceptions were those treated with sodium citrate and disodium phosphate in which similar growth curves to the untreated control were observed, but with reduced OD600 values. Evaluation of phage production by plaque-based assays showed that cultures treated with sodium citrate and disodium phosphate released phages in similar o lower levels than untreated cultures. However, semi-quantification of Stx revealed higher levels of extracellular Stx in STEC cultures treated with 2.5% sodium citrate than in untreated cultures. Our results reinforce the importance to evaluate if additives and other treatments used to decrease bacterial contamination in food induce stx-phage and Stx production. PMID:27446032

  5. Effect of water and citrate solubility on agronomic effectiveness of acidulated phosphates in three consecutive corn crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Prochnow

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available In the process of phosphate rock acidulation, several impure P compounds may be formed along with the desirable Ca and NH4 phosphates. Such compounds normally reduce the content of water-soluble P and thus the agronomic effectiveness of commercial fertilizers. In order to study this problem, a greenhouse experiment consisting of three consecutive corn crops was conducted in samples of a Red-Yellow Latosol (Typical Hapludox in a completely randomized design (6 x 2 x 2, with four replicates. Six commercial fertilizers were added to 2 kg of soil at a rate of 70 mg kg-1 P, based on the content of soluble P in neutral ammonium citrate plus water (NAC + H2O of the fertilizers. Fertilizer application occurred either in the original form or leached to remove the water-soluble fraction, either by mixing the fertilizer with the whole soil in the pots or with only 1 % of its volume. The corn plants were harvested 40 days after emergence to determine the shoot dry matter and accumulated P. For the first crop and localized application, the elimination of water-soluble P from the original fertilizers resulted in less bioavailable P for the plants. For the second and third crops, the effects of P source, leaching and application methods were not as evident as for the first, suggesting that the tested P sources may have similar efficiencies when considering successive cropping. The conclusion was drawn that the water-insoluble but NAC-soluble fractions of commercial P fertilizers are not necessarily inert because they can provide P in the long run.

  6. Phosphoric ore treatment by roasting it with sodium carbonate and leaching it with ammonium citrate for the recovery of soluble phosphate and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By thermal treatment of phosphoric ore, with low phosphorus contents and iron, aluminum, and silicon impurities, basic fertilizers with P2O5 soluble in citric acid or ammonium citrate, can be produced. The phosphoric ore lightly grinded with alkaline salts like CO3Na2 y SiO2 is roasted between 800 to 1 000°C in rotary kilns. The roasted material contains from 25–30% of alkaline phosphates soluble in citrates. Phosphoric ore from the province of Napo-Ecuador with 24% of P2O5, 40% CaO in form of apatite, 20% of SiO2 and 7 g/ton U is tested by thermic differential analysis, roasting at 800°C for 2 hours with 50% w/w of sodium carbonate and 2% w/w of SiO2 by using a Nichols pilot furnace with 15 L of capacity which uses gas (propane-butane) as fuel, and agitated leaching with ammonium citrate (5% w/w). The initial ore and products are characterized by using atomic absorption spectrophotometry (Perkin Elmer AA400) and x-ray diffraction (Bruker D8 Advance). In the best conditions, 32% of phosphorus soluble in water is obtained as well as 40% of phosphorus and 56% uranium soluble in ammonium citrate. (author)

  7. Complexation of neptunium(V) by salicylate, phthalate and citrate ligands in a pH 7.5 phosphate buffered system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conditional stability constants, enthalpies and entropies of complexation at pH 7.5 and ionic strength 0.1 have been determined for neptunium(V) complexes of phosphate, salicylate, phthalate and citrate. Results are given and discussed. At pH 7.5 salicylate does not form a complex with neptunium(V) due to the low charge density of the NpO2+ ion and incomplete ionization of the salicylate ion. In all cases, only 1:1 complexes were identified. (U.K.)

  8. Mean platelet volume measurement, EDTA or citrate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastjerdi, Mansour Siavash; Emami, Tajolmolouk; Najafian, Alireza; Amini, Masoud

    2006-10-01

    Most laboratories use EDTA for anticoagulation of whole blood prior to automated cell counting but due to platelet swelling, mean platelet volume (MPV) values may increase with its use. MPV changes may be less with acid citrate based anticoagulation. As MPV is a marker of platelet function and its precise measurement is important in a number of clinical situations, this study was performed to assess if EDTA and citrate based anticoagulated blood samples can be used interchangeably for MPV measurement. In this cross sectional descriptive study, EDTA and citrate based anticoagulated blood samples of the same patients were assessed by auto-analyzer within 1 h of sampling. In the 61 evaluated patients, there was a close correlation between MPV as measured by EDTA and citrate, but mean MPV measured from EDTA samples was 0.66 fL (9%) more than citrate. There was also a significant negative correlation between platelets count and MPV by both methods. The results of our study reveal that MPV can be measured accurately by both methods of anticoagulation; EDTA and citrate if analysis be performed within 1 h of sampling. PMID:17607580

  9. Gene delivery using calcium phosphate nanoparticles: Optimization of the transfection process and the effects of citrate and poly(l-lysine) as additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammed A; Wu, Victoria M; Ghosh, Shreya; Uskoković, Vuk

    2016-06-01

    Despite the long history of nanoparticulate calcium phosphate (CaP) as a non-viral transfection agent, there has been limited success in attempts to optimize its properties for transfection comparable in efficiency to that of viral vectors. Here we focus on the optimization of: (a) CaP nanoparticle precipitation conditions, predominantly supersaturation and Ca/P molar ratios; (b) transfection conditions, mainly the concentrations of the carrier and plasmid DNA; (c) the presence of surface additives, including citrate anion and cationic poly(l-lysine) (PLL). CaP nanoparticles significantly improved transfection with plasmid DNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells compared to a commercial non-viral carrier. At the same time they elicited significantly lesser cytotoxicity than the commercial carrier. Plasmid DNA acted as a nucleation promoter, decreasing the nucleation lag time of metastable CaP solutions and leading to a higher rate of nucleation and a lower size of the precipitated particles. The degree of supersaturation (DS) of 15 was found to be more optimal for transfection than that of 12.5 or 17.5 and higher. Because CaP particles precipitated at DS 15 were spherical, while DS 17.5 and 21 yielded acicular particles, it was concluded that spherical particle morphologies were more conducive to transfection than the anisotropic ones. Even though the yield at DS 15 was 10 and 100 times lower than that at DS 17.5 and 21, respectively, transfection rates were higher using CaP nanoparticle colloids prepared at DS 15 than using those made at higher or lower DS, indicating that the right particle morphology can outweigh the difference in the amount of the carrier, even when this difference is close to 100×. In contrast to the commercial carrier, the concentration of CaP-pDNA delivered to the cells was directly proportional to the transfection rate. Osteosarcoma K7M2 cells were four times more easily transfectable with

  10. Gender and chronological age affect erythrocyte membrane oxidative indices in citrate phosphate dextrose adenine-formula 1 (CPDA-1) blood bank storage condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erman, Hayriye; Aksu, Uğur; Belce, Ahmet; Atukeren, Pınar; Uzun, Duygu; Cebe, Tamer; Kansu, Ahmet D; Gelişgen, Remisa; Uslu, Ezel; Aydın, Seval; Çakatay, Ufuk

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that in vitro storage lesions lead to membrane dysfunction and decreased number of functional erythrocytes. As erythrocytes get older, in storage media as well as in peripheral circulation, they undergo a variety of biochemical changes. In our study, the erythrocytes with different age groups in citrate phosphate dextrose adenine-formula 1 (CPDA-1) storage solution were used in order to investigate the possible effect of gender factor on oxidative damage. Oxidative damage biomarkers in erythrocyte membranes such as ferric reducing antioxidant power, pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance, protein-bound advance glycation end products, and sialic acid were analyzed. Current study reveals that change in membrane redox status during blood-bank storage condition also depends on both gender depended homeostatic factors and the presence of CPDA-1. During the storage period in CPDA-1, erythrocytes from the male donors are mostly affected by free radical-mediated oxidative stress but erythrocytes obtained from females are severely affected by glyoxidative stress. PMID:27045670

  11. Anticoagulant rodenticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Barbara E; Proudfoot, Alex T; Bradberry, Sally M; Vale, J Allister

    2005-01-01

    Anticoagulant pesticides are used widely in agricultural and urban rodent control. The emergence of warfarin-resistant strains of rats led to the introduction of a new group of anticoagulant rodenticides variously referred to as 'superwarfarins', 'single dose' or 'long-acting'. This group includes the second generation 4-hydroxycoumarins brodifacoum, bromadiolone, difenacoum, flocoumafen and the indanedione derivatives chlorophacinone and diphacinone. Most cases of anticoagulant rodenticide exposure involve young children and, as a consequence, the amounts ingested are almost invariably small. In contrast, intentional ingestion of large quantities of long-acting anticoagulant rodenticides may cause anticoagulation for several weeks or months. Occupational exposure has also been reported. Anticoagulant rodenticides inhibit vitamin K(1)-2,3 epoxide reductase and thus the synthesis of vitamin K and subsequently clotting factors II, VII, IX and X. The greater potency and duration of action of long-acting anticoagulant rodenticides is attributed to their: (i) greater affinity for vitamin K(1)-2,3-epoxide reductase; (ii) ability to disrupt the vitamin K(1)-epoxide cycle at more than one point; (iii) hepatic accumulation; and (iv) unusually long biological half-lives due to high lipid solubility and enterohepatic circulation. Substantial ingestion produces epistaxis, gingival bleeding, widespread bruising, haematomas, haematuria with flank pain, menorrhagia, gastrointestinal bleeding, rectal bleeding and haemorrhage into any internal organ; anaemia may result. Spontaneous haemoperitoneum has been described. Severe blood loss may result in hypovolaemic shock, coma and death. The first clinical signs of bleeding may be delayed and patients may remain anticoagulated for several days (warfarin) or days, weeks or months (long-acting anticoagulants) after ingestion of large amounts. There are now sufficient data in young children exposed to anticoagulant rodenticides to

  12. Safety test of a supplement, 5-aminolevulinic acid phosphate with sodium ferrous citrate, in diabetic patients treated with oral hypoglycemic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naohide Yamashita

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to examine the safety of 5-aminolevulinic acid phosphate (5-ALA with sodium ferrous citrate (SFC in diabetic patients treated with one or more oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs. Background: Recent intervention studies performed in the USA and Japan have shown that a nutritional supplement of 5-ALA with SFC efficiently reduced blood glucose levels in pre-diabetic population without any adverse events. Thus, it was anticipated that 5-ALA with SFC may potentially be taken as a beneficial supplement by diabetic patients who were being treated with OHA therapy. Nevertheless, it is important to examine its safety and efficacy in diabetic population. Methods: This study was a prospective single-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled and parallel-group comparison study. Medically treated diabetic patients between the ages of 30 and 75 were recruited from the Tokyo metropolitan area of Japan and 45 subjects were selected after screening. These subjects were randomly assigned to three groups: daily intake of 15mg 5-ALA, 50mg 5-ALA, and a placebo (n=15, respectively. The supplement or placebo was administered for 12 weeks followed by a four week washout period. The primary endpoint was safety and occurrence of hypoglycemic attack, while the secondary endpoint was changes of fasting blood glucose (FBG and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c. Results: Adverse events related to 5-ALA with SFC were not observed in all the groups. Abnormalities in blood and urine tests were not observed either. Significant decrease in FBG was not detected in all the groups. However, there was a small but significant decrease in HbA1c at 4 and 8 week in the 15 mg 5-ALA group. Significant decrease in HbA1c was not observed in the 50 mg 5-ALA group, although a tendency to decrease after 4 weeks was apparent. Conclusion: 5-ALA with SFC is a safe and potentially beneficial supplement if taken by diabetic patients treated with OHAs.

  13. Anticoagulant induced leukoagglutination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low leukocyte count secondary to leukocyte aggregation caused by an ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) occur in both benign and malignant disorders. We report a 71-year-old male patient who was admitted to the hospital with acute chest infection. Complete blood count (CBC) collected in ETDA tube and analyzed by sysmex instrument (SE/9500) revealed low hemoglobin level of 9.4g/dl, white blood cell (WBC) count of 8.2x109/L. Peripheral blood smear review shows multiple leukocyte aggregation (one clump in each field). When we asked for another blood sample in citrate anticoagulant, the CBC showed WBC count of 11.8x109/L and neutrophils of 6.26x109/L. This is a case of low leukocyte count secondary to leukocyte aggregation induced by EDTA. (author)

  14. Sequestration of Sr-90 Subsurface Contamination in the Hanford 100-N Area by Surface Infiltration of a Ca-Citrate-Phosphate Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szecsody, James E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Oostrom, Martinus; Moore, R. C.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Williams, Mark D.; Zhong, Lirong; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; McKinley, James P.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Covert, Matthew A.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Breshears, Andrew T.; Garcia, Ben J.

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a method to emplace apatite precipitate in the 100N vadose zone, which results in sorption and ultimately incorporation of Sr-90 into the apatite structure. The Ca-citrate-PO4 solution can be infiltrated into unsaturated sediments to result in apatite precipitate to provide effective treatment of Sr-90 contamination. Microbial redistribution during solution infiltration and a high rate of citrate biodegradation for river water microbes (water used for solution infiltration) results in a relatively even spatial distribution of the citrate biodegradation rate and ultimately apatite precipitate in the sediment. Manipulation of the Ca-citrate-PO4 solution infiltration strategy can be used to result in apatite precipitate in the lower half of the vadose zone (where most of the Sr-90 is located) and within low-K layers (which are hypothesized to have higher Sr-90 concentrations). The most effective infiltration strategy to precipitate apatite at depth (and with sufficient lateral spread) was to infiltrate a high concentration solution (6 mM Ca, 15 mM citrate, 60 mM PO4) at a rapid rate (near ponded conditions), followed by rapid, then slow water infiltration. Repeated infiltration events, with sufficient time between events to allow water drainage in the sediment profile can be used to buildup the mass of apatite precipitate at greater depth. Low-K heterogeneities were effectively treated, as the higher residual water content maintained in these zones resulted in higher apatite precipitate concentration. High-K zones did not receive sufficient treatment by infiltration, although an alternative strategy of air/surfactant (foam) was demonstrated effective for targeting high-K zones. The flow rate manipulation used in this study to treat specific depths and heterogeneities are not as easy to implement at field scale due to the lack of characterization of heterogeneities and difficulty tracking the wetting front over a large

  15. Dilute Russell's viper venom and activated partial thromboplastin time in lupus anticoagulant diagnosis: is mixing essential?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrashekar, Vani

    2016-06-01

    Dilute Russell's viper venom (DRVV) testing and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) have been effectively used in combination for lupus anticoagulant testing. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the role of mixing in activated partial thromboplastin and dilute Russell's viper venom testing for evaluation of lupus anticoagulants. Citrated blood from patients who were not on oral anticoagulant therapy was studied. Mixing study with 1 : 1 normal plasma for elevated APTT and also few samples with elevated screen time was carried out. Elevated APTT was seen in only 48.1% of patients with lupus anticoagulant. Correction of APTT was seen in 27.8% of lupus anticoagulant-positive patients. DRVV test on mixing resulted in 83.8% false-negative values. Integrated DRVV test could be a standalone test for testing lupus anticoagulant. Mixing study may be restricted for patients on oral anticoagulants or patients with strong lupus anticoagulant. PMID:26626041

  16. Pharmacologic Therapies in Anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Joana Lima; Wipf, Joyce E

    2016-07-01

    Anticoagulants are beneficial for prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. The development of target-specific oral anticoagulants is changing the landscape of anticoagulation therapy and created growing interest on this subject. Understanding the pharmacology of different anticoagulants is the first step to adequately treat patients with best available therapy while avoiding serious bleeding complications. This article reviews the pharmacology of the main anticoagulant classes (vitamin K antagonists, direct oral anticoagulants, and heparins) and their clinical indications based on evidence-based data currently available in the literature. PMID:27235611

  17. Venous Thromboembolism Anticoagulation Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘泽霖

    2009-01-01

    @@ VTE of the main treatment for anticoagulant thera-py, anticoagulant therapy drug of choice for low molecu-lar weight heparin (LMWH) for the overwhelming major-ity of clinicians agree that long-term oral anticoagulant therapy is still Vit. K antagonist (mainly warfarin).

  18. Citrat og nyresten

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osther, P J

    1993-01-01

    Citrate is an important naturally occurring inhibitor of calcium stone formation in urine. Urinary citrate excretion was examined in 43 consecutive patients with recurrent idiopathic calcium nephrolithiasis and in 50 normal controls by a specific enzymatic technique. Hypocitraturia (<1.6 mmol/24h...

  19. Comparison of Blood Collected in Acid-Citrate-Dextrose and EDTA for Use in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Fiscus, Susan A.; Chakraborty, Hrishikesh; Shepard, Robin; Goodman, Melissa

    2000-01-01

    Paired blood samples collected in acid-citrate-dextrose and EDTA were compared for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infectivity on the day of collection or after 1 day of storage at room temperature. No significant differences between the anticoagulants were observed. Culture positivity was significantly associated with HIV RNA viral loads for both anticoagulants.

  20. Influence of some anticoagulants on dynamics of sugar concentration in the goats’ blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Zapryanova

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of the content in the goats’ blood (at the instant the sample was taken, and then after 3, 6 and 24 hours under influence of 4 anticoagulants (sodium fluoride, sodium citrate, heparin and complexon III were studied. Long term storage of the blood samples resulted in the glucose level decrease. It was mostly pronounced under the sodium citrate treatment.

  1. Gastrointestinal citrate absorption in nephrolithiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fegan, J.; Khan, R.; Poindexter, J.; Pak, C. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Gastrointestinal absorption of citrate was measured in stone patients with idiopathic hypocitraturia to determine if citrate malabsorption could account for low urinary citrate. Citrate absorption was measured directly from recovery of orally administered potassium citrate (40 mEq.) in the intestinal lavage fluid, using an intestinal washout technique. In 7 stone patients citrate absorption, serum citrate levels, peak citrate concentration in serum and area under the curve were not significantly different from those of 7 normal subjects. Citrate absorption was rapid and efficient in both groups, with 96 to 98% absorbed within 3 hours. The absorption of citrate was less efficient from a tablet preparation of potassium citrate than from a liquid preparation, probably due to a delayed release of citrate from wax matrix. However, citrate absorption from solid potassium citrate was still high at 91%, compared to 98% for a liquid preparation. Thus, hypocitraturia is unlikely to be due to an impaired gastrointestinal absorption of citrate in stone patients without overt bowel disease.

  2. Anticoagulants used in plasma collection affect adipokine multiplexed measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allione, Alessandra; Di Gaetano, Cornelia; Dani, Nadia; Barberio, Davide; Sieri, Sabina; Krogh, Vittorio; Matullo, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Obesity is an important health problem worldwide. Adipose tissue acts as an endocrine organ that secretes various bioactive substances, called adipokines, including pro-inflammatory biomarkers such as TNF-α, IL-6, leptin and C-reactive protein (CRP) and anti-inflammatory molecules such as adiponectin. The deregulated production of adipokines in obesity is linked to the pathogenesis of various disease processes and monitoring their variation is critical to understand metabolic diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the plasma concentration of adipokines in healthy subjects by multiplexed measurements and the effect of anticoagulants on their levels. Plasma samples from 10 healthy donors were collected in two different anticoagulants (sodium citrate or heparin). All markers, excluding TNF-α, showed significantly higher concentrations in heparinized compared to citrate plasma. However, levels of adipokines in different plasma samples were highly correlated for most of these markers. We reported that different anticoagulants used in the preparation of the plasma samples affected the measurements of some adipokines. The importance of the present results in epidemiology is relevant when comparing different studies in which blood samples were collected with different anticoagulants. PMID:26945995

  3. Heterofucans from Dictyota menstrualis have anticoagulant activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.R.L. Albuquerque

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Fucan is a term used to denote a family of sulfated L-fucose-rich polysaccharides which are present in the extracellular matrix of brown seaweed and in the egg jelly coat of sea urchins. Plant fucans have several biological activities, including anticoagulant and antithrombotic, related to the structural and chemical composition of polysaccharides. We have extracted sulfated polysaccharides from the brown seaweed Dictyota menstrualis by proteolytic digestion, followed by separation into 5 fractions by sequential acetone precipitation. Gel electrophoresis using 0.05 M 1,3-diaminopropane-acetate buffer, pH 9.0, stained with 0.1% toluidine blue, showed the presence of sulfated polysaccharides in all fractions. The chemical analyses demonstrated that all fractions are composed mainly of fucose, xylose, galactose, uronic acid, and sulfate. The anticoagulant activity of these heterofucans was determined by activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT using citrate normal human plasma. Only the fucans F1.0v and F1.5v showed anticoagulant activity. To prolong the coagulation time to double the baseline value in the APTT, the required concentration of fucan F1.0v (20 µg/ml was only 4.88-fold higher than that of the low molecular weight heparin Clexane® (4.1 µg/ml, whereas 80 µg/ml fucan 1.5 was needed to obtain the same effect. For both fucans this effect was abolished by desulfation. These polymers are composed of fucose, xylose, uronic acid, galactose, and sulfate at molar ratios of 1.0:0.8:0.7:0.8:0.4 and 1.0:0.3:0.4:1.5:1.3, respectively. This is the fist report indicating the presence of a heterofucan with higher anticoagulant activity from brown seaweed.

  4. Anticoagulants on yield of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells harvested from dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Fernando Vicente de Brito

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapy with bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells is an alternative to therapy with mesenchymal stem cell cultures. The aim of the present research was the comparison of the yield of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells harvested from dogs with two different anticoagulants. Bone marrow was harvested from the iliac crest of five healthy dogs aged between 15 and 30 months, and the effect of two anticoagulant solutions, CPDA-1 (citrate phosphate dextrose adenine-1 and heparin, on the isolation of mononuclear cells was compared. Mononuclear cells were isolated in a density gradient and stained for CD9 and CD44 for characterization by flow cytometry. Means were compared using Student's paired t-test. Samples harvested with CPDA-1 yielded an average of 5.16x106 (±1.76x106 to 20.20x106 (±1.55x106 mononuclear cells/mL, whereas the yield of samples harvested with heparin varied between 4.56x106 (±0.69x106 and 24.30x106 (±2.12x106 mononuclear cells mL-1. By flow cytometry, mean percentage of double-stained cells varied from 1.96% (±0.64% to 5.01% (±0.73% for CPDA-1 and from 2.23% (±0.70% to 7.27% (±0.97% for heparin. No significant statistical differences were observed on yield or CD9 and CD44 expression. Further studies are recommended to assess efficacy of CPDA on mononuclear cell isolation.

  5. Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000547.htm Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lupus anticoagulants are antibodies against substances in the lining ...

  6. Anticoagulants in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howie, P W

    1986-06-01

    Thromboembolic disorders are still a serious problem in pregnancy and anticoagulants have an important part to play in both treatment and prevention. Warfarin is the most convenient drug to give but can cause maternal and fetal bleeding problems, especially during late pregnancy and delivery. There are also small risks of embryopathy from warfarin in early pregnancy but these may have been overstated. Heparin, which has to be given parenterally, does not cross the placental barrier but can still cause bleeding problems in pregnancy. Full intravenous heparin is only suitable for short-term use, and subcutaneous heparin has been introduced for long-term therapy. This regimen is a useful advance but long-term use still has problems of bruising and maternal bone demineralization. The standard treatment of acute thromboembolic events in pregnancy is continuous intravenous heparin followed by either subcutaneous heparin or warfarin, the latter being changed at 36 weeks gestation. In the prophylaxis of thromboembolism, the trend is towards a more selective approach, anticoagulants being given during pregnancy to those at highest risk and during labour and the puerperium to all with a previous history of thromboembolism. Anticoagulants during pregnancy are necessary in patients with artificial heart valves and, because subcutaneous heparin is not sufficient, warfarin should be used until 36 weeks followed by continuous intravenous heparin until delivery. No method of anticoagulation during pregnancy is entirely free of risk and all management policies must be based on an estimate of risk-benefit ratio in individual patients. PMID:2426029

  7. Cataract surgery and anticoagulants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, SA; VanRij, G

    1996-01-01

    A questionnaire was sent to 240 members of the Netherlands Intraocular implant Club (NIOIC) to register their policy followed in 1993 with regard to anticoagulant therapy (ACT) and the use of aspirin in patients having cataract surgery. Ninety-one (32%) forms were suitable for analysis. Most eye sur

  8. Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Benjamin A; Piccini, Jonathan P

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke, which is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The use of oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation at moderate or high risk of stroke, estimated by established criteria, improves outcomes. However, to ensure that the benefits exceed the risks of bleeding, appropriate patient selection is essential. Vitamin K antagonism has been the mainstay of treatment; however, newer drugs with novel mechanisms are also available. These novel oral anticoagulants (direct thrombin inhibitors and factor Xa inhibitors) obviate many of warfarin's shortcomings, and they have demonstrated safety and efficacy in large randomized trials of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. However, the management of patients taking warfarin or novel agents remains a clinical challenge. There are several important considerations when selecting anticoagulant therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation. This review will discuss the rationale for anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation; risk stratification for treatment; available agents; the appropriate implementation of these agents; and additional, specific clinical considerations for treatment. PMID:24733535

  9. In-vitro anticoagulant activity of fucoidan derivatives from brown seaweed Laminaria japonica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jing; ZHANG Quanbin; ZHANG Zhongshan; HOU Yun; ZHANG Hong

    2011-01-01

    Fucoidan, a group of sulfated heteropolysaccharides, was extracted from Laminariajaponica,an important economic alga species in China. The anticoagulant activity of fucoidan and its derivatives (including sulfated, phosphorylated, and aminated fucoidan) was examined using in-vitro anticoagulant systems. The correlation between chemical variations within the fucoidan group and anticoagulant activity was determined. The in-vitro anticoagulant properties of fucoidan and its derivatives were determined by measuring activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT), and thrombin time (TT).The results indicate anticoagulant activity in all samples using APTT and TT assays; however, only the fucoidan derivatives affected the PT assay. Thus, the fucoidan derivatives were able to inhibit both intrinsic and extrinsic blood coagulants. Fucoidan (FPS) and its derivatives presented better anticoagulant activity than low molecular weight fucoidan (DFPS) and its derivatives, suggesting that molecular weight and proper conformation are contributing factors for anticoagulant activity of polysaccharides. Amino groups have a positive charge and can thus change the charge density of fucoidan. Accordingly, among the tested samples, aminated fucoidan (NF) was the most active reflecting the importance of charge density for anticoagulant activity. Available data obtained using in-vitro models suggest that the sulfate content,sulfate/total-sugar ratio, molecular weight, and the substituted group of fucoidan are important factors for anticoagulant activity but that the influence of sulfate, phosphate and amino groups on anticoagulant activity was different.

  10. In-vitro anticoagulant activity of fucoidan derivatives from brown seaweed Laminaria japonica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Quanbin; Zhang, Zhongshan; Hou, Yun; Zhang, Hong

    2011-05-01

    Fucoidan, a group of sulfated heteropolysaccharides, was extracted from Laminaria japonica, an important economic alga species in China. The anticoagulant activity of fucoidan and its derivatives (including sulfated, phosphorylated, and aminated fucoidan) was examined using in-vitro anticoagulant systems. The correlation between chemical variations within the fucoidan group and anticoagulant activity was determined. The in-vitro anticoagulant properties of fucoidan and its derivatives were determined by measuring activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT), and thrombin time (TT). The results indicate anticoagulant activity in all samples using APTT and TT assays; however, only the fucoidan derivatives affected the PT assay. Thus, the fucoidan derivatives were able to inhibit both intrinsic and extrinsic blood coagulants. Fucoidan (FPS) and its derivatives presented better anticoagulant activity than low molecular weight fucoidan (DFPS) and its derivatives, suggesting that molecular weight and proper conformation are contributing factors for anticoagulant activity of polysaccharides. Amino groups have a positive charge and can thus change the charge density of fucoidan. Accordingly, among the tested samples, aminated fucoidan (NF) was the most active reflecting the importance of charge density for anticoagulant activity. Available data obtained using in-vitro models suggest that the sulfate content, sulfate/total-sugar ratio, molecular weight, and the substituted group of fucoidan are important factors for anticoagulant activity but that the influence of sulfate, phosphate and amino groups on anticoagulant activity was different.

  11. Anticoagulation in Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Yousif; YH Lip, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) are at increased thromboembolic risk, and they suffer more severe strokes with worse outcomes. Most thromboembolic complications of AF are eminently preventable with oral anticoagulation, and the increasing numbers of AF patients mean antithrombotic therapy is the most crucial management aspect of this common arrhythmia. Despite the proven efficacy of warfarin, a string of limitations have meant that it is underused by physicians and patients alike. This...

  12. Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Steinberg, Benjamin A; Piccini, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke, which is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The use of oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation at moderate or high risk of stroke, estimated by established criteria, improves outcomes. However, to ensure that the benefits exceed the risks of bleeding, appropriate patient selection is essential. Vitamin K antagonism has been the mainstay of treatment; however, newer drugs with novel mechanisms are also availabl...

  13. Ferric citrate controls phosphorus and delivers iron in patients on dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Julia B; Sika, Mohammed; Koury, Mark J; Chuang, Peale; Schulman, Gerald; Smith, Mark T; Whittier, Frederick C; Linfert, Douglas R; Galphin, Claude M; Athreya, Balaji P; Nossuli, A Kaldun Kaldun; Chang, Ingrid J; Blumenthal, Samuel S; Manley, John; Zeig, Steven; Kant, Kotagal S; Olivero, Juan Jose; Greene, Tom; Dwyer, Jamie P

    2015-02-01

    Patients on dialysis require phosphorus binders to prevent hyperphosphatemia and are iron deficient. We studied ferric citrate as a phosphorus binder and iron source. In this sequential, randomized trial, 441 subjects on dialysis were randomized to ferric citrate or active control in a 52-week active control period followed by a 4-week placebo control period, in which subjects on ferric citrate who completed the active control period were rerandomized to ferric citrate or placebo. The primary analysis compared the mean change in phosphorus between ferric citrate and placebo during the placebo control period. A sequential gatekeeping strategy controlled study-wise type 1 error for serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, and intravenous iron and erythropoietin-stimulating agent usage as prespecified secondary outcomes in the active control period. Ferric citrate controlled phosphorus compared with placebo, with a mean treatment difference of -2.2±0.2 mg/dl (mean±SEM) (P<0.001). Active control period phosphorus was similar between ferric citrate and active control, with comparable safety profiles. Subjects on ferric citrate achieved higher mean iron parameters (ferritin=899±488 ng/ml [mean±SD]; transferrin saturation=39%±17%) versus subjects on active control (ferritin=628±367 ng/ml [mean±SD]; transferrin saturation=30%±12%; P<0.001 for both). Subjects on ferric citrate received less intravenous elemental iron (median=12.95 mg/wk ferric citrate; 26.88 mg/wk active control; P<0.001) and less erythropoietin-stimulating agent (median epoetin-equivalent units per week: 5306 units/wk ferric citrate; 6951 units/wk active control; P=0.04). Hemoglobin levels were statistically higher on ferric citrate. Thus, ferric citrate is an efficacious and safe phosphate binder that increases iron stores and reduces intravenous iron and erythropoietin-stimulating agent use while maintaining hemoglobin. PMID:25060056

  14. Citrate-Stabilized Gold Nanorods

    OpenAIRE

    Mehtala, Jonathan G; Zemlyanov, Dmitry Y.; Max, Joann P.; Kadasala, Naveen; Zhao, Shou; Wei, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Stable aqueous dispersions of citrate-stabilized gold nanorods (cit-GNRs) have been prepared in scalable fashion by surfactant exchange from cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)-stabilized GNRs, using polystyrenesulfonate (PSS) as a detergent. The surfactant exchange process was monitored by infrared spectroscopy, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The latter established the quantitative displacement of CTAB (by PSS) and of PSS (by citrate)....

  15. Comparing new anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, James M

    2012-12-01

    For years, the pharmaceutical industry has been trying to find a safe and effective drug to replace warfarin. Although warfarin is an effective anticoagulant, its pharmacology, adverse effects, and risk profiles dictate that patients taking this medication must be monitored judiciously. The US Food and Drug Administration has approved two drugs for commercial use, dabigatran and rivaroxaban, that will compete directly with warfarin for use in specific indications. Because of direct marketing to patients, physicians are being asked to comment on these new medications. This brief review illustrates the data available for the two new drugs when compared to warfarin for the specified indications. For some patients, these drugs may be highly beneficial and offer an excellent alternative to warfarin. For others, warfarin may still be the preferred drug. PMID:23211502

  16. Characterization of citrate utilization in Corynebacterium glutamicum by transcriptome and proteome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polen, Tino; Schluesener, Daniela; Poetsch, Ansgar; Bott, Michael; Wendisch, Volker F

    2007-08-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum grows aerobically on a variety of carbohydrates and organic acids as single or combined sources of carbon and energy. To characterize the citrate utilization in C. glutamicum on a genomewide scale, a comparative analysis was carried out by combining transcriptome and proteome analysis. In cells grown on citrate, transcriptome analysis revealed highest expression changes for two different citrate-uptake systems encoded by citM and tctCBA, whereas genes encoding uptake systems for the glucose- (ptsG), sucrose- (ptsS) and fructose- (ptsF) specific PTS components and permeases for gluconate (gntP) and glutamate (gluC) displayed decreased mRNA levels in citrate-grown cells. This pattern was also observed when cells grown in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium plus citrate were compared with cells grown in LB medium, indicating some kind of catabolite repression. Genes encoding enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (aconitase, succinyl-CoA synthetase, succinate dehydrogenase and fumarase), malic enzyme, PEP carboxykinase, gluconeogenic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and ATP synthase displayed increased expression in cells grown on citrate. Accordingly, proteome analysis revealed elevated protein levels of these enzymes and showed a good correlation with the mRNA levels. In conclusion, this study revealed the citrate stimulon in C. glutamicum and the regulated central metabolic genes when grown on citrate. PMID:17559405

  17. Enhancement of Aminoacylase Activity by Sodium Citrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于范利; 曹志方; 李森; 周海梦

    2001-01-01

    Kidney and other tissues of animals and humans have a high concentration of citrate which is an important intermediate substance in the citrate cycle. Citrate may play an important physiological role in metabolism. In this paper, we studied the interaction of the sodium salt of citrate with aminoacylase which is an important enzyme in metabolism and found sodium citrate can enhance the activity of aminoacylase. The maximum enzyme activity induced by sodium citrate increased approximately 3 folds over the enzyme activity without sodium citrate. The initial reaction rates (Ⅴ) for different concentrations of sodium citrate were obtained, showing that sodium citrate is a non-competitive activator. The result of the ANS binding fluorescence measurements for aminoacylase indicated that increasing sodium citrate concentrations markedly increased the ANS binding fluorescence with a blue shift of the emission spectra peak. This suggests the formation of more hydrophobic regions. Aggregates formed quickly when aminoacylase was incubated with sodium citrate (0.3 mol/L) and guanidinium chloride (0- 3. 5 mol/L). Aminoacylase lost enzyme activity in the guanidinium chloride more quickly in the presence of sodium citrate than in the absence of sodium citrate. The intrinsic fluorescence emission intensity decreased more quickly and the red shift of the emission spectra peak was larger than that without sodium citrate.

  18. Influence of the sample anticoagulant on the measurements of impedance aggregometry in cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Solomon

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Cristina Solomon1, Michael Winterhalter1, Isabel Gilde1, Ludwig Hoy2, Andreas Calatzis3, Niels Rahe-Meyer11Department of Anesthesiology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany; 2Institute for Biometry, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany; 3Department Hemostasis Transfusion Medicine, University Hospital Munich, Munich, GermanyBackground: The standard method of assessment of platelet function is represented by light transmission aggregometry (LTA, performed in citrated platelet-rich plasma (PRP. With LTA, decrease and subsequent post-cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB recovery of platelet function have been reported during cardiac surgery. Multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA may be used as point-of-care method to monitor perioperative changes in platelet function. Since MEA assesses macroaggregation which is influenced by the plasmatic levels of unbound calcium, citrate may be inadequate as anticoagulant for MEA. We used citrate and heparin for MEA samples, to see with which anticoagulant the intraoperative decrease and postoperative recovery in platelet function previously described with other aggregometric methods in cardiac surgery may be observed with MEA.Methods: Blood was obtained from 60 patients undergoing routine cardiac surgery and the samples were collected in standard tubes containing unfractionated heparin (50 U/mL or trisodium citrate (3.2%. The samples were obtained before CPB, at 30 minutes on CPB, end of CPB and on the first postoperative day. MEA was performed using the Multiplate® analyzer. Collagen (COLtest, 100 μg/mL and TRAP-6 (thrombin receptor activating peptide, TRAPtest, 1mM/mL were used as aggregation agonists.Results: Platelet aggregometric response decreased significantly during CPB. Platelet aggregation assessed using TRAP-6 as agonist on heparinized blood significantly correlated with the duration of CPB (r = −0.41, p = 0.001, 2-tailed Pearson test. The aggregometric analysis performed on the first

  19. Anticoagulation Considerations for Travel to High Altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2015-09-01

    DeLoughery, Thomas G. Anticoagulation considerations for travel to high altitude. High Alt Med Biol 16:181-185, 2015.-An increasing percentage of the population are on anticoagulation medicine for clinical reasons ranging from stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation to long term prevention of deep venous thrombosis. In recent years, several new direct oral anticoagulants have entered the market. The key questions that should be kept in mind when approaching a potential traveler on anticoagulation are: 1) why is the patient on anticoagulation? 2) do they need to stay on anticoagulation? 3) what are the choices for their anticoagulation? 4) will there be any drug interactions with medications needed for travel? and 5) how will they monitor their anticoagulation while traveling? Knowing the answers to these questions then can allow for proper counseling and planning for the anticoagulated traveler's trip. PMID:26186419

  20. UPLC-ESI-QTOF/MS and multivariate data analysis for blood plasma and serum metabolomics: effect of experimental artefacts and anticoagulant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barri, Thaer; Dragsted, Lars Ove

    2013-01-01

    agents, e.g. heparin, EDTA and citrate. In the present study, we looked into metabolite and other differences in matched serum and plasma samples and different plasma preparations by using untargeted UPLC-ESI-QTOF/MS profiling and multivariate data analysis (PCA and OPLS-DA). Metabolite differences...... between serum and plasma samples were mainly related to small peptides reflecting presence or absence of coagulation. Only subtle metabolite differences between the different plasma preparations were noticed, which were primarily related to ion suppression or enhancement caused by citrate and EDTA...... anticoagulants. For the first time, we also report that anticoagulant counter cation (Na+ or K+) in Na-citrate and K-EDTA plasma can make some metabolites more dominant in ESI-MS. Polymeric material residues originating from blood collection tubes for serum preparation were observed only in serum samples...

  1. Anticoagulation in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jeffrey C; Pugliese, Steven C; Fox, Daniel L; Badesch, David B

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by molecular and pathologic alteration to the pulmonary circulation, resulting in increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular failure, and eventual death. Pharmacologic treatment of PAH consists of use of a multitude of pulmonary vasodilators, sometimes in combination. PAH has been associated with increased thrombosis and disrupted coagulation and fibrinolysis, making anticoagulation an attractive and frequently employed therapeutic modality. Observational studies have provided some insight into the therapeutic potential of anticoagulation in idiopathic PAH, but there is a distinct lack of well-controlled prospective trials. Due to the conflicting evidence, there is a large amount of heterogeneity in the application of therapeutic anticoagulation in PAH and further well-controlled prospective trials are needed to clarify its role in treating PAH. PMID:27137522

  2. Regulatory Citrate Lyase Mutants of Salmonella typhimurium

    OpenAIRE

    Kulla, Hans G.

    1983-01-01

    Citrate lyase, the key enzyme of anaerobic citrate catabolism, could not be deleted from Salmonella typhimurium. The only class of mutants found had a mode of covalent regulation that strongly resembled the Escherichia coli system: citrate lyase was only active, i.e., acetylated, when a cosubstrate was present.

  3. Regulatory citrate lyase mutants of Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulla, H G

    1983-01-01

    Citrate lyase, the key enzyme of anaerobic citrate catabolism, could not be deleted from Salmonella typhimurium. The only class of mutants found had a mode of covalent regulation that strongly resembled the Escherichia coli system: citrate lyase was only active, i.e., acetylated, when a cosubstrate was present. PMID:6336740

  4. 21 CFR 582.5449 - Manganese citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese citrate. 582.5449 Section 582.5449 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5449 Manganese citrate. (a) Product. Manganese citrate. (b) Conditions of use....

  5. 21 CFR 184.1449 - Manganese citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Manganese citrate. 184.1449 Section 184.1449 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1449 Manganese citrate. (a) Manganese citrate (Mn3(C6H5O7)2, CAS... manganese carbonate from manganese sulfate and sodium carbonate solutions. The filtered and...

  6. Coagulant and anticoagulant activities of Bothrops lanceolatus (Fer de lance) venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lôbo de Araújo, A; Kamiguti, A; Bon, C

    2001-01-01

    Bothrops lanceolatus venom contains caseinolytic, phospholipase, esterase and haemorrhagic activities. We have investigated the coagulant and anticoagulant actions of B. lanceolatus venom on human citrated plasma and on purified plasma components. Although B. lanceolatus venom up to 50 microg/ml was unable to clot citrated plasma, at concentrations > or = 5 microg/ml the venom dose-dependently clotted purified human fibrinogen, indicating the presence of a thrombin-like enzyme. Human plasma (final concentration > or = 12.5%) dose-dependently inhibited the venom-induced fibrinogen clotting. This finding suggested that endogenous plasma protease inhibitors can affect the venom's action on fibrinogen. To investigate this possibility, B. lanceolatus venom was incubated with different plasma protease inhibitors and the activity on fibrinogen tested. alpha(2)-Macroglobulin and alpha(1)-antitrypsin did not interfere with the coagulant activity of the venom whereas the antithrombin-III/heparin complex partially inhibited this activity. A non-toxic, acidic phospholipase A(2) purified from B. lanceolatus venom prolonged the activated partial thromboplastin time in human plasma from 39.7+/-0.5 s (control with saline) to 60.2+/-0.9 s with 50 microg of PLA(2) (p<0.001), suggesting an anticoagulant activity associated with this enzyme. This anticoagulant activity may account for some of the effects of the venom on blood coagulation. PMID:10978756

  7. Anticoagulation in Older Adults with Multimorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Anna L; Fang, Margaret C

    2016-05-01

    The number of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) who are of advanced age or have multiple comorbidities is expected to increase substantially. Older patients with AF generally gain a net benefit from anticoagulation. Guidelines typically recommend anticoagulation. There are multiple challenges in the safe use of anticoagulation in frail patients, including bleeding risk, monitoring and adherence, and polypharmacy. Although there are options for chronic oral anticoagulation, clinicians must understand the unique advantages and disadvantages of these medications when developing a management plan. This article reviews issues surrounding the appropriate use and selection of anticoagulants in complex older patients with AF. PMID:27113150

  8. Field evaluation of water or citrate soluble phosphorus in modified phosphate rocks for soybean Avaliação agronômica do fósforo solúvel em água ou citrato de fosfatos de rocha acidulados para a soja

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Ignácio Prochnow

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Ten P fertilizers were collected (commercial fertilizers or synthesized (experimental sources in order to obtain single superphosphates varying in water and citrate solubility. A standard source of P was also produced by crystallization of the water-soluble fraction of a triple superphosphate. Eleven P sources were band applied to a medium textured Xanthic Hapludox, in Bahia, Brazil (low content of resin-extractable P at a rate of 80 kg ha-1 of NAC + H2O (neutral ammonium citrate plus water soluble P2O5, with soybean as the crop which was grown to maturity. A check plot (control was included in the study. Three of the P sources [single superphosphate produced from Araxa phosphate rock (PR, low-grade single superphosphate produced from Lagamar PR and the standard source of P] were also applied at rates to provide 40 and 120 kg ha-1 of NAC + H2O soluble P2O5. Yield of soybean was evaluated by analysis of variance with mean comparison performed utilizing LSD lines, considering the P sources applied at a rate of 80 kg ha-1 of P2O5 + control. Regression procedures were used to study the relation between yield of soybean and rates of P2O5. The fertilizers tested performed equally well as a source of P for soybean. The level of water-soluble P did not influence fertilizer performance.Dez fontes de P foram coletadas em unidades revendedoras de fertilizantes comerciais ou produzidas em laboratório de tal forma a obter superfosfatos simples com variabilidade em água e citrato neutro de amônio + água (CNA + H2O. Utilizou-se como fonte padrão de fósforo a fração solubilizada, filtrada e cristalizada de um superfosfato triplo. As onze fontes de P foram aplicadas nas linhas de semeadura de soja de um Xanthic Hapludox textura média, localizado no Município de Barreiras, Bahia (baixo teor de fósforo resina na dose de 80 kg ha-1 de P2O5 solúvel em CNA + H2O. Três das fontes (superfosfatos simples produzido a partir da rocha fosfática de Araxá e

  9. Comparison of sodium citrate with defibrination for the processing of blood for tsetse mass-rearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Various experimental bioassays comparing the use of sodium citrated bovine blood to defibrinated bovine blood were performed in order to reach an alternative anticoagulant procedure. Defibrination is the standard process to obtain blood, which is the only source of nutrients for tsetse flies. This process is time consuming, requires special equipment, trained personnel and could be an extra source of blood contamination. For the blood collection, special care was taken to rule out biological bias by using the same donor animal for both citrated and defibrinated collections. Contamination was avoided by sterile collection from the jugular vein. As the university owns these animals, their medical history is known and could be inspected prior to collection in order to rule out any recent antibiotic treatments, which could influence the results of the experiment. Both blood treatments were transported under refrigeration, irradiated in a Gammacell 220 Co60 irradiator with 1 kGy, stored at -20 deg. C and bacteriologically tested (nutrient agar plate test). All flies were kept under standard condition of temperature (24.5 ± 0.5 deg. C) and relative humidity (75 ± 5%). For the bioassays, flies from the Glossina pallidipes colony, Entomology Unit, Seibersdorf, were used. The flies were divided into 2 groups of males and females in a 1:4 ratio and each group was composed of 4 cages. The first experiment lasted for 37 days and the second 93 days. One group received defibrinated bovine blood and the other group received citrated bovine blood (0.02M final concentration). Survival, mortality and fecundity rates of the flies and pupal size category and weight were recorded for both groups and were analysed and compared. The results showed that there was no significant difference between the two treatments for survival, mortality and fecundity and that the pupal size category and weight for the citrated group had slightly better results than the defibrinated group

  10. Aluminum resistance in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) involves induction and maintenance of citrate exudation from root apices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Andrés Felipe; Rao, Idupulapati Madhusudana; Braun, Hans-Peter; Horst, Walter Johannes

    2010-02-01

    Two common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genotypes differing in aluminum (Al) resistance, Quimbaya (Al-resistant) and VAX-1 (Al-sensitive) were grown in hydroponics for up to 25 h with or without Al, and several parameters related to the exudation of organic acids anions from the root apex were investigated. Al treatment enhanced the exudation of citrate from the root tips of both genotypes. However, its dynamic offers the most consistent relationship between Al-induced inhibition of root elongation and Al accumulation in and exclusion from the root apices. Initially, in both genotypes the short-term (4 h) Al-injury period was characterized by the absence of citrate efflux independent of the citrate content of the root apices, and reduction of cytosolic turnover of citrate conferred by a reduced Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-isocitrate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.42) activity. Transient recovery from initial Al stress (4-12 h) was found to be dependent mainly on the capacity to utilize internal citrate pools (Al-resistant genotype Quimbaya) or enhanced citrate synthesis [increased activities of NAD-malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.37) and ATP-phosphofructokinase (EC 2.7.1.11) in Al-sensitive VAX-1]. Sustained recovery from Al stress through citrate exudation in genotype Quimbaya after 24 h Al treatment relied on restoring the internal citrate pool and the constitutive high activity of citrate synthase (CS) (EC 4.1.3.7) fuelled by high phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (EC 4.1.1.31) activity. In the Al-sensitive genotype VAX-1 the citrate exudation and thus Al exclusion and root elongation could not be maintained coinciding with an exhaustion of the internal citrate pool and decreased CS activity. PMID:20053183

  11. Evaluation of anticoagulant control in a pharmacist operated anticoagulant clinic.

    OpenAIRE

    Radley, A S; Hall, J; Farrow, M.; Carey, P J

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To compare the quality of outpatient anticoagulant control before and after the transfer of dosing responsibility to designated trained pharmacists from rotating junior medical staff. METHODS--All International Normalised Ratio (INR) values for an eight month period either side of the staff changeover were assessed for precision of therapeutic control according to described standards. Allowing for patient associated effects, observed and expected frequencies of "successful" control for ...

  12. Anticoagulant surface of 316 L stainless steel modified by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Weihua; Zhu, Jian; Cheng, Zhenping; Zhang, Zhengbiao; Zhu, Xiulin

    2011-05-01

    Polished 316 L stainless steel (SS) was first treated with air plasma to enhance surface hydrophilicity and was subsequently allowed to react with 2-(4-chlorosulfonylphenyl)ethyltrimethoxysilane to introduce an atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiator. Accordingly, the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization of polyethylene glycol methacrylate (PEGMA) was carried out on the surface of the modified SS. The grafting progress was monitored by water contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The polymer thickness as a function different polymerization times was characterized using a step profiler. The anticoagulative properties of the PEGMA modified SS surface were investigated. The results showed enhanced anticoagulative to acid-citrate-dextrose (ACD) blood after grafting PEGMA on the SS surface. PMID:21528878

  13. The challenges of lupus anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chighizola, Cecilia Beatrice; Raschi, Elena; Banzato, Alessandra; Borghi, Maria Orietta; Pengo, Vittorio; Meroni, Pier Luigi

    2016-01-01

    The term "lupus anticoagulant" (LA) refers to a heterogeneous group of immunoglobulins behaving as acquired in vitro inhibitors of coagulation. These antibodies, namely anti-β2GPI and anti-prothrombin antibodies, induce the in vitro elongation of clotting time interfering with phospholipid-dependent coagulation cofactors. Positive LA is associated with thrombosis and pregnancy complications, providing one of the three laboratory criteria for the classification of the anti-phospholipid syndrome. LA is the strongest predictor of clinical events, especially when associated with other anti-phospholipid antibodies. Much more controversial is the risk conveyed by isolated and weak LA. LA detection is technically laborious, envisaging screening, mixing and confirming tests. Hopefully critical issues in LA detection, such as the interference of anticoagulants, will be overcome, in the next future. PMID:26789237

  14. Protein source and choice of anticoagulant decisively affect nanoparticle protein corona and cellular uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöttler, S.; Klein, Katja; Landfester, K.; Mailänder, V.

    2016-03-01

    Protein adsorption on nanoparticles has been a focus of the field of nanocarrier research in the past few years and more and more papers are dealing with increasingly detailed lists of proteins adsorbed to a plethora of nanocarriers. While there is an urgent need to understand the influence of this protein corona on nanocarriers' interactions with cells the strong impact of the protein source on corona formation and the consequence for interaction with different cell types are factors that are regularly neglected, but should be taken into account for a meaningful analysis. In this study, the importance of the choice of protein source used for in vitro protein corona analysis is concisely investigated. Major and decisive differences in cellular uptake of a polystyrene nanoparticle incubated in fetal bovine serum, human serum, human citrate and heparin plasma are reported. Furthermore, the protein compositions are determined for coronas formed in the respective incubation media. A strong influence of heparin, which is used as an anticoagulant for plasma generation, on cell interaction is demonstrated. While heparin enhances the uptake into macrophages, it prevents internalization into HeLa cells. Taken together we can give the recommendation that human plasma anticoagulated with citrate seems to give the most relevant results for in vitro studies of nanoparticle uptake.Protein adsorption on nanoparticles has been a focus of the field of nanocarrier research in the past few years and more and more papers are dealing with increasingly detailed lists of proteins adsorbed to a plethora of nanocarriers. While there is an urgent need to understand the influence of this protein corona on nanocarriers' interactions with cells the strong impact of the protein source on corona formation and the consequence for interaction with different cell types are factors that are regularly neglected, but should be taken into account for a meaningful analysis. In this study, the importance

  15. Effects of EDTA and Sodium Citrate on hormone measurements by fluorometric (FIA and immunofluorometric (IFMA methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lando Valeria

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Measurements of hormonal concentrations by immunoassays using fluorescent tracer substance (Eu3+ are susceptible to the action of chemical agents that may cause alterations in its original structure. Our goal was to verify the effect of two types of anticoagulants in the hormone assays performed by fluorometric (FIA or immunofluorometric (IFMA methods. Methods Blood samples were obtained from 30 outpatients and were drawn in EDTA, sodium citrate, and serum separation Vacutainer®Blood Collection Tubes. Samples were analyzed in automatized equipment AutoDelfia™ (Perkin Elmer Brazil, Wallac, Finland for the following hormones: Luteinizing hormone (LH, Follicle stimulating homone (FSH, prolactin (PRL, growth hormone (GH, Sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH, insulin, C peptide, total T3, total T4, free T4, estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, and cortisol. Statistical analysis was carried out by Kruskal-Wallis method and Dunn's test. Results No significant differences were seen between samples for LH, FSH, PRL and free T4. Results from GH, TSH, insulin, C peptide, SHBG, total T3, total T4, estradiol, testosterone, cortisol, and progesterone were significant different between serum and EDTA-treated samples groups. Differences were also identified between serum and sodium citrate-treated samples in the analysis for TSH, insulin, total T3, estradiol, testosterone and progesterone. Conclusions We conclude that the hormonal analysis carried through by FIA or IFMA are susceptible to the effects of anticoagulants in the biological material collected that vary depending on the type of assay.

  16. Clinical and biochemical studies on the mechanism of gallium-67 citrate accumulation in tumor tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of 67Ga scintigraphies, taken at Kobe University Hospital and Tenri Hospital from 1970 to 1974, were investigated statistically and histologically. Positive imaging of the lesion was obtained in 87% of 196 cases of primary lung cancer; 94%, 83% and 82% were positive in squamous cell carcinoma, undifferentiated carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma. In a comparative study on inflammatory lesions such as pneumonia or lung abcess, positive imaging was also obtained frequently during the active state but no positive image was noted in the inactive state. Since cyclic AMP is reported to play a role as a potent growth regulator, the effect of cyclic AMP as well as that of theophylline on 67Ga citrate binding in vitro was examined using a Millipore filter. Although cyclic AMP released 67Ga citrate bound to the cytosols of a rat liver, theophylline stimulated 67Ga citrate binding. In order to prove the working hypothesis that cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase binds 67Ga citrate, this enzyme was purified to a specific activity of 2330 mU/mg by an elaborate method such as ammonium sulfate treatment (30 - 50%) and stepwise Hydroxyapatite fractionation. The specific radioactivity of 67Ga citrate bound to this enzyme preparation (500 mM potassium phosphate buffer, pH 7.5) was 70-fold greater than that of transferrin and 240-fold more than that of cyclic AMP-binding protein purified as 50 mM potassium phosphate buffer, pH 7.5 eluted through Hydroxyapatite. It was also confirmed that the lysosome purified from the more rapidly growing hepatoma (7316 A) had a radioactivity two-fold higher than that of the slower growing hepatoma (7794 A) using an in vitro 67Ga citrate binding method. (auth.)

  17. Anticoagulant Medicine: Potential for Drug-Food Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AerobiKa® Cardiology Medications Anticoagulant Medicine Anticoagulants and Drug-Food Interactions COPD Medications Bronchodilators Anti-Inflammatories Antibiotics Managing Your Medications Devices ...

  18. Bio-inspired citrate functionalized apatite coating on rapid prototyped titanium scaffold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Designed and reproducible porous titanium scaffolds were produced. • Hydrophilic nanoporous film was built on scaffold. • Apatite coating was deposited on scaffold under the modulation of citrate ions. • Citrate ions could affect CO32− incorporation in apatite coatings. - Abstract: Scaffold functionalized with appropriate osteogenic coatings can significantly improve implant-bone response. In this study, with designed model and optimized manufacture parameters, reproducible and precise titanium scaffolds were produced. Reconstructed three-dimensional image and sectional structure of the scaffold were examined by micro-computed tomography and relative software. Alkali treatment was carried out on these manufactured porous scaffolds to produce nanoporous hydrophilic film. After 6 days deposition in simulated body fluid (SBF) containing sodium citrate (SC-SBF), plate-like amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) coating was deposited on scaffold surface. Ultrasonication tests qualitatively indicated an enhanced adhesion force of apatite coatings deposited in SC-SBF compared to that deposited in SBF. And the effect of citrate ions on the CO32− incorporation rate in apatite coating was quantitatively examined by bending vibration of CO32− at ∼874 cm−1. Results indicated the highest carbonate content was obtained at the citrate ion concentration of 6 × 10−5 mol/L in SC-SBF. These three-dimensional porous titanium-apatite hybrid scaffolds are expected to find application in bone tissue regeneration

  19. Phosphate sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Bergwitz, Clemens; Jüppner, Harald

    2011-01-01

    Human phosphate homeostasis is regulated at the level of intestinal absorption of phosphate from the diet, release of phosphate through bone resorption, and renal phosphate excretion and involves the actions of parathyroid hormone (PTH), 1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D (1,25-(OH)2-D), and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) to maintain circulating phosphate levels within a narrow normal range, which is essential for numerous cellular functions, for the growth of tissues and for bone mineralization. ...

  20. Protein source and choice of anticoagulant decisively affect nanoparticle protein corona and cellular uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöttler, S; Klein, Katja; Landfester, K; Mailänder, V

    2016-03-14

    Protein adsorption on nanoparticles has been a focus of the field of nanocarrier research in the past few years and more and more papers are dealing with increasingly detailed lists of proteins adsorbed to a plethora of nanocarriers. While there is an urgent need to understand the influence of this protein corona on nanocarriers' interactions with cells the strong impact of the protein source on corona formation and the consequence for interaction with different cell types are factors that are regularly neglected, but should be taken into account for a meaningful analysis. In this study, the importance of the choice of protein source used for in vitro protein corona analysis is concisely investigated. Major and decisive differences in cellular uptake of a polystyrene nanoparticle incubated in fetal bovine serum, human serum, human citrate and heparin plasma are reported. Furthermore, the protein compositions are determined for coronas formed in the respective incubation media. A strong influence of heparin, which is used as an anticoagulant for plasma generation, on cell interaction is demonstrated. While heparin enhances the uptake into macrophages, it prevents internalization into HeLa cells. Taken together we can give the recommendation that human plasma anticoagulated with citrate seems to give the most relevant results for in vitro studies of nanoparticle uptake. PMID:26804616

  1. To anticoagulate or not to anticoagulate patients with cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, S P

    2001-11-01

    The current published literature does not indicate whether the long-term effect of anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy contributes to mortality reduction in patients with LV dysfunction. Evaluating patients for personal risk for emboli or for ischemic coronary artery events may influence the choice of therapies. As more is learned about the mechanisms of drug effects in different populations, physicians may be better able to direct appropriate therapies. Until that time, one must weigh the risks and benefits of each drug alone and in combination. In NYHA class IV patients, the risk for thrombosis owing to spontaneous clotting increases as does the adverse potential of warfarin and the adverse effects of inhibiting prostaglandin mediated vasodilation by aspirin. In NYHA class I and II patients, the quality of life and convenience of multidrug therapy is weighed against the devastating effect of a major stroke. In less symptomatic patients, the long-term risk for acute coronary events may be higher than previously identified. This would suggest that all patients with depressed LV function should be on some type of antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy. The current WATCH study will provide much needed information about the outcome differences between these agents. Conclusions based on available data include the following: Heart failure is increasing in incidence and prevalence. Atherosclerotic disease is an important causative factor for the development of heart failure or may be a comorbid condition in these patients. There is a measurable rate of stroke in patients with heart failure, although the cause of death in large studies is more often owing to sudden death or progressive heart failure. Sudden death may be from new ischemic events, asystole, or from ventricular tachyarrhythmias. In patients with heart failure, not all strokes are cardioembolic in origin. The benefits and risks of warfarin may be increased as the EF worsens or heart failure functional class

  2. Anticoagulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... even if it is not listed below. Aspirin Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol, Excedrin) Ibuprofen (e.g., Motrin, ... skin or eyes (jaundice) Rare side effects: Headache Dizziness Shortness of breath Mouth sores or bleeding gums ...

  3. Optical profiling of anticoagulation status (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tshikudi, Diane M.; Tripathi, Markandey M.; Hajjarian, Zeinab; Nadkarni, Seemantini K.

    2016-02-01

    Defective blood coagulation resulting from excessive procoagulant activity often leads to thrombotic disorders such as stroke and myocardial infarction. A variety of oral and injectable anticoagulant drugs are prescribed to prevent or treat life-threatening thrombosis. However, due to bleeding complications often associated with anticoagulant treatment, routine monitoring and accurate dosing of anticoagulant therapy is imperative. We have developed Optical thromboelastography (OTEG), a non-contact approach that utilizes a drop of whole blood to measure blood coagulation status in patients. Here, we demonstrate the capability of OTEG for rapidly monitoring anticoagulation in whole blood samples. OTEG monitors coagulation status by assessing changes in blood viscosity from temporal intensity fluctuations of laser speckle patterns during clotting. In OTEG a blood drop is illuminated with coherent light and the blood viscosity is measured from the speckle intensity autocorrelation curve, g2 (t). The metrics, clotting time (R+k), clot progression (angle) and maximum clot stiffness (MA) are then extracted. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the accuracy of OTEG in assessing anticoagulation status of common anticoagulants including heparin, argatroban and rivaroxaban status. A dose-dependent prolongation of R+k was observed in anticoagulated blood, which closely corresponded with standard-reference Thromboelastography (TEG) (r 0.87-0.99, P>0.01 for all cases). OTEG angle was unaltered by anticoagulation whereas TEG angle presented a dose-dependent diminution probably linked to clot rupture. In both OTEG and TEG, MA was unaffected by heparin, argatroban or rivaroxaban. We conclude that OTEG can accurately monitor anticoagulation status following treatment, potentially providing a powerful tool for routine monitoring of patients in the doctor's office or in the home setting.

  4. [Direct oral anticoagulant associated bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godier, A; Martin, A-C; Rosencher, N; Susen, S

    2016-07-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) are recommended for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. However, they are associated with hemorrhagic complications. Management of DOAC-induced bleeding remains challenging. Activated or non-activated prothrombin concentrates are proposed, although their efficacy to reverse DOAC is uncertain. Therapeutic options also include antidotes: idarucizumab, antidote for dabigatran, has been approved for use whereas andexanet alpha, antidote for anti-Xa agents, and aripazine, antidote for all DOAC, are under development. Other options include hemodialysis for the treatment of dabigatran-associated bleeding and administration of oral charcoal if recent DOAC ingestion. DOAC plasma concentration measurement is necessary to guide DOAC reversal. We propose an update on DOAC-associated bleeding, integrating the availability of dabigatran antidote and the critical place of DOAC concentration measurements. PMID:27297642

  5. Anaphylaxis related to fentanyl citrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Singh Tomar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaphylaxis is a fulminant, unexpected, immunoglobulin E-mediated allergic reaction that can be triggered by multiple agents. Common causative agents include neuromuscular blocking drugs, latex, antibiotics, colloids, hypnotics, and opioids. Fentanyl citrate, however, is an extremely unusual cause of anaphylaxis. Pulmonary edema, although uncommon in anaphylaxis, can be a prominent feature, as was in one of the patient. An adverse drug reaction is a noxious or unintended reaction to a drug that is administered in standard doses by the proper route for the purpose of prophylaxis, diagnosis, or treatment. Reactions are classified into two major subtypes: type A, which are dose dependent and predictable; and type B, which are not dose dependent and unpredictable. Unpredictable reactions include immune (allergic or no immune drug hypersensitivity reactions and are related to genetic susceptibilities or undefined mechanisms (formally called idiosyncratic and intolerance reactions. A drug allergy is always associated with an immune mechanism for which evidence of drug-specific antibodies or activated T lymphocytes can be shown. In the last few years, many novel drugs have entered clinical practice (i.e., biologic agents generating novel patterns of drug hypersensitivity reactions. As old drugs continue to be used, new clinical and biologic techniques enable improvement in the diagnosis of these reactions.

  6. Sodium Phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodium phosphate is used in adults 18 years of age or older to empty the colon (large intestine, bowel) ... view of the walls of the colon. Sodium phosphate is in a class of medications called saline ...

  7. Phosphate salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... levels that are too high, and for preventing kidney stones. They are also taken for treating osteomalacia (often ... But intravenous phosphate salts should not be used. Kidney stones (nephrolithiasis). Taking potassium phosphate by mouth might help ...

  8. Relationship between protein C antigen and anticoagulant activity during oral anticoagulation and in selected disease states.

    OpenAIRE

    Vigano D'Angelo, S; Comp, P C; Esmon, C T; D'Angelo, A.

    1986-01-01

    Protein C is a natural vitamin K-dependent plasma anticoagulant, deficiencies of which have been found in patients with recurrent thrombosis and warfarin-induced skin necrosis. To appreciate more fully the role of protein C in disease states and during oral anticoagulation, a new functional assay for protein C involving adsorption of plasma protein C on a Ca+2-dependent monoclonal antibody, elution, quantitative activation, and assessment of plasma anticoagulant activity, has been developed. ...

  9. Managing hyperphosphatemia in patients with chronic kidney disease on dialysis with ferric citrate: latest evidence and clinical usefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagil, Yoram; Fadem, Stephen Z; Kant, Kotagal S; Bhatt, Udayan; Sika, Mohammed; Lewis, Julia B; Negoi, Dana

    2015-09-01

    Ferric citrate is a novel phosphate binder that allows the simultaneous treatment of hyperphosphatemia and iron deficiency in patients being treated for end-stage renal disease with hemodialysis (HD). Multiple clinical trials in HD patients have uniformly and consistently demonstrated the efficacy of the drug in controlling hyperphosphatemia with a good safety profile, leading the US Food and Drug Administration in 2014 to approve its use for that indication. A concurrent beneficial effect, while using ferric citrate as a phosphate binder, is its salutary effect in HD patients with iron deficiency being treated with an erythropoietin-stimulating agent (ESA) in restoring iron that becomes available for reversing chronic kidney disease (CKD)-related anemia. Ferric citrate has also been shown in several studies to diminish the need for intravenous iron treatment and to reduce the requirement for ESA. Ferric citrate is thus a preferred phosphate binder that helps resolve CKD-related mineral bone disease and iron-deficiency anemia. PMID:26336594

  10. Parenteral anticoagulation in patients with cancer who have no therapeutic or prophylactic indication for anticoagulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A. Akl; S. Gunukula; M. Barba; V.E.D. Yosuico; F.F. van Doormaal; S. Kuipers; S. Middeldorp; H.O. Dickinson; A. Bryant; H. Schuenemann

    2011-01-01

    Background Anticoagulation may improve survival in patients with cancer through an antitumor effect in addition to the perceived antithrombotic effect. Objectives To evaluate the efficacy and safety of parenteral anticoagulants in patients with cancer with no therapeutic or prophylactic indication f

  11. Anticoagulation control in atrial fibrillation patients present to outpatient clinic of cardiology versus anticoagulant clinics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Xin; MA Chang-sheng; LIU Xiao-hui; DONG Jian-zeng; WANG Jun-nan; CHENG Xiao-jing

    2005-01-01

    @@ Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia in clinical practice, which if untreated results in a doubling of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. AF is an independent predictor of stroke, with an annual risk 5 to 6 times higher than patients in sinus rhythm.1 During recent years, several randomised clinical trials conducted by investigators around the world involving 13 843 participants with NVAF have demonstrated convincingly the value of warfarin therapies for stroke prevention in high risk patients.2-8 However, the dose response of warfarin is complex and its activity is easily altered by concurrent medications, food interactions, alcohol and illnesses. Adherence to medical advice and routine monitoring of the international normalized ratio (INR) is important, because low anticoagulant intensity predisposes the patients to thromboembolic complications and high intensity to haemorrhage. Studies suggested that anticoagulant clinics could improve the quality of anticoagulation control,9 and anticoagulant clinics are common in western countries. However, in China, most AF patients taking warfarin usually attend the outpatient clinic of cardiology, while the quality of anticoagulation control is never investigated. We therefore assessed anticoagulation control in the outpatient clinic of cardiology, and the quality of anticoagulation control since the establishment of anticoagulant clinics.

  12. Sodium bicarbonate and sodium citrate: ergogenic aids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requena, Bernardo; Zabala, Mikel; Padial, Paulino; Feriche, Belén

    2005-02-01

    Numerous studies have used exogenous administration of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO(3)) and sodium citrate (Na-citrate) in an attempt to enhance human performance. After ingestion of NaHCO(3) and Na-citrate, two observations have been made: (a) There was great individual variability in the ergogenic benefit reached, which can be attributed to the level of physical conditioning of the subjects and to their tolerance of the buffer substance; and (b) the subjects who had ingested NaHCO(3) and Na-citrate show higher levels of pH, bicarbonate, and lactate ions concentrations in their exercising blood than do the subjects who had ingested the placebo. A majority of the studies have suggested that the ingestion of both substances provides an ergogenic effect due to the establishment and maintenance of an elevated pH level during exercise. However, the exact mechanism by which the ergogenic effects occur has not been demonstrated conclusively. Sodium bicarbonate and Na-citrate seem to be effective in activities with a sufficient duration to generate a difference in the hydrogen ion gradient, characterized by a very high intensity and involving large muscular groups. However, in activities of equally high intensity, but with longer duration, the results obtained have been conflicting and inconclusive. PMID:15705037

  13. Vibrational study of tamoxifen citrate polymorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamberini, M. C.; Baraldi, C.; Tinti, A.; Palazzoli, F.; Ferioli, V.

    2007-09-01

    The trans isomer of ( Z)-2-[ p-(1,2-diphenyl-butenyl)phenoxy]- N, N-dimethyletylamine (tamoxifen) is well known for its endocrine activity as an antiestrogenic agent. Its citrate salt, a widely used pharmaceutical agent, appears in three main polymorphic forms, two of which are well known (I and II) and another form not yet well evidenced. A vibrational study has been conducted for identifying the two known polymorphic forms of tamoxifen citrate (I and II) and for characterising the other form (form III) examined in this study. Other techniques for the characterization of the different polymorphs, such as XRDP, have been used.

  14. Phosphate binders in chronic kidney disease: a systematic review of recent data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floege, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    Hyperphosphatemia is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is treated by dietary measures, dialysis techniques and/or phosphate binders. For the present review PubMed was searched for new publications on phosphate binders appearing between January 2010 and October 2015. This review summarizes the latest information on non-pharmacological measures and their problems in lowering phosphate in CKD patients, effects of phosphate binders on morbidity and mortality, adherence to phosphate binder therapy as well as new information on specific aspects of the various phosphate binders on the market: calcium acetate, calcium carbonate, magnesium-containing phosphate binders, polymeric phosphate binders (sevelamer, bixalomer, colestilan), lanthanum carbonate, ferric citrate, sucroferric oxyhydroxide, aluminum-containing phosphate binders, and new compounds in development. The review also briefly covers the emerging field of drugs targeting intestinal phosphate transporters. PMID:26800972

  15. Energy-dependent inactivation of citrate lyase in Enterobacter aerogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulla, H; Gottschalk, G

    1977-12-01

    Enterobacter aerogenes was grown in continous culture with ammonia as the growth-limiting substrate, and changes in citrate lyase and citrate synthase activities were monitored after growth shifts from anaerobic growth on citrate to aerobic growth on citrate, aerobic growth on glucose, anaerobic growth on glucose, and anaerobic growth on glucose plus nitrate. Citrate lyase was inactivated during aerobic growth on glucose and during anaerobic growth with glucose plus nitrate. Inactivation did not occur during anaerobic growth on glucose, and as a result of the simultaneous presence of citrate lyase and citrate synthase, growth difficulties were observed. Citrate lyase inactivation consisted of deacetylation of the enzyme. The corresponding deacetylase could not be demonstrated in cell extracts, and it is concluded that, as in a number of other inactivations, electron transport to oxygen or nitrate was required for inactivation. PMID:924971

  16. Phosphate salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for children 9-18 years of age. Phosphate salts are POSSIBLY UNSAFE if the amount of phosphate consumed (expressed as phosphorous) exceeds the tolerable upper intake level (UL). The ULs are 3 grams per day for children 1-8 years; and 4 grams per day ...

  17. Excessive anticoagulation with warfarin or phenprocoumon may have multiple causes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meegaard, Peter Martin; Holck, Line H V; Pottegård, Anton;

    2012-01-01

    Excessive anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists is a serious condition with a substantial risk of an adverse outcome. We thus found it of interest to review a large case series to characterize the underlying causes of excessive anticoagulation....

  18. Interrupting Anticoagulation in Patients With Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Yates, Scott W

    2014-01-01

    No agents are approved to reverse the effects of newer anticoagulants used to reduce the risk of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. This review focuses on ways to monitor, interrupt, and reverse such anticoagulation.

  19. Anticoagulant conversion in the elderly: pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nasser, Bassam

    2016-05-01

    The prevalence of medical conditions representing a risk for thromboembolic complications and requiring antithrombotic therapy increases gradually with age. Two cases of fatal noncritical organ bleeding complication that occurred during the conversion period from initial fondaparinux to vitamin K antagonist are presented. An 81-year-old obese female patient (body mass index 43 kg/m(2)) with previous postoperative thrombosis underwent uneventful total knee replacement under spinal anesthesia. She presented with popliteal hematoma during conversion to oral anticoagulant. A 92-year-old female patient (body mass index 33 kg/m(2)) with left lower limb thrombosis was referred to our orthopedics department from her senior citizens' home for right lower limb hematoma and ischemia that occurred during conversion to oral anticoagulant. Thromboembolic and bleeding events in the elderly are real public health problems. Specific guidelines dedicated to this particular population are needed, which will improve the management of anticoagulation and decrease risk of complications. PMID:26547115

  20. Physicochemical action of potassium-magnesium citrate in nephrolithiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, C. Y.; Koenig, K.; Khan, R.; Haynes, S.; Padalino, P.

    1992-01-01

    Effect of potassium-magnesium citrate on urinary biochemistry and crystallization of stone-forming salts was compared with that of potassium citrate at same dose of potassium in five normal subjects and five patients with calcium nephrolithiasis. Compared to the placebo phase, urinary pH rose significantly from 6.06 +/- 0.27 to 6.48 +/- 0.36 (mean +/- SD, p less than 0.0167) during treatment with potassium citrate (50 mEq/day for 7 days) and to 6.68 +/- 0.31 during therapy with potassium-magnesium citrate (containing 49 mEq K, 24.5 mEq Mg, and 73.5 mEq citrate per day). Urinary pH was significantly higher during potassium-magnesium citrate than during potassium citrate therapy. Thus, the amount of undissociated uric acid declined from 118 +/- 61 mg/day during the placebo phase to 68 +/- 54 mg/day during potassium citrate treatment and, more prominently, to 41 +/- 46 mg/day during potassium-magnesium citrate therapy. Urinary magnesium rose significantly from 102 +/- 25 to 146 +/- 37 mg/day during potassium-magnesium citrate therapy but not during potassium citrate therapy. Urinary citrate rose more prominently during potassium-magnesium citrate therapy (to 1027 +/- 478 mg/day from 638 +/- 252 mg/day) than during potassium citrate treatment (to 932 +/- 297 mg/day). Consequently, urinary saturation (activity product) of calcium oxalate declined significantly (from 1.49 x 10(-8) to 1.03 x 10(-8) M2) during potassium-magnesium citrate therapy and marginally (to 1.14 x 10(-8) M2) during potassium citrate therapy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  1. 21 CFR 184.1195 - Calcium citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Food Chemicals Codex, 3d ed. (1981), pp. 49 and 50, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium citrate. 184.1195 Section 184.1195 Food...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1625 - Potassium citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals Codex, 3d ed. (1981), p. 242, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium citrate. 184.1625 Section 184.1625...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1751 - Sodium citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals Codex, 3d ed. (1981), pp. 283-284, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium citrate. 184.1751 Section 184.1751 Food...

  4. 14 N NQR spectrum of sildenafil citrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, David; Singh, Nadia

    2015-04-01

    The 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectrum of sildenafil citrate tablets has been recorded allowing the quadrupole coupling constants and asymmetry parameters of all six unique nitrogen atoms in its structure to be determined. A density function calculation gives results that are largely in agreement with the experimental values.

  5. 14N NQR spectrum of sildenafil citrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectrum of sildenafil citrate tablets has been recorded allowing the quadrupole coupling constants and asymmetry parameters of all six unique nitrogen atoms in its structure to be determined. A density function calculation gives results that are largely in agreement with the experimental values

  6. Pharmacology of anticoagulants used in the treatment of venous thromboembolism

    OpenAIRE

    Nutescu, Edith A.; Burnett, Allison; Fanikos, John; Spinler, Sarah; Wittkowsky, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Anticoagulant drugs are the foundation of therapy for patients with VTE. While effective therapeutic agents, anticoagulants can also result in hemorrhage and other side effects. Thus, anticoagulant therapy selection should be guided by the risks, benefits and pharmacologic characteristics of each agent for each patient. Safe use of anticoagulants requires not only an in-depth knowledge of their pharmacologic properties but also a comprehensive approach to patient management and education. Thi...

  7. Hematometra secondary to anticoagulant rodenticide toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An adult, intact female Australian shepherd presented for frank vaginal bleeding of unknown duration. The only coagulation profile abnormality upon presentation was mild prolongation of the partial thromboplastin time (PTT). The uterus was removed at surgery and contained a large amount of coagulated blood. Clotting profiles were markedly abnormal48 hours postoperatively. Serum analysis was positive for brodifacoum, an anticoagulant rodenticide. Preoperative coagulation was most likely normalized by vitamin K-1 therapy administered prior to presentation. The only manifestation of anticoagulant rodenticide was hematometra. Rodenticide intoxication should be considered in the differential diagnosis list of hematometra or metrorrhagia

  8. Fatal pulmonary hemorrhage after taking anticoagulation medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel P. Hammar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 64-year-old man with extensive diffuse acute lung hemorrhage, presumably as a result of anticoagulation therapy. We evaluated reports in the literature concerning acute exacerbation (acute lung injury of unknown cause in UIP and other forms of fibrotic interstitial pneumonias. We also evaluated autopsy tissue in this case in order to determine the cause of death in this 64-year-old man, who was initially thought to have an asbestos-related disease. Based on the autopsy findings, this man died as a result of anticoagulation therapy; specifically, the use of Xarelto® (rivaroxaban.

  9. [Pharmacologic heterogeneity of new anticoagulants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samamaa, M-M; Conard, J; Flaujac, C; Combe, S; Horellou, M-H

    2011-12-01

    Amongst numerous promising anticoagulant molecules, rivaroxaban (Xarelto(®)), dabigatran (Pradaxa(®)) and apixaban (Eliquis(®)) have been registered outside the USA in the prevention of thromboembolic events in patients undergoing total hip or knee prosthetic replacement. Rivaroxaban however has been granted authorisation by the FDA for the thromboprophylaxis after surgery for total hip or knee surgery. Dabigatran has been granted authorisation by the FDA in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (RE-LY trial) while rivaroxaban is expecting approval in this same indication (ROCKET trial). Phase III results in the treatment and in the secondary prevention of established venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism are encouraging. These small molecules are obtained by chemical synthesis, their molecular weight is lower than 500 daltons. Many coagulation tests may be affected by these molecules. Those modifications should be known in order to avoid misinterpretation of the tests but could also be used to measure plasma concentrations of these products. The choice of a non specific global and readily available test has been documented (Quick time for rivaroxaban and aPTT for dabigatran). Anti-Xa (for rivaroxaban) and anti-IIa (for dabigatran) activities should however be preferred, expressed in ng/ml with calibrated plasmas (containing predetermined concentration of the tested drug). The half-life is around 8 to 12 hours, with a peak activity 2 to 4 hours after ingestion. Dabigatran is mainly eliminated via the kidney, hence requiring dose-adjustment in case of moderate renal insufficiency, and contra-indicated in case of severe renal insufficiency. Rivaroxaban being excreted via kidney and liver, some precautions should apply in case of liver insufficiency. No data are available in pregnancy or pediatrics, clinical trials are ongoing. There are few interactions with concomitant drugs, which should not be ignored. The short half-life of these new agents compensates for the

  10. 21 CFR 522.800 - Droperidol and fentanyl citrate injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Droperidol and fentanyl citrate injection. 522.800... § 522.800 Droperidol and fentanyl citrate injection. (a) Specifications. Droperidol and fentanyl citrate injection is a sterile solution containing 20 milligrams of droperidol and 0.4 milligram of fentanyl...

  11. 21 CFR 172.370 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Iron-choline citrate complex. 172.370 Section 172... CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.370 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline citrate complex made by reacting approximately equimolecular quantities of ferric hydroxide, choline,...

  12. 21 CFR 573.580 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron-choline citrate complex. 573.580 Section 573.580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Additive Listing § 573.580 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline citrate complex made...

  13. Ventricular tachycardia after administration of sildenafil citrate: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmussen Jeppe G

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has not previously been reported that sildenafil citrate causes malignant arrhythmias in humans. Case presentation A 41-year-old man developed sustained ventricular tachycardia following sildenafil citrate administration. Conclusion It cannot be dismissed that this patient experienced ventricular tachycardia as an adverse effect of sildenafil citrate administration.

  14. Ventricular tachycardia after administration of sildenafil citrate: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Rasmussen Jeppe G; Toft Egon; Frøbert Ole

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background It has not previously been reported that sildenafil citrate causes malignant arrhythmias in humans. Case presentation A 41-year-old man developed sustained ventricular tachycardia following sildenafil citrate administration. Conclusion It cannot be dismissed that this patient experienced ventricular tachycardia as an adverse effect of sildenafil citrate administration.

  15. Managing hyperphosphatemia in patients with chronic kidney disease on dialysis with ferric citrate: latest evidence and clinical usefulness

    OpenAIRE

    Yagil, Yoram; Fadem, Stephen Z.; Kant, Kotagal S.; Bhatt, Udayan; Sika, Mohammed; Lewis, Julia B.; Negoi, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Ferric citrate is a novel phosphate binder that allows the simultaneous treatment of hyperphosphatemia and iron deficiency in patients being treated for end-stage renal disease with hemodialysis (HD). Multiple clinical trials in HD patients have uniformly and consistently demonstrated the efficacy of the drug in controlling hyperphosphatemia with a good safety profile, leading the US Food and Drug Administration in 2014 to approve its use for that indication. A concurrent beneficial effect, w...

  16. Pharmacology of anticoagulants used in the treatment of venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutescu, Edith A; Burnett, Allison; Fanikos, John; Spinler, Sarah; Wittkowsky, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Anticoagulant drugs are the foundation of therapy for patients with VTE. While effective therapeutic agents, anticoagulants can also result in hemorrhage and other side effects. Thus, anticoagulant therapy selection should be guided by the risks, benefits and pharmacologic characteristics of each agent for each patient. Safe use of anticoagulants requires not only an in-depth knowledge of their pharmacologic properties but also a comprehensive approach to patient management and education. This paper will summarize the key pharmacologic properties of the anticoagulant agents used in the treatment of patients with VTE. PMID:26780737

  17. Pyrolytic citrate synthesis and ozone annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pyrolytic procedure is described that via a citrate synthesis allowed us to obtain very fine grained YBCO powders that, after a first furnace thermal treatment in ozone, results already to contain a large amount of superconducting microcrystals. A second identical thermal treatment gives a final product strongly textured, as shown by magnetic torque measurements. Complementary structural and diamagnetic measurement show the high quality of these sintered pellets. The role covered by both the pyrolytic preparation and the ozone annealing are discussed

  18. Pyrolitic citrate synthesis and ozone annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pyrolytic procedure that via a citrate synthesis allowed to obtain very fine grained YBCO powders that, after a first furnace thermal treatment in ozone, result already to contain a large amount of superconducting microcystals is described. A second identical thermal treatment gives a final product strongly textured, as shown by magnetic torque measurements. Complementary structural and diamagnetic measurements show the high quality of these sintered pellets. The role covered by both the pyrolytic preparation and the ozone annealing are discussed

  19. Photodynamical Properties of Various Phthalocyanine Citrates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drobek, M.; Klusoň, Petr; Hejda, S.; Krýsa, J.; Rakušan, J.

    Prague: ICT Prague Press, 2010 - (Krýsa, J.), s. 68 ISBN 978-80-7080-750-7. [European Meeting on Solar Chemistry and Photocatalysis: Environmental Applications /6./. Prague (CZ), 13.06.2010-16.06.2010] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN400720701; GA MŠk 1M0577 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : phthalocyanine citrates * photodynamical properties Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  20. Sildenafil Citrate in Fetal Growth Restriction

    OpenAIRE

    Panda, Subrat; Das, Ananya; Md Nowroz, Hossain

    2014-01-01

    Background Pregnancies with early onset fetal growth restriction have poor perinatal outcome. Sildenafil citrate (PDE -5 inhibitor) as a vasodilator increases utero-placental blood flow and potentiates fetal growth. Case Presentation In this study, a case was examined and Sildenafil was administered for her. It was found that Sildenafil improved the uterine blood flow with a favorable fetal outcome at delivery. Conclusion Sildenafil, as a vasodilator has emerged as a potential management opti...

  1. Assembly of citrate gold nanoparticles on hydrophilic monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikholm-Lundin, Inger; Rosqvist, Emil; Ihalainen, Petri; Munter, Tony; Honkimaa, Anni; Marjomäki, Varpu; Albers, Willem M.; Peltonen, Jouko

    2016-08-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) as model surfaces were linked onto planar gold films thorough lipoic acid or disulfide groups. The molecules used were polyethylene glycol (EG-S-S), N-[tris-(hydroxymethyl)methyl]acrylamide polymers with and without lipoic acid (Lipa-pTHMMAA and pTHMMAA) and a lipoic acid triazine derivative (Lipa-MF). All the layers, but Lipa-MF with a primary amino group were hydroxyl terminated. The layers were characterized by contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy, AFM. Citrate stabilized nanoparticles, AuNPs in water and phosphate buffer were allowed to assemble on the layers for 10 min and the binding was followed in real-time with surface plasmon resonance, SPR. The SPR resonance curves were observed to shift to higher angles and become increasingly damped, while also the peaks strongly broaden when large nanoparticles assembled on the surface. Both the angular shift and the damping of the curve was largest for nanoparticles assembling on the EG-S-S monolayer. High amounts of particles were also assembled on the pTHMMAA layer without the lipoic acid group, but the damping of the curve was considerably lower with a more even distribution of the particles. Topographical images confirmed that the highest number of particles were assembled on the polyethylene glycol monolayer. By increasing the interaction time more particles could be assembled on the surface.

  2. Ferric Citrate Reduces Intravenous Iron and Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agent Use in ESRD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umanath, Kausik; Jalal, Diana I; Greco, Barbara A; Umeukeje, Ebele M; Reisin, Efrain; Manley, John; Zeig, Steven; Negoi, Dana G; Hiremath, Anand N; Blumenthal, Samuel S; Sika, Mohammed; Niecestro, Robert; Koury, Mark J; Ma, Khe-Ni; Greene, Tom; Lewis, Julia B; Dwyer, Jamie P

    2015-10-01

    Ferric citrate (FC) is a phosphate binder with shown efficacy and additional effects on iron stores and use of intravenous (iv) iron and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). We provide detailed analyses of changes in iron/hematologic parameters and iv iron/ESA use at time points throughout the active control period of a phase 3 international randomized clinical trial. In all, 441 subjects were randomized (292 to FC and 149 to sevelamer carbonate and/or calcium acetate [active control (AC)]) and followed for 52 weeks. Subjects on FC had increased ferritin and transferrin saturation (TSAT) levels compared with subjects on AC by week 12 (change in ferritin, 114.1±29.35 ng/ml; Ptreatment with FC as a phosphate binder results in increased iron parameters apparent after 12 weeks and reduces iv iron and ESA use while maintaining hemoglobin over 52 weeks, with a safety profile similar to that of available binders. PMID:25736045

  3. Nanoscale observations of the effect of citrate on calcium oxalate precipitation on calcite surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos-Cara, Alejandro; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; Putnis, Christine V.

    2016-04-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaC2O4ṡxH2O) minerals are naturally occurring minerals found in fossils, plants, kidney stones and is a by-product in some processes such as paper, food and beverage production [1,2]. In particular, calcium oxalate monohydrate phase (COM) also known as whewellite (CaC2O4ṡH2O), is the most frequently reported mineral phase found in urinary and kidney stones together with phosphates. Organic additives are well known to play a key role in the formation of minerals in both biotic and abiotic systems, either facilitating their precipitation or hindering it. In this regard, recent studies have provided direct evidence demonstrating that citrate species could enhance dissolution of COM and inhibit their precipitation. [3,4] The present work aims at evauate the influence of pH, citrate and oxalic acid concentrations in calcium oxalate precipitation on calcite surfaces (Island Spar, Chihuahua, Mexico) through in-situ nanoscale observation using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM, Multimode, Bruker) in flow-through experiments. Changes in calcium oxalate morphologies and precipitated phases were observed, as well as the inhibitory effect of citrate on calcium oxalate precipitation, which also lead to stabilization an the amorphous calcium oxalate phase. [1] K.D. Demadis, M. Öner, Inhibitory effects of "green"additives on the crystal growth of sparingly soluble salts, in: J.T. Pearlman (Ed.), Green Chemistry Research Trends, Nova Science Publishers Inc., New York, 2009, pp. 265-287. [2] M. Masár, M. Zuborová, D. Kaniansky, B. Stanislawski, Determination of oxalate in beer by zone electrophoresis on a chip with conductivity detection, J. Sep. Sci. 26 (2003) 647-652. [3] Chutipongtanate S, Chaiyarit S, Thongboonkerd V. Citrate, not phosphate, can dissolve calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals and detach these crystals from renal tubular cells. Eur J Pharmacol 2012;689:219-25. [4] Weaver ML, Qiu SR, Hoyer JR, Casey WH, Nancollas GH, De Yoreo JJ

  4. Anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A S; Idorn, L; Nørager, B;

    2015-01-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease are a growing population. One of the major challenges in the care of these patients is to prevent thromboembolic episodes. Despite relative young age and no typical cardiovascular risk factors, this cohort has a high prevalence of thrombotic events. It is....... Furthermore, there is a lack of scientific evidence regarding how to prevent thromboembolic events with anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature pertaining to anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease and hence enable...... difficult to use treatment algorithms from the general adult population with acquired heart disease in this heterogeneous population due to special conditions such as myocardial scarring after previous surgery, atypical atrial flutter, prothrombotic conditions and the presence of interatrial shunts...

  5. Lupus anticoagulants: pathogenesis and laboratory diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, E L

    1997-12-01

    The pathogenesis of the lupus anticoagulant (LA) has been the focus of much research over the past decade, and a plethora of laboratory tests have been developed to detect it. This essay reviews the nature of LA and its pathogenesis, and a number of approaches employed in its diagnosis. These range from well established tests such as the kaolin clotting time (KCT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and tissue thromboplastin inhibition test (TTI), to the 'newer' tests such as the dilute Russell's viper venom time (DRVVT) and more recent snake venom tests such as the textarin/ecarin ratio and Taipan snake venom time (TSVT). The criteria for diagnosis are discussed, including pre-analytical variables such as sample preparation, and the effects of therapeutic anticoagulants used to treat thrombotic manifestations of the syndrome or an underlying disease process. PMID:9624740

  6. [Therapeutic equivalence of the new oral anticoagulants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Villar, A; Nacle López, I; Barbero Hernández, M J; Lizan Tudela, L

    2015-10-01

    In an attempt to minimize the economic impact due to the incorporation of innovative drugs, health authorities have promoted and supported the evaluation and market positioning of drugs, as equivalent therapeutic alternatives. This issue has recently gained importance, possibly due to the current economic crisis. The equivalent therapeutic alternatives are justified by the need to compete on price, and by the authorities recommendation to establish therapeutic equivalence, price and financing of medicinal products at the same time. The establishment of the new oral anticoagulants and the equivalent therapeutic alternatives is a problematic issue if it is based on the absence of direct comparisons between different drugs and the questionable methodology used in the current indirect comparisons. Currently, it is difficult to determine when a new oral anticoagulant is more recommendable than others, but efforts are being made in order to propose alternatives for the decision based on patient characteristics. PMID:26146035

  7. [New orally anticoagulants and brain stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczorowska, Beata; Pawełczyk, Małgorzata; Przybyła, Monika

    2016-05-26

    Brain stroke is a grave society problem. About 20% ischemic strokes are cardiac related problems. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cause of ischemic strokes. Decision to deploy anticoagulant treatment with AF patient depends on bleeding and thrombo-embolic risk which summerise scale CHA2DS2VASc and HAS-BLED. Past recent years in AF treatment anticoagulants from the group of vitamin K antagonist were used. At present in brain stroke prevention and systemic emboilment, new oral anticoagulants (NOA) which weren't worst than vitamin K antagonists, and they are recomendet in most cases of AF unrelated with heart valve defets. Useing NOA causes lower risk of bleeding, including intracranial heamorrhage. It is believed that this is related to the selective inhibition of specific coagulation factors, and respect other hemostatic mechanisms. Results from clinical studies NOA are encouraging, but still lacks clear answers regarding, among other things: long-term safety of treatment and economically viable in everyday clinical practice. In addition, to date there is no specific antidote for this group of drugs. PMID:27234866

  8. Novel oral anticoagulants in plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, C F; Reid, A J

    2016-05-01

    Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have emerged as a good alternative to warfarin in the prevention of stroke for patients with atrial fibrillation. NOAC use is increasing rapidly; therefore, greater understanding of their use in the perioperative period is important for optimal care. Studies and reviews that reported on the use of NOACs were identified, with particular focus on the perioperative period. PubMed was searched for relevant articles published between January 2000 and August 2015. The inevitable rise in the use of NOACs such as rivaroxaban (Xarelto™), apixaban (Eliquis™), edoxaban (Lixiana™) and dabigatran (Pradaxa™) may present a simplified approach to perioperative anticoagulant management due to fewer drug interactions, rapidity of onset of action and relatively short half-lives. Coagulation status, however, cannot reliably be monitored and no antidotes are currently available. When planning for discontinuation of NOACs, special consideration of renal function is required. Advice regarding the management of bleeding complications is provided for consideration in emergency surgery. In extreme circumstances, haemodialysis may be considered for bleeding with the use of dabigatran. NOACs will increasingly affect operative planning in plastic surgery. In order to reduce the incidence of complications associated with anticoagulation, the management of NOACs in the perioperative period requires knowledge of the time of last dose, renal function and the bleeding risk of the planned procedure. Consideration of these factors will allow appropriate interpretation of the current guidelines. PMID:27013144

  9. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulation agents in anticoagulant naive atrial fibrillation patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Sørensen, Rikke; Hansen, Morten Lock;

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulation (NOAC) agents have been approved for stroke prophylaxis in atrial fibrillation (AF). We investigated 'real-world' information on how these drugs are being adopted. METHODS AND RESULTS: Using Danish nationwide administrative registers, we...... the drug came on market. By October, 2013, 40% were being started on warfarin and dabigatran, respectively, and another 20% were started on either rivaroxaban or apixaban. Rivaroxaban and apixaban users generally had a higher predicted risk of stroke and bleeding compared with warfarin and dabigatran users....... Older age, female gender, and prior stroke were some of the factors associated with NOAC use vs. warfarin, whereas chronic kidney disease, myocardial infarction, and heart failure showed the opposite association. CONCLUSION: Among oral anticoagulation-naïve AF patients initiated on oral anticoagulation...

  10. Pharmacist-managed oral anticoagulation therapy in the community setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwmeester, Carla; Chim, Christine

    2013-05-01

    Pharmacists are at the forefront when caring for patients requiring anticoagulation resulting from chronic conditions, complex medications therapy, or at risk for drug interactions. As a consequence, there is a greater need for pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinics in the community setting. This article will review special considerations for oral anticoagulant therapy in the elderly, collaborative therapy management, establishment of policies and procedures, documentation of patient visits, patient counseling, and barriers to successful anticoagulation management. It will also discuss evidence-based guidelines for the use of oral anticoagulants and compare the agents currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Finally, barriers to anticoagulation management will be examined, including issues with adherence and communication with patients and health care providers. PMID:23649677

  11. Urinary Citrate: A view in Chronic Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANTHOSH KUMAR.N

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim & Objective: To evaluate the 24 hour urinary citrate levels in chronic renal failure and healthy controls and to define the role of urinary citrates in the chronic renal failures. Materials and Methods: The 24 hours urinary citrates, Blood urea, Serum creatinine, Na+, K+were evaluated in 25 chronic renal failure patients and25 healthy subjects taken as controls. In both groups participants were on their usual diet. In addition, none of the participant was taking any drugs that could interfere with the citrate excretion. Results: The mean 24 hour urinary citrate excretion in patients and healthy controls was 296.3 ± 8.543mg and 323.9 ± 4.304mg respectively. Using previously defined values of normal urinary citrates as more than 320 mg.The difference in 24 hour urinary citrateexcretion in all patients and healthy control was statistically significant (

    citrate excretion in recurrent renal failures and healthy controls. Uniformly low citrate excretion in patients indicates that low citrate levels may be a feature seen in predisposing factor for renal failure

  12. An audit of anticoagulant management to assess anticoagulant control using decision support software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Paul; Harper, Joe; Hill, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of a computerised self-adjusting anticoagulant algorithm to predict appropriate warfarin dosing and to assess its use in clinical practice. Design A 3-year audit of anticoagulant control in patients managed by doctors and pharmacists using computer decision support and an evaluation of the impact of dose adjustments made by the users. Participants 3660 patients on oral anticoagulants; one-third of patients managed by doctors and two-thirds by pharmacists. Setting Anticoagulant supervision in primary care and pharmacies at 60 sites in New Zealand. Main outcome measures The time in the therapeutic range (TTR), the outcome of adherence to the computer dosing algorithm, the percentage of time the clinicians over-ride the algorithm and the impact of their intervention on anticoagulant control. Results A TTR of 72.9% was achieved for all patients. The TTR was significantly better in patients managed by pharmacists than doctors (75.1% versus 67.4%, ppharmacists. Conclusions The clinicians predominantly change the dose when the INR is below the therapeutic range. The changes are not necessary to correct for inaccuracies in the algorithm. The most likely explanation is the clinician's belief that their own dose adjustment would achieve better control; however, in practice, their changes tend to underdose patients. The doctors achieved poorer control than the pharmacists; this is in part due to the action of the doctors over-riding the algorithm. Our results imply that clinicians could achieve better anticoagulant control if they more closely followed the computer algorithm. PMID:25183709

  13. Use of anticoagulants in elderly patients: practical recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helia Robert-Ebadi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Helia Robert-Ebadi, Grégoire Le Gal, Marc RighiniDivision of Angiology and Hemostasis (HRE, MR, Department of Internal Medicine, Geneva University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland, and Department of Internal Medicine and Chest Diseases, EA 3878 (GETBO, Brest University Hospital, Brest, France (GLGAbstract: Elderly people represent a patient population at high thromboembolic risk, but also at high hemorrhagic risk. There is a general tendency among physicians to underuse anticoagulants in the elderly, probably both because of underestimation of thromboembolic risk and overestimation of bleeding risk. The main indications for anticoagulation are venous thromboembolism (VTE prophylaxis in medical and surgical settings, VTE treatment, atrial fibrillation (AF and valvular heart disease. Available anticoagulants for VTE prophylaxis and initial treatment of VTE are low molecular weight heparins (LMWH, unfractionated heparin (UFH or synthetic anti-factor Xa pentasaccharide fondaparinux. For long-term anticoagulation vitamin K antagonists (VKA are the first choice and only available oral anticoagulants nowadays. Assessing the benefit-risk ratio of anticoagulation is one of the most challenging issues in the individual elderly patient, patients at highest hemorrhagic risk often being those who would have the greatest benefit from anticoagulants. Some specific considerations are of utmost importance when using anticoagulants in the elderly to maximize safety of these treatments, including decreased renal function, co-morbidities and risk of falls, altered pharmacodynamics of anticoagulants especially VKAs, association with antiplatelet agents, patient education. Newer anticoagulants that are currently under study could simplify the management and increase the safety of anticoagulation in the future.Keywords: anticoagulation, elderly patients, venous thromboembolism, hemorrhagic risk, atrial fibrillation, thrombin inhibitors, factor Xa

  14. New anticoagulants for the prevention of venous thromboembolism

    OpenAIRE

    Becattini, Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    Cecilia Becattini, Alessandra Lignani, Giancarlo AgnelliInternal and Cardiovascular Medicine and Stroke Unit, University of Perugia, ItalyAbstract: Anticoagulant drugs have an essential role in the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic diseases. Currently available anticoagulants substantially reduce the incidence of thromboembolic events in a number of clinical conditions. However, these agents have limitations that strengthen the case for the development of new anticoagulants. An ideal...

  15. Anticoagulation for the Acute Management of Ischemic Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Austin A.; Ikuta, Kevin; Soverow, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Few prospective studies support the use of anticoagulation during the acute phase of ischemic stroke, though observational data suggest a role in certain populations. Depending on the mechanism of stroke, systemic anticoagulation may prevent recurrent cerebral infarction, but concomitantly carries a risk of hemorrhagic transformation. In this article, we describe a case where anticoagulation shows promise for ischemic stroke and review the evidence that has discredited its use in some circums...

  16. Secretion of a proteolytic anticoagulant by Ancylostoma hookworms

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    Hookworms of the genus Ancylostoma secrete an anticoagulant that both inhibits the clotting of human plasma and promotes fibrin clot dissolution. This anticoagulant activity is attributable to a 36,000 dalton proteolytic enzyme. The protease can degrade fibrinogen into five smaller polypeptides that intrinsically have anticoagulating properties, covert plasminogen to a mini-plasminogen-like molecule, and hydrolyze a synthetic peptide substrate with specificity for elastolytic enzymes. It is h...

  17. Efficacy and Safety of Novel Anticoagulants Compared with Established Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Rybak, Iwona; Ehle, Michael; Buckley, Leo; Fanikos, John

    2011-01-01

    Dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban are novel oral anticoagulants that offer major advantages over existing agents. The onset of the anticoagulant effect of these agents is rapid. Each agent has a predictable anticoagulant response that eliminates the need for monitoring. Clinical trials have been completed with all three agents in the prevention and treatment of the three leading causes of cardiovascular death: myocardial infarction, stroke, and venous thromboembolism (VTE). Novel agents h...

  18. The Kaiser Permanente Colorado Clinical Pharmacy Anticoagulation Service as a model of modern anticoagulant care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Daniel M

    2008-01-01

    The Clinical Pharmacy Anticoagulation Service (CPAS) at Kaiser Permanente Colorado grew from a single pharmacist assisting a single physician to a comprehensive service staffed by over 20 employees. CPAS provides care for over 7200 patients with each CPAS pharmacist managing all aspects of anticoagulation therapy for 150 to 500 patients. Unique aspects of CPAS include its centralized organization structure, the use of telepharmacy, collaboration drug therapy management agreement with referring physicians and a robust research agenda. Results of various CPAS research projects have been published in the peer-reviewed medical literature. PMID:18804262

  19. Exploring plant factors for increasing phosphorus utilization from rock phosphates and native soil phosphates in acidic soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six plant species with contrasting capacity in utilizing rock phosphates were compared with regard to their responses to phosphorus starvation in hydroponic cultures. Radish, buckwheat and oil rapeseed are known to have strong ability to use rock phosphates while ryegrass, wheat and sesbania are less efficient. Whereas other plants acidified their culture solution under P starvation (-P), radish plants make alkaline the solution. When neutralizing the pH of the solutions cultured with plants under either -P or + P conditions, solutions with P starved buckwheat, rapeseed, and radish had a higher ability to solubilize Al and Fe phosphates than did those cultured with sesbania, ryegrass and wheat. Characterization of organic ligands in the solutions identified that citrate and malate were the major organic anions exuded by rapeseed and radish. Besides citrate and malate, buckwheat exuded a large amount of tartrate under P starvation. In contrast, ryegrass, wheat and sesbania secreted only a limited amount of oxalic acid, regardless of P status. Changes in activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, acid phosphatase, and nitrate reductase in these plants were also compared under P- sufficient or -deficient conditions. The results indicated that plant ability to use rock phosphates or soil phosphates is closely related to their responses toward P starvation. The diversity of P starvation responses was discussed in the context of co-evolution between plants and their environment. Approaches to use plant factors to enhance the effectiveness of rock phosphates were also discussed. (author)

  20. Inositol hexa-phosphate: a potential chelating agent for uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebrian, D.; Tapia, A.; Real, A.; Morcillo, M.A. [Radiobiology Laboratory, Radiation Dosimetry Unit, Department of Environment, CIEMAT, Avda Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    Chelation therapy is an optimal method to reduce the radionuclide-related risks. In the case of uranium incorporation, the treatment of choice is so far i.v infusion of a 1.4% sodium bicarbonate solution, but the efficacy has been proved to be not very high. In this study, we examine the efficacy of some substances: bicarbonate, citrate, diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA), ethidronate (EHBP) and inositol hexa-phosphate (phytic acid) to chelate uranium using a test developed by Braun et al. Different concentrations of phytic acid, an abundant component of plant seeds that is widely distributed in animal cells and tissues in substantial levels, were tested and compared to the same concentrations of sodium citrate, bicarbonate, EHBP and DTPA. The results showed a strong affinity of inositol hexa-phosphate for uranium, suggesting that it could be an effective chelating agent for uranium in vivo. (authors)

  1. Inositol hexa-phosphate: a potential chelating agent for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelation therapy is an optimal method to reduce the radionuclide-related risks. In the case of uranium incorporation, the treatment of choice is so far i.v infusion of a 1.4% sodium bicarbonate solution, but the efficacy has been proved to be not very high. In this study, we examine the efficacy of some substances: bicarbonate, citrate, diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA), ethidronate (EHBP) and inositol hexa-phosphate (phytic acid) to chelate uranium using a test developed by Braun et al. Different concentrations of phytic acid, an abundant component of plant seeds that is widely distributed in animal cells and tissues in substantial levels, were tested and compared to the same concentrations of sodium citrate, bicarbonate, EHBP and DTPA. The results showed a strong affinity of inositol hexa-phosphate for uranium, suggesting that it could be an effective chelating agent for uranium in vivo. (authors)

  2. Anticoagulation therapy in intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation: Does IABP really need anti-coagulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋晨阳; 赵莉莉; 王建安; 单江; MOHAMMODBalgaith

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate if intra-aortic balloon pump(IABP) is contraindicated without anticoag-ulation therapy. Methods: Some 153 IABP patients in the King Abdulaziz Cardiac Center(KSA) were random-ly assigned into two groups. Anticoagulation group( Group A) consisted of 71 patients who were given heparin intravenously with target aPTT 50 - 70 seconds. Non-anticoagulation group( Group B) consisted of 82 patients without intravenous heparin during balloon pumping. Hematological parameters including platelet count, D-dimer, Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and fibrinogen degradation products(FDP) were checked respectively at the point of baseline, 24 hours, 48 hours and 24 hours post IABP counterpulsation. Clot deposits on balloon surface, vascular complications from IABP including bleeding and limb ischemia were recorded.Results: Platelet count and PAI-1 level decreased at 24 hours and 48 hours in both groups ( P 0.05) . Three patients in Group A and 2 patients in Group B developed minor limb ischemia( P > 0.05). No major limb ischemia in either group. Two patients in Group A suffered major bleeding and required blood transfusion or surgical intervention, whereas no patient had major bleeding in Group B. Eight patients had minor bleeding in Group A, but only 2 patients in Group B ( P <0.05). No clot deposit developed on IABP surface in either group. Conclusion: IABP is safe without routine anticoagulation therapy. Selecting appropriate artery approach and early detection intervention are key methods for preventing complications.

  3. Anticoagulation therapy in intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation:Does IABP really need anti-coagulation?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Chen-yang(蒋晨阳); ZHAO Li-li(赵莉莉); WANG Jian-an(王建安); SAN Jiang(单江); MOHAMMOD Balgaith

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate if intra-aortic balloon pump(IABP) is contraindicated without anticoagulation therapy. Methods: Some 153 IABP patients in the King Abdulaziz Cardiac Center(KSA) were randomly assigned into two groups. Anticoagulation group(Group A) consisted of 71 patients who were given heparin intravenously with target aPTT 50-70 seconds. Non-anticoagulation group(Group B) consisted of 82 patients without intravenous heparin during balloon pumping. Hematological parameters including platelet count, D-dimer, Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1(PAI-1) and fibrinogen degradation products(FDP) were checked respectively at the point of baseline, 24 hours, 48 hours and 24 hours post IABP counterpulsation. Clot deposits on balloon surface, vascular complications from IABP including bleeding and limb ischemia were recorded. Results: Platelet count and PAI-1 level decreased at 24 hours and 48 hours in both groups (P0.05). Three patients in Group A and 2 patients in Group B developed minor limb ischemia(P>0.05). No major limb ischemia in either group. Two patients in Group A suffered major bleeding and required blood transfusion or surgical intervention, whereas no patient had major bleeding in Group B. Eight patients had minor bleeding in Group A, but only 2 patients in Group B(P<0.05). No clot deposit developed on IABP surface in either group. Conclusion: IABP is safe without routine anticoagulation therapy. Selecting appropriate artery approach and early detection intervention are key methods for preventing complications.

  4. The Role of Anticoagulation Clinics in the Era of New Oral Anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Testa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anticoagulation Clinics (ACs are services specialized in management of patients on anticoagulant treatment. At present, ACs manage patients chiefly on antivitamin K antagonists (AVKs, but patient population has already changed in the last few years, because of an increase of treatments with other anticoagulant drugs, which require different management systems. The strong increase in the number of patients at AC, mainly on long-term treatment, has determined the development of web management, through telemedicine systems, improving the quality of life and maintaining the same clinical quality levels. New oral anticoagulants (NOAs have shown to be as effective as AVK antagonists in stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and for treatment of venous thromboembolism in addition to VTE prophylaxis in orthopaedic surgery, when administered at a fixed dose, but patient adherence and compliance are crucial for good quality treatment. At present, lacking data from the real world, an oversimplification of treatment with NOAs could cause unjustified risks for patients and also a possible future underuse of good drugs. For these reasons the vigilance must be high and ACs can have a crucial role in defining which is the best management for NOA patients and how to do it, as it happened for AVKs.

  5. Diffuse abdominal gallium-67 citrate uptake in salmonella infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two pediatric patients with salmonella infections (one with typhoid fever and the second with salmonella C2 gastroenteritis), had a diffuse abdominal uptake of Ga-67 citrate. The possible explanation for this finding is discussed. Salmonella infection should be included as a cause in the differential diagnosis of diffuse accumulation of Ga-67 citrate

  6. Citrate increases glass transition temperature of vitrified sucrose preparations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kets, E.P.W.; Lipelaar, P.J.; Hoekstra, F.A.; Vromans, H.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of sodium citrate on the properties of dried amorphous sucrose glasses. Addition of sodium citrate to a sucrose solution followed by freeze-drying or convective drying resulted in a glass transition temperature (T-g) that was higher than the well-s

  7. Injectable citrate-modified Portland cement for use in vertebroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn-Jones, Gareth; Shelton, Richard M; Hofmann, Michael P

    2014-11-01

    The injectability of Portland cement (PC) with several citrate additives was investigated for use in clinical applications such as vertebroplasty (stabilization of a fractured vertebra with bone cement) using a syringe. A 2-wt % addition of sodium or potassium citrate with PC significantly improved cement injectability, decreased cement setting times from over 2 h to below 25 min, while increasing the compressive strength to a maximum of 125 MPa. Zeta-potential measurements indicated that the citrate anion was binding to one or more of the positively charged species causing charged repulsion between cement particles which dispersed aggregates and caused the liquefying effect of the anion. Analysis of the hydrating phases of PC indicated that the early strength producing PC phase (ettringite) developed within the first 2 h of setting following addition of the citrate anion, while this did not occur in the control cement (PC only). Within 24 h ettringite developed in PC as well as calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H), the major setting phase of PC, whereas cements containing citrate did not develop this phase. The evidence suggested that in the presence of citrate the cements limited water supply appeared to be utilized for ettringite formation, producing the early strength of the citrate cements. The present study has demonstrated that it is possible to modify PC with citrate to both improve the injectability and crucially reduce the setting times of PC while improving the strength of the cement. PMID:24711245

  8. 21 CFR 520.622b - Diethylcarbamazine citrate syrup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Diethylcarbamazine citrate syrup. 520.622b Section... Diethylcarbamazine citrate syrup. (a)(1) Specifications. Each milliliter of syrup contains 60 milligrams of... veterinarian. (b)(1) Specifications. Each milliliter of syrup contains 60 milligrams of...

  9. 21 CFR 520.622c - Diethylcarbamazine citrate chewable tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....622c, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Diethylcarbamazine citrate chewable tablets. 520... Diethylcarbamazine citrate chewable tablets. (a) Specifications. Each chewable tablet contains 30, 45, 60, 120,...

  10. 21 CFR 520.622a - Diethylcarbamazine citrate tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Diethylcarbamazine citrate tablets. 520.622a... Diethylcarbamazine citrate tablets. (a) Sponsors. (1) See 015579 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter for use of 50, 200, and 400 milligram tablets for prevention of heartworm disease in dogs and as an aid in the...

  11. 21 CFR 520.623 - Diethylcarbamazine citrate, oxibendazole chewable tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Diethylcarbamazine citrate, oxibendazole chewable tablets. 520.623 Section 520.623 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... § 520.623 Diethylcarbamazine citrate, oxibendazole chewable tablets. (a) Specifications. Each...

  12. Structural Basis for Norovirus Inhibition and Fucose Mimicry by Citrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansman, Grant S.; Shahzad-ul-Hussan, Syed; McLellan, Jason S.; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Georgiev, Ivelin; Shimoike, Takashi; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Bewley, Carole A.; Kwong, Peter D. (NIAID)

    2012-01-20

    Human noroviruses bind with their capsid-protruding domains to histo-blood-group antigens (HBGAs), an interaction thought to direct their entry into cells. Although human noroviruses are the major cause of gastroenteritis outbreaks, development of antivirals has been lacking, mainly because human noroviruses cannot be cultivated. Here we use X-ray crystallography and saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance (STD NMR) to analyze the interaction of citrate with genogroup II (GII) noroviruses. Crystals of citrate in complex with the protruding domain from norovirus GII.10 Vietnam026 diffracted to 1.4 {angstrom} and showed a single citrate bound at the site of HBGA interaction. The citrate interaction was coordinated with a set of capsid interactions almost identical to that involved in recognizing the terminal HBGA fucose, the saccharide which forms the primary conserved interaction between HBGAs and GII noroviruses. Citrate and a water molecule formed a ring-like structure that mimicked the pyranoside ring of fucose. STD NMR showed the protruding domain to have weak affinity for citrate (460 {mu}M). This affinity, however, was similar to the affinities of the protruding domain for fucose (460 {mu}M) and H type 2 trisaccharide (390 {mu}M), an HBGA shown previously to be specifically recognized by human noroviruses. Importantly, competition STD NMR showed that citrate could compete with HBGA for norovirus binding. Together, the results suggest that citrate and other glycomimetics have the potential to block human noroviruses from binding to HBGAs.

  13. 99mTc-Citrate versus 67Ga-citrate for the scintigraphic visualization of inflammatory lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Citric acid was labeled with 99mTc with an efficiency of > 99%. The biodistribution of 99mTc-citrate was studied in mice with turpentine-induced abscesses in comparison to 67Ga-citrate. The max. abscess/muscle concentration ratios were 4.61 ± 1.92 (3 h) for 99mTc-citrate and 4.76 ± 2.04 (4 h) for 67Ga-citrate. Arthritis was induced in 10 rabbits by intra-articular injection of ovalbumin Scintigrams obtained 4 days later and at 3 h post-injection of 99mTc-citrate showed increased activity involving the synovium. The max. arthritic/contralateral knee ratio was 3.19 ± 1.29 (3 h) and 6.47 ± 3.71 (24 h) for 99mTc- and 67Ga-citrate, respectively. The blood clearance curve of 99mTc-citrate in rabbits was biexponential with a fast and a slow component, compared to mono-exponential clearance of 67Ga-citrate. In 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis whole-body scintigrams and spot images of involved joints indicated localization of the tracer in inflamed tissues. The mean target-to-soft tissue ratios were 3.04 ± 0.81 and 4.95 ± 2.56 for 99mTc-citrate and 99mTc-MDP, respectively. Renal clearance of radioactivity was evident from the scintigrams. Our results demonstrated that 99mTc-citrate is effective as a radiopharmaceutical for the visualization of inflammatory lesions and may be preferred to 67Ga-citrate due to the ideal physical characteristics of the radionuclide, easy preparation, low cost, early accumulation and the preference for the renal route of excretion. (Author)

  14. Vitamin K requirement in Danish anticoagulant-resistant Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette D.; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Nielsen, Robert;

    2003-01-01

    Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus, Denmark, anticoagulant rodenticide resistance, vitamin K requirement......Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus, Denmark, anticoagulant rodenticide resistance, vitamin K requirement...

  15. Antibodies for detecting and quantifying anticoagulant agents

    OpenAIRE

    Salvador, Juan Pablo; Marco, María Pilar

    2012-01-01

    [EN] The present invention relates to the design of haptens that are structurally related to coumarin oral anticoagulant compounds (COAC), to be used for the production of specific antibodies against said type of substances and the subsequent use thereof for the development of diagnosis tools for use in laboratories or in point-of-care (PoC) devices. In particular, the produced antibodies have been used to develop a diagnosis tool that enables the plasma levels of COAC to be quantified in pat...

  16. Anticoagulant activity of original synthetic peptide derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozd, N N; Tolstenkov, A S; Makarov, V A; Miphtakhova, N T; Voyushina, T L; Sergeev, M E

    2008-01-01

    Original synthetic peptide derivatives exhibit anticoagulant activity in vitro and in vivo. They delayed fibrin clot formation from human blood plasma in tests for the intrinsic coagulation pathway (activated partial thromboplastin time) and final stage of plasma coagulation (thrombin time) and inhibited amidolytic activity of thrombin. We determined the minimum effective dose of the most active compound providing a 2-fold lengthening of blood clotting time (activated partial thromboplastin time test and thrombin time test), which persisted for 2-3 h. PMID:19024001

  17. Shortfalls using second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borst, G H A; Counotte, G H M

    2002-03-01

    Second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides can give rise to unexpected casualties in nontarget species in zoos. The first two offspring of a pair of turkey vultures (Cathartes aura) died of brodifacoum toxicosis. The adult birds fed rodenticide-killed mice to their offspring. There are previous case reports of small carnivorous birds (Dacelo novae-guinae and Tockus deckeni) killed eating poisoned (difenacoum and brodifacoum) mice. Even a granivorous species (Rollulus roulroul) died, probably by contamination of its food by cockroaches that transported the rodenticide. PMID:12216801

  18. New anticoagulants for the prevention of venous thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Becattini

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Cecilia Becattini, Alessandra Lignani, Giancarlo AgnelliInternal and Cardiovascular Medicine and Stroke Unit, University of Perugia, ItalyAbstract: Anticoagulant drugs have an essential role in the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic diseases. Currently available anticoagulants substantially reduce the incidence of thromboembolic events in a number of clinical conditions. However, these agents have limitations that strengthen the case for the development of new anticoagulants. An ideal anticoagulant should be at least as effective as those currently in use, as well as safe, simple to use, and widely applicable. The majority of new anticoagulants currently under investigation are small molecules with a selective and direct anti-Xa or antithrombin action, allowing oral administration in fixed doses. These new agents are in different phases of clinical development. The anti-Xa agent rivaroxaban and the antithrombin agent dabigatran are already available for the prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism in some countries. Apixaban is in an advanced phase of clinical development and several anti-Xa agents are currently approaching phase III clinical trials. Promising results in terms of efficacy and safety profiles have been obtained with these agents in different clinical conditions. Differences in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics could offer the potential for individualized anticoagulant therapies in the near future.Keywords: anticoagulant therapy, antithrombotic therapy, anticoagulants, direct thrombin inhibitors, factor Xa inhibitors

  19. Clinical considerations of anticoagulation therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu ZHANG

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) increases the risk of stroke.New anticoagulation agents have recently provided alternative and promising approaches.This paper reviews the current state of anticoagulation therapy in AF patients,focusing on various clinical scenarios and on comparisons,where possible,between western and eastern populations.

  20. Effects of computer-assisted oral anticoagulant therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Corell, Pernille; Madsen, Poul;

    2012-01-01

    UNLABELLED: BACKGROUND: Computer-assistance and self-monitoring lower the cost and may improve the quality of anticoagulation therapy. The main purpose of this clinical investigation was to use computer-assisted oral anticoagulant therapy to improve the time to reach and the time spent within the...

  1. Synthesis and characterization of biomimetic citrate-based biodegradable composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Richard T; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Chang; Huang, Minjun; Tang, Wanjin; Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Zhongmin; Jin, Dadi; Banik, Brittany; Brown, Justin L; Xie, Zhiwei; Bai, Xiaochun; Yang, Jian

    2014-08-01

    Natural bone apatite crystals, which mediate the development and regulate the load-bearing function of bone, have recently been associated with strongly bound citrate molecules. However, such understanding has not been translated into bone biomaterial design and osteoblast cell culture. In this work, we have developed a new class of biodegradable, mechanically strong, and biocompatible citrate-based polymer blends (CBPBs), which offer enhanced hydroxyapatite binding to produce more biomimetic composites (CBPBHAs) for orthopedic applications. CBPBHAs consist of the newly developed osteoconductive citrate-presenting biodegradable polymers, crosslinked urethane-doped polyester and poly (octanediol citrate), which can be composited with up to 65 wt % hydroxyapatite. CBPBHA networks produced materials with a compressive strength of 116.23 ± 5.37 MPa comparable to human cortical bone (100-230 MPa), and increased C2C12 osterix gene and alkaline phosphatase gene expression in vitro. The promising results above prompted an investigation on the role of citrate supplementation in culture medium for osteoblast culture, which showed that exogenous citrate supplemented into media accelerated the in vitro phenotype progression of MG-63 osteoblasts. After 6 weeks of implantation in a rabbit lateral femoral condyle defect model, CBPBHA composites elicited minimal fibrous tissue encapsulation and were well integrated with the surrounding bone tissues. The development of citrate-presenting CBPBHA biomaterials and preliminary studies revealing the effects of free exogenous citrate on osteoblast culture shows the potential of citrate biomaterials to bridge the gap in orthopedic biomaterial design and osteoblast cell culture in that the role of citrate molecules has previously been overlooked. PMID:23996976

  2. Physical and sensory properties of low-salt phosphate-free frankfurters composed with various ingredients

    OpenAIRE

    Ruusunen, Marita; VainionpÀÀ, Jukka; Puolanne, Eero; Lyly, Marika; LÀhteenmÀki, Liisa; Niemistö, Markku; Ahvenainen, Raija

    2003-01-01

    http://www.elsevier.com/locate/meatsci The physical properties and sensory attributes of phosphate-free frankfurters were examined using response surface methodology by varying the amounts of five compositional variables: salt, modified tapioca starch-, sodium citrate (NaC)- and wheat bran and fat in the batter. Altogether, 20 different types of frankfurters were prepared. When the frankfurters were made without phosphate, additional non-meat ingredients were needed at salt contents of ...

  3. Novel oral anticoagulants in the management of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Sean R; Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen; Schneider, David J

    2016-08-01

    Despite advances in interventional and pharmacologic therapy, survivors of myocardial infarction remain at an increased risk of subsequent cardiovascular events. Initial pharmacological management includes both platelet inhibition and parenteral anticoagulation, whereas long-term pharmacological therapy relies on antiplatelet therapy for prevention of thrombotic complications. Biomarkers showing ongoing thrombin generation after acute coronary syndromes suggest that anticoagulants may provide additional benefit in reducing cardiovascular events. We review the pharmacokinetics of novel anticoagulants, clinical trial results, the role of monitoring, and future directions for the use of novel oral anticoagulants in the treatment of coronary artery disease. Clinical trials have shown that long-term use of oral anticoagulants decreases the risk of cardiovascular events, but they do so at a cost of an increased risk of bleeding. Future studies will need to identify optimal treatment combinations for selected patients and conditions that address both the appropriate combination of therapy and the appropriate dosage of each agent when used in combination. PMID:27228186

  4. Intracranial hemorrhage in cancer patients treated with anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Matthew J; Uhlmann, Erik J; Zwicker, Jeffrey I

    2016-04-01

    Both venous thromboembolism and intracranial metastases are common complications in the setting of primary brain tumors and metastatic malignancies. Anticoagulation is indicated in the presence of cancer-associated thrombosis in order to limit the risk of pulmonary embolism; however, there is reluctance to initiate anticoagulation in the setting of intracranial metastatic disease due to potential for intracranial hemorrhage. Recent evidence suggests that therapeutic anticoagulation can be safely administered in the setting of metastatic brain tumors. This review examines the current understanding of the pathophysiology of intracranial hemorrhage in malignancy, describes the incidence of intracranial hemorrhage in the setting of brain tumors with therapeutic anticoagulation, and outlines management strategies relevant to the treatment of intracranial hemorrhage in the setting of anticoagulation. PMID:27067980

  5. New anticoagulants for the treatment of venous thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio Julio Cesar dos Santos Fernandes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, venous thromboembolism (VTE is among the leading causes of death from cardiovascular disease, surpassed only by acute myocardial infarction and stroke. The spectrum of VTE presentations ranges, by degree of severity, from deep vein thrombosis to acute pulmonary thromboembolism. Treatment is based on full anticoagulation of the patients. For many decades, it has been known that anticoagulation directly affects the mortality associated with VTE. Until the beginning of this century, anticoagulant therapy was based on the use of unfractionated or low-molecular-weight heparin and vitamin K antagonists, warfarin in particular. Over the past decades, new classes of anticoagulants have been developed, such as factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors, which significantly changed the therapeutic arsenal against VTE, due to their efficacy and safety when compared with the conventional treatment. The focus of this review was on evaluating the role of these new anticoagulants in this clinical context.

  6. [New anticoagulants in the treatment of venous thromboembolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bura-Rivière, Alessandra

    2013-09-01

    Anticoagulant therapy is the cornerstone of treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE). The treatment needs rapid initial anticoagulaton to minimize the risk of thrombus extension and fata pulmonary embolism, followed by an extended anticoagulation, aimed at preventing recurrent VTE. Till very recently, immediate anticoagulation can only be achieved with parenteral agents, such as heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin, or fondaparinux. Extended treatment usually involves the administration of vitamin K antagonists, such as warfarin. Emerging direct oral anticoagulants have the potential to streamline VTE treatment. These agents include oral anticoagulants that target thrombin or factor Xa. This article reviews the characteristics of these agents, describes the results of clinical trials in venous thromboembolic disease and outlines their strengths and weakness. PMID:24167902

  7. The treatment of venous thromboembolism with new oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Imberti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditional anticoagulants, such as low molecular weight heparin, unfractionated heparin, fondaparinux and vitamin K antagonists, have been the mainstay of treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE in the clinical hospital setting and after discharge. These anticoagulants are effective, but are associated with some limitations that may lead to their underuse in many settings. Based on the results of large, randomized clinical trials, new oral anticoagulants have been validated for the treatment of acute deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, and for the prevention of recurrent VTE. These drugs represent a landmark shift in anticoagulation care and may overcome some of the limitations of traditional agents, with the potential of improving adherence to anticoagulation therapy.

  8. [The practice guideline 'Neuraxis blockade and anticoagulation'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lange, J J; Van Kleef, J W; Van Everdingen, J J E

    2004-07-31

    In a patient with a coagulation disorder, the administration of a local anaesthetic by means of a needle or via the insertion of a catheter into the epidural space or spinal cavity may lead to bleeding and haematoma formation, with a danger of pressure on the spinal cord or nerve roots. Employing the method of the Dutch Institute for Healthcare (CBO) for the development of practice guidelines, a working group of anaesthesiologists, a haematologist and a hospital chemist have drawn up recommendations for neuraxis blockade in combination with anticoagulant therapy. In patients with a clinically acquired tendency toward increased bleeding, the management is highly dependent on the cause of the bleeding tendency. If the patient uses acetylsalicylic acid or clopidogrel, the medication must be withdrawn at least 10 days before neuraxis blockade is started. Therapy with glycoprotein-IIb/IIIa-receptor antagonists is an absolute contra-indication for neuraxis blockade. In patients who are using coumarin derivatives, neuraxis blockade results in an increased risk of a neuraxial haematoma. The coumarin derivative should then be withdrawn and replaced by a different form of anticoagulation. The use of low-molecular-weight heparin at the usual prophylactic dosage is not a contra-indication for neuraxis blockade and the risk of a neuraxial haematoma following neuraxis blockade is also not increased significantly by the subcutaneous administration of unfractionated heparin. PMID:15366721

  9. New oral anticoagulants – a practical guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciurus, Tomasz; Sobczak, Sebastian; Cichocka-Radwan, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Oral direct inhibitors of thrombin and activated factor Xa are approved as new anticoagulant drugs. In contrast to vitamin K antagonists (VKA) and heparins, the new agents have single targets in the coagulation cascade and more predictable pharmacokinetics, but they lack validated and available antidotes. Unlike VKA, they do not require routine monitoring of coagulation. However, the measurement of their pharmacologic effects might be of value in selected patients. They interfere with the routine coagulation tests, which should be interpreted with caution. Specific tests exist and can be used in case of emergencies. Adequate supportive care and temporary removal of all antithrombotic agents constitute the basis for management of serious bleeding complications. The administration of coagulation factors, such as fresh frozen plasma, prothrombin complex concentrates or recombinant activated FVII, can benefit in life-threatening bleeding or emergency surgery. Specific antidotes for non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants are in clinical development. This review aims at answering in a brief and simplified manner some clinical questions. PMID:26336492

  10. Evidence of a protein C-like anticoagulant system in bony fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salte, R; Norberg, K; Odegaard, O R

    1996-09-01

    Evidence is presented, confirming the presence of an anticoagulant system in the plasma of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum) (Order: Teleostei, Family: Salmonidae) that bears striking similarities with the protein C anticoagulant system in mammals; its vitamin K-dependence was documented through a warfarin feeding trial. A potent activator of this system is the protein C activator from the venom of the Central American Moccasin, Agkistrodon bilineatus. When activated, the system splits the tripeptide substrate glu-pro-arg-pNa, which is the substrate preferred for the in vitro assay of human protein C. It also prolongates the plasma activated partial thromboplastin time, indicating that the system is of clinical relevance. A temperature dependence of the plasma protein C-like activity was evident, the mean activity being 5- to 10-fold higher, but also more variable, in both species in summer and early fall, than it was in winter. There was also a species difference, with rainbow trout having the higher levels. In man, subnormal values of protein C implies an increased risk of thrombosis. Whether this applies to fish is not known. It is, however, a fact that microvascular thromboses are prevalent in farmed Atlantic salmon in winter, whereas thrombotic disease is not a problem in rainbow trout; in the present study plasma protein C-like activity was 30% (of a human reference plasma) in salmon at 4 degrees C compared to a level of 60% in rainbow trout. A complicating factor for the assay of protein C-like activity in salmonid plasma, is the poor stability of the inhibitory system upon storage. Consequently, assays have to be done with freshly prepared citrated plasma. PMID:8873347

  11. Management of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy for endoscopic procedures: introduction to novel oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha L. González-Bárcenas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The development of novel antithrombotic therapy in the past few years and its prescription in patients with cardiovascular and circulatory disease has widened the spectrum of drugs that need to be considered when performing an endoscopic procedure. The balance between the thrombotic risk patients carry due to their medical history and the bleeding risk involved in endoscopic procedures should be thoroughly analyzed by Gastroenterologists. New oral anticoagulants (NOACs impose an additional task. These agents, that specifically target factor IIa or Xa, do not dispose of an anticoagulation monitoring method nor have an antidote to revert their effect, just as with antiplatelet agents. Understanding the fundamental aspects of these drugs provides the necessary knowledge to determine the ideal period the antithrombotic therapy should be interrupted in order to perform the endoscopic procedure, offering maximum safety for patients and optimal results.

  12. Role of Ga-67 citrate imaging in pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aburano, T.; Yokoyama, K.; Hisada, K.; Kakuma, K.; Ichiyanagi, K.

    1988-11-01

    Two patients with pancreatitis in whom an area of predominant uptake of Ga-67 citrate was demonstrated involving the entire pancreas are presented. Ultrasound and x-ray CT did not reveal any morphologic abnormalities in the pancreas, whereas Ga-67 citrate imaging indicated the presence of active inflammatory change. Ga-67 citrate imaging may be useful in confirming the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis or acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis based on clinical and laboratory data, especially when ultrasound and/or x-ray CT cannot reveal any morphologic abnormalities in the pancreas.

  13. Momordica charantia seed extract exhibits strong anticoagulant effect by specifically interfering in intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation and dissolves fibrin clot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjappa, Bhagyalakshmi; Gangaraju, Sowmyashree; Girish, Kesturu S; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Gonchigar, Sathish J; Shankar, Rohit L; Shinde, Manohar; Sannaningaiah, Devaraja

    2015-03-01

    The current study explores the anticoagulant and fibrin clot-hydrolyzing properties of Momordica charantia seed extract (MCSE). MCSE hydrolyzed casein with the specific activity of 0.780 units/mg per min. Interestingly, it enhanced the clot formation process of citrated human plasma from control 146 to 432 s. In addition, the intravenous injection of MCSE significantly prolonged the bleeding time in a dose-dependent manner from control 150 to more than 800 s, and strengthened its anticoagulant activity. Interestingly, MCSE specifically prolonged the clotting time of only activated partial thromboplastin time, but not prothrombin time, and revealed the participation of MCSE in the intrinsic pathway of the blood coagulation cascade. Furthermore, MCSE completely hydrolyzed both Aα and Bβ chains of the human fibrinogen and partially hydrolyzed the γ chain. However, it hydrolyzed all the chains (α polymer, α chain, β chain and γ-γ dimmers) of partially cross-linked human fibrin clot. The proteolytic activity followed by the anticoagulant effect of the MCSE was completely abolished by the 1,10-phenanthroline and phenyl methyl sulphonyl fluoride, but iodoacetic acid, EDTA, and ethylene glycol-N,N,N',N'-tetra acetic acid did not. Curiously, MCSE did not hydrolyze any other plasma proteins except the plasma fibrinogen. Moreover, MCSE was devoid of RBC lysis, edema and hemorrhagic properties, suggesting its nontoxic nature. Taken together, MCSE may be a valuable candidate in the treatment of blood clot/thrombotic disorders. PMID:25192240

  14. Electrochemical stability of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles electrostatically assembled on amine-modified glassy carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles assembled on covalently attached ethylenediamine films on glassy carbon was probed using cyclic voltammetry and scanning electron microscopy. The accessible potential windows in 0.01 M HClO4 and phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) were found to be very similar to those for re-constructed polycrystalline bulk gold. At the nanoparticle electrodes, gold is dissolved at high positive potentials and re-deposited at lower potentials resulting in the formation of fewer, larger particles. The electrografted amine layer does not limit the stability range and citrate-capping groups do not stabilise the nanoparticles to oxidation. In addition to the structural stability of the nanoparticle electrodes, preliminary investigations of the stability of their activity for voltammetric analyses were also undertaken. Repeated voltammetric reduction of H2O2 at the nanoparticle electrodes showed excellent reproducibility indicating that the nanoparticle surface maintained a constant activity for the redox process. In contrast, a re-constructed polycrystalline bulk gold electrode did not exhibit a stable response under the same conditions.

  15. New oral anticoagulants: key messages for clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Giorgi-Pierfranceschi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available New oral anticoagulants are an effective and safe alternative to vitamin K antagonists in many fields of clinical practice. The use of the direct inhibitors of activated Factor II (dabigatran and activated Factor X (apixaban and rivaroxaban, both in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF and those with acute venous thromboembolism (VTE, is of great interest for internal medicine physicians. This paper aims to give practical guidance on management (starting therapy, follow up and bleeding complications of patients treated with dabigatran, rivaroxaban or apixaban for NVAF or acute VTE providing practical tables concerning the phases of therapy, management of complications, drug interaction and dose adjustment if renal impairment occurs.

  16. Thromboembolism and anticoagulation after Fontan surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Sangeetha

    2016-01-01

    This review attempts to answer the common questions faced by a clinician regarding thromboembolism and thromboprophylaxis in patients following Fontan surgery. The review is in an easy to understand question and answer format and discusses the currently available literature on the subject in an attempt to arrive at practical clinically relevant solutions. Patients who have undergone the Fontan operation are at a high risk for thromboembolism. Based on available evidence, there is a strong rationale for thromboprophylaxis. However, it is not clear as to which agent should be administered to prevent thromboembolic events. While the available evidence suggests that antiplatelet agents alone may be as good as oral anticoagulants, there is a need for a large multicenter randomized control trial comparing these two common strategies to deliver a clear verdict. PMID:27625521

  17. Dissecting the substrate recognition of 3-O-sulfotransferase for the biosynthesis of anticoagulant heparin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Andrea F.; Xu, Yongmei; Woody, Susan M.; Krahn, Joseph M.; Linhardt, Robert J.; Liu, Jian; Pedersen, Lars C. (NIH); (UNC); (Rensselaer)

    2012-05-29

    Heparin is a polysaccharide-based natural product that is used clinically as an anticoagulant drug. Heparan sulfate 3-O-sulfotransferase (3-OST) is an enzyme that transfers a sulfo group to the 3-OH position of a glucosamine unit. 3-OST is present in multiple isoforms, and the polysaccharides modified by these different isoforms perform distinct biological functions. 3-OST isoform 1 (3-OST-1) is the key enzyme for the biosynthesis of anticoagulant heparin. Here, we report the crystal structure of the ternary complex of 3-OST-1, 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphate, and a heptasaccharide substrate. Comparisons to previously determined structures of 3-OST-3 reveal unique binding modes used by the different isoforms of 3-OST for distinguishing the fine structures of saccharide substrates. Our data demonstrate that the saccharide substrates display distinct conformations when interacting with the different 3-OST isoforms. Site-directed mutagenesis data suggest that several key amino residues, including Lys259, Thr256, and Trp283 in 3-OST-3 and Arg268 in 3-OST-1, play important roles in substrate binding and specificity between isoforms. These results deepen our understanding of the biosynthetic mechanism of heparan sulfate and provide structural information for engineering enzymes for an enhanced biosynthetic approach to heparin production.

  18. Synthetic oligosaccharides as heparin-mimetics displaying anticoagulant properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avci, Fikri Y; Karst, Nathalie A; Linhardt, Robert J

    2003-01-01

    Heparin and low molecular weight heparins are major clinical anticoagulants and the drugs of choice for the treatment of deep venous thrombosis. The discovery of an antithrombin binding domain in heparin focused interest on understanding the mechanism of heparin's antithrombotic/ anticoagulant activity. Various heparin-mimetic oligosaccharides have been prepared in an effort to replace polydisperse heparin and low molecular weight heparins with a structurally-defined anticoagulant. The goal of attaining a heparin-mimetic with no unwanted side-effects has also provided motivation for these efforts. This article reviews structure-activity relationship (SAR) of structurally-defined heparin-mimetic oligosaccharides. PMID:14529394

  19. Periablative Anticoagulation Strategies in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo B. Saad

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is associated with thromboembolic events that may cause important impairment on quality of life. Pulmonary vein isolation is the treatment of choice in cases that are refractory to medical therapy. Once sheaths and catheters are manipulated inside the left atrium, anticoagulation with heparin must be used during the procedure to protect patients from thromboembolic phenomena. Different strategies of anticoagulation are used at different centers. This review summarizes the pathophysiology of thrombus formation in the left atrium, defines which patients are under high risk and describes the main strategies used for anticoagulation.

  20. Patient survey of a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, S M; Kroner, B A

    1997-11-01

    The literature describing pharmacy involvement with anticoagulation services primarily does not include information about patients' perceptions of this involvement. A 22-question survey was developed and administered to 296 patients enrolled in the anticoagulation clinic at the VA Pittsburgh Health Care System. Excluded patients had fewer than four clinic visits or were followed outside of the anticoagulation clinic. The study period was nine weeks and any missed patients were telephoned. The median response to each question was determined. Similar questions were analyzed for acquiescent trends. Results indicate that, overall, patients are comfortable with pharmacists providing warfarin monitoring and dose adjustments. PMID:10174757

  1. Emergency management of patients being treated with oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Manzato

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin K antagonists (VKA are among the most widely prescribed drugs in the industrialized world. In fact, for decades, VKA have been the only orally available anticoagulant for the primary and secondary prevention of venous and arterial thrombotic events. Their efficacy has been widely demonstrated in a series of studies carried out in the 1990s. Since the incidences of atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism increase exponentially with age, the number of anticoagulated patients is destined to increase. This paper examines anticoagulation therapy management with particular attention to the use of VKA.

  2. Hanford 100-N Area In Situ Apatite and Phosphate Emplacement by Groundwater and Jet Injection: Geochemical and Physical Core Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szecsody, James E.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Williams, Mark D.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Phillips, Jerry L.

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate emplacement of phosphate into subsurface sediments in the Hanford Site 100-N Area by two different technologies: groundwater injection of a Ca-citrate-PO4 solution and water-jet injection of sodium phosphate and/or fish-bone apatite. In situ emplacement of phosphate and apatite adsorbs, then incorporates Sr-90 into the apatite structure by substitution for calcium. Overall, both technologies (groundwater injection of Ca-citrate-PO4) and water-jet injection of sodium phosphate/fish-bone apatite) delivered sufficient phosphate to subsur¬face sediments in the 100-N Area. Over years to decades, additional Sr-90 will incorporate into the apatite precipitate. Therefore, high pressure water jetting is a viable technology to emplace phosphate or apatite in shallow subsurface sediments difficult to emplace by Ca-citrate-PO4 groundwater injections, but further analysis is needed to quantify the relevant areal extent of phosphate deposition (in the 5- to 15-ft distance from injection points) and cause of the high deposition in finer grained sediments.

  3. Injectable citrate-modified Portland cement for use in vertebroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Wynn-Jones, Gareth; Shelton, Richard M.; Hofmann, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    The injectability of Portland cement (PC) with several citrate additives was investigated for use in clinical applications such as vertebroplasty (stabilization of a fractured vertebra with bone cement) using a syringe. A 2-wt % addition of sodium or potassium citrate with PC significantly improved cement injectability, decreased cement setting times from over 2 h to below 25 min, while increasing the compressive strength to a maximum of 125 MPa. Zeta-potential measurements indicated that the...

  4. Why sildenafil and sildenafil citrate monohydrate crystals are not stable?

    OpenAIRE

    Sawatdee, Somchai; Pakawatchai, Chaveng; Nitichai, Kwanjai; Srichana, Teerapol; PHETMUNG, Hirihattaya

    2015-01-01

    Sildenafil citrate was crystallized by various techniques aiming to determine the behavior and factors affecting the crystal growth. There are only 2 types of sildenafil obtaining from crystallization: sildenafil (1) and sildenafil citrate monohydrate (2). The used techniques were (i) crystallization from saturated solutions, (ii) addition of an antisolvent, (iii) reflux and (iv) slow solvent evaporation method. By pursuing these various methods, our work pointed that the best formation of cr...

  5. Evaluation of a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic: Improving patient care

    OpenAIRE

    Bungard, Tammy J; Gardner, Leslie; Archer, Stephen L.; Hamilton, Peter; Ritchie, Bruce; Tymchak, Wayne; Tsuyuki, Ross T.

    2009-01-01

    Background Anticoagulation management services (AMSs) are widely used for anticoagulation management in many countries. Our AMS is a pharmacist-run ambulatory clinic with a physician advisory committee that manages patients referred with complicated anticoagulation histories. This paper assesses the adequacy of anticoagulation, rates of anticoagulant-related events and associated health care resource utilization for patients before and after referral to our AMS. Methods Consecutive patients r...

  6. Thrombolytic-plus-Anticoagulant Therapy versus Anticoagulant-Alone Therapy in Submassive Pulmonary Thromboembolism (TVASPE Study: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Taherkhani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of thrombolytic agents in the treatment of hemodynamically stable patients with acute submassive pulmonary embolism (PTE remains controversial. We, therefore, conducted this study to compare the effect of thrombolytic plus anticoagulation versus anticoagulation alone on early death and adverse outcome following submassive PTE.Methods: We conducted a study of patients with acute pulmonary embolism and pulmonary hypertension or right ventricular dilatation/dysfunction but without arterial hypotension or shock. The patients were randomly assigned in a single-blind fashion to receive an anticoagulant [Enoxaparin (1 mg/kg twice a day] plus a thrombolytic [Alteplase (100 mg or Streptokinase (1500000 u/2 hours] or an anticoagulant [Enoxaparin (1 mg/kg twice a day] alone. The primary endpoint was in-hospital death or clinical deterioration requiring an escalation of treatment. The secondary endpoints of the study were major bleeding, pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular dilatation at the end of the first week, and exertional dyspnea at the end of the first month.Results: Of 50 patients enrolled, 25 patients were randomly assigned to receive an anticoagulant plus a thrombolytic and the other 25 patients were given an anticoagulant alone. The incidence of the primary endpoints was significantly higher in the anticoagulant-alone group than in the thrombolytic-plus-anticoagulant group (p value = 0.022. At the time of discharge, pulmonary artery pressure was significantly higher in the anticoagulant-alone group than in the thrombolytic- plus-anticoagulant group (p value = 0.018; however, reduction in the right ventricular size or normalization of the right ventricle showed non-significant differences between the two groups. There was no significant difference regarding the New York Heat Association (NYHA functional class between the two groups at the end of the first month (p value = 0.213. No fatal bleeding or cerebral bleeding

  7. Recent developments in the use of oral anticoagulants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Michael R

    2009-01-01

    For many years, vitamin K antagonists, unfractionated heparins, low-molecular-weight heparins and a pentasaccharide were the only anticoagulant drugs available for the prevention of venous thromboembolism after surgery. However, their benefits were associated with disadvantages, such as their...

  8. Update of oral surgery management in orally anticoagulated patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Evrosimovska, Biljana; Pandilova, Maja; Kovacevska, Ivona; Zabokova-Bilbilova, Efka

    2013-01-01

    Aim of this study is to review the evidence of different therapy approach, to highlight the areas of major concern and to suggest specific oral surgery treatment for patients on oral anticoagulants. The aim of operative treatment is to minimize the risk of hemorrhage while continuing to protect the patient against thromboembolism formation. The ordinary treatment includes the interruption of anticoagulant therapy for oral surgery interventions to prevent hemorrhage. However, this practice may...

  9. Use of tranexamic acid in anticoagulated oral surgery patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Papakoca, Kiro; Kovacevska, Ivona; Kamceva, Gordana

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTIONS: The oral surgeons are frequently asked to manage patients who are receiving oral anticoagulants. The goal of treatment is to minimize the risk of hemorrhage while continuing to protect the patient against thromboembolism formation. The ordinary treatment includes the interruption of anticoagulant therapy for oral surgery interventions to prevent hemorrhage. AIM:However, this practice may logically increase the risk of a potentially life-threatening thromboembolism. Thus, thi...

  10. Management of oral surgery procedures in orally anticoagulated patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena

    2010-01-01

    The oral and maxillofacial surgeons are frequently asked to manage patients who are receiving oral anticoagulants. The goal of treatment is to minimize the risk of hemorrhage while continuing to protect the patient against thromboembolism formation. The ordinary treatment includes the interruption of anticoagulant therapy for oral surgery interventions to prevent hemorrhage. However, this practice may logically increase the risk of a potentially life-threatening thromboembolism. Thus, this is...

  11. Management of oral surgery procedures in oral anticoagulated patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena

    2010-01-01

    The oral and maxillofacial surgeons are frequently asked to manage patients who are receiving oral anticoagulants. The goal of treatment is to minimize the risk of hemorrhage while continuing to protect the patient against thromboembolism formation. The ordinary treatment includes the interruption of anticoagulant therapy for oral surgery interventions to prevent hemorrhage. However, this practice may logically increase the risk of a potentially life-threatening thromboembolism. Thus, this is...

  12. New perspectives and recommendations for anticoagulant therapy post orthopedic surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelo Kropf; Cleidson Alves Bergami; Felipe Dias Leal; Claudia Oliveira Dias Passos; Zilda de Santana Gonsalves; Isabela Laudares Marques; Isabela Azevedo Mota; Marcele Lima Monte Gonçalves

    2011-01-01

    Anticoagulant therapy is essential for the prevention of risks associated with the formation of thrombus in patients after surgery, especially in orthopedics. Recently, new oral anticoagulants were introduced in the therapeutic arsenal. This fact is important, because the current drug of choice in clinical practice is enoxaparin, a low molecular weight heparin. As all injecting drugs, enoxaparin may reduce patients' adherence to treatment by dissatisfaction with and resistance to the administ...

  13. Use of antifibrinolytic mouthwash solution in anticoagulated oral surgery patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Evrosimovska, Biljana; Papakoca, Kiro; Georgiev, Zlatko; Angelovska, Bistra; Ristoska, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Introduction:The ordinary treatment of anticoagulated patients includes the interruption of anticoagulant therapy for oral surgery interventions to prevent hemorrhage. However, this practice may logically increase the risk of a potentially life-threatening thromboembolism, so this issue is still controversial. The aim of the study was to evaluate the antifibrinolitic mouthwash solution (tranexamic acid) as a local haemostatic modality after oral surgery interventions. Methods:To realize the a...

  14. The Comprehensive Management of Anticoagulation: Ochsner Coumadin Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Barrios, Annette C.; Ventura, Hector O.; Milani, Richard V.

    2002-01-01

    Clinical privileging of pharmacists and the effective use of support staff and information technology have helped create an efficient pharmacist-operated anticoagulation clinic at Ochsner Clinic Foundation that will support future growth efforts for improved patient care. Developed by Ochsner's Department of Cardiology, the pharmacist-operated anticoagulation clinic cares for 2000 patients with a clinical pharmacist, staff pharmacist, registered nurse, and medical assistants. Patients are man...

  15. Anticoagulant Rodenticide Intoxication in Animals – A Review

    OpenAIRE

    VALCHEV, Ivan; Binev, Rumen; YORDANOVA, Veska; Nikolov, Yordan

    2008-01-01

    The newest measures for the control of harmful rodent populations are from the anticoagulant rodenticide group, which are divided into 2 subgroups: first and second generations, and indandione derivatives. Non-target organisms are potentially at risk of direct consumption of baits (primary hazard) and of eating poisoned rodents (secondary hazard). Anticoagulant rodenticides inhibit the enzyme vitamin K-dependent carboxylase and thus impair the reactivation of vitamin K1, indirectly affecting ...

  16. Mechanical Prosthetic Valves and Pregnancy: A therapeutic dilemma of anticoagulation

    OpenAIRE

    Prashanth Panduranga; Mohammed El-Deeb; Chitra Jha

    2014-01-01

    Choosing the best anticoagulant therapy for a pregnant patient with a mechanical prosthetic valve is controversial and the published international guidelines contain no clear-cut consensus on the best approach. This is due to the fact that there is presently no anticoagulant which can reliably decrease thromboembolic events while avoiding damage to the fetus. Current treatments include either continuing oral warfarin or substituting warfarin for subcutaneous unfractionated heparin or low-mole...

  17. Novel Anticoagulants in Atrial Fibrillation: Monitoring, Reversal and Perioperative Management

    OpenAIRE

    Fadi Shamoun; Hiba Obeid; Harish Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation continues to be a significant source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Effective anticoagulation remains the cornerstone of outpatient and inpatient treatment. The use of the new generation of anticoagulants (NOACs) continues to grow. Recently published data indicate their cost-effectiveness and overall safety in stroke prevention; compared to vitamin K antagonists, they can be prescribed in fixed doses for long-term therapy without the need for coagulation monitoring....

  18. Phosphate Removal by Anion Binding on Functionalized Nanoporous Sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Wiacek, Robert J.; Pattamakomsan, Kanda; Sangvanich, Thanapon; Grudzien, Rafal M.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Yantasee, Wasanna

    2010-03-26

    Phosphate was captured from aqueous solutions by cationic metal-EDA complexes anchored inside mesoporous silica MCM-41 supports (Cu(II)-EDA-SAMMS and Fe(III)-EDA-SAMMS). Fe-EDA-SAMMS was more effective at capturing phosphate than the Cu-EDA-SAMMS and was further studied for matrix effects (e.g., pH, ionic strength, and competing anions) and sorption performance (e.g., capacity and rate). The adsorption of phosphate was highly pH dependent; it increased with increasing pH from 1.0 to 6.5, and decreased above pH 6.5. The adsorption was affected by high ionic strength (0.1 M of NaCl). In the presence of 1000-fold molar excess of chloride and nitrate anions, phosphate removal by Fe-EDA-SAMMS was not affected. Slight, moderate and large impacts were seen with bicarbonate, sulfate and citrate anions, respectively. The phosphate adsorption data on Fe-EDA-SAMMS agreed well with the Langmuir model with the estimated maximum capacity of 43.3 mg/g. The material displayed rapid sorption rate (99% of phosphate removal within 1 min) and lowering the phosphate content to ~ 10 µg/L of phosphorus, which is lower than the EPA’s established freshwater contaminant level for phosphorous (20 µg/L).

  19. Citrate-release-mediated aluminum resistance is coupled to the inducible expression of mitochondrial citrate synthase gene in Paraserianthes falcataria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, Hiroki; Kojima, Katsumi

    2006-05-01

    Aluminum (Al) resistance in some leguminous plants is achieved by enhanced citrate release from roots. Enhancement requires several hours for complete activation and is postulated to involve Al-responsive genes or components. We examined the mechanism of Al-induced citrate release by studying the relationship between citrate release and expression of the mitochondrial citrate synthase (mCS) gene in three leguminous trees. Root elongation in Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit was arrested within 24 h by 30 microM Al, whereas root elongation in Paraserianthes falcataria (L.) Neilson and Acacia mangium Willd. was inhibited mangium maintained enhanced release and accumulation of citrate for at least 28 days in response to Al treatment. Aluminum increased the accumulation of mCS transcripts in P. falcataria roots, but not in L. leucocephala roots, and thus up-regulation decreased following removal of Al. Lanthanum did not alter the expression level of mCS. Aluminum increased mCS activity concomitantly with enhanced mCS gene expression in P. falcataria, whereas it did not affect mCS activity in L. leucocephala. Aluminum content in root apices of P. falcataria was increased by cycloheximide, supporting the idea that de novo synthesis of proteins is a prerequisite for Al resistance. Our findings suggest that Al-inducible expression of mCS coupled with enhanced citrate release mediates Al resistance in P. falcataria. PMID:16452070

  20. Adherence to a new oral anticoagulant treatment prescription: dabigatran etexilate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Bellamy

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available L Bellamy1, N Rosencher1, BI Eriksson21Anaesthesiology Department, Hôpital Cochin (AP-HP, René Descartes University, Paris 75014 France; 2Orthopaedic Department, University Hospital Sahlgrenska/Ostra, Gothenburg, SwedenAbstract: The recent development of new oral anticoagulants, of which dabigatran etexilate is currently at the most advanced stage of development, is the greatest advance in the provision of convenient anticoagulation therapy for many years. A new oral anticoagulation treatment, dabigatran etexilate, is already on the market in Europe. The main interest probably will be to improve the prescription and the adherence to an effective thromboprophylaxis in medical conditions such as atrial fibrillation without bleeding side effects, without the need for monitoring coagulation, and without drug and food interactions such as vitamin K anticoagulant (VKA treatment. Dabigatran is particularly interesting for extended thromboprophylaxis after major orthopedic surgery in order to avoid daily injection for a month. However, oral long-term treatments such as VKA are not systematically associated with a higher compliance level than injected treatments such as low-molecular-weight heparins. Indeed, adherence to an oral treatment, instead of the usual daily injection in major orthopedic surgery, is complex, and based not only on the frequency of dosing but also on patient motivation, understanding, and socio-economic status. New oral anticoagulants may be useful in this way but education and detection of risk factors of nonadherence to treatment are still essential.Keywords: oral anticoagulant, adherence, compliance, education, dabigatran

  1. New anticoagulants for the prevention of venous thromboembolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becattini, Cecilia; Lignani, Alessandra; Agnelli, Giancarlo

    2010-01-01

    Anticoagulant drugs have an essential role in the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic diseases. Currently available anticoagulants substantially reduce the incidence of thromboembolic events in a number of clinical conditions. However, these agents have limitations that strengthen the case for the development of new anticoagulants. An ideal anticoagulant should be at least as effective as those currently in use, as well as safe, simple to use, and widely applicable. The majority of new anticoagulants currently under investigation are small molecules with a selective and direct anti-Xa or antithrombin action, allowing oral administration in fixed doses. These new agents are in different phases of clinical development. The anti-Xa agent rivaroxaban and the antithrombin agent dabigatran are already available for the prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism in some countries. Apixaban is in an advanced phase of clinical development and several anti-Xa agents are currently approaching phase III clinical trials. Promising results in terms of efficacy and safety profiles have been obtained with these agents in different clinical conditions. Differences in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics could offer the potential for individualized anticoagulant therapies in the near future. PMID:20531960

  2. [Duration of anticoagulant therapy in venous thromboembolic complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, M R; Leontyev, S G; Neskhodimov, L A; Tolstikhin, V Yu; Khotinskiy, A A

    2016-01-01

    Adequate anticoagulant therapy is a general approach to treatment of deep vein thrombosis. However, the duration of anticoagulant therapy is not strictly specified in everyday clinical practice. The present article deals with various approaches to selecting the duration of therapy with anticoagulants based on the findings of studies, national and foreign clinical guidelines. The minimal duration of therapy for deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism amounts to 3 months in accordance with the national and American recommendations. For some cohorts of patients, continuation of therapy above 3 months is considered: patients with idiopathic thrombosis (the recommended duration of therapy of not less than 6 months), patients having persisting risk factor for relapse of thrombosis on termination of the main therapeutic course, oncological patients (6 month therapy followed by assessing the risk and benefit of continuing therapy with anticoagulants). Prolonged therapy of venous thromboembolism using unfractionated heparin or low-molecular-weight heparin followed by changing over to vitamin K antagonists is associated with decreased risk for thrombosis relapse approximately by 90%, however increasing the risk of haemorrhage. Currently, as an alternative, it is possible to consider administration of novel oral anticoagulants (rivaroxaban, dabigatran, apixaban) which beside high efficacy are associated with less risk of bleeding. The route of administration, no necessity to control the INR, and the minimal number of drug and food interactions make administration of new oral anticoagulants an attractive alternative to therapy with heparins and vitamin K antagonists. PMID:27100556

  3. Establishing an outpatient anticoagulation clinic in a community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, J L; Gibson, D L

    1996-05-15

    The establishment of a pharmacist-managed out-patient anticoagulation clinic in a private community hospital is described. Discussions by pharmacy with office-based physicians at a 187-bed, private, nonprofit community medical center indicated that the traditional system of anticoagulation management was not ideal for the physicians or their patients. Development of a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic began in fall 1993; operations began in spring 1994. Planning included analyzing existing practices, reviewing the relevant literature, obtaining physician input, visiting an established anticoagulation clinic, formulating a business plan, and developing clinical protocols. Collaborative relationships were established with the hospital laboratory, business office, and risk management, information services, and medical records departments. Two pharmacists were trained to work in the clinic and provide coverage 24 hours a day. Services include patient assessment, monitoring of anticoagulation, warfarin dosage adjustment, medication management, patient education, follow-up care, and providing feedback to referring and attending physicians. The clinic has met with physician and patient satisfaction, has reduced the number of admissions to treat warfarin-related bleeding, and has been able to cover its direct costs. A pharmacist-managed anti-coagulation clinic was successfully established in a private community hospital. PMID:8734675

  4. Effects of low dose gamma irradiation on PVC blood bags containing anticoagulant CPDA solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PVC blood bags were exposed to 20Gy and 60Gy low gamma radiation dose to investigate possibility of change in leaching behavior of the plasticizer into CPDA solution and the blood. Reversed phase HPLC was used for the investigations on anti coagulant solution CPDA(citrate, phosphate, dextrose and adenine) contained in PVC bag before and after gamma irradiation. The studies were repeated using methanol as an extractant instead of CPDA solution, considering higher extractability of plasticizer by blood. Irradiation of PVC bags by gamma radiation for a dose up to 60Gy does not lead to change in leaching behavior of the plasticizer in CPDA solution and methanol indicating similar expected behavior in blood. (author)

  5. Intestinal Phosphate Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Sabbagh, Yves; Giral, Hector; Caldas, Yupanqui; Levi, Moshe; Schiavi, Susan C.

    2011-01-01

    Phosphate is absorbed in the small intestine by at least two distinct mechanisms: paracellular phosphate transport which is dependent on passive diffusion and active transport which occurs through the sodium-dependent phosphate co-transporters. Despite evidence emerging for other ions, regulation of the phosphate specific paracellular pathways remains largely unexplored. In contrast, there is a growing body of evidence that active transport through the sodium-dependent phosphate co-transporte...

  6. Thrombolytic-plus-Anticoagulant Therapy versus Anticoagulant-Alone Therapy in Submassive Pulmonary Thromboembolism (TVASPE Study): A Randomized Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Taherkhani; Adineh Taherkhani; SeyedReza Hashemi; Taraneh Faghihi-Langroodi; Roxana Sadeghi; Mohammadreza Beyranvand

    2014-01-01

    Background: The use of thrombolytic agents in the treatment of hemodynamically stable patients with acute submassive pulmonary embolism (PTE) remains controversial. We, therefore, conducted this study to compare the effect of thrombolytic plus anticoagulation versus anticoagulation alone on early death and adverse outcome following submassive PTE.Methods: We conducted a study of patients with acute pulmonary embolism and pulmonary hypertension or right ventricular dilatation/dysfunction but w...

  7. Anticoagulation reversal in the era of the non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enriquez, Andres; Lip, Gregory Y H; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have emerged as an alternative to warfarin for the prevention and treatment of thrombo-embolic disease. Large randomized trials have demonstrated that these agents, which act by directly targeting thrombin (dabigatran) and factor Xa....... New specific antidotes (e.g. idarucizumab, andexanet alfa, and ciraparantag) show promising data, and may soon become available for clinical use. In this article, we review the pharmacology of these agents, the incidence and outcomes of haemorrhagic complications, the available strategies for...

  8. Preparation of lead titanate zirconate from metal citrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lead titanate zirconate (PZT) preparation from its metal constituent citrates have been investigated. Metal citrates were obtained by forced precipitation using a dehydration alcohol mixture. Salt solutions of lead nitrate and octahydrated zirconyl chloride, and titanium tetrachloride were treated separately with citric acid and ammonium hydroxide. Zirconium, titanium and lead oxides resulted from thermal decomposition of corresponding citrates at 5000 C, 4500 C and 2500 C, respectively. Lead titanate (PT) and lead zirconate (P Z) were obtained by calcining at 4500 C and 5000 C, respectively, after adequate heating of citrates mechanically mixed in ethyl ether. PZT samples were obtained with different starting stoichiometry. Rhombohedral PZT-1 53/47 sample was prepared from co precipitating zirconyl ammonium and ammonium lead citrates in presence of ethanolic titanium oxide dispersion, and calcinating at 8000 C. Rhombohedral PZT-q 52/48 sample was obtained from heating at 5000 C for 2 hours a mixture of metal citrates coprecipitated by dehydration mixture of acetone-ethanol-formic acid (2:1:0,06). Tetragonal PZT-m stoichiometry 53/47 sample were obtained by calcining at after 6000 C for 2 hours after heating a mechanically mixed metal citrates. PT phase arose at 4000 C. PZT-m powders obtained in a range of 4000 C-8000 C were isostatically pressed, and sintered at 11000 C and 12000 C in saturated Pb O atmosphere. Rhombohedral sintered PZT was obtained with 7,78 g.cm-3 at 12000 C. (author). 123 refs, 53 figs, 32 tabs

  9. Alkali absorption and citrate excretion in calcium nephrolithiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhaee, K.; Williams, R. H.; Oh, M. S.; Padalino, P.; Adams-Huet, B.; Whitson, P.; Pak, C. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The role of net gastrointestinal (GI) alkali absorption in the development of hypocitraturia was investigated. The net GI absorption of alkali was estimated from the difference between simple urinary cations (Ca, Mg, Na, and K) and anions (Cl and P). In 131 normal subjects, the 24 h urinary citrate was positively correlated with the net GI absorption of alkali (r = 0.49, p < 0.001). In 11 patients with distal renal tubular acidosis (RTA), urinary citrate excretion was subnormal relative to net GI alkali absorption, with data from most patients residing outside the 95% confidence ellipse described for normal subjects. However, the normal relationship between urinary citrate and net absorbed alkali was maintained in 11 patients with chronic diarrheal syndrome (CDS) and in 124 stone-forming patients devoid of RTA or CDS, half of whom had "idiopathic" hypocitraturia. The 18 stone-forming patients without RTA or CDS received potassium citrate (30-60 mEq/day). Both urinary citrate and net GI alkali absorption increased, yielding a significantly positive correlation (r = 0.62, p < 0.0001), with the slope indistinguishable from that of normal subjects. Thus, urinary citrate was normally dependent on the net GI absorption of alkali. This dependence was less marked in RTA, confirming the renal origin of hypocitraturia. However, the normal dependence was maintained in CDS and in idiopathic hypocitraturia, suggesting that reduced citrate excretion was largely dietary in origin as a result of low net alkali absorption (from a probable relative deficiency of vegetables and fruits or a relative excess of animal proteins).

  10. Theoretical Study on Sulfur Dioxide Absorption with Citrate Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛娟琴; 洪涛; 王召启; 李林波

    2006-01-01

    The citrate absorption of SO2 is currently one of the most successful and economic methods to harness sulfur dioxide pollution.In order to theoretically elucidate the mechanism of SO2 absorption by citrate solution and provide theoretical instruction for experiments and industrial process, the theory of multi-buffer solution, combined with computer numerical calculation methods, was applied to study the distribution parameters of the components of the citrate solution in the process of SO2 absorption and the following results were obtained: (1) HCi2- and H2Ci- in the citrate solution played the dominant role in the absorption and desorption processes; (2) Through the calculation for the buffer capacity of citrate solution, it was found that the pH of the absorption and desorption solution should be in the range of 2~8, while at pH=4.5 the buffer capacity reached its maximum. Some valuable parameters were obtained, which are instructive to the ensuing experiments and industrial design.

  11. Electrodeposition of Sn-Zn-Cu alloys from citrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first stage of this study involves the development of stable baths for electrodepositing Sn-Zn-Cu alloys; these developments are based on thermodynamic models of citrate baths and experiments exploring the stability of the baths. The effects of the sodium citrate (complexation agent) concentration and the pH of the solution on the stability of the baths were examined experimentally. The stability of the baths was determined through spectrophotometric analysis. Stable baths designed for the electrodeposition of Sn-Zn-Cu alloys were produced in the range of dominant citrate complexes with highly negative charge (the reduction process is strongly inhibited by high activation energy). Voltammetric studies and potentiostatic deposition were conducted to analyse the co-deposition of tin, zinc, and copper, and the co-evolution of hydrogen. The effect of the solution pH, the concentration of sodium citrate and the hydrodynamic conditions on the electrodeposition process and the composition of the deposits were examined. The deposits were analysed using chemical (μXRF) as also grain size and phase analysis (X-ray diffraction). The possibility of electrodepositing Sn-Zn-Cu alloys from citrate solutions was confirmed. The tin content of these coatings varied from 60 to 96 wt.%, the copper content varied from 3.5 to 20.5 wt.%, and the zinc content reached up to approximately 37.5 wt.%

  12. Characterization of cylindrical and strip-shaped tamoxifen citrate-loaded biodegradable implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadeesh G Hiremath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to prepare tamoxifen citrate (TC-loaded cylindrical and strip-shaped polymeric subdermal implants. The implant was based on poly(ε-caprolactone, a low-melting, biodegradable and biocompatible polymer. Polyethylene glycol (PEG 4000 was used to enhance solubility and release of the drug in the phosphate buffer saline pH 7.4. Implants were prepared by a standardized melt manufacturing method. The prepared implants were evaluated for their physicochemical parameters and drug content in implants by UV spectrophotometric method. PCL-based implants were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction studies (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. DSC studies showed that the TC in the implants was in the amorphous state. In vitro drug release studies were performed in methanol:phosphate-buffered saline (pH 7.4 at 37±2°C by using horizontal water bath shaker. Stability study was carried out for 90 days, there was no significant change in drug content and other parameters of the PCL-based formulations.

  13. Major cerebral events in Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis: is anticoagulant therapy safe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus V; Snygg-Martin, Ulrika; Olaison, Lars;

    2009-01-01

    -hospital mortality was 23% (95% CI: 17-29%), and there was no significant difference between those with or without anticoagulation. CONCLUSIONS: We found no increased risk of cerebral haemorrhage in S. aureus IE patients receiving anticoagulation. Anticoagulation was associated with a reduced risk of cerebral events...... before initiation of antibiotics. Data support the continuance of anticoagulation in S. aureus IE patients when indicated.......OBJECTIVES: To study the impact of anticoagulation on major cerebral events in patients with left-sided Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis (IE). METHODS: A prospective cohort study; the use of anticoagulation and the relation to major cerebral events was evaluated separately at onset...

  14. Alkali absorption and citrate excretion in calcium nephrolithiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhaee, K.; Williams, R. H.; Oh, M. S.; Padalino, P.; Adams-Huet, B.; Whitson, P.; Pak, C. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The role of net gastrointestinal (GI) alkali absorption in the development of hypocitraturia was investigated. The net GI absorption of alkali was estimated from the difference between simple urinary cations (Ca, Mg, Na, and K) and anions (Cl and P). In 131 normal subjects, the 24 h urinary citrate was positively correlated with the net GI absorption of alkali (r = 0.49, p mEq/day). Both urinary citrate and net GI alkali absorption increased, yielding a significantly positive correlation (r = 0.62, p reduced citrate excretion was largely dietary in origin as a result of low net alkali absorption (from a probable relative deficiency of vegetables and fruits or a relative excess of animal proteins).

  15. Survey of Botulinum Toxin Injections in Anticoagulated Patients: Korean Physiatrists' Preference in Controlling Anticoagulation Profile Prior to Intramuscular Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yongjun; Park, Geun-Young; Park, Jihye; Choi, Asayeon; Kim, Soo Yeon; Boulias, Chris; Phadke, Chetan P.; Ismail, Farooq

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate Korean physiatrists' practice of performing intramuscular botulinum toxin injection in anticoagulated patients and to assess their preference in controlling the bleeding risk before injection. Methods As part of an international collaboration survey study, a questionnaire survey was administered to 100 Korean physiatrists. Physiatrists were asked about their level of experience with botulinum toxin injection, the safe international normalized ratio range in anticoagulated patients undergoing injection, their tendency for injecting into deep muscles, and their experience of bleeding complications. Results International normalized ratio <2.0 was perceived as an ideal range for performing Botulinum toxin injection by 41% of the respondents. Thirty-six respondents replied that the international normalized ratio should be lowered to sub-therapeutic levels before injection, and 18% of the respondents reported that anticoagulants should be intentionally withheld and discontinued prior to injection. In addition, 20%–30% of the respondents answered that they were uncertain whether they should perform the injection regardless of the international normalized ratio values. About 69% of the respondents replied that they did have any standardized protocols for performing botulinum toxin injection in patients using anticoagulants. Only 1 physiatrist replied that he had encountered a case of compartment syndrome. Conclusion In accordance with the lack of consensus in performing intramuscular botulinum toxin injection in anticoagulated patients, our survey shows a wide range of practices among many Korean physiatrists; they tend to avoid botulinum toxin injection in anticoagulated patients and are uncertain about how to approach these patients. The results of this study emphasize the need for formulating a proper international consensus on botulinum toxin injection management in anticoagulated patients. PMID:27152278

  16. Anticoagulant rodenticide poisoning in animals of Apulia and Basilicata, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscarella, Marilena; Armentano, Antonio; Iammarino, Marco; Palermo, Carmen; Amorena, Michele

    2016-06-30

    This study evaluates the presence of anticoagulant rodenticides in animals with a diagnosis of suspected poisoning and in bait samples. The survey was carried out from 2010 to 2012, in 2 regions of South Italy (Puglia and Basilicata) on 300 organs of animals and 90 suspected bait samples. The qualitative and quantitative analyses were conducted using an analytical method based on high‑performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorimetric detection (FLD) for the simultaneous determination of 8 anticoagulant rodenticides (bromadiolone, brodifacoum, coumachlor, coumafuryl, coumatetralyl, difenacoum, flocoumafen, and warfarin). The presence of anticoagulant rodenticides was detected in 33 organs of animals (11% of the total) and 6 bait samples (7% of the total). The most commonly detected compound was coumachlor (47% of 39 positive samples) followed by bromadiolone (24%), and brodifacoum (11%). The species mostly involved in anticoagulant rodenticide poisoning were dogs and cats. This study emphasizes the relevance of the determinations of anticoagulant rodenticides in cases of suspected poisoning in veterinary practice. PMID:27393877

  17. Retrospective evaluation of a pharmacist-managed warfarin anticoagulation clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garabedian-Ruffalo, S M; Gray, D R; Sax, M J; Ruffalo, R L

    1985-02-01

    The effectiveness of a pharmacist-managed warfarin anticoagulation clinic in maintaining therapeutic prothrombin times and preventing hospitalizations secondary to inadequate control of anticoagulation was evaluated. Patients who had received warfarin sodium for at least one year before being referred to the anticoagulation clinic were studied using retrospective chart reviews. Clinical pharmacists provided patient education, monitored patients for hemorrhagic and thromboembolic complications, and adjusted warfarin sodium dosage to maintain therapeutic prothrombin times. The patients' primary physicians retained responsibility for overall care and were consulted by pharmacists regarding complications of anticoagulation and patient unreliability. The percentage of patients requiring hospitalization (39% versus 4%) and the percentage of prothrombin times outside the therapeutic range (35.8% versus 14.4%) were significantly higher during the preclinic phase (before referral to the clinic) than during the clinic phase. Eight patients were hospitalized for hemorrhagic complications and four for thromboembolism during the preclinic phase; only one hospitalization for hemorrhage occurred during the clinic phase. The warfarin anticoagulation clinic staffed by specially trained pharmacists provided improved therapy compared with treatment received by patients before their referral to the clinic. PMID:3976675

  18. Pharmacology of new oral anticoagulants: mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Masotti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to their mechanism of action, the new oral anticoagulants are named direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs. Dabigatran is a selective, competitive, direct inhibitor of thrombin (Factor IIa while rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban act by directly inhibiting the activated Factor X (FXa in a selective and competitive manner. DOACs have a relatively short half-life and almost immediate anticoagulant activity, and rapidly reach the plasma peak concentration. Therefore, they do not need a phase of overlapping with parenteral anticoagulants. After their withdrawal, their removal is sufficiently rapid, although influenced by renal function. Dabigatran is the only DOACs to be administered as a pro-drug and becomes active after drug metabolization. The route of elimination of dabigatran is primarily renal, whereas FXa inhibitors are mainly eliminated by the biliary-fecal route. The drug interactions of DOACs are mainly limited to drugs that act on P-glycoprotein for dabigatran and on P-glycoprotein and/or cytochrome P3A4 for anti-Xa. DOACs have no interactions with food. Given their linear pharmacodynamics, with a predictable dose/response relationship and anticoagulant effect, DOACs are administered at a fixed dose and do not require routine laboratory monitoring.

  19. Efficacy of preventing hemodialysis catheter infections with citrate lock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jorge; Antunes, Jorge; Carvalho, Telmo; Ponce, Pedro

    2012-10-01

    Prevalent use of tunneled dialysis catheters can reach 30%. Infection remains the most serious catheter-related problem. Catheter locks are increasingly used for prevention, but are not yet recommended either by the Food and Drug Association or European Medicines Agency, on the basis of increasing bacterial resistance or lock toxicity. The aim was to test safety and effectiveness of citrate. A prospective, interventional study was conducted to assess the safety and efficacy of a 30% citrate lock in preventing catheter-related bacteremia (CRB). A total of 157 prevalent tunneled catheters were locked with citrate and prospectively followed during a 1-year period. The primary endpoint was first CRB diagnosed according to two of the diagnostic criteria for Catheter Infection of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), namely definite and probable infection. The CDC criterion of possible but not proved infection was not considered. This citrate lock cohort (n = 157) had 10 episodes of CRB. We observed 0.49 CRB episodes/1000 patient-days and the mean infection-free catheter day was 130.6 ± 100.9. No clinically relevant adverse events were observed. No proved tunnel or exit site infection was observed and no patients died because of CRB. Catheter obstruction episodes were reported on 69 occasions out of 14 catheters. These results were compared with an historical cohort from a previous study of catheter locking with low-dose gentamicin and did not show significant difference in efficacy. Citrate lock is effective in preventing CRB. No toxicity was observed. The use of citrate lock may have advantages over antibiotic locks: no reported bacterial resistance, lower industrial cost, and less manipulation. PMID:22515732

  20. Formation of colloidal silver nanoparticles: Capping action of citrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colloidal silver sols of long-time stability are formed in the γ-irradiation of 1.0 x 10-4 M AgClO4 solutions, which also contain 0.3 M 2-propanol, 2.5 x 10-2 M N2O, and sodium citrate in various concentrations. The reduction of Ag+ in these solutions is brought about by the 1-hydroxyalkyl radical generated in the radiolysis of 2-propanol; citrate does not act as a reductant but solely as a stabilizer of the colloidal particles formed. Its concentration is varied in the range from 5.0 x 10-5 to 1.5 x 10-3 M, and the size and size distribution of the silver particles are studied by electron microscopy. At low citrate concentration, partly agglomerated large particles are formed that have many imperfections. In an intermediate range (a few 10-4 M), well-separated particles with a rather narrow size distribution and little imperfections are formed, the size slightly decreasing with increasing citrate concentration. At high citrate concentrations, large lumps of coalesced silver particles are present, due to destabilization by the high ionic strength of the solution. These findings are explained by two growth mechanisms: condensation of small silver clusters (type-1 growth), and reduction of Ag+ on silver particles via radical-to-particle electron transfer (type-2 growth). The particles formed in the intermediate range of citrate concentration were studied by high-resolution electron microscopy and computer simulations. They constitute icosahedra and cuboctahedra

  1. Effect of sildenafil citrate on penile erection of rhesus macaques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xun-BinHuang; Cheng-LiangXiong; Cheng-GaoYu; Jie-LingZhou; Ji-YunShen

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To examine the effect of sildenafil citrate on penile erection of male rhesus macaque. Methods:Twenty Macaca mulatta were divided into the sildenafil treated and the control groups of l0 animals each. The penile size, the corpus cavernosal electromyogram (EMG) and the intra-corpus cavernosal pressure (ICP) were determined. Results: The diameter of penis and the ICP were significantly increased and the corpus cavernosal EMG significantly reduced in the sildenafil group. Conclusion: Sildenafil citrate increases the penile size and ICP and reduces the corpus cavernosal EMG in male rhesus macaque. (Asian J Androl 2004 Sep; 6: 233-235)

  2. Gastric fluid pH in patients receiving sodium citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, O J; Ravindran, R S; Shumacker, C A

    1981-07-01

    Gastric fluid pH was measured following induction of anesthesia and placement of an endotracheal tube in 30 surgical patients undergoing elective operations. None of the patients received an anticholinergic drug before surgery. Fifteen patients who had been given 15 ml of sodium citrate 15 to 20 minutes before induction of anesthesia had a mean pH of 6.2 +/- 0.8. The control group, which also consisted of 15 patients, had a mean pH of 2.1 +/- 1.4. The increase in gastric pH noted following sodium citrate would result in reduced pulmonary reaction should aspiration occur. PMID:7195668

  3. Adherence to oral anticoagulant therapy in secondary stroke prevention – impact of the novel oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luger S

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sebastian Luger,1 Carina Hohmann,2 Daniela Niemann,1 Peter Kraft,3 Ignaz Gunreben,3 Tobias Neumann-Haefelin,2 Christoph Kleinschnitz,3 Helmuth Steinmetz,1 Christian Foerch,1 Waltraud Pfeilschifter1 1Department of Neurology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, 2Department of Neurology, Klinikum Fulda gAG, Fulda, 3Department of Neurology, University Hospital Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany Background: Oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT potently prevents strokes in patients with atrial fibrillation. Vitamin K antagonists (VKA have been the standard of care for long-term OAT for decades, but non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOAC have recently been approved for this indication, and raised many questions, among them their influence on medication adherence. We assessed adherence to VKA and NOAC in secondary stroke prevention. Methods: All patients treated from October 2011 to September 2012 for ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack with a subsequent indication for OAT, at three academic hospitals were entered into a prospective registry, and baseline data and antithrombotic treatment at discharge were recorded. At the 1-year follow-up, we assessed the adherence to different OAT strategies and patients’ adherence to their respective OAT. We noted OAT changes, reasons to change treatment, and factors that influence persistence to the prescribed OAT. Results: In patients discharged on OAT, we achieved a fatality corrected response rate of 73.3% (n=209. A total of 92% of these patients received OAT at the 1-year follow-up. We observed good adherence to both VKA and NOAC (VKA, 80.9%; NOAC, 74.8%; P=0.243 with a statistically nonsignificant tendency toward a weaker adherence to dabigatran. Disability at 1-year follow-up was an independent predictor of lower adherence to any OAT after multivariate analysis, whereas the choice of OAT did not have a relevant influence. Conclusion: One-year adherence to OAT after stroke is strong (>90% and patients

  4. Uranium from phosphate ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics are described briefly: the way phosphate fertilizers are made; how uranium is recovered in the phosphate industry; and how to detect covert uranium recovery operations in a phsophate plant

  5. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003671.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a type of ...

  6. Chloroquine Phosphate Oral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chloroquine phosphate is in a class of drugs called antimalarials and amebicides. It is used to prevent and treat ... Chloroquine phosphate comes as a tablet to take by mouth. For prevention of malaria in adults, one dose is ...

  7. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of oral anticoagulants, especially phenprocoumon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haustein, K O

    1999-01-01

    Anticoagulants of the cumarin-type (warfarin, phenprocoumon, and acenocoumarol) are drugs for the long-term treatment and prevention of thromboembolic disorders. Because of their narrow therapeutic range, many patients have bleedings of variable severity or have recurrent thrombotic events. For this reason, the study of the pharmacokinetic parameters of phenprocoumon (PPC), considering its influence on blood clotting factors, is of high interest. The elimination kinetics of PPC, its interaction with phytomenadion (vitamin K), and the pharmacokinetic behavior of the anticoagulant under steady-state conditions have been investigated in studies with healthy volunteers and patients taking anticoagulants. The maintenance dose and the plasma levels of PPC were correlated with prothrombin time (PT) in 89 patients treated with PPC. Varying parameters in each patient (e.g., elimination kinetics of PPC, activity of the cumarin-dependent blood-clotting factors, endogenous phytomenadion stores), render it impossible to use a different means of monitoring than that of PT determination. PMID:10327214

  8. A pharmacologic overview of current and emerging anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutescu, Edith A; Shapiro, Nancy L; Chevalier, Aimee; Amin, Alpesh N

    2005-04-01

    For over 50 years, anticoagulant options for the treatment and prevention of thrombosis have been limited mainly to traditional agents such as unfractionated heparin and oral vitamin K antagonists such as warfarin. These traditional agents are fraught with limitations that complicate their clinical use. A variety of novel anticoagulants with improved pharmacologic and clinical profiles have recently been introduced or are in development, offering benefits over traditional therapies. Specifically, progress has been made in the development of low-molecular-weight heparins, factor Xa inhibitors, and direct thrombin inhibitors. Because of their convenience and ease of use, some of these novel compounds are competing with the traditional anticoagulants and are needed additions to the antithrombotic arsenal. PMID:15853173

  9. Development of macroporous calcium phosphate scaffold processed via microwave rapid drying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porous hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffold has great potential in bone tissue engineering applications. A new method to fabricate macroporous calcium phosphate (CP) scaffold via microwave irradiation, followed by conventional sintering to form HA scaffold was developed. Incorporation of trisodium citrate dihydrate and citric acid in the CP mixture gave macroporous scaffolds upon microwave rapid drying. In this work, a mixture of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), calcium carbonate (CaCO3), trisodium citrate dihydrate, citric acid and double distilled de-ionised water (DDI) was exposed to microwave radiation to form a macroporous structure. Based on gross eye examinations, addition of trisodium citrate at 30 and 40 wt.% in the CP mixture (β-TCP and CaCO3) without citric acid indicates increasing order of pore volume where the highest porosity yield was observed at 40 wt.% of trisodium citrate addition and the pore size was detected at several millimeters. Therefore, optimization of pore size was performed by adding 3-7 wt.% of citric acid in the CP mixture which was separately mixed with 30 and 40 wt.% of trisodium citrate for comparison purposes. Fabricated scaffolds were calcined at 600 deg. C and washed with DDI water to remove the sodium hydroxycarbonate and sintered at 1250 deg. C to form HA phase as confirmed in the X-ray diffraction (XRD) results. Based on Archimedes method, HA scaffolds prepared from 40 wt.% of trisodium citrate with 3-7 wt.% of citric acid added CP mixture have an open and interconnected porous structure ranging from 51 to 53 vol.% and observation using Scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed the pore size distribution between 100 and 500 μm. The cytotoxicity tests revealed that the porous HA scaffolds have no cytotoxic potential on MG63 osteoblast-like cells which might allow for their use as biomaterials.

  10. Personalized antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy: applications and significance of pharmacogenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beitelshees AL

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Amber L Beitelshees,1,* Deepak Voora,2,* Joshua P Lewis,1,* 1Program for Personalized and Genomic Medicine and Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Nutrition, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Center for Applied Genomics & Precision Medicine, Department of Medicine, Duke School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA*All authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: In recent years, substantial effort has been made to better understand the influence of genetic factors on the efficacy and safety of numerous medications. These investigations suggest that the use of pharmacogenetic data to inform physician decision-making has great potential to enhance patient care by reducing on-treatment clinical events, adverse drug reactions, and health care-related costs. In fact, integration of such information into the clinical setting may be particularly applicable for antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapeutics, given the increasing body of evidence implicating genetic variation in variable drug response. In this review, we summarize currently available pharmacogenetic information for the most commonly used antiplatelet (ie, clopidogrel and aspirin and anticoagulation (ie, warfarin medications. Furthermore, we highlight the currently known role of genetic variability in response to next-generation antiplatelet (prasugrel and ticagrelor and anticoagulant (dabigatran agents. While compelling evidence suggests that genetic variants are important determinants of antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy response, significant barriers to clinical implementation of pharmacogenetic testing exist and are described herein. In addition, we briefly discuss development of new diagnostic targets and therapeutic strategies as well as implications for enhanced patient care. In conclusion, pharmacogenetic testing can provide important information to assist clinicians with prescribing the most personalized and effective antiplatelet and

  11. Evaluating the impact of new anticoagulants in the hospital setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braidy N

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The short-comings of current anticoagulants have led to the development of newer, albeit more expensive, oral alternatives.Objective: To explore the potential impact the new anticoagulants dabigatran and rivaroxaban in the local hospital setting, in terms of utilisation and subsequent costing.Method: A preliminary costing analysis was performed based on a prospective 2-week clinical audit (29th June - 13th July 2009. Data regarding current anticoagulation management were extracted from the medical files of patients admitted to Ryde Hospital. To model potential costing implications of using the newer agents, the reported incidence of VTE/stroke and bleeding events were obtained from key clinical trials.Results: Data were collected for 67 patients treated with either warfarin (n=46 or enoxaparin (n=21 for prophylaxis of VTE/stroke. At least two-thirds of all patients were deemed suitable candidates for the use of newer oral anticoagulants (by current therapy: warfarin: 65.2% (AF, 34.8% (VTE; enoxaparin: 100%, (VTE. The use of dabigatran in VTE/stroke prevention was found to be more cost-effective than warfarin and enoxaparin due to significantly lower costs of therapeutic monitoring and reduced administration costs. Rivaroxaban was more cost-effective than warfarin and enoxaparin for VTE/stroke prevention when supplier-rebates (33% were factored into costing.Conclusion: This study highlights the potential cost-effectiveness of newer anticoagulants, dabigatran and rivaroxaban, compared to warfarin and enoxaparin. These agents may offer economic advantages, as well as clinical benefits, in the hospital-based management of anticoagulated patients.

  12. Comparison of pharmacist managed anticoagulation with usual medical care in a family medicine clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Dillon Carla; Twells Laurie; Bishop Lisa; Young Stephanie; Hawboldt John; O'Shea Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The beneficial outcomes of oral anticoagulation therapy are dependent upon achieving and maintaining an optimal INR therapeutic range. There is growing evidence that better outcomes are achieved when anticoagulation is managed by a pharmacist with expertise in anticoagulation management rather than usual care by family physicians. This study compared a pharmacist managed anticoagulation program (PC) to usual physician care (UC) in a family medicine clinic. Methods A retros...

  13. Novel oral anticoagulants in the treatment of cerebral venous thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feher, G; Illes, Z; Komoly, S; Hargroves, D

    2015-01-01

    (NOACs) have been extensively studied in patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE) and non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). The aim of our work to review the available evidence for NOACs in the treatment of CVT. Based on our literature search there is insufficient evidence to......Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is an uncommon cause of stroke with extremely diverse clinical features, predisposing factors, brain imaging findings, and outcome. Anticoagulation is the cornerstone of CVT management, however, it is not supported by high-quality evicence. Novel oral anticoagulants...

  14. Novel oral anticoagulants in the treatment of cerebral venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feher, Gergely; Illes, Zsolt; Komoly, Samuel; Hargroves, David

    2016-08-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is an uncommon cause of stroke with extremely diverse clinical features, predisposing factors, brain imaging findings, and outcome. Anticoagulation is the cornerstone of CVT management, however, it is not supported by high-quality evicence. Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been extensively studied in patients with deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and non-valvular atrial fibrillation. The aim of our work was to review the available evidence for NOACs in the treatment of CVT. Based on our literature search there is insufficient evidence to support the use of NOACs in CVT, although case series with rivaroxaban and dabigatran have showed promising results. PMID:25994451

  15. Management of acute stroke in patients taking novel oral anticoagulants

    OpenAIRE

    Hankey, Graeme J; Norrving, Bo; Hacke, Werner; Steiner, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Each year, 1·0–2·0% of individuals with atrial fibrillation and 0·1–0·2% of those with venous thromboembolism who are receiving one of the novel oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, or apixaban) can be expected to experience an acute ischemic stroke. Additionally, 0·2–0·5% of individuals with atrial fibrillation who are receiving one of the novel oral anticoagulants can be expected to experience an intracranial hemorrhage. This opinion piece addresses the current literature and offer...

  16. [Serious surgical complications associated with chronic anticoagulant therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitrák, V; Hadacová, I; Hochová, I; Hoch, J

    2001-06-01

    Chronic anticoagulant treatment is administered mostly for cardiological reasons. Cumarin derivatires are used in the majority of cases (Warfarin, Pelentan). It is necessary to monitor this treatment regularly and to control the dose according to the INR value. Different complications can occur; the haemorrhage represents a serious one. The authors discuss several aspects of anticoagulant therapy and possible prevention of the complications. The importance of the problems is demonstrated on the authors' clinical experience--two cases of haemorrhage after Warfarin administration simulating an acute surgical event. PMID:11482149

  17. Ferric Citrate Controls Phosphorus and Delivers Iron in Patients on Dialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Julia B.; Sika, Mohammed; Koury, Mark J.; Chuang, Peale; Schulman, Gerald; Smith, Mark T.; Whittier, Frederick C.; Linfert, Douglas R.; Galphin, Claude M.; Athreya, Balaji P.; Nossuli, A. Kaldun Kaldun; Chang, Ingrid J.; Blumenthal, Samuel S.; Manley, John; Zeig, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Patients on dialysis require phosphorus binders to prevent hyperphosphatemia and are iron deficient. We studied ferric citrate as a phosphorus binder and iron source. In this sequential, randomized trial, 441 subjects on dialysis were randomized to ferric citrate or active control in a 52-week active control period followed by a 4-week placebo control period, in which subjects on ferric citrate who completed the active control period were rerandomized to ferric citrate or placebo. The primary...

  18. Polymeric architectures of bismuth citrate based on dimeric building blocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Four bismuth complexes, (H2En)[Bi2(cit)2(H2O)4/3]·(H2O)x (1), (H2En)3[Bi2(cit)2Cl4]·(H2O)x (2), (HPy)2[Bi2(cit)2(H2O)8/5]·(H2O)x (3) and (H2En)[Bi2(cit)2](H2O)x (4) [cit = citrate4-; En = ethylenediamine; Py = pyridine] have been synthesized and crystallized. The crystal structures reveal that the basic building blocks in all of these complexes are bismuth citrate dimeric units which combine to form polymeric architectures. The embedded protonated ethylenediamine and pyridine moieties in the polymeric frameworks have been identified by X-ray crystallography and solid-state cross polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) 13C NMR. Based on the framework of complex 1, a structural model of a clinically used antiulcer drug, ranitidine bismuth citrate (RBC) was generated. The behavior of the protonated amine-bismuth citrate complexes in acidic aqueous solution has been studied by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS).

  19. Tumour imaging using technetium-99m-citrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sixteen patients with soft tissue malignancy or fibroadenoma of the breast (Group A) were imaged using 99mTc-citrate. Majority of the patients (n=14) has new untreated lesions. Appreciable skeletal uptake of the tracer was serendipitously noticed in all cases. One of these had widespread bone metastases seen almost identically in 99mTc-citrate and 99mTc-MDP studies. Accordingly, 10 patients (Group B) having more than 40 malignant lesions on the bone scan underwent 99mTc-citrate study. In group A, accumulation of the tracer was seen in all malignant breast nodules and axillary lymphnode mass (n=4), medullary carcinoma of the thyroid along with its metastasis and a carcinoid (n=4) and an ovarian malignancy. Uptake and outflow pattern could differentiate fibroadenoma (n=3) from carcinoma of the breast. No significant uptake was seen in liver secondaries (n>10), lymphoma lesions (n=5), papillary carcinoma of thyroid, renal cell and embryonal cell carcinoma. In group B patients, the radiotracer accumulated well in the metastatic lesions while there was distinctly lesser uptake in normal/degenerated joints compared to the bone scan. The study shows potential of the tracer in imaging soft tissue malignancies. Bone scanning with 99mTc-citrate is an interesting possibility since mechanism of its uptake appears to be different to 99mTc-MDP. (author)

  20. Enhanced citrate production through gene insertion in Aspergillus niger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jongh, Wian de; Nielsen, Jens

    2007-01-01

    The effect of inserting genes involved in the reductive branch of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle on citrate production by Aspergillus niger was evaluated. Several different genes were inserted individually and in combination, i.e. malate dehydrogenase (mdh2) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two...

  1. {sup 14}N NQR spectrum of sildenafil citrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, David, E-mail: david.stephenson@sta.uwi.edu; Singh, Nadia [University of the West Indies, Chemistry Department (Trinidad and Tobago)

    2015-04-15

    The {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectrum of sildenafil citrate tablets has been recorded allowing the quadrupole coupling constants and asymmetry parameters of all six unique nitrogen atoms in its structure to be determined. A density function calculation gives results that are largely in agreement with the experimental values.

  2. APPLICATIONS OF PHARMACOGENETIC TESTING FOR PERSONALIZATION OF THERAPY WITH ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS IN RUSSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Sychev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The clinical significance of the patient genetic characteristics in the individual pharmacological response to oral anticoagulants is considered. Possible tactics of warfarin dosing and new oral anticoagulants choice on the basis of pharmacogenetic testing as well as indications for this approach in clinical practice are discussed. It should increase efficacy and safety of anticoagulant therapy.

  3. Sodium to phosphate ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphate chemistry is widely used in fossil-fired utility boilers and many of these phosphate programs use the sodium to phosphate ratio as the controlling parameter. This paper steps through the fundamental chemical analyses to determine a systems Na/PO4 ratio. A mathematical equation is introduced to simply calculate the ratio using the pH and phosphate concentration. This equation is also used to build graphs to chart the boiler's phosphate chemistry. By looking at the dynamic nature of the chemistry, boiler health can be determined. (orig.)

  4. Enzyme Basis for pH Regulation of Citrate and Pyruvate Metabolism by Leuconostoc oenos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramos, Ana; Lolkema, Juke S.; Konings, Wilhelmus; Santos, Helena

    1995-01-01

    Citrate and pyruvate metabolism by nongrowing cells of Leuconostoc oenos was investigated. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to elucidate the pathway of citrate breakdown and to probe citrate or pyruvate utilization, noninvasively, in living cell suspensions. The utilization

  5. 76 FR 19997 - Determination That FENTORA (Fentanyl Citrate) Buccal Tablet, 300 Micrograms, Was Not Withdrawn...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Determination That FENTORA (Fentanyl Citrate) Buccal Tablet... determined that FENTORA (fentanyl citrate) buccal tablet, 300 micrograms (mcg), was not withdrawn from sale... drug applications (ANDAs) for fentanyl citrate buccal tablet, 300 mcg, if all other legal...

  6. Lupus anticoagulant: a unique case with lupus anticoagulant and habitual abortion together with antifactor II antibody and bleeding tendency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stormorken, H; Gjemdal, T; Bjøro, K

    1988-01-01

    Lupus anticoagulants (LA) are associated with various forms of thrombotic events. Of particular interest to obstetrics is the association with placental infarcts and habitual abortion. In the case described a near full-term viable infant was delivered subsequent to four early miscarriages. However, the mother had then developed an antifactor II antibody leading to grave hypoprothrombinemia with bleeding tendency, indicating efficient autoanticoagulation. This natural experiment indicates that these patients should receive anticoagulation during pregnancy, possibly in combination with steroids to depress the LA level. PMID:3139508

  7. Lupus anticoagulant (LA in pregnant women with history of recurrent fetal loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaniyi JA

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Olaniyi JA, Olomu SA, Finomo SADepartment of Haematology, University College Hospital, Ibadan, NigeriaAbstract: The frequency of LA in 50 women with intact pregnancy, age range 26 to 39 years, but with past history of at least 2 lost pregnancies, was determined using coagulation-based assays. Most (68% of the pregnant women were in the first trimester. Venous blood (4.5 mL carefully collected from each of the subjects and also the controls (normal relative donors was put in 0.5 mL of 3.8% citrate (ratio 9:1. The blood was quickly centrifuged at 1500 g; platelet-poor plasma was separated and frozen at -30°C until analyzed. The control plasma was pooled and dispensed in 2 mL aliquots. Partial thromboplastin time with kaolin (PTTk (against the control samples for comparison and kaolin clotting time (KCT were determined on each of the test samples using standard laboratory procedures. Prolonged PTTk was obtained in 36 patients (72%. KCT was obtained through mixtures of patients' plasma with pooled control plasma (P:C at 100:0; 0.8:0.2; 0.6:0.4; 0.5:0.5; 0.4:0.6; 0.2:0.8; 0:100; and lin-lin graph paper was used to plot out each of these dilutions against their respective clotting time in seconds. The interpreted graph showed that 12 (24% had LA, while 3 (6% had LA with cofactor. This high frequency necessitates regular screening for LA in pregnant women with a history of recurrent fetal loss at any gestational age.Keywords: prevalence, pregnancy, recurrent fetal loss, lupus anticoagulant, coagulation-based assays

  8. Perioperative anticoagulation for children with prosthetic mechanical valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, P; Grech, V

    2000-04-01

    The insertion of a mechanical heart valve predisposes to thrombosis and embolism, and for this reason, individuals with mechanical valves who undergo dental/surgical procedures must take special precautions. In this article, we illustrate a protocol for anticoagulation during such procedures in individuals with mechanical valves. PMID:22368581

  9. Do we have to anticoagulated patients with cerebral venous thrombosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feher, G; Illes, Z; Hargroves, D; Komoly, S

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare form of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Although anticoagulation is recommended for the initial and long term treatment with regards to thrombotic risks for patients with CVT, the role of anticogalution has not been fully elucidated. The aim of...

  10. Anticoagulant drugs increase natural killer cell activity in lung cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bobek, M.; Boubelík, Michael; Fišerová, Anna; Luptovcová, Martina; Vannucci, Luca; Kacprzak, G.; Kolodzej, J.; Majewski, A.M.; Hoffman, R. M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 2 (2005), s. 215-223. ISSN 0169-5002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : anticoagulant drugs * lung cancer * NK cells Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.172, year: 2005

  11. Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism With New Anticoagulant Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becattini, Cecilia; Agnelli, Giancarlo

    2016-04-26

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common disease associated with high risk for recurrences, death, and late sequelae, accounting for substantial health care costs. Anticoagulant agents are the mainstay of treatment for deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. The recent availability of oral anticoagulant agents that can be administered in fixed doses, without laboratory monitoring and dose adjustment, is a landmark change in the treatment of VTE. In Phase III trials, rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban (antifactor Xa agents), and dabigatran (an antithrombin agent) were noninferior and probably safer than conventional anticoagulation therapy (low-molecular-weight heparin followed by vitamin K antagonists). These favorable results were confirmed in specific patient subgroups, such as the elderly and fragile. However, some patients, such as those with cancer or with intermediate- to high-risk pulmonary embolism, were underrepresented in the Phase III trials. Further clinical research is required before new oral anticoagulant agents can be considered standard of care for the full spectrum of patients with VTE. PMID:27102510

  12. Haemorrhage in the labyrinth caused by anticoagulant therapy: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a patient who experienced a severe vertiginous episode with bilateral tinnitus and progressive right-sided hearing loss. She had Marfan's disease and was on anticoagulant treatment. The fluid in the labyrinth gave higher signal than cerebrospinal fluid on T1-weighted images, suggesting haemorrhage. The radiological follow-up is discussed. (orig.)

  13. Structure and anticoagulant properties of sulfated glycosaminoglycans from primitive Chordates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAVÃO MAURO S. G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatan sulfates and heparin, similar to the mammalian glycosaminoglycans, but with differences in the degree and position of sulfation were previously isolated from the body of the ascidian Styela plicata and Ascidia nigra. These differences produce profound effects on their anticoagulant properties. S. plicata dermatan sulfate composed by 2-O-sulfatedalpha-L-iduronic acid and 4-O-sulfated N-acetyl-beta-D-galactosamine residues is a potent anticoagulant due to a high heparin cofactor II activity. Surprisingly, it has a lower potency to prevent thrombus formation on an experimental model and a lower bleeding effect in rats than the mammalian dermatan sulfate. In contrast, A. nigra dermatan sulfate, also enriched in 2-O-sulfated alpha-L-iduronic acid, but in this case sulfated at O-6 of the N-acetyl-beta-D-galactosamine units, has no in vitro or in vivo anticoagulant activity, does not prevent thrombus formation but shows a bleeding effect similar to the mammalian glycosaminoglycan. Ascidian heparin, composed by 2-O-sulfated alpha-L-iduronic acid, N- and 6-O-sulfated glucosamine (75% and alpha-L-iduronic acid, N- and 6-O-sulfated glucosamine (25% disaccharide units has an anticoagulant activity 10 times lower than the mammalian heparin, is about 20 times less potent in the inhibition of thrombin by antithrombin, but has the same heparin cofactor II activity as mammalian heparin.

  14. Vitamin K and stability of oral anticoagulant therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rombouts, Eva Karolien

    2011-01-01

    One of the causes of unstable anticoagulation is a variable vitamin K intake. The main objective of this thesis was to test the hypothesis that the INR is particularly sensitive to changes in vitamin K intake when vitamin K status is low, and that patients with a low vitamin K intake would therefore

  15. Haemorrhage in the labyrinth caused by anticoagulant therapy: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callonnec, F.; Gerardin, E.; Thiebot, J. [Department of Radiology, Rouen University Hospital, 1 rue de Germont, F-76031 Rouen cedex (France); Marie, J.P.; Andrieu Guitrancourt, J. [Department of Otolaryngology, Rouen University Hospital (France); Marsot-Dupuch, K. [Department of Radiology, St. Antoine, Paris University Hospital (France)

    1999-06-01

    We report a patient who experienced a severe vertiginous episode with bilateral tinnitus and progressive right-sided hearing loss. She had Marfan`s disease and was on anticoagulant treatment. The fluid in the labyrinth gave higher signal than cerebrospinal fluid on T1-weighted images, suggesting haemorrhage. The radiological follow-up is discussed. (orig.) With 2 figs., 11 refs.

  16. Antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy in elective percutaneous coronary intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verheugt Freek WA

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thrombosis plays a major role in acute vessel closure both after coronary balloon angioplasty and after stenting. This review will address the role of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy in preventing early thrombotic complications after percutaneous coronary intervention. The focus will be on agents that are routinely available and commonly used.

  17. Laboratory monitoring of novel oral anticoagulants rivaroxaban and dabigatran

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerenberg, E.S.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Sijpkens, M.K.; Meijers, J.C.; Büller, H.R.; Levi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Rivaroxaban and dabigatran are new oral anticoagulants that both have been licensed worldwide for the treatment of atrial fibrillation and rivaroxaban also for venous thrombosis. Both drugs specifically inhibit one coagulation factor, factor Xa and thrombin, respectively, and both compou

  18. Perioperative anticoagulation for children with prosthetic mechanical valves

    OpenAIRE

    Grech, Victor E.; Rees, P.

    2000-01-01

    The insertion of a mechanical heart valve predisposes to thrombosis and embolism, and for this reason, individuals with mechanical valves who undergo dental/surgical procedures must take special precautions. In this article, we illustrate a protocol for anticoagulation during such procedures in individuals with mechanical valves.

  19. Qualitative identification of rodenticide anticoagulants by LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleberg, Robert A; Homan, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Rodenticide anticoagulants are used in the control of rodent populations. In addition to accidental ingestions in humans, such agents have also been used for homicidal and suicidal purposes. There are two major groups of rodenticide anticoagulants - hydroxycoumarins and indanediones. Before the advent of LC-MS/MS, analysis for such agents was relegated to such techniques as TLC and HPLC with nonspecific modes of detection. LC-MS/MS has been used to determine any given number of rodenticide anticoagulants in animal tissues, foods, plasma, etc. Use of this technique allows for the simultaneous identification of individual compounds within both classes of rodenticide anticoagulants. The LC-MS/MS method presented allows for simultaneous qualitative identification of brodifacoum, bromadiolone, chlorphacinone, dicumarol, difenacoum, diphacinone, and warfarin in blood, serum, and plasma using ESI in the negative mode. Two transitions are monitored for each analyte after a simple sample preparation. Chromatographic separation is accomplished using a gradient of ammonium hydroxide in water and ammonium hydroxide in methanol. Chloro-warfarin is used as internal standard. PMID:22767114

  20. Use of Oral Anticoagulation Therapy in Atrial Fibrillation after Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Stine Funder; Christensen, Louisa M; Christensen, Anders;

    2013-01-01

    Background. The knowledge is still sparse about patient related factors, influencing oral anticoagulation therapy (OAC) rates, in stroke patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Aims. To assess the use of OAC in ischemic stroke patients diagnosed with AF and to identify patient related factors...

  1. Personalised treatment with oral anticoagulant drugs : clinical and economic issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, T.I.

    2013-01-01

    Coumarin derivatives such as acenocoumarol, phenprocoumon and warfarin are frequently used for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with atrial fibrillation or for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. These oral anticoagulants have a narrow therapeutic range and a large var

  2. Phosphate, inositol and polyphosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livermore, Thomas M; Azevedo, Cristina; Kolozsvari, Bernadett; Wilson, Miranda S C; Saiardi, Adolfo

    2016-02-15

    Eukaryotic cells have ubiquitously utilized the myo-inositol backbone to generate a diverse array of signalling molecules. This is achieved by arranging phosphate groups around the six-carbon inositol ring. There is virtually no biological process that does not take advantage of the uniquely variable architecture of phosphorylated inositol. In inositol biology, phosphates are able to form three distinct covalent bonds: phosphoester, phosphodiester and phosphoanhydride bonds, with each providing different properties. The phosphoester bond links phosphate groups to the inositol ring, the variable arrangement of which forms the basis of the signalling capacity of the inositol phosphates. Phosphate groups can also form the structural bridge between myo-inositol and diacylglycerol through the phosphodiester bond. The resulting lipid-bound inositol phosphates, or phosphoinositides, further expand the signalling potential of this family of molecules. Finally, inositol is also notable for its ability to host more phosphates than it has carbons. These unusual organic molecules are commonly referred to as the inositol pyrophosphates (PP-IPs), due to the presence of high-energy phosphoanhydride bonds (pyro- or diphospho-). PP-IPs themselves constitute a varied family of molecules with one or more pyrophosphate moiety/ies located around the inositol. Considering the relationship between phosphate and inositol, it is no surprise that members of the inositol phosphate family also regulate cellular phosphate homoeostasis. Notably, the PP-IPs play a fundamental role in controlling the metabolism of the ancient polymeric form of phosphate, inorganic polyphosphate (polyP). Here we explore the intimate links between phosphate, inositol phosphates and polyP, speculating on the evolution of these relationships. PMID:26862212

  3. Characteristics of ambulatory anticoagulant adverse drug events: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eckstrand Julie

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the high frequency with which adverse drug events (ADEs occur in outpatient settings, detailed information regarding these events remains limited. Anticoagulant drugs are associated with increased safety concerns and are commonly involved in outpatient ADEs. We therefore sought to evaluate ambulatory anticoagulation ADEs and the patient population in which they occurred within the Duke University Health System (Durham, NC, USA. Methods A retrospective chart review of ambulatory warfarin-related ADEs was conducted. An automated trigger surveillance system identified eligible events in ambulatory patients admitted with an International Normalized Ratio (INR >3 and administration of vitamin K. Event and patient characteristics were evaluated, and quality/process improvement strategies for ambulatory anticoagulation management are described. Results A total of 169 events in 167 patients were identified from December 1, 2006-June 30, 2008 and included in the study. A median supratherapeutic INR of 6.1 was noted, and roughly half of all events (52.1% were associated with a bleed. Nearly 74% of events resulted in a need for fresh frozen plasma; 64.8% of bleeds were classified as major. A total of 59.2% of events were at least partially responsible for hospital admission. Median patient age was 68 y (range 36-95 y with 24.9% initiating therapy within 3 months prior to the event. Of events with a prior documented patient visit (n = 157, 73.2% were seen at a Duke clinic or hospital within the previous month. Almost 80% of these patients had anticoagulation therapy addressed, but only 60.0% had a follow-up plan documented in the electronic note. Conclusions Ambulatory warfarin-related ADEs have significant patient and healthcare utilization consequences in the form of bleeding events and associated hospital admissions. Recommendations for improvement in anticoagulation management include use of information technology to assist

  4. Modeling intracerebral hemorrhage growth and response to anticoagulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles H Greenberg

    Full Text Available The mechanism for hemorrhage enlargement in the brain, a key determinant of patient outcome following hemorrhagic stroke, is unknown. We performed computer-based stochastic simulation of one proposed mechanism, in which hemorrhages grow in "domino" fashion via secondary shearing of neighboring vessel segments. Hemorrhages were simulated by creating an initial site of primary bleeding and an associated risk of secondary rupture at adjacent sites that decayed over time. Under particular combinations of parameters for likelihood of secondary rupture and time-dependent decay, a subset of lesions expanded, creating a bimodal distribution of microbleeds and macrobleeds. Systematic variation of the model to simulate anticoagulation yielded increases in both macrobleed occurrence (26.9%, 53.2%, and 70.0% of all hemorrhagic events under conditions simulating no, low-level, and high-level anticoagulation and final hemorrhage size (median volumes 111, 276, and 412 under the same three conditions, consistent with data from patients with anticoagulant-related brain hemorrhages. Reversal from simulated high-level anticoagulation to normal coagulation was able to reduce final hemorrhage size only if applied relatively early in the course of hemorrhage expansion. These findings suggest that a model based on a secondary shearing mechanism can account for some of the clinically observed properties of intracerebral hemorrhage, including the bimodal distribution of volumes and the enhanced hemorrhage growth seen with anticoagulation. Future iterations of this model may be useful for elucidating the effects of hemorrhage growth of factors related to secondary shearing (such as small vessel pathology or time-dependent decay (such as hemostatic agents.

  5. Worldwide management of oral anticoagulant therapy: the ISAM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pengo, Vittorio; Pegoraro, Cinzia; Cucchini, Umberto; Iliceto, Sabino

    2006-02-01

    A multicenter, observational, retrospective, cross-sectional study of patients, receiving oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT) for stroke prophylaxis in chronic non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) was conducted in the US, Canada, France, Italy and Spain according to their predominant model of care [routine medical care (RMC) or Anticoagulation Clinic care (ACC)]. The study objectives were to assess anticoagulation control (time in target range), and to describe the features of the local model of care. Consecutive patients were recruited on the basis of a minimum of 60 days of oral anticoagulant treatment over a 12 month period, and clinic and physician details were captured by means of a structured face-to-face or telephone interview. Time in therapeutic range (TTR) was calculated by using linear interpolation between INR values. A total of 1511 patients were recruited, of whom 1445 were included in the analysis of TTR. TTR was higher in ACC (69.5% and 64.9% for Italy and Spain, respectively) with respect to RMC (58.1%, 62.8% and 59.3% for the US, Canada and France, respectively). Mean intervals between INR determinations were between 3 and 4 weeks. Dose changes in case of INR outside therapeutic range were more frequent in Spain and less frequent in France. Striking differences were observed in type of VKA used, specialists involved in patient management, and dosage instructions. Studying of anticoagulation management based on local models of care highlights important discrepancies among countries and suggests further standardization of the management of this important therapy is necessary. PMID:16475046

  6. Metformin-clomiphene citrate vs. clomiphene citrate alone: Polycystic ovarian syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aqueela Ayaz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is the commonest endocrinopathy in women that is associated with reproductive and metabolic disorders. Objectives: We compared the ovulation and conception rates after the treatment with clomiphene citrate (CC alone and in combination with metformin in infertile patients presented with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS. Materials and Methods: This randomized controlled trial of independent cases and controls was conducted at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hera General Hospital, Makkah, Saudi Arabia from February 01 to December 31, 2008. The 42 subjects diagnosed as PCOS were divided into group A and B (21 subjects in each for management with CC + metformin and CC alone, respectively. Group A received 500 mg three times a day of metformin continuously from the first cycle for 6 months or till pregnancy was confirmed. In both groups CC was started at a dose of 50 mg from day-2 till day-6 of the menstrual cycle. The dose of CC was increased to 100 mg in second and 150 mg in third cycle, and then remained 150 mg for the remaining three cycles. With ovulation the dose of CC was unaltered in both groups. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS version 16. Results: More than 50% females in both groups were had body mass index > 25. Group A achieved high rate of regular cycles, ovulation success, and conception than group B (71.4% vs. 38.1%; P = 0.03, (76.2% vs. 38.1%; P = 0.021, and (66.6% vs. 28.6%; P = 0.01, respectively. Conclusion: Management with metformin + CC increased the ovulation and conception rates.

  7. Phosphate metabolism and vitamin D

    OpenAIRE

    Fukumoto, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    Phosphate plays many essential roles in our body. To accomplish these functions, serum phosphate needs to be maintained in a certain range. Serum phosphate level is regulated by intestinal phosphate absorption, renal phosphate handling and equilibrium of extracellular phosphate with that in bone or intracellular fluid. Several hormones such as parathyroid hormone, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) regulate serum phosphate by modulating intestinal pho...

  8. Production of technical-grade sodium citrate from glycerol-containing biodiesel waste by Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamzolova, Svetlana V; Vinokurova, Natalia G; Lunina, Julia N; Zelenkova, Nina F; Morgunov, Igor G

    2015-10-01

    The production of technical-grade sodium citrate from the glycerol-containing biodiesel waste by Yarrowia lipolytica was studied. Batch experiments showed that citrate was actively produced within 144 h, then citrate formation decreased presumably due to inhibition of enzymes involved in this process. In contrast, when the method of repeated batch cultivation was used, the formation of citrate continued for more than 500 h. In this case, the final concentration of citrate in the culture liquid reached 79-82 g/L. Trisodium citrate was isolated from the culture liquid filtrate by the addition of a small amount of NaOH, so that the pH of the filtrate increased to 7-8. This simple and economic isolation procedure gave the yield of crude preparation containing trisodium citrate 5.5-hydrate up to 82-86%. PMID:26141285

  9. Preparation and in vitro characterization of the transdermal drug delivery system containing tamoxifen citrate for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhyapak Anjana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A matrix-type transdermal drug delivery system of tamoxifen citrate was developed by using a different ratio of eudragit-RL100, hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC-K15, and ethyl cellulose (EC, by the solvent evaporation technique. The effect of the binary mixture of polymers with a penetration enhancer on the physical chemical parameters including, thickness, folding endurance, uniformity of drug content, moisture content, moisture uptake, tensile strength, and in vitro drug permeation were evaluated. The in vitro drug permeation studies were conducted by using modified Keshary-Chein diffusion cells through female Sprague Dawley rat skin using pH 7.4 phosphate buffer saline (PBS. The selected formulation′s stability studies were conducted as per the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH guidelines, and did not show any degradation of the drug.

  10. ATP citrate lyase knockdown impacts cancer stem cells in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Hanai, J-i; Doro, N; Seth, P; Sukhatme, V P

    2013-01-01

    ATP citrate lyase (ACL) knockdown (KD) causes tumor suppression and induces differentiation. We have previously reported that ACL KD reverses epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) in lung cancer cells. Because EMT is often associated with processes that induce stemness, we hypothesized that ACL KD impacts cancer stem cells. By assessing tumorsphere formation and expression of stem cell markers, we showed this to be the case in A549 cells, which harbor a Ras mutation, and in two other non-sm...

  11. Subclinical abortions in patients treated with clomiphene citrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using radioimmunoassay for human chorionic gonadotrophin beta-subunit, 39 treatment cycles of clomiphene citrate therapy were studied prospectively for incidence of subclinical abortions. Eight treatment cycles resulted in clinically recognizable pregnancies and three other treatment cycles ended up with subclinical abortions. The plasma progesterone levels in patients with subclinical abortions at the 13th day after ovulation were lower than those in patients with normal pregnancies. (author)

  12. Studies on Ga-67 citrate uptake in various experimental tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ga-67 citrate uptake was autoradiographically studied in Ehrlich's tumor and sarcoma 180 in mice and 3'-Me-DAB hepatoma in rats with a histological comparison. In order to evaluate the relationship between tumor growth and degree of Ga-67 citrate uptake, animals were sacrificed 3, 5, 7 and 10 days after transplantation of tumor cells of Ehrlich's tumor and sarcoma 180. The results were as follows. 1) When Ga-67 citrate was administered to mice having Ehrlich's tumor, sarcoma 180 and to rats having 3'-Me-DAB hepatoma, varying degrees of accumulation of Ga-67 were seen in all experimental tumors. 2) In Ehrlich's tumor and sarcoma 180, RI uptake ratio (Tumor/Normal tissue uptake ratio; T/N ratio) was increased in accordance with tumor growth and was about 5 in these tumors 10 days after transplantation of tumor cells. On the other hand, RI uptake ratio (Tumor/Normal Liver tissue uptake ratio; T/NL ratio) ranged from 1.62 to 3.31 in 3'-Me-DAB hepatoma. 3) In all tumors, remarkable accumulation of Ga-67 was demonstrated in the highly cellular sites of tumors without degeneration and necrosis. 4) In Ehrlich's tumor and sarcoma 180, an accumulation of Ga-67 citrate was also observed in granulation tissues consisting of fibroblasts, fibrocyte, neutrophils and a small number of lymphocytes around the tumor, and it was more intense than that of tumorous tissue in many cases. 5) In 3'-Me-DAB hepatoma, Ga-67 uptake was seen in hepatocellular carcinoma with little fibrous stroma, but not in cholangiocarcinoma with dense fibrous stroma. (author)

  13. Citrate Root Exudation under Zn and P Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Bless Aplena Elen Siane

    2012-01-01

    Zinc and phosphorus are essential nutrients with low bioavailability in calcareous soils. Some plants exude organic acids to increase the solubility of these two nutrients. The objective of this study was to examine citrate exudation rates of different lupin (Feodora and Energy) and rapeseed (Dunkeld, Yickadee and Rainbow) cultivars underdeficiencies of Zn and P. The plants were cultivated into three different nutrient solutions (complete, -Zn, and -P)with pH around 7. Under Zn deficiency, ra...

  14. Silver-YBCO composite through citrate gel decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver-YBCO composite containing upto 75% silver has been prepared by thermal decomposition of citrate gel. In this paper the morphological and structural changes taking place during the decomposition of the gel in the range 100--900 degrees C are presented. Heat treatment at 915 degrees C of the composite powder containing Ag2O above a critical limit has been found to impart superconductivity without any external oxygen annealing. The mechanical and microstructural features of the sintered composite are presented

  15. Electrodeposition of iron-molybdenum coatings from citrate electrolyte

    OpenAIRE

    Ved, M. V.; Sakhnenko, N. D.; Karakurkchi, A. V.; Zyubanova, S. I.

    2014-01-01

    Specifi c features of the electrodeposition of iron–molybdenum coatings from a citrate electrolyte based on iron(III) sulfate and sodium molybdate in dc and unipolar pulsed modes were studied. It was demonstrated that bright compact coatings with varied content of molybdenum can be produced by varying the relative concentrations of salts of the alloy-forming components and the solution pH. The current density ranges providing the high efficiency of the galvanostastic electrolysis were determi...

  16. Electrodeposition of iron-molybdenum-tungsten coatings from citrate electrolytes

    OpenAIRE

    Karakurkchi, A. V.; Ved, M. V.; Sakhnenko, N. D.; Yermolenko, I. Yu.

    2015-01-01

    Specific features of the electrodeposition of iron–molybdenum–tungsten coatings from citrate electrolytes based on iron(III) sulfate in the dc mode and with a unipolar pulsed current were studied. It was shown that varying the relative concentrations of salts of alloy-forming metals and the solution pH makes it possible to obtain lustrous compact coatings with low porosity and various contents of high-melting components. The effect of temperature on the coating composition and current efficie...

  17. Renal Localization of {sup 67}Ga Citrate in Noninfectious Nephritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kang Wook; Jeong, Min Soo; Rhee, Sunn Kgoo; Kim, Sam Yong; Shin, Young Tai; Ro, Heung Kyu [Chungnam University College of Medicine, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-07-15

    {sup 67}Ga citrate scan has been requested for detection or follow-up of inflammatory or neoplastic disease. Visualization of {sup 67}Ga citrate in the kidneys at 48 and 72 hr post injection is usually interpreted as evidence of renal pathology. But precise mechanisms of abnormal {sup 67}Ga uptake in kidneys were unknown. We undertook a study to determine the clinical value of {sup 67}Ga citrate imaging of the kidneys in 68 patients with primary or secondary nephropathy confirmed by renal biopsy and 66 control patients without renal disease. Renal uptake in 48 to 72 hr images was graded as follows: Grade 0=background activity;1=faint uptake greater than background; 2=definite uptake, but less than lumbar vertebrae;3 same uptake as lumbar vertebrae, but less than liver; 4=same or higher uptake than liver. The results were as follows. 1) 42 of 68(62%) patients with noninfectious nephritis showed grade 2 or higher {sup 67}Ga renal uptake but only 10 percent of control patients showed similar uptake. 2) In 14 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, 8 of 9 (89%) patients with lupus nephritis exhibited marked renal uptake. 3) 36 of 41 patients (88%) with combined nephrotic syndrome showed Grade 2 or higher renal uptake. 4) Renal {sup 67}Ga uptake was correlated with clinical severity of nephrotic syndrome determined by serum albumin level, 24 hr urine protein excretion and serum lipid levels. 5) After complete remission of nephrotic syndrome, renal uptake in all 8 patients who were initially Grade 3 or 4, decreased to Grade 1 or 0. In conclusion, we think that the mechanism of renal {sup 67}Ga uptake in nephrotic syndrome might be related to the pathogenesis of nephrotic syndrome. In systemic lupus erythematosus, {sup 67}Ga citrate scan is useful in predicting renal involvement.

  18. PZ, PT and PZT formation from metal citrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lead zirconate, lead titanate and lead titanate-zirconate were obtained by mechanical mixing of lead, titanium and zirconium citrates in ether and by calcination. The process was analyzed by DTA, TGA, IR, pore size distribution and surface area measurements. The results indicate that the decomposition reaction and formation of PZ, PT occur simultaneaously without formation of intermediate compounds. PZT was formed from 5000C. (author)

  19. Sildenafil citrate and uteroplacental perfusion in fetal growth restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Vahid Dastjerdi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To determine whether the phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor, Sildenafil citrate, affects uteroplacental perfusion. Materials and Methods: Based on a randomized double-blinded and placebo-controlled trial, forty one pregnant women with documented intrauterine growth retardation at 24-37 weeks of gestation were evaluated for the effect of a single dose of Sildenafil citrate on uteroplacental circulation as determined by Doppler ultrasound study of the umbilical and middle cerebral arteries. Statistical analysis included χ2 -test to compare proportions, and independent-samples t-test and paired student′s t-test to compare continuous variables. Results: Sildenafil group fetuses demonstrated a significant decrease in systolic/diastolic ratios (0.60 [SD 0.40] [95% Cl 0.37-0.84], P=0.000, and pulsatility index (0.12 [SD 0.15] [95% Cl 0.02-0.22], P=0.019 for the umbilical artery and a significant increase in middle cerebral artery pulsatility index (MCA PI (0.51 [SD 0.60] [95% Cl 0.16-0.85], P=0.008. Conclusion: Doppler velocimetry index values reflect decreased placental bed vascular resistance after Sildenafil. Sildenafil citrate can improve fetoplacental perfusion in pregnancies complicated by intrauterine growth restriction. It could be a potential therapeutic strategy to improve uteroplacental blood flow in pregnancies with fetal growth restriction (FGR.

  20. Calcium citrate and vitamin D in the treatment of osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada Gómez, José Manuel; Blanch Rubió, Josep; Díaz Curiel, Manuel; Díez Pérez, Adolfo

    2011-01-01

    The combination of calcium with vitamin D (vitamin D(3) [colecalciferol]) forms the basis of preventive and therapeutic regimens for osteoporosis. A number of studies have suggested that the combination of calcium and vitamin D is effective when administered at respective dosages of at least 1200 mg and 800 IU per day, although efficacy is, as expected, affected by patient compliance. Overall, treatment with this combination appears to be effective in reducing the incidence of non-vertebral and hip fractures. Also, in all drug studies (of antiresorptive and anabolic agents and strontium ranelate) that demonstrated a reduction in risk of osteoporotic fractures, patients also took calcium and vitamin D supplements. An important finding in this regard is that vitamin D levels have been demonstrated to be inadequate in more than half of women treated for osteoporosis in the US and Europe. The capacity of the small intestine to absorb calcium salts depends on the solubility and ionization of the salts. These properties vary for different salts, with fasting calcium citrate absorption being greater than that of calcium lactogluconate and calcium carbonate. Calcium citrate formulations taken between meals may help to prevent abdominal distension and flatulence, as well as minimize the risk of renal calculus formation, thus helping to optimize patient compliance. Therefore, calcium citrate combined with vitamin D is the combination of choice for the prevention or treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:21405146

  1. DESIGNING OF COLON SPECIFIC MATRIX TABLET OF DIETHYL CARBAMAZINE CITRATE FOR THE TREATMENT OF FILARIASIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahoo Chinmaya Keshari

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the study was to develop colon specific sustained release matrix tablets of diethyl carbamazine citrate (DEC, an anthelmintic for improving patient compliance, delivered to colon for its effective actions. The colon targeted matrix tablet was prepared by wet granulation technique using different percentage of guar gum as matrix carrier and coated with Eudragit L 100.Seven batches of matrix tablets were prepared with varying percentage of guar gum and hydroxyl propyl methyl cellulose (HPMC.The dissolution study of DEC matrix tablet in simulated colonic fluid (phosphate buffer pH 6.8 was 96.78% at the end of 24hr study. The best result of studies showed that colon targeted matrix tablet containing 48% guar gum was most to provide targeting of DEC for local action in the colon. Short term stability studies (at 40±2ºC/75±5% RH for 3 months on the best formulation indicated that there no significant changes in drug content. IR spectroscopic study indicated that there are no drug excipient interactions.

  2. A Process-Based Model of TCA Cycle Functioning to Analyze Citrate Accumulation in Pre- and Post-Harvest Fruits

    OpenAIRE

    Etienne, Audrey; GÉNARD, MICHEL; Bugaud, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Citrate is one of the most important organic acids in many fruits and its concentration plays a critical role in organoleptic properties. The regulation of citrate accumulation throughout fruit development, and the origins of the phenotypic variability of the citrate concentration within fruit species remain to be clarified. In the present study, we developed a process-based model of citrate accumulation based on a simplified representation of the TCA cycle to predict citrate concentration in...

  3. The Australian national reactive phosphate rock project - Aims, experimental approach, and site characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field-based cutting trials were established across Australia in a range of environments to evaluate the agronomic effectiveness of 5 phosphate rocks, and 1 partially acidulated phosphate rock, relative to either single super-phosphate or triple superphosphate. The phosphate rocks differed in reactivity, as determined by the degree of carbonate substitution for phosphate in the apatite structure and solubility of phosphorus present in the fertilizers in 2% formic acid, 2% citric acid and neutral ammonium citrate. Sechura (Bayovar) and North Carolina phosphate rocks were highly reactive (>70% solubility in 2% formic acid), whilst Khouribja (Moroccan) and Hamrawein (Egypt) phosphate rock were moderately reactive. Duchess phosphate rock from Queensland was relatively unreactive (2, from 4.0 to 5.1, and Colwell extractable phosphorus ranged from 3 to 47 μg/g prior to fertilizer application. Two core experiments were established at each site. The first measured the effects of phosphate rock reactivity on agronomic effectiveness, while the second core experiment measured the effects of the degree of water solubility of the phosphorus source on agronomic effectiveness. The National Reactive Phosphate Rock Project trials provided the opportunity to confirm the suitability of accepted procedures to model fertilizer response and to develop new approaches for comparing different fertilizer responses. The Project also provided the framework for subsidiary studies such as the effect of fertilizer source on soil phosphorus extractability; cadmium and fluorine concentrations in herbage; evaluation of soil phosphorus tests; and the influence of particle size on phosphate rock effectiveness. The National Reactive Phosphate Rock Project presents a valuable model for a large, Australia-wide, collaborative team approach to an important agricultural issue. The use of standard and consistent experimental methodologies at every site ensured that maximum benefit was obtained from data

  4. Exogenous citrate impairs glucose tolerance and promotes visceral adipose tissue inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leandro, João G B; Espindola-Netto, Jair M; Vianna, Maria Carolina F; Gomez, Lilian S; DeMaria, Thaina M; Marinho-Carvalho, Monica M; Zancan, Patricia; Paula Neto, Heitor A; Sola-Penna, Mauro

    2016-03-01

    Overweight and obesity have become epidemic worldwide and are linked to sedentary lifestyle and the consumption of processed foods and drinks. Citrate is a metabolite that plays central roles in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. In addition, citrate is the additive most commonly used by the food industry, and therefore is highly consumed. Extracellular citrate can freely enter the cells via the constitutively expressed plasma membrane citrate transporter. Within the cytosol, citrate is readily metabolised by ATP-citrate lyase into acetyl-CoA - the metabolic precursor of endogenously produced lipids and cholesterol. We therefore hypothesised that the citrate ingested from processed foods and drinks could contribute to increased postprandial fat production and weight gain. To test our hypothesis, we administered citrate to mice through their drinking water with or without sucrose and monitored their weight gain and other metabolic parameters. Our results showed that mice receiving citrate or citrate+sucrose did not show increased weight gain or an increase in the weight of the liver, skeletal muscles or adipose tissues (AT). Moreover, the plasma lipid profiles (TAG, total cholesterol, LDL and HDL) were similar across all groups. However, the group receiving citrate+sucrose showed augmented fasting glycaemia, glucose intolerance and the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-10) in their AT. Therefore, our results suggest that citrate consumption contributes to increased AT inflammation and altered glucose metabolism, which is indicative of initial insulin resistance. Thus, citrate consumption could be a previously unknown causative agent for the complications associated with obesity. PMID:26863933

  5. [Use of direct oral anticoagulants in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickley, Frank; Geigenmüller, Grit; Schinköthe, Claudia

    2015-12-01

    Equal safety and efficacy of direct oral anticoagulants as compared to vitamin K antagonists have been shown in elderly and very old patients. The use of these seem to have certain advantages in this special patient cohort: higher drug safety, no need for lab monitoring, less drug-drug interactions and a lower rate of intracranial hemorrhages. However, more data is needed to quantify the exact bleeding risk for geriatric patients. Elderly patients suffer quite frequently from significant comorbidities, such as renal failure, dementia, vision loss etc., which might put them at higher risk to suffer from medication side effects, especially bleeding complications. Routine clinical examinations combined with monitoring of renal function are therefore of paramount importance. Regarding these precautions the use of the new oral anticoagulants in the elderly is hence quite justified and rising. PMID:26625228

  6. Emergent Bleeding in Patients Receiving Direct Oral Anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Richard L; Sterling, Sarah A

    2016-01-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) offer clinical advantages over warfarin, such as minimal medication and food interactions and fixed dosing without the need for routine monitoring of coagulation status. As with all anticoagulants, bleeding, either spontaneous or provoked, is the most common complication. The long-term use of these drugs is increasing, and there is a crucial need for emergency medicine service professionals to understand the optimal management of associated bleeding. This review aims to describe the indications and pharmacokinetics of available DOACs; to discuss the risk of bleeding; to provide a treatment algorithm to manage DOAC-associated emergency bleeding; and to discuss future directions in bleeding management, including the role of specific reversal agents, such as the recently approved idarucizumab for reversal of the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran. Because air medical personnel are increasingly likely to encounter patients receiving DOACs, it is important that they have an understanding of how to manage patients with emergent bleeding. PMID:27255877

  7. Patients' attitude and knowledge about oral anticoagulation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amara, Walid; Larsen, Torben B; Sciaraffia, Elena; Hernández Madrid, Antonio; Chen, Jian; Estner, Heidi; Todd, Derick; Bongiorni, Maria G; Potpara, Tatjana S; Dagres, Nikolaos; Sagnol, Pascal; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this European Heart Rhythm Association survey was to assess the attitude, level of education, and knowledge concerning oral anticoagulants (OACs) among patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) taking vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs) or antiplatelets. A...... total of 1147 patients with AF [mean age 66 ± 13 years, 529 (45%) women] from 8 selected European countries responded to this survey. The overall use of OACs and antiplatelets was 77 and 15.3%, respectively. Of the patients taking OACs, 67% were on VKAs, 33% on NOACs, and 17.9% on a combination of OACs...... and antiplatelets. Among patients on VKAs, 91% correctly stated the target international normalized ratio (INR) level. The proportion of patients on VKA medication who were aware that monthly INR monitoring was required for this treatment and the proportion of patients on NOAC who knew that renal...

  8. Predictors of recurrent venous thromboembolism and bleeding on anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menapace, Laurel A; McCrae, Keith R; Khorana, Alok A

    2016-04-01

    The impact of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in the cancer population remains substantial despite significant advances in detecting and treating thrombotic events. While there is extensive literature regarding predictors of first VTE event in cancer patients as well as a validated predictive score, less data exist regarding recurrent VTE in cancer cohorts and associated predictive variables. A similar paucity of data in regard to bleeding events in cancer patients receiving anticoagulation has been observed. This review article will highlight clinical risk factors as well as predictive biomarkers associated with recurrent VTE and bleeding in cancer patients receiving therapeutic anticoagulation. Predictive risk assessment models for cancer-associated recurrent VTE and bleeding are also discussed. PMID:27067987

  9. Self-management of oral anticoagulant therapy in two centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Hanna; Grove, E; Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard;

    endpoints: all-cause mortality, major thromboembolism and bleeding events, percentage of time within therapeutic International Normalized Ratio (INR) target range (TTR) and variance of the INR value. Patient data was obtained from two databases in the two centers, where all data had been prospectively......Self-management of oral anticoagulant therapy in two centers: 11.000 patient-years of follow-up H Nilsson1,2,3, EL Grove2, TB Larsen3, M Maegaard1, TD Christensen1 1Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery & Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus; 2Department of...... registered. Results: Results are pending but baseline characteristics (age, gender, indication for anticoagulant therapy) and data on all-cause mortality, major thromboembolism and bleeding events, TTR, INR-variance will be presented at the meeting. Conclusions: We hope to find a good quality of treatment...

  10. Difficulties in anticoagulation management during coadministration of warfarin and rifampin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C R; Thrasher, K A

    2001-10-01

    The clinical significance of rifampin's induction of warfarin metabolism is well documented, but no published studies or case reports have quantified this interaction with respect to the international normalized ratio (INR). A patient receiving concomitant rifampin and warfarin to treat a mycobacterial infection and intraventricular thrombus, respectively, underwent routine INR testing at a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic to assess his anticoagulation regimen. A 233% increase in warfarin dosage over 4 months proved insufficient to attain a therapeutic INR during long-term rifampin therapy More aggressive titration of the warfarin dosage was needed. In addition, a gradual 70% reduction in warfarin dosage over 4-5 weeks was necessary to maintain a therapeutic INR after rifampin discontinuation, demonstrating the clinically significant offset of this drug interaction. Extensive changes in warfarin dosage are required to attain and maintain a therapeutic INR during the initiation, maintenance, and discontinuation of rifampin. PMID:11601670

  11. Evaluation of a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, I A; Hutchison, T A; Kirking, D M; Shue, M E

    1985-06-01

    Medical records were retrospectively analyzed to evaluate the success of a pharmacist-managed Anticoagulation Surveillance Clinic (ASC). The 78 patients in group I were followed by the ASC. The 17 patients in Group II were followed by other Veterans Administration Medical Center clinics. Demographic characteristics, warfarin indication and potentially complicating conditions were comparable between the groups. Group I patients had shorter intervals between visits to the clinic than Group II patients. Although not statistically different compared to Group II, Group I patients had better prothrombin time control. Group I patients also had fewer complications per treatment year (6.9% vs 9.0%) and received fewer potentially interacting drugs. The ASC was at least as successful as the other clinics in managing patients on warfarin, and results compared very favorably to those reported in the literature for other anticoagulation clinics. PMID:4019790

  12. AParadigm Shift: The New Novel Oral Anticoagulation Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Wajeeha; Burke, James F; Mirrani, Ghazi; Sirinivasa, Minisha; Nabi, Usman; Hayat, Umar; Khan, Zubair; Sardar, Muhammad Rizwan

    2016-07-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia and represents one-third of the arrhythmia-related hospital admissions in the developed countries. Embolic strokes associated with AF are more severe and disabling. Thromboembolic stroke prevention is a major goal in treatment of AF and Warfarin has successfully served this purpose for many years. Drug-drug interaction and regular monitoring with Warfarin pose a significant challenge where health care system has limited resources; and lack of a well-structured health system, hinders regular International Normalized Ratio (INR) monitoring. Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have opened up a new exciting chapter in the field of anticoagulation in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). This review discussed the landmark trials that led to the development of NOACs and explored the potentials of these new agents with simultaneous comparison of Warfarin. PMID:27504556

  13. New oral anticoagulants – the newest update in dental surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Kovacevska, Ivona; Angelovska, Bistra

    2013-01-01

    Aim of this study is to review the evidence of different therapy approach, to highlight the areas of major concern, and to suggest specific oral surgery treatment for patients on new oral anticoagulants. A Medline and an extensive hand search were performed on English-language publications beginning in 1971 till now. The pertinent literature and clinical protocols of hospital dentistry departments have been extensively reviewed, presented and discussed. Several evolving clinical practic...

  14. Direct oral anticoagulants: a guide for daily practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Pierre; Robert-Ebadi, Helia; Bounameaux, Henri; Boehlen, Françoise; Righini, Marc

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, small oral compounds that specifically block activated coagulation factor X (FXa) or thrombin (FIIa) have become alternatives to the anticoagulants that had been used for several decades. As of today, these direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) include dabigatran etexilate (thrombin inhibitor) and apixaban, edoxaban and rivaroxaban (inhibitors of FXa). While there is no doubt that DOACs represent a major step forward in the management of patients with venous thromboembolic disease and atrial fibrillation, new challenges have arisen. They need to be addressed with the necessary pragmatism on the basis of evidence. Indeed, a better understanding of the management of these last-generation antithrombotics will favour safer use and increase confidence of the practitioner for the prescription of these drugs. The aim of this article is to present practical suggestions for the prescription and use of these drugs in everyday clinical practice, based on clinical experience and recently updated recommendations of the European Heart Rhythm Association and the American College of Chest Physicians among other scientific organisations. We address issues such as pharmacokinetics, dosing, side effects, limitations of use, drug interactions, switching from and to other anticoagulants, renal function, concomitant administration of antiplatelet agents and perioperative use. We also address the issue of monitoring and reversal, taking advantage of the most recent development in this latter area. Rather than being one additional set of recommendations, our narrative review aims at assisting the practicing physician in his or her daily handling of these novel anticoagulant compounds, based on frequently asked questions to the authors, a group of experienced specialists in the field who have, however, no commitment to issue guidelines. PMID:26964028

  15. Colorimetric measurement of iron in plasma samples anticoagulated with EDTA.

    OpenAIRE

    Walmsley, T. A.; George, P M; Fowler, R. T.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To determine if the iron in EDTA anticoagulated plasma samples can be measured by colorimetric assays using Ferrozine. METHODS: Paired samples of serum and EDTA plasma were obtained from 24 patients and analysed by three commercial iron methods. The EDTA plasmas were also analysed using methods modified by the addition of zinc sulphate or with different concentrations of Ferrozine. The iron contamination of EDTA sample tubes was measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy. RESULTS: Two c...

  16. Anticoagulation in chronic kidney disease patients—the practical aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Stephen; Szeki, Iren; Nash, Michael J; Thachil, Jecko

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness about the risks of arterial and venous thromboembolism (TE) in hospital patients and general public which has led to consideration of thrombosis prevention measures in earnest. Early recognition of the symptoms of TE disease has led to timely administration of antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs, translating to better outcome in many of these patients. In this respect, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) represent a special group. They indeed represent...

  17. New oral anticoagulants in the prevention of stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Konrad Jarząbek; Dawid Bąkowski; Beata Wożakowska-Kapłon

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is associated with a few folds higher risk of stroke. Traditional vitamin K antagonists used in the prevention of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation are often not efficient enough due to their interactions with a broad range of substances including medicines or food ingridients and problems with monitoring the treatment. New oral anticoagulants pose an alternative for the vitamin K antagonists. They are equally efficient in the prevention of stroke, ...

  18. Radioactivity of phosphate mineral products

    OpenAIRE

    Mitrović Branislava; Vitorović Gordana; Stojanović Mirjana; Vitorović Duško

    2011-01-01

    The phosphate industry is one of the biggest polluters of the environment with uranium. Different products are derived after processing phosphoric ore, such as mineral and phosphate fertilizers and phosphate mineral supplements (dicalcium-and monocalcium phosphate) for animal feeding. Phosphate mineral additives used in animal food may contain a high activity of uranium. Research in this study should provide an answer to the extent in which phosphate minera...

  19. Coagulation assessment with the new generation of oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Charles V

    2016-06-01

    Long-term oral anticoagulant (OAC) therapy is used for the treatment and prevention of thrombosis and thromboembolism. As OAC use is so widespread, emergency physicians are likely to encounter patients on anticoagulant therapy in the emergency department (ED) on a regular basis, either for the same reasons as the population in general or as a result of the increased bleeding risk that OAC use entails.The vitamin K antagonist warfarin has been the standard OAC for several decades, but recently, the newer agents dabigatran etexilate, rivaroxaban and apixaban (collectively, novel OACs, non-vitamin K OACs, or simply 'NOACs') have become available for long-term use. Protocols for assessing and managing warfarin-treated patients in the ED are well established and include international normalised ratio (INR) testing, which helps guide patient management. However, the INR does not give an accurate evaluation of coagulation status with NOACs, and alternative tests are therefore needed for use in emergency settings. This paper discusses what information the INR provides for a patient taking warfarin and which coagulation tests can guide the physician when treating patients on one of the NOACs, as well as other differences in emergency anticoagulation management. PMID:25987596

  20. Improvements of anticoagulant activities of silk fibroin films with fucoidan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Fucoidan (FC),an effective anticoagulant constituent extracted from brown algae,was introduced into silk fibroin (SF) for improving its blood compatibility.The SF and SF/FC blend films were characterized by attenuated total reflectance Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR),X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS),scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and dynamic contact angle determinator (CA).The in vitro anticoagulant activities of the films were evaluated by activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT),thrombin time (TT) and prothrombin time (PT) measurements.The endothelial cell attachment and proliferation viability on the film were assessed by micropipette aspiration technique and MTT assay,respectively.The testing results indicated that the introduction of FC increased the roughness,hydrophilicity and sulfate component of the film surface without impeding the formation of β-sheet conformation in SF.More important,FC brought excellent anticoagulant activity and better endothelial cell affinity to SF.The SF/FC blend film was hopeful to be used as blood-contacting biomaterials.

  1. Novel oral anticoagulants for heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelley, Jessica W; Kyle, Jeffrey A; Roberts, Rachel A

    2016-08-01

    To review the use of the novel oral anticoagulant (NOAC) agents for the treatment of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) from relevant clinical trial data. A MEDLINE, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, ClinicalTrials.gov, and Google-Scholar searches (1966-March 2016) were conducted using the keywords: thrombocytopenia, NOACs, dabigatran, apixaban, rivaroxaban, edoxaban, Xa inhibitor, direct thrombin inhibitor. Articles evaluating the new oral anticoagulants for thrombocytopenia published in English and using human subjects were selected. Eight clinical trials were identified. References cited in identified articles were used for additional citations. Approximately 12 million hospitalized patients each year are exposed to heparin for thromboprophylaxis. HIT, an immune-mediated, prothrombotic adverse reaction is a potential complication of heparin therapy. As a result, heparin products must be immediately withdrawn and replaced by alternative anticoagulants to compensate for the thrombotic risk associated with HIT. Limitations exist with the only currently FDA approved heparin alternative, argatroban. NOACs have been considered as potential alternatives to traditional agents based on their pharmacologic activity. Case reports have indicated positive results in patients, with clinical outcomes and tolerability supporting the use of the NOACs as alternative agents in the treatment of HIT. Positive results have been reported for the use of NOACs in the treatment of HIT. Further robust studies are needed for definitive decision making by clinicians. PMID:27102287

  2. Selection of an aptamer antidote to the anticoagulant drug bivalirudin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Martin

    Full Text Available Adverse drug reactions, including severe patient bleeding, may occur following the administration of anticoagulant drugs. Bivalirudin is a synthetic anticoagulant drug sometimes employed as a substitute for heparin, a commonly used anticoagulant that can cause a condition called heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT. Although bivalrudin has the advantage of not causing HIT, a major concern is lack of an antidote for this drug. In contrast, medical professionals can quickly reverse the effects of heparin using protamine. This report details the selection of an aptamer to bivalirudin that functions as an antidote in buffer. This was accomplished by immobilizing the drug on a monolithic column to partition binding sequences from nonbinding sequences using a low-pressure chromatography system and salt gradient elution. The elution profile of binding sequences was compared to that of a blank column (no drug, and fractions with a chromatographic difference were analyzed via real-time PCR (polymerase chain reaction and used for further selection. Sequences were identified by 454 sequencing and demonstrated low micromolar dissociation constants through fluorescence anisotropy after only two rounds of selection. One aptamer, JPB5, displayed a dose-dependent reduction of the clotting time in buffer, with a 20 µM aptamer achieving a nearly complete antidote effect. This work is expected to result in a superior safety profile for bivalirudin, resulting in enhanced patient care.

  3. [Influence of anticoagulants on the appearance of chronic subdural hematoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupa, Mariusz; Moskała, Marek; Składzień, Tomasz; Grzywna, Ewelina

    2009-01-01

    In recent years in the Department of Neurotraumatology in Cracow it has been noticed the frequent connection between appearance of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) and treatment by anticoagulant medications. The aim of this study is to draw attention to the problem of insufficient control of anticoagulants consumption, especially by patients treated for cardiovascular system diseases that increases the risk of bleeding and CSDH development. The paper is based on data from questionnaires that was sent to patients with CSDH, cured in the Department of Neurotraumatology form 2004 to 2005. Analyzed was the group of 51 patients with chronic subdural hematoma; 37 individuals (72.5%) confirmed taking acetylsalicylic acid in the period of 3 months before admission to the Department, 9 (17.6%) patients answered that they were taking low-molecular weight heparin. One patient (1.9%) was taking chronically derivative of cumarin. The authors would inform that anticoagulant treatment might favour increase of chronic subdural hematoma incidence. It's especially important, because the average life expectancy has been prolonged in Poland and there are more people taking acetylsalicylic acid. This can be an epidemiological problem in future. PMID:20043584

  4. New anticoagulants in the treatment of stroke:future promise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emre Kumral; Tuba Cerraho(g)lu (S)irin

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence is leading to the replacement of vitamin K antagonists,the efficacy of which in preventing stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) is well established,with better tolerated and more manageable new anticoagulant drugs,with a lower risk of intracranial bleeding,no clear interactions with food,fewer interactions with medications,and no need for frequent laboratory monitoring and dose adjustments.Among new anticoagulants,dabigatran etexilate is a direct,competitive inhibitor of thrombin.It was evaluated for patients with AF in the RE-LY trial,showing lower rates of stroke and systemic embolism at a dose of 150 mg twice daily with similar rates of major hemorrhage compared with warfarin; and non-inferiority compared with warfarin for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism at a dose of 110 mg twice daily,with lower rates of major bleeding.Beside dabigatran,oral factor X a inhibitors are also emerging for the prevention of thromboembolic events in AF.Despite the obvious advantages of these new oral anticoagulants over vitamin K antagonists,further information is still needed on how to prioritize the patients deriving the greatest benefit from these novel agents on the basis of patient characteristics or drug pharmacokinetics.There is also a need for assessing their long-term efficacy and safety over decades in the real-world setting.

  5. Electroconvulsive therapy and anticoagulation after pulmonary embolism: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cesar Lazaro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is considered the most effective treatment for catatonia regardless its underlying condition. The rigid fixed posture and immobility observed in catatonia may lead to several clinical complications, of which, pulmonary embolism (PE is one of the most severe. The rapid improvement of the psychiatric condition in catatonia-related PE is essential, since immobility favors the occurrence of new thromboembolic events and further complications. In that scenario, ECT should be considered, based on a risk-benefit analysis, aiming at the faster resolution of the catatonia. Methods Case report and literature review. Results A 66-years-old woman admitted to the psychiatric ward with catatonia due to a depressive episode presented bilateral PE. Clinically stable, but still severely depressed after a trial of antidepressants, she was treated with ECT in the course of full anticoagulation with enoxaparin. After five ECT sessions, her mood was significantly better and she was walking and eating spontaneously. She did not present complications related either to PE or to anticoagulation. After the eighth ECT session, she evolved with hypomania, which was managed with oral medication adjustments. The patient was completely euthymic at discharge. Conclusion The case we presented provides further evidence to the anecdotal case reports on the safety of ECT in the course of concomitant full anticoagulant therapy after PE, and illustrates how, with the proper precautions, the benefits of ECT in such condition might outweigh its risks.

  6. PHOSPHATE MANAGEMENT: FY2010 RESULTS OF PHOSPHATE PRECIPITATION TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, M.; King, W.

    2011-04-04

    The Phosphate Management program seeks to develop treatment options for caustic phosphate solutions resulting from the caustic leaching of the bismuth phosphate sludge. The SRNL subtask investigated the precipitation of phosphate salts from caustic solutions through addition of fluoride and by crystallization. The scoping tests examined the: precipitation of phosphate by the addition of sodium fluoride to form the sodium fluorophosphate double salt, Na{sub 7}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} {center_dot} 19H{sub 2}O, crystallization of phosphate by reducing the temperature of saturated phosphate solutions, and combinations of precipitation and crystallization. A simplified leachate simulant was used in the study produced by dissolving sodium phosphate in 1 M to 3.5 M sodium hydroxide solutions. The results show that all three processes; precipitation with sodium fluoride, crystallization, and combined precipitation/crystallization can be effective for removing large amounts of phosphate from solution. The combined process of precipitation/crystallization showed >90% removal of phosphate at all hydroxide concentrations when cooling a non-saturated phosphate solution from 65 C to 25 C. Based on the measured solubility of sodium phosphate, pH adjustment/caustic addition will also remove large amounts of phosphate from solution (>80%). For all three processes, the phosphate concentration in the caustic solution must be managed to keep the phosphate from becoming too concentrated and thereby potentially forming a solid mass of sodium phosphate after an effective phosphate removal process.

  7. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: established oral anticoagulants versus novel anticoagulants-translating clinical trial data into practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezekowitz, Michael D; Spahr, Judy; Ghosh, Pradeepto; Corelli, Kathryn

    2014-09-01

    Anticoagulation for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) is effective. Pivotal trials RE-LY, ROCKET AF, ARISTOTLE, and ENGAGE-AF TIMI 48 tested novel agents against warfarin (W). In RE-LY, an open-label trial, dabigatran 150 mg BID (D150) was superior (35%) and 110 mg BID (D110) was noninferior to W. D150 reduced ischemic strokes by 25% and intracerebral bleeds by 74%, but increased major GI bleeds by 0.5 % per year. In ROCKET AF, a double-blind study, rivaroxaban 20 mg daily, downtitrated to 15 mg daily (if CrCl was 80; weight, 1.5 mg) was superior for safety (31%), efficacy (21%), and all-cause mortality (11%). In ENGAGE-AF TIMI 48, edoxaban 60 mg once daily (30 mg once daily if CrCl 30-50 ml/min, weight <60 kg, or concomitant verapamil or quinidine) was noninferior to W for efficacy, but reduced major bleeding (20%). To translate clinical trials to practice, understanding the disease and each anticoagulant is essential. For all novel agents, rapid anticoagulation, absence of monitoring, and a short half-life differentiate them from W. Bleed rates were either noninferior or lower than for W, without an antidote. Patient compliance is critical. Knowledge of renal function is essential and maintaining patients on therapy is key. PMID:24880227

  8. Patient costs in anticoagulation management: a comparison of primary and secondary care.

    OpenAIRE

    Parry, D; Bryan, S; Gee, K; Murray, E.; Fitzmaurice, D

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The demand for anticoagulation management is increasing. This has led to care being provided in non-hospital settings. While clinical studies have similarly demonstrated good clinical care in these settings, it is still unclear as to which alternative is the most efficient. AIM: To determine the costs borne by patients when attending an anticoagulation management clinic in either primary or secondary care and to use this information to consider the cost-effectiveness of anticoagul...

  9. Forsterite Carbonation in Wet Supercritical CO2 and Sodium Citrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, L.; Schaef, T.; Wang, Z.; Miller, Q.; McGrail, P.

    2013-12-01

    Lin Qiu1*, Herbert T. Schaef2, Zhengrong Wang1, Quin R.S. Miller3, BP McGrail2 1. Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA 2. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA 3. University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY, USA Geologic reservoirs for managing carbon emissions (mostly CO2) have expanded over the last 5 years to include unconventional formations including basalts and fractured shales. Recently, ~1000 metric tons of CO2 was injected into the Columbia River Basalt (CRB) in Eastern Washington as part of the Wallula Pilot Project, Big Sky Regional Carbon Partnership. Based on reservoir conditions, the injected CO2 is present as a supercritical fluid that dissolves into the formation water over time, and reacts with basalt components to form carbonate minerals. In this paper, we discuss mineral transformation reactions occurring when the forsterite (Mg2SiO4) is exposed to wet scCO2 in equilibrium with pure water and sodium citrate solutions. Forsterite was selected as it is an important olivine group mineral present in igneous and mafic rocks. Citrate was selected as it has been shown to enhance mineral dissolution and organic ligands are possible degradation products of the microbial communities present in the formational waters of the CRB. For the supercritical phase, transformation reactions were examined by in situ high pressure x-ray diffraction (HXRD) in the presence of supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) in contact with water and sodium citrate solutions at conditions relevant to carbon sequestration. Experimental results show close-to-complete dissolution of forsterite in contact with scCO2 equilibrated with pure water for 90 hours (90 bar and 50°C). Under these conditions, thin films of water coated the mineral surface, providing a mechanism for silicate dissolution and transport of cations necessary for carbonate formation. The primary crystalline component initially detected with in situ HXRD was the hydrated magnesium carbonate, nesquehonite [Mg

  10. Standard characterization of phosphate rock samples from the FAO/IAEA phosphate project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphate rocks (PR) are phosphate-bearing minerals that vary widely in their inherent characteristics and consequently their agronomic potential. In the framework of a FAO/IAEA networked research project, the evaluation of the agronomic effectiveness of natural and modified PR products under a variety of soil climate and crop management conditions was carried out. The characterization of phosphate rocks is the first and essential step in evaluating their suitability for direct application. If several PR sources are utilized, standardized methods should be used for comparison purposes to determine their agronomic potential. This paper describes the standard characterization of phosphate rock products utilized in the project, in particular the mineralogical and crystallographic analyses, physical analyses, chemical composition and solubility in conventional reagents. A total of 28 phosphate rock samples from 15 countries were collected and analyzed in specialized laboratories. The data on mineralogy, chemical composition and solubility in conventional reagents are closely interrelated. An arbitrary classification of the reactivity of the PR samples was made based on the solubility indices in conventional reagents. On another hand, the results of the crystallographic parameters, calculated indices of absolute solubility, specific surface and porosity reflect the variability of the physical state and the sample pre-conditioning treatment of the analyzed products. A proper characterization of phosphate rock samples should provide the maximum of basic information that can be obtained in a cost-effective manner in normal chemical laboratories. Based on the results of this characterization, the following determinations are recommended: a description of the sample, major elemental (total P, Ca, Mg) composition, solubility in conventional reagents (neutral ammonium citrate, citric and formic acid) and particle size analysis. The classification of PR samples for direct

  11. Engineering genetically encoded nanosensors for real-time in vivo measurements of citrate concentrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C Ewald

    Full Text Available Citrate is an intermediate in catabolic as well as biosynthetic pathways and is an important regulatory molecule in the control of glycolysis and lipid metabolism. Mass spectrometric and NMR based metabolomics allow measuring citrate concentrations, but only with limited spatial and temporal resolution. Methods are so far lacking to monitor citrate levels in real-time in-vivo. Here, we present a series of genetically encoded citrate sensors based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET. We screened databases for citrate-binding proteins and tested three candidates in vitro. The citrate binding domain of the Klebsiella pneumoniae histidine sensor kinase CitA, inserted between the FRET pair Venus/CFP, yielded a sensor highly specific for citrate. We optimized the peptide linkers to achieve maximal FRET change upon citrate binding. By modifying residues in the citrate binding pocket, we were able to construct seven sensors with different affinities spanning a concentration range of three orders of magnitude without losing specificity. In a first in vivo application we show that E. coli maintains the capacity to take up glucose or acetate within seconds even after long-term starvation.

  12. Renal uptake of /sup 67/Ga-citrate in renal amyloidosis due to Familiar Mediterranean Fever

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banzo-Marraco, J.; Abos-Olivares, M.D.; Iribar-Ibabe, M.C.; Prats-Rivera, E.; Banzo-Marraco, J.I.; Teijeiro-Vidal, J.; Nerin-Mora, E.; Nerin de la Puerta, I.

    1981-06-01

    Renal uptake of /sup 67/Ga-citrate is described in a patient with biopsy-proven amyloidosis of the kidneys, due to Familiar Mediterranean Fever. After administration 150 MBq (4mCi) /sup 67/Ga-citrate, scans were done at 48, 72, and 120 h. Intense uptake was noted in both kidneys. A renal biopsy done 5 days after the /sup 67/Ga-citrate scan revealed a pattern typical of amyloidosis. Gallium scanning can be useful in patients with fever of unknown origin. Renal amyloidosis can be considered when renal uptake of /sup 67/Ga-citrate associated with nephrotic syndrome is observed.

  13. MODERN APPROACHES TO ANTICOAGULANT THERAPY DURING CATHETER ABLATION TREATMENT OF NON-VALVULAR ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

    OpenAIRE

    E. A. Belikov; K. V. Davtyan; O. N. Tkacheva

    2015-01-01

    Prevention of thromboembolic complications in patients with atrial fibrillation during catheter pulmonary veins isolation is discussed. This subject review is presented with special consideration to new anticoagulants.

  14. Anticoagulation to prevent stroke in atrial fibrillation and its implications for managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, D E

    1998-03-12

    Nonrheumatic atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most potent common risk factor for stroke, raising the risk of stroke 5-fold. Six randomized trials of anticoagulation in AFib consistently demonstrated a reduction in the risk of stroke by about two-thirds. In these trials, anticoagulation in AFib was quite safe. In contrast, randomized trials indicate that aspirin confers only a small reduction in risk of stroke, at best. Pooled data from the first set of randomized trials indicate that prior stroke, hypertension, diabetes, and increasing age are independent risk factors for future stroke with AFib. Individuals AFib increases greatly at INR levels AFib depend on maintaining the INR between 2.0-3.0. Cost-effectiveness studies indicate that anticoagulation for AFib is among the most efficient preventive interventions in adults. Importantly, the benefits of anticoagulation in AFib accrue immediately. The implications for managed care organizations are that anticoagulation for AFib should be encouraged in their covered populations, and that dedicated anticoagulation services should be developed to promote system-wide control of anticoagulation intensity. Quality measures would include the proportion of patients with AFib who are anticoagulated, and the percentage of time patients' INR levels are between 2.0-3.0. Managed care organizations can benefit from recent research on anticoagulation for AFib; they have a responsibility to support future research and development efforts. PMID:9525571

  15. Comparison of the efficiency of clomiphene citrate and letrozole in combination with metformin in moderately obese clomiphene citrate - resistant polycystic ovarian syndrome patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjelica Artur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Polycystic ovary syndrome is the most common endocrinopathy in women of reproductiveage. Therapy for those who want to get pregnant involves ovulation induction using clomiphene citrate, metformin, letrozole and gonadotropins. Objective. The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of combinations of clomiphene citrate-metformin and letrozole-metformin in obese patients who are resistant to clomiphene citrate alone. Methods. The investigation was conducted as a retrospective study involving 60 moderately obese patients with polycystic ovary syndrome. Thirty-one of them received the clomiphene citrate-metformin, and 29 letrozole-metformin therapy. Stimulation was carried out for the procedures of intrauterine insemination (IUI. Results. The age of patients, duration of infertility, and body mass index in both groups were similar. There was statistically significant difference in the thickness of the endometrium in favor of the group having the letrozole-metformin therapy (8.9 ± 1.7 mm compared with the group receiving the clomiphene citrate-metformin treatment (6.3 ± 1.3 mm. The number of follicles was not statistically significantly different. Pregnancy rate in the first cycle of IUI in the clomiphene citrate group was 6.4%, and 17.2% in the letrozole group, which also was not statistically different. After the third IUI cycle, the pregnancy rate was significantly higher in the letrozole group (20.6%, while in the clomiphene citrate group it was (9.6%. Conclusion. This retrospective study demonstrated the advantages of the use of letrozole over clomiphene citrate in combination with metformin in moderately obese patients with polycystic ovary syndrome who are resistant to stimulation with clomiphene citrate alone.

  16. Impact of Creatine on Coordination of Urea and Citrate Cycles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kohlíková, E.; Petr, M.; Navrátil, Tomáš; Šenholdová, Z.; Přistoupilová, K.; Přistoupil, T. I.; Heyrovský, Michael; Pelclová, D.

    Praha: IV. interní klinika 1. LF UK Praha, 2006 - (Tvrzická, E.), s. 21-24 ISBN 80-239-7726-1. [Atherosklerosa 2006. Diagnostika, léčba, prevence v dětském i dospělém věku. Praha (CZ), 11.09.2006-13.09.2006] R&D Projects: GA MPO 1H-PK/42; GA MZd NR8107 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : Atherosclerosis * Citrate cycle * Urea cycle * Blood Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  17. Metal-phosphate binders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Beth Ann [Lewistown, IL; Chaps-Cabrera, Jesus Guadalupe [Coahuila, MX

    2009-05-12

    A metal-phosphate binder is provided. The binder may include an aqueous phosphoric acid solution, a metal-cation donor including a metal other than aluminum, an aluminum-cation donor, and a non-carbohydrate electron donor.

  18. Dysregulation of phosphate metabolism and conditions associated with phosphate toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Ronald B; Razzaque, Mohammed S

    2015-01-01

    Phosphate homeostasis is coordinated and regulated by complex cross-organ talk through delicate hormonal networks. Parathyroid hormone (PTH), secreted in response to low serum calcium, has an important role in maintaining phosphate homeostasis by influencing renal synthesis of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, thereby increasing intestinal phosphate absorption. Moreover, PTH can increase phosphate efflux from bone and contribute to renal phosphate homeostasis through phosphaturic effects. In addition,...

  19. Uranium from phosphate ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphate rock, the major raw material for phosphate fertilizers, contains uranium that can be recovered when the rock is processed. This makes it possible to produce uranium in a country that has no uranium ore deposits. The author briefly describes the way that phosphate fertilizers are made, how uranium is recovered in the phosphate industry, and how to detect uranium recovery operations in a phosphate plant. Uranium recovery from the wet-process phosphoric acid involves three unit operations: (1) pretreatment to prepare the acid; (2) solvent extraction to concentrate the uranium; (3) post treatment to insure that the acid returning to the acid plant will not be harmful downstream. There are 3 extractants that are capable of extracting uranium from phosphoric acid. The pyro or OPPA process uses a pyrophosphoric acid that is prepared on site by reacting an organic alcohol (usually capryl alcohol) with phosphorous pentoxide. The DEPA-TOPO process uses a mixture of di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (DEPA) and trioctyl phosphine oxide (TOPO). The components can be bought separately or as a mixture. The OPAP process uses octylphenyl acid phosphate, a commercially available mixture of mono- and dioctylphenyl phosphoric acids. All three extractants are dissolved in kerosene-type diluents for process use

  20. Formulation, Characterization and Physicochemical Evaluation of Potassium Citrate Effervescent Tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Fattahi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to design and formulation of potassium citrate effervescent tablet for reduction of calcium oxalate and urate kidney stones in patients suffering from kidney stones. Methods: In this study, 13 formulations were prepared from potassium citrate and effervescent base in different concentration. The flowability of powders and granules was studied. Then effervescent tablets were prepared by direct compression, fusion and wet granulation methods. The prepared tablets were evaluated for hardness, friability, effervescent time, pH, content uniformity. To amend taste of formulations, different flavoring agents were used and then panel test was done by using Latin Square method by 30 volunteers. Results: Formulations obtained from direct compression and fusion methods had good flow but low hardness. Wet granulation improves flowability and other physicochemical properties such as acceptable hardness, effervescence time ≤3 minutes, pH<6, friability < 1%, water percentage < 0.5% and accurate content uniformity. In panel test, both of combination flavors; (orange - lemon and (strawberry - raspberry had good acceptability. Conclusion: The prepared tablets by wet granulation method using PVP solution had more tablet hardness. It is a reproducible process and suitable to produce granules that are compressed into effervescent tablets due to larger agglomerates.

  1. Trapping and release of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electrical method to trap and release charged gold nanoparticles onto and from the surface of gold electrodes modified by an alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer (SAM) is presented. To form electrodes coated with gold nanoparticles (GNPs), amine-terminated SAMs on gold electrodes were immersed in a solution of negatively charged citrate-capped GNPs. Accumulation of GNPs on the electrode surface was monitored by a decrease in the impedance of the SAM-modified electrode and by an increase in the electrochemical activity at the electrode as shown through cyclic voltammetry (CV). Electrostatic interactions between the GNPs and the amine-terminated SAM trap the GNPs on the electrode surface. Application of a subsequent negative bias to the electrode initiated a partial release of the GNPs from the electrode surface. Impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to monitor and confirm the attraction of GNPs to and release from the aminealkanethiolated gold electrodes. This work describes a method of trapping and release for citrate-capped GNPs that could be used for on-demand nanoparticle delivery applications such as in assessing and modeling nanoparticle toxicology, as well as for monitoring the functionalization of gold nanoparticles.

  2. Phosphate taxis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Kato, J.; Ito, A.; Nikata, T; Ohtake, H

    1992-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was shown to be attracted to phosphate. The chemotactic response was induced by phosphate starvation. The specificity of chemoreceptors for phosphate was high so that no other tested phosphorus compounds elicited a chemotactic response as strong as that elicited by phosphate. Competition experiments showed that the chemoreceptors for phosphate appeared to be different from those for the common amino acids. Mutants constitutive for alkaline phosphatase showed the chemota...

  3. Genetic disorders of phosphate regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Gattineni, Jyothsna; Baum, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of phosphate homeostasis is critical for many biological processes, and both hypophosphatemia and hyperphosphatemia can have adverse clinical consequences. Only a very small percentage (1%) of total body phosphate is present in the extracellular fluid, which is measured by routine laboratory assays and does not reflect total body phosphate stores. Phosphate is absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract via the transcellular route [sodium phosphate cotransporter 2b (NaPi2b)] and acros...

  4. Anticoagulation after anterior myocardial infarction and the risk of stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob A Udell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Survivors of anterior MI are at increased risk for stroke with predilection to form ventricular thrombus. Commonly patients are discharged on dual antiplatelet therapy. Given the frequency of early coronary reperfusion and risk of bleeding, it remains uncertain whether anticoagulation offers additional utility. We examined the effectiveness of anticoagulation therapy for the prevention of stroke after anterior MI. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We performed a population-based cohort analysis of 10,383 patients who survived hospitalization for an acute MI in Ontario, Canada from April 1, 1999 to March 31, 2001. The primary outcome was four-year ischemic stroke rates compared between anterior and non-anterior MI patients. Risk factors for stroke were assessed by multivariate Cox proportional-hazards analysis. Warfarin use was determined at discharge and followed for 90 days among a subset of patients aged 66 and older (n = 1483. Among the 10,383 patients studied, 2,942 patients survived hospitalization for an anterior MI and 20% were discharged on anticoagulation therapy. Within 4 years, 169 patients (5.7% were admitted with an ischemic stroke, half of which occurred within 1-year post-MI. There was no significant difference in stroke rate between anterior and non-anterior MI patients. The use of warfarin up to 90 days was not associated with stroke protection after anterior MI (hazard ratio [HR], 0.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.37-1.26. The use of angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (HR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.44-0.95 and beta-blockers (HR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.41-0.87 were associated with a significant decrease in stroke risk. There was no significant difference in bleeding-related hospitalizations in patients who used warfarin for up to 90 days post-MI. CONCLUSION: Many practitioners still consider a large anterior-wall MI as high risk for potential LV thrombus formation and stroke. Among a cohort of elderly patients who survived an anterior

  5. Conservatively managed pineal apoplexy in an anticoagulated patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werder, Gabriel M. [William Beaumont Hospital, Department of Radiology, 3600 West Thirteen Mile Road, Royal Oak, MI 48073 (United States); St Christopher Iba Mar Diop College of Medicine, Luton (United Kingdom)], E-mail: gabriel_werder@yahoo.com; Razdan, Rahul S.; Gagliardi, Joseph A.; Chaddha, Shashi K.B. [St Vincent' s Medical Center, Bridgeport, CT (United States)

    2008-02-15

    We present a case of pineal apoplexy in an anticoagulated and hypertensive 56-year-old Hispanic male. At presentation, the patient's international normalized ratio (INR) was 10.51 and his blood pressure was 200/130 mmHg. His presenting symptoms included acute onset of headache, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, vertigo, and visual disturbance. Neuroimaging demonstrated hemorrhage into a morphologically normal pineal gland. Under conservative management, the patient experienced gradual resolution of all symptoms excluding the disturbance of upward gaze.

  6. Inflammation is strongly associated with lupus anticoagulant positivity, indepentent of know autoimmune disease and recent venous or arterial thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Just, Søren Andreas; Nybo, Mads; Laustrup, Helle;

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is strongly associated with lupus anticoagulant positivity, indepentent of know autoimmune disease and recent venous or arterial thrombosis......Inflammation is strongly associated with lupus anticoagulant positivity, indepentent of know autoimmune disease and recent venous or arterial thrombosis...

  7. Bioavailability of zinc and phosphorus in calcareous soils as affected by citrate exudation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duffner, A.; Hoffland, E.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Zinc (Zn) and phosphorus (P) deficiency often occurs at the same time and limits crop production in many soils. It has been suggested that citrate root exudation is a response of plants to both deficiencies. We used white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) as a model plant to clarify if citrate exuded by

  8. PREPARATION OF SORBITOL CITRATE POLYESTERS BY REACTIVE EXTRUSION AND APPLICATION AS INHIBITIORS OF CALCIUM CARBONATE PRECIPITATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbitol citrates were prepared using a vented ZSK-30-twin-screw extruder as part of a program to develop bio-based, water soluble polycarboxylates. A Box-Behnken experimental design was used and included the variables sorbitol, citric acid, sodium citrate, temperature and feed rate. Extent of est...

  9. MECHANISM AND ENERGETICS OF A CITRATE-TRANSPORT SYSTEM OF KLEBSIELLA-PNEUMONIAE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERREST, ME; ABEE, T; MOLENAAR, D; KONINGS, WN

    1991-01-01

    The citrate-transport determinant of plasmid pES1 from Klebsiella pneumoniae [Schwarz, E. & Oesterhelt, D. (1985) EMBO J. 4, 1599 - 1603] has been subcloned in Escherichia coli DH1. Uptake of citrate in E. coli membrane vesicles via this uptake system is an electrogenic process, although the pH grad

  10. 21 CFR 520.763c - Dithiazanine iodide and piperazine citrate suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dithiazanine iodide and piperazine citrate... § 520.763c Dithiazanine iodide and piperazine citrate suspension. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of the drug contains 69 milligrams of dithiazanine iodide and 83 milligrams of piperazine base...

  11. Mechanism of Citrate Metabolism by an Oxaloacetate Decarboxylase-Deficient Mutant of Lactococcus lactis IL1403

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pudlik, Agata M.; Lolkema, Juke S.

    2011-01-01

    Citrate metabolism in resting cells of Lactococcus lactis IL1403(pFL3) results in the formation of two end products from the intermediate pyruvate, acetoin and acetate (A. M. Pudlik and J. S. Lolkema, J. Bacteriol. 193:706-714, 2011). Pyruvate is formed from citrate following uptake by the transport

  12. Addition of senna improves quality of colonoscopy preparation with magnesium citrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stergios Vradelis; Evangelos Kalaitzakis; Yalda Sharifi; Otto Buchel; Satish Keshav; Roger W Chapman; Barbara Braden

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To prospectively investigate the effectiveness and patient's tolerance of two low-cost bowel cleansing preparation protocols based on magnesium citrate only or the combination of magnesium citrate and senna. METHODS: A total of 342 patients who were referred for colonoscopy underwent a colon cleansing protocol with magnesium citrate alone ( n = 160) or magnesium citrate and senna granules ( n = 182). The colonoscopist rated the overall efficacy of colon cleansing using an established score on a 4-point scale. Patients were questioned before undergoing colonoscopy for side effects and symptoms during bowel preparation. RESULTS: The percentage of procedures rescheduled because of insufficient colon cleansing was 7% in the magnesium citrate group and 4% in the magnesium citrate/senna group ( P = 0.44). Adequate visualization of the colonic mucosa was rated superior under the citramag/senna regimen ( P = 0.004). Both regimens were well tolerated, and did not significantly differ in the occurrence of nausea, bloating or headache. However, abdominal cramps were observed more often under the senna protocol (29.2%) compared to the magnesium citrate only protocol (9.9%, P < 0.0003). CONCLUSION: The addition of senna to the bowel preparation protocol with magnesium citrate significantly improves the cleansing outcome.

  13. Standardization of the biological control of 67 Ga-citrate in rats and mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    67Ga-citrate is frequently used in Nuclear Medicine for tumor diagnosis. This study established the biological distribution parameters in rats with experimental abscesses in the left thigh. The biological model choosen made possible the routine control of 67Ga-citrate giving a realiable result in a relative short-time (60 min.) after the radionuclide administration. (author)

  14. Relationship between diet and anticoagulant response to warfarin – A factor analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet composition is one of the factors that may contribute to intraindividual variability in the anticoagulant response to warfarin. The aim of this study was to determine the associations between food pattern and anticoagulant response to warfarin in a group of Brazilian patients with vascular dis...

  15. Uranium production from phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to estimates of the world's uranium consumption, exploitation of most rich sources is expected by the 1980's. Forecasts show that the rate of uranium consumption will increase towards the end of the century. It is therefore desirable to exploit poor sources not yet in use. In the near future, the most reasonable source for developing uranium is phosphate rock. Uranium reserves in phosphates are estimated at a few million tons. Production of uranium from phosphates is as a by-product of phosphate rock processing and phosphoric acid production; it will then be possible to save the costs incurred in crushing and dissolving the rock when calculating uranium production costs. Estimates show that the U.S. wastes about 3,000 tons of uranium per annum in phosphoric acid based fertilisers. Studies have also been carried out in France, Yugoslavia and India. In Israel, during the 1950's, a small plant was operated in Haifa by 'Chemical and Phosphates'. Uranium processes have also been developed by linking with the extraction processes at Arad. Currently there is almost no activity on this subject because there are no large phosphoric acid plants which would enable production to take place on a reasonable scale. Discussions are taking place about the installation of a plant for phosphoric acid production utilising the 'wet process', producing 200 to 250,000 tons P2O5 per annum. It is necessary to combine these facilities with uranium production plant. (author)

  16. Radiolabeled porphyrin versus gallium-67 citrate for the detection of human melanoma in athymic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We performed the biodistribution and imaging studies of 111In and 67Ga labeled tetra(4-N-methylpyridyl) porphine, (T4NMPYP), and compared it to that of 67Ga citrate in athymic mice bearing a human melanoma xenograft. The biodistribution results of both 111In and 67Ga labeled T4NMPYP (3, 6, 24, and 48 hours) were similar but differed from that of 67Ga citrate (48 hours). The optimum tumor uptake of both radiolabeled porphyrins was at 6 hours postinjection and was lower than the tumor uptake of 67Ga citrate at 48 hours postinjection. Kidney was the only organ showing higher uptake of radiolabeled porphyrin compared to that of 67Ga citrate. The imaging studies performed with 111In T4NMPYP and 67Ga citrate correspond to the biodistribution results. Osteomyelitis present in one mouse showed good localization of 111In T4NMPYP. 15 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  17. Use of direct oral anticoagulants with regional anesthesia in orthopedic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelleri, Gianluca; Fanelli, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    The use of direct oral anticoagulants including apixaban, rivaroxaban, and dabigatran, which are approved for several therapeutic indications, can simplify perioperative and postoperative management of anticoagulation. Utilization of regional neuraxial anesthesia in patients receiving anticoagulants carries a relatively small risk of hematoma, the serious complications of which must be acknowledged. Given the extensive use of regional anesthesia in surgery and the increasing number of patients receiving direct oral anticoagulants, it is crucial to understand the current clinical data on the risk of hemorrhagic complications in this setting, particularly for anesthesiologists. We discuss current data, guideline recommendations, and best practice advice on effective management of the direct oral anticoagulants and regional anesthesia, including in specific clinical situations, such as patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery at high risk of a thromboembolic event, or patients with renal impairment at an increased risk of bleeding. PMID:27290980

  18. Interference from lupus anticoagulant on von Willebrand factor measurement in splenic marginal zone lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinholt, Pernille J; Nybo, Mads

    2015-01-01

    We present a case concerning a patient with splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) and isolated prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) caused by lupus anticoagulant. Von Willebrand factor (VWF) activity and antigen were immeasurable by latex particle immunoturbidimetric assays, and...... several coagulation factor levels were decreased. However, VWF activity and antigen were normal when analyzed by other methods. Also, coagulation factor levels were normal if an aPTT reagent with low lupus anticoagulant sensitivity or a chromogenic method was applied. Altogether, the initial findings were...... because of lupus anticoagulant interference and in fact, the patient had normal VWF activity and coagulation status. Interference of lupus anticoagulant in clot-based assays is well known but has not previously been described in VWF assays. This is furthermore the first report in which lupus anticoagulant...

  19. Anticoagulation, ferrotoxicity and the future of translational lung cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharski, Leo R

    2016-06-01

    Numerous studies have shown that elements of coagulation reactions mediate tumor cell proliferation, motility (invasiveness), tissue remodeling and metastasis. Coagulation activation is virtually a universal feature of human malignancy that differs from the clotting response to injury in that it is self-perpetuating rather than self-attenuating. Coagulation activation participates in tumor matrix deposition and local inflammation, and predicts subsequent cancer risk and adverse cancer outcomes. Several clinical trials of anticoagulants have shown improved outcomes in small cell carcinoma of the lung (SCCL) that have been correlated with assembly on the tumor cells of an intact coagulation pathway. However, variable efficacy of anticoagulant therapy has raised doubts about the coagulation hypothesis. Recently, initiators of coagulation and fibrinolytic pathways have been identified that mediate tumor inception and progression. Notable among these is oxidative stress driven by iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen species that may be the basis for local coagulation activation, tumor matrix deposition, inflammation and aberrant properties characteristic of the malignant phenotype. Recognition of important biological characteristics of individual tumor types, disease stage, choice of standard therapy including chemotherapy and the iron status of the host may clarify mechanisms. All of these are subject to modification based on controlled clinical trial design. Further tests of the coagulation hypothesis may lead to novel, low cost and relatively non-toxic approaches to treatment of malignancy including lung cancer that contrast with certain current cancer treatment paradigms. PMID:27413710

  20. Procoagulants and anticoagulants in fetal blood. A literature survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Uszyński

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In intrauterine life, hemostasis is maintained by the same components as in extrauterine life (blood platelets, coagulation and fibrinolysis systems, involvement of the vascular wall; in the fetus, however, these components show significant differences of a quantitative/qualitative nature. In the present study, we surveyed the literature on the coagulation system in the fetus. We focused on the velocity of development of the coagulation system, being reflected in the increased concentration of all procoagulants and anticoagulants (a rise from approximately 20% in the middle of pregnancy to about 60% or more in the period of labor; exceptions: factors V, VIII and XIII which in the labor period reach the adult level and screening test results (prothrombin time, aPTT - activated prothrombin time, and thrombin time. Reference values were given for the 19-38 weeks of pregnancy and the labor term. Biochemical features of fetal fibrinogen and PIVKA factors were also discussed. The role of activated protein C (APC in the maintenance of balance between procoagulants and anticoagulants was postulated as well as the role of APC in the formation of thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI.

  1. Anticoagulation, ferrotoxicity and the future of translational lung cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that elements of coagulation reactions mediate tumor cell proliferation, motility (invasiveness), tissue remodeling and metastasis. Coagulation activation is virtually a universal feature of human malignancy that differs from the clotting response to injury in that it is self-perpetuating rather than self-attenuating. Coagulation activation participates in tumor matrix deposition and local inflammation, and predicts subsequent cancer risk and adverse cancer outcomes. Several clinical trials of anticoagulants have shown improved outcomes in small cell carcinoma of the lung (SCCL) that have been correlated with assembly on the tumor cells of an intact coagulation pathway. However, variable efficacy of anticoagulant therapy has raised doubts about the coagulation hypothesis. Recently, initiators of coagulation and fibrinolytic pathways have been identified that mediate tumor inception and progression. Notable among these is oxidative stress driven by iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen species that may be the basis for local coagulation activation, tumor matrix deposition, inflammation and aberrant properties characteristic of the malignant phenotype. Recognition of important biological characteristics of individual tumor types, disease stage, choice of standard therapy including chemotherapy and the iron status of the host may clarify mechanisms. All of these are subject to modification based on controlled clinical trial design. Further tests of the coagulation hypothesis may lead to novel, low cost and relatively non-toxic approaches to treatment of malignancy including lung cancer that contrast with certain current cancer treatment paradigms.

  2. Reservations against new oral anticoagulants after stroke and cerebral bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöllberger, Claudia; Finsterer, Josef

    2013-07-15

    Dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban are the new oral anticoagulants (NOAC) which have been investigated in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) for primary and secondary prevention of stroke and thromboembolism. In these trials NOAC had a similar efficacy and safety profile compared to traditional vitamin-K-antagonists such as warfarin. We advise caution in the use of NOAC in patients with stroke or cerebral hemorrhage because of the following reasons: 1) Patients with cerebral bleeding were excluded from the trials. 2) Stroke within 14 days and severe stroke within 6 months before screening were exclusion criteria in the trials investigating dabigatran and rivaroxaban. 3) There is no antidote for reversal and no reliable laboratory monitoring of the anticoagulant effect for emergency situations. 4) NOAC are either substrates of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) or are metabolized by the cytochrome P450 (CYP) system, or both. Drug-drug interactions between NOAC and P-gp and CYP-affecting drugs are largely unknown. 5) Long-term effects of thrombin generation inhibition on the occurrence of infections, malignancies, dementia, and other diseases are unknown. Based on these considerations it is our opinion that studies of NOAC in patients with stroke compared with other prevention strategies, as well as more post marketing surveillance data, are required. PMID:23628464

  3. [Anticoagulant rodenticide poisoning in dogs in The Netherlands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robben, J H; Mout, H C; Kuijpers, E A

    1997-09-01

    The occurrence, the diagnosis, and the treatment of anticoagulant rodenticide poisoning in dogs in the Netherlands was evaluated by a survey among Dutch veterinarians carried out by the National Poisons Control Center (NPCC). The survey included information on 54 dogs, 32 being treated by veterinarians who consulted the NPCC and 22 that were admitted to the Utrecht University Clinic for Companion Animals (UUCCA). The poisons that were suspected were brodifacoum (n = 19), bromadiolone (n = 14), difenacoum (n = 8), difethialone (n = 6) and chlorophacinone (n = 1). In 6 dogs the identity of the poison was unknown. Of 31 dogs with hemorrhages, 2 died shortly after presentation to practitioners and 2 died shortly after admission to the UUCCA. Signs of bleeding occurred especially in poisoning by brodifacoum (n = 16). In all but one of the dogs without hemorrhages, the intake of poison had taken place within 24 hours before presentation. The method of treatment varied, with the induction of vomiting and the use of vitamin K mentioned most. The choice of therapy was determined by the length of time after intake of the poison, the clinical signs and whether or not an anticoagulant toxicosis was suspected at the time of the initial examination. These findings provide the basis for discussion of several aspects of diagnosis and treatment. PMID:9534772

  4. The comprehensive management of anticoagulation: ochsner coumadin clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Annette C; Ventura, Hector O; Milani, Richard V

    2002-01-01

    Clinical privileging of pharmacists and the effective use of support staff and information technology have helped create an efficient pharmacist-operated anticoagulation clinic at Ochsner Clinic Foundation that will support future growth efforts for improved patient care. Developed by Ochsner's Department of Cardiology, the pharmacist-operated anticoagulation clinic cares for 2000 patients with a clinical pharmacist, staff pharmacist, registered nurse, and medical assistants. Patients are managed by face-to-face and telephone encounters. The pharmacists are privileged by medical staff to write prescriptions for warfarin, adjust warfarin doses, and conduct appropriate laboratory monitoring. Patients attend a mandatory initial visit where they are given medication instructions and educational materials. The pharmacist determines the treatment dose and schedules follow-up appointments. A software system developed by Ochsner's Information Services Department imports patient data from the institution's central computer system, allowing for a limited electronic patient record. Once fully implemented, this program will allow for more specific patient tracking and assist with quality improvement efforts. At present, approximately 68% of our patient population is within therapeutic range. PMID:22822313

  5. PREPARATION, CHRACTERIZATION AND EVALUATION OF STARCH CITRATE- A NEW MODIFIED STARCH AS A DISINTEGRANT IN TABLET FORMULATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    K. P. R. Chowdary

    2011-01-01

    Starch citrate prepared by reacting potato starch with citric acid at elevated temperatures was found to be a white, crystalline, non-hygroscopic powder. Starch citrate prepared exhibited excellent flow characteristics. Starch citrate was insoluble in water and aqueous fluids of acidic and alkaline pHs. It also exhibited good swelling (1500%) in water. It has no pasting or gelling property when heated at 1000C in water for 30 min. As starch citrate exhibited good swelling in water it is consi...

  6. Model‐Based Assessment of Plasma Citrate Flux Into the Liver: Implications for NaCT as a Therapeutic Target

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Li; Erion, DM; Maurer, TS

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic citrate serves as an important regulator of gluconeogenesis and carbon source for de novo lipogenesis in the liver. For this reason, the sodium‐coupled citrate transporter (NaCT), a plasma membrane transporter that governs hepatic influx of plasma citrate in human, is being explored as a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders. As cytoplasmic citrate also originates from intracellular mitochondria, the relative contribution of these two pathways represents critical in...

  7. Phosphate Mines, Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Jordan's leading industry and export commodities are phosphate and potash, ranked in the top three in the world. These are used to make fertilizer. The Jordan Phosphate Mines Company is the sole producer, having started operations in 1935. In addition to mining activities, the company produces phosphoric acid (for fertilizers, detergents, pharmaceuticals), diammonium phosphate (for fertilizer), sulphuric acid (many uses), and aluminum fluoride (a catalyst to make aluminum and magnesium). The image covers an area of 27.5 x 49.4 km, was acquired on September 17, 2005, and is located near 30.8 degrees north latitude, 36.1 degrees east longitude. The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  8. Factors affecting the quality of anticoagulation with warfarin: experience of one cardiac centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciurus, Tomasz; Cichocka-Radwan, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The risk of complications in anticoagulation therapy can be reduced by maximising the percentage of time spent by the patient in the optimal therapeutic range (TTR). However, little is known about the predictors of anticoagulation control. The aim of this paper was to assess the quality of anticoagulant therapy in patients on warfarin and to identify the factors affecting its deterioration. Material and methods We studied 149 patients who required anticoagulant therapy with warfarin due to non-valvular atrial fibrillation and/or venous thromboembolism. Each patient underwent proper training regarding the implemented treatment and remained under constant medical care. Results The mean age of the patients was 68.8 ± 12.6 years, and 59% were male. A total of 2460 international normalised ratio (INR) measurements were collected during the 18-month period. The mean TTR in the studied cohort was 76 ± 21%, and the median was 80%. The level at which high-quality anticoagulation was recorded for this study was based on TTR values above 80%. Seventy-five patients with TTR ≥ 80% were included in the stable anticoagulation group (TTR ≥ 80%); the remaining 74 patients constituted the unstable anticoagulation group (TTR < 80%). According to multivariate stepwise regression analysis, the independent variables increasing the risk of deterioration of anticoagulation quality were: arterial hypertension (OR 2.74 [CI 95%: 1.06-7.10]; p = 0.038), amiodarone therapy (OR 4.22 [CI 95%: 1.30-13.70]; p = 0.017), and obesity (OR 1.11 [CI 95%: 1.02-1.21]; p = 0.013). Conclusions The presence of obesity, hypertension, or amiodarone therapy decreases the quality of anticoagulation with warfarin. High quality of anticoagulation can be achieved through proper monitoring and education of patients. PMID:26855650

  9. Use of Blemaren citrate formula in gout patients with nephrolithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M S Eliseev

    2008-01-01

    Results. After completion of a course of Blemaren therapy, there was an 8% reduction in the mean serum UA levels, which correlated with an increase in its daily excretion (by an average of 20%. The highest increase in UA excretion was observed in 20 patients with baseline hypoex-cretion (<700 mg/day: from 226,3 (range 201,6-436,8 to 635,0 (range 272,2-705,6 mg/day (p = 0,01. UA excretion substantially unchanged in patients with normal uricosuria (>700 mg/day. Side effects that could cause the agent to be discontinued were absent. Conclusion. The Blemaren citrate formula used in gout patients with nephrolithiasis causes a significant increase in the renal excretion of UA (p = 0,01, normalizes its metabolic parameters, and shows a high safety, without worsening hepatic and renal functions and electrolyte metabolism.

  10. Response of patients with indolent systemic mastocytosis to tamoxifen citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Joseph H; Chen, Dong

    2016-01-01

    We examined whether tamoxifen citrate at 20mg/day for 1 year had a beneficial effect on laboratory findings, bone marrow mastocytosis, common clinical symptoms, or quality-of-life assessment for 5 women and 2 men with indolent systemic mastocytosis. Tamoxifen was well tolerated. We found significant reductions in the platelet count, serum alkaline phosphatase, and 24-h urinary excretion of N-methylhistamine and significant increases in serum lactate dehydrogenase and (excluding 2 patients taking aspirin) in 24-h urinary excretion of 11β-prostaglandin F2α. Overall, no change occurred in percent involvement of bone marrow by mastocytosis. Symptom scores were mild and did not change during the treatment. The 36-Item Short Form Health Survey scores for quality of life physical and mental components showed no marked changes. Tamoxifen, an older, nonhematotoxic medication, has limited activity in systemic mastocytosis at the dosage used in this study. PMID:26612479

  11. Effect of Nb on barium titanate prepared from citrate solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Biljana D.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the addition of dopants on the microstructure development and electrical properties of BaTiO3 doped with 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 mol% of Nb and 0.01 mol% of Mn based compounds was studied. Doped barium titanate was prepared using the polymeric precursor method from citrate solutions. The powders calcined at 700°C for 4 hours were analysed by infrared (IR spectroscopy to verify the presence of carbonates, and by X-ray diffraction (XRD for phase formation. The phase composition, microstructure and dielectric properties show a strong dependence on the amount of added niobium.

  12. Inkjet printing of silver citrate conductive ink on PET substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A direct synthesis method of silver conductive film on PET substrate was presented. ► A stable particle-free conductive ink was prepared. ► Formation of silver-amine complex reduced the thermal decomposition temperature. ► Conductive patterns for flexible electronics were fabricated by inkjet printing. ► Silver film on PET substrate possessed highest adhesion rating even without polymer. - Abstract: Direct synthesis of silver conductive film on PET substrate by inkjet printing silver citrate conductive ink was presented in this paper. This kind of conductive ink contained silver citrate as silver precursor, 1,2-diaminopropane as complex agent dissolving the silver salt and methanol and isopropanol as a media adjusting the viscosity and surface tension. The formation of silver-amine complex reduced the decomposition temperature from 180 °C to 135 °C, thus the ink could be cured at relatively low temperature. The film reached the lowest resistivity of 17 μΩ cm after cured at 150 °C for 50 min, 3.1 μΩ cm at 230 °C and possessed high reflection and excellent adhesive property. Electrical conductivity, surface morphology and composition were investigated by four-point probe method, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). It is demonstrated how the cured condition affects the silver film. Moreover, radio-frequency identification (RFID) antenna was fabricated by inkjet printing, which opens up routes for the flexible electronics fabrication.

  13. Inkjet printing of silver citrate conductive ink on PET substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie Xiaolei [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Wang Hong, E-mail: hongwang@tju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zou Jing [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A direct synthesis method of silver conductive film on PET substrate was presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A stable particle-free conductive ink was prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of silver-amine complex reduced the thermal decomposition temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conductive patterns for flexible electronics were fabricated by inkjet printing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silver film on PET substrate possessed highest adhesion rating even without polymer. - Abstract: Direct synthesis of silver conductive film on PET substrate by inkjet printing silver citrate conductive ink was presented in this paper. This kind of conductive ink contained silver citrate as silver precursor, 1,2-diaminopropane as complex agent dissolving the silver salt and methanol and isopropanol as a media adjusting the viscosity and surface tension. The formation of silver-amine complex reduced the decomposition temperature from 180 Degree-Sign C to 135 Degree-Sign C, thus the ink could be cured at relatively low temperature. The film reached the lowest resistivity of 17 {mu}{Omega} cm after cured at 150 Degree-Sign C for 50 min, 3.1 {mu}{Omega} cm at 230 Degree-Sign C and possessed high reflection and excellent adhesive property. Electrical conductivity, surface morphology and composition were investigated by four-point probe method, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). It is demonstrated how the cured condition affects the silver film. Moreover, radio-frequency identification (RFID) antenna was fabricated by inkjet printing, which opens up routes for the flexible electronics fabrication.

  14. Genome-wide identification of citrus ATP-citrate lyase genes and their transcript analysis in fruits reveals their possible role in citrate utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-Mei; Shi, Cai-Yun; Liu, Xiao; Jin, Long-Fei; Liu, Yong-Zhong; Peng, Shu-Ang

    2015-02-01

    ATP-citrate lyase (ACL, EC4.1.3.8) catalyzes citrate to oxaloacetate and acetyl-CoA in the cell cytosol, and has important roles in normal plant growth and in the biosynthesis of some secondary metabolites. We identified three ACL genes, CitACLα1, CitACLα2, and CitACLβ1, in the citrus genome database. Both CitACLα1 and CitACLα2 encode putative ACL α subunits with 82.5 % amino acid identity, whereas CitACLβ1 encodes a putative ACL β subunit. Gene structure analysis showed that CitACLα1 and CitACLα2 had 12 exons and 11 introns, and CitACLβ1 had 16 exons and 15 introns. CitACLα1 and CitACLβ1 were predominantly expressed in flower, and CitACLα2 was predominantly expressed in stem and fibrous roots. As fruits ripen, the transcript levels of CitACLα1, CitACLβ1, and/or CitACLα2 in cultivars 'Niuher' and 'Owari' increased, accompanied by significant decreases in citrate content, while their transcript levels decreased significantly in 'Egan No. 1' and 'Iyokan', although citrate content also decreased. In 'HB pummelo', in which acid content increased as fruit ripened, and in acid-free pummelo, transcript levels of CitACLα2, CitACLβ1, and/or CitACLα1 increased. Moreover, mild drought stress and ABA treatment significantly increased citrate contents in fruits. Transcript levels of the three genes were significantly reduced by mild drought stress, and the transcript level of only CitACLβ1 was significantly reduced by ABA treatment. Taken together, these data indicate that the effects of ACL on citrate use during fruit ripening depends on the cultivar, and the reduction in ACL gene expression may be attributed to citrate increases under mild drought stress or ABA treatment. PMID:25120169

  15. Research on Uncrystallized Phosphating Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG En-jun; XING Ze-kuan

    2004-01-01

    This article excogitated a kind of uncrystallized phosphating film bears wearing capacity goodly by adding Ca2 + in normal phosphating solution. This technology is very useful to protect steel parts working in oil from abrasion.

  16. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000528.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a condition ...

  17. Anilinium dihydrogen phosphate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaman, Ondřej; Smrčok, L.; Gyepes, R.; Havlíček, D.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 2 (2012), "o57"-"o60". ISSN 0108-2701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : anilinium * dihydrogen phosphate * crystal structure * hydrogen bonds Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.492, year: 2012 http://scripts.iucr.org/cgi-bin/paper?S0108270111054874

  18. Effect of sodium citrate on preparation of nano-sized cobalt particles by organic colloidal process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huaping ZHU; Hao LI; Huiyu SONG; Shijun LIAO

    2009-01-01

    Nano-sized cobalt particles with the diameter of 2 nm were prepared via an organic colloidal process with sodium formate, ethylene glycol and sodium citrate as the reducing agent, the solvent and the complexing agent, respectively. The effects of sodium citrate on the yield, crystal structure, particle size and size distribution of the prepared nano-sized cobalt particles were then investigated. The results show that the average particle diameter decreases from 200 nm to 2 nm when the molar ratio of sodium citrate to cobalt chloride changes from 0 to 6. Furthermore, sodium citrate plays a crucial role in the controlling of size distribution of the nano-sized particles. The size distribution of the particle without sodium citrate addition is in range from tens of nanometers to 300 or 400 nm, while that with sodium citrate addition is limited in the range of (2±0.25) nm. Moreover, it is found that the addition of sodium citrate as a complex agent could decrease the yield of the nano-sized cobalt particle.

  19. Concentrations of anticoagulant rodenticides in stoats Mustela erminea and weasels Mustela nivalis from Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmeros, Morten; Christensen, Thomas Kjær; Lassen, Pia

    2011-05-15

    Anticoagulant rodenticides are widely used to control rodent populations but they also pose a risk of secondary poisoning in non-target predators. Studies on anticoagulant rodenticide exposure of non-target species have mainly reported on frequency of occurrence. They have rarely analyzed variations in residue concentrations. We examine the occurrence and concentrations of five anticoagulant rodenticides in liver tissue from 61 stoats (Mustela erminea) and 69 weasels (Mustela nivalis) from Denmark. Anticoagulant rodenticides were detected in 97% of stoats and 95% of weasels. 79% of the animals had detectable levels of more than one substance. Difenacoum had the highest prevalence (82% in stoats and 88% in weasels) but bromadiolone was detected in the highest concentrations in both stoat (1.290 μg/g ww) and weasel (1.610 μg/g ww). Anticoagulant rodenticide concentrations were highest during autumn and winter and varied with sampling method. Anticoagulant rodenticide concentrations were higher in stoats and weasels with unknown cause of death than in specimens killed by physical trauma. There was a negative correlation between anticoagulant rodenticide concentrations and body condition. Our results suggest that chemical rodent control in Denmark results in an extensive exposure of non-target species and may adversely affect the fitness of some stoats and weasels. PMID:21477845

  20. Differentiation of parenteral anticoagulants in the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adiguzel Cafer

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevention of venous thromboembolism has been identified as a leading priority in hospital safety. Recommended parenteral anticoagulant agents with different indications for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism include unfractionated heparin, low-molecular-weight heparins and fondaparinux. Prescribing decisions in venous thromboembolism management may seem complex due to the large range of clinical indications and patient types, and the range of anticoagulants available. Methods MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched to identify relevant original articles. Results Low-molecular-weight heparins have nearly replaced unfractionated heparin as the gold standard antithrombotic agent. Low-molecular-weight heparins currently available in the US are enoxaparin, dalteparin, and tinzaparin. Each low-molecular-weight heparin is a distinct pharmacological entity with different licensed indications and available clinical evidence. Enoxaparin is the only low-molecular-weight heparin that is licensed for both venous thromboembolism prophylaxis and treatment. Enoxaparin also has the largest body of clinical evidence supporting its use across the spectrum of venous thromboembolism management and has been used as the reference standard comparator anticoagulant in trials of new anticoagulants. As well as novel oral anticoagulant agents, biosimilar and/or generic low-molecular-weight heparins are now commercially available. Despite similar anticoagulant properties, studies report differences between the branded and biosimilar and/or generic agents and further clinical studies are required to support the use of biosimilar low-molecular-weight heparins. The newer parenteral anticoagulant, fondaparinux, is now also licensed for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in surgical patients and the treatment of acute deep-vein thrombosis; clinical experience with this anticoagulant is expanding. Conclusions Parenteral

  1. Citrate-selective electrochemical μ-sensor for early stage detection of prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Azzouzi, Sawsen; Patra, Hirak K.; Ben Ali, Mounir; Abbas, Mohammed Nooredeen; Dridi, Cherif; Errachid, Abdelhamid; Turner, Anthony P. F.

    2016-01-01

    The extremely specialised anatomical function of citrate inside the prostate, make it one of the preferred biomarkers for early stage detection of prostate cancer. However, current detection methods are seriously limited due to the very low citrate concentrations that need to be measured in order to follow disease progression. In the present work, we report a novel citrate-selective μ-sensor based on iron (III) phthalocyanine chloride-C-monoamido-Poly-n-Butyl Acrylate (Fe(III)MAPcCl-P-n-BA) m...

  2. Ferric Citrate Transport of Escherichia coli: Functional Regions of the FecR Transmembrane Regulatory Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Welz, Dietrich; Braun, Volkmar

    1998-01-01

    Transcription of the ferric citrate transport genes of Escherichia coli is induced by ferric citrate bound to the outer membrane receptor FecA. Additional ferric citrate-specific regulatory proteins are FecR in the cytoplasmic membrane and the FecI sigma factor in the cytoplasm. To further understand the assumed FecR-mediated signal transduction across the cytoplasmic membrane, the transmembrane topology of FecR (317 amino acids) was determined with hybrid proteins containing portions of FecR...

  3. Cerebrovascular Accident due to Thyroid Storm: Should We Anticoagulate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Gonzalez-Bossolo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid storm is a life-threatening condition that occurs secondary to an uncontrolled hyperthyroid state. Atrial fibrillation is a cardiovascular complication occurring in up to 15% of patients experiencing thyroid storm, and if left untreated this condition could have up to a 25% mortality rate. Thyroid storm with stroke is a rare presentation. This case report details a left middle cerebral artery (MCA stroke with global aphasia and thyroid storm in a 53-year-old Hispanic male patient. Although uncommon, this combination has been reported in multiple case series. Although it is well documented that dysfunctional thyroid levels promote a hypercoagulable state, available guidelines from multiple entities are unclear on whether anticoagulation therapy is appropriate in this situation.

  4. Role of Antiplatelet Therapy and Anticoagulation in Nonischemic Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carazo, Matthew; Berger, Jeffrey S; Reyentovich, Alex; Katz, Stuart D

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the United States. The pathophysiology of heart failure involves the activation of complex neurohormonal pathways, many of which mediate not only hypertrophy and fibrosis within ventricular myocardium and interstitium, but also activation of platelets and alteration of vascular endothelium. Platelet activation and vascular endothelial dysfunction may contribute to the observed increased risk of thromboembolic events in patients with chronic heart failure. However, current data from clinical trials do not support the routine use of chronic antiplatelet or oral anticoagulation therapy for ambulatory heart failure patients without other indications (atrial fibrillation and/or coronary artery disease) as the risk of bleeding seems to outweigh the potential benefit related to reduction in thromboembolic events. In this review, we consider the potential clinical utility of targeting specific pathophysiological mechanisms of platelet and vascular endothelial activation to guide clinical decision making in heart failure patients. PMID:26501990

  5. Clinical and economic effectiveness of an inpatient anticoagulation service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamdani, M M; Racine, E; McCreadie, S; Zimmerman, C; O'Sullivan, T L; Jensen, G; Ragatzki, P; Stevenson, J G

    1999-09-01

    We conducted a prospective cohort study to evaluate clinical and economic end points achieved by a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation service compared with usual care (50 patients/group). The primary therapeutic end point was the time between starting heparin therapy and surpassing the activated partial thromboplastin time therapeutic threshold. The primary economic end point was the direct variable cost of hospitalization from admission to discharge. No significant differences between groups were noted for the primary therapeutic end point. Total hospital costs were significantly lower for patients receiving pharmacist-managed care than for those receiving usual care ($1594 and $2014, respectively, 1997 dollars, p=0.04). Earlier start of warfarin (p=0.05) and shorter hospital stay (5 and 7 days, p=0.05) were associated with the pharmacist-managed group. PMID:10610013

  6. Chemically sulfated natural galactomannans with specific antiviral and anticoagulant activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschin, Tegshi; Budragchaa, Davaanyam; Kanamoto, Taisei; Nakashima, Hideki; Ichiyama, Koji; Yamamoto, Naoki; Shuqin, Han; Yoshida, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    Naturally occurring galactomannans were sulfated to give sulfated galactomannans with degrees of substitution of 0.7-1.4 per sugar unit and molecular weights of M¯n=0.6×10(4)-2.4×10(4). Sulfated galactomannans were found to have specific biological activities in vitro such as anticoagulant, anti-HIV and anti-Dengue virus activities. The biological activities were compared with those of standard dextran and curdlan sulfates, which are polysaccharides with potent antiviral activity and low cytotoxicity. It was found that sulfated galactomannans had moderate to high anticoagulant activity, 13.4-36.6unit/mg, compared to that of dextran and curdlan sulfates, 22.7 and 10.0unit/mg, and high anti-HIV and anti-Dengue virus activities, 0.04-0.8μg/mL and 0.2-1.1μg/mL, compared to those curdlan sulfates, 0.1μg/mL, respectively. The cytotoxicity on MT-4 and LCC-MK2 cells was low. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of sulfated galactomannans revealed strong interaction with poly-l-lysine as a model compound of virus proteins, and suggested that the specific biological activities might originate in the electrostatic interaction of negatively charged sulfate groups of sulfated galactomannans and positively charged amino groups of surface proteins of viruses. These results suggest that sulfated galactomannans effectively prevented the infection of cells by viruses and the degree of substitution and molecular weights played important roles in the biological activities. PMID:27154517

  7. In vitro anticoagulation monitoring of low-molecular-weight heparin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian-qi; SHI Xu-bo; YANG Jin-gang; HU Da-yi

    2009-01-01

    Background Although low-molecular-weight heparin has replaced unfractionated heparin to become the primary anticoagulation drug for treatment of acute coronary syndrome, there is no convenient bedside monitoring method. We explored the best laboratory monitoring method of low-molecular-weight heparins (enoxapadn, dalteparin, and nadroparin) by use of the Sonoclot coagulation analyzer to monitor the activated clotting time.Methods Atotal of 20 healthy volunteers were selected and 15 ml of fasting venous blood samples were collected and incubated. Four coagulants, kaolin, diatomite, glass bead, and magnetic stick, were used to determine the activated clotting time of the low-molecular-weight heparins at different in vitro anti-Xa factor concentrations. A correlation analysis was made to obtain the regression equation. The activated clotting time of the different low-molecular-weight heparins with the same anti-Xa factor concentration was monitored when the coagulant glass beads were applied. Results The activated clotting time measured using the glass beads, diatomite, kaolin, and magnetic stick showed a linear correlation with the concentration of nadroparin (r= 0.964, 0.966, 0.970, and 0.947, respectively). The regression equation showed that the linear slopes of different coagulants were significantly different (glass beads 230.03 s/IU,diatomite 89.91 s/IU, kaolin 50.87 s/IU, magnetic stick could not be calculated). When the concentration of the anti-Xa factor was the same for different low-molecular-weight heparins, the measured activated clotting time was different after the application of the glass bead coagulant.Conclusions The glass bead coagulant is most feasible for monitoring the in vitro anticoagulation activity of nadroparin.The different effects of different low-molecular-weight heparins on the activated clotting time may be related to the different anti-Ila activities.

  8. A Process-Based Model of TCA Cycle Functioning to Analyze Citrate Accumulation in Pre- and Post-Harvest Fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etienne, Audrey; Génard, Michel; Bugaud, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Citrate is one of the most important organic acids in many fruits and its concentration plays a critical role in organoleptic properties. The regulation of citrate accumulation throughout fruit development, and the origins of the phenotypic variability of the citrate concentration within fruit species remain to be clarified. In the present study, we developed a process-based model of citrate accumulation based on a simplified representation of the TCA cycle to predict citrate concentration in fruit pulp during the pre- and post-harvest stages. Banana fruit was taken as a reference because it has the particularity of having post-harvest ripening, during which citrate concentration undergoes substantial changes. The model was calibrated and validated on the two stages, using data sets from three contrasting cultivars in terms of citrate accumulation, and incorporated different fruit load, potassium supply, and harvest dates. The model predicted the pre and post-harvest dynamics of citrate concentration with fairly good accuracy for the three cultivars. The model suggested major differences in TCA cycle functioning among cultivars during post-harvest ripening of banana, and pointed to a potential role for NAD-malic enzyme and mitochondrial malate carriers in the genotypic variability of citrate concentration. The sensitivity of citrate accumulation to growth parameters and temperature differed among cultivars during post-harvest ripening. Finally, the model can be used as a conceptual basis to study citrate accumulation in fleshy fruits and may be a powerful tool to improve our understanding of fruit acidity. PMID:26042830

  9. Biochemical Characterization of Phosphate Degrading Pseudomonas Cichorii Isolated From Forest Soils In Seshachalam Hills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Prasada Babu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas cichoriiisolates were obtained from forest soils in Seshachalm hills using selective medium. The isolates were screened for phosphate activity and all the isolates were gram negative and showed bright fluorescence under UV light. The cultural and biochemical characteristics confirmed that the isolates were P.cichorii. Carbohydrates utilization profiles confirmed that the isolates were able to utilize Lactose, Xylose, Fructose, Glycerol, Trehalose, Mannitol and Ribose. However, the isolates were unable to utilize glucose and sucrose. The isolates showed positive results for levan production, oxidase and HCN. However they were negative for citrate utilization, ONPG and Gelatin hydrolysis.

  10. Real life anticoagulation treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation in Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilke, Thomas; Groth, Antje; Pfannkuche, Matthias;

    2015-01-01

    Oral anticoagulation (OAC) with either new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) or Vitamin-K antagonists (VKAs) is recommended by guidelines for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and a moderate to high risk of stroke. Based on a claims-based data set the aim of this study was to quantify the stroke...... have been recommended for 56.1/62.9 % of the patients (regarding factors disfavouring VKA/NOAC use). For 38.88/39.20 % of the patient-days in 2010 we could not observe any coverage by anticoagulants. Dementia of patients (OR 2.656) and general prescription patterns of the treating physician (OR 1...

  11. Monitoring the Effects and Antidotes of the Non-vitamin K Oral Anticoagulants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahmat, Nur A; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, we have witnessed the emergence of the oral non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs), which have numerous advantages compared with the vitamin K antagonists, particularly their lack of need for monitoring; as a result their use is increasing. Nonetheless, the NOACs face two...... major challenges: the need for reliable laboratory assays to assess their anticoagulation effect, and the lack of approved antidotes to reverse their action. This article provides an overview of monitoring the anticoagulant effect of NOACs and their potential specific antidotes in development....

  12. Model‐Based Assessment of Plasma Citrate Flux Into the Liver: Implications for NaCT as a Therapeutic Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erion, DM; Maurer, TS

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic citrate serves as an important regulator of gluconeogenesis and carbon source for de novo lipogenesis in the liver. For this reason, the sodium‐coupled citrate transporter (NaCT), a plasma membrane transporter that governs hepatic influx of plasma citrate in human, is being explored as a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders. As cytoplasmic citrate also originates from intracellular mitochondria, the relative contribution of these two pathways represents critical information necessary to underwrite confidence in this target. In this work, hepatic influx of plasma citrate was quantified via pharmacokinetic modeling of published clinical data. The influx was then compared to independent literature estimates of intracellular citrate flux in human liver. The results indicate that, under normal conditions, NaCT inhibition will have a limited impact on hepatic citrate concentrations across species. PMID:27069776

  13. Model-Based Assessment of Plasma Citrate Flux Into the Liver: Implications for NaCT as a Therapeutic Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Erion, D M; Maurer, T S

    2016-03-01

    Cytoplasmic citrate serves as an important regulator of gluconeogenesis and carbon source for de novo lipogenesis in the liver. For this reason, the sodium-coupled citrate transporter (NaCT), a plasma membrane transporter that governs hepatic influx of plasma citrate in human, is being explored as a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders. As cytoplasmic citrate also originates from intracellular mitochondria, the relative contribution of these two pathways represents critical information necessary to underwrite confidence in this target. In this work, hepatic influx of plasma citrate was quantified via pharmacokinetic modeling of published clinical data. The influx was then compared to independent literature estimates of intracellular citrate flux in human liver. The results indicate that, under normal conditions, NaCT inhibition will have a limited impact on hepatic citrate concentrations across species. PMID:27069776

  14. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes both magnesium phosphate, dibasic, and magnesium phosphate, tribasic. Magnesium phosphate, dibasic...

  15. Calcium Phosphate Biomaterials: An Update

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Current calcium phosphate (CaP) biomaterials for bone repair, substitution, augmentation and regeneration include hydroxyapatite ( HA ) from synthetic or biologic origin, beta-tricalcium phosphate ( β-TCP ) , biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP), and are available as granules, porous blocks, components of composites (CaP/polymer) cements, and as coatings on orthopedic and dental implants. Experimental calcium phosphate biomaterials include CO3- and F-substituted apatites, Mg-and Zn-substituted β-TCP, calcium phosphate glasses. This paper is a brief review of the different types of CaP biomaterials and their properties such as bioactivity, osteoconductivity, osteoinductivity.

  16. The effect of individual phosphate emulsifying salts and their selected binary mixtures on hardness of processed cheese spreads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František Buňka

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false CS JA X-NONE The aim of this work was to observe the effects of emulsifying salts composed of trisodium citrate and sodium phosphates with different chain length (disodium phosphate (DSP, tetrasodium diphosphate (TSPP, pentasodium triphosphate (PSTP and sodium salts of polyphosphates with 5 different mean length (n ≈ 5, 9, 13, 20, 28 on hardness of processed cheese spreads. Hardness of processed cheese spreads with selected binary mixtures of the above mentioned salts were also studied. Measurements were performed after 2, 9 and 30 days of storage at 6 °C. Hardness of processed cheese increased with increase in chain length of individually used phosphates.  Majority of applied binary mixtures of emulsifying salts had not significant influence on hardness charges in processed cheese spreads. On the other hand, a combination of phosphates salts (DSP with TSPP was found, which had specific effect on hardness of processed cheese spreads. Textural properties of samples with trisodium citrate were similar compared to samples with DSP.

  17. The impact of citrate introduction at UK syringe exchange programmes: a retrospective cohort study in Cheshire and Merseyside, UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wareing Michelle

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2003, it became legal in the UK for syringe exchange programmes (SEPs to provide citrate to injecting drug users to solubilise heroin. Little work has been undertaken on the effect of policy change on SEP function. Here, we examine whether the introduction of citrate in Cheshire and Merseyside SEPs has altered the number of heroin/crack injectors accessing SEPs, the frequency at which heroin/crack injectors visited SEPs and the number of syringes dispensed. Methods Eleven SEPs in Cheshire and Merseyside commenced citrate provision in 2003. SEP-specific data for the six months before and six months after citrate was introduced were extracted from routine monitoring systems relating to heroin and crack injectors. Analyses compared all individuals attending pre and post citrate and matched analyses only those individuals attending in both periods (defined as 'longitudinal attenders'. Non-parametric tests were used throughout. Results Neither new (first seen in either six months period nor established clients visited SEPs more frequently post citrate. New clients collected significantly less syringes per visit post citrate, than pre citrate (14.5,10.0; z = 1.992, P Conclusion The introduction of citrate did not negatively affect SEP attendance. 'Longitudinal attenders' visited SEPs more frequently post citrate, providing staff with greater opportunity for intervention and referral. As the number of syringes they collected each visit remained unchanged the total number of clean syringes made available to this group of injectors increased very slightly between the pre and post citrate periods. However, new clients collected significantly less syringes post citrate than pre citrate, possibly due to staff concerns regarding the amount of citrate (and thus syringes to dispense safely to new clients. These concerns should not be allowed to negatively impact on the number of syringes dispensed.

  18. Biomediated continuous release phosphate fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Alan H.; Rogers, Robert D.

    1999-01-01

    A composition is disclosed for providing phosphate fertilizer to the root zone of plants. The composition comprises a microorganism capable of producing and secreting a solubilization agent, a carbon source for providing raw material for the microorganism to convert into the solubilization agent, and rock phosphate ore for providing a source of insoluble phosphate that is solubilized by the solubilization agent and released as soluble phosphate. The composition is provided in a physical form, such as a granule, that retains the microorganism, carbon source, and rock phosphate ore, but permits water and soluble phosphate to diffuse into the soil. A method of using the composition for providing phosphate fertilizer to plants is also disclosed.

  19. CcpA-independent regulation of expression of the Mg2+-citrate transporter gene citM by arginine metabolism in Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warner, JB; Magni, C; Lolkema, JS; Warner, Jessica B.

    2003-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of the Mg2+ -citrate transporter, CitM, the main citrate uptake system of Bacillus subtilis, was studied during growth in rich medium. Citrate in the growth medium was required for induction under all growth conditions. In Luria-Bertani medium containing citrate, citM expr

  20. Layered metal uranyl phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HUO2PO4·4H2O (HUP) forms a laminar intercalate with butylamine, c = 29.30(5) angstrom, which accepts cationic metals in exchange for the n-butylammonium ions. Hydrated uranyl metal phosphates M(UO2PO4)2·nH2O (M=Mn,Co,Ni,Cu,Zn,Cd) are obtained by ionic exchange and were studied by thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction. The tetragonal structures of all these product compounds are derived from HUP. The diffuse electronic reflectance spectra of every sample show characteristic UO22+ absorption bands. In the spectra of the Co, Ni and Cu phosphates there are other bands in the 500-800 nm zone compatible with their observed aquocation transitions

  1. Emergency Management of Major Bleeding in a Case of Maxillofacial Trauma and Anticoagulation: Utility of Prothrombin Complex Concentrates in the Shock Room

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandro Morotti; Mauro Felice Frascisco

    2015-01-01

    Life-threatening bleeding in anticoagulation with Warfarin is an emergency challenging issue. Several approaches are available to treat bleeding in either over-anticoagulation or proper-anticoagulation, including vitamin K, fresh frozen plasma and prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC) administration. In coexisting trauma-induced bleeding and anticoagulation, reversal of anticoagulation must be a rapid and highly effective procedure. Furthermore the appropriate treatment must be directly avai...

  2. Changes in phosphorylation of adenosine phosphate and redox state of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) in Geobacter sulfurreducens in response to electron acceptor and anode potential variation

    KAUST Repository

    Rose, Nicholas D.

    2015-12-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. Geobacter sulfurreducens is one of the dominant bacterial species found in biofilms growing on anodes in bioelectrochemical systems. The intracellular concentrations of reduced and oxidized forms of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NADH and NAD+, respectively) and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH and NADP+, respectively) as well as adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) were measured in G. sulfurreducens using fumarate, Fe(III)-citrate, or anodes poised at different potentials (110, 10, -90, and -190mV (vs. SHE)) as the electron acceptor. The ratios of CNADH/CNAD+ (0.088±0.022) and CNADPH/CNADP+ (0.268±0.098) were similar under all anode potentials tested and with Fe(III)-citrate (reduced extracellularly). Both ratios significantly increased with fumarate as the electron acceptor (0.331±0.094 for NAD and 1.96±0.37 for NADP). The adenylate energy charge (the fraction of phosphorylation in intracellular adenosine phosphates) was maintained near 0.47 under almost all conditions. Anode-growing biofilms demonstrated a significantly higher molar ratio of ATP/ADP relative to suspended cultures grown on fumarate or Fe(III)-citrate. These results provide evidence that the cellular location of reduction and not the redox potential of the electron acceptor controls the intracellular redox potential in G. sulfurreducens and that biofilm growth alters adenylate phosphorylation.

  3. Uranium extraction from ores with lemon juice; II,b. uranium recovery from pregnant lemon juice liquors obtained by attacking phosphate ore and suggested flowsheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to recover uranium from the pregnant liquors obtained by attacking Safaga phosphate and Qatrani phosphatic sandstone ore materials with lemon juice, methylation for acidic fraction-salt separation has been carried out. Afterwards, separation of uranium from the associated calcium (mainly present in lemon juice liquors as citrate) has been performed by making-use of the wide difference in their water solubility. The solutions containing the separated uranium were then subjected to evaporation till dryness whereby the precipitated uranyl citrate was calcined at 500 degree C to obtain the yellow orange oxide powder (UO3). On the basis of one ton ore treatment, a flowsheet for uranium recovery from the two ore materials has been suggested

  4. Uranium extraction from ores with lemon juice I,b-uranium recovery from pregnant lemon juice liquors obtained by attacking phosphate ores and suggested flowsheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to recover uranium from the pregnant liquors obtained by attacking safaga phosphate and qatrani phosphatic sandstone ore materials with lemon juice, methylation for acidic fraction-salt separation has been carried out. Afterwards, separation of uranium from the associated calcium (mainly present in lemon juice liquors as citrate) has been performed by making-use of the wide difference in their water solubility. The solutions containing the separated uranium were then subjected to evaporation till dryness whereby the precipitated uranyl citrate was calcined at 500 degree C to obtain the yellow orange oxide powder (U o3). On the basis of one ton ore treatment, a flowsheet for uranium recovery from the two ore materials has been suggested

  5. Dysregulation of phosphate metabolism and conditions associated with phosphate toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ronald B; Razzaque, Mohammed S

    2015-01-01

    Phosphate homeostasis is coordinated and regulated by complex cross-organ talk through delicate hormonal networks. Parathyroid hormone (PTH), secreted in response to low serum calcium, has an important role in maintaining phosphate homeostasis by influencing renal synthesis of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, thereby increasing intestinal phosphate absorption. Moreover, PTH can increase phosphate efflux from bone and contribute to renal phosphate homeostasis through phosphaturic effects. In addition, PTH can induce skeletal synthesis of another potent phosphaturic hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), which is able to inhibit renal tubular phosphate reabsorption, thereby increasing urinary phosphate excretion. FGF23 can also fine-tune vitamin D homeostasis by suppressing renal expression of 1-alpha hydroxylase (1α(OH)ase). This review briefly discusses how FGF23, by forming a bone-kidney axis, regulates phosphate homeostasis, and how its dysregulation can lead to phosphate toxicity that induces widespread tissue injury. We also provide evidence to explain how phosphate toxicity related to dietary phosphorus overload may facilitate incidence of noncommunicable diseases including kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, cancers and skeletal disorders. PMID:26131357

  6. Electrodeposition and characterisation of Ni/Cu nanostructured multilayers from citrate solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Meuleman, W R A

    2002-01-01

    A study of the effect of chemical and electrochemical parameters such as solution composition, pH, and current and potential waveforms on magnetic metal multi-layers plated from citrate electrolytes was carried out. Until now, magnetic multilayers have usually been electrodeposited mainly form sulfamate electrolytes; far less information is available on Cu-Ni multilayers obtained from citrate electrolytes. Since copper is deposited at its diffusion limiting current during multilayer deposition from citrate electrolytes, a rotating disc electrode study was carried out. It was found that the apparent diffusion coefficient changes significantly depending on the citrate ion concentration and pH, indicating the importance of metal speciation. In order to identify the rate controlling species, speciation calculations were carried out in order to model the dependence of the limiting current on the solution composition. The model is based on the assumption that complexes in solution are either labile or inert. A vert...

  7. Problems in the scintigraphic detection of osteomyelitis. [/sup 99m/Tc-phosphate compounds; /sup 67/Ga-citrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilday, D.L.

    1980-06-01

    Bone imaging has played a major role in the early detection of pediatric osteomyelitis. The single gamma camera view (rather than whole body imaging) successfully delineates the growth zones of the long bones and can detect subtle changes in these regions. If a high suspicion of osteomyelitis is entertained despite a normal bone scan, gallium imaging should be employed. Cases have been reported in which delayed scans were normal but the blood pool image was not.

  8. Plasma membrane H+-ATPase-dependent citrate exudation from cluster roots of phosphate-deficient white lupin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomasi, Nicola; Kretzschmar, Tobias; Espen, Luca;

    2009-01-01

    increased transiently and reached a maximum after 5 h. This effect was accompanied by a strong acidification of the external medium and alkalinization of the cytosol, as evidenced by in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Fusicoccin, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Fusicoccin...

  9. USE OF TRANSDERMAL GEL OF SILDENAFIL CITRATE IN SEXUAL DYSFUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshid Patel , Amit Maniyar and Hiren Patel*

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Premature Ejaculation (PE is one of the most common forms of Sexual Dysfunction and is thought to affect up to 30 % of men. This is the most frequently encountered sexual complaint of men and couples. The physical problem associated with premature ejaculation can be simply described as “over-sensitivity” of the penis. Psychological causes of PE are often associated with “performance anxiety” – anxiety relating to sexual intercourse. The most common treatment today is the oral treatment with phosphodiesterase -5 (PDE-5 inhibitors. There are currently three different inhibitors available Sildenafil, Vardenafil, and Tadalafil. Sildenafil citrate is a drug of choice used in the treatment of premature ejaculation disorder. It was licensed for use in the United States in 1998; Sildenafil has shown in studies that it improves ED in men regardless of disease etiology, severity of disease, or even age. Transdermal gel has gained more and more importance because the gel based formulations are better percutaneously absorbed than creams and ointment bases. Transdermal drug delivery systems are defined as self-contained, discrete dosage forms which, when applied to the intact skin, deliver the drug, through the skin, at a controlled rate to the systemic circulation. Present Status - A review by Barry in 2001 showed, the transdermal route has vied with oral treatment as the most successful innovative research area in drug delivery.

  10. Pseudohypernatremia secondary to trisodium citrate (Citra-LockTM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milliere, Janice; Corriveau, Daryl; Parmar, Malvinder S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hypernatremia is common among hospitalized patients especially in the intensive care units and presents an independent risk factor for mortality. Mild hypernatremia is often asymptomatic but severe hypernatremia causes central nervous system dysfunction with initial non-specific symptoms of encephalopathy that may progress to seizures, coma and death, if left untreated. Severe hypernatremia is a medical emergency and requires emergent medical attention. Materials and methods A haemodialysis patient who arrived for his scheduled haemodialysis treatment had monthly blood work drawn and was reported to have severe hypernatremia with serum sodium concentration of 183 mmol/L. The possibility of technique or laboratory error was considered and systematically evaluated. Results The serum sodium measurement using another analyser showed similar value of 182 mmolL. A repeat serum sodium level on a sample drawn 2 h later showed normal value of 139–140 mmol/L. A step-wise evaluation of the complete procedure from blood collection to analysis of the sample revealed this to be spuriously elevated serum sodium concentration secondary to contamination of the sample during sample collection with trisodium citrate, a catheter-lock solution, commonly used in dialysis units to maintain patency of dialysis catheters. Conclusions Spuriously elevated plasma sodium concentration (pseudohypernatremia) of mild degree is common but severe pseudohypernatremia is rare and the possibility of sample contaminations or laboratory error should be considered. Vigilance is required by both the medical and the laboratory staff to resolve such issues in a timely fashion to avoid unintended consequences. PMID:27346973

  11. Anticaries effect of dentifrices with calcium citrate and sodium trimetaphosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Carlos Botazzo Delbem

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Because of the growing concerns regarding fluoride ingestion by young children and dental fluorosis, it is necessary to develop new dentifrices. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of dentifrices with calcium citrate (Cacit and sodium trimetaphosphate (TMP on enamel demineralization. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Enamel blocks (n=70, previously selected through surface hardness analysis, were submitted to daily treatment with dentifrices diluted in artificial saliva and to a pH-cycling model. The fluoride concentration in dentifrices was 0, 250, 450, 550, 1,000 and 1,100 µg F/g. CrestTM was used as a positive control (1,100 mg F/g. Cacit (0.25% and TMP (0.25% were added to dentifrices with 450 and 1,000 µg F/g. Surface hardness was measured again and integrated loss of subsurface hardness and fluoride concentration in enamel were calculated. Parametric and correlation tests were used to determine difference (p0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Dentifrices with 450 and 1,000 µg F/g, Cacit and TMP were as effective as a gold standard one.

  12. Triplet heterotopic pregnancy following ovulation induction with clomiphene citrate: a case report and review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Maheswari S; Seetha Panicker

    2013-01-01

    Heterotopic pregnancy, though rare is a combined pregnancy in which synchronous intrauterine and extra uterine pregnancy occur. An estimated incidence of between 1/8000 to 1/30,000 has been reported following spontaneous conception. After artificial reproductive techniques, the incidence is as high as 1/100 and after ovulation induction with clomiphene citrate, it is around 1/900. We are reporting a case of 26 year old gravida 2 who conceived after ovulation induction with clomiphene citrate ...

  13. Preparation of association compound between rhodium(II) citrate and β-cyclodextrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inclusion compound of rhodium(II) citrate withβ-cyclodextrin in a 1:1 molar ratio was prepared using freeze-drying method. X-ray diffractometry, thermal analysis (TG/DTG/DSC), infrared and 1H-NMR with 1H spin lattice relaxation (1H T1) measurements and 13C techniques were used to characterize the system prepared. The results indicated the formation of inclusion or association compounds between rhodium(II) citrate and β-cyclodextrin. (author)

  14. Comparison of different anticoagulation methods in blood purification in severe patients%重症患者血液净化不同抗凝方式的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何润芝; 邓湘辉

    2015-01-01

    目的:比较重症患者血液净化中不同抗凝方式:低分子肝素抗凝(A 组)、局部枸橼酸抗凝(B 组)的效果及安全性。方法:回顾性分析我科自2014年10月至2015年03月行血液净化的27例重症患者资料,其中 A 组19例,B 组8例,比较两组患者在血液净化效果(血液净化前后血清肌酐下降值),安全性(出血、凝血事件,凝血功能)及死亡率等方面的差异。结果:两组患者在溶质清除率(血液净化前后血清肌酐下降值)、凝血功能方面无统计学差异,皆无明显出血事件,死亡率(A:26.32%与 B:37.5%)差异可能与原发病有关,凝血事件方面 B 组优于 A 组。结论:血液净化中用局部枸橼酸抗凝安全、可行、有效,局部枸橼酸抗凝在重症患者尤其是高危出血风险的患者中具有良好的应用前景。%Objective:To compare the effects and safety of different anticoagulant Methods low molecular weight heparin(A group)and regional citrate anti-coagulation (B group)in severe patients in blood purification.Methods:We analyzed retrospectively 27 cases of critically ill patients in our department from Oc-tober in 2014 to March in 2015 for blood purification,including 19 cases of A group,8 cases of B group ,the purification effects (the decline in value of serum creatinine before and after blood purification ),safety (hemorrhage,coagulant events,blood coagulate function ) and the mortality of two groups were compared.Results:There was no significant difference in two groups in the solute clearance rate (the decline in value of serum creatinine before and after blood purification),and blood coagulate function.There were no hemorrhage.Differences of mortality(A:26.32% and B:37.5%)may be related to the primary dis-ease.B group surpass than A group in coagulant events.Conclusion:Blood purification with regional citrate anticoagulation is safe,feasible,effective,there was a good

  15. Self-Inflicted Intraoral Hematoma in a Cardiac Patient Receiving Oral Anticoagulant Therapy- A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantala Arunkumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraoral hematoma secondary to systemic anticoagulant therapy is rare, but it is a potentially fatal condition requiring immediate medical management. Case report: Here we report a case of self-inflicted hematoma in the anterior maxillary gingival region in a 65year old female cardiac patient who was on systemic anticoagulant therapy with a poor periodontal condition, manifesting as a periodontal swelling for a period of one week. Oral anticoagulant therapy is considerably imperative to prevent thromboembolic complications in various medical conditions, in such patients there are chances for spontaneous bleeding or hematoma by means of minor trauma due to sharp teeth or dental prosthesis in the mouth leading to life threatening complications such as partial or complete airway blockage. Therefore,directives about possible bleeding complications secondary to anticoagulant drugs in the oral cavity and the importance of maintaining oral health hygiene are necessary for the patient.

  16. Reproductive success of bromadiolone-resistant rats in absence of anticoagulant pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Leirs, Herwig; Siegismund, Hans Redlef

    2006-01-01

    Resistance to anticoagulant rodenticides in brown rats (Rattus norvegicus Berk.) is associated with pleiotropic effects, notably with an increased dietary vitamin K requirement. Owing to this disadvantage, resistance is believed to be selected against if anticoagulant selection is absent. In small...... experimental populations of wild brown rats, an investigation was carried out to establish whether tolerance to anticoagulant exposure changed over a period of 2 years. In the same populations, DNA microsatellite markers were used to infer parentage, and this made it possible to estimate reproductive success...... of sensitive and resistant rats and estimate effective population size, Ne. Even though there was evidence for a selection against resistant rats with high vitamin K requirement, anticoagulant tolerance was not seen to be significantly influenced in the absence of bromadiolone selection. As the...

  17. Prognostic impact of anticardiolipin antibodies in women with recurrent miscarriage negative for the lupus anticoagulant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henriette Svarre; Christiansen, Ole Bjarne

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA) are found with increased prevalence in women with unexplained recurrent miscarriage (RM) but their impact on future pregnancy outcome in lupus anticoagulant (LAC) negative patients needs better quantification. METHODS: The impact of a repeatedly positive...

  18. Bleeding Risk, Management and Outcome in Patients Receiving Non-VKA Oral Anticoagulants (NOACs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werth, Sebastian; Breslin, Tomás; NiAinle, Fionnuala; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan

    2015-08-01

    Modern direct-acting anticoagulants are rapidly replacing vitamin K antagonists (VKA) in the management of millions of patients worldwide who require anticoagulation. These drugs include agents that inhibit activated factor X (FXa) (such as apixaban and rivaroxaban) or thrombin (such as dabigatran), and are collectively known today as non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs). Since bleeding is the most common and most dangerous side effect of long-term anticoagulation, and because NOACs have very different mechanisms of action and pharmacokinetics compared with VKA, physicians are naturally concerned about the lack of experience regarding frequency, management and outcome of NOAC-associated bleeding in daily care. This review appraises trial and registry (or "real-world") data pertaining to bleeding complications in patients taking NOACs and VKA and provides practical recommendations for the management of acute bleeding situations. PMID:25940651

  19. Oral Anticoagulants and Atrial Fibrillation: An Update for the Clinical Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, Inna E

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulation is an important strategy for the prevention of stroke associated with atrial fibrillation. Development of new oral agents has created a need to educate nurses to administer these medications and provide patient education. PMID:26306367

  20. Multicomponent determination of 4-hydroxycoumarin anticoagulant rodenticides in blood serum by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felice, L J; Chalermchaikit, T; Murphy, M J

    1991-01-01

    A sensitive liquid chromatographic method was developed for the analysis of 4-hydroxycoumarin anticoagulant rodenticides in blood serum. The method can simultaneously measure the serum levels of five anticoagulant rodenticides: brodifacoum, bromadiolone, coumatetralyl, difenacoum, and warfarin. Serum proteins are precipitated with acetonitrile and the supernatant is mixed with ethyl ether. The organic phase is separated, evaporated to dryness, and the residue subjected to chromatographic analysis. The anticoagulants are separated by reversed-phase gradient chromatography with fluorescence detection at an excitation wavelength of 318 nm and emission wavelength of 390 nm. Extraction efficiencies of 68.1 to 98.2% were obtained. The within-run precision (CV) ranged from 2.19 to 3.79% and the between-run precision (CV) from 3.72 to 9.57%. The anticoagulants can be quantitated at serum levels of 10 to 20 ng/mL. PMID:1943055

  1. Reversed-phase HPLC determination of eight anticoagulant rodenticides in animal liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauconnet, V; Pouliquen, H; Pinault, L

    1997-01-01

    A reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic method was developed for the analysis of eight anticoagulant rodenticides in animal liver. Coumarinic anticoagulant rodenticides (brodifacoum, bromadiolone, coumachlor, coumatetralyl, difenacoum, and warfarin) were detected by using a gradient elution and a fluorimetric detection. Indanedione anticoagulant rodenticides (chlorophacinone and diphacinone) were detected by using an isocratic elution and an UV detection. Anticoagulants were extracted from liver with mixtures of acetone/diethylether and acetone/chloroform. Extracts were applied to solid-phase extraction cartridges. Linearity was checked over the concentration range 0.1-0.6 microgram/g. Relative standard deviations of within-run and between-run variability were all between 5.7 and 10.3%. Recoveries from spiked liver samples were between 51.7 (difenacoum) and 78.2% (warfarin). Limits of detection were between 0.01 (difenacoum and warfarin) and 0.11 microgram/g (chlorophacinone). PMID:9399124

  2. Pros and cons of vitamin K antagonists and non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Nicoletta; Ageno, Walter

    2015-03-01

    Anticoagulant treatment can be currently instituted with two different classes of drugs: the vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) and the newer, "novel" or non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant drugs (NOACs). The NOACs have several practical advantages over VKAs, such as the rapid onset/offset of action, the lower potential for food and drug interactions, and the predictable anticoagulant response. However, the VKAs currently have a broader spectrum of indications, a standardized monitoring test, and established reversal strategies. The NOACs emerged as alternative options for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Nevertheless, there remain some populations for whom the VKAs remain the most appropriate anticoagulant drug. This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of VKAs and NOACs. PMID:25703519

  3. Improved late survival and disability after stroke with therapeutic anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation: a population study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, Niamh

    2011-09-01

    Although therapeutic anticoagulation improves early (within 1 month) outcomes after ischemic stroke in hospital-admitted patients with atrial fibrillation, no information exists on late outcomes in unselected population-based studies, including patients with all stroke (ischemic and hemorrhagic).

  4. Old and new oral anticoagulants for secondary stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Sacquegna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin K antagonists, such as warfarin, used in oral anticoagulation therapy currently represent the standard drugs for the primary and secondary prevention of stroke in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF, with a relative risk reduction close to 70%. Newer oral anticoagulants, such as direct thrombin inhibitors (i.e., dabigatran and direct factor Xa inhibitors (i.e., apixaban and rivaroxaban have been recently compared with warfarin in large randomized trials for stroke prevention in AF. The new oral anticoagulants showed, compared with warfarin, no statistically significant difference in the rate of stroke or systemic embolism in secondary prevention (patients with previous transient ischemic attack or stroke subgroups. With regard to safety, the risk of intracranial bleeding was reduced with new anticoagulants compared with warfarin. Indirect treatment comparisons of clinical trials on secondary prevention cohorts showed no significant difference in efficacy among apixaban, rivaroxaban, and dabigatran; but dabigatran 110 mg was associated with less intracranial bleedings than rivaroxaban.

  5. Dental Procedures in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and New Oral Anticoagulants

    OpenAIRE

    Tsolka, Pepie

    2014-01-01

    This review discusses the basic pharmacology of new oral anticoagulants that are used for prevention of thromboembolism in patients with atrial fibrillation. It presents available evidence, and provides recommendations for the management of patients requiring invasive procedures in dental practice.

  6. Anticoagulation dilemma in a high-risk patient with On-X valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ami M Karkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thromboembolism continues to be a major concern in patients with mechanical heart valves, especially in those with unsatisfactory anticoagulation levels. The new On-X valve (On-X Life Technologies, Austin, TX, USA has been reported as having unique structural characteristics that offer lower thrombogenicity to the valve. We report a case where the patient received no or minimal systemic anticoagulation after placement of On-X mitral and aortic valves due to development of severe mucosal arterio-venous malformations yet did not show any evidence of thromboembolism. This case report reinforces the findings of recent studies that lower anticoagulation levels may be acceptable in patients with On-X valves and suggests this valve may be particularly useful in those in whom therapeutic levels of anticoagulation cannot be achieved due to increased risk of bleeding.

  7. Fingerprinting of sildenafil citrate and tadalafil tablets in pharmaceutical formulations via X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Rafael S; Mariotti, Kristiane C; Schwab, Nicolas V; Sabin, Guilherme P; Rocha, Werickson F C; de Castro, Eustáquio V R; Limberger, Renata P; Mayorga, Paulo; Bueno, Maria Izabel M S; Romão, Wanderson

    2012-01-25

    The production of counterfeited drugs is a criminal problem that carries serious risks to public health in the worldwide. In Brazil, Viagra and Cialis are the most counterfeit medicines, being used to inhibit the phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5), treating thus, problems related to erectile dysfunction. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is a suitable technique to control the quality of new pharmaceutical formulations and distinguish between authentic and counterfeit tablets. XRF has advantageous features like multielemental capability, good detectivity, high precision, short analysis times, and is nondestructive, which makes it suitable to be extended to a great variety of samples. In this work, the inorganic fingerprinting chemical of forty-one commercial samples (Viagra, Cialis, Lazar, Libiden, Maxfil, Plenovit, Potent 75, Rigix, V-50, Vimax and Pramil) and fifty-six counterfeit samples (Viagra and Cialis) were obtained from XRF data. XRF presented an excellent analytical methodology for semi-quantitative determination of active ingredient (in case of sildenafil citrate that presents S in its structure) and excipients such as calcium phosphate, titanium oxide and iron oxide (P, Ca, Ti and Fe). The matrix data were allied to chemometric methods (Principal Component Analysis and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis) to classify the tablets investigated between authentic and counterfeit, grouping the samples into of seven groups: A, B, C, D and E (counterfeit group) and F and G (authentic group). PMID:22014651

  8. QbD-Driven Development and Validation of a HPLC Method for Estimation of Tamoxifen Citrate with Improved Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Premjeet Singh; Beg, Sarwar; Katare, O P; Singh, Bhupinder

    2016-09-01

    The current studies entail Quality by Design (QbD)-enabled development of a simple, rapid, sensitive and cost-effective high-performance liquid chromatographic method for estimation of tamoxifen citrate (TMx). The factor screening studies were performed using a 7-factor 8-run Taguchi design. Systematic optimization was performed employing Box-Behnken design by selecting the mobile phase ratio, buffer pH and oven temperature as the critical method parameters (CMPs) identified from screening studies, thus evaluating the critical analytical attributes (CAAs), namely, peak area, retention time, theoretical plates and peak tailing as the parameters of method robustness. The optimal chromatographic separation was achieved using acetonitrile and phosphate buffer (pH 3.5) 52:48 v/v as the mobile phase with a flow rate 0.7 mL/min, an oven temperature 40°C and UV detection at 256 nm. The method was validated as per the ICH recommended conditions, which revealed high degree of linearity, accuracy, precision, sensitivity and robustness over the existing liquid chromatographic methods of the drug. Also the method was applied for the estimation of TMx in nanostructured formulations, which indicated no significant change in the retention time. In a nutshell, the studies demonstrated successful development of the HPLC method of TMx with improved understanding of the relationship among the influential variables for enhancing the method performance. PMID:27226463

  9. Preparation of 153Sm-citrate-HA for radioactive synovectomy of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new kind of labelled radiopharmaceutical hydroxyapatite (HA) by means of transfer complexing for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis is described. HA with partials of 2-10 μm is labelled with 153Sm by a citrate transfer ligand. 153Sm-citrate-HA is obtained in high yield and is extremely stable in vitro. The complexing capability of HA is about 5 mg Sm2O3/g HA, the decomposition rates of 153Sm-citrate-HA both in saline of 0.9% and in human plasma (37 +- 0.5 degree C) are less than 2.0% for a period of 3 half lives. Biodistribution studies in rabbits demonstrated long term retention of nearly 99% of injected 153Sm-Citrate-HA in arthritis joint. Extra-articular leakage of radioactivity in both blood and urine accounted for 0.5% of injected dose, and few retained in other major tissues after about 14.8 MBq of 153Sm-Citrate-HA has injected into the left knee joint of normal rabbits. 153Sm-citrate-HA could be potentially useful in radio-synovectomy treatment of rheumatism arthritis

  10. Is it safe to prescribe clomiphene citrate without ultrasound monitoring facilities?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coughlan, C

    2010-05-01

    The majority of triplet and higher order multiple pregnancies now result from ovulation induction\\/superovulation rather than in vitro fertilisation. However, clomiphene citrate is still widely prescribed by gynaecologists and general practitioners who do not have access to ultrasound monitoring. The objective of our study was to determine the prevalence of multifollicular development with different doses of clomiphene citrate. A retrospective review of transvaginal ultrasound monitoring of 425 cycles in 182 women receiving clomiphene citrate from January 2002 to December 2003, was studied. Three or more follicles of >or= 14 mm were identified in 58 cycles (14%). Patients received 50 mg of clomiphene citrate in 52 of these 58 cycles and 25 mg in the remaining six. One patient was noted to have developed five follicles and 10 patients developed four follicles. One patient developed six follicles, despite receiving only 25 mg clomiphene citrate daily. It was concluded that a significant number of women (14%) developed three or more follicles, despite receiving low doses of clomiphene citrate.

  11. Inpatient Oral Anticoagulation Management by Clinical Pharmacists: Safety and Cost effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Hosmane, Sharath R.; Tucker, Johanna; Osman, Dave; Williams, Steve; Waterworth, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Background Warfarin prescription for anticoagulation after cardiac surgery has always been a challenge for junior medical staff. Methods A prospective study was carried out to assess the quality of anticoagulation control by junior doctors compared with clinical pharmacists at South Manchester University hospitals NHS Trust. The junior medical staff prescribed warfarin for 50 consecutive patients from April to September 2006 (group A, n = 50) and experienced clinical pharmacists dosed 46 cons...

  12. New oral anticoagulants -the newest update in patients undergo oral surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Kovacevska, Ivona; Angelovska, Bistra

    2013-01-01

    During the past 20 years, the approval of anticoagulants such as low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs), indirect factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors has signaled a growing interest in antithrombotic compounds that have relatively discrete targets within the coagulation pathway. Aim of this study is to review the evidence of different therapy approach, to highlight the areas of major concern, and to suggest specific oral surgery treatment for patients on new oral anticoagul...

  13. Direct oral anticoagulants for secondary prevention in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Luca Masotti; Mario Di Napoli; Walter Ageno; Davide Imberti; Cecilia Becattini; Maurizio Paciaroni; Daniel Augustin Godoy; Roberto Cappelli; Giancarlo Landini; Grazia Panigada; Ido Iori; Domenico Prisco; Giancarlo Agnelli

    2013-01-01

    The patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), both permanent and paroxysmal, and history of previous transient ischemic attack (TIA) or stroke represent a category of patients at high risk of new embolic events, independently of the presence of other risk factors. In these patients, national and international guidelines recommend oral anticoagulants as first choice for antithrombotic prevention. Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have been demonstrated to be not inferior to warfa...

  14. Extensive Thrombosis Following Lead Extraction: Further Justification for Routine Post-operative Anticoagulation

    OpenAIRE

    Hanninen, Mikael; Cassagneau, Romain; Manlucu, Jaimie; Yee, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Lead extraction is becoming increasingly common as indications for pacing and ICD insertion expand. Periop management varies between extraction centers, and no clinical guidelines have addressed the need for perioperative anticoagulation. We report a case of massive thrombosis which occurred shortly after laser lead extraction and is undoubtedly related to the trauma of the extraction and ensuing hypercoagulabiilty. Routine post-operative anticoagulation has been advocated as a means to preve...

  15. Efficacy of long-term anticoagulant treatment in subgroups of patients after myocardial infarction.

    OpenAIRE

    Bergen, P. F. van; Deckers, J.W.; Jonker, J. J.; van Domburg, R. T.; Azar, A J; Hofman, A.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the efficacy of long term oral anticoagulant treatment in subgroups of patients after myocardial infarction. DESIGN--Analysis of the effect of anticoagulant treatment in subgroups of hospital survivors of myocardial infarction based upon age, gender, history of hypertension, previous myocardial infarction, smoking habits, diabetes mellitus, Killip class, anterior location of infarction, thrombolytic therapy, and use of beta blockers. SUBJECTS--Participants of a multi...

  16. Lupus anticoagulant, disease activity and low complement in the first trimester are predictive of pregnancy loss

    OpenAIRE

    Mankee, Anil; Petri, Michelle; Magder, Laurence S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Multiple factors, including proteinuria, antiphospholipid syndrome, thrombocytopenia and hypertension, are predictive of pregnancy loss in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In the PROMISSE study of predictors of pregnancy loss, only a battery of lupus anticoagulant tests was predictive of a composite of adverse pregnancy outcomes. We examined the predictive value of one baseline lupus anticoagulant test (dilute Russell viper venom time) with pregnancy loss in women with SLE. Me...

  17. Ancylostoma caninum anticoagulant peptide: a hookworm-derived inhibitor of human coagulation factor Xa.

    OpenAIRE

    Cappello, M; Vlasuk, G P; Bergum, P W; Huang, S.; Hotez, P. J.

    1995-01-01

    Human hookworm infection is a major cause of gastrointestinal blood loss and iron deficiency anemia, affecting up to one billion people in the developing world. These soil-transmitted helminths cause blood loss during attachment to the intestinal mucosa by lacerating capillaries and ingesting extravasated blood. We have isolated the major anticoagulant used by adult worms to facilitate feeding and exacerbate intestinal blood loss. This 8.7-kDa peptide, named the Ancylostoma caninum anticoagul...

  18. THE PROBLEM OF THE USE OF NEW ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS IN CANCER PATIENTS RECEIVING CHEMOTHERAPY

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Rumyantsev; I. A. Pokataev; T.V. Kozlov; N.A. Rumyantsev

    2015-01-01

    Despite large number of known risk factors of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in cancer patients existing prediction models do not allow definite identification of cancer patients that have indications for anticoagulant prevention. Besides, heparin and warfarin use for VTE prevention in cancer is accompanied by some problems. New oral anticoagulants (NOAC) are promising drugs for use in oncology practice; however their use is complicated by the lack of data on efficacy and safety in these patien...

  19. Effective management of venous thromboembolism in the community: non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    OpenAIRE

    Patel R

    2016-01-01

    Raj Patel Department of Haematological Medicine, King's Thrombosis Centre, King's College Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Anticoagulation therapy is essential for the effective treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE). For many years, anticoagulation for acute VTE was limited to the use of initial parenteral heparin, overlapping with and followed by a vitamin K antagonist. Although highly effective, this regimen has several limitations and is particularly cha...

  20. Effective management of venous thromboembolism in the community: non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Raj Patel Department of Haematological Medicine, King's Thrombosis Centre, King's College Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Anticoagulation therapy is essential for the effective treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE). For many years, anticoagulation for acute VTE was limited to the use of initial parenteral heparin, overlapping with and followed by a vitamin K antagonist. Although highly effective, this regimen has several limitations and is particul...

  1. D-dimer: a useful tool in gauging optimal duration of oral anticoagulant therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Silingardi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY Optimal duration of oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT in idiopathic venous thromboembolism (VTE is unknown. Indefinite OAT carries an unacceptable risk of major bleeding and prospective studies have demonstrated that OAT is no longer protective after its withdrawal. How to identify the patients at risk for recurrence? D-dimer is a marker of thrombin activity. Early prospective studies showed that elevated D-dimer levels after anticoagulation had a highly predictive value for a recurrent episode. Does D-dimer assay have a role in gauging the appropriate duration of anticoagulant therapy? The PROLONG study tries to answer this question. METHOD D-dimer assay was performed one month after stopping anticoagulation. Patiens with normal D-dimer levels did not resume anticoagulation while patients with elevated D-dimer levels were randomized to discontinue or resume anticoagulation. Study end-points was the composite of recurrent VTE and major bleeding during an average follow-up of 1.4 years. RESULTS The rate of recurrence is significantly higher in patients with elevated D-dimer levels who discontinued anticoagulation. Resuming anticoagulation in this cohort of patients markedly reduces recurrent events without increasing major bleeding. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS PROLONG study is provocative, because D-dimer assay is simple, thus not requiring dedicated laboratory facilities. D-dimer test has otherwise high sensitivity but low specificity in VTE diagnosis. Aspecifically elevated D-dimer levels are available in the elderly and the majority of patients included in the study were > 65 years old, thus introducing a possible selection bias. Nonetheless the results of the study are useful for the clinician. Prolongation of vitamin K antagonists in patients with elevated D-dimer levels one month after discontinuation of OAT for a first unprovoked episode of VTE results in a favourable risk-benefit relationship. Probably this

  2. Anticoagulation and delayed bowel resection in the management of mesenteric venous thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Acute mesenteric venous thrombosis is potentially lethal because it can result in mesenteric ischemia and, ultimately, bowel infarction requiring surgical intervention. Systemic anticoagulation for the prevention of thrombus propagation is a well-recognized treatment modality and the current mainstay therapy for patients with acute mesenteric venous thrombosis. However, the decision between prompt surgical exploration vs conservative treatment with anticoagulation is somewhat difficult in pat...

  3. Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation. Is there a gap in care for ambulatory patients?

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Atrial fibrillation (AF) substantially increases risk of stroke. Evidence suggests that anticoagulation to reduce risk is underused (a "care gap"). Our objectives were to clarify measures of this gap in care by including data from family physicians and to determine why eligible patients were not receiving anticoagulation therapy. DESIGN: Telephone survey of family physicians regarding specific patients in their practices. SETTING: Nova Scotia. PARTICIPANTS: Ambulatory AF patients n...

  4. Dose Dependence of the Anticoagulant Effect of Intravenously Administered Cellulose Sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozd, N N; Kuznetsova, S A; Kalinina, T B; Vasilieva, N Yu

    2016-04-01

    Experiments on rabbits showed that increasing the dose of intravenously administered cellulose sulfate from wheat straw (dynamic viscosity 3.4 cP, sulfur content 14.1%) increased plasma clotting time in some coagulation tests and plasma anticoagulant activity. When cellulose sulfate was administered in the dose of 1 mg/kg, plasma clotting time in the presence of the anticoagulant (5 min after administration) was ~3-fold higher than after saline administration. PMID:27165079

  5. A vacuolar phosphate transporter essential for phosphate homeostasis in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jinlong; Yang, Lei; Luan, Mingda; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Bin; Shi, Jisen; Zhao, Fu-Geng; Lan, Wenzhi; Luan, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Phosphate is an essential nutrient for plant growth, and inorganic phosphate (Pi) is stored largely in the vacuole of plant cells. Thus, vacuolar Pi maintains homeostasis of cytosolic Pi to ensure an optimal Pi supply for plants under variable Pi status in the soil. This study uncovered in Arabidopsis a vacuolar phosphate transporter, VPT1, that mediates vacuolar Pi sequestration. Lack of VPT1 caused growth defects under both low-Pi and high-Pi conditions, implicating VPT1 in plant adaptation...

  6. Anticoagulant treatment for acute pulmonary embolism: a pathophysiology-based clinical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnelli, Giancarlo; Becattini, Cecilia

    2015-04-01

    The management of patients with acute pulmonary embolism is made challenging by its wide spectrum of clinical presentation and outcome, which is mainly related to patient haemodynamic status and right ventricular overload. Mechanical embolic obstruction and neurohumorally mediated pulmonary vasoconstriction are responsible for right ventricular overload. The pathophysiology of acute pulmonary embolism is the basis for risk stratification of patients as being at high, intermediate and low risk of adverse outcomes. This risk stratification has been advocated to tailor clinical management according to the severity of pulmonary embolism. Anticoagulation is the mainstay of the treatment of acute pulmonary embolism. New direct oral anticoagulants, which are easier to use than conventional anticoagulants, have been compared with conventional anticoagulation in five randomised clinical trials including >11 000 patients with pulmonary embolism. Patients at high risk of pulmonary embolism (those with haemodynamic compromise) were excluded from these studies. Direct oral anticoagulants have been shown to be as effective and at least as safe as conventional anticoagulation in patients with pulmonary embolism without haemodynamic compromise, who are the majority of patients with this disease. Whether these agents are appropriate for the acute-phase treatment of patients at intermediate-high risk pulmonary embolism (those with both right ventricle dysfunction and injury) regardless of any risk stratification remains undefined. PMID:25700388

  7. Could Some Geriatric Characteristics Hinder the Prescription of Anticoagulants in Atrial Fibrillation in the Elderly?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paule Denoël

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have reported underprescription of anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation (AF. We conducted an observational study on 142 out of a total of 995 consecutive ≥75 years old patients presenting AF (14% when admitted in an emergency unit of a general hospital, in search of geriatric characteristics that might be associated with the underprescription of anticoagulation therapy (mostly antivitamin K at the time of the study. The following data was collected from patients presenting AF: medical history including treatment and comorbidities, CHADS2 score, ISAR scale (frailty, Lawton’s scale (ADL, GDS scale (mood status, MUST (nutrition, and blood analysis (INR, kidney function, and albumin. Among those patients for who anticoagulation treatment was recommended (73%, only 61% were treated with it. In the group with anticoagulation therapy, the following characteristics were observed more often than in the group without such therapy: a recent (≤6 months hospitalization and medical treatment including digoxin or based on >3 different drugs. Neither the value of the CHADS2 score, nor the geriatric characteristics could be correlated with the presence or the absence of an anticoagulation therapy. More research is thus required to identify and clarify the relative importance of patient-, physician-, and health care system-related hurdles for the prescription of oral anticoagulation therapy in older patients with AF.

  8. Increased sulphation improves the anticoagulant activities of heparan sulphate and dermatan sulphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofosu, F A; Modi, G J; Blajchman, M A; Buchanan, M R; Johnson, E A

    1987-01-01

    Heparan sulphate and dermatan sulphate have both antithrombotic and anticoagulant properties. These are, however, significantly weaker than those of a comparable amount of standard pig mucosal heparin. Antithrombotic and anticoagulant effects of glycosaminoglycans depend on their ability to catalyse the inhibition of thrombin and/or to inhibit the activation of prothrombin. Since heparan sulphate and dermatan sulphate are less sulphated than unfractionated heparin, we investigated whether the decreased sulphation contributes to the lower antithrombotic and anticoagulant activities compared with standard heparin. To do this, we compared the anticoagulant activities of heparan sulphate and dermatan sulphate with those of their derivatives resulphated in vitro. The ratio of sulphate to carboxylate in these resulphated heparan sulphate and dermatan sulphate derivatives was approximately twice that of the parent compounds and similar to that of standard heparin. Anticoagulant effects were assessed by determining (a) the catalytic effects of each glycosaminoglycan on the inhibition of thrombin added to plasma, and (b) the ability of each glycosaminoglycan to inhibit the activation of 125I-prothrombin in plasma. The least sulphated glycosaminoglycans were least able to catalyse the inhibition of thrombin added to plasma and to inhibit the activation of prothrombin. Furthermore, increasing the degree of sulphation improved the catalytic effects of glycosaminoglycans on the inhibition of thrombin by heparin cofactor II in plasma. The degree of sulphation therefore appears to be an important functional property that contributes significantly to the anticoagulant effects of the two glycosaminoglycans. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:2963622

  9. Occurrence, elimination, and risk of anticoagulant rodenticides and drugs during wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Canela, Cristian; Barata, Carlos; Lacorte, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Anticoagulants are biocides widely used as pest control agents in agriculture, urban infrastructures, and domestic applications for the control of rodents. Other anticoagulants such as warfarin and acenocoumarol are also used as drugs against thrombosis. After use, anticoagulants are discharged to sewage grids and enter wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Our hypothesis is that WWTP effluents can be a source of anticoagulants to receiving waters and that these can affect aquatic organisms and other nontarget species. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to determine the occurrence of 11 anticoagulants in WWTPs receiving urban and agricultural wastewaters. Warfarin was the most ubiquitous compound detected in influent waters and was partially eliminated during the activated sludge treatment, and low nanograms per liter concentration were found in the effluents. Other detected compounds were coumatetralyl, ferulenol, acenocoumarol, flocoumafen, brodifacoum, bromadiolone, and difenacoum at concentrations of 0.86-87.0 ng L(-1). Considering water volumes of each WWTP, daily emissions were estimated to be 0.02 to 21.8 g day(-1), and thus, WWTPs contribute to the loads of anticoagulants to receiving waters. However, low aquatic toxicity was observed using Daphnia magna as a model aquatic organism. PMID:24622989

  10. National survey of training and credentialing methods in pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlberg, J; Wittkowsky, A K; Possidente, C

    1998-05-15

    A national survey of pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinics was conducted to determine how pharmacists are trained to provide care in such clinics. In June 1996 a survey was mailed to 177 pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinics in the United States. A total of 128 surveys were returned (response rate, 72%). One hundred ten surveys representing 42 states and a variety of institutions were usable. Twenty-five (23%) of the 110 clinics offered an anticoagulation training program for their pharmacists. Most training programs had both didactic and experiential components and had been in existence for one to five years. Thirty-two (29%) of the 110 responding clinics had at least one pharmacist who had completed the ASHP Research and Education Foundation's Anticoagulation Service Traineeship. Twenty-three of the 25 clinics with a training program required successful completion of the program before a pharmacist could practice in the clinic. The overall quality of pharmacists' performance was regularly assessed by 22 of the 25 clinics. Most pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinics in the United States do not offer formal training in anticoagulation therapy to pharmacists who practice in that setting. PMID:9606455

  11. A COMPARISON OF CLOMIPHENE CITRATE AND SEQUENTIAL CLOMIPHENE CITRATE PLUS HUMAN MENOPAUSAL GONADOTROPIN FOR USE IN CONJUNCTION WITH INTRAUTERINE INSEMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. H. Rashidi

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available There are currently ‎many different protocols in use for controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH, but the optimal method has ‎not yet been determined. To compare the outcome of COH using ‎clomiphene citrate (CC versus CC plus human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG in conjunction with intrauterine insemination (IUI, we studied 117 infertile couples‎. IUI with CC was used in 92 cycles ‎(group A and IUI with CC plus hMG was used in 66 cycles (group B. ‎Data analysis demonstrated no significant difference between the two ‎groups with respect to patients’ age, duration and type of infertility, prior COH and endometrial thickness and pattern. Group A had a little ‎longer follicular phase length than group B. ‎Pregnancy rate for group A and B were 6.52% and 12.12%, respectively (P= 0.22. ‎Endometrial pattern and thickness had no impact on pregnancy rate. ‎There were no multiple gestation and obvious hyperstimulation syndrome. ‎For patients undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with IUI, ‎CC plus hMG protocol yields higher pregnancy rate than one using CC, although this ‎difference was not statistically significant because of limitation of number of ‎cycles.

  12. Pyridoxal phosphate-dependent neonatal epileptic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Bagci, S.; Zschocke, J.; Hoffmann, G F; Bast, T.; Klepper, J; Müller, A.; Heep, A; Bartmann, P.; Franz, A R

    2009-01-01

    Pyridox(am)ine-5′-phosphate oxidase converts pyridoxine phosphate and pyridoxamine phosphate to pyridoxal phosphate, a cofactor in many metabolic reactions, including neurotransmitter synthesis. A family with a mutation in the pyridox(am)ine-5′-phosphate oxidase gene presenting with neonatal seizures unresponsive to pyridoxine and anticonvulsant treatment but responsive to pyridoxal phosphate is described. Pyridoxal phosphate should be considered in neonatal epileptic encephalopathy unrespons...

  13. Integrated assessment of the phosphate industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phosphate industry in the United States includes three major activities, namely, mining and milling of phosphate rock, phosphate product manufacture, and phosphate product use. Phosphatic materials contain uranium, thorium, and their decay products in greater than background amounts. This assessment of the radiological impacts associated with the redistribution of radioactive components of phosphate materials may provide insight into the effects of uranium extraction from phosphate materials for use in the nuclear fuel cycle

  14. New perspectives and recommendations for anticoagulant therapy post orthopedic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Kropf

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Anticoagulant therapy is essential for the prevention of risks associated with the formation of thrombus in patients after surgery, especially in orthopedics. Recently, new oral anticoagulants were introduced in the therapeutic arsenal. This fact is important, because the current drug of choice in clinical practice is enoxaparin, a low molecular weight heparin. As all injecting drugs, enoxaparin may reduce patients' adherence to treatment by dissatisfaction with and resistance to the administration. This article reviews the available literature on the overall utility of these innovative medicines, approaching the pharmacology, the compared efficacy in relation to current agents, and the potential targets for new agents, as well as points to new trends in research and development. The article also contributes with a practical guide for use and recommendations to health professionals, especially focusing on the reversibility of hemorrhagic events, and discusses the importance of convenience/satisfaction of use, the cost of treatment, and the risk-benefit profile for patients.A terapia anticoagulante é fundamental para a prevenção de riscos associados à formação de trombos em pacientes pós-cirúrgicos, principalmente em ortopedia. Recentemente, novos anticoagulantes orais foram introduzidos no arsenal terapêutico. Tal fato é importantíssimo, visto que o atual medicamento de primeira escolha na prática clínica é a enoxaparina, uma heparina de baixo peso molecular. Por ser de uso injetável, a enoxaparina pode diminuir a adesão do paciente ao tratamento, devido à insatisfação e à resistência quanto à via de administração. Este artigo revisa a literatura disponível sobre a utilidade total desses medicamentos inovadores ao abordar a farmacologia, a eficácia em comparação com os agentes atuais e os alvos potenciais para novos agentes, bem como aponta as novas tendências em pesquisa e desenvolvimento. O artigo também contribui

  15. Redox properties and activity of iron-citrate complexes: evidence for redox cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Fatima I; Bounds, Patricia L; Kissner, Reinhard; Koppenol, Willem H

    2015-04-20

    Iron in iron overload disease is present as non-transferrin-bound iron, consisting of iron, citrate, and albumin. We investigated the redox properties of iron citrate by electrochemistry, by the kinetics of its reaction with ascorbate, by ESR, and by analyzing the products of reactions of ascorbate with iron citrate complexes in the presence of H2O2 with 4-hydroxybenzoic acid as a reporter molecule for hydroxylation. We report -0.03 V +0.01 V for the (Fe(3+)-cit/Fe(2+)-cit) couple. The first step in the reaction of iron citrate with ascorbate is the rapid formation of mixed complexes of iron with citrate and ascorbate, followed by slow reduction to Fe(2+)-citrate with k = ca. 3 M(-1) s(-1). The ascorbyl radical is formed by iron citrate oxidation of Hasc(-) with k = ca. 0.02 M(-1) s(-1); the majority of the ascorbyl radical formed is sequestered by complexation with iron and remains EPR silent. The hydroxylation of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid driven by the Fenton reduction of iron citrate by ascorbate in the presence of H2O2 proceeds in three phases: the first phase, which is independent of the presence of O2, is revealed as a nonzero intercept that reflects the rapid reaction of accumulated Fe(2+) with H2O2; the intermediate oxygen-dependent phase fits a first-order accumulation of product with k = 5 M(-1) s(-1) under aerobic and k = 13 M(-1) s(-1) under anaerobic conditions; the slope of the final linear phase is ca. k = 5 × 10(-2) M(-1) s(-1) under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Product yields under aerobic conditions are greater than predicted from the initial concentration of iron, but they are less than predicted for continuous redox cycling in the presence of excess ascorbate. The ongoing formation of hydroxylated product supports slow redox cycling by iron citrate. Thus, when H2O2 is available, iron-citrate complexes may contribute to pathophysiological manifestations of iron overload diseases. PMID:25654270

  16. Mitochondrial aconitase and citrate metabolism in malignant and nonmalignant human prostate tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin Renty B

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In prostate cancer, normal citrate-producing glandular secretory epithelial cells undergo a metabolic transformation to malignant citrate-oxidizing cells. m-Aconitase is the critical step involved in this altered citrate metabolism that is essential to prostate malignancy. The limiting m-aconitase activity in prostate epithelial cells could be the result of a decreased level of m-aconitase enzyme and/or the inhibition of existing m-aconitase. Earlier studies identified zinc as an inhibitor of m-aconitase activity in prostate cells; and that the depletion of zinc in malignant cells is an important factor in this metabolic transformation. However, a possibility remains that an altered expression and level of m-aconitase enzyme might also be involved in this metabolic transformation. To address this issue, the in situ level of m-aconitase enzyme was determined by immunohistochemical analysis of prostate cancer tissue sections and malignant prostate cell lines. Results The immunocytochemical procedure successfully identified the presence of m-aconitase localized in the mitochondrial compartment in PC-3, LNCaP, and DU-145 malignant prostate cell lines. The examination of prostate tissue sections from prostate cancer subjects demonstrated that m-aconitase enzyme is present in the glandular epithelium of normal glands, hyperplastic glands, adenocrcinomatous glands, and prostatic intraepithelial neoplastic foci. Quantitative analysis of the relative level of m-aconitase in the glandular epithelium of citrate-producing adenomatous glands versus the citrate-oxidizing adenocarcinomatous glands revealed no significant difference in m-aconitase enzyme levels. This is in contrast to the down-regulation of ZIP1 zinc transporter in the malignant glands versus hyperplastic glands that exists in the same tissue samples. Conclusion The results demonstrate the existence of m-aconitase enzyme in the citrate-producing glandular epithelial cells

  17. Transport of citrate-coated silver nanoparticles in unsaturated sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumahor, Samuel K., E-mail: samuel.kumahor@ufz.de [Department of Soil Physics, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research–UFZ, Theodor-Lieser-Strasse 4, 06120 Halle-Saale (Germany); Hron, Pavel, E-mail: pavel.hron@iwr.uni-heidelberg.de [Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 368, Raum 422, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Metreveli, George, E-mail: metreveli@uni-landau.de [Universität Koblenz-Landau, Institute for Environmental Sciences, Group of Environmental and Soil Chemistry, Fortstr. 7, D-76829 Landau (Germany); Schaumann, Gabriele E., E-mail: schaumann@uni-landau.de [Universität Koblenz-Landau, Institute for Environmental Sciences, Group of Environmental and Soil Chemistry, Fortstr. 7, D-76829 Landau (Germany); Vogel, Hans-Jörg, E-mail: hans-joerg.vogel@ufz.de [Department of Soil Physics, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research–UFZ, Theodor-Lieser-Strasse 4, 06120 Halle-Saale (Germany); Institute of Soil Science and Plant Nutrition, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Von-Seckendorff-Platz 3, 06120 Halle-Saale (Germany)

    2015-12-01

    Chemical factors and physical constraints lead to coupled effects during particle transport in unsaturated porous media. Studies on unsaturated transport as typical for soils are currently scarce. In unsaturated porous media, particle mobility is determined by the existence of an air–water interface in addition to a solid–water interface. To this end, we measured breakthrough curves and retention profiles of citrate-coated Ag nanoparticles in unsaturated sand at two pH values (5 and 9) and three different flow rates corresponding to different water contents with 1 mM KNO{sub 3} as background electrolyte. The classical DLVO theory suggests unfavorable deposition conditions at the air–water and solid–water interfaces. The breakthrough curves indicate modification in curve shapes and retardation of nanoparticles compared to inert solute. Retention profiles show sensitivity to flow rate and pH and this ranged from almost no retention for the highest flow rate at pH = 9 to almost complete retention for the lowest flow rate at pH = 5. Modeling of the breakthrough curves, thus, required coupling two parallel processes: a kinetically controlled attachment process far from equilibrium, responsible for the shape modification, and an equilibrium sorption, responsible for particle retardation. The non-equilibrium process and equilibrium sorption are suggested to relate to the solid–water and air–water interfaces, respectively. This is supported by the DLVO model extended for hydrophobic interactions which suggests reversible attachment, characterized by a secondary minimum (depth 3–5 kT) and a repulsive barrier at the air–water interface. In contrast, the solid–water interface is characterized by a significant repulsive barrier and the absence of a secondary minimum suggesting kinetically controlled and non-equilibrium interaction. This study provides new insights into particle transport in unsaturated porous media and offers a model concept representing the

  18. Transport of citrate-coated silver nanoparticles in unsaturated sand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical factors and physical constraints lead to coupled effects during particle transport in unsaturated porous media. Studies on unsaturated transport as typical for soils are currently scarce. In unsaturated porous media, particle mobility is determined by the existence of an air–water interface in addition to a solid–water interface. To this end, we measured breakthrough curves and retention profiles of citrate-coated Ag nanoparticles in unsaturated sand at two pH values (5 and 9) and three different flow rates corresponding to different water contents with 1 mM KNO3 as background electrolyte. The classical DLVO theory suggests unfavorable deposition conditions at the air–water and solid–water interfaces. The breakthrough curves indicate modification in curve shapes and retardation of nanoparticles compared to inert solute. Retention profiles show sensitivity to flow rate and pH and this ranged from almost no retention for the highest flow rate at pH = 9 to almost complete retention for the lowest flow rate at pH = 5. Modeling of the breakthrough curves, thus, required coupling two parallel processes: a kinetically controlled attachment process far from equilibrium, responsible for the shape modification, and an equilibrium sorption, responsible for particle retardation. The non-equilibrium process and equilibrium sorption are suggested to relate to the solid–water and air–water interfaces, respectively. This is supported by the DLVO model extended for hydrophobic interactions which suggests reversible attachment, characterized by a secondary minimum (depth 3–5 kT) and a repulsive barrier at the air–water interface. In contrast, the solid–water interface is characterized by a significant repulsive barrier and the absence of a secondary minimum suggesting kinetically controlled and non-equilibrium interaction. This study provides new insights into particle transport in unsaturated porous media and offers a model concept representing the

  19. Phosphate Test 2.0

    OpenAIRE

    Stalder, Etienne; Zumbuehl, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The accurate measurement of the phosphate content of a liposomal suspension is important when working with differential scanning calorimetry. Standard phosphate tests date back several decades and require extended hands-on time. Here, we present a rapid version of a phosphate test taking advantage of microwave-assisted chemical digestion and multiwell plate reading technology allowing for the fast and accurate testing of many samples in parallel.

  20. Structural classification of phosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A structural classification of phosphate glasses is proposed. Following types of phosphate glasses are distinguished: discontinuous polymeric structure glasses (phosphate and mixed chains and rings containing glasses), continuous spatial network structure glasses (ultraphosphate and mixed network glasses) and non-polymeric structure glasses (oxide-halide and halide glasses, stuffed with ortho- and pyrophosphate-like groups). Type of the structure determines in a considerable degree the relation between glass composition and properties. (author). 25 refs

  1. Inositol phosphates in the environment.

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Benjamin L.; Papházy, Michael J; Haygarth, Philip M.; McKelvie, Ian D

    2002-01-01

    The inositol phosphates are a group of organic phosphorus compounds found widely in the natural environment, but that represent the greatest gap in our understanding of the global phosphorus cycle. They exist as inositols in various states of phosphorylation (bound to between one and six phosphate groups) and isomeric forms (e.g. myo, D-chiro, scyllo, neo), although myo-inositol hexakisphosphate is by far the most prevalent form in nature. In terrestrial environments, inositol phosphates are ...

  2. : Emergency Physician Patterns Related to Anticoagulation of Patients with Recent-Onset Atrial Fibrillation and Flutter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paraish Misra, MD

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Guidelines strongly recommend long-term anticoagulation with warfarin for patients with newly recognized AF who have high embolic risk by virtue of a CHADS2 (Congestive Heart Failure, Hypertension, Age >65, Diabetes, History of Stroke score ≥ 2. The goal of this study was to determine patterns of emergency department-initiated anticoagulation among eligible patients discharged from Canadian centers with an episode of recent-onset atrial fibrillation and flutter (RAFF and determine if decision-making is driven by the CHADS2 score or other factors. This was accomplished by examining health records using uniform case identification and data abstraction as well as centralized quality control; it was conducted in 8 Canadian university emergency departments over a 12-month period. Eligible patients for this analysis demonstrated RAFF requiring emergency management, were not already taking warfarin and were not admitted to hospital. Univariate analyses were conducted using T-test or Chi-square to select factors associated with anticoagulation initiation at a significance level of p < 0.15 and multiple logistic regression was employed to evaluate independent predictors after adjustment for confounders. Among 633 eligible patients, only 21 out of 120 patients (18% with a CHADS2 score ≥ 2 received anticoagulation and among 70 patients who were given anticoagulation only 21 (30% had a CHADS2 score ≥ 2. Independent predictors of anticoagulation included age by 10-year strata: (OR = 1.7; 95% CI 1.3 – 2.1, heparin use in the anticoagulation (OR = 9.6; 95% CI 4.9 – 18.9, a new prescription for metoprolol (OR = 9.6; 95% CI 4.9 – 18.9 and being referred to cardiology for follow-up (OR = 5.6; 95% CI 2.6 – 12.0. CHADS2 ≥ 2 doubled the likelihood of being prescribed anticoagulation (OR= 2.0; 95% CI 1.5 – 3.5 but was not an independent predictor. It was thus determined that patients discharged from the emergency department in this study were not

  3. Anticoagulant activities of piperlonguminine in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonhwa Lee

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Piperlonguminine (PL, an important component of Piperlongum fruits, is known to exhibit anti-hyperlipidemic, antiplateletand anti-melanogenic activities. Here, the anticoagulantactivities of PL were examined by monitoring activatedpartial-thromboplastin-time (aPTT, prothrombin-time (PT, andthe activities of thrombin and activated factor X (FXa. Theeffects of PL on the expressions of plasminogen activatorinhibitor type 1 (PAI-1 and tissue-type plasminogen activator(t-PA were also tested in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-αactivated HUVECs. The results showed that PL prolonged aPTTand PT significantly and inhibited the activities of thrombin andFXa. PL inhibited the generation of thrombin and FXa inHUVECs. In accordance with these anticoagulant activities, PLprolonged in vivo bleeding time and inhibited TNF-α inducedPAI-1 production. Furthermore, PAI-1/t-PA ratio was significantlydecreased by PL. Collectively, our results suggest that PLpossesses antithrombotic activities and that the current studycould provide bases for the development of new anticoagulantagents. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(10: 484-489

  4. Anticoagulation Management in Patients with Pacemaker-Detected Atrial Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poposka, Lidija; Boskov, Vladimir; Risteski, Dejan; Taleski, Jane; Georgievska-Ismail, Ljubica

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In patients with an implanted pacemaker, asymptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with an increased risk of thrombo-embolic complications. There is still no consensus which duration of episodes of atrial fibrillation should be taken as an indicator for inclusion of oral anticoagulation therapy (OAC). MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 104 patients who had no AF episodes in the past and have an indication for permanent pacing were included in the study. RESULTS: During an average follow-up of 18 months, 33 of the patients developed episodes of AF. Inclusion of OAC was performed in 17 patients, in whom AF was recorded, although in all patients CHA2DS2-VASc score was ≥ 1. The inclusion of OAC showed a statistically significant correlation with increasing duration of episodes of AF (r = 0.502, p = 0.003). During the follow-up period none of the patients developed thrombo-embolic complication. CONCLUSION: Considering that our group of patients had no thrombo-embolic events, we could conclude that dividing the AF episodes in less than 1% in 24 hours and longer than 1% within 24 hours could be an indicator for decision-making to include OAK if the CHA2DS2-VASc score is ≥ 1. PMID:27335594

  5. Left Atrial Thrombus Despite Anticoagulation: The Importance Of Homocystein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. J. David Spence

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Patients in atrial fibrillation may have left atrial thrombi or strokes despite adequate anticoagulation. It is important to consider elevated plasma total homocysteine (tHcy as a treatable clotting factor that may explain such cases. Metabolic B12 deficiency is common even in patients with a “normal” serum B12. Measurement of holotranscobalamin, methylmalonic acid or, in folate-replete patients, tHcy are necessary to diagnose metabolic B12 deficiency when the serum B12 is below 400 pmol/L. Elevated tHcy quadruples the risk of stroke in atrial fibrillation, and is far more common than the usual clotting factors for which testing is commonly performed: among patients attending a secondary stroke prevention clinic, tHcy > 14 mmol/L is present in 20% at age 40, and in 40% at age 80. B vitamin therapy does reduce the risk of stroke; key issues are renal impairment and adequacy of vitamin B12. This intervention should be considered routinely in patients with AF.

  6. Structure versus anticoagulant and antithrombotic actions of marine sulfated polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Hugo Pomin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Marine sulfated polysaccharides (MSP, such as sulfated fucans (SF, sulfated galactans (SG and glycosaminoglycans (GAG isolated from either algae or invertebrate animals, are highly anionic polysaccharides capable of interacting with certain cationic proteins, such as (co-factors of the coagulation cascade during clotting-inhibition processes. These molecular complexes between MSP and coagulation-related proteins might, at first glance, be assumed to be driven mostly by electrostatic interactions. However, a systematic comparison using several novel sulfated polysaccharides composed of repetitive oligosaccharides with clear sulfation patterns has shown that these molecular interactions are regulated essentially by the stereochemistry of the glycans (which depends on a conjunction of anomericity, monosaccharide, conformational preference, and glycosylation and sulfation sites, rather than just a simple consequence of their negative charge density (mainly the number of sulfate groups. Here, we present an overview of the structure-function relationships of MSP, correlating their structures with their potential anticoagulant and antithrombotic actions, since pathologies related to the cardiovascular system are one of the major causes of illness and mortality in the world.

  7. Anticoagulation in pregnant females with mechanical heart valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the complications and outcome of anticoagulation therapy in pregnant females with valvular heart diseases. All pregnant females with prosthetic heart valves admitted in Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology from Jan 2004 to Dec 2004 were included in this study Basic demographic data including age, duration of pregnancy and complications observed were recorded. Warfarin was replaced with un-fractionated heparin (UFH) in first trimester and after that warfarin was continued with a targeted INR between 2.0-3.0. At 36 weeks warfarin was stopped and UFH was added; however, if patient went into spontaneous labour before this then immediate caesarian section was performed and UFH was restarted 4-6 hours after delivery along with oral warfarin. Out of 21 patients, sixteen (76.1%) had mitral valve diseases and five (23.9%) had both mitral and atrial. Majority (42.3%)of patients were in age group 26-30 years. Eleven (52.2%) reported in 9th month of gestation. Complications observed were hypertension (1), transient ischaemic attacks (1), pulmonary embolism (1), haemoptysis (1) and abortion (1). All patients, except one had successful completion of pregnancy. No case of foetal abnormality was seen. In 76% patients, daily dose of warfarin was <5 mg. Thrombo-prophylaxis in pregnancy with warfarin and UFH with an INR of 2.0-3.0 is effective in preventing thrombotic complications in females with mechanical valves without resulting in increase hemorrhagic complications. (author)

  8. Dissolution kinetics and biodurability of tremolite particles in mimicked lung fluids: Effect of citrate and oxalate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozalen, Marisa; Ramos, M. Elena; Huertas, F. Javier; Fiore, Saverio; Gervilla, Fernando

    2013-11-01

    The effect of citrate and oxalate on tremolite dissolution rate was measured at 37 °C in non-stirred flow-through reactors, using modified Gamble's solutions at pH 4 (macrophages), 7.4 (interstitial fluids) and 5.5 (intermediate check point) containing 0, 0.15, 1.5 and 15 mmol L-1 of citrate or oxalate. The dissolution rates calculated from Si concentration in the output solutions without organic ligands depend on pH, decreasing when the pH increases from -13.00 (pH 4) to -13.35 (pH 7.4) mol g-1 s-1 and following a proton-promoted mechanism. The presence of both ligands enhances dissolution rates at every pH, increasing this effect when the ligand concentration increases. Citrate produces a stronger effect as a catalyst than oxalate, mainly at more acidic pHs and enhances dissolution rates until 20 times for solutions with 15 mmol L-1 citrate. However, at pH 7.4 the effect is lighter and oxalate solutions (15 mmol L-1) only enhances dissolution rates eight times respect to free organic ligand solutions. Dissolution is promoted by the attack to protons and organic ligands to the tremolite surface. Magnesium speciation in oxalate and citrate solutions shows that Mg citrate complexes are more effective than oxalate ones during the alteration of tremolite in magrophages, but this tendency is the opposite for interstitial fluids, being oxalate magnesium complexes stronger. The biodurability estimations show that the destruction of the fibers is faster in acidic conditions (macrophages) than in the neutral solutions (interstitial fluid). At pH 4, both ligands oxalate and citrate reduce the residence time of the fibers with respect to that calculated in absence of ligands. Nevertheless, at pH 7.4 the presence of ligands does not reduce significantly the lifetime of the fibers.

  9. Effects and mechanisms of action of sildenafil citrate in human chorionic arteries.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maharaj, Chrisen H

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Sildenafil citrate, a specific phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor, is increasingly used for pulmonary hypertension in pregnancy. Sildenafil is also emerging as a potential candidate for the treatment of intra-uterine growth retardation and for premature labor. Its effects in the feto-placental circulation are not known. Our objectives were to determine whether phosphodiesterase-5 is present in the human feto-placental circulation, and to characterize the effects and mechanisms of action of sildenafil citrate in this circulation. STUDY DESIGN: Ex vivo human chorionic plate arterial rings were used in all experiments. The presence of phosphodiesterase-5 in the feto-placental circulation was determined by western blotting and immunohistochemical staining. In a subsequent series of pharmacologic studies, the effects of sildenafil citrate in pre-constricted chorionic plate arterial rings were determined. Additional studies examined the role of cGMP and nitric oxide in mediating the effects of sildenafil. RESULTS: Phosphodiesterase-5 mRNA and protein was demonstrated in human chorionic plate arteries. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated phosphodiesterase-5 within the arterial muscle layer. Sildenafil citrate produced dose dependent vasodilatation at concentrations at and greater than 10 nM. Both the direct cGMP inhibitor methylene blue and the cGMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMPS significantly attenuated the vasodilation produced by sildenafil citrate. Inhibition of NO production with L-NAME did not attenuate the vasodilator effects of sildenafil. In contrast, sildenafil citrate significantly enhanced the vasodilation produced by the NO donor sodium nitroprusside. CONCLUSION: Phosphodiesterase-5 is present in the feto-placental circulation. Sildenafil citrate vasodilates the feto-placental circulation via a cGMP dependent mechanism involving increased responsiveness to NO.

  10. Value of trans-oesophageal echocardiography as a method of encouraging patients with chronic atrial fibrillation to use anticoagulation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Bakalli, Aurora; Kamberi, Lulzim; Dragusha, Gani; Zeqiri, Nexhmi; Gashi, Fitim; Prekpalaj, Lazer

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite the indisputable role of anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation (AF) patients at risk for stroke, anticoagulants remain under-used in everyday clinical practice. We assumed that by performing trans-oesophageal echocardiography (TEE) on patients with AF who were not on anticoagulation treatment prior to the procedure, and by explaining to them the TEE images obtained, as well as the possible consequences of these findings, we could convince patients to start anticoa...

  11. 21 CFR 137.175 - Phosphated flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Related Products § 137.175 Phosphated flour. Phosphated flour, phosphated white flour, and phosphated wheat flour, conform to the definition and standard of identity, and are subject to the requirements for... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Phosphated flour. 137.175 Section 137.175 Food...

  12. Triphenyl phosphate allergy from spectacle frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, L; Andersen, K E; Egsgaard, Helge;

    1986-01-01

    A case of triphenyl phosphate allergy from spectacle frames is reported. Patch tests with analytical grade triphenyl phosphate, tri-m-cresyl phosphate, and tri-p-cresyl phosphate in the concentrations 5%, 0.5% and 0.05% pet. showed positive reactions to 0.05% triphenyl phosphate and 0.5% tri-m-cr...

  13. Specific antidotes against direct oral anticoagulants: A comprehensive review of clinical trials data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummala, Ramyashree; Kavtaradze, Ana; Gupta, Anjan; Ghosh, Raktim Kumar

    2016-07-01

    The Vitamin K antagonist warfarin was the only oral anticoagulant available for decades for the treatment of thrombosis and prevention of thromboembolism until Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOACs); a group of new oral anticoagulants got approved in the last few years. Direct thrombin inhibitor: dabigatran and factor Xa inhibitors: apixaban, rivaroxaban, and edoxaban directly inhibit the coagulation cascade. DOACs have many advantages over warfarin. However, the biggest drawback of DOACs has been the lack of specific antidotes to reverse the anticoagulant effect in emergency situations. Activated charcoal, hemodialysis, and activated Prothrombin Complex Concentrate (PCC) were amongst the nonspecific agents used in a DOAC associated bleeding but with limited success. Idarucizumab, the first novel antidote against direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran was approved by US FDA in October 2015. It comprehensively reversed dabigatran-induced anticoagulation in a phase I study. A phase III trial on Idarucizumab also complete reversal of anticoagulant effect of dabigatran. Andexanet alfa (PRT064445), a specific reversal agent against factor Xa inhibitors, showed a complete reversal of anticoagulant activity of apixaban and rivaroxaban within minutes after administration without adverse effects in two recently completed parallel phase III trials ANNEXA-A and ANNEXA-R respectively. It is currently being studied in ANNEXA-4, a phase IV study. Aripazine (PER-977), the third reversal agent, has shown promising activity against dabigatran, apixaban, rivaroxaban, as well as subcutaneous fondaparinux and LMWH. This review article summarizes pharmacological characteristics of these novel antidotes, coagulation's tests affected, available clinical and preclinical data, and the need for phase III and IV studies. PMID:27082776

  14. Anticoagulation therapy prevents portal-splenic vein thrombosis after splenectomy with gastroesophageal devascularization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Lai; Shi-Chun Lu; Guan-Yin Li; Chuan-Yun Li; Ju-Shan Wu; Qing-Liang Guo; Meng-Long Wang; Ning Li

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To compare the incidence of early portal or splenic vein thrombosis (PSVT) in patients treated with irregular and regular anticoagulantion alter splenectomy with gastroesophageal devascularization.METHODS:We retrospectively analyzed 301 patients who underwent splenectomy with gastroesophageal devascularization for portal hypertension due to cirrhosis between April 2004 and July 2010.Patients were categorized into group A with irregular anticoagulation and group B with regular anticoagulation,respectively.Group A (153 patients) received anticoagulant monotherapy for an undesignated time period or with aspirin or warfarin without low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) irregularly.Group B (148 patients) received subcutaneous injection of LMWH routinely within the first 5 d after surgery,followed by oral warfarin and aspirin for one month regularly.The target prothrombin time/international normalized ratio (PT/INR) was 1.25-1.50.Platelet and PT/INR were monitored.Color Doppler imaging was performed to monitor PSVT as well as the effectiveness of thrombolytic therapy.RESULTS:The patients' data were collected and analyzed retrospectively.Among the patients,94 developed early postoperative mural PSVT,including 63patients in group A (63/153,41.17%) and 31 patients in group B (31/148,20.94%).There were 50 (32.67%)patients in group A and 27 (18.24%) in group B with mural PSVT in the main trunk of portal vein.After the administration of thrombolytic,anticoagulant and antiaggregation therapy,complete or partial thrombus dissolution achieved in 50 (79.37%) in group A and 26 (83.87%) in group B.CONCLUSION:Regular anticoagulation therapy can reduce the incidence of PSVT in patients who undergo splenectomy with gastroesophageal devascularization,and regular anticoagulant therapy is safer and more effective than irregular anticoagulant therapy.Early and timely thrombolytic therapy is imperative and feasible for the prevention of PSVT.

  15. Comparison of pharmacist managed anticoagulation with usual medical care in a family medicine clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dillon Carla

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The beneficial outcomes of oral anticoagulation therapy are dependent upon achieving and maintaining an optimal INR therapeutic range. There is growing evidence that better outcomes are achieved when anticoagulation is managed by a pharmacist with expertise in anticoagulation management rather than usual care by family physicians. This study compared a pharmacist managed anticoagulation program (PC to usual physician care (UC in a family medicine clinic. Methods A retrospective cohort study was carried out in a family medicine clinic which included a clinical pharmacist. In 2006, the pharmacist assumed anticoagulation management. For a 17-month period, the PC group (n = 112 of patients on warfarin were compared to the UC patients (n = 81 for a similar period prior to 2006. The primary outcome was the percentage of time patients' INR was in the therapeutic range (TTR. Secondary outcomes were the percentage of time in therapeutic range within ± 0.3 units of the recommended range (expanded TTR and percentage of time the INR was >5.0 or Results The baseline characteristics were similar between the groups. Fifty-five percent of the PC group was male with a mean age of 67 years; 51% of the UC group was male with a mean age of 71 years. The most common indications for warfarin in both groups were atrial fibrillation, mechanical heart valves and deep vein thrombosis. The TTR was 73% for PC and 65% for UC (p 5 were 0.3% for PC patients and 0.1% for UC (p Conclusion The pharmacist-managed anticoagulation program within a family practice clinic compared to usual care by the physicians achieved significantly better INR control as measured by the percentage of time patients' INR values were kept in both the therapeutic and expanded range. Based on the results of this study, a collaborative family practice clinic using pharmacists and physicians may be an effective model for anticoagulation management with these results verified in future

  16. Application of citrate as a tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle intermediate, prevents diabetic-induced heart damages in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianqian Liang

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Results indicate that application of citrate, a tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle intermediate, might alleviate cardiac dysfunction by reducing cardiac inflammation, apoptosis, and increasing cardiac EC.

  17. Drug: D08741 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D08741 Mixture, Drug Adenine - sodium citrate hydrate - citric acid hydrate - gluco...se - potassium phosphate, monobasic mixt; CPDA solution; Karmi CA (TN) Adenine [DR:D00034], Sodium citrate hydr...ate [DR:D01781], Citric acid hydrate [DR:D01222], Glucose [DR:D00009], Sodium phosphate, monobasic Therap...eutic category: 3339 Therapeutic category of drugs in Japan [BR:br08301] 3 Agents... affecting metabolism 33 Blood and body fluid agents 333 Anticoagulants 3339 Others D08741 Adenine - sodium citrate hydr

  18. Concave Urinary Crystallines: Direct Evidence of Calcium Oxalate Crystals Dissolution by Citrate In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Feng Shang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The changes in urinary crystal properties in patients with calcium oxalate (CaOx calculi after oral administration of potassium citrate (K3cit were investigated via atomic force microscopy (AFM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD, and zeta potential analyzer. The AFM and SEM results showed that the surface of urinary crystals became concave, the edges and corners of crystals became blunt, the average size of urinary crystallines decreased significantly, and aggregation of urinary crystals was reduced. These changes were attributed to the significant increase in concentration of excreted citrate to  mg/L after K3cit intake from  mg/L before K3cit intake. After the amount of urinary citrate was increased, it complexed with Ca2+ ions on urinary crystals, which dissolved these crystals. Thus, the appearance of concave urinary crystals was a direct evidence of CaOx dissolution by citrate in vivo. The XRD results showed that the quantities and species of urinary crystals decreased after K3cit intake. The mechanism of inhibition of formation of CaOx stones by K3cit was possibly due to the complexation of Ca2+ with citrate, increase in urine pH, concentration of urinary inhibitor glycosaminoglycans (GAGs, and the absolute value of zeta potential after K3cit intake.

  19. Films based on neutralized chitosan citrate as innovative composition for cosmetic application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libio, Illen C; Demori, Renan; Ferrão, Marco F; Lionzo, Maria I Z; da Silveira, Nádya P

    2016-10-01

    In this work, citrate and acetate buffers, were investigated as neutralizers to chitosan salts in order to provide biocompatible and stable films. To choose the appropriate film composition for this study, neutralized chitosan citrate and acetate films, with and without the plasticizer glycerol, were prepared and characterized by thickness, moisture content, degree of swelling, total soluble matter in acid medium, simultaneous thermal analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. Chitosan films neutralized in citrate buffer showed greater physical integrity resulted from greater thicknesses, lower moisture absorbance, lower tendency to solubility in the acid medium, and better swelling capacities. According to thermal analyses, these films had higher interaction with water which is considered an important feature for cosmetic application. Since the composition prepared in citrate buffer without glycerol was considered to present better physical integrity, it was applied to investigate hyaluronic acid release in a skin model. Skins treated with those films, with or without hyaluronic acid, show stratum corneum desquamation and hydration within 10min. The results suggest that the neutralized chitosan citrate film prepared without glycerol promotes a cosmetic effect for skin exfoliation in the presence or absence of hyaluronic acid. PMID:27287105

  20. Nitrate Protects Cucumber Plants Against Fusarium oxysporum by Regulating Citrate Exudation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Sun, Yuming; Gu, Zechen; Wang, Ruirui; Sun, Guomei; Zhu, Chen; Guo, Shiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2016-09-01

    Fusarium wilt causes severe yield losses in cash crops. Nitrogen plays a critical role in the management of plant disease; however, the regulating mechanism is poorly understood. Using biochemical, physiological, bioinformatic and transcriptome approaches, we analyzed how nitrogen forms regulate the interactions between cucumber plants and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum (FOC). Nitrate significantly suppressed Fusarium wilt compared with ammonium in both pot and hydroponic experiments. Fewer FOC colonized the roots and stems under nitrate compared with ammonium supply. Cucumber grown with nitrate accumulated less fusaric acid (FA) after FOC infection and exhibited increased tolerance to chemical FA by decreasing FA absorption and transportation in shoots. A lower citrate concentration was observed in nitrate-grown cucumbers, which was associated with lower MATE (multidrug and toxin compound extrusion) family gene and citrate synthase (CS) gene expression, as well as lower CS activity. Citrate enhanced FOC spore germination and infection, and increased disease incidence and the FOC population in ammonium-treated plants. Our study provides evidence that nitrate protects cucumber plants against F. oxysporum by decreasing root citrate exudation and FOC infection. Citrate exudation is essential for regulating disease development of Fusarium wilt in cucumber plants. PMID:27481896

  1. Direct separation of 67Ga citrate from zinc and copper target materials by an ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The separation of 67Ga from zinc and copper target materials using an anion- f:exchanger (Dowex21K) and 0.1 M citrate buffer at pH 6 is described. The gallium-67 was separated in citrate solution and can be directly used for medical applications. Gallium-67 with a half-life of 78.3 h and gamma-rays with energies of 93, 185 and 300 keV is a cyclotron produced radioisotope for which a considerable demand exists. 67Ga is frequently produced through proton or deuteron bombardment of natural or enriched Zn targets (Helus and Maier-Borst, 1973). It is usually separated from Zn by ion exchange chromatography (Helus and Maier-Borst, 1973; van der Walt and Strelow, 1983) or by liquid extraction Helus and Maier-Borst, 1973; Hupf and Beaver, 1970). The isotope is usually supplied in citrate solution which is widely used as 67Ga Gallium citrate which is a well-established radiopharmaceutical for imaging soft tissue tumors and abscesses. Several routes for large scale production of 67Ga and the development of medical applications have been reported (Silvester and Thakur, 1970; Dahl and Tilbury, 1972; Steyn and Meyer,1973; Vlatkovic et al., 1975; Neirinckx, 1976; Thakur, 1977). Various attempts were carried out to separate gallium-67 by using different ion exchange methods (Strelow et al., 1971; Das and Ramamoorthy, 1995; Boothe et al.,1991) through the labelling of citrate by using 67Ga was carried out for medical applications

  2. Radiolabeled porphyrin versus gallium-67 citrate for the detection of human melanoma in athymic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maric, N.; Chan, S. Ming; Hoffer, P.B.; Duray, P.

    1987-01-01

    We performed the biodistribution and imaging studies of /sup 111/In and /sup 67/Ga labeled tetra(4-N-methylpyridyl) porphine, (T4NMPYP), and compared it to that of /sup 67/Ga citrate in athymic mice bearing a human melanoma xenograft. The biodistribution results of both /sup 111/In and /sup 67/Ga labeled T4NMPYP (3, 6, 24, and 48 hours) were similar but differed from that of /sup 67/Ga citrate (48 hours). The optimum tumor uptake of both radiolabeled porphyrins was at 6 hours postinjection and was lower than the tumor uptake of /sup 67/Ga citrate at 48 hours postinjection. Kidney was the only organ showing higher uptake of radiolabeled porphyrin compared to that of /sup 67/Ga citrate. The imaging studies performed with /sup 111/In T4NMPYP and /sup 67/Ga citrate correspond to the biodistribution results. Osteomyelitis present in one mouse showed good localization of /sup 111/In T4NMPYP. 15 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Light weight phosphate cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, Arun S.; Natarajan, Ramkumar,; Kahn, David

    2010-03-09

    A sealant having a specific gravity in the range of from about 0.7 to about 1.6 for heavy oil and/or coal bed methane fields is disclosed. The sealant has a binder including an oxide or hydroxide of Al or of Fe and a phosphoric acid solution. The binder may have MgO or an oxide of Fe and/or an acid phosphate. The binder is present from about 20 to about 50% by weight of the sealant with a lightweight additive present in the range of from about 1 to about 10% by weight of said sealant, a filler, and water sufficient to provide chemically bound water present in the range of from about 9 to about 36% by weight of the sealant when set. A porous ceramic is also disclosed.

  4. Copper scandium zirconium phosphate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bond, Andrew David; Warner, Terence Edwin

    2013-01-01

    The title compound, with nominal formula Cu(2)ScZr(PO(4))(3), has a beige coloration and displays fast Cu(+) cation conduction at elevated temperatures. It adopts a NASICON-type structure in the space group R3c. The examined crystal was an obverse-reverse twin with approximately equal twin...... components. The [Sc(III)Zr(IV)(PO(4))(3)](2-) framework is composed of corner-sharing Sc/ZrO(6) octahedra and PO(4) tetrahedra. The Sc and Zr atoms are disordered on one atomic site on a crystallographic threefold axis. The P atom of the phosphate group lies on a crystallographic twofold axis. Nonframework...... Cu(+) cations occupy three positions. Two of the Cu(+) positions generate an approximately circular distribution around a site of 3 symmetry, referred to as the M1 site in the NASICON-type structure. The other Cu(+) position is situated close to the twofold symmetric M2 site, displaced...

  5. Thoracic radiographic features of anticoagulant rodenticide toxicity in fourteen dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoracic radiographs and clinical records from 14 dogs with confirmed anticoagulant rodenticide toxicity were reviewed. Twelve of the 14 dogs were presented with a chief complaint of respiratory distress, and 12 had elevated prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin times consistent with a coagulopathy secondary to a clotting factor deficiency. Thoracic radiographs of the 14 dogs were reviewed and abnomalities included increased mediastinal soft tissue opacity with extra and intrathoracic tracheal narrowing (4/14), increased mediastinal soft tissue opacity without tracheal narrowing (8/14), variable degrees of pleural effusion (13/14) and generalized, patchy interstitial/alveolar pulmonary infiltrates (8/14). Radiographic evidence of cardiomegaly and pulmonary artery abnormalities consistent with concurrent heartworm infestation were detected in one dog. In four dogs, dramatic tracheal narrowing was identified on the lateral thoracic radiograph caused by either mediastinal hemorrhage compressing the trachea or submucosal hemorrhage within the tracheal lumen. The trachea was displaced in a ventral direction in two dogs, and extra and intrathoracic luminal diameter narrowing was evident cranially in all four dogs. Two of these four dogs had soft tissue opacity within the dorsal trachea that extended from the larynx to the intrathoracic trachea. Twelve of the 14 dogs survived with standard treatment protocols utilizing injectable and oral vitamin K1. One dog died from pancreatitis and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. The other dog died soon after presentation due to severe, disseminated hemorrhage. Follow-up thoracic radiographs were made in four dogs that survived and showed resolution of the mediastinal, pleural and pulmonary changes within one to five days after the initiation of vitamin K1 therapy

  6. Suboptimal use of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başaran, Özcan; Dogan, Volkan; Beton, Osman; Tekinalp, Mehmet; Aykan, Ahmet Cağri; Kalaycioğlu, Ezgi; Bolat, Ismail; Taşar, Onur; Şafak, Özgen; Kalcik, Macit; Yaman, Mehmet; İnci, Sinan; Altintaş, Bernas; Kalkan, Sedat; Kirma, Cevat; Biteker, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to investigate the potential misuse of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) and the physicians’ adherence to current European guideline recommendations in real-world using a large dataset from Real-life Multicenter Survey Evaluating Stroke Prevention Strategies in Turkey (RAMSES Study). RAMSES study is a prospective, multicenter, nationwide registry (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02344901). In this subgroup analysis of RAMSES study, patients who were on NOACs were classified as appropriately treated (AT), undertreated (UT), and overtreated (OT) according to the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines. The independent predictors of UT and OT were determined by multivariate logistic regression. Of the 2086 eligible patients, 1247 (59.8%) received adequate treatment. However, off-label use was detected in 839 (40.2%) patients; 634 (30.4%) patients received UT and 205 (9.8%) received OT. Independent predictors of UT included >65 years of age, creatinine clearance ≥50 mL/min, urban living, existing dabigatran treatment, and HAS-BLED score of <3, whereas that of OT were creatinine clearance <50 mL/min, ongoing rivaroxaban treatment, and HAS-BLED score of ≥3. The suboptimal use of NOACs is common because of physicians’ poor compliance to the guideline recommendations in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Older patients who were on dabigatran treatment with good renal functions and low risk of bleeding were at risk of UT, whereas patients who were on rivaroxaban treatment with renal impairment and high risk of bleeding were at risk of OT. Therefore, a greater emphasis should be given to prescribe the recommended dose for the specified patients. PMID:27583892

  7. Anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing coronary stent implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, A; Fauchier, L; Pellegrin, C; Clementy, N; Saint Etienne, C; Banerjee, A; Naudin, D; Angoulvant, D

    2013-09-01

    In patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) undergoing coronary stent implantation, the optimal antithrombotic strategy is unclear. We evaluated whether use of oral anticoagulation (OAC) was associated with any benefit in morbidity or mortality in patients with AF, high risk of thromboembolism (TE) (CHA2DS2-VASC score ≥ 2) and coronary stent implantation. Among 8,962 unselected patients with AF seen between 2000 and 2010, a total of 2,709 (30%) had coronary artery disease and 417/2,709 (15%) underwent stent implantation while having CHA2DS2-VASC score ≥ 2. During follow-up (median=650 days), all TE, bleeding episodes, and major adverse cardiac events (i.e. death, acute myocardial infarction, target lesion revascularisation) were recorded. At discharge, 97/417 patients (23%) received OAC, which was more likely to be prescribed in patients with permanent AF and in those treated for elective stent implantation. The incidence of outcome event rates was not significantly different in patients treated and those not treated with OAC. However, in multivariate analysis, the lack of OAC at discharge was independently associated with increased risk of death/stroke/systemic TE (relative risk [RR] =2.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-4.67, p=0.04), with older age (RR =1.12, 1.04-1.20, p=0.003), heart failure (RR =3.26, 1.18-9.01, p=0.02), and history of stroke (RR =18.87, 3.11-111.11, p=0.001). In conclusion, in patients with AF and high thromboembolic risk after stent implantation, use of OAC was independently associated with decreased risk of subsequent death/stroke/systemic TE, suggesting that OAC should be systematically used in this patient population. PMID:23846210

  8. Successful management of anticoagulation therapy during international travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Teresa; Armor, Becky L

    2012-03-01

    Warfarin is considered a high-risk drug because of its narrow therapeutic window, variability in dose response, and multitude of drug and food interactions. Although travel advice is available for patients who are taking warfarin, it is geared toward patients who are traveling to developed countries and tends to be lacking in detail. We describe a 53-year-old woman with two mechanical heart valves and chronic atrial fibrillation who was taking warfarin for thromboembolism prophylaxis and had plans to travel to Vietnam for 10 weeks. Three days before her departure, she was prescribed amiodarone for long-term use. As a result of the extended duration of her travel and the complexities of warfarin use, the pharmacists who managed the patient's anticoagulation reviewed several aspects of a comprehensive management approach with the patient for a safe international trip. They assessed the patient's thromboembolic and hemorrhagic risks, and determined which other drugs (e.g., enoxaparin, phytonadione), dosages, and adequate supplies would be required along with warfarin, as well as how to safely transport these drugs during travel. In addition, the logistics of effectively monitoring international normalized ratio (INR) levels were evaluated, and methods of managing multiple potential scenarios were carefully planned out. Contact with the patient was made through pharmacist-directed telephone visits throughout the travel period. A total of 12 telephone visits were conducted with the patient during the 10 weeks of travel. Her INR was supratherapeutic on three occasions and was subtherapeutic once; however, neither enoxaparin nor phytonadione were needed during the travel period, and the patient returned safely to the United States. Effective and safe use of high-risk drugs for patients leaving the United States requires extensive pretravel planning, and pharmacists can play a central role in optimizing therapeutic outcomes for these patients during international travel

  9. Outcome analysis of a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilt, V M; Gums, J G; Ahmed, O I; Moore, L M

    1995-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine if a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation monitoring service (AMS) improved the outcomes of patients receiving warfarin in a family practice setting and was cost effective in treating and preventing thromboembolic disorders. A retrospective chart review was performed on all patients at the University of Florida's Family Practice Residency Program who received warfarin pharmacotherapy between October 1, 1988, and December 15, 1993. The outcomes of patients followed by AMS were compared with those of a control group consisting of patients receiving warfarin but followed only by their physician. Outcomes were evaluated based on the number of thromboembolic and hemorrhagic events, as well as unplanned clinic visits, emergency room visits, and hospital admissions. Cost of hospital admissions, emergency room visits, and participation in the AMS were analyzed. During 28 person-years of treatment, control subjects sustained 12 thromboembolic events (2 pulmonary embolisms, 1 cerebrovascular accident, and 9 deep venous thromboses) and 2 minor and 5 major hemorrhagic events. The study group reported two minor hemorrhagic events during a total of 60 person-years. The control group was 20 times more likely than the study group to experience any event (rate ratio 20, 95% CI 5-87). In addition, hospitalization and emergency room charges indicated an actual cost of $119,074.95 for the control group's events. The cost to this group for 28 person-years of participation in the AMS would have been $5040.00. A potential cost avoidance of $4072.68 per person-year of follow-up may have been possible if these patients had been followed by the AMS. A pharmacist-managed AMS in a family practice setting can result in improved outcomes for patients receiving warfarin and is cost effective. PMID:8602380

  10. Preferences for anticoagulation therapy in atrial fibrillation: the patients' view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, Björn; Thate-Waschke, Inga-Marion; Bauersachs, Rupert; Kohlmann, Thomas; Wilke, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Since the introduction of new oral anticoagulants (NOACs), besides vitamin-K antagonists, an additional option for stroke prevention of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) is available. The objective of this study was to assess AF patients' preferences with regard to the attributes of these different treatment options. We conducted a multicenter study among randomly selected physicians. Preferences were assessed by computer-assisted telephone interviews. We used a discrete-choice-experiment (DCE) with four convenience-related treatment dependent attributes (need of bridging: yes/no, interactions with food/nutrition: yes/no, need of INR controls/dose adjustment: yes/no; frequency of intake: once/twice daily) and one comparator attribute (distance to practitioner: 15 km). Preferences measured in the interviews were analyzed descriptively and based on a conditional logit regression model. A total of 486 AF patients (age: 73.9 ± 8.2 years; 43.2 % female; mean CHA2DS2-VASc: 3.7 ± 1.6; current medication: 48.1 % rivaroxaban, 51.9 % VKA) could be interviewed. Regardless of type of medication, patients significantly preferred the attribute levels (in order of patients' importance) "once daily intake" (Level: once = 1 vs. twice = 0; Coefficient = 0.615; p 15 km = 0 vs. ≤1 km = 1; 0.494; p important OAC-attribute for patients' choice followed by "no bridging necessary" and "no interactions with food/nutrition". Thus, patients with AF seem to prefer treatment options which are easier to administer. PMID:26260625

  11. Phosphate transport and sensing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Wykoff, D D; O'Shea, E K

    2001-01-01

    Cellular metabolism depends on the appropriate concentration of intracellular inorganic phosphate; however, little is known about how phosphate concentrations are sensed. The similarity of Pho84p, a high-affinity phosphate transporter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to the glucose sensors Snf3p and Rgt2p has led to the hypothesis that Pho84p is an inorganic phosphate sensor. Furthermore, pho84Delta strains have defects in phosphate signaling; they constitutively express PHO5, a phosphate starvat...

  12. Genetic Determinants of Phosphate Response in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Clemens Bergwitz; Wee, Mark J.; Sumi Sinha; Joanne Huang; Charles DeRobertis; Mensah, Lawrence B.; Jonathan Cohen; Adam Friedman; Meghana Kulkarni; Yanhui Hu; Arunachalam Vinayagam; Michael Schnall-Levin; Bonnie Berger; Perkins, Lizabeth A.; Mohr, Stephanie E.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphate is required for many important cellular processes and having too little phosphate or too much can cause disease and reduce life span in humans. However, the mechanisms underlying homeostatic control of extracellular phosphate levels and cellular effects of phosphate are poorly understood. Here, we establish Drosophila melanogaster as a model system for the study of phosphate effects. We found that Drosophila larval development depends on the availability of phosphate in the medium. ...

  13. Genetic Determinants of Phosphate Response in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Bergwitz, Clemens; Wee, Mark J.; Sinha, Sumi; Huang, Joanne Hyunjung; DeRobertis, Charles; Mensah, Lawrence; Cohen, Jonathan Brewer; Friedman, Adam Amiel Laufer; Kulkarni, Meghana; Hu, Yanhui; Vinayagam, Arunachalam; Schnall-Levin, Michael; Berger, Bonnie; Perkins, Lizabeth A; Mohr, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Phosphate is required for many important cellular processes and having too little phosphate or too much can cause disease and reduce life span in humans. However, the mechanisms underlying homeostatic control of extracellular phosphate levels and cellular effects of phosphate are poorly understood. Here, we establish Drosophila melanogaster as a model system for the study of phosphate effects. We found that Drosophila larval development depends on the availability of phosphate in the medium. ...

  14. The latest recommendations on the use of new oral anticoagulants in routine practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Witkowski

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs has become a breakthrough in anticoagulant treatment and it is expected to rise significantly in upcoming years. The use of conventional anticoagulants have several limitations: subcutaneous administration of heparin, or close monitoring of INR during application of vitamin K antagonists. In the last decade, target-specific oral anticoagulants (TSOAC including dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban have been marketed for prophylaxis and treatment. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the potential uses, side effects, and management of these agents in routine practice. NOACs have major pharmacologic advantages, including a rapid onset and offset of action, fewer drug interactions than conventional anticoagulants, and predictable pharmacokinetics. These agents are gaining popularity among both physicians and patients because of their easiness of administration and the eliminating the requirement for regular coagulation monitoring. In this review, we focus on discussing practical recommendations for the use of NOACs and the risks and benefits of incorporating them into routine practice.

  15. Comparison of Physicochemical Characteristics and Anticoagulant Activities of Polysaccharides from Three Sea Cucumbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengmin Wang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to search for sulfated polysaccharides in different invertebrate connective tissues and to examine their biological activities, we have isolated three types of polysaccharides from the body wall of the three sea cucumbers Holothuria edulis, Apostichopus japonicas and Holothuria nobilis. The physicochemical properties and anticoagulant activities of these polysaccharides were examined and compared. The chemical composition analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR analysis indicate that two types of polysaccharides, sulfated fucan and fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (FuCS, were found in all of the three species and in addition a neutral glycan was observed in H. edulis. The neutral α-glucan was firstly obtained from sea cucumber. The same type of polysaccharides from different species of sea cucumbers have similar physicochemical properties and anticoagulant activities, but those of different types of glycans are significantly different, possibly due to their different monosaccharide compositions, electric charges and average molecular weights. The FuCSs have stronger anticoagulant activities than the sulfated fucans, although the molecular sizes of the FuCSs are lower than those of the sulfated fucans, whereas the neutral glucan has no activity, as expected from the absence of sulfate. Thus, anticoagulant activities of the different type of polysaccharides are likely to relate to monosaccharide composition and sulfate content. Preliminary analysis suggests that the sulfation patterns of the FuCSs may result in the difference in anticoagulant activities. Our data could help elucidate the structure-activity relationship of the sea cucumber polysaccharides.

  16. The use of hirudin as universal anticoagulant in haematology, clinical chemistry and blood grouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menssen, H D; Melber, K; Brandt, N; Thiel, E

    2001-12-01

    Undesirable interactions between anticoagulants and diagnostic test kit procedures so far have prevented the development of a single uniform blood sampling tube. Contrary to K2-EDTA, heparin and other anticoagulants, hirudin only minimally alters blood cells and dissolved blood constituents, thus qualifying as a universal anticoagulant for diagnostic purposes. Automated complete blood counts, automated analyses of clinical chemistry analytes and immunohaematology were performed from hirudinised and routinely processed blood obtained from healthy volunteers (n=35) and hospitalised patients (n=45). Hirudin (400 ATU/ml blood) sufficiently anticoagulated blood for diagnostic purposes. The measurements of automated complete blood counts obtained from K2-EDTA-anticoagulated and hirudinised blood correlated significantly as did the measurements of 24 clinical chemistry analytes from hirudinised plasma and serum. Regression analysis revealed that the results of complete blood counts and clinical chemistry tests were predictable from the respective measurements from hirudinised blood (p=0.001). Immunohaematological tests and cross-matching from hirudinised and native blood of the same donors gave identical results. Single clotting factors, but not global coagulation analytes, could be measured from hirudinised blood. Therefore, a universal hirudin-containing blood sampling tube could be designed for automated analysis of haematological, serological and clinical chemistry analytes. PMID:11798089

  17. [An outpatient clinic measure and control system for anticoagulation levels, CoaguChek XS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Guardeño, Araceli; Pérez Lucena, Dolores Amalia

    2009-03-01

    A significant increase during recent years in the number of patients who need Oral Anticoagulant Treatment has meant a greater role for nurses, especially in Primary Health Care Centers, since nurses, along with doctors, are the professionals responsible for treating those patients. This control is carried out by measuring the levels of anticoagulants in the blood, regulating the anticoagulant medicine doses, and providing patients with the essential health education so patients participate in the treatment of their illness. To a large degree, the preponderance of Primary Health Care Centers in the aforementioned control has developed hand-in-hand with the availability of portable, simple and low cost coagulation measuring systems which permit a direct reading of a patient's anticoagulation level with one drop of capillary blood. The objective of this article is introduce the reader to a measuring system appropriate for outpatient clinic control of anticoagulant levels in blood by mans of the CoaguChek XS System, which is described. The authors specify the sample extraction procedure, how to measure coagulant levels, and recommendations to keep in mind while carrying out this procedure. The authors sketch the importance of health education and finally, they describe some advantages and inconveniences this system has. PMID:19462604

  18. Adherence to long-term anticoagulation treatment, what is known and what the future might hold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdou, John K; Auyeung, Vivian; Patel, Jignesh P; Arya, Roopen

    2016-07-01

    Adherence to medication, commonly reported as being 50% in chronic diseases, is of great concern in healthcare. Medication non-adherence is particularly apparent in chronic diseases, where treatment is often preventative and may provide little or no symptomatic relief or feedback for the patient. A lot of research has been undertaken to describe the extent of non-adherence to long-term anticoagulation therapy, particularly with vitamin K antagonists and more recently with direct oral anticoagulants. However, the literature is scarce with respect to describing adherence to anticoagulation in terms of the behavioural aspects that influence medicine use. Utilizing the COM-B (capability, opportunity, motivation and behaviour) psychological model of non-adherence, we present the available evidence, not only in terms of describing the extent of the non-adherence problem, but also describing why patients do not adhere, offering theory-driven and evidence-based solutions to improve long-term adherence to chronic anticoagulation therapy. Lessons learned are not only applicable within the field of anticoagulation but throughout haematology. PMID:27173746

  19. A Summary of the Literature Evaluating Adherence and Persistence with Oral Anticoagulants in Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obamiro, Kehinde O; Chalmers, Leanne; Bereznicki, Luke R E

    2016-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a growing public health concern and remains an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke. Warfarin, a commonly used oral anticoagulant, is associated with a 60-70 % relative reduction in stroke risk and a reduction in mortality of 26 %. However, warfarin has several limitations, including a narrow therapeutic window, variable dose response, multiple interactions with other drugs and concurrent illnesses, and the need for frequent laboratory monitoring. In recent years, the direct acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs), including dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban, have been developed to overcome the limitations of warfarin therapy. These treatment strategies are either comparable or superior to warfarin in stroke prevention in AF. Despite the documented effectiveness of oral anticoagulants in AF, patients may not derive optimal benefit if they fail to adhere or fail to continue with their medication. This may lead to treatment failure, increased hospitalization and mortality. This review summarizes the literature regarding adherence and persistence (or discontinuation) rates with oral anticoagulants in the management of AF; the impact of non-adherence and non-persistence on treatment outcomes; and the effectiveness of strategies to improve adherence and persistence with oral anticoagulant therapy. PMID:27262433

  20. Development and implementation of a pharmacist-managed inpatient anticoagulation monitoring program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellman, Jessica C; Kraus, Peggy S; Burton, Bradley L; Ensor, Christopher R; Nesbit, Todd W; Ross, Patricia A; Thomas, Michelle L; Streiff, Michael B

    2011-05-15

    PURPOSE. A stepwise approach to development and implementation of a program to standardize and increase pharmacists' involvement in anticoagulation therapy at a large academic medical center is described. SUMMARY. In response to the Joint Commission's national goal of improved patient safety in anticoagulation therapy, a work group of pharmacy administrators, educators, clinical specialists, and decentralized pharmacists at the hospital developed the structure for a comprehensive inpatient anticoagulation program (IAP); the work group also developed a list of required competencies, educational materials, assessment methods, and mechanisms for eliciting feedback from IAP pharmacists and other patient care staff. After completion of training that included structured case-review sessions, a one-on-one shadowing experience, and competency assessment, IAP pharmacists began reviewing clinical and laboratory data on patients receiving warfarin and low-molecular-weight heparins and providing recommendations to physicians, nurse practitioners, and other health care team members. Feedback from other clinicians was generally positive, with a majority of those surveyed indicating that increased pharmacist involvement in anticoagulation monitoring and dosage adjustment resulted in improved patient care; about 80% indicated that they concurred with pharmacists' recommendations at least 75% of the time. Results of a survey of IAP pharmacists indicated increased satisfaction with their daily duties but also a need for improved pharmacist-to-pharmacist communication. CONCLUSION. Case-based advanced training and implementation of an IAP in a tertiary care hospital increased pharmacists' involvement in the management of inpatients receiving anticoagulants. PMID:21546645

  1. Anticoagulation inhibits tumor cell-mediated release of platelet angiogenic proteins and diminishes platelet angiogenic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battinelli, Elisabeth M; Markens, Beth A; Kulenthirarajan, Rajesh A; Machlus, Kellie R; Flaumenhaft, Robert; Italiano, Joseph E

    2014-01-01

    Platelets are a reservoir for angiogenic proteins that are secreted in a differentially regulated process. Because of the propensity for clotting, patients with malignancy are often anticoagulated with heparin products, which paradoxically offer a survival benefit by an unknown mechanism. We hypothesized that antithrombotic agents alter the release of angiogenesis regulatory proteins from platelets. Our data revealed that platelets exposed to heparins released significantly decreased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in response to adenosine 5'-diphosphate or tumor cells (MCF-7 cells) and exhibited a decreased angiogenic potential. The releasate from these platelets contained decreased proangiogenic proteins. The novel anticoagulant fondaparinux (Xa inhibitor) demonstrated a similar impact on the platelet angiogenic potential. Because these anticoagulants decrease thrombin generation, we hypothesized that they disrupt signaling through the platelet protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) receptor. Addition of PAR1 antagonists to platelets decreased VEGF release and angiogenic potential. Exposure to a PAR1 agonist in the presence of anticoagulants rescued the angiogenic potential. In vivo studies demonstrated that platelets from anticoagulated patients had decreased VEGF release and angiogenic potential. Our data suggest that the mechanism by which antithrombotic agents increase survival and decrease metastasis in cancer patients is through attenuation of platelet angiogenic potential. PMID:24065244

  2. Theoretical and experimental approach to test the cohesion of calcium phosphate pastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Bohner

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have revealed that the ability of a calcium phosphate cement paste to harden in a physiological environment without desintegrating into small particles might be a key property to ensure a safe and reliable clinical use of calcium phosphate cements. However, this property called cohesion is not well understood and has not been studied extensively. The goal of the present study was to better understand which factors affect the cohesion of a calcium phosphate paste using the combination of a theoretical and experimental approach. In the theoretical approach, factors expected to influence the paste cohesion such as Van der Waals forces, electrostatic and steric interactions, as well as osmotic effects were listed and discussed. In the experimental approach, a new method to measure the cohesion of a non-setting calcium phosphate paste was presented and used to assess the effects of various factors on this property. The new method allowed a continuous measurement of cohesion and gave reproducible results. The experimental results confirmed the theoretical predictions: an increase of the liquid-to-powder ratio of the paste and of the powder particle size, as well as the addition of citrate ions and in limited cases dissolved xanthan polymer chains reduced the paste cohesion.

  3. Direct separation of uranium and thorium from Qatrani phosphatic raw ore by consecutive percolation leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphatic sandstone of Qatrani area contains high concentrations of uranium and thorium (1450 and 870 ppm respectively). These elements were directly separated from a representative sample of the ore by percolation leaching. Separation made was carried out by using two different leaching reagents, citric and nitric acids for obtaining two separate concentrates of U and Th consecutively from the sample. Uranium was leached first by using citric acid where other rock ingredients were left intact. The effects of: (a) increasing acid input amounts and (b) increasing leaching solution volumes (dilution) on U leaching efficiency were studied. The results revealed that citric acid reaction upon phosphate is limited in spite of higher residual acidity reported in the leach liquors. Regarding uranium, its leaching efficiency increased by increasing acid amounts and/or leaching solution volumes while fixing the acid input amounts. The efficiency of U leaching is more pronounced in the second case than in the first. Increasing U leaching while phosphate dissolution is limited could be interpreted as that the relative complexing affinity of citrate anion for hexavalent uranium is by far much greater than with phosphate. Thorium was thereafter leached by using dilute solutions of nitric acid to avoid dissolution of nitric acid to avoid dissolution of impurities. Percolation leaching experiments were thus performed on the uranium-free samples in the columns used previously in uranium leaching. The effects of increasing acid amounts and increasing leach liquor recycles on Th (and P2O5) leaching efficiency were studied

  4. Nitrate Removal from Drinking Water with Sodium Citrate as Sole Carbon Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Bo; ZHAO Lin; TAN Xin

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of using sodium citrate(NaC6H5O6*2H2O)as sole carbon source for nitrate removal from drinking water.With sodium citrate as sole carbon source, batch experiments have been conducted to study the law of denitrification influenced by pH, C/N and temperature. Results show that a denitrification rate reaching 1.32 g NO-3-N /(g Biomass*d) was obtained when pH was at 7.5,C/N at 1.7(atom ratio), and temperature from 20 ℃ to 30 ℃. The results also show that denitrification rate with sodium citrate as carbon source approaches to that with methanol as carbon source.

  5. Tamoxifen citrate loaded ethosomes for transdermal drug delivery system: preparation and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwa, Khomendra Kumar; Suresh, Preeti K; Debnath, Manabendra; Ahmad, Mohammad Zaki

    2013-08-01

    Long term tamoxifen citrate therapy is imperative to treat several dermatological and hormonal sensitive disorders. Successful oral and parenteral administration of tamoxifen citrate has been challenging since it undergoes enzymatic degradation and has poor aqueous solubility issues. In the present work, tamoxifen citrate loaded ethosomes were prepared and characterized for transdermal applications. The prepared formulations were characterized for morphological features, particle size distribution, calorimetric attributes, zeta potential and drug entrapment. Permeation profile of prepared ethosomes was compared with liposomes and hydroethonalic solution across cellophane membrane and human cadaver skin. Results of the permeation studies indicate that ethosomes were able to deliver >90% drug within 24 hours of application, while liposomes and hydroethanolic solution delivered only 39.04% and 36.55% respectively. Skin deposition and stability studies are also reported. PMID:23656399

  6. Preparation and evaluation of 99m Tc-Sn-citrate freeze dried kits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for preparing 99m Tc-Sn-citrate freeze dried kits is established. The method is based on the use of Sn(II), HCl and citrate concentrations which give the final pH 5.1 without pH adjustment. The obtained Sn-citrate solution is sterilized by filtration through 0.22 μm membrane filter. A 1.0 ml aliquots are transferred into pre sterilized 10 ml serum vials, quickly frozen by liquid nitrogen and lyophilized. The determined formulation was applied in the kit preparation in aseptic and pyrogen free conditions. The freeze dried kits were checked radio chromatographic ally and assayed biologically in normal mice. Under optimum conditions more than 97% labelling yield was obtained and more than 56% of the injected dose was found in urine 2 hours after injection. 1 fig. 6 tab

  7. Effect on the citrate secretion of soybean seedling under aluminum stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aluminum toxicity is one of the most significant constaints limiting plant growth and crop production in acid soils.The root growth is hurted by Al stress and absorbability of water and nutrient decreased, so the growth and development of plant is limited. In the present study, with solution culture, Jilin70 was selected as the Al-tolerant cultivars for the research of effect of Al on the citrate secretion of soybean seedling. The results were as follows: Exclusion of citrate acid from soybean roots be used to chelating Al and thus minimising the impact of Al toxicity. We found that large quantities of citrate secretion from soybean roots occurred after 6-h Al stress. Therefore, the former was classified to pattern II; results of root manipulation experiments revealed that only the Al-treated root portions were hurted.This injury was not observed in the roots of the same plant, which received only calcium solution without Al. (authors)

  8. Enhancing radium solubilization in soils by citrate, EDTA, and EDDS chelating amendments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The aim was to optimize radium solubilization for the purposes of remediation. ► The most important factor in radium solubilization was found to be the pH. ► Radium release increases with the reagent concentration. ► The largest release of radium is obtained with 50 mmol kg−1 of citrate, at pH acid, and 4 days after incubation. ► The best conditions for the release of radium are the same as for uranium. -- Abstract: The effect of three chelating agents (citrate, EDTA, and EDDS) on the solubilization of radium from a granitic soil was studied systematically, considering different soil pH values, chelating agent concentrations, and leaching times. For all the chelating agents tested, the amount of radium leached proved to be strongly dependent on the pH of the substrate: only for acidic conditions did the amount of radium released increase significantly relative to the controls. Under the best conditions, the radium released from the amended soil was greater by factors of 20 in the case of citrate, 18 for EDTA, and 14 for EDDS. The greatest improvement in the release of radium was obtained for the citrate amendment at the highest concentration tested (50 mmol kg−1). A slightly lower amount of radium was leached with EDTA at 5 mmol kg−1 soil, but the solubilization over time was very different from that observed with citrate or EDDS. With EDTA, a maximum in radium leaching was reached on the first day after amendment, while with citrate, the maximum was attained on the fourth day. With EDDS, radium leaching increased slightly but steadily with time (until the sixth day), but the net effect for the period tested was the lowest of the three reagents

  9. Endometrial Receptivity Markers in Mice Stimulated With Raloxifene Versus Clomiphene Citrate and Natural Cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cairong; Yan, Qiuxia; Liu, Kunping; Zhou, Xiuqin; Xian, Yingjie; Liang, Dali; Zhao, Xiaoying; Guo, Xiaoyan; Quan, Song

    2016-06-01

    Ovulation induction therapy with clomiphene citrate can suppress endometrial receptivity. Raloxifene may be an alternative therapeutic for women with ovulatory disorders. This study aimed to compare the expression of endometrial receptivity markers, including homeobox gene 10 (HOXA10), integrin β3, and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), as well as pinopode production during the implantation window in mice stimulated with raloxifene and clomiphene citrate and natural cycles. Thirty-six 8-week-old female Kunming mice were randomly divided into 3 groups (n = 12) and administered daily raloxifene (22 mg/kg), clomiphene citrate (18 mg/kg), and normal saline (1 mL), respectively, by gavage. Two days later, mice were injected with 5 IU human chorionic gonadotropin and mated. Successfully mated female animals were identified with vaginal plugs designated gestation day 1. At day 4.5, pregnant donor mice were euthanized, and uterus samples were collected for immunohistochemistry, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and scanning electron microscopy analyses. Homeobox gene 10, integrin β3, and LIF messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels were significantly higher in the raloxifene-treated animals compared with the clomiphene citrate group (all P raloxifene and saline groups; however, in the clomiphene citrate-treated mice, fewer and poorly developed pinopodes were obtained. In mice, raloxifene had no effect on HOXA10, integrin β3, and LIF expression as well as pinopode production, suggesting it has no adverse effects on endometrial receptivity. Raloxifene may provide a viable alternative oral ovulation induction agent to clomiphene citrate. PMID:26603317

  10. Modulation of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization by citrate through selective binding to atomic steps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, S R; Wierzbicki, A; Salter, E A; Zepeda, S; Orme, C A; Hoyer, J R; Nancollas, G H; Cody, A M; De Yoreo, J J

    2004-10-19

    The majority of human kidney stones are composed primarily of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals. Thus, determining the molecular mechanisms by which urinary constituents modulate calcium oxalate crystallization is crucial for understanding and controlling urolithiassis in humans. A comprehensive molecular-scale view of COM shape modification by citrate, a common urinary constituent, obtained through a combination of in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and molecular modeling is now presented. We show that citrate strongly influences the growth morphology and kinetics on the (-101) face but has much lower effect on the (010) face. Moreover, binding energy calculations show that the strength of the citrate-COM interaction is much greater at steps than on terraces and is highly step-specific. The maximum binding energy, -166.5 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, occurs for the [101] step on the (-101) face. In contrast, the value is only -56.9 kJ {center_dot} mol-1 for the [012] step on the (010) face. The binding energies on the (-101) and (010) terraces are also much smaller, -65.4 and -48.9 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} respectively. All other binding energies lie between these extremes. This high selectivity leads to preferential binding of citrate to the acute [101] atomic steps on the (-101) face. The strong citrate-step interactions on this face leads to pinning of all steps, but the anisotropy in interaction strength results in anisotropic reductions in step kinetics. These anisotropic changes in step kinetics are, in turn, responsible for changes in the shape of macroscopic COM crystals. Thus, the molecular scale growth morphology and the bulk crystal habit in the presence of citrate are similar, and the predictions of molecular simulations are fully consistent with the experimental observations.

  11. Use of Potassium Citrate to Reduce the Risk of Renal Stone Formation During Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitson, P. A.; Pietrzyk, R. A.; Sams, C. F.; Jones, J. A.; Nelman-Gonzalez, M.; Hudson, E. K.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: NASA s Vision for Space Exploration centers on exploration class missions including the goals of returning to the moon and landing on Mars. One of NASA s objectives is to focus research on astronaut health and the development of countermeasures that will protect crewmembers during long duration voyages. Exposure to microgravity affects human physiology and results in changes in the urinary chemical composition favoring urinary supersaturation and an increased risk of stone formation. Nephrolithiasis is a multifactorial disease and development of a renal stone is significantly influenced by both dietary and environmental factors. Previous results from long duration Mir and short duration Shuttle missions have shown decreased urine volume, pH, and citrate levels and increased calcium. Citrate, an important inhibitor of calcium-containing stones, binds with urinary calcium reducing the amount of calcium available to form stones. Citrate inhibits renal stone recurrence by preventing crystal growth, aggregation, and nucleation and is one of the most common therapeutic agents used to prevent stone formation. Methods: Thirty long duration crewmembers (29 male, 1 female) participated in this study. 24-hour urines were collected and dietary monitoring was performed pre, in, and postflight. Crewmembers in the treatment group received two potassium citrate (KCIT) pills, 10 mEq/pill, ingested daily beginning 3 days before launch, all inflight days and through 14 days postflight. Urinary biochemical and dietary analyses were completed. Results: KCIT treated subjects exhibited decreased urinary calcium excretion and maintained the levels of calcium oxalate supersaturation risk at their preflight levels. The increased urinary pH levels in these subjects reduced the risk of uric acid stones. Discussion: The current study investigated the use of potassium citrate as a countermeasure to minimize the risk of stone formation during ISS missions. Results suggest that

  12. Enhancing radium solubilization in soils by citrate, EDTA, and EDDS chelating amendments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prieto, C.; Lozano, J.C. [Departamento de Física Fundamental, Universidad de Salamanca, 37008 Salamanca (Spain); Rodríguez, P. Blanco [Natural Radioactivity Group, Universidad de Extremadura, Avda. Elvas s/n, 06071 Badajoz (Spain); Tomé, F. Vera, E-mail: fvt@unex.es [Natural Radioactivity Group, Universidad de Extremadura, Avda. Elvas s/n, 06071 Badajoz (Spain)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► The aim was to optimize radium solubilization for the purposes of remediation. ► The most important factor in radium solubilization was found to be the pH. ► Radium release increases with the reagent concentration. ► The largest release of radium is obtained with 50 mmol kg{sup −1} of citrate, at pH acid, and 4 days after incubation. ► The best conditions for the release of radium are the same as for uranium. -- Abstract: The effect of three chelating agents (citrate, EDTA, and EDDS) on the solubilization of radium from a granitic soil was studied systematically, considering different soil pH values, chelating agent concentrations, and leaching times. For all the chelating agents tested, the amount of radium leached proved to be strongly dependent on the pH of the substrate: only for acidic conditions did the amount of radium released increase significantly relative to the controls. Under the best conditions, the radium released from the amended soil was greater by factors of 20 in the case of citrate, 18 for EDTA, and 14 for EDDS. The greatest improvement in the release of radium was obtained for the citrate amendment at the highest concentration tested (50 mmol kg{sup −1}). A slightly lower amount of radium was leached with EDTA at 5 mmol kg{sup −1} soil, but the solubilization over time was very different from that observed with citrate or EDDS. With EDTA, a maximum in radium leaching was reached on the first day after amendment, while with citrate, the maximum was attained on the fourth day. With EDDS, radium leaching increased slightly but steadily with time (until the sixth day), but the net effect for the period tested was the lowest of the three reagents.

  13. Effect of titanium (III) citrate as reducing agent on growth of rumen bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, G A; Pickard, M D

    1980-01-01

    We compared the growth of 10 strains of rumen bacteria in an anaerobic medium reduced with cysteine hydrochloride, dithiothreitol, or titanium (III) citrate. The redox potential of medium reduced with cysteine hydrochloride was -167.8 mV; with dithiothreitol it was -175.8 mV; and with titanium(III) citrate it was -302.4 mV at a concentration of 5 X 10(-4) M titanium and -403.9 mV at 2 X 10(-3) M titanium. Maximum growth of the strains was generally lower with dithiothreitol or titanium(III) c...

  14. Bioavailability of zinc and phosphorus in calcareous soils as affected by citrate exudation

    OpenAIRE

    Duffner, A.; Hoffland, E.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Zinc (Zn) and phosphorus (P) deficiency often occurs at the same time and limits crop production in many soils. It has been suggested that citrate root exudation is a response of plants to both deficiencies. We used white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) as a model plant to clarify if citrate exuded by roots could increase the bioavailability of Zn and P in calcareous soils. Methods White lupin was grown in nutrient solution and in two calcareous soils in a rhizobox. Rhizosphere soil solution wa...

  15. Interfacial properties of asymmetrically functionalized citrate-stabilized gold and silver nanoparticles related to molecular adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Won

    A detailed understanding of the conformation of adsorbed molecules and regional surface functionalization of metal nanoparticles (MNPs) is challenging for nanometer-size (10 -- 100 m) materials and necessary for fundamental studies and applications. The studies are motivated by open questions related to surface chemistry of noble MNPs. Although citrate-stabilized gold NPs (AuNPs) have been widely used, the citrate layer is not well-understood. Thiols have been suggested to displace citrate anions adsorbed on metal surfaces due to strong gold-sulfur interaction, but quantitative experimental evidence of the extent of ligand-exchange has not been reported. Whereas asymmetrically-functionalized AuNPs are utilized for nanoparticle assembly due to the interparticle coupling of localized surface plasmons, the interface between asymmetric nanoparticles in single assemblies has not been studied. Noble MNPs with sizes smaller than citrate-stabilized AuNPs also need to be surface-modified for stability in water for biological applications. The dissertation presents investigations of the chemical and physical properties of gold and silver NPs (AgNPs) related to ligand adsorption at the metal surface. Firstly, self-assembled layers of citrate adsorbed on AuNP (111), (110), and (100) surfaces were proposed, based on geometric considerations and spectroscopic investigations by infrared (IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Adsorption characteristics of citrate are the unique structure of adsorbed species, intermolecular interactions through hydrogen bonds and van der Waals attractions, bilayer formation, surface coverage, nanoparticle-stabilization role, and chirality. Secondly, IR and XPS studies showed coadsorption of thiolate on the surface of citrate-stabilized AuNPs. Steric, chelating effects and intermolecular interactions are the origins of the strong adsorption of citrate on AuNP surfaces. Surface coverage was determined from XPS analyses. Thirdly, an

  16. Abnormal splenic uptake of gallium-67 citrate in a case of infectious mononucleosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of fever of undetermined origin (FUO) demonstrated abnormal intense concentration of Ga-67 citrate in the spleen. Initial workup demonstrated two negative mono spot tests for infectious mononucleosis (IM) but, on hospital day 2, a repeat mono test was positive. The diagnosis was subsequently confirmed by rising heterophilic antibody titers. Six weeks after hospital discharge, repeat Ga-67 citrate imaging demonstrated absence of abnormal splenic activity. To our knowledge, this phenomenon has not been previously described in IM. In the appropriate clinical setting, intense splenic uptake of Ga-67 should alert the clinician to include the possibility of IM in the differential diagnosis

  17. Morphology control of hydroxyapatite microcrystals: Synergistic effects of citrate and CTAB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Wang, Yingjun

    2016-05-01

    Using hydrothermal treatment and with the synergistic regulating effects of citrate and CTAB, various 3D hierarchical superstructure of hydroxyapatite (HAp) microcrystals were synthesized by simply adjusting the Ct/CTAB ratio and calcium-citrate complex (CC) morphology. The resulting superstructure was characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) etc. With the shape transformation of CC from sphere-like colloid, nano-needle to lamellar-like particles, the final products were hollow spheres, bunched-like microrods and nanorod clusters, respectively. A possible mechanism for the formation of HAp hierarchical microstructure was proposed. PMID:26952410

  18. Calcium citrate improves the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition induced by acidosis in proximal tubular cells

    OpenAIRE

    Maria José Rodriguez Cabalgante; Liliana Gadola; Leonella Luzardo; María Márquez; José Boggia; Mirian Aparecida Boim

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key event in renal fibrosis. The aims of the study were to evaluate acidosis induced EMT, transforming-growth-factor (TGF) β1 role and citrate effect on it. METHODS: HK2 cells (ATCC 2290) were cultured in DMEM/HAM F12 medium, pH 7.4. At 80% confluence, after 24 hr under serum free conditions, cells were distributed in three groups (24 hours): A) Control: pH 7.4, B) Acidosis: pH 7.0 and C) Calcium citrate (0.2 mmol/L) + pH 7.0. Chan...

  19. Sodium-coupled dicarboxylate and citrate transporters from the SLC13 family

    OpenAIRE

    Pajor, AM

    2014-01-01

    The SLC13 family in humans and other mammals consists of sodium-coupled transporters for anionic substrates: three transporters for dicarboxylates/ citrate and two transporters for sulfate. This review will focus on the di- and tricarboxylate transporters: NaDC1 (SLC13A2), NaDC3 (SLC13A3), and NaCT (SLC13A5). The substrates of these transporters are metabolic intermediates of the citric acid cycle, including citrate, succinate, and α-ketoglutarate, which can exert signaling effects through sp...

  20. EFFICACY OF THERAPY WITH INDIRECT ANTICOAGULANTS: ROLE OF THE FOODSTUFF VITAMIN K CONTENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Momot

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The anticoagulants of indirect action during many years serve drugs of basic prophylaxis and therapy of thromboembolic episodes at cardiovascular , neurological, oncology, orthopaedic and other diseases, after surgical interventions and traumas, and also large bunch of the generically caused and acquired (secondary thrombophilie. The contents of vitamin К1 in nutrition depend on a method of product preparation. The highest concentrations are found in dark green vegetables and grass: parsley, spinach, green turnip, and also in cabbage and lettuce. For achievement stable hypocoagulation at assignment of anticoagulants of indirect action the daily entering with nutrition of constant amounts of vitamin K (at a level 65-80 mkg/day is necessary. Thus, a doctor at assignment of anticoagulants, is obliged to pay attention to character of a food and to inform patient about possible undesirable consequences at the use of products keeping high levels of vitamin К1.